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Sample records for complicating crohn disease

  1. Pellagra complicating Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, I.; Millard, L.

    1995-01-01

    We report a 53-year-old patient with clinical features of pellagra as a complication of Crohn's disease. His symptoms improved rapidly on taking oral nicotinic acid and vitamin B complex. We suggest the paucity of reported cases of pellagra in Crohn's disease is a reflection of poor recognition of this complication. Images Figure PMID:7567761

  2. Thoracic vertebral osteomyelitis: an unusual complication of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ajayi, Olushola; Mayooran, Nithiananthan; Iqbal, Nasir

    2014-01-01

    Vertebral osteomyelitis complicating Crohn's disease is a rare occurrence and mostly occurred in patients with Crohn's disease complicated by an abscess or fistulising disease. We report a case of thoracic vertebral osteomyelitis, occurring in a refractory Crohn's disease without contiguous abscess or fistula with the bowel. PMID:24916975

  3. [Colonic Crohn's disease complicated with peripheral neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Chaoui, F; Hellal, H; Balamane, M; Boudhane, M; Mikol, J; Masmoudi, A

    1990-01-01

    The association of Crohn's disease and peripheral neuropathy is a rare event and the pathogenic factors often implicated are vitamin B12 deficiency or metronidazole treatment. We report a case of severe axonal polyneuropathy associated with Crohn's disease and unrelated to vitamin deficiency or metronidazole treatment. This represents a very rare extra-digestive manifestation of Crohn's disease. PMID:2125951

  4. Oophorovesicular-colonic fistula: a rare complication of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, S D; Gray, R R; Cadesky, K I; Mackenzie, R L

    1988-11-01

    Salpingitis and vesicular fistulas are rare complications of Crohn's disease. In this report the authors describe a case of oophorovesicular-colonic fistula secondary to Crohn's disease. The patient presented with bleeding from the bladder during menstruation, fecaluria and pneumaturia. A single-stage left salpingo-oophorectomy, sigmoid resection and repair of the fistula were carried out, with complete resolution of symptoms and preservation of fertility potential. PMID:3179852

  5. Crohn's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Crohn's disease causes inflammation of the digestive system. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory ... small intestine called the ileum. The cause of Crohn's disease is unknown. It may be due to an ...

  6. Efficacy and Complications of Surgery for Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with Crohn's disease commonly undergo surgery during their lifetime. Indications for surgical intervention include obstruction, intra-abdominal or perianal abscess, enterocutaneous fistulas, and complex perianal disease. As medical therapies continue to improve, it is important that surgical therapies are chosen carefully. This is particularly important in the treatment of perianal fistulas; combined surgical and medical therapy offer the best chance for success. In the treatment of small-bowel disease, bowel preservation is key. For the repair of short strictures, endoscopic dilatation is the preferred method when accessible; strictureplasty has been shown to be safe and effective for increasingly longer segments of disease. Intra-abdominal abscesses should be drained percutaneously, if possible. In the presence of colonic disease, segmental resection is recommended. Unfortunately, refractory disease still frequently requires complete proctectomy and permanent diversion. PMID:21088749

  7. Toxic megacolon complicating a first course of Crohn's disease: about two cases.

    PubMed

    Hefaiedh, Rania; Cheikh, Mariem; Ennaifer, Rym; Gharbi, Lassad; Hadj, Najet Bel

    2013-08-01

    Toxic megacolon is a rare and serious complication of Crohn's disease. Because of the associated high morbidity and mortality, early recognition and management of toxic megacolon is important. Through two cases of toxic megacolon complicating Crohn's disease, we assessed the clinical, radiologic and therapeutic characteristics of this complication. A 35-year-old man presented a first course of Crohn's disease treated with corticosteroid. He exhibited sudden severe abdominal pain and distension with shock. A plain abdominal radiography revealed toxic megacolon. He underwent medical therapy, but symptoms not relieved. The patient underwent subtotal colectomy with ileostomy. The resected specimen confirmed the diagnosis. Recovery of digestive continuity was performed. Endoscopic evaluation six months later did not shown recurrence. A 57-year-old man presented with severe acute colitis inaugurating Crohn's disease, was treated with corticosteroid and antibiotics. He exhibited signs of general peritonitis. Computed tomographic examination revealed toxic megacolon with free perforation, showing prominent dilation of the transverse colon and linear pneumatosis. The patient underwent emergent subtotal colectomy and ileostomy. The final histological patterns were consisting with diagnosis of Crohn's disease associated with cytomegalovirus infection. The patient underwent antiviral therapy during 15 days. Because of the high risk of postoperative recurrence, he underwent immunosuppressive therapy. Recovery of digestive continuity was performed successfully. Toxic megacolon in Crohn's disease is a serious turning of this disease. We underscore the importance of early diagnosis of toxic megacolon and rapid surgical intervention if improvement is not observed on medical therapy. PMID:24765512

  8. Musculoskeletal complications of Crohn's disease: the role of computed tomography in diagnosis and patient management.

    PubMed

    Brenner, H I; Fishman, E K; Harris, M L; Bayless, T M

    2000-11-01

    The delayed diagnosis of musculoskeletal complications of Crohn's disease may produce major morbidity in patients. This study compared abdominal and pelvic computed tomography (CT) with conventional radiography in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal complications in 23 of 552 patients with Crohn's disease examined by CT over a 7-year period. Surgical confirmation was available in 15 of 21 patients. The clinical features of psoas/gluteal abscesses, abdominal wall fistulae, and sacral osteomyelitis are described. Because the clinical manifestations of these musculoskeletal complications are often nonspecific, CT is often useful in diagnosing and directing therapeutic interventions. PMID:11103962

  9. Intestinal and extraintestinal complications of Crohn's disease: predictors and cumulative probability of complications.

    PubMed

    Maeda, K; Okada, M; Yao, T; Sakurai, T; Iida, M; Fuchigami, T; Yoshinaga, K; Imamura, K; Okada, Y; Sakamoto, K

    1994-10-01

    Of 238 patients with Crohn's disease seen at our clinics from April 1973 to August 1988, 203 patients were selected for this study, since they fulfilled the following criteria: they had been followed up for more than 6 months as outpatients or had been treated as inpatients for more than 1 month. They were studied to elucidate: (a) the different types and incidence of various complications, (b) the factors related to complications present at the time of diagnosis, (c) predictors of new complications arising after diagnosis, and (d) the cumulative incidence of complications occurring during the course of the disease from the times of onset and diagnosis. Of the intestinal complications, perianal fistula was most common (33%), followed by strictures with dilatations of the proximal bowel (21%), and internal fistula (14%). Of the extraintestinal complications, menstrual disturbance was the most common (18% of the female patients), followed by arthritis (10%), and aphthous stomatitis (10%). As for the factors influencing complications present at the time of diagnosis, the pattern of bowel involvement was significantly correlated with the presence of intestinal stricture, while the erythrocyte sedimentation rate was significantly correlated with the presence of perianal fistula. A significant predictor of new complications arising after diagnosis was the general well-being of patients at the time of diagnosis. Patients who, at diagnosis, already have complications such as stricture, abdominal abscess, internal or external fistula, massive hemorrhage, and free perforation or anal lesions are more likely to develop new complications in addition to those present at diagnosis, compared with patients without any complications at diagnosis (P = 0.055). PMID:8000504

  10. Crohn disease

    PubMed Central

    Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Rioux, John D.; Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Huett, Alan; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette; Wileman, Tom; Mizushima, Noboru; Carding, Simon; Akira, Shizuo; Parkes, Miles; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2011-01-01

    Crohn disease (CD) is a chronic and debilitating inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract.1 Prevalence in western populations is 100–150/100,000 and somewhat higher in Ashkenazi Jews. Peak incidence is in early adult life, although any age can be affected and a majority of affected individuals progress to relapsing and chronic disease. Medical treatments rely significantly on empirical corticosteroid therapy and immunosuppression, and intestinal resectional surgery is frequently required. Thus, 80% of patients with CD come to surgery for refractory disease or complications. It is hoped that an improved understanding of pathogenic mechanisms, for example by studying the genetic basis of CD and other forms of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), will lead to improved therapies and possibly preventative strategies in individuals identified as being at risk. PMID:20729636

  11. Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Crohn's disease is a chronic condition of the gastrointestinal tract. It is characterised by transmural, granulomatous inflammation that occurs in a discontinuous pattern, with a tendency to form fistulae. The cause is unknown but may depend on interactions between genetic predisposition, environmental triggers, and mucosal immunity. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of medical treatments to induce remission in adults with Crohn's disease? What are the effects of surgical interventions to induce and maintain remission in adults with small-bowel Crohn's disease? What are the effects of surgical interventions to induce remission in adults with colonic Crohn's disease? What are the effects of medical interventions to maintain remission in adults with Crohn's disease; and to maintain remission following surgery? What are the effects of lifestyle interventions to maintain remission in adults with Crohn's disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to December 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 93 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aminosalicylates, antibiotics, azathioprine/mercaptopurine, ciclosporin, corticosteroids (oral), enteral nutrition, fish oil, infliximab, methotrexate, probiotics, resection, segmental colectomy, smoking cessation, and strictureplasty. PMID:21524318

  12. Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Crohn's disease is a long-term chronic condition of the gastrointestinal tract. It is characterised by transmural, granulomatous inflammation that occurs in a discontinuous pattern, with a tendency to form fistulae. The cause is unknown but may depend on interactions between genetic predisposition, environmental triggers, and mucosal immunity. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of medical treatments in adults to induce remission in Crohn's disease? What are the effects of lifestyle interventions in adults with Crohn's disease to maintain remission? What are the effects of surgical interventions in adults with small-bowel Crohn's disease to induce remission? What are the effects of surgical interventions in adults with colonic Crohn's disease to induce remission? What are the effects of medical interventions to maintain remission in adults with Crohn's disease; and to maintain remission following surgery? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to March 2006 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 60 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aminosalicylates, antibiotics, azathioprine/mercaptopurine, ciclosporin, corticosteroids (oral), enteral nutrition, fish oil, infliximab, methotrexate, probiotics, resection, segmental colectomy, smoking cessation, and strictureplasty. PMID:19450352

  13. Hemoglobin and Hematocrit Levels in the Prediction of Complicated Crohn's Disease Behavior – A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Florian; Paul, Gisela; Schnoy, Elisabeth; Schleder, Stephan; Wolf, Alexandra; Kamm, Florian; Dirmeier, Andrea; Strauch, Ulrike; Obermeier, Florian; Lopez, Rocio; Achkar, Jean-Paul; Rogler, Gerhard; Klebl, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Background Markers that predict the occurrence of a complicated disease behavior in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) can permit a more aggressive therapeutic regimen for patients at risk. The aim of this cohort study was to test the blood levels of hemoglobin (Hgb) and hematocrit (Hct) for the prediction of complicated CD behavior and CD related surgery in an adult patient population. Methods Blood samples of 62 CD patients of the German Inflammatory Bowel Disease-network “Kompetenznetz CED” were tested for the levels of Hgb and Hct prior to the occurrence of complicated disease behavior or CD related surgery. The relation of these markers and clinical events was studied using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and adjusted COX-proportional hazard regression models. Results The median follow-up time was 55.8 months. Of the 62 CD patients without any previous complication or surgery 34% developed a complication and/or underwent CD related surgery. Low Hgb or Hct levels were independent predictors of a shorter time to occurrence of the first complication or CD related surgery. This was true for early as well as late occurring complications. Stable low Hgb or Hct during serial follow-up measurements had a higher frequency of complications compared to patients with a stable normal Hgb or Hct, respectively. Conclusions Determination of Hgb or Hct in complication and surgery naïve CD patients might serve as an additional tool for the prediction of complicated disease behavior. PMID:25116048

  14. Necrotizing fasciitis in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Panter, S J; Bramble, M G; Bell, J R

    2001-04-01

    We report a case of a 34-year-old woman, presenting initially with anaemia followed by sacro-iliac pain, and subsequently found to have necrotizing fasciitis complicating Crohn's disease where the organisms were introduced via a fistulous tract. It is perhaps surprising that this is not a more common complication of fistulating Crohn's disease, but we believe this is the first case report of this particular complication. PMID:11338075

  15. Varicella zoster meningitis complicating combined anti-tumor necrosis factor and corticosteroid therapy in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Christopher; Walters, Brennan; Fedorak, Richard N

    2013-06-01

    Opportunistic viral infections are a well-recognized complication of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Cases of severe or atypical varicella zoster virus infection, both primary and latent reactivation, have been described in association with immunosuppression of Crohn's disease (CD) patients. However, central nervous system varicella zoster virus infections have been rarely described, and there are no previous reports of varicella zoster virus meningitis associated with anti-TNF therapy among the CD population. Here, we present the case of a 40-year-old male with severe ileocecal-CD who developed a reactivation of dermatomal herpes zoster after treatment with prednisone and adalimumab. The reactivation presented as debilitating varicella zoster virus meningitis, which was not completely resolved despite aggressive antiviral therapy with prolonged intravenous acyclovir and subsequent oral valacyclovir. This is the first reported case of opportunistic central nervous system varicella zoster infection complicating anti-TNF therapy in the CD population. This paper also reviews the literature on varicella zoster virus infections of immunosuppressed IBD patients and the importance of vaccination prior to initiation of anti-TNF therapy. PMID:23745038

  16. Oral Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Padmavathi, Bn; Sharma, Smriti; Astekar, Madhusudan; Rajan, Y; Sowmya, Gv

    2014-09-01

    'Crohn's disease' is an inflammatory granulomatous disease of the gastrointestinal tract with extra-intestinal manifestations. Oral lesions may precede the intestinal disease and serve as a source for histological diagnosis. We present a case of orofacial Crohn's disease where orofacial symptoms were present for about 13 years and occasional constipation was present, since 6 months. Oral examination plays an important role in early diagnosis of Crohn's disease. PMID:25364165

  17. Oral Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Padmavathi, BN; Sharma, Smriti; Astekar, Madhusudan; Rajan, Y; Sowmya, GV

    2014-01-01

    Crohn's disease’ is an inflammatory granulomatous disease of the gastrointestinal tract with extra-intestinal manifestations. Oral lesions may precede the intestinal disease and serve as a source for histological diagnosis. We present a case of orofacial Crohn's disease where orofacial symptoms were present for about 13 years and occasional constipation was present, since 6 months. Oral examination plays an important role in early diagnosis of Crohn's disease. PMID:25364165

  18. Carcinoma of the small intestine and colon as a complication of Crohn disease: radiologic manifestation

    SciTech Connect

    Kerber, G.W.; Frank, P.H.

    1984-03-01

    Barium examinations of the large and small bowel were analyzed in six of seven patients who had adenocarcinoma in areas of the intestine affected with Crohn disease; radiographic changes were correlated with clinical, surgical, and pathologic findings. Radiographic examinations were available in five of these patients at the time of diagnosis of tumor. Two of the five patients demonstrated classic radiographic changes associated with carcinoma. In the other three cases, the radiographic changes were atypical for carcinoma and demonstrated progression of disease over time to include more portions of the bowel and presence of fistulas, strictures, and obstruction. The most frequent clinical presentation of adenocarcinoma in these patients was a recrudescence of symptoms after a long quiescent period. In patients with long-standing Crohn disease plus these clinical features and the above radiographic findings, the diagnosis of a coexisting carcinoma should be considered.

  19. Crohn's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... can help control symptoms, and may include medicines, nutrition supplements, and/or surgery. Some people have long periods of remission, when they are free of symptoms. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  20. [Surgery in Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Horisberger, K; Kienle, P

    2015-11-01

    Surgical treatment is primarily used to treat complications of Crohn's disease but also to improve the quality of life. An adequate preoperative preparation including improvement of the nutritional status, weaning off or stopping immunosuppressive medication and preoperative drainage of abscesses can decrease the complication rate. With the exception of when neoplasia is present, bowel-sparing techniques (e. g. strictureplasty and limited resection) are now standard, which has resulted in a low risk of short bowel syndrome. The laparoscopic approach is possible for most indications even in the case of recurrent disease, in primary ileocecal resection the laparoscopic approach has been shown to be superior to the open approach. None of the available techniques for anastomotic reconstruction of the bowels has been shown to be superior. A drainage seton is a good option to retain the quality of life in complex fistulas and reconstructive repair should only be considered when the rectum is free from inflammation. PMID:26537846

  1. [Focus on Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Klotz, Caroline; Dhooge, Marion; Oudjit, Ammar; Barret, Maximilien; Beuvon, Frédéric; Chaussade, Stanislas; Coriat, Romain; Abitbol, Vered

    2015-04-01

    Crohn's disease is an inflammatory bowel disease that affects the entire digestive tract, from the mouth to the anus. The inflammatory disease is transmural and may be complicated by abscesses, fistulas, strictures. Budesonide is used as first-line treatment for a first episode of ileitis. Thiopurines and methotrexate are used as immunosuppressive maintenance therapy. Anti-tumour necrosis factors (TNF) alpha therapy is used as induction and maintenance therapy in case of severe flares or corticodependence. Combination of immunosuppressive therapy and anti-TNF-alpha (combotherapy) prevents the appearance of specific anti drug antibodies. Combotherapy is used in case of severe disease. The goal of the treatment is to achieve clinical remission, endoscopic mucosal healing, and to prevent the occurrence of complications such as strictures, fistulas or abscesses. Anoperineal lesions are found in 10% of the patients at diagnosis. Surgical treatment is indicated for severe medical treatment-resistant patients or complications such as symptomatic stenosis, fistula or abscess unresponsive to medical treatment or immediately complicated. PMID:25622513

  2. [Mediterranean lymphoma mimicking Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Jouini, S; Ayadi, K; Mokrani, A; Wachuku, E; Hmouda, H; Gourdie, R

    2001-07-01

    We report an uncommon localization of mediterranean lymphoma of the terminal ileum in a 28 year-old male patient. Ultrasound and Computed Tomography showed moderate regular and symmetrical intestinal wall thickening simulating Crohn's disease. We highlight the role of computed tomography in the diagnosis, staging and detection of complications. PMID:11507451

  3. High grade anorectal stricture complicating Crohn's disease: endoscopic treatment using insulated-tip knife

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Hyung Ku; Shin, Ik Sang; Kim, Sang Wook

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic treatments have emerged as an alternative to surgery, in the treatment of benign colorectal stricture. Unlike endoscopic balloon dilatation, there is limited data on endoscopic electrocautery incision therapy for benign colorectal stricture, especially with regards to safety and long-term patency. We present a case of a 29-year-old female with Crohn's disease who had difficulty in defecation and passing thin stools. A pelvic magnetic resonance imaging scan, gastrograffin enema, and sigmoidoscopy showed a high-grade anorectal stricture. An endoscopic insulated-tip knife incision was successfully performed to resolve the problem. From our experience, we suggest that endoscopic insulated-tip knife treatment may be a feasible and effective modality for patients with short-segment, very rigid, fibrotic anorectal stricture. PMID:27433152

  4. High grade anorectal stricture complicating Crohn's disease: endoscopic treatment using insulated-tip knife.

    PubMed

    Chon, Hyung Ku; Shin, Ik Sang; Kim, Sang Wook; Lee, Soo Teik

    2016-07-01

    Endoscopic treatments have emerged as an alternative to surgery, in the treatment of benign colorectal stricture. Unlike endoscopic balloon dilatation, there is limited data on endoscopic electrocautery incision therapy for benign colorectal stricture, especially with regards to safety and long-term patency. We present a case of a 29-year-old female with Crohn's disease who had difficulty in defecation and passing thin stools. A pelvic magnetic resonance imaging scan, gastrograffin enema, and sigmoidoscopy showed a high-grade anorectal stricture. An endoscopic insulated-tip knife incision was successfully performed to resolve the problem. From our experience, we suggest that endoscopic insulated-tip knife treatment may be a feasible and effective modality for patients with short-segment, very rigid, fibrotic anorectal stricture. PMID:27433152

  5. A case report of a duodenal adenocarcinoma: a complication with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Yuko; Yamada, Takuya; Kimura, Keiichi; Iwasaki, Ryuichirou; Iwasaki, Tetsuya; Ishihara, Akio; Nakazuru, Shoichi; Ishida, Hisashi; Kodama, Yoshinori; Mita, Eiji

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of Crohn's disease (CD) in Japan is increasing, and so is the incidence of colorectal and small bowel cancers associated with CD. However, few reports have described the malignant transformation of duodenal lesions; moreover, such a diagnosis is rarely possible preoperatively. We present a case of malignant degeneration in the duodenal mucosa associated with CD. A 54-year-old man had been receiving treatment for CD for more than 20 years. Seven years ago, he was diagnosed with duodenal stenosis related to CD. He was asymptomatic, and biopsy results from the proximal stricture showed inflammatory changes without malignant transformation. The lesion was then monitored during follow-up. In 2013, he underwent an endoscopy, which revealed an ulcerated, nodular mucosa, immediately proximal to a high-grade obstruction of the descending duodenum. A biopsy of the ulcer lesion confirmed a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma. The patient then underwent duodenopancreatectomy. Histopathological results from the resected duodenum confirmed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma that had invaded the subserosa. The patient recovered, and no recurrence has been observed. Although the duodenum can be accessed without difficulty during endoscopy, it is challenging to preoperatively diagnose malignant transformation. There are only four reported cases of duodenal cancer stemming from CD-associated stricture, and only one of them received a preoperative diagnosis of malignancy based on endoscopic biopsy results. Progressive duodenal narrowing and ulceration in patients with CD should indicate a need for careful endoscopic evaluation and biopsy in order to exclude malignant degeneration of Crohn's duodenitis. Early diagnosis of cases of CD-associated cancers is necessary. We report the features of a rare and illustrative case of duodenal adenocarcinoma in a patient with CD. PMID:26947045

  6. Management of Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kammermeier, Jochen; Morris, Mary-Anne; Garrick, Vikki; Furman, Mark; Rodrigues, Astor; Russell, Richard K

    2016-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is rapidly increasing in children so an up to date knowledge of diagnosis, investigation and management is essential. Exclusive enteral nutrition is the first line treatment for active disease. The vast majority of children will need immunosuppressant treatment and around 20% will need treatment with biologics. Recent guidelines have helped make best use of available therapies. PMID:26553907

  7. Urolithiasis and crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Sandro Roberto da Silva; Mendonça, Tiago; Oliveira, Pedro; Oliveira, Tiago; Dias, José; Lopes, Tomé

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To present an updated description of the relation between Crohn's disease (CD) and Urolithiasis. Patients and Methods: A literature search for English-language original and review articles was conducted in Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases in the month of December 2014 for papers either published or e-published up to that date, addressing the association between CD and urolithiasis as its consequence. All articles published in English language were selected for screening based on the following search terms: “CD,” “renal calculus,” “IBD,” and “urolithiasis.” We restricted the publication dates to the last 15 years (2000–2014). Results: In total, 901 patients were included in this review of which 95 were identified as having CD and urolithiasis simultaneously, for a total of 10.5%. Average age was 45.07 years old, irrespective of gender. 28.6% of patients received some kind of medical intervention without any kind of surgical technique involved, 50% of patients were submitted to a surgical treatment, and the remaining 21.4% were submitted to a combination of surgical and medical treatment. Urolithiasis and pyelonephritis incidence ranged from 4% to 23% with a risk 10–100 times greater than the risk for general population or for patients with UC, being frequent in patients with ileostomy and multiple bowel resections. We found that urolithiasis occurred in 95 patients from a total of 901 patients with CD (10.5%); 61.81% in men and 38.19% in women. Stone disease seems to present approximately 4–7 years after the diagnosis of bowel disease and CaOx seems to be the main culprit. Conclusions: CD is a chronic, granulomatous bowel disease, with urolithiasis as the most common extraintestinal manifestation (EIM), particularly frequent in patients submitted to bowel surgery. This complication needs to be recognized and addressed appropriately, especially in patients with unexplained renal dysfunction, abdominal pain, or recurrent urinary

  8. Pathogenesis of Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Boyapati, Ray; Satsangi, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Significant progress in our understanding of Crohn's disease (CD), an archetypal common, complex disease, has now been achieved. Our ability to interrogate the deep complexities of the biological processes involved in maintaining gut mucosal homeostasis is a major over-riding factor underpinning this rapid progress. Key studies now offer many novel and expansive insights into the interacting roles of genetic susceptibility, immune function, and the gut microbiota in CD. Here, we provide overviews of these recent advances and new mechanistic themes, and address the challenges and prospects for translation from concept to clinic. PMID:26097717

  9. Pathogenesis of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Boyapati, Ray; Satsangi, Jack; Ho, Gwo-Tzer

    2015-01-01

    Significant progress in our understanding of Crohn's disease (CD), an archetypal common, complex disease, has now been achieved. Our ability to interrogate the deep complexities of the biological processes involved in maintaining gut mucosal homeostasis is a major over-riding factor underpinning this rapid progress. Key studies now offer many novel and expansive insights into the interacting roles of genetic susceptibility, immune function, and the gut microbiota in CD. Here, we provide overviews of these recent advances and new mechanistic themes, and address the challenges and prospects for translation from concept to clinic. PMID:26097717

  10. Magnetic Resonance Enterography in Crohn׳s Disease.

    PubMed

    Westerland, Olwen; Griffin, Nyree

    2016-08-01

    Over the past decade, magnetic resonance (MR) enterography has become established as the first-line imaging test for patients with Crohn׳s disease. This article reviews the role of MR enterography in assessing the extent and activity of Crohn׳s disease at baseline and on treatment follow-up. It discusses the role of diffusion-weighted imaging, and the recent introduction of MR scoring systems to facilitate noninvasive objective assessment of disease activity and cumulative bowel damage. PMID:27342892

  11. Rifaximin and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Prantera, Cosimo; Scribano, Maria Lia

    2013-11-14

    In a recent article, Longman and Swaminath analyzed our paper on the use of rifaximin in patients with moderately active Crohn's disease (CD). Here we report some considerations concerning their article. The exploratory post-hoc subgroup analysis showed that early-stage disease and, differently from that written by Longman and Swaminath, also colonic involvement seemed to be associated with a significant higher efficacy of rifaximin-EIR 800 mg twice daily. Early-stage disease is generally considered as the more easily treatable phase of CD, and the better response to rifaximin in Crohn's colitis is in accordance with the high concentration of bacteria in the colon. In addition, patients with C reactive protein level > 5 mg/L achieved remission more significantly than patients with normal values, thus suggesting that the symptoms were probably caused by inflammation instead of by non-inflammatory causes. We also analyze the role of rifaximin against gut bacteria and the clinical situations that could obtain the best results from antibiotics. PMID:24259983

  12. [Treatment and outcome of Crohn's disease without initial complications. Results of a retrospective, multicenter Tunisian study].

    PubMed

    Cheikh, Imed; Ben Ammar, Ahmed; Essid, Mejda; Azzouz, Messadak; Ettahri, Nabil; Krichene, Mohamed; Bouzaidi, Slim; Ennajar, Taoufik

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate and achieve the factors that have an influence on the evolution of the Chron's disease. This study was done in 124 patients reaching the diagnosis of Chron's disease between 1988 and 1997. The evolution of this disease was achieved in 87 patients. The Chron's disease was inactive among 31 patients (35-6%)--with discontinous evolution in 42 patients (48.3%) and active chronic in 14 patients (16-1%). The active chronic form of Chron's disease was twice more frequent among the smokers and the patients with age above 40 years--but this difference has no statistical significance. The indication of surgical treatment was realised in 21 patients and it takes place as result of failure of medical treatment in 16 patients (76-2%)--an abcess in 2 patents (9-5%) and iatrogenic perforation in 1 patient (4-8%). The age-sexe-smoke--the intensity of the initial attack and the nature of the treatment had no influence in the need of the surgical interfference. The Chron's disease showed the less severe evolution in this study--the age above 40 years and the consumption of smoke increased the frequency of active chronic form. PMID:12416354

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Crohn disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cardon L, Mathew CG. Sequence variants in the autophagy gene IRGM and multiple other replicating loci contribute ... new susceptibility loci for Crohn disease and implicates autophagy in disease pathogenesis. Nat Genet. 2007 May;39( ...

  14. Primary Adenocarcinoma of an Ileostomy in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Meena A.; Lo, Amy; Bellaguarda, Emanuelle; Strong, Scott; Hanauer, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Although Crohn's disease has been associated with an increased risk of small bowel adenocarcinoma, primary adenocarcinoma arising from an ileostomy is a complication that has been rarely documented in Crohn's disease. Chronic small bowel inflammation may lead to development of malignancy through the dysplasia-carcinoma sequence. We report a case of a 61-year-old woman with Crohn's ileocolitis diagnosed with a primary adenocarcinoma at the ileostomy with metastases to the liver 47 years after proctocolectomy, and review the literature.

  15. Perianal Crohn Disease

    PubMed Central

    Galandiuk, Susan; Kimberling, Jennifer; Al-Mishlab, Talib G.; Stromberg, Arnold J.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Fissures, fistulas, abscesses, and anal canal stenosis are manifestations of perianal Crohn disease (CD). There are no known predictors of which patients will fail sphincter-sparing surgical therapy and ultimately require fecal diversion. Methods: Of 356 consecutive patients with CD, 24% (86) had perianal CD (age range, 14–83 years), and women were slightly more frequently affected. Clinical variables were examined for factors predictive of the need for permanent fecal diversion. Results: CD associated with perianal CD was limited to the small bowel and/or ileocolic area in 23% of patients; the remainder had colorectal CD. Eighty-six patients underwent 344 operations. Forty-two patients (49%) ultimately required permanent diversion; among them were 21 of 32 patients (66%) with anal stricture and 12 of 20women (60%) with rectovaginal fistula. Univariate analyses of clinical variables were performed with respect to need for permanent fecal diversion. Significant univariate predictors were the presence of colonic CD (P = 0.0045, odds ratio [OR] 5.4), avoidance of ileocolic resection (P = 0.0147, OR 0.4), and the presence of an anal stricture (P = 0.0165, OR 3.0). In multivariate logistic regression, the presence of colonic disease and anal canal stricture were predictors of permanent diversion. The OR associated with the risk of permanent diversion in the presence of colonic disease and in the absence of anal stricture was 10 (P = 0.0345). In the presence of both colonic disease and anal canal stenosis, the OR associated with permanent stoma was 33 (P = 0.0023). Conclusions: The management of perianal CD continues to be challenging. Roughly half of patients required permanent fecal diversion, which was even more frequently true for patients with colonic CD and anal stenosis. Recognizing these tendencies will assist both patients and surgeons in planning optimal treatment. PMID:15849515

  16. Cutaneous Manifestations of Crohn Disease.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Joshua W; Swoger, Jason M; Grandinetti, Lisa M

    2015-07-01

    Awareness of the extraintestinal manifestations of Crohn disease is increasing in dermatology and gastroenterology, with enhanced identification of entities that range from granulomatous diseases recapitulating the underlying inflammatory bowel disease to reactive conditions and associated dermatoses. In this review, the underlying etiopathology of Crohn disease is discussed, and how this mirrors certain skin manifestations that present in a subset of patients is explored. The array of extraintestinal manifestations that do not share a similar pathology, but which are often seen in association with inflammatory bowel disease, is also discussed. Treatment and pathogenetic mechanisms, where available, are discussed. PMID:26143422

  17. Sweet's syndrome in association with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Vaz, A; Kramer, K; Kalish, R A

    2000-11-01

    A case of Sweet's syndrome in association with Crohn's disease in a young woman is reported. Sweet's syndrome is a rare extraintestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. PMID:11060149

  18. Crohn's Disease: The First Visit

    PubMed Central

    Farraye, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    A Crohn's disease patient's first visit to a new practice is the optimal time to collect important clinical data and identify appropriate therapies. A methodologic approach to this visit is crucial. The focus of this visit should be on preparing the patient for the initiation of treatment, with particular attention to the necessary steps prior to the use of immunosuppressive and biologic agents. This paper is intended to provide recommendations and a checklist for the initial assessment and evaluation of patients with Crohn's disease. PMID:21528042

  19. Growth in paediatric Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Cezard, J P; Touati, G; Alberti, C; Hugot, J P; Brinon, C; Czernichow, P

    2002-01-01

    Growth failure (GF) is one of the major complications affecting children with inflammatory bowel disease. The faltering is temporary in 40-50% of cases and prolonged in 10-20% in Crohn's disease (CD). Such failure is rare in children with ulcerative colitis (5%). This complication is often associated with retarded bone development and delayed onset of sexual maturation. The delayed linear growth has a variety of causes including insufficient intake due to anorexia and the inflammatory process with increased energy and protein expenditure. Other factors are increased intestinal loss, secondary hypopituitarism and treatment with steroids. Therapeutic strategies of CD in children have changed this last decade by introducing new therapeutic agents such as topic steroids, immunosuppressors, anti-TNF (antibody and notably in children enteral nutrition which has shown its efficacy in inducing remissions of active CD, restoring nutritional status and stimulation of linear growth. The results of a recent prospective multicentric study over 2 years in 82 CD show that severe GF (-2 SD) is initially present in 15% (n = 12), among them 11 remain < -2SD after 2 years of follow-up. Six patients who were on the normal range initially increased their GF during the follow-up (< -2SD) (total 21% < -2SD (n = 17) at 2 years). At inclusion in this group there was no difference in growth velocity, used of steroids, enteral nutrition or severity of CD as compared to the group with no GF. It suggests that new treatment strategy should be developed in the future for this specific complication of paediatric CD. PMID:12373007

  20. Pediatric Magnetic Resonance Enterography: Focused on Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So Mi; Choi, Young Hun

    2015-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic idiopathic inflammatory disease of the intestines characterized by frequent relapse and remission. It often develops in children and adolescents, who are vulnerable to repeated exposure to ionizing radiations. Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) is an increasingly important radiation-free imaging modality that is used to evaluate pediatric patients with Crohn's disease. MRE can evaluate extraluminal and extraintestinal abnormalities as well as the status of the bowel wall. In addition, MRE has an advantage in the evaluation of the small bowel involvement. MRE can be used for the initial diagnosis of Crohn's disease, and can aid in the assessment of disease activity and complications such as penetrating and fibrostenotic diseases. The aims of this article are to review the MRE technique for obtaining diagnostic and high-quality images and to discuss interpretations of imaging findings in patients with Crohn's disease. PMID:26473134

  1. Rectovaginal fistula in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Cohen, J L; Stricker, J W; Schoetz, D J; Coller, J A; Veidenheimer, M C

    1989-10-01

    Rectovaginal fistulas in the setting of Crohn's disease present a difficult management dilemma. Some patients with this problem require proctocolectomy, yet other patients with minimal symptoms never require an operation for treatment of the rectovaginal fistula. For a small percentage of patients, local surgical repair of the fistula may be warranted. Since 1980, this study has attempted local repair in seven patients with symptomatic rectovaginal fistulas from Crohn's disease. Five patients underwent staged repair of the fistula. Closure of the colostomy was eventually possible in three of these patients. Two of the three patients have had no evidence of recurrence at followup in excess of two years. The third patient required an ileostomy for intestinal disease and had no recurrence of the fistula. Two patients underwent primary repair of the rectovaginal fistula without fecal diversion; in one of these patients, the fistula recurred ten days after operation, necessitating a diverting ileostomy. The other patient remains cured 26 months after repair. The results of this review indicate that in the setting of quiescent rectal disease, an attempt to repair the fistula can be expected to have a reasonable chance of success. The presence of a rectovaginal fistula in a patient with Crohn's disease does not mandate removal of the rectum. PMID:2791765

  2. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy in patient with Crohn's disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Sung-Min; Park, Ki Jeong; Ha, Yong-Chan

    2014-05-01

    Numerous causes of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) have been reported. Commonly, secondary osteoarthropathy accompanies pulmonary diseases such as carcinoma of the lung, pleural tumors, lung abscesses, and bronchiectasis. However, HOA in inflammatory bowel disease is a rare complication. There are only a few reports of secondary HOA with Crohn's disease. Our purpose was to report another case of HOA in Crohn's disease. We describe a case of a 27-year-old man with underlying Crohn's disease presenting with 2 years of pain in multiple joints. Radiographic findings suggested HOA in extremities. We performed a conservative treatment including medication and rehabilitations. The patient's symptoms were much improved at the latest follow-up. Although numerous studies on HOA have been published, the pathogenesis of HOA is still unclear. Various treatment modalities were recommended but further studies to uncover the pathogenesis of HOA with Crohn's disease and to establish a treatment modality are needed. PMID:25025001

  3. Evolving roles of cross-sectional imaging in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Magarotto, Andrea; Orlando, Stefania; Coletta, Marina; Conte, Dario; Fraquelli, Mirella; Caprioli, Flavio

    2016-09-01

    The implementation of cross-sectional imaging techniques for the clinical management of Crohn's disease patients has steadily grown over the recent years, thanks to a series of technological advances, including the evolution of contrast media for magnetic resonance, computed tomography and bowel ultrasound. This has resulted in a continuous improvement of diagnostic accuracy and capability to detect Crohn's disease-related complications. Additionally, a progressive widening of indications for cross-sectional imaging in Crohn's disease has been put forward, thus leading to hypothesize that in the near future imaging techniques can increasingly complement endoscopy in most clinical settings, including the grading of disease activity and the assessment of mucosal healing or Crohn's disease post-surgical recurrence. PMID:27338853

  4. Case for diagnosis. Metastatic Crohn's disease*

    PubMed Central

    Gontijo, João Renato Vianna; Leidenz, Franciele Antonieta Bianchi; de Sousa, Maria Silvia Laborne Alves

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic Crohn's disease is a rare skin manifestation, defined by granulomatous skin lesions that are discontinuous to the affected gastrointestinal tract and histopathologically resembling inflammatory bowel lesions. Up to 44% of patients with Crohn's disease have cutaneous manifestations, of which metastatic lesions are the least common. We present a case of an adolescent with refractory Crohn's disease and persistent papules and plaques on the skin. PMID:27579756

  5. Case for diagnosis. Metastatic Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Gontijo, João Renato Vianna; Leidenz, Franciele Antonieta Bianchi; Sousa, Maria Silvia Laborne Alves de

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic Crohn's disease is a rare skin manifestation, defined by granulomatous skin lesions that are discontinuous to the affected gastrointestinal tract and histopathologically resembling inflammatory bowel lesions. Up to 44% of patients with Crohn's disease have cutaneous manifestations, of which metastatic lesions are the least common. We present a case of an adolescent with refractory Crohn's disease and persistent papules and plaques on the skin. PMID:27579756

  6. Anorectal syphilis mimicking Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Mesut; Memisoglu, Reşat; Aydin, Selda; Tabak, Omur; Mete, Bilgül; Memisoglu, Necat; Tabak, Fehmi

    2011-10-01

    Anorectal syphilis, one of the great masqueraders in medicine, can be difficult to diagnose not only because of its variable symptoms but also because it is hard to think of unless a detailed history about sexual preferences and practices, including homosexuality, has been gathered. With increasing acceptance of sexual activity in our culture, despite moral and religious issues, various forms of sex have led to many different clinical conditions of sexually transmitted diseases. In this report, we describe a rare case of primary anorectal syphilis with clinical, endoscopic and histologic features that was misdiagnosed as Crohn's disease. PMID:21437679

  7. Crohn's Disease of the Ileoanal Pouch.

    PubMed

    Lightner, Amy L; Pemberton, John H; Loftus, Edward J

    2016-06-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) of the pouch is an increasingly recognized diagnosis after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. This post-ileal pouch-anal anastomosis diagnosis in conjunction with pouchitis remains the leading reason for pouch excision. Unfortunately, CD of the pouch remains a difficult diagnosis with lack of a uniform definition largely because of its similarity to common postoperative pouch complications, including pouchitis, abscess formation, or stricture at the anastomosis. Once diagnosed, treatment algorithms largely include multimodal therapy including biologics. This review focuses on the definition, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment for CD of the pouch, a postoperative de novo diagnosis of CD. PMID:27057684

  8. What Is Crohn's Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... trial of experimental treatments. Interactive Disease Tracker Use GI Buddy to keep a daily log of your ... but the areas affected in the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract) are different. Crohn’s most commonly affects the ...

  9. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Crohn Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, David H; Carucci, Laura R; Baker, Mark E; Cash, Brooks D; Dillman, Jonathan R; Feig, Barry W; Fowler, Kathryn J; Gage, Kenneth L; Noto, Richard B; Smith, Martin P; Yaghmai, Vahid; Yee, Judy; Lalani, Tasneem

    2015-10-01

    Crohn disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder involving the gastrointestinal tract, characterized by episodic flares and times of remission. Underlying structural damage occurs progressively, with recurrent bouts of inflammation. The diagnosis and management of this disease process is dependent on several clinical, laboratory, imaging, endoscopic, and histologic factors. In recent years, with the maturation of CT enterography, and MR enterography, imaging has played an increasingly important role in relation to Crohn Disease. In addition to these specialized examination modalities, ultrasound and routine CT have potential uses. Fluoroscopy, radiography, and nuclear medicine may be less beneficial depending on the clinical scenario. The imaging modality best suited to evaluating this disease may change, depending on the target population, severity of presentation, and specific clinical situation. This document presents seven clinical scenarios (variants) in both the adult and pediatric populations and rates the appropriateness of the available imaging options. They are summarized in a consolidated table, and the underlying rationale and supporting literature are presented in the accompanying narrative. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:26435118

  10. Highly destructive perianal Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, A. K.; Udall, J.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, E.

    1998-01-01

    This article reports a case of highly destructive perianal Crohn's disease in a 15-year-old boy who presented with fecal impaction and incontinence. Both upper and lower gastrointestinal tract endoscopy were unrevealing. Treatment with intravenous prednisolone and broad-spectrum antibiotics supplemented by enteral feeding with an elemental diet resulted in prompt recovery. However, healing of his perianal lesions began only after a diverting colostomy. Awareness of this uncommon entity is important because prompt recognition can lead to early institution of appropriate treatment and avoid further morbidity. PMID:9727293

  11. Food intolerance and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, M; Teahon, K; Levi, A J; Bjarnason, I

    1993-01-01

    It has been claimed that prolonged remissions of Crohn's disease can be achieved after enteral or parenteral nutrition, by identifying and excluding foods that exacerbate a patient's symptoms. The occurrence of food intolerances were assessed after induction of remission with elemental diet in 42 eligible patients to whom single foods were introduced over five days. Suspect foods were reinvestigated with open and if possible, double blind rechallenge. Fourteen patients (33%) dropped out of the study because of relapse of disease unrelated to food (n = 8) or because of difficulties in complying with the regimen (n = 6). Twenty (48%) of the patients identified food sensitivities whereas eight (19%) did not. Seventeen of the patients who identified food sensitivities had an open rechallenge with recurrence of symptoms in 10 (24% of total). Food sensitivity was confirmed in three patients on double blind challenge. There was no significant difference in the duration of remission between patients who did or did not identify food sensitivities. During the study three cases of intolerance to the formula diet, and one of severe salicylate sensitivity were encountered. In conclusion food sensitivities are evident after treatment of Crohn's disease with elemental diet but are variable, often do not persist, and are of insufficient importance to warrant putting all patients through elimination diets. PMID:8314511

  12. Dysphagia in Crohn's disease: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Knoblauch, C; Netzer, P; Scheurer, U; Seibold, F

    2002-09-01

    Dysphagia is a rare manifestation in a patient with Crohn's disease. We report on the case of a patient with long-standing Crohn's disease who developed progressive dysphagia over 3 years. Endoscopy showed minimal distal oesophagitis with non-specific histological findings. Further investigation with cinematography, barium swallow and manometry established an achalasia-like motility disorder. Biopsies obtained from the oesophagus were non-specific. Balloon dilatation was performed. Initial success was followed by recurrent dysphagia. At repeat endoscopy, an oesophageal fistula was detected. An attempt at conservative medical management failed and oesophagectomy was successfully performed. Pathology results of the resected specimen confirmed the suspected diagnosis of oesophageal Crohn's disease. Even if achalasia is suspected in a Crohn's patient, it should be taken into consideration that the motility disorder could be the result of a transmural inflammation with or without fibrosis caused by Crohn's disease. PMID:12405254

  13. What is Crohn's Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Crohn's Disease What is Crohn's Disease Past Issues / Winter 2016 Table of Contents As ... large intestine, leading to the anus. Who Gets Crohn's Disease? Both men and women can get Crohn's disease, ...

  14. Agglutinins to bacteria in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, N; Mayberry, J F; Rhodes, J; Neale, L; Munro, J; Wensinck, F; Lawson, G H; Rowland, A C; Berkhoff, G A; Barthold, S W

    1980-01-01

    Sera from patients with Crohn's disease were tested for antibodies against organisms which are thought to cause inflammatory bowel disease in animals, or have been implicated in human Crohn's disease. Control sera were collected from healthy individuals and patients with ulcerative colitis. Sera from Crohn's disease and controls failed to agglutinate Clostridium colinum or Campylobacter sputorum subsp. mucosalis and two strains of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis (M26 and M27). Most of the sera agglutinated a Citrobacter freundii variant, Mycobacterium paratuberculosis (M28) and Mycobacterium avium (M41) but Crohn's disease sera did not differ from controls. A complement fixation test against Chlamydia gave more positive reactions in patients with Crohn's disease and colitis than in healthy controls. There was a clear difference between the sera from patients with Crohn's disease and other sera, including ulcerative colitis, in agglutination tests with the commensal coccoid rods of the genera Eubacterium and Peptostreptococcus; in these tests 54% of sera from Crohn's disease were positive compared with 11% in ulcerative colitis and none of the sera from healthy controls. All the results were essentially negative with the exception of those from Eubacterium and Peptostreptococcus and these bacteria merit investigation. PMID:7429299

  15. Evaluation for postoperative recurrence of Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Swoger, Jason M; Regueiro, Miguel

    2012-06-01

    Disease recurrence following resective surgery for Crohn disease remains a challenging clinical problem, and more studies are needed to better define risk stratification and treatment recommendations in the postoperative setting. Endoscopy remains the gold standard for the assessment of postoperative disease recurrence, and all Crohn disease patients who undergo surgery should undergo ileocolonoscopy within 6 to 12 months of surgery. The degree of endoscopic recurrence in the neoterminal ileum during this procedure provides prognostic information regarding the severity of the future disease course. WCE, MRE, and SICUS are all promising noninvasive modalities to assess for postoperative Crohn disease activity. However, further studies are needed to better define scoring systems, operating characteristics and variability, and prognostic data for each of these modalities. In patients at risk for early disease recurrence, more aggressive prophylactic therapy should be considered, in hopes of delivering true “top-down” therapy that may offer maximum impact in altering the natural history of Crohn disease. PMID:22500519

  16. Is Crohn's disease due to defective immunity?

    PubMed Central

    Korzenik, J R

    2007-01-01

    The understanding of the pathophysiology of Crohn's disease is currently undergoing a reassessment. The concept of this disease as a primary T cell disorder is being questioned, with a new emphasis on the role of innate immunity in initiating early events and in perpetuating the inflammatory state. Crohn's disease has been proposed instead to result from impaired innate immunity, encompassing the mucosal barrier and cellular elements including neutrophils and macrophages. Recent advances in genetics, functional studies on innate immunity and therapeutic trials on patients with Crohn's disease have lent support to this evolving hypothesis. PMID:17172582

  17. Tracheobronchitis in a Patient With Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Vincent; Govind, Anusha G.; Arastu, Sanaa

    2016-01-01

    We report a 63-year-old woman who presented with 1 month of non-productive cough and non-bloody diarrhea. She was on maintenance therapy for a 15-year history of Crohn's disease. Treatment with systemic corticosteroids resulted in rapid improvement of both her diarrhea and respiratory symptoms. Our patient is unique in that she presented with tracheobronchitis during an acute flare of her Crohn's without obvious lung pathology on chest imaging. Tracheobronchitis is a rare manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease that should be considered in Crohn's disease patients presenting with persistent non-infectious cough. PMID:27144198

  18. Cell therapy of refractory Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Knyazev, O V; Parfenov, A I; Shcherbakov, P L; Ruchkina, I N; Konoplyannikov, A G

    2013-11-01

    We analyzed medium-term efficiency and safety of biological therapy of Crohn's disease, in particular transplantation of allogenic mesenchymal stromal bone marrow cells and anticytokine therapy with selective immunosuppressive agents. It was found that both methods of biological therapy of refractory Crohn's disease resulted in clinical and in some cases endoscopic remission. In most cases, clinical remission was maintained without steroid hormone therapy. Thus, both methods produce comparable clinical results. It was concluded that transplantation of mesenchymal stromal bone marrow cells could be considered as a promising method in the therapy of refractory Crohn's disease comparable by its efficiency with infliximab therapy. PMID:24319711

  19. Body Mass Index Is a Marker of Nutrition Preparation Sufficiency Before Surgery for Crohn's Disease From the Perspective of Intra-Abdominal Septic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min; Gao, Xiang; Chen, Yuanhan; Zhi, Min; Chen, Huangwei; Tang, Jian; Su, Minli; Yao, Jiayin; Yang, Qingfan; Chen, Junrong; Hu, Pinjin; Liu, Huanliang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Poor preoperative nutritional status for individuals with Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with intra-abdominal septic complications (IASCs). The present study aimed to investigate the association of the common nutrition indices serum albumin and body mass index (BMI) with IASCs. Sixty-four CD patients who had received elective intestinal operations were retrospectively investigated. Among these patients, 32 had received individualized fortified nutrition support. IASCs occurred in 7 patients (10.9%). Compared with non-IASC patients, IASC patients had a lower BMI (17.6 ± 2.7 vs 15.6 ± 1.3 kg/m2, P = 0.048). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve according to the BMI-based IASC prediction was 0.772 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.601–0.944; P = 0.020) with an optimum diagnostic cutoff value of 16.2 kg/m2. A BMI < 16.2 kg/m2 significantly increased the risk of developing an IASC (odds ratio [OR], 10.286; 95% CI, 1.158–91.386). Even after correction with the simplified CD activity index (CDAI), a low BMI level remained associated with IASCs (OR, 7.650; 95% CI, 0.808–72.427; P = 0.076). Serum albumin was not associated with IASCs. Although the fortified nutrition support group had an albumin level comparable to the control group, this group had a higher simplified CDAI score, a lower BMI level, and a comparable incidence rate of IASCs. Thus, BMI more accurately reflects the basic preoperative nutritional status of CD patients than serum albumin. BMI can aid in guiding preoperative nutrition support and judging the appropriate operation time for CD. PMID:26334908

  20. [Sweet syndrome associated with Crohn disease].

    PubMed

    Ly, S; Beylot-Barry, M; Beyssac, R; Doutre, M S; Beylot, C

    1995-01-01

    The association of Sweet's syndrome and Crohn's disease is rare. We report a new case of such association. A 45 year-old woman developed a diarrhea, fever, and skin lesions consistent with a presumptive diagnosis of Sweet's syndrome. Crohn's disease was also diagnosed. Oral prednisone, associated with mesalazine, effected improvement of both cutaneous lesions and bowel disease. The ten cases of the literature and ours show that Sweet's syndrome may occur during an acute phase of Crohn's disease. Most of the time, Crohn's disease has already been diagnosed. However, this was not so with our patient, wherein lies the originality of our case. A general corticotherapy is the preferred course of treatment. PMID:8570958

  1. Crohn's disease: the cold chain hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Alastair; Kalantzis, Tommy

    2006-07-01

    A recent published hypothesis proposed that Crohn's disease was provoked by infantile exposure to micro-organisms that can survive refrigerator temperature. A case-control study was accordingly devised. The mean age at first fridge was 5.6 years amongst 88 patients with Crohn's disease, 5.5 years in 88 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 7.6 years in 88 controls, but a majority of individuals had always been exposed to refrigerated food. Differences were more striking in subjects aged above the median (10.3, 10.9 and 15.0 years for Crohn's disease, UC and controls, respectively). This support for the hypothesis reached statistical significance for those with Crohn's disease compared to the controls (p=0.045). PMID:16059694

  2. THERAPIES FOR CROHN'S DISEASE: a clinical update.

    PubMed

    Sobrado, Carlos Walter; Leal, Raquel Franco; Sobrado, Lucas Faraco

    2016-01-01

    The main objectives of clinical therapy in Crohn's disease are clinical and endoscopic remission without the use of corticosteroids for long periods of time, prevention of hospitalization and surgery, and improvement of quality of life. The main limitation of drug therapy is the loss of response over the long term, which makes incorporation of new drugs to the therapeutic arsenal necessary. This review analyses the main drugs currently used in clinical treatment of Crohn's disease. PMID:27438429

  3. Overview of biologic therapy for Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Dryden, Gerald W

    2009-08-01

    Therapy for Crohn's disease (CD) is evolving at breakneck speed. Biologic therapies are assuming ever more important roles in treating this unrelenting, life-long disorder. New evidence suggests that earlier, more aggressive use of biological therapies for CD may improve overall efficacy rates, as well as reduce long-term complications. In addition to optimizing the use of older biologic therapies (antibodies against TNF-alpha), recent and ongoing clinical trials are evaluating the clinical efficacy of a large number of other biologic therapies, honing in on a wide array of immunological targets. The promise of biologic therapies stems from their ability to induce complete and long-lasting remission of symptoms in a way that 'standard' therapies have not been able to accomplish. In this review of biologic therapies for CD, we examine the latest clinical trial data and evidence for mechanism of action of a variety of current and future therapies. PMID:19591627

  4. Sterile Seroma after Drainage of Purulent Muscle Abscess in Crohn's Disease: Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Treitman, Adam; Tabriz, Muhammed

    2016-01-01

    Purulent skeletal muscle abscesses can occur in Crohn's disease. We report a case of a sterile seroma complicating percutaneous drainage of a purulent skeletal muscle abscess in Crohn's ileitis. We compare and contrast this case with a similar case we published earlier. We emphasize the importance of recognition and differentiation from a septic purulent abscess. PMID:27529038

  5. Imaging of perianal fistulizing Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Chidi, Vivian N; Schwartz, David A

    2015-06-01

    Perianal fistula is a complication of Crohn's disease that carries a high morbidity. It is a channel that develops between the lower rectum, anal canal and perianal or perineal skin. The development of perianal fistulas typically connotes a more aggressive disease phenotype and may warrant escalation of treatment to prevent poor outcomes over time. Based on fistula anatomy, debris can form inside these tracts and cause occlusion, which subsequently leads to abscess formation, fever and malaise. The clinical presentation is often with complaints of pain, continuous rectal drainage of fecal matter as well as malodorous discharge. Considering that the presence of fistulas often indicates refractory and aggressive disease, early identification of its presence is important. Some patients may not have the classic symptoms of fistulizing disease at presentation and others may have significant scarring and/or pain from previous fistulizing episodes, which can make an accurate assessment on physical exam alone problematic. As a result, utilizing diagnostic imaging is the best means of identifying the early signs of perianal fistulas or abscess formation in these patients. Several imaging modalities exist which can be used for diagnosis and management. Endoscopic ultrasound and pelvic MRI are considered the most useful in establishing the diagnosis. However, a combination of multiple imaging modalities and/or examination under anesthesia is probably the most ideal. Incomplete characterization of the fistula tract(s) extent or the presence of abscess carries a high morbidity and far-reaching personal expense for the patient - promoting worsening of the disease. PMID:25816833

  6. Medical radar considerations for detecting and monitoring Crohn's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Sonny; Narayanan, Ram M.; Messaris, Evangelos

    2014-05-01

    Crohn's disease is a condition that causes inflammation and associated complications along any section of the digestive tract. Over the years, numerous radiological and endoscopic methods as well as the use of ultrasound have been developed to examine and diagnose inflammatory bowel disorders such as Crohn's disease. While such techniques have much merit, an alternative medical solution that is safe, non-invasive, and inexpensive is proposed in this paper. Reflections from electromagnetic signals transmitted by an ultra-wide band (UWB) radar allow for not only range (or extent) information but also spectral analysis of a given target of interest. Moreover, the radar cross-section (RCS) of an object measures how detectable the electromagnetic return energy of such an object is to the radar. In the preliminary phase of research, we investigate how disparities in the dielectric properties of diseased versus non-diseased portions of the intestines can aid in the detection of Crohn's disease. RCS analysis from finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method simulations using a simple 3D model of the intestines are presented. The ultimate goal of our research is to design a UWB radar system using a suitable waveform to detect and monitor Crohn's disease.

  7. [Surgical management of intestinal Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Funayama, Yuji; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Ken-Ichi; Haneda, Sho; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Ikezawa, Fumie; Unno, Michiaki

    2015-03-01

    Various intestinal conditions such as stricture, fistula, abscess, perforation, and hemorrhage are complications of Crohn's disease. Surgical intervention remains important, even in the era of biologic therapy. Limited surgical resection is essential to avoid short bowel syndrome after massive resection or multiple operations. Strictureplasty is effective for short, isolated stricture of the small intestine and provides good results equivalent to those of intestinal resection. Fecal diversion in the case of very complicated lesions not suitable for immediate resection can offer patients general and local improvement. Although bypass surgery is currently not performed because of the possibility of deterioration or carcinogenesis of the bypassed segment, bypass surgery is useful for avoiding stoma. Laparoscopic surgery is indicated for patients with nonperforating, localized ileocecal lesions, and for those presenting initially. The cumulative postoperative reoperation rate is about 50% to 60% at 10 years. The risk factors for early recurrence are smoking, perforating type, previous reoperation, and small intestinal disease. During postoperative follow-up and maintenance treatment, the importance of an algorithm comprising regular check-ups with ileocolonoscopy and the use of thioprines and biologics has been proposed. PMID:26050508

  8. Optimizing biological therapy in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Gecse, Krisztina Barbara; Végh, Zsuzsanna; Lakatos, Péter László

    2016-01-01

    Anti-TNF therapy has revolutionized the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, including both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. However, a significant proportion of patients does not respond to anti-TNF agents or lose response over time. Recently, therapeutic drug monitoring has gained a major role in identifying the mechanism and management of loss of response. The aim of this review article is to summarize the predictors of efficacy and outcomes, the different mechanisms of anti-TNF/biological failure in Crohn's disease and identify strategies to optimize biological treatment. PMID:26471077

  9. Recurrent Sweet's syndrome in reactivated Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Actis, G C; Lagget, M; Ciancio, A; Rocca, G; Tomasini, C; Puiatti, P; Verme, G

    1995-12-01

    A 50-year-old woman developed an acute febrile dermatosis on two occasions concurrently with recurrent Crohn's disease of the colon. Based on the presence of painful erythematous plaques on both hands and forearms, on the leukocytosis with excess bands in peripheral blood, on the histology showing dermal infiltration by mature granulocytes, and on the prompt response to steroids, the diagnosis was made of Sweet's syndrome associated with Crohn's disease. Sweet's syndrome is thought to be a hypersensitivity reaction that leads to parainflammatory (e.g., infections, autoimmune disorders, vaccinations) and paraneoplastic (myeloproliferative disorders, solid malignancy) associations, with a frequency of 10-30%. The association of Sweet's syndrome with Crohn's disease is very rare, but the gastroenterologist should readily differentiate it; it is important to be aware that such patients may have a nonspecific elevated activity index owing to the underlying dermatosis. PMID:8583109

  10. Living with Crohn's Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Crohn's Disease Living with Crohn's Disease Past Issues / Winter 2016 Table of Contents Photo ... Why have you chosen to speak out about Crohn's disease? For many years I really didn't talk ...

  11. Granulomatous interstitial nephritis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, Sjoerd A M E G; Christiaans, Maarten H L; Abdul-Hamid, Myrurgia A; Stifft, Frank; Damoiseaux, Jan G M C; van Paassen, Pieter

    2016-08-01

    Granulomatous interstitial nephritis has been observed in <1% of native renal biopsies. Here, we describe two patients with granulomatous interstitial nephritis in relation to Crohn's disease. Circulating helper and cytotoxic T cells were highly activated, and both cell types predominated in the interstitial infiltrate, indicating a cellular autoimmune response. After immunosuppressive treatment, renal function either improved or stabilized in both patients. In conclusion, granulomatous interstitial nephritis is a genuine extraintestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease, the treatment of which should include immunosuppressive agents. PMID:27478596

  12. MRI for Crohn's Disease: Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kichul; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Lee, Hong J.

    2015-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory condition with relapsing-remitting behavior, often causing strictures or penetrating bowel damage. Its lifelong clinical course necessitates frequent assessment of disease activity and complications. Computed tomography (CT) enterography has been used as primary imaging modality; however, the concern for radiation hazard limits its use especially in younger population. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has advantages of avoiding radiation exposure, lower incidence of adverse events, ability to obtain dynamic information, and good soft-tissue resolution. MR enterography (MRE) with oral contrast agent has been used as primary MR imaging modality of CD with high sensitivity, specificity, and interobserver agreement. The extent of inflammation as well as transmural ulcers and fibrostenotic diseases can be detected with MRE. Novel MR techniques such as diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI), motility study, PET-MRI, and molecular imaging are currently investigated for further improvement of diagnosis and management of CD. MR spectroscopy is a remarkable molecular imaging tool to analyze metabolic profile of CD with human samples such as plasma, urine, or feces, as well as colonic mucosa itself. PMID:26413543

  13. Crohn's disease: the cold chain hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Alberti, Corinne; Berrebi, Dominique; Bingen, Edouard; Cézard, Jean-Pierre

    2003-12-13

    Crohn's disease is the result of an abnormal immune response of the gut mucosa triggered by one or more environmental risk factors in people with predisposing gene variations, including CARD15 mutations. Epidemiological data allow assessment of familial environmental risk factors related to western lifestyle, diet, bacteria, and domestic hygiene. All findings point to refrigeration as a potential risk factor for Crohn's disease. Furthermore, cold-chain development paralleled the outbreak of Crohn's disease during the 20th century. The cold chain hypothesis suggests that psychrotrophic bacteria such as Yersinia spp and Listeria spp contribute to the disease. These bacteria have been identified in Crohn's disease lesions and we discuss their pathogenic properties with respect to our knowledge of the disease. From a molecular perspective, we postulate that the disease is a result of a defect in host recognition by pathogenic bacterial components that usually escape the immune response (eg, Yop molecules), which results in an excessive host response to these bacteria. PMID:14683664

  14. Crohn`s disease. Increasing trend in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Mofleh, Ibrahim A; Azzam, Nahlah A

    2013-11-01

    We attempted, through systematic review to explore the epidemiology and risk factors of Crohn's disease (CD) with special attention to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). We selected articles that contained population-based, epidemiological, and clinical character studies of CD. We collected data concerned with the prevalence, demographic features, and the possible etiology of CD that might explain its emergence in KSA. The prevalence of CD in Western countries ranged between 11-43/100,000 with flawless evidence of CD prevalence emerging in previously low incidence areas like Asia. Prevalence in KSA has markedly increased over the last 3 decades. Combined ileal and colonic involvement was the most frequently affected site. Diet, smoking, drugs, and westernization of life are assumed to contribute to the pathogenesis. There is convincing evidence of CD emerging in Asia, including KSA. Westernization of lifestyle and smoking is probably the major contributing factors. Genetic studies are warranted. PMID:24252887

  15. Crohn's Disease - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Crohn's Disease URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih. ...

  16. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography in Crohn's Disease Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Białecki, Marcin; Białecka, Agnieszka; Laskowska, Katarzyna; Liebert, Ariel; Kłopocka, Maria; Serafin, Zbigniew

    2015-06-01

    The chronic nature of Crohn's disease (CD) implicates necessity of multiple control assessments throughout patient's life. It is accepted that in patients with CD requiring disease monitoring, magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) and computed tomography enterography (CTE) are--apart from endoscopy--imaging studies of first choice. In practice, diagnostic imaging of patients with CD is troublesome, since MRE is an expensive and complicated study, and CTE exposes patients to high doses of ionizing radiation. Therefore, there is a need for new, both non-invasive and effective, methods of imaging in CD. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography (CEUS) is a relatively new method using gas-filled microbubbles serving as contrast agent. It allows for detailed assessment of blood perfusion within intestine wall and peri-intestinal tissues, which enables detection and monitoring of inflammation and its qualitative assessment. The purpose of this paper is to describe CEUS examination technique and its clinical applications in patients with Crohn's disease. PMID:26902030

  17. Coexistent Crohn's disease and sigmoid diverticulosis.

    PubMed Central

    McCue, J.; Coppen, M. J.; Rasbridge, S. A.; Lock, M. R.

    1989-01-01

    This study reports six patients with a diagnosis of diverticular disease with associated localized Crohn's colitis who were all treated by segmental resection. Two patients died in the post-operative period from disease unrelated to their colonic pathology. The remaining four patients remain well, show no signs of recurrent disease and have required no further surgery. The behaviour and significance of the two conditions occurring in the same patient is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2608592

  18. An update of the role of nutritional therapy in the management of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Alhagamhmad, Moftah H; Day, Andrew S; Lemberg, Daniel A; Leach, Steven T

    2012-08-01

    Crohn's disease is an increasingly global health concern. Currently without a cure, it significantly alters the quality of life of Crohn's disease sufferers and places a heavy financial burden on the community. Recent reports show that the rising prevalence of Crohn's disease is no longer confined to Western countries, with considerable increases seen particularly in Asia. Nutritional problems are often associated with Crohn's disease, most notably in the paediatric population, with underweight and stunting commonly seen at presentation. In addition, linear growth retardation and pubertal delay can also manifest in these younger patients. Therefore, exclusive enteral nutrition has been used as a therapeutic option to treat Crohn's disease, in part to address the nutritional complications of the disease. Exclusive enteral nutrition can improve nutrition as well as induce remission at a rate equivalent to corticosteroids. It is safe particularly with long-term use and can induce mucosal healing, considered the gold standard for therapy, at a rate superior to corticosteroids. Exclusive enteral nutrition has thus become the preferred therapeutic option in many centres for the treatment of paediatric Crohn's disease. This review discusses the role of exclusive enteral nutrition as a therapeutic option for the treatment of Crohn's disease, as well as the latest findings into its mechanisms of action. PMID:22699323

  19. Possible Association of Cutaneous Rosai-Dorfman Disease and Chronic Crohn Disease A Case Series Report

    PubMed Central

    Salva, Katrin A.; Stenstrom, Melissa; Breadon, Jonith Y.; Odland, Paul Blair; Bennett, Daniel; Longley, Jack; Wood, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Cutaneous Rosai-Dorfman disease (CRDD), a variant of Rosai-Dorfman disease limited to the skin, has a wide range of clinical presentations. Rosai-Dorfman disease is believed to result from an aberrant response to antigens, caused by immunosuppressive macrophages. Macrophage-mediated immunosuppression is also implicated in the pathogenesis of Crohn disease, linking these otherwise unrelated entities. To our knowledge, the coexistence of these disorders has been described in only 2 cases, 1 of them confined to the skin and soft tissue. OBSERVATIONS We present a series of 3 patients who developed purely CRDD in the context of long-standing Crohn disease. Statistical estimates suggested that the association of these 2 disorders is not due to chance (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Our case series provides the clinical correlate to the pathogenetic parallels between CRDD and Crohn disease. Crohn disease is frequently complicated by various skin manifestations, which may be mimicked by CRDD. Therefore, it may be prudent for clinicians to include CRDD in the list of differential diagnoses when examining skin lesions in patients with Crohn disease. PMID:24305684

  20. Treatment of metastatic cutaneous Crohn disease with certolizumab.

    PubMed

    Kiuru, Maija; Camp, Brendan; Adhami, Katayun; Jacob, Vinita; Magro, Cynthia; Wildman, Horatio

    2015-11-01

    Metastatic Crohn disease is a rare cutaneous manifestation of Crohn disease characterized by granulomatous lesions discontinuous with the diseased areas of the gastrointestinal tract. We report a case of a 32-year-old woman with history of Crohn disease who was admitted for treatment of cellulitis after presenting with a tender erythematous plaque of the left calf. Microbiological tests including tissue cultures were negative. A skin biopsy revealed granulomatous dermatitis consistent with metastatic cutaneous Crohn disease. Owing to concomitant perianal fistulas and abscesses and prior infusion reaction to infliximab, the patient was treated with certolizumab, a pegylated tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor combined with methotrexate resulting in complete resolution of the skin lesion. This case emphasizes the importance of recognizing this rare skin manifestation of Crohn disease and adds certolizumab as one of TNF inhibitors useful in the treatment of metastatic cutaneous Crohn disease. PMID:26632928

  1. [Surgical management of small bowel localization of Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Pătraşcu, Tr; Catrina, E; Doran, H; Mihalache, O; Bugă, C; Degeratu, D; Predescu, G

    2009-01-01

    Crohn's disease is an inflammatory bowel disease, a chronic condition with recurrent relapses, difficult to diagnose and requiring a complex medical and surgical treatment. Analyzing 11 patients admitted in the surgical Clinique between 2003 and 2008 with Crohn's disease diagnostic, the authors study at the 7 patients operated the reason of the surgical interventions represented by the complications of the inflammatory disease--intestinal obstruction 2 cases, peritonitic syndrome in 3 cases, malignization 1 case, enterovesical fistulae--1 case. Intraoperatory the differential diagnosis between an inflammatory or tumoral etiology of the lesions was very difficult, and the surgical indication was in almost all cases for enteral resection. Postoperative evolution was in most cases with complications (5 cases)--unique anastomotic fistulae 2 cases, or recurrent fistulae in 3 cases, late bowel obstruction--2 cases. Studying the literature, it can be concluded that the surgical treatment is only one stage of the complex treatment that must be individualized for each case and applied only to the complications of the disease. PMID:20187469

  2. European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation Topical Review on Prediction, Diagnosis and Management of Fibrostenosing Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Florian; Latella, Giovanni; Magro, Fernando; Yuksel, Elif S; Higgins, Peter D R; Di Sabatino, Antonio; de Bruyn, Jessica R; Rimola, Jordi; Brito, Jorge; Bettenworth, Dominik; van Assche, Gert; Bemelman, Willem; d'Hoore, Andre; Pellino, Gianluca; Dignass, Axel U

    2016-08-01

    This ECCO topical review of the European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation [ECCO] focused on prediction, diagnosis, and management of fibrostenosing Crohn's disease [CD]. The objective was to achieve evidence-supported, expert consensus that provides guidance for clinical practice. PMID:26928961

  3. Postoperative outcome of Crohn's disease in 30 children

    PubMed Central

    Besnard, M; Jaby, O; Mougenot, J; Ferkdadji, L; Debrun, A; Faure, C; Delagausie, P; Peuchmaur, M; Aigrain, Y; Navarro, J; Cezard, J

    1998-01-01

    Background—Thirty children operated on for Crohn's disease (CD) were reviewed (1975-1994). The aim of the study was to assess their postoperative outcome. 
Patients—19 boys and 11 girls, aged 15.3 (2) years (range 11.3-20) at surgery were studied. 
Results—Surgical indications were acute complications of CD and chronic intestinal illness. Six months after surgery, 11 of 12 patients had been weaned off steroids, and 22 of 23 patients were weaned off nutritional support; 17 patients without recurrrence had a mean (SD) weight gain of 2.1 (8) kg and a height gain of 3.36 (3) cm. During 3.1 (2.7) years follow up, 12 patients (40%) had a recurrence of the disease after 19.4 (14) months (means (SD)): supra-anastomotic recurrence (six), severe perianal disease (two), and chronic illness (four). Six of 14 patients who were treated with mesalazine (13) or azathioprine (one) had recurrences. The postoperative recurrence rate was 50% at two years. 
Conclusion—Surgical treatment modifies the immediate outcome of severe or complicated CD, but does not prevent recurrence, despite localised resection or prophylactic postoperative treatment. Extension of the disease before surgery seems to be a major risk factor for postoperative recurrence in children. 

 Keywords: Crohn's disease; surgery; children PMID:9824343

  4. Organizing Pneumonia in a Patient with Quiescent Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ozeki, Keiji; Katano, Takahito; Shimura, Takaya; Mori, Yoshinori; Joh, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    A 64-year-old man with Crohn's disease (CD) was admitted to our hospital due to moderate risk of pneumonia while receiving scheduled adalimumab maintenance therapy. Symptoms remained virtually unchanged following administration of antibiotics. A final diagnosis of organizing pneumonia (OP) was made based on findings of intra-alveolar buds of granulation tissue and fibrous thickening of the alveolar walls on pathological examination and patchy consolidations and ground glass opacities on computed tomography. Immediate administration of prednisolone provided rapid, sustained improvement. Although a rare complication, OP is a pulmonary manifestation that requires attention in CD patients. PMID:27413560

  5. Course and prognosis of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Truelove, S C; Pena, A S

    1976-01-01

    During the period 1938-70 there were 303 patients at the Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, diagnosed as suffering from Crohn's disease. Of these, 82 have been excluded, leaving 221 with a firm diagnosis. These patients have been divided into 'new cases', in which the disease was diagnosed at the Radcliffe Infirmary, and 'referred cases' in which the diagnosis was already made at the time of referral. In this series, there were three main sites of involvement: small intestinal, large intestinal, and both small and large intestinal. Ileocolitis was the commonest anatomical distribution. The disease showed progression to new, sites in a considerable number of the patients during the period under study. There was a fivefold increase of new cases between the first and third decades covered by the study and this applied equally to patients presenting as an acute abdomen, which supports the idea that the disease is truly increasing. Survival curves have been plotted and compared with expected survival curves. In terms of mortality, Crohn's disease emerges as a disease which becomes progressively more dangerous as the years go by, which is in sharp contrast with the findings in ulcerative colitis in which the main risk of dying is in the early years. PMID:1269986

  6. Practical Approaches to "Top-Down" Therapies for Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Amezaga, Aranzazu Jauregui; Van Assche, Gert

    2016-07-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic, progressive, and disabling disease that leads in most cases to the development of bowel damage presenting as a fistula, abscess, or stricture. For years, therapy for Crohn's disease has been based on a "step-up" approach, in which anti-TNF agents are administered after the failure of steroids and immunosuppressants. However, recent studies have suggested that early introduction of anti-TNF agents combined with immunosuppressants can modify the natural history of the disease. Patients who could benefit more of this "top-down" strategy would be those at elevated risk of a complicated or severe inflammatory bowel disease or with factors that can predict an aggressive disease course. Therefore, the management of a patient with CD should be personalized, taking into account the patient's specific characteristics and comorbidities, disease activity, site and behavior of the disease, and predictable factors of poor prognosis. A balance between medication and potential adverse effects should be achieved, trying to avoid under or overtreatment, always discussing the different therapeutic options with the patient. The natural history of ulcerative colitis differs from CD and, to date, there is not much scientific evidence on the use of early combined immunosuppression. PMID:27184044

  7. Meeting the Challenge of Crohn's Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Crohn's Disease Meeting the Challenge of Crohn's Disease Past Issues / Winter 2016 ... How old were you when you first experienced the symptoms that would later be diagnosed as Crohn's ...

  8. Metabolomics reveals metabolic biomarkers of Crohn's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, J.K.; Willing, B.; Lucio, M.; Fekete, A.; Dicksved, J.; Halfvarson, J.; Tysk, C.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.

    2009-06-01

    The causes and etiology of Crohn's disease (CD) are currently unknown although both host genetics and environmental factors play a role. Here we used non-targeted metabolic profiling to determine the contribution of metabolites produced by the gut microbiota towards disease status of the host. Ion Cyclotron Resonance Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry (ICR-FT/MS) was used to discern the masses of thousands of metabolites in fecal samples collected from 17 identical twin pairs, including healthy individuals and those with CD. Pathways with differentiating metabolites included those involved in the metabolism and or synthesis of amino acids, fatty acids, bile acids and arachidonic acid. Several metabolites were positively or negatively correlated to the disease phenotype and to specific microbes previously characterized in the same samples. Our data reveal novel differentiating metabolites for CD that may provide diagnostic biomarkers and/or monitoring tools as well as insight into potential targets for disease therapy and prevention.

  9. Vulvoperineal Crohn's disease: response to metronidazole.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Aida; Ezzine-Sebai, Nadia; Fazaa, Becima; Zeglaoui, Faten; Zermani, Rachida; Kamoun, Mohamed Ridha

    2010-01-01

    A 46-year-old woman with a medical history of chronic juvenile arthritis with bilateral prosthetic hips presented with vulvoperineal ulcerations of 3 years' duration. There was no diarrhea or recent weight loss. Cutaneous examination showed asymmetrical vulvar edema of the labia minora and labia majora with deep and linear ulcerations having verrucous borders located on the inguinocrural regions and the buttocks fold (Figure 1). On physical examination there was bilateral limited mobilization of the hips. A biopsy specimen was taken from the border of the vulvar ulceration and histologic examination showed under a hyperplasic epidermis an epithelioid granuloma with multinucleated giant cells of the dermis without caseification. Laboratory analyses and results from chest x-ray were normal. Results for Koch bacilla in the spittle, microbiologic studies (staining for microorganisms and cultures), and tuberculin intradermoreaction were negative. There was no Crohn's disease aspect on colonoscopy, and there was normal small bowel enterography. Systematic intestinal biopsies were also with normal aspect. Based on the clinical data and granulomatous histologic characteristics, the diagnosis of metastatic Crohn's disease without digestive involvement was obtained. The patient was started on metronidazole 1 g/d. After 6 months of treatment, there was an almost-complete healing of ulcerations (Figure 2). Treatment was well-tolerated. PMID:21137614

  10. Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease tissue cytotoxins

    SciTech Connect

    McLaren, L.C.; Gitnick, G.

    1982-06-01

    Bowel-wall tissue filtrates from patients with inflammatory bowel disease produce cytopathic effects in tissue culture. The cytopathic effects inducers have been reported to have the characteristics of a small RNA virus. Clostridium difficile toxin also produces cytopathic effects and has been found in the stools of patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. The present study concerns the further characterization of the cytopathic inducers in tissues of inflammatory bowel disease patients. It was found that they are nonsedimentable at 148,000 g for 2 h and resistant to inactivation by UV light. They are proteins that are distinct from C. difficile toxin and are unique cytotoxins which are associated with the early cytopathic effects observed in Riff-free chick embryo and rabbit ileum cell cultures. These results suggest that the early cytopathic effects previously described are not produced by a virus. They do not explain the delayed cytopathic effects seen in rabbit ileum or WI-38 cells.

  11. [Crohn's disease. Clinical and therapeutical considerations].

    PubMed

    Paşalega, M; Calotă, F; Paraliov, T; Meşină, C; Vîlcea, D; Tomescu, P; Pănuş, A; Tenea, T; Mirea, C; Traşcă, E; Ene, D; Vasile, I

    2005-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic granulomatous inflammatory condition of the intestinal tract of unknown etiology. Most commonly the disease affects the small bowel, the colon and the rectum. The acute and aggressive forms can evolve fast, mimicking an acute surgical illness, requiring surgical intervention in emergency. Surgical therapeutical option, in this condition, must be determined strictly by establishing a correct intraoperative diagnosis, through macroscopic features and histologic evidence. Because it is an incurable disease with variable evolution, marked by recurrence, that involves repeated surgical intervention, the surgical treatment (often resection), must be most conservative from the small bowel. We present 3 cases of surgical interventions with emergency characteristics (bowel obstruction through fitobezoar, colonic tumors obstruction of colon splenic angle, urachal infected tumors). In these cases the diagnosis was established intraoperatively and the surgical intervention was adapted to the particular cases. PMID:16372678

  12. Inferior mesenteric vein thrombosis in Crohn`s disease: CT diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Coralnick, J.R.; Budin, J.A.; Sedarat, A.

    1996-01-01

    Mesenteric vein thrombosis has been described in association with such risk factors as coagulation disorders, postoperative dehydration, sepsis, and trauma. CT and ultrasound have greatly facilitated early diagnosis, and the features of superior mesenteric and portal vein thrombosis are well recognized. We present a case of inferior mesenteric vein thrombosis in a patient with Crohn`s disease. To our knowledge, this entity has not been reported in the radiologic literature. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Sweet's syndrome in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Carpels, W; Mattelaer, C; Geboes, K; Coremans, G; Tack, J

    1999-01-01

    Crohn's disease is rarely associated with Sweet's syndrome. We report a 32-year old woman who presented with diarrhea, fever and disseminated erythematous plaques on the arms and the trunk. After colonoscopy with biopsies, Crohn's disease was diagnosed. Skin biopsy showed a dense infiltration of neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes, establishing also the diagnosis of Sweet's syndrome. Crohn's disease is one of several systemic diseases that may underlie Sweet's syndrome. Treatment with methylprednisolone resulted in a rapid improvement of both gastro-intestinal symptoms and skin lesions. PMID:10547905

  14. The oral cavity in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Pittock, S; Drumm, B; Fleming, P; McDermott, M; Imrie, C; Flint, S; Bourke, B

    2001-05-01

    We assessed the utility of expert oral examination as a part of the diagnostic evaluation of patients with suspected Crohn's disease. Of 45 patients with newly diagnosed CD, 25 had been examined by a dentist. Twelve (48%) of these had oral CD lesions. Mucosal tags constituted the most frequent form of oral lesion (8/12). Of 8 oral biopsy specimens, 6 (75%) contained non-caseating granulomas. Patients with oral CD had more oral symptoms, presented for diagnosis sooner, and were more likely to have other upper gastrointestinal inflammation than those without oral lesions. Oral manifestations of CD are common in children; therefore, expert oral examination may be useful during diagnostic evaluation of children with suspected inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:11343060

  15. Oral status in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Sundh, B; Hultén, L

    1982-01-01

    The dental status in a randomly selected group of patients with Crohn's disease was assessed and compared with that in a normal population. The results showed evidence that these patients in spite of an ordinary oral hygiene standard have a high caries frequency and activity, and that dental caries was particularly common in those subjected to extensive small bowel resection. Unusual dietary habits and malabsorption may probably be the main cause of the condition, although neglect of oral hygiene during active phases of the disease might also be important. Increased attention has to be directed towards this problem. A strict oral hygiene should be recommended and the regular use of fluoride treatment appears to be justified in such a high risk group of patients. PMID:7158213

  16. On the etiology of Crohn disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mishina, D; Katsel, P; Brown, S T; Gilberts, E C; Greenstein, R J

    1996-01-01

    Crohn disease (CD) is a chronic, panenteric intestinal inflammatory disease. Its etiology is unknown. Analogous to the tuberculoid and lepromatous forms of leprosy, CD may have two clinical manifestations. One is aggressive and fistulizing (perforating), and the other is contained, indolent, and obstructive (nonperforating) [Gi]-berts, E. C. A. M., Greenstein, A. J., Katsel, P., Harpaz, N. & Greenstein, R. J. (1994) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91, 12721-127241. The etiology, if infections, may be due to Mycobacterium paratuberculosis. We employed reverse transcription PCR using M. paratuberculosis subspecies-specific primers (IS 900) on total RNA from 12 ileal mucosal specimens (CD, n = 8; controls, n = 4, 2 with ulcerative colitis and 2 with colonic cancer). As a negative control, we used Myobacterium avium DNA, originally cultured from the drinking water of a major city in the United States. cDNA sequence analysis shows that all eight cases of Crohn's disease and both samples from the patients with ulcerative colitis contained M. paratuberculosis RNA. Additionally, the M. avium control has the DNA sequence of M. paratuberculosis. We demonstrate the DNA sequence of M. paratuberculosis from mucosal specimens from humans with CD. The potable water supply may be a reservoir of infection. Although M. paratuberculosis signal in CD has been previously reported, a cause and effect relationship has not been established. In part, this is due to conflicting data from studies with empirical antimycobacterial therapy. We conclude that clinical trials with anti-M. paratuberculosis therapy are indicated in patients with CD who have been stratified into the aggressive (perforating) and contained (nonperforating) forms. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8790414

  17. Treatment of Crohn's disease recurrence after ileoanal anastomosis by azathioprine.

    PubMed

    Berrebi, W; Chaussade, S; Bruhl, A L; Pariente, A; Valleur, P; Hautefeuille, P; Couturier, D

    1993-08-01

    Ileoanal anastomosis is a surgical procedure performed in patients with ulcerative colitis. In a small number of patients operated on for ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease occurs in the reservoir, mimicking pouchitis, and may lead to pouch excision and to a permanent terminal ileostomy. Two patients with recurrent Crohn's disease in the reservoir after ileoanal anastomosis were treated with azathioprine for 18 and 24 months, respectively. Azathioprine induced a complete clinical and endoscopic remission. These two observations suggested that immunosuppressive drugs were a good option for permanent ileostomy in cases of recurrence of Crohn's disease in the reservoir after ileoanal anastomosis. PMID:8344116

  18. A Practical Approach to Preventing Postoperative Recurrence in Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hashash, Jana G; Regueiro, Miguel

    2016-05-01

    Postoperative Crohn's disease recurrence remains common, and preventing additional surgery remains a challenge. A critical step to postoperative management of Crohn's disease is being able to identify patients who should receive immediate postoperative therapy from the patients who can wait for recurrence prior to starting medications. All patients, regardless of their risk for recurrence, are advised to undergo a colonoscopy at 6 to 12 months after surgery to evaluate for endoscopic evidence of Crohn's disease. Further management of patients depends on symptoms and the presence or absence of endoscopic recurrence. PMID:27086006

  19. A case of phrynoderma in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Cobos, Gabriela; Cornejo, Christine; McMahon, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Phrynoderma is a type of follicular hyperkeratosis associated with nutritional deficiencies. It is rarely seen in developed countries, although cases have been reported in patients with severe malnutrition or malabsorption secondary to various causes. This report describes a 19-year-old patient with poorly controlled Crohn's disease and malnutrition who developed the characteristic hyperkeratotic papules and plaques on his trunk and extremities in the setting of low serum vitamin A levels. To our knowledge, there are no reports of phrynoderma associated with Crohn's disease. It is likely that our patient's low vitamin A level and subsequent phrynoderma was the result of increased Crohn's disease activity and malnutrition. PMID:24274972

  20. Meeting the Challenge of Crohn's Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Feature: Crohn's Disease Meeting the Challenge of Crohn's Disease Past Issues / Winter 2016 Table of Contents During the early stages of ... Clinical Research Trials: www.clinicaltrials.gov search "Crohn's disease" Crohns and Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA): ... Issue: Volume 10 Number 4 Page 6-7

  1. [Medical mangement of Crohn's disease (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Preel, J L; Eugene, C; Mignon, M; Weissman, A; Hardouin, J P; Debray, C

    Medical management of Crohn's disease is above all symptomatic. According to the severeness of the case, treatment varies and may be simple (regimen, antidiarrheic agents and sulfamid drugs) or more sophisticated (continous parenteral alimentation). Sulfamids and antibiotics have a definite although temporary action. Pathogenic medication includes: 1) steroid therapy who is active, but its effects are not long stand; 2) immunosuppressors who allow for the reduction of steroid therapy dosages; 3) immunostimulants as proposed by Geffroy. Among those presently studied are Calmette-Guérin vaccine, either given orally or by scarification, and two anti-parasitic drugs, metronidazole and levamisole. Short term results are good but they worsen with time. The main problem is to know when to discuss surgery. As need be, resection although mutilating, should be timely indicated. PMID:224473

  2. A case report of acute febril neutrophilic dermatosis (Sweet's syndrome) and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Beitner, H; Nakatani, T; Hammar, H

    1991-01-01

    A case of Crohn's disease complicated by Sweet's syndrome is presented. The main ultrastructural findings were the multiplication of basal lamina surrounding the venulea, interendothelial gaps and in perivascular locations mixed infiltrates of neutrophiles and erythrocytes. The changes indicate that the initial site of the reaction was the walls of the dermal vessels. PMID:1681661

  3. Crohnic Kidney Disease: Recurrent Acute Kidney Failure in a Patient With Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Mehmet Emin; Ercan, Zafer; Karakas, Emel Yigit; Ulas, Turgay; Buyukhatipoglu, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    Context: Short bowel syndrome is a rare and devastating complication in chronic inflammatory bowel disease following functional or anatomic loss of extensive segments of the intestine. Case Report: A 60-year-old male patient with Crohn's disease had undergone multiple resections of the intestine and developed short bowel syndrome. Despite up to 4-5 liters of orally fluid, sufficient calcium and magnesium intake, he suffered from recurrent acute kidney injury due to profound volume depletion and those electrolyte deficiencies. Administration of intravenous fluid and electrolyte repleacement treatment at regular intervals prevented further kidney injuries. Conclusion: We present a case of recurrent acute kidney failure in a patient with Crohn's disease, and aimed to remark importance of receiving sufficient parenteral fluid and electrolyte support in those with short bowel syndrome. PMID:25599054

  4. Fistulizing Crohn's Disease Presenting After Surgery on a Perianal Lesion.

    PubMed

    Singer, Andrew A M; Gadepalli, Samir K; Eder, Sally J; Adler, Jeremy

    2016-03-01

    Perianal skin lesions, such as skin tags, can be an early presenting sign of Crohn's disease. Surgical intervention on these lesions may increase the risk of fistula development and lead to worse outcomes. This case series examined 8 patients who underwent surgical intervention on what appeared to be benign perianal skin lesions, only to reveal fistulas leading to the diagnosis of Crohn's disease. This patient population comprised 20% of all pediatric patients with Crohn's disease who had perianal fistula present at diagnosis. The initial type of perianal lesion varied from case to case and included skin tags, hemorrhoids, and perianal abscesses. All of the patients had other presenting features that, in retrospect, may have been attributed to Crohn's disease. None presented solely with a perianal lesion. Four patients had weight loss or growth failure. Most of the remainder had abnormal laboratory test results. These findings should raise the awareness of primary care providers that perianal lesions can be the first presenting sign of possible Crohn's disease in otherwise healthy appearing children. Such children should undergo a thorough evaluation for Crohn's disease before surgical intervention on perianal lesions because surgical procedures may be associated with worse outcomes. PMID:26908665

  5. Evolving role of MRI in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, Joseph H; Obara, Piotr; Oto, Aytekin

    2013-06-01

    MR enterography is playing an evolving role in the evaluation of small bowel Crohn's disease (CD). Standard MR enterography includes a combination of rapidly acquired T2 sequence, balanced steady-state acquisition, and contrast enhanced T1-weighted gradient echo sequence. The diagnostic performance of these sequences has been shown to be comparable, and in some respects superior, to other small bowel imaging modalities. The findings of CD on MR enterography have been well described in the literature. New and emerging techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), cinematography, and magnetization transfer, may lead to improved accuracy in characterizing the disease. These advanced techniques can provide quantitative parameters that may prove to be useful in assessing disease activity, severity, and response to treatment. In the future, MR enterography may play an increasing role in management decisions for patients with small bowel CD; however, larger studies are needed to validate these emerging MRI parameters as imaging biomarkers. PMID:23712842

  6. Improving the outcome of fistulising Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Molendijk, Ilse; Peeters, Koen C M J; Baeten, Coen I M; Veenendaal, Roeland A; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E

    2014-06-01

    Fistulas are a frequent manifestation of Crohn's disease (CD) and can result in considerable morbidity. Approximately 35% of all patients with CD will experience one fistula episode during their disease course of which 54% is perianal. The major symptoms of patients with perianal fistulas are constant anal pain, the formation of painful swellings around the anus and continuous discharge of pus and/or blood from the external fistula opening. The exact aetiology of perianal fistulas in CD patients remains unclear, but it is thought that a penetrating ulcer in the rectal mucosa caused by active CD forms an abnormal passage between the epithelial lining of the rectum and the perianal skin. Genetic, microbiological and immunological factors seem to play important roles in this process. Although the incidence of perianal fistulas in patients with CD is quite high, an effective treatment is not yet discovered. In this review all available medical and surgical therapies are discussed and new treatment options and research targets will be highlighted. PMID:24913389

  7. Noninfectious lung pathology in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Casey, Mary B; Tazelaar, Henry D; Myers, Jeffrey L; Hunninghake, Gary W; Kakar, Sanjay; Kalra, Sanjay X; Ashton, Rendell; Colby, Thomas V

    2003-02-01

    Lung involvement in Crohn's disease is not well characterized. We reviewed our experience with 11 lung biopsies (seven wedge and four transbronchial) from patients with Crohn's disease to study this association further. Negative cultures, special stains for organisms Gomori-methenamine-silver [GMS], acid fast), and polymerase chain reaction for (four cases) were required for inclusion. The group included five women and six men with a mean age of 47 years (range 13-84 years). A diagnosis of Crohn's disease preceded the lung disease in nine patients. In two patients the diagnosis of Crohn's disease followed the diagnosis of their pulmonary disease 1 and 15 months later. Radiologically, eight patients had diffuse infiltrates, two had bilateral nodular infiltrates, and one had a mass. Chronic bronchiolitis with nonnecrotizing granulomatous inflammation was present in four patients, one of whom was taking mesalamine. Two patients had an acute bronchiolitis associated with a neutrophil-rich bronchopneumonia with suppuration and vague granulomatous features. One patient on mesalamine had cellular interstitial pneumonia with rare giant cells. Four patients demonstrated organizing pneumonia with focal granulomatous features, two of whom were taking mesalamine, and one of these two responded to infliximab (anti-tumor necrosis factor) monoclonal antibody therapy. Noninfectious pulmonary disease in patients with Crohn's disease has variable histologic appearances, including granulomatous inflammation and airway-centered disease resembling that seen in patients with ulcerative colitis. Drugs may contribute to pulmonary disease in some patients. PMID:12548168

  8. An unusual cutaneous manifestation of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Jessica A; Markowitz, David M; Husain, Sameera; Grossman, Marc E

    2011-01-01

    A 61-year-old man with a 12-year history of quiescent Crohn's disease on mesalamine presented to his gastroenterologist in April 2009, complaining of abdominal cramping, diarrhea, and a 25-lb weight loss over 6 weeks. He did not respond to prednisone 50 mg and 6-mercaptopurine 100 mg daily. Abdominal computed tomography findings revealed diffuse submucosal edema consistent with extensive colitis. Colonoscopy demonstrated diffuse inflammation with erythema, friability, and shallow ulcerations in the rectum and colon. Biopsies were consistent with Crohn's colitis. He was admitted for infliximab infusion for his unremitting diarrhea. Five days before admission, the patient noted mild swelling and redness of the left lower eyelid, which progressed to involve the right lower eyelid with frank pus draining from both eyes. He had no visual impairment or eye pain. Two days before admission, an ophthalmologist prescribed a steroid eyedrop with no relief. He also complained of seropurulent painful skin lesions on his face and scalp, which spread to involve his upper trunk and proximal arms. On admission to the hospital, dermatology, ophthalmology, and infectious disease consultations were obtained to rule out disseminated infection before initiation of infliximab therapy. The patient was afebrile and hemodynamically stable. His oral mucosa was normal. He had prominent bilateral lower eyelid edema, erythema, and superficial erosions with hemorrhagic crusting and frank green purulent drainage from both eyes, with crusting along the lower lash line and bilateral sclera injection (Figure 1). On his scalp, face, trunk, and proximal extremities, he had 25 to 30 erythematous, 4- to 8-mm papulopustules with narrow red halos, some with central necrosis and crusting (Figure 2). Cultures from the purulent ocular drainage and pustules on the trunk and arms were all negative for bacteria, virus, and fungi. Gram stain from the eye drainage showed polymorphonuclear leukocytes without

  9. Early and delayed indium 111 leukocyte imaging in Crohn's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Navab, F.; Boyd, C.M.; Diner, W.C.; Subramani, R.; Chan, C.

    1987-10-01

    Twenty-seven patients with Crohn's disease were studied for the presence and location of activity by both early (4 h) and delayed (18-24 h) indium 111 leukocyte imaging. The results were compared with other parameters of disease activity including Crohn's disease activity index, barium studies, and endoscopy. There was a correlation between early images and Crohn's disease activity index (r = 0.78) and between delayed images and index (r = 0.82). Based upon the corresponding Crohn's disease activity index, the sensitivity of early and delayed imaging was 81.0% and 95.2%, respectively. Specificity of early and delayed imaging was 75.0% and 87.0%, respectively. Presence of activity on the early and delayed imaging agreed with activity on barium studies and colonoscopy in approximately 80% of cases. Correlation of location of disease by leukocyte imaging and x-ray was observed in 58.9% of early scans and 55.0% of delayed scans. Correlation of the location of disease by imaging and endoscopy was observed in 71.4% of early and 75.0% of delayed studies. Because of the possibility of occurrence of false-negative results in early images, delayed imaging should always be included in evaluation of disease activity in patients with Crohn's disease who are suspected of having mild activity. Delayed imaging is not required if the early imaging study clearly shows activity.

  10. Specific antibody response to oligomannosidic epitopes in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Sendid, B; Colombel, J F; Jacquinot, P M; Faille, C; Fruit, J; Cortot, A; Lucidarme, D; Camus, D; Poulain, D

    1996-01-01

    Elevated antibody levels against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been reported in sera from patients with Crohn's disease and not with ulcerative colitis. The aim of the study was to identify the nature of the epitopes supporting this antibody response. Whole cells from different S. cerevisiae strains were selected in immunofluorescence assay for their ability to differentiate the antibody responses of patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Their cell wall phosphopeptidomannans were then tested as antigen in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) against sera from 42 patients with Crohn's disease, 20 patients with ulcerative colitis, and 34 healthy controls. Graded chemical degradations were performed on the most reactive strain phosphopeptidomannan. The discriminating epitope was determined through gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The greatest discrimination among patients with Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and controls was obtained with Su1, a S. cerevisiae strain used in brewing of beer. ELISA directed against phosphopeptidomannan of this strain was 64% sensitive and 77% specific for discriminating Crohn's disease versus ulcerative colitis and 71% sensitive and 89% specific for Crohn's disease versus controls. Periodate oxidation and selective degradation demonstrated that the most important polysaccharide epitope was shared by both the acid-stable and the alkali-labile domains of the phosphopeptidomannan. The determination of oligomannose sequences of S. cerevisiae Su1 phosphopeptidomannans suggested that a mannotetraose, Man (1 --> 3)Man(1 --> 2)Man(1 --> 2)Man, supported the serological response seen in Crohn's disease. Further identification of the immunogen eliciting this antibody response as a marker of the disease may help to understand its etiology. PMID:8991640

  11. Absorption of prednisolone in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, J A; Williams, S E; Turnberg, L A; Houston, J B; Rowland, M

    1983-01-01

    The absorption of prednisolone in patients with Crohn's disease was investigated. Seven patients with Crohn's disease and eight normal control subjects were given a tracer dose of tritiated prednisolone with 20 mg cold prednisolone by mouth. On a separate occasion they were given an intravenous injection of radiolabelled prednisolone. After oral ingestion only 53.4 +/- 11.7% of labelled material was excreted in the urine of Crohn's patients compared with 82.5 +/- 3.6% in the normal subjects. The oral/intravenous availability ratio was 0.61 +/- 0.14 in Crohn's patients and 0.89 +/- 0.07 in the normal group. Areas under plasma concentration-time curves were lower in patients than normal subjects and the oral/intravenous ratios were 0.6 +/- 0.2 and 0.86 +/- 0.09 respectively. Faecal excretion of radioactivity after oral ingestion was greater in Crohn's patients (19.3 +/- 2.5%, n = 3) than in normal subjects (7 +/- 2.8%, n = 4). The range for each type of measurement was much wider in the patient group than in the normal subjects. These data suggest that patients with Crohn's disease do not absorb prednisolone normally and that absorption varies between patients. PMID:6826099

  12. Genetic studies of Crohn's disease: Past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jimmy Z.; Anderson, Carl A.

    2014-01-01

    The exact aetiology of Crohn's disease is unknown, though it is clear from early epidemiological studies that a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors contributes to an individual's disease susceptibility. Here, we review the history of gene-mapping studies of Crohn's disease, from the linkage-based studies that first implicated the NOD2 locus, through to modern-day genome-wide association studies that have discovered over 140 loci associated with Crohn's disease and yielded novel insights into the biological pathways underlying pathogenesis. We describe on-going and future gene-mapping studies that utilise next generation sequencing technology to pinpoint causal variants and identify rare genetic variation underlying Crohn's disease risk. We comment on the utility of genetic markers for predicting an individual's disease risk and discuss their potential for identifying novel drug targets and influencing disease management. Finally, we describe how these studies have shaped and continue to shape our understanding of the genetic architecture of Crohn's disease. PMID:24913378

  13. Herpes simplex virus duodenitis accompanying Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Hoo; Um, Wook Hyun; Jeon, Seong Ran; Kim, Hyun Gun; Lee, Tae Hee; Kim, Wan Jung; Kim, Jin-Oh; Jin, So Young

    2013-11-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a recognized cause of gastrointestinal infection in immunodeficient patients. Although a few cases of HSV gastritis and colitis in immunocompromised patients have been reported, there are no reports of HSV duodenitis in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). A 74-year-old female was admitted with general weakness and refractory epigastric pain. She had been diagnosed with CD three years ago. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed diffuse edematous and whitish mucosa with multiple erosions in the duodenum. Considering the possibility of viral co-infection, cytomegalovirus (CMV) immunohistochemical staining, PCR, and cultures of duodenal biopsies were performed, all of which were negative with the exception of the isolation of HSV in culture. After administration of intravenous acyclovir for 1 week, follow-up EGD showed almost complete resolution of the lesions and the patient's symptoms improved. In CD patients with refractory gastro-intestinal symptoms, HSV, as well as CMV, should be considered as a possible cause of infection, so that the diagnosis of viral infection is not delayed and the appropriate antiviral treatment can be initiated. PMID:24262595

  14. Novel biomarkers of fibrosis in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Pellino, Gianluca; Pallante, Pierlorenzo; Selvaggi, Francesco

    2016-08-15

    Fibrosis represents a major challenge in Crohn's disease (CD), and many CD patients will develop fibrotic strictures requiring treatment throughout their lifetime. There is no drug that can reverse intestinal fibrosis, and so endoscopic balloon dilatation and surgery are the only effective treatments. Since patients may need repeated treatments, it is important to obtain the diagnosis at an early stage before strictures become symptomatic with extensive fibrosis. Several markers of fibrosis have been proposed, but most need further validation. Biomarkers can be measured either in biological samples obtained from the serum or bowel of CD patients, or using imaging tools and tests. The ideal tool should be easily obtained, cost-effective, and reliable. Even more challenging is fibrosis occurring in ulcerative colitis. Despite the important burden of intestinal fibrosis, including its detrimental effect on outcomes and quality of life in CD patients, it has received less attention than fibrosis occurring in other organs. A common mechanism that acts via a specific signaling pathway could underlie both intestinal fibrosis and cancer. A comprehensive overview of recently introduced biomarkers of fibrosis in CD is presented, along with a discussion of the controversial areas remaining in this field. PMID:27574564

  15. Monocytes and their pathophysiological role in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L; Braat, H; Faber, K N; Dijkstra, G; Peppelenbosch, M P

    2009-01-01

    Our immune system shows a stringent dichotomy, on the one hand displaying tolerance towards commensal bacteria, but on the other hand vigorously combating pathogens. Under normal conditions the balance between flora tolerance and active immunity is maintained via a plethora of dynamic feedback mechanisms. If, however, the balancing act goes faulty, an inappropriate immune reaction towards an otherwise harmless intestinal flora causes disease, Crohn's disease for example. Recent developments in the immunology and genetics of mucosal diseases suggest that monocytes and their derivative cells play an important role in the pathophysiology of Crohn's disease. In our review, we summarize the recent studies to discuss the dual function of monocytes - on the one hand the impaired monocyte function initiating Crohn's disease, and on the other hand the overactivation of monocytes and adaptive immunity maintaining the disease. With a view to developing new therapies, both aspects of monocyte functions need to be taken into account. PMID:18791847

  16. Neoterminal ileal blood flow after ileocolonic resection for Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Angerson, W J; Allison, M C; Baxter, J N; Russell, R I

    1993-01-01

    Endoscopic laser Doppler flowmetry was used to measure neoterminal ileal blood flow in 16 patients who had undergone ileocolonic resection for Crohn's disease and had since remained clinically and biochemically free of disease, and eight control patients who had undergone similar surgery for colonic carcinoma. Four patients with clinically active Crohn's disease of the terminal ileum were also studied. Neoterminal ileal recurrence in those with inactive Crohn's disease was graded endoscopically. The median and minimum of five local blood flow measurements performed in each patient were inversely correlated with the endoscopic recurrence grade (r = -0.52, p = 0.04 and r = -0.63, p = 0.01 respectively). Relative to the control group, median blood flow was non-significantly lower in the inactive Crohn's disease group as a whole (p > 0.05) but was significantly reduced in patients with active disease (p = 0.02). A progressive reduction in tissue perfusion may accompany recurrence of Crohn's disease while at a subclinical stage. PMID:8244138

  17. Spheroplastic phase of mycobacteria isolated from patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Chiodini, R J; Van Kruiningen, H J; Thayer, W R; Coutu, J A

    1986-01-01

    Two strains of an unclassified Mycobacterium species were isolated after 18 and 30 months of incubation of media inoculated with resected intestinal tissues from patients with Crohn's disease. These strains represented the third and fourth isolates of this organism from Crohn's disease patients. Ultrastructural examination of this strain and two previously isolated strains revealed the presence of spheroplasts which eventually transformed into the bacillary form of a previously unrecognized Mycobacterium species. These cell wall-deficient forms did not stain with conventional dyes and failed to grow on hypertonic media. Restriction polymorphism of the ribosomal DNA genes was used to determine the relationship between the cell wall-deficient and bacillary forms. Identical restriction patterns of the ribosomal DNA genes were found between the spheroplasts and Mycobacterium sp. isolates with EcoRI, BamHI, and XhoI restriction endonucleases, thus providing definitive evidence of their origin. Unidentified spheroplasts were isolated from an additional 12 patients with Crohn's disease, of which 7 of 10 seroagglutinated with antiserum prepared against the Mycobacterium sp. Spheroplasts were isolated from 16 of 26 (61%) patients with Crohn's disease but not from tissues of 13 patients with ulcerative colitis or 13 patients with other diseases of the bowel. These findings support the role of mycobacteria as etiologic agents in some cases of Crohn's disease. Images PMID:3760132

  18. Intestinal tuberculosis versus crohn's disease: Clinical and radiological recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Raju; Madhusudhan, Kumble S; Ahuja, Vineet

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal tuberculosis is a common clinical problem in India. The clinical features of this disease are nonspecific and can be very similar to Crohn's disease. Radiological evaluation of the small bowel has undergone a paradigm shift in the last decade. This long tubular organ that has traditionally been difficult to evaluate can now be well-visualized by some innovative imaging and endoscopic techniques. This article highlights the state-of-the-art evaluation of ulceroconstrictive diseases of the bowel and provides recommendations for the differentiation of intestinal tuberculosis from Crohn's disease. PMID:27413261

  19. Intestinal tuberculosis versus crohn's disease: Clinical and radiological recommendations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Raju; Madhusudhan, Kumble S; Ahuja, Vineet

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal tuberculosis is a common clinical problem in India. The clinical features of this disease are nonspecific and can be very similar to Crohn's disease. Radiological evaluation of the small bowel has undergone a paradigm shift in the last decade. This long tubular organ that has traditionally been difficult to evaluate can now be well-visualized by some innovative imaging and endoscopic techniques. This article highlights the state-of-the-art evaluation of ulceroconstrictive diseases of the bowel and provides recommendations for the differentiation of intestinal tuberculosis from Crohn's disease. PMID:27413261

  20. Extracorporeal photopheresis for the treatment of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Sharyle; Jones, Jennifer; Hull, Peter R; Ghosh, Subrata

    2015-04-01

    Small, open-label studies show promising results for ECP in the treatment of steroid-dependent and medically-refractory Crohn's disease. However, proper randomized, sham-controlled trials have not yet been performed. Based on the proposed mechanism of action of ECP, induction of a tolerogenic T cell response, ECP should be assessed in patients with early inflammatory disease rather than those who have progressed to fibrotic or stricturing disease. Randomized, sham-controlled trials need to be performed before ECP can be incorporated into standard clinical practice for the treatment of Crohn's disease. PMID:25747960

  1. Prevalence of infectious pathogens in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Knösel, Thomas; Schewe, Christiane; Petersen, Nanni; Dietel, Manfred; Petersen, Iver

    2009-01-01

    The importance of infectious pathogens in Crohn's disease (CD) is still under debate. Therefore, we examined a panel of potential viral and bacterial pathogens in a large series of CD patients and controls. Archival tissue from 76 patients, 56 with CD and 20 control patients, with normal colon mucosa (n=10) and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced colitis (n=10) were examined using PCR-based detection methods for human cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), herpes simplex virus 1, 2 (HSV1,2), adenovirus (AD), varicella-zoster virus (VZV), human herpes virus 6 (HHV6), human herpes virus 8 (HHV8), Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (Mtbc), atypical mycobacteria (nM/MG1), including Mycobacterium avium (subspecies paratuberculosis, MAP), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (Sm), and Yersinia enterocolitica (Ye). In CD patients, positive PCR results were achieved in 19 cases (34%). Sm was most frequent in 10 of 56 cases (17.9%) followed by EBV (6/56, 10.7%), nM/MG1 (4/56, 7.1%), including MAP, HHV6, and CMV (2/56, 3.6%), and finally Mtbc and AD (1/56, 1.8%). The control patients showed positive PCR results in 12 patients (12/20, 60%), nine of them with only weak signals, suggesting a persistent infection. In addition, we compared typical pathomorphological features of CD patients with the PCR results and found a significant correlation between EBV infection and mural abscesses (P=0.014). Our data demonstrate that several potential pathogens can be detected in a sizeable fraction of specimens from patients with CD, but also in control patients, suggesting that the analyzed infectious pathogens may be associated with the disease, but do not represent an obligatory cause. PMID:19186006

  2. European evidence based consensus on the diagnosis and management of Crohn's disease: special situations

    PubMed Central

    Caprilli, R; Gassull, M A; Escher, J C; Moser, G; Munkholm, P; Forbes, A; Hommes, D W; Lochs, H; Angelucci, E; Cocco, A; Vucelic, B; Hildebrand, H; Kolacek, S; Riis, L; Lukas, M; de Franchis, R; Hamilton, M; Jantschek, G; Michetti, P; O'Morain, C; Anwar, M M; Freitas, J L; Mouzas, I A; Baert, F; Mitchell, R; Hawkey, C J

    2006-01-01

    This third section of the European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation (ECCO) Consensus on the management of Crohn's disease concerns postoperative recurrence, fistulating disease, paediatrics, pregnancy, psychosomatics, extraintestinal manifestations, and alternative therapy. The first section on definitions and diagnosis reports on the aims and methods of the consensus, as well as sections on diagnosis, pathology, and classification of Crohn's disease. The second section on current management addresses treatment of active disease, maintenance of medically induced remission, and surgery of Crohn's disease. PMID:16481630

  3. [A case of Sweet's syndrome associated with Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Gonzálvez Perales, J L; Tamarit Ortí, R; Ballester Fayos, J; Jiménez Martínez, A; Antón Conejero, M D; Rodríguez Gil, F J; Moreno Osset, E; González Martínez, M A

    1997-03-01

    The Sweet syndrome or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis is a well characterized cutaneous disease from a clinical and histological point of view and is frequently associated with systemic diseases. Prognosis is favorable with good response to corticoid therapy. A well documented case of Sweet syndrome associated with an outbreak of Crohn's disease with peculiar good therapeutic response is reported. PMID:9162534

  4. Development of CAD prototype system for Crohn's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Masahiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Osamu; Ando, Takafumi; Goto, Hidemi; Mori, Kensaku

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a CAD prototype system for Crohn's disease. Crohn's disease causes inflammation or ulcers of the gastrointestinal tract. The number of patients of Crohn's disease is increasing in Japan. Symptoms of Crohn's disease include intestinal stenosis, longitudinal ulcers, and fistulae. Optical endoscope cannot pass through intestinal stenosis in some cases. We propose a new CAD system using abdominal fecal tagging CT images for efficient diagnosis of Crohn's disease. The system displays virtual unfolded (VU), virtual endoscopic, curved planar reconstruction, multi planar reconstruction, and outside views of both small and large intestines. To generate the VU views, we employ a small and large intestines extraction method followed by a simple electronic cleansing method. The intestine extraction is based on the region growing process, which uses a characteristic that tagged fluid neighbor air in the intestine. The electronic cleansing enables observation of intestinal wall under tagged fluid. We change the height of the VU views according to the perimeter of the intestine. In addition, we developed a method to enhance the longitudinal ulcer on views of the system. We enhance concave parts on the intestinal wall, which are caused by the longitudinal ulcer, based on local intensity structure analysis. We examined the small and the large intestines of eleven CT images by the proposed system. The VU views enabled efficient observation of the intestinal wall. The height change of the VU views helps finding intestinal stenosis on the VU views. The concave region enhancement made longitudinal ulcers clear on the views.

  5. Economic implications of biological therapy for Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Paradowski, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    In the early 90s American authors estimated that if a theoretical new drug was introduced that was capable of changing the natural course of the disease and reducing direct non-drug medical costs (including hospitalisation and surgery) by 20%, despite doubling the overall drugs bill, there would still be a reduction in total direct medical costs of Crohn's disease by 13%. Infliximab proved to be efficacious in reducing and maintaining remission in moderate to severe active Crohn's disease and/or fistulising Crohn's disease. A higher acquisition cost still remains its major limitation. Currently only the use of infliximab in case of treatment for flares seems to be cost-effective. However, this statement may be modified in the near future. PMID:26759625

  6. Increased permeability of macroscopically normal small bowel in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Peeters, M; Ghoos, Y; Maes, B; Hiele, M; Geboes, K; Vantrappen, G; Rutgeerts, P

    1994-10-01

    To investigate permeability alterations of the macroscopically normal jejunum in Crohn's disease, the permeation of two probes was measured during perfusion of an isolated jejunal segment. The data were compared with the results obtained by the standard per oral test in the same patients. Test probes were PEG-400 and [51Cr]EDTA. Ten normal individuals, 12 patients with Crohn's ileitis or ileocolitis, and seven patients with isolated Crohn's colitis all with normal jejunum on x-ray series were studied. Upon perfusion of the proximal small bowel, the 3-hr [51Cr]EDTA excretion was significantly increased in ileitis patients (P = 0.023) as compared to normals. The excretion exceeded the highest value of normals in eight of 12 ileitis patients. The excretion in Crohn's colitis patients was not significantly increased (P = 0.24) and abnormal excretion was found only in one of the Crohn's colitis patients. PEG-400 permeation during perfusion did not differentiate between the groups, but five of the seven patients with isolated Crohn's colitis had PEG-400 excretion exceeding the highest value in normals. Overall, 13 of the 19 patients had increased permeation of one of the two probes through jejunal mucosa during perfusion. These data suggest that the permeability is increased in the majority of patients even in segments that seem normal on x-ray. PMID:7924738

  7. Elemental diet in the management of Crohn's disease during pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Teahon, K; Pearson, M; Levi, A J; Bjarnason, I

    1991-01-01

    Four patients with Crohn's disease were treated with an elemental diet during pregnancy. Two had active disease and two also had symptoms of small intestinal obstruction. All went into a clinical remission within a few days of starting treatment. Treatment periods varied from two to four weeks, and were followed by elemental diet as a supplement to normal food in two patients. At term, all delivered a healthy infant. These patients indicate that elemental diet is a safe form of treatment for Crohn's disease during pregnancy and may be considered as an alternative to conventional drug treatments which carry a theoretical risk of teratogenesis. Images Figure 2 PMID:1916496

  8. Glycoprotein 2 antibodies in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Roggenbuck, Dirk; Reinhold, Dirk; Werner, Lael; Schierack, Peter; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Conrad, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CrD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), the two major inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), remains poorly understood. Autoimmunity is considered to be involved in the triggering and perpetuation of inflammatory processes leading to overt disease. Approximately 30% of CrD patients and less than 8% of UC patients show evidence of humoral autoimmunity to exocrine pancreas, detected by indirect immunofluorescence. Pancreatic autoantibodies (PAB) were described for the first time in 1984, but the autoantigenic target(s) of PABs were identified only in 2009. Utilizing immunoblotting and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, the major zymogen granule membrane glycoprotein 2 (GP2) has been discovered as the main PAB autoantigen. The expression of GP2 has been demonstrated at the site of intestinal inflammation, explaining the previously unaddressed contradiction of pancreatic autoimmunity and intestinal inflammation. Recent data demonstrate GP2 to be a specific receptor on microfold (M) cells of intestinal Peyer's patches, which are considered to be the original site of inflammation in CrD. Novel ELISAs, employing recombinant GP2 as the solid phase antigen, have confirmed the presence of IgA and IgG anti-GP2 PABs in CrD patients and revealed an association of anti-GP2 IgA as well as IgG levels with a specific clinical phenotype in CrD. Also, GP2 plays an important role in modulating innate and acquired intestinal immunity. Its urinary homologue, Tamm-Horsfall protein or uromodulin, has a similar effect in the urinary tract, further indicating that GP2 is not just an epiphenomenon of intestinal destruction. This review discusses the role of anti-GP2 autoantibodies as novel CrD-specific markers, the quantification of which provides the basis for further stratification of IBD patients. Given the association with a disease phenotype and the immunomodulating properties of GP2 itself, an important role for GP2

  9. Crohn's disease presenting as acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Podugu, Amareshwar; Tandon, Kanwarpreet; Castro, Fernando J

    2016-01-01

    Severe gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage is a rare complication of Crohn’s disease (CD). Although several surgical and non-surgical approaches have been described over the last 2 decades this complication still poses significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Given the relative infrequency of severe bleeding in CD, available medical literature on this topic is mostly in the form of retrospective case series and reports. In this article we review the risk factors, diagnostic modalities and treatment options for the management of CD presenting as GI hemorrhage. PMID:27122659

  10. Detection of longitudinal ulcer using roughness value for computer aided diagnosis of Crohn's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Masahiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Osamu; Ando, Takafumi; Goto, Hidemi; Mori, Kensaku

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a new method to detect ulcers, which is one of the symptoms of Crohn's disease, from CT images. Crohn's disease is an inflammatory disease of the digestive tract. Crohn's disease commonly affects the small intestine. An optical or a capsule endoscope is used for small intestine examinations. However, these endoscopes cannot pass through intestinal stenosis parts in some cases. A CT image based diagnosis allows a physician to observe whole intestine even if intestinal stenosis exists. However, because of the complicated shape of the small and large intestines, understanding of shapes of the intestines and lesion positions are difficult in the CT image based diagnosis. Computer-aided diagnosis system for Crohn's disease having automated lesion detection is required for efficient diagnosis. We propose an automated method to detect ulcers from CT images. Longitudinal ulcers make rough surface of the small and large intestinal wall. The rough surface consists of combination of convex and concave parts on the intestinal wall. We detect convex and concave parts on the intestinal wall by a blob and an inverse-blob structure enhancement filters. A lot of convex and concave parts concentrate on roughed parts. We introduce a roughness value to differentiate convex and concave parts concentrated on the roughed parts from the other on the intestinal wall. The roughness value effectively reduces false positives of ulcer detection. Experimental results showed that the proposed method can detect convex and concave parts on the ulcers.

  11. Role of HLA typing on Crohn's disease pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mahdi, Batool Mutar

    2015-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is the main type of chronic inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology. Evidence from family and twin studies suggests that genetics plays a significant role in predisposing an individual to develop Crohn's disease. A susceptibility locus for Crohn's disease has been mapped 3 to chromosome 16: a frameshift variant and two missense variants of NOD2, encoding a member of the Apaf-1/Ced-4 superfamily of apoptosis regulators which is expressed in hematopoietic compartment cells and intestinal epithelial cells as well as in paneth cells, where NOD2 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Crohn disease in the gastrointestinal system. This leads to alteration the structure of either the leucine-rich repeat domain of the protein or the adjacent region. NOD2 activates nuclear factor NF-kB; this activating function is regulated by the carboxy-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain, which has two functions, first an inhibitory role and also acts as an intracellular receptor for components of microbial pathogens. Thus, NOD2 gene product confers susceptibility to Crohn's disease by altering the recognition of these components and/or by over-activating NF-kB in intestinal epithelial cells as well as in paneth cells. Further confirmation of a genetic predisposition comes from studies of the association between the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system and CD. The immunogenetic predisposition may be considered an important requirement for the development of CD, as several alleles of human major histocompatibility complex had an association with CD. Although it is difficult to estimate the importance of this region in determining overall genetic susceptibility in a population, studies of HLA allele sharing within families suggest that this region contributes between 10% and 33% of the total genetic risk of Crohn's disease. PMID:26288728

  12. Supplementary enteral nutrition maintains remission in paediatric Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wilschanski, M; Sherman, P; Pencharz, P; Davis, L; Corey, M; Griffiths, A

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Liquid diets given enterally combined with "bowel rest' are efficacious in the treatment of active Crohn's disease, but rapid recrudescence of gastrointestinal symptoms after resumption of a normal diet is common. AIMS--This study examined whether continuation of enteral nutrition as a nocturnal supplement to an ad libitum daytime intake of a normal diet increased the length of remission of Crohn's disease in children. PATIENTS AND METHODS--Children and adolescents with active Crohn's disease treated successfully with exclusive enteral nutrition were classified retrospectively according to whether they continued supplementary enteral nutrition or not. Time to relapse and linear growth were compared between the two cohorts. RESULTS--Between January 1986 and December 1992, 65 patients aged 7-17 years (mean (SD) 13.6 (2.1) years) (36 males, 29 females) with Crohn's disease in exacerbation were treated for > or = four weeks by bowel rest and nasogastric tube feeding of an oligopeptide or amino acid based formula. At first follow up visit, remission (fall in Paediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index, PCDAI to < or = 20) was achieved in 47 of 65 (72%) patients. Subsequently, 20 of these 47 (43%) relapsed by six months and 28 of 47 (60%) by 12 months. Patients who continued nasogastric supplementary feeding (n = 28) after resumption of an otherwise normal diet remained well longer than those who discontinued nocturnal supplements completely (n = 19) (p < 0.02). Furthermore, continued use of nasogastric supplements before completion of puberty was associated with improved linear growth. CONCLUSION--After successful treatment of active Crohn's disease by exclusive enteral nutrition, supplementary enteral nutrition without restriction of normal diet is associated with prolongation of remission and improved linear growth in children and adolescents. PMID:8707085

  13. On exploration of medical database of Crohn's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manerowska, Anna; Dadalski, Maciej; Socha, Piotr; Mulawka, Jan

    2010-09-01

    The primary objective of this article is to find a new, more effective method of diagnosis of Crohn's disease. Having created the database on this disease we wanted to find the most suitable classification models. We used the algorithms with their implementations stored in R environment. Having carried out the investigations we have reached results interesting for clinical practice.

  14. Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Disease: Implications for College Health Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelphi, A. P.

    1977-01-01

    The author reviews clinical patterns of inflammatory bowel disorders, establishes a perspective for recognizing ulcerative colitis, ulcerative proctitis, and Crohn's disease in relation to other bowel inflammations, and suggests some epidemiologic strategies for studying etiology, pathogenesis, and natural history of the diseases. (MJB)

  15. Small Bowel Imaging in Managing Crohn's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Jörg G.

    2012-01-01

    The small bowel is essential to sustain alimentation and small bowel Crohn's disease (CD) may severely limit its function. Small bowel imaging is a crucial element in diagnosing small bowel CD, and treatment control with imaging is increasingly used to optimize the patients outcome. Thereby, capsule endoscopy, Balloon-assisted enteroscopy, and Magnetic resonance imaging have become key players to manage CD patients. In this review, role of small bowel imaging is detailed discussed for use in diagnosing and managing Crohn's disease patients. PMID:22474438

  16. Editorial: Smoking Cessation for Crohn's Disease: Clearing the Haze.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2016-03-01

    The TABACROHN Study Group conducted a multicenter prospective cohort study, demonstrating that smoking cessation improved the prognosis of Crohn's disease. Patients who continued to smoke were 50% more likely to relapse compared with non-smokers. Smoking cessation reduced the risk of flaring, regardless of exposure to anti-tumor necrosis factor agents. Despite the evidence that smoking cessation is beneficial, many patients do not quit smoking after their diagnosis of Crohn's disease. Lack of awareness, physical addiction, and social context of smoking inhibit smoking cessation. In spite of this, comprehensive smoking cessation programs have been shown to be effective and reduce costs. PMID:27018116

  17. A "false positive" octreoscan in ileal Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Alberto; Tabuenca, Olga; Peteiro, Angeles

    2008-09-14

    We present a case report of a patient with a suspicious ileal carcinoid tumour. Clinical examination as well as computer tomography (CT) scan suggested a tumour. Octeotride scan showed uptake in the same bowel loop reported as pathological in CT. The patient underwent surgery and biopsy which reported Crohn's disease (CD). The interest in the case is due to the fact that this is, to the best of our knowledge, the second report of Crohn's disease as a cause of false positive octeotride scan. Unfortunately, no somatostatin receptors could be found in the sample, so further studies should be performed. PMID:18785291

  18. "Miniguts" from plucked human hair meet Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Hohwieler, M; Renz, S; Liebau, S; Lin, Q; Lechel, A; Klaus, J; Perkhofer, L; Zenke, M; Seufferlein, T; Illing, A; Müller, M; Kleger, A

    2016-08-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent a powerful tool to study human embryonic development and disease but also open up novel strategies for cell replacement therapies. Their capacity to give rise to every cell type of the human body, meanwhile, enables researchers to generate high yields of mesodermal, ectodermal, but also endodermal-derived tissues such as hepatic, pancreatic, or intestinal cells. Another progress in the field came with the advent of 3-dimensional culture conditions, so-called organoids, which facilitate maturation of stem cells and in turn more faithfully recapitulate human tissue architecture. While several studies reported the derivation of organoid cultures from adult intestinal tissue, the derivation of intestinal organoids derived from plucked human hair of Crohn's disease patients has not been reported. The current research project reports such successful generation and characterization of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from hair sheet keratinocyte cultures of a patient with Crohn's disease. Stepwise differentiation along the intestinal lineage showed no differences in intermediate stages such as definitive endoderm formation. We also directed the patterned primitive gut tube toward intestinal organoids resembling the cellular architecture of human "miniguts". As expected from current pathophysiological knowledge on Crohn's disease, there were no obvious morphological differences in the "miniguts" derived from healthy control and diseased patient-induced pluripotent stem cells. Taken together, our platform will enable for detailed and complementary phenotyping of the pathophysiology of Crohn's disease in a novel disease-in-a-dish format. PMID:27415403

  19. Ofloxacin induced Sweet's syndrome in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Davut; Korkmaz, Uğur; Sahin, Idris; Sencan, Irfan; Kavak, Ayşe; Küçükbayrak, Abdülkadir; Cakir, Selma

    2006-05-01

    Sweet's syndrome is an acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis. This syndrome can be idiopathic, para-inflammatory, paraneoplastic, drug-induced, or pregnancy-related. In this paper, a case of Sweet's syndrome associated with ofloxacin therapy in a patient with Crohn's disease is reported. PMID:16213026

  20. Fulminant herpes colitis in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    el-Serag, H B; Zwas, F R; Cirillo, N W; Eisen, R N

    1996-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a well-recognized cause of gastrointestinal infection, most commonly in patients with underlying immunodeficiency. The esophagus, perianum, and rectum are the most common sites of involvement; however, extensive colitis is rare. We describe a woman with Crohn's disease who developed pathologically proven HSV colitis. We review the literature and present the possible implications of the diagnosis. PMID:8724263

  1. Impact of Intestinal Ultrasound on Classification and Management of Crohn's Disease Patients with Inconclusive Colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Kerri L.; Lebeuf-Taylor, Eleonore; Wilson, Stephanie R.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. We aim to evaluate the benefit of ultrasound in the assessment of Crohn's disease and to demonstrate its potential contribution to disease management. Methods. We conduct a retrospective review of adult patients with Crohn's disease examined with sonography and colonoscopy within 30 days. Study patients were identified in whom colonoscopy did not access a pathological segment, detected and evaluated by ultrasonography. Changes in management were predominantly attributed to ultrasound in those cases where the diseased segment was not assessed on endoscopy. Results. From 115 patients with temporally related ileocolonoscopy and ultrasound, 41 had disease fully assessed on ultrasound only, with complications in 26/41. Twenty-nine of 41 had mild or no endoscopic inflammation with moderate or severe disease on ultrasound at the same segment or at a segment proximal to the reach of the endoscope. Changes in management were significantly attributed to ultrasound in 22 of these 29 patients. Conclusion. The benefit of cross-sectional imaging is invaluable for the comprehensive assessment of bowel not shown on ileocolonoscopy. Ultrasound may make a significant contribution to correct classification of disease extent and severity of Crohn's disease. Prospective studies are needed to further understand the contribution of US in patient management. PMID:27446873

  2. Perioperative Considerations in Crohn Disease and Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, T Paul; Merchea, Amit

    2016-06-01

    The management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is medically and surgically complex. Numerous patient- and disease-oriented factors must be considered in treating patients with IBD, including nutritional replenishment/support, effect of immunosuppressive medications, extent of resection, and use of proximal diversion. Perioperative planning and optimization of the patient is imperative to ensuring favorable outcomes and limiting morbidity. These perioperative considerations in Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis are reviewed here. PMID:27247531

  3. Adalimumab for the treatment of pediatric Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Nuti, Federica; Fiorino, Gionata; Danese, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterized by a chronic relapsing course, high morbidity and impaired quality of life. Their incidence is rising, and about 25% of cases are diagnosed in pediatric age. Anti-TNF-α antibodies, such as infliximab and adalimumab (ADA), are usually administered in patients refractory to conventional therapies. However, increasing evidence suggests that they can be introduced earlier in the course of the disease, especially in patients with aggressive and extensive disease since diagnosis. ADA is a fully human anti-TNF-α antibody recently approved for pediatric Crohn's disease not only in patients unresponsive to infliximab, but also as a first-line anti-TNF-α therapy. In this review, we aim to summarize the current knowledge on the use of ADA in pediatric Crohn's disease and to discuss open issues regarding safety as well as future perspectives. PMID:26211396

  4. Clinical Diagnostic Clues in Crohn's Disease: A 41-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, C.; Galleguillos, L.; Benavides, E.; Quintana, J. C.; Zúñiga, A.; Duarte, I.; Klaassen, J.; Kolbach, M.; Soto, R. M.; Iacobelli, S.; Álvarez, M.; O'Brien, A.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the diagnosis of Crohn's disease has been highly difficult mainly during the first years of this study carried out at the Pontificia Universidad Catolica (PUC) Clinical Hospital. For instance, it has been frequently confused with Irritable bowel syndrome and sometimes misdiagnosed as ulcerative colitis, infectious colitis or enterocolitis, intestinal lymphoma, or coeliac disease. Consequently, it seems advisable to characterize what the most relevant clinical features are, in order to establish a clear concept of Crohn's disease. This difficulty may still be a problem at other medical centers in developing countries. Thus, sharing this information may contribute to a better understanding of this disease. Based on the clinical experience gained between 1963 and 2004 and reported herein, the main clinical characteristics of the disease are long-lasting day and night abdominal pain, which becomes more intense after eating and diarrhoea, sometimes associated to a mass in the abdomen, anal lesions, and other additional digestive and nondigestive clinical features. Nevertheless, the main aim of this work has been the following: is it possible to make, in an early stage, the diagnosis of Crohn's disease with a high degree of certainty exclusively with clinical data? PMID:23213555

  5. Risk factors for small bowel cancer in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Lashner, B A

    1992-08-01

    Suspected risk factors for adenocarcinoma of the small bowel in Crohn's disease include surgically excluded small bowel loops, chronic fistulous disease, and male sex. Review of all seven University of Chicago cases failed to confirm any suspected risk factor. A case-control study was performed to identify possible alternatives. Each case was matched to four randomly selected controls from an inflammatory bowel disease registry matched for year of birth, sex, and confirmed small bowel Crohn's disease. Three factors were significantly associated with the development of cancer: (1) Four cancers developed in the jejunum, and jejunal Crohn's disease was associated with the development of cancer [odds ratio (OR) 8.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-39.3]. (2) There was an association between the development of cancer and occupations known to be associated with an increased colorectal cancer risk (OR 20.3, CI 2.7-150.5). Three cases (a chemist with exposure to halogenated aromatic compounds and aliphatic amines, a pipefitter with exposure to asbestos, and a machinist with exposures to cutting oils, solvents, and abrasives) and one of 28 controls (a fireman with multiple hazardous exposures) had an occupational risk factor. (3) Among medications taken for at least six months, only 6-mercaptopurine use was associated with cancer (OR 10.8, CI 1.1-108.7). In conclusion, proximal small bowel disease, 6-mercaptopurine use, and hazardous occupations are associated with cancer of the small bowel in patients with Crohn's disease and can be added to the list of suspected risk factors. PMID:1499440

  6. Crohn's disease confined to the duodenum: A case report.

    PubMed

    Song, Dong Jin; Whang, Il Soon; Choi, Hyung Wook; Jeong, Cheol Yun; Jung, Sung Hoon

    2016-06-16

    Crohn's disease (CD) can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract from the mouth to anus. However, gastroduodenal CD is rare with a frequency reported to range between 0.5% and 4.0%. Most patients with gastroduodenal CD have concomitant lesions in the terminal ileum or colon, but isolated gastroduodenal Crohn's disease is an extremely rare presentation of the disease accounting for less than 0.07% of all patients with CD. The symptoms of gastroduodenal CD include epigastric pain, dyspepsia, early satiety, anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. The diagnosis of gastroduodenal CD requires a high level of clinical suspicion and can be made by comprehensive clinical evaluation. Here we report a rare case of isolated duodenal CD not confirmed by identification of granuloma on biopsy, but diagnosed by clinical evaluation. PMID:27326400

  7. Controlled trial comparing two types of enteral nutrition in treatment of active Crohn's disease: elemental versus polymeric diet.

    PubMed Central

    Rigaud, D; Cosnes, J; Le Quintrec, Y; René, E; Gendre, J P; Mignon, M

    1991-01-01

    To determine whether an elemental diet or a polymeric defined formula diet would be more effective for treating active Crohn's disease, we conducted a prospective randomised clinical trial in 30 patients with active Crohn's disease unresponsive to steroids and/or complicated by malnutrition. They received a four to six week enteral nutrition course with either an elemental diet or a polymeric diet. Clinical remission occurred in 10 of the 15 patients on elemental diet compared with 11 of the 15 patients assigned to polymeric diet. Both groups showed similar improvements in nutritional status, biological inflammation, alpha 1 antitrypsin clearance, and colonoscopic lesions (diminished in 17 out of 24 patients). Most patients relapsed during the year after discharge. We conclude that enteral nutrition, whatever the diet, is an efficient primary therapy for active Crohn's disease but does not influence the long term outcome. PMID:1773955

  8. Reversibility of Stricturing Crohn's Disease-Fact or Fiction?

    PubMed

    Bettenworth, Dominik; Rieder, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal fibrosis is a common feature of Crohn's disease and may appear as a stricture, stenosis, or intestinal obstruction. Fibrostenosing Crohn's disease leads to a significantly impaired quality of life in affected patients and constitutes a challenging treatment situation. In the absence of specific medical antifibrotic treatment options, endoscopic or surgical therapy approaches with their potential harmful side effects are frequently used. However, our understanding of mechanisms of fibrogenesis in general and specifically intestinal fibrosis has emerged. Progression of fibrosis in the liver, lung, or skin can be halted or even reversed, and possible treatment targets have been identified. In face of this observation and given the fact that fibrotic alterations in various organs of the human body share distinct core characteristics, this article aims to address whether reversibility of intestinal fibrosis may be conceivable and to highlight promising research avenues and therapies. PMID:26588089

  9. Computed tomography in the evaluation of Crohn disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, H.I.; Gore, R.M.; Margulis, A.R.; Moss, A.A.; Baker, E.L.

    1983-02-01

    The abdominal and pelvic computed tomographic examinations in 28 patients with Crohn disease were analyzed and correlated with conventional barium studies, sinograms, and surgical findings. Mucosal abnormalities such as aphthous lesions, pseudopolyps, and ulcerations were only imaged by conventional techniques. Computed tomography proved superior in demonstrating the mural, serosal, and mesenteric abnormalities such as bowel wall thickening (82%), fibrofatty proliferation of mesenteric fat (39%), mesenteric abscess (25%), inflammatory reaction of the mesentery (14%), and mesenteric lymphadenopathy (18%). Computed tomography was most useful clinically in defining the nature of mass effects, separation, or displacement of small bowel segments seen on small bowel series. Although conventional barium studies remain the initial diagnostic procedure in evaluating Crohn disease, computed tomography can be a useful adjunct in resolving difficult clinical and radiologic diagnostic problems.

  10. Uncommon Presentation of Isolated Jejunal Lymphoma Masquerading as Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sattavan, Swati; Aggarwal, Lalit; Dikshit, Priyadarshi

    2016-01-01

    Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma is a rare entity, commonly involving stomach, small bowel, and colorectum. The usual location for small bowel B cell lymphoma is distal ileum due to abundant lymphoid tissue. We are reporting the case of a 53-year-old lady presumptively diagnosed as Crohn's disease on clinical and radiological grounds but histopathologically proven to be an unusual variant of isolated primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:27313941

  11. Revisiting Crohn's disease as a primary immunodeficiency of macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Despite two decades of mouse immunology and human genetics studies, the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD) remains elusive. New clinical investigations suggest that CD may be caused by inborn errors of macrophages. These errors may result in impaired attraction of granulocytes to the gut wall, causing impaired clearance of intruding bacteria, thereby precipitating the formation of granulomas. This theory paves the way for a macrophage-based Mendelian genetic dissection of CD. PMID:19687225

  12. Revisiting Crohn's disease as a primary immunodeficiency of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Abel, Laurent

    2009-08-31

    Despite two decades of mouse immunology and human genetics studies, the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD) remains elusive. New clinical investigations suggest that CD may be caused by inborn errors of macrophages. These errors may result in impaired attraction of granulocytes to the gut wall, causing impaired clearance of intruding bacteria, thereby precipitating the formation of granulomas. This theory paves the way for a macrophage-based Mendelian genetic dissection of CD. PMID:19687225

  13. Sclerosing cholangitis associated with Crohn's disease and autoimmune haemolytic anaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Eilam, O.; Goldin, E.; Shouval, D.; Gimon, T.; Brautbar, C.

    1993-01-01

    A middle-aged man was found to have autoimmune haemolytic anaemia. Seven years after the first manifestations of the anaemia, he developed jaundice without haemolysis and a diagnosis of primary sclerosing cholangitis was made by endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. Crohn's colitis was later confirmed by X-rays and colonoscopy. This association is unique to the best of our knowledge and suggests that genetic and immunological mechanisms may be involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Images Figure 1 PMID:8234117

  14. Pulmonary Epithelioid Hemangioendothelioma in a Patient with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramchandar, Nanda; Wojtczak, Henry A.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (PEH) is a rare neoplasm, largely unresponsive to chemotherapeutic medications, and with varied prognosis. Imaging on computerized tomography may demonstrate perivascular nodules, but diagnosis is ultimately made on biopsy with immunohistochemical analysis. Here we describe a case of PEH in a 14-year-old male with Crohn's disease, which, to our knowledge, has not previously been described in the literature. PMID:25815232

  15. Crohn's disease and the mycobacterioses: a review and comparison of two disease entities.

    PubMed Central

    Chiodini, R J

    1989-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic granulomatous ileocolitis, of unknown etiology, which generally affects the patient during the prime of life. Medical treatment is supportive at best, and patients afflicted with this disorder generally live with chronic pain, in and out of hospitals, throughout their lives. The disease bears the name of the investigator who convincingly distinguished this disease from intestinal tuberculosis in 1932. This distinction was not universally accepted, and the notion of a mycobacterial etiology has never been fully dismissed. Nevertheless, it was 46 years after the distinction of Crohn's disease and intestinal tuberculosis before research attempting to reassociate mycobacteria and Crohn's disease was published. Recently, there has been a surge of interest in the possible association of mycobacteria and Crohn's disease due largely to the isolation of genetically identical pathogenic Mycobacterium paratuberculosis from several patients with Crohn's disease in the United States, the Netherlands, Australia, and France. These pathogenic organisms have been isolated from only a few patients, and direct evidence for their involvement in the disease process is not clear; however, M. paratuberculosis is an obligate intracellular organism and strict pathogen, which strongly suggests some etiologic role. Immunologic evidence of a mycobacterial etiology, as assessed by humoral immune determinations, has been conflicting, but evaluation of the more relevant cellular immunity has not been performed. Data from histochemical searches for mycobacteria in Crohn's disease tissues have been equally conflicting, with acid-fast bacilli detected in 0 to 35% of patients. Animal model studies have demonstrated the pathogenic potential of isolates as well as elucidated the complexity of mycobacterial-intestinal interactions. Treatment of Crohn's disease patients with antimycobacterial agent has not been fully assessed, although case reports suggest efficacy. The

  16. Crohn's disease associated with Sweet's syndrome and Sjögren's syndrome treated with infliximab.

    PubMed

    Foster, Erina N; Nguyen, Khanh K; Sheikh, Rafiq A; Prindiville, Thomas P

    2005-06-01

    The association of Crohn's disease (CD) and Sweet's syndrome is rare and the presence of Sjögren's syndrome in Crohn's disease is even rarer, with only three reports found in the literature. We describe two cases of Crohn's disease associated with Sweet's syndrome, one of which is the first case of CD and Sweet's concomitantly associated with Sjogren's syndrome. Both cases responded rapidly to Infliximab therapy with complete resolution of the skin lesions. PMID:16050146

  17. Takayasu's Arteritis and Crohn's Disease in a Young Hispanic Female

    PubMed Central

    Saurabh, Shireesh; Tan, Irene J.

    2014-01-01

    Takayasu's arteritis (TA) and Crohn's disease (CD) are chronic inflammatory granulomatous disorders of undetermined etiology. TA is a large vessel vasculitis with a predilection for the aorta and its branches in young women of Asian descent; whereas CD has characteristic gastrointestinal manifestations more prevalent in young Caucasians. We describe a case of both diseases in a young Hispanic female, review the literature, and impart new insight on possible genetic linkage and the role of interleukin 12 B (IL-12B) as the common autoimmune mechanism and potential therapeutic target in this rare disease combination. PMID:25152825

  18. Guillain-Barré syndrome as an extraintestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente-Fernández, R.; Rubio-Nazabal, E.; de la Iglesia-Martínez, F.

    1995-01-01

    A variety of extraintestinal manifestations, probably immune-mediated, may appear during relapses of Crohn's disease. We report the clinical observation of a 34-year-old woman who developed a Guillain-Barré syndrome, aphthous stomatitis and oligoarthritis during a relapse of Crohn's ileocolitis. This case suggests that the Guillain-Barré syndrome may be another extraintestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease. PMID:7567741

  19. A Rare Case of Azathioprine-Induced Sweet's Syndrome in a Patient with Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Chaker; Salem, Chaker B; Larif, Sofiene; Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Aounallah, Amina; Sakhri, Jaballah; Hmouda, Houssem

    2015-01-01

    Sweet's syndrome has been reported in association with inflammatory diseases such as Crohn's disease. It has also been reported in association with several drugs. Here, we report a rare case of Sweet's syndrome induced by azathioprine in a patient with Crohn's disease. PMID:26219289

  20. Cannabis finds its way into treatment of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Schicho, Rudolf; Storr, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In ancient medicine, cannabis has been widely used to cure disturbances and inflammation of the bowel. A recent clinical study now shows that the medicinal plant Cannabis sativa has lived up to expectations and proved to be highly efficient in cases of inflammatory bowel diseases. In a prospective placebo-controlled study, it has been shown what has been largely anticipated from anecdotal reports, i.e. that cannabis produces significant clinical benefits in patients with Crohn's disease. The mechanisms involved are not yet clear but most likely include peripheral actions on cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2, and may also include central actions. PMID:24356243

  1. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome following sepsis in a Crohn's disease patient: A case report.

    PubMed

    Papaconstantinou, Ioannis; Mantzos, Dionysios S; Pantiora, Eirini; Tasoulis, Marios K; Vassilopoulou, Sofia; Mantzaris, Gerassimos

    2016-04-16

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-ragiological syndrome presenting with neurological symptoms and characteristic radiologic findings. PRES occurs in the setting of various clinical conditions and requires prompt management of the causative factor for a full recovery. This is a case report of a Crohn's disease patient who developed PRES syndrome during a complicated post-operative course. In the presence of multiple causative factors, sepsis was considered as the predominant one. After prompt management, the patient recovered with no permanent neurological damage. PMID:27099860

  2. Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis induced in a patient treated with infliximab for Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Tichy, Martin; Tichy, Martin; Kopova, Renata; Sternbersky, Jan; Ditrichova, Dagmar

    2012-06-01

    The induction of psoriasis as a side effect of treatment with TNF-alpha inhibitors is one of a few rare complications of treatment, the pathogenic mechanism of which has not yet been completely clarified. The clinical presentation of these reactions may show the typical characteristics of psoriasis, palmoplantar pustulosis and psoriasiform exanthema; the individual variations of which may combine to give different presentations in individual patients. We present the case of a patient who, after administration of infliximab indicated for Crohn's disease, developed not only skin manifestations but also those of psoriatic arthritis. PMID:21254868

  3. Current perspectives on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, Johne's disease, and Crohn's disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Over, Ken; Crandall, Philip G; O'Bryan, Corliss A; Ricke, Steven C

    2011-05-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes the disease of cattle, Johne's. The economic impact of this disease includes early culling of infected cattle, reduced milk yield, and weight loss of cattle sold for slaughter. There is a possible link between MAP and Crohn's disease, a human inflammatory bowel disease. MAP is also a potential human food borne pathogen because it survives current pasteurization treatments. We review the current knowledge of MAP, Johne's disease and Crohn's disease and note directions for future work with this organism including rapid and economical detection, effective management plans and preventative measures. PMID:21254832

  4. Sarcoid-like lymphocytosis of the lower respiratory tract in patients with active Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Smiéjan, J M; Cosnes, J; Chollet-Martin, S; Soler, P; Basset, F M; Le Quintrec, Y; Hance, A J

    1986-01-01

    To re-evaluate the relationship between Crohn's disease and sarcoidosis, we compared the numbers and types of cells recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage from normal volunteers and patients with Crohn's disease, with other forms of inflammatory bowel disease, and with sarcoidosis. Patients with Crohn's disease, but not patients with other inflammatory bowel disorders, had an increase in the number of T lymphocytes on the surface of the lower respiratory tract similar to that seen in patients with sarcoidosis. As in sarcoidosis, this lymphocytosis results from an expansion of the T4+ T-lymphocyte subset, is characteristic of patients with active disease only, and is not associated with similar abnormalities in the peripheral blood. Thus, patients with apparently localized Crohn's disease have sarcoid-like lymphocytosis of the lower respiratory tract, a finding that emphasizes the systemic nature of Crohn's disease and the disorder's close relationship to sarcoidosis. PMID:3940500

  5. Crohn's disease and Sweet's syndrome: an uncommon association.

    PubMed

    Catalán-Serra, I; Martín-Moraleda, L; Navarro-López, L; Gil-Borrás, R; Pont-Sanjuán, V; Ferrando-Marco, J; Herrera-García, L; Durbán-Serrano, L; Hontangas-Pla, V; Benlloch-Pérez, S; Escudero-Sanchis, A; Gonzalvo-Sorribes, J M; Bixquert-Jiménez, M

    2010-05-01

    Sweet's syndrome or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis (SS) is characterized by the sudden onset of painful erythematous lesions (papules, nodules, and plaques) together with fever and neutrophilia. The lesions are typically located on hands, arms, upper trunk, neck and face, showing an asymmetric distribution. Acute phase reactants are usually elevated and dermal infiltration of neutrophils without vasculitis is seen on skin biopsies. It is considered as a marker of systemic disease in over half of the cases, and is associated with infections, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune connective tissue disorders and various neoplasias. Its association with Crohn's disease (CD) is unusual and it appears mainly in association with colonic involvement. Fewer than 50 cases have been published in the medical literature since its first description in 1964, some concurrent with the first episode of CD. We present two patients with Crohn's disease and Sweet's syndrome diagnosed in our department at the time of CD diagnosis, as well as their response to treatment, subsequent course of the disease, and a review of the scientific literature. PMID:20524763

  6. Microbial Dysbiosis in Pediatric Patients with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaakoush, Nadeem O.; Day, Andrew S.; Huinao, Karina D.; Leach, Steven T.; Lemberg, Daniel A.; Dowd, Scot E.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial dysbiosis has been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD); however, many studies of gut microbial communities have been confounded by environmental and patient-related factors. In this study, the microbial flora of fecal samples from 19 children newly diagnosed with CD and 21 age-matched controls were analyzed using high-throughput sequencing to determine differences in the microbial composition between CD patients and controls. Analysis of the microbial composition of specific bacterial groups revealed that Firmicutes percentages were significantly lower in CD patients than in controls and that this was due largely to changes in the class Clostridia. Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria percentages were higher and significantly higher in CD patients than in controls, respectively. Both the detection frequencies of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes correlated (positively and negatively, respectively) with the calculated pediatric Crohn's disease activity index scores of patients. Upon further analysis, differences in the microbial compositions of patients with mild disease and moderate to severe disease were identified. Our findings indicate that a combination of different bacterial species or a dynamic interplay between individual species is important for disease and is consistent with the dysbiosis hypothesis of CD. PMID:22837318

  7. Microbial dysbiosis in pediatric patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Day, Andrew S; Huinao, Karina D; Leach, Steven T; Lemberg, Daniel A; Dowd, Scot E; Mitchell, Hazel M

    2012-10-01

    Microbial dysbiosis has been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD); however, many studies of gut microbial communities have been confounded by environmental and patient-related factors. In this study, the microbial flora of fecal samples from 19 children newly diagnosed with CD and 21 age-matched controls were analyzed using high-throughput sequencing to determine differences in the microbial composition between CD patients and controls. Analysis of the microbial composition of specific bacterial groups revealed that Firmicutes percentages were significantly lower in CD patients than in controls and that this was due largely to changes in the class Clostridia. Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria percentages were higher and significantly higher in CD patients than in controls, respectively. Both the detection frequencies of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes correlated (positively and negatively, respectively) with the calculated pediatric Crohn's disease activity index scores of patients. Upon further analysis, differences in the microbial compositions of patients with mild disease and moderate to severe disease were identified. Our findings indicate that a combination of different bacterial species or a dynamic interplay between individual species is important for disease and is consistent with the dysbiosis hypothesis of CD. PMID:22837318

  8. Diagnostic imaging in Crohn's disease: what is the new gold standard?

    PubMed

    Dambha, F; Tanner, J; Carroll, N

    2014-06-01

    Historically Barium and isotope studies been used for imaging of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) but carry risk of radiation exposure. Use of Barium is declining resulting in fewer radiologists that have the necessary expertise. Isotopes studies lack anatomical definition but 18F - fludeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) shows promise in accurate assessment of disease compared to endoscopy. Computerised tomography (CT) is particularly useful in assessment of complications of Crohn's disease (CD) but radiation exposure is high. CT enterography (CTE) has improved visualisation of small bowel mucosal disease and allows assessment of disease activity. Ultrasound is increasingly used for preliminary assessment of patients with potential IBD. Although widely available and economically attractive, the expertise required is not widespread. Finally magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is proving to be the most accurate tool for assessment of disease extent and distribution. MRI of the pelvis has superseded other techniques in assessment of peri-anal fistulation. PMID:24913382

  9. Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis: Emotional Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications usually are used for brief periods of time. Antidepressant medication may be used for either severe symptoms of depression or for management of chronic pain resulting from the disease. In ...

  10. Quality of care in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Makharia, Govind K

    2014-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic and progressive inflammatory disease of the intestine. Overall, healthcare delivery for patients with CD is not optimal at the present time and therefore needs improvement. There are evidences which suggest that there is a variation in the care provided to patients with CD by the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) experts and community care providers. The delivery of healthcare for patients with CD is often complex and requires coordination between gastroenterologists/IBD specialist, gastrointestinal surgeon, radiologists and IBD nurses. In order to improve the quality of health care for patients with CD, there is need that we focus on large-scale, system-wide changes including creation of IBD comprehensive care units, provision to provide continuous care, efforts to standardize care, and education of the community practitioners. PMID:25400990

  11. Short Bowel Syndrome and Intestinal Failure in Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Limketkai, Berkeley N; Parian, Alyssa M; Shah, Neha D; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic and progressive inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. Despite the availability of powerful immunosuppressants, many patients with Crohn's disease still require one or more intestinal resections throughout the course of their disease. Multiple resections and a progressive reduction in bowel length can lead to the development of short bowel syndrome, a form of intestinal failure that compromises fluid, electrolyte, and nutrient absorption. The pathophysiology of short bowel syndrome involves a reduction in intestinal surface area, alteration in the enteric hormonal feedback, dysmotility, and related comorbidities. Most patients will initially require parenteral nutrition as a primary or supplemental source of nutrition, although several patients may eventually wean off nutrition support depending on the residual gut anatomy and adherence to medical and nutritional interventions. Available surgical treatments focus on reducing motility, lengthening the native small bowel, or small bowel transplantation. Care of these complex patients with short bowel syndrome requires a multidisciplinary approach of physicians, dietitians, and nurses to provide optimal intestinal rehabilitation, nutritional support, and improvement in quality of life. PMID:26818425

  12. Guidelines for treatment with infliximab for Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Hommes, D W; Oldenburg, B; van Bodegraven, A A; van Hogezand, R A; de Jong, D J; Romberg-Camps, M J L; van der Woude, J; Dijkstra, G

    2006-01-01

    Infliximab is an accepted induction and maintenance treatment for patients with Crohn's disease. The effectiveness of infliximab has been demonstrated for both active luminal disease and for enterocutaneous fistulisation. In addition, infliximab can be administered for extraintestinal symptoms of Crohn's disease, such as pyoderma gangrenosum, uveitis and arthropathy. Maintenance treatment with infliximab is effective and is regarded as safe as long as the necessary safety measures are heeded. Infusion reactions occur in 3 to 17% of the patients and are associated with the formation of antibodies to infliximab. A reduction in infusion reactions is possible by the concurrent administration of steroids and the use of immunosuppressants (azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, methotrexate). Furthermore, immunosuppressants increase the duration of the response to infliximab. For these reasons, the concomitant use of immunosuppressants with infliximab is recommended. Infections and most specifically tuberculosis need to be ruled out before infliximab is administered. Up to now, there are no indications for a connection between an increased risk for malignancies and treatment with infliximab. PMID:16929083

  13. Clinical features of Crohn disease concomitant with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Song; Ding, Jie; Wang, Meng; Zhou, Wanqing; Feng, Min; Guan, Wenxian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) cause increased morbidity and decreased quality of life in Crohn disease (CD). Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) belongs to EIMs. Very little is known on the clinical features of CD concomitant with AS. This study is to investigate the clinical features of CD patients with AS. We retrospectively collected all CD patients with AS in our hospital, and established a comparison group (CD without AS) with age, sex, and duration of Crohn disease matched. Clinical information was retrieved for comparison. Eight CD + AS patients were identified from 195 CD patients. Sixteen CD patients were randomly selected into comparison group. All CD + AS patients were male, HLA-B27 (+), and rheumatoid factor (−) with an average age of 40.8 ± 4.52 years. Significant correlation between disease activity of CD and AS was revealed (r = 0.857, P = 0.011). Significant correlation between disease activity of CD and functional limitation associated with AS was identified (r = 0.881, P < 0.01). C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and globulin were positively correlated to Crohn disease activity index (CDAI), Bath AS disease activity index, and Bath AS functional index(BASFI) scores (r = 0.73–0.93, P < 0.05). Albumin was negatively associated with CDAI and BASFI (r = −0.73 to −0.91, P < 0.05). The ratio of albumin to globulin (Alb/Glo) was significantly related to all 3 scores (r = −0.81 to −0.91, P < 0.05). Male predominance with a 4.12% concomitant incidence of AS is observed in CD patients. Disease activity of CD correlates with disease activity of AS and functional limitation caused by AS. CRP, ESR, and Alb/Glo may serve as biomarkers for disease activity and functional limitation in CD patients concomitant with AS, although future studies are expected. PMID:27428240

  14. Schaumann bodies in Crohn's disease: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Luisa; Bisoffi, Zeno; Bortesi, Laura; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Liut, Francesca; Villanacci, Vincenzo

    2012-08-01

    Schaumann bodies are inclusion bodies, first described by Schaumann in 1941, typically seen in granulomatous diseases such as tuberculosis, sarcoidosis and chronic beryllium diseases. Williams WJ, in 1964, reported Schaumann bodies to occur in 10% of Crohn's disease (CD). We report a case of Crohn's disease, initially misdiagnosed as a schistosoma-related colitis for the presence of numerous calcified bodies resembling calcified ova and scattered granulomas. Subsequent biopsies showed more typical histological features and, in combination with a more complete clinical history, diagnosis of Crohn's disease was made. PMID:22503169

  15. [Coexistence of Crohn disease and Wegener granulomatosis in a 15-year-old patient].

    PubMed

    Sieczkowska, Agnieszka; Lewandowski, Piotr; Szumera, Małgorzata; Kamińska, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Crohn disease is being diagnosed more and more frequently in children and teenagers. Clinical symptoms are mainly related to the gastrointestinal tract, however there are many reports in the literature about the coexistence of Crohn disease with other autoimmunological disorders such as celiac disease, autoimmune hypothyroidism, systemic lupus erythematosus and Wegener granulomatosis. We report a 15-year-old patient with Crohn disease who also developed Wegener granulomatosis. The presented case illustrates the difficulties in establishing the diagnosis when symptoms of the original disease are superimposed on symptoms of a different disorder. PMID:22516704

  16. Faecal mucus degrading glycosidases in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, J M; Gallimore, R; Elias, E; Allan, R N; Kennedy, J F

    1985-08-01

    Because the normal faecal flora includes bacteria which can produce mucus-digesting glycosidases, it follows that increased digestion of colonic mucus by these bacterial enzymes could be important in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Faecal activities of potential mucus-degrading glycosidases have therefore been assayed in samples from patients with inflammatory bowel disease and normal controls. The enzymes alpha-D-galactosidase, beta-D-galactosidase, beta-NAc-D-glucosaminidase alpha-L-fucosidase and neuraminidase were assayed. Considerable glycosidase activity was present in most faecal samples. Similar activities of all the enzymes assayed were found in faeces from patients with ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease and normal controls and there was no significant correlation with disease activity. These results imply that relapse of ulcerative colitis is not initiated by increased degradation of colonic mucus by faecal glycosidases but do not exclude a role for bacterial mucus degradation in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. PMID:2991089

  17. Emerging therapeutic targets and strategies in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Furfaro, Federica; Fiorino, Gionata; Allocca, Mariangela; Gilardi, Daniela; Danese, Silvio

    2016-06-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an immune-mediated inflammatory bowel disease, in which inflammation is driven by a complex interaction between the microbiota, immune cells, genes and mediators. New mechanisms of action and several cytokines have been identified as factors involved in the inflammatory process in CD, and many new molecules have been developed to treat this complex disease. New agents have been developed that target leukocyte trafficking, block or adhesion molecules for example, as well as the development of antibodies against classic inflammatory cytokines or therapies directed against IL-12/23 and Janus kinases. The development of selective mechanisms of action and targeting of different cytokines or inflammatory mediators for each patient presents the biggest challenge for the future in CD therapy. Such agents are currently at different phases of development. We aim to review the current literature data on a targeted approach in CD, which could be promising alternative approach for CD patients in the near future. PMID:26766496

  18. [Overview of diet-related study in Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Li, Guanwei; Ren, Jian'an; Li, Jieshou

    2015-12-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder affecting any part of the digestive tract which relapses and remits throughout the disease course. It occurs in individuals with genetic susceptibility and involves an abnormal response of the immune system to the external environment. Besides, improved hygiene, abuse of antibiotics, westernization of diet with high sugar and fat are thought to be associated with rapidly increasing incidence of CD. Certain components of foods may influence gut inflammation through antigen presentation and alteration of the microflora. This article aims mainly to review diet-related clinical studies to outline its roles in the pathogenesis and progress of disease, and then give some evidence-based suggestions. PMID:26704014

  19. Implementation of the Simple Endoscopic Activity Score in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Koutroumpakis, Efstratios; Katsanos, Konstantinos H.

    2016-01-01

    Simple Endoscopic Score for Crohn's Disease (SES-CD) was developed as an attempt to simplify Crohn's Disease Endoscopic Index of Severity (CDEIS). Since it was constructed from CDEIS, SES-CD performs comparably but also carries similar limitations. Several studies have utilized SES-CD scoring to describe disease severity or response to therapy. Some of them used SES-CD score as a continuous variable while others utilized certain cutoff values to define severity grades. All SES-CD cutoff values reported in published clinical trials were empirically selected by experts. Although in most of the studies that used SEC-CD scoring to define disease severity, a score <3 reflected inactive disease, no study is using score 0 to predefine inactivity. Studies applying SES-CD to define response to treatment used score 0. There is no optimal SES-CD cut-off for endoscopic remission. The quantification of mucosal healing using SES-CD scoring has not been standardized yet. As the definition of mucosal healing by SES-CD is unset, the concept of deep remission is also still evolving. Serum and fecal biomarkers as well as new radiologic imaging techniques are complementary to SES-CD. Current practice as well as important changes in endoscopy should be taken into consideration when defining SES-CD cutoffs. The optimal timing of SES-CD scoring to assess mucosal healing is not defined yet. To conclude, SES-CD represents a valuable tool. However, a consensus agreement on its optimal use is required. PMID:27184635

  20. Crohn's disease and growth deficiency in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gasparetto, Marco; Guariso, Graziella

    2014-10-01

    Nutritional concerns, linear growth deficiency, and delayed puberty are currently detected in up to 85% of patients with Crohn's disease (CD) diagnosed at childhood. To provide advice on how to assess and manage nutritional concerns in these patients, a Medline search was conducted using "pediatric inflammatory bowel disease", "pediatric Crohn's disease", "linear growth", "pubertal growth", "bone health", and "vitamin D" as key words. Clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses published between 2008 and 2013 were selected to produce this narrative review. Studies referring to earlier periods were also considered if the data was relevant to our review. Although current treatment strategies for CD that include anti-tumor necrosis factor-α therapy have been shown to improve patients' growth rate, linear growth deficiencies are still common. In pediatric CD patients, prolonged diagnostic delay, high initial activity index, and stricturing/penetrating type of behavior may cause growth deficiencies (in weight and height) and delayed puberty, with several studies reporting that these patients may not reach an optimal bone mass. Glucocorticoids and inflammation inhibit bone formation, though their impact on skeletal modeling remains unclear. Long-term control of active inflammation and an adequate intake of nutrients are both fundamental in promoting normal puberty. Recent evidence suggests that recombinant growth factor therapy is effective in improving short-term linear growth in selected patients, but is of limited benefit for ameliorating mucosal disease and reducing clinical disease activity. The authors conclude that an intense initial treatment (taking a "top-down" approach, with the early introduction of immunomodulatory treatment) may be justified to induce and maintain remission so that the growth of children with CD can catch up, ideally before puberty. Exclusive enteral nutrition has a key role in inducing remission and improving patients

  1. Indirect costs of inflammatory bowel diseases: Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are lifelong illnesses which have a significant impact on quality of life and personal burden through a reduction in the ability to work, sick leave and restrictions of leisure time. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the indirect costs of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Material and methods The search was carried out in Medline, EMBASE, the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, and reference lists of identified articles and reference lists of identified articles were also handsearched. All costs were adjusted to 2013 USD values by using the consumer price index and purchasing power parity. Identified studies were then analysed in order to assess their heterogeneity and possibility of inclusion in the meta-analysis. Results Eleven of the identified publications presented indirect costs of Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. The range of estimated yearly indirect costs per patient was large, from $1 159.09 for loss of earnings to $14 135.64 for lost productivity and sick leave for Crohn's disease. The values for ulcerative colitis ranged from $926.49 to $6 583.17. Because of the imprecise definition of methods of indirect cost calculations as well as heterogeneity of indirect cost components, a meta-analysis was not performed. Conclusions The indirect costs of ulcerative colitis seem to be slightly lower than in the case of Crohn's disease. A small number of studies referring to indirect costs of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis were identified, which indicates the need to conduct further investigations on this problem. PMID:27186172

  2. Active learning based segmentation of Crohns disease from abdominal MRI.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Dwarikanath; Vos, Franciscus M; Buhmann, Joachim M

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel active learning (AL) framework, and combines it with semi supervised learning (SSL) for segmenting Crohns disease (CD) tissues from abdominal magnetic resonance (MR) images. Robust fully supervised learning (FSL) based classifiers require lots of labeled data of different disease severities. Obtaining such data is time consuming and requires considerable expertise. SSL methods use a few labeled samples, and leverage the information from many unlabeled samples to train an accurate classifier. AL queries labels of most informative samples and maximizes gain from the labeling effort. Our primary contribution is in designing a query strategy that combines novel context information with classification uncertainty and feature similarity. Combining SSL and AL gives a robust segmentation method that: (1) optimally uses few labeled samples and many unlabeled samples; and (2) requires lower training time. Experimental results show our method achieves higher segmentation accuracy than FSL methods with fewer samples and reduced training effort. PMID:27040833

  3. Peripheral neutrophil functions and cell signalling in Crohn`s disease.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Rajesh; Nuij, Veerle J A A; van der Woude, C Janneke; Kuipers, Ernst J; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Fuhler, Gwenny M

    2013-01-01

    The role of the innate immunity in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD), an inflammatory bowel disease, is a subject of increasing interest. Neutrophils (PMN) are key members of the innate immune system which migrate to sites of bacterial infection and initiate the defence against microbes by producing reactive oxygen species (ROS), before undergoing apoptosis. It is believed that impaired innate immune responses contribute to CD, but it is as yet unclear whether intrinsic defects in PMN signal transduction and corresponding function are present in patients with quiescent disease. We isolated peripheral blood PMN from CD patients in remission and healthy controls (HC), and characterised migration, bacterial uptake and killing, ROS production and cell death signalling. Whereas IL8-induced migration and signalling were normal in CD, trans-epithelial migration was significantly impaired. Uptake and killing of E. coli were normal. However, an increased ROS production was observed in CD PMN after stimulation with the bacterial peptide analogue fMLP, which was mirrored by an increased fMLP-triggered ERK and AKT signal activation. Interestingly, cleavage of caspase-3 and caspase-8 during GMCSF-induced rescue from cell-death was decreased in CD neutrophils, but a reduced survival signal emanating from STAT3 and AKT pathways was concomitantly observed, resulting in a similar percentage of end stage apoptotic PMN in CD patients and HC. In toto, these data show a disturbed signal transduction activation and functionality in peripheral blood PMN from patients with quiescent CD, which point toward an intrinsic defect in innate immunity in these patients. PMID:24367671

  4. High frequency of helicobacter negative gastritis in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Halme, L; Kärkkäinen, P; Rautelin, H; Kosunen, T U; Sipponen, P

    1996-01-01

    The frequency of gastric Crohn's disease has been considered low. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of chronic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with Crohn's disease. Oesophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed on 62 consecutive patients suffering from ileocolonic Crohn's disease. Biopsy specimens from the antrum and corpus were processed for both histological and bacteriological examinations. H pylori antibodies of IgG and IgA classes were measured in serum samples by enzyme immunoassay. Six patients (9.7%) were infected with H pylori, as shown by histology, and in five of them the infection was also verified by serology. Twenty one patients (32%) had chronic H pylori negative gastritis (negative by both histology and serology) and one of them also had atrophy in the antrum and corpus. Granulomas were found in four patients. The characteristic appearance of H pylori negative gastritis was focal and mostly mild inflammation resembling the inflammatory changes seen in the gut in Crohn's disease. Patients with H pylori negative chronic gastritis had a significantly more active disease in their gut than those with normal gastric mucosa (p < 0.01). It is concluded that H pylori positive gastritis is rare, while H pylori negative gastritis is relatively common in patients with Crohn's disease. H pylori negative 'Crohn's gastritis' seems to be associated with active Crohn's disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8675090

  5. Biologics in pediatric Crohn's disease: is it time to move to an earlier therapeutic approach?

    PubMed

    Hyams, Jeffrey S

    2014-11-01

    The treatment of Crohn's disease in children has undergone a revolution in the past decade following studies that have demonstrated the efficacy of anti-TNFα agents in producing durable clinical response/remission as well as reversal of growth delay in many patients. The positioning of biologic therapy continues to be debated. Should it be reserved for children failing conventional therapy including immunomodulators or should it be used as primary therapy shortly after diagnosis in children with more severe disease likely to suffer a more complicated disease course? Risk stratification will be crucial to any therapeutic decisions and emerging data hold promise that identification of those most likely to benefit will be available in the near future. PMID:25340425

  6. Update on Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Ultrasound Evaluation of Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Deepak, Parakkal; Kolbe, Amy B; Fidler, Jeff L; Fletcher, Joel G; Knudsen, John M; Bruining, David H

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) and abdominal ultrasound are integral parts of multimodality assessments for patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Applications include assessing Crohn's disease (CD) extent and severity, differentiating CD from ulcerative colitis, detecting CD complications, evaluating response to therapy, and demonstrating postoperative recurrence. Magnetic resonance imaging protocols are being developed that may reduce or eliminate the need for intravenous contrast agents and better differentiate inflammatory from fibrotic strictures. MRE scoring systems have been created to objectively quantify disease activity and response to therapy. By utilizing advanced sonographic imaging techniques, including ultrasound contrast and Doppler assessments, the role of abdominal ultrasonography in the evaluation and management of CD continues to expand. Abdominal ultrasound may function as a low-cost, point-of care assessment tool, especially in CD restricted to the terminal ileum and ileocolic anastomosis. PMID:27231453

  7. Extra intestinal manifestations and complications in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Marineaţă, Anca; Rezuş, Elena; Mihai, Cătălina; Prelipcean, Cristina Cijevschi

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), doesn't affect only the intestinal tract, but also involve other organs such as: eyes, skin, joints, liver and biliary tracts, kidneys, lungs, vascular system. It is difficult to differentiate the true extraintestinal manifestations from secondary extraintestinal complications. The pathogenetic autoimmune mechanisms include genetic susceptibility, antigenic display of autoantigen, aberrant self-recognition and immunopathogenetic autoantibodies against organ-specific cellular antigens shared by colon and extra-colonic organs. An important role is owned by microbes due to molecular mimicry. This paper reviews the frequency, clinical presentation and therapeutic implications of extraintestinal symptoms in inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:25076688

  8. Resident Rounds: Part III - Case Report: Crohn's Disease Presenting as Granulomatous Cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Desmond, Bryce L; Thomas, R Scott; Howerter, Stephanie S

    2016-02-01

    Cutaneous Crohn's is a rare extra-intestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease seen in a select group of patients, in which cutaneous lesions similar to those of the intestinal illness appear distant from the gastrointestinal tract. Oral findings may be found in up to 60% of patients with extra-intestinal Crohn's and may appear as the initial symptom underlying disease. We present a case of a 17-year-old male presenting with granulomatous chelitis of the lower lip who was unaware of the underlying diagnosis of Crohn's disease (CD). PMID:26885796

  9. Crohn's disease and massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding: angiographic appearance and two case reports

    SciTech Connect

    McGarrity, T.J.; Manasse, J.S.; Koch, K.L.; Weidner, W.A.

    1987-10-01

    Massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding is described in two patients with Crohn's disease. In case 1, extravasation of contrast material from the ileal branch of the ileocolic artery was seen during selective angiography. In case 2, results of an in vitro labeled /sup 99/Tc pyrophosphate red blood cell scan localized bleeding to the ileum. In both cases, medical management was unsuccessful, and surgical resection of the affected bowel was required to stop the bleeding. Angiographic appearance of Crohn's disease is discussed, and a review of the literature of this unusual feature of Crohn's disease is presented. 16 references.

  10. Laparoscopic Pancreaticoduodenectomy for the Management of Localized Crohn's Disease of the Duodenum.

    PubMed

    Xingjun, Guo; Feng, Zhu; Min, Wang; Renyi, Qin

    2016-08-01

    Crohn's disease of the duodenum is an uncommon condition. Our case was an extremely rare manifestation of Crohn's disease, who presented with obstruction of the pylorus and the first and the second parts of the duodenum. Because of the severity of the obstruction, he underwent laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy. Postoperative pancreatic leakage and bowel fistula were not observed, and there was no morbidity during the follow-up period. There was also no disturbance in digestive function, postoperatively. This is the first case employing laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy to cure benign lesions leading to duodenal obstruction. Minimally invasive laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy technology shows a very big advantage in treating this rare benign Crohn's disease. PMID:27574357

  11. The influence of zinc status and malnutrition on immunological function in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ainley, C; Cason, J; Slavin, B M; Wolstencroft, R A; Thompson, R P

    1991-06-01

    Cellular immunity is likely to be important in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease; whether it is abnormal is not clear. The heterogeneity of patients with Crohn's disease probably underlies the disparity of reports, but attempts to determine which clinical features influence cellular immunity have been largely unsuccessful. This is probably caused by the omission of nutritional status as a potential factor, even though zinc deficiency has frequently been linked with abnormal immunity. Therefore, a detailed study of nutritional and tissue zinc status, nonspecific cellular immunity, and a measure of phagocytic function was performed in 32 patients with Crohn's disease and in a control group of 18 normal subjects and 12 patients with anorexia nervosa. Fourteen patients with Crohn's disease, all patients with anorexia nervosa, but none of the normal controls were malnourished. Peripheral blood lymphocyte population levels were normal in patients with Crohn's disease and in normal controls, but there was a small decrease in the levels of patients with anorexia nervosa. In vivo delayed hypersensitivity skin test responses were profoundly depressed in patients with anorexia nervosa and decreased in patients with Crohn's disease who were malnourished or receiving systemic glucocorticoids. In vitro lymphocyte transformation was reduced in malnourished patients with Crohn's disease, but there were only minor changes in patients with anorexia nervosa. There were alterations of in vitro immunoregulation in Crohn's disease, but they were not responsible for the abnormal lymphocyte transformation responses in malnourished patients. In vitro phagocytic function was reduced in patients with active Crohn's disease. These findings suggest that depressed in vivo and in vitro cellular immunity in malnourished patients with Crohn's disease is caused by a qualitative lymphocyte defect and that depressed in vivo but normal in vitro cellular immunity in anorexia nervosa is caused by a

  12. Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease: is Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis the common villain?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium, subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) causes a chronic disease of the intestines in dairy cows and a wide range of other animals, including nonhuman primates, called Johne's ("Yo-knee's") disease. MAP has been consistently identified by a variety of techniques in humans with Crohn's disease. The research investigating the presence of MAP in patients with Crohn's disease has often identified MAP in the "negative" ulcerative colitis controls as well, suggesting that ulcerative colitis is also caused by MAP. Like other infectious diseases, dose, route of infection, age, sex and genes influence whether an individual infected with MAP develops ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. The apparently opposite role of smoking, increasing the risk of Crohn's disease while decreasing the risk of ulcerative colitis, is explained by a more careful review of the literature that reveals smoking causes an increase in both diseases but switches the phenotype from ulcerative colitis to Crohn's disease. MAP as the sole etiologic agent of both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease explains their common epidemiology, geographic distribution and familial and sporadic clusters, providing a unified hypothesis for the prevention and cure of the no longer "idiopathic" inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:21167058

  13. [Combination biological therapy for fistular Crohn's disease: clinical demonstration].

    PubMed

    Knyazev, O V; Parfenov, A I; Shcherbakov, P L; Konoplyannikov, A G; Ruchkina, I N; Lischchinskaya, A A

    2014-01-01

    Perianal fistulas are the most common and frequently encountered types of fistulas in Crohn's disease (CD). They are incurable, may worsen quality of life in a patient and increase the risk of total bowel resection. Despite the significant impact of biological (anticytokine) therapy for fistular CD, treatment in this category of patients remains a difficult task with the high risk of recurrent CD. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) having immunomodulatory properties and a great regenerative potential are currently also used to treat fistulas in CD and perianal fistulas of another etiology. The given clinical case demonstrates that complete fistula healing could be achieved only after a few local administrations of MSCs in combination with infliximab and azathioprine. World and our experiences indicate that there is a need for randomized controlled trials with a sufficient number of patients to prove the efficacy of MSCs in the combination therapy of fistulas in CD. PMID:24772517

  14. Tracheal Involvement in Crohn Disease: the First Case in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seunghyun; Park, Jongha; Kim, Hyun-Kuk; Kim, Ji Yeon; Hur, So Chong; Lee, Ju Hyung; Jung, Jae Won; Lee, Juwon

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory involvement in Crohn disease (CD) is rare condition with only about a dozen reported cases. We report the first case of CD with tracheal involvement in Korea. An 18-year-old woman with CD was hospitalized because of coughing, dyspnea, and fever sustained for 3 weeks. Because she had stridor in her neck, we performed computed tomography of the neck, which showed circumferential wall thickening of the larynx and hypopharynx. Bronchoscopy revealed mucosal irregularity, ulceration, and exudates debris in the proximal trachea, and bronchial biopsy revealed chronic inflammation with granulation tissue. Based on these findings, we suspected CD with tracheal involvement and began administering intravenous methylprednisolone at 1 mg/kg per day, after which her symptoms and bronchoscopic findings improved. PMID:26879553

  15. Regression of Sweet's syndrome associated with Crohn's disease after anti-Tumour Necrosis Factor therapy.

    PubMed

    Rahier, J F; Lion, L; Dewit, O; Lambert, M

    2005-01-01

    The association of inflammatory bowel disease and acute febrile neutrophilic dermatitis (Sweet's syndrome) has infrequently been reported in the literature. We describe the case of a 41-year-old Caucasian woman with ileo- anal Crohn's disease who presented simultaneously an erythema nodosum and a Sweet's syndrome. A dramatic regression of the cutaneous lesions was observed after infliximab treatment, indicating that this therapy might be useful for both Crohn's disease and Sweet's syndrome. PMID:16268426

  16. Recent Advances in Characterizing the Gastrointestinal Microbiome in Crohn's Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Emily K.; Teo, Shu Mei; Inouye, Michael; Wagner, Josef; Kirkwood, Carl D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The intestinal microbiota is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. A reduction in the diversity of the intestinal microbiota as well as specific taxonomic and functional shifts have been reported in Crohn's disease and may play a central role in the inflammatory process. The aim was to systematically review recent developments in the structural and functional changes observed in the gastrointestinal microbiome in patients with Crohn's Disease. Results: Seventy-two abstracts were included in this review. The effects of host genetics, disease phenotype, and inflammatory bowel disease treatment on the gastrointestinal microbiome in Crohn's disease were reviewed, and taxonomic shifts in patients with early and established disease were described. The relative abundance of Bacteroidetes is increased and Firmicutes decreased in Crohn's disease compared with healthy controls. Enterobacteriaceae, specifically Eschericia coli, is enriched in Crohn's disease. Faecalibacterium prausnitzii is found at lower abundance in Crohn's disease and in those with postoperative recurrence. Observed functional changes include major shifts in oxidative stress pathways, a decrease in butanoate and propanoate metabolism gene expression, lower levels of butyrate, and other short-chain fatty acids, decreased carbohydrate metabolism, and decreased amino acid biosynthesis. Conclusions: Changes in microbial composition and function have been described, although a causative role remains to be established. Larger, prospective, and longitudinal studies are required with deep interrogation of the microbiome if causality is to be determined, and refined microbial manipulation is to emerge as a focused therapy. PMID:25844959

  17. Crohn's disease and Takayasu's arteritis: an uncommon association.

    PubMed

    Taddio, Andrea; Maschio, Massimo; Martelossi, Stefano; Barbi, Egidio; Ventura, Alessandro

    2013-09-21

    Takayasu's arteritis (TA) and Crohn's disease (CD) are two rare autoimmune disorders; however some reports describe the presence of both diseases in the same patient. This finding has suggested the possibility that both diseases could share some common etiologic origin. We describe a case of a 13-year-old male affected by CD characterized by fever, diarrhea, weight loss, abdominal pain and elevation of inflammatory markers. Clinical and histological features from colonic specimens were consistent with CD. Treatment with steroids and azathioprine was started, however disease flared every time steroids were tapered. One year later, while still on treatment, he came back to our attention for dyspnea at rest and at night, tiredness and weakness. At physical examination a diastolic heart murmur was found as well as a left carotid artery bruit. A transthoracic echocardiography showed mild aortic valve insufficiency, left ventricular hypertrophy and a dilated ascending aorta with same findings at the aortic arch. A computed tomography scan showed abdominal aorta thickening, dilated thoracic aorta and the presence of a thoracic aortic aneurysm. TA associated with CD was diagnosed and medical treatment with cyclophosphamide, steroids and aminosalicylic acid was started, with good clinical response at 6 mo follow-up. We discuss the presence of possible common causes for the two diseases and the importance of differential diagnosis in those patients characterized for intractable disease. PMID:24124342

  18. Endoscopic balloon dilatation of postsurgical intestinal strictures in Crohn's disease: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ljubicić, Neven; Bisćanin, Alen; Nikić, Ines; Budimir, Ivan; Nikolić, Marko; Pavić, Tajana

    2013-09-01

    Strictures are one of the most common complications of Crohn's disease. If symptomatic and resistant to medical anti-inflammatory therapy, and especially in cases of acute obstruction, surgical correction may be unavoidable. Although surgical treatment is dramatically effective in curing Crohn's disease strictures, a high rate of postsurgical restenosis has been recognized, ultimately requiring additional surgery. To avoid the risks and costs entailed by repeated surgical resection, endoscopic balloon dilatation (EBD) has been proposed as a conservative treatment option for intestinal strictures in Crohn's disease, in which the stricture is pneumatically dilated with through-the-scope balloons of different diameters. The main clinical indication for EBD is the appearance of obstructive symptoms associated with the stricture, especially if they are postoperative and shorter than 4 centimeters. Usually more than one dilatation session is required for every stricture. EBD is applied infrequently, possibly due to the perceived risk of perforation and early stricture recurrence, but studies have demonstrated that EBD has a high success rate, a low chance of complications, excellent symptomatic response, as well as good short-term and long-term outcomes, proving that it is a relatively simple and successful technique that provides long-term effective palliation of the symptoms with minimal risk in patients with simple strictures, and offers a reasonable alternative to surgery. PMID:24558771

  19. Sweet's syndrome in association with Crohn's disease: report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, A; Shaked, M; Landau, M; Dolev, E

    2001-10-01

    A 41-year-old woman developed a skin rash as part of Sweet's syndrome concurrent with the first episode of Crohn's disease of the colon. Sweet's syndrome, acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, may be associated with inflammatory, infectious, or neoplastic diseases. Its association with Crohn's disease is very rare, and when reported it has been mainly associated with Crohn's colitis. This association has been described in various stages of the disease. Sweet's syndrome may be considered one of the extraintestinal manifestations of Crohn's disease. Early diagnosis of this dermatosis may be important because of the prompt response to treatment with corticosteroids. The value of metronidazole should be considered because this medication may enhance response to treatment. PMID:11598485

  20. Wernicke's encephalopathy after total parenteral nutrition in patients with Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Shin, In Seub; Seok, Hyeri; Eun, Yeong Hee; Lee, You-Bin; Lee, Seung-Eun; Kim, Eun Ran; Chang, Dong Kyung; Kim, Young-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies in Crohn's disease (CD) patients are not uncommon and usually result in a combination of reduced dietary intake, disease-related malabsorption, and a catabolic state. Decreased serum thiamine levels are often reported in patients with CD. Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a severe form of thiamine deficiency that can cause serious neurologic complications. Although WE is known to occur frequently in alcoholics, a number of non-alcoholic causes have also been reported. Here, we report two cases of non-alcoholic WE that developed in two severely malnourished CD patients who were supported by prolonged total parenteral nutrition without thiamine supplementation. These patients complained of sudden-onset ophthalmopathy, cerebellar dysfunction, and confusion. Magnetic resonance imaging allowed definitive diagnosis for WE despite poor sensitivity. The intravenous administration of thiamine alleviated the symptoms of WE dramatically. We emphasize the importance of thiamine supplementation for malnourished patients even if they are not alcoholics, especially in those with CD. PMID:27175122

  1. Colosplenopleural fistula: An unusual colonic fistula in a 44-year-old male with Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Michael W.; Lee, Steven

    2015-01-01

    A 44-year-old male with a history of well-controlled human immunodeficiency virus disease and Crohn's disease presented with fever, cough, and left-sided chest pain with radiation to his back. His medical history was notable for a medically managed spontaneous microperforation of the colon at the splenic flexure 30 months prior, and recurrent left-lower-lobe pneumonia with empyema and a splenic abscess within the past 24 months. CT demonstrated a complex left pleural fluid collection with fistulous connection through the spleen and into the large bowel. The patient tolerated a diverting loop ileostomy without complications and was discharged home with plans for resection of the fistulous tract and splenectomy in several months.

  2. Antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae in patients with Crohn's disease and their possible pathogenic importance.

    PubMed Central

    Giaffer, M H; Clark, A; Holdsworth, C D

    1992-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) may play an important part in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. Because of this the levels of IgG and IgA antibodies against three S cerevisiae strains (NCYC 77, NCYC 79, and NCYC 1108) were assayed in 49 patients with Crohn's disease, 43 with ulcerative colitis, 14 with coeliac disease, and 21 healthy controls. Coded serum samples were tested by ELISA. Similar antibody patterns to all three strains were found. IgG and IgA antibody levels were significantly raised in patients with Crohn's disease compared with healthy controls (p < 0.001 and p < 0.0001 respectively) and with ulcerative colitis patients (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0006 respectively). Raised IgA, but not IgG, yeast antibody levels were found in two patients with Crohn's disease who were intolerant to yeast, but these values were similar to those in other patients without yeast intolerance. In ulcerative colitis, both IgG and IgA levels were similar to normal controls. Patients with small bowel Crohn's disease had significantly higher IgG antibody levels than those with colonic disease (p < 0.01). High levels of IgG, but not IgA, antibody were present in patients with coeliac disease, the antibody responses being indistinguishable from those found in Crohn's disease. It is concluded that the presence of IgG antibody to S cerevisiae is characteristic but not specific to Crohn's disease. Although raised IgA antibody levels are more frequently found in Crohn's disease, their pathogenic importance remains to be established. PMID:1398231

  3. Consensus guidelines of ECCO/ESPGHAN on the medical management of pediatric Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ruemmele, F M; Veres, G; Kolho, K L; Griffiths, A; Levine, A; Escher, J C; Amil Dias, J; Barabino, A; Braegger, C P; Bronsky, J; Buderus, S; Martín-de-Carpi, J; De Ridder, L; Fagerberg, U L; Hugot, J P; Kierkus, J; Kolacek, S; Koletzko, S; Lionetti, P; Miele, E; Navas López, V M; Paerregaard, A; Russell, R K; Serban, D E; Shaoul, R; Van Rheenen, P; Veereman, G; Weiss, B; Wilson, D; Dignass, A; Eliakim, A; Winter, H; Turner, D

    2014-10-01

    Children and adolescents with Crohn's disease (CD) present often with a more complicated disease course compared to adult patients. In addition, the potential impact of CD on growth, pubertal and emotional development of patients underlines the need for a specific management strategy of pediatric-onset CD. To develop the first evidenced based and consensus driven guidelines for pediatric-onset CD an expert panel of 33 IBD specialists was formed after an open call within the European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation and the European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterolog, Hepatology and Nutrition. The aim was to base on a thorough review of existing evidence a state of the art guidance on the medical treatment and long term management of children and adolescents with CD, with individualized treatment algorithms based on a benefit-risk analysis according to different clinical scenarios. In children and adolescents who did not have finished their growth, exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) is the induction therapy of first choice due to its excellent safety profile, preferable over corticosteroids, which are equipotential to induce remission. The majority of patients with pediatric-onset CD require immunomodulator based maintenance therapy. The experts discuss several factors potentially predictive for poor disease outcome (such as severe perianal fistulizing disease, severe stricturing/penetrating disease, severe growth retardation, panenteric disease, persistent severe disease despite adequate induction therapy), which may incite to an anti-TNF-based top down approach. These guidelines are intended to give practical (whenever possible evidence-based) answers to (pediatric) gastroenterologists who take care of children and adolescents with CD; they are not meant to be a rule or legal standard, since many different clinical scenario exist requiring treatment strategies not covered by or different from these guidelines. PMID:24909831

  4. Fracture risk is increased in Crohn's disease, but not in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Vestergaard, P; Krogh, K; Rejnmark, L; Laurberg, S; Mosekilde, L

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To study fracture rates and risk factors for fractures in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.
METHODS—998 self administered questionnaires were issued to members of the Danish Colitis/Crohn Association, and 1000 questionnaires were issued to randomly selected control subjects. 845 patients (84.5%) and 645 controls (65.4%) returned the questionnaire (p<0.01). 817 patients and 635 controls could be analysed.
RESULTS—Analysis was performed on 383 patients with Crohn's disease (median age 39, range 8-82 years; median age at diagnosis 26, range 1-75 years), 434 patients with ulcerative colitis (median age 39, range 11-86 years; median age at diagnosis 29, range 10-78 years), and 635 controls (median age 43, range 19-93 years, p<0.01). The fracture risk was increased in female patients with Crohn's disease (relative risk (RR) = 2.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-3.6), but not in male patients with Crohn's disease (RR = 0.6, 95% CI 0.3-1.3) or in patients with ulcerative colitis (RR = 1.1, 95% CI 0.8-1.6). An increased proportion of low energy fractures was observed in patients with Crohn's disease (15.7% versus 1.4 % in controls, 2p<0.01), but not in patients with ulcerative colitis (5.4%, 2p=0.30). The increased fracture frequency in Crohn's disease was present for fractures of the spine, feet, and toes and fractures of the ribs and pelvis. Fracture risk increased with increasing duration of systemic corticosteroid use in Crohn's disease (2p=0.028), but not in ulcerative colitis (2p=0.50).
CONCLUSIONS—An increased risk of low energy fractures was observed in female patients with Crohn's disease, but not in male patients with Crohn's disease or in patients with ulcerative colitis.


Keywords: fracture; Crohn's disease; ulcerative colitis; inflammatory bowel disease; osteoporosis PMID:10644310

  5. Case report of cheilitis granulomatosa and joint complaints as presentation of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Hoekman, Daniël R; Roelofs, Joris J T H; van Schuppen, Joost; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; D'Haens, Geert R; Benninga, Marc A

    2016-04-01

    Cheilitis granulomatosa is characterized by granulomatous lip swelling. We report a case of a 13-year-old girl who presented with orofacial swelling and arthralgia, who eventually was diagnosed with Crohn's disease, which was successfully treated with infliximab and azathioprine combination therapy. Recurrent or persistent orofacial swelling should prompt consideration of cheilitis granulomatosa, and further diagnostic evaluation to exclude the presence of Crohn's disease seems warranted. PMID:27017505

  6. [Sweet syndrome (acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis) and erythema nodosum in Crohn disease].

    PubMed

    Schlegel Gómez, R; Kiesewetter, F; von den Driesch, P; Hornstein, O P

    1990-07-01

    We report on 2 patients who developed an acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis (Sweet's syndrome) and erythema nodosum in association with Crohn's disease. The first patient showed symmetrical painful erythemas on her cheeks after hemicolectomy. Additionally, red painful nodules appeared on her lower legs. The second patient disclosed typical Sweet's syndrome-like lesions with pustules and plaques on her face, scalp and extremities after activation of Crohn's disease. Simultaneously, erythema nodosum-like lesions appeared on her lower legs. PMID:2144848

  7. Alopecia totalis in a patient with Crohn's disease and its treatment with azathioprine.

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, C. J.; August, P. J.; Whorwell, P. J.

    1989-01-01

    A patient with Crohn's disease and alopecia totalis is described. Despite relative inactivity of the Crohn's disease, treatment with azathioprine was commenced. This led to complete regrowth of hair which was lost when the drug was discontinued. Re-institution of azathioprine restored hair to normal again and the patient has since declined to try stopping the drug despite the knowledge of potential side effects. PMID:2813243

  8. Preventing Collateral Damage in Crohn's Disease: The Lémann Index.

    PubMed

    Fiorino, Gionata; Bonifacio, Cristiana; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Danese, Silvio

    2016-04-01

    Crohn's disease [CD] is a chronic progressive and destructive condition. Half of all CD patients will develop bowel damage at 10 years. As in rheumatic diseases, preventing the organ damage consequent to CD complications [fistula, abscess, and/or stricture] is emerging as a new therapeutic goal for these patients in clinical practice. This might be the only way to alter disease course, as surgery is often required for disease complications. Similar to the joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis, bowel damage has also emerged as a new endpoint in disease-modification trials such as the REACT trial. Recently, the Lemann Index [LI] has been developed to measure CD-related bowel damage, and to assess damage progression over time, in order to evaluate the impact of therapeutic strategies in terms of preventing bowel damage. While validation is pending, recent reports suggested that bowel damage is reversible by anti-tumour necrosis factor [TNF] therapy. The Lémann index may play a key role in CD management, and should be implemented in all upcoming disease-modification trials in CD. PMID:26744441

  9. Reduced Paneth cell alpha-defensins in ileal Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Wehkamp, Jan; Salzman, Nita H; Porter, Edith; Nuding, Sabine; Weichenthal, Michael; Petras, Robert E; Shen, Bo; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias; Linzmeier, Rose; Feathers, Ryan W; Chu, Hiutung; Lima, Heriberto; Fellermann, Klaus; Ganz, Tomas; Stange, Eduard F; Bevins, Charles L

    2005-12-13

    The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD), an idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease, is attributed, in part, to intestinal bacteria that may initiate and perpetuate mucosal inflammation in genetically susceptible individuals. Paneth cells (PC) are the major source of antimicrobial peptides in the small intestine, including human alpha-defensins HD5 and HD6. We tested the hypothesis that reduced expression of PC alpha-defensins compromises mucosal host defenses and predisposes patients to CD of the ileum. We report that patients with CD of the ileum have reduced antibacterial activity in their intestinal mucosal extracts. These specimens also showed decreased expression of PC alpha-defensins, whereas the expression of eight other PC products either remained unchanged or increased when compared with controls. The specific decrease of alpha-defensins was independent of the degree of inflammation in the specimens and was not observed in either CD of the colon, ulcerative colitis, or pouchitis. The functional consequence of alpha-defensin expression levels was examined by using a transgenic mouse model, where we found changes in HD5 expression levels, comparable to those observed in CD, had a pronounced impact on the luminal microbiota. Thus, the specific deficiency of PC defensins that characterizes ileal CD may compromise innate immune defenses of the ileal mucosa and initiate and/or perpetuate this disease. PMID:16330776

  10. Features and perspectives of MR enterography for pediatric Crohn disease assessment.

    PubMed

    Ognibene, Noemi Maria Giovanna; Basile, Massimo; Di Maurizio, Marco; Petrillo, Giuseppe; De Filippi, Claudio

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide indications for performing magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) in Crohn's disease (CD), the essential technical elements of MRE techniques and typical findings in patients with CD. Patients suffering from CD frequently require cross-sectional imaging. By performing MRE, it is possible to obtain results comparable to those obtained with endoscopy in terms of identifying and assessing disease activity and better than other cross-sectional imaging techniques, such as CT, in the evaluation of the fibrosis and complications of disease. The MR imaging of diffusion MR is a technique which enables medical staff to add important additional information and which may replace the use of intravenous contrast agents in the near future. Magnetic resonance enterography is an accurate tool for assessing bowel disease and the various complications associated with CD. The lack of exposure to non-ionizing radiation is an important advantage of this imaging technique, especially in the case of pediatric patients. Familiarity with common and pathognomonic imaging features of CD is essential for every clinician involved in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease and the care of patients. PMID:26838591

  11. Inflammation-driven malnutrition: a new screening tool predicts outcome in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Irene; Prager, Matthias; Valentini, Luzia; Büning, Carsten

    2016-09-01

    Malnutrition is a frequent feature in Crohn's disease (CD), affects patient outcome and must be recognised. For chronic inflammatory diseases, recent guidelines recommend the development of combined malnutrition and inflammation risk scores. We aimed to design and evaluate a new screening tool that combines both malnutrition and inflammation parameters that might help predict clinical outcome. In a prospective cohort study, we examined fifty-five patients with CD in remission (Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI) <200) at 0 and 6 months. We assessed disease activity (CDAI, Harvey-Bradshaw index), inflammation (C-reactive protein (CRP), faecal calprotectin (FC)), malnutrition (BMI, subjective global assessment (SGA), serum albumin, handgrip strength), body composition (bioelectrical impedance analysis) and administered the newly developed 'Malnutrition Inflammation Risk Tool' (MIRT; containing BMI, unintentional weight loss over 3 months and CRP). All parameters were evaluated regarding their ability to predict disease outcome prospectively at 6 months. At baseline, more than one-third of patients showed elevated inflammatory markers despite clinical remission (36·4 % CRP ≥5 mg/l, 41·5 % FC ≥100 µg/g). Prevalence of malnutrition at baseline according to BMI, SGA and serum albumin was 2-16 %. At 6 months, MIRT significantly predicted outcome in numerous nutritional and clinical parameters (SGA, CD-related flares, hospitalisations and surgeries). In contrast, SGA, handgrip strength, BMI, albumin and body composition had no influence on the clinical course. The newly developed MIRT was found to reliably predict clinical outcome in CD patients. This screening tool might be used to facilitate clinical decision making, including treatment of both inflammation and malnutrition in order to prevent complications. PMID:27546478

  12. Effect of 2 Psychotherapies on Depression and Disease Activity in Pediatric Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Youk, Ada O.; Gonzalez-Heydrich, Joseph; Bujoreanu, Simona I.; Weisz, John; Fairclough, Diane; Ducharme, Peter; Jones, Neil; Lotrich, Francis; Keljo, David; Srinath, Arvind; Bousvaros, Athos; Kupfer, David; DeMaso, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with depression. It is unclear if psychosocial interventions offer benefit for depressive symptoms during active CD. In this secondary analysis of a larger study of treating depression in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease, we assessed whether cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) would differentiate from supportive nondirective therapy in treating depression and disease activity in youth with CD. We also explored whether somatic depressive symptoms showed a different pattern of response in the overall sample and the subset with active inflammatory bowel disease. Methods: Youth with depression and CD (n = 161) were randomized to 3 months of CBT (teaching coping skills) or supportive nondirective therapy (supportive listening). Depressive severity was measured using the Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised (CDRS-R) with the somatic depressive subtype consisting of those CDRS-R items, which significantly correlated with CD activity. Disease activity was measured by the Pediatric Crohn's disease Activity Index. Given the potential confound of higher dose steroids, subanalyses excluded subjects on >20 mg/d prednisone equivalent (n = 34). Results: Total CDRS-R scores in the overall sample significantly decreased over time after both treatments (P < 0.0001). Treatment with CBT was associated with a significantly greater improvement in the Pediatric Crohn's disease Activity Index (P = 0.05) and somatic depressive subtype (P = 0.03) in those with active inflammatory bowel disease (n = 95) compared with supportive nondirective therapy. After excluding those on steroids (n = 34), there was a significant improvement in total CDRS-R (P = 0.03) and in Pediatric Crohn's disease Activity Index (P = 0.03) after CBT. Conclusions: Psychotherapy may be a useful adjunct to treat depression in the context of CD-related inflammation in youth who are not concurrently on higher dose steroids. PMID:25822010

  13. Intestinal permeability to (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA in children with Crohn's disease and celiac disease

    SciTech Connect

    Turck, D.; Ythier, H.; Maquet, E.; Deveaux, M.; Marchandise, X.; Farriaux, J.P.; Fontaine, G.

    1987-07-01

    (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA was used as a probe molecule to assess intestinal permeability in 7 healthy control adults, 11 control children, 17 children with Crohn's disease, and 6 children with untreated celiac disease. After subjects fasted overnight, 75 kBq/kg (= 2 microCi/kg) /sup 51/Cr-labeled EDTA was given by mouth; 24-h urinary excretion of (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA was measured and expressed as a percentage of the total oral dose. Mean and SD were as follows: control adults 1.47 +/- 0.62, control children 1.59 +/- 0.55, and patients with Crohn's disease or celiac disease 5.35 +/- 1.94. The difference between control children and patients was statistically significant (p less than 0.001). These results show that intestinal permeability to (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA is increased among children with active or inactive Crohn's disease affecting small bowel only or small bowel and colon, and with untreated celiac disease. The (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA permeability test could facilitate the decision to perform more extensive investigations in children suspected of small bowel disease who have atypical or poor clinical and biological symptomatology.

  14. Intestinal tuberculosis and Crohn's disease: challenging differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jia Yi; Tong, Jin Lu; Ran, Zhi Hua

    2016-03-01

    Along with epidemiological changes in tuberculosis (TB) and an increased incidence of Crohn's disease (CD), the differential diagnosis of intestinal TB (ITB) and CD is of vital importance and has become a clinical challenge because treatment based on misdiagnosis may lead to fatal outcomes. In this study, we reviewed the similarities and differences in clinical, endoscopic, radiological and histological features of these two diseases. Concomitant pulmonary TB, ascites, night sweats, involvement of fewer than four segments of the bowel, patulous ileocecal valve, transverse ulcers, scars or pseudopolyps strongly indicate ITB. Bloody stools, perianal signs, chronic diarrhea, extraintestinal manifestations, anorectal lesions, longitudinal ulcers and a cobblestone appearance are all suggestive of CD. Significant differences in the size, number, location and patterns of granulomas in ITB and CD with regard to their histopathologic features have been noted. Immune stain of cell surface markers is also helpful. Interferon-γ release assay and polymerase chain reaction analysis have achieved satisfactory sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of ITB. Computed tomography enterographic findings of segmental small bowel or left colon involvement, mural stratification, the comb sign and fibrofatty proliferation are significantly more common in CD, whereas mesenteric lymph node changes (calcification or central necrosis) and focal ileocecal lesions are more frequently seen in ITB. A diagnosis should be carefully established before the initiation of the therapy. In suspicious cases, short-term empirical anti-TB therapy is quite efficient to further confirm the diagnosis. PMID:26854750

  15. Misdiagnosis and Mistherapy of Crohn's Disease as Intestinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jiang-Peng; Wu, Xiao-Yan; Gao, Sen-Yang; Chen, Qiu-Yu; Liu, Tong; Liu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The differential diagnosis of Crohn's disease (CD) and intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) remains difficult as the clinical symptoms of the 2 digestive diseases are so similar. Here we report a case where a patient was initially misdiagnosed with ITB prior to the correct CD diagnosis. The 46-year-old male patient was hospitalized elsewhere for pain in the right lower abdomen and underwent an appendectomy. The pathological diagnosis was ITB and the patient was administered antituberculosis therapy for 1 year. Afterward, the patient was readmitted to the hospital for a right lower abdominal mass. A computed tomography scan revealed intestinal gas, fistula, and abdominal mass. We performed a right hemicolectomy on the patient. Postoperatively, we diagnosed the patient with CD, based on patient history and pathological examination. According to the CD active index (CDAI), the patient was at high risk and began treatment with infliximab. The patient has remained in complete remission and made a good recovery after 8-months follow-up. We compared this case with the results of a literature review on the misdiagnosis between CD and ITB (26 previously reported cases) to determine the characteristics of misdiagnosed cases. We found that distinguishing between ITB and CD is difficult because of their varied clinical presentation, nonspecific investigative tools, and profound similarities even in pathological specimens. Although a CT scan to determine the morphology of the bowel wall is a key for correct diagnosis, each case still poses challenges for diagnosis and administrating the appropriate treatment. PMID:26735549

  16. Gut Microbial Diversity Is Reduced in Smokers with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Opstelten, Jorrit L.; Plassais, Jonathan; van Mil, Saskia W. C.; Achouri, Emna; Pichaud, Matthieu; Siersema, Peter D.; Cervino, Alessandra C. L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Smoking has a negative impact on Crohn's disease (CD), but the mechanisms underlying this association are unclear. We compared the gut microbiota composition of smoking with nonsmoking patients with CD using a metagenomic approach. Methods: Stool samples and clinical data were collected from current smokers and nonsmokers with CD from France and the Netherlands, matched for country, gender, age, disease activity, and body mass index. Fecal DNA was sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2500. On average, 40 million paired-end reads were generated per sample. Gene richness and the Shannon index were computed to assess microbial diversity. Wilcoxon's signed-rank tests for paired samples were performed to detect differences between the 2 groups. Results: In total, 21 smoking and 21 nonsmoking patients with CD were included. Compared with nonsmoking patients, gut microbial gene richness (P = 0.01), genus diversity (P < 0.01), and species diversity (P = 0.01) were decreased in smoking patients. This was accompanied by a reduced relative abundance of the genera Collinsella (P = 0.02), Enterorhabdus (P = 0.02), and Gordonibacter (P = 0.02) in smokers. No statistically significant differences at the species level were observed, although smokers had lower proportions of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (P = 0.10). Conclusions: Gut microbial diversity is reduced in smokers with CD compared with nonsmokers with CD. The microbial profile differs between these groups at the genus level. Future studies should evaluate whether intestinal microbes mediate the adverse effects of smoking in CD. PMID:27542127

  17. Pharmacokinetics of budesonide (Entocort EC) capsules for Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Edsbäcker, Staffan; Andersson, Tommy

    2004-01-01

    This overview summarises available pharmacokinetic data on budesonide capsules (Entocort EC), approved for the treatment of mild-to-moderate active Crohn's disease involving the ileum and/or ascending colon and for prolongation of symptom control. Budesonide is a locally-acting glucocorticosteroid with an extensive, primarily hepatic, metabolism after oral administration. It is rapidly absorbed and biotransformed by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A to metabolites with negligible glucocorticoid activity. Entocort EC, a pH- and time-dependent oral formulation of budesonide, was developed to optimise drug delivery to the ileum and throughout the colon. Pharmaco-scintigraphic studies have confirmed that the Entocort EC formulation delays budesonide absorption and prolongs the rate of elimination but maintains complete absorption. This improves the delivery of budesonide to the intestinal lumen relative to a plain formulation. A low systemic availability of 9-21% indicates extensive first-pass elimination. Food appears to have little impact on the absorption of budesonide from Entocort EC capsules and the pharmacokinetics are dose-proportional between 3 and 15 mg. On average, systemic availability was 2.5-fold higher in patients with cirrhosis compared with healthy controls; however, mild liver impairment had little effect on systemic exposure. Pharmacokinetics appear unaffected by gender and age, although this has not been tested in younger children. Renal impairment is not expected to have an impact on the kinetics of Entocort EC. Budesonide is unlikely to inhibit the metabolism of other drugs, including CYP3A4 substrates, mainly because of the very low plasma concentrations obtained with the compound even after high doses of Entocort trade mark EC capsules. Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as ketoconazole, will inhibit the metabolism of budesonide, resulting in several-fold increases in the area under the concentration-time curve of budesonide. Also, grapefruit juice intake

  18. Polymorphonuclear leucocytes in Crohn's disease and ulcerative proctocolitis: association between enhanced adherence to nylon fibre and disease variables.

    PubMed

    Cason, J; Ainley, C C; Wolstencroft, R A; Thompson, R P

    1988-03-01

    The adherence of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) to nylon fibre was investigated in patients with Crohn's disease, ulcerative proctocolitis, and anorexia nervosa, and compared with changes of circulating PMNs, C reactive protein concentrations, erythrocyte sedimentation rates, and clinical assessment of disease activity. PMN adherence was in excess of the maximum value detected for healthy subjects in 14 of 25 patients with Crohn's disease and two of 10 with proctocolitis, but it was within the normal range for all eight with anorexia nervosa. High adherence in Crohn's disease, however, was not associated with quantitative or qualitative changes of PMN populations, absolute concentrations of C reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rates, disease severity, drug regimens, malnutrition, or zinc deficiency. High PMN adherence in Crohn's disease may therefore reflect the activation in vivo of normal PMN by humoral factors. PMID:3360954

  19. Magnetic resonance enterography: A stepwise interpretation approach and role of imaging in management of adult Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Roopa; Sarver, David; Pandey, Tarun; Guidry, Carey L; Jambhekar, Kedar R

    2016-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that often requires frequent imaging of patients in order to detect active disease and other complications related to disease activity. While endoscopy is the gold standard for diagnosis, it may be contraindicated in some patients and has a limited role in detecting deep submucosal/mesenteric diseases and intra abdominal complications. In recent years, magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) has evolved as a noninvasive, radiation free imaging modality in the evaluation of patients with CD. This review article will focus on role of MRE in imaging patients with CD with emphasis on technical considerations, systematic image interpretation, differential diagnoses, and the role of imaging in deciding treatment options for patients. PMID:27413262

  20. Ten years' experience with an elemental diet in the management of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Teahon, K; Bjarnason, I; Pearson, M; Levi, A J

    1990-01-01

    The immediate and longterm outcome of treating patients with acute Crohn's disease with an elemental diet was studied retrospectively. Successful diet induced remission was achieved in 96 of 113 patients (85%) regardless of age, sex, site or severity of disease, or associated complications of strictures, fistula, or perianal disease. Treatment was unsuccessful in 17 patients (15%), but there were no features at the outset of treatment that distinguished these patients from those who had successful remission. The longterm outcome of treatment was assessed over a five year period by analysis of life tables and survival curves. Twenty two per cent of the patients relapsed within six months of treatment and thereafter the annual relapse rate was 8-10%. Patients with disease complicated by fistula or perianal involvement had early relapse, approaching 100% for the latter. A further retrospective comparison of longterm outcome of diet v steroid induced remissions showed no significant difference in the relapse rates between the two groups at one, three, and five years. PMID:2083858

  1. Effect of intestinal resection on serum antibodies to the mycobacterial 45/48 kilodalton doublet antigen in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kreuzpaintner, G; Das, P K; Stronkhorst, A; Slob, A W; Strohmeyer, G

    1995-01-01

    Interest in the role of mycobacterial infection in Crohn's disease has been revived by the cultural detection of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis in patients with Crohn's disease. This hypothesis was examined serologically using assays with high specificity for Crohn's disease. The effect of intestinal resection on serum antibodies specific for Crohn's disease was investigated with an immunoblot assay and an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay using the 45/48 kilodalton doublet antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Antibodies were detected in 64.7% of patients with Crohn's disease (n = 17), 10% of patients with ulcerative colitis (n = 10), 5% of patients with carcinoma of the colon (n = 20), and none of 10 healthy subjects with the immunoblot assay. Statistical comparison of the Crohn's disease patients with each control group resulted in p = 0.0000236. Immunoglobulin G was essentially unchanged 75 days (mean) after surgery. After more than 180 days, however, the antibody response was reduced in all of five patients studied, and was no longer demonstrable in two of them (40%). Simultaneously, the Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI) decreased. Both the high specificity of this assay for Crohn's disease and the diminished antibody response after intestinal resection in parallel with decreased CDAI support a mycobacterial aetiology of Crohn's disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7590431

  2. Adequacy of nutritional intake in a Canadian population of patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Aghdassi, Elaheh; Wendland, Barbara E; Stapleton, Melanie; Raman, Maitreyi; Allard, Johane P

    2007-09-01

    Crohn's disease is frequently associated with nutritional deficiencies, often a result of disease activity and poor oral intake. This study investigated the adequacy of dietary intake, based on the Canadian Dietary Reference Intake, in ambulatory patients with Crohn's disease and a normal body mass index (BMI; calculated as kg/m(2)). This was a cross-sectional study of 74 patients with mean age of 35.7+/-1.4 years and BMI of 23.05+/-0.45. All patients completed a 7-day food record and a diary for the Crohn's Disease Activity Index. Mean Crohn's Disease Activity Index was 138.99+/-11.38. Energy and protein intakes were within the recommended levels of intake, but total carbohydrates, fat, and saturated fat intake exceeded the recommended levels of <55%, <35%, and <10% in 39.2%, 27%, and 59.5% of the patients, respectively. Micronutrient intakes were suboptimal most notably for folate, vitamins C, E, and calcium. There were no substantial differences between patients with active and inactive disease in terms of failure to meet the Dietary Reference Intake. In conclusion, in this population sample, a large number of ambulatory patients with Crohn's disease have suboptimal dietary patterns despite a normal BMI and inactive disease. Dietary counseling and supplementation may be warranted in this patient population. PMID:17761234

  3. Molecular evidence for two forms of Crohn disease.

    PubMed Central

    Gilberts, E C; Greenstein, A J; Katsel, P; Harpaz, N; Greenstein, R J

    1994-01-01

    Recent epidemiological evidence suggests that there are two forms of Crohn disease (CD): perforating and nonperforating. We hypothesized that, just as with tuberculoid and lepromatous leprosy, differences in the two forms of CD would be both identified and determined by differences in the host immune response. Resected intestinal tissue from control patients as well as perforating and nonperforating CD patients was evaluated for mRNA levels. We employed 32P PCR amplification with published or custom-designed primers of a housekeeping gene (beta-actin); a human T-cell marker (CD3-delta); and the cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha, transforming growth factor beta, granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin (IL) 1 beta, IL-1ra, and IL-6. Differences were identified with IL-1 beta (control = 162 +/- 57 vs. perforating = 464 +/- 154 vs. nonperforating = 12,582 +/- 4733; P < or = 0.02) and IL-1ra (control = 1337 +/- 622 vs. perforating = 2194 +/- 775 vs. nonperforating = 9715 +/- 2988; P < or = 0.02). These data corroborate the epidemiological observation that there are two forms of CD. Nonperforating CD, the more benign form, is associated with increased IL-1 beta and IL-1ra mRNA expression. We conclude that it is the host immune response that determines which form of CD becomes manifest in any given individual and discuss the investigative, diagnostic, and therapeutic implications of these observations. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7809109

  4. Current management of anal fistulas in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Piotr; Banasiewicz, Tomasz; Matysiak, Konrad; Łykowska-Szuber, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Anal fistulas occurring in Crohn's disease (CD) comprise a risk factor of severe course of inflammation. They are frequently intractable due to various factors such as penetration of the anal canal or rectal wall, impaired wound healing, and immunosuppression, among others. Anal fistulas typical to CD develop from fissures or ulcers of the anal canal or rectum. Accurate identification of the type of fistula, such as low and simple or high and complex, is crucial for prognosis as well as for the choice of treatment. If fistulotomy remains the gold standard in the surgical treatment of the former, it is contraindicated in high and complex fistulas due to possible risk of damage to the anal sphincter with subsequent faecal incontinence. Therefore, the latter require a conservative and palliative approach, such as an incision and drainage of abscesses accompanying fistulas or prolonged non-cutting seton placement. Currently, conservative, sphincter-preserving, and definitive procedures such as mucosal advancement or dermal island flaps, the use of plugs or glue, video assisted anal fistula treatment, ligation of the intersphincteric track, and vacuum assisted closure are gaining a great deal of interest. Attempting to close the internal opening without injuring the sphincter is a major advantage of those methods. However, both the palliative and the definitive procedures require adjuvant therapy with medical measures. PMID:26557938

  5. MR enterography in Crohn's disease: current consensus on optimal imaging technique and future advances from the SAR Crohn's disease-focused panel.

    PubMed

    Grand, David J; Guglielmo, Flavius F; Al-Hawary, Mahmoud M

    2015-06-01

    MR enterography is a powerful tool for the non-invasive evaluation of patients with Crohn's disease (CD) without ionizing radiation. The following paper describes the current consensus on optimal imaging technique, interpretation, and future advances from the Society of Abdominal Radiology CD-focused panel. PMID:25666967

  6. Microsporidia and Its Relation to Crohn's Disease. A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Andreu-Ballester, Juan C.; Garcia-Ballesteros, Carlos; Amigo, Victoria; Ballester, Ferran; Gil-Borrás, Rafael; Catalán-Serra, Ignacio; Magnet, Angela; Fenoy, Soledad; del Aguila, Carmen; Ferrando-Marco, Jose; Cuéllar, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Background The cause of Crohn's Disease (CD) remains unknown. Recently a decrease in the global lymphocyte population in the peripheral blood of CD patients has been reported. This decrease was more evident in γδ T lymphocytes, especially γδ CD8+T subsets. Furthermore, a decrease of IL-7 was also observed in these patients. We propose the hypothesis that microsporidia, an obligate intracellular opportunistic parasite recently related to fungi, in CD patients can take advantage of the lymphocytes and IL-7 deficits to proliferate and to contribute to the pathophysiology of this disease. Methods and Findings In this case-control study, serum samples were collected from 36 CD patients and from 36 healthy individuals (controls), IgE and IgG anti-Encephalitozoon antibodies were determined by ELISA; and forty-four intestinal tissue samples were analyzed through real time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), twenty CD patients, nine with others diseases and 15 healthy subjects. We observed that IgE anti-Encephalitozoon levels were significantly higher in patients with CD: 0.386(±0.256) vs control group, 0.201(±0.147), P<0.001. However, IgG anti-Encephalitozoon values were significantly lower in CD patients: 0.361(±0.256) vs control group, 0.876(±0.380), P<0.001. In the group of CD patients, 6/20 (30%) were positive by real time PCR for microsporidia and, all the patients of the control group were negative by real time PCR. Conclusions These results suggest that CD patients are a group at risk for microsporidiasis and, moreover that microsporidia may be involved as a possible etiologic factor of CD. PMID:23637975

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Small Bowel in Crohn's Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Osman; Rodrigues, David Mario

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Crohn's disease is most commonly found in the terminal ileum and colonic region. Magnetic resonance has become a useful modality for assessing small bowel activity. In this study, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis on the use of MR in detecting small bowel activity as well as extramural complications in Crohn's patients. Methods. Two independent reviewers sorted through articles until October 2, 2014. We included both studies providing raw data for pooling and studies without raw data. Sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for each study. Results. There were 27 included studies, of which 19 were included in the pooled analysis. Pooled analysis of the 19 studies (1020 patients) with raw data revealed a sensitivity of 0.88 (95% CI 0.86 to 0.91) and specificity was 0.88 (95% CI 0.84 to 0.91). In regard to detecting stenosis, pooled sensitivity was 0.65 (95% CI 0.53 to 0.76) and specificity was 0.93 (95% CI 0.89 to 0.96). Conclusion. MR imaging provides a reliable alternative in detecting small bowel activity in patients with Crohn's disease. Its advantages include high diagnostic accuracy and no radiation exposure while its disadvantages include high cost and limited availability. PMID:27446869

  8. Linkage analyses of chromosome 6 loci, including HLA, in familial aggregations of Crohn disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hugot, J.P.; Laurent-Puig, P.; Gower-Rousseau, C.; Caillat-Zueman, S.; Beaugerie, L.; Dupas, J.L.; Van Gossum, A.; Bonaiti-Pellie, C.; Cortot, A.

    1994-08-15

    Segregation analyses of familial aggregations of Crohn disease have provided consistent results pointing to the involvement of a predisposing gene with a recessive mode of inheritance. Although extensively investigated, the role played by human leucocyte antigen (HLA) genes in this inflammatory bowel disease remains elusive and the major histocompatibility complex is a candidate region for the mapping of the Crohn disease susceptibility gene. A total of 25 families with multiple cases of Crohn disease was genotyped for HLA DRB1 and for 16 highly polymorphic loci evenly distributed on chromosome 6. The data were subjected to linkage analysis using the lod score method. Neither individual nor combined lod scores for any family and for any locus tested reached values suggesting linkage or genetic heterogeneity. The Crohn disease predisposing locus was excluded from the whole chromosome 6 with lod scores less than -2. It was excluded from the major histocompatibility complex and from 91% of the chromosome 6 genetic map with lod scores less than -4. The major recessive gene involved in genetic predisposition to Crohn disease does not reside on the major histocompatibility complex nor on any locus mapping to chromosome 6. 37 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Detecting Microbial Dysbiosis Associated with Pediatric Crohn Disease Despite the High Variability of the Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Kaplan, Jess L; Gold, Benjamin D; Bhasin, Manoj K; Ward, Naomi L; Kellermayer, Richard; Kirschner, Barbara S; Heyman, Melvin B; Dowd, Scot E; Cox, Stephen B; Dogan, Haluk; Steven, Blaire; Ferry, George D; Cohen, Stanley A; Baldassano, Robert N; Moran, Christopher J; Garnett, Elizabeth A; Drake, Lauren; Otu, Hasan H; Mirny, Leonid A; Libermann, Towia A; Winter, Harland S; Korolev, Kirill S

    2016-02-01

    The relationship between the host and its microbiota is challenging to understand because both microbial communities and their environments are highly variable. We have developed a set of techniques based on population dynamics and information theory to address this challenge. These methods identify additional bacterial taxa associated with pediatric Crohn disease and can detect significant changes in microbial communities with fewer samples than previous statistical approaches required. We have also substantially improved the accuracy of the diagnosis based on the microbiota from stool samples, and we found that the ecological niche of a microbe predicts its role in Crohn disease. Bacteria typically residing in the lumen of healthy individuals decrease in disease, whereas bacteria typically residing on the mucosa of healthy individuals increase in disease. Our results also show that the associations with Crohn disease are evolutionarily conserved and provide a mutual information-based method to depict dysbiosis. PMID:26804920

  10. Development and assessment of a modified Pediatric Crohn Disease Activity Index.

    PubMed

    Leach, Steven T; Nahidi, Lily; Tilakaratne, Samantha; Day, Andrew S; Lemberg, Daniel A

    2010-08-01

    The Pediatric Crohn Disease Activity Index (PCDAI) is an established and validated measure of disease activity in children with Crohn disease. However, its use in the research setting can be limited because of ambiguity of the subjective and anthropometric components of the index. Here we propose and evaluate a modified PCDAI (Mod PCDAI) consisting of the laboratory measures of the PCDAI plus C-reactive protein. This Mod PCDAI can provide an indication of disease activity because it correlates with the PCDAI, physicians' global assessment, and fecal calprotectin, and therefore may provide a suitable alternative to the PCDAI when required. PMID:20479686

  11. Coexistence of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) and Crohn's disease or multiorgan manifestation of the same disease?

    PubMed Central

    Ławnicka, Izabela; Książek, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is a systemic necrotizing vasculitis of unknown aetiology, often related to the antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA). GPA was previously named Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). The disease frequently has multisystemic presentation, targeting mainly the respiratory tract and kidneys, but gastrointestinal involvement is uncommon. Crohn's disease (CD) is an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with many extraintestinal manifestations. Clinically, symptoms of WG and CD can mimic each other. In this paper a case of GPA manifested initially by severe multiorgan damage including colitis, regarded to be coexistent CD, is presented. The case illustrates the difficulties in establishing the diagnosis when symptoms of the diseases mimic each other. PMID:27407286

  12. Exhaled nitric oxide as a marker of lung involvement in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Malerba, M; Ragnoli, B; Buffoli, L; Radaeli, A; Ricci, C; Lanzarotto, F; Lanzini, A

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease is an inflammatory bowel disease associated with a variety of systemic manifestations, including large and small airway involvement. The latter is most often a subclinical one, and requires expensive and invasive diagnostic approaches. Nitric oxide (NO) can be detected non-invasively in the exhaled air (eNO) and be considered as a surrogate marker of airway inflammation. eNO tested at multiple expiratory flows can be used to distinguish the alveolar concentration of NO (CalvNO) from the total amount of fractional eNO (FeNO). The aim of our study is to compare FeNO and concentration of alveolar nitric oxide (CalvNO) levels and to assess their relationship with pulmonary involvement in Crohn's patients differing in clinical stage and therapeutic regimens versus a group of healthy subjects. Thirty Crohn's patients not showing clinical evidence of pulmonary diseases and 21 non-smoking, non-atopic healthy controls were enrolled. FeNO (14.9±10.2 ppb vs 10.1±6.3 ppb, p=0.049) and CalvNO (4.4±2.2 ppb vs 2.6±1.9; p=0.006) values were found to be significantly higher in Crohn's patients than in healthy controls. Both FeNO and CalvNO correlated positively with the Crohn's Disease Activity Index. In conclusion, our results for FeNO and CalvNO confirm the presence of subclinical pulmonary involvement in Crohn's disease. eNO measurement may be of clinical value in the follow-up of Crohn's patients. PMID:22230422

  13. Design of a light delivery system for the photodynamic treatment of the Crohn's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrecht, Tanja; Borle, Francois; van den Bergh, Hubert; Michetti, Pierre; Ortner, Maria-Anna; Wagnières, Georges

    2007-07-01

    Crohn's disease is an inflammatory bowel disease originating from an overwhelming response of the mucosal immune system. Low dose photodynamic therapy (PDT) may modify the mucosal immune response and thus serve as a therapy for Crohn's disease. Most patients with Crohn's disease show inflammatory reactions in the terminal ileum or colon where PDT treatment is feasible by low-invasive endoscopic techniques. However, the tube like geometry of the colon, it's folding, and the presences of multiple foci of Crohn's lesions along the colon require the development of adequate light delivery techniques. We present a prototype light delivery system for endoscopic clinical PDT in patients with Crohn's disease. The system is based on a cylindrical light diffuser inserted into a diffusing balloon catheter. Homogenous irradiation is performed with a 4 W diode laser at 635 nm. Light dosimetry is performed using a calibrated integrating sphere. The system can be used with conventional colonoscopes and colonovideoscopes having a 3.8 mm diameter working channel. The feasibility of PDT in colon with our prototype was demonstrated in first clinical trials.

  14. Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita in a 17-year-old boy with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Russo, Irene; Ferrazzi, Anna; Zanetti, Irene; Alaibac, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita is a rare, acquired, autoimmune subepidermal blistering disease of the skin, characterised by blisters and erosions, especially in trauma-prone sites and extensor skin surface, scarring with formation of milia, skin fragility and nail dystrophy. Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita is extremely rare in childhood and it has been reported to be frequently associated with Crohn's disease. Furthermore, autoantibodies against type VII collagen have been found in a large number of patients with Crohn's disease without epidermolysis bullosa acquisita. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy affected by Crohn's disease who presented with milia on infiltrated erythematous plaques over the back of the hands. The diagnosis of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita was confirmed by histopathology, direct and indirect immunofluorescence analysis and ELISA. PMID:26163555

  15. [Inflammatory changes of oral cavity proceeding appearance of clinical symptoms of Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Szczeklik, Katarzyna; Darczuk, Dagmara; Owczarek, Danuta

    2010-01-01

    Crohn's disease belongs to the inflammatory bowel diseases. Inflammatory changes can be located in any part of the gastrointestinal tract including rarely oral cavity. We present a case of a 21 years old woman with unhealed by the local treatment, and verified by histological examination, inflammatory changes of oral cavity. These changes had proceed the diagnosis of typical changes in gastrointestinal tract for 6 months. Changes were located in terminal ileum and colon and were confirmed by colonoscopic, histologic and radiologic studies. Standard therapy of Crohn's disease with antiinflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs led to the healing of oral changes. We point out on the necessity of proper differential diagnosis of problematic unhealing changes, particularly with ulcerations of oral mucosa in young patients. Dental examination with histological confirmation of mucosal changes may be helpful in proper diagnosis of Crohn's disease in the young group of patients. PMID:21591368

  16. Crohn'z meanz Heinz’: foreign body inflammatory mass mimicking Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Visagan, R; Grossman, R; Dimitriadis, P A; Desai, A

    2013-01-01

    The authors present a patient with a presumed diagnosis of Crohn's disease for 6 years turning out to be an unusual inflammatory mass caused by ileal perforation due to a foreign body. When surgical intervention became necessary for admissions with recurrent obstruction, laparoscopy revealed an inflammatory mass in the terminal ileum, exposing two pieces of plastic bearing the word ‘Heinz’. Resection of the inflammatory mass led to the complete resolution of symptoms. Histology from the operative specimen showed no features of Crohn's disease. There were no granulomas and no fissuring ulcers. This case highlights that an inflammatory mass in the small intestine caused by the perforation of ingested foreign body can mimic Crohn's disease. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a synthetic plastic packaging causing ileo-caecal junctional perforation mimicking Crohn’s disease. PMID:23749825

  17. Virtual colonoscopy-induced perforation in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sunny H; Wong, Vincent W S; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2007-02-14

    We report a case of sigmoid colon perforation in a patient with Crohn's disease undergoing computed-tomographic (CT) colonography. A 70-year-old patient with Crohn's disease with terminal ileitis and sigmoid stricture underwent CT colonography after incomplete conventional colonoscopy. During the procedure, the colon was inflated by air insufflation and the patient developed abdominal pain with radiological evidence of retroperitoneal and intraperitoneal free gas. Hartmann's operation was performed. This case highlights that CT colonography is not risk-free. The risk of perforation may be higher in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:17352037

  18. Acute stroke revealing Takayasu's arteritis in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Gil; Zalmanovich, Anat; Golan, Yitzhak; Jonas Kimchi, Tali; Barenboim, Erez

    2016-08-01

    A 36-year-old Caucasian male with Crohn's disease exhibited acute ischaemic stroke as the first manifestation of Takayasu's arteritis. Stroke as the first clinical manifestation of Takayasu's arteritis has been rarely reported. Though rare in Western countries, Takayasu's arteritis should be considered as a possibility in young patients presenting with stroke. Both Takayasu's arteritis and Crohn's disease may increase the risk of ischaemic stroke. Furthermore, their coexistence is much higher than that expected by chance and suggest a pathophysiological link between these diseases. PMID:27075786

  19. A case of ileo-caecal Crohn's disease presenting as acute intestinal obstruction.

    PubMed

    Islam, S R; Boksh, Z; Ahaduzzaman, M; Barman, A

    2012-10-01

    We report a case of 42 year old man who presented with one month history of weight loss, gradual abdominal distension and constipation. X-ray of the abdomen showed features of small gut obstruction. A tight stricture at the ileoceacal junction was found to be the cause of obstruction on laparotomy. Distal ileum was found to be severely inflammed with enlarged regional lymph nodes. Right hemicolectomy with resection of distal ileum was done. Histology revealed non caseating granuloma of Chroh's disease. Crohn's disease is relatively rare in Bangladesh. Recent data suggests rising incidence of Crohn's disease (CD) in the Indian sub-continent. PMID:23134927

  20. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Following Anti-TNF-α Therapy With Infliximab for Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Amir Y; Concepcion, Orestes; Schlachterman, Alexander; Glover, Sarah; Forsmark, Christopher Y

    2016-04-01

    We present a 29-year-old male with Crohn's disease who developed chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) related to infliximab therapy. He developed lower extremity weakness and dysesthesia 3 weeks after a fourth infliximab dose. Laboratory examination revealed an elevated cerebrospinal fluid protein without pleocytosis. The patient initially responded to plasmapheresis therapy with marked symptomatic improvement, but relapsed and was refractory to subsequent treatments with plasmaphereisis, intravenous immunoglobulin, and glucocorticoids. While a causal relationship between infliximab and CIDP cannot be proven, clinicians should monitor Crohn's disease patients who are receiving TNF-α antagonists for neurologic symptoms suggestive of demyelinating disease. PMID:27144200

  1. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Following Anti-TNF-α Therapy With Infliximab for Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Concepcion, Orestes; Schlachterman, Alexander; Glover, Sarah; Forsmark, Christopher Y.

    2016-01-01

    We present a 29-year-old male with Crohn's disease who developed chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) related to infliximab therapy. He developed lower extremity weakness and dysesthesia 3 weeks after a fourth infliximab dose. Laboratory examination revealed an elevated cerebrospinal fluid protein without pleocytosis. The patient initially responded to plasmapheresis therapy with marked symptomatic improvement, but relapsed and was refractory to subsequent treatments with plasmaphereisis, intravenous immunoglobulin, and glucocorticoids. While a causal relationship between infliximab and CIDP cannot be proven, clinicians should monitor Crohn's disease patients who are receiving TNF-α antagonists for neurologic symptoms suggestive of demyelinating disease. PMID:27144200

  2. Contribution of intestinal smooth muscle to Crohn's disease fibrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Severi, C; Sferra, R; Scirocco, A; Vetuschi, A; Pallotta, N; Pronio, A; Caronna, R; Di Rocco, G; Gaudio, E; Corazziari, E; Onori, P

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal cells transdifferentiation and extracellular matrix deposition are involved in the fibrotic process of Crohn's disease (CD). Mesenchymal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) de-differentiation, driven by Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) that counteracts Transforming growth factor (TGF-β) has been studied in vascular muscle. The role of SMCs in intestinal fibrogenesis is still not clearly elucidated. Aim of the study was to evaluate the possible myogenic contribution to CD fibrotic process through the comparative analysis of histological, morphometric and molecular alterations occurring in human smooth muscle. Full thickness specimens were obtained from CD (non-involved and stenotic tracts) and healthy (control) ileum. Tissues were processed for histological and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses and SMCs were isolated from the muscularis propria for morphofunctional and molecular (qPCR) analyses. CD stenotic ileum showed a significant increased thickness of all layers compared to CD non-involved and control ileum. IHC revealed an overexpression of α-smooth muscle actin and collagens I-III throughout all intestinal layers only in stenotic tracts. The two growth factors, PDGF and TGF-β, showed a progressive increase in expression in the muscle layer from CD non-involved to stenotic tracts. Freshly isolated SMCs presented alterations in CD non-involved tracts that progressively increased in the stenotic tracts consisting in a statistical increase in mRNA encoding for PDGF-β and collagen III, paralleled to a decrease in TGF-β and Tribbles-like protein-3 mRNA, and altered morphofunctional parameters consisting in progressive decreases in cell length and contraction to acetylcholine. These findings indicate that intrinsic myogenic alterations occur in CD ileum, that they likely precede stricture formation, and might represent suitable new targets for anti-fibrotic interventions. PMID:25578979

  3. Dietary Supplement Therapies for Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Parian, Alyssa; Limketkai, Berkeley N

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are chronic relapsing and remitting chronic diseases for which there is no cure. The treatment of IBD frequently requires immunosuppressive and biologic therapies which carry an increased risk of infections and possible malignancy. There is a continued search for safer and more natural therapies in the treatment of IBD. This review aims to summarize the most current literature on the use of dietary supplements for the treatment of IBD. Specifically, the efficacy and adverse effects of vitamin D, fish oil, probiotics, prebiotics, curcumin, Boswellia serrata, aloe vera and cannabis sativa are reviewed. PMID:26561079

  4. Inherited determinants of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis phenotypes: a genetic association study

    PubMed Central

    Cleynen, Isabelle; Boucher, Gabrielle; Jostins, Luke; Schumm, L Philip; Zeissig, Sebastian; Ahmad, Tariq; Andersen, Vibeke; Andrews, Jane M; Annese, Vito; Brand, Stephan; Brant, Steven R; Cho, Judy H; Daly, Mark J; Dubinsky, Marla; Duerr, Richard H; Ferguson, Lynnette R; Franke, Andre; Gearry, Richard B; Goyette, Philippe; Hakonarson, Hakon; Halfvarson, Jonas; Hov, Johannes R; Huang, Hailang; Kennedy, Nicholas A; Kupcinskas, Limas; Lawrance, Ian C; Lee, James C; Satsangi, Jack; Schreiber, Stephan; Théâtre, Emilie; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Weersma, Rinse K; Wilson, David C; Parkes, Miles; Vermeire, Severine; Rioux, John D; Mansfield, John; Silverberg, Mark S; Radford-Smith, Graham; McGovern, Dermot P B; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Lees, Charlie W

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease; treatment strategies have historically been determined by this binary categorisation. Genetic studies have identified 163 susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease, mostly shared between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. We undertook the largest genotype association study, to date, in widely used clinical subphenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease with the goal of further understanding the biological relations between diseases. Methods This study included patients from 49 centres in 16 countries in Europe, North America, and Australasia. We applied the Montreal classification system of inflammatory bowel disease subphenotypes to 34 819 patients (19 713 with Crohn's disease, 14 683 with ulcerative colitis) genotyped on the Immunochip array. We tested for genotype–phenotype associations across 156 154 genetic variants. We generated genetic risk scores by combining information from all known inflammatory bowel disease associations to summarise the total load of genetic risk for a particular phenotype. We used these risk scores to test the hypothesis that colonic Crohn's disease, ileal Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis are all genetically distinct from each other, and to attempt to identify patients with a mismatch between clinical diagnosis and genetic risk profile. Findings After quality control, the primary analysis included 29 838 patients (16 902 with Crohn's disease, 12 597 with ulcerative colitis). Three loci (NOD2, MHC, and MST1 3p21) were associated with subphenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease, mainly disease location (essentially fixed over time; median follow-up of 10·5 years). Little or no genetic association with disease behaviour (which changed dramatically over time) remained after conditioning on disease location and age at onset. The genetic risk score representing all known risk alleles for

  5. Severe viral oesophagitis, pharyngitis, and stomatitis as antecedents of ileocecal Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Waluga, Marek; Budzyńska, Agnieszka; Kajor, Maciej; Hartleb, Marek

    2015-01-01

    We present a 22-year-old male who developed a severe erosive oesophagitis extending to the pharynx and oral cavity without obvious risk factors. Endoscopic image suggested viral aetiology that could not be confirmed by routine serological diagnostics of infections with cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and Herpes simplex virus. The histopathological evaluation also gave no definite clues to the aetiology of the inflammation. Treatment with acyclovir was ineffective, but gancyclovir therapy caused spectacular clinical improvement and healing of erosions. Two months later the patient presented febrile diarrhoea that was a symptom of ileocecal Crohn's disease proven by endoscopy, enterography, and histopathology. It is the first report of severe viral oesophagitis preceding clinical manifestation of Crohn's disease. This observation warrants further study towards the viral aetiology of oral, pharyngeal, and oesophageal erosions, frequently associated with Crohn's disease. PMID:25960815

  6. Transformation of chenodeoxycholic acid to ursodeoxycholic acid in patients with Crohn's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Miwa, H.; Yamamoto, M.; Nishida, T.; Yao, T.

    1986-03-01

    In vivo 7 beta-epimerization of chenodeoxycholic acid to ursodeoxycholic acid and the role of 7-ketolithocholic acid as an intermediate in this biotransformation were studied in 11 patients with Crohn's disease and in 5 healthy volunteers. The incorporation of deuterium into biliary ursodeoxycholic acid and 7-ketolithocholic acid was determined by computed gas chromatography-mass fragmentography after ingestion of a dideuterated chenodeoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic-11,12-d2 acid. The incorporation of deuterium into ursodeoxycholic acid increased to a peak level at 48 h in the patients with Crohn's disease, but was delayed in healthy volunteers. In 8 patients and 2 healthy controls there were small amounts of 7-ketolithocholic acid in bile. The incorporation of deuterium into 7-ketolithocholic acid was confirmed in only 2 patients and the peak level was noted at 48 h. These observations suggest that 7-ketolithocholic acid is an intermediate of this biotransformation in patients with Crohn's disease.

  7. Controlled trial of polymeric versus elemental diet in treatment of active Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Giaffer, M H; North, G; Holdsworth, C D

    1990-04-01

    30 patients with active Crohn's disease, mean Crohn's Disease Activity Index 301 (SE 32), who would otherwise have been treated with steroids, were randomised to receive for 4 weeks either an elemental diet ('Vivonex') (n = 16) or a polymeric diet ('Fortison') (n = 14). Assessment on days 10 and 28 showed that clinical remission occurred in 5 (36%) of the 14 patients on fortison compared with 12 (75%) of the 16 patients assigned to vivonex. The difference in remission rate was significant (p less than 0.03). Dietary treatment resulted in little change in the nutritional state and various laboratory indices of activity over a 4 week period despite clinical improvement. Polymeric diets do not seem to offer an effective therapeutic alternative to elemental diets in patients with acute exacerbations of Crohn's disease. PMID:1969560

  8. Elemental diet as primary treatment of acute Crohn's disease: a controlled trial.

    PubMed

    O'Moráin, C; Segal, A W; Levi, A J

    1984-06-23

    Acute exacerbations of Crohn's disease are usually treated with prednisolone or potentially more toxic immunosuppressive drugs or by surgery. In pilot studies replacing the normal diet by a protein free elemental diet also induced remission. A controlled trial was therefore conducted in which 21 patients acutely ill with exacerbations of Crohn's disease were randomised to receive either prednisolone 0.75 mg/kg/day or an elemental diet (Vivonex) for four weeks. Assessment at four and 12 weeks showed that the patients treated with the elemental diet had improved as much as and by some criteria more than the steroid treated group. Elemental diet is a safe and effective treatment for acute Crohn's disease. PMID:6428577

  9. Pulmonary complications of hepatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Surani, Salim R; Mendez, Yamely; Anjum, Humayun; Varon, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Severe chronic liver disease (CLD) may result from portal hypertension, hepatocellular failure or the combination of both. Some of these patients may develop pulmonary complications independent from any pulmonary pathology that they may have. Among them the hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS), portopulmonary hypertension (PPH) and hepatic hydrothorax (HH) are described in detail in this literature review. HPS is encountered in approximately 15% to 30% of the patients and its presence is associated with increase in mortality and also requires liver transplantation in many cases. PPH has been reported among 4%-8% of the patient with CLD who have undergone liver transplantation. The HH is another entity, which has the prevalence rate of 5% to 6% and is associated in the absence of cardiopulmonary disease. These clinical syndromes occur in similar pathophysiologic environments. Most treatment modalities work as temporizing measures. The ultimate treatment of choice is liver transplant. This clinical review provides basic concepts; pathophysiology and clinical presentation that will allow the clinician to better understand these potentially life-threatening complications. This article will review up-to-date information on the pathophysiology, clinical features and the treatment of the pulmonary complications among liver disease patients. PMID:27468192

  10. Interleukin 10 (Tenovil) in the prevention of postoperative recurrence of Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Colombel, J; Rutgeerts, P; Malchow, H; Jacyna, M; Nielsen, O; Rask-Madsen, J; Van Deventer, S; Ferguson, A; Desreumaux, P; Forbes, A; Geboes, K; Melani, L; Cohard, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—New lesions of Crohn's disease occur early after ileal or ileocolonic resection and ileocolonic anastomosis. We performed a double blind controlled trial to evaluate the safety and tolerance of recombinant human interleukin 10 (IL-10; Tenovil) in subjects operated on for Crohn's disease. We also assessed the effect of Tenovil in preventing endoscopic recurrence 12 weeks after surgery.
METHODS—Patients with Crohn's disease who underwent curative ileal or ileocolonic resection and primary anastomosis were randomised within two weeks after surgery to receive subcutaneous Tenovil 4 µg/kg once daily (QD) (n=22) or 8 µg/kg twice weekly (TIW) (n=21), or placebo (QD or TIW) (n=22). An ileocolonoscopy was performed after 12 weeks of treatment.
RESULTS—Compliance was excellent. The most frequently observed adverse events were mild and moderate in severity and equally distributed across treatment groups. Thirty seven patients in the pooled Tenovil group and 21 patients in the pooled placebo group were evaluable by endoscopy. At 12 weeks, 11 of 21 patients (52%) in the placebo group had recurrent lesions compared with 17 of 37 patients (46%) in the Tenovil group (ns). The incidence of severe endoscopic recurrence was similar in both groups (9%).
CONCLUSION—Tenovil treatment for 12 consecutive weeks in patients with Crohn's disease after intestinal resection was safe and well tolerated. No evidence of prevention of endoscopic recurrence of Crohn's disease by Tenovil was observed.


Keywords: Crohn's disease; interleukin 10; endoscopic recurrence PMID:11413109

  11. Immunoresponsiveness in Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Disease—Effect of Colectomy and Suppression of Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lyanga, John; Davis, Paul; Thomson, Alan B. R.

    1988-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of medically induced symptomatic disease improvement on in vitro tests of cell-mediated immune responses in 33 patients with Crohn's disease. When results obtained in 17 patients with ulcerative colitis were compared with those of 10 patients with ulcerative colitis who had undergone a colectomy, no significant correlation was detected between individual clinical and laboratory variables or the Crohn's disease activity index and in vitro tests of cell-mediated immunity. A different pattern emerged from the longitudinal tests of cell-mediated immunity: when these test results were initially abnormal in patients with Crohn's disease, clinical improvement as assessed by the Crohn's disease activity index was associated with normalizing cell-mediated immunity. In contrast, when the test results were initially normal, clinical improvement was not associated with any change in the immune response. Following colectomy in patients with ulcerative colitis, some abnormalities of suppressed immune responses remained, although patients were cured of their disease. Factors other than clinical disease activity may be responsible for the suppressed immunoresponsiveness in some patients with inflammatory bowel disease, and variable changes in cell-mediated immunity occur after both surgical and medical treatment. PMID:3388844

  12. [Superior sagittal sinus thrombosis caused by Crohn's disease and macrocytic anemia : a case report].

    PubMed

    Osawa, Shigeyuki; Suzuki, Sachio; Yamada, Masaru; Fukushima, Yutaka; Utsuki, Satoshi; Shimizu, Satoru; Kurata, Akira; Fujii, Kiyotaka; Kan, Shinichi

    2007-06-01

    A 32-years-old man with a past history of hemorrhoids presenting with hemiparesis was diagnosed as having sagittal sinus thrombosis with hemorrtagic infarction. Laboratory data revealed macrocytic anemia (Hb 11.2 g/d/) with hypoproteinernia (5.5 g/d). After discharge the patient developed abdominal pain, diarrhea, edema in the leg and sustained anemia. Final diagnosis through colon fiberscope findings was Crohn's disease Macrocytic anemia seemed to be induced by Vit. B12 deficiency due to malabsorption. The mechanism and causal relationship between Crohn's disease and sinus thrombosis is discussed. PMID:17564049

  13. Cephalic Duodenopancreatectomy for Hyperalgic Duodenal Crohn's Disease Fistulized in the Pancreatic Gland

    PubMed Central

    Guellouz, Sabra; Pariente, Benjamin; Benet, Claire; Baudry, Clotilde; Lourenco, Nelson; Kraemer, Aurore; Allez, Matthieu; Gornet, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract involvement in adult Crohn's disease (CD) is rare and severe complications unusual. Stenosis has been reported, but gastroduodenal fistulae are seldom detected during surgery and most of the fistulae are cologastric or ileogastric. In complicated gastroduodenal CD, medical treatments are often effective and surgery is only considered in exceptional cases. We here report the unusual case of a 23-year-old patient with upper GI CD presenting a hyperalgic giant ulcer of the bulb fistulized in the pancreatic gland. The failure of steroids and two lines of combined treatment led us to a salvage surgical option. Abdominal exploration showed a plate stomach with an inflammatory bulboduodenal block. Cephalic duodenopancreatectomy and cholecystectomy were performed; histological analysis reported large fissuring pylorus ulceration with micro abscesses reaching the pancreas and the presence of non-caseating granulomas. Six months after the surgery, the patient had stopped antalgic treatment and did not have residual abdominal pain. He had gained 11 kg in weight and had no diarrhea with pancreatic enzymes. To our knowledge, we report the first case of an upper GI and fistulizing CD patient heavily treated with steroids and combined immunosuppressant agents requiring salvage cephalic duodenopancreatectomy. PMID:24748861

  14. [Environmental risk factors in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (excluding tobacco and appendicectomy)].

    PubMed

    Jantchou, Prévost; Monnet, Elisabeth; Carbonnel, Franck

    2006-01-01

    A rapid increase in the incidence of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis in developed countries, the occurrence of Crohn's disease in spouses, and a lack of complete concordance in monozygotic twins are strong arguments for the role of environmental factors in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Research in the field of environmental factors in IBD is based upon epidemiological (geographical and case-control), clinical and experimental studies. The role of two environmental factors has clearly been established in IBD. Smoking is a risk factor for Crohn's disease and a protective factor for ulcerative colitis; appendectomy is a protective factor for ulcerative colitis. Many other environmental factors for IBD have been investigated, including infectious agents, diet, drugs, stress and social status. They are detailed in the present review. Among them, atypical Mycobacteria, oral contraceptives and antibiotics could play a role in Crohn's disease. To date, three hypotheses associate environmental factors with the pathophysiology of IBD (loss of tolerance of intestinal immune system towards commensal bacterial flora): the hygiene, infection and cold chain hypotheses. Much work remains to be done to identify risk factors for IBD. Research identifying environmental factors that might cause a predisposition to IBD is useful. It may lead to disease prevention in subjects who are genetically predisposed and disease improvement in patients. PMID:16885870

  15. Genotype profiles of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis recovered from suspected and Crohn's disease patients in India.

    PubMed

    Singh, A V; Singh, S V; Sohal, J S; Singh, P K

    2010-06-01

    Present study aimed to genotype Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) recovered from suspected and Crohn' s disease patients. A total of 32 MAP and DNA (directly from clinical samples) recovered from human origin were genotyped using IS 1311 PCR-REA. Isolates were cultured from stool, biopsies and blood clots of Crohn's disease patients, and stool samples of suspected (animal attendants, lab workers etc). Of the 32 MAP isolates belonging to 28 human beings, majority (84.3%) were genotyped as 'Bison type', while 21.7% were of 'cattle' and none was 'sheep' genotype. Study first time reports distribution of 'Cattle' and 'Bison type' 'genotypes in suspected and Crohn's patients on pilot scale in India. 'Bison type' genotype was predominant in the surveyed human population. PMID:22471168

  16. Usefulness of Endoscopic Indices in Determination of Disease Activity in Patients with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kucharski, Marcin; Karczewski, Jacek; Mańkowska-Wierzbicka, Dorota; Karmelita-Katulska, Katarzyna; Kaczmarek, Elżbieta; Iwanik, Katarzyna; Rzymski, Piotr; Grzymisławski, Marian; Linke, Krzysztof; Dobrowolska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Background. Assessment of endoscopic activity of Crohn's disease (CD) is of growing importance both in clinical practice and in clinical trials. The study aimed to assess which of the endoscopic indices used for evaluation of mucosal changes correlates with the currently used clinical indices for determination of disease activity and with the results of histopathological examination. Study. A group of 71 patients with CD and 52 individuals without a diagnosis of GI tract disease as a control group were investigated, considering clinical and histological severity of the disease and the severity of inflammatory changes in the bowel. Evaluation was conducted with the use of clinical, endoscopic, and histopathological indices. Endoscopic indices were then correlated with different clinical and histopathological indices with the aim of finding the strongest correlations. Results and Conclusions. Correlation between the clinical disease activity and the severity of endoscopic lesions in CD was shown in this study to be poor. The results also indicate that the optimal endoscopic index used in the diagnostic stage and in the assessment of treatment effects in CD is Simple Endoscopic Score for Crohn's Disease (SES-CD). PMID:26997952

  17. Microbial Population Differentials between Mucosal and Submucosal Intestinal Tissues in Advanced Crohn's Disease of the Ileum

    PubMed Central

    Chiodini, Rodrick J.; Dowd, Scot E.; Chamberlin, William M.; Galandiuk, Susan; Davis, Brian; Glassing, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Since Crohn's disease is a transmural disease, we hypothesized that examination of deep submucosal tissues directly involved in the inflammatory disease process may provide unique insights into bacterial populations transgressing intestinal barriers and bacterial populations more representative of the causes and agents of the disease. We performed deep 16s microbiota sequencing on isolated ilea mucosal and submucosal tissues on 20 patients with Crohn's disease and 15 non-inflammatory bowel disease controls with a depth of coverage averaging 81,500 sequences in each of the 70 DNA samples yielding an overall resolution down to 0.0001% of the bacterial population. Of the 4,802,328 total sequences generated, 98.9% or 4,749,183 sequences aligned with the Kingdom Bacteria that clustered into 8545 unique sequences with <3% divergence or operational taxonomic units enabling the identification of 401 genera and 698 tentative bacterial species. There were significant differences in all taxonomic levels between the submucosal microbiota in Crohn's disease compared to controls, including organisms of the Order Desulfovibrionales that were present within the submucosal tissues of most Crohn's disease patients but absent in the control group. A variety of organisms of the Phylum Firmicutes were increased in the subjacent submucosa as compared to the parallel mucosal tissue including Ruminococcus spp., Oscillospira spp., Pseudobutyrivibrio spp., and Tumebacillus spp. In addition, Propionibacterium spp. and Cloacibacterium spp. were increased as well as large increases in Proteobacteria including Parasutterella spp. and Methylobacterium spp. This is the first study to examine the microbial populations within submucosal tissues of patients with Crohn's disease and to compare microbial communities found deep within the submucosal tissues with those present on mucosal surfaces. Our data demonstrate the existence of a distinct submucosal microbiome and ecosystem that is not well

  18. Small intestine contrast ultrasonography for the detection and assessment of Crohn disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chenjing; Ma, Xuelei; Xue, Luqi; Xu, Jing; Li, Qingfang; Wang, Yun; Zhang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Crohn disease (CD) is a chronic relapsing disease. Imaging modalities are essential for the diagnosis and assessment of CD. Small intestine contrast ultrasonography (SICUS) is a well-tolerated, noninvasive and radiation-free modality and has shown potential in CD assessment. We aimed at evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of SICUS in the detection and assessment of small-bowel lesions and complications in CD. Methods: We searched PubMed database for relevant studies published before April 24, 2016. We integrated the true positive, false positive, false negative, and true negative into the pooled estimates of sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, and diagnostic odds ratio. Forest plots were to represent the pooled results of all studies. Results: Thirteen articles were finally considered eligible. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of SICUS in detecting small-bowel lesions were 0.883 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.847–0.913) and 0.861 (95% CI 0.828–0.890), respectively. The pooled diagnostic odds ratio was 39.123 (95% CI 20.014–76.476) and the area under the curve of summary receiver operating characteristic was 0.9273 (standard error: 0.0152). In subgroup analyses, SICUS represented fine sensitivity and specificity in proximal and distal small intestine lesion, as well as in CD-related complications such as stricture, dilation, abscess, and fistula. Conclusion: SICUS is accurate enough to make a complete assessment about the location, extent, number, and almost all kinds of complications in CD small-bowel lesions. PMID:27495028

  19. Cardiovascular complications of respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Chowdhuri, Susmita; Crook, Errol D; Taylor, Herman A; Badr, M Safwan

    2007-11-01

    A major burden of morbidity and mortality due to respiratory diseases can be directly related to the cardiovascular (CV) complications of these disorders. Evidence from cross-sectional and longitudinal studies link reduced lung function and cardiovascular diseases. However, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. Hypoxia-induced increased sympathetic activity, blood viscosity, or inflammation, among other factors, may mediate the underlying pathogenesis. In addition, sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) has been implicated by association in multiple CV diseases including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, and stroke. However, the exact contribution of SDB, including obstructive and central sleep apneas, to the development of cardiovascular diseases is not fully understood. In this context, the contribution of the new large, prospective, Jackson Heart Study could be significant in that it is designed to answer several of these questions, specifically in the African American population. This review examines the current evidence that links both reduced lung function and SDB to CV diseases. PMID:18004091

  20. The impact of mode of delivery on outcomes in patients with perianal Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Alice G; Oxford, Emily C; Sauk, Jenny; Nguyen, Deanna D; Yajnik, Vijay; Friedman, Sonia; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Crohn's disease (CD) often affects women during the reproductive years. While several studies have examined the impact of pregnancy on luminal disease, limited literature exists in those with perianal CD. Decision regarding mode of delivery is a unique challenge in such patients due to concerns regarding the effect of pelvic floor trauma during delivery on pre-existing perianal involvement. Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of CD patients with established perianal disease undergoing either vaginal delivery or Caesarean section (C-section) at our institutions. We examined the occurrence of symptomatic perianal disease flares within 5 years after delivery in such women compared to non-pregnant CD controls. We also compared the occurrence of such flares between the two modes of delivery in women with established perianal CD. Results We identified 61 pregnant CD patients with established perianal disease (11 vaginal delivery, 50 via C-section) and 61 non-pregnant CD controls with perianal disease. One-third of the C-sections were primarily for obstetric indications. Six of the vaginal deliveries were complicated. Approximately 36% of cases had a symptomatic perianal flare within 1 year after delivery. This was similar across both modes of delivery (p=0.53), and similar to non-pregnant CD patients. There was no difference in the rates of perianal surgical intervention or luminal disease flares in our population based on mode of delivery, or between pregnant CD patients and non-pregnant CD controls. Conclusion We observed no difference in risk of symptomatic perianal flares in patients with established perianal CD delivering vaginally or via C-section. PMID:24918322

  1. Depressed T cell reactivity to recall antigens in Crohn's disease before and after surgical resection.

    PubMed

    D'Haens, G; Hiele, M; Rutgeerts, P; Geboes, K; Ceuppens, J L

    1994-12-01

    Earlier studies regarding possible primary immune disturbances participating in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease yielded conflicting results. Peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets and lymphocyte proliferative responses to five soluble recall antigens and to the polyclonal stimulator phythaemagglutinin were therefore measured in 17 patients with active Crohn's disease, before and six months after surgical resection of the inflamed intestine and in 16 healthy controls. Lymphocyte proliferation in response to all five recall antigens was significantly lower in patients than in controls. No significant differences with controls were detected after surgery. Addition of indomethacin to phythaemagglutinin stimulated lymphocyte cultures had a stronger proliferation enhancing effect in patients than in controls, resulting in comparable proliferative responses in both groups. When both indomethacin and prostaglandin E2 were added, inhibition of reactivity by prostaglandin E2 was stronger in patients' cultures. This suggests a higher sensitivity to inflammatory prostaglandins in Crohn's disease. The degree of lymphocyte stimulation by antigens correlated positively with the percentage of circulating memory T cells (CD 45 RA-). The percentage of activated (HLA-DR+) CD8 cells was higher in patients than in controls. The CD4/CD8 ratio, which was not significantly different between patients and controls, correlated significantly with disease activity and characteristics, even in the postoperative phase. These findings suggest that immune abnormalities in Crohn's disease fluctuate with and are probably secondary to inflammatory activity. PMID:7829010

  2. Depressed T cell reactivity to recall antigens in Crohn's disease before and after surgical resection.

    PubMed Central

    D'Haens, G; Hiele, M; Rutgeerts, P; Geboes, K; Ceuppens, J L

    1994-01-01

    Earlier studies regarding possible primary immune disturbances participating in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease yielded conflicting results. Peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets and lymphocyte proliferative responses to five soluble recall antigens and to the polyclonal stimulator phythaemagglutinin were therefore measured in 17 patients with active Crohn's disease, before and six months after surgical resection of the inflamed intestine and in 16 healthy controls. Lymphocyte proliferation in response to all five recall antigens was significantly lower in patients than in controls. No significant differences with controls were detected after surgery. Addition of indomethacin to phythaemagglutinin stimulated lymphocyte cultures had a stronger proliferation enhancing effect in patients than in controls, resulting in comparable proliferative responses in both groups. When both indomethacin and prostaglandin E2 were added, inhibition of reactivity by prostaglandin E2 was stronger in patients' cultures. This suggests a higher sensitivity to inflammatory prostaglandins in Crohn's disease. The degree of lymphocyte stimulation by antigens correlated positively with the percentage of circulating memory T cells (CD 45 RA-). The percentage of activated (HLA-DR+) CD8 cells was higher in patients than in controls. The CD4/CD8 ratio, which was not significantly different between patients and controls, correlated significantly with disease activity and characteristics, even in the postoperative phase. These findings suggest that immune abnormalities in Crohn's disease fluctuate with and are probably secondary to inflammatory activity. PMID:7829010

  3. Pulmonary Crohn's Disease in Down Syndrome: A Link or Linkage Problem

    PubMed Central

    Thaver, Danyal; Beg, Mirza

    2016-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an autoimmune inflammatory disorder that primarily affects the gastrointestinal tract. It may have pulmonary involvement, which has been rarely reported in pediatric patients. Down syndrome (DS) has been associated with increased frequency of autoimmune diseases. However, associations between CD and DS have been rarely reported. We present the case of a 5-year-old girl with known DS and a history of chronic intermittent abdominal pain who presented with persistent pneumonia. Her workup included a chest computed tomography (CT) scan that showed multiple noncalcified pulmonary nodules. An extensive infectious workup was done that was negative. CT-guided needle biopsy of the lung nodules showed necrotizing granulomas. This raised concern for primary CD with extraintestinal pulmonary manifestation. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy were performed, and colon biopsies showed scattered epithelioid granulomas. Based on this information, there was consensus that her lung nodules were secondary to CD. She was started on standard therapy for CD, and her abdominal and respiratory symptoms gradually improved. However, she continues to have mild residual lung calcification and fibrosis. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of pulmonary CD in a child with DS. The natural history of pulmonary CD in the pediatric population is not very well studied. Furthermore, since DS has been well known to be associated with increased frequency of malignancies and autoimmune conditions due to immune dysregulation, it is difficult to predict the severity and possible complications in this patient. PMID:27462187

  4. Kawasaki Disease: Complications, Treatment and Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Stroke More Kawasaki Disease: Complications, Treatment and Prevention Updated:Apr 27,2016 Complications The possibility of ... problems that did not show up right away. Prevention There is no known prevention for Kawasaki disease. ...

  5. Familial expression of anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae mannan antibodies in affected and unaffected relatives of patients with Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, C; Yang, H; Li, Z; Rotter, J; Targan, S; Braun, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Crohn's disease is a familial disorder, and antiglycan antibodies to the cell wall mannan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA) are highly correlated with Crohn's disease.
AIMS—To determine whether there is a familial pattern for expression of serum levels of anti-mannan Ig, and whether this trait is expressed in clinically unaffected Crohn's disease family members.
METHODS—349 patients with Crohn's disease, 87 Crohn's disease affected relatives, 333 inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) free relatives, 58 spouses, and 190 healthy control patients were studied. Serum IgG and IgA binding activity to S cerevisiae cell wall mannan was quantitated by ELISA.
RESULTS—A high percentage of patients with Crohn's disease (51.9%) and affected family members (56.3%) were seropositive for anti-mannan Ig, compared with the normal control population (3.7%). Seropositive and seronegative phenotypes of Crohn's disease probands were correlated among all affected relatives, and this association was stronger in affected first degree relatives. Statistical intraclass correlations of quantitative anti-mannan Ig levels revealed significantly less variation within, rather than between families. A significant familial aggregation was observed for affected relatives; this was even stronger for unaffected relatives. While a significant familial aggregation was observed among unaffected siblings pairs, there was no significant correlation among marital pairs.
CONCLUSION—Results show that anti-mannan Ig in family members affected and unaffected with Crohn's disease is a familial trait for both affected and unaffected relatives. The lack of concordance in marital pairs indicates that familiality is due in part to a genetic factor or childhood environmental exposure.


Keywords: Crohn's disease; inflammatory bowel disease; ulcerative colitis; anti-mannan antibodies; intraclass correlation; statistical genetics PMID:10601056

  6. Management of Crohn's Disease in the New Era of Gut Rehabilitation and Intestinal Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nyabanga, Custon; Kochhar, Gursimran; Costa, Guilherme; Soliman, Basem; Shen, Bo; Abu-Elmagd, Kareem

    2016-07-01

    Despite recent therapeutic advances, patients with Crohn's disease (CD) continue to experience high recurrence with cumulative structural damage and ultimate loss of nutritional autonomy. With short bowel syndrome, strictures, and enteric fistulae being the underlying pathology, CD is the second common indication for home parenteral nutrition (HPN). With development of intestinal failure, nutritional management including HPN is required as a rescue therapy. Unfortunately, some patients do not escape the HPN-associated complications. Therefore, the concept of gut rehabilitation has evolved as part of the algorithmic management of these patients, with transplantation being the ultimate life-saving therapy. With type 2 intestinal failure, comprehensive rehabilitative measures including nutritional care, pharmacologic manipulation, autologous reconstruction, and bowel lengthening is often successful, particularly in patients with quiescent disease. With type 3 intestinal failure, transplantation is the only life-saving treatment for patients with HPN failure and intractable disease. With CD being the second common indication for transplantation in adults, survival outcome continues to improve because of surgical innovation, novel immunosuppression, and better postoperative care. Despite being a rescue therapy, the procedure has achieved survival rates similar to other solid organs, and comparable to those who continue to receive HPN therapy. With similar technical, immunologic, and infectious complications, survival is similar in the CD and non-CD recipients. Full nutritional autonomy is achievable in most survivors with better quality of life and long-term cost-effectiveness. CD recurrence is rare with no impact on graft function. Further progress is anticipated with new insights into the pathogenesis of CD and mechanisms of transplant tolerance. PMID:27104827

  7. ATG16L1: A multifunctional susceptibility factor in Crohn disease

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Mohammad; Ammitzboell, Mette; Nys, Kris; Seidelin, Jakob Benedict; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variations in the autophagic pathway influence genetic predispositions to Crohn disease. Autophagy, the major lysosomal pathway for degrading and recycling cytoplasmic material, constitutes an important homeostatic cellular process. Of interest, single-nucleotide polymorphisms in ATG16L1 (autophagy-related 16-like 1 [S. cerevisiae]), a key component in the autophagic response to invading pathogens, have been associated with an increased risk of developing Crohn disease. The most common and well-studied genetic variant of ATG16L1 (rs2241880; leading to a T300A conversion) exhibits a strong association with risk for developing Crohn disease. The rs2241880 variant plays a crucial role in pathogen clearance, resulting in imbalanced cytokine production, and is linked to other biological processes, such as the endoplasmic reticulum stress/unfolded protein response. In this review, we focus on the importance of ATG16L1 and its genetic variant (T300A) within the elementary biological processes linked to Crohn disease. PMID:25906181

  8. Fire in the Belly and the Professionalization of Nurses: A Historical Analysis of Crohn Disease Care

    PubMed Central

    Brotherton, Carol S.; Taylor, Ann Gill; Keeling, Arlene

    2012-01-01

    Today professional nurses around the world are stepping up to meet the needs of individuals with Crohn disease using their specialized knowledge and skills that demonstrate areas of expertise that have not always existed. The gastrointestinal-specific knowledge being used by these 21st century nurses exists today because progressive efforts of nurses in previous decades moved the profession of nursing forward. The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze the development of the role of nurses in responding to new challenges patients with Crohn disease face since the emergence of the disease in the early 1900s. The authors used traditional historic research methods to conduct the study. Primary sources include nursing journals and textbooks published in the 20th and 21st centuries and documents archived at The Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, where Burrill B. Crohn conducted his seminal work. The significance of the findings is that the changing role of nurses in caring for patients with Crohn disease mirrors the professionalization of nursing during the 20th and early 21st centuries. PMID:23364362

  9. Lipidomic profiling in Crohn's disease: Abnormalities in phosphatidylinositols, with preservation of ceramide, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine composition

    PubMed Central

    Sewell, Gavin W.; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Han, Xianlin; Koster, Grielof; Bielawski, Jacek; Goss, Victoria; Smith, Philip J.; Rahman, Farooq Z.; Vega, Roser; Bloom, Stuart L.; Walker, Ann P.; Postle, Anthony D.; Segal, Anthony W.

    2012-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory condition largely affecting the terminal ileum and large bowel. A contributing cause is the failure of an adequate acute inflammatory response as a result of impaired secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages. This defective secretion arises from aberrant vesicle trafficking, misdirecting the cytokines to lysosomal degradation. Aberrant intestinal permeability is also well-established in Crohn's disease. Both the disordered vesicle trafficking and increased bowel permeability could result from abnormal lipid composition. We thus measured the sphingo- and phospholipid composition of macrophages, using mass spectrometry and stable isotope labelling approaches. Stimulation of macrophages with heat-killed Escherichia coli resulted in three main changes; a significant reduction in the amount of individual ceramide species, an altered composition of phosphatidylcholine, and an increased rate of phosphatidylcholine synthesis in macrophages. These changes were observed in macrophages from both healthy control individuals and patients with Crohn's disease. The only difference detected between control and Crohn's disease macrophages was a reduced proportion of newly-synthesised phosphatidylinositol 16:0/18:1 over a defined time period. Shotgun lipidomics analysis of macroscopically non-inflamed ileal biopsies showed a significant decrease in this same lipid species with overall preservation of sphingolipid, phospholipid and cholesterol composition. PMID:22728312

  10. Vitamin D-mediated calcium absorption in patients with clinically stable Crohn's disease: a pilot study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin D is the critical hormone for intestinal absorption of calcium. Optimal calcium absorption is important for proper mineralization of bone in the prevention of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures, among other important functions. Diseases associated with gut inflammation, such as Crohn's ...

  11. Model for Postgraduate Medical Education: Study of Crohn's Disease in New Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Daniel H.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to introduce a model system for the continuous retrieval, storage, and dissemination of relevant clinical information that has proven to be an effective resource of real-life data. Patients with Crohn's disease from a geographic area served as the population base for 2 groups of physicians, one group practicing in the…

  12. Immunomodulators for the treatment of Crohn's disease in adults: optimal use and prospects for future drug treatments.

    PubMed

    Allen, Patrick B; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) requires treatment beyond symptoms by enabling and maintaining mucosal healing and therefore clinical remission. However, with the increasing use of biologics there have been safety concerns and there is a significant cost implication with the early use of biologics. Therefore, it is imperative that patients with severe/complicated disease or poor prognostic factors are treated with an aggressive strategy while all remaining patients should be treated in a step-up strategy. The potential for disease modification with thiopurines and methotrexate is debated in CD when they are used as a monotherapy. In this review we discuss existing and newer therapies that have recently been developed for CD. We will also provide an algorithm for current management of adult CD patients in routine clinical practice. PMID:26900725

  13. Multifocal-motor-neuropathy-like disease associated with Infliximab treatment in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Menéndez, S; González Nafría, N; Redondo-Robles, L; Sierra-Ausín, M; García-Santiago, R; Saponaro-González, A

    2015-02-15

    Multifocal motor neuropathy is an immune-mediated disorder characterized by motor-conduction block in nerve-conduction studies. It is recognized that anti-TNF-α therapies are associated with immune-mediated conditions as adverse events. We report a case of multifocal-motor-neuropathy-like disease associated with the use of Infliximab in a patient with Crohn's disease. The diagnosis was based on neurophysiological evaluation and complete screening tests. Clinical and laboratory findings were not compatible with other potential causes. There was a mild response to the IVIg treatment, and once Infliximab treatment was withdrawn, the patient made slow but substantial progress in his motor function, with partial improvement of motor conduction blocks in the last neurophysiological evaluation. We believe there is a causal relationship between anti-TNF-α treatment and the disorder in this patient. There are few well-documented reports of this association. To our knowledge, our case is the first occurring in a patient with Crohn's disease. PMID:25592414

  14. Twin studies reveal specific imbalances in the mucosa-associated microbiota of patients with ileal Crohn's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Willing, B.; Halfvarson, J.; Dicksved, J.; Rosenquist, M.; Jarnerot, G.; Engstrand, L.; Tysk, C.; Jansson, J. K

    2008-08-15

    Large inter-individual variation in the composition of the intestinal microbiota between unrelated individuals has made it challenging to identify specific aspects of dysbiosis that lead to Crohn's disease. To reduce variations in exposure during establishment of the gut flora and influence of genotype, we studied the mucosaassociated microbiota of monozygotic twin pairs that were discordant (n=6) or concordant (n=4) for Crohn's disease. DNA was extracted from biopsies collected from 5 locations between the ileum and rectum. Bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA genes were amplified and community composition assessed by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism, cloning and sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR. The microbial compositions at all biopsy locations for each individual were similar, regardless of disease state, but there were differences between individuals. In particular, individuals with predominantly ileal Crohn's had a dramatically lower abundance (P<0.001) of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and increased abundance (P<0.03) of Escherichia coli compared to healthy co-twins and those with Crohn's localized in the colon. This dysbiosis was significantly correlated to the disease phenotype rather than genotype. The reduced abundance of F. prausnitzii and increased abundance of E. coli are indicative of an ileal Crohn's disease phenotype, distinct from colonic Crohn's disease and the relative abundances of these specific bacterial populations are promising biomarker candidates for differential diagnosis of Crohn's and eventually customized treatment.

  15. Quality of Life Is Related to Fecal Calprotectin Concentrations in Colonic Crohn Disease and Ulcerative Colitis, but not in Ileal Crohn Disease.

    PubMed

    Gauss, Annika; Geib, Thomas; Hinz, Ulf; Schaefert, Rainer; Zwickel, Philipp; Zawierucha, Anna; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Klute, Lukas

    2016-04-01

    To formulate therapy goals, we aimed to define the relationship between fecal calprotectin and health-related quality of life in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). This retrospective single-center cross-sectional study included ambulatory IBD patients who had completed standardized questionnaires comprising items of health-related quality of life (Short Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire) and clinical disease activity scores, and who had provided stool samples for calprotectin determination within 30 days of questionnaire completion. Correlation analyses were performed between the indicated parameters. Post hoc analysis was conducted, taking into account only data from patients with fecal calprotectin concentrations measured within 3 days of questionnaire completion. One hundred ninety-seven patients with Crohn disease and 111 patients with ulcerative colitis were enrolled in the study. Lower fecal calprotectin concentrations were associated with better health-related quality of life. The correlations were weak, but stronger if only fecal calprotectin concentrations measured within 3 days of questionnaire completion were included (results for 3 days; Crohn disease: n = 86, rS = -0.419, P < 0.001; ulcerative colitis: n = 43, rS = -0.432, P = 0.004). In Crohn disease, a significant correlation between fecal calprotectin concentration and health-related quality of life was found in patients with colonic involvement (n = 59, rS = -0.470, P < 0.001), but not in patients with purely ileal disease (n = 27, rS = -0.268, P = 0.18). Correlations between fecal calprotectin concentrations and clinical disease activity were also only weak to moderate. Owing to its moderate correlation with fecal calprotectin concentrations in IBD patients with colonic involvement, health-related quality of life should be used in combination with other markers for IBD management. This is even more important in isolated ileal Crohn disease

  16. Quality of Life Is Related to Fecal Calprotectin Concentrations in Colonic Crohn Disease and Ulcerative Colitis, but not in Ileal Crohn Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gauss, Annika; Geib, Thomas; Hinz, Ulf; Schaefert, Rainer; Zwickel, Philipp; Zawierucha, Anna; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Klute, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To formulate therapy goals, we aimed to define the relationship between fecal calprotectin and health-related quality of life in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). This retrospective single-center cross-sectional study included ambulatory IBD patients who had completed standardized questionnaires comprising items of health-related quality of life (Short Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire) and clinical disease activity scores, and who had provided stool samples for calprotectin determination within 30 days of questionnaire completion. Correlation analyses were performed between the indicated parameters. Post hoc analysis was conducted, taking into account only data from patients with fecal calprotectin concentrations measured within 3 days of questionnaire completion. One hundred ninety-seven patients with Crohn disease and 111 patients with ulcerative colitis were enrolled in the study. Lower fecal calprotectin concentrations were associated with better health-related quality of life. The correlations were weak, but stronger if only fecal calprotectin concentrations measured within 3 days of questionnaire completion were included (results for 3 days; Crohn disease: n = 86, rS = −0.419, P < 0.001; ulcerative colitis: n = 43, rS = −0.432, P = 0.004). In Crohn disease, a significant correlation between fecal calprotectin concentration and health-related quality of life was found in patients with colonic involvement (n = 59, rS = −0.470, P < 0.001), but not in patients with purely ileal disease (n = 27, rS = −0.268, P = 0.18). Correlations between fecal calprotectin concentrations and clinical disease activity were also only weak to moderate. Owing to its moderate correlation with fecal calprotectin concentrations in IBD patients with colonic involvement, health-related quality of life should be used in combination with other markers for IBD management. This is even more important in isolated ileal

  17. Comparison of the composition of faecal fluid in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Schilli, R; Breuer, R I; Klein, F; Dunn, K; Gnaedinger, A; Bernstein, J; Paige, M; Kaufman, M

    1982-01-01

    We determined the ionic composition of faecal fluid from 13 patients with Crohn's disease limited to the colon, 10 with diffuse ulcerative colitis, and eight with ulcerative proctitis. The Crohn's and colitis groups had similar proportions of colon surface involved radiographically and similar 24 hour faecal weights. However, Crohn's patients' faecal fluid had arithmetically lower mean sodium and statistically lower mean chloride (34.8 mmol/l +/- 16.2 SD vs. 53.1 mmol/l +/- 23.1 SD) and higher potassium (49.2 mmol/l +/- 20.2 SD vs. 33.0 mmol/l +/- 13.8 SD) concentrations (p less than 0.05 for each) and much higher osmolality (487.1 mOsmol/kg +/- 87.1 SD vs. 341.1 mOsmol/kg +/- 88.9 SD, p less than 0.001). Separation of these patients using the faecal osmotic gap agreed with the clinical classification in 86% of cases. The diarrhoea of proctitis patients had a nearly normal ionic composition which was clearly distinguishable from that of diffuse colitis. These results suggest differences in the composition and perhaps the pathogenesis of the diarrhoea of Crohn's and ulcerative colitis. The composition of fluid may prove a useful, non-invasive method for classifying patients with inflammatory bowel disease and, in ulcerative colitis, determining the extent of the inflammatory process. PMID:7076010

  18. Integrated Metagenomics/Metaproteomics Reveals Human Host-Microbiota Signatures of Crohn's Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Alison L; Cantarel, Brandi; Lamendella, Regina; Darzi, Youssef; Mongodin, Emmanuel; Pan, Chongle; Shah, Manesh B; Halfvarsson, J; Tysk, C; Henrissat, Bernard; Raes, Jeroen; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Fraser-Liggett, C; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Jansson, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an inflammatory bowel disease of complex etiology, although dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been implicated in chronic immune-mediated inflammation associated with CD. Here we combined shotgun metagenomic and metaproteomic approaches to identify potential functional signatures of CD in stool samples from six twin pairs that were either healthy, or that had CD in the ileum (ICD) or colon (CCD). Integration of these omics approaches revealed several genes, proteins, and pathways that primarily differentiated ICD from healthy subjects, including depletion of many proteins in ICD. In addition, the ICD phenotype was associated with alterations in bacterial carbohydrate metabolism, bacterial-host interactions, as well as human host-secreted enzymes. This eco-systems biology approach underscores the link between the gut microbiota and functional alterations in the pathophysiology of Crohn's disease and aids in identification of novel diagnostic targets and disease specific biomarkers.

  19. The role of small bowel endoscopy in small bowel Crohn's disease: when and how?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mikang

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopy has a crucial role in the diagnosis, management, and surveillance of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It contributes in supporting the diagnosis of IBD with the clinical history, physical examination, laboratory findings, and targeted biopsies. Furthermore, endoscopy has a significant role in assessing disease activity and distribution in treatment efficacy evaluation, post-surgical recurrence risk, and cancer surveillance in patients with long-lasting illness. Endoscopy also provides therapeutic potential for the treatment of IBD, especially with stricture dilatation and treatment of bleeding. Small bowel (SB) endoscopy (capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy) and cross-sectional radiologic imaging (computed tomography enterography and magnetic resonance enterography) have become important diagnostic options to diagnose and treat patients with SB Crohn's disease. We reviewed the present role of SB endoscopy in patients with SB Crohn's disease. PMID:27433142

  20. The role of small bowel endoscopy in small bowel Crohn's disease: when and how?

    PubMed

    Kim, Mikang; Jang, Hyun Joo

    2016-07-01

    Endoscopy has a crucial role in the diagnosis, management, and surveillance of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It contributes in supporting the diagnosis of IBD with the clinical history, physical examination, laboratory findings, and targeted biopsies. Furthermore, endoscopy has a significant role in assessing disease activity and distribution in treatment efficacy evaluation, post-surgical recurrence risk, and cancer surveillance in patients with long-lasting illness. Endoscopy also provides therapeutic potential for the treatment of IBD, especially with stricture dilatation and treatment of bleeding. Small bowel (SB) endoscopy (capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy) and cross-sectional radiologic imaging (computed tomography enterography and magnetic resonance enterography) have become important diagnostic options to diagnose and treat patients with SB Crohn's disease. We reviewed the present role of SB endoscopy in patients with SB Crohn's disease. PMID:27433142

  1. [Association between Crohn's disease and primary sclerosing cholangitis in a 10 year old girl].

    PubMed

    Muñoz Lozón, Ana; Iglesias Blázquez, Cristina; Menéndez Arias, Cristina; Domínguez Sánchez, Patricia

    2016-06-01

    A 10 year old girl with diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss and fever of one month and a half of evolution. Analytical and sonographic findings raised the possibility of inflammatory bowel disease. Endoscopy and histology showed findings consistent with Crohn's disease. Treatment was initiated with mesalazine and exclusive enteral nutrition. Later corticosteroid treatment, immunosuppressive drugs and ursodeoxycholic acid were added due to cholestasis and persistent hypergammaglobulinemia. Magnetic resonance cholangiography and liver biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of concomitant primary sclerosing cholangitis. The association between Crohn's disease and primary sclerosing cholangitis is rare, predominantly in males between 20 and 40 years old and it presents a great clinical variability. The confirmation of the diagnosis requires magnetic resonance cholangiography or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The prognosis is poor and there is no treatment to slow the progression of the disease. PMID:27164355

  2. Contemporary surgical management of rectovaginal fistula in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Michael A; Hull, Tracy L

    2014-01-01

    Rectovaginal fistula is a disastrous complication of Crohn’s disease (CD) that is exceedingly difficult to treat. It is a disabling condition that negatively impacts a women’s quality of life. Successful management is possible only after accurate and complete assessment of the entire gastrointestinal tract has been performed. Current treatment algorithms range from observation to medical management to the need for surgical intervention. A wide variety of success rates have been reported for all management options. The choice of surgical repair methods depends on various fistula and patient characteristics. Before treatment is undertaken, establishing reasonable goals and expectations of therapy is essential for both the patient and surgeon. This article aims to highlight the various surgical techniques and their outcomes for repair of CD associated rectovaginal fistula. PMID:25400993

  3. Resected Hepatocellular Carcinoma in a Patient with Crohn's Disease on Azathioprine

    PubMed Central

    Heron, Valérie; Fortinsky, Kyle Joshua; Spiegle, Gillian; Hilzenrat, Nir; Szilagyi, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma rarely occurs in patients without underlying cirrhosis or liver disease. While inflammatory bowel disease has been linked to certain forms of liver disease, hepatocellular carcinoma is exceedingly rare in these patients. We report the twelfth case of hepatocellular carcinoma in a patient with Crohn's disease. The patient is a 61-year-old with longstanding Crohn's disease who was treated with azathioprine and was found to have elevated liver enzymes and a new 3-cm liver mass on ultrasound. A complete workup for underlying liver disease was unremarkable and liver biopsy revealed hepatocellular carcinoma. The patient underwent a hepatic resection, and there is no evidence of recurrence at the 11-month follow-up. The resection specimen showed no evidence of cancer despite the initial biopsy revealing hepatocellular carcinoma. This case represents the third biopsy-proven complete spontaneous regression of hepatocellular carcinoma. Although large studies have failed to show a definite link between azathioprine and hepatocellular carcinoma, the relationship remains concerning given the multiple case reports suggesting a possible association. Clinicians should exercise a high degree of suspicion in patients with Crohn's disease who present with elevated liver enzymes, especially those on azathioprine therapy. PMID:27403102

  4. Granulomatous pyoderma gangrenosum of the genitalia in the absence of Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kambil, Srinath M.; Bhat, Ramesh M.; Dandekeri, Sukumar

    2015-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare ulcerative neutrophilic disorder of the skin. Atypical variants of PG such as vegetative PG, bullous PG, and pustular forms are described in literature. Occasionally, granulomatous reaction in dermis may be seen on histology when PG is associated with Crohn's disease or in the vegetative variant of PG. We report a case of granulomatous PG involving the genitalia in a 43-year-old female without associated inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26392658

  5. Gastric lesions in patients with Crohn's disease in Korea: a multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    So, Hoonsub; Park, Young Soo; Kim, Jihun; Kim, Joo Sung; Moon, Won; Lee, Kang-Moon; Kim, You Sun; Keum, Bora; Kim, Seong-Eun; Kim, Kyeong Ok; Kim, Eun Soo; Lee, Chang Kyun; Hong, Sung Pil; Im, Jong Pil; Koo, Ja Seol; Choi, Chang Hwan; Shin, Jeong Eun; Lee, Bo In; Huh, Kyu Chan; Kim, Young-Ho; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Park, Young Sook; Han, Dong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Gastric pathology and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection among Asian patients with Crohn's disease (CD) are still unclear. We evaluated gastric histologic features and frequency of H. pylori infection in Korean patients with CD. Methods Among 492 patients with CD receiving upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopic evaluation in 19 Korean hospitals, we evaluated the endoscopic findings and gastric histopathologic features of 47 patients for our study. Histopathologic classification was performed using gastric biopsy tissues, and H. pylori infection was determined using the rapid urease test and histology. Results There were 36 men (76.6%), and the median age of patients at the time of upper GI endoscopy was 23.8 years (range, 14.2–60.5). For CD phenotype, ileocolonic disease was observed in 38 patients (80.9%), and non-stricturing, non-penetrating disease in 31 patients (66.0%). Twenty-eight patients (59.6%) complained of upper GI symptoms. Erosive gastritis was the most common gross gastric feature (66.0%). Histopathologically, H. pylori-negative chronic active gastritis (38.3%) was the most frequent finding. H. pylori testing was positive in 11 patients (23.4%), and gastric noncaseating granulomata were detected in 4 patients (8.5%). Gastric noncaseating granuloma showed a statistically significant association with perianal abscess/fistula (P=0.0496). Conclusions H. pylori-negative chronic active gastritis appears to be frequent among Korean patients with CD. The frequency of H. pylori infection was comparable with previous studies. An association with perianal complications suggests a prognostic value for gastric noncaseating granuloma in patients with CD. PMID:26884736

  6. Therapeutic Armamentarium for Stricturing Crohn's Disease: Medical Versus Endoscopic Versus Surgical Approaches.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, Shishira; Fleshner, Phillip; Shen, Bo

    2015-09-01

    One-third of patients with Crohn's disease (CD) present as stricturing phenotype characterized by progressive luminal narrowing and obstructive symptoms. The diagnosis and management of these patients have been intriguing and challenging. Immunomodulators and biologics have been successfully used in treating inflammatory and fistulizing CD. There are issues of efficacy and safety of biological agents in treating strictures in CD. Rapid mucosal healing from potent biological agents may predispose patients to the development of new strictures or worsening of existing strictures. On the other hand, strictures constitute one-fifth of the reasons for surgery in patients with CD. Disease recurrence is common at or proximal to the anastomotic site with the majority of these patients developing new endoscopic lesions within 1 year of surgery. The progressive nature of the disease with repetitive cycle of inflammation and stricture formation results in repeated surgery, with a risk of small bowel syndrome. There is considerable quest for bowel conserving endoscopic and surgical strategies. Endoscopic balloon dilation and stricturoplasty have emerged as valid alternatives to resection. Endoscopic balloon dilation has been shown to be feasible, safe, and effective for the short primary or anastomotic strictures. However, repeated dilations are often needed, and long-term outcomes of endoscopic balloon dilation remain to be investigated. The introduction of stricturoplasty has added another dimension to bowel saving strategy. Although postoperative recurrence rate after stricturoplasty is comparable with surgical resection, there are concerns for increased risk of malignancy in preserved bowel. Laparoscopic surgery has widely been performed with similar outcomes to open approach with fewer complications, quicker recovery, better cosmesis, and lower cost. All of these issues should be considered by physicians involved in the management of patients with stricturing CD. PMID

  7. Duration of recurrent ileitis after ileocolonic resection correlates with presurgical extent of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    D'Haens, G R; Gasparaitis, A E; Hanauer, S B

    1995-01-01

    Crohn's disease of the terminal ileum recurs in a predictable sequence proximal to the ileocolonic anastomosis after surgical resection. To confirm the suspicion that the duration of recurrent ileitis correlates with the extent of presurgical disease, this study investigated 23 consecutive patients with recurrent Crohn's disease symptoms who had undergone ileocaecal resections between 1982 and 1992 at our institution and had both preoperative and postoperative small bowel follow through studies available for comparison. All films were reviewed by a blinded gastrointestinal radiologist using uniform criteria. Symptomatic recurrence was reported at a mean (SEM) of 29 (25) months after resection. Presurgical length of inflammation averaged 26 (15) (8-57) cm and at recurrence 24 (14) (7-55) cm. The correlation coefficient (r) between pre and postsurgical extent of ileal disease was 0.70 (p < 0.0001). Seven patients had sequential small bowel series after 20 (10) (7-36) months without intervening surgery. The extent of measured inflammation between examinations correlated with r = 0.995 (p < 0.0001), showing the consistency of the measurement process. The close correlation between the duration of postoperative recurrence with the extent of presurgical disease is another example of individual patterns of recurrent Crohn's disease and is an additional factor to be considered when contemplating surgical resections. Images Figure 2 PMID:7797122

  8. [Growth peculiarities of commensal Escherichia coli isolates from the gut microflora in Crohn's disease patients].

    PubMed

    Gasparian, G; Balaian, M; Grigorian, A; Akopian, A; Manvelian, A; Mirzabekian, S; Trchunian, A; Pepoian, A

    2013-01-01

    Verhulst's logistic differential equation, popular in mathematical ecology, is used in modeling of population growth, neural networks, statistics, reaction models, Fermi distribution, modeling of tumor growth, etc. We used this function to characterize growth of commensal Escherichia coli isolates from gut microflora in Crohn's disease patients. The results of our investigations show differences in growth parameters of commensal E. coli, isolated from the gut microflora in Crohn's disease patients and healthy volunteers; it is most likely explained by the influence of chronic inflammatory processes on growth and reproduction of these bacteria. It has been established that the used mathematical model well characterizes growth of patients' gut E. coli isolates, and it can be important for the expedient probiotics' application during the disease. PMID:24455889

  9. Assessment of the Microbiota in Microdissected Tissues of Crohn's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    De Hertogh, Gert; Lemmens, Bart; Verhasselt, Peter; de Hoogt, Ronald; Sagaert, Xavier; Joossens, Marie; Van Assche, Gert; Rutgeerts, Paul; Vermeire, Severine; Aerssens, Jeroen

    2012-01-01

    The microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract is frequently mentioned as one of the key players in the etiopathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD). Four hypotheses have been suggested: the single, still unknown bacterial pathogen, an abnormal overall composition of the bowel microbiota (“dysbiosis”), an abnormal immunological reaction to an essentially normally composed microbiota, and increased bacterial translocation. We propose that laser capture microdissection of selected microscopic structures, followed by broad-range 16S rRNA gene sequencing, is an excellent method to assess spatiotemporal alterations in the composition of the bowel microbiota in CD. Using this approach, we demonstrated significant changes of the composition, abundance, and location of the gut microbiome in this disease. Some of these abnormal findings persisted even after macroscopic mucosal healing. Further investigations along these lines may lead to a better understanding of the possible involvement of the bowel bacteria in the development of clinical Crohn's disease. PMID:22191064

  10. NOD2, an Intracellular Innate Immune Sensor Involved in Host Defense and Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Strober, Warren; Watanabe, Tomohiro

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotide binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) is an intracellular sensor for small peptides derived from the bacterial cell wall component, peptidoglycan. Recent studies have uncovered unexpected functions of NOD2 in innate immune responses such as induction of type I IFN and facilitation of autophagy; moreover, they have disclosed extensive cross-talk between NOD2 and Toll-like receptors which plays an indispensable role both in host defense against microbial infection and in the development of autoimmunity. Of particular interest, polymorphisms of CARD15 encoding NOD2 are associated with Crohn's disease and other autoimmune states such as graft versus host disease. In this review, we summarize recent findings regarding normal functions of NOD2 and discuss the mechanisms by which NOD2 polymorphisms associated with Crohn's disease lead to intestinal inflammation. PMID:21750585

  11. Elemental diet in steroid-dependent and steroid-refractory Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, C J; Giaffer, M H; Cann, P A; Holdsworth, C D

    1991-11-01

    Sixteen patients with Crohn's disease who had symptoms uncontrolled by high-dose steroids (n = 11) or symptoms invariably appearing on reduction or withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy (n = 5) were treated with elemental diet. After 4 wk of dietary treatment, 10 patients were in remission and off all medication. Seven continued to be well without treatment for a minimum of 6 months, and four for at least 1 yr. No patient who subsequently relapsed had further steroid-refractory symptoms. Of the six patients failing to respond to elemental diet, four with steroid-refractory disease required early resective surgery for symptom relief, and two continued with steroid therapy, one in much reduced dosage. Elemental diet can bring about a sustained remission in many patients with Crohn's disease dependent on or refractory to corticosteroids, and reduce the need for surgical intervention. PMID:1951239

  12. Peritoneal inclusion cysts in patients affected by Crohn's disease: magnetic resonance enterography findings in a case series.

    PubMed

    Mazziotti, Silvio; D'Angelo, Tommaso; Racchiusa, Sergio; Salamone, Ignazio; Blandino, Alfredo; Ascenti, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal inclusion cystarises when fluid produced by ovary is trapped within peritoneal adhesions. In this article, we describe a case series of patients affected by Crohn's disease, undergoing to magnetic resonance enterography, in whom it was possible not only to monitor the pathological findings of small bowel but also to primarily diagnose the presence of peritoneal inclusion cysts. The current knowledge of peritoneal inclusion cyst concomitant to Crohn's disease is still limited, often leading radiologists to misdiagnose it. PMID:26456117

  13. Clinical, microbiological, and immunological effects of fructo‐oligosaccharide in patients with Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, J O; Whelan, K; Stagg, A J; Gobin, P; Al‐Hassi, H O; Rayment, N; Kamm, M A; Knight, S C; Forbes, A

    2006-01-01

    Background and aims The intestinal microbiota play a pivotal role in the inflammation associated with Crohn's disease through their interaction with the mucosal immune system. Some bifidobacteria species are immunoregulatory and induce increased dendritic cell interleukin 10 (IL‐10) release in vitro. Fructo‐oligosaccharides (FOS) increase faecal and mucosal bifidobacteria in healthy volunteers. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of FOS administration on disease activity, bifidobacteria concentrations, and mucosal dendritic cell function in patients with moderately active Crohn's disease. Patients and methods Ten patients with active ileocolonic Crohn's disease received 15 g of FOS for three weeks. Disease activity was measured using the Harvey Bradshaw index. Faecal and mucosal bifidobacteria were quantified by fluorescence in situ hybridisation, and mucosal dendritic cell IL‐10 and Toll‐like receptor (TLR) expression were assessed by flow cytometry of dissociated rectal biopsies. Results FOS induced a significant reduction in the Harvey Bradshaw index from 9.8 (SD 3.1) to 6.9 (3.4) (p<0.01). There was a significant increase in faecal bifidobacteria concentration from 8.8 (0.9) log10 to 9.4 (0.9) log10 cells/g dry faeces (p<0.001). The percentage of IL‐10 positive dendritic cells increased from 30 (12)% to 53 (10)% (p = 0.06). Finally, the percentage of dendritic cells expressing TLR2 and TLR4 increased from 1.7 (1.7)% to 36.8 (15.9)% (p = 0.08) and from 3.6 (3.6)% to 75.4 (3.4)% (p<0.001), respectively. Conclusions FOS supplementation increases faecal bifidobacteria concentrations and modifies mucosal dendritic cell function. This novel therapeutic strategy appears to decrease Crohn's disease activity in a small open label trial and therefore warrants further investigation. PMID:16162680

  14. [Procollagen-III-peptide in the serum of patients with Crohn disease].

    PubMed

    Loeschke, K; Kaltenthaler, P

    1989-03-01

    Serum procollagen-III-peptide (PP III) concentrations were measured in 54 patients with Crohn's disease and compared with data obtained from healthy controls and patients with liver fibrosis or ulcerative colitis. Whereas in alcoholic liver cirrhosis and chronic active hepatitis PP III was increased up to 18-fold as described by others, only 3 patients with Crohn's disease had slightly elevated PP III concentrations. In 2 of them, increased PP III could be explained by adolescence. In 5 other patients, PP III levels were at the upper limit of normal. Subgroup analysis showed that high clinical disease activity, recurrence after intestinal resection, presence of strictures and long disease duration did not elevate PP III levels. We therefore conclude that determination of serum PP III is of no value in the follow-up patients with Crohn's disease. In ulcerative colitis, PP III levels were uniformly normal. An additional result was a decreased PP III during corticosteroid therapy, suggesting a direct effect on collagen metabolism. PMID:2718533

  15. Activated eosinophils and interleukin 5 expression in early recurrence of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Dubucquoi, S; Janin, A; Klein, O; Desreumaux, P; Quandalle, P; Cortot, A; Capron, M; Colombel, J F

    1995-01-01

    Endoscopic recurrences after radical surgery for Crohn's disease are useful for studying the pathogenesis of initial lesions of Crohn's disease. Factors predisposing to recurrence are poorly understood, but it has been shown that eosinophilic infiltration of the neoileum may occur within a few weeks of resection. The aim of this study was to compare, in nine patients having an ileocolectomy, the infiltration of eosinophils and their activation state in normal and diseased areas of the neoileum, three months after surgery. Tissue eosinophils were studied by histochemical methods and electron microscopy. Mucosal expression of interleukin 5 (IL 5), an important eosinophil activating factor was studied using in situ hybridisation. Sixty per cent of patients had endoscopic recurrence at three months. Eosinophil infiltration was more pronounced in diseased than in endoscopically normal areas and was associated with a high expression of IL 5 mRNA. Ultrastructural analysis showed features of eosinophil activation, but no cytotoxic lesions of surrounding inflammatory or epithelial cells. This study suggests that local synthesis of IL 5 associated with eosinophil activation in the tissues could participate in early mucosal damage in Crohn's disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7557575

  16. [Arterial complications of hydatic disease].

    PubMed

    Mayoussi, C; El Mesnaoui, A; Lekehal, B; Sefiani, Y; Benosman, A; Bensaid, Y

    2002-04-01

    We report two cases of hydatic cyst with rupture into the aorta in two young patients cared for at the Ibn Sina hospital in Rabat, Morocco. In the first patient, a false hydatic aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta was discovered at surgery performed for suspected hydatic cyst of the lower lobe of the left lung. Despite reconstruction with a prosthetic graft, the patient died peroperatively due to exsanguination via uncontrollable bleeding through the aneurysmal sac. The second case was a 20-year-old woman whose false hydatic aneurysm of the thoracoabdominal aorta was disclosed by embolic ischemia of the lower limbs. Aorto-aortic reconstruction was followed by medical treatment with albendazol. During follow-up, the patient developed a hydatic cyst of the kidney and a parietal cyst. Both were treated surgically. An analysis of these two cases and 9 others reported in the literature concerning arterial involvement in hydatic disease revealed the characteristic clinical, radiological and therapeutic features of this rare but serious complication. PMID:12015489

  17. Scintigraphic assessment of bowel involvement and disease activity in Crohn's disease using technetium 99m-hexamethyl propylene amine oxine as leukocyte label

    SciTech Connect

    Schoelmerich, J.S.; Schmidt, E.; Schuemichen, C.B.; Billmann, P.; Schmidt, H.; Gerok, W.

    1988-11-01

    Using a novel labeling technique with technetium 99m-hexamethyl propylene amine oxine, we studied 29 patients with known or suspected Crohn's disease. Technetium 99m-hexamethyl propylene amine oxine leukocyte scanning (99mTc scan) was prospectively compared with the results of independently performed radiologic, endoscopic, and histologic examinations, and with findings at surgery, to assess the clinical usefulness of this technique to localize inflammatory lesions. In addition, uptake of technetium 99m-hexamethyl propylene amine oxine in the bowel was graded by comparing it with the uptake in liver and bone marrow and correlating this with established parameters of disease activity. The viability of homologous labeled leukocytes was greater than 95%. Less than 5% of lymphocytes were found in the final preparation. It was found that 45% +/- 12% of the label was bound to granulocytes, and 98% of the unbound label was washed off before reinjection. The results of 99mTc scan revealed a good correlation with those of barium enema (r = 0.880, p less than 0.001), of endoscopy/surgery (r = 0.983, p less than 0.001), and of all combined reference methods (r = 0.981, p less than 0.001). Activity as determined by 99mTc scan was weakly correlated with the results of Crohn's disease activity index (r = 0.559, p less than 0.01), van Hees index (r = 0.606, p less than 0.01), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r = 0.456, p less than 0.05) in 24 patients with proven Crohn's disease. The correlation was improved when the 99mTc scan was compared with a combination of these activity parameters and C-reactive protein (r = 0.781, p less than 0.001). Extraintestinal manifestations (joints) and complications (cholecystitis) were also identified correctly by the 99mTc scan.

  18. Controlled trial of oligopeptide versus amino acid diet in treatment of active Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, J C; Giaffer, M H; Holdsworth, C D

    1995-01-01

    Elemental diets are effective in inducing remission in active Crohn's disease, but how they exert this therapeutic effect is unclear. In a previous study a whole protein containing diet proved less effective than one in which food antigens were excluded, suggesting that exclusion of food antigens from the gut was a possible mechanism. This study was designed to test whether an oligopeptide diet of hydrolysed proteins was as effective as an amino acid based diet. These diets were equally antigen free but with different nitrogen sources. Forty four patients with active Crohn's disease were randomised in a controlled trial of amino acid versus oligopeptide diet. The feeds were given by nasogastric tube in equicaloric quantities and were the sole form of nutrition. Treatment was continued for four weeks although failure to improve by day 10 resulted in withdrawal. Quantitative leucocyte scintigraphy was used to investigate the effect of diet treatment on gut inflammation. Clinical and nutritional responses to treatment were also measured. Sixteen patients entered remission (including withdrawal of corticosteroids), six patients could not tolerate the nasogastric tube, and 22 patients failed to respond. The two diets were equally effective. Patients who responded had a rapid drop in clinical index of disease activity and a major reduction in the bowel uptake of leucocytes on scintigraphy. The oligopeptide and amino acid based enteral feeds were equally effective at inducing remission in active Crohn's disease. With both diets clinical improvement was accompanied by a reduction in intestinal inflammation. Images Figure 3 PMID:7890238

  19. Pediatric Small Bowel Crohn Disease: Correlation of US and MR Enterography

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ethan A.; Sanchez, Ramon J.; DiPietro, Michael A.; DeMatos-Maillard, Vera; Strouse, Peter J.; Darge, Kassa

    2015-01-01

    Small bowel Crohn disease is commonly diagnosed during the pediatric period, and recent investigations show that its incidence is increasing in this age group. Diagnosis and follow-up of this condition are commonly based on a combination of patient history and physical examination, disease activity surveys, laboratory assessment, and endoscopy with biopsy, but imaging also plays a central role. Ultrasonography (US) is an underutilized well-tolerated imaging modality for screening and follow-up of small bowel Crohn disease in children and adolescents. US has numerous advantages over computed tomographic (CT) enterography and magnetic resonance (MR) enterography, including low cost and no required use of oral or intravenous contrast material. US also has the potential to provide images with higher spatial resolution than those obtained at CT enterography and MR enterography, allows faster examination than does MR enterography, does not involve ionizing radiation, and does not require sedation or general anesthesia. US accurately depicts small bowel and mesenteric changes related to pediatric Crohn disease, and US findings show a high correlation with MR imaging findings in this patient population. ©RSNA, 2015 PMID:25839736

  20. Fluorescence endoscopic imaging study of anastomotic recurrence of Crohn's disease after right ileocolonic resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordon, Serge R.; Maunoury, Vincent; Klein, Olivier; Colombel, Jean-Frederic

    1995-12-01

    Crohn's disease is an inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology. Vasculitis is hypothesized but it was never demonstrated in vivo. This study aimed to evaluate the vascular mucosa perfusion using fluorescence imaging in 13 patients who had previously undergone eileocolonic resection and who agreed to participate in a prospective endoscopic study of anastomotic recurrence. This anastomotic recurrence rate is known to be high (73% after 1 year follow-up) and is characterized by ulcerations. The fluorescence study was started with an I.V. bolus injection of sodium fluorescein. The pre-anastomotic mucosa was endoscopically examined with blue light that stimulates fluorescein fluorescence. Fluorescence emission was recorded with an ultra-high-sensitivity camera connected to the endoscope via an interference filter (520 - 560 nm). A uniform fluorescence was observed a few seconds after the injection and lasted for 15 min in healthy subjects. In case of recurrence, the centers of the ulcerations displayed a very low fluorescence indicating localized ischemia. In contrast, the rims of the ulcers revealed brighter fluorescent images than those of normal mucosa. The anastomotic ulcerations of Crohn's disease recurrence exhibit a high fluorescence intensity at their margins indicating an increased mucosal blood flow and/or enhanced transcapillary diffusion. These findings support the hypothesis of a primary vasculitis in Crohn's disease.

  1. Possible transmission of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis through potable water: lessons from an urban cluster of Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Ellen S

    2009-01-01

    A "cluster" of patients refers to the geographic proximity of unrelated patients with the same disease and suggests a common environmental cause for that disease. Clusters of patients with Crohn's disease have been linked to the presence of an infectious microorganism in unpasteurized milk and cheese, untreated water supplied by wells or springs, animal manure used as fertilizer for family vegetable gardens, and bodies of water contaminated by agricultural runoff. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is the suspected cause of Crohn's disease. MAP causes a disease in dairy cows and other animals that is similar to Crohn's disease, called Johne's ('Yo-knees') disease or paratuberculosis. Dairy cows with Johne's disease secrete MAP into their milk and excrete MAP into their feces. MAP is present in untreated water such as well water, in bodies of water contaminated by agricultural runoff, and in unpasteurized milk and cheese. The "treatment" of "tap" water to make it "drinkable" or "potable" by the processes of sedimentation, filtration and chlorination has little to no effect on MAP. MAP is so resistant to chlorine disinfection that such disinfection actually selects for its growth. Other subspecies of Mycobacterium avium grow in biofilms present on tap water pipes. Despite the documented presence of MAP in tap water and its probable growth on tap water pipes, clusters of Crohn's disease have not previously been described in relationship to tap water pipes supplying patients' homes. This report describes three unrelated individuals who lived on the same block along a street in a midwestern American city and developed Crohn's disease within four years of each other in the 1960's. A common tap water pipe supplied their homes. This is the first reported cluster of Crohn's disease possibly linked to fully treated drinking water, and is consistent with previously reported clusters of Crohn's disease linked to an infectious microorganism in water. PMID

  2. Opening (and Swallowing) A Can of Worms to Treat My Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Sean

    2016-07-01

    Editor's Note: This article discusses the experience, ingenuity, and determination of Sean Ahrens, a young patient with Crohn's disease who took it upon himself to treat his longstanding, symptomatic Crohn's disease with pig whipworm eggs. Reading this story will make some of you uncomfortable. You might question whether this work belongs in a medical journal or sends the wrong message to readers. However, we recognize that this topic is controversial and that N=1 reports cannot and should not change practice. The purpose of this story is not to encourage the use of pig whipworm or to demonstrate its efficacy (or lack thereof). We firmly believe that patients are uniquely qualified to provide insights into how they view their illnesses, weigh risks and benefits, and ultimately achieve self-efficacy. Stories like this are important for us to acknowledge and understand, even if they do not change our practice. PMID:27215921

  3. Certolizumab pegol - A new therapeutic option for refractory disseminated pyoderma gangrenosum associated with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Hurabielle, Charlotte; Schneider, Pierre; Baudry, Clotilde; Bagot, Martine; Allez, Matthieu; Viguier, Manuelle

    2016-01-01

    Systemic steroids, in association or not with cyclosporin, are indicated for the treatment of large or widespread Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG). We report the case of a 27-year-old woman with a 15-year history of severe Crohn's disease, who developed a severe and disseminated PG, refractory to multiple lines of treatment. Infliximab and adalimumab were contraindicated, either because of allergy or of ineffectiveness on Crohn's disease. The addition of certolizumab pegol to the baseline treatment, associating systemic steroids and tacrolimus, finally allowed the complete healing of PG. Oral prednisone was stopped and tacrolimus was decreased, without any cutaneous or digestive relapse. Certolizumab pegol could be an alternative therapy in the treatment of PG in case of intolerance or ineffectiveness of the other anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapies. PMID:25909366

  4. Cutaneous aseptic neutrophilic abscesses and Yersinia enterocolitica infection in a case subsequently diagnosed as Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Safa, G; Loppin, M; Tisseau, L; Lamoril, J

    2008-01-01

    We report the case of a man who presented cutaneous aseptic abscesses, a rare form of neutrophilic disease, associated with Yersinia enterocolitica infection and who was later diagnosed as having Crohn's disease (CD). Genetic analysis showed that the patient had a mutation in the caspase activation recruitment domain 15/nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 gene (R702W heterozygote). This case is in keeping with recent evidence in the literature which suggests that CD is a disease linked to abnormal immune responses to enteric bacteria in genetically susceptible individuals. Further understanding of the innate immune system should provide new insights into the pathogenesis of these inflammatory diseases. PMID:18799880

  5. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation by TCDD Reduces Inflammation Associated with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Jenna M.; Shepherd, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease results from a combination of genetic and environmental factors that trigger an inappropriate immune response to commensal gut bacteria. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is well known for its involvement in the toxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), an environmental contaminant that affects people primarily through the diet. Recently, TCDD was shown to suppress immune responses by generating regulatory T cells (Tregs). We hypothesized that AhR activation dampens inflammation associated with Crohn's disease. To test this hypothesis, we utilized the 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) murine model of colitis. Mice were gavaged with TCDD prior to colitis induction with TNBS. Several parameters were examined including colonic inflammation via histological and flow cytometric analyses. TCDD-treated mice recovered body weight faster and experienced significantly less colonic damage. Reduced levels of interleukin (IL) 6, IL-12, interferon-gamma, and tumor necrosis factor-α demonstrated suppression of inflammation in the gut following TCDD exposure. Forkhead box P3 (Foxp3)egfp mice revealed that TCDD increased the Foxp3+ Treg population in gut immune tissue following TNBS exposure. Collectively, these results suggest that activation of the AhR by TCDD decreases colonic inflammation in a murine model of colitis in part by generating regulatory immune cells. Ultimately, this work may lead to the development of more effective therapeutics for the treatment of Crohn's disease. PMID:21131560

  6. Temporary Fecal Diversion in the Management of Colorectal and Perianal Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mennigen, Rudolf; Heptner, Britta; Senninger, Norbert; Rijcken, Emile

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the results of temporary fecal diversion in colorectal and perianal Crohn's disease. Method. We retrospectively identified 29 consecutive patients (14 females, 15 males; median age: 30.0 years, range: 18–76) undergoing temporary fecal diversion for colorectal (n = 14), ileal (n = 4), and/or perianal Crohn's disease (n = 22). Follow-up was in median 33.0 (3–103) months. Response to fecal diversion, rate of stoma reversal, and relapse rate after stoma reversal were recorded. Results. The response to temporary fecal diversion was complete remission in 4/29 (13.8%), partial remission in 12/29 (41.4%), no change in 7/29 (24.1%), and progress in 6/29 (20.7%). Stoma reversal was performed in 19 out of 25 patients (76%) available for follow-up. Of these, the majority (15/19, 78.9%) needed further surgical therapies for a relapse of the same pathology previously leading to temporary fecal diversion, including colorectal resections (10/19, 52.6%) and creation of a definitive stoma (7/19, 36.8%). At the end of follow-up, only 4/25 patients (16%) had a stable course without the need for further definitive surgery. Conclusion. Temporary fecal diversion can induce remission in otherwise refractory colorectal or perianal Crohn's disease, but the chance of enduring remission after stoma reversal is low. PMID:25649893

  7. Preoperative Nutritional Therapy Reduces the Risk of Anastomotic Leakage in Patients with Crohn's Disease Requiring Resections

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhen; Guo, Dong; Gong, Jianfeng; Zhu, Weiming; Zuo, Lugen; Sun, Jing; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2016-01-01

    Background. The rate of anastomotic leakage is high in surgeries for Crohn's disease, and therefore a temporary diverting stoma is often needed. We conducted this study to investigate whether preoperative nutritional therapy could reduce the risk of anastomotic leakage while decreasing the frequency of temporary stoma formation. Methods. This was a retrospective study. Patients requiring bowel resections due to Crohn's disease were reviewed. The rate of anastomotic leakage and temporary diverting stoma was compared between patients who received preoperative nutritional therapy and those on a normal diet before surgery. Possible predictive factors for anastomotic leakage were also analyzed. Results. One hundred and fourteen patients undergoing 123 surgeries were included. Patients in nutritional therapy (NT) group had a significantly lower level of C-reactive protein on the day before surgery. Patients in NT group suffered less anastomotic leakage (2.3% versus 17.9%, P = 0.023) and less temporary diverting stoma (22.8% versus 40.9%, P = 0.036). Serum albumin of the day before surgery ≤35 g/L and preoperative nutritional therapy were identified as factors which independently affected the rate of anastomotic leakage. Conclusion. Preoperative nutritional therapy reduced the risk of anastomotic leakage and the frequency of temporary diverting stoma formation in patients with Crohn's disease requiring resections. PMID:26858749

  8. Adalimumab Treatment in Pediatric-Onset Crohn's Disease Patients after Infliximab Failure: A Single Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Won Jae; Kang, Ben; Choi, So Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of adalimumab in pediatric-onset Crohn's disease patients who had failed treatment with infliximab. Methods In this retrospective study, patients included were those who had been diagnosed with Crohn's disease before 18 years old, and had received treatment with adalimumab after infliximab failure. The efficacy of adalimumab treatment was investigated at 1 month and 1 year, and adverse events that had occurred during treatment with adalimumab were explored. Results Ten patients were included in this study. The median duration from diagnosis to adalimumab treatment was 5.5 years (range: 2.4-7.9 years). At 1 month after adalimumab initiation, 80% (8/10) of patients showed clinical response, and 40% (4/10) achieved clinical remission. At 1 year, 71% (5/7) of patients showed clinical response, and 43% (3/7) were under clinical remission. Among the total included patients, 5 patients (50%) showed clinical response at 1 year. Primary non-response to adalimumab was observed in 2 patients (20%), and secondary failure to adalimumab was observed in 3 patients (30%) during 1 year treatment with adalimumab. No serious adverse event had occurred during adalimumab treatment. Conclusion Adalimumab was effective for 1 year without serious adverse events in half of pediatric-onset Crohn's disease patients who had failed treatment with infliximab. PMID:27437188

  9. Monozygotic twins with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis: a unique case report

    PubMed Central

    Breslin, N; Todd, A; Kilgallen, C; O'Morain, C

    1997-01-01

    Background—A large number of monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs with inflammatory bowel disease have been reported. To date no twin pair has developed phenotypically discordant inflammatory bowel disease. This case report is the first documented occurrence of discordant inflammatory bowel disease occurring in monozygotic twins. 
Case report—Twenty two year old identical male twins presented within three months of each other with inflammatory bowel disease that proved to be discordant in overall disease type, disease distribution, clinical course, and histopathological findings. Twin 1 developed a severe pancolitis necessitating total colectomy while twin 2 developed a predominantly distal patchy colitis with frequent granulomas, controlled by aminosalicylates. Twin 1 was antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) negative at the time of testing while twin 2 (Crohn's disease) was ANCA positive. Significantly, the twins possessed the HLA type DR3-DR52-DQ2 previously associated with extensive colitis. 
Conclusion—This case report confirms the important role played by genetic factors in the development of inflammatory bowel disease. It also highlights the crucial role of undetermined environmental agents in dictating disease expression and phenotype. 

 Keywords: monozygotic twins; ulcerative colitis; Crohn's disease; inflammatory bowel disease PMID:9391259

  10. Redo Ileal pouch-anal anastomosis combined with anti-TNF-α maintenance therapy for Crohn's disease with pelvic fistula: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Araki, Toshimitsu; Okita, Yoshiki; Fujikawa, Hiroyuki; Ohi, Masaki; Tanaka, Koji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Uchida, Keiichi; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2014-10-01

    Pouch failure has been reported to occur after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for Crohn's disease. We report two cases of patients with Crohn's disease, who underwent redo ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (redo-IPAA) combined with anti-TNF-α maintenance therapy, with good functional results. The first patient, a man with presumed ulcerative colitis, suffered pelvic fistula recurrence and anastomotic dehiscence. He underwent redo-IPAA, at which time longitudinal ulcers were found. Infliximab was started 4 days postoperatively and continued. The second patient, a woman treated for ulcerative colitis, underwent laparoscopic IPAA 8 years later. After the development of a pelvic fistula, twisted mesentery of the ileal pouch was found intraoperatively and Crohn's disease was diagnosed. Adalimumab therapy resulted in fistula closure. Redo-IPAA was performed to normalize the twisted mesentery of the ileal pouch. No complications have been observed in either patient, both of whom have experienced good functional results after closure of the covering stomas. PMID:24442570

  11. Discs Large Homolog 5 (DLG5) Gene Polymorphism and Crohn's Disease: A Meta-Analysis of the Published Studies.

    PubMed

    Shafieyoun, Arezoo; Moraveji, Sharareh; Bashashati, Mohammad; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-05-01

    The real pathophysiology of Crohn's disease is unknown. The higher prevalence of Crohn's disease in Caucasian and Jewish ethnicities, as well as its familial aggregation and higher concordance among monozygotic twins, suggest some roles for genes in its development, clinical progression, and outcome. Recent original studies have indicated DLG5113G/A gene polymorphism as a risk factor for Crohn's disease. Meanwhile, the results of these studies are not consistent. We performed the current meta-analysis to understand whether there is any association between DLG5 gene polymorphism and the risk of Crohn's disease. PubMed was searched to find the case-control studies on DLG5 gene polymorphisms and Crohn's disease. This search compiled 65 articles and based on our criteria. 11 articles were included in this meta-analysis. The association between the DLG5 113G/A polymorphism and the risk of disease was assessed using odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Heterogeneity was evaluated based on I2 values.  Random and fixed-effect models were used when I2>50% and I2≤50%, respectively. Eleven studies with a total of 4648 cases and 5677 controls were pooled. Based on our meta-analysis, DLG5113G/A gene polymorphism both at genotypic and allelic levels were not associated with the risk of Crohn's disease. Pooled data indicated no significant association between DLG5113G/A gene polymorphism and the development of Crohn's disease. In order to achieve a superior conclusion, multicenter studies on larger number of patients are recommended. PMID:27309475

  12. Advancement flap plasty for the closure of anal and recto-vaginal fistulas in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Penninckx, F; D'Hoore, A; Filez, L

    2001-01-01

    The management of anal fistulas in patients with IBD continues to be extremely challenging and, indeed, somewhat frustrating. Despite a global closure rate of about 75%, all patients should be informed about the risk of infection, early failure, eventual temporary disfunctioning stoma and the possibility of late recurrence (about 15%). Closure of a RVF in Crohn's disease should not be considered an easy undertaking, especially in patients with several Crohn localisations. The technique can be adapted to the local situation. Construction of a temporary stoma is not mandatory. However, stoma construction seems to be beneficial when extensive perianal or recto-vaginal dissection including eventual tissue interposition is required. Advancement flaps are an attractive surgical alternative for the management of all anal transsphincteric fistulas, also in Crohn's disease, because sphincter architecture and function are well preserved. Improved medical treatment and the changed approach from conservative to reparative surgery may well have resulted in a decreased need or at least in a delay of the need for a proctectomy. Although the surgical principles of advancement flap techniques are sound, these techniques have not been used for many decades. Skills needed, problematic approach, suboptimal quality of local tissues have contributed to its selective use and to the absence of prospective randomised studies. PMID:11475141

  13. Is Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the cause of Johne's disease in animals, a good candidate for Crohn's disease in man?

    PubMed

    Singh, A V; Singh, S V; Singh, P K; Sohal, J S

    2010-03-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne's disease or paratuberculosis, a gastro intestinal inflammatory condition in ruminants and other animals, which is similar to Crohn's disease (CD) that occurs in man. The role of MAP in the causation of CD has been under intense investigation in the last few decades. This review summarizes the status of MAP in animals and the food chain and its association with CD in man. PMID:20443099

  14. Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... may begin with flu-like symptoms such as fever, chills, swollen lymph nodes, headaches, fatigue, muscle aches, and joint pain. Neurological complications most often occur in the second stage ... such as fever, stiff neck, and severe headache. Other problems, which ...

  15. Pneumococcal Disease: Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... bacteremia and sepsis are blood infections. Symptoms include: Fever Chills Low alertness Pneumococcus bacteria causes up to half of middle ear infections (otitis media). Symptoms include: Ear pain A red, swollen ear drum Fever Sleepiness  Top of Page Complications Some pneumococcal ...

  16. GSK-1605786, a selective small-molecule antagonist of the CCR9 chemokine receptor for the treatment of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Eksteen, Bertus; Adams, David H

    2010-07-01

    GSK-1605786 (CCX-282; Traficet-EN), a selective antagonist of the CC chemokine receptor (CCR9), is being developed by GlaxoSmithKline plc under license from ChemoCentryx Inc for the potential treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, including Crohn's disease and celiac disease. CCR9 is a tissue-specific lymphocyte trafficking molecule that selectively attracts both B- and T-cells to the small gut. Inhibition of CCR9 by GSK-1605786 may inhibit B- and T-cell entry to the small gut and ameliorate inflammation while leaving immune function at other anatomical sites unaffected. GSK-1605786 was assessed as a treatment for moderate-to-severe Crohn's disease in the phase II/III PROTECT-1 trial and as a treatment for celiac disease in a phase II trial. Data suggest that GSK-1605786 is efficacious in patients with Crohn's disease with the advantage of being orally bioavailable. PMID:20582872

  17. Genetic analyses of chromosome 12 loci in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lesage, S; Zouali, H; Colombel, J; Belaiche, J; Cezard, J; Tysk, C; Almer, S; Gassull, M; Binder, V; Chamaillard, M; Le Gall, I; Thomas, G; Hugot, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, both of which are multifactorial diseases involving the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. A region on chromosome 12 centred around the marker locus D12S83 has previously been associated with IBD predisposition. The aim of the study was to investigate this genetic region in an independent panel of European families affected by Crohn's disease.
METHODS—A sample of 95 families with two or more affected relatives and 75 simplex nuclear families were genotyped for 19 microsatellite loci located on chromosome 12. A search for linkage and linkage disequilibrium was performed using non-parametric two point and multipoint analyses with the Analyze and Genehunter packages.
RESULTS—No evidence of linkage or linkage disequilibrium was observed for any of the marker loci, including D12S83 (p=0.35 for the two point linkage test). Multipoint linkage analysis also failed to reveal positive linkage on chromosome 12. Power calculations allowed us to reject the hypothesis that the genetic region of chromosome 12 centred on D12S83 contains a susceptibility locus with a relative risk (λs) equal to or greater than 2.0 in these families.
CONCLUSION—Failure to detect linkage or linkage disequilibrium in these families suggests that the chromosome 12 locus previously reported to be associated with genetic predisposition to IBD does not play a role in all European family samples. This observation is compatible with heterogeneity in the genetic basis of susceptibility to the disease and/or exposure to various environmental factors among Caucasian families.


Keywords: chromosome 12; inflammatory bowel disease; Crohn's disease; linkage analyses; replication study PMID:11076876

  18. Factors affecting poor nutritional status after small bowel resection in patients with Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ki Ung; Yu, Chang Sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Park, In Ja; Yoon, Yong Sik; Kim, Chan Wook; Lee, Jong Lyul; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Ye, Byong Duk; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2016-07-01

    In Crohn disease, bowel-preserving surgery is necessary to prevent short bowel syndrome due to repeated operations. This study aimed to determine the remnant small bowel length cut-off and to evaluate the clinical factors related to nutritional status after small bowel resection in Crohn disease.We included 394 patients (69.3% male) who underwent small bowel resection for Crohn disease between 1991 and 2012. Patients who were classified as underweight (body mass index < 17.5) or at high risk of nutrition-related problems (modified nutritional risk index < 83.5) were regarded as having a poor nutritional status. Preliminary remnant small bowel length cut-offs were determined using receiver operating characteristic curves. Variables associated with poor nutritional status were assessed retrospectively using Student t tests, chi-squared tests, Fisher exact tests, and logistic regression analyses.The mean follow-up period was 52.9 months and the mean patient ages at the time of the last bowel surgery and last follow-up were 31.2 and 35.7 years, respectively. The mean remnant small bowel length was 331.8 cm. Forty-three patients (10.9%) underwent ileostomy, 309 (78.4%) underwent combined small bowel and colon resection, 111 (28.2%) had currently active disease, and 105 (26.6%) underwent at least 2 operations for recurrent disease. The mean body mass index and modified nutritional risk index were 20.6 and 100.8, respectively. The independent factors affecting underweight status were remnant small bowel length ≤240 cm (odds ratio: 4.84, P < 0.001), ileostomy (odds ratio: 4.70, P < 0.001), and currently active disease (odds ratio: 4.16, P < 0.001). The independent factors affecting high nutritional risk were remnant small bowel length ≤230 cm (odds ratio: 2.84, P = 0.012), presence of ileostomy (odds ratio: 3.36, P = 0.025), and currently active disease (odds ratio: 4.90, P < 0.001).Currently active disease, ileostomy, and remnant small

  19. European survey of fertility and pregnancy in women with Crohn's disease: a case control study by European collaborative group.

    PubMed Central

    Mayberry, J F; Weterman, I T

    1986-01-01

    Two hundred and seventy five patients with Crohn's disease from five countries were interviewed. Each patient was matched with a control of the same age. Of the 275 women with Crohn's disease 224 had been married at some time compared with 208 controls. The mean age at marriage was 23 years. Diagnosis of Crohn's disease was made five years later and the survey was conducted on average 16 years after marriage. Cases and controls had a similar obstetric study before diagnosis. After diagnosis there was a significant reduction in the number of children born to patients (0.4) compared with controls (0.7). Crohn's disease did not increase the rate of miscarriage or Caesarean section but prematurity was more common in patients (16%) than controls (7%). The site of disease at diagnosis did not affect these findings. Medical advice against pregnancy may be partly responsible for this reduction in fertility, but patients practised contraception less than controls and a significantly greater proportion of these (42%) failed to become pregnant compared with controls (28%). Crohn's disease results in subfertility. PMID:3732892

  20. Impaired Autophagy of an Intracellular Pathogen Induced by a Crohn's Disease Associated ATG16L1 Variant

    PubMed Central

    Rioux, John D.; Daly, Mark J.; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2008-01-01

    The genetic risk factors predisposing individuals to the development of inflammatory bowel disease are beginning to be deciphered by genome-wide association studies. Surprisingly, these new data point towards a critical role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. A single common coding variant in the autophagy protein ATG16L1 predisposes individuals to the development of Crohn's disease: while ATG16L1 encoding threonine at amino acid position 300 (ATG16L1*300T) confers protection, ATG16L1 encoding for alanine instead of threonine (ATG16L1*300A, also known as T300A) mediates risk towards the development of Crohn's disease. Here we report that, in human epithelial cells, the Crohn's disease-associated ATG16L1 coding variant shows impairment in the capture of internalized Salmonella within autophagosomes. Thus, we propose that the association of ATG16L1*300A with increased risk of Crohn's disease is due to impaired bacterial handling and lowered rates of bacterial capture by autophagy. PMID:18852889

  1. Urogenital Manifestations of Metastatic Crohn's Disease in Children: Case Series and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Rani, Uzma; Russell, Alexandra; Tanaka, Stacy; Correa, Hernan; Nicholson, Maribeth R

    2016-06-01

    Although cutaneous manifestations are the most common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease, metastatic Crohn's disease (MCD) is rare. MCD is defined as the presence of noncaseating granulomatous inflammation and perivascular infiltrate in the cutaneous tissue that is noncontiguous to the gastrointestinal tract. MCD rarely involves the genitourinary tract in children. When it does, it can present as external genitalia swelling, erythema, plaques, or ulcerations. Here we present three pediatric cases of MCD involving the genitourinary tract. In addition to discussion of the presented cases, we have reviewed the literature on the genitourinary presentation of MCD in the pediatric population. PMID:26921647

  2. Detecting inflammation and fibrosis in bowel wall with photoacoustic imaging in a Crohn's disease animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Johnson, Laura A.; Hu, Jack; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Higgins, Peter D. R.; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an autoimmune disease affecting 700,000 people in the United States. This condition may cause obstructing intestinal narrowings (strictures) due to inflammation, fibrosis (deposition of collagen), or a combination of both. Utilizing the unique strong optical absorption of hemoglobin at 532 nm and collagen at 1370 nm, this study investigated the feasibility of non-invasively characterizing intestinal strictures using photoacoustic imaging (PAI). Three normal controls, ten pure inflammation and 9 inflammation plus fibrosis rat bowel wall samples were imaged. Statistical analysis of the PA measurements has shown the capability of discriminating the purely inflammatory from mixed inflammatory and fibrotic strictures.

  3. Initial response and subsequent course of Crohn's disease treated with elemental diet or prednisolone.

    PubMed Central

    Gorard, D A; Hunt, J B; Payne-James, J J; Palmer, K R; Rees, R G; Clark, M L; Farthing, M J; Misiewicz, J J; Silk, D B

    1993-01-01

    Elemental diet is as effective as corticosteroids in the treatment of previously untreated Crohn's disease. It is unclear whether a poor nutritional state is a prerequisite for efficacy of elemental diet, whether previously treated patients respond as well, or how duration of remission using elemental diet compares with corticosteroid induced remission. Forty two patients with active Crohn's disease were stratified for nutritional state and randomised to receive Vivonex TEN 2.1 l/day for four weeks, or 0.75 mg prednisolone/kg/day for two weeks and subsequent reducing doses. Nine of 22 (41%) patients assigned to nutritional treatment were intolerant of the diet. Thirty patients completed four weeks treatment. Disease activity decreased on elemental diet from mean (SEM) 4.8 (0.9) to 1.7 (0.6), p < 0.05, and on prednisolone from 5.3 (0.5) to 1.9 (0.6), p < 0.05. For each treatment, nourished and malnourished patients responded similarly. Patients with longstanding disease responded as well as newly diagnosed patients. The probability of maintaining remission at six months was 0.67 after prednisolone, 0.28 after elemental diet, and at one year was 0.35 after prednisolone and 0.09 after elemental diet, p < 0.05. When tolerated, elemental diet is as effective in the short term as prednisolone in newly and previously diagnosed Crohn's disease, and its benefit is independent of nutritional state. The subsequent relapse rate after elemental diet induced remission, however, is greater than after treatment with prednisolone. PMID:8406153

  4. Initial response and subsequent course of Crohn's disease treated with elemental diet or prednisolone.

    PubMed

    Gorard, D A; Hunt, J B; Payne-James, J J; Palmer, K R; Rees, R G; Clark, M L; Farthing, M J; Misiewicz, J J; Silk, D B

    1993-09-01

    Elemental diet is as effective as corticosteroids in the treatment of previously untreated Crohn's disease. It is unclear whether a poor nutritional state is a prerequisite for efficacy of elemental diet, whether previously treated patients respond as well, or how duration of remission using elemental diet compares with corticosteroid induced remission. Forty two patients with active Crohn's disease were stratified for nutritional state and randomised to receive Vivonex TEN 2.1 l/day for four weeks, or 0.75 mg prednisolone/kg/day for two weeks and subsequent reducing doses. Nine of 22 (41%) patients assigned to nutritional treatment were intolerant of the diet. Thirty patients completed four weeks treatment. Disease activity decreased on elemental diet from mean (SEM) 4.8 (0.9) to 1.7 (0.6), p < 0.05, and on prednisolone from 5.3 (0.5) to 1.9 (0.6), p < 0.05. For each treatment, nourished and malnourished patients responded similarly. Patients with longstanding disease responded as well as newly diagnosed patients. The probability of maintaining remission at six months was 0.67 after prednisolone, 0.28 after elemental diet, and at one year was 0.35 after prednisolone and 0.09 after elemental diet, p < 0.05. When tolerated, elemental diet is as effective in the short term as prednisolone in newly and previously diagnosed Crohn's disease, and its benefit is independent of nutritional state. The subsequent relapse rate after elemental diet induced remission, however, is greater than after treatment with prednisolone. PMID:8406153

  5. A case of chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis associated with crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    van Ommen, C; Dehoorne, J; De Baets, Fr; Vande Velde, S; Van Winckel, M; Van Biervliet, S

    2015-06-01

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is an autoinflammatory bone disease of unknown etiology, most commonly affecting the metaphysis of long bones, especially the tibia, femur and clavicle. The clinical spectrum varies from self-limited uni-or multi-focal lesions to chronic recurrent courses. Diagnosis is based on clinical, radiologic and pathological findings, is probably underdiagnosed due to poor recognition of the disease. A dysregulated innate immunity causes immune cell infiltration of the bones with subsequent osteoclast activation leading to sterile bone lesions. The molecular pathophyiology is still incompletely understood but association with other auto-inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), psoriasis, Wegener's disease, arthritis and synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome is interesting. CRMO can precede the symptoms of the associated disease by several years. The bone remodeling caused by CRMO can cause permanent disability. We report the case of a 10-year-old boy with CRMO in association with Crohn's disease. PMID:26151695

  6. The Association between Hidradenitis Suppurativa and Crohn's Disease: in Search of the Missing Pathogenic Link.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, Hessel H; Horvath, Barbara; Jemec, Gregor B E; Prens, Errol P

    2016-09-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa is a chronic, autoinflammatory skin disease. Shalom et al. demonstrate in a large cross-sectional study an association between Crohn's disease and hidradenitis suppurativa, but not with ulcerative colitis. This association supports the hypothesis that a similar pathogenic mechanism contributes to both diseases, providing new possibilities for functional studies and therapy development. PMID:27542293

  7. Ascorbic acid absorption in Crohn's disease. Studies using L-(carboxyl-/sup 14/C)ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, S.H.; Shaffer, J.L.; Johns, C.W.; Bennett, R.J.; Irving, M.H.

    1989-04-01

    Total body pool and intestinal absorption of ascorbic acid were studied in 12 patients undergoing operation for Crohn's disease (six with fistulae and six without) and in six control patients undergoing operation for reasons other than Crohn's disease. L-(carboxyl-/sup 14/C)Ascorbic acid, 0.19-0.40 megabecquerels (MBq), was given orally. After a period of equilibration, the labeled ascorbic acid was flushed out of the patient's body tissues using large doses of unlabeled ascorbic acid. Intestinal absorption of ascorbic acid, assessed from the total cumulative urinary /sup 14/C recovery, was found to be similar in patients with fistulizing Crohn's disease (73.9 +/- 8.45%), those without fistulas (72.8 +/- 11.53%), and in controls (80.3 +/- 8.11%). Total body pools of ascorbic acid, calculated using the plasma /sup 14/C decay curves, were similar in patients with Crohn's disease with fistulas (17.1 +/- 5.91 mg/kg), patients without fistulas (9.6 +/- 3.58 mg/kg), and in controls (13.3 +/- 4.28 mg/kg). The results indicate that ascorbic acid absorption is normal in patients with both fistulizing and nonfistulizing Crohn's disease. The results suggest that routine supplements of vitamin C are not necessary unless oral ascorbic acid intake is low.

  8. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis causes Crohn's disease in some inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    PubMed

    Naser, Saleh A; Sagramsingh, Sudesh R; Naser, Abed S; Thanigachalam, Saisathya

    2014-06-21

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory condition that plagues millions all over the world. This debilitating bowel disease can start in early childhood and continue into late adulthood. Signs and symptoms are usually many and multiple tests are often required for the diagnosis and confirmation of this disease. However, little is still understood about the cause(s) of CD. As a result, several theories have been proposed over the years. One theory in particular is that Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is intimately linked to the etiology of CD. This fastidious bacterium also known to cause Johne's disease in cattle has infected the intestines of animals for years. It is believed that due to the thick, waxy cell wall of MAP it is able to survive the process of pasteurization as well as chemical processes seen in irrigation purification systems. Subsequently meat, dairy products and water serve as key vehicles in the transmission of MAP infection to humans (from farm to fork) who have a genetic predisposition, thus leading to the development of CD. The challenges faced in culturing this bacterium from CD are many. Examples include its extreme slow growth, lack of cell wall, low abundance, and its mycobactin dependency. In this review article, data from 60 studies showing the detection and isolation of MAP by PCR and culture techniques have been reviewed. Although this review may not be 100% comprehensive of all studies, clearly the majority of the studies overwhelmingly and definitively support the role of MAP in at least 30%-50% of CD patients. It is very possible that lack of detection of MAP from some CD patients may be due to the absence of MAP role in these patients. The latter statement is conditional on utilization of methodology appropriate for detection of human MAP strains. Ultimately, stratification of CD and inflammatory bowel disease patients for the presence or absence of MAP is necessary for appropriate and effective

  9. A Crohn's disease variant in Atg16l1 enhances its degradation by caspase 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, Aditya; Li, Yun; Peng, Ivan; Reichelt, Mike; Katakam, Anand Kumar; Noubade, Rajkumar; Roose-Girma, Merone; Devoss, Jason; Diehl, Lauri; Graham, Robert R.; van Lookeren Campagne, Menno

    2014-02-01

    Crohn's disease is a debilitating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that can involve the entire digestive tract. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) encoding a missense variant in the autophagy gene ATG16L1 (rs2241880, Thr300Ala) is strongly associated with the incidence of Crohn's disease. Numerous studies have demonstrated the effect of ATG16L1 deletion or deficiency; however, the molecular consequences of the Thr300Ala (T300A) variant remains unknown. Here we show that amino acids 296-299 constitute a caspase cleavage motif in ATG16L1 and that the T300A variant (T316A in mice) significantly increases ATG16L1 sensitization to caspase-3-mediated processing. We observed that death-receptor activation or starvation-induced metabolic stress in human and murine macrophages increased degradation of the T300A or T316A variants of ATG16L1, respectively, resulting in diminished autophagy. Knock-in mice harbouring the T316A variant showed defective clearance of the ileal pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica and an elevated inflammatory cytokine response. In turn, deletion of the caspase-3-encoding gene, Casp3, or elimination of the caspase cleavage site by site-directed mutagenesis rescued starvation-induced autophagy and pathogen clearance, respectively. These findings demonstrate that caspase 3 activation in the presence of a common risk allele leads to accelerated degradation of ATG16L1, placing cellular stress, apoptotic stimuli and impaired autophagy in a unified pathway that predisposes to Crohn's disease.

  10. Circulating antibodies to heat-shock protein 60 in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, T R; Winrow, V R; Blake, D R; Rampton, D S

    1992-01-01

    Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) are highly conserved immunogenic intracellular molecules that are induced by inflammatory mediators and may induce autoimmune phenomena in vivo. We have recently demonstrated the increased expression of HSP-60 in the colonocytes of patients with ulcerative colitis. To study further the role of HSP-60 in inflammatory bowel disease, we have now measured antibodies to recombinant mycobacterial HSP-65 (a member of the HSP-60 family) in patients with Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, healthy volunteers and, as disease controls, patients with confirmed bacterial diarrhoea. In comparison with healthy controls (n = 20; median level of 89 ELISA units; range 24-292), serum IgA HSP-60 antibodies were elevated in Crohn's disease (n = 21; 157; 57-364; P < 0.05) and active ulcerative colitis (n = 16; 188; 58-373; P < 0.01) but not bacterial diarrhoea (n = 10; 106; 51-285). Increased IgA HSP-60 antibody levels in patients with inflammatory bowel disease may occur as the result of HSP release from injured gut epithelium; alternatively, increased intestinal permeability could facilitate mucosal access of luminal antigens and the generation of cross-reactive anti-bacterial HSP antibodies. PMID:1424286

  11. Mycobacterium avium ss paratuberculosis-associated diseases: piecing the Crohn's puzzle together.

    PubMed

    Gitlin, Laura; Borody, Thomas Julius; Chamberlin, William; Campbell, Jordana

    2012-09-01

    The relation of Mycobacterium avium ss paratuberculosis (MAP) to Crohn's Disease (CD) and other MAP-associated conditions remains controversial. New data, coupled with the analogous Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) story, has permitted us to piece together the MAP puzzle and move forward with a more scientific way of treating inflammatory bowel disease, particularly CD. As infection moves centre stage in inflammatory bowel disease, the dated "aberrant reaction" etiology has lost scientific credibility. Now, our growing understanding of MAP-associated diseases demands review and articulation. We focus here on (1) the concept of MAP-associated diseases; (2) causality, Johne Disease, the "aberrant reaction" hypothesis; and (3) responses to published misconceptions questioning MAP as a pathogen in CD. PMID:22858515

  12. Resolution of Crohn's disease and complex regional pain syndrome following treatment of paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kuenstner, J Todd; Chamberlin, William; Naser, Saleh A; Collins, Michael T; Dow, Coad Thomas; Aitken, John M; Weg, Stuart; Telega, Grzegorz; John, Kuruvilla; Haas, David; Eckstein, Torsten M; Kali, Maher; Welch, Christine; Petrie, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    A cohort of family members with various chronic diseases including Crohn's disease, asthma, complex regional pain syndrome, hypothyroidism, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and lymphangiomatosis and/or evidence of infection by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) are described in this series of case reports. MAP was cultured from the blood of three members affected by the first five diseases and there was accompanying elevated anti-MAP IgG in two members. The patient affected by the sixth disease has a markedly elevated anti-MAP titer. The two patients affected by the first four diseases have been treated with a combination of anti-MAP antibiotics and ultraviolet blood irradiation therapy with resolution of the disease symptomatology and inability to culture MAP in post treatment blood samples. These case reports of patients with MAP infections provide supportive evidence of a pathogenic role of MAP in humans. PMID:25852293

  13. Coexistence of Celiac and Crohn's Disease in a Patient Presenting with Chronic Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Lail, Ghulamullah; Tasneem, Abbas Ali; Butt, Muhammed Osama; Luck, Nasir Hassan; Laeq, Syed Mudassir; Abbas, Zaigham; Mubarak, Muhammed

    2016-06-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is one of the most common causes of malabsorption. It is an immune-mediated disease manifested by diarrhea, steatorrhea, flatulence, and weight loss, caused by ingestion of gluten containing diets. The disease has typical small intestinal biopsy features of villous atrophy, crypt hyperplasia, and intense inflammation of the mucosal layer. The disease is rarely associated with Crohn's disease (CRD). Studies on the impact of CD on the natural history of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have shown that the natural course of CRD is not influenced by coexistent CD. We report a case of 54-year female who presented with diarrhea and weight loss. On initial evaluation, CD was diagnosed, and responded to gluten-free diet (GFD). Later on, she developed joint pains and her diarrhea recurred. Further evaluation revealed coexistence of CRD. The treatment of CRD was also initiated and this led to marked improvement in the symptoms of the patient. PMID:27353997

  14. Genetic determinants of ulcerative colitis include the ECM1 locus and five loci implicated in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Sheila A; Tremelling, Mark; Anderson, Carl A; Gwilliam, Rhian; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Prescott, Natalie J; Nimmo, Elaine R; Massey, Dunecan; Berzuini, Carlo; Johnson, Christopher; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Cummings, Fraser R; Drummond, Hazel; Lees, Charlie W; Onnie, Clive M; Hanson, Catherine E; Blaszczyk, Katarzyna; Inouye, Mike; Ewels, Philip; Ravindrarajah, Radhi; Keniry, Andrew; Hunt, Sarah; Carter, Martyn; Watkins, Nick; Ouwehand, Willem; Lewis, Cathryn M; Cardon, Lon; Lobo, Alan; Forbes, Alastair; Sanderson, Jeremy; Jewell, Derek P; Mansfield, John C; Deloukas, Panos; Mathew, Christopher G; Parkes, Miles; Satsangi, Jack

    2008-06-01

    We report results of a nonsynonymous SNP scan for ulcerative colitis and identify a previously unknown susceptibility locus at ECM1. We also show that several risk loci are common to ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease (IL23R, IL12B, HLA, NKX2-3 and MST1), whereas autophagy genes ATG16L1 and IRGM, along with NOD2 (also known as CARD15), are specific for Crohn's disease. These data provide the first detailed illustration of the genetic relationship between these common inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:18438406

  15. Pulmonary complications of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Ruby A; Musallam, Khaled M; Mroueh, Salman; Abboud, Miguel R

    2011-01-01

    The pulmonary complications of sickle cell disease are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in affected patients. The acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a leading cause of death in patients with sickle cell disease and has a multifactorial etiology. Hydroxyurea (HU), stem cell transplantation (SCT) and chronic transfusions are known to prevent the recurrence of ACS. Careful management of patients admitted for pain crises and surgery including use of incentive spirometry is critical in preventing this complication. Pulmonary hypertension is well known to be associated with sickle cell disease and patients with pulmonary hypertension have increased mortality. Asthma is also commonly seen in patients with sickle cell disease and is associated with a more complicated course. Chronic lung disease develops in a significant proportion of patients with sickle cell disease. PMID:21973051

  16. Post-traumatic stress in Crohn's disease and its association with disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Cámara, Rafael J A; Gander, Marie-Louise; Begré, Stefan; von Känel, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Objective Violence, accidents and natural disasters are known to cause post-traumatic stress, which is typically accompanied by fear, suffering and impaired quality of life. Similar to chronic diseases, such events preoccupy the patient over longer periods. We hypothesised that post-traumatic stress could also be caused by Crohn's disease (CD), and that CD specific post-traumatic stress could be associated with an increased risk of disease exacerbation. Methods A cohort of CD patients was observed over 18 months in various types of locations providing gastroenterological treatment in Switzerland. The cohort included 597 consecutively recruited adults. At inclusion, CD specific post-traumatic stress was assessed using the Post-traumatic Diagnostic Scale (range 0–51 points). During follow-up, clinical aggravation was assessed by combining important outcome measures. Patients with post-traumatic stress levels suggestive of a post-traumatic stress disorder (≥ 15 points) were compared with patients with lower post-traumatic stress levels as well as with patients without post-traumatic stress. Also, the continuous relation between post-traumatic stress severity and risk of disease exacerbation was assessed. Results The 88 (19.1%) patients scoring ≥15 points had 4.3 times higher odds of exacerbation (95% CI 2.6 to 7.2) than the 372 (80.9%) patients scoring <15 points, and 13.0 times higher odds (95% CI 3.6 to 46.2) than the 45 (9.8%) patients scoring 0 points. The odds of exacerbation increased by 2.2 (95% CI 1.6 to 2.8) per standard deviation of post-traumatic stress. Conclusions CD specific post-traumatic stress is frequent and seems to be associated with exacerbation of CD. Thus gastroenterologists may want to ask about symptoms of post-traumatic stress and, where relevant, offer appropriate management according to current knowledge. PMID:24349679

  17. Adalimumab for maintenance treatment of Crohn's disease: results of the CLASSIC II trial

    PubMed Central

    Sandborn, W J; Hanauer, S B; Rutgeerts, P; Fedorak, R N; Lukas, M; MacIntosh, D G; Panaccione, R; Wolf, D; Kent, J D; Bittle, B; Li, J; Pollack, P F

    2007-01-01

    Background Adalimumab induced clinical remission after four weeks in patients with active Crohn's disease in the CLASSIC I trial. Objective To evaluate long term efficacy and safety of adalimumab maintenance therapy in Crohn's disease in a follow‐on randomised controlled trial (CLASSIC II). Methods In the preceding CLASSIC I trial, 299 patients with moderate to severe Crohn's disease naive to tumour necrosis factor antagonists received induction therapy with adalimumab 40 mg/20 mg, 80 mg/40 mg, or 160 mg/80 mg, or placebo, at weeks 0 and 2. In all, 276 patients from CLASSIC I enrolled in CLASSIC II and received open‐label adalimumab 40 mg at weeks 0 (week 4 of CLASSIC I) and 2; 55 patients in remission at both weeks 0 and 4 were re‐randomised to adalimumab 40 mg every other week, 40 mg weekly, or placebo for 56 weeks. Patients not in remission at both weeks 0 and 4 were enrolled in an open‐label arm and received adalimumab 40 mg every other week. With non‐response or flare, these patients could have their dosages increased to 40 mg weekly. Patients in the randomised arm with continued non‐response or disease flare could switch to open‐label adalimumab 40 mg every other week and again to 40 mg weekly. The primary end point was maintenance of remission (CDAI <150) in randomised patients through week 56. Results Of 55 patients randomised at week 4, 79% who received adalimumab 40 mg every other week and 83% who received 40 mg weekly were in remission at week 56, v 44% for placebo (p<0.05). In all, 204 patients entered the open‐label arm. Of these, 93 (46%) were in clinical remission at week 56. Adalimumab was generally well‐tolerated in all patients. Conclusions Adalimumab induced and maintained clinical remission for up to 56 weeks in patients with moderate to severe Crohn's disease naive to anti‐TNF treatment. PMID:17299059

  18. Living with Crohn's Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Past Issues / Winter 2016 Table of Contents Photo courtesy of Laura King Benjamin King, star of ... King from competing in a triathlon in 2010. Photo courtesy of Laura King Can you share with ...

  19. Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis: A Guide for Parents

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes, some have been ruled out, including tension, anxiety, personality traits, or dietary factors. Also, the diseases ... child can stay calm, maintain perspective, and avoid anxiety. Encourage your child to try several different approaches ...

  20. What is Crohn's Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... fistula, fissure, or intestinal obstruction. Surgery often involves removal of the diseased segment of bowel (resection), and ... extra calories and right amount of vitamins and minerals to keep you healthy. During acute phases of ...

  1. A new look at Crohn's disease: breakdown of the mucosal antibacterial defense.

    PubMed

    Wehkamp, Jan; Stange, Eduard F

    2006-08-01

    Crohn's disease (CD), a chronic inflammatory disease of the intestinal mucosa is usually located in the small intestine (ileum) and or in the colon. Ileal CD has been linked to a mutation in the NOD2 gene, a bacterial recognition protein. A disturbed antimicrobial defense as provided by an arsenal of different epithelial defensins seems to be a critical factor in disease pathogenesis. Defensins are antimicrobial peptides and in the ileum are mainly expressed in Paneth cells (PCs), epithelial cells that also express NOD2. In the colon, defensins are expressed by enterocytes or metaplastic PCs. Ileal CD patients are characterized by a reduced antibacterial activity and a specific reduction of ileal PC defensins. In ileal Crohn's patients displaying a NOD2 mutation, this decrease is even more pronounced. In contrast, CD of the colon is characterized by an impaired induction of beta defensins in enterocytes. In conclusion, the regional localizations of CD, either ileal or colonic disease, can be linked to different defects in defensin expression. In line with these new findings, we predict that future therapeutic strategies aimed at restoring the host-microbe balance at the intestinal mucosa may prove superior to those that broadly suppress inflammation and adaptive immunity. PMID:17057212

  2. The effect of elemental diet on intestinal permeability and inflammation in Crohn's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Teahon, K.; Smethurst, P.; Pearson, M.; Levi, A.J.; Bjarnason, I. )

    1991-07-01

    This study examines whether treatment of acute Crohn's disease with an elemental diet improves intestinal integrity and inflammation as assessed by a 51Cr-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetatic acid (EDTA) permeability test and the fecal excretion of 111In-labeled autologous leukocytes, respectively. Thirty-four patients with active Crohn's disease completed a 4-week treatment course with an elemental diet. Active disease was characterized by increased intestinal permeability (24-hour urine excretion of orally administered 51Cr-EDTA, 6.4% {plus minus} 0.6% (mean {plus minus} SE); normal, less than 3.0%) and by high fecal excretion of 111In-labeled leukocytes (14.2% {plus minus} 1.1%; normal, less than 1.0%). Twenty-seven (80%) went into clinical remission, usually within a week of starting treatment. After 4 weeks of treatment, there was a significant decrease in both the urine excretion of 51Cr-EDTA (to 3.4% {plus minus} 0.5%; P less than 0.01) and the fecal excretion of 111In (to 5.7% {plus minus} 1.0%; P less than 0.001), indicating that such treatment is not just symptomatic. A framework for the mechanism by which elemental diet works, centering around the importance of the integrity of the intestinal barrier function, is proposed, and also appears to provide a logical explanation for some relapses of the disease.

  3. Health-related quality of life in youth with Crohn's disease: The role of disease activity and parenting stress

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Wendy N.; Boyle, Shana L.; Graef, Danielle M.; Janicke, David M.; Jolley, Christopher D.; Denson, Lee A.; Baldassano, Robert N.; Hommel, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is an important, but understudied construct in pediatric IBD. Family-level predictors of HRQOL have been understudied as are the mechanisms through which disease activity impacts HRQOL. The current study examines the relationship between a family-level factor (parenting stress) and HRQOL in youth with Crohn's disease. Parenting stress is examined as a mechanism through with disease activity impacts HRQOL. Methods 99 adolescents with Crohn's disease and their parents were recruited across three sites. Adolescents completed the IMPACT-III (IBD-specific HRQOL). Parents completed the Pediatric Inventory for Parents, a measure of medically-related parenting stress that assesses: 1) stress due to the occurrence of medical stressors and 2) stress due to the perceived difficulty of stressors. Disease activity was obtained from medical records. Results Parenting stress due to the occurrence of medical stressors partially mediated the disease severity-HRQOL relationship, reducing the relationship between these variables from 49.67% to 31.58% (B = -.56, p <.0001). Boot strapping analysis confirmed that the indirect effect of disease severity on HQROL via parenting stress significantly differed from zero. Parenting stress due to the perceived difficulty of medical stressors partially mediated the disease severity-HRQOL relationship, reducing the relationship from 49.67% to 30.29% (B = -.55, p < .0001). The indirect effect was confirmed via bootstrapping procedures. Conclusions As disease severity increased, parenting stress also increased, and adolescent HRQOL decreased. Parenting stress should be considered and assessed for along with medical factors as part of a comprehensive approach to improving HRQOL in adolescents with Crohn's disease. PMID:25564807

  4. [Magnetic resonance imaging in the exploration of abdominal and anoperineal fistulas in Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Boudghène, F; Aboun, H; Grange, J D; Wallays, C; Bodin, F; Bigot, J M

    1993-01-01

    In a twelve month period, ten patients with fistulas related to Crohn's disease were explored by magnetic resonance imaging performed with a high-field supraconductive magnet. This technique demonstrated 3 cases of peri-anal abcesse invisible by other imaging modalities, and in 8 cases, fistules tracts, including 5 complex fistules, and one communicating with the bladder. This examination defined the extension of these lesions relative to the elevator plane, and demonstrated diffusion to the inferior space in 4 cases, to the superior space in 2 cases, and to both spaces in 2 cases. This method seems to be efficacious and does not expose the patient to X-rays. PMID:8330690

  5. Magnetic resonance enterography in Crohn's disease: optimal use in clinical practice and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Rimola, Jordi; Panés, Julián; Ordás, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide a practical appraisal of the usefulness of magnetic resonance enterography in the management of Crohn's disease and the potential utilities that this imaging modality may have in clinical research. Also, we review some basic technical considerations that clinicians should know to understand the value and limitations of the technique. Lastly, we outline the future trends and potential contributions of new technological advances in the field of magnetic resonance imaging that can improve the classic magnetic resonance enterography technique. PMID:25523557

  6. [Crohn's disease and cancer risk. Incidence/prevalence, clinical characteristics, and potential prevention strategies].

    PubMed

    Allgayer, Hubert; Holtmeier, Wolfgang; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2007-09-15

    Epidemiologic data concerning the risk for colorectal cancer in ulcerative colitis are based on a variety of large and well-conducted cohort studies. Guidelines for tumor prevention have been published by the German Gastroenterology Society (DGVS) in 2004. By contrast, the risk constellations in Crohn's disease are less clear and guidelines are lacking. Based on a recent literature search (PubMed March 2007), the published data predominantly expressed as relative risk and/or standardized incidence/mortality ratio are critically reviewed with recommendations for tumor prevention strategies based on individual risk constellations. PMID:17879011

  7. Crohn's disease confined to the duodenum: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Song, Dong Jin; Whang, Il Soon; Choi, Hyung Wook; Jeong, Cheol Yun; Jung, Sung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract from the mouth to anus. However, gastroduodenal CD is rare with a frequency reported to range between 0.5% and 4.0%. Most patients with gastroduodenal CD have concomitant lesions in the terminal ileum or colon, but isolated gastroduodenal Crohn’s disease is an extremely rare presentation of the disease accounting for less than 0.07% of all patients with CD. The symptoms of gastroduodenal CD include epigastric pain, dyspepsia, early satiety, anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. The diagnosis of gastroduodenal CD requires a high level of clinical suspicion and can be made by comprehensive clinical evaluation. Here we report a rare case of isolated duodenal CD not confirmed by identification of granuloma on biopsy, but diagnosed by clinical evaluation. PMID:27326400

  8. Influence of medical treatment, smoking and disease activity on pregnancy outcomes in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Julsgaard, Mette; Nørgaard, Mette; Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Grosen, Anne; Hasseriis, Sara; Christensen, Lisbet Ambrosius

    2014-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. Little is known about predictors for adverse pregnancy outcomes among women with Crohn's disease (CD). In this population-based study, we examined pregnancy outcomes in CD stratified by medical treatment and smoking status while accounting for disease activity. METHODS. In two Danish regions with a population of 1.6 million, we identified 154 CD women who had given birth within a 6-year period. We combined questionnaire data, prescription data, data from medical records and population-based medical databases. We used logistic regression to estimate prevalence odds ratios (POR) for adverse pregnancy outcomes by different predictors. RESULTS. Among 105 (80%) respondents, 55 (52%) reported taking medication during pregnancy. The majority (95%) were in disease remission. The children's mean birth weight did not differ by maternal medical treatment. As expected, smoking was a predictor of low birth weight. Mean birth weight in children of smokers in medical treatment was significantly reduced by 274 g compared with children of non-smokers who received medical treatment. In children of women without medical treatment, this difference was 126 g between smokers and non-smokers. Women in medical treatment did not have an increased risk of preterm delivery (POR 0.71; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.18-2.79), congenital malformations (POR 0.60; 0.10-3.76) or cesarean section (POR 1.40; 0.63-3.08). CONCLUSIon. In CD, smoking was negatively associated with child birth weight. This association was most pronounced among women who received medical treatment. Maternal medical treatment for CD did not seem to be a risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:24417179

  9. Upper limb erythema nodosum: the first presentation of Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Faulkes, R E

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Inflammatory bowel disease can present with extraintestinal features as the patient's only complaint. The erythema nodosum (EN) initially affected the upper limbs only, reminding us that signs do not always present in a classical fashion. The presence of EN should prompt the clinician to look for any underlying cause. PMID:25614807

  10. Enteral Nutrition in Crohn's Disease: An Underused Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kansal, S.; Wagner, J.; Kirkwood, C. D.; Catto-Smith, A. G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on the history, efficacy, and putative mechanism of action of enteral nutrition for inflammatory bowel disease in both paediatric and adult patients. It also analyses the reasoning behind the low popularity of exclusive enteral nutrition in clinical practice despite the benefits and safety profile. PMID:24382954

  11. Asia Pacific Consensus Statements on Crohn's disease. Part 1: Definition, diagnosis, and epidemiology: (Asia Pacific Crohn's Disease Consensus--Part 1).

    PubMed

    Ooi, Choon Jin; Makharia, Govind K; Hilmi, Ida; Gibson, Peter R; Fock, Kwong Ming; Ahuja, Vineet; Ling, Khoon Lin; Lim, Wee Chian; Thia, Kelvin T; Wei, Shu-chen; Leung, Wai Keung; Koh, Poh Koon; Gearry, Richard B; Goh, Khean Lee; Ouyang, Qin; Sollano, Jose; Manatsathit, Sathaporn; de Silva, H Janaka; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Pisespongsa, Pises; Abu Hassan, Muhamad Radzi; Sung, Joseph; Hibi, Toshifumi; Boey, Christopher C M; Moran, Neil; Leong, Rupert W L

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) was previously thought to be rare in Asia, but emerging data indicate rising incidence and prevalence of IBD in the region. The Asia Pacific Working Group on Inflammatory Bowel Disease was established in Cebu, Philippines, at the Asia Pacific Digestive Week conference in 2006 under the auspices of the Asian Pacific Association of Gastroenterology with the goal of developing best management practices, coordinating research, and raising awareness of IBD in the region. The consensus group previously published recommendations for the diagnosis and management of ulcerative colitis with specific relevance to the Asia-Pacific region. The present consensus statements were developed following a similar process to address the epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of Crohn's disease. The goals of these statements are to pool the pertinent literature specifically highlighting relevant data and conditions in the Asia-Pacific region relating to the economy, health systems, background infectious diseases, differential diagnoses, and treatment availability. It does not intend to be all comprehensive and future revisions are likely to be required in this ever-changing field. PMID:25819140

  12. An Atypical Eating Disorder with Crohn's Disease in a Fifteen-Year-Old Male: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holaday, Margot; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Discusses how 6 months after psychological intervention for an eating disorder, a 15-year-old male was diagnosed with Crohn's disease, a chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Addresses need for additional training for those from traditional school and counseling psychology programs. Advocates a team approach and consultations. (RJM)

  13. Subcutaneous Histiocytoid Sweet Syndrome Associated with Crohn Disease in an Adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Torres, Rosa María; Castro, Susana; Moreno, Ana; Álvarez, Roberto; Fonseca, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of subcutaneous histiocytoid Sweet syndrome in an adolescent with Crohn disease. A 14-year-old boy with a 1-year history of ileocolonic and perianal Crohn disease, treated with infliximab and azathioprine, was admitted to the Pediatrics Department with malaise, abdominal pain, bloody diarrhea, and fever (39°C) from 15 days ago. Two days later, he developed cutaneous lesions consisting of tender, erythematous, and violaceous papules and nodules scattered over his legs, soles, and upper extremities. Laboratory studies revealed neutrophilia, microcytic anemia, and elevation of both erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein rate. A skin biopsy specimen showed deep dermal and predominantly septal inflammatory infiltrate in the subcutaneous tissue composed of polymorphonuclears, eosinophils, and mononuclear cells of histiocytic appearance. These histiocytoid cells stained positive for myeloperoxidase. Subcutaneous Sweet syndrome is a rare subtype of acute neutrophilic dermatosis, in which the infiltrate is exclusively or predominantly located in the subcutaneous tissue, causing lobular or septal panniculitis. It is often described in patients with an underlying haematological disorder or caused by drugs, but very rare in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, especially in childhood or adolescence. To our knowledge, this is the first case of subcutaneous histiocytoid type in a paediatric patient. PMID:24839565

  14. Subcutaneous histiocytoid sweet syndrome associated with crohn disease in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Torres, Rosa María; Castro, Susana; Moreno, Ana; Alvarez, Roberto; Fonseca, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of subcutaneous histiocytoid Sweet syndrome in an adolescent with Crohn disease. A 14-year-old boy with a 1-year history of ileocolonic and perianal Crohn disease, treated with infliximab and azathioprine, was admitted to the Pediatrics Department with malaise, abdominal pain, bloody diarrhea, and fever (39°C) from 15 days ago. Two days later, he developed cutaneous lesions consisting of tender, erythematous, and violaceous papules and nodules scattered over his legs, soles, and upper extremities. Laboratory studies revealed neutrophilia, microcytic anemia, and elevation of both erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein rate. A skin biopsy specimen showed deep dermal and predominantly septal inflammatory infiltrate in the subcutaneous tissue composed of polymorphonuclears, eosinophils, and mononuclear cells of histiocytic appearance. These histiocytoid cells stained positive for myeloperoxidase. Subcutaneous Sweet syndrome is a rare subtype of acute neutrophilic dermatosis, in which the infiltrate is exclusively or predominantly located in the subcutaneous tissue, causing lobular or septal panniculitis. It is often described in patients with an underlying haematological disorder or caused by drugs, but very rare in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, especially in childhood or adolescence. To our knowledge, this is the first case of subcutaneous histiocytoid type in a paediatric patient. PMID:24839565

  15. Endoscopic fluorescence imaging for early assessment of anastomotic recurrence of Crohn's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordon, Serge R.; Maunoury, Vincent; Geboes, K.; Klein, Olivier; Desreumaux, P.; Debaert, A.; Colombel, Jean-Frederic

    1999-02-01

    Crohn's disease is an inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology. The mechanism of the initial mucosal alterations is still unclear: ulcerations overlying lymphoid follicles and/or vasculitis have been proposed as the early lesions. We have developed a new and original method combining endoscopy of fluorescence angiography for identifying the early pathological lesions, occurring in the neo-terminal ileum after right ileocolonic resection. The patient population consisted of 10 subjects enrolled in a prospective protocol of endoscopic follow-up at 3 and 12 months after surgery. Fluorescence imaging showed small spots giving a bright fluorescence distributed singly in mucosa which appeared normal in routine endoscopy. Histopathological examination demonstrated that the fluorescence of small spots originated from small, usually superficial, erosive lesions. In several cases, these erosive lesions occurred over lymphoid follicles. Endoscopic fluorescence imaging provides a suitable means of investigating the initial aspect of the Crohn's disease process in displaying some correlative findings between fluorescent aspects and early pathological mucosal alterations.

  16. Reduced Paneth cell α-defensins in ileal Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Wehkamp, Jan; Salzman, Nita H.; Porter, Edith; Nuding, Sabine; Weichenthal, Michael; Petras, Robert E.; Shen, Bo; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias; Linzmeier, Rose; Feathers, Ryan W.; Chu, Hiutung; Lima, Heriberto; Fellermann, Klaus; Ganz, Tomas; Stange, Eduard F.; Bevins, Charles L.

    2005-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Crohn′s disease (CD), an idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease, is attributed, in part, to intestinal bacteria that may initiate and perpetuate mucosal inflammation in genetically susceptible individuals. Paneth cells (PC) are the major source of antimicrobial peptides in the small intestine, including human α-defensins HD5 and HD6. We tested the hypothesis that reduced expression of PC α-defensins compromises mucosal host defenses and predisposes patients to CD of the ileum. We report that patients with CD of the ileum have reduced antibacterial activity in their intestinal mucosal extracts. These specimens also showed decreased expression of PC α-defensins, whereas the expression of eight other PC products either remained unchanged or increased when compared with controls. The specific decrease of α-defensins was independent of the degree of inflammation in the specimens and was not observed in either CD of the colon, ulcerative colitis, or pouchitis. The functional consequence of α-defensin expression levels was examined by using a transgenic mouse model, where we found changes in HD5 expression levels, comparable to those observed in CD, had a pronounced impact on the luminal microbiota. Thus, the specific deficiency of PC defensins that characterizes ileal CD may compromise innate immune defenses of the ileal mucosa and initiate and/or perpetuate this disease. PMID:16330776

  17. Leisure-time physical activity in Canadians living with Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis: population-based estimates.

    PubMed

    Mack, Diane E; Wilson, Philip M; Gilmore, Jennica C; Gunnell, Katie E

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide population-based estimates of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) in Canadians diagnosed with Crohn disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC). Data were derived from the Canadian Community Health Survey Cycle 3.1 (2005). Those diagnosed with CD (n = 474; 61.60% female) or UC (n = 637; 65.10% female) were compared with those not reporting CD/UC (n = 113,685; 53.60% female). The most prevalent forms of LTPA reported were walking and gardening/yard work. Individuals with CD were more likely to be classified as "inactive" (OR = 1.34; 95% CI [1.12, 1.61]) and less likely to be "active" (OR = 0.69; 95% CI [0.55, 0.87]) than those not reporting CD/UC. These trends were mirrored for those living with UC, although statistical significance was not attained. Despite claims advocating the benefits of LTPA for ameliorating complications associated with CD/UC, prevalence estimates from a population-based sample of Canadians living with CD/UC suggest that the majority do not meet current public health guidelines. Results offer benchmarks for prevalence of LTPA in those diagnosed with CD/UC. Findings suggest that many living with this condition will not benefit from the protective role of LTPA on complications associated with CD/UC. PMID:21814062

  18. Clinical features of Crohn disease concomitant with ankylosing spondylitis: A preliminary single-center study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Song; Ding, Jie; Wang, Meng; Zhou, Wanqing; Feng, Min; Guan, Wenxian

    2016-07-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) cause increased morbidity and decreased quality of life in Crohn disease (CD). Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) belongs to EIMs. Very little is known on the clinical features of CD concomitant with AS. This study is to investigate the clinical features of CD patients with AS.We retrospectively collected all CD patients with AS in our hospital, and established a comparison group (CD without AS) with age, sex, and duration of Crohn disease matched. Clinical information was retrieved for comparison.Eight CD + AS patients were identified from 195 CD patients. Sixteen CD patients were randomly selected into comparison group. All CD + AS patients were male, HLA-B27 (+), and rheumatoid factor (-) with an average age of 40.8 ± 4.52 years. Significant correlation between disease activity of CD and AS was revealed (r = 0.857, P = 0.011). Significant correlation between disease activity of CD and functional limitation associated with AS was identified (r = 0.881, P < 0.01). C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and globulin were positively correlated to Crohn disease activity index (CDAI), Bath AS disease activity index, and Bath AS functional index(BASFI) scores (r = 0.73-0.93, P < 0.05). Albumin was negatively associated with CDAI and BASFI (r = -0.73 to -0.91, P < 0.05). The ratio of albumin to globulin (Alb/Glo) was significantly related to all 3 scores (r = -0.81 to -0.91, P < 0.05).Male predominance with a 4.12% concomitant incidence of AS is observed in CD patients. Disease activity of CD correlates with disease activity of AS and functional limitation caused by AS. CRP, ESR, and Alb/Glo may serve as biomarkers for disease activity and functional limitation in CD patients concomitant with AS, although future studies are expected. PMID:27428240

  19. The treatment-naive microbiome in new-onset Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Gevers, Dirk; Kugathasan, Subra; Denson, Lee A; Vázquez-Baeza, Yoshiki; Van Treuren, Will; Ren, Boyu; Schwager, Emma; Knights, Dan; Song, Se Jin; Yassour, Moran; Morgan, Xochitl C; Kostic, Aleksandar D; Luo, Chengwei; González, Antonio; McDonald, Daniel; Haberman, Yael; Walters, Thomas; Baker, Susan; Rosh, Joel; Stephens, Michael; Heyman, Melvin; Markowitz, James; Baldassano, Robert; Griffiths, Anne; Sylvester, Francisco; Mack, David; Kim, Sandra; Crandall, Wallace; Hyams, Jeffrey; Huttenhower, Curtis; Knight, Rob; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2014-03-12

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), including Crohn's disease (CD), are genetically linked to host pathways that implicate an underlying role for aberrant immune responses to intestinal microbiota. However, patterns of gut microbiome dysbiosis in IBD patients are inconsistent among published studies. Using samples from multiple gastrointestinal locations collected prior to treatment in new-onset cases, we studied the microbiome in the largest pediatric CD cohort to date. An axis defined by an increased abundance in bacteria which include Enterobacteriaceae, Pasteurellacaea, Veillonellaceae, and Fusobacteriaceae, and decreased abundance in Erysipelotrichales, Bacteroidales, and Clostridiales, correlates strongly with disease status. Microbiome comparison between CD patients with and without antibiotic exposure indicates that antibiotic use amplifies the microbial dysbiosis associated with CD. Comparing the microbial signatures between the ileum, the rectum, and fecal samples indicates that at this early stage of disease, assessing the rectal mucosal-associated microbiome offers unique potential for convenient and early diagnosis of CD. PMID:24629344

  20. Transforming growth factor-betas and their signaling receptors are coexpressed in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    di Mola, F F; Friess, H; Scheuren, A; Di Sebastiano, P; Graber, H; Egger, B; Zimmermann, A; Korc, M; Büchler, M W

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate mechanisms that contribute to tissue repair and tissue remodeling in Crohn's disease (CD). SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Transforming growth factor-betas (TGF-betas) are involved in different chronic inflammatory disorders. They function by binding to two receptors, type I (TbetaR-I) subtype ALK5 and type II (TbetaR-II), which are concomitantly required for signal transduction. METHODS: Tissues were obtained from 18 patients with CD (10 female patients, 8 male patients, median age 38.7 years [range 16 to 58 years]) undergoing surgery because of CD-related complications. Tissue samples of 18 healthy organ donors (10 female subjects, 8 male subjects, median age 50.3 years [range 15 to 65 years]) served as controls. The expression and localization of TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2, TGF-beta3, TbetaR-IALK5, TbetaR-II, and TbetaR-III were studied by Northern blot analysis, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: On Northern blot analysis, 94% of the CD samples exhibited enhanced TGF-beta1, TGF-beta3, and TbetaR-II mRNA expression compared with controls. TGF-beta2 was increased in 72%, TbetaR-IALK5 in 72%, and TbetaR-III in 82% of the patients with CD. On in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analysis, TGF-beta1, TbetaR-IALK5, and TbetaR-II were seen to be colocalized in the lamina propria cells and in the lymphocytes closest to the luminal surface, but also in the remaining epithelial cells, and in fibroblasts of CD tissue samples. CONCLUSIONS: The concomitant overexpression of TGF-betas and their signaling receptors in CD points to a potential role of these regulatory molecules in the pathophysiology of CD. Activation of TGF-beta-mediated pathways might promote the repair of mucosal injury by enhancing the process of reepithelization, but might also contribute to extracellular matrix generation and subsequently to intramural fibrosis and intestinal obstruction. Images Figure 1. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:9923802

  1. The relationship between infliximab concentrations, antibodies to infliximab and disease activity in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Vande Casteele, Niels; Khanna, Reena; Levesque, Barrett G; Stitt, Larry; Zou, G Y; Singh, Sharat; Lockton, Steve; Hauenstein, Scott; Ohrmund, Linda; Greenberg, Gordon R; Rutgeerts, Paul J; Gils, Ann; Sandborn, William J; Vermeire, Séverine; Feagan, Brian G

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although low infliximab trough concentrations and antibodies to infliximab (ATI) are associated with poor outcomes in patients with Crohn's disease (CD), the clinical relevance of ATI in patients with adequate infliximab concentrations is uncertain. We evaluated this question using an assay sensitive for identification of ATI in the presence of infliximab. Design In an observational study, 1487 trough serum samples from 483 patients with CD who participated in four clinical studies of maintenance infliximab therapy were analysed using a fluid phase mobility shift assay. Infliximab and ATI concentrations most discriminant for remission, defined as a C-reactive protein concentration of ≤5 mg/L, were determined by receiver operating characteristic curves. A multivariable regression model evaluated these factors as independent predictors of remission. Results Based upon analysis of 1487 samples, 77.1% of patients had detectable and 22.9% had undetectable infliximab concentrations, of which 9.5% and 71.8%, respectively, were positive for ATI. An infliximab concentration of >2.79 μg/mL (area under the curve (AUC)=0.681; 95% CI 0.632 to 0.731) and ATI concentration of <3.15 U/mL (AUC=0.632; 95% CI 0.589 to 0.676) were associated with remission. Multivariable analysis showed that concentrations of both infliximab trough (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.3 to 2.5; p<0.001) and ATI (OR 0.57; 95% CI 0.39 to 0.81; p=0.002) were independent predictors of remission. Conclusions The development of ATI increases the probability of active disease even at low concentrations and in the presence of a therapeutic concentration of drug during infliximab maintenance therapy. Evaluation of strategies to prevent ATI formation, including therapeutic drug monitoring with selective infliximab dose intensification, is needed. PMID:25336114

  2. Role of Salmonella enterica exposure in Chilean Crohn's disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Lobos, Manuel; Pizarro, Daniela P; Palavecino, Christian E; Espinoza, Abner; Sebastián, Valentina P; Alvarado, Juan C; Ibañez, Patricio; Quintana, Carlos; Díaz, Orlando; Kalergis, Alexis M; Bueno, Susan M

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study the association between exposure to Salmonella enterica (SE) and Crohn’s disease (CD) and its clinical implications in Chilean patients. METHODS: Ninety-four unrelated Chilean CD patients from CAREI (Active Cohort Registry of Inflammatory Bowel Disease) presenting to a single inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) unit of a University Hospital were prospectively included in this study. A complete clinical evaluation, including smoking history, was performed at the initial visit, and all the important data of clinical evolution of CD were obtained. Blood samples from these CD patients and 88 healthy sex- and age-matched control subjects were analyzed for exposure to SE and for their NOD2/CARD15 gene status using the presence of anti-Salmonella lipopolysaccharide antibodies [immunoglobulin-G type (IgG)] and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), respectively. We also evaluated exposure to SE in 90 sex- and age-matched patients without CD, but with known smoking status (30 smokers, 30 non-smokers, and 30 former smokers). RESULTS: CD patients comprised 54 females and 40 males, aged 35.5 ± 15.2 years at diagnosis with a mean follow-up of 9.0 ± 6.8 years. CD was inflammatory in 59 patients (62.7%), stricturing in 24 (25.5%) and penetrating in 15 (15.5%). Thirty cases (31.9%) had lesions in the ileum, 29 (30.8%) had ileocolonic lesions, 32 (34.0%) had colonic lesions and 23 (24.4%) had perianal disease. Sixteen CD patients (17%) were exposed to SE compared to 15 (17%) of 88 healthy control subjects (P = 0.8). Thirty-one CD patients (32.9%) were smokers, and 7 (7.4%) were former smokers at diagnosis. In the group exposed to SE, 10 of 16 patients (62.5%) were active smokers compared to 21 of 78 patients (26.9%) in the unexposed group (P = 0.01). On the other hand, 10 of 31 smoking patients (32%) were exposed to SE compared to 5 of 56 nonsmoking patients (9%), and one of the seven former smokers (14%) (P = 0.01). In the group of 90 patients without CD, but whose

  3. Smoking Linked to Higher Relapse Risk After Surgery for Crohn's

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Smoking Linked to Higher Relapse Risk After Surgery for Crohn's Research supports immediate drug treatment after bowel surgery for ... Crohn's disease patients will have relapses after bowel surgery, new research suggests. The study included 240 Crohn's disease patients ...

  4. Crohn's disease and growth deficiency in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Gasparetto, Marco; Guariso, Graziella

    2014-01-01

    Nutritional concerns, linear growth deficiency, and delayed puberty are currently detected in up to 85% of patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) diagnosed at childhood. To provide advice on how to assess and manage nutritional concerns in these patients, a Medline search was conducted using “pediatric inflammatory bowel disease”, “pediatric Crohn’s disease”, “linear growth”, “pubertal growth”, “bone health”, and “vitamin D” as key words. Clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses published between 2008 and 2013 were selected to produce this narrative review. Studies referring to earlier periods were also considered if the data was relevant to our review. Although current treatment strategies for CD that include anti-tumor necrosis factor-α therapy have been shown to improve patients’ growth rate, linear growth deficiencies are still common. In pediatric CD patients, prolonged diagnostic delay, high initial activity index, and stricturing/penetrating type of behavior may cause growth deficiencies (in weight and height) and delayed puberty, with several studies reporting that these patients may not reach an optimal bone mass. Glucocorticoids and inflammation inhibit bone formation, though their impact on skeletal modeling remains unclear. Long-term control of active inflammation and an adequate intake of nutrients are both fundamental in promoting normal puberty. Recent evidence suggests that recombinant growth factor therapy is effective in improving short-term linear growth in selected patients, but is of limited benefit for ameliorating mucosal disease and reducing clinical disease activity. The authors conclude that an intense initial treatment (taking a “top-down” approach, with the early introduction of immunomodulatory treatment) may be justified to induce and maintain remission so that the growth of children with CD can catch up, ideally before puberty. Exclusive enteral nutrition has a key role in inducing

  5. Pulmonary hypertension complicating connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Joseph P; Belperio, John A; Saggar, Rajeev; Fishbein, Michael C; Saggar, Rajan

    2013-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) may complicate connective tissue disease (CTD), particularly systemic sclerosis (SSc, scleroderma), and markedly increases mortality. More than 70% of cases of PH complicating CTD occur in SSc, which is the major focus of this article. Pulmonary complications (i.e., interstitial lung disease [ILD] and PH) are the leading causes of scleroderma-related deaths. "Isolated" PH (i.e., without ILD) complicates SSc in 7.5 to 20% of cases; secondary PH may also occur in patients with SSc-associated ILD. Several clinical markers and specific autoantibody profiles have been associated with PH in SSc. The role of PH-specific therapy is controversial, as prognosis and responsiveness to therapy are worse in SSc-associated PH compared with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. We discuss medical therapies for CTD-associated PH and the role of lung transplantation for patients failing medical therapy. PMID:24037627

  6. Differences in clinical features of Crohn's disease and intestinal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xin; Liao, Wang-Di; Yu, Chen; Tu, Yi; Pan, Xiao-Lin; Chen, You-Xiang; Lv, Nong-Hua; Zhu, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinical features of Crohn’s disease (CD) and intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) with a scoring system that we have developed. METHODS: A total of 25 CD and 40 ITB patients were prospectively enrolled from August 2011 to July 2012. Their characteristics and clinical features were recorded. Laboratory, endoscopic, histologic and radiographic features were determined. The features with a high specificity were selected to establish a scoring system. The features supporting CD scored +1, and those supporting ITB scored -1; each patient received a final total score. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to determine the best cut-off value for distinguishing CD from ITB. RESULTS: Based on a high specificity of differentiating between CD and ITB, 12 features, including longitudinal ulcers, nodular hyperplasia, cobblestone-like mucosa, intestinal diseases, intestinal fistula, the target sign, the comb sign, night sweats, the purified protein derivative test, the interferon-γ release assay (T-SPOT.TB), ring ulcers and ulcer scars, were selected for the scoring system. The results showed that the average total score of the CD group was 3.12 ± 1.740, the average total score of the ITB group was -2.58 ± 0.984, the best cutoff value for the ROC curve was -0.5, and the diagnostic area under the curve was 0.997, which was statistically significant (P < 0.001). The patients whose total scores were higher than -0.5 were diagnosed with CD; otherwise, patients were diagnosed with ITB. Overall, the diagnostic accuracy rate and misdiagnosis rate of this scoring system were 97% and 3%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Some clinical features are valuable for CD and ITB diagnosis. The described scoring system is key to differentiating between CD and ITB. PMID:25834333

  7. Small intestinal Crohn's disease with hepatic portal venous gas: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamadera, Masato; Kajiwara, Yoshiki; Shinto, Eiji; Hokari, Ryota; Shimazaki, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Junji; Hase, Kazuo; Ueno, Hideki

    2016-12-01

    An 80-year-old man presented in another hospital with acute abdominal pain; computed tomography indicated hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG) and small intestinal thickening. He was then transferred to our hospital, where we diagnosed idiopathic inflammation and stenosis of the ileum. Because the patient's abdominal symptoms were mild and his general condition was good, we chose to administer conservative therapy. His condition improved and we discharged him from our hospital. However, he was hospitalized again 9 days later because his abdominal pain had recurred and was worse. We performed a laparoscopic partial resection of the ileum 3 weeks after the patients' initial presentation. Macroscopically, longitudinal ulcers were observed near the stenosis of the ileum; the segment of the small intestine that contained the ulcers was removed, and subsequent pathological findings indicated Crohn's disease of the small intestine. The post-operative course was favorable, and the patient was discharged on post-operative day 9. Such serendipitous diagnosis of small intestinal Crohn's disease in an elderly patient with hepatic portal venous gas is rare; to our knowledge, this is the first of such case in which laparoscopic surgery was performed. PMID:27352296

  8. Dietary fiber information for individuals with Crohn disease: reports of gastrointestinal effects.

    PubMed

    Brotherton, Carol S; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2013-01-01

    The experiences of individuals with Crohn disease before and after receiving dietary fiber information have not been described in the literature. This article offers findings from a study that used four semistructured audiorecorded interviews during a 4-week time period for the purpose of exploring the experiences of 11 individuals before and after receiving dietary fiber information from a healthcare professional. The first and second interviews occurred immediately before and after the presentation of information. Follow-up interviews occurred at 2-week intervals. Thematic analysis of the baseline interviews revealed 2 themes: (a) accepting a redefined (lower expectations) definition of normal quality of life and (b) continuing to look for answers. Three themes emerged from the follow-up interviews at Week 4: (a) reevaluating old diet-related concepts, (b) enjoying a healthier lifestyle at a self-set pace, and (c) enjoying positive physical effects of wheat bran consumption. This article examines the 3rd postintervention theme, "enjoying physical effects of wheat bran consumption." The relevance of this research is that nurses equipped with dietary fiber information may be better able to help some individuals with Crohn disease to explore the potential benefits of a well-rounded nutritious pattern of eating that includes wheat bran cereal. PMID:24084130

  9. Isolated ileitis associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis in three patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Moussata, Driffa; Boschetti, Gilles; Stefanescu, Carmen; Nancey, Stephane; Bouhnik, Yoram; Flourie, Bernard

    2016-06-01

    Background Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is associated with ulcerative colitis and extensive colonic involvement or ileocolitis in Crohn's disease (CD). To our knowledge, no specific report of isolated ileitis associated with PSC in CD patients has been published in CD patients. Aim and methods We report three cases of patients with isolated Crohn's ileitis associated with PSC and in whom colonic inflammation was never documented. Results Patients were followed up 10-23 years and each patient underwent 6-7 ileocolonoscopies: inflammation was located only in the terminal ileum, which was confirmed on surgical specimens in two patients. Small-duct PSC led to diagnosis of CD ileitis in one patient, while small and large-ducts PSC were evidenced after CD diagnosis in the other 2. PSC were regularly followed for 9-10 years. Conclusions Our three cases of PSC with isolated CD ileitis and long-term follow-up without any sign of colonic involvement argue against the concept that colonic mucosal inflammation is critical for the pathogenesis of PSC in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26806276

  10. Controlled trial of bowel rest and nutritional support in the management of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, G R; Fleming, C R; Jeejeebhoy, K N; Rosenberg, I H; Sales, D; Tremaine, W J

    1988-01-01

    To define the role of bowel rest as an independent variable from nutritional support a prospective, randomised controlled trial was undertaken in 51 patients with active Crohn's disease unresponsive to other medical management. Nutritional support for 21 days was randomised to total parenteral nutrition and nil by mouth (n = 17), defined formula diet administered through a nasogastric tube (n = 19), or partial parenteral nutrition and oral food (n = 15). Nutrient input in the first two groups provided 40 non-protein kcal/kg ideal body weight /d and 1g/ kg/d protein respectively, while the third group received 15 non-protein kcal/kg/d and 0.3 g/kg/d protein intravenously and ate unrestricted food. Clinical remissions occurred in 71% of patients on parenteral nutrition, in 58% on the defined formula diet and in 60% on partial parenteral nutrition; the probability for each group of being in remission at one year, after successful therapy was 42%, 55%, and 56% respectively. These differences were not significant. In patients with active Crohn's disease bowel rest was not a major factor in achieving a remission during nutritional support and did not influence outcome during one year's follow-up. PMID:3143625

  11. [Exclusive elemental enteral diet in cortico-resistant and cortico-dependent forms of Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Le Quintrec, Y; Cosnes, J; Le Quintrec, M; Contou, J F; Baumer, P; Bellanger, J; Gendre, J P

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the value of elemental diet in steroid-resistant and steroid-dependent Crohn's disease. Elemental diet (Vivonex HN, 39.4 +/- 9.2 kcal/kg/d) was delivered through a nasogastric tube at a constant rate. Twenty therapeutic periods lasting from 20 to 74 days (median, 32 days) were undertaken in 18 patients. Elemental diet was well tolerated. Mean values of hemoglobin, serum albumin, and serum transferrin increased significantly through the therapeutic period; body weight and anthropometric data did not change significantly. The short-term response to elemental diet was excellent in 11 cases, demonstrated by achievement of clinical remission and steroid withdrawal; six patients had an incomplete remission and remained slightly active or had to be maintained under low dose steroids; three patients did not respond to therapy and had to be operated upon. During the follow-up (6-30 months), 8 patients out of 17 had a relapse. Relapse was controlled by medical therapy in 5 cases and led to surgery in the 3 other cases. We conclude that elemental diet, as total parenteral nutrition, is an effective therapy of steroid-resistant and steroid-dependent Crohn's disease. However, elemental diet does not prevent relapse. PMID:3111930

  12. Dietary Fiber Information for Individuals with Crohn Disease: Reports of Gastrointestinal Effects

    PubMed Central

    Brotherton, Carol S.; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2013-01-01

    The experiences of individuals with Crohn disease before and after receiving dietary fiber information have not been described in the literature. This article offers findings from a study that used four semi-structured audio recorded interviews during a 4-week time period for the purpose of exploring the experiences of 11 individuals before and after receiving dietary fiber information from a healthcare professional. The first and second interviews occurred immediately before and after the presentation of information. Follow-up interviews occurred at 2-week intervals. Thematic analysis of the baseline interviews revealed two themes: (a) accepting a redefined (lower expectations) definition of normal quality of life, and (b) continuing to look for answers. Three themes emerged from the follow-up interviews at week 4: (a) re-evaluating old diet-related concepts, (b) enjoying a healthier lifestyle at a self-set pace, and (c) enjoying positive physical effects of wheat bran consumption. This paper examines the third post-intervention theme, “enjoying physical effects of wheat bran consumption.” The relevance of this research is that nurses equipped with dietary fiber information may be better able to help some individuals with Crohn disease to explore the potential benefits of a well-rounded nutritious pattern of eating that includes wheat bran cereal. PMID:24084130

  13. Antibodies to Mycobacterium paratuberculosis-specific protein antigens in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Elsaghier, A; Prantera, C; Moreno, C; Ivanyi, J

    1992-01-01

    The possible role of infection with Mycobacterium paratuberculosis (MAP) for the etiopathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD) has been a matter of long-term controversy. In addition to similarities with the pathology of ruminant paratuberculosis, DNA fingerprinting confirmed the organism isolated from gut tissue, but the specificity of the immune repertoire has not as yet been evaluated. We report here on a serological study of 29 patients with CD, 20 patients with ulcerative colitis and 18 healthy control subjects, using three antigens attributed with species-specificity and selective immunogenicity following MAP infection. Antibodies binding to the 38-kD band of MAP extract were demonstrable by the Western blot technique in 57% of CD patients. Antibody levels to the 24-kD (p24BCD) cathodic bands, determined by competition ELISA using a monospecific murine antiserum, and to the 18-kD protease-resistant purified bacterioferritin, detected by standard ELISA, were significantly elevated in 53% of CD patients. However, these three antibody specificities tested in individual CD patients did not show any correlation with each other. Thus, 18% of patients were positive for all three specificities, whilst 84% had antibodies to at least one of the specific antigens. Although the exact proportion of affected patients is yet to be defined, the serological results obtained support the view that MAP infection may play an etiological role in Crohn's disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:1281056

  14. Thrombotic complications in von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo

    2006-02-01

    Thrombotic events occur rarely in patients with von Willebrand disease (VWD). In this review we analyze the data reported in the literature, selected through a PubMed search, on thrombotic complications in VWD patients. On the basis of this analysis, we conclude that thrombotic complications in VWD patients often have a multi-factorial pathogenesis resulting from a complex interaction between acquired (coagulation factor replacement, surgery, cardiovascular risk factors) and/or inherited (thrombophilic gene mutations) prothrombotic risk factors. PMID:16522550

  15. Role of Exclusive Enteral Nutrition in the Preoperative Optimization of Patients With Crohn's Disease Following Immunosuppressive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Zuo, Lugen; Zhu, Weiming; Gong, Jianfeng; Zhang, Wei; Gu, Lili; Guo, Zhen; Cao, Lei; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We conducted a study to evaluate the impact of the exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) on perioperative outcome in Crohn's disease (CD) patients following immunosuppressive therapy. Patients with CD followed at a referral center between January 2001 and March 2014 who underwent abdominal surgery were identified. Patients were divided into 4 groups: patients not exposed to immunosuppressive agents in the previous 8 weeks before surgery (group 1); patients received immunosuppressive medications without preoperative drug-free interval (group 2); patients had preoperative immunosuppressants-free interval (group 3); patients treated with adding EEN to preoperative immunosuppressants-free interval regimen (group 4). Urgent operation requirement, stoma creation, postoperative complications, readmission, and reoperation were compared in patients among groups. Overall, 708 abdominal surgeries performed in 498 CD patients were identified. Three hundred seventy-six (53.11%) surgeries performed in those receiving preoperative immunosuppressive medications. Compared with other groups, group 2 had increased postoperative complications, more frequent urgent operation, and higher rate of stoma creation. Patients in group 4 were found to have better outcome including lower rate of stoma creation (P < 0.05), and decreased incidence of postoperative complications (P < 0.05) compared with group 2 and group 3. Additionally, decreased urgent operation requirement (P < 0.05) and extended preoperative drug-free interval (P < 0.001) were observed in the group 4 than those in the group 3. Preoperative optimization of CD following immunosuppressive therapy by EEN prolongs the immunosuppressants-free interval, reduces the risk of urgent surgery and reoperation, and most importantly, decreases complications after abdominal surgery. PMID:25654387

  16. Pregnancy complicated by heart disease in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Chhetri, Shailaja; Shrestha, Nikesh Raj; Pilgrim, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence, characteristics and maternal and perinatal outcomes of pregnancies complicated by heart disease. Design Prospective single-centre registry. Setting Tertiary care teaching hospital in eastern Nepal. Patients Pregnant women presenting to the antenatal clinic and/or labour room between 1 March 2012 and 31 March 2013. Main outcome measures Prevalence, characteristics, and maternal and perinatal outcomes of pregnancies complicated by heart disease. Results Fifty-three out of 9463 pregnancies (0.6%) were complicated by cardiac disease. Proportions of acquired, congenital and arrhythmic heart disease amounted to 89%, 9% and 2%, respectively. Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) was the most frequent cardiac disease complicating pregnancy (n=47). Among 45 women with RHD continuing pregnancy until delivery, 30 (67%) were primigravidae. The predominant valvular pathology was mitral stenosis (62%), followed by mitral regurgitation (21%) and aortic regurgitation (13%). Twenty women (44%) underwent elective or emergency caesarean section. Maternal and fetal/perinatal mortality of pregnancies complicated by RHD amounted to 4% and 16%, respectively. New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class III or class IV (HR 6.0, 95% CI 1.2 to 29.1, p=0.026), pulmonary hypertension (HR 9.1, 95% CI 1.6 to 51.5, p=0.012) and severe mitral stenosis (HR 7.0, 95% CI 1.4 to 34.4, p=0.017) were identified as predictors of maternal or fetal/perinatal mortality in an univariate analysis. Conclusions Rheumatic mitral stenosis was the most frequent heart disease complicating pregnancy in a consecutive cohort from a teaching hospital in Nepal. Exercise intolerance, pulmonary hypertension and severe mitral stenosis were identified as predictors of maternal or fetal/perinatal mortality. PMID:27326158

  17. [Barrier- and autophagic functions of the intestinal epithelia: role of disturbances in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Lapis, Károly

    2010-10-01

    Crohn's disease is a widely known debilitating chronic inflammatory disease, mostly affecting terminal ileum and/or colon. Epidemiological, familial and twin studies suggest that genetic factors play an important role in susceptibility to the disease. Clinical observations suggest that ill-defined environmental factors also play a part. Advances in molecular genotyping technology, statistical methodologies, bioinformatics and the combined use of them in genome wide scanning and association studies resulted in the identification of more than 30 susceptibility genes and loci associated with Crohn's disease and revealed and highlighted a number of new previously unsuspected pathways playing a role in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. Close association of the disease with polymorphisms in the genes encoding the pattern recognition receptors particularly the NOD2 protein, the Wnt pathway transcription factor Tcf4 (also known as TCFL2) and the autophagic regulator ATG16L1 have been found. The polymorphisms involved are associated with decreased defensin production (defensin deficiency) which can lead to changes in the composition of the commensal microbial flora, defects in the intestinal barrier functions and bacterial invasion of the mucosa. Other recently recognized consequences of the polymorphisms involving the genes encoding NOD2 and ATG16L1 proteins are that the truncated NOD2 protein is unable to induce autophagy and this protein, just like the ATG16L1 T300A mutant protein, leads to failure adequately to destroy phagocytosed bacteria. The consequence is persisting low level infection, chronic intestinal inflammation, tissue injury and the clinical symptoms of the disease. Thus, Crohn's disease can be seen to be caused by defects in the innate immune defense, in particular defects in bacterial processing and clearance. The accumulated evidence suggests that Crohn's disease is associated with an exaggerated adaptive immune response to the persisting intestinal

  18. IDO1 and IDO2 Non-Synonymous Gene Variants: Correlation with Crohn's Disease Risk and Clinical Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanhao; Sayuk, Gregory S.; Li, Ellen; Ciorba, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract. Genetic polymorphisms can confer CD risk and influence disease phenotype. Indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase-1 (IDO1) is one of the most over-expressed genes in CD and mediates potent anti-inflammatory effects via tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway. We aimed to determine whether non-synonymous polymorphisms in IDO1 or IDO2 (a gene paralog) are important either as CD risk alleles or as modifiers of CD phenotype. Methods Utilizing a prospectively collected database, clinically phenotyped CD patients (n = 734) and non-IBD controls (n = 354) were genotyped for established IDO1 and IDO2 non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and novel genetic variants elucidated in the literature. Allelic frequencies between CD and non-IBD controls were compared. Genotype-phenotype analysis was conducted. IDO1 enzyme activity was assessed by calculating the serum kynurenine to tryptophan ratio (K/T). Results IDO1 SNPs were rare (1.7% non-IBD vs 1.1% CD; p = NS) and not linked to Crohn's disease diagnosis in this population. IDO1 SNPs did however associate with a severe clinical course, presence of perianal disease, extraintestinal manifestations and a reduced serum K/T ratio during active disease suggesting lower IDO1 function. IDO2 minor allele variants were common and one of them, rs45003083, associated with reduced risk of Crohn's disease (p = 0.025). No IDO2 SNPs associated with a particular Crohn's disease clinical phenotype. Conclusions This work highlights the functional importance of IDO enzymes in human Crohn's disease and establishes relative rates of IDO genetic variants in a US population. PMID:25541686

  19. Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis in children: an update for 2014.

    PubMed

    Lemberg, Daniel A; Day, Andrew S

    2015-03-01

    Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), the two main types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), have become increasingly common in Australasian children and adolescents in recent years. Furthermore, CD and UC are seen more often in younger children. These conditions are typically more extensive in children and tend to follow more severe disease courses than in adults. Although many children may present with typical symptoms (such as abdominal pain or bloody diarrhoea), others have atypical features (including oral ulceration, short stature or skin manifestations). In addition, many children with IBD will have altered growth or nutrition, which may compromise normal linear growth and pubertal development. Early identification and full assessment of children presenting with possible IBD are essential to avoid consequences of diagnostic delay and to optimise short- and long-term outcomes. Management of IBD encompasses various options and should be undertaken within a team-based, child and family-focused, multidisciplinary setting. PMID:25039307

  20. [Possible association between Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis infection and Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Retamal, Patricio; Beltrán, Caroll; Abalos, Pedro; Quera, Rodrigo; Hermoso, Marcela

    2011-06-01

    Paratuberculosis is a chronic intestinal disease of animals caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), which has some pathological features similar to Crohn's disease (CD) in humans. The presence of MAP in food for human consumption and in affected tissues of patients with CD has been detected. Therefore, a causal association between this microorganism and the disease in humans, has been postulated. However, several related studies have failed to confirm this hypothesis and the scientific acceptance of MAP as a zoonotic agent remains controversial. This review presents the main findings related to this issue, contrasting evidences for and against an association between MAP and CD. The need to promote national studies focusing on this area is suggested. PMID:22051762

  1. Asia-Pacific consensus statements on Crohn's disease. Part 2: Management.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Choon Jin; Makharia, Govind K; Hilmi, Ida; Gibson, Peter R; Fock, Kwong Ming; Ahuja, Vineet; Ling, Khoon Lin; Lim, Wee Chian; Thia, Kelvin T; Wei, Shu-chen; Leung, Wai Keung; Koh, Poh Koon; Gearry, Richard B; Goh, Khean Lee; Ouyang, Qin; Sollano, Jose; Manatsathit, Sathaporn; de Silva, H Janaka; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Pisespongsa, Pises; Abu Hassan, Muhamad Radzi; Sung, Joseph; Hibi, Toshifumi; Boey, Christopher C M; Moran, Neil; Leong, Rupert W L

    2016-01-01

    The Asia Pacific Working Group on Inflammatory Bowel Disease was established in Cebu, Philippines, at the Asia Pacific Digestive Week conference in 2006 under the auspices of the Asian Pacific Association of Gastroenterology (APAGE) with the goal of developing best management practices, coordinating research and raising awareness of IBD in the region. The consensus group previously published recommendations for the diagnosis and management of ulcerative colitis (UC) with specific relevance to the Asia-Pacific region. The present consensus statements were developed following a similar process to address the epidemiology, diagnosis and management of Crohn's disease (CD). The goals of these statements are to pool the pertinent literature specifically highlighting relevant data and conditions in the Asia-Pacific region relating to the economy, health systems, background infectious diseases, differential diagnoses and treatment availability. It does not intend to be all-comprehensive and future revisions are likely to be required in this ever-changing field. PMID:25819311

  2. Enterocolitis induced by autoimmune targeting of enteric glial cells: A possible mechanism in Crohn's disease?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, Anne; Savidge, Tor C.; Cabarrocas, Julie; Deng, Wen-Lin; Colombel, Jean-Frederic; Lassmann, Hans; Desreumaux, Pierre; Liblau, Roland S.

    2001-11-01

    Early pathological manifestations of Crohn's disease (CD) include vascular disruption, T cell infiltration of nerve plexi, neuronal degeneration, and induction of T helper 1 cytokine responses. This study demonstrates that disruption of the enteric glial cell network in CD patients represents another early pathological feature that may be modeled after CD8+ T cell-mediated autoimmune targeting of enteric glia in double transgenic mice. Mice expressing a viral neoself antigen in astrocytes and enteric glia were crossed with specific T cell receptor transgenic mice, resulting in apoptotic depletion of enteric glia to levels comparable in CD patients. Intestinal and mesenteric T cell infiltration, vasculitis, T helper 1 cytokine production, and fulminant bowel inflammation were characteristic hallmarks of disease progression. Immune-mediated damage to enteric glia therefore may participate in the initiation and/or the progression of human inflammatory bowel disease.

  3. MicroRNAs Classify Different Disease Behavior Phenotypes of Crohn's Disease and May Have Prognostic Utility

    PubMed Central

    Peck, Bailey C. E.; Weiser, Matthew; Lee, Saangyoung E.; Gipson, Gregory R.; Iyer, Vishal B.; Sartor, Ryan B.; Herfarth, Hans H.; Long, Millie D.; Hansen, Jonathan J.; Isaacs, Kim L.; Trembath, Dimitri G.; Rahbar, Reza; Sadiq, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is a dire need for reliable prognostic markers that can guide effective therapeutic intervention in Crohn's disease (CD). We examined whether different phenotypes in CD can be classified based on colonic microRNA (miRNA) expression and whether miRNAs have prognostic utility for CD. Methods: High-throughput sequencing of small and total RNA isolated from colon tissue from patients with CD and controls without Inflammatory Bowel Disease (non-IBD) was performed. To identify miRNAs associated with specific phenotypes of CD, patients were stratified according to disease behavior (nonstricturing, nonpenetrating; stricturing; penetrating), and miRNA profiles in each subset were compared with those of the non-IBD group. Validation assays were performed using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These miRNAs were further evaluated by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue (index biopsies) of patients with nonpenetrating CD at the time of diagnosis that either retained the nonpenetrating phenotype or progressed to penetrating/fistulizing CD. Results: We found a suite of miRNAs, including miR-31-5p, miR-215, miR-223-3p, miR-196b-5p, and miR-203 that stratify patients with CD according to disease behavior independent of the effect of inflammation. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that expression levels of miR-215 in index biopsies of patients with CD might predict the likelihood of progression to penetrating/fistulizing CD. Finally, using a novel statistical simulation approach applied to colonic RNA-sequencing data for patients with CD and non-IBD controls, we identified miR-31-5p and miR-203 as candidate master regulators of gene expression profiles associated with CD. Conclusions: miRNAs may serve as clinically useful prognostic markers guiding initial therapy and identifying patients who would benefit most from effective intervention. PMID:26164662

  4. Depressive Symptoms in Crohn's Disease: Relationship with Immune Activation and Tryptophan Availability

    PubMed Central

    Guloksuz, Sinan; Wichers, Marieke; Kenis, Gunter; Russel, Maurice G. V. M.; Wauters, Annick; Verkerk, Robert; Arts, Baer; van Os, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with immune activation and depressive symptoms. This study determines the impact of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α treatment in CD patients on depressive symptoms and the degree to which tryptophan (TRP) availability and immune markers mediate this effect. Fifteen patients with CD, eligible for anti-TNF-α treatment were recruited. Disease activity (Harvey-Bradshaw Index (HBI), Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI)), fatigue (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI)), quality of life (Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (IBDQ)), symptoms of depression and anxiety (Symptom Checklist (SCL-90), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS)), immune activation (acute phase proteins (APP)), zinc and TRP availability were assessed before treatment and after 2, 4 and 8 weeks. Anti-TNF-α increased IBDQ scores and reduced all depression scores; however only SCL-90 depression scores remained decreased after correction for HBI. Positive APPs decreased, while negative APPs increased after treatment. After correction for HBI, both level and percentage of γ fraction were associated with SCL-90 depression scores over time. After correction for HBI, patients with current/past depressive disorder displayed higher levels of positive APPs and lower levels of negative APPs and zinc. TRP availability remained invariant over time and there was no association between SCL-90 depression scores and TRP availability. Inflammatory reactions in CD are more evident in patients with comorbid depression, regardless of disease activity. Anti-TNF-α treatment in CD reduces depressive symptoms, in part independently of disease activity; there was no evidence that this effect was mediated by immune-induced changes in TRP availability. PMID:23544139

  5. Intestinal APCs of the endogenous nanomineral pathway fail to express PD-L1 in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Jack; Haas, Carolin T; Pele, Laetitia C; Monie, Tom P; Charalambos, Charles; Parkes, Miles; Hewitt, Rachel E; Powell, Jonathan J

    2016-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory condition most commonly affecting the ileum and colon. The aetiology of Crohn's disease is complex and may include defects in peptidoglycan recognition, and/or failures in the establishment of intestinal tolerance. We have recently described a novel constitutive endogenous delivery system for the translocation of nanomineral-antigen-peptidoglycan (NAP) conjugates to antigen presenting cells (APCs) in intestinal lymphoid patches. In mice NAP conjugate delivery to APCs results in high surface expression of the immuno-modulatory molecule programmed death receptor ligand 1 (PD-L1). Here we report that NAP conjugate positive APCs in human ileal tissues from individuals with ulcerative colitis and intestinal carcinomas, also have high expression of PD-L1. However, NAP-conjugate positive APCs in intestinal tissue from patients with Crohn's disease show selective failure in PD-L1 expression. Therefore, in Crohn's disease intestinal antigen taken up by lymphoid patch APCs will be presented without PD-L1 induced tolerogenic signalling, perhaps initiating disease. PMID:27226337

  6. Musculoskeletal complications of neuromuscular disease in children.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Sherilyn W; Skinner, Joline

    2008-02-01

    A wide variety of neuromuscular diseases affect children, including central nervous system disorders such as cerebral palsy and spinal cord injury; motor neuron disorders such as spinal muscular atrophy; peripheral nerve disorders such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease; neuromuscular junction disorders such as congenital myasthenia gravis; and muscle fiber disorders such as Duchenne's muscular dystrophy. Although the origins and clinical syndromes vary significantly, outcomes related to musculoskeletal complications are often shared. The most frequently encountered musculoskeletal complications of neuromuscular disorders in children are scoliosis, bony rotational deformities, and hip dysplasia. Management is often challenging to those who work with children who have neuromuscular disorders. PMID:18194756

  7. Late complications of Hodgkin's disease management

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.C.; Bookman, M.A.; Longo, D.L. )

    1990-01-01

    In the past several decades, Hodgkin's disease has been transformed from a uniformly fatal illness to one that can be treated with the expectation of long-term remission or cure in the majority of patients. Because patients now survive for long periods after curative intervention, various complications have been identified. The spectrum of complications following curative therapy is quite diverse and includes immunologic, cardiovascular, pulmonary, thyroid, and gonadal dysfunction. In addition, second malignant neoplasms in the form of acute leukemia as well as secondary solid tumors have now been documented to occur with increased frequency in patients cured of Hodgkin's disease. 80 references.

  8. Severe Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Patient with Crohn's Disease: a Case Report and the Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Paragomi, Pedram; Moradi, Kamran; Khosravi, Pejman; Ansari, Reza

    2015-11-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is rarely presented with lower GI bleeding (LGIB) which eludes the clinician. A 25-year-old lady with severe rectorrhagia was presented with no history of constipation, diarrhea or abdominal pain. Colonoscopy revealed ulcers in the rectum, sigmoid colon, and terminal ileum. Crohn's pathologic features were detected in the terminal ileum. The bleeding was controlled via supportive care and IV corticosteroid. Recurrent LGIB was managed by prednisolone and azathioprine. The patient had an uneventful recovery. The clinicians should consider CD as a possible diagnosis in severe LGIB. Prednisolone and azathioprine efficiently control acute bleeding episodes and prevent the recurrence. PMID:26786996

  9. Is faecal calprotectin equally useful in all Crohn's disease locations? A prospective, comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Piotr; Lykowska-Szuber, Liliana; Krela-Kazmierczak, Iwona; Klimczak, Katarzyna; Szymczak, Aleksandra; Szachta, Patrycja; Katulska, Katarzyna; Linke, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There are data suggesting that the diagnostic usefulness of faecal calprotectin (FC) may vary depending on the Crohn's disease (CD) location. The aim of the study was to compare the diagnostic usefulness of FC in CD patients with different disease locations. Material and methods We prospectively enrolled 120 CD patients in the study. Disease activity was assessed by using Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI), biochemical markers, and endoscopic and radiographic methods. Faecal calprotectin concentration was assessed in single stool samples by using the ELISA method. Results Among all patients, 54 (45%) had ileocolonic CD location, 44 (36.5%) had isolated small bowel location, and 22 (18.5%) had colonic CD location. FC correlated significantly with C-reactive protein concentration and endoscopic and radiographic activity among patients with isolated small bowel CD (p = 0.03, r = 0.32; p < 0.0001, r = 0.78; p = 0.03, r = 0.35; respectively) and with C-reactive protein and endoscopic activity in isolated colonic CD (p = 0.0009, r = 0.7; p = 0.0002, r = 0.78; respectively). CDAI and inflammatory biochemical markers did not correlate with endoscopic and radiographic assessment in small bowel CD. In patients with ileocolonic CD, FC correlated significantly with endoscopy (p = 0.006, r = 0.5), radiographic assessment (p = 0.04, r = 0.3), CDAI (p = 0.0006, r = 0.5) and the majority of biochemical markers. Conclusions Faecal calprotectin is a useful diagnostic marker in all CD patients. Although its usefulness in small bowel CD seems to be the lowest, it should be utilized particularly in this disease location because of the lack of other reliable, non-invasive diagnostic methods. PMID:25995752

  10. Aberrant esophageal HLA-DR expression in a high percentage of patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Oberhuber, G; Püspök, A; Peck-Radosavlevic, M; Kutilek, M; Lamprecht, A; Chott, A; Vogelsang, H; Stolte, M

    1999-08-01

    Esophageal histology is not well studied in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). We, therefore, analyzed the histologic and immunohistologic appearance of esophageal mucosa in CD. Biopsy specimens taken from the esophagus of 57 consecutive patients with known CD of the large and/or small bowel, of 200 Crohn's-free controls, of 15 cases with ulcerative colitis, and of 5 cases with viral esophagitis were evaluated. In controls, most patients had either HLA-DR negative esophageal epithelium or showed focal or diffuse basal staining. HLA-DR expression of all epithelial layers (transepithelial staining) was observed in only four (2%) control subjects, in one case with herpes esophagitis, but not in patients with ulcerative colitis. In contrast, transepithelial HLA-DR expression was found in 19 (33%) patients with CD (p < 0.0001). In CD patients, it was associated with a significantly increased epithelial content in T-cells (CD3+, TIA-1+, granzyme B+), B-cells (CD79a+), natural killer cells (CD57+), and macrophages (CD68+). There was no correlation with either histological findings elsewhere in the upper gastrointestinal tract or with laboratory findings, symptoms, CDAI, or medication. Transepithelial esophageal HLA-DR expression is common in CD. Immunohistochemistry may prove useful in supporting the histologic diagnosis of CD in staging procedures, for initial diagnosis as well as in doubtful cases. PMID:10435568

  11. Placental involvement by non-Hodgkin lymphoma in a Crohn disease patient on long-term thiopurine therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, G; Crispin, P; Cherian, M; Dahlstrom, J E; Sethna, F F; Kaye, G; Pavli, P; Subramaniam, K

    2016-01-01

    We report the first published case of aggressive diffuse large B-cell (non-Hodgkin) lymphoma in a 35-year-old pregnant woman who had Crohn disease and was taking long-term thiopurine therapy: the patient developed placental insufficiency, and there was intrauterine fetal death. PMID:26813900

  12. Oral Manifestations of Crohn's Disease: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Victoria L.

    2015-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract that is likely caused by an inappropriate mucosal inflammatory response to intestinal bacteria in a genetically predisposed host. The lesions of CD can involve any region of the GI tract as well as extraintestinal sites such as the skin, joints, and eyes. The most common presenting symptoms are abdominal pain and prolonged diarrhea associated with fevers, fatigue, and malaise. Delayed growth and failure to thrive may also be observed in pediatric patients. Oral manifestations of CD are known as oral CD and may precede GI involvement, thus serving as early markers of this condition. We describe a 6-year-old male who presented with oral lesions as his initial manifestation of disease and review the current literature pertaining to oral CD. PMID:26240765

  13. Characterizing intestinal inflammation and fibrosis in Crohn's disease by photoacoustic imaging: feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Lei, Hao; Johnson, Laura A; Liu, Shengchun; Moons, David S; Ma, Teng; Zhou, Qifa; Rice, Michael D; Ni, Jun; Wang, Xueding; Higgins, Peter D R; Xu, Guan

    2016-07-01

    The pathology of Crohn's disease (CD) is characterized by obstructing intestinal strictures because of inflammation (with high levels of hemoglobin), fibrosis (high levels of collagen), or a combination of both. The accurate characterization of the strictures is critical for the management of CD. This study examines the feasibility of characterizing intestinal strictures by Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) without extrapolation from superficial biopsies. Ex vivo normal rat colon tissue, inflammatory and fibrotic intestinal strictures in rat trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) model were first differentiated by a PA-US parallel imaging system. Surgically removed human intestinal stricture specimens were afterwards imaged by a multiwavelength acoustic resolution PA microscope (ARPAM). The experiment results suggest that PAI is a potential tool for the diagnosis of the diseased conditions in intestinal strictures. PMID:27446710

  14. Sudden hearing loss and Crohn disease: when Cogan syndrome must be suspected.

    PubMed

    Tirelli, Giancarlo; Tomietto, Paola; Quatela, Eliana; Perrino, Fiorella; Nicastro, Luca; Cattin, Luigi; Carretta, Renzo

    2015-01-01

    Cogan's syndrome is a rare systemic vasculitis of unknown origin. It is characterized by the presence of worsening audiovestibular and ocular symptoms that may manifest simultaneously or sequentially. No specific diagnostic laboratory tests or imaging studies exist. The diagnosis is clinical and should be established as early as possible so as to initiate prompt treatment with steroids and prevent rapid progression to deafness or blindness and potentially fatal systemic involvement. We report a case of association between Cogan's syndrome and ileal Crohn's disease which we believe deserves attention since, after an accurate review of the literature, we have found approximately 250 reports of patients with Cogan's syndrome, only 13 of whom with concurrent chronic inflammatory bowel disease; of these 13 cases, none experienced improvement after therapy. In the light of the good outcome obtained in our case, we proposed a valid treatment option with boluses of steroids, combined with early systemic immunosuppression and intra-tympanic steroid injections. PMID:25841536

  15. Herpes Simplex Virus Sepsis in a Young Woman with Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Haag, Lea-Maxie; Hofmann, Jörg; Kredel, Lea Isabell; Holzem, Christina; Kühl, Anja A; Taube, Eliane T; Schubert, Stefan; Siegmund, Britta; Epple, Hans-Jörg

    2015-12-01

    We present the case of a herpes simplex virus-1 [HSV-1] sepsis with severe herpes hepatitis in a young female treated with triple immunosuppressive therapy [adalimumab, azathioprine, prednisolone] for refractory Crohn's disease [CD]. The patient presented with high fever, generalised abdominal tenderness, strongly elevated transaminases, coagulopathy, and pancytopenia. Comprehensive diagnostics including blood HSV-1 polymerase chain reaction [PCR], liver biopsy, and immunohistochemistry revealed the diagnosis of fulminant herpes hepatitis. HSV-1 positivity of cutaneous lesions proved the disseminated nature of the infection. Early treatment with intravenous acyclovir led to a rapid improvement of the patient's condition and resulted in a full recovery of her liver function. This is the first reported case of HSV-sepsis in a patient with CD. Physicians treating inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] patients with combined immunosuppressive therapy should be aware of the possibility of herpes hepatitis, and early empirical antiviral therapy should be considered in immunosuppressed patients presenting with fever and severe anicteric hepatitis. PMID:26351382

  16. OctreoScan positive Crohn's disease mimicking an ileal carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Marko, Jamie; Lamba, Reema; Miller, Frank; Buchman, Alan; Spies, Stewart; Nikolaidis, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Somatostatin receptors have been identified in many tissues throughout the human body. Alterations in the expression of somatostatin receptors have been reported in many disease states including both tumorous and nontumorous conditions. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy utilizing OctreoScan (Mallinckrodt Medical, Inc., St. Louis, MO), a radiolabled form of octreotide, has been reported to be a highly sensitive imaging technique for identifying pathology, such as neuroendocrine tumors, that are somatostatin receptor dense. Unfortunately, many conditions cause an increase in the quantity of somatostatin receptors and therefore may cause false positive Octreoscans. In this report, we discuss the alterations in somatostatin receptors that occur with Crohn's disease and describe a case of an OctreoScan-positive inflammatory mass mimicking a carcinoid tumor. PMID:18097293

  17. Factitious Disorder in Crohn's Disease: Recurrent Pancytopenia Caused by Surreptitious Ingestion of 6-Mercaptopurine

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Allon; Boroff, Erika S.; Martin, Kari A.; Northfelt, Donald W.; Heigh, Russell I.

    2015-01-01

    Factitious disorder is a rare psychiatric illness characterized by the willful and deceptive induction of illness for the purpose of assuming the sick role. It presents a substantial diagnostic challenge, as patients often go to great lengths to conceal their deception. Accordingly, its presence in the full spectrum of gastrointestinal diseases is likely underappreciated. While factitious gastrointestinal bleeding, abdominal pain and diarrhea are relatively common, factitious non-gastrointestinal symptoms in the setting of gastrointestinal illness have been infrequently reported. We present the case of a patient with Crohn's disease with recurrent pancytopenia attributed to the surreptitious ingestion of 6-mercaptopurine. In patients with possible access to immunomodulatory drugs, a high suspicion for and early identification of factitious disorder may improve patient outcomes and avoid invasive and costly diagnostic evaluations. PMID:26078732

  18. Severe perianal shingles during azathioprine and budesonide treatment for Crohn's disease-preventable with zoster vaccine?

    PubMed

    Elliott, Timothy Ross; Miller, Charles; Macrae, Finlay A

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), particularly those on immunosuppressive medications, suffer a high incidence of, and worse clinical outcomes relating to, herpes zoster (HZ) reactivation. We report on the presentation and management of a patient with Crohn's disease who developed severe perianal HZ after starting azathioprine and oral budesonide treatment. The zoster vaccine may prevent such zoster reactivation in patients with IBD. The zoster vaccine is effective in decreasing the risk of HZ in older adults but its role in younger adults and those with IBD has not been tested prospectively. A review of the potential risks and benefits of this live vaccine in patients with IBD and an approach to further determining its role in this patient population is discussed. PMID:27440857

  19. Decreased Pregnane X Receptor Expression in Children with Active Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Shakhnovich, Valentina; Vyhlidal, Carrie; Friesen, Craig; Hildreth, Amber; Singh, Vivekanand; Daniel, James; Kearns, Gregory L; Leeder, J Steven

    2016-07-01

    Expression of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) has been reported to be decreased in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To investigate the differential expression of PXR in children with Crohn's disease, a type of IBD, RNA was extracted from archived intestinal biopsies from 18 children with Crohn's disease (CD) and 12 age- and sex-matched controls (aged 7-17yrs). The aim of this investigation was to compare the relative mRNA expression of PXR, cytochrome p450 3A4 (CYP3A4), and villin 1 (VIL1) (a marker of epithelial cell integrity) in the inflamed terminal ileum (TI) versus noninflamed duodenum of children with CD. Relative expression was determined via reverse transcription real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, data normalized to glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and differences in gene expression explored via paired t tests. PXR expression was decreased in the inflamed TI versus noninflamed duodenum (TI = 1.88 ± 0.89 versus duodenum = 2.5 ± 0.67; P < 0.001) in CD, but not controls (TI = 2.11 ± 0.41 versus duodenum = 2.26 ± 0.61; P = 0.52). CYP3A4 expression was decreased in CD (TI = -0.89 ± 3.11 versus duodenum = 1.90 ± 2.29; P < 0.05), but not controls (TI = 2.46 ± 0.51 versus duodenum = 2.60 ± 0.60; P = 0.61), as was VIL1 (CD TI = 3.80 ± 0.94 versus duodenum = 4.61 ± 0.52; P < 0.001; controls TI = 4.30 ± 0.35 versus duodenum = 4.47 ± 0.40; P = 0.29). PXR expression correlated with VIL1 (r = 0.78, P = 0.01) and CYP3A4 (r = 0.52, P = 0.01) expression. In conclusion, PXR, CYP3A4, and VIL1 expression was decreased only in the actively inflamed small intestinal tissue in children with CD. Our findings suggest that inflammation has the potential to influence expression of genes, and potentially intestinal proteins, important to drug disposition and response. The observed differential patterns of gene expression support further investigation of the role of PXR in the pathogenesis and/or treatment of pediatric Crohn

  20. Polymorphisms in the Mannose-Binding Lectin Gene are Associated with Defective Mannose-Binding Lectin Functional Activity in Crohn's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Choteau, Laura; Vasseur, Francis; Lepretre, Frederic; Figeac, Martin; Gower-Rousseau, Corine; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Poulain, Daniel; Colombel, Jean-Frederic; Sendid, Boualem; Jawhara, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin, together with mannose-associated serine proteases, activates the lectin pathway of the complement system and subsequent inflammatory mechanisms. An association between mannose-binding lectin deficiency and anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody levels is observed in Crohn's disease and this deficiency is frequently associated with a severe Crohn's disease phenotype. In the present study, we assessed the relationship between serum concentrations of mannose-binding lectin, mannose-binding lectin functional activity, MBL2 and NOD2 polymorphisms, anti-S. cerevisiae antibody levels and clinical Crohn's disease phenotype in 69 Crohn's disease patients and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. The results show that the MBL2 variant rs5030737 at codon 52 was associated with a low level of mannose-binding lectin and impaired mannose-binding lectin-mannose-associated serine protease (MBL-MASP) functional activity in Crohn's disease patients. This MBL2 variant was also associated with a higher level of anti-S. cerevisiae antibodies. In addition, the NOD2 variant rs2066844, which is associated with susceptibility to Crohn's disease, was significantly correlated with an impairment in MBL-MASP functional activity. These results provide evidence that Crohn's disease patients have an impairment in MBL-MASP functional activity and that this defect is associated with MBL2 and NOD2 variants. PMID:27404661

  1. Increased production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha interleukin-1 beta, and interleukin-6 by morphologically normal intestinal biopsies from patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Reimund, J M; Wittersheim, C; Dumont, S; Muller, C D; Kenney, J S; Baumann, R; Poindron, P; Duclos, B

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increasing evidence points to a important role for inflammatory cytokines for the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. AIM: To compare the secretion rate of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) by morphologically normal and inflamed intestinal mucosa from patients with Crohn's disease. RESULTS: Organ cultures of intestinal biopsy specimens taken from areas of affected mucosa from patients with Crohn's disease spontaneously produced increased amounts of TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, and IL-6 compared with controls but also biopsy specimens taken in macroscopically and microscopically unaffected areas in the same patients. Concentrations of IL-1 beta and IL-6 measured in the supernatant fluid of biopsy cultures were positively correlated with the degree of tissue involvement measured by both endoscopic and histological grading. By contrast, TNF-alpha concentrations were not correlated to endoscopic and histological grading. CONCLUSIONS: These consistently raised TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6 secretions by normal appearing mucosa from patients with Crohn's disease provide evidence for a sustained immune stimulation in Crohn's disease even in the absence of patent inflammation. The results shed a new light on the role of inflammatory cytokines in the onset of intestinal tissue damage in Crohn's disease and suggest that the range of intestinal lesions in Crohn's disease may be wider than suspected on the basis of regular endoscopic and histological examinations. PMID:9026483

  2. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Crohn Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guanwei; Ren, Jianan; Wang, Gefei; Wu, Qin; Gu, Guosheng; Ren, Huajian; Liu, Song; Hong, Zhiwu; Li, Ranran; Li, Yuan; Guo, Kun; Wu, Xiuwen; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding (ALGIB) is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of Crohn disease (CD). Thus far, few studies of ALGIB in the context of CD have been published, most of which were case reports with limited value. We aimed to explore the prevalence of ALGIB in CD patients, evaluate risk factors for hemorrhagic CD and its recurrence, and analyze clinical data of the death cases. A total of 1374 CD patients registered from January 2007 to June 2013 were examined. Medical records of 73 patients with ALGIB and 146 matched as controls were reviewed and analyzed retrospectively. Logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards analyses were performed to identify risk factors for ALGIB and the cumulative probability of rebleeding. Kaplan–Meier curves with log-rank tests were used to demonstrate the cumulative survival rates of rebleeding. The prevalence of ALGIB was 5.31% (73/1374) in this study. In the univariate analysis, possible risk factors for ALGIB were duration of CD (odds ratio [OR] 0.60, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.33–1.09, P = 0.095), perianal disease (OR 1.96, 95% CI 0.92–4.20, P = 0.082), left colon involvement (OR 2.16, 95% CI 1.10–4.24, P = 0.025), azathioprine use ≥1 year (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.23–0.90, P = 0.023), and previous hemorrhage history (OR 11.86, 95% CI 5.38–26.12, P < 0.0001). In the multivariate analysis, left colon involvement (OR 2.26, 95% CI 1.04–4.91, P = 0.039), azathioprine use ≥1 year (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.20–0.99, P = 0.044), and previous hemorrhage history (OR 13.04, 95% CI 5.66–30.04, P < 0.0001) remained independent influencing factors. Older age (HR 0.23, 95% CI 0.07–0.77, P = 0.018), surgical treatment (HR 0.17, 95% CI 0.06–0.50, P < 0.001), and having bleeding episodes >3 months ago (HR 0.24, 95% CI 0.07–0.82, P = 0.022) resulted to be predictors associated with rebleeding after discharge. Patients who died often

  3. Crohn's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... priorities, and trends Funding Process Tips for applicants; human subjects research information; grant review and management resources; and commonly used funding mechanisms, including diversity and ...

  4. Crohn's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes, such as infection. You may also undergo flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, body CT, body MRI, MR enterography, upper GI, small ... Flexible sigmoidoscopy , performed by inserting a sigmoidoscope (a flexible tube ... can also sometimes be seen. Body CT scan , a special type of x-ray ...

  5. Crohn's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Griffin Rodgers, Director of the NIDDK Clinical Trials Current research studies and how you can volunteer Community Outreach and Health Fairs Science-based information and tips for planning an outreach effort or community event For Health Care Professionals Patient and provider resources ...

  6. Crohn disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... supplements to help keep your bones strong Vitamin B12 to prevent anemia If you have an ileostomy, ... joints Lack of important nutrients, such as vitamin B12 and iron Problems with maintaining a healthy weight

  7. Crohn disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... beans. Ask your doctor about extra vitamins and minerals you may need, such as: Iron supplements (if ... intestine Surgeries that may be done include: Ileostomy Removal of part of the large bowel or small ...

  8. Crohn's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... liver or spleen is abnormal or enlarged Lab Tests A health care provider may order lab tests, including blood and stool tests. Blood tests. A ... technologist will analyze the blood sample. A health care provider may use blood tests to look for changes in red blood cells. ...

  9. Treatment of vitamin D deficiency due to Crohn's disease with tanning bed ultraviolet B radiation.

    PubMed

    Koutkia, P; Lu, Z; Chen, T C; Holick, M F

    2001-12-01

    In Crohn's disease, severe skeletal demineralization, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and muscle weakness can occur. This may be caused by impaired vitamin D absorption, resulting from extensive intestinal disease and resection of duodenum and jejunum, where vitamin D is absorbed. We report a 57-year-old woman with a long history of Crohn's disease and short-bowel syndrome who had only 2 feet of small intestine remaining after 3 bowel resections. She was taking a daily multivitamin containing 400 IU of vitamin D(3) and was dependent on total parenteral nutrition that contained 200 IU of vitamin D and calcium (18 mEq in a 1-L bag infused over 8 hours daily) for a period of 36 months. Despite the above replacement, she complained of bone pain and muscle weakness, and she continued to be vitamin D-deficient with a 25(OH)D level <20 ng/mL. She was then exposed to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation in a tanning bed wearing a 1-piece bathing suit for 10 minutes, 3 times a week for 6 months at the General Clinical Research Center, Boston University Medical Center. She tolerated the irradiation well without evidence of erythema. After 4 weeks, her serum 25(OH)D level increased by 357% from 7 to 32 ng/mL, parathyroid hormone level decreased by 52% from 92 to 44 pg/mL, and the serum calcium level increased from 7.8 to 8.5 mg/dL. After 6 months of UVB treatment, her serum 25(OH)D level was maintained in the normal range and was free of muscle weakness, and bone and muscle pain. PMID:11729127

  10. Effectiveness of Anti-TNFα for Crohn Disease: Research in a Pediatric Learning Health System

    PubMed Central

    Crandall, Wallace V.; Bailey, L. Charles; Zhang, Peixin; Joffe, Marshall M.; Colletti, Richard B.; Adler, Jeremy; Baron, Howard I.; Berman, James; del Rosario, Fernando; Grossman, Andrew B.; Hoffenberg, Edward J.; Israel, Esther J.; Kim, Sandra C.; Lightdale, Jenifer R.; Margolis, Peter A.; Marsolo, Keith; Mehta, Devendra I.; Milov, David E.; Patel, Ashish S.; Tung, Jeanne; Kappelman, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: ImproveCareNow (ICN) is the largest pediatric learning health system in the nation and started as a quality improvement collaborative. To test the feasibility and validity of using ICN data for clinical research, we evaluated the effectiveness of anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (anti-TNFα) agents in the management of pediatric Crohn disease (CD). METHODS: Data were collected in 35 pediatric gastroenterology practices (April 2007 to March 2012) and analyzed as a sequence of nonrandomized trials. Patients who had moderate to severe CD were classified as initiators or non-initiators of anti-TNFα therapy. Among 4130 patients who had pediatric CD, 603 were new users and 1211 were receiving anti-TNFα therapy on entry into ICN. RESULTS: During a 26-week follow-up period, rate ratios obtained from Cox proportional hazards models, adjusting for patient and disease characteristics and concurrent medications, were 1.53 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20–1.96) for clinical remission and 1.74 (95% CI, 1.33–2.29) for corticosteroid-free remission. The rate ratio for corticosteroid-free remission was comparable to the estimate produced by the adult SONIC study, which was a randomized controlled trial on the efficacy of anti-TNFα therapy. The number needed to treat was 5.2 (95% CI, 3.4–11.1) for clinical remission and 5.0 (95% CI, 3.4–10.0) for corticosteroid-free remission. CONCLUSIONS: In routine pediatric gastroenterology practice settings, anti-TNFα therapy was effective at achieving clinical and corticosteroid-free remission for patients who had Crohn disease. Using data from the ICN learning health system for the purpose of observational research is feasible and produces valuable new knowledge. PMID:24935993

  11. [Pulmonary complications in adult sickle cell disease].

    PubMed

    Maître, B; Mekontso-Dessap, A; Habibi, A; Bachir, D; Parent, F; Godeau, B; Galacteros, F

    2011-02-01

    Sickle cell disease is an autosomal genetic condition which represents the most frequent genetic disease in Île-de-France and Caribbean islands. The main clinical manifestations can be divided into infectious disease, hemolytic anemia and vaso-occlusive events. Pulmonary complications represent 20 to 30% of mortality due to sickle cell and can be divided into acute and chronic events. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is an acute lung injury often preceded by a vaso-occlusive crisis and triggered by different factors including: hypoventilation, pulmonary infectious disease and vascular occlusions. These occlusions can be secondary to fat embolism, thrombosis or sickling. Treatment is mainly supportive combining oxygen supplementation adequate hydration analgesia and sedation. Exchange transfusion may be indicated in severe forms of ACS, characterized by a right ventricular dysfunction and acute respiratory failure. Pulmonary hypertension is the most serious chronic complication. Its frequency is estimated at 6% in adult patients and is more often described in patients with venous ulcers and higher levels of chronic hemolysis. Prognosis is poor with 12.5% of patients dying in the first two years following diagnosis irrespective of the actual pulmonary artery pressure level. There are currently limited data on the effects of any treatment modality. Other respiratory complications such as sleep disorders and nocturnal hypoxemia, infiltrative lung disease and exertional dyspnea are described and should be considered. PMID:21402228

  12. Autoinflammatory granulomatous diseases: from Blau syndrome and early-onset sarcoidosis to NOD2-mediated disease and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Caso, Francesco; Galozzi, Paola; Costa, Luisa; Sfriso, Paolo; Cantarini, Luca; Punzi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    The recent identification of genetic mutations leading to dysfunction of inflammatory and apoptotic pathways, has allowed to characterise a group of diseases, recognised as monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes. Among those, Blau syndrome (BS) and early-onset sarcoidosis (EOS) have been identified as familial and sporadic phenotypes of the same non-caseating granulomatous form. Both the diseases are caused by mutations in the CARD15/NOD2 gene, encoding the cytosolic NOD2 protein, one of the key molecules in the regulation of innate immunity. Clinical onset is typically located in the first years of life and phenotype is characterised by simultaneous or less articular, cutaneous and ocular non-caseating granulomatous inflammation, which can be variably associated with a heterogeneous systemic spectrum. The CARD15/NOD2 gene has also been identified as one of the genes linked to susceptibility to Crohn's disease (CD), a common polygenic inflammatory granulomatous bowel disease. The heightened nuclear factor-κB activity, found in the intestinal tissue of patients affected by CD, has probably a genetic cause related to several CARD15/NOD2 polymorphisms. Other substitutions in the CARD15/NOD2 gene have also been found in a recently described disorder, called NOD2-associated autoinflammatory disease, which shares several clinical characteristics with BS and EOS. This review attempts to describe these diseases on the basis of the most recent evidences. We described genetic and clinical aspects, mainly focusing on BS and EOS, the most representative diseases of autoinflammatory granulomatous diseases, with the ultimate purpose to expand their knowledge. PMID:26509073

  13. Autoinflammatory granulomatous diseases: from Blau syndrome and early-onset sarcoidosis to NOD2-mediated disease and Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Caso, Francesco; Galozzi, Paola; Costa, Luisa; Sfriso, Paolo; Cantarini, Luca; Punzi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    The recent identification of genetic mutations leading to dysfunction of inflammatory and apoptotic pathways, has allowed to characterise a group of diseases, recognised as monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes. Among those, Blau syndrome (BS) and early-onset sarcoidosis (EOS) have been identified as familial and sporadic phenotypes of the same non-caseating granulomatous form. Both the diseases are caused by mutations in the CARD15/NOD2 gene, encoding the cytosolic NOD2 protein, one of the key molecules in the regulation of innate immunity. Clinical onset is typically located in the first years of life and phenotype is characterised by simultaneous or less articular, cutaneous and ocular non-caseating granulomatous inflammation, which can be variably associated with a heterogeneous systemic spectrum. The CARD15/NOD2 gene has also been identified as one of the genes linked to susceptibility to Crohn's disease (CD), a common polygenic inflammatory granulomatous bowel disease. The heightened nuclear factor-κB activity, found in the intestinal tissue of patients affected by CD, has probably a genetic cause related to several CARD15/NOD2 polymorphisms. Other substitutions in the CARD15/NOD2 gene have also been found in a recently described disorder, called NOD2-associated autoinflammatory disease, which shares several clinical characteristics with BS and EOS. This review attempts to describe these diseases on the basis of the most recent evidences. We described genetic and clinical aspects, mainly focusing on BS and EOS, the most representative diseases of autoinflammatory granulomatous diseases, with the ultimate purpose to expand their knowledge. PMID:26509073

  14. Drug−disease interaction: Crohn's disease elevates verapamil plasma concentrations but reduces response to the drug proportional to disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Sanaee, Forough; Clements, John D; Waugh, Alistair W G; Fedorak, Richard N; Lewanczuk, Richard; Jamali, Fakhreddin

    2011-01-01

    AIM Inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases that includes reduced response to pharmacotherapy due to altered pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. It is not known if these effects exist in general in all inflammatory conditions. It also remains unknown whether in a given population the effect is a function of disease severity. We investigated whether pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a typical calcium channel inhibitor are influenced by Crohn's disease (CD), a disease for which the disease severity can be readily ranked. METHODS We administered 80 mg verapamil orally to (i) healthy control subjects (n = 9), (ii) patients with clinically quiescent CD (n = 22) and (iii) patients with clinically active CD (n = 14). Serial analysis of verapamil enantiomers (total and plasma unbound), blood pressure and electrocardiograms were recorded over 8 h post dose. The severity of CD was measured using the Harvey-Bradshaw Index. RESULTS CD substantially and significantly increased plasma verapamil concentration and in a stereoselective fashion (S, 9-fold; R, 2-fold). The elevated verapamil concentration, however, failed to result in an increased verapamil pharmacodynamic effect so that the patients with elevated verapamil concentration demonstrated no significant increase in response measured as PR interval and blood pressure. Instead, the greater the disease severity, the lower was the drug potency to prolong PR interval (r = 0.86, P < 0.0006), CONCLUSIONS CD patients with severe disease may not respond to cardiovascular therapy with calcium channel blockers. Reducing the severity increases response despite reduced drug concentration. This observation may have therapeutic implication beyond the disease and the drug studies herein. PMID:21592185

  15. Understanding Host-Adherent-Invasive Escherichia coli Interaction in Crohn's Disease: Opening Up New Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Massier, Sébastien; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette; Billard, Elisabeth; Barnich, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    A trillion of microorganisms colonize the mammalian intestine. Most of them have coevolved with the host in a symbiotic relationship and some of them have developed strategies to promote their replication in the presence of competing microbiota. Recent evidence suggests that perturbation of the microbial community favors the emergence of opportunistic pathogens, in particular adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) that can increase incidence and severity of gut inflammation in the context of Crohn's disease (CD). This review will report the importance of AIEC as triggers of intestinal inflammation, focusing on their impact on epithelial barrier function and stimulation of mucosal inflammation. Beyond manipulation of immune response, restoration of gut microbiota as a new treatment option for CD patients will be discussed. PMID:25580435

  16. Central Retinal Vein Occlusion in a Patient with Retinal Vasculitis and Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Lígia; Rothwell, Renata; Brandão, Arnaldo

    2014-01-01

    The authors report a rare case of a 47-year-old woman with Crohn's disease (CD) who presented with retinal vasculitis and central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) during remission. The patient complained of sudden painless visual loss in her left eye (OS). Ophthalmologic evaluation revealed a best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 20/20 in the right eye and hand movements in OS. Ophthalmoscopy and fluorescein angiography of OS showed signs of nonischemic CRVO and extensive vasculitis. She was treated with oral prednisolone, mercaptopurine, and intravitreal bevacizumab in OS. After 1 month of treatment, VA of OS improved to 5/10 and after 1 year it was 10/10 with complete resolution of retinal vasculitis and nonischemic CRVO. PMID:25506451

  17. Inadvertent yellow fever vaccination of a patient with Crohn's disease treated with infliximab and methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Ekenberg, Christina; Friis-Møller, Nina; Ulstrup, Thomas; Aalykke, Claus

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 56-year-old woman with Crohn's disease, treated with methotrexate and infliximab, who inadvertently received yellow fever vaccination (YFV) prior to a journey to Tanzania. She was not previously vaccinated against YF. YFV contains live-attenuated virus, and is contraindicated in patients treated with immunosuppressive drugs. Following vaccination, the patient fell ill with influenza-like illness. Elevated transaminase levels and YF viremia were detected. Despite being immunocompromised, the patient did not develop more severe adverse effects. Neutralising antibodies to YF virus were detected on day 14 following vaccination and remained protective at least 10 months after vaccination. Limited data is available on outcomes of YFV in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy, including biologics, and we report this case as a reminder of vigilance of vaccine recommendations in this population. PMID:27571912

  18. The effect of NOD2 on the microbiota in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Lauro, Mackenzie L; Burch, Jason M; Grimes, Catherine Leimkuhler

    2016-08-01

    Recent advancements toward the treatment of Crohn's disease (CD) indicate great promise for long-term remission. CD patients suffer from a complex host of dysregulated interactions between their innate immune system and microbiome. The most predominant link to the onset of CD is a genetic mutation in the innate immune receptor nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing 2 (NOD2). NOD2 responds to the presence of bacteria and stimulates the immune response. Mutations to NOD2 promote low diversity and dysbiosis in the microbiome, leading to impaired mucosal barrier function. Current treatments suppress the immune response rather than enhancing the function of this critical protein. New progress toward stabilizing NOD2 signaling through its interactions with chaperone proteins holds potential in the development of novel CD therapeutics. PMID:27035071

  19. Mesenteric Fibromatosis in Crohn's Disease as a Potential Effect of Adalimumab

    PubMed Central

    Goud, Aditya; Fleisher, Albert S.

    2016-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman with no medical or surgical history was evaluated for weight loss. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed signs of Crohn's disease, which was later confirmed endoscopically. She was started on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitor therapy. Nine months after treatment, she experienced additional weight loss and a 7 x 8 x 8-cm mass on repeat CT. Biopsy revealed retroperitoneal fibromatosis, so TNF-α was continued. Repeat CT showed an enlarged mass. TNF-α therapy had a suspected role in mass growth, therapy was discontinued, and the mass surgically resected. One year after resection, she has regained weight with no recurrence of the mesenteric fibromatosis. PMID:27144199

  20. Comparison of nitrogen utilization of two elemental diets in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Vaisman, N; Griffiths, A; Pencharz, P B

    1988-01-01

    Energy, nitrogen absorption, and nitrogen utilization of two commercial elemental diets, Vivonex and Vital, were compared in 10 teenage boys and girls with Crohn's disease. The diets were given in random order as overnight feedings and were the sole source of nutrients for two consecutive periods of 3 weeks each. Urine and stools were collected for 48 h at the end of each 3-week period. Energy absorption was slightly better on Vivonex (p less than 0.05), although 95-100% of energy was absorbed with both formulas. Nitrogen absorption was not different for the two formulas, but nitrogen utilization was significantly better on Vital (28.6 +/- 12.9% versus 9.7 +/- 17.7%, p less than 0.01). This difference may be attributable to the different concentrations of sulfur-containing and aromatic amino acids in the two formulas. PMID:3335991

  1. Analysis of thiopurine S-methyltransferase phenotype-genotype in a Tunisian population with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ben Salah, Lynda; Belkhiria el Haj Amor, Mouna; Chbili, Chahra; Khlifi, Saida; Fathallah, Neila; Bougmiza, Iheb; Ben Jazia, Elhem; Houdret, Nicole; Ben Salem, Chaker; Saguem, Saad

    2013-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the thiopurine S-methyltransferase TPMT activity distribution and gene mutations in Tunisian population with positive diagnostic for Crohn's disease. TPMT activity was measured in Tunisian population (n = 88) by a high performance liquid chromatography assay. Polymerase chain reaction-based methods were used to determine the frequency of TPMT mutant alleles TPMT*2, TPMT*3A, TPMT*3B and TPMT*3C. TPMT activity was normally distributed, ranging from 4.58 to 35.27 nmol/(h ml) RBC with a mean of 18.67 ± 7.10 nmol/(h ml) RBC. Seven TPMT*3A heterozygotes and one TPMT*3C homozygote were found in 88 patients, with allele frequencies of 0.039 and 1.13, respectively. TPMT*3A and the TPMT*3C, which cause the largest decrease in enzyme activity, were both variant alleles detected in the Tunisian population. PMID:23553048

  2. Second generation of thiazolylmannosides, FimH antagonists for E. coli-induced Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Chalopin, T; Alvarez Dorta, D; Sivignon, A; Caudan, M; Dumych, T I; Bilyy, R O; Deniaud, D; Barnich, N; Bouckaert, J; Gouin, S G

    2016-04-28

    The anti-adhesive strategy, consisting of disrupting bacterial attachment to the host cells, is widely explored as an alternative to antibiotic therapies. Recently, thiazolylmannosides (TazMans) have been identified as strong anti-adhesives of E. coli strains implied in the gut inflammation of patients with Crohn's disease. In this work, we developed a second generation of TazMans with improved chemical stability. The anomeric nitrogen was substituted by short linkers and the compounds were assessed against the bacterial adhesin FimH and the clinically isolated LF82 E. coli strain in four in vitro assays. The results obtained on the FimH adhesin alone and the whole bacteria enabled the identification of a candidate for further in vivo evaluations. PMID:27043998

  3. Assessment of Activity of Crohn Disease by Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Hua; Sun, Can-Hui; Mao, Ren; Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Jiang, Xiao-Song; Pui, Margaret H; Chen, Min-Hu; Li, Zi-Ping

    2015-10-01

    To assess the diagnostic efficacy of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) for evaluating inflammatory activity in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). A total of 47 CD patients underwent MR enterography (MRE) and DWI using 3 b values of 50, 400, and 800 s/mm. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of inflamed and normal bowel wall were calculated. The conventional MRE findings and DWI signal intensities were qualitatively scored from 0 to 3. The correlation between Crohn disease activity index (CDAI) and both ADCs and magnetic resonance imaging scores was analyzed. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis was used to determine the diagnostic accuracy of CD activity. Of the 47 patients, 25 were active CD (CDAI≥150) and 22 were inactive (CDAI<150). Diffusion-weighted MR imaging and MRE + DWI scores of active CD were significantly higher than that of inactive CD (both P < 0.001). Apparent diffusion coefficients in inflamed segments of active CD were lower than that of inactive CD (P < 0.001). The DWI scores (r = 0.74, P < 0.001), ADCs (r = -0.71, P < 0.001), MRE scores (r = 0.54, P < 0.001), and MRE + DWI scores (r = 0.66, P < 0.001) were all correlated with CDAI. The areas under the receiver-operating characteristics curves for ADCs, DWI scores, MRE scores, and MRE + DWI scores ranged from 0.83 to 0.98. The threshold ADC value of 1.17 × 10 mm/s allowed differentiation of active from inactive CD with 100% sensitivity and 88% specificity. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging and ADC correlated with CD activity, and had excellent diagnostic accuracy for differentiating active from inactive CD. PMID:26512584

  4. Briakinumab for Treatment of Crohn's Disease: Results of a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sandborn, William J.; Gordon, Glenn L.; Lee, Scott D.; Safdi, Alan; Sedghi, Shahriar; Feagan, Brian G.; Hanauer, Stephen; Reinisch, Walter; Valentine, John F.; Huang, Bidan; Carcereri, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study assessed the efficacy and safety of briakinumab, a human anti-IL-12/23p40 monoclonal antibody, compared with placebo for the induction and maintenance of remission in patients with moderately to severely active Crohn's disease. Methods: In this phase 2b, multicenter, double-blind, parallel group study, 246 patients stratified by prior tumor necrosis factor–antagonist use and response, were randomized (1:1:1:3) to 4 intravenous induction regimens: placebo, 200, 400, or 700 mg briakinumab, at weeks 0/4/8. At week 12, responders in the placebo or 400-mg induction groups entered the maintenance phase with the same regimen, whereas responders in the 700-mg induction group were rerandomized (1:1:1) to receive placebo, 200, or 700 mg briakinumab at weeks 12/16/20. At week 24, patients in remission stopped receiving study drug (withdrawal phase) until relapse. Patients experiencing relapse, nonresponders, and nonremitters could enter the open-label phase. Results: The primary end point of clinical remission at week 6 was not met. There were numerically greater rates of remission and response at 6, 12, or 24 weeks in patients treated with briakinumab. The safety and tolerability profile of briakinumab was similar in the induction and maintenance phases of the trial. Conclusions: Briakinumab showed a similar safety and tolerability profile to placebo in the induction and maintenance phases, and comparable rates of serious adverse events, adverse events leading to discontinuation, and malignancy. These data provide support for the potential efficacy of briakinumab and other IL-12/23 inhibitors in the treatment of moderate-to-severe Crohn's disease. PMID:25989338

  5. Butyrate inhibits inflammatory responses through NFκB inhibition: implications for Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Segain, J; de la Bletiere, D R.; Bourreille, A; Leray, V; Gervois, N; Rosales, C; Ferrier, L; Bonnet, C; Blottiere, H; Galmiche, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM—Proinflammatory cytokines are key factors in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD). Activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB), which is involved in their gene transcription, is increased in the intestinal mucosa of CD patients. As butyrate enemas may be beneficial in treating colonic inflammation, we investigated if butyrate promotes this effect by acting on proinflammatory cytokine expression.
METHODS—Intestinal biopsy specimens, isolated lamina propria cells (LPMC), and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were cultured with or without butyrate for assessment of secretion of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and mRNA levels. NFκB p65 activation was determined by immunofluorescence and gene reporter experiments. Levels of NFκB inhibitory protein (IκBα) were analysed by western blotting. The in vivo efficacy of butyrate was assessed in rats with trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS) induced colitis.
RESULTS—Butyrate decreased TNF production and proinflammatory cytokine mRNA expression by intestinal biopsies and LPMC from CD patients. Butyrate abolished lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced expression of cytokines by PBMC and transmigration of NFκB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. LPS induced NFκB transcriptional activity was decreased by butyrate while IκBα levels were stable. Butyrate treatment also improved TNBS induced colitis.
CONCLUSIONS—Butyrate decreases proinflammatory cytokine expression via inhibition of NFκB activation and IκBα degradation. These anti-inflammatory properties provide a rationale for assessing butyrate in the treatment of CD.


Keywords: inflammation; butyrate; Crohn's disease; nuclear factor kappa B; cytokines PMID:10940278

  6. Characteristics of Pediatric Crohn's Disease in Saudi Children: A Multicenter National Study

    PubMed Central

    Saadah, Omar I.; El Mouzan, Mohammad; Al Mofarreh, Mohammad; Al Mehaidib, Ali; Al Edreesi, Mohammad; Hasosah, Mohammed; Al-Hussaini, Abdulrahman; AlSaleem, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Crohn's disease (CD) is an evolving disease in KSA. Little is known about its characteristics in the Saudi population. The aims of this study were to describe the characteristics of Saudi children with CD and to determine whether the characteristics of CD in KSA are different from those seen in Western countries. Methods. In this study, children younger than eighteen years of age diagnosed with CD between January 2003 and December 2012 were included. Results. Of 330 patients identified, 186 (56.4%) were males. The median age at diagnosis was 15.8 years. A positive family history for IBD in first-degree relatives occurred in 13.6% of patients. The most common symptoms were abdominal pain (84.2%), weight loss (75.2%), and diarrhea (71.8%). The main disease location was ileocolonic (42.1%) and the main disease behavior was nonstricturing and nonpenetrating (63.6%). Perianal involvement was seen in 60 (18.2%) patients. Laboratory findings revealed anemia in 57.9% of patients, low albumin in 34.5%, and high CRP in 39.4%. Conclusions. Saudi children with CD have lower frequency of first-degree relatives with IBD, lower prevalence of early onset disease, longer diagnostic delay, higher prevalence of growth failure, and greater frequency of stricturing and penetrating disease behavior compared to Western patients. PMID:26858752

  7. Characteristics of Pediatric Crohn's Disease in Saudi Children: A Multicenter National Study.

    PubMed

    Saadah, Omar I; El Mouzan, Mohammad; Al Mofarreh, Mohammad; Al Mehaidib, Ali; Al Edreesi, Mohammad; Hasosah, Mohammed; Al-Hussaini, Abdulrahman; AlSaleem, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Crohn's disease (CD) is an evolving disease in KSA. Little is known about its characteristics in the Saudi population. The aims of this study were to describe the characteristics of Saudi children with CD and to determine whether the characteristics of CD in KSA are different from those seen in Western countries. Methods. In this study, children younger than eighteen years of age diagnosed with CD between January 2003 and December 2012 were included. Results. Of 330 patients identified, 186 (56.4%) were males. The median age at diagnosis was 15.8 years. A positive family history for IBD in first-degree relatives occurred in 13.6% of patients. The most common symptoms were abdominal pain (84.2%), weight loss (75.2%), and diarrhea (71.8%). The main disease location was ileocolonic (42.1%) and the main disease behavior was nonstricturing and nonpenetrating (63.6%). Perianal involvement was seen in 60 (18.2%) patients. Laboratory findings revealed anemia in 57.9% of patients, low albumin in 34.5%, and high CRP in 39.4%. Conclusions. Saudi children with CD have lower frequency of first-degree relatives with IBD, lower prevalence of early onset disease, longer diagnostic delay, higher prevalence of growth failure, and greater frequency of stricturing and penetrating disease behavior compared to Western patients. PMID:26858752

  8. Sweet's syndrome: an unusual cutaneous feature of Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. The South West Gastroenterology Group.

    PubMed

    Travis, S; Innes, N; Davies, M G; Daneshmend, T; Hughes, S

    1997-07-01

    Sweet's syndrome is characterized by tender, red inflammatory nodules or papules, usually affecting the upper limbs, face or neck. It is part of the group of acute neutrophilic dermatoses that includes pyoderma gangrenosum, but can be distinguished by its appearance, distribution and histological features. Four patients with Sweet's syndrome and Crohn's disease are reported. A total of 30 cases from the literature suggest that Sweet's syndrome is an unusual extraintestinal manifestation of either Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. There is a strong predilection for women (87%), patients with colonic disease (100%) and those with other extraintestinal features (77%). The rash is associated with active disease in 67-80%, but may precede the onset of intestinal symptoms in 21% and has been reported 3 months after proctocolectomy for ulcerative colitis. PMID:9262983

  9. Mild clinical behaviour of Crohn disease in elderly patients in a Latin American country: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto-Furusho, Jesús K; Sarmiento-Aguilar, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Crohn disease is characterized by fluctuating clinical behaviour, which is influenced by various factors. There are no data from Latin America that evaluate the clinical behaviour of Crohn disease in elderly patients. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical course of elderly onset Crohn disease compared with younger onset in the Mexican population. METHODS: The present analysis was a case-control study that included 132 patients with a histopathological diagnosis of Crohn disease between 1983 and 2013 in an inflammatory bowel disease clinic of a tertiary care centre. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 17 (IBM Corporation, USA) and descriptive statistics, χ2 and Fisher’s exact test for categorical variables and Student’s t test for numerical variables. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to identify associated risk factors and OR was calculated. RESULTS: A total of 132 patients (73 men and 59 women) were divided into two groups according to age at diagnosis: 27 cases (>60 years of age) and 105 controls (≤60 years of age). Factors influencing the clinical course of Crohn disease in the elderly were: female sex (OR 2.55 [95% CI 1.06 to 6.10]; P=0.02); colonic location (OR 0.22 [95% CI 0.03 to 0.89]; P=0.02); mild clinical behaviour of disease (OR 10.08 [95% CI 3.74 to 27.17]; P=0.0001); response to medical treatment (OR 2.85 [95% CI 1.08 to 7.48]; P=0.02); frequent use of sulfasalazine (OR 4.46 [95% CI 1.22 to 16.28]; P=0.03); less use of azathioprine (OR 0.38 [95% CI 0.13 to 1.03]; P=0.04); and long-term remission (OR 4.96 [95% CI 1.70 to 14.48]; P=0.002). CONCLUSION: Elderly patients with Crohn disease had a mild clinical course characterized by the lack of escalation to immunosuppressive and anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy, as well as long-term remission. PMID:25996614

  10. Treatment of refractory Crohn's disease and pyoderma gangrenosum with a combination regimen of rifaximin, gentamicin and metronidazole.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Neil D; Vadlamudi, Aravinda; Parrish, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    The etiology of Crohn's disease (CD) remains controversial. It is hypothesized that CD is the result of an abnormal immune response to the gut flora in genetically susceptible hosts. However, an infectious etiology has not been completely ruled out. Antibiotics have been utilized with some success to modify the course of the disease. Here, we report a patient with CD and pyoderma gangrenosum refractory to standard therapy, including biologics, who achieved remission with a combination of rifaximin, gentamicin and metronidazole. PMID:25802494

  11. Treatment of Refractory Crohn's Disease and Pyoderma Gangrenosum with a Combination Regimen of Rifaximin, Gentamicin and Metronidazole

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Neil D.; Vadlamudi, Aravinda; Parrish, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    The etiology of Crohn's disease (CD) remains controversial. It is hypothesized that CD is the result of an abnormal immune response to the gut flora in genetically susceptible hosts. However, an infectious etiology has not been completely ruled out. Antibiotics have been utilized with some success to modify the course of the disease. Here, we report a patient with CD and pyoderma gangrenosum refractory to standard therapy, including biologics, who achieved remission with a combination of rifaximin, gentamicin and metronidazole. PMID:25802494

  12. Chronic Pulmonary Complications of Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Mehari, Alem; Klings, Elizabeth S

    2016-05-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), the most common genetic hemolytic anemia worldwide, affects 250,000 births annually. In the United States, SCD affects approximately 100,000 individuals, most of African descent. Hemoglobin S (HbS) results from a glutamate-to-valine mutation of the sixth codon of the β-hemoglobin allele; the homozygous genotype (HbSS) is associated with the most prevalent and severe form of the disease. Other SCD genotypes include HbSC, composed of one HbS allele and one HbC (glutamate-to-lysine mutation) allele; and HbS-β-thalassemia(0) or HbS-β-thalassemia(+), composed of one HbS allele and one β-thalassemia allele with absent or reduced β-chain production, respectively. Despite advances in care, median survival remains in the fifth decade, due in large part to chronic complications of the disease. Chronic pulmonary complications in SCD are major contributors to this early mortality. Although our understanding of these conditions has improved much over the past 10 to 15 years, there remains no specific treatment for pulmonary complications of SCD. It is unclear whether conventional treatment regimens directed at non-SCD populations have equivalent efficacy in patients with SCD. This represents a critical research need. In this review, the authors review the state-of-the-art understanding of the following pulmonary complications of SCD: (1) pulmonary hypertension; (2) venous thromboembolic disease; (3) sleep-disordered breathing; (4) asthma and recurrent wheezing; and (5) pulmonary function abnormalities. This review highlights the advances as well as the knowledge gaps in this field to update clinicians and other health care providers and to garner research interest from the medical community. PMID:26836905

  13. Capsule Endoscopy for Crohn's Disease: Current Status of Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dong-Hoon; Keum, Bora; Jeen, Yoon Tae

    2016-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease involving the small and/or large intestine. More than 50% of Western CD patients and up to 88% of Asian CD patients may have small intestinal involvement. Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) has a higher diagnostic yield than small bowel barium radiography and computed tomography enterography for the detection of small intestinal involvement of CD. VCE also provides diagnostic yields comparable to magnetic resonance- (MR-) based enterography or enteroclysis and may have several advantages over MR-based tests for the detection of early small intestinal lesions. Several studies have suggested the use of VCE-based disease activity scoring systems to evaluate small intestinal mucosal disease activity, although their clinical relevance needs to be further studied. A possible indication for VCE is recurrence monitoring after complete surgical excision of CD-involved segments but its usefulness and efficacy compared with conventional endoscopy should be evaluated. The capsule retention rate ranges from 0 to 5.4% in suspected CD patients and from 0 to 13.2% in established CD patients. If VCE is necessary, significant small bowel stricture should be ruled out before VCE by performing a patency capsule study and/or small bowel radiological study in suspected or established CD patients. PMID:26819612

  14. Capsule Endoscopy for Crohn's Disease: Current Status of Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong-Hoon; Keum, Bora; Jeen, Yoon Tae

    2016-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease involving the small and/or large intestine. More than 50% of Western CD patients and up to 88% of Asian CD patients may have small intestinal involvement. Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) has a higher diagnostic yield than small bowel barium radiography and computed tomography enterography for the detection of small intestinal involvement of CD. VCE also provides diagnostic yields comparable to magnetic resonance- (MR-) based enterography or enteroclysis and may have several advantages over MR-based tests for the detection of early small intestinal lesions. Several studies have suggested the use of VCE-based disease activity scoring systems to evaluate small intestinal mucosal disease activity, although their clinical relevance needs to be further studied. A possible indication for VCE is recurrence monitoring after complete surgical excision of CD-involved segments but its usefulness and efficacy compared with conventional endoscopy should be evaluated. The capsule retention rate ranges from 0 to 5.4% in suspected CD patients and from 0 to 13.2% in established CD patients. If VCE is necessary, significant small bowel stricture should be ruled out before VCE by performing a patency capsule study and/or small bowel radiological study in suspected or established CD patients. PMID:26819612

  15. Crohn's disease and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis: the need for a study is long overdue.

    PubMed

    Davis, William C; Madsen-Bouterse, Sally A

    2012-01-15

    The initial suggestion that Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) might be involved in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD) was based on the apparent similarity of lesions in the intestine of patients with CD with those present in cattle infected with Map, the etiological agent of Johne's disease (JD). Recent investigations have now revealed the presence of Map or Map DNA in blood or lesions from adults and children with CD. Of special interest, Map has also been found in patients with other diseases as well as healthy subjects. The latter observations indicate all humans are susceptible to infection with Map and that, like with other mycobacterial pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, infection does not invariably lead to development of clinical disease but rather development of a persistent latent stage of infection where an immune response controls but does not eliminate the pathogen. Limited information has been obtained on the immune response to Map in healthy subjects and patients with CD. Understanding how Map may be involved in the pathogenesis of CD will require a better understanding of the immune response to Map in one of its common hosts as well as healthy humans and patients with CD. PMID:22209202

  16. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in the etiology of Crohn's disease, cause or epiphenomenon?

    PubMed

    Liverani, Elisa; Scaioli, Eleonora; Cardamone, Carla; Dal Monte, Paola; Belluzzi, Andrea

    2014-09-28

    The origin of inflammatory bowel disease is unknown. Attempts have been made to isolate a microorganism that could explain the onset of inflammation, but no pathological agent has ever been identified. Johne's disease is a granulomatous chronic enteritis of cattle and sheep caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) and shows some analogies with Crohn's disease (CD). Several studies have tried to clarify if MAP has a role in the etiology of CD. The present article provides an overview of the evidence in favor and against the "MAP-hypothesis", analyzing the methods commonly adopted to detect MAP and the role of antimycobacterial therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Studies were identified through the electronic database, MEDLINE, and were selected based on their relevance to the objective of the review. The presence of MAP was investigated using multiple diagnostic methods for MAP detection and in different tissue samples from patients affected by CD or ulcerative colitis and in healthy controls. On the basis of their studies, several authors support a close relationship between MAP and CD. Although increasing evidence of MAP detection in CD patients is unquestionable, a clear etiological link still needs to be proven. PMID:25278700

  17. The Link between Ankylosing Spondylitis, Crohn's Disease, Klebsiella, and Starch Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Taha; Wilson, Clyde; Ebringer, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Both ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and Crohn's disease (CD) are chronic and potentially disabling interrelated conditions, which have been included under the group of spondyloarthropathies. The results of a large number of studies support the idea that an enteropathic pathogen, Klebsiella pneumoniae, is the most likely triggering factor involved in the initiation and development of these diseases. Increased starch consumptions by genetically susceptible individuals such as those possessing HLA-B27 allelotypes could trigger the disease in both AS and CD by enhancing the growth and perpetuation of the Klebsiella microbes in the bowel. Exposure to increased levels of these microbes will lead to the production of elevated levels of anti-Klebsiella antibodies as well as autoantibodies against cross-reactive self-antigens with resultant pathological lesions in the bowel and joints. Hence, a decrease of starch-containing products in the daily dietary intake could have a beneficial therapeutic effect on the disease especially when used in conjunction with the currently available medical therapies in the treatment of patients with AS and CD. PMID:23781254

  18. Non-malignant complications of coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Holmes, G K

    1996-05-01

    Patients with coeliac disease are at increased risk of developing complications which increase morbidity and mortality. Emphasis on malignant complications has often overshadowed the non-malignant risks, which have received relatively little attention, although some of these can be very troublesome and even life-threatening. This article points out that a large population of unidentified or neglected coeliac patients is at potential risk. The challenge is to identify this group by case-finding or screening programmes in selected populations, so that they can be offered a gluten-free diet and other treatments which will not only improve general health but may also prevent or reduce the development of health problems. The non-malignant risks are outlined and bone and neuropsychiatric disturbances considered in more detail because of recent developments in these areas. PMID:8783765

  19. Current tecniques and new perpectives research of magnetic resonance enterography in pediatric Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Masselli, Gabriele; Mastroiacovo, Ilaria; De Marco, Emidio; Francione, Giulia; Casciani, Emanuele; Polettini, Elisabetta; Gualdi, Gianfranco

    2016-07-28

    Crohn's disease affects more than 500000 individuals in the United States, and about 25% of cases are diagnosed during the pediatric period. Imaging of the bowel has undergone dramatic changes in the past two decades. The endoscopy with biopsy is generally considered the diagnostic reference standard, this combination can evaluates only the mucosa, not inflammation or fibrosis in the mucosa. Actually, the only modalities that can visualize submucosal tissues throughout the small bowel are the computed tomography (CT) enterography (CTE) with the magnetic resonance enterography (MRE). CT generally is highly utilized, but there is growing concern over ionizing radiation and cancer risk; it is a very important aspect to keep in consideration in pediatric patients. In contrast to CTE, MRE does not subject patients to ionizing radiation and can be used to detect detailed morphologic information and functional data of bowel disease, to monitor the effects of medical therapy more accurately, to detect residual active disease even in patients showing apparent clinical resolution and to guide treatment more accurately. PMID:27551337

  20. Mechanism of action of the tuberculosis and Crohn disease risk factor IRGM in autophagy.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Santosh; Mandell, Michael A; Deretic, Vojo

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphisms in the IRGM gene, associated with Crohn disease (CD) and tuberculosis, are among the earliest identified examples documenting the role of autophagy in human disease. Functional studies have shown that IRGM protects against these diseases by modulating autophagy, yet the exact molecular mechanism of IRGM's activity has remained unknown. We have recently elucidated IRGM's mechanism of action. IRGM functions as a platform for assembling, stabilizing, and activating the core autophagic machinery, while at the same time physically coupling it to conventional innate immunity receptors. Exposure to microbial products or bacterial invasion increases IRGM expression, which leads to stabilization of AMPK. Specific protein-protein interactions and post-translational modifications such as ubiquitination of IRGM, lead to a co-assembly with IRGM of the key autophagy regulators ULK1 and BECN1 in their activated forms. IRGM physically interacts with 2 other CD risk factors, ATG16L1 and NOD2, placing these 3 principal players in CD within the same molecular complex. This explains how polymorphisms altering expression or function of any of the 3 factors individually can affect the same process-autophagy. Furthermore, IRGM's interaction with NOD2, and additional pattern recognition receptors such as NOD1, RIG-I, and select TLRs, transduces microbial signals to the core autophagy apparatus. This work solves the long-standing enigma of how IRGM controls autophagy. PMID:26313894

  1. The Role of MR Enterography in Assessing Crohn's Disease Activity and Treatment Response.

    PubMed

    Moy, Matthew P; Sauk, Jenny; Gee, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    MR enterography (MRE) has become the primary imaging modality in the assessment of Crohn's disease (CD) in both children and adults at many institutions in the United States and worldwide, primarily due to its noninvasiveness, superior soft tissue contrast, and lack of ionizing radiation. MRE technique includes distention of the small bowel with oral contrast media with the acquisition of T2-weighted, balanced steady-state free precession, and multiphase T1-weighted fat suppressed gadolinium contrast-enhanced sequences. With the introduction of molecule-targeted biologic agents into the clinical setting for CD and their potential to reverse the inflammatory process, MRE is increasingly utilized to evaluate disease activity and response to therapy as an imaging complement to clinical indices or optical endoscopy. New and emerging MRE techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), magnetization transfer, ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide- (USPIO-) enhanced MRI, and PET-MR, offer the potential for an expanded role of MRI in detecting occult disease activity, evaluating early treatment response/resistance, and differentiating inflammatory from fibrotic strictures. Familiarity with MR enterography is essential for radiologists and gastroenterologists as the technique evolves and is further incorporated into the clinical management of CD. PMID:26819611

  2. The Role of MR Enterography in Assessing Crohn's Disease Activity and Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    Moy, Matthew P.; Sauk, Jenny; Gee, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    MR enterography (MRE) has become the primary imaging modality in the assessment of Crohn's disease (CD) in both children and adults at many institutions in the United States and worldwide, primarily due to its noninvasiveness, superior soft tissue contrast, and lack of ionizing radiation. MRE technique includes distention of the small bowel with oral contrast media with the acquisition of T2-weighted, balanced steady-state free precession, and multiphase T1-weighted fat suppressed gadolinium contrast-enhanced sequences. With the introduction of molecule-targeted biologic agents into the clinical setting for CD and their potential to reverse the inflammatory process, MRE is increasingly utilized to evaluate disease activity and response to therapy as an imaging complement to clinical indices or optical endoscopy. New and emerging MRE techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), magnetization transfer, ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide- (USPIO-) enhanced MRI, and PET-MR, offer the potential for an expanded role of MRI in detecting occult disease activity, evaluating early treatment response/resistance, and differentiating inflammatory from fibrotic strictures. Familiarity with MR enterography is essential for radiologists and gastroenterologists as the technique evolves and is further incorporated into the clinical management of CD. PMID:26819611

  3. Genetic interplay between HLA-C and MIR148A in HIV control and Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Smita; Qi, Ying; O'hUigin, Colm; Pereyra, Florencia; Ramsuran, Veron; McLaren, Paul; Fellay, Jacques; Nelson, George; Chen, Haoyan; Liao, Wilson; Bass, Sara; Apps, Richard; Gao, Xiaojiang; Yuki, Yuko; Lied, Alexandra; Ganesan, Anuradha; Hunt, Peter W; Deeks, Steven G; Wolinsky, Steven; Walker, Bruce D; Carrington, Mary

    2013-12-17

    Variation in the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of the HLA-C locus determines binding of the microRNA Hsa-miR-148a, resulting in lower cell surface expression of alleles that bind miR-148a relative to those alleles that escape its binding. The HLA-C 3'UTR variant was shown to associate with HIV control, but like the vast majority of disease associations in a region dense with causal candidates, a direct effect of HLA-C expression level on HIV control was not proven. We demonstrate that a MIR148A insertion/deletion polymorphism associates with its own expression levels, affecting the extent to which HLA-C is down-regulated, the level of HIV control, and the risk of Crohn disease only among those carrying an intact miR-148a binding site in the HLA-C 3'UTR. These data illustrate a direct effect of HLA-C expression level on HIV control that cannot be attributed to other HLA loci in linkage disequilibrium with HLA-C and highlight the rich complexity of genetic interactions in human disease. PMID:24248364

  4. Granulomatous appendicitis: is it Crohn's disease? Report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Timmcke, A E

    1986-04-01

    Primary granulomatous inflammation of the appendix is a rare entity. When fungi, parasites, foreign bodies, and obstruction secondary to fecalith, mucocele, or tumor have been eliminated histologically as causes, fewer than 80 cases have been reported in the literature since 1932. Various diseases have also been suggested, including tuberculosis, sarcoidosis, Crohn's disease, and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. A case of primary granulomatous inflammation of the appendix is presented, and 61 cases reported in the literature since 1953 are reviewed. Patients presented with pain in the right lower quadrant of the abdomen frequently associated with a mass and a protracted preoperative course. Of the 61 patients, 31 were men, 24 were women, and the sex of six of the patients was not reported. The median age of patients was 21 yr. The majority (77%) underwent simple appendectomy. Of patients undergoing ileocolectomy, five of 14 (36%) had concurrent granulomatous ileal involvement. The majority of specimens exhibited appreciable transmural thickening with fibrosis, noncaseating granulomas, formation of Langhans giant cells, and mucosal ulceration. No operative deaths and no postoperative fecal fistulas occurred. In patients without concurrent or synchronous granulomatous disease elsewhere who were followed from 1 to 16.8 yr (mean 5.2 yr), the incidence of recurrence approximated 14%. Therefore, patients with granulomatous appendicitis appear to have a favorable prognosis but require careful long-term observation. PMID:3962954

  5. Craniofacial surgical management of a patient with systematic juvenile idiopathic arthritis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Kasfikis, Georgios; Georgios, Kasfikis; Antoniades, Helias; Helias, Antoniades; Kyrgidis, Athanassios; Athanassios, Kyrgidis; Markovitsi, Eleni; Eleni, Markovitsi; Antoniades, Konstantinos; Konstantinos, Antoniades

    2009-05-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic inflammatory disease in early age. It affects one or more joints, lasts more than 3 weeks, and appears in patients younger than 16 years. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is classified according to the International League of Associations for Rheumatology consensus depending on the number of affected joints in the beginning of the disease. When JIA affects the temporomandibular joint, the development of the mandible is constrained. Patients show a tendency toward retrognathism and a vertical facial development pattern. The purpose of this study was to present a rare case of a young teenager who experienced JIA and Crohn's disease at the same time. The patient was referred to the hospital for aesthetic and functional problems, mainly convex facial profile and obstructive sleep apnea caused by the craniofacial abnormality. The patient was treated by sagittal split mandibular advancement osteotomy and advancement genioplasty. The mechanisms of obstructive sleep apnea development and the surgical treatment through osteotomies are commentated on. The surgical outcome is functionally and aesthetically favorable and solid 2 years after the operation. Surgical management of the craniofacial region can be a problem-solving treatment modality for patients with juvenile arthritis. PMID:19461338

  6. Environmental risk factors in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis: an update.

    PubMed

    Carbonnel, F; Jantchou, P; Monnet, E; Cosnes, J

    2009-06-01

    Rapid increase in Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) incidence in developed countries, occurrence of CD in spouses and lack of complete concordance in monozygotic twins are strong arguments for the role of environmental factors in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Only two environmental factors have an established role in IBD. Smoking is a risk factor for CD and a protective factor for UC; appendectomy is a protective factor for UC. Many other environmental factors for IBD have been investigated. These are infectious agents, diet, drugs, stress and socio-economic factors. They are detailed in this paper. Among them, adherent invasive E. coli, infectious gastroenteritis, oral contraceptives and antibiotics could play a role in CD. To date, three theories integrate environmental factors to pathogenesis of IBD: hygiene, infection and cold chain. Much work remains to be done to identify risk factors for IBD. As exemplified by smoking, research of environmental risk factors of IBD is useful since it may lead to an improved disease course among patients and perhaps, to appropriate prevention among predisposed subjects. Further studies in this field are eagerly awaited. PMID:20117338

  7. Transcriptomics to study the effect of a Mediterranean-inspired diet on inflammation in Crohn's disease patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inflammation is an essential immune response; however, chronic inflammation results in disease including Crohn's disease. Therefore, reducing the inflammation can yield a significant health benefit, and one way to achieve this is through diet. We developed a Mediterranean-inspired anti-inflammatory diet and used this diet in a 6-week intervention in a Crohn's disease population. We examined changes in inflammation and also in the gut microbiota. We compared the results of established biomarkers, C-reactive protein and the micronuclei assay, of inflammation with results from a transcriptomic approach. Results Data showed that being on our diet for 6 weeks was able to reduce the established biomarkers of inflammation. However, using transcriptomics, we observed significant changes in gene expression. Although no single gene stood out, the cumulative effect of small changes in many genes combined to have a beneficial effect. Data also showed that our diet resulted in a trend of normalising the microbiota. Conclusions This study showed that our Mediterranean-inspired diet appeared to benefit the health of people with Crohn's disease. Our participants showed a trend for reduced markers of inflammation and normalising of the microbiota. The significant changes in gene expression after 6 weeks highlighted the increased sensitivity of using transcriptomics when compared to the established biomarkers and open up a new era of dietary intervention studies. PMID:24283712

  8. [Hyperacute periarteritis nodosa complicating Basedow's disease].

    PubMed

    Boutin, J; Cornec, A; Chevrant-Breton, J; Almange, C; Guérin, D

    The symptoms and the evolution of necrotizing vasculitis vary greatly. The authors illustrate the case of an 18 year old patient with a history of frequent allergic manifestations (urticaria and others) who was found to have, in septembre 1975, a typical case of Grave's disease. During the following 2 months she was treated with an iodide derivative. One year later the clinical signs increased to the point where a treatment associating lugol, carbamizole and propanolol was deemed necessary. Less than 2 months later there developed a polyvisceral disease with oscillating fever, polyarthralgia and necrotizing vasculitis. The plurivisceral nature of the illness was further illustrated by the presence of a hyperreflexia, a glomerulopathy and retinal exsudats. A muscle biopsy revealed the necrotizing vasculitis with granulomas typical of periarteritis nodosa. Cardiac, neurologic and renal complications were responsable for a rapid down-hill course and despite corticoïdes and immunosuppresive drugs, the patient died after a few weeks of treatment. That periarteritis nodosa should complicate the evolution of Grave's disease suggests a connection between the two, very probably immunologic in nature. The role of drugs capable of inducing vasculitis must be explored, especially the iodide derivatives, the antithyroïd medications or their association. Such cases, even though they may be rare, should incite special care in the prescription of antithyroïd drugs in the allergic patient. PMID:34881

  9. Pulmonary Complications of Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a common monogenetic disorder with high associated morbidity and mortality. The pulmonary complications of SCD are of particular importance, as acute chest syndrome and pulmonary hypertension have the highest associated mortality rates within this population. This article reviews the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of clinically significant pulmonary manifestations of SCD, including acute chest syndrome, asthma, and pulmonary hypertension in adult and pediatric patients. Clinicians should be vigilant in screening and treating such comorbidities to improve patient outcomes. PMID:22447965

  10. Laparoscopic approach in complicated diverticular disease

    PubMed Central

    Rotholtz, Nicolás A; Canelas, Alejandro G; Bun, Maximiliano E; Laporte, Mariano; Sadava, Emmanuel E; Ferrentino, Natalia; Guckenheimer, Sebastián A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the results of laparoscopic colectomy in complicated diverticular disease. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study conducted at an academic teaching hospital. Data were collected from a database established earlier, which comprise of all patients who underwent laparoscopic colectomy for diverticular disease between 2000 and 2013. The series was divided into two groups that were compared: Patients with complicated disease (abscess, perforation, fistula, or stenosis) (G1) and patients undergoing surgery for recurrent diverticulitis (G2). Recurrent diverticulitis was defined as two or more episodes of diverticulitis regardless of patient age. Data regarding patient demographics, comorbidities, prior abdominal operations, history of acute diverticulitis, classification of acute diverticulitis at index admission and intra and postoperative variables were extracted. Univariate analysis was performed in both groups. RESULTS: Two hundred and sixty patients were included: 28% (72 patients) belonged to G1 and 72% (188 patients) to G2. The mean age was 57 (27-89) years. The average number of episodes of diverticulitis before surgery was 2.1 (r 0-10); 43 patients had no previous inflammatory pathology. There were significant differences between the two groups with respect to conversion rate and hospital stay (G1 18% vs G2 3.2%, P = 0.001; G1: 4.7 d vs G2 3.3 d, P < 0.001). The anastomotic dehiscence rate was 2.3%, with no statistical difference between the groups (G1 2.7% vs G2 2.1%, P = 0.5). There were no differences in demographic data (body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiology and previous abdominal surgery), operative time and intraoperative and postoperative complications between the groups. The mortality rate was 0.38% (1 patient), represented by a death secondary to septic shock in G2. CONCLUSION: The results support that the laparoscopic approach in any kind of complicated diverticular disease can be performed with low morbidity and

  11. Subclassification of small bowel Crohn's disease using magnetic resonance enterography: a review using evidence-based medicine methodology.

    PubMed

    Murphy, D J; Smyth, A E; McEvoy, S H; Gibson, D J; Doherty, G A; Malone, D E

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) has a growing role in imaging small bowel Crohn's disease (SBCD), both in diagnosis and assessment of treatment response. Certain SBCD phenotypes respond well to biologic therapy and others require surgery; MRE has an expanding role in triaging these patients. In this review, we evaluate the MRE signs that subclassify SBCD using evidence-based medicine (EBM) methodology and provide a structured approach to MRE interpretation. PMID:26372328

  12. [A case of Crohn's disease developing bladder rupture 4 months after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy with partial cystectomy for vesicosigmoidal fistula].

    PubMed

    Masumori, Naoya; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Takeuchi, Motoi; Ichihara, Koji; Inoue, Ryuta; Shinkai, Nobuo; Maehana, Takeshi; Mizuno, Takahiro; Tabata, Hidetoshi; Hiyama, Yoshiki; Tsukamoto, Taiji

    2012-05-01

    A 32-year-old well-nourished man having a vesicosigmoidal fistula due to Crohn's disease received laparoscopic sigmoidectomy with partial cystectomy. The bladder wall was closed with an all-layer running suture and additional interrupted sutures using 2-0 Vicryl. Four months after surgery, the suture site on the bladder showed perforation to the abdominal cavity. Since the same event occurred again 6 months after surgery, open partial cystectomy was performed to repair the perforated site 8 months after the initial surgery. The perforated site showed a thinning bladder wall composed of normal urothelium, scar tissue and thin detrusor muscle. Non-caseating granuloma was not found in the specimen, even though it was slightly observed in the margin of the detrusor muscle resected in the initial surgery. Although it was possible that the persisting activity of Crohn's disease, subclinical impaired nutrition due to Crohn's disease or insufficient suturing of the bladder wall were involved in the bladder rupture, the definitive cause remains unknown. PMID:22767277

  13. Controlled trial comparing prednisolone with an elemental diet plus non-absorbable antibiotics in active Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Saverymuttu, S; Hodgson, H J; Chadwick, V S

    1985-10-01

    In a randomised clinical trial, patients with moderately active Crohn's disease received either prednisolone 0.5 mg/kg/day plus a normal diet, or an elemental diet plus oral framycetin, colistin and nystatin. Patients were assessed using the Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI), ESR, and faecal granulocyte excretion quantified by 111In-autologous leucocytes. Five patients were intolerant of the elemental diet plus antibiotics and were withdrawn from the trial within 72 hours. Sixteen patients completed 10 days treatment on each regime. Fifteen of 16 patients on elemental diet plus antibiotics and all 16 patients on prednisolone improved with marked, but statistically indistinguishable falls in CDAI, ESR, and faecal granulocyte excretion between the two groups. Thus a regime decreasing the intraluminal concentration of bacteria and complex food molecules, was associated with rapid improvement in activity of Crohn's disease. This suggests that these intraluminal factors play a role in maintaining inflammation and that their removal or alteration offers an approach to management. PMID:3902590

  14. Comparison of amino acid v peptide based enteral diets in active Crohn's disease: clinical and nutritional outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Royall, D; Jeejeebhoy, K N; Baker, J P; Allard, J P; Habal, F M; Cunnane, S C; Greenberg, G R

    1994-01-01

    Elemental diets are considered an effective primary treatment for active Crohn's disease. This study examined the hypothesis that improvement occurs because of the presence of amino acids or the low fat content, or both. A randomised, controlled trial was undertaken in 40 patients with active Crohn's disease to evaluate clinical and nutritional outcomes after an amino acid based diet containing 3% fat was given by a feeding tube compared with a peptide based diet containing 33% fat. After three weeks' treatment, clinical remission occurred in 84% of patients who were given the amino acid diet and 75% of patients who received the peptide diet (p = 0.38). Plasma linoleic acid concentration was reduced after the amino acid but not the peptide diet. An increase in total body nitrogen was associated with the magnitude of nutritional depletion before treatment and at six months' follow up, only patients who showed gains in total body nitrogen after enteral nutrition had a sustained clinical remission. This study shows that peptide based high fat diets are as effective as amino acid low fat diets for achieving clinical remission in active Crohn's disease. Improved total body protein stores but not essential fatty acid depletion may be an important indicator of a sustained remission. PMID:8020806

  15. Peripheral blood derived gene panels predict response to infliximab in rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biological therapies have been introduced for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Crohn's disease (CD). The efficacy of biologics differs from patient to patient. Moreover these therapies are rather expensive, therefore treatment of primary non-responders should be avoided. Method We addressed this issue by combining gene expression profiling and biostatistical approaches. We performed peripheral blood global gene expression profiling in order to filter the genome for target genes in cohorts of 20 CD and 19 RA patients. Then RT-quantitative PCR validation was performed, followed by multivariate analyses of genes in independent cohorts of 20 CD and 15 RA patients, in order to identify sets ofinterrelated genes that can separate responders from non-responders to the humanized chimeric anti-TNFalpha antibody infliximab at baseline. Results Gene panels separating responders from non-responders were identified using leave-one-out cross-validation test, and a pool of genes that should be tested on larger cohorts was created in both conditions. Conclusions Our data show that peripheral blood gene expression profiles are suitable for determining gene panels with high discriminatory power to differentiate responders from non-responders in infliximab therapy at baseline in CD and RA, which could be cross-validated successfully. Biostatistical analysis of peripheral blood gene expression data leads to the identification of gene panels that can help predict responsiveness of therapy and support the clinical decision-making process. PMID:23809696

  16. Alcohol binging causes peliosis hepatis during azathioprine therapy in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Elsing, Christoph; Placke, Joerg; Herrmann, Thomas

    2007-09-14

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease have normal life expectancy and, due to modern immunosuppressive therapies, also a normal quality of life. Since mostly young people are affected, their social behaviour suits this environment. Alcohol binging is an increasingly disturbing factor among young people. We describe a patient with Crohn's disease, treated with azathioprine, who developed peliosis hepatis after three epsiodes of alcohol binging. Liver toxicity was not observed previously during the course of the treatment. Azathioprine-induced peliosis hepatis is thought to be idiosyncratic in humans. From animal studies, however, it is clear that hepatic depletion of glutathione leads to azathioprine toxicity to the sinusoidal endothelial cells. Damage of these cells causes peliosis hepatis. Since alcohol binging leads to hepatic glutathione depletion, we conclude that in our patient the episodes of binging have reduced liver gluathione content and therefore this has increased azathioprine toxicity causing peliosis hepatis. The problem of alcohol binging has not yet been addressed in IBD patients undertaking immunosuppressive therapy. This should be reviewed in future considerations regarding patients advice. PMID:17729423

  17. Retrospective Binary-Trait Association Test Elucidates Genetic Architecture of Crohn Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Duo; Zhong, Sheng; McPeek, Mary Sara

    2016-01-01

    In genetic association testing, failure to properly control for population structure can lead to severely inflated type 1 error and power loss. Meanwhile, adjustment for relevant covariates is often desirable and sometimes necessary to protect against spurious association and to improve power. Many recent methods to account for population structure and covariates are based on linear mixed models (LMMs), which are primarily designed for quantitative traits. For binary traits, however, LMM is a misspecified model and can lead to deteriorated performance. We propose CARAT, a binary-trait association testing approach based on a mixed-effects quasi-likelihood framework, which exploits the dichotomous nature of the trait and achieves computational efficiency through estimating equations. We show in simulation studies that CARAT consistently outperforms existing methods and maintains high power in a wide range of population structure settings and trait models. Furthermore, CARAT is based on a retrospective approach, which is robust to misspecification of the phenotype model. We apply our approach to a genome-wide analysis of Crohn disease, in which we replicate association with 17 previously identified regions. Moreover, our analysis on 5p13.1, an extensively reported region of association, shows evidence for the presence of multiple independent association signals in the region. This example shows how CARAT can leverage known disease risk factors to shed light on the genetic architecture of complex traits. PMID:26833331

  18. Approach to the Patient with Mild Crohn's Disease: a 2016 Update.

    PubMed

    Scott, Frank I; Lichtenstein, Gary R

    2016-09-01

    Mild Crohn's disease (CD) is classified as those patients who are ambulatory, with <10 % weight loss, are eating and drinking without abdominal mass, tenderness, obstructive symptoms, or fever, and endoscopically they have non-progressive mild findings. Initial evaluation of mild CD should focus on assessment for high-risk features requiring more aggressive therapy. In contrast to moderate-to-severe disease, where therapy is focused on mucosal healing, the management of mild CD is focused on symptom management, while exposing the individual to minimal therapeutic risks. Budesonide is the most commonly used medication for mild CD given its safety profile. Assessment of inflammatory markers, in concert with computed-tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) enterographies and endoscopic studies, should be considered in clinical remission to ensure that mucosal inflammation is not present. Endoscopic inflammation can precede clinical recurrence. Individuals with mild CD require routine vaccination, monitoring for iron-deficiency anemia and vitamin D deficiency, and colorectal cancer screening when appropriate. PMID:27448619

  19. Pediatric Crohn disease patients exhibit specific ileal transcriptome and microbiome signature

    PubMed Central

    Haberman, Yael; Tickle, Timothy L.; Dexheimer, Phillip J.; Kim, Mi-Ok; Tang, Dora; Karns, Rebekah; Baldassano, Robert N.; Noe, Joshua D.; Rosh, Joel; Markowitz, James; Heyman, Melvin B.; Griffiths, Anne M.; Crandall, Wallace V.; Mack, David R.; Baker, Susan S.; Huttenhower, Curtis; Keljo, David J.; Hyams, Jeffrey S.; Kugathasan, Subra; Walters, Thomas D.; Aronow, Bruce; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Gevers, Dirk; Denson, Lee A.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between the host and gut microbial community likely contribute to Crohn disease (CD) pathogenesis; however, direct evidence for these interactions at the onset of disease is lacking. Here, we characterized the global pattern of ileal gene expression and the ileal microbial community in 359 treatment-naive pediatric patients with CD, patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), and control individuals. We identified core gene expression profiles and microbial communities in the affected CD ilea that are preserved in the unaffected ilea of patients with colon-only CD but not present in those with UC or control individuals; therefore, this signature is specific to CD and independent of clinical inflammation. An abnormal increase of antimicrobial dual oxidase (DUOX2) expression was detected in association with an expansion of Proteobacteria in both UC and CD, while expression of lipoprotein APOA1 gene was downregulated and associated with CD-specific alterations in Firmicutes. The increased DUOX2 and decreased APOA1 gene expression signature favored oxidative stress and Th1 polarization and was maximally altered in patients with more severe mucosal injury. A regression model that included APOA1 gene expression and microbial abundance more accurately predicted month 6 steroid-free remission than a model using clinical factors alone. These CD-specific host and microbe profiles identify the ileum as the primary inductive site for all forms of CD and may direct prognostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:25003194

  20. Pediatric Crohn disease patients exhibit specific ileal transcriptome and microbiome signature.

    PubMed

    Haberman, Yael; Tickle, Timothy L; Dexheimer, Phillip J; Kim, Mi-Ok; Tang, Dora; Karns, Rebekah; Baldassano, Robert N; Noe, Joshua D; Rosh, Joel; Markowitz, James; Heyman, Melvin B; Griffiths, Anne M; Crandall, Wallace V; Mack, David R; Baker, Susan S; Huttenhower, Curtis; Keljo, David J; Hyams, Jeffrey S; Kugathasan, Subra; Walters, Thomas D; Aronow, Bruce; Xavier, Ramnik J; Gevers, Dirk; Denson, Lee A

    2014-08-01

    Interactions between the host and gut microbial community likely contribute to Crohn disease (CD) pathogenesis; however, direct evidence for these interactions at the onset of disease is lacking. Here, we characterized the global pattern of ileal gene expression and the ileal microbial community in 359 treatment-naive pediatric patients with CD, patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), and control individuals. We identified core gene expression profiles and microbial communities in the affected CD ilea that are preserved in the unaffected ilea of patients with colon-only CD but not present in those with UC or control individuals; therefore, this signature is specific to CD and independent of clinical inflammation. An abnormal increase of antimicrobial dual oxidase (DUOX2) expression was detected in association with an expansion of Proteobacteria in both UC and CD, while expression of lipoprotein APOA1 gene was downregulated and associated with CD-specific alterations in Firmicutes. The increased DUOX2 and decreased APOA1 gene expression signature favored oxidative stress and Th1 polarization and was maximally altered in patients with more severe mucosal injury. A regression model that included APOA1 gene expression and microbial abundance more accurately predicted month 6 steroid-free remission than a model using clinical factors alone. These CD-specific host and microbe profiles identify the ileum as the primary inductive site for all forms of CD and may direct prognostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:25003194

  1. Trisomy 9 syndrome: Report of a case with Crohn disease and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Wolldridge, J.; Zuncih, J.

    1995-04-10

    We report on a 6-year-old boy with mosaic trisomy 9. The patient was born at 42 weeks of gestation to a 27-year-old G1 white woman. Birth weight was 2,820 g, length 52 cm, and Apgar scores were 4 and 6 at 1 and 5 min, respectively. The infant presented with apparently low-set ears, overfolded helices, epicanthal folds, prominent nasal bridge, high-arched palate, micrognathia, bilateral dislocated hips, left genu recurvatum, and cryptorchidism. Chromosome analysis showed an unusual karyotype: 47,XY,+inv(9qh+)/47,XY,+mar. The marker chromosome was thought to be a remnant of the inv (9qh+), while the father`s was 46,XY. At age 5 months, the patient developed seizures and gastroesophageal reflux. Crohn disease was diagnosed at age 2 years, although symptoms began at age 1 year. Recurrent bouts of pneumonia have occurred since the patient`s birth. Severe psychomotor retardation was also noted. Trisomy 9 syndrome was first reported in 1973. Over 30 cases have been reported since then. Of these case reports, only 5 patients were older than 1 year. Inflammatory bowel disease has been reported in association with other chromosome abnormalities, but to our knowledge, has not been reported in trisomy 9 syndrome. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Optimal delivery of follow-up care after surgery for Crohn's disease: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Campbell, James P; Vaughn, Byron P

    2016-01-01

    Despite improvements in medical therapies for Crohn's disease (CD), up to 70% of patients require surgery within 10 years of diagnosis. Surgery is not curative, and almost all patients will experience endoscopic recurrence, and many will go on to clinical recurrence. Identifying patients at high-risk of endoscopic recurrence and standardizing postoperative assessments are essential in preventing clinical recurrence of CD. In this review, we discuss the assessment, monitoring, and treatment of postoperative CD patients. We address the various individual risk factors as well as composite risk factors. Medications used for primary CD treatment can be used in the postoperative setting to prevent endoscopic or clinical recurrence with varying efficacy, although the cost-effectiveness of these approaches are not fully understood. Future directions for postoperative CD management include evaluation of newer biologic agents such as anti-integrin therapy and fecal microbiota transplant for prevention of recurrence. Development of a standard preoperative risk assessment tool to clearly stratify those at high-risk of recurrence is necessary to guide empiric therapy. Lastly, the incorporation of noninvasive testing into disease monitoring will likely lead to early detection of endoscopic recurrence that will allow for tailored treatment to prevent clinical recurrence. PMID:27540307

  3. Pulmonary Vascular Complications of Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Jason S.; Fallon, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome and portopulmonary hypertension are two pulmonary vascular complications of liver disease. The pathophysiology underlying each disorder is distinct, but patients with either condition may be limited by dyspnea. A careful evaluation of concomitant symptoms, the physical examination, pulmonary function testing and arterial blood gas analysis, and echocardiographic, imaging, and hemodynamic studies is crucial to establishing (and distinguishing) these diagnoses. Our understanding of the pathobiology, natural history, and treatment of these disorders has advanced considerably over the past decade; however, the presence of either still increases the risk of morbidity and mortality in patients with underlying liver disease. There is no effective medical treatment for hepatopulmonary syndrome. Although liver transplantation can resolve hepatopulmonary syndrome, there appears to be worse survival even with transplantation. Liver transplantation poses a very high risk of death in those with significant portopulmonary hypertension, where targeted medical therapies may improve functional status and allow successful transplantation in a small number of select patients. PMID:23155142

  4. A distinct pattern of disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms in IBD risk genes in a family with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Barthel, Christiane; Spalinger, Marianne R; Brunner, Jakob; Lang, Silvia; Fried, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard; Scharl, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Recent studies have identified more than 160 inflammatory bowel disease susceptibility loci and provided evidence for genetic heritability in disease pathogenesis. Here we describe a case of a 47-year-old White woman suffering from Crohn's disease (CD), who had four children, two with CD and two with a factor V Leiden variation. We analysed the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms in several CD susceptibility genes. SNP analysis was carried out using commercially available assays. The female CD patient had a positive inflammatory bowel disease family history. All of the patients had a mild disease course, without fistulae or symptomatic stenosis. The patient was heterozygous for risk variants of the genes encoding nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) and Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) and a homozygous carrier of both of the identified protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 2 (PTPN2) risk alleles. The CD-affected daughter carried heterozygous risk alleles of the genes encoding TLR5, NOD2 and PTPN2. The son, with the earliest onset of disease in the family at the age of 12 years, was heterozygous for risk alleles of autophagy 16 like 1 (ATG16L1), TLR5, NOD2 and PTPN2. This study reports an interesting pattern of CD-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms in a family with CD. This report clearly supports the observation that genetic variations, especially in genes associated with the innate immune system, contribute to disease onset. PMID:24901824

  5. Characterization of Changes in Serum Anti-Glycan Antibodies in Crohn's Disease – a Longitudinal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Florian; Lopez, Rocio; Franke, Andre; Wolf, Alexandra; Schleder, Stephan; Dirmeier, Andrea; Schirbel, Anja; Rosenstiel, Philip; Dotan, Nir; Schreiber, Stefan; Rogler, Gerhard; Klebl, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Anti-glycan antibodies are a promising tool for differential diagnosis and disease stratification of patients with Crohn's disease (CD). We longitudinally assessed level and status changes of anti-glycan antibodies over time in individual CD patients as well as determinants of this phenomenon. Methods 859 serum samples derived from a cohort of 253 inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients (207 CD, 46 ulcerative colitis (UC)) were tested for the presence of anti-laminarin (Anti-L), anti-chitin (Anti-C), anti-chitobioside (ACCA), anti-laminaribioside (ALCA), anti-mannobioside (AMCA) and anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (gASCA) antibodies by ELISA. All patients had at least two and up to eleven serum samples taken during the disease course. Results Median follow-up time for CD was 17.4 months (Interquartile range (IQR) 8.0, 31.6 months) and for UC 10.9 months (IQR 4.9, 21.0 months). In a subgroup of CD subjects marked changes in the overall immune response (quartile sum score) and levels of individual markers were observed over time. The marker status (positive versus negative) remained widely stable. Neither clinical phenotype nor NOD2 genotype was associated with the observed fluctuations. In a longitudinal analysis neither changes in disease activity nor CD behavior led to alterations in the levels of the glycan markers. The ability of the panel to discriminate CD from UC or its association with CD phenotypes remained stable during follow-up. In the serum of UC patients neither significant level nor status changes were observed. Conclusions While the levels of anti-glycan antibodies fluctuate in a subgroup of CD patients the antibody status is widely stable over time. PMID:21573154

  6. High Amount of Dietary Fiber Not Harmful But Favorable for Crohn Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Mitsuro; Tsuji, Tsuyotoshi; Nakane, Kunio; Komatsu, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Current chronic diseases are a reflection of the westernized diet that features a decreased consumption of dietary fiber. Indigestible dietary fiber is metabolized by gut bacteria, including Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, to butyrate, which has a critical role in colonic homeostasis owing to a variety of functions. Dietary fiber intake has been significantly inversely associated with the risk of chronic diseases. Crohn disease (CD) is not an exception. However, even authors who reported the inverse association between dietary fiber and a risk of CD made no recommendation of dietary fiber intake to CD patients. Some correspondence was against advocating high fiber intake in CD. We initiated a semivegetarian diet (SVD), namely a lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet, for patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Our SVD contains 32.4 g of dietary fiber in 2000 kcal. There was no untoward effect of the SVD. The remission rate with combined infliximab and SVD for newly diagnosed CD patients was 100%. Maintenance of remission on SVD without scheduled maintenance therapy with biologic drugs was 92% at 2 years. These excellent short- and long-term results can be explained partly by SVD. The fecal bacterial count of F prausnitzii in patients with CD is significantly lower than in healthy controls. Diet reviews recommend plant-based diets to treat and to prevent a variety of chronic diseases. SVD belongs to plant-based diets that inevitably contain considerable amounts of dietary fiber. Our clinical experience and available data provide a rationale to recommend a high fiber intake to treat CD. PMID:25663207

  7. Celiac disease: how complicated can it get?

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, Jeroen; Koning, Frits

    2010-01-01

    In the small intestine of celiac disease patients, dietary wheat gluten and similar proteins in barley and rye trigger an inflammatory response. While strict adherence to a gluten-free diet induces full recovery in most patients, a small percentage of patients fail to recover. In a subset of these refractory celiac disease patients, an (aberrant) oligoclonal intraepithelial lymphocyte population develops into overt lymphoma. Celiac disease is strongly associated with HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8, as both genotypes predispose for disease development. This association can be explained by the fact that gluten peptides can be presented in HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 molecules on antigen presenting cells. Gluten-specific CD4+ T cells in the lamina propria respond to these peptides, and this likely enhances cytotoxicity of intraepithelial lymphocytes against the intestinal epithelium. We propose a threshold model for the development of celiac disease, in which the efficiency of gluten presentation to CD4+ T cells determines the likelihood of developing celiac disease and its complications. Key factors that influence the efficiency of gluten presentation include: (1) the level of gluten intake, (2) the enzyme tissue transglutaminase 2 which modifies gluten into high affinity binding peptides for HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8, (3) the HLA-DQ type, as HLA-DQ2 binds a wider range of gluten peptides than HLA-DQ8, (4) the gene dose of HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8, and finally,(5) additional genetic polymorphisms that may influence T cell reactivity. This threshold model might also help to understand the development of refractory celiac disease and lymphoma. PMID:20661732

  8. Resource use and cost of care with biologicals in Crohn's disease in South Africa: a retrospective analysis from a payer perspective.

    PubMed

    Miot, Jacqui; Smith, Susan; Bhimsan, Niri

    2016-08-01

    Background Crohn's disease is a relapsing remitting inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract. Treatment may require expensive biological therapy in severe patients. Affordability of the high cost anti-TNF-α agents has raised concern although evidence suggests cost-offsets can be achieved. There is little information on the resource utilisation of Crohn's patients in low and middle income countries. Objective The objective of this study is to investigate the resource utilisation and costs associated with biologicals treatment of Crohn's disease. Setting The setting for this study is in private healthcare in South Africa from a payer perspective. Method A retrospective longitudinal analysis of an administrative claims database from a large private healthcare insurer of patients who had at least 1 year claims exposure prior to starting biologicals and 2 years follow-up thereafter. Resource utilisation and costs including total Crohn's costs, hospital admissions and surgery, out of hospital costs, biologicals and chronic medicines were analysed. Main outcome measure The primary objective was to compare the change in resource utilisation and costs for Crohn's related conditions before and after starting biological treatment. Results A cohort of 72 patients was identified with a 35% (p = 0.005) reduction in Crohn's related costs (excluding the cost of biologicals) from ZAR 55,925 (U$5369) 1 year before compared to ZAR 36,293 (U$3484) 2 years after starting biological medicines. However, inclusion of the cost of biologicals more than doubled the total costs to ZAR 150,915 (±91,642) U$14,488 (±8798) in Year 2. Significant reductions in out-of hospital Crohn's related spend was also observed. Conclusions A reduction in healthcare costs is seen following starting biologicals in patients with moderate to severe Crohn's disease. However, the high cost of biological therapy outweighs any possible savings achieved in other areas of healthcare utilisation. PMID

  9. Working Group Guidelines on the nursing roles in caring for patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Kurek, Marzena; Poteralska, Aneta; Bieniek, Ewa; Marynka, Anna; Pabich, Grażyna; Liebert, Ariel; Kłopocka, Maria; Rydzewska, Grażyna

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, present a major challenge for present-day gastroenterology due to their increasing incidence, chronic nature, risk of permanent worsening of quality of life of patients, and the costs of conservative and invasive treatment. Basic and advanced nursing care are important parts of the multidisciplinary care for patients. The developed guidelines on the nursing care, which are compliant with the European guidelines published by Nurses-European Crohn's & Colitis Organisation (N-ECCO), were adjusted to the current situation in Poland. Significant issues that are important for nursing teams have been identified, with particular emphasis on the specificity of working in centres specialising in the care of IBD patients. The Working Group paid attention to the conditions that should be satisfied in order to optimise the nursing care for IBD patients, and the necessity to develop professional and scientific cooperation with European centres within European Crohn's & Colitis Organisation (ECCO) and N-ECCO. PMID:25276248

  10. Mechanisms of Microbe-Host Interaction in Crohn's Disease: Dysbiosis vs. Pathobiont Selection.

    PubMed

    Buttó, Ludovica F; Schaubeck, Monika; Haller, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a systemic chronic inflammatory condition mainly characterized by discontinuous transmural pathology of the gastrointestinal tract and frequent extraintestinal manifestations with intermittent episodes of remission and relapse. Genome-wide association studies identified a number of risk loci that, catalyzed by environmental triggers, result in the loss of tolerance toward commensal bacteria based on dysregulated innate effector functions and antimicrobial defense, leading to exacerbated adaptive immune responses responsible for chronic immune-mediated tissue damage. In this review, we discuss the inter-related role of changes in the intestinal microbiota, epithelial barrier integrity, and immune cell functions on the pathogenesis of CD, describing the current approaches available to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease. Substantial effort has been dedicated to define disease-associated changes in the intestinal microbiota (dysbiosis) and to link pathobionts to the etiology of inflammatory bowel diseases. A cogent definition of dysbiosis is lacking, as well as an agreement of whether pathobionts or complex shifts in the microbiota trigger inflammation in the host. Among the rarely available animal models, SAMP/Yit and TNF(deltaARE) mice are the best known displaying a transmural CD-like phenotype. New hypothesis-driven mouse models, e.g., epithelial-specific Caspase8(-/-), ATG16L1(-/-), and XBP1(-/-) mice, validate pathway-focused function of specific CD-associated risk genes highlighting the role of Paneth cells in antimicrobial defense. To study the causal role of bacteria in initiating inflammation in the host, the use of germ-free mouse models is indispensable. Unraveling the interactions of genes, immune cells and microbes constitute a criterion for the development of safe, reliable, and effective treatment options for CD. PMID:26635787

  11. Early surgery in Crohn's disease patients with entero-urinary fistulas: does it change the prognosis?

    PubMed

    Coelho, Rosa; Magro, Fernando; Silva, Marco; Macedo, Guilherme

    2016-06-01

    Background Entero-urinary fistulas (EUF) are observed in only 2-8% of Crohn's disease (CD) patients. Aim To compare the outcome of patients with EUF, after surgical treatment, with those with non-penetrating and non-stenosing, penetrating, and stenosing phenotypes (B1, B2, and B3 phenotypes). Methods Case-control study of 21 CD patients with EUF submitted to surgical treatment. Each patient with EUF was compared with six patients, two of each group: B1, B2, and B3 phenotypes. They were randomly selected from inflammatory bowel disease database and had the same extent of disease, smoking status, perianal disease, and age at diagnosis. Results One hundred and forty-seven patients were included (n = 21 EUF; n = 42 of each group B1, B2, and B3). Comparing B3 group with EUF, the former was more steroid-dependent and resistant (54.8% versus 19.0%, p = 0.037) and needed anti-TNF therapy more frequently (59.5% versus 23.8%, p = 0.004). Moreover, B3 patients had a poorer response to anti-TNF therapy without remission free of steroid therapy in comparison with EUF patients (45.2% versus 95.2%, p < 0.001). EUF patients did not differ from B2 group regarding anti-TNF therapy (p = 0.956) and steroid-dependence or resistance (p = 0.141). Surgery rate after index surgery was inferior in EUF in comparison with B2 and B3 groups. Hospital admission rate of patients with EUF was also lower than the B3 group. Conclusion Early surgery seems to be a good choice for patients with EUF as their response to surgery appears not to differ from B2 patients and had a better prognosis than phenotype B3 patients. PMID:26679346

  12. Dysbiotic gut microbiota causes transmissible Crohn's disease-like ileitis independent of failure in antimicrobial defence

    PubMed Central

    Clavel, Thomas; Calasan, Jelena; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Haange, Sven Bastiaan; Jehmlich, Nico; Basic, Marijana; Dupont, Aline; Hornef, Mathias; von Bergen, Martin; Bleich, André; Haller, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota is associated with Crohn's disease (CD). Functional evidence for a causal role of bacteria in the development of chronic small intestinal inflammation is lacking. Similar to human pathology, TNFdeltaARE mice develop a tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-driven CD-like transmural inflammation with predominant ileal involvement. Design Heterozygous TNFdeltaARE mice and wildtype (WT) littermates were housed under conventional (CONV), specific pathogen-free (SPF) and germ-free (GF) conditions. Microbial communities were analysed by high-throughput 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Metaproteomes were measured using LC-MS. Temporal and spatial resolution of disease development was followed after antibiotic treatment and transfer of microbial communities into GF mice. Granulocyte infiltration and Paneth cell function was assessed by immunofluorescence and gene expression analysis. Results GF-TNFdeltaARE mice were free of inflammation in the gut and antibiotic treatment of CONV-TNFdeltaARE mice attenuated ileitis but not colitis, demonstrating that disease severity and location are microbiota-dependent. SPF-TNFdeltaARE mice developed distinct ileitis-phenotypes associated with gradual loss of antimicrobial defence. 16S analysis and metaproteomics revealed specific compositional and functional alterations of bacterial communities in inflamed mice. Transplantation of disease-associated but not healthy microbiota transmitted CD-like ileitis to GF-TNFdeltaARE recipients and triggered loss of lysozyme and cryptdin-2 expression. Monoassociation of GF-TNFdeltaARE mice with the human CD-related Escherichia coli LF82 did not induce ileitis. Conclusions We provide clear experimental evidence for the causal role of gut bacterial dysbiosis in the development of chronic ileal inflammation with subsequent failure of Paneth cell function. PMID:25887379

  13. CD40: Novel Association with Crohn's Disease and Replication in Multiple Sclerosis Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Alcina, Antonio; Teruel, María; Díaz-Gallo, Lina M.; Gómez-García, María; López-Nevot, Miguel A.; Rodrigo, Luis; Nieto, Antonio; Cardeña, Carlos; Alcain, Guillermo; Díaz-Rubio, Manuel; de la Concha, Emilio G.; Fernandez, Oscar; Arroyo, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Background A functional polymorphism located at −1 from the start codon of the CD40 gene, rs1883832, was previously reported to disrupt a Kozak sequence essential for translation. It has been consistently associated with Graves' disease risk in populations of different ethnicity and genetic proxies of this variant evaluated in genome-wide association studies have shown evidence of an effect in rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility. However, the protective allele associated with Graves' disease or rheumatoid arthritis has shown a risk role in MS, an effect that we aimed to replicate in the present work. We hypothesized that this functional polymorphism might also show an association with other complex autoimmune condition such as inflammatory bowel disease, given the CD40 overexpression previously observed in Crohn's disease (CD) lesions. Methodology Genotyping of rs1883832C>T was performed in 1564 MS, 1102 CD and 969 ulcerative colitis (UC) Spanish patients and in 2948 ethnically matched controls by TaqMan chemistry. Principal Findings The observed effect of the minor allele rs1883832T was replicated in our independent Spanish MS cohort [p = 0.025; OR (95% CI) = 1.12 (1.01–1.23)]. The frequency of the minor allele was also significantly higher in CD patients than in controls [p = 0.002; OR (95% CI) = 1.19 (1.06–1.33)]. This increased predisposition was not detected in UC patients [p = 0.5; OR (95% CI) = 1.04 (0.93–1.17)]. Conclusion The impact of CD40 rs1883832 on MS and CD risk points to a common signaling shared by these autoimmune conditions. PMID:20634952

  14. Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease in an unselected population of monozygotic and dizygotic twins. A study of heritability and the influence of smoking.

    PubMed Central

    Tysk, C; Lindberg, E; Järnerot, G; Flodérus-Myrhed, B

    1988-01-01

    By running the Swedish twin registry containing about 25,000 pairs of twins of the same sex together with the central national diagnosis register of hospital inpatients, 80 twin pairs suffering from inflammatory bowel disease were found. In the ulcerative colitis group one of 16 monozygotic pairs was concordant for the disease, but all the other 20 pairs (dizygotic or unknown zygosity) were discordant. In the Crohn's disease group eight of 18 monozygotic pairs and one of 26 dizygotic pairs were concordant. The proband concordance rate among monozygotic twins was 6.3% for ulcerative colitis and 58.3% for Crohn's disease. The calculated heritability of liability based on monozygotic pairs was 0.53 and 1.0 respectively. Thus heredity as an aetiological factor is stronger in Crohn's disease than in ulcerative colitis. Monozygotic twins with Crohn's disease were more likely to be smokers than monozygotic twins with ulcerative colitis. Smoking did not explain the discordance of twin pairs with either ulcerative colitis, or Crohn's disease. The combination of identical heredity and similar smoking habit is not sufficient to cause disease. PMID:3396969

  15. Magnetic resonance enterography for the evaluation of the deep small intestine in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Kazuo; Takenaka, Kento; Kitazume, Yoshio; Fujii, Toshimitsu; Matsuoka, Katsuyoshi; Kimura, Maiko; Nagaishi, Takashi; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2016-04-01

    For the control of Crohn's disease (CD) a thorough assessment of the small intestine is essential; several modalities may be utilized, with cross-sectional imaging being important. Magnetic resonance (MR) enterography, i.e., MRE is recommended as a modality with the highest accuracy for CD lesions. MRE and MR enteroclysis are the two methods performed following distension of the small intestine. MRE has sensitivity and specificity comparable to computed tomography enterography (CTE); although images obtained using MRE are less clear compared with CTE, MRE does not expose the patient to radiation and is superior for soft-tissue contrast. Furthermore, it can assess not only static but also dynamic and functional imaging and reveals signs of CD, such as abscess, comb sign, fat edema, fistula, lymph node enhancement, less motility, mucosal lesions, stricture, and wall enhancement. Several indices of inflammatory changes and intestinal damage have been proposed for objective evaluation. Recently, diffusion-weighted imaging has been proposed, which does not need bowel preparation and contrast enhancement. Comprehension of the characteristics of MRE and other modalities is important for better management of CD. PMID:27175112

  16. Magnetic resonance enterography for the evaluation of the deep small intestine in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Takenaka, Kento; Kitazume, Yoshio; Fujii, Toshimitsu; Matsuoka, Katsuyoshi; Kimura, Maiko; Nagaishi, Takashi; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    For the control of Crohn's disease (CD) a thorough assessment of the small intestine is essential; several modalities may be utilized, with cross-sectional imaging being important. Magnetic resonance (MR) enterography, i.e., MRE is recommended as a modality with the highest accuracy for CD lesions. MRE and MR enteroclysis are the two methods performed following distension of the small intestine. MRE has sensitivity and specificity comparable to computed tomography enterography (CTE); although images obtained using MRE are less clear compared with CTE, MRE does not expose the patient to radiation and is superior for soft-tissue contrast. Furthermore, it can assess not only static but also dynamic and functional imaging and reveals signs of CD, such as abscess, comb sign, fat edema, fistula, lymph node enhancement, less motility, mucosal lesions, stricture, and wall enhancement. Several indices of inflammatory changes and intestinal damage have been proposed for objective evaluation. Recently, diffusion-weighted imaging has been proposed, which does not need bowel preparation and contrast enhancement. Comprehension of the characteristics of MRE and other modalities is important for better management of CD. PMID:27175112

  17. Altered potassium homeostasis in cirrhosis of the liver and Crohn's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Schober, O.; Bossaller, C.

    1984-01-01

    In the course of patients (pts) with cirrhosis of the liver (Ci) and Crohn's disease (CD) frequently noticed arrhythmias of the heart, weakness and adynamic ileus suggest alterations in the potassium (K) homeostasis. It is the purpose of the study to assess the role of Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ pump mechanism in intracellular and extracellular K homeostasis. Relative total body potassium (TBK), serum potassium (K-S), and the number of red blood cell ouabain binding sites (n-ATPase) was studied in 21 pts with Ci, 31 pts with CD and in 31 controls (C), all were not on digitalis. TBK was measured by equilibrium binding of H-3-ouabain. A significant reduction in TBK was accompanied by normal serum potassium levels, whereas the number of Na-K pumps is increased. The results support the suggestion that changes in TBK may regulate the synthesis of Na-K pump molecules. Secondary hyperaldosteronism and diarrhea e.g. may be responsible for chronic potassium depletion. The need for a nutritional support is discussed.

  18. Diminished Macrophage Apoptosis and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation after Phorbol Ester Stimulation in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Christine D.; Rahman, Farooq Z.; Sewell, Gavin W.; Ahmed, Afshan; Ashcroft, Margaret; Bloom, Stuart L.; Segal, Anthony W.; Smith, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Crohn's Disease (CD) is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by granulomatous inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Although its pathogenesis is complex, we have recently shown that CD patients have a systemic defect in macrophage function, which results in the defective clearance of bacteria from inflammatory sites. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we have identified a number of additional macrophage defects in CD following diacylglycerol (DAG) homolog phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) activation. We provide evidence for decreased DNA fragmentation, reduced mitochondrial membrane depolarization, impaired reactive oxygen species production, diminished cytochrome c release and increased IL-6 production compared to healthy subjects after PMA exposure. The observed macrophage defects in CD were stimulus-specific, as normal responses were observed following p53 activation and endoplasmic reticulum stress. Conclusion These findings add to a growing body of evidence highlighting disordered macrophage function in CD and, given their pivotal role in orchestrating inflammatory responses, defective apoptosis could potentially contribute to the pathogenesis of CD. PMID:19907654

  19. Use of adaptive hybrid filtering process in Crohn's disease lesion detection from real capsule endoscopy videos.

    PubMed

    Charisis, Vasileios S; Hadjileontiadis, Leontios J

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this Letter is to present a new capsule endoscopy (CE) image analysis scheme for the detection of small bowel ulcers that relate to Crohn's disease. More specifically, this scheme is based on: (i) a hybrid adaptive filtering (HAF) process, that utilises genetic algorithms to the curvelet-based representation of images for efficient extraction of the lesion-related morphological characteristics, (ii) differential lacunarity (DL) analysis for texture feature extraction from the HAF-filtered images and (iii) support vector machines for robust classification performance. For the training of the proposed scheme, namely HAF-DL, an 800-image database was used and the evaluation was based on ten 30-second long endoscopic videos. Experimental results, along with comparison with other related efforts, have shown that the HAF-DL approach evidently outperforms the latter in the field of CE image analysis for automated lesion detection, providing higher classification results. The promising performance of HAF-DL paves the way for a complete computer-aided diagnosis system that could support the physicians' clinical practice. PMID:27222730

  20. Chronic vagus nerve stimulation in Crohn's disease: a 6-month follow-up pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bonaz, B; Sinniger, V; Hoffmann, D; Clarençon, D; Mathieu, N; Dantzer, C; Vercueil, L; Picq, C; Trocmé, C; Faure, P; Cracowski, J-L; Pellissier, S

    2016-06-01

    The vagus nerve (VN) is a link between the brain and the gut. The VN is a mixed nerve with anti-inflammatory properties through the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis by its afferents and by activating the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway through its efferents. We have previously shown that VN stimulation (VNS) improves colitis in rats and that the vagal tone is blunted in Crohn's disease (CD) patients. We thus performed a pilot study of chronic VNS in patients with active CD. Seven patients under VNS were followed up for 6 months with a primary endpoint to induce clinical remission and a secondary endpoint to induce biological (CRP and/or fecal calprotectin) and endoscopic remission and to restore vagal tone (heart rate variability). Vagus nerve stimulation was feasible and well-tolerated in all patients. Among the seven patients, two were removed from the study at 3 months for clinical worsening and five evolved toward clinical, biological, and endoscopic remission with a restored vagal tone. These results provide the first evidence that VNS is feasible and appears as an effective tool in the treatment of active CD. PMID:26920654

  1. Reprograming of gut microbiome energy metabolism by the FUT2 Crohn's disease risk polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Maomeng; McHardy, Ian; Ruegger, Paul; Goudarzi, Maryam; Kashyap, Purna C; Haritunians, Talin; Li, Xiaoxiao; Graeber, Thomas G; Schwager, Emma; Huttenhower, Curtis; Fornace, Albert J; Sonnenburg, Justin L; McGovern, Dermot PB; Borneman, James; Braun, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Fucosyltransferase 2 (FUT2) is an enzyme that is responsible for the synthesis of the H antigen in body fluids and on the intestinal mucosa. The H antigen is an oligosaccharide moiety that acts as both an attachment site and carbon source for intestinal bacteria. Non-secretors, who are homozygous for the loss-of-function alleles of FUT2 gene (sese), have increased susceptibility to Crohn's disease (CD). To characterize the effect of FUT2 polymorphism on the mucosal ecosystem, we profiled the microbiome, meta-proteome and meta-metabolome of 75 endoscopic lavage samples from the cecum and sigmoid of 39 healthy subjects (12 SeSe, 18 Sese and 9 sese). Imputed metagenomic analysis revealed perturbations of energy metabolism in the microbiome of non-secretor and heterozygote individuals, notably the enrichment of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, cofactor and vitamin metabolism and glycan biosynthesis and metabolism-related pathways, and the depletion of amino-acid biosynthesis and metabolism. Similar changes were observed in mice bearing the FUT2−/− genotype. Metabolomic analysis of human specimens revealed concordant as well as novel changes in the levels of several metabolites. Human metaproteomic analysis indicated that these functional changes were accompanied by sub-clinical levels of inflammation in the local intestinal mucosa. Therefore, the colonic microbiota of non-secretors is altered at both the compositional and functional levels, affecting the host mucosal state and potentially explaining the association of FUT2 genotype and CD susceptibility. PMID:24781901

  2. Application of multiple laboratory tests for Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis detection in Crohn's disease patient specimens.

    PubMed

    Banche, Giuliana; Allizond, Valeria; Sostegni, Raffaello; Lavagna, Alessandro; Bergallo, Massimiliano; Sidoti, Francesca; Daperno, Marco; Rocca, Rodolfo; Cuffini, Anna Maria

    2015-07-01

    The difficulties involved in detecting and enumerating Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) as a pathogen potentially involved in Crohn's disease (CD) are well known. This study aimed to improve this situation through the application of multiple laboratory diagnostic tests to detect and isolate this bacterium from different specimens collected from CD-patients and non-CD subjects as controls. A total of 120 samples (terminal ileum and colon biopsies, blood and stool) were obtained from 19 CD-patients and from 11 individuals who did not have a clinicopathological diagnosis of CD (non-CD controls) attending for ileocolonoscopy. All samples were processed by staining techniques, culture on both solid and liquid media, and Insertion Sequence 900/F57 real-time PCR. The MAP frequency in CD-patients was found in a significantly greater proportion than in non-CD subjects; the most positive samples were biopsies from CD-patients tested by real-time PCR. MAP detection in biopsies, and in the other samples, by applying multiple and validated laboratory diagnostic tests, could be a marker of active infection, supporting MAP involvement in CD. PMID:26147146

  3. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and the intestinal innate immune cell homeostasis in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Däbritz, Jan

    2014-03-01

    Current literature consolidates the view of Crohn's disease (CD) as a form of immunodeficiency highlighting dysregulation of intestinal innate immunity in the pathogenesis of CD. Intestinal macrophages derived from blood monocytes play a key role in sustaining the innate immune homeostasis in the intestine, suggesting that the monocyte/macrophage compartment might be an attractive therapeutic target for the management of CD. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor that also promotes myeloid cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation. GM-CSF has a protective effect in human CD and mouse models of colitis. However, the role of GM-CSF in immune and inflammatory reactions in the intestine is not well defined. Beneficial effects exerted by GM-CSF during intestinal inflammation could relate to modulation of the mucosal barrier function in the intestine, including epithelial cell proliferation, survival, restitution, and immunomodulatory actions. The aim of this review is to summarize potential mechanistic roles of GM-CSF in intestinal innate immune cell homeostasis and to highlight its central role in maintenance of the intestinal immune barrier in the context of immunodeficiency in CD. PMID:24503766

  4. Aluminum is a potential environmental factor for Crohn's disease induction: extended hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Aaron

    2007-06-01

    Aluminum (Al) is a common environmental compound with immune-adjuvant activity and granulomatous inflammation inducer. Al exposure in food, additives, air, pharmaceuticals, and water pollution is ubiquitous in Western culture. Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic relapsing intestinal inflammation in genetically susceptible individuals and is influenced by yet unidentified environmental factors. It is hypothesized, in the present review, that Al is a potential factor for induction or maintaining the inflammation in CD. Epidemiologically, CD incidence is higher in urban areas, where microparticle pollution is prevalent. Al immune activities share many characteristics with the immune pathology of CD: increased antigen presentation and APCs activation, many luminal bacterial or dietary compounds can be adsorbed to the metal and induce Th1 profile activity, promotion of humoral and cellular immune responses, proinflammatory, apoptotic, oxidative activity, and stress-related molecule expression enhancement, affecting intestinal bacterial composition and virulence, granuloma formation, colitis induction in an animal model of CD, and terminal ileum uptake. The Al-bacterial interaction, the microparticles homing the intestine together with the extensive immune activity, put Al as a potential environmental candidate for CD induction and maintenance. PMID:17804561

  5. [Maternal Crohn's disease-related vitamin B12 deficient megaloblastic anemia in an infant].

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Wataru; Yamaoka, Masayoshi; Yokoi, Kentaro; Iwahashi, Megumi; Inage, Yuka; Arihiro, Seiji; Koganei, Kazutaka; Sugita, Akira; Ida, Hiroyuki; Akiyama, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    We report an 11-month-old breast-fed boy with feeding difficulties, lethargy, and developmental delay. Blood examination showed pancytopenia and decreased serum levels of vitamin B12. Anisocytosis and poikilocytes were detected in his peripheral blood, and increased megaloblastosis without leukemic cells was detected in his bone marrow. After the diagnosis of megaloblastic anemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency, symptoms were improved by vitamin B12 administration. Further investigation of the mother identified Crohn's disease and suggested that the supply of vitamin B12 from the mother to the infant, via the placenta during pregnancy and via breast milk after birth, was decreased due to impaired absorption of vitamin B12 in the mother's small intestine. Magnetic resonance imaging of the boy's brain on admission showed cerebral cortex atrophy which had improved by the age of 1 year and 10 months after vitamin B12 treatment, though developmental delay was still evident at the age of 3 years. Infantile vitamin B12 deficiency often presents with nonspecific manifestations, such as developmental delay and failure to thrive, in addition to anemia and is thus not easily diagnosed. To prevent severe neurological sequelae, this condition must be rapidly diagnosed, because a prolonged duration increases the risk of permanent disabilities. PMID:26861098

  6. [Crohn's disease and enteral feeding: comparative nutritional efficacy of elemental and polymeric nutritive mixtures].

    PubMed

    Cosnes, J; Bellanger, J; Gendre, J P; Le Quintrec, Y

    1988-10-01

    The nutritional development with three types of enteral diets during 28 days, was compared in 45 patients with malnutrition presenting an active Crohn's disease. Enteral feeding consisted of a polymeric mixture (Realmentyl) administered in addition to a normal oral diet in 11 patients; the same mixture was administered alone exclusively to 9 patients, and an elemental diet (Vivonex HN) administered exclusively to 25 patients. The total caloric intake reached, in the three groups, the mean values of 60.2, 36.9 and 33.8 kcal/kg of ideal weight/day, respectively. 33 patients also received steroids. At the end of 28 days of enteral diet, the improvement in the weight and the anthropometric measurements (muscle circumference, triceps skinfold) was significantly more marked (gain of 6.5 kg) with the supplemental polymeric mixture than with exclusive enteral diet, polymeric diet (+/- 2.0 kg) or basic (+1.2 kg). Transferrin and albumin plasma levels increased in all 3 groups, but much faster with the exclusive elemental feeding, in spite of a higher urinary urea excretion in these patients. The overall nutritional development was significantly better with supplemental polymeric feeding, and was identical in the two other groups. These results confirm that the supplemental polymeric enteral feeding is more effective, from the nutrition standpoint. With an exclusive enteral feeding, the nutritional result is appreciably the same, whether the mixture consists of polymers or basic elements. PMID:3144938

  7. Effect of Exclusive Enteral Nutrition on the Microbiota of Children With Newly Diagnosed Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Day, Andrew S; Leach, Steven T; Lemberg, Daniel A; Nielsen, Shaun; Mitchell, Hazel M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) is commonly used to treat pediatric Crohn's disease (CD). Meta-analysis of pediatric studies that have compared the effect of EEN with other treatments have shown that EEN induces remission in up to 80–85% of patients. We aimed to gain a comprehensive understanding of the effect of EEN on the microbiota of CD patients. Methods: We used 16S rRNA gene and whole-genome high throughout sequencing to determine changes in the fecal microbiota of five CD children, before, during, and after EEN therapy and compared this with five healthy controls. Results: The microbial diversity observed in CD patients tended to be lower than that in controls (CD: 2.25±0.24, controls: 2.75±0.14, P=0.11). In all CD patients, dysbiosis was observed prior to therapy. EEN therapy had a positive effect in all patients, with 80% going into remission. In some patients, the positive effect diminished following the conclusion of EEN therapy. Significantly, the number of operational taxonomic units (OTU) decreased dramatically upon starting EEN and this corresponded with CD remission. Recurrence of CD corresponded with an increase in OTUs. Six families within the Firmicutes were found to correlate with disease activity during and following EEN therapy, a finding that was confirmed by whole-genome high throughput sequencing. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that EEN leads to common and patient-specific alterations in the microbiota of CD patients, a number of which correlate with disease activity. PMID:25588524

  8. miR-19b downregulates intestinal SOCS3 to reduce intestinal inflammation in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiuqin; Zhang, Xiaofei; Su, Jiewen; Zhang, Yingdi; Zhou, Weimei; Zhou, Jun; Wang, Cheng; Liang, Hongwei; Chen, Xi; Shi, Ruihua; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zhang, Hongjie

    2015-01-01

    Although aberrant microRNA (miRNA) expression has frequently been observed in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), its biological functions and targets remain largely unknown. Present study found that miR-19b was significantly downregulated in active Crohn's disease (CD). Using bioinformatics analysis, suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 (SOCS3), a physiological regulator of innate and adaptive immunity that controls several immuno-inflammatory diseases, was predicted to be a potential target of miR-19b. An inverse correlation between miR-19b and SOCS3 protein levels, but not mRNA, was identified in active-CD intestinal tissue samples. By overexpressing or knocking down miR-19b in Caco2 cells and HT29 cells, it was experimentally validated that miR-19b is a direct regulator of SOCS3. Using a luciferase reporter assay, it was confirmed that miR-19b directly recognizes the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of SOCS3. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-19b decreased SOCS3 expression, leading to increased production of macrophage-inflammatory protein-3α (MIP-3α) in Caco2 cells. In contrast, knockdown of miR-19b increased SOCS3 and decreased MIP-3α. Finally, intracolonically delivered miR-19b decreased the severity of colitis induced with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS). Taken together, our findings suggest that miR-19b suppresses the inflammatory response by inhibiting SOCS3 to modulate chemokine production in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and thereby prevents the pathogenesis of CD. PMID:25997679

  9. Comparisons of seven algorithms for pathway analysis using the WTCCC Crohn's Disease dataset

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Though rooted in genomic expression studies, pathway analysis for genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has gained increasing popularity, since it has the potential to discover hidden disease pathogenic mechanisms by combining statistical methods with biological knowledge. Generally, algorithms or programs proposed recently can be categorized by different types of input data, null hypothesis or counts of analysis stages. Due to complexity caused by SNP, gene and pathway relationships, re-sampling strategies like permutation are always utilized to derive an empirical distribution for test statistics for evaluating the significance of candidate pathways. However, evaluation of these algorithms on real GWAS datasets and real biological pathway databases needs to be addressed before we apply them widely with confidence. Findings Two algorithms which use summary statistics from GWAS as input were implemented in KGG, a novel and user-friendly software tool for GWAS pathway analysis. Comparisons of these two algorithms as well as the other five selected algorithms were conducted by analyzing the WTCCC Crohn's Disease dataset utilizing the MsigDB canonical pathways. As a result of using permutation to obtain empirical p-value, most of these methods could control Type I error rate well, although some are conservative. However, the methods varied greatly in terms of power and running time, with the PLINK truncated set-based test being the most powerful and KGG being the fastest. Conclusions Raw data-based algorithms, such as those implemented in PLINK, are preferable for GWAS pathway analysis as long as computational capacity is available. It may be worthwhile to apply two or more pathway analysis algorithms on the same GWAS dataset, since the methods differ greatly in their outputs and might provide complementary findings for the studied complex disease. PMID:21981765

  10. [When is it too early or too late for surgery in Crohn's disease? ].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Blanco Hernáiz, J I; Monturiol Jalón, J M

    2008-01-01

    The surgical boarding of Crohn's disease (CD) admitted as a last effort of treatment against behavior in those the therapy prescribes it has failed, it supposes a loss on perspective that can postpone the delay in the recovery of patients and it retracts them of a better quality of life when it is considered that 50% of patients maintain inactive illness during years after selected surgical procedures; some rate no reached by the most effective treatments. The risk to specify surgical procedure in the course of CD rises to 75% of payees, more than 50% in the first year from the diagnosis, and practically 100% patients in the evolution when it is contemplated to attend perianal lesions. Therefore gastroenterologist should be trained in the selection who, when and why these patients should be operated. To retard the surgery to advanced illness phases increases morbidity, and if it is certain that the new biological therapy allow induction of remissions it is also it that to increase the duration of the process and the patient s age and contributes to face bigger surgical risk and worse perspectives in the treatment of their acute complications and also chronic manifestations often clinically inconsiderate as: Retractile mesenteritis, the states of hipercoagulability and the appearance of malignizations phenomena. Saving absolute indications for initial selective surgery in management of CD patient like: Massive intestinal bleeding, toxic megacolon or free perforation, other surgical conditions they should be reevaluated on light of our current knowledge. Patient s genotyping constitutes a clinical element that contributes to the identification of its specific risks and it facilitates the therapeutic selection. Unfortunately until these analyses can be routinely used the precocious employment of CD surgery it will be based on the consideration clinical data: The patient age, its nutritional state, smoking, and the necessities of steroids. To differ among inflammatory

  11. Association of the T allele of an intronic single nucleotide polymorphism in the colony stimulating factor 1 receptor with Crohn's disease: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Zapata-Velandia, Adriana; Ng, San-San; Brennan, Rebecca F; Simonsen, Neal R; Gastanaduy, Mariella; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Lentz, Jennifer J; Craver, Randall D; Correa, Hernan; Delgado, Alberto; Pitts, Angela L; Himel, Jane R; Udall, John N; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, Eberhard; Brown, Raynorda F; Athas, Grace B; Keats, Bronya B; Mannick, Elizabeth E

    2004-05-14

    BACKGROUND: Polymorphisms in several genes (NOD2, MDR1, SLC22A4) have been associated with susceptibility to Crohn's disease. Identification of the remaining Crohn's susceptibility genes is essential for the development of disease-specific targets for immunotherapy. Using gene expression analysis, we identified a differentially expressed gene on 5q33, the colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) gene, and hypothesized that it is a Crohn's susceptibility gene. The CSF1R gene is involved in monocyte to macrophage differentiation and in innate immunity. METHODS: Patients provided informed consent prior to entry into the study as approved by the Institutional Review Board at LSU Health Sciences Center. We performed forward and reverse sequencing of genomic DNA from 111 unrelated patients with Crohn's disease and 108 controls. We also stained paraffin-embedded, ileal and colonic tissue sections from patients with Crohn's disease and controls with a polyclonal antibody raised against the human CSF1R protein. RESULTS: A single nucleotide polymorphism (A2033T) near a Runx1 binding site in the eleventh intron of the colony stimulating factor 1 receptor was identified. The T allele of this single nucleotide polymorphism occurred in 27% of patients with Crohn's disease but in only 13% of controls (X2 = 6.74, p < 0.01, odds ratio (O.R.) = 2.49, 1.23 < O.R. < 5.01). Using immunohistochemistry, positive staining with a polyclonal antibody to CSF1R was observed in the superficial epithelium of ileal and colonic tissue sections. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that the colony stimulating factor receptor 1 gene may be a susceptibility gene for Crohn's disease. PMID:15144560

  12. Crohn's and colitis in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Day, Andrew S; Ledder, Oren; Leach, Steven T; Lemberg, Daniel A

    2012-11-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis can be grouped as the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). These conditions have become increasingly common in recent years, including in children and young people. Although much is known about aspects of the pathogenesis of these diseases, the precise aetiology is not yet understood, and there remains no cure. Recent data has illustrated the importance of a number of genes-several of these are important in the onset of IBD in early life, including in infancy. Pain, diarrhoea and weight loss are typical symptoms of paediatric Crohn's disease whereas bloody diarrhoea is more typical of colitis in children. However, atypical symptoms may occur in both conditions: these include isolated impairment of linear growth or presentation with extra-intestinal manifestations such as erythema nodosum. Growth and nutrition are commonly compromised at diagnosis in both Crohn's disease and colitis. Consideration of possible IBD and completion of appropriate investigations are essential to ensure prompt diagnosis, thereby avoiding the consequences of diagnostic delay. Patterns of disease including location and progression of IBD in childhood differ substantially from adult-onset disease. Various treatment options are available for children and adolescents with IBD. Exclusive enteral nutrition plays a central role in the induction of remission of active Crohn's disease. Medical and surgical therapies need to considered within the context of a growing and developing child. The overall management of these chronic conditions in children should include multi-disciplinary expertise, with focus upon maintaining control of gut inflammation, optimising nutrition, growth and quality of life, whilst preventing disease or treatment-related complications. PMID:23139601

  13. Birth outcome in women with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, and pharmacoepidemiological aspects of anti-inflammatory drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Nørgård, Bente Mertz

    2011-12-01

    The clinical epidemiological studies included in this thesis fall into three parts. The first part includes studies on birth outcome in women with ulcerative colitis. The second part includes pharmacoepidemiological studies on birth outcome after anti-inflammatory drug therapy in pregnancy, including patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. The third part (and the latest publications) includes birth outcome in women with Crohn's disease; and the methods of cohort establishment in these studies are developed and improved due to the knowledge gathered from conducting the earlier studies. The birth outcomes in women with ulcerative colitis are examined in a nationwide, Danish, cohort of women based on data from the Danish National Hospital Discharge Registry and the Danish Medical Birth Registry, and within a Hungarian case-control data set. Our data suggest: 1) Significantly increased risk of preterm birth when women give birth 0-6 months after establishment of the diagnosis. It is considered whether the increased risk may be influenced by disease activity around the time of establishing the diagnosis. 2) No increased risk of giving birth to children with low birth weight, intrauterine growth retardation or congenital abnormalities (evaluated overall). 3) Significantly increased risk of some selected congenital abnormalities (limb deficiencies, obstructive urinary and multiple congenital abnormalities). No other studies have examined the risk of selected congenital abnormalities in children born by women with ulcerative colitis. The pharmacoepidemiological studies on birth outcomes after use of anti-inflammatory drug therapy in pregnancy, including women with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, are based on data from the Hungarian case-control data set, a countywide Danish prescription Database, the Danish National Hospital Discharge Registry, the Danish Medical Birth Registry, and review of selected medical records. After exposure to sulfasalazine

  14. A Case Report of Improvement in Crohn's Disease-related Symptoms Following Participation in a Comprehensive Mind-Body Program.

    PubMed

    Dossett, Michelle L; Korzenik, Joshua R; Baim, Margaret; Denninger, John W; Mehta, Darshan H

    2016-01-01

    Stress is widely believed to play a role in the development and pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and several studies of mind-body programs have suggested benefits in this patient population. Here we describe a case report of a young man with a flare in Crohn's disease-related symptoms that improved in response to a comprehensive, multi-modal, mind-body program and the development of a novel IBD treatment center that incorporates mind-body approaches, nutrition, and other modalities to provide more holistic and patient-centered care for individuals with IBD. PMID:26937324

  15. Molecular analysis of the gut microbiota of identical twins with Crohn's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, Janet; Dicksved, Johan; Halfvarson, Jonas; Rosenquist, Magnus; Jarnerot, Gunnar; Tysk, Curt; Apajalahti, Juha; Engstrand, Lars; Jansson, Janet K.

    2008-03-14

    Increasing evidence suggests that a combination of host genetics and the composition of the gut microbiota are important for development of Crohn's disease (CD). Our aim was to study identical twins with CD to determine microbial factors independently of host genetics. Fecal samples were studied from 10 monozygotic twin pairs with CD (discordant n=6, concordant n=4) and 8 healthy twin pairs. DNA was extracted, 16S rRNA genes were PCR amplified and T-RFLP fingerprints generated using general bacterial and Bacteroides group specific primers. The microbial communities were also profiled based on their % G+C contents. Bacteroides 16S rRNA genes were cloned and sequenced from a subset of the samples. The bacterial diversity in each sample and similarity indices between samples were estimated based on the T-RFLP data using a combination of statistical approaches. Healthy individuals had a significantly higher bacterial diversity compared to individuals with CD. The fecal microbial communities were more similar between healthy twins than between twins with CD, especially when these were discordant for the disease. The microbial community profiles of individuals with ileal CD were significantly different from healthy individuals and those with colonic CD. Also, CD individuals had a lower relative abundance of B. uniformis and higher relative abundances of B. ovatus and B. vulgatus. Our results suggest that genetics and/or environmental exposure during childhood in part determine the gut microbial composition. However, CD is associated with dramatic changes in the gut microbiota and this was particularly evident for individuals with ileal CD.

  16. A Novel Approach to Detect Cumulative Genetic Effects and Genetic Interactions in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming-Hsi; Fiocchi, Claudio; Duerr, Richard H.; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Ripke, Stephan; Achkar, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified at least 71 Crohn's disease (CD) genetic risk loci but the role of gene-gene interactions is unclear. The value of genetic variants in clinical practice is not defined due to limited explained heritability. Materials and Methods We examined model predictability of combining the 71 CD risk alleles and genetic interactions in an ongoing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) GWAS. The Wellcome Trust Case-Control Consortium (WTCCC) IBD GWAS was used as a replicate cohort. We used logic regression (LR), an adaptive regression methodology, to search for high order binary predictors (e.g. single nucleotide polymorphism [SNP]) interactions. Results The combined 71 CD SNPs had good CD risk predictability (area under the curve, AUCs of 0.75 and 0.73 in the 2 cohorts). Higher cumulative allele score predicted higher CD risk, but a relatively small difference in cumulative allele scores was observed between CD and controls (49 vs. 47, P<0.001). Through LR, we identified high order genetic interactions and significantly improved the model predictability (AUC, 0.75 to 0.77, P<0.0001). A genetic interaction model including NOD2, ATG16L1, IL10/IL19, C13orf31 and chr21q loci was discovered and successfully replicated in the independent WTCCC cohort. The explained heritability of the 71 CD SNPs alone was 24% and increased to 27% after adding the genetic interactions. Conclusions A novel approach allowed the identification and replication of genetic interactions among NOD2, ATG16L1, IL10/IL19, C13orf31 and chr21q loci. CD risk can be predicted by a model of 71 CD loci and improved by adding genetic interactions. PMID:23598818

  17. Dysbiosis of the fecal microbiota in the TNBS-induced Crohn's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    He, Qing; Li, Xiaoping; Liu, Chuan; Su, Lili; Xia, Zhongkui; Li, Xin; Li, Ying; Li, Lingling; Yan, Ting; Feng, Qiang; Xiao, Liang

    2016-05-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is characterized by chronic transmural inflammation. The symptom of the mice model induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) is closed to human under CD condition, so this kind of animal is widely used in the related researches. Although the dysbiosis of the fecal microbiota has been proved to play an important role in the patients with CD, the composition of the gastrointestinal microbiota in the mouse model under disease condition is still unclear. In the current study, male 7-week BALB/c mice were anesthetized and intrarectal administrated by ethanol (ET group), TNBS in ethanol (TN group), and phosphate buffered saline (PBS) (CK group) as control. The symptoms of individuals under the CD condition were observed, and the changes of the bacterial taxonomic structure and functional composition were revealed by next-generation sequencing (NGS) 16S sequencing. The BALB/c mice in TN group demonstrated CD-like symptoms and the damages in the intestinal tract. The NGS 16S results exhibited that the diversity and microbial composition under CD condition are significantly different with those in ET group. The KEGG Orthology (KO) profile were generated from PICRUSt, and function modules such as methanogenesis (M00347) and microcin C transport system (M00349) were found enriched in the individuals in the TN group. This study proved that mouse model induced by TNBS could develop the similar symptom to CD patient, and we firstly showed the significant intestinal microbe changes on both taxonomic structure and functional composition in this mouse model. PMID:26795965

  18. Aberrant plasmacytoid dendritic cell distribution and function in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Baumgart, D C; Metzke, D; Guckelberger, O; Pascher, A; Grötzinger, C; Przesdzing, I; Dörffel, Y; Schmitz, J; Thomas, S

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) function is believed to be of critical importance for the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To date, most research in animal models and the few human data available is restricted to myeloid DC, while plasmacytoid DC (pDC) capable of controlling both innate and adaptive immune responses have not yet been investigated systematically in human Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC). CD11c-, CD303+/CD304+ and CD123+ pDC from peripheral blood (n = 90), mucosal tissue (n = 28) or mesenteric lymph nodes (n = 40) (MLNs) of patients with UC and CD or controls were purified and cultured. Thereafter, pDC were enumerated, phenotyped and cytokine secretion measured by flow cytometry (FACS), immunohistochemistry and/or cytometric bead array, respectively. Interferon (IFN)-α secretion following cytosine phosphatidyl guanine (CpG) A oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) 2216 (5′-GGGGGACGATCGTCGGGGGG-3′) stimulation was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found a significantly higher frequency of pDC in the inflamed colonic mucosa and MLN of IBD patients. Moreover, the fraction of CD40 and CD86 expressing cultured peripheral blood pDC was significantly higher in flaring UC and CD patients and their secretion of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 were increased significantly compared with controls. In contrast, the IFN-α secretion of peripheral blood pDC isolated from flaring IBD, particularly in UC patients, was reduced significantly compared with controls. Our data suggest an aberrant distribution and function of pDC in IBD, contrary to their generally implicated role as inducers of tolerance. We speculate that the impaired IFN-α secretion may relate to the hypothesized defect in innate immunity in IBD and could also impact upon the generation of regulatory T cells (Treg). PMID:21762123

  19. Crohn's disease-derived monocytes fail to induce Paneth cell defensins.

    PubMed

    Courth, Lioba F; Ostaff, Maureen J; Mailänder-Sánchez, Daniela; Malek, Nisar P; Stange, Eduard F; Wehkamp, Jan

    2015-11-10

    Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with a multitude of genetic defects, many of which likely affect Paneth cell function. Paneth cells reside in the small intestine and produce antimicrobial peptides essential for the host barrier, principally human α-defensin 5 (HD5) and HD6. Patients with CD of the ileum are characterized by reduced constitutive expression of these peptides and, accordingly, compromised antimicrobial barrier function. Here, we present a previously unidentified regulatory mechanism of Paneth cell defensins. Using cultures of human ileal tissue, we showed that the secretome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy controls restored the attenuated Paneth cell α-defensin expression characteristic of patients with ileal CD. Analysis of the Wnt pathway in both cultured biopsies and intestinal epithelial cells implicated Wnt ligands driving the PBMC effect, whereas various tested cytokines were ineffective. We further detected another defect in patients with ileal CD, because the PBMC secretomes derived from patients with CD were unable to restore the reduced HD5/HD6 expression. Accordingly, analysis of PBMC subtypes showed that monocytes of patients with CD express significantly lower levels of canonical Wnt ligands, including Wnt3, Wnt3a, Wnt1, and wntless Wnt ligand secretion mediator (Evi/Wls). These studies reveal an important cross-talk between bone marrow-derived cells and epithelial secretory Paneth cells. Defective Paneth cell-mediated innate immunity due to inadequate Wnt ligand stimulation by monocytes provides an additional mechanism in CD. Because defects of Paneth cell function stemming from various etiologies are overcome by Wnt ligands, this mechanism is a potential therapeutic target for this disease. PMID:26512113

  20. Extensive Modulation of the Fecal Metagenome in Children With Crohn's Disease During Exclusive Enteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Quince, Christopher; Ijaz, Umer Zeeshan; Loman, Nick; Eren, A Murat; Saulnier, Delphine; Russell, Julie; Haig, Sarah J; Calus, Szymon T; Quick, Joshua; Barclay, Andrew; Bertz, Martin; Blaut, Michael; Hansen, Richard; McGrogan, Paraic; Russell, Richard K; Edwards, Christine A; Gerasimidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Exploring associations between the gut microbiota and colonic inflammation and assessing sequential changes during exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) may offer clues into the microbial origins of Crohn's disease (CD). METHODS: Fecal samples (n=117) were collected from 23 CD and 21 healthy children. From CD children fecal samples were collected before, during EEN, and when patients returned to their habitual diets. Microbiota composition and functional capacity were characterized using sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and shotgun metagenomics. RESULTS: Microbial diversity was lower in CD than controls before EEN (P=0.006); differences were observed in 36 genera, 141 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), and 44 oligotypes. During EEN, the microbial diversity of CD children further decreased, and the community structure became even more dissimilar than that of controls. Every 10 days on EEN, 0.6 genus diversity equivalents were lost; 34 genera decreased and one increased during EEN. Fecal calprotectin correlated with 35 OTUs, 14 of which accounted for 78% of its variation. OTUs that correlated positively or negatively with calprotectin decreased during EEN. The microbiota of CD patients had a broader functional capacity than healthy controls, but diversity decreased with EEN. Genes involved in membrane transport, sulfur reduction, and nutrient biosynthesis differed between patients and controls. The abundance of genes involved in biotin (P=0.005) and thiamine biosynthesis decreased (P=0.017), whereas those involved in spermidine/putrescine biosynthesis (P=0.031), or the shikimate pathway (P=0.058), increased during EEN. CONCLUSIONS: Disease improvement following treatment with EEN is associated with extensive modulation of the gut microbiome. PMID:26526081