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Sample records for complicating subarachnoid haemorrhage

  1. Acute myocardial infarction complicating subarachnoid haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    van der Velden, L.B.J.; Otterspoor, L.C.; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Biessels, G.J.; Verheugt, F.W.A.

    2009-01-01

    An acute myocardial infarction is a rare complication of a subarachnoid haemorrhage. The combination of these two conditions imposes important treatment dilemmas. We describe two patients with this combination of life-threatening conditions. Patient 1 was treated with emergency percutaneous coronary intervention followed by clipping of the anterior communicating artery aneurysm. Six months after discharge the patient's memory and orientation had almost completely recovered. Patient 2 was treated with aspirin until coiling of the aneurysm could be performed. After successful coiling low-molecular-weight heparin was added. One week later the patient died due to a free wall rupture. (Neth Heart J 2009;17:284-7.19789696) PMID:19789696

  2. Nosocomial ventriculitis due to Roseomonas gilardii complicating subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Jason S; Waites, Ken B

    2005-04-01

    Roseomonas gilardii is a pink-pigmented, non-fermentative, Gram-negative coccobacillus that has been recognized as a rare cause of human infections. We report the first case of ventriculitis caused by R. gilardii in a 54-year-old man with a subarachnoid haemorrhage secondary to a vertebral artery aneurysm; discuss previous reports of this organism as a nosocomial and community-acquired pathogen, laboratory diagnosis, and patient management. PMID:15780421

  3. Recovery after subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, P.; Willison, J. R.; Lowe, D.; Neil-Dwyer, G.

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the implications of subarachnoid haemorrhage for quality of life and aftercare. DESIGN--Prospective follow up study of patients surviving subarachnoid haemorrhage over one year (at discharge, three months, and one year) by examination of cognitive functions (a test battery) and changes in everyday life (semistructured interview). SETTING--Regional neurosurgical unit at a tertiary referral centre. PATIENTS--100 Patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage; 17 were lost during the study because of ineligibility (further surgery, previous head injury, relevant psychiatric history, and cultural differences), loss of contact, and non-compliance; a further 13 patients who developed a neurological deficit were considered separately. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Performance on cognitive test battery and reported changes in quality of life. RESULTS--At discharge patients with and without neurological deficit scored below established norms with most tests, but by three months the difference had resolved in patients without deficit. Reduced quality of life attributable to subarachnoid haemorrhage at one year mainly included less energy (seven patients), adverse emotional changes (five), early retirement, affected social life, and domestic tension (three each). None reported reduced capacity for work. CONCLUSIONS--Patients surviving subarachnoid haemorrhage without neurological symptoms have a good prognosis and should be encouraged to return to a normal lifestyle within about three months. PMID:2507029

  4. Subarachnoid Haemorrhage and Sports

    PubMed Central

    Sousa Nanji, Liliana; Melo, Teresa P.; Canhão, Patrícia; Fonseca, Ana Catarina; Ferro, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Some cases of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) have been associated with vigorous physical activity, including sports. Our research aimed to describe the association between SAH and sports and to identify the types of sports that were more frequently found as precipitating factors in a tertiary single-centre SAH register. Methods We retrieved information from a prospectively collected SAH registry and reviewed discharge notes of acute SAH patients admitted to the Stroke Unit of Hospital de Santa Maria, Lisbon, between 1995 and 2014. Results Out of 738 patients included in the analysis, 424 (57.5%) cases of SAH were preceded by physical activity. Nine cases (1.2%) were associated with sports, namely running (2 cases), aerobics (2 cases), cycling, body balance, dance, surf and windsurf. Patients with SAH while practicing sports were younger than controls (average age 43.1 vs. 57.0 years; p = 0.007). In 1 patient, there was a report of trauma to the neck. Patients in the sports group only had Hunt and Hess scale grades 1 (11.1%) or 2 (88.9%) at admission, while patients in the control group had a wider distribution in severity. Conclusions Our findings indicate that SAH precipitated by sports is not very frequent and is uncommonly related to trauma. Patients who suffered SAH associated with sports were younger and apparently had a milder clinical presentation. PMID:26648972

  5. Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: guidance in making the correct diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Liebenberg, W; Worth, R; Firth, G; Olney, J; Norris, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: The natural history of untreated aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage carries a dismal prognosis. Case fatalities range between 32% and 67%. Treatment with either surgical clipping or endovascular coiling is highly successful at preventing re-bleeding and yet the diagnosis is still missed. Methods: Based on the national guidelines for analysis of cerebrospinal fluid for bilirubin in suspected subarachnoid haemorrhage and a review of other available literature this study has compiled guidance in making the diagnosis. Conclusion: In patients presenting with a suspected non-traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage, computed tomography within 12 hours will reliably show 98% of subarachnoid haemorrhage. In patients who present after 12 hours with a negative computed tomogram, formal cerebrospinal fluid spectophotometry will detect subarachnoid haemorrhage for the next two weeks with a reliability of 96%. Between the early diagnosis with the aid of computed tomography and the later diagnosis with the added benefit of spectophotometry in the period where computed tomograms become less reliable, it should be possible to diagnose most cases of subarachnoid haemorrhage correctly. PMID:15998826

  6. Experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage results in multifocal axonal injury.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Terrance T; Magnoni, Sandra; MacDonald, Christine L; Dikranian, Krikor; Milner, Eric; Sorrell, James; Conte, Valeria; Benetatos, Joey J; Zipfel, Gregory J; Brody, David L

    2015-09-01

    The great majority of acute brain injury results from trauma or from disorders of the cerebrovasculature, i.e. ischaemic stroke or haemorrhage. These injuries are characterized by an initial insult that triggers a cascade of injurious cellular processes. The nature of these processes in spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage is poorly understood. Subarachnoid haemorrhage, a particularly deadly form of intracranial haemorrhage, shares key pathophysiological features with traumatic brain injury including exposure to a sudden pressure pulse. Here we provide evidence that axonal injury, a signature characteristic of traumatic brain injury, is also a prominent feature of experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage. Using histological markers of membrane disruption and cytoskeletal injury validated in analyses of traumatic brain injury, we show that axonal injury also occurs following subarachnoid haemorrhage in an animal model. Consistent with the higher prevalence of global as opposed to focal deficits after subarachnoid haemorrhage and traumatic brain injury in humans, axonal injury in this model is observed in a multifocal pattern not limited to the immediate vicinity of the ruptured artery. Ultrastructural analysis further reveals characteristic axonal membrane and cytoskeletal changes similar to those associated with traumatic axonal injury. Diffusion tensor imaging, a translational imaging technique previously validated in traumatic axonal injury, from these same specimens demonstrates decrements in anisotropy that correlate with histological axonal injury and functional outcomes. These radiological indicators identify a fibre orientation-dependent gradient of axonal injury consistent with a barotraumatic mechanism. Although traumatic and haemorrhagic acute brain injury are generally considered separately, these data suggest that a signature pathology of traumatic brain injury-axonal injury-is also a functionally significant feature of subarachnoid haemorrhage, raising

  7. Experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage results in multifocal axonal injury

    PubMed Central

    Magnoni, Sandra; MacDonald, Christine L.; Dikranian, Krikor; Milner, Eric; Sorrell, James; Conte, Valeria; Benetatos, Joey J.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Brody, David L.

    2015-01-01

    The great majority of acute brain injury results from trauma or from disorders of the cerebrovasculature, i.e. ischaemic stroke or haemorrhage. These injuries are characterized by an initial insult that triggers a cascade of injurious cellular processes. The nature of these processes in spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage is poorly understood. Subarachnoid haemorrhage, a particularly deadly form of intracranial haemorrhage, shares key pathophysiological features with traumatic brain injury including exposure to a sudden pressure pulse. Here we provide evidence that axonal injury, a signature characteristic of traumatic brain injury, is also a prominent feature of experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage. Using histological markers of membrane disruption and cytoskeletal injury validated in analyses of traumatic brain injury, we show that axonal injury also occurs following subarachnoid haemorrhage in an animal model. Consistent with the higher prevalence of global as opposed to focal deficits after subarachnoid haemorrhage and traumatic brain injury in humans, axonal injury in this model is observed in a multifocal pattern not limited to the immediate vicinity of the ruptured artery. Ultrastructural analysis further reveals characteristic axonal membrane and cytoskeletal changes similar to those associated with traumatic axonal injury. Diffusion tensor imaging, a translational imaging technique previously validated in traumatic axonal injury, from these same specimens demonstrates decrements in anisotropy that correlate with histological axonal injury and functional outcomes. These radiological indicators identify a fibre orientation-dependent gradient of axonal injury consistent with a barotraumatic mechanism. Although traumatic and haemorrhagic acute brain injury are generally considered separately, these data suggest that a signature pathology of traumatic brain injury—axonal injury—is also a functionally significant feature of subarachnoid haemorrhage

  8. Subarachnoid haemorrhage as the initial manifestation of cortical venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Sahu, Ritesh; Lalla, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Aneurysmal rupture is the commonest cause of non-traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). SAH can rarely be the manifestation of cortical venous thrombosis (CVT). CVT is potentially lethal but treatable disorder with positive outcome if timely treatment is instituted. The site of bleeding is mainly on convexities and sulcus with sparing of basal cisterns in SAH related to CVT. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of treatment, in spite of SAH complicated by CVT. In this submission, the author highlighted a case of SAH presented as initial manifestation of CVT in an elderly woman. Early therapy with anticoagulation led to complete clinical and radiological recovery in a short duration of 2 weeks. Thus, diagnosis of CVT should be kept in mind in unusual presentation of SAH. PMID:22914236

  9. Pathological mechanisms underlying aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage and vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Penn, David L; Witte, Samantha R; Komotar, Ricardo J; Sander Connolly, E

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage is a cerebrovascular disease associated with an overall mortality as high as 50%. Delayed ischaemic neurologic deficits are a major contributor to this statistic, as well as the significant morbidity associated with the disease. Studies examining the pathophysiologic events causing these devastating changes in cerebral blood flow have identified several mechanisms which are thought to contribute to the development of delayed ischaemic neurological deficits, perhaps the most damaging of which are increased intracranial pressure and cerebral vasospasm. In addition, the presence of blood in the subarachnoid space can trigger a myriad of reactions resulting in increased capillary permeability, breakdown of the blood-brain barrier, and inflammation in surrounding neural tissue that adds to the devastating effects of haemorrhage. A detailed understanding of the post-haemorrhagic cellular and molecular changes that contribute to the development of cerebral ischaemia and vasospasm is imperative to the formulation of treatment and prevention options for subarachnoid haemorrhage patients. Despite a large body of research within this field, a complete understanding of rupture and vasospasm remains elusive. This study reviews the role of vasoactive substances, such as endothelin-1, as well as the histochemistry and molecular pathology of post-haemorrhage inflammation in the development of vasospasm and cerebral ischaemia. PMID:25113969

  10. Incidence of delayed cerebral ischaemia following subarachnoid haemorrhage of unknown cause.

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, P

    1985-01-01

    A retrospective study was made of 50 consecutive patients with spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage for which no cause was found, looking for evidence of delayed cerebral ischaemia particularly during the first 2 weeks after the bleed. Twenty-three patients had blood visible on the CT scan but only 4-6% developed delayed ischaemia, all of whom made a good recovery. The low incidence of this complication in this group of patients suggests that subarachnoid blood is not a sufficient cause for delayed ischaemia. PMID:3981169

  11. [Seizures caused by subarachnoid haemorrhage in a pregnant woman].

    PubMed

    Shim, Susy; Christiansen, Ulla Birgitte; Sørensen, Anne Nødgaard

    2016-07-25

    This case report describes a pregnant woman of gestational week 37 + 2 days who was admitted to the hospital with first-time seizures. The patient was stabilized, and an acute caesarian section was performed due to the possible aetiology of eclampsia and the advanced gestational age. Because of the atypical clinical history and normal maternal blood samples a computed tomography of the cerebrum was performed demonstrating a subarachnoid haemorrhage. A computed tomography-angiography revealed an aneurism at the anterior communicating artery. The aneurism was coiled the following day to reduce the risk of rebleeding. PMID:27460576

  12. Bleeding in the subarachnoid space: a possible complication during laser therapy for equine progressive ethmoid haematoma.

    PubMed

    Vreman, S; Wiemer, P; Keesler, R I

    2013-10-01

    A 10-year-old KWPN (Royal Warmblood Studbook of the Netherlands) gelding was euthanized after developing severe neurological symptoms preceded by severe epistaxis during laser treatment for progressive ethmoid haematoma (PEH) in the right nasal cavity. Postmortem examination of the head revealed a large amount of clotted blood between the right ventral and dorsal conchae in the nasal cavity and acute haemorrhage in the right subarachnoid space. Histologically, there was moderate, acute polioencephalomalacia in the neuropil adjacent to the haemorrhage. The haemorrhages were most likely caused by the laser treatment and therefore should be considered a possible complication that could lead to severe peracute neurological symptoms. PMID:24199337

  13. Three years prospective investigation of pituitary functions following subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Z; Tanriverdi, F; Dagli, A T; Selcuklu, A; Casanueva, F F; Unluhizarci, K; Kelestimur, F

    2013-03-01

    Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is known to be related to pituitary dysfuntion in retrospective and short-term prospective studies. We aimed to investigate pituitary functions in patients with SAH in longer follow-up periods to demonstrate if pituitary hormone deficiencies recover, persist or new hormone deficiencies occur. Twenty patients with SAH, who were followed up for 3 years, were included in the present study. Patients were evaluated with basal hormone levels and glucagon stimulation test (GST).Serum basal cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels were found to be significantly elevated at 3rd year of SAH compared to 1st year. Other basal hormone levels at 3rd year did not show a significant change from the levels found at 1st year. One of the patients had ACTH deficiency at 1st year of SAH and recovered at 3rd year. Growth hormone (GH) deficiency, according to GST,was diagnosed in 4 patients. One patient with GH deficiency at first year was still deficient, 3 of them recovered and 3 patients were found to have new-onset GH deficiency 3 years after SAH. SAH is associated with anterior pituitary dysfunction and GH is the most frequently found deficient hormone in the patients. Although one year after SAH seems to be an appropriate time for the evaluation of pituitary functions, further follow-up may be required at least in some cases due to recovered and new-onset hormone deficiencies at 3rd year of SAH. PMID:22315089

  14. The autophagy-lysosomal system in subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haijian; Niu, Huanjiang; Wu, Cheng; Li, Yong; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Jianmin; Wang, Yirong; Yang, Shuxu

    2016-09-01

    The autophagy-lysosomal pathway is a self-catabolic process by which dysfunctional or unnecessary intracellular components are degraded by lysosomal enzymes. Proper function of this pathway is critical for maintaining cell homeostasis and survival. Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is one of the most devastating forms of stroke. Multiple pathogenic mechanisms, such as inflammation, apoptosis, and oxidative stress, are all responsible for brain injury and poor outcome after SAH. Most recently, accumulating evidence has demonstrated that the autophagy-lysosomal pathway plays a crucial role in the pathophysiological process after SAH. Appropriate activity of autophagy-lysosomal pathway acts as a pro-survival mechanism in SAH, while excessive self-digestion results in cell death after SAH. Consequently, in this review article, we will give an overview of the pathophysiological roles of autophagy-lysosomal pathway in the pathogenesis of SAH. And approaching the molecular mechanisms underlying this pathway in SAH pathology is anticipated, which may ultimately allow development of effective therapeutic strategies for SAH patients through regulating the autophagy-lysosomal machinery. PMID:27027405

  15. Sensitivity of computed tomography performed within six hours of onset of headache for diagnosis of subarachnoid haemorrhage: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Stiell, Ian G; Sivilotti, Marco L A; Bullard, Michael J; Émond, Marcel; Symington, Cheryl; Sutherland, Jane; Worster, Andrew; Hohl, Corinne; Lee, Jacques S; Eisenhauer, Mary A; Mortensen, Melodie; Mackey, Duncan; Pauls, Merril; Lesiuk, Howard; Wells, George A

    2011-01-01

    Objective To measure the sensitivity of modern third generation computed tomography in emergency patients being evaluated for possible subarachnoid haemorrhage, especially when carried out within six hours of headache onset. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting 11 tertiary care emergency departments across Canada, 2000-9. Participants Neurologically intact adults with a new acute headache peaking in intensity within one hour of onset in whom a computed tomography was ordered by the treating physician to rule out subarachnoid haemorrhage. Main outcome measures Subarachnoid haemorrhage was defined by any of subarachnoid blood on computed tomography, xanthochromia in cerebrospinal fluid, or any red blood cells in final tube of cerebrospinal fluid collected with positive results on cerebral angiography. Results Of the 3132 patients enrolled (mean age 45.1, 2571 (82.1%) with worst headache ever), 240 had subarachnoid haemorrhage (7.7%). The sensitivity of computed tomography overall for subarachnoid haemorrhage was 92.9% (95% confidence interval 89.0% to 95.5%), the specificity was 100% (99.9% to 100%), the negative predictive value was 99.4% (99.1% to 99.6%), and the positive predictive value was 100% (98.3% to 100%). For the 953 patients scanned within six hours of headache onset, all 121 patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage were identified by computed tomography, yielding a sensitivity of 100% (97.0% to 100.0%), specificity of 100% (99.5% to 100%), negative predictive value of 100% (99.5% to 100%), and positive predictive value of 100% (96.9% to 100%). Conclusion Modern third generation computed tomography is extremely sensitive in identifying subarachnoid haemorrhage when it is carried out within six hours of headache onset and interpreted by a qualified radiologist. PMID:21768192

  16. To Look Beyond Vasospasm in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Messerer, Mahmoud; Oddo, Mauro; Daniel, Roy Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Delayed cerebral vasospasm has classically been considered the most important and treatable cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Secondary ischemia (or delayed ischemic neurological deficit, DIND) has been shown to be the leading determinant of poor clinical outcome in patients with aSAH surviving the early phase and cerebral vasospasm has been attributed to being primarily responsible. Recently, various clinical trials aimed at treating vasospasm have produced disappointing results. DIND seems to have a multifactorial etiology and vasospasm may simply represent one contributing factor and not the major determinant. Increasing evidence shows that a series of early secondary cerebral insults may occur following aneurysm rupture (the so-called early brain injury). This further aggravates the initial insult and actually determines the functional outcome. A better understanding of these mechanisms and their prevention in the very early phase is needed to improve the prognosis. The aim of this review is to summarize the existing literature on this topic and so to illustrate how the presence of cerebral vasospasm may not necessarily be a prerequisite for DIND development. The various factors determining DIND that worsen functional outcome and prognosis are then discussed. PMID:24967389

  17. Enlargement of the third ventricle and hyponatraemia in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Wijdicks, E F; Vandongen, K J; Vangijn, J; Hijdra, A; Vermeulen, M

    1988-01-01

    Hyponatraemia following aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage is associated with an increased risk of cerebral infarction. Whether the development of hyponatraemia was related to enlargement of the third ventricle on the admission CT scan was investigated in a consecutive series of 133 patients who were seen within 72 hours of aneurysmal haemorrhage. Hyponatraemia occurred significantly more often in patients with enlargement of the third ventricle (with or without dilatation of the lateral ventricles) than in patients with a normal ventricular system (20/41 versus 24/92, p = 0.016). After ventricular drainage, the sodium levels returned to normal in two patients in whom the size of the third ventricle decreased and not in four patients with persistent enlargement of the third ventricle. The significant relationship between enlargement of the third ventricle and hyponatraemia remained after adjustment for the amount of cisternal blood, but not after adjustment for the amount of intraventricular blood. These results suggest that the size of the third ventricle is an important but not the only factor in the relationship between acute hydrocephalus and hyponatraemia in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. Images PMID:3379424

  18. Neurosurgical versus endovascular treatment of subarachnoid haemorrhage caused by ruptured cerebral aneurysm: comparison of patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kamensky, J

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this critical review is to determine whether endovascular treatment (EVT) of a subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) has better patient outcomes than neurosurgical treatment (NST). A review of six cohort studies (listed in Table 1) was carried out and the main findings were summarised in the conclusion. In addition the list of author's recommendations is included at the end of the paper. Theatre practitioners involved in neurosurgery might find this review useful in enhancing their understanding of how SAH is currently treated. It could also bring some insights about the reasons why a particular modality of the treatment was chosen for their patient. PMID:26016283

  19. Pituitary apoplexy can mimic acute meningoencephalitis or subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Ahmed-Ramadan; Gregory, Stephen; Jaiganesh, Thiagarajan

    2011-01-01

    symptoms and lack of prodrome, an urgent CT head scan was performed to rule out a cerebrovascular event. The scan demonstrated an enlarged pituitary gland (3 cm in diameter) with impingement of the optic chiasm. The centre of the enlarged pituitary gland was noted to be hypodense in comparison to its periphery, which was consistent with a diagnosis of pituitary apoplexy. A subsequent MRI confirmed the diagnosis (Figure 1) of an enlarged sella containing abnormal soft tissue with increased signal intensity suggestive of haemorrhage (Figure 1A).Post-MRI a lumbar puncture was performed revealing glucose 3.4 mmol/l, protein 1.0 g/l, red cells of 53/mm3 and white cells of 174/mm3 with predominant neutrophilia. No organisms were seen, and CSF cultures and HSV DNA tests were found to be negative. Endocrinological investigations demonstrated low concentrations of thyroid hormones [TSH: 0.14 mIu/l (0.35-5.5 mlU/l), FT3: 1.1 nmol/l (1.2-3.0 nmol/l), FT4: 9.6 pmol/l (8-22 pmol/l)], gonadal hormones (LH: < 1 u/l) and prolactin: 16 u/l (<450 u/l). Serum FSH was 2.9 u/l (0.8-11.5 u/L) and cortisol 575 nmol/l (450-700 nmol/l). The patient was treated for hypopituitarism based on clinical and radiological findings with intravenous fluids, hydrocortisone (100 mg) and thyroxine (50 μg) as loading doses in the ED.Within 24 h of commencement of therapy the patient's GCS rose to 15, and within 48 h there was marked improvement in the right sixth cranial nerve palsy. Formal visual field assessment demonstrated temporal visual field loss in the left eye. The patient was discharged to his usual residence a week later and follow-up was organised with both the endocrinologists and ophthalmologists. Follow-up MRI demonstrated that there was no significant change in either size or signal characteristics of the pituitary fossa mass (Figure 1B). PMID:21975129

  20. Advances in the understanding of delayed cerebral ischaemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Liam; Andrews, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Delayed cerebral ischaemia has been described as the single most important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients who survive the initial aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. Our understanding of the pathophysiology of delayed cerebral ischaemia is meagre at best and the calcium channel blocker nimodipine remains the only intervention to consistently improve functional outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. There is substantial evidence to support cerebral vessel narrowing as a causative factor in delayed cerebral ischaemia, but contemporary research demonstrating improvements in vessel narrowing has failed to show improved functional outcomes. This has encouraged researchers to investigate other potential causes of delayed cerebral ischaemia, such as early brain injury, microthrombosis, and cortical spreading depolarisation. Adherence to a common definition of delayed cerebral ischaemia is needed in order to allow easier assessment of studies using multiple different terms. Furthermore, improved recognition of delayed cerebral ischaemia would not only allow for faster treatment but also better assessment of interventions. Finally, understanding nimodipine’s mechanism of action may allow us to develop similar agents with improved efficacy. PMID:26937276

  1. Coincidental cerebral venous thrombosis and subarachnoid haemorrhage related to ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Claudia; Baumgartner, Annette; Mader, Irina; Rijntjes, Michel; Meckel, Stephan

    2016-08-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) are rare cerebrovascular pathologies. Here, we report the extremely rare coincidental presentation of both entities and discuss the likely relationship in aetiology and their optimal management. A female patient presented with headache and progressive neurological deficits. Cranial computed tomography and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) revealed dural venous sinus thrombosis, left-sided frontal and parietal infarcts, and left middle and anterior cerebral artery stenosis. In addition, left hemispheric subarachnoid haemosiderosis was seen on MRI. Following standard anticoagulation therapy for CVT, she represented with acute SAH. Digital subtraction angiography revealed a ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm and left middle cerebral artery/anterior cerebral artery vasospasms that were responsive to intra-arterial nimodipine. The latter were already present on the previous MRI, and had most likely prevented the detection of the aneurysm initially. The aneurysm was successfully coil embolised, and the patient improved clinically. Despite this case being an extremely rare coincidence, a ruptured aneurysm should be excluded in the presence of CVT and non-sulcal SAH. A careful consideration of treatment of both pathologies is required, since anticoagulation may have a potentially negative impact on aneurysmal bleeding. PMID:27188326

  2. Polymorphisms of apolipoprotein E and aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Arati, S; Sibin, M K; Bhat, Dhananjaya I; Narasingarao, K V L; Chetan, G K

    2016-09-01

    Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is characterised by bleeding in the subarachnoid space in the brain. There are various polymorphisms in genes which are associated with this disease. We performed a systematic meta- analysis to investigate the relationship of APOE polymorphism on aSAH. A comprehensive literature search was done in the Pubmed database, Science Direct, Cochrane library and Google Scholar. The OR and 95% CI were evaluated for the gene and aSAH association using fixed and random effect models. Publication bias was assessed using Begg's funnel plot and Egger's regression test. All statistical evaluations were done using the software Review Manager 5.0 and Comprehensive Meta Analysis v2.2.023. A total of 9 studies were assessed on APOE polymorphism (1100 Cases, 2732 Control). Meta analysis results showed significant association in ε2/ ε2 versus ε3/ε3, ε2 versus ε3 genetic models and ε2 allele frequency. In subgroup analysis statistically significant association was observed in Asians in the genetic models ε2/ ε2 versus ε3/ε3, ε2/ε3 versus ε3/ε3, ε2 versus ε3 and also in ε2 allele frequency. However, in Caucasian population only ε2/ε2 versus ε3/ε3 genetic model showed significant association between APOE and risk of aSAH. In this meta-analysis study, the ε2/ε2 genotype is associated with increased risk of aSAH. PMID:27408823

  3. Haemorrhagic complications of peripartum anticoagulation: A retrospective chart review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Erica HZ; Marnoch, Catherine A; Khurana, Rshmi; Sia, Winnie

    2014-01-01

    Background Women with venous thromboembolism (VTE), thrombophilias or mechanical heart valves may require anticoagulation during pregnancy and postpartum. The incidence of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) in the literature is 2.9–6%, but the rate while on anticoagulation is not well documented. Aims To determine the incidence of haemorrhagic complications associated with the use of peripartum anticoagulation, and the types and risk factors for haemorrhagic complications. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted on women who delivered at an academic teaching hospital and received peripartum anticoagulation between January 2000 and August 2009. Women with known bleeding disorders were excluded. Results In total, 195 cases were identified with mean age 31.3 years and gestational age of 37.7 weeks. Of these, 49% had a history of VTE, 21% had active VTE in the index pregnancy, and 63% had vaginal delivery. Types of anticoagulation used antepartum were unfractionated heparin (UFH) (43%) and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) (36%), with 26% receiving therapeutic doses. The rate of haemorrhagic complications was 12.8%, with majority being PPH (80%). Sixty percent of the PPH occurred before reintroduction of anticoagulation postpartum. Use of therapeutic UFH antepartum was associated with increased risk of haemorrhagic complications compared to LMWH (OR 3.08, 95% CI 0.663 – 15.03, p = 0.183). Conclusion The rate of haemorrhagic complications is higher in women on peripartum anticoagulation compared with published incidence in unselected obstetric populations; however, this rate is similar to our institution’s reported rates. Our findings inform clinicians about competing risks of thrombotic and haemorrhagic complications in this population.

  4. Haemorrhagic complications of pancreatitis: presentation, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed Central

    Ammori, B. J.; Madan, M.; Alexander, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Massive haemorrhage is an uncommon complication in pancreatitis. Most affected patients suffer from chronic disease with associated pseudocyst. We present five patients (four male) with a mean age of 41 years (range 34-48 years). All patients had alcohol-induced pancreatitis complicated either by haematemesis (3), intraperitoneal haemorrhage (1) or both haematemesis and intraperitoneal haemorrhage (1). Source of bleeding was pseudocyst wall (2), splenic artery pseudoaneurysm (2) and splenic artery rupture (1). Distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy was performed in two patients, intracystic ligation and drainage in two, and packing with subsequent external drainage in one. Rebleeding occurred in two patients and required subsequent distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy in one; the other patient died of splenic rupture. No rebleeding and no mortality occurred after resection. Primary pancreatic resection is recommended whenever possible. Other management options include embolisation and ligation. Images Figure 1 PMID:9849330

  5. Subarachnoid haemorrhage from the rupture of two intracranial aneurysms in the same day: a rare occurrence, not a myth.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Jerome Laval Cyril; Major, Otto

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of intracranial aneurysms is approximately 6% throughout the world, although it can be more prevalent in some populations than others. Subarachnoid haemorrhage from a single aneurysm rupture can be devastating, with approximately 35% of patients not regaining consciousness after the initial bleed. In some cases, patients will have two or more aneurysms at presentation, and only one of them will have bled. Having two or more aneurysms that have bled within a few minutes or few hours of one another, is almost unheard of. Our case report is based on a patient who presented with subarachnoid haemorrhage from two ruptured aneurysms, confirmed intraoperatively and corroborated by the available, preoperative, standard head CT scan, which can be performed in any hospital with CT scanning facilities, and CT angiogram. PMID:26884073

  6. A single subcutaneous bolus of erythropoietin normalizes cerebral blood flow autoregulation after subarachnoid haemorrhage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Springborg, Jacob Bertram; Ma, XiaoDong; Rochat, Per; Knudsen, Gitte Moos; Amtorp, Ole; Paulson, Olaf B; Juhler, Marianne; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2002-01-01

    Systemic administration of recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) has been demonstrated to mediate neuroprotection. This effect of EPO may in part rely on a beneficial effect on cerebrovascular dysfunction leading to ischaemic neuronal damage. We investigated the in vivo effects of subcutaneously administered recombinant EPO on impaired cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation after experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH).Four groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: group A, sham operation plus vehicle; group B, sham operation plus EPO; group C, SAH plus vehicle; group D, SAH plus EPO. SAH was induced by injection of 0.07 ml of autologous blood into the cisterna magna. EPO (400 iu kg−1 s.c.) or vehicle was given immediately after the subarachnoid injection of blood or saline. Forty-eight hours after the induction of SAH, CBF autoregulatory function was evaluated using the intracarotid 133Xe method.CBF autoregulation was preserved in both sham-operated groups (lower limits of mean arterial blood pressure: 91±3 and 98±3 mmHg in groups A and B, respectively). In the vehicle treated SAH-group, autoregulation was abolished and the relationship between CBF and blood pressure was best described by a single linear regression line. A subcutaneous injection of EPO given immediately after the induction of SAH normalized autoregulation of CBF (lower limit in group D: 93±4 mmHg, NS compared with groups A and B).Early activation of endothelial EPO receptors may represent a potential therapeutic strategy in the treatment of cerebrovascular perturbations after SAH. PMID:11834631

  7. Recurrent non-aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage in Takayasu arteritis: is the cause immunological or mechanical?

    PubMed Central

    Shuaib, Umar Ashfaq; Kate, Mahesh; Homik, Joanne; Jerrakathil, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is rarely associated with Takayasu's arteritis (TA). The present report describes a 21-year-old woman with recurrent SAH and TA. In addition, she also had recurrent spells of postural weakness in the bilateral lower limb occurring at the same time. Sequential CT of the head and MRI showed bilateral cortical SAH. Vascular imaging with MR angiogram and CT angiogram showed bilateral subclavian arteries and left common carotid artery occlusion with multiple hypertrophied collaterals vessels in the neck. There was no evidence of aneurysms in the intracranial vasculature in the conventional angiogram. The CT angiogram of the aorta showed severe stenosis of the abdominal aorta above the renal arteries. The patient was treated with immunomodulatory therapy and had a favourable outcome without further recurrence at end of 1 year of follow-up. A review of the literature showed 21cases with aneurysmal SAH and three cases non-aneurysmal SAH in patients with TA have been reported. Various factors are responsible for the reorganisation of the intracranial of the arteries in patients with chronic vasculitis in the presence of extracranial stenosis and occlusion, which could possibly explain the SAH in absence of aneurysm in patients with TA. PMID:23771963

  8. Incidence of subarachnoid haemorrhage: a systematic review with emphasis on region, age, gender and time trends

    PubMed Central

    de Rooij, N K; Linn, F H H; van der Plas, J A; Algra, A; Rinkel, G J E

    2007-01-01

    Background and aim To update our 1996 review on the incidence of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and assess the relation of incidence with region, age, gender and time period. Methods We searched for studies on the incidence of SAH published until October 2005. The overall incidences with corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated. We determined the relationship between the incidence of SAH and determinants by means of univariate Poisson regression. Results We included 51 studies (33 new), describing 58 study populations in 21 countries, observing 45 821 896 person‐years. Incidences per 100 000 person‐years were 22.7 (95% CI 21.9 to 23.5) in Japan, 19.7 (18.1 to 21.3) in Finland, 4.2 (3.1 to 5.7) in South and Central America, and 9.1 (8.8 to 9.5) in the other regions. With age category 45–55 years as the reference, incidence ratios increased from 0.10 (0.08 to 0.14) for age groups younger than 25 years to 1.61 (1.24 to 2.07) for age groups older than 85 years. The incidence in women was 1.24 (1.09 to 1.42) times higher than in men; this gender difference started at age 55 years and increased thereafter. Between 1950 and 2005, the incidence decreased by 0.6% (1.3% decrease to 0.1% increase) per year. Conclusions The overall incidence of SAH is approximately 9 per 100 000 person‐years. Rates are higher in Japan and Finland and increase with age. The preponderance of women starts only in the sixth decade. The decline in incidence of SAH over the past 45 years is relatively moderate compared with that for stroke in general. PMID:17470467

  9. Simple and validated UHPLC-MS/MS analysis of nimodipine in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Susan; Riva, Roberto; Contin, Manuela

    2016-08-15

    We present a simple, fast and validated method for the determination of nimodipine in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage using ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). Plasma or CSF 250μL aliquots were pretreated with acetonitrile spiked with lacosamide as internal standard. The chromatographic separation was performed on a Fusion (3μm) 50×2.0mm I.D. column with gradient elution of 0.1% (v/v) formic acid in water and 0.1% (v/v) formic acid in acetonitrile at a flow rate of 0.35mL/min. The MS/MS ion transitions were 419.1→343 for nimodipine and 251.1→91 for the internal standard. The linearity was determined from 2.0 to 40.0ng/mL in plasma and 40.0-800.0pg/mL in CSF. The lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) of nimodipine was 0.4ng/mL in plasma and 40pg/mL in CSF. The mean recovery for nimodipine was ≥75% in plasma and ≥90% in CSF at all three considered concentrations. Intra- and interassay precision and accuracy were ≤15% at all quality control concentrations in plasma and CSF. The method was applied to measure plasma and CSF concentrations of nimodipine in a series of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage treated with intravenous nimodipine. The present procedure, omitting time-consuming liquid-liquid extraction and drying steps, is faster, simpler and cheaper than published LC-MS/MS analytical methods for nimodipine in plasma and the first validated one for nimodipine in CSF. PMID:27327399

  10. Finding out if "The 'me' will shut down": successful cognitive-behavioural therapy of seizure-related panic symptoms following subarachnoid haemorrhage: a single case report.

    PubMed

    Gracey, Fergus; Oldham, Paul; Kritzinger, Rudi

    2007-01-01

    Successful cognitive and behavioural therapies for anxiety disorders in separate cases of acquired brain injury and seizure disorder have been reported although evidence of efficacy is limited. This paper describes the presentation and cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) of seizure-related panic symptoms in the context of subarachnoid haemorrhage and cavernoma. Multidisciplinary clinical assessment was conducted and 12 sessions of CBT according to the model of Clark (1986) were delivered. Outcome was measured in terms of goal attainment, belief ratings of target cognitions and completion of standardised questionnaire measures pre and post-treatment. Process was measured through client's ratings of anxiety-related beliefs through treatment. The client attained all goals, eliminated avoidance and other unhelpful coping behaviour, and rated reduced levels of anxiety on a standardised measure. Changes in identified target cognitions were also evident. It is concluded that a cognitive-behavioural approach may be helpful in understanding and treating anxiety disorders where symptom presentation is complicated by neurological problems. Further investigation of the relationship between development of anxiety disorders, occurrence of neurological events, and processes of CBT following acquired brain injury is suggested. PMID:17178607

  11. Prediction of two month modified Rankin Scale with an ordinal prediction model in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH) is a devastating event with a frequently disabling outcome. Our aim was to develop a prognostic model to predict an ordinal clinical outcome at two months in patients with aSAH. Methods We studied patients enrolled in the International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT), a randomized multicentre trial to compare coiling and clipping in aSAH patients. Several models were explored to estimate a patient's outcome according to the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at two months after aSAH. Our final model was validated internally with bootstrapping techniques. Results The study population comprised of 2,128 patients of whom 159 patients died within 2 months (8%). Multivariable proportional odds analysis identified World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) grade as the most important predictor, followed by age, sex, lumen size of the aneurysm, Fisher grade, vasospasm on angiography, and treatment modality. The model discriminated moderately between those with poor and good mRS scores (c statistic = 0.65), with minor optimism according to bootstrap re-sampling (optimism corrected c statistic = 0.64). Conclusion We presented a calibrated and internally validated ordinal prognostic model to predict two month mRS in aSAH patients who survived the early stage up till a treatment decision. Although generalizability of the model is limited due to the selected population in which it was developed, this model could eventually be used to support clinical decision making after external validation. Trial Registration International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial, Number ISRCTN49866681 PMID:20920243

  12. Serum concentration of adhesion molecules in patients with delayed ischaemic neurological deficit after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: the immunoglobulin and selectin superfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, J; Mantle, D; Gregson, B; Mendelow, A

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Adhesion molecules are involved in the pathogenesis of cerebral ischaemia and may play a part in the pathophysiology of delayed ischaemic neurological deficit (DIND) after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. It was hypothesised that after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage, adhesion molecules may play a part in the pathophysiology of DIND as reflected by significantly altered serum concentrations in patients with and without DIND.
METHODS—In a prospective study, mean serum concentrations of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, PECAM, and E, P, and L-selectin were compared between patients without (n=23) and with (n=13) DIND in patients with World Federation of Neurological Surgeons (WFNS) grades 1 or 2subarachnoid haemorrhage. Serum was sampled from patients within 2 days of haemorrhage and on alternate days until discharge. Concentrations of adhesion molecules were measured by standard procedures using commercially available enzyme linked immunoabsorbent assays.
RESULTS—There were non-significant differences in serum concentrations of ICAM-1 (290.8 ng/ml v 238.4 ng/ml, p=0.0525), VCAM-1 (553.2ng/ml v 425.8 ng/ml, p=0.053), and PECAM (22.0 ng/ml v 21.0 ng/ml, p=0.56) between patients without and with DIND respectively. The E-selectin concentration between the two patient groups (44.0ng/ml v 37.4 ng/ml, p=0.33) was similar. The P-selectin concentration, however, was significantly higher in patients with DIND compared with those patients without DIND (149.5 ng/ml v 112.9 ng/ml, p=0.039). By contrast, serum L-selectin concentrations were significantly lower in patients with DIND (633.8 ng/ml v 897.9 ng/ml, p=0.013).
CONCLUSIONS—Of all the adhesion molecules examined in this study, P and L-selectin are involved in the pathophysiology of DIND after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage.

 PMID:11511705

  13. Topiramate attenuates early brain injury following subarachnoid haemorrhage in rats via duplex protection against inflammation and neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yong; Guo, Song-Xue; Li, Jian-Ru; Du, Hang-Gen; Wang, Chao-Hui; Zhang, Jian-Min; Wu, Qun

    2015-10-01

    Early brain injury (EBI) following aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) insults contributes to the poor prognosis and high mortality observed in SAH patients. Topiramate (TPM) is a novel, broad-spectrum, antiepileptic drug with a reported protective effect against several brain injuries. The current study aimed to investigate the potential of TPM for neuroprotection against EBI after SAH and the possible dose-dependency of this effect. An endovascular perforation SAH model was established in rats, and TPM was administered by intraperitoneal injection after surgery at three different doses (20mg/kg, 40mg/kg, and 80mg/kg). The animals' neurological scores and brain water content were evaluated, and ELISA, Western blotting and immunostaining assays were conducted to assess the effect of TPM. The results revealed that TPM lowers the elevated levels of myeloperoxidase and proinflammatory mediators observed after SAH in a dose-related fashion, and the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signalling pathway is the target of neuroinflammation regulation. In addition, TPM ameliorated SAH-induced cortical neuronal apoptosis by influencing Bax, Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-3 protein expression, and the effect of TPM was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner. Various dosages of TPM also upregulated the protein expression of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic signalling molecules, GABAA receptor (GABAAR) α1, GABAAR γ2, and K(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter 2 (KCC2) together and downregulated Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter 1 (NKCC1) expression. Thus, TPM may be an effective neuroprotectant in EBI after SAH by regulating neuroinflammation and neuronal cell death. PMID:26086367

  14. Improvement in patient outcomes following endovascular treatment of WFNS grade V subarachnoid haemorrhage from 2000 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Inamasu, Joji; Sadato, Akiyo; Oheda, Motoki; Hayakawa, Motoharu; Nakae, Shunsuke; Ohmi, Tatsuo; Adachi, Kazuhide; Nakahara, Ichiro; Hirose, Yuichi

    2016-05-01

    Patient outcomes following grade V subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) have been dismal, although they may have improved following recent technological advances in endovascular treatment (EVT). A single-centre, retrospective study was conducted to evaluate whether outcomes have improved from 2000 to 2014 for patients with World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) grade V SAH. Coiling has been the preferred first-line treatment for grade V SAH patients in our institution since 2000. Patients who underwent EVT (n=115) were grouped on the basis of their hospital admission year: 2000-2004 (n=44), 2005-2009 (n=37) and 2010-2014 (n=34). Patient demographics, outcomes and in-hospital mortality rates were compared between the groups. Patient outcomes at discharge were evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS), with GOS scores of 4-5 defined as favourable outcomes. There were no significant intergroup differences in patient demographics. In addition, there were no significant differences in the frequencies of favourable outcomes (14% in 2000-2004, 16% in 2005-2009 and 26% in 2010-2014). Mortality rates were 52% in 2000-2004, 43% in 2005-2009 and 24% in 2010-2014, with a significantly lower mortality rate in 2010-2014 than in 2000-2004 (p=0.01). Both perioperative rebleeding and delayed cerebral ischaemia decreased over time; however, multivariate regression analysis showed that the former contributed more to the decrease in mortality. Age was the only variable associated with favourable outcomes. The results of this study indicate that EVT is an appropriate therapeutic option for grade V SAH patients. However, multi-centre, prospective trials are required to provide evidence-based verification of the efficacy of EVT. PMID:26778358

  15. Soluble Toll-Like Receptors 2 and 4 in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Acute Hydrocephalus following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Sokół, Bartosz; Jankowski, Roman; Hołysz, Marcin; Więckowska, Barbara; Jagodziński, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    Background Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling begins early in subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), and plays a key role in inflammation following cerebral aneurysm rupture. Available studies suggest significance of endogenous first-line blockers of a TLR pathway—soluble TLR2 and 4. Methods Eighteen patients with SAH and acute hydrocephalus underwent endovascular coiling and ventriculostomy; sTLR2 and 4 levels were assayed in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collected on post-SAH days 0–3, 5, and 10–12. Release kinetics were defined. CSF levels of sTLR2 and 4 were compared with a control group and correlated with the clinical status on admission, the findings on imaging, the degree of systemic inflammation and the outcome following treatment. Results None of study group showed detectable levels of sTLR2 and 4 on post-SAH day 0–3. 13 patients showed increased levels in subsequent samples. In five SAH patients sTLR2 and 4 levels remained undetectable; no distinctive features of this group were found. On post-SAH day 5 the strongest correlation was found between sTLR2 level and haemoglobin level on admission (cc = -0.498, P = 0.037). On post-SAH day 10–12 the strongest correlation was revealed between sTLR2 and treatment outcome (cc = -0.501, P = 0.076). Remaining correlations with treatment outcome, status at admission, imaging findings and inflammatory markers on post-SAH day 5 and 10–12 were negligible or low (-0.5 ≤ cc ≤ 0.5). Conclusions In the majority of cases, rupture of a cerebral aneurysm leads to delayed release of soluble TLR forms into CSF. sTLR2 and 4 seem to have minor role in human post-SAH inflammation due to delayed release kinetics and low levels of these protein. PMID:27223696

  16. Reversible Akinetic Mutism after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage in the Territory of the Anterior Cerebral Artery without Permanent Ischaemic Damage to Anterior Cingulate Gyri

    PubMed Central

    Sibille, François-Xavier; Duprez, Thierry; van Pesch, Vincent; Giglioli, Simone

    2016-01-01

    We report on two cases of transient akinetic mutism after massive subarachnoid haemorrhage due to the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA). In the two cases, vasospasm could not be demonstrated by imaging studies throughout the clinical course. Both patients shared common radiological features: a hydrocephalus due to haemorrhagic contamination of the ventricular system and a mass effect of a subpial hematoma on the borders of the corpus callosum. Patients were also investigated using auditory event-related evoked potentials at acute stage. In contrast to previous observations of akinetic mutism, P300 wave could not be recorded. Both patients had good recovery and we hypothesized that this unexpectedly favourable outcome was due to the absence of permanent structural damage to the ACA territory, with only transient dysfunction due to a reversible mass effect on cingulate gyri. PMID:27418987

  17. Extensive haemorrhagic necrosis of liver is an unpredictable fatal complication in dengue infection: a postmortem study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue infection carries a potential risk of death despite stringent management of plasma leak and haemorrhage. It appears that the extent of liver dysfunction determines the outcome. Methods We present a postmortem study of five patients, died of dengue shock syndrome who had markedly elevated liver enzymes and irreparable circulatory failure. Results All were females with a median age of 46 years (range 20–50 years). All had positive NS1 and IgM. Clinically, one patient developed severe degree of hepatic encephalopathy whilst three patients developed uncontrollable bleeding manifestations. Dengue virus was detected in three liver specimens by reverse transcription PCR. Histology of the liver revealed massive necrosis with haemorrhages in these patients with evidence of micro and macrovesicular steatosis with significant periportal inflammatory infiltrate. No significant ischaemic changes or necrosis was observed in the other organs. Conclusions Severe haemorrhagic necrosis of the liver was the cause of death in these patients probably due to direct viral infection. Predilection for severe liver disease remains unknown. Therefore, it is prudent to think beyond plasma leak as the main pathology of dengue infection and attempts should be made to develop other treatment modalities to prevent and manage unforeseen fatal complications of dengue infection. PMID:24628767

  18. Complications and pregnancy outcome following uterine compression suture for postpartum haemorrhage: a single centre experience.

    PubMed

    Liu, S; Mathur, M; Tagore, S

    2014-07-01

    In the treatment of postpartum haemorrhage from uterine atony, uterine compression sutures, such as the B-Lynch suture and its modifications have a role with the advantage of preservation of the uterus for fertility. There is however, a risk that apposition of the anterior and posterior walls of the uterus will impede drainage of lochia, resulting in undesirable complications. We undertook a five-year retrospective study of all women who underwent uterine compression sutures at the KK Women's and Children's Hospital, between 2008 and 2012. In total, 23 women had uterine compression sutures during the study period, of which, nineteen women managed to conserve their uterus. Our complication rate was 25%, which included persistent vaginal discharge, pyometra and endometritis. There were three conceptions, with two successful pregnancies. Our study shows uterine compression suture to be a safe and effective alternative to avoid hysterectomy with preservation of fertility at the time of major postpartum haemorrhage. The outcome of subsequent pregnancies is reassuring. PMID:24678816

  19. Systemic lupus erythematosus complicated by diffuse alveolar haemorrhage: risk factors, therapy and survival

    PubMed Central

    Kazzaz, Nayef M; Coit, Patrick; Lewis, Emily E; McCune, W Joseph; Sawalha, Amr H; Knight, Jason S

    2015-01-01

    Objectives While diffuse alveolar haemorrhage (DAH) is recognised as a life-threatening complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), little is known about its risk factors and response to treatment. We describe 22 cases of DAH in a US lupus cohort of approximately 1000 patients, and compare them to 66 controls from the same outpatient cohort. Methods We captured variables pertaining to diagnoses of SLE and secondary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), and analysed them by univariate testing. Those variables with p values <0.05 were then further considered in a multivariate model. Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed for each group, and survival was analysed by Log-rank test. Results Of the 22 patients with DAH, 59% were diagnosed with DAH within 5 years of lupus diagnosis. By univariate testing, several manifestations of SLE and APS were more common in patients with DAH, including history of thrombocytopenia, cardiac valve disease, low C3, leucopenia, neuropsychiatric features, haemolysis, arterial thrombosis, lupus anticoagulant, secondary APS and low C4. On multivariate analysis, history of thrombocytopenia and low C3 were maintained as independent risk factors. Importantly, only two patients had platelet counts <50 000/µL at the time of the DAH episode, arguing that DAH was not simply a haemorrhagic complication of thrombocytopenia. All patients were treated with increased immunosuppression, including various combinations of corticosteroids, plasmapheresis, cyclophosphamide, rituximab and mycophenolate mofetil. Notably, all patients in the cohort survived their initial episode of DAH. While the patients with DAH did well in the short-term, their long-term survival was significantly worse than controls. Several of the deaths were attributable to thrombotic complications after recovering from DAH. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest case–control study of lupus DAH to date. History of thrombocytopenia was strongly predictive of

  20. Tonic-Clonic Activity at Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Onset: Impact on Complications and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    De Marchis, Gian Marco; Pugin, Deborah; Lantigua, Hector; Zammit, Christopher; Tadi, Prasanna; Schmidt, J. Michael; Falo, M. Cristina; Agarwal, Sachin; Mayer, Stephan A.; Claassen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Objective Tonic-clonic activity (TCA) at onset complicates 3% to 21% of cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The impact of onset TCA on in-hospital complications, including seizures, remains unclear. One study associated onset TCA with poor clinical outcome at 6 weeks after SAH, but to our knowledge no other studies have confirmed this relationship. This study aims to assess the impact of onset TCA on in-hospital complications, poor functional outcome, mortality, and epilepsy at 3 months. Methods Analysis of a prospective study cohort of 1479 SAH patients admitted to Columbia University Medical Center between 1996 and 2012. TCA within 6 hours of hemorrhage onset was identified based on accounts of emergency care providers or family witnesses. Results TCA at onset was described in 170 patients (11%). Patients with onset TCA were younger (P = 0.002), presented more often with poor clinical grade (55% vs. 26%, P<0.001) and had larger amounts of cisternal, intraventricular, and intracerebral blood than those without onset TCA (all, P<0.001). After adjusting for known confounders, onset TCA was significantly associated with in-hospital seizures (OR 3.80, 95%-CI: 2.43–5.96, P<0.001), in-hospital pneumonia (OR 1.56, 95%-CI: 1.06–2.31, p = 0.02), and delayed cerebral ischemia (OR 1.77, 95%-CI: 1.21–2.58, P = 0.003). At 3 months, however, onset TCA was not associated with poor functional outcome, mortality, and epilepsy after adjusting for age, admission clinical grade, and cisternal blood volume. Conclusions Onset TCA is not a rare event as it complicates 11% of cases of SAH. New and clinically relevant findings are the association of onset TCA with in-hospital seizures, pneumonia and delayed cerebral ischemia. Despite the increased risk of in-hospital complications, onset TCA is not associated with disability, mortality, and epilepsy at 3 months. PMID:23951155

  1. Temporary alopecia after subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Nannapaneni, R; Behari, S; Mendelow, D; Gholkar, A

    2007-02-01

    Primary endovascular intervention is increasingly the first choice of treatment for cerebral aneurysms, particularly for those with complex anatomy in the posterior circulation. However, their clinical management and follow-up continue to be predominantly in the hands of neurosurgeons. In this report, the development of alopecia following the coiling of posterior circulation aneurysms is described. The alopecia was transient and lasted for approximately 6 months, and occurred in the occipital and suboccipital regions of the scalp. This report aims to highlight this condition, which has not been previously reported in the neurosurgical literature. The potential hazards of irradiation should be borne in mind while carrying out complex endovascular procedures. The patient should be counselled and all necessary steps undertaken to limit radiation exposure. PMID:17107802

  2. Pregnancy complicated by haemorrhagic ascites in a woman with newly diagnosed HIV.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Catrin; Nicholls, Kate; Gangat, Nusraat; Sansome, Stafford

    2016-01-01

    A young pregnant Zambian woman was referred from a district hospital in South Zambia to the university teaching hospital, Lusaka with severe anaemia and ascites. The ascites had developed over a month and the woman was currently 15 weeks pregnant. Further workup revealed that the patient was HIV-positive and the ascitic tap showed haemorrhagic fluid. After being reviewed by multiple doctors, the cause of the haemorrhagic ascites remained unclear; therefore, the decision was made to do a laparotomy. The laparotomy revealed haemoperitoneum and a large cyst attached to the liver containing 5 L of bloodstained fluid. The histopathology report revealed features consistent with a giant haemangioma. There were many barriers to accessing optimum healthcare in this case. These included limited access to blood, poor communication resulting in the patient being unaware of her HIV status and lack of patient education about HIV. PMID:27473033

  3. [Subarachnoid hemorrhage complicated with different manifestations of transient abnormal left ventricular wall motion: two case reports].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Fumitaka; Tsuzuki, Takashi; Thoma, Yoshiki; Shiono, Shigeru; Tabuse, Hisayuki; Hoshida, Thoru; Saito, Yoshihiko

    2006-05-01

    Two patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage presented with transient abnormal left ventricular wall motion. Case 1 was a 56-year-old man. Electrocardiography showed ST segment elevation in leads I, II, II, aVL, aVF, V3-V6. Echocardiography showed localized left ventricular hypokinesis around the apical area (takotsubo-like cardiomyopathy). Ejection fraction was 20% (1st hospital day). Troponin T was positive. Case 2 was a 48-year-old woman. Electrocardiography showed ST segment elevation in leads I, aVL, V2-V6 and ST segment depression in leads II, III, aVF, V1. Echocardiography showed diffuse left ventricular hypokinesis. Ejection fraction was 21% (1st hospital day). Troponin T was positive. These two patients had no history of cardiac disease, and coronary angiography showed no stenosis or obstruction. Catecholamine was given for 1 day(Case 1) and for about 2 weeks (Case 2). Pimobendane was given to Case 2. Ejection fraction was 57% in Case 1 (2nd hospital day) and 33% (6th hospital day), 43% (7th hospital day)and 58% (16th hospital day)in Case 2. The recovery period of left ventricular abnormal wall motion and the medication period were longer in Case 2 showing diffuse hypokinesis than in Case 1 showing takotsubo-like cardiomyopathy. PMID:16764331

  4. Mouse genetic background is associated with variation in secondary complications after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    D'Abbondanza, Josephine A; Lass, Elliot; Ai, Jinglu; Loch Macdonald, R

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a form of hemorrhagic stroke that accounts for approximately 7 % of all strokes worldwide and is associated with mortality in approximately 35 % of cases and morbidity in many of the survivors. Studies have suggested that genetic variations may affect the pathophysiology of SAH. The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of mouse genetic background on brain injury and large artery vasospasm after SAH. SAH was induced in seven inbred strains of mice, and the degree of large artery vasospasm and brain injury was assessed. After 48 h, SAH mice showed a significant reduction in middle cerebral artery diameter and increased neuronal injury in the cerebral cortex compared with sham-operated controls. Mouse strains also demonstrated variable degrees of vasospasm and brain injury. This data suggests that different genetic factors influence how much brain injury and vasospasm occur after SAH. Future investigations may provide insight into the causes of these differences between strains and into which genetic contributors may be responsible for vasospasm and brain injury after SAH. PMID:25366595

  5. Intracranial haemorrhage in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Fairhall, Jacob M; Stoodley, Marcus A

    2009-01-01

    Intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) is a rare, yet potentially devastating event in pregnancy. There is a risk of maternal mortality or morbidity and a significant risk to the unborn child. The risk of haemorrhage increases during the third trimester and is greatest during parturition and the puerperium. ICH can be extradural, subdural, subarachnoid or intraparenchymal. Causes of bleeding include trauma, arteriovenous malformations, aneurysms, preeclampsia/eclampsia and venous thrombosis. Urgent neurosurgical conditions generally outweigh obstetric considerations in management decisions, although anaesthetic and surgical modifications can be made to minimize adverse effects to the fetus.

  6. Transvaginal Oocyte Retrieval Complicated by Life-Threatening Obturator Artery Haemorrhage and Managed by a Vessel-Preserving Technique.

    PubMed Central

    Bolster, Ferdia; Mocanu, Edgar; Geoghegan, Tony; Lawler, Leo

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 36-year-old woman with secondary infertility who underwent routine transvaginal oocyte retrieval as part of IVF treatment. Four days following the procedure she presented with life threatening haemorrhagic shock. She underwent surgical laparotomy followed by CT and selective angiography, which demonstrated haemorrhage from a pseudoaneurysm of the obturator artery. The haemorrhage was successfully managed endovascularly with a vessel preserving covered stent. PMID:25484463

  7. Postpartum Pyomyoma, a Rare Complication of Sepsis Associated with Chorioamnionitis and Massive Postpartum Haemorrhage Treated with an Intrauterine Balloon

    PubMed Central

    Kaler, Mandeep; Gailer, Ruth; Iskaros, Joseph; David, Anna L.

    2015-01-01

    We report the successful treatment of a postpartum pyomyoma, a rare but serious complication of uterine leiomyomata in a 28-year-old primigravida. The patient was treated for an Escherichia Coli (E. Coli) urinary tract infection (UTI) at 16 weeks of gestation. She had asymptomatic short cervical length on ultrasound scan at 20 weeks that was managed conservatively due to the presence of further UTI and received antibiotics. She was known to have a left sided intramural leiomyoma. She presented with abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding at 23+1 weeks of gestation and the next day she had spontaneous vaginal delivery and collapsed with E. Coli septic shock, massive postpartum haemorrhage, and disseminated intravascular coagulation and was successfully treated with oxytocic drugs, a Rusch intrauterine balloon, and intravenous antibiotics. Eleven days postnatally she re-presented with systemic sepsis and was treated for retained products of conception. Sepsis persisted and investigations showed a postpartum pyomyoma that was initially managed with intravenous antibiotics to avoid surgery. Ultimately she required laparotomy, drainage of pyomyoma, and myomectomy. Postoperative recovery was good and the patient had a successful pregnancy two years later. PMID:26199774

  8. Neurogenic stress cardiomyopathy associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Pinnamaneni, Sowmya; Dutta, Tanya; Melcer, Joshua; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac manifestations are recognized complications of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Neurogenic stress cardiomyopathy is one complication that is seen in acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. It can present as transient diffuse left ventricular dysfunction or as transient regional wall motion abnormalities. It occurs more frequently with neurologically severe-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage and is associated with increased morbidity and poor clinical outcomes. Managing this subset of patients is challenging. Early identification followed by a multidisciplinary team approach can potentially improve outcomes. PMID:25606704

  9. Subarachnoid hemorrhage

    MedlinePlus

    ... injury leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage is motor vehicle crashes. Risks include: Aneurysm in other blood vessels Fibromuscular ... lumbar puncture ( spinal tap ) may be done. Other tests that may be done include: Cerebral angiography of ...

  10. Subarachnoid hemorrhage

    MedlinePlus

    ... malformation (AVM) Bleeding disorder Bleeding from a cerebral aneurysm Head injury Unknown cause (idiopathic) Use of blood ... subarachnoid hemorrhage is motor vehicle crashes. Risks include: Aneurysm in other blood vessels Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) and ...

  11. Subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by Aspergillus aneurysm as a complication of transcranial biopsy of an orbital apex lesion--case report.

    PubMed

    Okada, Y; Shima, T; Nishida, M; Yamane, K; Yoshida, A

    1998-07-01

    A 62-year-old male complaining of unilateral visual disturbance and pain in the involved eye had a small mass at the right orbital apex which was identified as an Aspergillus granuloma by transcranial biopsy. One month later, the patient became comatose because of fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a newly developed aneurysm. Autopsy showed a ruptured aneurysm on the right internal carotid-posterior communicating artery. Histological examination demonstrated prominent Aspergillus invasion of the arterial wall. Aspergillus infection must be taken into consideration in patients with orbital apex syndrome, which may lead to serious cerebrovascular consequences. If sino-orbital lesions are detected by neuroimaging techniques, biopsy using an extradural approach should be performed to obtain a definitive diagnosis. PMID:9745252

  12. Intracerebral haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Mendelow, A David; Hanley, Daniel F

    2011-01-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage is an important public health problem leading to high rates of death and disability in adults. Although the number of hospital admissions for intracerebral haemorrhage has increased worldwide in the past 10 years, mortality has not fallen. Results of clinical trials and observational studies suggest that coordinated primary and specialty care is associated with lower mortality than is typical community practice. Development of treatment goals for critical care, and new sequences of care and specialty practice can improve outcome after intracerebral haemorrhage. Specific treatment approaches include early diagnosis and haemostasis, aggressive management of blood pressure, open surgical and minimally invasive surgical techniques to remove clot, techniques to remove intraventricular blood, and management of intracranial pressure. These approaches improve clinical management of patients with intracerebral haemorrhage and promise to reduce mortality and increase functional survival. PMID:19427958

  13. Intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Mendelow, A David; Hanley, Daniel F

    2009-05-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage is an important public health problem leading to high rates of death and disability in adults. Although the number of hospital admissions for intracerebral haemorrhage has increased worldwide in the past 10 years, mortality has not fallen. Results of clinical trials and observational studies suggest that coordinated primary and specialty care is associated with lower mortality than is typical community practice. Development of treatment goals for critical care, and new sequences of care and specialty practice can improve outcome after intracerebral haemorrhage. Specific treatment approaches include early diagnosis and haemostasis, aggressive management of blood pressure, open surgical and minimally invasive surgical techniques to remove clot, techniques to remove intraventricular blood, and management of intracranial pressure. These approaches improve clinical management of patients with intracerebral haemorrhage and promise to reduce mortality and increase functional survival. PMID:19427958

  14. The dilemma of complicated shunt valves: How to identify patients with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus after aneurysmatic subarachnoid hemorrhage who will benefit from a simple valve?

    PubMed Central

    von der Brelie, Christian; Meier, Ullrich; Gräwe, Alexander; Lemcke, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sophisticated shunt valves provide the possibility of pressure adjustment and antisiphon control but have a higher probability of valve dysfunction especially in a posthemorrhagic setting. The aim of the present study is to analyze the clinical outcome of patients with shunt dependent posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus after aneurysmatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in order to identify patients who would benefit from a simple differential pressure valve. Methods: From 2000 to 2013, 547 patients with aneurysmatic SAH were treated at our institution, 114 underwent ventricular shunt placement (21.1%). 47 patients with available pre- and post-operative computed tomography scans, and an available follow-up of minimum 6 months were included. In order to measure the survival time which a nonprogrammable differential pressure valve would have had in an individual patient we defined the initial equalized shunt survival time (IESS). IESS is the time until surgical revisions of fixed differential pressure or flow-regulated valves for the treatment of over- or under-drainage as well as re-programming of adjustable valves due to over- or under-drainage. Results: Twenty patients were treated with fixed differential pressure valves, 15 patients were treated with flow-regulated valves, and 12 underwent ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt placement with differential pressure valves assisted by a gravitational unit. Patients who reacted with remarkable changes of the ventricular width after the insertion of external ventricular drainage (EVD), before shunt placement, showed a significantly longer IESS. Conclusions: Decline of the ventricular width after EVD placement was a predictor for successful VP shunt therapy in the later course of disease. Possibly, this could allow identifying patients who benefit from a simple differential pressure valve or a flow-regulated valve, and thus could possibly avoid valve-associated complications of a programmable valve in the later course of

  15. Unreported neurological complications of Gemella bergeriae infective endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Kosar; Abubaker, Jawed; Omar Al Deesi, Zulfa; Ahmed, Raees

    2014-01-01

    We report the first case of native aortic and mitral valve endocarditis due to Gemella bergeriae from the Middle East in a young patient with rheumatic heart disease. Our case illustrates a fulminant course of infection with G. bergeriae endocarditis that was complicated by embolic stroke, as well as intracerebral and subarachnoid haemorrhage secondary to rupture of a mycotic aneurysm in the right middle cerebral artery. This case highlights the dire, unreported neurological complications of infective endocarditis due to a rare causative organism—G. bergeriae. PMID:24899013

  16. Non-aneurysmal spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage: perimesencephalic versus non-perimesencephalic

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Luís Guilherme Bastos Silva Aguiar; Costa, José Manuel Dias; Silva, Elsa Irene Peixoto Azevedo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical evolution of perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage and non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage. Methods The study was conducted retrospectively in a tertiary hospital center in the north region of Portugal. Included patients had no identifiable cause for subarachnoid hemorrhage. Several epidemiologic, clinical and imaging aspects were statistically analyzed, taking into account the differences in perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage and non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage. Results Sixty-two patients met the inclusion criteria (46.8% - perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage; 53.2% - non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage). Demographic and clinical background characteristics were similar in both groups. Complications were more frequent in patients with non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage - 84.8% of the patients had at least one complication versus 48.3% in perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage. Vasospasm, infection and hydrocephaly were the most common complications (each was detected more frequently in the non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage group than in perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage group). Two patients died, both had a non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage. The median inpatient time was longer in the non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage group (21 versus 14 days). No incidents of rebleeding were reported during the follow-up period (mean time of 15 ± 10.3 months). Conclusion Perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage and non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage are two different entities that have different clinical outcomes, namely in terms of complication rate and median inpatient time. The management of these patients should respect this difference to improve treatment and optimize health care resources. PMID:27410409

  17. Amphetamine abuse and intracranial haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, N; McConachie, N S

    2000-01-01

    Amphetamines taken by any route can cause cerebral vasculitis and intracranial haemorrhage. 8 cases were seen in a neurosurgical unit over 3.5 years. The published work indicates that those who experience these complications, mainly young adults, have poor outcomes. PMID:11089483

  18. Giant malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with cauda equina syndrome and subarachnoid hemorrhage: Complications in a case of type 1 neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Patil, Tushar B; Singh, Maneesh Kumar; Lalla, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 neurofibromatosis (NF1), which mainly involves ectodermal tissue arising from the neural crest, can increase the risk of developing malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), soft tissue sarcomas and subarachnoid hemorrhage. We describe a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 who developed soft tissue sarcoma, MPNST, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. A 22-year-old male reported right focal seizures consequence to severe headache. He had a weakness in both legs, could walk only with the support of a stick for the last 3 months and suffered from constipation and intermittent urinary retention for the past 1 week. The patient had a history of swelling in the back of left thigh for which surgical resection was done 6 months back. Cutaneous examination revealed multiple nodules of varying sizes all over the body, along with many café-au-lait spots and Lisch nodule in iris. Patient had weakness in bilateral hip abduction, extension, knee flexion, extension and ankle dorsiflexion and plantiflexion. Bilateral ankle reflexes were absent while other deep tendon reflexes were sub-optimal. A noncontrast computed tomography brain indicated subarachnoid hemorrhage in left perisylvian region. Ultrasound of left thigh showed a hypoechoic solid lesion in the posterior aspect of left thigh in muscle plane. Histopathology of the lesion following resection showed features suggestive of a low-grade pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma. Histology of cutaneous nodules was consistent with neurofibroma. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine demonstrated a tumor arising from cauda equina. Histopathological examination of the tumor suggested high-grade MPNST. Unfortunately, the patient's MPNST was inoperable, and he received palliative radiotherapy for local control of the disease. The care of a patient with neurofibromatosis requires a comprehensive multisystem evaluation. MPNST occurs in 8-13% patients with neurofibromatosis. Early diagnosis and surgical resection are key

  19. The link between intracranial haemorrhage and cardiogenic shock: a case of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Caretta, Giorgio; Vizzardi, Enrico; Rovetta, Riccardo; Evaristi, Laura; Quinzani, Filippo; Raddino, Riccardo; Dei Cas, Livio

    2012-06-01

    Myocardial dysfunction occurs frequently during subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and it is often referred to as neurogenic stunned myocardium (NSM). Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC), which can lead to life-threatening acute heart failure, has been considered a possible complication of SAH. Actually, NSM and TTC are believed to share the same pathophysiological mechanisms and are likely a manifestation of the same disease. We report a case of a 64-year-old woman with SAH and cardiogenic shock due to acute left ventricular dysfunction. Echocardiography and ventriculography showed the typical pattern of TTC. Angiography excluded coronary artery disease or coronary spasm. Short-term inotropic support was necessary. Rapid recovery of left ventricular function was observed after 8 days. Acute myocardial dysfunction due to TTC in the setting of SAH may lead to cardiogenic shock which is difficult to treat. Patients with SAH and haemodynamic instability warrant a careful assessment of ventricular function on admission to rule out TTC PMID:22870749

  20. Significance of placental pathology in transplacental haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Banti; Jennison, R. F.; Langley, F. A.

    1968-01-01

    Placentae were examined from 120 women whose pregnancy and delivery was normal, from 264 women whose pregnancy or delivery was complicated, and from 98 women who were Rh-negative without antibodies and 35 women Rh-negative with antibodies. The presence of Kline's haemorrhages, intervillous thrombi, infarcts, and retroplacental haemorrhages was positively correlated with the presence of foetal cells in the maternal circulation. When there were no maternal antibodies transplacental haemorrhages occurred occasionally in the absence of such placental lesions but more frequently when these lesions were present. Moreover, the greater the number of lesions in a placenta the greater the size of the transplacental haemorrhage. In Rh-negative women with antibodies the observed incidence of transplacental haemorrhage was significantly less despite an appreciable increase in placental lesions. Images PMID:4972435

  1. Acute Methanol Poisoning: Prevalence and Predisposing Factors of Haemorrhagic and Non-Haemorrhagic Brain Lesions.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, Sergey; Kotikova, Katerina; Vaneckova, Manuela; Seidl, Zdenek; Nurieva, Olga; Navratil, Tomas; Caganova, Blazena; Pelclova, Daniela

    2016-08-01

    The purpose was to study the prevalence and predisposing factors of brain lesions in survivors of acute methanol poisoning. Clinical data on 106 patients with methanol poisoning were collected during the Czech mass poisoning outbreak. Of 83 survivors, in 46 (55%) patients, follow-up examinations including magnetic resonance imaging of brain (MR) were performed 3-8 and 24-28 months after discharge from the hospital. Of 46 patients with a median age of 49 (interquartile range, 35-57) years, 24 (52%) patients had a total of 40 abnormal brain findings with haemorrhagic lesions detected in 15 (33%) and non-haemorrhagic lesions found in 9 (19%) patients. The patients with haemorrhagic brain lesions were more acidemic (lower arterial blood pH, higher base deficit) and had higher glycaemia and lactacidaemia on admission than those without haemorrhages (all p < 0.05). Thirteen of 32 (41%) of patients with systemic anticoagulation and 2 of 14 (14%) of patients without it had haemorrhagic lesions (p = 0.080). Bleeding complications during the treatment occurred in 4 of 15 (27%) patients, and 5 of 15 (33%) patients had conditions predisposing to haemorrhage in the group with haemorrhagic lesions. In three cases with a series of computer tomography (CT)/MR performed during hospitalization, the necrotic lesions in the brain remained non-haemorrhagic during hospitalization and haemorrhagic lesions were detected on the follow-up MR examinations only. No association between brain haemorrhages and systemic anticoagulation during dialysis was found: brain haemorrhages might occur in severely poisoned patients treated without systemic anticoagulation, whereas treatment with high doses of heparin might not lead to brain haemorrhages. PMID:26806851

  2. Spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage: computed tomographic patterns in Accra.

    PubMed

    Obajimi, M O; Nyame, P K; Jumah, K B; Wiredu, E K

    2002-01-01

    The diagnosis of stroke and the ability to distinguish the subtypes is central in the management of patients. This CT study has confirmed an increased prevalence of stroke (CVA) among Ghanaians. It has also reaffirmed a relatively higher incidence (52.9%) of spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage over cerebral infarcts among the 1,172 stroke patients studied. The study points to a male preponderance and a mean age of 55.7 years. Parenchymal haemorrhage was found to be the commonest variety of these haemorrhages. It occurred in 83.6% of cases while primary subarachnoid haemorrhage was reported in only 8.1% of cases. Ventricular extension of the parenchymal haemorrhage was reported in 22.7% of cases. The latter were mostly unilateral and on the left side especially in the parietal lobe (70.9%), subdural haemorrhage like the parenchymal variety was also reported to be more on the left, mainly unilateral and acute. Haemorrhages in the cerebellum and pons which are normally difficult to diagnose were also outlined with ease in the CT images. Other CT findings in these patients include parilesional oedema and mass effect found in 87.10% and 77.4% respectively. PMID:12081348

  3. Spontaneously reported haemorrhagic adverse events associated with rivaroxaban and dabigatran in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Esa Y. H.; Diug, Basia; Bell, J. Simon; Mc Namara, Kevin P.; Dooley, Michael J.; Kirkpatrick, Carl M.; McNeil, John J.; Caughey, Gillian E.; Ilomäki, Jenni

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of our study was to describe spontaneously reported haemorrhagic adverse events associated with rivaroxaban and dabigatran in Australia. Methods: Data were sourced from the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) Database of Adverse Event Notifications between June 2009 and May 2014. Records of haemorrhagic adverse events in which rivaroxaban or dabigatran was considered as a potential cause were analysed. Results: There were 240 haemorrhagic adverse events associated with rivaroxaban and 504 associated with dabigatran. Age was specified for 164 (68%) haemorrhages associated with rivaroxaban, of which 101 occurred in people aged ⩾75 years. Age was specified for 437 (87%) haemorrhages associated with dabigatran, of which 300 occurred in people aged ⩾75 years. Time from treatment initiation to haemorrhage was specified for 122 (51%) haemorrhages associated with rivaroxaban, with 69 (57%) haemorrhages occurring within 30 days of rivaroxaban initiation. Time from treatment initiation to haemorrhage was specified for 253 (50%) haemorrhages associated with dabigatran, with 123 (49%) haemorrhages occurring within 30 days of dabigatran initiation. Gastrointestinal (GI) haemorrhages were the most frequent type of haemorrhages associated with both rivaroxaban (n = 105, 44%) and dabigatran (n = 302, 60%). Data were available on the severity of haemorrhage for 101 (42%) haemorrhages associated with rivaroxaban, with haemorrhage leading to death in 17 people. The severity of haemorrhage was specified for 384 (76%) haemorrhages associated with dabigatran, with haemorrhage leading to death in 61 people. Conclusions: Our study highlights the need for research on the haemorrhagic complications of anticoagulation in clinical care. A considerable proportion of reported haemorrhagic events occurred within 30 days of rivaroxaban and dabigatran initiation. This highlights the importance of considering bleeding risk at the time of treatment

  4. Epizootic Haemorrhagic Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epizootic haemorrhagic disease (EHD) is an infectious non contagious viral disease transmitted by insects of the genus Culicoides which affects wild and domestic ruminants. The causative agent, the epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV), belongs to the family Reoviridae, genus Orbivirus and sha...

  5. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: An Update.

    PubMed

    Dority, Jeremy S; Oldham, Jeffrey S

    2016-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a debilitating, although uncommon, type of stroke with high morbidity, mortality, and economic impact. Modern 30-day mortality is as high as 40%, and about 50% of survivors have permanent disability. Care at high-volume centers with dedicated neurointensive care units is recommended. Euvolemia, not hypervolemia, should be targeted, and the aneurysm should be secured early. Neither statin therapy nor magnesium infusions should be initiated for delayed cerebral ischemia. Cerebral vasospasm is just one component of delayed cerebral edema. Hyponatremia is common in subarachnoid hemorrhage and is associated with longer length of stay, but not increased mortality. PMID:27521199

  6. Subarachnoid hemorrhage then thrombosis of posterior inferior cerebellar artery dissection: is early surgical exploration warranted?

    PubMed

    Alexiades, Nikita G; Ellis, Jason A; Meyers, Philip M; Connolly, E Sander

    2016-06-01

    The natural history of spontaneous cerebral artery dissection and thrombosis remains uncertain. Concurrent subarachnoid hemorrhage further complicates the therapeutic approach. Thus the best strategy for managing patients with acute vessel thrombosis in the setting of subarachnoid hemorrhage is unclear. Here we present a case of spontaneous posterior inferior cerebellar artery dissection presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage and acute thrombosis. Although the patient was initially managed conservatively, angiographic follow-up demonstrated recanalization of the diseased vessel, necessitating definitive treatment. Thus we propose that angiographic follow-up is necessary in the management of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage in association with apparent vessel thrombosis. PMID:25987592

  7. Prevention of intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Patrick; Mitra, Dipayan; Gregson, Barbara A; Mendelow, A David

    2007-07-01

    Nontraumatic intracerebral haemorrhages arise from a wide range of causes falling into two broad groups: discreet vascular "ictohaemorrhagic" lesions such as aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, cavernomas, tumours, and dural fistulae; and more generalised amyloid or hypertension related conditions. It is now possible using family history, associated risk factors and gradient echo MRI to predict cases at high risk of hypertensive or amyloid related haemorrhage. There is considerable potential for prevention of hypertensive haemorrhages by treatment of high risk cases with antihypertensive medication. As yet no effective preventative treatment for amyloid angiopathy related ICH has emerged although a variety of drugs are under investigation. Prevention of haemorrhage from ictohaemorrhagic lesions revolves around removal or obliteration of the lesion. Although there is a wide range of such lesions available treatments come down to three modalities. These are surgical excision, stereotactic radiosurgery and endovascular embolisation. PMID:17630936

  8. Haemorrhagic Fevers, Viral

    MedlinePlus

    ... fever, dengue, Omsk haemorrhagic fever, Kyasanur forest disease). Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa in 2014-2015 All information on Ebola virus disease Ebola features map Dashboard - Progress update ...

  9. Subconjunctival haemorrhage from bronchoscopy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Huey Ying; Puah, Ser Hon; Ang, Leslie Jonathan P.S.; Teo, En Qi; Lau, Sabrina Y.; Goh, Kee San; Lim, Albert Y.H.; Tai, Dessmon Y.H.; Abisheganaden, John; Verma, Akash

    2015-01-01

    Flexible bronchoscopy has been available for almost five decades. It has evolved as one of the most commonly used invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedure in pulmonology, and its scope of applications is progressively expanding with the addition of new adjunct technologies such as endobronchial ultrasound, bronchial Thermoplasty, and navigational bronchoscopy. It is a safe procedure with complications ranging from fever, infiltrates, hypoxemia, bleeding, pneumothoraces and death, with most significant complications being bleeding and pneumothorax. We report a case of subconjuctival haemorrhage as an immediate complication of bronchoscopy. To our knowledge this is the first report documenting this rare complication. PMID:26744668

  10. Cerebral blood flow changes in acute experimental haemorrhagic vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, J; McCleery, W N; Todd, J H; Smart, R C

    1976-01-01

    Subarachnoid haemorrhage was produced in 26 dogs by injecting fresh homogenous blood into the cysterna chiasmatica. Two types of vasospasm were observed, firstly segmental arterial spasm closely related to the bleeding point and secondly generalized arterial vasospasm not directly related to the bleeding point and often occurring some way from the bleeding point. Reduction in CBF occurred in 61% of cases and was always accompanied by radiological vasospasm. However, in about one quarter of the cases with vasospasm there was no alteration in CBF. PMID:961484

  11. Desmopressin Acetate in Intracranial Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kapapa, Thomas; Röhrer, Stefan; Struve, Sabine; Petscher, Matthias; König, Ralph; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Woischneck, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The secondary increase in the size of intracranial haematomas as a result of spontaneous haemorrhage or trauma is of particular relevance in the event of prior intake of platelet aggregation inhibitors. We describe the effect of desmopressin acetate as a means of temporarily stabilising the platelet function. Patients and Methods. The platelet function was analysed in 10 patients who had received single (N = 4) or multiple (N = 6) doses of acetylsalicylic acid and 3 patients (control group) who had not taken acetylsalicylic acid. All subjects had suffered intracranial haemorrhage. Analysis was performed before, half an hour and three hours after administration of desmopressin acetate. Statistical analysis was performed by applying a level of significance of P ≤ 0.05. Results. (1) Platelet function returned to normal 30 minutes after administration of desmopressin acetate. (2) The platelet function worsened again after three hours. (3) There were no complications related to electrolytes or fluid balance. Conclusion. Desmopressin acetate can stabilise the platelet function in neurosurgical patients who have received acetylsalicylic acid prior to surgery without causing transfusion-related side effects or a loss of time. The effect is, however, limited and influenced by the frequency of drug intake. Further controls are needed in neurosurgical patients. PMID:25610644

  12. Managing Major Postpartum Haemorrhage following Acute Uterine Inversion with Rusch Balloon Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Keriakos, Remon; Chaudhuri, Smriti Ray

    2011-01-01

    Acute postpartum uterine inversion is a relatively rare complication. The uterus inverts and the uterine fundus prolapses to or through the dilated cervix. It is associated with major postpartum haemorrhage with or without shock. Shock is sometimes out of proportion to the haemorrhage. Minimal maternal morbidity and mortality can be achieved when uterine inversion is promptly and aggressively managed. We present this report of three cases of acute uterine inversion complicated with major postpartum haemorrhage and managed with Rusch balloon. The paper highlights the importance of early recognition and the safety of the use of intrauterine balloon to manage major postpartum haemorrhage in these cases. PMID:24826322

  13. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Stanlies

    2015-07-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  14. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  15. Management of postpartum haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Marie Pierre; Benhamou, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Postpartum Haemorrhage (PPH) is a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Treatment of acquired coagulopathy observed in severe PPH is an important part of PPH management, but is mainly based on literature in trauma patients, and data thus should be interpreted with caution. This review describes recent advances in transfusion strategy and in the use of tranexamic acid and fibrinogen concentrates in women with PPH. PMID:27408694

  16. Timing of intraventricular haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, P; Fujimura, M; Howat, P; Howes, D; Keeling, J; Robinson, R O; Salisbury, D; Tizard, J P

    1977-01-01

    The detection of the onset of intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) during life is a necessary preliminary to understanding the cause of this condition. In 10 infants of very low birthweight treated with serial transfusions of adult blood the proportions of transfused cells circulating after each transfusion were compared with the proportion of transfused cells found in the intraventricular clot at necropsy. This allowed the timing of IVH to be restricted retrospectively to the period between consecutive blood transfusions. In addition, the proportional changes of transfused cells produced by infusion of a known red cell mass allow changes in the babies' original red cell mass to be followed during life. A fall in this value occurred in 8 infants dying with IVH and was taken to indicate haemorrhage. Comparison of the two methods in 9 infants suggested that, while in some cases intraventricular bleeding occurs rapidly, in others it takes place over a period of time. The interval between birth and the onset of haemorrhage was directly proportional to the gestational age of the infant. PMID:848996

  17. Foetal and neonatal intracranial haemorrhage in term newborn infants: Hacettepe University experience.

    PubMed

    Tavil, Betül; Korkmaz, Ayşe; Bayhan, Turan; Aytaç, Selin; Unal, Sule; Kuskonmaz, Baris; Yigit, Sule; Cetin, Mualla; Yurdakök, Murat; Gumruk, Fatma

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the incidence, risk factors, causes and clinical management of intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) diagnosed during foetal life or in the first month of life in term neonates with a discussion of the role of haematological risk factors. This study included term neonates (gestational age 37-42 weeks) with ICH diagnosed, treated and followed up in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey, between January 1994 and January 2014. Medical follow-up was obtained retrospectively from hospital files and prospectively from telephonic interviews and/or clinical visits. During the study period, 16 term neonates were identified as having ICH in our hospital. In six (37.5%) neonates, ICH was diagnosed during foetal life by obstetric ultrasonography, and in 10 (62.5%) neonates, it has been diagnosed after birth. Haemorrhage types included intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) in eight (50.0%), intraparenchymal haemorrhage in six (37.5%), subarachnoid haemorrhage in one (6.2%) and subdural haemorrhage in one (6.2%) neonate. IVH was the most common (n = 5/6, 83.3%) haemorrhage type among neonates diagnosed during foetal life. Overall, haemorrhage severity was determined as mild in three (18.7%) neonates, moderate in three (18.75%) neonates and severe in 10 (62.5%) neonates. During follow-up, one infant was diagnosed as afibrinogenemia, one diagnosed as infantile spasm, one cystic fibrosis, one orofaciodigital syndrome and the other diagnosed as Friedrich ataxia. Detailed haematological investigation and search for other underlying diseases are very important to identify the reason of ICH in term neonates. Furthermore, early diagnosis, close monitoring and prompt surgical interventions are significant factors to reduce disabilities. PMID:26829281

  18. [Management of post partum haemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Csorba, Roland

    2012-04-29

    Primary post partum haemorrhage is the most common form of major obstetric haemorrhage. The traditional definition of primary post partum haemorrhage is the loss of 500 ml or more of blood from the genital tract within 24 hours of the birth of a baby. Post partum haemorrhage can be minor (500-1000 ml) or major (more than 1000 ml). Major could be divided to moderate (1000-2000 ml) or severe (more than 2000 ml). The recommendations in this article apply to women experiencing primary post partum haemorrhage of 500 ml or more. Secondary post partum haemorrhage is defined as abnormal or excessive bleeding from the birth canal between 24 hours and 12 weeks postnatally. The main causes of the secondary form are: inflammations (endometritis), placental tissue retention, inadequate involution of the uterus and malignancy. Because of its importance as a leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality, obstetric haemorrhage must be considered as a priority topic. According to the tragic and dramatic outcomes of this morbidity, and to the fact that most cases of post partum haemorrhage have no identifiable risk factors, the practical obstetricians should be aware of the accurate diagnosis and management of this illness. PMID:22543219

  19. The Effects of Vasospasm and Re-Bleeding on the Outcome of Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage from Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Filipce, Venko; Caparoski, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Vasospasm and re-bleeding after subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysm are devastating complication that can severely affect the outcome of the patients. We are presenting a series of total number of 224 patients treated and operated at our Department due to subarachnoid hemorrhage, out of which certain number developed vasospasm and re-bleeding. We are evaluating the effect of these complications on the outcome of the patients according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale at the day of discharge. In our experience both vasospasm and ReSAH can significantly influence the outcome of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysm. PMID:27442399

  20. Intraventricular haemorrhage and haemostasis defects.

    PubMed Central

    Beverley, D W; Chance, G W; Inwood, M J; Schaus, M; O'Keefe, B

    1984-01-01

    Twenty five of 106 preterm infants of 34 weeks' gestation or less developed intraventricular haemorrhage within the first 48 hours of life. A comparison of infants with and without intraventricular haemorrhage showed no significant differences in their haemostatic parameters at birth. At age 48 hours the group with intraventricular haemorrhage showed a prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time and reduced factor II, VII, and X activity. There was a significant correlation between the severity of intraventricular haemorrhage and the degree of haemostasis abnormality both in cord blood and in blood obtained at age 48 hours. Those infants sustaining grade IV intraventricular haemorrhage had a significantly prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time, reduced factor II, VII, and X activity; and a decreased fibrinogen concentration at birth. At age 48 hours these defects were accompanied by reduced platelet counts and an increased megathrombocyte index. Although intraventricular haemorrhage is multifactorial, we postulate that correction of haemostasis abnormalities at birth may prevent progression to more severe grades of haemorrhage. PMID:6732274

  1. The effect of subarachnoid erythrocyte lysate on brain injury: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zi-Huan; Han, Yan-Ling; Wang, Chun-Xi; Zhou, Chen-Hui; Wu, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Hua-Sheng; Chen, Qiang; Fan, Jie-Mei; Zhou, Meng-Liang; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Abundant erythrocytes remain and lyse partially in the subarachnoid space after severe subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). But the effect of subarachnoid erythrocyte lysate on brain injury is still not completely clear. In this study, autologous erythrocytes (the non-lysate group) and their lysate (the lysate group) were injected separately into the cistern magna of rabbits to induce a model of experimental SAH, although the control group received isotonic sodium chloride solution instead of erythrocyte solution. Results showed that vasospasm of the basilar artery was observed at 72 h after experimental SAH, but there was no significant difference between the non-lysate group and the lysate group. Brain injury was more severe in the lysate group than in the non-lysate group. Meanwhile, the levels of peroxiredoxin 2 (Prx2), IL-6 and TNF-α in brain cortex and in CSF were significantly higher in the lysate group than those in the non-lysate group. These results demonstrated that brain injury was more likely to be caused by erythrocyte lysate than by intact erythrocytes in subarachnoid space, and inflammation response positively correlated with Prx2 expression might be involved in mechanism of brain injury after SAH. PMID:27279653

  2. The effect of subarachnoid erythrocyte lysate on brain injury: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-Huan; Han, Yan-Ling; Wang, Chun-Xi; Zhou, Chen-Hui; Wu, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Hua-Sheng; Chen, Qiang; Fan, Jie-Mei; Zhou, Meng-Liang; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2016-08-01

    Abundant erythrocytes remain and lyse partially in the subarachnoid space after severe subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). But the effect of subarachnoid erythrocyte lysate on brain injury is still not completely clear. In this study, autologous erythrocytes (the non-lysate group) and their lysate (the lysate group) were injected separately into the cistern magna of rabbits to induce a model of experimental SAH, although the control group received isotonic sodium chloride solution instead of erythrocyte solution. Results showed that vasospasm of the basilar artery was observed at 72 h after experimental SAH, but there was no significant difference between the non-lysate group and the lysate group. Brain injury was more severe in the lysate group than in the non-lysate group. Meanwhile, the levels of peroxiredoxin 2 (Prx2), IL-6 and TNF-α in brain cortex and in CSF were significantly higher in the lysate group than those in the non-lysate group. These results demonstrated that brain injury was more likely to be caused by erythrocyte lysate than by intact erythrocytes in subarachnoid space, and inflammation response positively correlated with Prx2 expression might be involved in mechanism of brain injury after SAH. PMID:27279653

  3. Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured cavernous internal carotid artery aneurysm after medical prolactinoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Khalsa, Siri Sahib; Hollon, Todd C; Shastri, Ravi; Trobe, Jonathan D; Gemmete, Joseph J; Pandey, Aditya S

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysms of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA) are believed to have a low risk of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), given the confines of the dural rings and the anterior clinoid process. The risk may be greater when the bony and dural protection has been eroded. We report a case of spontaneous SAH from rupture of a cavernous ICA aneurysm in a patient whose large prolactinoma had markedly decreased in size as the result of cabergoline treatment. After passing a balloon test occlusion, the patient underwent successful endovascular vessel deconstruction. This case suggests that an eroding skull base lesion may distort normal anterior cranial base anatomy and allow communication between the cavernous ICA and subarachnoid space. The potential for SAH due to cavernous ICA aneurysm rupture should be recognised in patients with previous pituitary or other skull base lesions adjacent to the cavernous sinus. PMID:27277584

  4. Management of post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus in premature infants.

    PubMed

    Ellenbogen, Jonathan R; Waqar, Mueez; Pettorini, Benedetta

    2016-09-01

    Post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus (PHH) is the most common neurological complication of preterm birth and can result in severe and life-long psychomotor and cognitive sequelae. Cerebrospinal fluid diversion is often required but the optimum time for intervention is unclear. Numerous neurosurgical procedures exist to temporise PHH but it is not clear which is the optimum method. Approximately 15% of preterm infants who suffer intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) will require permanent cerebrospinal fluid diversion with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. It is likely that earlier intervention may result in reduced neurological disability and ventriculoperitoneal shunt dependency. In this review we discuss the current methods of PHH management. PMID:27369088

  5. Haemorrhagic Lumbar Juxtafacet Cyst with Ligamentum Flavum Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Ghent, Finn; Davidson, Trent; Mobbs, Ralph Jasper

    2014-01-01

    Juxtafacet cysts are an uncommon cause of radiculopathy. They occur most frequently in the lumbar region, and their distribution across the spine correlates with mobility. Haemorrhagic complications are rare and may occur in the absence of any provocation, although there is some association with anticoagulation and trauma. We present a case of acute radiculopathy due to an L5/S1 juxtafacet cyst with unprovoked haemorrhage which was found to extend into ligamentum flavum. The patient underwent uncomplicated microscope assisted decompression with excellent results. The demographics, presentation, aetiology, and management of juxtafacet cysts are discussed. PMID:25580330

  6. Vesical Artery Embolization in Haemorrhagic Cystitis in Children.

    PubMed

    García-Gámez, Andrés; Bermúdez Bencerrey, Patricia; Brio-Sanagustin, Sonia; Guerrero Vara, Rubén; Sisinni, Luisa; Stuart, Sam; Roebuck, Derek; Gómez Muñoz, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    Haemorrhagic cystitis is an uncommon and, in its severe form, potentially life-threatening complication of haematopoietic stem cell transplantation or cancer therapy in children. The severe form involves macroscopic haematuria with blood clots, urinary obstruction and/or renal impairment. There are many therapeutic options to treat acute haemorrhage, but only recombinant factor VII has a high level of clinical evidence in children. Supraselective vesical artery embolization (SVAE) is an increasingly used therapeutic procedure for controlling haemorrhage in adults, but is less commonly used in children. This might be due to several factors, such as the invasive nature of the procedure, lack of appropriate medical experience and possible long-term side effects. We present three cases of children successfully treated by means of effective SVAE. PMID:26850734

  7. Intracranial haemorrhage and child abuse.

    PubMed

    Cheah, I G; Kasim, M S; Shafie, H M; Khoo, T H

    1994-01-01

    Intracranial haemorrhage is a major cause of severe morbidity and mortality in child abuse cases in developed countries. However, similar data are not available in most developing countries. This study therefore aimed to determine the incidence of intracranial haemorrhage amongst all cases of child physical abuse, the nature of the injuries incurred, and the morbidity and mortality resulting therefrom. Among 369 cases of physical abuse seen over a 4-year period, 41 (11.4%) had intracranial haemorrhage, of whom 37 (90%) were 2 years old or less. A history of trauma was present in only eight (20%), of which only two were compatible with the injuries incurred. Subdural haemorrhages accounted for 80% of the cases, with skull fractures present in only nine cases. Fifty-four per cent of the 37 children aged 2 years of age or less had no external signs of trauma, but 11 of them had retinal haemorrhages. This is in contrast to the children older than 2 years of age who all had external signs of trauma. The overall prognosis was dismal with an early mortality of almost 30% (13 cases) and at least seven cases with severe neurological sequelae. These findings are comparable with studies from developed countries which have established that non-accidental injury must be considered as a cause of intracranial haemorrhage in any young child, despite the absence of external signs of trauma. PMID:7880096

  8. Bilateral adrenal gland haemorrhage: an unusual cause

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Vasant; Malabu, Usman; Cameron, Donald; Sangla, Kunwarjit

    2014-01-01

    Summary Our patient had drainage of a large amoebic liver abscess. This got complicated by a severe degree of hypotension, which required aggressive fluid resuscitation and hydrocortisone support. Computerised tomography (CT) of the abdomen revealed bilateral adrenal gland haemorrhage (BAH) resulting in primary adrenal gland failure, which was the cause for hypotension. Patient was on long-term warfarin for provoked deep vein thrombosis of lower limb, which was discontinued before the procedure. Thrombophilia profile indicated the presence of lupus anticoagulant factor with prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT). Patient was discharged on lifelong warfarin. This case emphasises the need for strong clinical suspicion for diagnosing BAH, rare but life-threatening condition, and its association with amoebic liver abscess and anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome (APLS). Learning points Recognition of BAH as a rare complication of sepsis.APLS can rarely cause BAH. PMID:25276353

  9. Emergency Imaging of Intracerebral Haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Alobeidi, Farah; Aviv, Richard I

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating condition with high mortality and morbidity despite advances in neurocritical care. Early deterioration is common in the first few hours after ICH onset, secondary to rapid haematoma expansion and growth. Rapid diagnosis and aggressive early management of these patients are therefore crucial. Imaging plays a key role in establishing the diagnosis and the underlying aetiology of ICH, identifying complications and predicting patients who are at high risk for haematoma expansion. In this chapter, we present an evidence-based imaging framework for the management of spontaneous ICH in the acute setting. Non-enhanced computed tomography is long established as the gold standard for ICH diagnosis but has limitations in demonstrating the underlying aetiology in cases of secondary ICH. There is now growing evidence for the ability of non-invasive angiography to establish the underlying aetiology and to predict further haematoma expansion. The presence of small enhancing foci within the haematoma on computed tomography angiography (CTA), the CTA Spot Sign, has been prospectively validated as a predictor of haematoma expansion. Early identification of patients at risk of haematoma expansion allows for the appropriate escalation of care to a neurosurgical team, admission to a neurocritical care unit, appropriate supportive therapy and targeted novel medical and surgical interventions. Catheter angiography, which remains the gold standard for identifying underlying secondary vascular lesions, should be used in selected cases. However, non-invasive vascular imaging should be considered as an important step in the diagnosis and early management of secondary ICH patients. Previous concerns related to the radiation dose, contrast-induced nephropathy and cost are addressed in this chapter. Recently, animal models have enabled the qualitative assessment of haematoma expansion, and our increased understanding of ICH may

  10. Symptomatic Tarlov Cyst Following Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Woo Keun; Hong, Seung-Koan

    2011-01-01

    Most of Tarlov or perineurial cysts remain asymptomatic throughout the patient's life. The pathogenesis is still unclear. Hemorrhage has been suggested as one of the possible causes and trauma with resultant hemorrhage into subarachnoid space has been suggested as an origin of these cysts. However, Tarlov cysts related to spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage has not been reported. The authors report a case of Tarlov cyst which was symptomatic following spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:22053232

  11. Ebolavirus and Haemorrhagic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Matua, Gerald A.; Van der Wal, Dirk M.; Locsin, Rozzano C.

    2015-01-01

    The Ebola virus is a highly virulent, single-stranded ribonucleic acid virus which affects both humans and apes and has fast become one of the world’s most feared pathogens. The virus induces acute fever and death, with haemorrhagic syndrome occurring in up to 90% of patients. The known species within the genus Ebolavirus are Bundibugyo, Sudan, Zaïre, Reston and Taï Forest. Although endemic in Africa, Ebola has caused worldwide anxiety due to media hype and concerns about its international spread, including through bioterrorism. The high fatality rate is attributed to unavailability of a standard treatment regimen or vaccine. The disease is frightening since it is characterised by rapid immune suppression and systemic inflammatory response, causing multi-organ and system failure, shock and often death. Currently, disease management is largely supportive, with containment efforts geared towards mitigating the spread of the virus. This review describes the classification, morphology, infective process, natural ecology, transmission, epidemic patterns, diagnosis, clinical features and immunology of Ebola, including management and epidemic containment strategies. PMID:26052448

  12. Epizootic haemorrhagic disease.

    PubMed

    Maclachlan, N J; Zientara, S; Savini, G; Daniels, P W

    2015-08-01

    Summary Epizootic haemorrhagic disease (EHD) is an arthropod-transmitted viral disease of certain wild ungulates, notably North American white-tailed deer and, more rarely, cattle. The disease in white-tailed deer results from vascular injury analogous to that caused by bluetongue virus (BTV), to which EHD virus (EHDV) is closely related. There are seven serotypes of EHDV recognised, and Ibaraki virus, which is the cause of sporadic disease outbreaks in cattle in Asia, is included in EHDV serotype 2. The global distribution and epidemiology of BTV and EHDV infections are also similar, as both viruses occur throughout temperate and tropical regions of the world where they are transmitted by biting Culicoides midges and infect a wide variety of domestic and wild ungulates. However, the global distribution and epidemiology of EHDV infection are less well characterised than they are for BTV. Whereas most natural and experimental EHDV infections (other than Ibaraki virus infection) of livestock are subclinical or asymptomatic, outbreaks of EHD have recently been reported among cattle in the Mediterranean Basin, Reunion Island, South Africa, and the United States. Accurate and convenient laboratory tests are increasingly available for the sensitive and specific serological and virological diagnosis of EHDV infection and confirmation of EHD in animals, but commercial vaccines are available only for prevention of Ibaraki disease and not for protection against other strains and serotypes of EHDV. PMID:26601439

  13. Post-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage: A review.

    PubMed

    Modi, Nikhilkumar J; Agrawal, Manish; Sinha, Virendra Deo

    2016-01-01

    Head injury has been the leading cause of death and disability in people younger than 40 years and the incidence is rising continuously. Anticipation of the pathological consequences of post-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (tSAH) and an outcome-oriented management are very important in these cases. To encounter the complications pertaining to traumatic brain injury (TBI) and tSAH, various classifications have been proposed and goal-oriented screening strategies have been offered. The role of serial computed tomography (CT) scans, perfusion studies, transcranial Doppler, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and angiographic studies as diagnostic tools, has been described. Recently, MRI fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), gradient reversal echo (GRE), and susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) have emerged as excellent complimentary MRI sequences, and the authors of this article have evaluated their role in the diagnosis and prognostication of patients with tSAH. Numerous studies have been conducted on the various complications associated with tSAH such as vasospasm, hydrocephalus, and electrolyte disturbances and their management. This article discusses these aspects of tSAH and their management nuances. PMID:26954974

  14. Remote Cerebellar Haemorrhage after Burr Hole Drainage of Chronic Subdural Haematoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Karaarslan, Numan; Gök, Sevki; Soyalp, Celaleddin

    2016-01-01

    Remote cerebellar haemorrhage (RCH) is an unusual complication of supratentorial neurosurgical procedures. Even the rarer is cerebellar haemorrhage occurring after supratentorial burr hole drainage of Chronic Subdural Haematoma (CSDH). The exact mechanism is still unclear despite some possible causative factors such as rapid evacuation of haematoma and overdrainage of CSF (Cerebrospinal Fluid). We report a 80-year-old male patient who developed cerebellar haemorrhage after burr hole drainage of left frontoparietal chronic subdural haematoma and discuss the possible aetiological mechanisms through the review of the current literature. PMID:27437296

  15. [A case of Churg-Strauss syndrome with subarachnoid hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Ito, Miiko; Kato, Naoki; Su, Ching-Chan; Kayama, Takamasa

    2014-03-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a vasculitis syndromes and is only rarely complicated by subarachnoid hemorrhage. In the current report, we describe a case of CSS with subarachnoid hemorrhage, which showed a favorable outcome following conservative treatment. A 68-year-old man with CSS on maintenance steroid therapy underwent MRI/A during tinnitus aggravation, and showed dilation of the left middle cerebral artery and stenosis of the peripheral area of the right vertebral artery. After 2 months, he presented sudden pain in the occipitocervical area, and CT revealed subarachnoid hemorrhage. Intracranial 3D CT-A and MRI/A showed the development of a protrusion at the base of the left anterior cerebral artery. Although both findings suggested cerebral artery dissection, the source of hemorrhage could not be identified. The 2009 Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Stroke recommends early diagnosis and treatment of hemorrhagic cerebral artery dissection because of the high risk of re-bleeding. However, considering the risks of vasculitis aggravation, development of systemic complications, and recurrence, conservative treatment was selected. In addition, owing to the risk of complications associated with the frequent use of iodinated contrast agents and angiography procedures, patient was followed up using MRI. His course was favorable, and he was discharged despite mild right abducens paralysis. When patients with hemorrhagic cerebral artery dissection have a history of allergic diseases, CCS should be considered; conservative treatment consisting of rest, strict blood pressure control, and steroid therapy may be the most appropriate option for certain patients. PMID:24607952

  16. Early heparin therapy in patients with spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Boeer, A; Voth, E; Henze, T; Prange, H W

    1991-01-01

    In 68 patients with spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage the effect of heparin treatment beginning on the second, fourth or tenth day was investigated. Early (day 2) low-dose heparin medication significantly lowered the incidence of pulmonary embolism. An increase in the number of patients with rebleeding was not observed. The results indicate that the early use of heparin in these patients is safe and can be recommended for the prevention of thromboembolic complications. PMID:1865215

  17. An uncommon initial presentation of snake bite-subarachnoid hemorrhage: A case report with literature review

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Manoj Kumar; Dutta, Joydip; Chatterjee, Apratim; Sarkar, Anup; Roy, Koushik; Agarwal, Rakhesh; Lahiri, Durjoy; Biswas, Amrito; Mondal, Anupam; Maity, Pranab; Mukhopadhyay, Jotideb

    2015-01-01

    Snake bites are very common in India, particularly in West Bengal. Snake bite can cause various hematological, neuromyopathical complications. It can be very fatal if not detected and treated early. Timely intervention can save the patient. We are reporting a case of hematotoxic Russell viper snake bite presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Patient was successfully treated with antivenom serum (AVS) along with other conservative management. Subarachnoid hemorrhage as an initial presentation in viper bite is very rare and we discuss the case with proper literature review. PMID:26425018

  18. [Subarachnoid hematoma and spinal anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Dupeyrat, A; Dequiré, P M; Mérouani, A; Moullier, P; Eid, G

    1990-01-01

    Two cases of spinal subarachnoid haematoma occurring after spinal anaesthesia are reported. In the first case, lumbar puncture was attempted three times in a 81-year-old man; spinal anaesthesia trial was than abandoned, and the patient given a general anaesthetic. He was given prophylactic calcium heparinate soon after surgery. On the fourth day, the patient became paraparetic. Radioculography revealed a blockage between T10 and L3. Laminectomy was performed to remove the haematoma, but the patient recovered motor activity only very partially. The second case was a 67-year-old man, in whom spinal anaesthesia was easily carried out. He was also given prophylactic calcium heparinate soon after surgery. On the fourth postoperative day, pulmonary embolism was suspected. Heparin treatment was then started. Twelve hours later, lumbar and bilateral buttock pain occurred, which later spread to the neck. On the eighth day, the patient had neck stiffness and two seizures. Emergency laminectomy was carried out, which revealed a subarachnoid haematoma spreading to a level higher than T6 and below L1, with no flow of cerebrospinal fluid, and a non pulsatile spinal cord. Surgery was stopped. The patient died on the following day. Both these cases are similar to those previously reported and point out the role played by anticoagulants. Because early diagnosis of spinal cord compression is difficult, the prognosis is poor, especially in case of paraplegia. PMID:2278424

  19. Surgical management of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Colby, Geoffrey P; Coon, Alexander L; Tamargo, Rafael J

    2010-04-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is a common and often devastating condition that requires prompt neurosurgical evaluation and intervention. Modern management of aSAH involves a multidisciplinary team of subspecialists, including vascular neurosurgeons, neurocritical care specialists and, frequently, neurointerventional radiologists. This team is responsible for stabilizing the patient on presentation, diagnosing the offending ruptured aneurysm, securing the aneurysm, and managing the patient through a typically prolonged and complicated hospital course. Surgical intervention has remained a definitive treatment for ruptured cerebral aneurysms since the early 1900s. Over the subsequent decades, many innovations in microsurgical technique, adjuvant maneuvers, and intraoperative and perioperative medical therapies have advanced the care of patients with aSAH. This report focuses on the modern surgical management of patients with aSAH. Following a brief historical perspective on the origin of aneurysm surgery, the topics discussed include the timing of surgical intervention after aSAH, commonly used surgical approaches and craniotomies, fenestration of the lamina terminalis, intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring, intraoperative digital subtraction and fluorescent angiography, temporary clipping, deep hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass, management of acute hydrocephalus, cerebral revascularization, and novel clip configurations and microsurgical techniques. Many of the topics highlighted in this report represent some of the more debated techniques in vascular neurosurgery. The popularity of such techniques is constantly evolving as new studies are performed and data about their utility become available. PMID:20380967

  20. High frequency of spinal involvement in patients with basal subarachnoid neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Callacondo, D.; Garcia, H.H.; Gonzales, I.; Escalante, D.; Gilman, Robert H.; Tsang, Victor C.W.; Gonzalez, Armando; Lopez, Maria T.; Gavidia, Cesar M.; Martinez, Manuel; Alvarado, Manuel; Porras, Miguel; Saavedra, Herbert; Rodriguez, Silvia; Verastegui, Manuela; Mayta, Holger; Herrera, Genaro; Lescano, Andres G.; Zimic, Mirko; Gonzalvez, Guillermo; Moyano, Luz M.; Ayvar, Viterbo; Diaz, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of spinal neurocysticercosis (NCC) in patients with basal subarachnoid NCC compared with that in individuals with viable limited intraparenchymal NCC (≤20 live cysts in the brain). Methods: We performed a prospective observational case-control study of patients with NCC involving the basal cisterns or patients with only limited intraparenchymal NCC. All patients underwent MRI examinations of the brain and the entire spinal cord to assess spinal involvement. Results: Twenty-seven patients with limited intraparenchymal NCC, and 28 patients with basal subarachnoid NCC were included in the study. Spinal involvement was found in 17 patients with basal subarachnoid NCC and in only one patient with limited intraparenchymal NCC (odds ratio 40.18, 95% confidence interval 4.74–340.31; p < 0.0001). All patients had extramedullary (intradural) spinal NCC, and the lumbosacral region was the most frequently involved (89%). Patients with extensive spinal NCC more frequently had ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement (7 of 7 vs 3 of 11; p = 0.004) and tended to have a longer duration of neurologic symptoms than those with regional involvement (72 months vs 24 months; p = 0.062). Conclusions: The spinal subarachnoid space is commonly involved in patients with basal subarachnoid NCC, compared with those with only intraparenchymal brain cysts. Spinal cord involvement probably explains serious late complications including chronic meningitis and gait disorders that were described before the introduction of antiparasitic therapy. MRI of the spine should be performed in basal subarachnoid disease to document spinal involvement, prevent complications, and monitor for recurrent disease. PMID:22517102

  1. Endoscopic management of hypertensive intraventricular haemorrhage with obstructive hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Mukerji, Gaurav; Shenoy, Ravikiran; Basoor, Abhijeet; Jain, Gaurav; Nelson, Adam

    2007-01-01

    Background Intracranial haemorrhage accounts for 30–60 % of all stroke admissions into a hospital, with hypertension being the main risk factor. Presence of intraventricular haematoma is considered a poor prognostic factor due to the resultant obstruction to CSF and the mass effect following the presence of blood resulting in raised intracranial pressure and hydrocephalus. We report the results following endoscopic decompression of obstructive hydrocephalus and evacuation of haematoma in patients with hypertensive intraventricular haemorrhage. Methods During a two year period, 25 patients diagnosed as having an intraventricular haemorrhage with obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to hypertension were included in this study. All patients underwent endoscopic evacuation of the haematoma under general anaesthesia. Post operative evaluation was done by CT scan and Glasgow outcome scale. Results Of the 25 patients, thalamic haemorrhage was observed in 12 (48%) patients, while, 11 (44%) had a putaminal haematoma. Nine (36%) patients had a GCS of 8 or less pre-operatively. Resolution of hydrocephalus following endoscopic evacuation was observed in 24 (96%) patients. No complications directly related to the surgical technique were encountered in our study. At six months follow-up, a mortality rate of 6.3% and 55.5% was observed in patients with a pre-operative GCS of ≥ 9 and ≤ 8 respectively. Thirteen of the 16 (81.3%) patients with a pre-operative GCS ≥ 9 had good recovery. Conclusion Endoscopic technique offers encouraging results in relieving hydrocephalus in hypertensive intraventricular haemorrhage. Final outcome is better in patient with a pre-operative GCS of >9. Future improvements in instrumentation and surgical techniques, with careful case selection may help improve outcome in these patients. PMID:17204141

  2. 'Subarachnoid cyst' after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma: Case report of an unusual postoperative morbidity.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Low Y Y; Wai Hoe, N G

    2016-01-01

    Burr-hole drainage of chronic subdural hematomas are routine operative procedures done by neurosurgical residents. Common postoperative complications include acute epidural and/or subdural bleeding, tension pneumocephalus, intracranial hematomas and ischemic cerebral infarction. We report an interesting post-operative complication of a 'subarachnoid cyst' after burr-hole evacuation of a chronic subdural hematoma. The authors hypothesize that the 'cyst' is likely secondary to the splitting of the adjacent neomembrane within its arachnoid-brain interface by iatrogenic irrigation of the subdural space. Over time, this 'cyst' develops into an area of gliosis which eventually causes long-term scar epilepsy in the patient. As far as we are aware, this is the first complication of such a 'subarachnoid cyst' post burr-hole drainage reported in the literature. PMID:27366276

  3. Reduction in periventricular haemorrhage in preterm infants.

    PubMed Central

    Szymonowicz, W; Yu, V Y; Walker, A; Wilson, F

    1986-01-01

    Our previous cerebral ultrasound study of antecedents of periventricular haemorrhage in infants weighing 1250 g or less at birth suggested that neonatal events that caused increased or fluctuating cerebral blood flow lead to periventricular haemorrhage. As the risk period for this type of haemorrhage was the first four days of life strict guidelines were introduced to avoid the previously identified neonatal risk factors. No attempt was made to modify obstetric practice. Over the next two years, although the obstetric risk profile, the frequency and severity of hyaline membrane disease, and the gestation, birth weight, and sex distributions of a similar cohort of infants did not change, the incidence of periventricular haemorrhage decreased significantly from 60% to 36%. Significant antecedents of haemorrhage similar to those found in the previous study included severe bruising, low arterial:fractional inspiratory oxygen ratio and low packed cell volume on admission, hyaline membrane disease, hypercarbia, and hypoxaemia. Assisted ventilation, pneumothorax, treatment with tubocurarine, and hypotension were no longer significant risk factors for periventricular haemorrhage. A multivariate discriminant analysis correctly predicted haemorrhage in 86% of the study group when bruising, hypercarbia, hypoxaemia, hyaline membrane disease, and low gestation were considered. These results suggest that changes in neonatal practices can reduce the incidence of periventricular haemorrhage and that drug studies indicating similar reduction in haemorrhage need to be evaluated carefully to ensure that placebo and treated groups are in fact comparable. PMID:3740905

  4. UK guidelines on the management of variceal haemorrhage in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Dhiraj; Stanley, Adrian J; Hayes, Peter C; Patch, David; Millson, Charles; Mehrzad, Homoyon; Austin, Andrew; Ferguson, James W; Olliff, Simon P; Hudson, Mark; Christie, John M

    2015-01-01

    These updated guidelines on the management of variceal haemorrhage have been commissioned by the Clinical Services and Standards Committee (CSSC) of the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) under the auspices of the liver section of the BSG. The original guidelines which this document supersedes were written in 2000 and have undergone extensive revision by 13 members of the Guidelines Development Group (GDG). The GDG comprises elected members of the BSG liver section, representation from British Association for the Study of the Liver (BASL) and Liver QuEST, a nursing representative and a patient representative. The quality of evidence and grading of recommendations was appraised using the AGREE II tool. The nature of variceal haemorrhage in cirrhotic patients with its complex range of complications makes rigid guidelines inappropriate. These guidelines deal specifically with the management of varices in patients with cirrhosis under the following subheadings: (1) primary prophylaxis; (2) acute variceal haemorrhage; (3) secondary prophylaxis of variceal haemorrhage; and (4) gastric varices. They are not designed to deal with (1) the management of the underlying liver disease; (2) the management of variceal haemorrhage in children; or (3) variceal haemorrhage from other aetiological conditions. PMID:25887380

  5. Mouse model of intracerebellar haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tijjani Salihu, Abubakar; Muthuraju, Sangu; Aziz Mohamed Yusoff, Abdul; Ahmad, Farizan; Zulkifli Mustafa, Mohd; Jaafar, Hasnan; Idris, Zamzuri; Rahman Izaini Ghani, Abdul; Malin Abdullah, Jafri

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the behavior and neuronal morphological changes in the perihaemorrhagic tissue of the mouse intracerebellar haemorrhage experimental model. Adult male Swiss albino mice were stereotactically infused with collagenase type VII (0.4U/μl of saline) unilaterally in to the cerebellum, following anaesthesia. Motor deficits were assessed using open field and composite score for evaluating the mouse model of cerebellar ataxia at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after collagenase infusion. The animals were sacrificed at the same time interval for evaluation of perihaematomal neuronal degeneration using haematoxylin and eosin staining and Annexin V-FITC/Propidium iodide assay. At the end of the study, it was found that infusion of 0.4U collagenase produces significant locomotor and ataxic deficit in the mice especially within the first week post surgery, and that this gradually improved within three weeks. Neuronal degeneration evident by cytoplasmic shrinkage and nuclear pyknosis was observed at the perihaematomal area after one day; especially at 3 and 7 days post haemorrhage. By 21 days, both the haematoma and degenerating neurons in the perihaematomal area were phagocytosed and the remaining neuronal cells around the scar tissue appeared normal. Moreover, Annexin-V/propidium iodide-positive cells were observed at the perihaematomal area at 3 and 7 days implying that the neurons likely die via apoptosis. It was concluded that a population of potentially salvageable neurons exist in the perihaematomal area after cerebellar haemorrhage throughout a wide time window that could be amenable to treatment. PMID:27327104

  6. Anaesthesia in a patient with subarachanoidal haemorrhage and high oxygen affinity haemoglobinopathy (HB york): case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Approximately 90 haemoglobinopathies have been identified that result in abnormally high oxygen affinity. One of these is haemoglobinopathy York (HbY), first described in 1976. HbY causes an extreme leftward shift of the oxygen dissociation curve with the P50 value changing to 12.5 - 15.5 mmHg (normal value 26.7 mmHg), indicating that approximately half of the haemoglobin is not available as oxygen carrier. Patients with haemoglobinopathies with increased oxygen affinity could suffer from the risk developing ischaemic complications due to a lack of functional oxygen carriers. This is, to best of our knowledge, the first case report on a patient with HbY published in connection with anesthesia. Case Presentation A 42-year-old female with a severe headache and Glasgow coma scale (GCS) of 15 was admitted to the neurosurgical intensive care unit with a ruptured, right sided ICA aneurysm with consecutive subarachnoid haemorrhage [Fisher III, World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) I)]. The medical history of the patient included an erythrocytosis (Hb 17.5 g/dl) on the base of a high-oxygen-affinity haemoglobinopathy, called Hb York (HbY). With no time available to take special preoperative precautions, rapid blood loss occurred during the first attempt to clip the aneurysm. General transfusion procedures, according to the guidelines based on haemoglobin and haematocrit values, could not be applied due to the uncertainty in the oxygen carrier reduction. To maintain tissue oxygen supply, clinical indicators of ischaemia were instead utilized to gauge the appropriate required blood products, crystalloids and colloids replacements. Despite this, the patient survived the neurosurgical intervention without any neurological deficit. Conclusions Family members of patients with HbY (and other haemoglobinopathies with increased oxygen affinity) should undergo clinical assessment, particularly if they are polycythaemic. If the diagnosis of HbY is confirmed

  7. Mitral endocarditis due to Rothia aeria with cerebral haemorrhage and femoral mycotic aneurysms, first French description.

    PubMed

    Collarino, R; Vergeylen, U; Emeraud, C; Latournèrie, G; Grall, N; Mammeri, H; Messika-Zeitoun, D; Vallois, D; Yazdanpanah, Y; Lescure, F-X; Bleibtreu, A

    2016-09-01

    Rothia aeria is a Rothia species from the Micrococcaceae family. We report here the first French R. aeria endocarditis complicated by brain haemorrhage and femoral mycotic aneurysms. Altogether, severity and antimicrobial susceptibility should make us consider the management of R. aeria endocarditis as Staphylococcus aureus methicillin-susceptible endocarditis. PMID:27408740

  8. [Giant racemose subarachnoid and intraventricular neurocysticercosis: A case report].

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Larsen, Alvaro; Monteagudo, Maria; Lozano-Setien, Elena; Garcia-Garcia, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is the most frequent parasitic disease of the central nervous system. It is caused by the larvae of Taenia solium, which can affect different anatomical sites. In Spain there is an increasing prevalence mainly due to immigration from endemic areas. The extraparenchymal forms are less common, but more serious because they usually develop complications. Neuroimaging plays a major role in the diagnosis and follow-up of this disease, supported by serology and a compatible clinical and epidemiological context. First-line treatments are cysticidal drugs such as albendazole and praziquantel, usually coadministered with corticosteroids, and in some cases surgery is indicated. We here report a case of neurocysticercosis with simultaneous intraventricular and giant racemose subarachnoid involvement. PMID:26321177

  9. Viral haemorrhagic fever in children.

    PubMed

    MacDermott, Nathalie E; De, Surjo; Herberg, Jethro A

    2016-05-01

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) are currently at the forefront of the world's attention due to the recentZaire ebolavirusepidemic in West Africa. This epidemic has highlighted the frailty of the world's public health response mechanisms and demonstrated the potential risks to nations around the world of imported cases of epidemic diseases. While imported cases in children are less likely, the potential for such a scenario remains. It is therefore essential that paediatricians are aware of and prepared for potential imported cases of tropical diseases, VHFs being of particular importance due to their propensity to cause nosocomial spread. Examining the four families of viruses-Filoviridae,Arenaviridae,BunyaviridaeandFlaviviridae, we describe the different types of VHFs, with emphasis on differentiation from other diseases through detailed history-taking, their presentation and management from a paediatric perspective. PMID:26787609

  10. Bilateral adrenal haemorrhage leading to adrenal crisis

    PubMed Central

    McGowan-Smyth, Sam

    2014-01-01

    A 77-year-old man presented with an acute worsening of chronic back pain. CT showed dense bilateral adrenal glands suggestive of adrenal haemorrhage which was confirmed by MRI. Despite appropriate glucocorticoid replacement for adrenal insufficiency, 7 days after admission this patient suffered an adrenal crisis. Owing to the timely diagnosis, appropriate treatment was given and the patient survived. Large bilateral adrenal haemorrhage however, can lead to cardiovascular collapse and death if not appropriately diagnosed and managed promptly. Despite its rarity, bilateral adrenal haemorrhage should always be considered as a differential for back pain in the setting of an acute illness due to its potentially fatal consequences. PMID:24969071

  11. Surgical Craniotomy for Intracerebral Haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mendelow, A David

    2015-01-01

    Craniotomy is probably indicated for patients with superficial spontaneous lobar supratentorial intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) when the level of consciousness drops below 13 within the first 8 h of the onset of the haemorrhage. Once the level drops below 9, it is probably too late to consider craniotomy for these patients, so clinical vigilance is paramount. While this statement is only backed up by evidence that is moderately strong, meta-analysis of available data suggests that it is true in the rather limited number of patients with ICH. Meta-analyses like this can often predict the results of future prospective randomised controlled trials a decade or more before the trials are completed and published. Countless such examples exist in the literature, as is the case for thrombolysis in patients with myocardial infarction in the last millennium: meta-analysis determined the efficacy more than a decade BEFORE the last trial (ISIS-2) confirmed the benefit of thrombolysis for myocardial infarction. Careful examination of the meta-analysis' Forest plots in this chapter will demonstrate why this statement is made at the outset. Other meta-analyses of surgery for ICH have also indicated that minimal interventional techniques using topical thrombolysis or endoscopy via burrholes or even twist drill aspiration may be particularly successful for the treatment of supratentorial ICH, especially when the clot is deep seated. Ongoing clinical trials (CLEAR III and MISTIE III) should confirm this in the fullness of time. There are 2 exceptions to these generalisations. First, based on trial evidence, aneurysmal ICH is best treated with surgery. Second, cerebellar ICH represents a special case because of the development of hydrocephalus, which may require expeditious drainage as the intracranial pressure rises. The cerebellar clot will then require evacuation, usually via posterior fossa craniectomy, rather than craniotomy. Technical advances suggest that image-guided surgery

  12. Visual outcome of 25-gauge microincision vitrectomy surgery in diabetic vitreous haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Burhan Abdul Majid; Rizvi, Syed Fawad; Mahmood, Syed Asaad; Mal, Washoo; Zafar, Shakir

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the visual outcome and complications of 25-gauge micro incision vitrectomy surgery (MIVS) in diabetic vitreous haemorrhage. Methods: This Quasi Experimental study was conducted at LRBT, Tertiary eye care hospital Karachi, from February 2012 to January 2013. Sixty eyes of sixty patients with uncontrolled type II diabetes mellitus (DM) were included. There were 43 (71.7%) males and 17 (28.3%) females. Age range was 40 – 60 years. All randomly selected patients underwent 25-gauge sutureless micro incision vitrectomy surgery for diabetic vitreous haemorrhage. Main outcomes measured were best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) assessed with logMAR and post-operative complications. Follow ups were at one day, one week, one month, three months and six months post-operatively. Result: Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) gradually improved in majority of subjects in each subsequent follow up visit. Preoperative visual acuity was 1.023 ±0.226 logMAR, which was improved after final follow up to 0.457±0.256 and P-value was < 0.001. Five patients developed recurrent vitreous haemorrhage during study period, one patient developed cataract (1.7%), one (1.7%) had ocular hypotony defined as intraocular pressure < 5 mmHg and one (1.7%) developed endophthalmitis. Conclusion: 25-gauge micro incision vitrectomy surgery (MIVS) is an effective sutureless parsplana vitrectomy surgery which has good visual outcome in diabetic vitreous haemorrhage with minimum manageable complications. PMID:26649013

  13. Acute Kidney Injury is More Common in Acute Haemorrhagic Stroke in Mymensingh Medical College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ray, N C; Chowdhury, M A; Sarkar, S R

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after acute stroke and is an independent predictor of both early and long-term mortality after acute stroke. Acute kidney injury is associated with increased mortality in haemorrhagic stroke patients. This cross sectional observational study was conducted in Nephrology, Neuromedicine and Medicine department of Mymensingh Medical College & Hospital, Mymensingh from July 2012 to June 2014. A total of 240 patients with newly detected acute stroke confirmed by CT scan of brain were included in this study. According to this study, 15.42% of acute stroke patients developed AKI. Among the patients with haemorrhagic stroke 21.87% developed AKI while only 13.07% patients with ischaemic stroke developed AKI. So, early diagnosis and management of AKI in patients with acute stroke especially in haemorrhagic stroke is very important to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these patients. PMID:26931240

  14. Amyloid angiopathy and lobar cerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, N; Nishihara, Y; Horie, A

    1984-01-01

    Seven cases of lobar cerebral haemorrhage due to amyloid angiopathy were found among 60 necropsy cases of intracerebral haemorrhage. Clinically five patients were demented and two had hypertension. Immediately after the onset of stroke there was a high incidence of headache and vomiting, followed by nuchal rigidity. Amyloid angiopathy was most prominent in the cerebral cortex and the leptomeninges. Senile plaques were noted in all cases. One should suspect that a haemorrhage may be due to amyloid angiopathy, when lobar cerebral haemorrhage occurs in an aged, normotensive patient with or without dementia. Surgical evacuation of the haematoma is inadvisable, because of the diffuse nature of amyloid angiopathy, high recurrence rate and less tendency to cause brain stem compression. Images PMID:6502178

  15. Chronic gastrointestinal haemorrhage controlled by antifibrinolytic agents.

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Antifibrinolytic agents are used chiefly for control of acute haemorrhage. Their applicability to chronic bleeding from inflammatory lesions of the gastrointestinal tract is illustrated by two case histories. PMID:2813242

  16. [Complications of cocaine addiction].

    PubMed

    Karila, Laurent; Lowenstein, William; Coscas, Sarah; Benyamina, Amine; Reynaud, Michel

    2009-06-20

    Addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by repetitive and compulsive drug-seeking behavior and drug abuse despite negative health or social consequences. Cocaine addiction is a significant worldwide public health problem, which has somatic, psychological, psychiatric, socio-economic and judicial complications. Some of the most frequent complications are cardiovascular effects (acute coronary syndrome, cardiac arrhythmias, increased blood pressure); respiratory effects (fibrosis, interstitial pneumonitis, pulmonary hypertension, alveolar haemorrhage, asthma exacerbation; emphysema), neurological effects (strokes, aneurysms, seizures, headaches); risk for contracting HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B and C, sexual transmitted disease and otolaryngologic effects. Other complications are not discussed here. The vast majority of studies indicate that there are cognitive deficits induced by cocaine addiction. Attention, visual and working memories, executive functioning are affected in cocaine users. Psychiatric complications found in clinical practice are major depressive disorders, cocaine-induced paranoia, cocaine-induced compulsive foraging and panic attacks. PMID:19642439

  17. Subarachnoid cyst’ after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma: Case report of an unusual postoperative morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Sharon, Low Y. Y.; Wai Hoe, NG

    2016-01-01

    Burr-hole drainage of chronic subdural hematomas are routine operative procedures done by neurosurgical residents. Common postoperative complications include acute epidural and/or subdural bleeding, tension pneumocephalus, intracranial hematomas and ischemic cerebral infarction. We report an interesting post-operative complication of a ‘subarachnoid cyst’ after burr-hole evacuation of a chronic subdural hematoma. The authors hypothesize that the ‘cyst’ is likely secondary to the splitting of the adjacent neomembrane within its arachnoid-brain interface by iatrogenic irrigation of the subdural space. Over time, this ‘cyst’ develops into an area of gliosis which eventually causes long-term scar epilepsy in the patient. As far as we are aware, this is the first complication of such a ‘subarachnoid cyst’ post burr-hole drainage reported in the literature. PMID:27366276

  18. [Diagnostic challenges of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Vehviläinen, Juho; Niemelä, Mika; Korja, Miikka

    2016-01-01

    Diagostic approach to aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is based on computer tomography (CT) imaging, although a lumbar puncture and subsequent cerebrospinal fluid analysis is sometimes necessary. Identification of the ruptured aneurysm is done using angiography. Despite of modern imaging techniques, diagnostic definition of aSAH is still occasionally challenging. We describe three cases in which the diagnosis of aSAH has been delayed, in spite of positive imaging or lumbar puncture findings. PMID:27089620

  19. The clinical significance of small subarachnoid hemorrhages.

    PubMed

    Albertine, Paul; Borofsky, Samuel; Brown, Derek; Patel, Smita; Lee, Woojin; Caputy, Anthony; Taheri, M Reza

    2016-06-01

    With advancing technology, the sensitivity of computed tomography (CT) for the detection of traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (tSAH) continues to improve. Increased resolution has allowed for the detection of hemorrhage that is limited to one or two images of the CT exam. At our institution, all patients with a SAH require intensive care unit (ICU) admission, regardless of size. It was our hypothesis that patients with small subarachnoid hemorrhage experience favorable outcomes, and may not require the intensive monitoring offered in the ICU. This retrospective study evaluated 62 patients between 2011 and 2014 who presented to our Level I trauma center emergency room for acute traumatic injuries, and found to have subarachnoid hemorrhages on CT examination. The grade of subarachnoid hemorrhage was determined using previously utilized scoring systems, such as the Fisher, Modified Fisher, and Claassen grading systems. Electronic medical records were used to evaluate for medical decline, neurological decline, neurosurgical intervention, and overall hospital course. Admitting co-morbidities were noted, as were the presence of patient intoxication and use of anticoagulants. Patient outcomes were based on discharge summaries upon which the neurological status of the patient was assessed. Each patient was given a score based on the Glasgow outcome scale. The clinical and imaging profile of 62 patients with traumatic SAH were studied. Of the 62 patients, 0 % underwent neurosurgical intervention, 6.5 % had calvarial fractures, 25.8 % had additional intracranial hemorrhages, 27.4 % of the patients had significant co-morbidities, and 1.6 % of the patients expired. Patients with low-grade tSAH spent less time in the ICU, demonstrated neurological and medical stability during hospitalization. None of the patients with low-grade SAH experienced seizure during their admission. In our study, patients with low-grade tSAH demonstrated favorable clinical outcomes. This suggests

  20. Recombinant activated factor VII in post partum haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Magon, Navneet; Babu, K. M.; Kapur, Krishan; Chopra, Sanjiv; Joneja, Gurdarshan Singh

    2013-01-01

    Post-partum haemorrhage (PPH) is a life-threatening obstetric complication and the leading cause of maternal death. Any bleeding that results in or could result in haemodynamic instability, if untreated, must be considered as PPH. There is no controversy about the need for prevention and treatment of PPH. The keystone of management of PPH entails first, non-invasive and nonsurgical methods and then invasive and surgical methods. However, mortality remains high. Therefore, new advancements in the treatment are most crucial. One such advancement has been the use of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) in PPH. First used 12 years back in PPH, this universal haemostatic agent has been effectively used in controlling PPH. The best available indicator of rFVIIa efficacy is the arrest of haemorrhage, which is judged by visual evidence and haemodynamic stabilization. It also reduces costs of therapy and the use of blood components in massive PPH. In cases of intractable PPH with no other obvious indications for hysterectomy, administration of rFVIIa should be considered before surgery. We share our experience in a series of cases of PPH, successfully managed using rFVIIa. PMID:24403703

  1. A case of subarachnoid hemorrhage revealed by an acute coronary syndrome (ACS).

    PubMed

    Hatim, Abdedaim; El Otmani, Wafae; Houssa, Mehdi Ait; Atmani, Noureddine; Moutakiallah, Younes; Haimeur, Charqui; Drissi, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    The subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is definitely the best descriptive model of the interaction between cardiovascular system and cerebral damage. The underlying mechanism of cardiovascular alterations after SAH is linked to the adrenergic discharge related to aneurysm rupture. Cardiac and pulmonary complications are common after severe brain injury, especially the aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Acute neurogenic pulmonary edema is not exceptional; it may occur in 20% of cases and commonly follows a severe subarachnoid hemorrhage. Severe myocardial damage with cardiogenic shock may possibly reveal the SAH (3% of cases) and mislead to wrong diagnosis of ACS with dramatic therapeutic consequences. The contribution of CT and cerebral angiography is essential for diagnosis and treatment. Surgical or endovascular treatment depends on location, size and shape of the aneurysm, on patient's age, neurological status and existence of concomitant diseases. We report the case of a 58 years old patient, with a past medical history of diabetes and hypertension, admitted for acute pulmonary edema with cardiogenic shock. This case illustrates an unusual presentation of aneurismal SAH in a patient presenting with an acute coronary syndrome. PMID:26309459

  2. Spinal subarachnoid haematoma after spinal anaesthesia: case report.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Marion; Strzelecki, Antoine; Houadec, Mireille; Krikken, Isabelle Ranz; Danielli, Antoine; Souza Neto, Edmundo Pereira de

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid haematoma after spinal anaesthesia is known to be very rare. In the majority of these cases, spinal anaesthesia was difficult to perform and/or unsuccessful; other risk factors included antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy, and direct spinal cord trauma. We report a case of subarachnoid haematoma after spinal anaesthesia in a young patient without risk factors. PMID:27591468

  3. Optimization of oxygen delivery in a Jehovah's Witness with severe anaemia after postpartum haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, LaVone; Stephenson-Famy, Alyssa; Easterling, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The delivery of a 25-year-old Jehovah's Witness was complicated by postpartum haemorrhage with a nadir haematocrit of 3%. To improve oxygen delivery without blood transfusion, FiO2 was increased to maximize dissolved oxygen delivery. Central venous oxygen saturation was used to assess tissue oxygenation. When blood products are refused, successful management of severe anaemia is possible with supportive medical care to achieve haemostasis, optimize oxygen delivery and promote haematopoiesis.

  4. [Continuous EEG monitoring for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Pugin, D; Vulliemoz, S; Bijlenga, P; Gasche, Y

    2014-12-10

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) still carries a high morbidity and mortality, despite improvement in surgical and medical management. Seizures and delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) secondary to vasospasm or cortical spreading depression are frequent after SAH. Continuous EEG allows early detection of non-convulsive seizures or delayed cerebral ischemia and may become a promissing tool in the monitoring of SAH patients. However, its use in clinical practice is still limited because many resources are required for recording and analyzing continuous EEG. Moreover, we require more data to confirm the relationship between aggressive treatment of non-convulsive seizure or delayed cerebral ischemia triggered by continuous EEG and outcome. PMID:25632630

  5. Spontaneous retroperitoneal haemorrhage in a young adult

    PubMed Central

    Baksi, Aditya; Gupta, Shahana; Ray, Udipta; Ghosh, Shibajyoti

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of a primary adrenal cortical malignancy presenting with spontaneous retroperitoneal haemorrhage in a young adult. To the best of our knowledge, this is the thirteenth such case to be reported in the English literature. PMID:24658522

  6. Transient global amnesia and left frontal haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Jacome, D. E.; Yanez, G. F.

    1988-01-01

    A patient developed spontaneous, acute, dominant frontal lobe haemorrhage neighbouring on a zone of pre-existing post-traumatic encephalomalacia manifesting clinically as transient global amnesia. Amnesia can be secondary to disease of the frontal lobe, affecting pathways interconnecting the basal forebrain and hippocampus of the temporal lobe. Images Figure 1 PMID:3174526

  7. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia manifesting as subdural empyema.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Sandeep P; Taylor, Christopher; Robertson, Iain

    2016-06-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) also known as Osler-Weber-Rendu disease is a rare autosomal dominant condition causing vascular dysplasia. Cerebral abscess formation, secondary to paradoxical septic emboli via HHT-derived pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (pAVMs) in this context is well documented. Herein, we present the first case of subdural empyema with this aetiology. PMID:26982736

  8. Effect of neonatal periventricular haemorrhage on neurodevelopmental outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Catto-Smith, A G; Yu, V Y; Bajuk, B; Orgill, A A; Astbury, J

    1985-01-01

    All 56 infants born between 23 and 28 weeks' gestation admitted to this hospital in 1981 were examined for periventricular haemorrhage with cerebral ultrasonography. Haemorrhage was diagnosed in 34 (61%)-12 (22%) had germinal layer haemorrhage, 18 (32%) had intraventricular haemorrhage, and four (7%) had intracerebral haemorrhage. The two year outcome of survivors with and without periventricular haemorrhage was compared to determine the effect on neurodevelopment. Only three (16%) of 19 infants with normal scans or germinal layer haemorrhages had evidence of major disability but nine (75%) of 12 infants with intraventricular or intracerebral haemorrhage had major disability. The mental and psychomotor performance on the Bayley scales of infant development was also significantly worse in the latter group. All three survivors with intracerebral haemorrhage had major disability. The continuation of life support treatment for extremely preterm infants who are at very high risk of severe handicap is a matter of increasing concern in neonatal intensive care. Our results show that if extensive periventricular haemorrhage, in particular intracerebral haemorrhage, occurs in this gestational group, extreme pessimism is warranted. PMID:2578773

  9. The distribution of intravenous nicardipine in rat brain after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukahara, T.; Arista, A.; Kassell, N.F. )

    1989-09-01

    The distribution of intravenously injected nicardipine in rat brain was investigated, as well as the influence of subarachnoid hemorrhage on its distribution. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated the accumulation of {sup 3}H-nicardipine only in the ventricles and subarachnoid spaces around pial vessels in normal brains. Thirty minutes after subarachnoid hemorrhage, the concentration of {sup 3}H-nicardipine was higher in the ventricles and in the subarachnoid space than that found in normal brains. It is concluded that nicardipine penetrates into the subarachnoid spaces and ventricles from pial vessels and/or choroid plexus, and that subarachnoid hemorrhage increases the penetration of nicardipine from vessels into the subarachnoid space.

  10. Ehrlichia Meningitis Mimicking Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Dredla, Brynn

    2015-01-01

    Thunderclap headache is a sudden and severe headache that can occur after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a medical emergency that requires prompt attention and hospitalization. Patients with thunderclap headache often undergo a noncontrast head computed tomography (CT) scan to ascertain SAH bleeding and, if the scan is negative, then undergo a lumbar puncture to look for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) red blood cells (RBCs), which would be consistent with an aneurysmal leak. If the initial CT is negative and CSF is positive for RBCs, patients are usually admitted to the hospital for evaluation of intracranial aneurysm. We encountered a patient with thunderclap headache whose initial head CT was negative for SAH and whose CSF tested positive for RBCs. The patient was referred to our center for evaluation and management of aneurysmal SAH. However, on careful review of the patient’s medical history, serum laboratory values, and spinal fluid values, the patient was diagnosed with Ehrlichia chaffeensis meningitis. While Ehrlichia meningitis is rare, it is important to recognize the clinical clues that could help avoid formal cerebral angiography, a costly and potentially unnecessary procedure. We present how this case represented a cognitive framing bias and anchoring heuristic as well as steps that medical providers can use to prevent such cognitive errors in diagnosis. PMID:27053985

  11. Subarachnoid hemorrhage from intracranial aneurysms during pregnancy and the puerperium.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hiroharu; Miyoshi, Takekazu; Neki, Reiko; Yoshimatsu, Jun; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Iihara, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm (IA) is a rare but serious complication of pregnancy and is responsible for important morbidity and mortality during pregnancy. This study reviewed reports of ruptured IA during pregnancy and the puerperium, and our own cases of ruptured IA in pregnant women. Hemorrhage occurred predominantly during the third trimester of pregnancy, when maternal cardiac output and blood volume increase and reach maximum. Physiological and hormonal changes in pregnancy are likely to affect the risk of IA rupture. Ruptured IAs during pregnancy should be managed based on neurosurgical considerations, and the obstetrical management of women with ruptured IAs should be decided according to the severity of SAH and the gestational age. Emergent cesarean section followed by clipping or coiling of aneurysms is indicated if the maternal condition and the gestational age allow such interventions. Although SAH during pregnancy can result in disastrous outcomes, the necessity of intracranial screening for high-risk pregnant women is still controversial. PMID:23979051

  12. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Models: Do They Need a Fix?

    PubMed Central

    Sehba, Fatima A.; Pluta, Ryszard M.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of tissue plasminogen activator to treat acute stroke is a success story of research on preventing brain injury following transient cerebral ischemia (TGI). That this discovery depended upon development of embolic animal model reiterates that proper stroke modeling is the key to develop new treatments. In contrast to TGI, despite extensive research, prevention or treatment of brain injury following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) has not been achieved. A lack of adequate aSAH disease model may have contributed to this failure. TGI is an important component of aSAH and shares mechanism of injury with it. We hypothesized that modifying aSAH model using experience acquired from TGI modeling may facilitate development of treatment for aSAH and its complications. This review focuses on similarities and dissimilarities between TGI and aSAH, discusses the existing TGI and aSAH animal models, and presents a modified aSAH model which effectively mimics the disease and has a potential of becoming a better resource for studying the brain injury mechanisms and developing a treatment. PMID:23878760

  13. Effect of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage on Word Generation

    PubMed Central

    Ladowski, Daniella; Qian, Winnie; Kapadia, Anish N.; Macdonald, R. Loch; Schweizer, Tom A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) survivors commonly exhibit impairment on phonemic and semantic fluency tests; however, it is unclear which of the contributing cognitive processes are compromised in aSAH patients. One method of disentangling these processes is to compare initial word production, which is a rapid, semiautomatic, frontal-executive process, and late phase word production, which is dependent on more effortful retrieval and lexical size and requires a more distributed neural network. Methods. Seventy-two individuals with aSAH and twenty-five control subjects were tested on a cognitive battery including the phonemic and semantic fluency task. Demographic and clinical information was also collected. Results. Compared to control subjects, patients with aSAH were treated by clipping and those with multiple aneurysms were impaired across the duration of the phonemic test. Among patients treated by coiling, those with anterior communicating artery aneurysms or a neurological complication (intraventricular hemorrhage, vasospasm, and edema) showed worse output only in the last 45 seconds of the phonemic test. Patients performed comparably to control subjects on the semantic test. Conclusions. These results support a “diffuse damage” hypothesis of aSAH, indicated by late phase phonemic fluency impairment. Overall, the phonemic and semantic tests represent a viable, rapid clinical screening tool in the postoperative assessment of patients with aSAH. PMID:24803729

  14. Spontaneous cervical haemorrhage of a parathyroid adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Knee, Graham; Todd, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Haemorrhage of a parathyroid adenoma is a rare clinical presentation. This report describes a previously fit and well 54-year-old woman who presented with acute neck swelling and pain with an overlying ecchymosis. Admission laboratory tests revealed a raised parathyroid hormone and hypercalcaemia. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed widespread anterior cervical haemorrhage and a lesion at the inferior pole of the left thyroid gland. A working diagnosis of spontaneous haemorrhage from a parathyroid adenoma was made. As she was haemodynamically stable, she was treated conservatively with a period of observation in hospital to monitor for signs of neck organ compression. Follow-up imaging with CT, ultrasound and sestamibi confirmed the likely source of haemorrhage as a parathyroid nodule with significant vascularity. The diagnosis was confirmed on histopathological analysis after elective surgical exploration of the neck 6 months after her presentation. This revealed a benign parathyroid adenoma with evidence of acute and chronic bleeding. The patient made a full recovery with immediate normalisation of her biochemistry post-operatively. Despite developing a hoarse voice in the immediate post-operative period, this resolved completely within 1 month. This case report provides further evidence to support a minimal delay for elective surgery after conservative management to reduce the risks associated with recurrent bleeding. Learning points Haemorrhage of a parathyroid adenoma should be a differential for all cases of acute cervical swelling or ecchymosis with no precipitating factor.The clerking should identify any risk factors for endocrine disease.Blood tests to screen for abnormal parathyroid biochemistry should be performed on admission.Detailed imaging of the neck is essential to identify the source of haemorrhage and risk of compression to vital neck organs.Conservative management is a suitable option for patients who remain haemodynamically stable

  15. [Subarachnoid hemorrhage: epidemiology, social impact and a multidisciplinary approach].

    PubMed

    Ingelmo Ingelmo, I; Fàbregas Julià, N; Rama-Maceiras, P; Hernández-Palazón, J; Rubio Romero, R; Carmona Aurioles, J

    2010-12-01

    Cerebrovascular disease, whether ischemic or hemorrhagic, is a worldwide problem, representing personal tragedy, great social and economic consequences, and a heavy burden on the health care system. Estimated to be responsible for up to 10% of mortality in industrialized countries, cerebrovascular disease also affects individuals who are still in the workforce, with consequent loss of productive years. Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a type of cerebrovascular accident that leads to around 5% of all strokes. SAH is most often due to trauma but may also be spontaneous, in which case the cause may be a ruptured intracranial aneurysm (80%) or arteriovenous malformation or any other abnormality of the blood or vessels (20%). Although both the diagnosis and treatment of aneurysmal SAH has improved in recent years, related morbidity and mortality remains high: 50% of patients die from the initial hemorrhage or later complications. If patients whose brain function is permanently damaged are added to the count, the percentage of cases leading to severe consequences rises to 70%. The burden of care of patients who are left incapacitated by SAH falls to the family or to private and public institutions. The economic cost is considerable and the loss of quality of life for both the patient and the family is great. Given the magnitude of this problem, the provision of adequate prophylaxis is essential; also needed are organizational models that aim to reduce mortality as well as related complications. Aneurysmal SAH is a condition which must be approached in a coordinated, multidisciplinary way both during the acute phase and throughout rehabilitation in order to lower the risk of unwanted outcomes. PMID:21298906

  16. European research priorities for intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Thorsten; Petersson, Jesper; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Christensen, Hanne; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Csiba, Laszlo; Harnof, Sagi; Krieger, Derk; Mendelow, David; Molina, Carlos; Montaner, Joan; Overgaard, Karsten; Roine, Risto O; Schmutzhard, Erich; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Toni, Danilo; Stapf, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Over 2 million people are affected by intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) worldwide every year, one third of them dying within 1 month, and many survivors being left with permanent disability. Unlike most other stroke types, the incidence, morbidity and mortality of ICH have not declined over time. No standardised diagnostic workup for the detection of the various underlying causes of ICH currently exists, and the evidence for medical or surgical therapeutic interventions remains limited. A dedicated European research programme for ICH is needed to identify ways to reduce the burden of ICH-related death and disability. The European Research Network on Intracerebral Haemorrhage EURONICH is a multidisciplinary academic research collaboration that has been established to define current research priorities and to conduct large clinical studies on all aspects of ICH. PMID:21986448

  17. Dengue haemorrhagic fever with unusual prolonged thrombocytopaenia.

    PubMed

    Kamil, S M; Mohamad, N H; Narazah, M Y; Khan, F A

    2006-04-01

    We describe a case of dengue haemorrhagic fever with prolonged thrombocytopaenia. A 22-year-old Malay man with no prior illness presented with a history of fever and generalised macular rash of four days duration. Initial work-up suggested the diagnosis of dengue haemorrhagic fever based on thrombocytopaenia and positive dengue serology. Patient recovered from acute illness by day ten, and was discharged from the hospital with improving platelet count. He was then noted to have declining platelet count on follow-up and required another hospital admission on day 19 of his illness because of declining platelet count. The patient remained hospitalised till day 44 of his illness and managed with repeated platelet transfusion and supportive care till he recovered spontaneously. PMID:16572249

  18. European Research Priorities for Intracerebral Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Thorsten; Petersson, Jesper; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Christensen, Hanne; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Csiba, Laszlo; Harnof, Sagi; Krieger, Derk; Mendelow, David; Molina, Carlos; Montaner, Joan; Overgaard, Karsten; Roine, Risto O.; Schmutzhard, Erich; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Toni, Danilo; Stapf, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Over 2 million people are affected by intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) worldwide every year, one third of them dying within 1 month, and many survivors being left with permanent disability. Unlike most other stroke types, the incidence, morbidity and mortality of ICH have not declined over time. No standardised diagnostic workup for the detection of the various underlying causes of ICH currently exists, and the evidence for medical or surgical therapeutic interventions remains limited. A dedicated European research programme for ICH is needed to identify ways to reduce the burden of ICH-related death and disability. The European Research Network on Intracerebral Haemorrhage EURONICH is a multidisciplinary academic research collaboration that has been established to define current research priorities and to conduct large clinical studies on all aspects of ICH. PMID:21986448

  19. Lessons from nosocomial viral haemorrhagic fever outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Fisher-Hoch, Susan P

    2005-01-01

    The outbreak of Marburg haemorrhagic fever in Angola in 2004-2005 shows once again the devastating and rapid spread of viral haemorrhagic fevers in medical settings where hygiene practices are poorly applied or ignored. The legacy of years of war and poverty in Angola has resulted in very poor medical education and services. The initial high rate of infection among infants in Angola may have been related to poor hospital practices, possibly administration of vaccines. Though the outbreak in Angola was in a part of Africa not previously known to have filovirus infection, prior ecological modelling had predicted this location and many others. Prevention of future outbreaks will not be easy. The urgent need is dissemination of knowledge and the training, discipline and resources for good clinical practice. Educating the public to demand higher standards could be a powerful tool. Good practices are difficult to establish and maintain on the scale needed. PMID:16373655

  20. Jugular Foramen Arteriovenous Shunt with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Rodesch, G.; Comoy, J.; Hurth, M.; Lasjaunias, P.

    1991-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 37-year-old man with an extracerebral arteriovenous fistula at the skull base, revealed by subarachnoid and intraventricular hemorrhage. The malformation was fed by the neuromeningeal trunk of the ascending pharyngeal artery and drained into left laterobulbar veins. Embolization with bucrylate was performed and occluded totally the shunting zone. A 1-year follow-up angiogram confirmed the good stability of the result, the patient being asymptomatic. This case emphasizes the quality of results that can be obtained with bucrylate in arterioverious fistulas presenting with hemorrhage. It confirms that the external carotid artery must be studied when dealing with intracranial hemorrhage. On the other hand, magnetic resonance imaging and angiography may depict vascular abnormalities but do not always indicate the shunting area, thus the pathologic type of the malformation. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 5p136-b PMID:17170835

  1. Magnesium sulfate administration in subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Jose I

    2011-09-01

    Magnesium offers theoretic vascular and neuroprotective benefits for patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. An electronic literature search was conducted to identify original research studies describing intravenous magnesium treatment in patients with SAH published in English between January 1990 and October 2010. Seventeen articles were identified and reviewed, including one phase III randomized-controlled clinical trial and six phase II randomized-controlled trials. Study quality was low for most of the included studies, with the phase III trial considered to be of moderate quality. Due to inconsistently reported benefits and the occurrence of side effects, phase II data suggested that intravenous magnesium for SAH provided either no overall net benefit or uncertain trade-offs. Benefit was likewise not supported in the single phase III clinical trial. PMID:21748496

  2. Epidemiology of Intracranial Haemorrhages Associated with Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in Spain: TAC Registry

    PubMed Central

    Zapata-Wainberg, Gustavo; Ximénez-Carrillo Rico, Álvaro; Benavente Fernández, Lorena; Masjuan Vallejo, Jaime; Gállego Culleré, Jaime; Freijó Guerrero, María del Mar; Egido, José; Gómez Sánchez, José Carlos; Martínez Domeño, Alejandro; Purroy García, Francisco; Vives Pastor, Bárbara; Blanco González, Miguel; Vivancos, José

    2015-01-01

    Background Vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (VKA-OACs) are effective for primary and secondary prevention of embolic events. The rate of haemorrhagic neurological complications in patients admitted to neurology departments in Spain is not yet known. Aims We aimed to determine the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients with intracranial haemorrhage secondary to VKA-OACs as well as the incidence of this severe complication. Methods We conducted a retrospective, descriptive, multi-centre study using information from the medical records of all patients admitted to neurology departments, diagnosed with spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage, and treated with VKA-OACs within a 1-year period. We collected demographic and care data from centres, patients' medical records [demographic data, medical history, haemorrhage origin, vascular risk factors, concomitant treatment, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores], and patients' outcome at 3 months [independence (modified Rankin Scale score <3) and mortality rate]. Results Twenty-one hospitals serving a population of 8,155,628 inhabitants participated in the study. The total number of cases was 235, the mean age was 78.2 (SD 9.4) years, and the baseline NIHSS score was 11.6 (SD 9.5; median 9; interquartile range 14). The VKA-OACs used were acenocoumarol in 95.3% (224 patients) and warfarin in 4.7% (11 patients). The haemorrhage origin was deep in 29.8%, lobar in 25.5%, intraventricular in 11.5%, extensive in 17.4% (>100 ml), cerebellar in 12.3%, and in the brainstem in 3.4%. The international normalised ratio was within therapeutic ranges at admission (according to indication) in 29.4% (69 patients). The global incidence (cases per 100,000 inhabitants per year) is 2.88. The in-hospital mortality rate was 40%, and 24.3% of the patients were independent at 3 months, while the mortality at 3 months was 42.6%. Conclusion VKA-OAC treatment is associated with a large percentage of all

  3. Successful treatment of active haemorrhage from a duodenal diverticulum using surgicel (absorbable haemostat): a case report.

    PubMed

    Muguti, Gi; Gandhi, H; Ridgeway, D

    2007-01-01

    Haemorrhage is one of the rare but serious complications of duodenal diverticula. Current methods of treatment include: endoscopy with injection therapy or hemoclip application and diverticulectomy. In this paper we present the case of a 61 year old man with life threatening haemorrhage who was managed successfully with gentle packing of a bleeding duodenal diverticulum using SURGICEL (Absorbable Haemostat). This appears to be a simple and effective way of dealing with the problem especially in situations where other methods are ineffective or inapplicable. Early surgical intervention before the development of any coagulopathy increases the chances of a successful outcome. It has not been possible to find a similar report from a thorough literature search. PMID:20353131

  4. Cervical tourniquet in case of uncontrollable haemorrhage during caesarean section owing to a placenta accreta

    PubMed Central

    Huijgen, Q C A; Gijsen, A F; Hink, E; Van Kesteren, P J M

    2013-01-01

    This case report describes a 38-year-old woman in whom a primary caesarean section for placenta previa was complicated by postpartum haemorrhage due to a placenta accreta. Despite tamponade with a Bakri balloon and placement of a B-Lynch suture, the amount of blood loss could not be effectively reduced. The blood loss was eventually minimised by the placement of a Penrose drain around the cervix as a cervical tourniquet. We think that a cervical tourniquet is an effective method of stopping haemorrhage during caesarean section, as shown in this case report, and we consider this technique to be a valuable addition to several existing methods through which fertility is preserved by preventing emergency hysterectomy. PMID:23608864

  5. Cervical tourniquet in case of uncontrollable haemorrhage during caesarean section owing to a placenta accreta.

    PubMed

    Huijgen, Q C A; Gijsen, A F; Hink, E; Van Kesteren, P J M

    2013-01-01

    This case report describes a 38-year-old woman in whom a primary caesarean section for placenta previa was complicated by postpartum haemorrhage due to a placenta accreta. Despite tamponade with a Bakri balloon and placement of a B-Lynch suture, the amount of blood loss could not be effectively reduced. The blood loss was eventually minimised by the placement of a Penrose drain around the cervix as a cervical tourniquet. We think that a cervical tourniquet is an effective method of stopping haemorrhage during caesarean section, as shown in this case report, and we consider this technique to be a valuable addition to several existing methods through which fertility is preserved by preventing emergency hysterectomy. PMID:23608864

  6. Bevacizumab in vitreous haemorrhage secondary to radiation retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Montero, Javier Antonio; Yanez-Castro, Giovanni; Sanchis-Merino, Maria Eugenia; Ruiz-Moreno, Jose Maria

    2014-01-01

    Radiation retinopathy is a delayed-onset side effect of radiation exposure caused by retinal ischaemia that may induce proliferative retinopathy with neovascularisation, vitreous haemorrhage and macular oedema. An otherwise healthy, 51-year-old male patient who had been diagnosed with olfactory neuroblastoma and undergone complete surgical removal of the lesion followed by cranial irradiation developed bilateral cataracts and radiation retinopathy. The patient was treated by panretinal photocoagulation (PRP), followed by three-port pars-plana vitrectomy. Recurrent episodes of vitreous haemorrhages occurred following surgery and the patient was successfully treated by one intravitreal injection of bevacizumab with resolution of vitreous blood. Vitreous haemorrhage recurred 6 months later and a scheduled treatment with intravitreal bevacizumab every 4 months was established, preventing further haemorrhagic episodes. Six months after the last injection, a new episode of vitreous haemorrhage occurred. Scheduled intravitreal bevacizumab injections may help prevent recurrent vitreous haemorrhages in vitrectomised patients with radiation retinopathy. PMID:24510700

  7. Transcatheter coil embolotherapy: a safe and effective option for major colonic haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, A; Ettles, D; Hartley, J; Curzon, I; Lee, P; Duthie, G; Monson, J

    1998-01-01

    Background—The management of major colonic bleeding is problematic. A proportion of patients require emergency surgery which is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Percutaneous embolotherapy, previously considered a high risk procedure in the colon, may provide an alternative treatment in this group of patients. 
Aims—To assess the safety and efficacy of embolotherapy in the treatment of life threatening colonic haemorrhage. 
Patients and methods—Thirty eight patients with fresh haemorrhage per rectum were referred for surgery because of failed conservative treatment. All underwent angiography; in 14 a bleeding site or vascular abnormality was detected. A coaxial catheter was directed to the most distal bleeding artery and this was embolised with platinum coils. 
Results—Detection of a bleeding site correlated with haemodynamic stability at the time of angiography (r=1 for a systolic blood pressure less than 100 mm Hg). Bleeding sites or vascular abnormalities were detected and embolised in 14 patients (37%). In 12/14 there was immediate and sustained haemodynamic improvement; two continued to bleed and required emergency hemicolectomy (14%). Three developed ischaemic complications (21.4%); these were managed conservatively and required no intervention. The 30 day mortality was 7.1% in the embolotherapy group and 10.5% in the overall group of 38patients. 
Conclusion—Colonic embolotherapy for life threatening haemorrhage is an effective, relatively safe procedure with a low incidence of major complications. Its use depends on the identification of a focal bleeding point or vascular abnormality, which in turn depends on the haemodynamic stability of the patient at the time of angiography. 

 Keywords: colonic haemorrhage; embolisation; angiography; angiodysplasia; diverticular disease PMID:9771409

  8. Successful vaginal delivery following spontaneous adrenal haemorrhage at term.

    PubMed

    Street, Sally; Dekker Nitert, Marloes; Callaway, Leonie K

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous adrenal haemorrhage (SAH) is a rare event in the general population, estimated to be around 0.3-1.8%. The exact incidence in pregnancy is unknown but rare. Most cases of SAH at or near term have presented with massive haemorrhage and haemodynamic instability, requiring emergency caesarean delivery or intrauterine fetal death. This is the first reported case of a successful vaginal delivery after acute, spontaneous, left adrenal haemorrhage at term. PMID:27190116

  9. Factors associated with periventricular haemorrhage in very low birthweight infants.

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, R W

    1981-01-01

    Periventricular haemorrhage was diagnosed in vivo in 20 of 29 consecutively admitted infants of birthweight below 1500 g using an ultrasound scanner. Ten (51%) infants with haemorrhages survived. Mortality was related to the extent of the bleeding. Statistically significant associations with respiratory distress, ventilator therapy, metabolic acidosis, and hypercapnia were observed, lending support to their role in the pathogenesis of periventricular haemorrhage. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3a Fig. 4a Fig. 5a PMID:7259272

  10. Bilateral eyelid ecchymosis and subconjunctival haemorrhage manifesting as presenting feature in a case of dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sparshi; Goswami, Anup; Singh, Nidhi; Kaur, Savleen

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of bilateral eyelid ecchymosis and subconjunctival haemorrhage, a rare presenting feature of dengue haemorrhagic fever. A 17-year-old boy presented to the emergency department with complaints of redness in both eyes and vomiting. He had bilateral eyelid ecchymosis with subconjunctival haemorrhage. Complete blood count revealed a significantly reduced platelet count of 11000/µL suggestive of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). Ocular manifestations were followed by other systemic haemorrhagic manifestations of dengue later on which violates the usual sequence of events of dengue fever. Bilateral eyelid ecchymosis is a rare clinical manifestation and a rare presenting feature of dengue fever and one has to keep high index of suspicion for presence of dengue whenever a case of fever presents with lid ecchymosis/haemorrhage. PMID:25540163

  11. The effect of the results of the STICH trial on the management of spontaneous supratentorial intracerebral haemorrhage in Newcastle.

    PubMed

    Kirkman, M A; Mahattanakul, W; Gregson, B A; Mendelow, A D

    2008-12-01

    Recently, the Surgical Trial in IntraCerebral Haemorrhage (STICH) was unable to show an overall benefit from 'early surgery' compared with a policy of 'initial conservative treatment'. Here, we evaluated the impact of the STICH results on the management of spontaneous supratentorial intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) in the Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals. The STICH results were released to the Neurosurgery Department at Newcastle General Hospital in November 2003; using ICD-10 data, we analysed ICH admissions before (2002) and after (2004, 2006, 2007) this. We assessed numbers of Neurosurgery and Stroke Unit admissions, numbers of clot evacuation procedures, and 30-day mortality rate (Neurosurgery vs. Stroke Unit admissions). Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) admissions data were also collected to corroborate our findings. There were 478 spontaneous supratentorial ICH admissions in total; 156 in 2002, 120 in 2004, 106 in 2006 and 96 in 2007. SAH admissions remained remarkably constant over this period. Neurosurgery admissions decreased significantly across the four time periods, from 71% of total ICH admissions (n = 156) in 2002 to 55% (n = 96) in 2007, and Stroke Unit admissions increased significantly from 8% (n = 156) in 2002 to 30% (n = 96) in 2007 (chi(2) = 20.968, p < 0.001, df = 3). Clot evacuation procedures also decreased significantly from 32% (n = 111) of Neurosurgery admissions in 2002 to 17% (n = 53) in 2007 (chi(2) = 11.919, p = 0.008, df = 3). 30-day mortality increased in Neurosurgery from 14% of Neurosurgery admissions (n = 111) in 2002 to 26% (n = 53) in 2007, and decreased in the Stroke Unit, from 42% of Stroke Unit admissions (n = 12) in 2002 to 17% (n = 29) in 2007. The STICH results have significantly impacted ICH management in Newcastle, with a trend towards fewer Neurosurgery admissions and clot evacuations, and increased Stroke Unit admissions. The role of surgery for ICH remains controversial, and randomization continues in STICH II for patients

  12. [Serious surgical complications associated with chronic anticoagulant therapy].

    PubMed

    Pitrák, V; Hadacová, I; Hochová, I; Hoch, J

    2001-06-01

    Chronic anticoagulant treatment is administered mostly for cardiological reasons. Cumarin derivatires are used in the majority of cases (Warfarin, Pelentan). It is necessary to monitor this treatment regularly and to control the dose according to the INR value. Different complications can occur; the haemorrhage represents a serious one. The authors discuss several aspects of anticoagulant therapy and possible prevention of the complications. The importance of the problems is demonstrated on the authors' clinical experience--two cases of haemorrhage after Warfarin administration simulating an acute surgical event. PMID:11482149

  13. Paravascular pathways contribute to vasculitis and neuroinflammation after subarachnoid hemorrhage independently of glymphatic control

    PubMed Central

    Luo, C; Yao, X; Li, J; He, B; Liu, Q; Ren, H; Liang, F; Li, M; Lin, H; Peng, J; Yuan, T F; Pei, Z; Su, H

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating disease with high mortality. The mechanisms underlying its pathological complications have not been fully identified. Here, we investigate the potential involvement of the glymphatic system in the neuropathology of SAH. We demonstrate that blood components rapidly enter the paravascular space following SAH and penetrate into the perivascular parenchyma throughout the brain, causing disastrous events such as cerebral vasospasm, delayed cerebral ischemia, microcirculation dysfunction and widespread perivascular neuroinflammation. Clearance of the paravascular pathway with tissue-type plasminogen activator ameliorates the behavioral deficits and alleviates histological injury of SAH. Interestingly, AQP4−/− mice showed no improvements in neurological deficits and neuroinflammation at day 7 after SAH compared with WT control mice. In conclusion, our study proves that the paravascular pathway dynamically mediates the pathological complications following acute SAH independently of glymphatic control. PMID:27031957

  14. Neonatal cranial ultrasound screening for intraventricular haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tudehope, D I; Lamont, A C

    1998-04-01

    The cost effectiveness of performing routine neonatal cranial ultrasound scans to diagnose intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) on cohorts of high risk infants is in question. In the early 1980s cranial ultrasound scans were performed on preterm infants to expand knowledge of the incidence, aetiology, pathogenesis and evolution of IVH. In many neonatal units high risk infants are scanned on days 5-7 and 10-14 and prior to discharge for extremely low birthweight (ELBW) infants. Cranial ultrasound scanning is often used as a surrogate for assessment of neurodevelopmental outcome with information from meta analyses used to counsel parents about the likelihood of subsequent neurosensory disability. PMID:9588629

  15. Ultrasound and necropsy study of periventricular haemorrhage in preterm infants.

    PubMed Central

    Szymonowicz, W; Schafler, K; Cussen, L J; Yu, V Y

    1984-01-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of cerebral ultrasound for periventricular haemorrhage was determined by comparing this with necropsy findings in 30 preterm neonates of 30 weeks' gestation or less and birthweight under 1500 g. Ultrasound gave an accurate diagnosis of 85% in infants with germinal layer haemorrhage, 92% in intraventricular haemorrhage, and 97% in intracerebral haemorrhage. False positive errors were caused by vascular congestion; false negative errors occurred when the maximum dimension of haemorrhage was less than 3 mm. Cerebral ultrasound gave a diagnostic accuracy of 63% for periventricular leucomalacia. False negative errors occurred when periventricular leucomalacia was microscopic or when it was out of range of the scanner. The maximum width of the germinal layer was measured in 77 neonates of gestational age 23 to 36 weeks who died and had no periventricular haemorrhage at necropsy. The progressive involution of the germinal layer with increasing gestational age paralleled the steady decrease in incidence of periventricular haemorrhage diagnosed over the same gestational age range. Neonates of the youngest gestational age who had the most extensive germinal layers also had the highest risk for periventricular haemorrhage. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 p640-b Fig. 4 PMID:6465933

  16. Ultrasound and necropsy study of periventricular haemorrhage in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Szymonowicz, W; Schafler, K; Cussen, L J; Yu, V Y

    1984-07-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of cerebral ultrasound for periventricular haemorrhage was determined by comparing this with necropsy findings in 30 preterm neonates of 30 weeks' gestation or less and birthweight under 1500 g. Ultrasound gave an accurate diagnosis of 85% in infants with germinal layer haemorrhage, 92% in intraventricular haemorrhage, and 97% in intracerebral haemorrhage. False positive errors were caused by vascular congestion; false negative errors occurred when the maximum dimension of haemorrhage was less than 3 mm. Cerebral ultrasound gave a diagnostic accuracy of 63% for periventricular leucomalacia. False negative errors occurred when periventricular leucomalacia was microscopic or when it was out of range of the scanner. The maximum width of the germinal layer was measured in 77 neonates of gestational age 23 to 36 weeks who died and had no periventricular haemorrhage at necropsy. The progressive involution of the germinal layer with increasing gestational age paralleled the steady decrease in incidence of periventricular haemorrhage diagnosed over the same gestational age range. Neonates of the youngest gestational age who had the most extensive germinal layers also had the highest risk for periventricular haemorrhage. PMID:6465933

  17. Chronic alveolar haemorrhage in a paediatric patient: a diagnostic and treatment challenge.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Ana; Senra, Virgílio; Marinho, António; Guedes, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary haemosiderosis is characterised by chronic alveolar haemorrhage, which can lead to serious cardiorespiratory complications. Although considered idiopathic in most patients, there are many possible aetiologies. We present a case of an 18-year-old woman with pulmonary haemosiderosis since 4 years of age, with an inconclusive initial study, who was treated with systemic corticosteroids and hydroxychloroquine until the age of 12 years, and azathioprine since then. Multiple exacerbations led to interstitial lung disease with restrictive functional pattern. Unilateral cochlear deafness was diagnosed at the age of 12 years and occasional polyarthralgias were recorded. When she was 16 years of age the study revealed an atypical myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA) pattern. Cyclophosphamide and rituximab were administered with resolution of respiratory insufficiency and functional disability, without new episodes of alveolar haemorrhage. This case of chronic pulmonary haemorrhage was revealed to be an ANCA vasculitis, the diagnosis of which was possible only after 12 years of symptoms, with clinical and functional improvement with the association of cyclophosphamide and rituximab. PMID:25899510

  18. Introduction of an algorithm for ROTEM-guided fibrinogen concentrate administration in major obstetric haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mallaiah, S; Barclay, P; Harrod, I; Chevannes, C; Bhalla, A

    2015-02-01

    We compared blood component requirements during major obstetric haemorrhage, following the introduction of fibrinogen concentrate. A prospective study of transfusion requirements and patient outcomes was performed for 12 months to evaluate the major obstetric haemorrhage pathway using shock packs (Shock Pack phase). The study was repeated after the pathway was amended to include fibrinogen concentrate (Fibrinogen phase). The median (IQR [range]) number of blood components given was 8.0 (3.0-14.5 [0-32]) during the Shock Pack phase, and 3.0 (2.0-5.0 [0-26]) during the Fibrinogen phase (p = 0.0004). The median (IQR [range]) quantity of fibrinogen administered was significantly greater in the Shock Pack phase, 3.2 (0-7.1 [0-20.4]) g, than in the Fibrinogen phase, 0 (0-3.0 [0-12.4]) g, p = 0.0005. Four (9.5%) of 42 patients in the Shock Pack phase developed transfusion associated circulatory overload compared with none of 51 patients in the Fibrinogen phase (p = 0.038). Fibrinogen concentrate allows prompt correction of coagulation deficits associated with major obstetric haemorrhage, reducing the requirement for blood component therapy and the attendant risks of complications. PMID:25289791

  19. [Pulmonary hemorrhage complicating transthoracic puncture].

    PubMed

    Febvre, M; de Fenoyl, O; Capron, F; Vadrot, D; Rochemaure, J

    1989-01-01

    Fine needle transthoracic aspiration (FNTA) of pulmonary opacities under guidance of computerized tomography (CT) is a simple procedure yielding conclusive results in many patients with malignant lung tumours. The small caliber of the needles utilized and the CT control make this increasingly popular procedure both accurate and safe. Yet a number of complications have occurred; most of them were benign (e.g. pneumothorax) but some were potentially dangerous (e.g. pulmonary haemorrhage), so that the pros and cons of the procedure must carefully be weighed. We report the case of a patient in whom FNTA was complicated by copious haemoptysis and a pulmonary haematoma clearly visible at CT. The literature concerning the potential complications of transthoracic puncture is reviewed. PMID:2633295

  20. A multicenter prospective cohort study of volume management after subarachnoid hemorrhage: circulatory characteristics of pulmonary edema after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Obata, Yoshiki; Takeda, Junichi; Sato, Yohei; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Matsui, Toru; Isotani, Eiji

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is often accompanied by pulmonary complications, which may lead to poor outcomes and death. This study investigated the incidence and cause of pulmonary edema in patients with SAH by using hemodynamic monitoring with PiCCO-plus pulse contour analysis. METHODS A total of 204 patients with SAH were included in a multicenter prospective cohort study to investigate hemodynamic changes after surgical clipping or coil embolization of ruptured cerebral aneurysms by using a PiCCO-plus device. Changes in various hemodynamic parameters after SAH were analyzed statistically. RESULTS Fifty-two patients (25.5%) developed pulmonary edema. Patients with pulmonary edema (PE group) were significantly older than those without pulmonary edema (non-PE group) (p = 0.017). The mean extravascular lung water index was significantly higher in the PE group than in the non-PE group throughout the study period. The pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI) was significantly higher in the PE group than in the non-PE group on Day 6 (p = 0.029) and Day 10 (p = 0.011). The cardiac index of the PE group was significantly decreased biphasically on Days 2 and 10 compared with that of the non-PE group. In the early phase (Days 1-5 after SAH), the daily water balance of the PE group was slightly positive. In the delayed phase (Days 6-14 after SAH), the serum C-reactive protein level and the global end-diastolic volume index were significantly higher in the PE group than in the non-PE group, whereas the PVPI tended to be higher in the PE group. CONCLUSIONS Pulmonary edema that occurs in the early and delayed phases after SAH is caused by cardiac failure and inflammatory (i.e., noncardiogenic) conditions, respectively. Measurement of the extravascular lung water index, cardiac index, and PVPI by PiCCO-plus monitoring is useful for identifying pulmonary edema in patients with SAH. PMID:26613172

  1. AANA journal course: update for nurse anesthetists-improving the safety of subarachnoid and epidural blocks--Part A.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, M A

    1997-08-01

    Hypotension caused by reduced venous return to the heart is a common hazard during subarachnoid and epidural anesthesia. Reduced venous return can also cause severe bradycardia and even cardiac arrest. The infusion of a crystalloid intravenous preload prior to the injection of local anesthetic helps prevent these complications. Unfortunately, intravenous fluid preloading prior to subarachnoid or epidural block is neither appropriate for all patients nor is it always effective. Vasopressor infusions and lower extremity compression, though not completely studied, may allow for further decreases in the incidence of hypotension and bradycardia. When dosing an epidural catheter, making each dose a test dose and observing for signs of subarachnoid or intravascular injection decreases the incidence of hypotension, seizure, and cardiotoxicity. The pathophysiology of cardiac arrest and resuscitation is different during major conduction block due primarily to changes in peripheral vascular tone and venous return to the heart. Neural injury associated with regional anesthesia is due to needle trauma, hematoma, injectate toxicity, ischemia, and compression. Though neural injury is rare, it is more commonly associated with blocks performed in the lumbar region (spinals and epidurals) than in other types of blocks. PMID:9281920

  2. Subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by an undifferentiated sarcoma of the sellar region

    PubMed Central

    Ganaha, Tsukasa; Inamasu, Joji; Oheda, Motoki; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Hirose, Yuichi; Abe, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is rare for patients with pituitary apoplexy to exhibit concomitant subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Only a handful of patients with pituitary apoplexy have developed such hemorrhagic complications, and histopathological examination revealed pituitary adenoma as the cause of SAH. Case Report: A previously healthy 35-year-old woman was brought to our institution after complaining of severe headache and left monocular blindness. Brain computed tomography showed a diffuse SAH with a central low density. Subsequently, the brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intrasellar mass with heterogeneous contrast enhancement. The patient was presumptively diagnosed with SAH secondary to hemorrhagic pituitary adenoma and underwent transcranial surgery to remove both the tumor and subarachnoid clot. A histological evaluation of the surgical specimen revealed malignant cells with strong predilection for vascular invasion. Following immunohistochemical evaluation, the tumor was negative for the majority of tumor markers and was positive only for vimentin and p53; thus, a diagnosis of undifferentiated sarcoma was established. Conclusions: This case was informative in the respect that tumors other than pituitary adenoma should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with pituitary apoplexy. PMID:27500006

  3. Bichat guidelines for the clinical management of haemorrhagic fever viruses and bioterrorism-related haemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Bossi, Philippe; Tegnell, Anders; Baka, Agoritsa; Van Loock, Frank; Hendriks, Jan; Werner, Albrecht; Maidhof, Heinrich; Gouvras, Georgios

    2004-12-01

    Haemorrhagic fever viruses (HFVs) are a diverse group of viruses that cause a clinical disease associated with fever and bleeding disorder. HFVs that are associated with a potential biological threat are Ebola and Marburg viruses (Filoviridae), Lassa fever and New World arenaviruses (Machupo, Junin, Guanarito and Sabia viruses) (Arenaviridae), Rift Valley fever (Bunyaviridae) and yellow fever, Omsk haemorrhagic fever, and Kyanasur Forest disease (Flaviviridae). In terms of biological warfare concerning dengue, Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever and Hantaviruses, there is not sufficient knowledge to include them as a major biological threat. Dengue virus is the only one of these that cannot be transmitted via aerosol. Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever and the agents of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome appear difficult to weaponise. Ribavirin is recommended for the treatment and the prophylaxis of the arenaviruses and the bunyaviruses, but is not effective for the other families. All patients must be isolated and receive intensive supportive therapy. PMID:15677844

  4. Causes of 30-day readmission after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Jacob K; Washington, Chad W; Guniganti, Ridhima; Dacey, Ralph G; Derdeyn, Colin P; Zipfel, Gregory J

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Hospital readmission is a common but controversial quality measure increasingly used to influence hospital compensation in the US. The objective of this study was to evaluate the causes for 30-day hospital readmission following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) to determine the appropriateness of this performance metric and to identify potential avenues for improved patient care. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients who received surgical orendovas-cular treatment for aneurysmal SAH at Barnes-Jewish Hospital between 2003 and 2013. Two senior faculty identified by consensus the primary medical/surgical diagnosis associated with readmission as well as the underlying causes of rehospitalization. RESULTS Among 778 patients treated for aneurysmal SAH, 89 experienced a total of 97 readmission events, yielding a readmission rate of 11.4%. The median time from discharge to readmission was 9 days (interquartile range 3-17.5 days). Actual hydrocephalus or potential concern for hydrocephalus (e.g., headache) was the most frequent diagnosis (26/97, 26.8%), followed by infections (e.g., wound infection [5/97, 5.2%], urinary tract infection [3/97, 3.1%], and pneumonia [3/97, 3.1%]) and thromboembolic events (8/97, 8.2%). In most cases (75/97, 77.3%), we did not identify any treatment lapses contributing to readmission. The most common underlying causes for readmission were unavoidable development of SAH-related pathology (e.g., hydrocephalus; 36/97, 37.1%) and complications related to neurological impairment and immobility (e.g., thromboembolic event despite high-dose chemoprophylaxis; 21/97, 21.6%). The authors determined that 22/97 (22.7%) of the readmissions were likely preventable with alternative management. In these cases, insufficient outpatient medical care (for example, for hyponatremia; 16/97, 16.5%) was the most common shortcoming. CONCLUSIONS Most readmissions after aneurysmal SAH relate to late consequences of

  5. Prognosis Predicting Score for Endovascular Treatment of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Guoli; Yang, Pengfei; Li, Qiang; Zuo, Qiao; Zhang, Lei; Hong, Bo; Xu, Yi; Zhao, Wenyuan; Liu, Jianmin; Huang, Qinghai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The elderly patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) have a greater risk of poor clinical outcome after endovascular treatment (EVT) than younger patients do. Hence, it is necessary to explore which factors are associated with poor outcome and develop a predictive score specifically for elderly patients with aSAH receiving EVT. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a predictive score for 1-year outcomes in individual elderly patients with aSAH underwent EVT. In this 10-year prospective study, 520 consecutive aSAH elderly (age ≥ 60 years) patients underwent EVT in a single center were included. The risk factors, periprocedural, and 1-year follow-up data of all patients were entered in a specific prospective database. The modified Rankin scale was used for evaluating clinical outcome. To optimize the model's predictive capacity, the original matrix was randomly divided in 2 submatrices (learning and testing). The predictive score was developed using Arabic numerals for all variables based on the variable coefficients (β) of multivariable logistic regression analysis in the learning set and the predictive performance evaluation was assessed in the testing set. The risk classes were constructed using classification criteria based on sensitivity and specificity. The poor outcome rate at 1 year was 26.15%. Six risk factors, including age, hypertension, Hunt–Hess scale, Fisher scale, aneurysm location, and periprocedural complications, were independently associated with poor outcome and assembled the Changhai score. The discriminative power analysis with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of the Changhai score was statistically significant (0.864, 0.824–0.904, P < 0.001). The sensitivity and specificity of the Changhai score were 82.07% and 78.06%, respectively. Our study indicated that age, hypertension, Hunt–Hess scale, Fisher scale, aneurysm location, and periprocedural complications were

  6. Deep vein thrombosis induced by thalidomide to control epistaxis secondary to hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Penaloza, Andrea; Vekemans, Marie-Christiane; Lambert, Catherine; Hermans, Cedric

    2011-10-01

    Thalidomide was recently reported to reduce the severity and frequency of epistaxes in patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). We here describe the case of a patient with HHT and severe epistaxes refractory to medical and local surgical treatments who developed an extensive deep vein thrombosis shortly after initiation of treatment with thalidomide. This is the first report of venous thromboembolic complication induced by thalidomide prescribed in this setting. Although thalidomide was recently found to provide an alternative therapeutic strategy in patients with HHT and refractory epistaxes, this agent should be used with great caution in this indication, given its thrombogenicity and difficulties to manage systemic anticoagulation in patients with HHT. PMID:21885956

  7. Endoscopic resection of giant lipoma mimicking colonic neoplasm initially presenting with massive haemorrhage: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lazaraki, Georgia; Tragiannidis, Dimitrios; Xirou, Persefoni; Nakos, Andreas; Pilpilidis, Ioannis; Katsos, Ioannis

    2009-01-01

    Lipomas of the colon are benign tumors that rarely occur. Their size ranges from 2 mm to several cm. They are usually asymptomatic but occasionally they present with clinical manifestations depending on tumor size, localization and complications, which often lead to diagnostic difficulty. A 40-year-old man presented with massive rectal haemorrhage. During colonoscopy a giant polyp of over 50 mm in its bigger diameter, with a thick stalk of 2 cm, located in the transverse colon, was revealed. Endoscopic resection was performed with success. Histologic examination demonstrated a giant lipoma. In this report discussion over endoscopic resection of colonic lipomas mimicking neoplasms is also performed. PMID:20181161

  8. Endoscopic resection of giant lipoma mimicking colonic neoplasm initially presenting with massive haemorrhage: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Lipomas of the colon are benign tumors that rarely occur. Their size ranges from 2 mm to several cm. They are usually asymptomatic but occasionally they present with clinical manifestations depending on tumor size, localization and complications, which often lead to diagnostic difficulty. A 40-year-old man presented with massive rectal haemorrhage. During colonoscopy a giant polyp of over 50 mm in its bigger diameter, with a thick stalk of 2 cm, located in the transverse colon, was revealed. Endoscopic resection was performed with success. Histologic examination demonstrated a giant lipoma. In this report discussion over endoscopic resection of colonic lipomas mimicking neoplasms is also performed. PMID:20181161

  9. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia in a black adult male: case report.

    PubMed

    Kitonyi, G W; Wambugu, P M; Oburra, H O; Ireri, J M

    2008-08-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia, (HHT) or Rendu-Osler-Weber disease is a genetic autosomal dominant disorder that is characterised by telangiectasias, (small vascular malformations), in mucocutaneous tissues and arterial venous malformations, (AVMs), in various internal organs. Although HHT is relatively common in whites, the disorder has been reported to be rare in people of black African descent. Majority of HHT patients present with recurrent epistaxis, which in a significant proportion of patients is severe, warranting repeated blood transfusions and iron supplementation. Telangiectasias are most frequent on the tongue, hands, nose, lips and the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). AVMs occur in internal organs, particularly the lungs, brain, and the liver. Early and correct diagnosis of HHT is crucial as patients derive benefit from certain specific treatment modalities. Besides, AVMs which occur in various organs pose serious complications that may lead to death and therefore require early detection. We report a 55 year old black African male with HHT who presented with severe recurrent epistaxis and haematochezia leading to severe anaemia requiring repeated blood transfusions. His son, daughter and a maternal uncle experience milder recurrent epistaxis. The management of this patient and a brief review of the clinical features and management of HHT is presented. Our aim is to raise awareness of the occurrence of HHT in Kenya, in order to enhance early diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:19115559

  10. Benign enlargement of sub-arachnoid spaces in infancy

    PubMed Central

    Kuruvilla, Linu Cherian

    2014-01-01

    Benign enlargement of sub-arachnoid spaces (BESS) is one of the causes of macrocephaly in infants. It is a self-limiting condition and does not require any active medical or surgical treatment. We report a case of an infant aged 4 months who was referred for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain as the head circumference of the infant had increased rapidly from the 50th percentile in the 3rd month to more than the 95th percentile in the 4th month of age. MRI revealed enlarged anterior sub-arachnoid spaces and mild prominence of all the ventricles. A possibility of BESS was suspected since the child was neurodevelopmentally normal. A follow-up MRI done at the age of 18 months showed a reduction in the size of the sub-arachnoid spaces with normal sized ventricles. PMID:25250066

  11. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome and nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Barboza, Miguel A; Maud, Alberto; Rodriguez, Gustavo J

    2014-01-01

    Background Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome was first described by Call, Fleming, and colleagues. Clinically this entity presents acutely, with severe waxing and waning headaches (“thunderclap”), and occasional fluctuating neurological signs. Case presentation We present four subsequent cases of patients with severe thunderclap headache and brain tomography with evidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage. The brain angiogram showed no aneurysm but intracranial vasculopathy consistent with multiple areas of stenosis and dilatation (angiographic beading) in different territories. Conclusion Neurologists should be aware of Call Fleming syndrome presenting with severe headache and associated convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage. After other diagnoses are excluded, patients can be reassured about favorable prognosis with symptomatic management. Abbreviations RCVS Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome CT Computed tomography SAH Subarachnoid hemorrhage MR Magnetic resonance CTA Computed tomography angiography MRA Magnetic resonance angiography PMID:25132905

  12. Subarachnoid hemorrhage as the initial presentation of cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yuji; Takeda, Hidetaka; Furuya, Daisuke; Nagoya, Harumitsu; Deguchi, Ichiro; Fukuoka, Takuya; Tanahashi, Norio

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting as subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is very rare. We present a woman with thrombosis of the superior sagittal, straight, transverse and sigmoid sinuses who presented with SAH in the right temporal sulcus and bilateral cerebellar sulci. Brain perfusion CT demonstrated a delay of the mean transit time and high cerebral blood volume around the right posterior temporal lobe and cerebellum. These findings were compatible with venous congestion and they suggest the possibility that extension of the dural sinus thrombosis into the superficial veins caused localized venous hypertension with dilatation of the thin, fragile-walled cortical veins which eventually ruptured into the subarachnoid space. PMID:20190485

  13. Intrauterine balloon tamponade as management of postpartum haemorrhage and prevention of haemorrhage related to low-lying placenta.

    PubMed

    Patacchiola, F; D'Alfonso, A; Di Fonso, A; Di Febbo, G; Kaliakoudas, D; Carta, G

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Bakri balloon in preventing and treating postpartum haemorrhage (PPH). Intrauterine Bakri balloon was used in a total of 16 patients with two different purposes: prophylactic placement of the balloon after cesarean section (CS) in six patients with low-lying placenta and therapeutic placement in ten patients with persistent bleeding from uterine atony, after spontaneous delivery, and administration of uterotonics. Intrauterine Bakri balloon was a successful approach in controlling and preventing PPH in all 16 patients. The median nadir hematocrit was 26.6% in six patients who underwent CS and 25.6% in ten patients with persistent bleeding after spontaneous delivery. The intrauterine balloon was in place for a duration of 24 hours. The median balloon infusion volume was 345 ml (range 250-455). No complications were reported. Bakri balloon tamponade was a useful measure in treating PPH unresponsive to pharmacological therapy in patients who delivered vaginally. Moreover, it was able to prevent persistent bleeding in patients who underwent CS for central placenta previa. PMID:23444752

  14. [Anticoagulants after intracerebral haemorrhage in frail elderly].

    PubMed

    Olde Rikkert, Marcel; Claassen, Jurgen

    2015-01-01

    Restarting anticoagulants in frail older patients who have had an intracerebral haemorrhage as an adverse reaction to anticoagulant therapy is a major dilemma, and one which is not specifically addressed in the state-of-the-art paper on restarting anticoagulants elsewhere in this issue. Frail older persons have the highest risk of recurrent bleeding, but, in theory, also have the most benefit from anticoagulants due to the high absolute risk for ischemic events in atrial fibrillation, which is the major indication. However, frail older persons are largely excluded from trials with anticoagulants, which makes it impossible to solve this dilemma in an evidence-based way. Therefore, we argue that sound decision making cannot only be based on neurological or cardiological expertise, as proposed by others, but should include an overall comprehensive geriatric assessment, and, most importantly, patients and caregivers should be included in shared goal setting and shared decision making. PMID:25873225

  15. Pathogenesis of intraventricular haemorrhage in newborn infants

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Valerie A.; Durbin, G. M.; Olaffson, A.; Reynolds, E. O. R.; Rivers, R. P. A.; Smith, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    The ventricular CSF of a group of preterm infants dying in the newborn period contained a large excess of protein which appeared to be a plasma filtrate. This excess was found whether or not an intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) was also present. After consideration of the clinical features of the infants, their coagulation status, and the findings at necropsy, we suggest that increased cerebral venous and capillary pressure, usually caused by heart failure resulting from hypoxia and acidosis, was responsible both for the IVH, by rupturing the terminal veins, and for promoting the filtration of plasma proteins into the CSF. Abnormalities of haemostasis, though very common, did not seem to provide an adequate explanation for the initiation of intraventricular bleeding, though they may have exacerbated it. PMID:4422777

  16. Viral haemorrhagic fevers in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Richards, Guy A; Weyer, Jacqueline; Blumberg, Lucille H

    2015-09-01

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) include a diverse array of diseases caused by a broad range of viruses transmitted from various animal hosts and originating from almost all the continents in the world. These are potentially fatal and highly transmissible diseases without specific treatments or prophylactic vaccines. As has been demonstrated during the Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa, the consequences of VHFs are not limited to specific countries - they may become epidemic, and may have considerable economic impact and disrupt local public health and social service structures. Intensive public health intervention is necessary to contain these diseases. Here we provide a concise overview of the VHFs that are of current public health importance to South Africa. PMID:26428973

  17. Doctors' Knowledge of Viral Haemorrhagic Fevers.

    PubMed

    Lisk, Clifford; Snell, Luke; Haji-Coll, Michael; Ellis, Jayne; Sufi, Saaidullah; Raj, Rohit; Sharma, A; Smith, C

    2015-01-01

    Viral Haemorrhagic Fevers (VHF) such as Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) are of increasing concern to clinicians and public heath bodies across Europe and America due to the on-going epidemic in West Africa. We conducted an online study to assess clinicians' knowledge of VHF across six hospital sites in London. This showed suboptimal knowledge of Public Health England guidance, EVD epidemiology and the risk factors for acquiring VHF. Knowledge about VHF was dependent on seniority of grade with the most junior grade of doctors performing worse in several areas of the survey. Poor knowledge raises concerns that those at risk of VHF will be inappropriately risk stratified and managed. Education of doctors and other healthcare professionals about VHF is necessary to address these knowledge gaps. PMID:26305080

  18. Retinal haemorrhages associated with fatal paediatric infections.

    PubMed

    Salvatori, Marcus C; Lantz, Patrick E

    2015-04-01

    For many physicians, retinal haemorrhages (RHs) in infants and young children remain highly diagnostic of non-accidental (abusive) head trauma. Because clinicians have applied indirect ophthalmoscopy selectively to cases of suspected child abuse, the association between RH and other conditions such as infection, coagulopathy and accidental trauma has encountered habitual bias, creating the potential for iatrogenic misdiagnosis of child abuse. We present an autopsy case series of four children, aged three years old or younger, in whom RHs were detected by post-mortem monocular indirect ophthalmoscopy after the patients had died from infections. We discuss the laterality, number, type and location of RHs in these cases, and summarize proposed mechanisms of RH formation in fatalities from paediatric infection. We demonstrate that many of the ophthalmological findings that have been considered diagnostic of abusive head trauma can also occur in association with infective processes. PMID:24644226

  19. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Neuroinflammation: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P.; Logsdon, Aric F.; Manoranjan, Branavan; Turner, Ryan C.; McConnell, Evan; Vates, George Edward; Huber, Jason D.; Rosen, Charles L.; Simard, J. Marc

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) can lead to devastating outcomes including vasospasm, cognitive decline, and even death. Currently, treatment options are limited for this potentially life threatening injury. Recent evidence suggests that neuroinflammation plays a critical role in injury expansion and brain damage. Red blood cell breakdown products can lead to the release of inflammatory cytokines that trigger vasospasm and tissue injury. Preclinical models have been used successfully to improve understanding about neuroinflammation following aneurysmal rupture. The focus of this review is to provide an overview of how neuroinflammation relates to secondary outcomes such as vasospasm after aneurysmal rupture and to critically discuss pharmaceutical agents that warrant further investigation for the treatment of subarachnoid hemorrhage. We provide a concise overview of the neuroinflammatory pathways that are upregulated following aneurysmal rupture and how these pathways correlate to long-term outcomes. Treatment of aneurysm rupture is limited and few pharmaceutical drugs are available. Through improved understanding of biochemical mechanisms of injury, novel treatment solutions are being developed that target neuroinflammation. In the final sections of this review, we highlight a few of these novel treatment approaches and emphasize why targeting neuroinflammation following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage may improve patient care. We encourage ongoing research into the pathophysiology of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, especially in regards to neuroinflammatory cascades and the translation to randomized clinical trials. PMID:27049383

  20. [Retinal haemorrhages in non-accidental head injury in childhood].

    PubMed

    Oberacher-Velten, I M; Helbig, H

    2014-09-01

    Retinal haemorrhages are one of the three cardinal manifestations of the "shaken baby syndrome" or "non-accidental head injury" in childhood. The role of an ophthalmologist in suspected non-accidental head injury has not only medical but also legal aspects and has been discussed controversially in the literature. The differential diagnosis and the specificity of retinal haemorrhages in childhood for an abusive head trauma will be pointed out in this paper. PMID:25181505

  1. Decreased plasma isoleucine concentrations after upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Dejong, C H; Meijerink, W J; van Berlo, C L; Deutz, N E; Soeters, P B

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A decrease in arterial isoleucine values after intragastric blood administration in pigs has been observed. This contrasted with increased values of most other amino acids, ammonia, and urea. After an isonitrogenous control meal in these pigs all amino acids including isoleucine increased, and urea increased to a lesser extent, suggesting a relation between the arterial isoleucine decrease and uraemia after gastrointestinal haemorrhage. METHODS: To extend these findings to humans, plasma amino acids were determined after gastrointestinal haemorrhage in patients with peptic ulcers (n = 9) or oesophageal varices induced by liver cirrhosis (n = 4) and compared with preoperative patients (n = 106). RESULTS: After gastrointestinal haemorrhage, isoleucine decreased in all patients by more than 60% and normalised within 48 hours. Most other amino acids increased and also normalised within 48 hours. Uraemia occurred in both groups, hyperammonaemia was seen in patients with liver cirrhosis. CONCLUSIONS: These results confirm previous findings in animals and healthy volunteers that plasma isoleucine decreases after simulated upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. This supports the hypothesis that the absence of isoleucine in blood protein causes decreased plasma isoleucine values after gastrointestinal haemorrhage, and may be a contributory factor to uraemia and hyperammonaemia in patients with normal and impaired liver function, respectively. Intravenous isoleucine administration after gastrointestinal haemorrhage could be beneficial and will be the subject of further research. PMID:8881800

  2. Hyaline membrane disease, alkali, and intraventricular haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Wigglesworth, J S; Keith, I H; Girling, D J; Slade, S A

    1976-01-01

    The relation between intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) and hyaline membrane disease (HMD) was studied in singletons that came to necropsy at Hammersmith Hospital over the years 1966-73. The incidence of IVH in singleton live births was 3-22/1000 and of HMD 4-44/1000. Although the high figures were partily due to the large number of low birthweight infants born at this hospital, the incidence of IVH in babies weighing 1001-1500 g was three times as great as that reported in the 1658 British Perinatal Mortality Survey. Most IVH deaths were in babies with HMD, but the higher frequency of IVH was not associated with any prolongation of survival time of babies who died with HMD as compared with the 1958 survey. IVH was seen frequently at gestations of up to 36 weeks in babies with HMD but was rare above 30 weeks' gestation in babies without HMD. This indicated that factors associated with HMD must cause most cases of IVH seen at gestations above 30 weeks. Comparison of clinical details in infants with HMD who died with or without IVH (at gestations of 30-37 weeks) showed no significant differences between the groups other than a high incidence of fits and greater use of alkali therapy in the babies with IVH. During the 12 hours when most alkali therapy was given, babies dying with IVD received a mean total alkali dosage of 10-21 mmol/kg and those dying without IVH 6-34 mmol/kg (P less than 0-001).There was no difference in severity of hypoxia or of metabolic acidosis between the 2 groups. Babies who died with HMD and germinal layer haemorrhage (GLH) without IVH had received significantly more alkali than those who died with HMD alone, whereas survivors of severe respiratory distress syndrome had received lower alkali doses than other groups. It is suggested that the greatly increased death rate from IVH in babies with HMD indicates some alteration of management of HMD (since 1958) as a causative factor. Liberal use of hypertonic alkali solutions is the common factor

  3. Rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) and rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV): a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) is a calicivirus of the genus Lagovirus that causes rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) in adult European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). First described in China in 1984, the virus rapidly spread worldwide and is nowadays considered as endemic in several countries. In Australia and New Zealand where rabbits are pests, RHDV was purposely introduced for rabbit biocontrol. Factors that may have precipitated RHD emergence remain unclear, but non-pathogenic strains seem to pre-date the appearance of the pathogenic strains suggesting a key role for the comprehension of the virus origins. All pathogenic strains are classified within one single serotype, but two subtypes are recognised, RHDV and RHDVa. RHD causes high mortality in both domestic and wild adult animals, with individuals succumbing between 48-72 h post-infection. No other species has been reported to be fatally susceptible to RHD. The disease is characterised by acute necrotising hepatitis, but haemorrhages may also be found in other organs, in particular the lungs, heart, and kidneys due to disseminated intravascular coagulation. Resistance to the disease might be explained in part by genetically determined absence or weak expression of attachment factors, but humoral immunity is also important. Disease control in rabbitries relies mainly on vaccination and biosecurity measures. Such measures are difficult to be implemented in wild populations. More recent research has indicated that RHDV might be used as a molecular tool for therapeutic applications. Although the study of RHDV and RHD has been hampered by the lack of an appropriate cell culture system for the virus, several aspects of the replication, epizootology, epidemiology and evolution have been disclosed. This review provides a broad coverage and description of the current knowledge on the disease and the virus. PMID:22325049

  4. Emergency reversal of anticoagulation with a three-factor prothrombin complex concentrate in patients with intracranial haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Imberti, Davide; Barillari, Giovanni; Biasioli, Chiara; Bianchi, Marina; Contino, Laura; Duce, Rita; D’Incà, Marco; Gnani, Maria Cristina; Mari, Elisa; Ageno, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Background Intracranial haemorrhage is a serious and potentially fatal complication of oral anticoagulant therapy. Prothrombin complex concentrates can substantially shorten the time needed to reverse the effects of oral anticoagulants. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of a prothrombin complex concentrate for rapid reversal of oral anticoagulant therapy in patients with intracranial haemorrhage. Methods Patients receiving oral anticoagulant therapy and suffering from acute intracranial haemorrhage were eligible for this prospective cohort study if their International Normalised Ratio (INR) was higher than or equal to 2.0. The prothrombin complex concentrate was infused at doses of 35–50 IU/kg, stratified according to the initial INR. Results Forty-six patients (25 males; mean age: 75 years; range 38–92 years) were enrolled. The median INR at presentation was 3.5 (range, 2–9). At 30 minutes after administration of the prothrombin complex concentrate, the median INR was 1.3 (range, 0.9–3), and the INR then declined to less than or equal to 1.5 in 75% of patients. The benefit of the prothrombin complex concentrate was maintained for a long time, since the median INR remained lower than or equal to 1.5 (median, 1.16; range, 0.9–2.2) at 96% of all post-infusion time-points up to 96 hours. No thrombotic complications or significant adverse events were observed during hospitalisation; six patients (13%) died, but none of these deaths was judged to be related to administration of the prothrombin complex concentrate. Conclusions Prothrombin complex concentrates are an effective, rapid and safe treatment for the urgent reversal of oral anticoagulation in patients with intracranial haemorrhage. Broader use of prothrombin complex concentrates in this clinical setting appears to be appropriate. PMID:21251465

  5. Safety and Efficacy of Transluminal Balloon Angioplasty Using a Compliant Balloon for Severe Cerebral Vasospasm after an Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Beom Jin; Lee, Jae Il; Ko, Jun Kyeung; Park, Hwa Seung; Choi, Chang Hwa

    2011-01-01

    Objective Vasospasm of cerebral vessels remains a major source of morbidity and mortality after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of transluminal balloon angioplasty (TBA) for SAH-induced vasospasm. Methods Eleven patients with an angiographically confirmed significant vasospasm (>50% vessel narrowing and clinical deterioration) were studied. A total of 54 vessel segments with significant vasospasm were treated by TBA. Digital subtraction angiography was used to confirm the presence of vasospasm, and TBA was performed to dilate vasospastic arteries. Medical and angiographic reports were reviewed to determine technical efficacy and for procedural complications. Results TBA using Hyper-Glide or Hyper-Form balloons (MicroTherapeutics, Irvine, CA) was successfully accomplished in 88.9% vasospastic segments (48 of 54), namely, in the distal internal carotid artery (100%, n=7), the middle cerebral artery (100%), including the M1 (n=10), M2 (n=10), and M3 segments (n=4), in the vertebral artery (100%, n=2), basilar artery (100%, n=1), and in the anterior cerebral artery (ACA), including the A1 (66%), A2 (66%), and A3 segments (100%). Vessel diameters significantly increased after TBA. There were no cases of vessel rupture or thromboembolic complications. GCS at one day after TBA showed an improvement in all patients except one. Conclusion This study suggests that TBA using Hyper-Glide or Hyper-Form balloons is a safe and effective treatment for subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced cerebral vasospasm. PMID:21556235

  6. Ventriculomammary shunt: an unusual ventriculoperitoneal shunt complication.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Nauman S; Johnson, Jeremiah N; Morcos, Jacques J

    2015-02-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt malfunctions are common and can result in significant consequences for patients. Despite the prevalence of breast augmentation surgery and breast surgery for other pathologies, few breast related VP shunt complications have been reported. A 54-year-old woman with hydrocephalus post-subarachnoid hemorrhage returned 1 month after VP shunt placement complaining of painful unilateral breast enlargement. After investigation, it was determined that the distal VP shunt catheter had migrated from the peritoneal cavity into the breast and wrapped around her breast implant. The breast enlargement was the result of cerebrospinal fluid retention. We detail this unusual case and review all breast related VP shunt complications reported in the literature. To avoid breast related complications related to VP shunt procedures, it is important to illicit pre-procedural history regarding breast implants, evade indwelling implants during catheter tunneling and carefully securing the abdominal catheter to prevent retrograde catheter migration to the breast. PMID:25127261

  7. Astrocyte Ca2+ Signaling Drives Inversion of Neurovascular Coupling after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Anthony C; Koide, Masayo; Wellman, George C

    2015-09-30

    Physiologically, neurovascular coupling (NVC) matches focal increases in neuronal activity with local arteriolar dilation. Astrocytes participate in NVC by sensing increased neurotransmission and releasing vasoactive agents (e.g., K(+)) from perivascular endfeet surrounding parenchymal arterioles. Previously, we demonstrated an increase in the amplitude of spontaneous Ca(2+) events in astrocyte endfeet and inversion of NVC from vasodilation to vasoconstriction in brain slices obtained from subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) model rats. However, the role of spontaneous astrocyte Ca(2+) signaling in determining the polarity of the NVC response remains unclear. Here, we used two-photon imaging of Fluo-4-loaded rat brain slices to determine whether altered endfoot Ca(2+) signaling underlies SAH-induced inversion of NVC. We report a time-dependent emergence of endfoot high-amplitude Ca(2+) signals (eHACSs) after SAH that were not observed in endfeet from unoperated animals. Furthermore, the percentage of endfeet with eHACSs varied with time and paralleled the development of inversion of NVC. Endfeet with eHACSs were present only around arterioles exhibiting inversion of NVC. Importantly, depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores using cyclopiazonic acid abolished SAH-induced eHACSs and restored arteriolar dilation in SAH brain slices to two mediators of NVC (a rise in endfoot Ca(2+) and elevation of extracellular K(+)). These data indicate a causal link between SAH-induced eHACSs and inversion of NVC. Ultrastructural examination using transmission electron microscopy indicated that a similar proportion of endfeet exhibiting eHACSs also exhibited asymmetrical enlargement. Our results demonstrate that subarachnoid blood causes a delayed increase in the amplitude of spontaneous intracellular Ca(2+) release events leading to inversion of NVC. Significance statement: Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)--strokes involving cerebral aneurysm rupture and release of blood onto the

  8. Astrocyte Ca2+ Signaling Drives Inversion of Neurovascular Coupling after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Anthony C.; Koide, Masayo

    2015-01-01

    Physiologically, neurovascular coupling (NVC) matches focal increases in neuronal activity with local arteriolar dilation. Astrocytes participate in NVC by sensing increased neurotransmission and releasing vasoactive agents (e.g., K+) from perivascular endfeet surrounding parenchymal arterioles. Previously, we demonstrated an increase in the amplitude of spontaneous Ca2+ events in astrocyte endfeet and inversion of NVC from vasodilation to vasoconstriction in brain slices obtained from subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) model rats. However, the role of spontaneous astrocyte Ca2+ signaling in determining the polarity of the NVC response remains unclear. Here, we used two-photon imaging of Fluo-4-loaded rat brain slices to determine whether altered endfoot Ca2+ signaling underlies SAH-induced inversion of NVC. We report a time-dependent emergence of endfoot high-amplitude Ca2+ signals (eHACSs) after SAH that were not observed in endfeet from unoperated animals. Furthermore, the percentage of endfeet with eHACSs varied with time and paralleled the development of inversion of NVC. Endfeet with eHACSs were present only around arterioles exhibiting inversion of NVC. Importantly, depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores using cyclopiazonic acid abolished SAH-induced eHACSs and restored arteriolar dilation in SAH brain slices to two mediators of NVC (a rise in endfoot Ca2+ and elevation of extracellular K+). These data indicate a causal link between SAH-induced eHACSs and inversion of NVC. Ultrastructural examination using transmission electron microscopy indicated that a similar proportion of endfeet exhibiting eHACSs also exhibited asymmetrical enlargement. Our results demonstrate that subarachnoid blood causes a delayed increase in the amplitude of spontaneous intracellular Ca2+ release events leading to inversion of NVC. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)—strokes involving cerebral aneurysm rupture and release of blood onto the brain surface

  9. The metabolic effects of moderately severe upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in man.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, K. J.; Alberti, K. G.; Binder, C.; Holdstock, G.; Karran, S. J.; Smith, C. L.; Talbot, S.; Turnell, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The metabolic effects of moderately severe gastrointestinal haemorrhage were investigated in man. Before resuscitation, patients had raised circulating concentrations of glucose, lactate, alanine, glycerol and cortisol. After urgent operation for haemorrhage, metabolite concentrations were similar to those of control patients having elective abdominal surgery, but insulin concentrations were higher and cortisol lower in haemorrhage patients. There were no significant differences in nitrogen excretion between haemorrhage patients and their controls, but urinary 3-methyl-histidine excretion by haemorrhage patients was lower indicating decreased muscle protein breakdown. Decreased amino acid release from muscle might account for previously reported imparied wound healing after haemorrhage. PMID:7045838

  10. Risk Factors for Rebleeding of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chao; Zhang, Tian-Song; Zhou, Liang-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Background Rebleeding is a serious complication of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhaging. To date, there are conflicting data regarding the factors contributing to rebleeding and their significance. Methods A systematic review of PubMed and Embase databases was conducted for studies pertaining to aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) and rebleeding in order to assess the associated risk factors. Odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated from fourteen studies comprised of a total of 5693 patients that met the inclusion criteria. Results Higher rebleeding rates were observed < 6 h after the initial aSAH (OR  = 3.22, 95% CI  = 1.46–7.12), and were associated with high systolic blood pressure (OR  = 1.93, 95% CI  = 1.31–2.83), poor Hunt-Hess grade (III–IV) (OR  = 3.43, 95% CI  = 2.33–5.05), intracerebral or intraventricular hematomas (OR  = 1.65, 95% CI  = 1.33–2.05), posterior circulation aneurysms (OR  = 2.15, 95% CI  = 1.32–3.49), and aneurysms >10 mm in size (OR  = 1.70, 95% CI  = 1.35–2.14). Conclusions Aneurysmal rebleeding occurs more frequently within the first 6 hours after the initial aSAH. Risk factors associated with rebleeding include high systolic pressure, the presence of an intracerebral or intraventricular hematoma, poor Hunt-Hess grade (III-IV), aneurysms in the posterior circulation, and an aneurysm >10 mm in size. PMID:24911172

  11. Association of apolipoprotein E polymorphisms with cerebral vasospasm after spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hai-tao; Zhang, Xiao-dong; Su, Hai; Jiang, Yong; Zhou, Shuai; Sun, Xiao-chuan

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm (CVS) is the main complication of spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), severely affecting clinical outcome of patients with SAH. Apolipoprotein E gene (APOE) is associated with prognosis of spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and APOEε4 allele is reported to be apt to CVS after SAH. The current study aimed to investigate the association of APOE polymorphisms with CVS after SAH. One hundred and eighty-five patients with spontaneous SAH were recruited in the study. APOE genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). CVS was judged by Transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) combined with patients' condition. χ2-test and logistic regression analysis were done by SPSS (version 11.5). The distributions of APOE genotypes and alleles matched Hardy-Weinberg Law. In 185 patients, 21 of 32 (65.7%) patients with APOEε4 allele showed CVS, which was significantly different from those without APOE ε4 allele (56 of 153 patients, 36.6%, P=0.022). However, neither the presence of ε2 nor ε3 was significantly different from those absent of it (P>0.05). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that ApoEε4 allele was a risk factor (OR=2.842. 95% CI 1.072-6.124. P=0.019) to predispose to CVS after adjusting for age, sex, hypertension or not, hyperlipemia or not, Fisher grade, and Hunt-Hess grade after SAH. Our finding suggests that the patients with APOEε4 allele predispose to CVS after spontaneous SAH. PMID:21116929

  12. Subarachnoid space: middle ear pathways and recurrent meningitis.

    PubMed

    Barcz, D V; Wood, R P; Stears, J; Jafek, B W; Shields, M

    1985-03-01

    Congenital bony abnormalities of the inner ear may result in a communication between the middle ear and the subarachnoid space. Patients with this anomaly often present with recurrent meningitis associated with acute otitis media or with middle ear fluid. This article presents three cases of recurrent meningitis with open middle ear--subarachnoid space connections. The first two cases involve a cerebrospinal fluid leak into the middle ear via the oval window, both patients having a Mondini-type of inner ear deformity. The pathway in the third case opened into the middle ear along the horizontal portion of the facial nerve. Computed tomography (CT) scanning with metrizamide and differential density calculations helped to identify the abnormal pathway and to confirm that the leak has been closed postoperatively. Use of the CT scanner in these cases can be helpful in planning the surgical closure and in postoperative follow-up. PMID:4039111

  13. Ebola haemorrhagic fever in Zaire, 1976

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Between 1 September and 24 October 1976, 318 cases of acute viral haemorrhagic fever occurred in northern Zaire. The outbreak was centred in the Bumba Zone of the Equateur Region and most of the cases were recorded within a radius of 70 km of Yambuku, although a few patients sought medical attention in Bumba, Abumombazi, and the capital city of Kinshasa, where individual secondary and tertiary cases occurred. There were 280 deaths, and only 38 serologically confirmed survivors. The index case in this outbreak had onset of symptoms on 1 September 1976, five days after receiving an injection of chloroquine for presumptive malaria at the outpatient clinic at Yambuku Mission Hospital (YMH). He had a clinical remission of his malaria symptoms. Within one week several other persons who had received injections at YMH also suffered from Ebola haemorrhagic fever, and almost all subsequent cases had either received injections at the hospital or had had close contact with another case. Most of these occurred during the first four weeks of the epidemic, after which time the hospital was closed, 11 of the 17 staff members having died of the disease. All ages and both sexes were affected, but women 15-29 years of age had the highest incidence of disease, a phenomenon strongly related to attendance at prenatal and outpatient clinics at the hospital where they received injections. The overall secondary attack rate was about 5%, although it ranged to 20% among close relatives such as spouses, parent or child, and brother or sister. Active surveillance disclosed that cases occurred in 55 of some 550 villages which were examined house-by-house. The disease was hitherto unknown to the people of the affected region. Intensive search for cases in the area of north-eastern Zaire between the Bumba Zone and the Sudan frontier near Nzara and Maridi failed to detect definite evidence of a link between an epidemic of the disease in that country and the outbreak near Bumba. Nevertheless it was

  14. Brain Metastasis of Pleural Mesothelioma after a Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hirooka, Aya; Tamiya, Akihiro; Kanazu, Masaki; Nonaka, Junichi; Yonezawa, Taiji; Asami, Kazuhiro; Atagi, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an uncommon, fatal neoplasm induced by asbestos exposure. Brain metastases from MPM are extremely rare, with most such cases diagnosed only at the time of autopsy. This report describes what we believe to be the first case of MPM metastasizing to the brain after a subarachnoid hemorrhage, as well as the subsequent surgical removal of the brain metastasis. PMID:27041164

  15. Chronic haemorrhagic radiation proctitis: A review

    PubMed Central

    Nelamangala Ramakrishnaiah, Vishnu Prasad; Krishnamachari, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic haemorrhagic radiation proctitis (CHRP) is a difficult problem faced by the patients following radiation for pelvic malignancy. There is no standard treatment for this condition, but many methods of treatment are available. The aim of this study was to review the literature to see whether there is an improvement in the available evidence in comparison with previously published systematic reviews in treating patients with CHRP. The PubMed/Medline database and Google Scholar search was selectively searched. Studies, which treated patients with rectal bleeding due to chronic radiation proctitis or CHRP, were included. Seventy studies were finally selected out of which 14 were randomized controlled clinical trials. Though these studies could not be compared, it could be seen that there was an improvement in the methodology of the studies. There was an objective assessment of symptoms, signs and an objective assessment of outcomes. But, still, there were only a few studies that looked into the quality of life following treatment of CHRP. To increase recruitment to trials, a national registry of cases with established late radiation toxicity would facilitate the further improvement of such studies. Some of the conclusions that could be reached based on the available evidence are 4% formalin should be the first line treatment for patients with CHRP. Formalin and argon plasma coagulation (APC) are equally effective, but formalin is better for severe disease. Refractory patients, not responding to formalin or APC, need to be referred for hyperbaric oxygen therapy or surgery. Radio-frequency ablation is a promising modality that needs to be studied further in randomized trials. PMID:27462390

  16. Chronic haemorrhagic radiation proctitis: A review.

    PubMed

    Nelamangala Ramakrishnaiah, Vishnu Prasad; Krishnamachari, Srinivasan

    2016-07-27

    Chronic haemorrhagic radiation proctitis (CHRP) is a difficult problem faced by the patients following radiation for pelvic malignancy. There is no standard treatment for this condition, but many methods of treatment are available. The aim of this study was to review the literature to see whether there is an improvement in the available evidence in comparison with previously published systematic reviews in treating patients with CHRP. The PubMed/Medline database and Google Scholar search was selectively searched. Studies, which treated patients with rectal bleeding due to chronic radiation proctitis or CHRP, were included. Seventy studies were finally selected out of which 14 were randomized controlled clinical trials. Though these studies could not be compared, it could be seen that there was an improvement in the methodology of the studies. There was an objective assessment of symptoms, signs and an objective assessment of outcomes. But, still, there were only a few studies that looked into the quality of life following treatment of CHRP. To increase recruitment to trials, a national registry of cases with established late radiation toxicity would facilitate the further improvement of such studies. Some of the conclusions that could be reached based on the available evidence are 4% formalin should be the first line treatment for patients with CHRP. Formalin and argon plasma coagulation (APC) are equally effective, but formalin is better for severe disease. Refractory patients, not responding to formalin or APC, need to be referred for hyperbaric oxygen therapy or surgery. Radio-frequency ablation is a promising modality that needs to be studied further in randomized trials. PMID:27462390

  17. Induction of haemorrhagic anovulatory follicles in mares.

    PubMed

    Ginther, O J; Gastal, M O; Gastal, E L; Jacob, J C; Beg, M A

    2008-01-01

    A follicular wave and luteolysis were induced in mares by ablation of follicles > or =6 mm and treatment with prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF) on Day 10 (where ovulation = Day 0). The incidence of haemorrhagic anovulatory follicles (HAFs) in the induced waves (20%) was greater (P < 0.007) than in preceding spontaneous waves (2%). Hormone and follicle dynamics were compared between induced follicular waves that ended in ovulations (ovulating group; n = 36) v. HAFs (HAF group; n = 9). The day of the first ovulation or the beginning of HAF formation at the end of an induced wave was designated as post-treatment Day 0. The mean 13-day interval from Day 10 (PGF and ablation) to the post-treatment ovulation was normalised into Days 10 to 16, followed by Day -6 to Day 0 relative to the post-treatment ovulation. Concentrations of LH were greater (P < 0.05) in the HAF group than in the ovulating group on Days 10, 11, 12, 14, -3 and -2. The HAF group had greater (P < 0.003) LH concentrations on Day 10 of the preceding oestrous cycle with spontaneous ovulatory waves. The diameter of the largest follicle was less (P < 0.05) in the HAF group on most days between Day 13 and Day -1 and this was attributable to later (P < 0.002) emergence of the future largest follicle at 6 mm in the HAF group (Day 12.4 +/- 0.5) than in the ovulating group (Day 11.3 +/- 0.1). The results indicate that the high incidence of HAFs after PGF and ablation was associated with later follicle emergence and immediate and continuing greater LH concentration after PGF treatment, apparently augmented by an inherently high pretreatment LH concentration. PMID:19007559

  18. Diode laser treatment and clinical management of multiple oral lesions in patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Favia, G; Tempesta, A; Limongelli, L; Suppressa, P; Sabbà, C; Maiorano, E

    2016-05-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is rare, and characterised by vascular dysplasia that leads to various symptoms including visceral arteriovenous malformations and mucocutaneous telangiectatic lesions. Our aim was to describe the clinical features and options for the treatment of multiple oral lesions, and to illustrate the efficacy of the diode laser in the treatment of early (<2mm) and advanced lesions (2mm or more). We report 24 patients with 1200 oral telangiectatic lesions, which were often associated with regular bleeding (from monthly to daily), superinfection, pain, and swelling, and treated with multiple sessions of laser according to the number and size of the lesions. Early lesions were treated with a single laser impulse in ultrapulsed mode, and advanced lesions with repeated laser impulses in pulsed mode (t-on 200ms/t-off 500ms), at a power of 8W. Early lesions healed completely after laser photocoagulation with no operative or postoperative complications, while advanced lesions improved with a remarkable reduction in size but more discomfort. Protective occlusal plates were sometimes used to reduce the incidence of new lesions caused by dental trauma. The treatment of oral telangiectatic lesions is still being debated, and it is important to improve quality of life for patients. Diode laser surgery could be an effective treatment for oral lesions in those with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia. PMID:26360009

  19. Role of self-expanding metal stents in the management of variceal haemorrhage: Hype or hope?

    PubMed

    Hogan, Brian J; O'Beirne, James P

    2016-01-10

    Despite the advances of medical, endoscopic and radiological therapy over recent years the mortality rates of acute variceal haemorrhage are still 16%-20% and the medium term outcome has not improved in the last 25 years. Early transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt has proved to be an effective therapy for selected groups of patients with a high risk of re-bleeding and moderate liver disease. However, there is an unmet need for a therapy that can be applied in patients with a high risk of re-bleeding and advanced liver disease either as definitive therapy or as a bridge to permanent therapy. Self-expanding metal stents can be placed without the need for endoscopic or fluoroscopic control and, once in place, will provide effective haemostasis and allow a route for oral fluids and nutrition. They can remain in place whilst liver function recovers and secondary prophylaxis is initiated. We review the results of 6 case series including a total of 83 patients and the first randomised controlled trial of self-expanding metal stents vs balloon tamponade (BT) in the management of refractory variceal haemorrhage. We report that self-expanding metal stents provide effective haemostasis and perform better than BT in refractory bleeding, where they are associated with fewer complications. Whilst the most effective place for self-expanding metal stents in the management algorithm needs to be determined by further randomised controlled trials, currently they provide an effective alternative to BT in selected patients. PMID:26788260

  20. Role of self-expanding metal stents in the management of variceal haemorrhage: Hype or hope?

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Brian J; O’Beirne, James P

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advances of medical, endoscopic and radiological therapy over recent years the mortality rates of acute variceal haemorrhage are still 16%-20% and the medium term outcome has not improved in the last 25 years. Early transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt has proved to be an effective therapy for selected groups of patients with a high risk of re-bleeding and moderate liver disease. However, there is an unmet need for a therapy that can be applied in patients with a high risk of re-bleeding and advanced liver disease either as definitive therapy or as a bridge to permanent therapy. Self-expanding metal stents can be placed without the need for endoscopic or fluoroscopic control and, once in place, will provide effective haemostasis and allow a route for oral fluids and nutrition. They can remain in place whilst liver function recovers and secondary prophylaxis is initiated. We review the results of 6 case series including a total of 83 patients and the first randomised controlled trial of self-expanding metal stents vs balloon tamponade (BT) in the management of refractory variceal haemorrhage. We report that self-expanding metal stents provide effective haemostasis and perform better than BT in refractory bleeding, where they are associated with fewer complications. Whilst the most effective place for self-expanding metal stents in the management algorithm needs to be determined by further randomised controlled trials, currently they provide an effective alternative to BT in selected patients. PMID:26788260

  1. [Unilateral Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome after Ventriculo-Peritoneal Shunt for Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Koizumi, Takayuki; Sato, Daisuke; Endo, Shin; Kato, Syunichi

    2016-06-01

    The patient, a 79-year-old man, experienced a Hunt & Kosnik grade IV subarachnoid hemorrhage, presenting with sudden-onset coma and severe left hemiplegia. We performed cranial clipping surgery for a ruptured aneurysm on the right middle cerebral artery the same day. Post-operative recovery proceeded smoothly, with gradual improvements in disturbed consciousness and left hemiplegia. Three weeks post-operation, CT revealed low-density areas in the right frontal and temporal lobe, believed to be due to subarachnoid hemorrhage, as well as hydrocephaly. We then performed a lumbo-peritoneal (L-P) shunt for the hydrocephaly. Two months later, the patient experienced shunt occlusion, and we performed a ventriculo-peritoneal (V-P) shunt revision (pressure: 6 cm H(2)O). Headaches, severe decline in cognitive function, and worsened left hemiplegia were observed seven weeks post-shunt revision. Cranial CT revealed widespread low-density areas in right posterior cerebral white matter. We suspected unilateral posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) after performing cranial MRI and cerebral angiography. Increasing the set pressure of the shunt improved the symptoms and radiographic findings. PRES is typically bilateral, and unilateral incidents are rare. This is the first report of unilateral PRES secondary to shunt operation. Its unilaterality appears to have been caused by unilateral brain damage or adhesions to the brain surface from the subarachnoid cerebral hemorrhage. Overdrainage post-shunt can also induce PRES. Diagnosis of PRES is more difficult in unilateral cases;practitioners must keep PRES in mind as a rare complication post-shunt operation. PMID:27270150

  2. The collagen-binding protein of Streptococcus mutans is involved in haemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Kazuhiko; Hokamura, Kazuya; Taniguchi, Naho; Wada, Koichiro; Kudo, Chiho; Nomura, Ryota; Kojima, Ayuchi; Naka, Shuhei; Muranaka, Yoshinori; Thura, Min; Nakajima, Atsushi; Masuda, Katsuhiko; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Speziale, Pietro; Shimada, Nobumitsu; Amano, Atsuo; Kamisaki, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Tokutaro; Umemura, Kazuo; Ooshima, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Although several risk factors for stroke have been identified, one-third remain unexplained. Here we show that infection with Streptococcus mutans expressing collagen-binding protein (CBP) is a potential risk factor for haemorrhagic stroke. Infection with serotype k S. mutans, but not a standard strain, aggravates cerebral haemorrhage in mice. Serotype k S. mutans accumulates in the damaged, but not the contralateral hemisphere, indicating an interaction of bacteria with injured blood vessels. The most important factor for high-virulence is expression of CBP, which is a common property of most serotype k strains. The detection frequency of CBP-expressing S. mutans in haemorrhagic stroke patients is significantly higher than in control subjects. Strains isolated from haemorrhagic stroke patients aggravate haemorrhage in a mouse model, indicating that they are haemorrhagic stroke-associated. Administration of recombinant CBP causes aggravation of haemorrhage. Our data suggest that CBP of S. mutans is directly involved in haemorrhagic stroke. PMID:21952219

  3. Intraventricular haemorrhage and periventricular leucomalacia: ultrasound and autopsy correlation.

    PubMed Central

    Trounce, J Q; Fagan, D; Levene, M I

    1986-01-01

    The brains of 30 infants who died after at least one real time ultrasound scan were examined after fixation. The ultrasound diagnosis of either periventricular haemorrhage or periventricular leucomalacia was compared with the macroscopic and histological appearances. Each hemisphere was considered separately for both periventricular haemorrhage and periventricular leucomalacia. The accuracy of ultrasound diagnosis for periventricular haemorrhage was 88%, with sensitivity of 91% and specificity of 85%. The accuracy for periventricular leucomalacia was 90%, with sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 93%. Ultrasound was shown to diagnose the entire range of periventricular leucomalacia lesions. Three hemispheres showed the appearance of prolonged flare, and this correlated with extensive spongiosis and microcalcification of the periventricular white matter, although no macroscopic lesion was seen. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:3545096

  4. Nososcomial transmission of viral haemorrhagic fever in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Richards, Guy A

    2015-09-01

    Recent events in West Africa have highlighted the potential for the viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) to cause considerable mortality and morbidity among heathcare workers. However, this is not a new threat as, although the risk is currently increased, it has always been present. In South Africa (SA) the only endemic haemorrhagic fever is Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever, transmitted by the Hyalomma tick, which is ubiquitous in cattle farming areas. Johannesburg, the commercial and transport hub of SA, is unusual in that all cases of VHF seen there are imported, either from rural areas in SA or from countries to the north. Johannesburg functions as the gateway to and from the rest of Africa, and as a destination for more affluent residents of neighbouring countries seeking medical attention. Numerous outbreaks of nosocomial infection have occurred in SA, and these are described in the form of brief case reports. PMID:26428962

  5. Blood transfusion and the anaesthetist: management of massive haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D; Wee, M; Clyburn, P; Walker, I; Brohi, K; Collins, P; Doughty, H; Isaac, J; Mahoney, PF; Shewry, L

    2010-01-01

    Hospitals must have a major haemorrhage protocol in place and this should include clinical, laboratory and logistic responses. Immediate control of obvious bleeding is of paramount importance (pressure, tourniquet, haemostatic dressings). The major haemorrhage protocol must be mobilised immediately when a massive haemorrhage situation is declared. A fibrinogen < 1 g.l−1 or a prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) of > 1.5 times normal represents established haemostatic failure and is predictive of microvascular bleeding. Early infusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP; 15 ml.kg−1) should be used to prevent this occurring if a senior clinician anticipates a massive haemorrhage. Established coagulopathy will require more than 15 ml.kg−1 of FFP to correct. The most effective way to achieve fibrinogen replacement rapidly is by giving fibrinogen concentrate or cryoprecipitate if fibrinogen is unavailable. 1:1:1 red cell:FFP:platelet regimens, as used by the military, are reserved for the most severely traumatised patients. A minimum target platelet count of 75 × 109.l−1 is appropriate in this clinical situation. Group-specific blood can be issued without performing an antibody screen because patients will have minimal circulating antibodies. O negative blood should only be used if blood is needed immediately. In hospitals where the need to treat massive haemorrhage is frequent, the use of locally developed shock packs may be helpful. Standard venous thromboprophylaxis should be commenced as soon as possible after haemostasis has been secured as patients develop a prothrombotic state following massive haemorrhage. PMID:20963925

  6. A new NOTCH3 mutation presenting as primary intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Pradotto, Luca; Orsi, Laura; Daniele, Dino; Caroppo, Paola; Lauro, Danilo; Milesi, Alessandra; Sellitti, Luigi; Mauro, Alessandro

    2012-04-15

    Primary intracerebral haemorrhages (PICH) are defined as haemorrhages within the brain parenchyma in the absence of readily identifiable causes. CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy) is a hereditary vascular disease and its mainly clinical manifestations are early-onset infarcts. Spontaneous lobar haematomas are a rare occurrence. We report a very unusual presentation of CADASIL in a 65 year-old man carrying a new NOTCH3 mutation. The clinical onset of the disease was related to an intracerebral haematoma following colon surgery and causing a delirium. In brief, our report suggests that CADASIL must be considered in patient with PICH. PMID:22206696

  7. Extensive spinal epidural hematoma: a rare complication of aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Zizka, J; Eliás, P; Michl, A; Harrer, J; Cesák, T; Herman, A

    2001-01-01

    Development of collateral circulation belongs among the typical signs of aortic coarctation. Cerebral or spinal artery aneurysm formation with increased risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage represent the most common neurovascular complication of this disease. We report a case of a 20-year-old sportsman who developed acute non-traumatic paraplegia as a result of extensive spinal epidural hemorrhage from collateral vessels accompanying aortic coarctation which was unrecognized up to that time. To the best of our knowledge, acute spinal epidural hematoma as a complication of aortic coarctation has not been previously reported. PMID:11471620

  8. Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome complicating pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    González-Mesa, Ernesto; Blasco, Marta; Andérica, José; Herrera, José

    2012-01-01

    The Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is a rare congenital disorder that affects one or more limbs. It is characterised by cutaneous vascular nevi, venous malformations and hypertrophy of soft tissues and bone. There are very few cases reported in pregnant women, so the level of uncertainty is high when it appears during gestation. It is a disease that increases obstetric risk and can exacerbate complications, mainly thromboembolic and haemorrhagic. We report below the case of a pregnant woman diagnosed with this syndrome and the multidisciplinary management held in our centre. PMID:22854239

  9. Postpartum haemorrhage in a woman with essential thrombocythemia carrying calreticulin mutation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Villani, Michela; Colaizzo, Donatella; Tiscia, Giovanni L; Chinni, Elena; Bodenizza, Carl'Antonio; Cascavilla, Nicola; Grandone, Elvira

    2016-09-01

    Coagulation disorder associated with essential thrombocythemia may exacerbate the prothrombotic state physiologically occurring during pregnancy. We report a case of a severe postpartum haemorrhage in a 35-year-old woman previously diagnosed with essential thrombocythemia and carrying the somatic calreticulin mutation. She was referred to our Thrombosis and Haemostasis Unit for pregnancy management. A treatment with low-dose aspirin was prescribed until the labour started, as the platelets count raised above 1000 × 10/l. At the time of bleeding, no residual placenta was detected at the revision of the uterine cavity.Although the postpartum is a high-risk period for thrombotic events, we have to carefully evaluate in women with essential thrombocythemia the likelihood of developing a hemorrhagic complication. PMID:26650457

  10. Splenic rupture and intracranial haemorrhage in a haemophilic neonate: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Adamu, Ibrahim; Asarian, Armand; Xiao, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Splenic rupture and intracranial haemorrhage are life-threatening conditions infrequently encountered in neonates without history of birth trauma. External manifestations of birth trauma; namely, capput succadeneum and cephalhematoma, when present raise suspicions for more serious intracranial or visceral damage. Rupture of normal spleen without an obvious source of trauma in haemophilic neonate is a rare event. The concurrence of both conditions and the unusual presentation make this case a rare one that is seldom encountered in the literature. Additionally, when splenic rupture occurs, the consensus is to employ all non-operative techniques aimed at salvaging the spleen, thus avoiding the immune-compromised state associated with splenectomy. However, in this case, we present a 3-day-old male with family history of haemophilia A, who was diagnosed with splenic rupture and bilateral subdural haematomas and underwent splenectomy, albeit with post-operative complications, in light of haemodynamic instability and high ongoing transfusion requirements. PMID:22878771

  11. Diphtheria Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Diphtheria Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Diphtheria Home About Diphtheria Causes and Transmission Symptoms Complications ...

  12. Encephalic hemodynamic phases in subarachnoid hemorrhage: how to improve the protective effect in patient prognoses

    PubMed Central

    de Lima Oliveira, Marcelo; de Azevedo, Daniel Silva; de Azevedo, Milena Krajnyk; de Carvalho Nogueira, Ricardo; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage is frequently associated with poor prognoses. Three different hemodynamic phases were identified during subarachnoid hemorrhage: oligemia, hyperemia, and vasospasm. Each phase is associated with brain metabolic changes. In this review, we correlated the hemodynamic phases with brain metabolism and potential treatment options in the hopes of improving patient prognoses. PMID:26109948

  13. Breathing-Impaired Speech after Brain Haemorrhage: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heselwood, Barry

    2007-01-01

    Results are presented from an auditory and acoustic analysis of the speech of an adult male with impaired prosody and articulation due to brain haemorrhage. They show marked effects on phonation, speech rate and articulator velocity, and a speech rhythm disrupted by "intrusive" stresses. These effects are discussed in relation to the speaker's…

  14. Diffuse alveolar haemorrhage associated with aerosol propellant use

    PubMed Central

    Kelchen, Phillip; Jamous, Fady; Huntington, Mark K

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar haemorrhage (DAH) is a clinical syndrome resulting from injury to the alveolar microcirculation, most commonly associated with not only autoimmune disorders or connective tissue disease, but also a variety of infections, neoplasms and toxins. We report here a case of an otherwise healthy young man with DAH attributable to an inhalation injury resulting from use of aerosol spray paint. PMID:23955981

  15. Haemorrhage in seven cats with suspected anticoagulant rodenticide intoxication.

    PubMed

    Kohn, B; Weingart, C; Giger, U

    2003-10-01

    Clinical features were evaluated in seven adult cats (six males, one female) with haemorrhage and presumptive anticoagulant rodenticide intoxication. Haemorrhage appeared as thoracic haemorrhage, otic bleeding, haematoma, melena, haematochezia, and petechiation. The most common other presenting signs were lethargy, anorexia, and tachypnoea or dyspnoea. Six cats were anaemic, four cats were mildly thrombocytopenic (58000-161000/ microL), and three had slightly decreased plasma protein or albumin values. The prothrombin time (30.3->100 s, reference range: 16.5-27.5 s) and activated partial thromboplastin time values (32.6->100 s; reference range: 14-25 s) were markedly prolonged in all cats. All cats received vitamin K(1)subcutaneously or orally (3.7-5 mg/kg body weight initially) and depending on severity of signs five cats were transfused with fresh whole blood. Plasma coagulation times improved in all cats and returned to normal in 1-5 days. Rodenticide poisons represent an important but relatively rare cause of haemorrhage in cats and can be effectively treated. PMID:12948505

  16. Propofol Attenuates Early Brain Injury After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Song-sheng; Zhang, Hua-bin; Wang, Chun-hua; Yang, Wei-zhong; Liang, Ri-sheng; Chen, Ye; Tu, Xian-kun

    2015-12-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that propofol protects rat brain against focal cerebral ischemia. However, whether propofol attenuates early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats remains unknown until now. The present study was performed to evaluate the effect of propofol on early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats and further explore the potential mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by endovascular perforation then received treatment with propofol (10 or 50 mg/kg) or vehicle after 2 and 12 h of SAH. SAH grading, neurological scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, the myeloperoxidase activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were measured 24 h after SAH. Expression of nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65, and aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in rat brain were detected by Western blot. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Expressions of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were assessed by ELISA. Neurological scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, the myeloperoxidase activity, and MDA content were significantly reduced by propofol. Furthermore, expression of Nrf2 in rat brain was upregulated by propofol, and expression of NF-κB p65, AQP4, COX-2, MMP-9, TNF-α, and IL-1β in rat brain were attenuated by propofol. Our results demonstrated that propofol improves neurological scores, reduces brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, inflammatory reaction, and lipid peroxidation in rats of SAH. Propofol exerts neuroprotection against SAH-induced early brain injury, which might be associated with the inhibition of inflammation and lipid peroxidation. PMID:26342279

  17. Current strategies for the management of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Solomon, R A; Fink, M E

    1987-07-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from a ruptured intracranial aneurysm represents a major health issue. Although most people who experience an aneurysmal SAH survive to be admitted to a hospital, less than one third of these patients ever return to their premorbid status. Clearly, morbidity of this magnitude demands reevaluation of the clinical approach to this problem. This article reviews the natural history of aneurysmal SAH, and examines the current therapeutic strategies that have been suggested to improve the outcome. Careful evaluation of the existing data suggests that early aneurysm surgery and aggressive postoperative volume expansion therapy constitute the best presently available approach to patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysms. PMID:3297009

  18. Delayed Vasospasm after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Behcet Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Hak; Lee, Si-Un; Huh, Choonwoong; Oh, Chang Wan; Bang, Jae Seung

    2016-01-01

    A man visited the emergency room with a headache. Brain computed tomography showed aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and multiple aneurysms. After aneurysm clipping surgery, the patient was discharged. After 5 days, he was admitted to the hospital with skin ulceration and was diagnosed with Behcet syndrome. An angiogram taken 7 weeks after aneurysmal SAH showed intracranial vasospasm. Because inflammation in Behcet syndrome may aggravate intracranial vasospasm, intracranial vasospasm after aneurysmal SAH in Behcet syndrome should be monitored for longer compared to general aneurysmal SAH. PMID:27114963

  19. Current Status of Endovascular Treatment for Vasospasm following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Analysis of JR-NET2

    PubMed Central

    HAYASHI, Kentaro; HIRAO, Tomohito; SAKAI, Nobuyuki; NAGATA, Izumi

    2014-01-01

    Endovascular treatments are employed for cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage, which is not responded to the medical treatments. However, the effect or complication of the treatments is not known well. Here, we analyzed the data of Japanese Registry of Neuroendovascular Therapy 2 (JRNET2) and revealed current status of the endovascular treatment for the cerebral vasospasm. JR-NET2 is conducted from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2009. Information on the clinical status, imaging studies, treatment methods, the results of treatment, and status 30 days later were recorded. Totally 645 treatments for 480 patients (mean age, 59.4 years; 72.7% woman) were included. Factors related to the neurological improvement and treatment related complications were statistically analyzed. Treatments for ruptured cerebral aneurysm were direct surgery for 366 cases and endovascular treatment for 253 cases. The timing of the endovascular treatment for the cerebral vasospasm was within 3 hours in 209 cases, 3–6 hours in 158 cases, and more than 6 hours in 158 cases. Intra-arterial vasodilator was employed for the 495 cases and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty for 140 cases. Neurological improvement was observed in 372 cases and radiological improvement was seen in 623 cases. The treatment related complication occurred in 20 cases (3.1%), including 6 cases of intracranial hemorrhage, 5 cases of cerebral ischemia, a case of puncture site trouble, and 8 cases of others. Statistical analysis showed early treatment was related to the neurological improvement. Current status of endovascular treatment for cerebral vasospasm was revealed. Endovascular treatment was effective for vasospasm especially was performed early. PMID:24257541

  20. Correlation of Transcranial Color Doppler to N20 Somatosensory Evoked Potential Detects Ischemic Penumbra in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Di Pasquale, Piero; Zanatta, Paolo; Morghen, Ilaria; Bosco, Enrico; Forini, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Background: Normal subjects present interhemispheric symmetry of middle cerebral artery (MCA) mean flow velocity and N20 cortical somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP). Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) can modify this pattern, since high regional brain vascular resistances increase blood flow velocity, and impaired regional brain perfusion reduces N20 amplitude. The aim of the study is to investigate the variability of MCA resistances and N20 amplitude between hemispheres in SAH. Methods: Measurements of MCA blood flow velocity (vMCA) by transcranial color-Doppler and median nerve SSEP were bilaterally performed in sixteen patients. MCA vascular changes on the compromised hemisphere were calculated as a ratio of the reciprocal of mean flow velocity (1/vMCA) to contralateral value and correlated to the simultaneous variations of interhemispheric ratio of N20 amplitude, within each subject. Data were analysed with respect to neuroimaging of MCA supplied areas. Results: Both interhemispheric ratios of 1/vMCA and N20 amplitude were detected >0.65 (p <0,01) in patients without neuroimages of injury. Both ratios became <0.65 (p <0.01) when patients showed unilateral images of ischemic penumbra and returned >0.65 if penumbra disappeared. The two ratios no longer correlated after structural lesion developed, as N20 detected in the damaged side remained pathological (ratio <0.65), whereas 1/vMCA reverted to symmetric interhemispheric state (ratio >0.65), suggesting a luxury perfusion. Conclusion: Variations of interhemispheric ratios of MCA resistance and cortical N20 amplitude correlate closely in SAH and allow identification of the reversible ischemic penumbra threshold, when both ratios become <0.65. The correlation is lost when structural damage develops. PMID:21660110

  1. Molecular alterations in the hippocampus after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang Myung; Wan, Hoyee; Kudo, Gen; Foltz, Warren D; Vines, Douglass C; Green, David E; Zoerle, Tommaso; Tariq, Asma; Brathwaite, Shakira; D'Abbondanza, Josephine; Ai, Jinglu; Macdonald, R Loch

    2014-01-01

    Patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) frequently have deficits in learning and memory that may or may not be associated with detectable brain lesions. We examined mediators of long-term potentiation after SAH in rats to determine what processes might be involved. There was a reduction in synapses in the dendritic layer of the CA1 region on transmission electron microscopy as well as reduced colocalization of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and synaptophysin. Immunohistochemistry showed reduced staining for GluR1 and calmodulin kinase 2 and increased staining for GluR2. Myelin basic protein staining was decreased as well. There was no detectable neuronal injury by Fluoro-Jade B, TUNEL, or activated caspase-3 staining. Vasospasm of the large arteries of the circle of Willis was mild to moderate in severity. Nitric oxide was increased and superoxide anion radical was decreased in hippocampal tissue. Cerebral blood flow, measured by magnetic resonance imaging, and cerebral glucose metabolism, measured by positron emission tomography, were no different in SAH compared with control groups. The results suggest that the etiology of loss of LTP after SAH is not cerebral ischemia but may be mediated by effects of subarachnoid blood such as oxidative stress and inflammation. PMID:24064494

  2. Molecular alterations in the hippocampus after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang Myung; Wan, Hoyee; Kudo, Gen; Foltz, Warren D; Vines, Douglass C; Green, David E; Zoerle, Tommaso; Tariq, Asma; Brathwaite, Shakira; D'Abbondanza, Josephine; Ai, Jinglu; Macdonald, R Loch

    2014-01-01

    Patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) frequently have deficits in learning and memory that may or may not be associated with detectable brain lesions. We examined mediators of long-term potentiation after SAH in rats to determine what processes might be involved. There was a reduction in synapses in the dendritic layer of the CA1 region on transmission electron microscopy as well as reduced colocalization of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and synaptophysin. Immunohistochemistry showed reduced staining for GluR1 and calmodulin kinase 2 and increased staining for GluR2. Myelin basic protein staining was decreased as well. There was no detectable neuronal injury by Fluoro-Jade B, TUNEL, or activated caspase-3 staining. Vasospasm of the large arteries of the circle of Willis was mild to moderate in severity. Nitric oxide was increased and superoxide anion radical was decreased in hippocampal tissue. Cerebral blood flow, measured by magnetic resonance imaging, and cerebral glucose metabolism, measured by positron emission tomography, were no different in SAH compared with control groups. The results suggest that the etiology of loss of LTP after SAH is not cerebral ischemia but may be mediated by effects of subarachnoid blood such as oxidative stress and inflammation. PMID:24064494

  3. CSF and Serum Biomarkers Focusing on Cerebral Vasospasm and Ischemia after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Carla S.; Lange, Bettina; Zimmermann, Michael; Seifert, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Delayed cerebral vasospasm (CVS) and delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) remain severe complications after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Although focal changes in cerebral metabolism indicating ischemia are detectable by microdialysis, routinely used biomarkers are missing. We therefore sought to evaluate a panel of possible global markers in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients after SAH. CSF and serum of SAH patients were analyzed retrospectively. In CSF, levels of inhibitory, excitatory, and structural amino acids were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In serum, neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100B level were measured and examined in conjunction with CVS and DCI. CVS was detected by arteriography, and ischemic lesions were assessed by computed tomography (CT) scans. All CSF amino acids were altered after SAH. CSF glutamate, glutamine, glycine, and histidine were significantly correlated with arteriographic CVS. CSF glutamate and serum S100B were significantly correlated with ischemic events after SAH; however, NSE did not correlate neither with ischemia nor with vasospasm. Glutamate, glutamine, glycine, and histidine might be used in CSF as markers for CVS. Glutamate also indicates ischemia. Serum S100B, but not NSE, is a suitable marker for ischemia. These results need to be validated in larger prospective cohorts. PMID:23509668

  4. Clinical experience with nimodipine in the prophylaxis of neurological deficits after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kazner, E; Sprung, C; Adelt, D; Ammerer, H P; Karnick, R; Baumann, H; Böker, D K; Grotenhuis, J A; Jaksche, H; Istaitih, A R

    1985-05-01

    The efficacy and tolerability of the dihydropyridine calcium antagonist nimodipine (BAY e 9736) in the prophylaxis of ischemic neurological deficits after subarachnoid hemorrhage were investigated in 171 patients in an open, prospective, multicenter study. 68 of the patients had to be excluded from the efficacy assessment as they had failed to satisfy important inclusion criteria. The efficacy assessment was based on 104 patients of Hunt and Hess grades I-III. In 86 patients the ruptured aneurysm was clipped before or during the nimodipine therapy, while 18 patients did not undergo surgery owing to failure to detect an aneurysm, continuous deterioration of the clinical condition, or for other reasons. At the end of the nimodipine treatment 74 of the patients (71%) were completely free from symptoms or had only very slight neurological deficits. There were 10 patients (10%) with moderate and 10 with a severe disablement, 4 patients were apallic, and 6 (6%) died during the nimodipine treatment. In 4 patients (3.8%) cerebral vasospasm was the sole cause of severe neurological deficits or death, while in a further 3 patients (2.7%) vasospasm and other serious complications were responsible for poor outcome. 22 of the 171 patients (12.9%) died during or shortly after nimodipine therapy. Rebleeding occurred during nimodipine therapy in 7 of the 143 preoperatively treated cases (4.9%). PMID:4010865

  5. Delayed torrential haemorrhage after firearm injury

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pankaj; Singhal, Maneesh; Sagar, Sushma; Gupta, Amit

    2014-01-01

    A 30-year-old man was referred to us after 48 days of gunshot injury to left groin, with torrential bleeding from a pseudoaneurysm of the left external iliac artery. He was successfully managed with a team of specialists involving trauma surgeon, vascular and plastic surgeon, general surgeons and intervention radiologist with the help of critical care specialists. He required judicious debridement, a transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap, stenting of the external iliac artery, repair of the external iliac vein and ligation of the bilateral internal iliac artery. He had prolonged intensive care unit stay with open abdomen requiring specialised care. Errors in regular assessment of patient by clinical and radiological examination along with failure in early adequate debridement were responsible for trauma suffered by him. Though it is a rare injury, these devastating complications can occur after any gunshot injury and proper management guidelines must be established. PMID:24810442

  6. Spreading depolarizations increase delayed brain injury in a rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hamming, Arend M; Wermer, Marieke Jh; Umesh Rudrapatna, S; Lanier, Christian; van Os, Hine Ja; van den Bergh, Walter M; Ferrari, Michel D; van der Toorn, Annette; van den Maagdenberg, Arn Mjm; Stowe, Ann M; Dijkhuizen, Rick M

    2016-07-01

    Spreading depolarizations may contribute to delayed cerebral ischemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, but the effect of spreading depolarizations on brain lesion progression after subarachnoid hemorrhage has not yet been assessed directly. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that artificially induced spreading depolarizations increase brain tissue damage in a rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Subarachnoid hemorrhage was induced by endovascular puncture of the right internal carotid bifurcation. After one day, brain tissue damage was measured with T2-weighted MRI, followed by application of 1 M KCl (SD group, N = 16) or saline (no-SD group, N = 16) to the right cortex. Cortical laser-Doppler flowmetry was performed to record spreading depolarizations. MRI was repeated on day 3, after which brains were extracted for assessment of subarachnoid hemorrhage severity and histological damage. 5.0 ± 2.7 spreading depolarizations were recorded in the SD group. Subarachnoid hemorrhage severity and mortality were similar between the SD and no-SD groups. Subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced brain lesions expanded between days 1 and 3. This lesion growth was larger in the SD group (241 ± 233 mm(3)) than in the no-SD group (29 ± 54 mm(3)) (p = 0.001). We conclude that induction of spreading depolarizations significantly advances lesion growth after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage. Our study underscores the pathophysiological consequence of spreading depolarizations in the development of delayed cerebral tissue injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:26661246

  7. Resuscitation in massive obstetric haemorrhage using an intraosseous needle.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, D J; Bukunola, B; Samuels, T L; Induruwage, L; Uncles, D R

    2011-04-01

    A 38-year-old woman experienced a massive postpartum haemorrhage 30 minutes after emergency caesarean delivery. The patient became severely haemodynamically compromised with an unrecordable blood pressure. Rapid fluid resuscitation was limited by the capacity of the intravenous cannula in place at the time and inability to establish additional vascular access using conventional routes in a timely manner. An intraosseous needle was inserted in the proximal humerus at the first attempt and administration of resuscitation fluid by this route subsequently enabled successful placement of further intravenous lines. Blood and blood products were deployed in conjunction with intra-operative cell salvage and transoesophageal Doppler cardiac output monitoring was used to assess adequacy of volume replacement. Haemorrhage control was finally achieved with the use of recombinant factor VIIa and hysterectomy. PMID:21401545

  8. Detection and localization of internal haemorrhaging using electrical bioimpedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, J.; Fenech, M.

    2013-04-01

    Electrical bioimpedance is an effective measuring tool to provide quick, non-invasive, real-time results which will be applied to the detection of internal haemorrhaging. Experiments were performed on female Fancy Rats weighing 333±44g, and 10mL of porcine blood was injected abdominally over 3 minutes. Data was collected using an 8×8 needle electrode array at 5 kHz, and 95 kHz and sent to the BioParHom Z-Flow. A strong correlation was found between the electrode paths crossing directly through the blood injection site, showing a decrease of about -0.17±0.1Ω/mL for the 5 kHz frequency. This correlation allows us to quickly detect internal haemorrhaging and also localize it with the current path set-up in the electrode array.

  9. Prevention of upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage: current controversies and clinical guidance

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Johanne; Warburton, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a common medical emergency and associated with significant morbidly and mortality. The risk of bleeding from peptic ulceration and oesophagogastric varices can be reduced by appropriate primary and secondary preventative strategies. Helicobacter pylori eradication and risk stratification with appropriate gastroprotection strategies when used with antiplatelet drugs and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are effective in preventing peptic ulcer bleeding, whilst endoscopic screening and either nonselective beta blockade or endoscopic variceal ligation are effective at reducing the risk of variceal haemorrhage. For secondary prevention of variceal haemorrhage, the combination of beta blockade and endoscopic variceal ligation is more effective. Recent data on the possible interactions of aspirin and NSAIDs, clopidogrel and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), and the increased risk of cardiovascular adverse events associated with all nonaspirin cyclo-oxygenase (COX) inhibitors have increased the complexity of choices for preventing peptic ulcer bleeding. Such choices should consider both the GI and cardiovascular risk profiles. In patients with a moderately increased risk of GI bleeding, a NSAID plus a PPI or a COX-2 selective agent alone appear equivalent but for those at highest risk of bleeding (especially those with previous ulcer or haemorrhage) the COX-2 inhibitor plus PPI combination is superior. However naproxen seems the safest NSAID for those at increased cardiovascular risk. Clopidogrel is associated with a significant risk of GI haemorrhage and the most recent data concerning the potential clinical interaction of clopidogrel and PPIs are reassuring. In clopidogrel-treated patients at highest risk of GI bleeding, some form of GI prevention is indicated. PMID:23997925

  10. Spontaneous subdural haemorrhage in a patient with scleroderma renal crisis

    PubMed Central

    Bhangoo, Munveer Singh; Hein, Paul; Nicholson, Laura; Carter, Caitlin

    2014-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman with a history of systemic sclerosis presented with new onset seizures and renal failure. The patient's history, laboratory data and pathology supported the diagnosis of scleroderma renal crisis. The patient was also noted to have a subdural haemorrhage (SDH) in the absence of trauma. This is the first report of scleroderma renal crisis associated with a spontaneous SDH. PMID:25193814

  11. Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II) Protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Within the spectrum of spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage there are some patients with large or space occupying haemorrhage who require surgery for neurological deterioration and others with small haematomas who should be managed conservatively. There is equipoise about the management of patients between these two extremes. In particular there is some evidence that patients with lobar haematomas and no intraventricular haemorrhage might benefit from haematoma evacuation. The STICH II study will establish whether a policy of earlier surgical evacuation of the haematoma in selected patients will improve outcome compared to a policy of initial conservative treatment. Methods/Design an international multicentre randomised parallel group trial. Only patients for whom the treating neurosurgeon is in equipoise about the benefits of early craniotomy compared to initial conservative treatment are eligible. All patients must have a CT scan confirming spontaneous lobar intracerebral haemorrhage (≤1 cm from the cortex surface of the brain and 10-100 ml in volume). Any clotting or coagulation problems must be corrected and randomisation must take place within 48 hours of ictus. With 600 patients, the study will be able to demonstrate a 12% benefit from surgery (2p < 0.05) with 80% power. Stratified randomisation is undertaken using a central 24 hour randomisation service accessed by telephone or web. Patients randomised to early surgery should have the operation within 12 hours. Information about the status (Glasgow Coma Score and focal signs) of all patients through the first five days of their trial progress is also collected in addition to another CT scan at about five days (+/- 2 days). Outcome is measured at six months via a postal questionnaire to the patient. Primary outcome is death or severe disability defined using a prognosis based 8 point Glasgow Outcome Scale. Secondary outcomes include: Mortality, Rankin, Barthel, EuroQol, and Survival. Trial

  12. Blood products and their use in traumatic major haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Deveau, Simon Ross

    2016-02-01

    Blood loss due to trauma is a leading cause of death in young people and is the result of the 'lethal triad' of hypothermia, acidosis and coagulopathy, which collectively reduce haemostasis. Emergency department nurses can help to reverse the triad through the timely and efficient use of blood products and fluids. This article briefly examines different blood groups, describes the elements of the lethal triad, and discusses the blood products used to transfuse patients with major haemorrhage. PMID:26853674

  13. Intraventricular haemorrhage in the preterm infant without hyaline membrane disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wigglesworth, J S; Davies, P A; Keith, I H; Slade, S A

    1977-01-01

    The clinicopathological associations of 33 singleton infants who died with intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) without hyaline membrane disease (HMD) ('IVH only') were compared with those of 39 infants who died with IVH+HMD over the same gestation range in order to determine what factors other than those related to HMD may contribute to the pathogenesis of IVH. The incidence of 'IVH only' was inversely related to gestational age in the Hammersmith birth population, whereas the incidence of IVH+HMD rose to a peak at 28-29 weeks' gestation. Infants with 'IVH only' lived longer on average than those with IVH+HMD despite a lower birthweight and shorter gestation. Infants who died in the first 12 hours from 'IVH only' had suffered severe birth asphyxia but in those who died later the main symptom was recurrent apnoea. Fewer infants with asphyxia but in those who died later the main symptom was.recurrent apnoea. Fewer infants with 'IVH only' were given alkali therapy or were connected to the ventilator as compared to those with IVH+HMD, but there were no differences in alkali therapy in those who lived for 12 hours or more. In the 'IVH only' group there was a high incidence of haemorrhage from other sites and of bacterial infections. It is suggested that, in the absence of HMD, extreme immaturity is the main factor determining the occurrence of IVH. Birth asphyxia, apnoeic attacks, haemorrhage, and infections may play subsidiary roles, possibly through development of metabolic acidosis. PMID:879829

  14. Long-Term Outcomes for Different Forms of Stress Cardiomyopathy After Surgical Treatment for Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Bihorac, Azra; Ozrazgat-Baslanti, Tezcan; Mahanna, Elizabeth; Malik, Seemab; White, Peggy; Sorensen, Matthew; Fahy, Brenda G.; Petersen, John W

    2016-01-01

    Background Stress-induced cardiomyopathy (SCM) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) includes predominant apical or basal regional left ventricular dysfunction (RLVD) with concomitant changes in electrocardiogram or increase in cardiac enzymes. We hypothesized that difference in outcome is associated with the type of RLVD after SAH. Methods We studied a single-center retrospective cohort of SAH patients hospitalized between 2000 and 2010 with follow-up until 2013. We classified patients who had an echocardiogram for clinically indicated reasons according to the predominate location of RLVD as classic SCM-apical form and variant SCM-basal form. A Cox proportional hazard model and logistic regression were used to estimate risk for death and hospital complications associated with different RLVD, after adjustment for propensity to undergo echocardiography given clinical characteristics on admission. Results Among 715 SAH patients 28% (200/715) had an echocardiogram for clinical evidence of cardiac dysfunction during hospitalization, the most common being acute LV dysfunction, suspected acute ischemic event, changes in electrocardiogram and cardiac enzymes and arrhythmia. SCM was present in 59 patients (8% of all cohort and 30% of patients with echocardiogram, respectively) with similar distribution of SCM-basal (25/59) and SCM-Apical forms (34/59). SAH patients who had an echocardiogram for clinically indicated reasons had a significantly decreased risk-adjusted long-term survival compared to those without an echocardiogram, regardless of the presence of RLVD. SCM-basal was associated with cardiac complications (OR 6.1, 99% CI 1.8–20.2) and severe sepsis (OR 5.3 99% CI 1.6–17.2). Conclusions SAH patients with echocardiogram for a clinically indicated reason have a decreased long-term survival, regardless of the presence of RLVD. The association between severe sepsis and SCM-basal warrants future studies to determine their potential synergistic effect on LV systolic

  15. Desbaric air embolism during diving: an unusual complication of Osler-Weber-Rendu disease.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Y-L; Wang, H-C; Yang, P-C

    2004-08-01

    Cerebral manifestations of Osler-Weber-Rendu disease (OWRD, hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia) including telangiectases, venous malformations, and arteriovenous malformations, are usually under-recognised. The highest complication rate is observed in high flow cerebral arteriovenous malformations, which may present with headache, epilepsy, ischaemia, or haemorrhage. Cerebral air embolism during self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba) diving as the first manifestation of pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) in OWRD patients has never been reported before. Here we report a 31 year old male who presented desbaric air embolism as the first manifestation of PAVM. As far as we know, this is the first such case published in English medical literature. PMID:15273199

  16. Relationship between Postmenopausal Estrogen Deficiency and Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Tabuchi, Sadaharu

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is one of the most severe forms of stroke, which results from the rupture of a cerebral aneurysm. SAH is the only type of stroke with a female predominance, suggesting that reproductive factors may play a significant role in the etiology. Estrogen has important effects on vascular physiology and pathophysiology of cerebral aneurysm and SAH and, thus, potential therapeutic implications. There have been growing bodies of epidemiological and experimental studies which support the hypothesis of a significant relationship between estrogen deficiency and cerebral aneurysm formation with subsequent SAH. This hypothesis is the focus of this review as well as possible pathology-based therapeutics with regard to aspects of molecular pathophysiology, especially related to women's health. PMID:26538819

  17. Referral pattern of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Schievink, W I; van der Werf, D J; Hageman, L M; Dreissen, J J

    1988-05-01

    The referral pattern of 334 patients admitted to a neurosurgical clinic with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was analyzed. Forty-nine percent of the patients were admitted after the day following the SAH. Failure of patients to seek prompt medical care was a cause of delay in 29 patients and of physician diagnostic errors in 95 patients. Common misdiagnoses included migraine, mental exhaustion, sinusitis, and influenza. A delay at the referring hospital was observed in 97 patients. Early intervention is important for the optimal management of patients with SAH. Educating the public, medical students, and physicians about the signs and symptoms of SAH and the importance of prompt therapy is likely to improve overall outcome after aneurysmal rupture. PMID:3363473

  18. Subarachnoid midazolam: histologic study in rats and report of its effect on chronic pain in humans.

    PubMed

    Schoeffler, P; Auroy, P; Bazin, J E; Taxi, J; Woda, A

    1991-01-01

    Subarachnoid administration via a catheter of a water-soluble benzodiazepine, midazolam, was tested in the control of cancer pain. First, the lack of its toxicity during constant subarachnoid administration (50 micrograms per day) was assessed in the rat. After 15 days of treatment, a histologic examination of the spinal cord revealed the same amount of fibrosis, infiltration, and deformation in the control group (n = 14), which had received only saline, as in the test group (n = 18), treated with subarachnoid midazolam. Therefore, the histologic changes observed in the spinal cord probably are related to the presence of the catheter. After these results, a mixture of 2 mg midazolam and a variable dose of subarachnoid morphine was injected in two patients presenting chronic neoplastic pain resistant to high doses of morphine. In these two cases, the addition of midazolam appeared to be effective in controlling intractable neoplastic pain. PMID:1772817

  19. Arachnoid cell involvement in the mechanism of coagulation-initiated inflammation in the subarachnoid space after subarachnoid hemorrhage*

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Zhao-liang; Wu, Xiao-kang; Xu, Jian-rong; Li, Xi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess if arachnoid cells have the capability to present antigen and activate T-lymphocytes after stimulation by bloody cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and to illuminate the mechanism of coagulation-initiated inflammation in the subarachnoid space after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods: Arachnoid cells were cultured, characterized, and examined by immunofluorescence for the basal expression of human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR). Expression of HLA-DR, after co-culturing arachnoid cells in vitro with bloody CSF, was investigated by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry (FCM). The variation of arachnoid cells’ ultrastructure was observed by transmission electron microscope (TEM). Arachnoid cells were co-cultured with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The content of soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2r) in culture medium was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: (1) Arachnoid cells were successfully cultured for many passages. The immunofluorescent staining was positive for HLA-DR in over 95% of the human arachnoid cells. The punctate HLA-DR was distributed in cytoplasm and not in the karyon. (2) After co-culturing arachnoid cells in vitro with bloody CSF, numerous particles with strong fluorescence appeared in the cytoplasm on Day 6. On Day 8, the quantity of particles and fluorescent intensity were maximal. FCM showed that the percentage of HLA-DR expressing cells was (2.5±0.4)% at the first 5 d, increasing to (60.8±3.6)% on Day 7. (3) After co-culturing arachnoid cells in vitro with bloody CSF, many lysosome and secondary lysosome particles were present in the cytoplasm. Hyperplasia of rough endoplasmic reticulum and enlarged cysts were observed, with numerous phagocytizing vesicles also observed at the edge of the arachnoid cells. (4) Arachnoid cells stimulated by bloody CSF were co-cultured in vitro with PBMCs. The content of sIL-2r in the culture medium, having been maintained at around 1.30 ng/ml during

  20. Neurologic Complications of Cancer and its Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Giglio, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) are very susceptible to cancer and its treatment. The most direct involvement of the nervous system manifests in the development of primary brain and spinal cord tumors. Many cancers exhibit a propensity toward spread to the CNS, and brain metastases are common problems seen in malignancies such as lung, breast, and melanoma. Such spread may involve the brain or spine parenchyma or the subarachnoid space. In the PNS, spread is usually through direct infiltration of nerve roots, plexi, or muscle by neighboring malignancies. In some cases, cancer has sudden, devastating effects on the nervous system: epidural spinal cord compression or cord transection from pathologic fractures of vertebra involved by cancer; increased intracranial pressure from intracranial mass lesion growth and edema; and uncontrolled seizure activity as a result of intracranial tumors (status epilepticus), which are neuro-oncologic emergencies. The best known indirect or remote effects of cancer on the nervous system are the neurologic paraneoplastic syndromes. Cancer can also result in a hypercoagulable state causing cerebrovascular complications. Treatment of cancer can have neurologic complications. The commonest of these complications are radiation-induced injury to the brain, spine, and peripheral nerves and chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. The suppressant effect of cancer and its treatment on the body’s immune system can result in infectious complications within the nervous system. PMID:20425608

  1. Leptomeningeal transthyretin-type amyloidosis presenting as acute hydrocephalus and subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Bevers, Matthew B; McGuone, Declan; Jerath, Nivedita U; Musolino, Patricia L

    2016-07-01

    We present a report of a 47-year-old woman with developmental delay who presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage and acute hydrocephalus. She did not have an aneurysm, but there was symmetric calcification and gadolinium-enhancement of the meninges within the Sylvian fissure. Biopsy and genetic testing confirmed transthyretin-type amyloidosis. It is important to consider such rare causes in atypical presentations of non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:26896372

  2. Diagnosis and Management of Hyponatremia in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Marupudi, Neena I.; Mittal, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Hyponatremia is the most common, clinically-significant electrolyte abnormality seen in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Controversy continues to exist regarding both the cause and treatment of hyponatremia in this patient population. Lack of timely diagnosis and/or providing inadequate or inappropriate treatment can increase the risk of morbidity and mortality. We review recent literature on hyponatremia in subarachnoid hemorrhage and present currently recommended protocols for diagnosis and management. PMID:25937938

  3. Continuous subarachnoid analgesia in two adolescents with severe scoliosis and impaired pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    Sethna, N F; Berde, C B

    1991-01-01

    We report postoperative pain management of two adolescents after upper abdominal procedures, one with Hurler-Scheie syndrome and a second with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and both had progressive spinal scoliosis with poor pulmonary function. A combined technique of subarachnoid and general anesthesia was used during surgery. Postoperative administration of small intermittent doses of subarachnoid morphine produced profound analgesia, which eliminated the need for systemic opioids, restored preoperative arterial oxygenation within 48 hours after the operation, and expedited postoperative recovery. PMID:1772818

  4. Addition of intrathecal fentanyl to bupivacaine clonidine mixture effect on quality of subarachnoid block and postoperative analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Nazareth, Marilyn; Ghoshal, Pabitra; Namshikar, Viraj; Gaude, Yogesh

    2013-01-01

    Context: This study was undertaken in 100 patients scheduled for lower limb orthopaedic surgeries. Aim: The objective of this study was to study the effect of addition of intrathecal fentanyl to bupivacaine clonidine mixture on the quality of subarachnoid block and compare it with intrathecal bupivacaine clonidine mixture without fentanyl. Settings and Design: In this prospective and double blind randomized controlled study, one hundred patients, between 20-40 years of age, of either sex, weighing between 40-65 Kg, measuring more than 150 cm in height, of ASA Grade I and II who were undergoing orthopaedic lower limb surgeries were selected in order to study the quality of subarachnoid block and post-operative analgesia produced by a combination of bupivacaine clonidine and fentanyl in comparison with bupivacaine clonidine. Materials and Methods: The patients were randomly divided in two groups of 50 each: Group BC: 2.4 ml of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (12 mg) + 0.2 ml (30 μg) clonidine + 0.4 ml of 0.9% NaCl. Group BCF: 2.4 ml of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (12 mg) + 0.2 ml (30 μg) clonidine + 0.4 ml (20 μg) of fentanyl. The total volume of solution in both the groups was 3.0 ml. The quality of subarachnoid block and post-operative analgesia were studied. Statistical Analysis Used: The data thus obtained was statistically analysed using the following tests: Unpaired student's t-test. Average % change in data over baseline values to detect trends. A ‘P’ value of <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: There was no significant difference in duration of sensory and motor blockade in group BCF compared to BC. The duration of analgesia as assessed by, either VAS score of >5 or demand of additional analgesia was > 524.6 ± 32.21 mins in group BC and > 774.4 ± 59.59 mins in group BCF. This prolongation of duration of analgesia in group BCF compared to group BC has statistical significance. Blood pressure and heart rate changes were not

  5. Clinical Neurochemistry of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Toward Predicting Individual Outcomes via Biomarkers of Brain Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tholance, Yannick; Barcelos, Gleicy; Dailler, Frederic; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Renaud, Bernard

    2015-12-16

    The functional outcome of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage is difficult to predict at the individual level. The monitoring of brain energy metabolism has proven to be useful in improving the pathophysiological understanding of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Nonetheless, brain energy monitoring has not yet clearly been included in official guidelines for the management of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients, likely because previous studies compared only biological data between two groups of patients (unfavorable vs favorable outcomes) and did not determine decision thresholds that could be useful in clinical practice. Therefore, this Viewpoint discusses recent findings suggesting that monitoring biomarkers of brain energy metabolism at the level of individuals can be used to predict the outcomes of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients. Indeed, by taking into account specific neurochemical patterns obtained by local or global monitoring of brain energy metabolism, it may become possible to predict routinely, and with sufficient sensitivity and specificity, the individual outcomes of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients. Moreover, combining both local and global monitoring improves the overall performance of individual outcome prediction. Such a combined neurochemical monitoring approach may become, after prospective clinical validation, an important component in the management of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients to adapt individualized therapeutic interventions. PMID:26595414

  6. Acute complications of spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Ellen Merete

    2015-01-18

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of acute complications of spinal cord injury (SCI). Along with motor and sensory deficits, instabilities of the cardiovascular, thermoregulatory and broncho-pulmonary system are common after a SCI. Disturbances of the urinary and gastrointestinal systems are typical as well as sexual dysfunction. Frequent complications of cervical and high thoracic SCI are neurogenic shock, bradyarrhythmias, hypotension, ectopic beats, abnormal temperature control and disturbance of sweating, vasodilatation and autonomic dysreflexia. Autonomic dysreflexia is an abrupt, uncontrolled sympathetic response, elicited by stimuli below the level of injury. The symptoms may be mild like skin rash or slight headache, but can cause severe hypertension, cerebral haemorrhage and death. All personnel caring for the patient should be able to recognize the symptoms and be able to intervene promptly. Disturbance of respiratory function are frequent in tetraplegia and a primary cause of both short and long-term morbidity and mortality is pulmonary complications. Due to physical inactivity and altered haemostasis, patients with SCI have a higher risk of venous thromboembolism and pressure ulcers. Spasticity and pain are frequent complications which need to be addressed. The psychological stress associated with SCI may lead to anxiety and depression. Knowledge of possible complications during the acute phase is important because they may be life threatening and/ or may lead to prolonged rehabilitation. PMID:25621207

  7. Acute complications of spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Ellen Merete

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of acute complications of spinal cord injury (SCI). Along with motor and sensory deficits, instabilities of the cardiovascular, thermoregulatory and broncho-pulmonary system are common after a SCI. Disturbances of the urinary and gastrointestinal systems are typical as well as sexual dysfunction. Frequent complications of cervical and high thoracic SCI are neurogenic shock, bradyarrhythmias, hypotension, ectopic beats, abnormal temperature control and disturbance of sweating, vasodilatation and autonomic dysreflexia. Autonomic dysreflexia is an abrupt, uncontrolled sympathetic response, elicited by stimuli below the level of injury. The symptoms may be mild like skin rash or slight headache, but can cause severe hypertension, cerebral haemorrhage and death. All personnel caring for the patient should be able to recognize the symptoms and be able to intervene promptly. Disturbance of respiratory function are frequent in tetraplegia and a primary cause of both short and long-term morbidity and mortality is pulmonary complications. Due to physical inactivity and altered haemostasis, patients with SCI have a higher risk of venous thromboembolism and pressure ulcers. Spasticity and pain are frequent complications which need to be addressed. The psychological stress associated with SCI may lead to anxiety and depression. Knowledge of possible complications during the acute phase is important because they may be life threatening and/ or may lead to prolonged rehabilitation. PMID:25621207

  8. Neurologic complications of infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Lerner, P I

    1985-03-01

    Neurologic complications continue to occur in approximately 30 per cent of all patients with infective endocarditis and represent a major factor associated with an increased mortality rate in that disease. Of these complications, cerebral embolism is the most common and the most important, occurring in as many as 30 per cent of all patients, most of whom ultimately die. Emboli that are infected also account for all the other complications (mycotic aneurysm, meningitis or meningoencephalitis, brain abscess) that may develop. Emboli are more common in patients with mitral valve infection and in those infected with more virulent organisms. Mycotic aneurysms (often preceded by an embolic event) occur more frequently and earlier in the course of acute endocarditis, rather than later, which is more common in the course of subacute disease. The management of a cerebral mycotic aneurysm depends on the presence or absence of hemorrhage, its anatomic location and the clinical course. Healing can occur during the course of effective antimicrobial therapy and thus will preclude the need for automatic surgery in all angiographically demonstrated aneurysms. The indication for surgical intervention must be evaluated on an individual basis. Meningitis is usually purulent when associated with virulent organisms, but the CSF may present an aseptic formula when associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage or multiple microscopic embolic lesions, infected or otherwise. Macroscopic brain abscesses are rare, but multiple microscopic abscesses are not uncommon in patients with acute endocarditis due to virulent organisms. Seizures are not uncommon in patients with infective endocarditis. Focal seizures are more commonly associated with acute emboli, whereas generalized seizures are more commonly associated with systemic metabolic factors. Penicillin neurotoxicity should be considered in seizure patients with compromised renal function who are receiving high doses of penicillin. The CSF tends

  9. Origin of intraventricular haemorrhage in the preterm infant.

    PubMed Central

    Hambleton, G; Wigglesworth, J S

    1976-01-01

    A technique has been developed for the injection and stereomicroscopic examination of blood vessels in the preterm newborn brain. Using this technique it can be seen that in the immature brain there is a rich capillary bed in the germinal layer region supplied mainly by Heubner's artery. Capillary channels drain directly into the terminal vein and its main branches. Study of 19 cases with spontaneous germinal layer haemorrhage (GLH) with or without intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) failed to show rupture of the terminal vein or germinal layer infarction. In babies of up to 28 weeks' gestation GLH developed most frequently over the body of the caudate nucleus, whereas in babies of 29 weeks' gestation or more the haemorrhages were usually over the head of the caudate nucleus. Histological study of 10 cases of GLH failed to show rupture either of arteries or veins, though evidence of rupture at a capillary-vein junction was seen in one case and masses of fibrin adjacent to the vein wall in 2 others. Injection through the carotid artery caused prominent leaks of injection mass within the germinal layer capillary bed, often adjacent to the veins. Injection through the jugular veins in 2 cases failed to rupture the terminal vein but caused multiple vein ruptures at the junction of deep and cortical venous systems. Additional small ruptures in the germinal layer occurred in one of the cases only. It is suggested that the capillaries within the germinal layer may be ruptured by a rise in arterial pressure, particularly in conditions of hypercapnia and hypoxia. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FIG. 8 FIG. 9 FIG. 10 FIG. 11 FIG. 12 FIG. 13 PMID:999324

  10. Catastrophic gastrointestinal complication of systemic immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lyn Alexandra; Gangopadhyay, Mitali; Gaya, Daniel R

    2015-02-28

    We present a case of acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in a patient with systemic vasculitis immunosuppressed on cyclophosphamide and prednisolone. The patient presented with a diffuse haemorrhagic oesophagitis and a non-specific duodenitis. Biopsies taken from the oesophagus and duodenum demonstrated infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) respectively. Viral infection of the upper gastrointestinal tract is a recognised complication of immunosuppression and HSV is one of the most common pathogens. CMV on the other hand most commonly causes a colitis or less commonly oesophagitis. CMV enteritis is rare as is the synchronous infection with two viral agents in an immunocompromised patient having being described in a few case series only. Viral infection of the gastrointestinal tract in immunocompromised patients should be treated with systemic anti-viral medication and consideration to withdrawal of the immunosuppressive therapy if possible and appropriate. The authors highlight the need for a high suspicion of viral infection in immunosuppressed patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:25741165

  11. Intracranial haemorrhages in French haemophilia patients (1991-2001): clinical presentation, management and prognosis factors for death.

    PubMed

    Stieltjes, N; Calvez, T; Demiguel, V; Torchet, M F; Briquel, M E; Fressinaud, E; Claeyssens, S; Coatmelec, B; Chambost, H

    2005-09-01

    Intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) is known to be a severe although uncommon complication of haemophilia. A national survey has been conducted in France in order to collect information about ICHs which occurred in haemophiliacs between 1991 and 2001 and to propose recommendations for the diagnostic and treatment of ICH. Within this period, 123 episodes of ICH were recorded from 106 patients. Two-thirds of ICH concerned patients with severe haemophilia. Half of the cases occurred in patients under 15 years of age, 67.2% of which were post-traumatic. Ten cases occurred in neonates with three fatal outcomes. Overall mortality was high (21.9%) suggesting that availability of clotting factor concentrates has not improved the prognosis of this event. Morbidity was also high with 60% of long-term sequelae. The following parameters have been identified as prognostic factors for death: thrombocytopenia, HCV infection, intraventricular or intraparenchymatous haemorrhage. A delay in diagnosis was mentioned in 43.3% of cases, often related to the lack of recognition of the initial symptoms, which may be very common (apathy, tearfulness in young children and headache in elder patients). Delayed replacement therapy was recorded in 37.2% of cases. Emergency units initially dealt with half of these patients. Information concerning recognition and management of these episodes, not only in severe haemophilia, but also in moderate and mild forms, should be regularly supplied to paediatricians in maternity and physicians from emergency units, as well as to patients and their relatives. PMID:16128887

  12. Intracerebral haemorrhage in primary and metastatic brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Salmaggi, Andrea; Erbetta, Alessandra; Silvani, Antonio; Maderna, Emanuela; Pollo, Bianca

    2008-09-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage may both be a presenting manifestation in unrecognised brain tumour or--more frequently--take place in the disease course of known/suspected brain tumour due to diagnostic/therapeutic procedures, including biopsy, locoregional treatments and anti-angiogenic therapies. Apart from the difficulties inherent to accurate neuroradiological diagnosis in selected cases with small tumour volume, the main clinical problem that neurologists face is represented by decision making in prophylaxis/treatment of venous thromboembolism in these patients. These points are briefly discussed and available evidence on the last point is commented on. PMID:18690513

  13. [Leptospirosis with necro-haemorrhagic cholecystitis in a Boxer puppy].

    PubMed

    Steil, D; Quandt, A; Mayer-Scholl, A; Sie, J M; Löhr, C V; Teifke, J P

    2014-01-01

    A Boxer puppy from the island of Rügen, which was properly vaccinated according to its age, was presented with acute gastrointestinal symptoms. The presumptive diagnosis of leptospirosis with acute renal failure, hepatic damage, and jaundice was confirmed by seroconversion (increased titre to 1 : 800 in a non-vaccine serogroup 4 weeks after disease onset). Cholecystitis was diagnosed based on clinical symptoms and sonographic results. After an initial improvement, the puppy's condition deteriorated and cholecystectomy was performed. Histopathological diagnosis indicated a haemorrhagic necrotizing cholecystitis. PMID:25423604

  14. The effect of acute haemorrhage in the dog and man on plasma-renin concentration

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. J.; Davies, D. L.; Lever, A. F.; Robertson, J. I. S.; Verniory, A.

    1966-01-01

    1. The effect of acute haemorrhage on the plasma renin concentration was studied in the dog and man. 2. Plasma-renin concentration was regularly increased after the larger bleeds; after the smaller haemorrhages plasma-renin concentration remained unchanged. 3. The results are discussed in relation to current hypotheses concerning the control of renin and aldosterone secretion. PMID:4287431

  15. Incidence and Mortality of Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Martinique

    PubMed Central

    Mehdaoui, Hossein; Hamlat, Abderrahmane; Piotin, Michel; Banydeen, Rishika; Mejdoubi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background Incidence of spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhages (SAH) varies wildly across the world and seems to be low in Central and South America (4.2 per 100 000 person-years; CI 95%; 3.1–5.7). The objective of our study was to describe the characteristics of SAH and to estimate its incidence and severity in Martinique, a small French island located in the Caribbean Sea. Methods Due to its insular nature and small captive population, Martinique is ideal for the setting up of population-based epidemiological studies with good exhaustiveness. Our study, spanning a 7 year period (2007–2013), consisted of retrospective case ascertainment with multiple overlapping methods. Crude incidence and 30 day case-fatality rates for SAH among the Martinican population were computed for the study period. Incidence and disease severity was also analyzed according to age, gender and aneurysm presence. World age-standardized incidence rates were also calculated. Results A total of 121 patients had a SAH during the study period, with a higher frequency of female cases (71.1% versus 28.9%, p<0.001). Patient mean age was 57.1 years (median = 55 [46–66]). An aneurysmal origin was found in 96 SAH cases (79.3%). Crude annual incidence was 4.36 per 100 000 person-years (CI 95% 2.30–6.42). World age-standardized incidence was 3.29 per 100 000 person-years (CI 95% 1.74–4.84). During the 30 days following SAH diagnosis, 29 patients died (case fatality rate: 24% (CI 95% 16.4–31.6)). Conclusions The incidence of spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage in Martinique is much lower than in other parts of the world and similar to countries in Central and South America. These results are possibly related to environmental factors and most particularly to a low rate of smoking in the Martinican population. Thirty-day case-fatality rate is similar to what is observed in developed countries. PMID:27213614

  16. Stem Cells as a Potential Adjunctive Therapy in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ghonim, Hesham T.; Shah, Sumedh S.; Thompson, John W.; Ambekar, Sudheer; Peterson, Eric C.; Elhammady, Mohamed Samy

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Despite advances in the management of subarachnoid hemorrhage, a considerable proportion of patients are still left with severe and disabling long-term consequences. Unfortunately, there are limited therapeutic options to counteract the sequelae following the initial insult. The role of stem cells has been studied in the treatment of various diseases. The goal of this study was to provide a literature review regarding the potential advantages of stem-cell therapy to counteract or minimize the sequelae of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. METHODS PubMed, Google Scholar, and ClinicalTrials.gov searches were conducted to incorporate pertinent studies that discussed stem cell use in the management of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Included articles were subjected to data extraction for the synthesis of the efficacy of stem-cell therapy. RESULTS Four preclinical studies with 181 animal model subjects (44 mice, 137 rats) were incorporated in our review. Endovascular punctures (65%) and blood injections in subarachnoid spaces (17%) were used to induce hemorrhage models. Stem cells were administered intravenously (3.0 × 106 cells) or intranasally (1.5 × 106 cells). According to literature, mesenchymal cell therapy significantly (p<0.05) induces stem-cell migration to lesion sites, decreases associated neural apoptosis and inflammation, improves ultrastructural integrity of cerebral tissue, and aids in improving sensorimotor function post subarachnoid hemorrhage. CONCLUSION Stem cells, particularly mesenchymal stem cells, have shown promising cellular, morphological, and functional benefits in animal models suffering from induced subarachnoid hemorrhages. However, further studies are warranted to elucidate the full effects of stem-cell therapy for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:26958151

  17. Purification and characterization of an organ specific haemorrhagic toxin from Vipera russelli russelli (Russell's viper) venom.

    PubMed

    Kole, L; Chakrabarty, D; Datta, K; Bhattacharyya, D

    2000-04-01

    A haemorrhagic toxin (VRR-12) from Vipera russelli russelli (Russell's viper) venom has been purified by ion-exchange chromatography on CM-Sephadex C-50 followed by size-exclusion HPLC to electrophoretically homogeneous state. It is a 12 kDa single polypeptide having 1 mole of Zn+2 ion. This toxin induces intense intestinal haemorrhage and to a lesser extent skeletal muscle haemorrhage in mice. It does not show detectable proteolytic and esterolytic activity with selected substrates under specified conditions, haemolytic and phospholipase activity. When VRR-12, preincubated with bivalent antiserum against Saw-scaled and Russell's viper venom or EDTA was injected, haemorrhagic activity was not reduced, on the other hand preincubation with phenylmethyl sulphonyl fluoride reduced the activity markedly. Biodistribution studies with 125I VRR-12 show that haemorrhagic manifestation by this toxin is not a direct function of the fraction of the totally administered toxin distributed to that tissue. PMID:10983422

  18. Use of Intra-aortic- Balloon Pump Counterpulsation in Patients with Symptomatic Vasospasm Following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Neurogenic Stress Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mufti, Fawaz; Morris, Nicholas; Lahiri, Shouri; Roth, William; Witsch, Jens; Machado, Iona; Agarwal, Sachin; Park, Soojin; Meyers, Philip M.; Connolly, E. Sander; Claassen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intra-aortic counterpulsation balloon pumps (IABPs) have been widely used to augment hemodynamics in critically ill patients with cardiogenic shock and have recently been proposed as a management strategy for subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients with neurogenic stress cardiomyopathy (NSC). Prior case series have described the use of IABP as a means to manage cardiogenic shock in this patient population; however, we sought to describe our experience with IABP as a means to wean vasopressor requirement while augmenting hemodynamics and maintaining pressures at goal. Methods Five patients were identified from a single center, prospective, observational cohort study that received an IABP for the management of ischemia related to cerebral vasospasm in the setting of NSC. We evaluated all cases for efficacy of IABP in reducing vasopressor requirement, and complications. Results Vasopressor requirements were reduced by a mean of 50% (range 25–65%) following IABPs placement within 24–48 h. There were no significant complications from IABPs. Out of the five patients, the outcome in three cases was favorable (mRS≤1). Two patients suffered delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI), one patient passed away due to severe sepsis, and one patient was left with severe disability. Only one patient required anticoagulation and that was for a preexisting deep venous thrombosis. Conclusion The use of IABPs may be beneficial as an adjunctive therapy in SAH patients with concomitant symptomatic vasospasm and NSC. PMID:27403221

  19. Comparative studies for serodiagnosis of haemorrhagic septicaemia in cattle sera

    PubMed Central

    El-Jakee, Jakeen K.; Ali, Samah Said; El-Shafii, Soumaya Ahmed; Hessain, Ashgan M.; Al-Arfaj, Abdullah A.; Mohamed, Moussa I.

    2015-01-01

    Haemorrhagic septicaemia caused by Pasteurella multocida is a major epizootic disease in cattle and buffaloes in developing countries with high morbidity and mortality rate. In the present study, a total of 88 P. multocida isolates were isolated from 256 nasopharyngeal swabs and lung tissues samples (34.4%) during the period from January, 2013 to March, 2014 from different governorates located in Egypt. Dead calves showed the highest percentage of P. multocida isolation followed by the emergency slaughtered calves, diseased calves then apparently healthy ones. These isolates were confirmed as P. multocida microscopically, biochemically by traditional tests and by API 20E commercial kit then by PCR. The percentages of positive serum samples using somatic antigen and micro-agglutination test at 1/1280 diluted serum were 10%, 54.49% and 0% in apparently healthy, diseased and emergency slaughtered samples, respectively whereas, the percentages using capsular antigen and indirect haemagglutination test were 40%, 60.89% and 60% in apparently healthy, diseased and emergency slaughtered samples, respectively. The ELISA showed the highest sensitivity for diagnosing P. multocida in apparently healthy, diseased and emergency slaughtered animals with percentages of 42%; 92.9% and 80%, respectively. The obtained results revealed that the ELISA using capsular antigen of P. multocida is a more sensitive and specific serological test for diagnosis of haemorrhagic septicaemia. PMID:26858538

  20. Comparative studies for serodiagnosis of haemorrhagic septicaemia in cattle sera.

    PubMed

    El-Jakee, Jakeen K; Ali, Samah Said; El-Shafii, Soumaya Ahmed; Hessain, Ashgan M; Al-Arfaj, Abdullah A; Mohamed, Moussa I

    2016-01-01

    Haemorrhagic septicaemia caused by Pasteurella multocida is a major epizootic disease in cattle and buffaloes in developing countries with high morbidity and mortality rate. In the present study, a total of 88 P. multocida isolates were isolated from 256 nasopharyngeal swabs and lung tissues samples (34.4%) during the period from January, 2013 to March, 2014 from different governorates located in Egypt. Dead calves showed the highest percentage of P. multocida isolation followed by the emergency slaughtered calves, diseased calves then apparently healthy ones. These isolates were confirmed as P. multocida microscopically, biochemically by traditional tests and by API 20E commercial kit then by PCR. The percentages of positive serum samples using somatic antigen and micro-agglutination test at 1/1280 diluted serum were 10%, 54.49% and 0% in apparently healthy, diseased and emergency slaughtered samples, respectively whereas, the percentages using capsular antigen and indirect haemagglutination test were 40%, 60.89% and 60% in apparently healthy, diseased and emergency slaughtered samples, respectively. The ELISA showed the highest sensitivity for diagnosing P. multocida in apparently healthy, diseased and emergency slaughtered animals with percentages of 42%; 92.9% and 80%, respectively. The obtained results revealed that the ELISA using capsular antigen of P. multocida is a more sensitive and specific serological test for diagnosis of haemorrhagic septicaemia. PMID:26858538

  1. An outbreak of acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis in Kaduna, Nigeria.

    PubMed Central

    Babalola, O E; Amoni, S S; Samaila, E; Thaker, U; Darougar, S

    1990-01-01

    Clinical studies were carried out on two groups of patients with acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) during an epidemic in 1985 in Northern Nigeria. Group 1 consisted of 99 students attending a girls' boarding school, group 2 of 200 patients selected randomly from 1000 examined at the local clinic. Moderate to severe hyperaemia and papillary responses were present in the palpebral conjunctiva of all patients, and 234 (66%) had subconjunctival haemorrhages. Transient superficial punctate keratitis was noted in over 60% of patients. A transient flare suggestive of a low grade iritis was seen in five patients. No neurological disorders were noted. Serological studies were carried out on patients from group 2. Fifteen paired and 20 single serum samples were titrated against adenovirus type 4 (Ad-4) and enterovirus type 70 (EV-70). Two pairs of sera showed a 4-fold rise in antibody levels to EV-70, whereas the antibody titres to EV-70 in the rest of the sera ranged from 1:20 (no antibody) to 1:160. None of the paired serum samples showed a 4-fold rise in antibody levels to adenovirus. The results of clinical studies and serological findings support EV-70 as a probable cause of AHC in Nigeria. PMID:2155654

  2. Intracerebral haemorrhage in Down syndrome: protected or predisposed?

    PubMed Central

    Buss, Lewis; Fisher, Elizabeth; Hardy, John; Nizetic, Dean; Groet, Jurgen; Pulford, Laura; Strydom, André

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS), which arises from trisomy of chromosome 21, is associated with deposition of large amounts of amyloid within the central nervous system. Amyloid accumulates in two compartments: as plaques within the brain parenchyma and in vessel walls of the cerebral microvasculature. The parenchymal plaque amyloid is thought to result in an early onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia, a phenomenon so common amongst people with DS that it could be considered a defining feature of the condition. The amyloid precursor protein ( APP) gene lies on chromosome 21 and its presence in three copies in DS is thought to largely drive the early onset AD. In contrast, intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH), the main clinical consequence of vascular amyloidosis, is a more poorly defined feature of DS. We review recent epidemiological data on stroke (including haemorrhagic stroke) in order to make comparisons with a rare form of familial AD due to duplication (i.e. having three copies) of the APP region on chromosome 21, here called ‘dup-APP’, which is associated with more frequent and severe ICH. We conclude that although people with DS are at increased risk of ICH, this is less common than in dup-APP, suggesting the presence of mechanisms that act protectively. We review these mechanisms and consider comparative research into DS and dup-APP that may yield further pathophysiological insight. PMID:27239286

  3. Upregulation of Relaxin after Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Kikkawa, Yuichiro; Matsuo, Satoshi; Kurogi, Ryota; Nakamizo, Akira; Mizoguchi, Masahiro; Sasaki, Tomio

    2014-01-01

    Background. Although relaxin causes vasodilatation in systemic arteries, little is known about its role in cerebral arteries. We investigated the expression and role of relaxin in basilar arteries after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in rabbits. Methods. Microarray analysis with rabbit basilar artery RNA was performed. Messenger RNA expression of relaxin-1 and relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1) was investigated with quantitative RT-PCR. RXFP1 expression in the basilar artery was investigated with immunohistochemistry. Relaxin concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum were investigated with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Using human brain vascular smooth muscle cells (HBVSMC) preincubated with relaxin, myosin light chain phosphorylation (MLC) was investigated with immunoblotting after endothelin-1 stimulation. Results. After SAH, RXFP1 mRNA and protein were significantly downregulated on day 3, whereas relaxin-1 mRNA was significantly upregulated on day 7. The relaxin concentration in CSF was significantly elevated on days 5 and 7. Pretreatment with relaxin reduced sustained MLC phosphorylation induced by endothelin-1 in HBVSMC. Conclusion. Upregulation of relaxin and downregulation of RXFP1 after SAH may participate in development of cerebral vasospasm. Downregulation of RXFP1 may induce a functional decrease in relaxin activity during vasospasm. Understanding the role of relaxin may provide further insight into the mechanisms of cerebral vasospasm. PMID:25133183

  4. Histology and Morphology of the Brain Subarachnoid Trabeculae

    PubMed Central

    Saboori, Parisa; Sadegh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The interface between the brain and the skull consists of three fibrous tissue layers, dura mater, arachnoid, and pia mater, known as the meninges, and strands of collagen tissues connecting the arachnoid to the pia mater, known as trabeculae. The space between the arachnoid and the pia mater is filled with cerebrospinal fluid which stabilizes the shape and position of the brain during head movements or impacts. The histology and architecture of the subarachnoid space trabeculae in the brain are not well established in the literature. The only recognized fact about the trabeculae is that they are made of collagen fibers surrounded by fibroblast cells and they have pillar- and veil-like structures. In this work the histology and the architecture of the brain trabeculae were studied, via a series of in vivo and in vitro experiments using cadaveric and animal tissue. In the cadaveric study fluorescence and bright field microscopy were employed while scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used for the animal studies. The results of this study reveal that the trabeculae are collagen based type I, and their architecture is in the form of tree-shaped rods, pillars, and plates and, in some regions, they have a complex network morphology. PMID:26090230

  5. Botulinum toxin a treatment of cricopharyngeal dysphagia after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Krause, Eike; Schirra, Jörg; Gürkov, Robert

    2008-12-01

    Elevated muscular tone associated with spastic syndromes can cause excessive contractility at the upper esophageal sphincter and impede swallowing. A 47-year-old male patient with spasticity predominantly of the lower extremities after a subarachnoid hemorrhage suffered from severe dysphagia and chronic salivary aspiration. He was dependent on a cuffed tracheostomy tube and a percutaneous enterogastric feeding tube. Barium swallow and esophageal manometry revealed cricopharyngeal spasm, while laryngeal elevation and pharyngeal contractility were well preserved. We endoscopically injected 180 MU botulinum toxin A into the cricopharyngeus muscle. Two days post injection, swallowing function had improved and oral nutrition was possible. This improvement lasted for six weeks. After another injection 8 weeks later, an undesired diffusion into the hypopharynx occurred and manometry showed diminished contractility without amelioration of dysphagia. Botulinum toxin therapy of cricopharyngeal spasm improves swallowing function in a subgroup of patients with spastic syndromes. The therapeutic effect is of limited duration. Toxin diffusion into the pharynx should be avoided. Manometry is useful in planning and monitoring the therapy. PMID:18437465

  6. Neutrophil depletion after subarachnoid hemorrhage improves memory via NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Provencio, Jose Javier; Swank, Valerie; Lu, Haiyan; Brunet, Sylvain; Baltan, Selva; Khapre, Rohini V; Seerapu, Himabindu; Kokiko-Cochran, Olga N; Lamb, Bruce T; Ransohoff, Richard M

    2016-05-01

    Cognitive deficits after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are common and disabling. Patients who experience delayed deterioration associated with vasospasm are likely to have cognitive deficits, particularly problems with executive function, verbal and spatial memory. Here, we report neurophysiological and pathological mechanisms underlying behavioral deficits in a murine model of SAH. On tests of spatial memory, animals with SAH performed worse than sham animals in the first week and one month after SAH suggesting a prolonged injury. Between three and six days after experimental hemorrhage, mice demonstrated loss of late long-term potentiation (L-LTP) due to dysfunction of the NMDA receptor. Suppression of innate immune cell activation prevents delayed vasospasm after murine SAH. We therefore explored the role of neutrophil-mediated innate inflammation on memory deficits after SAH. Depletion of neutrophils three days after SAH mitigates tissue inflammation, reverses cerebral vasoconstriction in the middle cerebral artery, and rescues L-LTP dysfunction at day 6. Spatial memory deficits in both the short and long-term are improved and associated with a shift of NMDA receptor subunit composition toward a memory sparing phenotype. This work supports further investigating suppression of innate immunity after SAH as a target for preventative therapies in SAH. PMID:26872422

  7. Brain Volume Determination in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Using Rats.

    PubMed

    Lekic, Tim; Hardy, Maurice; Fujii, Mutsumi; McBride, Devin W; Zhang, John H

    2016-01-01

    Brain edema is routinely measured using the wet-dry method. Volume, however, is the sum total of all cerebral tissues, including water. Therefore, volumetric change following injury may not be adequately quantified using percentage of edema. We thus tested the hypothesis that dried brains can be reconstituted with water and then re-measured to determine the actual volume. Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was induced by endovascular perforation in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 30). Animals were euthanized at 24 and 72 h after evaluation of neurobehavior for determination of brain water content. Dried brains were thereafter reconstituted with equal parts of water (lost from brain edema) and centrifuged to remove air bubbles. The total volume was quantified using hydrostatic (underwater) physics principles that 1 ml water (mass) = 1 cm(3) (volume). The amount of additional water needed to reach a preset level marked on 2-ml test tubes was added to that lost from brain edema, and from the brain itself, to determine the final volume. SAH significantly increased both brain water and volume while worsening neurological function in affected rats. Volumetric measurements demonstrated significant brain swelling after SAH, in addition to the brain edema approach. This modification of the "wet-dry" method permits brain volume determination using valuable post hoc dried brain tissue. PMID:26463930

  8. Role of levosimendan in the management of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Varvarousi, Giolanda; Xanthos, Theodoros; Sarafidou, Pavlina; Katsioula, Ellisavet; Georgiadou, Marianthi; Eforakopoulou, Maria; Pavlou, Hlias

    2016-02-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is one of the leading causes of neurologic disability accounting for dismal long term survival rates. aSAH leads to a sudden increase in intracranial pressure and a massive sympathetic discharge. Excessive sympathetic stimulation leads to catecholamine mediated myocardial dysfunction and hemodynamic instability which may critically hamper brain perfusion and oxygenation. In the setting of acute aSAH, administration of vasoactive drugs aims at stabilizing impaired hemodynamics. However, studies have shown that conventional treatment with vasoactive drugs that lead to Ca(+2) overload and increase myocardial oxygen consumption, fail to restore hemodynamics and decrease cerebral blood flow. Levosimendan is a non-adrenergic inotropic Ca(+2) sensitizer with not only beneficial hemodynamic properties but also pleiotropic effects, contributing to its cardioprotective and neuroprotective role. Although there have been limited data available regarding the use of levosimendan in patients with aSAH, current evidence suggests that levosimendan may have a role in the setting of post-aSAH cardiomyopathy and decreased cerebral blood flow both in the emergency departments and in intensive care units. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of studies of levosimendan therapy for aSAH, and describe current knowledge about the effects of levosimendan in the management of aSAH. PMID:26669277

  9. Controversies and Evolving New Mechanisms in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng; Feng, Hua; Sherchan, Prativa; Klebe, Damon; Zhao, Gang; Sun, Xiaochuan; Zhang, Jianmin; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Despite decades of study, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) continues to be a serious and significant health problem in the United States and worldwide. The mechanisms contributing to brain injury after SAH remain unclear. Traditionally, most in vivo research has heavily emphasized the basic mechanisms of SAH over the pathophysiological or morphological changes of delayed cerebral vasospasm after SAH. Unfortunately, the results of clinical trials based on this premise have mostly been disappointing, implicating some other pathophysiological factors, independent of vasospasm, as contributors to poor clinical outcomes. Delayed cerebral vasospasm is no longer the only culprit. In this review, we summarize recent data from both experimental and clinical studies of SAH and discuss the vast array of physiological dysfunctions following SAH that ultimately lead to cell death. Based on the progress in neurobiological understanding of SAH, the terms “early brain injury” and “delayed brain injury” are used according to the temporal progression of SAH-induced brain injury. Additionally, a new concept of the vasculo-neuronal-glia triad model for SAH study is highlighted and presents the challenges and opportunities of this model for future SAH applications. PMID:24076160

  10. Acute management of poor condition subarachnoid hemorrhage patients

    PubMed Central

    Eleftherios, Archavlis; Carvi y Nievas, Mario Nazareno

    2007-01-01

    Poor condition subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients present a high mortality and morbidity. In this study, we reviewed the acute interventional (surgical and endovascular) management of 109 SAH-poor condition patients, who were treated as early as logistically possible after confirming stable circulation parameters. Patients over the age of 70 years, without clinical response to painful stimulation were excluded. We recognized at least 3 different postinterventional therapeutic approaches: (1) Norm- or hypovolemic, normotensive hemodilution in 30 patients with space-occupying intracranial hematomas as well as in 31 cases with acute cerebro-spinal-fluid obstruction. (2) Normovolemic, hypertensive hemodilution after unilateral decompressive craniotomy in 23 surgical- and 2 endovascular-treated patients with focalized space occupying lesions and reduced cerebral perfusion. (3) Hypovolemic, normo-, or hypertensive hemodilution after bilateral decompressive craniotomy in 23 cases with massive brain-swelling. We observed a reduced mortality (21%). The overall late outcome was favorable in 56% and unfavorable in 23%. Selective aggressive treatment adapted to increase the cerebral perfusion, seems to be an effective therapy to improve the survival and outcome of several poor condition SAH-patients. PMID:18200827

  11. Fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by Aspergillus arteritis without angiographic abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Miki, Yasuo; Tomiyama, Masahiko; Haga, Rie; Nishijima, Haruo; Suzuki, Chieko; Nishijima, Michiharu; Midorikawa, Hiroshi; Sannohe, Seiya; Kurotaki, Hidekachi; Wakabayashi, Koichi; Baba, Masayuki

    2012-10-01

    No source of bleeding is detected by angiogram in 15-20% of patients with nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). This negative angiographic finding might suggest a benign prognosis. We describe a case of fatal SAH caused by Aspergillus arteritis without formation of fusiform dilatation or aneurysms. A 76-year-old man with a 2-month history of progressive visual loss due to pachymeningitis around the optic nerves suffered from SAH in the bilateral sylvian fissures. Repetitive serum galactomannan assay and angiography showed no abnormality. Post mortem examination revealed marked proliferation of Aspergillus in the granulomas of the frontal base dura mater. In addition, major trunks and several branches of the bilateral middle cerebral arteries were invaded by Aspergillus hyphae, which destroyed the walls in the absence of dilatation and aneurysms. Invasive aspergillosis of the CNS often forms a mycotic aneurysm. However, four autopsy cases of nonaneurysmal SAH due to invasive aspergillosis have been reported. The present case is the second autopsy case of Aspergillus arteritis without angiographic abnormality, resulting in fatal SAH. Aggressive and continuous antifungal therapy is absolutely necessary in suspected cases of invasive aspergillosis of the CNS, even if angiography is negative and therapeutic markers of aspergillosis are normal. PMID:22239342

  12. Noninvasive Intracranial Pressure Determination in Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Noraky, James; Verghese, George C; Searls, David E; Lioutas, Vasileios A; Sonni, Shruti; Thomas, Ajith; Heldt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) should ideally be measured in many conditions affecting the brain. The invasiveness and associated risks of the measurement modalities in current clinical practice restrict ICP monitoring to a small subset of patients whose diagnosis and treatment could benefit from ICP measurement. To expand validation of a previously proposed model-based approach to continuous, noninvasive, calibration-free, and patient-specific estimation of ICP to patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), we made waveform recordings of cerebral blood flow velocity in several major cerebral arteries during routine, clinically indicated transcranial Doppler examinations for vasospasm, along with time-locked waveform recordings of radial artery blood pressure (APB), and ICP was measured via an intraventricular drain catheter. We also recorded the locations to which ICP and ABP were calibrated, to account for a possible hydrostatic pressure difference between measured ABP and the ABP value at a major cerebral vessel. We analyzed 21 data records from five patients and were able to identify 28 data windows from the middle cerebral artery that were of sufficient data quality for the ICP estimation approach. Across these windows, we obtained a mean estimation error of -0.7 mmHg and a standard deviation of the error of 4.0 mmHg. Our estimates show a low bias and reduced variability compared with those we have reported before. PMID:27165879

  13. Migrating lumbar intrathecal catheter fragment associated with intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hnenny, Luke; Sabry, Hatem A; Raskin, Jeffrey S; Liu, Jesse J; Roundy, Neil E; Dogan, Aclan

    2015-01-01

    Intrathecal catheter placement into the lumbar cistern has varied indications, including drug delivery and CSF diversion. These Silastic catheters are elastic and durable; however, catheter-associated malfunctions are well reported in the literature. Fractured catheters are managed with some variability, but entirely intradural retained fragments are often managed conservatively with observation. The authors describe a case of a 70-year-old man with an implanted intrathecal morphine pump for failed back surgery syndrome who presented to an outside hospital with a history of headache, neck pain, nausea, and photophobia of 3 days' duration. He also described mild weakness and intermittent numbness of both legs. Unenhanced head CT demonstrated subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A right C-5 hemilaminectomy was performed. This case is unique in that there was no indication that the lumbar intrathecal catheter had fractured prior to the patient's presentation with SAH. This case demonstrates that intrathecal catheter fragments are mobile and can precipitate intracranial morbidity. Extrication of known fragments is safe and should be attempted to prevent further neurosurgical morbidity. PMID:25360531

  14. Neuroprotective Effect of Radix Trichosanthis Saponins on Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Sun, Haiyan; Huang, Liyong; Li, Juxiang; Zhou, Wenke; Chang, Jingling

    2015-01-01

    Redox homeostasis has been implicated in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). As a result, antioxidants and/or free radical scavengers have become an important therapeutic modality. Considering that radix trichosanthis (RT) saponins exhibited strong antioxidant ability both in vivo and in vitro, the present study aimed to reveal whether the neuroprotective activities of RT saponins were mediated by p38/p53 signal pathway after SAH. An established SAH model was used and superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nitric oxide (NO), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), p-p38, and p53 activation were detected after 48 h of SAH. The results showed that RT saponins inhibited iNOS expression to restore NO to basal level. Moreover, compared with Cu/Zn-SOD, RT saponins (2 mg/kg/d dosage) significantly increased Mn-SOD activity after SAH. Accompanied with lowered NO and elevated SOD, decreased p38 phosphorylation and p53 activities were observed, especially for RT saponins at 2 mg/kg/d dosage. In this setting, the neurological outcome was also improved with less neuronal cells damage after RT saponins pretreatment. Our findings demonstrated the beneficial effects of RT saponins in enhancing neuroprotective effects by deducing iNOS activity, normalizing SOD level, and inhibiting p-p38 and p53 expression, hence offering significant therapeutic implications for SAH. PMID:26089937

  15. Behavioral deficits following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in the rat.

    PubMed

    Germanò, A F; Dixon, C E; d'Avella, D; Hayes, R L; Tomasello, F

    1994-06-01

    To characterize some of the short-term and long-term functional consequences of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in rats, we employed a battery of well-characterized tests for assessment of acute and chronic behavioral and neurologic performances. Three groups of 10 rats (blood injected, mock CSF injected and sham-operated controls) were studied. During the acute stage, simple nonpostural somatomotor reflexes (pinna and corneal reflexes), simple postural responses (paw flexion, tail flexion, and head support), startle response, and postural functions (righting reflex) did not differ significantly between the experimental groups. Assessments of body weight, beam walking ability, and beam balancing revealed significant disturbances in blood-injected rats. This work demonstrates that this single-hemorrhage rodent model of SAH is associated with the induction of enduring neurologic and behavioral deficits. Because of the significant interspecies difference, a direct extrapolation of our results to humans may not be appropriate. However, we suggest that the observed behavioral and neurologic changes may parallel those seen in humans after SAH. Results reported here further confirm the rat model of SAH as a viable laboratory instrument for the study of the pathophysiology of SAH and provide normative values for the evaluation of new treatment modalities. PMID:7996588

  16. Subarachnoid space of the CNS, nasal mucosa, and lymphatic system.

    PubMed

    Jackson, R T; Tigges, J; Arnold, W

    1979-04-01

    We have briefly reviewed the literature pertaining to the movement of tracer molecules and infectious organisms within the olfactory nerve. There is a body of evidence indicating that tracers placed in the CSF will quickly move via the olfactory nerve to the nasal mucosa and then to the cervical lymph nodes. Organic and inorganic tracer materials and organisms as diverse as viruses, a bacillus, and an amoeba, when placed in the nasal cavity, have been shown to move from the nasal mucosa via the olfactory nerve to the olfactory bulb and the CSF. We think that a portion of the data on tracer movement is due to incorporation of tracer materials and organisms into the axoplasm of the olfactory neurons with subsequent anterograde or retrograde axoplasmic transport. However, some of the movement of tracers may occur within the olfactory perineural space. This space may be continuous with a subarachnoid extension that surrounds the olfactory nerve as it penetrates the cribriform plate. To our knowledge, no one has yet followed the perineural space to determine if it is continuous from olfactory receptor to olfactory bulb. The consideration of this space and its role is the main reason for this review. PMID:85446

  17. Original surgical treatment of thoracolumbar subarachnoid cysts in six chondrodystrophic dogs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Subarachnoid cysts are rare conditions in veterinary medicine, associated with spinal cord dysfunction. Most of the 100 cases of subarachnoid cysts described since the first report in 1968 were apparently not true cysts. Reported cysts are usually situated in the cervical area and occur in predisposed breeds such as the Rottweiler. The purpose of this retrospective study, from May 2003 to April 2012, was to describe the distinctive features of thoracolumbar spinal subarachnoid cysts, together with their surgical treatment and outcome in 6 chondrodystrophic dogs. Results Five Pugs and 1 French Bulldog were examined. Images suggestive of a subarachnoid cyst were obtained by myelography (2/6) and computed tomography myelography (4/6), and associated disc herniation was observed in 3/6 dogs. A hemilaminectomy was performed. The protruding disc eventually found in 5/6 dogs was treated by lateral corpectomy. The ventral leptomeningeal adhesions observed in all dogs after durotomy were dissected. No or only mild post-operative neurological degradation was observed. Follow-up studies (7 months to 4 years) indicated good outcome and no recurrence. Conclusions All the thoracolumbar subarachnoid cysts described in these 6 chondrodystrophic dogs were associated with leptomeningeal adhesions. Good results seemed to be obtained by dissecting and removing these adhesions. A protruding disc, found here in 5/6 dogs, needs to be ruled out and can be treated by lateral corpectomy. PMID:24884635

  18. Rhabdomyolysis as a complication of canine babesiosis.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, L S; Lobetti, R G

    1996-06-01

    Rhabdomyolysis was diagnosed in two dogs with babesiosis. The first animal presented with muscle pain and caramel-coloured urine, and had markedly elevated serum myoglobin and muscle enzymes. Acute renal failure complicated the clinical picture. The second dog exhibited muscle pain and tremors, together with neurological signs and pulmonary oedema, and died soon after admission. Muscle necrosis and haemorrhage were found at necropsy. In human malaria, a disease clinically similar to canine babesiosis, rhabdomyolysis is unusual, but clinically silent muscle damage appears to be common. Likewise, biochemical evidence of muscle damage is readily found in experimental bovine babesiosis. Muscle enzymes were mildly elevated in three dogs with severe babesiosis and pigmenturia but there was no obvious muscle damage, indicating that this might also apply to canine babesiosis. The pathogenesis of infection-associated rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure remains unclear, but inflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide could play an important role. PMID:8965483

  19. Upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in the acute cardiac care setting: antiplatelets and endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Musa, S A; Brecker, S J; Rahman, T M; Kang, J Y

    2012-05-01

    Upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage (UGIH) in cardiac patients receiving antiplatelets presents a difficult management problem. The aim of this study was to describe a series of cardiac inpatients receiving antiplatelets who underwent endoscopy for an acute UGIH. Cardiac inpatients receiving antiplatelets and requiring endoscopy for UGIH over an 18-month period were followed up. Forty-one patients were studied. Most patients (25 [61%]) presented with melaena. Antiplatelets were withheld in 34 (83%) patients; predominantly in those with higher pre-endoscopy Rockall scores (median, 4; interquartile range [IQR], 3-5 versus median, 3; IQR, 2-4; P < 0.05). Positive findings were identified at endoscopy in 80%. Duodenal ulcers were the most common lesion and adrenaline the most common method of haemostasis. Median time to first endoscopy was 0 (IQR, 0-1) days. Seven (17%) patients re-bled, median Rockall score was six (IQR, 4-8). Three (7%) patients experienced procedural complications, two patients became hypoxic and one patient died. Following endoscopy, antiplatelets were restarted after a median of three (IQR, 3-5) days. On discharge, 27/28 (96%) patients continued with antiplatelet and proton-pump inhibitor therapy. Thirty-day inpatient mortality was 7% (3 patients). One patient re-bled within six months of discharge. Endoscopy helped assess the risk of re-bleeding and timing of antiplatelet re-introduction in cardiac inpatients experiencing UGIH. PMID:22555229

  20. Pathology of human plaque vulnerability: mechanisms and consequences of intraplaque haemorrhages.

    PubMed

    Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Martin-Ventura, José Luis; Nicoletti, Antonino; Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoit

    2014-06-01

    Atherothrombotic diseases are still major causes of inability and mortality and fighting atherothrombosis remains a public health priority. The involvement of repeated intraplaque haemorrhages (IPH) in the evolution of atherothrombotic lesions towards complications was proposed as early as 1936. This important topic has been recently revisited and reviewed. Histological observations have been corroborated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of human carotid atheroma, identifying IPH as the main determinant of plaque evolution towards rupture. Beside the intimal integration of asymptomatic luminal coagulum, inward sprouting of neovessels from the adventitia towards the plaque, is one source of IPH in human atheroma. We recently described that directed neo-angiogenesis from the adventitia towards the plaque, across the media, is initiated by lipid mediators generated by the plaque on the luminal side, outwardly convected to the medial VSMCs. Subsequent stimulation of VSMC PPAR-γ receptors induces VEGF expression which causes centripetal sprouting of adventitial vessels. However, this neovascularization is considered to be immature and highly susceptible to leakage. The main cellular components of IPH are Red Blood Cells (RBCs), which with their haemoglobin content and their cell membrane components, particularly enriched in unesterified cholesterol, participate in both the oxidative process and cholesterol accumulation. The presence of iron, glycophorin A and ceroids provides evidence of RBCs. IPH also convey blood leukocytes and platelets and are sites prone to weak pathogen contamination. Therefore prevention and treatment of the biological consequences of IPH pave the way to innovative preventive strategies and improved therapeutic options in human atherothrombotic diseases. PMID:24726899

  1. Follow-up of pulmonary right-to-left shunt in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Vorselaars, Veronique M M; Velthuis, Sebastiaan; Snijder, Repke J; Westermann, Cornelis J J; Vos, Jan A; Mager, Johannes J; Post, Martijn C

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) are associated with severe neurological complications in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Transthoracic contrast echocardiography (TTCE) is recommended for screening of pulmonary right-to-left shunts (RLS). Although growth of PAVMs is shown in two small studies, no studies on follow-up with TTCE exist.All HHT patients underwent a second TTCE 5 years after initial screening. Patients with a history of PAVM embolisation were excluded. Pulmonary RLS grade on TTCE after 5 years was compared to the grade at screening.200 patients (53.5% female, mean±sd age at screening 44.7±14.1 years) were included. Increase in RLS grade occurred in 36 (18%) patients, of whom six (17%) underwent embolisation. The change in grade between screening and follow-up was not more than one grade. Of patients with nontreatable pulmonary RLS at screening (n=113), 14 (12.4%) underwent embolisation. In patients without pulmonary RLS at initial screening (n=87), no treatable PAVMs developed during follow-up.Within 5 years, no treatable PAVMs developed in HHT patients without pulmonary RLS at initial screening. Increase in pulmonary RLS grade occurred in 18% of patients, and never increased by more than one grade. Of patients with nontreatable pulmonary RLS at initial screening, 12% underwent embolisation. PMID:26965291

  2. Isolated Cranial Nerve-III Palsy Secondary to Perimesencephalic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Abbatemarco, Justin R.

    2016-01-01

    We describe isolated cranial nerve-III palsy as a rare clinical finding in a patient with perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage. In this unusual case, the patient presented with complete cranial nerve-III palsy including ptosis and pupillary involvement. Initial studies revealed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the perimesencephalic, prepontine, and interpeduncular cisterns. Angiographic studies were negative for an intracranial aneurysm. The patient's neurological deficits improved with no residual deficits on follow-up several months after initial presentation. Our case report supports the notion that patients with perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage have an excellent prognosis. Our report further adds a case of isolated cranial nerve-III palsy as a rare initial presentation of this type of bleeding, adding to the limited body of the literature. PMID:26949557

  3. Platelet count and transfusion requirements during moderate or severe postpartum haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Jones, R M; de Lloyd, L; Kealaher, E J; Lilley, G J; Precious, E; Burckett St Laurent, D; Hamlyn, V; Collis, R E; Collins, P W

    2016-06-01

    Limited data exist on platelet transfusion during postpartum haemorrhage. We retrospectively analysed a consecutive cohort from a single centre of 347 women with moderate or severe postpartum haemorrhage, transfused according to national guidelines. Twelve (3%) women required a platelet transfusion. There were no differences between women who did and did not receive platelets with respect to age, mode of initiation of labour or mode of delivery. Women receiving a platelet transfusion had a lower median (IQR [range]) platelet count at study entry than women who did not receive platelets before haemorrhage (135 (97-175 [26-259])×10(9) .l(-1) vs 224 (186-274 [91-1006])×10(9) .l(-1) ), respectively), and at diagnosis of postpartum haemorrhage (median 114 (78-153 [58-238])×10(9) .l(-1) vs 193 (155-243 [78-762])×10(9) .l(-1) respectively). Six women were thrombocytopenic pre-delivery. The cause of haemorrhage that was associated with the highest rate of platelet transfusion was placental abruption, with three of 14 women being transfused. If antenatal thrombocytopenia or consumptive coagulopathy were not present, platelets were only required for haemorrhage > 5000 ml. Early formulaic platelet transfusion would have resulted in many women receiving platelets unnecessarily. Using current guidelines, the need for platelet transfusion is uncommon without antenatal thrombocytopenia, consumptive coagulopathy or haemorrhage > 5000 ml. We found no evidence to support early fixed-ratio platelet transfusion. PMID:27062151

  4. Protective effect of vitamin E (DL-alpha-tocopherol) against intraventricular haemorrhage in premature babies.

    PubMed Central

    Chiswick, M L; Johnson, M; Woodhall, C; Gowland, M; Davies, J; Toner, N; Sims, D G

    1983-01-01

    Forty four babies, of less than 32 weeks' gestation, were either randomly given 25 mg/kg vitamin E (DL-alpha-tocopherol acetate) intramuscularly after birth (day 0) and on days 1, 2, and 3 or served as controls. Frequent real time ultrasound examinations of the brain were made in each baby during the first week and less frequently thereafter. In babies under 32 weeks' gestation the incidence of intraventricular haemorrhage was lower in supplemented babies (18.8%) compared with the controls (56.3%). On days 0, 1, 2, and 3 median plasma vitamin E concentrations in babies without haemorrhage and in those with subependymal haemorrhage only were similar. Babies with intraventricular haemorrhage had lower median concentrations on day 1 (p less than 0.002) and day 2 (p less than 0.05) compared with those with subependymal haemorrhage and lower concentrations on day 0 (p less than 0.02) and day 1 (p less than 0.05) compared with those without haemorrhage. These findings suggest that in premature babies vitamin E, an antioxidant, protects endothelial cell membranes from oxidative damage and disruption and limits the magnitude of haemorrhage and its spread from the subependyma into the ventricles. Images FIG 1 PMID:6407714

  5. Diagnostic laboratory for bleeding disorders ensures efficient management of haemorrhagic disorders.

    PubMed

    Riddell, A; Chuansumrit, A; El-Ekiaby, M; Nair, S C

    2016-07-01

    Haemorrhagic disorders like Postpartum haemorrhage and Dengue haemorrhagic fever are life threatening and requires an active and efficient transfusion service that could provide the most appropriate blood product which could be effective in managing them. This would essentially require prompt identification of the coagulopathy so that the best available product can be given to the bleeding patient to correct the identified haemostatic defect which will help control the bleeding. This would only be possible if the transfusion service has a laboratory to correctly detect the haemostatic defect and that too with an accuracy and precision which is ensured by a good laboratory quality assurance practices. These same processes are necessary for the transfusion services to ensure the quality of the blood products manufactured by them and that it contains adequate amounts of haemostasis factors which will be good to be effective in the management of haemorrhagic disorders. These issues are discussed in detail individually in the management of postpartum haemorrhage and Dengue haemorrhagic fever including when these can help in the use of rFVIIa in Dengue haemorrhagic fever. The requirements to ensure good-quality blood products are made available for the management of these disorders and the same have also been described. PMID:27405683

  6. Consent for Brain Tissue Donation after Intracerebral Haemorrhage: A Community-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Samarasekera, Neshika; Lerpiniere, Christine; Farrall, Andrew J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; White, Philip M.; Torgersen, Antonia; Ironside, James W.; Smith, Colin; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam

    2015-01-01

    Background Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage is a devastating form of stroke and its incidence increases with age. Obtaining brain tissue following intracerebral haemorrhage helps to understand its cause. Given declining autopsy rates worldwide, the feasibility of establishing an autopsy-based collection and its generalisability are uncertain. Methods We used multiple overlapping sources of case ascertainment to identify every adult diagnosed with intracerebral haemorrhage between 1st June 2010-31st May 2012, whilst resident in the Lothian region of Scotland. We sought consent from patients with intracerebral haemorrhage (or their nearest relative if the patient lacked mental capacity) to conduct a research autopsy. Results Of 295 adults with acute intracerebral haemorrhage, 110 (37%) could not be approached to consider donation. Of 185 adults/relatives approached, 91 (49%) consented to research autopsy. There were no differences in baseline demographic variables or markers of intracerebral haemorrhage severity between consenters and non-consenters. Adults who died and became donors (n = 46) differed from the rest of the cohort (n = 249) by being older (median age 80, IQR 76–86 vs. 75, IQR 65–83, p = 0.002) and having larger haemorrhages (median volume 23ml, IQR 13–50 vs. 13ml, IQR 4–40; p = 0.002). Conclusions Nearly half of those approached consent to brain tissue donation after acute intracerebral haemorrhage. The characteristics of adults who gave consent were comparable to those in an entire community, although those who donate early are older and have larger haemorrhage volumes. PMID:26302447

  7. The Early Endocrine Stress Response in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, Christoffer; Karlsson, Torbjörn; Hillered, Lars; Stridsberg, Mats; Ronne Engström, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In patients with severe illness, such as aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a physiologic stress response is triggered. This includes activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the sympathetic nervous system. The aim of this study was to investigate the very early responses of these systems. Methods A porcine animal model of aneurysmal SAH was used. In this model, blood is injected slowly to the basal cisterns above the anterior skull base until the cerebral perfusion pressure is 0 mm Hg. Sampling was done from blood and urine at -10, +15, +75 and +135 minutes from time of induction of SAH. Analyses of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, aldosterone, catecholamines and chromogranin-A were performed. Results Plasma ACTH, serum cortisol and plasma aldosterone increased in the samples following induction of SAH, and started to decline after 75 minutes. Urine cortisol also increased after SAH. Urine catecholamines and their metabolites were found to increase after SAH. Many samples were however below detection level, not allowing for statistical analysis. Plasma chromogranin-A peaked at 15 minutes after SAH, and thereafter decreased. Conclusions The endocrine stress response after aneurysmal SAH was found to start within 15 minutes in the HPA axis with early peak values of ACTH, cortisol and aldosterone. The fact that the concentrations of the HPA axis hormones decreased 135 minutes after SAH may suggest that a similar pattern exists in SAH patients, thus making it difficult to catch these early peak values. There were also indications of early activation of the sympathetic nervous system, but the small number of valid samples made interpretation difficult. PMID:27007694

  8. Fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage following ischemia in vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Arseny A; Husain, Shakir; Sztajzel, Roman; Croquelois, Alexandre; Lobrinus, Johannes A; Thaler, David; Städler, Claudio; Hungerbühler, Hansjörg; Caso, Valeria; Rinkel, Gabriel J; Michel, Patrik

    2016-07-01

    Vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia (VBD) is a chronic disorder with various cerebrovascular and compressive manifestations, involving subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Occurrence of SAH shortly after worsening of clinical VBD symptoms has occasionally been reported. The goal of the study was to examine this association, in particular its pathophysiology, clinical precursor signs, time course, and outcome.To this end, in a retrospective multicenter study, we analyzed 20 patients with VBD and SAH in regard to preceding clinical symptoms, presence of vertebrobasilar thrombosis and ischemia, outcome and neuropathological correlates.Median age of the 7 female and 13 male patients was 70 years (interquartile range [IQR] 18.3 years). Fourteen patients (70%) presented with new or acutely worsening posterior fossa signs at a median of 3 days prior to SAH (IQR 2, range 0.5-14). A thrombus within the VBD was detected in 12 patients (60%). Thrombus formation was associated with clinical deterioration (χ = 4.38, P = 0.04) and ponto-cerebellar ischemia (χ = 8.09, P = 0.005). During follow-up after SAH, 13 patients (65%) died, after a median survival time of 24 hours (IQR 66.2, range 2-264 hours), with a significant association between proven ponto-cerebellar ischemia and case fatality (χ = 6.24, P = 0.01).The data establish an association between clinical deterioration in patients with VBD, vertebrobasilar ischemia, and subsequent SAH. Antithrombotic treatment after deterioration appears controversial and SAH outcome is frequently fatal. Our data also indicate a short window of 3 days that may allow for evaluating interventional treatment, preferably within randomized trials. PMID:27399083

  9. The Importance of Early Brain Injury after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Sehba, Fatima A.; Hou, Jack; Pluta, Ryszard M.; Zhang, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is a medical emergency that accounts for 5% of all stroke cases. Individuals affected are typically in the prime of their lives (mean age 50 years). Approximately 12% of patients die before receiving medical attention, 33% within 48 hours and 50% within 30 days of aSAH. Of the survivors 50% suffer from permanent disability with an estimated lifetime cost more than double that of an ischemic stroke. Traditionally, spasm that develops in large cerebral arteries 3-7 days after aneurysm rupture is considered the most important determinant of brain injury and outcome after aSAH. However, recent studies show that prevention of delayed vasospasm does not improve outcome in aSAH patients. This finding has finally brought in focus the influence of early brain injury on outcome of aSAH. A substantial amount of evidence indicates that brain injury begins at the aneurysm rupture, evolves with time and plays an important role in patients’ outcome. In this manuscript we review early brain injury after aSAH. Due to the early nature, most of the information on this injury comes from animals and few only from autopsy of patients who died within days after aSAH. Consequently, we began with a review of animal models of early brain injury, next we review the mechanisms of brain injury according to the sequence of their temporal appearance and finally we discuss the failure of clinical translation of therapies successful in animal models of aSAH. PMID:22414893

  10. NONCONVULSIVE SEIZURES IN SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE LINK INFLAMMATION AND OUTCOME

    PubMed Central

    Claassen, Jan; Albers, David; Schmidt, J. Michael; De Marchis, Gian Marco; Pugin, Deborah; Falo, Christina Maria; Mayer, Stephan A.; Cremers, Serge; Agarwal, Sachin; Elkind, Mitchell SV; Connolly, E. Sander; Dukic, Vanja; Hripcsak, George; Badjatia, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nonconvulsive seizures (NCSz) are frequent following acute brain injury and have been implicated as a cause of secondary brain injury but mechanisms that cause NCSz are controversial. Pro-inflammatory states are common after many brain injuries and inflammatory mediated changes in blood-brain-barrier permeability have experimentally been linked to seizures. Methods In this prospective observational study of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients we explored the link between the inflammatory response following SAH and in-hospital NCSz studying clinical (systemic inflammatory response syndrome,SIRS) and laboratory markers of inflammation (tumor necrosis factor receptor 1,TNF-R1; high sensitivity C-reactive protein,hsCRP). Logistic regression, cox proportional hazards regression, and mediation analyses were performed to investigate temporal and causal relationships. Results Among 479 SAH patients, 53(11%) had in-hospital NCSz. Patients with in-hospital NCSz had a more pronounced SIRS response (OR1.9 per point increase in SIRS; 95%-CI1.3-2.9), inflammatory surges were more likely immediately preceding NCSz onset, and the negative impact of SIRS on functional outcome at 3 months was mediated in part through in-hospital NCSz. In a subset with inflammatory serum biomarkers we confirmed these findings linking higher serum TNF-R1 and hsCRP to in-hospital NCSz (OR1.2 per 20 point hsCRP increase [95%-CI1.1-1.4]; OR2.5 per 100 point TNF-R1 increase [95%-CI2.1-2.9]). The association of inflammatory biomarkers with poor outcome was mediated in part through NCSz. Interpretation In-hospital NCSz were independently associated with a pro-inflammatory state following SAH reflected in clinical symptoms and serum biomarkers of inflammation. Our findings suggest that inflammation following SAH is associated with poor outcome and this effect is at least in part mediated through in-hospital NCSz. PMID:24771589

  11. Age-associated vasospasm in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kale, Sushant P; Edgell, Randall C; Alshekhlee, Amer; Borhani Haghighi, Afshin; Sweeny, Justin; Felton, Jason; Kitchener, Jacob; Vora, Nirav; Bieneman, Bruce K; Cruz-Flores, Salvador; Abdulrauf, Saleem

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between age and vasospasm caused by subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is controversial. We evaluated this relationship in a contemporary sample from a single institution. In a retrospective study design, we included patients with SAH caused by ruptured intracranial aneurysms. All patients underwent an evaluation that included head imaging, cerebral angiography, and treatment for the underlying aneurysm. Vasospasm was classified as absent, any vasospasm, or symptomatic vasospasm. Age was classified into 2 categories with a cutoff of 50 years, and also was stratified by decade. All patients had received preventative and therapeutic measures for vasospasm. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association between age and the occurrence of vasospasm. A total of 108 patients were included in this analysis, 67 of whom were age ≥50 years. The older patients had a higher incidence of vascular risk factors, and the younger patients had a higher incidence of smoking and illicit substance abuse. The mean age of the patients with any vasospasm (n = 41) was 48.51 ± 11.23 years, compared with 59.67 ± 13.30 years in those without vasospasm (P < .0001). Adjusted analysis found a greater risk of vasospasm in the younger patients compared with the older patients (odds ratio, 5.83; 95% confidence interval, 2.41-14.12 for any vasospasm; odds ratio, 2.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.008-7.052 for symptomatic vasospasm). This risk of vasospasm decreased with advanced age (P < .0001). Our findings suggest that patients age <50 years are at 5-fold greater risk of any vasospasm compared with older patients, and that age-adjusted prevention protocols may need to be considered. PMID:21719308

  12. Recombinant Osteopontin in Cerebral Vasospasm After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hidenori; Hasegawa, Yu; Chen, Wanqiu; Kanamaru, Kenji; Zhang, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Osteopontin (OPN), a pleiotropic extracellular matrix glycoprotein, has been reported to be protective against ischemic lesions, but effects of OPN on vascular functions have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to assess whether recombinant OPN (r-OPN) could prevent cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in rats. Methods r-OPN was administered intraventricularly to rats undergoing SAH by the endovascular perforation, and its protective effects were evaluated by measuring the diameter of cerebral arteries and neurobehavioral testing. Western blotting and immunofluorescence were performed to explore the underlying mechanisms. An integrin receptor antagonist GRGDSP or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase (MKP)-1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) was also administered to r-OPN-treated SAH rats, and those effects were evaluated. Results Pre-SAH administration of r-OPN prevented vasospasm and neurological impairments at 24–72 hours post-SAH. r-OPN enhanced an endogenous MAPK inhibitor, MKP-1, and suppressed the phosphorylation of MAPKs, caldesmon and heat shock protein 27 in the spastic cerebral arteries at 24 hours post-SAH. Immunofluorescence revealed that MKP-1 was induced in the arterial smooth muscle layer. GRGDSP prevented r-OPN-induced MKP-1 upregulation, and MKP-1 siRNA abolished both MAPK inactivation and anti-vasospastic effects by r-OPN. Post-SAH r-OPN treatment also prevented vasospasm. Interpretation r-OPN induced MKP-1 in the spastic cerebral arteries via binding to L-arginyl-glycyl-L-aspartate-dependent integrin receptors and prevented vasospasm after SAH. Therapeutic induction of MKP-1 may be a novel approach for the prevention and treatment of cerebral vasospasm. PMID:21031580

  13. Endometriosis-associated Maternal Pregnancy Complications – Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Petresin, J.; Wolf, J.; Emir, S.; Müller, A.; Boosz, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of endometriosis is increasing. Particularly during pregnancy and labour, clinicians should be alert to possible endometriosis-associated complications or complications of previous endometriosis treatment, despite a low relative risk. In addition to an increased rate of early miscarriage, complications such as spontaneous bowel perforation, rupture of ovarian cysts, uterine rupture and intraabdominal bleeding from decidualised endometriosis lesions or previous surgery are described in the literature. Unfavourable neonatal outcomes have also been discussed. We report on an irreducible ovarian torsion in the 16th week of pregnancy following extensive endometriosis surgery, and an intraabdominal haemorrhage due to endometriosis of the bowel in the 29th week of pregnancy. PMID:27570252

  14. Intravenous Immunoglobulin Responsive Persistent Thrombocytopenia after Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Charaniya, Riyaz; Ghosh, Anindya; Sahoo, Ratnakar

    2016-01-01

    Dengue outbreak is common in Indian subcontinent and causes significant morbidity and mortality. Year 2015 has witnessed yet another Dengue epidemic in northern India and the number of cases this year is maximum in a decade. Dengue infection is a viral disease and there are 4 different serotypes DENV1, DENV2, DENV3 and DENV4. This year DENV2 and DENV4 have been isolated from most of the patients. Thrombocytopenia is hallmark of dengue infection and generally recovers within ten days of onset of symptoms. We report a case of dengue haemorrhagic fever in which thrombocytopenia persisted for almost a month and improved after Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) administration. This is the first case where IVIG has been successfully used for treating persisting thrombocytopenia after dengue infection. PMID:27190868

  15. [“Sumo-compression” Stops Post PartumHaemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Spätling, L; Schneider, H

    2014-10-01

    Post partum haemorrhage (PPH) from uterine atony or extensive trauma of vaginal tissue is a major cause of maternal mortality. Compression of vaginal tissue and uterus by tightly packing the vagina with laparotomy pads is described as a novel approach for the management of PPH. A bandage is placed as a very tight belt above the uterus. Counterpressure is achieved by a second bandage, which runs from anterior to posterior and is tied to the belt pressing the pads inside the vagina firmly against the uterus. The term "Sumo-compression" was chosen to remind people of the pants of the Japanese wrestlers. Using this method 5 women were successfully treated between January 2010 and October 2012. PMID:25353217

  16. Progress towards the treatment of Ebola haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Ströher, Ute; Feldmann, Heinz

    2006-12-01

    Being highly pathogenic for human and nonhuman primates and the subject of former weapon programmes makes Ebola virus one of the most feared pathogens worldwide today. Due to a lack of licensed pre- and postexposure intervention, the current response depends on rapid diagnostics, proper isolation procedures and supportive care of case patients. Consequently, the development of more specific countermeasures is of high priority for the preparedness of many nations. Over the past years, enhanced research efforts directed to better understand virus replication and pathogenesis have identified potential new targets for intervention strategies. The authors discuss the most promising therapeutic approaches for Ebola haemorrhagic fever as judged by their efficacy in animal models. The current development in this field encourages discussions on how to move some of the experimental approaches towards clinical application. PMID:17107278

  17. Viewpoint: filovirus haemorrhagic fever outbreaks: much ado about nothing?

    PubMed

    Borchert, M; Boelaert, M; Sleurs, H; Muyembe-Tamfum, J J; Pirard, P; Colebunders, R; Van der Stuyft, P; van der Groen, G

    2000-05-01

    The recent outbreak of Marburg haemorrhagic fever in the Democratic Republic of Congo has put the filovirus threat back on the international health agenda. This paper gives an overview of Marburg and Ebola outbreaks so far observed and puts them in a public health perspective. Damage on the local level has been devastating at times, but was marginal on the international level despite the considerable media attention these outbreaks received. The potential hazard of outbreaks, however, after export of filovirus from its natural environment into metropolitan areas, is argued to be considerable. Some avenues for future research and intervention are explored. Beyond the obvious need to find the reservoir and study the natural history, public health strategies for a more timely and efficient response are urgently needed. PMID:10886793

  18. Intravenous Immunoglobulin Responsive Persistent Thrombocytopenia after Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prabhat; Charaniya, Riyaz; Ghosh, Anindya; Sahoo, Ratnakar

    2016-04-01

    Dengue outbreak is common in Indian subcontinent and causes significant morbidity and mortality. Year 2015 has witnessed yet another Dengue epidemic in northern India and the number of cases this year is maximum in a decade. Dengue infection is a viral disease and there are 4 different serotypes DENV1, DENV2, DENV3 and DENV4. This year DENV2 and DENV4 have been isolated from most of the patients. Thrombocytopenia is hallmark of dengue infection and generally recovers within ten days of onset of symptoms. We report a case of dengue haemorrhagic fever in which thrombocytopenia persisted for almost a month and improved after Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) administration. This is the first case where IVIG has been successfully used for treating persisting thrombocytopenia after dengue infection. PMID:27190868

  19. How to manage patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Geisthoff, Urban W; Nguyen, Ha-Long; Röth, Alexander; Seyfert, Ulrich

    2015-11-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia is a rare systemic autosomal dominantly inherited disorder of the fibrovascular tissue with a wide variety of clinical manifestations. Diagnosis is based on the clinical Curaçao criteria or molecular genetic testing. Dilated vessels can develop into telangiectases or larger vascular malformations in various organs, calling for an interdisciplinary approach. Epistaxis and gastrointestinal bleeding can result from these vascular defects. Various conservative and interventional treatments have been described for these conditions. However, no optimal therapy exists. Treatment can become especially difficult due to progressive anaemia or when anticoagulant or anti-thrombotic therapy becomes necessary. Screening for pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM) should be performed in all confirmed and suspected patients. Treatment by percutaneous transcatheter embolotherapy and antibiotic prophylaxis is normally effective for PAVM. Cerebral or hepatic vascular malformations and rare manifestations need to be evaluated on a case-by-case basis to determine the best course of action for treatment. PMID:26205234

  20. Haemorrhage after home birth: audit of decision making and referral.

    PubMed

    Smit, Marrit; Dijkman, Anneke; Rijnders, Marlies; Bustraan, Jacqueline; van Dillen, Jeroen; Middeldorp, Johanna; Havenith, Barbara; van Roosmalen, Jos

    2013-11-01

    In the Netherlands, 20 per cent of women give birth at home. In 0.7 per cent, referral to secondary care because of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is indicated. Midwives are regularly trained in managing obstetric emergencies. A postgraduate training programme developed for Dutch community-based midwives called 'CAVE' (pre-hospital obstetric emergency course) focuses on the identification and management of obstetric emergencies, including timely and adequate referral to hospital. This descriptive study aims to identify substandard care (SSC) in PPH after home birth in the Netherlands. Sixty seven cases of PPH reported by community-based midwives were collected. After applying selection criteria, seven cases were submitted to audit. The audit panel consisted of 12 midwives (of which seven contributed a case), 10 obstetricians, an educational expert and an ambulance paramedic. First, an individual assessment was performed by all members. Subsequently, at a plenary audit meeting, SSC factors were determined and assigned incidental, minor and major substandard care. PMID:24371910

  1. A rare case of Weil's disease with alveolar haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Abhiram; Nandy, Manab; Pal, Dipankar; Mallik, Sudesna

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis, a disease of protean manifestations occurs sporadically throughout the year with a peak seasonal incidence during the rainy season mimicking other febrile viral illness. In the rare case, the disease leads to renal and hepatic involvement with hemorrhage which may be associated with multisystem organ dysfunction in form of pulmonary, cardiac and central nervous system, when it is known as Weil's disease. Rarely haemorrhagic manifestations are assosciated. Early diagnosis is important as sometimes the disease may be life threatening. Proper antibiotics results in dramatic improvement. We hereby presented a case that had clinical features of Weil's disease with cough, dyspnoea and haemoptysis. Leptospirosis was detected on ELISA testing. Patient was cured rapidly with antibiotics. PMID:25183149

  2. Haemorrhage, hyponatraemia and more than just a hack

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mitsu; Kandil, Hala

    2014-01-01

    A 43-year-old previously healthy solicitor presented with a 9-day history of cough productive of yellow sputum with a prodrome of sore throat and myalgia. The cough was paroxysmal in nature and severe enough to cause extensive bilateral subconjunctival haemorrhages and cough syncopes multiple times a day, with one bout of associated haematemesis on the day of admission. He was isolated, treated for a presumed atypical chest infection with tazocin and clarithromycin, and monitored carefully until the hyponatraemia on presentation was resolved. Atypical screen and blood cultures were sent off, though unexciting at first, eventually confirmed the unlikely; Bordetella pertussis, much to the surprise of many who had Legionella as the top differential. PMID:24943139

  3. Haemorrhage, hyponatraemia and more than just a hack.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mitsu; Kandil, Hala

    2014-01-01

    A 43-year-old previously healthy solicitor presented with a 9-day history of cough productive of yellow sputum with a prodrome of sore throat and myalgia. The cough was paroxysmal in nature and severe enough to cause extensive bilateral subconjunctival haemorrhages and cough syncopes multiple times a day, with one bout of associated haematemesis on the day of admission. He was isolated, treated for a presumed atypical chest infection with tazocin and clarithromycin, and monitored carefully until the hyponatraemia on presentation was resolved. Atypical screen and blood cultures were sent off, though unexciting at first, eventually confirmed the unlikely; Bordetella pertussis, much to the surprise of many who had Legionella as the top differential. PMID:24943139

  4. [Two Cases of Ruptured Cerebral Aneurysm Complicated with Delayed Coil Protrusion after Coil Embolization].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Takashi; Ogata, Atsushi; Ebashi, Ryo; Takase, Yukinori; Masuoka, Jun; Kawashima, Masatou; Abe, Tatsuya

    2016-07-01

    We report two cases of delayed coil protrusion after coil embolization for ruptured cerebral aneurysms. Case 1:An 82-year-old woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured small anterior communicating artery aneurysm underwent successful coil embolization. Eighteen days after the procedure, coil protrusion from the aneurysm into the right anterior cerebral artery was observed without any symptoms. Further coil protrusion did not develop after 28 days. Case 2:A 78-year-old woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured small left middle cerebral artery aneurysm underwent successful coil embolization. Twenty days after the procedure, coil protrusion from the aneurysm into the left middle cerebral artery was observed, with a transient ischemic attack. Further coil protrusion did not develop. Both patients recovered with antithrombotic treatment. Even though delayed coil protrusion after coil embolization is rare, it should be recognized as a long-term complication of coil embolization for cerebral aneurysms. PMID:27384117

  5. Treatment of Syringomyelia due to Chiari Type I Malformation with Syringo-Subarachnoid-Peritoneal Shunt

    PubMed Central

    Akakın, Akın; Yılmaz, Baran; Kılıç, Türker

    2015-01-01

    Chiari type I malformation is a tonsillar herniation more than 3 mm from the level of foramen magnum, with or without concurrent syringomyelia. Different surgical treatments have been developed for syringomyelia secondary to Chiari's malformations: craniovertebral decompression with or without plugging of the obex, syringo-subarachnoid, syringo-peritoneal, and theco-peritoneal shunt placement. Shunt placement procedures are useful for neurologically symptomatic large-sized syrinx. In this paper, authors define the first successful treatment of a patient with syringomyelia due to Chiari type I malformation using a pre-defined new technique of syringo-subarachnoid-peritoneal shunt with T-tube system. PMID:25932303

  6. A risk scoring system for prediction of haemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Zodpey, S P; Tiwari, R R

    2005-01-01

    The present pair-matched case control study was carried out at Government Medical College Hospital, Nagpur, India, a tertiary care hospital with the objective to devise and validate a risk scoring system for prediction of hemorrhagic stroke. The study consisted of 166 hospitalized CT scan proved cases of hemorrhagic stroke (ICD 9, 431-432), and a age and sex matched control per case. The controls were selected from patients who attended the study hospital for conditions other than stroke. On conditional multiple logistic regression five risk factors- hypertension (OR = 1.9. 95% Cl = 1.5-2.5). raised scrum total cholesterol (OR = 2.3, 95% Cl = 1.1-4.9). use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents (OR = 3.4, 95% Cl =1.1-10.4). past history of transient ischaemic attack (OR = 8.4, 95% Cl = 2.1- 33.6) and alcohol intake (OR = 2.1, 95% Cl = 1.3-3.6) were significant. These factors were ascribed statistical weights (based on regression coefficients) of 6, 8, 12, 21 and 8 respectively. The nonsignificant factors (diabetes mellitus, physical inactivity, obesity, smoking, type A personality, history of claudication, family history of stroke, history of cardiac diseases and oral contraceptive use in females) were not included in the development of scoring system. ROC curve suggested a total score of 21 to be the best cut-off for predicting haemorrhag stroke. At this cut-off the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictivity and Cohen's kappa were 0.74, 0.74, 0.74 and 0.48 respectively. The overall predictive accuracy of this additive risk scoring system (area under ROC curve by Wilcoxon statistic) was 0.79 (95% Cl = 0.73-0.84). Thus to conclude, if substantiated by further validation, this scorincy system can be used to predict haemorrhagic stroke, thereby helping to devise effective risk factor intervention strategy. PMID:16479901

  7. Changes in the Metabolism of Sphingolipids after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Testai, Fernando D; Xu, Hao-Liang; Kilkus, John; Suryadevara, Vidyani; Gorshkova, Irina; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Pelligrino, Dale A; Dawson, Dawson

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously described that ceramide (Cer), a mediator of cell death, increases in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients. This study investigated the alterations of biochemical pathways involved in Cer homeostasis in SAH. Methods Cer, dihydroceramide (DHC), sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and the activities of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase), neutral sphingomyelinase (NSMase), sphingomyelinase synthase (SMS), S1P-lyase, and glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) were determined in the CSF of SAH subjects and in brain homogenate of SAH rats. Results Compared to controls (n=8), SAH patients (n=26) had higher ASMase activity (10.0±3.5 IF/µl.min vs. 15.0±4.6 IF/µl.min; p=0.009) and elevated levels of Cer (11.4±8.8 pmol/ml vs. 33.3±48.3 pmol/ml; p=0.001) and DHC (1.3±1.1 pmol/ml vs. 3.8±3.4 pmol/ml; p=0.001) in the CSF. The activities of GCS, NSMase, and SMS in the CSF were undetectable. Brain homogenates from SAH animals had increased ASMase activity (control: 9.7±1.2 IF/µg.min; SAH: 16.8±1.6 IF/µg.min; p<0.05) and Cer levels (control: 3422±26 fmol/nmol of total lipid P; SAH: 7073±2467 fmol/nmol of total lipid P; p<0.05) compared to controls. In addition, SAH was associated with a reduction of 60% in S1P levels, a 40% increase in S1P-lyase activity, and a 2-fold increase in the activity of GCS but similar NSMase and SMS activities than controls. Conclusions Our results show an activation of ASMase, S1P-lyase, and GCS resulting in a shift in the production of protective (S1P) in favor of deleterious (Cer) sphingolipids after SAH. Additional studies are needed to determine the effect of modulators of the pathways here described in the outcome of SAH. PMID:25597763

  8. Changes in the metabolism of sphingolipids after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Testai, Fernando D; Xu, Hao-Liang; Kilkus, John; Suryadevara, Vidyani; Gorshkova, Irina; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Pelligrino, Dale A; Dawson, Glyn

    2015-05-01

    We previously described how ceramide (Cer), a mediator of cell death, increases in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients. This study investigates the alterations of biochemical pathways involved in Cer homeostasis in SAH. Cer, dihydroceramide (DHC), sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), and the activities of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase), neutral sphingomyelinase (NSMase), sphingomyelinase synthase (SMS), S1P-lyase, and glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) were determined in the CSF of SAH subjects and in brain homogenate of SAH rats. Compared with controls (n = 8), SAH patients (n = 26) had higher ASMase activity (10.0 ± 3.5 IF/µl· min vs. 15.0 ± 4.6 IF/µl • min; P = 0.009) and elevated levels of Cer (11.4 ± 8.8 pmol/ml vs. 33.3 ± 48.3 pmol/ml; P = 0.001) and DHC (1.3 ± 1.1 pmol/ml vs. 3.8 ± 3.4 pmol/ml; P = 0.001) in the CSF. The activities of GCS, NSMase, and SMS in the CSF were undetectable. Brain homogenates from SAH animals had increased ASMase activity (control: 9.7 ± 1.2 IF/µg • min; SAH: 16.8 ± 1.6 IF/µg • min; P < 0.05) and Cer levels (control: 3,422 ± 26 fmol/nmol of total lipid P; SAH: 7,073 ± 2,467 fmol/nmol of total lipid P; P < 0.05) compared with controls. In addition, SAH was associated with a reduction of 60% in S1P levels, a 40% increase in S1P-lyase activity, and a twofold increase in the activity of GCS. In comparison, NSMase and SMS activities were similar to controls and SMS activities similar to controls. In conclusion, our results show an activation of ASMase, S1P-lyase, and GCS resulting in a shift in the production of protective (S1P) in favor of deleterious (Cer) sphingolipids after SAH. Additional studies are needed to determine the effect of modulators of the pathways described here in SAH. PMID:25597763

  9. Retroperitoneal Haematom due to Spontaneous Rupture and Haemorrhage of Adrenal Cyst Presenting with Grey Turner's Sign.

    PubMed

    Sonmez, Bedriye Muge; Yilmaz, Fevzi; Özkan, Fevzi Bircan; Ongar, Murat; Özturk, Derya; Cesur, Fatma

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous retroperitoneal haemorrhage is a rare entity and a potentially life-threatening condition. A 41-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with left flank pain and dysuria. Her physical examination disclosed left abdominal and costovertebral angle tenderness, left flank ecchymosis (Grey Turner sign). Abdominal computerised tomography revealed spontaneous retroperitoneal haemorrhage. She was discharged after 10 days with recommendation of urology follow-up. PMID:26160093

  10. [Bacillus cereus sepsis and subarachnoid hemorrhage following consolidation chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia].

    PubMed

    Kawatani, Eri; Kishikawa, Yuki; Sankoda, Chikahiro; Kuwahara, Nobuo; Mori, Daisuke; Osoegawa, Kouichi; Matsuishi, Eijo; Gondo, Hisashi

    2009-04-01

    A 64-year-old man with acute myelogenous leukemia (FAB classification, M7) in remission received consolidation chemotherapy with mitoxantrone/cytosine arabinoside. WBC counts decreased to 0/microl on day 14, and fever (39.3 degrees C) and epigastralgia developed on day 15. Cefozopran was instituted for febrile neutropenia; however, on day 16, he was found to be in cardiac arrest. CT scan on day 16 revealed subarachnoid hemorrhage. Gram-positive rods were isolated from blood cultures on day 15, and were later identified as B.cereus. He recovered transiently, but eventually died on day 19. Postmortem examination demonstrated many colonies of B. cereus in the cerebrum, cerebellum, lung, and liver. Hepatocyte necrosis was also observed in the liver. Bacterial aneurysms or septic emboli were not identified in the arachnoid vessels, but necrosis of cerebral vessels was prominent, which was considered to be the cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage has been reported to be associated with B. cereus sepsis, which developed at nadir following chemotherapy for leukemia patients. Because of the aggressive clinical course of B. cereus sepsis, including the risk for subarachnoid hemorrhage, early treatment with effective antibiotics for B. cereus sepsis would be important in the management of leukemia patients after chemotherapy. PMID:19404024

  11. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related atraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage: an ARIA before the tsunami

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Lizana, Eva; Carmona-Iragui, María; Alcolea, Daniel; Gómez-Choco, Manuel; Vilaplana, Eduard; Sánchez-Saudinós, María B; Clarimón, Jordi; Hernández-Guillamon, Mar; Munuera, Josep; Gelpi, Ellen; Gómez-Anson, Beatriz; de Juan-Delago, Manel; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Montaner, Joan; Ois, Angel; Amaro, Sergi; Blesa, Rafael; Martí-Fàbregas, Joan; Lleó, Alberto; Fortea, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Atraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage (cSAH) in elderly patients is a rare entity that has been associated with cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and intracerebral hematomas (ICH). To characterize this entity and to study these associations, 22 patients over 60 with cSAH were included in a multicenter ambispective cohort study. Clinical data, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, APOE genotyping, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers were evaluated. Results were compared with data from healthy controls (HC), non-cSAH CAA patients (CAAo), and Alzheimer disease patients. Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage presented with transient sensory or motor symptoms. At follow-up (median 30.7 months), 5 patients had died, 6 survivors showed functional disability (modified Rankins Scale (mRS)>2), and 12 cognitive impairment. Four patients had prior ICH and six had an ICH during follow-up. CSF-Aß40 and Aß42 levels were lower in cSAH and CAAo compared with HC. Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage presented an APOE-ɛ2 overrepresentation and CAAo had an APOE-ɛ4 overrepresentation. On MRI, all patients fulfilled CAA-modified Boston criteria and 9 showed cortical ischemia in the surrounding cortex or the vicinity of superficial siderosis. The neuropathologic study, available in one patient, showed severe CAA and advanced Alzheimer-type pathology. Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the elderly is associated with cognitive impairment and lobar ICH occurrence. Our findings support the existence of an underlying CAA pathology. PMID:25735919

  12. Accumulation of intimal platelets in cerebral arteries following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in cats

    SciTech Connect

    Haining, J.L.; Clower, B.R.; Honma, Y.; Smith, R.R.

    1988-07-01

    From 2 hours to 23 days following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage, the accumulation of indium-111-labeled platelets on the intimal surface of the middle cerebral artery was studied in 23 cats. Subarachnoid hemorrhage was produced by transorbital rupture of the right middle cerebral artery. Of the 23 cats, 17 exhibited right middle cerebral artery/left middle cerebral artery radioactivity ratios of greater than 1.25. When these results were compared with those of 12 control cats, 0.001 less than p less than 0.005 (chi2 test). Thus, the results from the control and experimental groups are significantly different and indicate early (after 2 hours) preferential accumulation of intimal platelets in the ruptured right middle cerebral artery compared with the unruptured left middle cerebral artery and new platelet deposition continuing for up to 23 days. However, the experimental group did not reveal a clear pattern for platelet accumulation following subarachnoid hemorrhage. There was no simple correlation between the magnitude of the radioactivity ratios and the time after hemorrhage when the cats were killed although the ratios for 2 hours to 7 days seemed greater than those for 8 to 23 days. Assuming the pivotal role of platelets in the angiopathy of subarachnoid hemorrhage, the administration of antiplatelet agents as soon as possible following its occurrence may be of value.

  13. Historical overview and review of current day treatment in the management of acute variceal haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Rajoriya, Neil; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2014-06-01

    Variceal haemorrhage is one of the most devastating consequences of portal hypertension, with a 1-year mortality of 40%. With the passage of time, acute management strategies have developed with improved survival. The major historical treatment landmarks in the management of variceal haemorrhage can be divided into surgical, medical, endoscopic and radiological breakthroughs. We sought to provide a historical overview of the management of variceal haemorrhage and how treatment modalities over time have impacted on clinical outcomes. A PubMed search of the following terms: portal hypertension, variceal haemorrhage, gastric varices, oesophageal varices, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt was performed. To complement this, Google™ was searched with the aforementioned terms. Other relevant references were identified after review of the reference lists of articles. The review of therapeutic advances was conducted divided into pre-1970s, 1970/80s, 1990s, 2000-2010 and post-2010. Also, a summary and review on the pathophysiology of portal hypertension and clinical outcomes in variceal haemorrhage was performed. Aided by the development of endoscopic therapies, medication and improved radiological interventions; the management of variceal haemorrhage has changed over recent decades with improved survival from an often-terminating event in recent past. PMID:24914369

  14. Historical overview and review of current day treatment in the management of acute variceal haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Rajoriya, Neil; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2014-01-01

    Variceal haemorrhage is one of the most devastating consequences of portal hypertension, with a 1-year mortality of 40%. With the passage of time, acute management strategies have developed with improved survival. The major historical treatment landmarks in the management of variceal haemorrhage can be divided into surgical, medical, endoscopic and radiological breakthroughs. We sought to provide a historical overview of the management of variceal haemorrhage and how treatment modalities over time have impacted on clinical outcomes. A PubMed search of the following terms: portal hypertension, variceal haemorrhage, gastric varices, oesophageal varices, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt was performed. To complement this, Google™ was searched with the aforementioned terms. Other relevant references were identified after review of the reference lists of articles. The review of therapeutic advances was conducted divided into pre-1970s, 1970/80s, 1990s, 2000-2010 and post-2010. Also, a summary and review on the pathophysiology of portal hypertension and clinical outcomes in variceal haemorrhage was performed. Aided by the development of endoscopic therapies, medication and improved radiological interventions; the management of variceal haemorrhage has changed over recent decades with improved survival from an often-terminating event in recent past. PMID:24914369

  15. Femoral access in 100 consecutive subarachnoid hemorrhage patients: the "craniotomy" of endovascular neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Femoral access is a fundamental element of catheter-based cerebral angiography. Knowledge of location of the common femoral artery (CFA) bifurcation is important as the risk of retroperitoneal bleeding is increased if the puncture is superior to the inguinal ligament and there is an increased risk of thrombosis and arteriovenous fistula formation if the puncture is distal into branch vessels. We sought to characterize the location of the CFA bifurcation along with the presence of significant atherosclerosis or iliac tortuosity in a contemporary series of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients. Findings The records of a prospective single-center aneurysm database were reviewed to identify 100 consecutive SAH patients. Using an oblique femoral arteriogram, the presence of significant atherosclerosis, iliac tortuosity, and the CFA bifurcation were assessed. The CFA bifurcation was graded according to its position with respect to the femoral head: below (grade 1), lower half (grade 2), and above the upper half (grade 3). We found a CFA bifurcation grade 1 in 50 patients (50%, mean age 51.2 years), grade 2 in 40 patients (40%, mean age 55.5 years), and grade 3 in 10 patients (10%, mean age 58.2 years). Whereas 30 of 90 patients with CFA grades I or II were male (33%), only 10% with grade 3 were male (1 of 10, p = 0.12). Mean age for significant atherosclerosis was 65.5 +/- 2.6 years versus 50.9 +/- 1.6 years (p < 0.001) without, and iliac tortuosity was 64.9 +/- 2.4 years versus 50.3 +/- 1.6 years (p < 0.001) without. Conclusions Although a requisite element of endovascular treatment in SAH patients, femoral access can be complicated by a high common femoral artery bifurcation and the presence of atherosclerotic disease and/or iliac artery tortuosity. In this study, we found a grade 3 (above the femoral head) CFA bifurcation in 10% patients, with 90% of these patients being female. We also found the presence of atherosclerotic disease and iliac tortuosity to

  16. [Coagulological aspects of treatment of complications of prolonged therapy with warfarin].

    PubMed

    Krylov, A Iu; Shulutko, A M; Prasolov, N V; Petrovskaia, A A; Khmyrova, S E

    2016-01-01

    The authors analysed the results of treating a total of 116 patients (68 men and 48 women aged from 20 to 84 years, mean age 59.5±15.5 years) presenting with various complications of prolonged therapy with warfarin. Prescription of prolonged therapy with warfarin had been caused by various cardiac diseases and lower extremity deep vein thromboses. The duration of anticoagulant therapy at the time of onset of complications was different and depended on the underlying disease. The majority of patients included into the study had been taking warfarin for one year and more, with nearly half of patients (48.1%) - for more than 5 years. Examination of patients included clinical, instrumental and laboratory studies, among which we determined standard laboratory parameters of haemostasis [activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), international normalised ratio (INR), prothrombin index, prothrombin time, thrombin time, fibrinogen, etc.] and global tests (the thrombodynamics test and thromboelastogram). Amongst complications of prolonged warfarin therapy, 10 patients were found to have various thrombotic complications and 106 patients were diagnosed as having various by localisation and intensity haemorrhage. The obtained results of the study have demonstrated that the appearance of any thrombotic complications takes place occurs on the background of insufficient hypocoagulation and often require only correction of warfarin therapy. Whereas floating thrombi developing on the background of inadequate warfarin therapy require surgical management. Once haemorrhagic complications have developed, beside appropriate correction of warfarin therapy it is necessary to carry out correction of coagulopathies, which is done by means of different drugs and therapeutic regimens, whose choice should be based on assessing the clinical findings (localization and severity of haemorrhage) and laboratory indices, the main of which are local coagulologic tests, as well as global tests. The

  17. Dose response study of subarachnoid diamorphine for analgesia after elective caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Skilton, R W; Kinsella, S M; Smith, A; Thomas, T A

    1999-10-01

    Subarachnoid diamorphine provides excellent analgesia after elective caesarean section but the optimum dose is still uncertain. We therefore investigated the effects of three regimens of subarachnoid diamorphine. Forty parturients were assigned to one of four groups. A control group received no diamorphine in their subarachnoid bupivacaine and three study groups received 0.1 mg, 0.2 mg or 0.3 mg diamorphine added to 12.5 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% in a semi-blind randomised design study. All women received a 100 mg diclofenac suppository at the end of the caesarean section and were provided with morphine patient controlled analgesia (PCA) postoperatively. The patients were assessed for pain, morphine usage and side-effects at 2, 4, 8 and 24 h after the subarachnoid injection. Postoperative visual analogue scores for pain and PCA morphine consumption were significantly lower, and mean time to first use of morphine was significantly longer in the 0.3 mg diamorphine group. The mean (SD) dose of PCA morphine used over 24 h was 39.4 (14.7), 25.6 (16.5), 21.6 (15.9) and 3.1 (3.6) mg, and mean time to first use of morphine was 1.6 (0.5), 3.0 (1.4), 3.4 (2.4) and 14.1 (9.4) h, in the 0, 0.1 mg, 0.2 mg and 0.3 mg groups respectively. Side-effects of pruritus, nausea and vomiting were dependent on the dose of spinal diamorphine but did not require treatment in any patients. We conclude that 0.3 mg subarachnoid diamorphine provides significantly better postoperative pain relief than the smaller doses with an acceptable increase in side-effects. PMID:15321116

  18. Chemical- and radiation-induced haemorrhagic cystitis: current treatments and challenges.

    PubMed

    Payne, Heather; Adamson, Andrew; Bahl, Amit; Borwell, Jonathan; Dodds, David; Heath, Catherine; Huddart, Robert; McMenemin, Rhona; Patel, Prashant; Peters, John L; Thompson, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    • To review the published data on predisposing risk factors for cancer treatment-induced haemorrhagic cystitis (HC) and the evidence for the different preventive and therapeutic measures that have been used in order to help clinicians optimally define and manage this potentially serious condition. • Despite recognition that HC can be a significant complication of cancer treatment, there is currently a lack of UK-led guidelines available on how it should optimally be defined and managed. • A systematic literature review was undertaken to evaluate the evidence for preventative measures and treatment options in the management of cancer treatment-induced HC. • There is a wide range of reported incidence due to several factors including variability in study design and quality, the type of causal agent, the grading of bleeding, and discrepancies in definition criteria. • The most frequently reported causal factors are radiotherapy to the pelvic area, where HC has been reported in up to 20% of patients, and treatment with cyclophosphamide and bacillus Calmette-Guérin, where the incidence has been reported as up to 30%. • Mesna (2-mercaptoethane sodium sulphonate), hyperhydration and bladder irrigation have been the most frequently used prophylactic measures to prevent treatment-related cystitis, but are not always effective. • Cranberry juice is widely cited as a preventative measure and sodium pentosanpolysulphate as a treatment, although the evidence for both is very limited. • The best evidence exists for intravesical hyaluronic acid as an effective preventative and active treatment, and for hyperbaric oxygen as an equally effective treatment option. • The lack of robust data and variability in treatment strategies used highlights the need for further research, as well as best practice guidance and consensus on the management of HC. PMID:24000900

  19. Imaging cerebral haemorrhage with magnetic induction tomography: numerical modelling.

    PubMed

    Zolgharni, M; Ledger, P D; Armitage, D W; Holder, D S; Griffiths, H

    2009-06-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a new electromagnetic imaging modality which has the potential to image changes in the electrical conductivity of the brain due to different pathologies. In this study the feasibility of detecting haemorrhagic cerebral stroke with a 16-channel MIT system operating at 10 MHz was investigated. The finite-element method combined with a realistic, multi-layer, head model comprising 12 different tissues, was used for the simulations in the commercial FE package, Comsol Multiphysics. The eddy-current problem was solved and the MIT signals computed for strokes of different volumes occurring at different locations in the brain. The results revealed that a large, peripheral stroke (volume 49 cm(3)) produced phase changes that would be detectable with our currently achievable instrumentation phase noise level (17 m degrees ) in 70 (27%) of the 256 exciter/sensor channel combinations. However, reconstructed images showed that a lower noise level than this, of 1 m degrees , was necessary to obtain good visualization of the strokes. The simulated MIT measurements were compared with those from an independent transmission-line-matrix model in order to give confidence in the results. PMID:19491437

  20. Surgical management of postpartum haemorrhage: survey of French obstetricians

    PubMed Central

    Bouet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Brun, Stéphanie; Madar, Hugo; Schinkel, Elsa; Merlot, Benjamin; Sentilhes, Loïc

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the theoretical and practical knowledge of French obstetricians about the surgical management of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH). Our study is a national anonymous self-administered survey. A total of 363 obstetricians responded to this questionnaire between December 2013 and April 2014. Questionnaire sent through email to all French obstetricians who are members of either of two federations of hospital-based obstetricians. Answers were collected until the end of June 2014. The main outcome measure was obstetricians’ level of mastery of each surgical technique. The results were analysed descriptively (proportions). Only the 286 questionnaires fully completed were analysed; the complete response rate was 23% (286/1246). In all, 33% (95/286) of the responding obstetricians reported that they had not mastered sufficiently or even at all the technique for bilateral ligation of the uterine arteries, 37% (105/286) for uterine compression suture, 62% (178/286) for ligation of the internal iliac arteries, and 47% (134/286) for emergency peripartum hysterectomy. In all, 18% (52/286) of respondents stated that they had not mastered any of these techniques. Our study shows that a worrisome number of French obstetricians reported insufficient mastery of the surgical techniques for PPH management. PMID:27460158

  1. Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever in adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Tantawichien, Terapong

    2012-05-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is endemic in tropical and subtropical zones and the prevalence is increasing across South-east Asia, Africa, the Western Pacific and the Americas. In recent years, the spread of unplanned urbanisation, with associated substandard housing, overcrowding and deterioration in water, sewage and waste management systems, has created ideal conditions for increased transmission of the dengue virus in tropical urban centres. While dengue infection has traditionally been considered a paediatric disease, the age distribution of dengue has been rising and more cases have been observed in adolescents and adults. Furthermore, the development of tourism in the tropics has led to an increase in the number of tourists who become infected, most of whom are adults. Symptoms and risk factors for dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and severe dengue differ between children and adults, with co-morbidities and incidence in more elderly patients associated with greater risk of mortality. Treatment options for DF and DHF in adults, as for children, centre round fluid replacement (either orally or intravenously, depending on severity) and antipyretics. Further data are needed on the optimal treatment of adult patients. PMID:22668446

  2. Delineating the Association between Heavy Postpartum Haemorrhage and Postpartum Depression

    PubMed Central

    Eckerdal, Patricia; Kollia, Natasa; Löfblad, Johanna; Hellgren, Charlotte; Karlsson, Linnea; Högberg, Ulf; Wikström, Anna-Karin; Skalkidou, Alkistis

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore the association between postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) and postpartum depression (PPD), taking into account the role of postpartum anaemia, delivery experience and psychiatric history. Methods A nested cohort study (n = 446), based on two population-based cohorts in Uppsala, Sweden. Exposed individuals were defined as having a bleeding of ≥1000ml (n = 196) at delivery, and non-exposed individuals as having bleeding of <650ml (n = 250). Logistic regression models with PPD symptoms (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression scale (EPDS) score ≥ 12) as the outcome variable and PPH, anaemia, experience of delivery, mood during pregnancy and other confounders as exposure variables were undertaken. Path analysis using Structural Equation Modeling was also conducted. Results There was no association between PPH and PPD symptoms. A positive association was shown between anaemia at discharge from the maternity ward and the development of PPD symptoms, even after controlling for plausible confounders (OR = 2.29, 95%CI = 1.15–4.58). Path analysis revealed significant roles for anaemia at discharge, negative self-reported delivery experience, depressed mood during pregnancy and postpartum stressors in increasing the risk for PPD. Conclusion This study proposes important roles for postpartum anaemia, negative experience of delivery and mood during pregnancy in explaining the development of depressive symptoms after PPH. PMID:26807799

  3. Rabbit haemorrhagic disease: virus persistence and adaptation in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Schwensow, Nina I; Cooke, Brian; Kovaliski, John; Sinclair, Ron; Peacock, David; Fickel, Joerns; Sommer, Simone

    2014-01-01

    In Australia, the rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) has been used since 1996 to reduce numbers of introduced European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) which have a devastating impact on the native Australian environment. RHDV causes regular, short disease outbreaks, but little is known about how the virus persists and survives between epidemics. We examined the initial spread of RHDV to show that even upon its initial spread, the virus circulated continuously on a regional scale rather than persisting at a local population level and that Australian rabbit populations are highly interconnected by virus-carrying flying vectors. Sequencing data obtained from a single rabbit population showed that the viruses that caused an epidemic each year seldom bore close genetic resemblance to those present in previous years. Together, these data suggest that RHDV survives in the Australian environment through its ability to spread amongst rabbit subpopulations. This is consistent with modelling results that indicated that in a large interconnected rabbit meta-population, RHDV should maintain high virulence, cause short, strong disease outbreaks but show low persistence in any given subpopulation. This new epidemiological framework is important for understanding virus–host co-evolution and future disease management options of pest species to secure Australia's remaining natural biodiversity. PMID:25553067

  4. Viral haemorrhagic disease of rabbits and human health.

    PubMed Central

    Carman, J. A.; Garner, M. G.; Catton, M. G.; Thomas, S.; Westbury, H. A.; Cannon, R. M.; Collins, B. J.; Tribe, I. G.

    1998-01-01

    Viral haemorrhagic disease of rabbits (VHD), a potential biological control for wild rabbits in Australia and New Zealand, escaped from quarantined field trials on Wardang Island and spread to the mainland of Australia in October 1995. This study looked for any evidence of infection or illness in people occupationally exposed to the virus. Two hundred and sixty-nine people were interviewed and 259 blood samples were collected. Exposures to VHD-infected rabbits ranged from nil to very high. No VHD antibodies were detected in any of the 259 sera when tested by VHD competitive enzyme immunoassay, which had been validated with 1013 VHDV-specific antibody negative sera. A questionnaire designed to elicit symptoms of disease in a range of organ systems found no significant differences between illness in those exposed and those not exposed to VHD, nor could an association be found between exposure and subsequent episodes of illness. The findings are consistent with the view that exposure to VHD is not associated with infection or disease in humans. PMID:9825794

  5. Solute equilibrium over the extracellular fluid space in haemorrhagic hypotension: a study in a cannulated thoracic duct model.

    PubMed

    Ware, J; Norberg, K A; Nylander, G

    1983-01-01

    Haemorrhagic hypotension, 50 mm Hg, has been inflicted on non-starved rats. Osmolar and solute developments have been followed in lymph and arterial plasma to assess diffusion and equilibration characteristics of the initial stages of haemorrhage. Lymph flow changes have reflected an intracellular fluid mobilization to the interstitium, caused by an osmotic gradient due to the elevated levels of glucose. A fluid homeostatic effect of pseudodiabetes associated with stress and haemorrhage is postulated. PMID:6617708

  6. Major neurovascular complications of clavicle fracture surgery

    PubMed Central

    Clitherow, Harry DS

    2014-01-01

    Clavicle fracture fixation is becoming an increasingly common operation, with good clinical outcomes and a low rate of significant complications. However, there are several reports of rare but potentially life or limb threatening, neurovascular complications. Arterial injuries are usually pseudoaneurysms associated with prominent screws. These may be clinically silent for several years before presenting as subcritical upper limb ischaemia. Venous injuries are a result of tearing of the vessel wall by fracture manipulation, drills or implants. This produces intra-operative haemorrhage and potentially air embolism, which can be fatal if not rapidly recognized and managed. Brachial plexopathy is the result of traction on adherent plexus or impingement by fracture fragments or callus. It presents as severe arm pain and paralysis immediately postoperatively. Neurovascular injuries can be avoided by a combination of pre-operative planning, communication with anaesthetic staff and strategic surgical technique. The plane of the surgical exposure, release of the soft tissues, drill direction and depth and screw length are all important factors.

  7. Japanese Encephalitis Complicated with Obstructive Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Suman, Vivek; Panwar, Ajay; Raizada, Alpana

    2016-01-01

    Japanese Encephalitis (JE), caused by Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a flavi-virus, is the most significant aetiology of arboviral encephalitis worldwide. It has resulted in epidemics of encephalitis in the Indian subcontinent. Here, we report a case of 36-year-old female who presented with a short history of fever and headache followed by altered sensorium. Funduscopic examination revealed Papilloedema. Pyogenic or viral meningoencephalitis along with complicated malaria were kept as initial differential diagnosis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of brain revealed involvement of posterior limb of internal capsule and bilateral thalami in the form of haemorrhagic encephalitis along with obstructive hydrocephalus. Cerebro Spinal Fluid (CSF) serology (IgM ELISA) showed JE as the causative agent. Despite extensive literature search, we could not find a case of JE reported with hydrocephalus as a complication. This case highlights the typical and atypical features of JE including imaging findings and exemplifies the way, how diversely JE can present and would thus help in preparing management paradigms accordingly. PMID:27042509

  8. Japanese Encephalitis Complicated with Obstructive Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Suman, Vivek; Roy, Ujjawal; Panwar, Ajay; Raizada, Alpana

    2016-02-01

    Japanese Encephalitis (JE), caused by Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a flavi-virus, is the most significant aetiology of arboviral encephalitis worldwide. It has resulted in epidemics of encephalitis in the Indian subcontinent. Here, we report a case of 36-year-old female who presented with a short history of fever and headache followed by altered sensorium. Funduscopic examination revealed Papilloedema. Pyogenic or viral meningoencephalitis along with complicated malaria were kept as initial differential diagnosis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of brain revealed involvement of posterior limb of internal capsule and bilateral thalami in the form of haemorrhagic encephalitis along with obstructive hydrocephalus. Cerebro Spinal Fluid (CSF) serology (IgM ELISA) showed JE as the causative agent. Despite extensive literature search, we could not find a case of JE reported with hydrocephalus as a complication. This case highlights the typical and atypical features of JE including imaging findings and exemplifies the way, how diversely JE can present and would thus help in preparing management paradigms accordingly. PMID:27042509

  9. Recommendations for the management of intracranial haemorrhage - part I: spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage. The European Stroke Initiative Writing Committee and the Writing Committee for the EUSI Executive Committee.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Thorsten; Kaste, Markku; Katse, Markku; Forsting, Michael; Mendelow, David; Kwiecinski, Hubert; Szikora, Istvan; Juvela, Seppo; Marchel, Andrzej; Chapot, René; Cognard, Christophe; Unterberg, Andreas; Hacke, Werner

    2006-01-01

    This article represents the recommendations for the management of spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage of the European Stroke Initiative (EUSI). These recommendations are endorsed by the 3 European societies which are represented in the EUSI: the European Stroke Council, the European Neurological Society and the European Federation of Neurological Societies. PMID:16926557

  10. Complications in Eyelid Surgery.

    PubMed

    Karimnejad, Kaveh; Walen, Scott

    2016-05-01

    Eyelid surgery consists of challenging reconstructive and cosmetic procedures. Because of the complex anatomy and corresponding vital functions of the upper and lower eyelids, the avoidance of eyelid complications is of vital importance. Complications after eyelid surgery include basic complications (infection, granuloma) and vision-threatening complications. Preoperative history, physical examination, surgical planning, and meticulous surgical technique must be undertaken to prevent complications after eyelid surgery. In addition, patient knowledge, expectations, and motivations must be determined before surgery is performed. PMID:27105805

  11. Genetic contribution to postpartum haemorrhage in Swedish population: cohort study of 466 686 births

    PubMed Central

    Hernandéz-Diaź, Sonia; Frisell, Thomas; Greene, Michael F; Almqvist, Catarina; Bateman, Brian T

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the familial clustering of postpartum haemorrhage in the Swedish population, and to quantify the relative contributions of genetic and environmental effects. Design Register based cohort study. Setting Swedish population (multi-generation and medical birth registers). Main outcome measure Postpartum haemorrhage, defined as >1000 mL estimated blood loss. Participants The first two live births to individuals in Sweden in 1997-2009 contributed to clusters representing intact couples (n=366 350 births), mothers with separate partners (n=53 292), fathers with separate partners (n=47 054), sister pairs (n=97 228), brother pairs (n=91 168), and mixed sibling pairs (n=177 944). Methods Familial clustering was quantified through cluster specific tetrachoric correlation coefficients, and the influence of potential sharing of known risk factors was evaluated with alternating logistic regression. Relative contributions of genetic and environmental effects to the variation in liability for postpartum haemorrhage were quantified with generalised linear mixed models. Results The overall prevalence of postpartum haemorrhage after vaginal deliveries in our sample was 4.6%. Among vaginal deliveries, 18% (95% confidence interval 9% to 26%) of the variation in postpartum haemorrhage liability was attributed to maternal genetic factors, 10% (1% to 19%) to unique maternal environment, and 11% (0% to 26%) to fetal genetic effects. Adjustment for known risk factors only partially explained estimates of familial clustering, suggesting that the observed shared genetic and environmental effects operate in part through pathways independent of known risk factors. There were similar patterns of familial clustering for both of the main subtypes examined (atony and retained placenta), though strongest for haemorrhage after retained placenta. Conclusions There is a maternal genetic predisposition to postpartum haemorrhage, but more than half of the total

  12. Neurological Complications of Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Block, H Steven

    2016-07-01

    Physiologic alterations during pregnancy create an environment for the occurrence of disease states that are either unique to pregnancy, occur more frequently in pregnancy, or require special management considerations that may be different from the nonpregnancy state. In the realm of cerebrovascular disease, preeclampsia, eclampsia, reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, sources of cardiogenic embolization including peripartum cardiomyopathy, cerebral venous thrombosis, pituitary apoplexy, subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, and special considerations for anticoagulation during pregnancy will be discussed. Management of epilepsy during pregnancy counterbalances maternal freedom from seizures against the potential for major, minor, cognitive, and behavioral fetal deformities. Teratogenic potential of the most common anticonvulsants are described. Considerations for anticonvulsant level monitoring during pregnancy are based upon differences in medication clearance in comparison to the prepregnancy state. The most common neuromuscular disorders of pregnancy are reviewed. PMID:27230113

  13. Subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by a fungal aneurysm of the vertebral artery as a complication of intracranial aneurysm clipping. Case report.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, W P; Pilz, P; Chuang, I H

    1990-12-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are an uncommon manifestation of fungal infection. A case is described in which the formation of an aneurysm followed an intracranial intraoperative Aspergillus infection attributable to a long period of preoperative antibiotic medication and immunosuppressive therapy with steroids. PMID:2230983

  14. Elevated Baseline C-Reactive Protein as a Predictor of Outcome After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Data From the Simvastatin in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage (STASH) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Budohoski, Karol; Smith, Christopher; Hutchinson, Peter J.; Kirkpatrick, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There remains a proportion of patients with unfavorable outcomes after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, of particular relevance in those who present with a good clinical grade. A forewarning of those at risk provides an opportunity towards more intensive monitoring, investigation, and prophylactic treatment prior to the clinical manifestation of advancing cerebral injury. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether biochemical markers sampled in the first days after the initial hemorrhage can predict poor outcome. METHODS: All patients recruited to the multicenter Simvastatin in Aneurysmal Hemorrhage Trial (STASH) were included. Baseline biochemical profiles were taken between time of ictus and day 4 post ictus. The t-test compared outcomes, and a backwards stepwise binary logistic regression was used to determine the factors providing independent prediction of an unfavorable outcome. RESULTS: Baseline biochemical data were obtained in approximately 91% of cases from 803 patients. On admission, 73% of patients were good grade (World Federation of Neurological Surgeons grades 1 or 2); however, 84% had a Fisher grade 3 or 4 on computed tomographic scan. For patients presenting with good grade on admission, higher levels of C-reactive protein, glucose, and white blood cells and lower levels of hematocrit, albumin, and hemoglobin were associated with poor outcome at discharge. C-reactive protein was found to be an independent predictor of outcome for patients presenting in good grade. CONCLUSION: Early recording of C-reactive protein may prove useful in detecting those good grade patients who are at greater risk of clinical deterioration and poor outcome. ABBREVIATIONS: ALP, alkaline phosphatase ALT, alanine aminotransferase CK, creatine kinase CRP, C-reactive protein EVD, external ventricular drainage ICH GCP, International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines for good clinical practice mRS, modified Rankin Scale SAH, subarachnoid hemorrhage STASH, Simvastatin in

  15. Central line complications

    PubMed Central

    Kornbau, Craig; Lee, Kathryn C; Hughes, Gwendolyn D; Firstenberg, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Central venous access is a common procedure performed in many clinical settings for a variety of indications. Central lines are not without risk, and there are a multitude of complications that are associated with their placement. Complications can present in an immediate or delayed fashion and vary based on type of central venous access. Significant morbidity and mortality can result from complications related to central venous access. These complications can cause a significant healthcare burden in cost, hospital days, and patient quality of life. Advances in imaging, access technique, and medical devices have reduced and altered the types of complications encountered in clinical practice; but most complications still center around vascular injury, infection, and misplacement. Recognition and management of central line complications is important when caring for patients with vascular access, but prevention is the ultimate goal. This article discusses common and rare complications associated with central venous access, as well as techniques to recognize, manage, and prevent complications. PMID:26557487

  16. Gastro-intestinal haemorrhage risks of selective serotonin receptor antagonist therapy: a new look

    PubMed Central

    Opatrny, Lucie; Delaney, J A ‘Chris’; Suissa, Samy

    2008-01-01

    AIMS (i) To determine the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and other classes of antidepressants on upper gastro-intestinal (GI) haemorrhage and (ii) to assess the drug–drug interaction effects of antidepressants and warfarin or clopidogrel on the risk of GI haemorrhage. METHODS This was a population-based case control study in the General Practice Research Database (GPRD). Cases with a first episode of upper GI haemorrhage between 2000 and 2005 were matched with up to 10 controls. Exposure to the study drugs was defined by a prescription issued in the 90 days before the index date. Rate ratios were estimated using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS Four thousand and twenty-eight cases of GI haemorrhage and 40 171 controls were identified. The excess risk of GI haemorrhage with SSRI use was small (Rate Ratio [RR]: 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1, 1.6) and null with exposure to tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) (RR 1.0; 95% CI: 0.8, 1.3). The risk of GI haemorrhage was highest with venlafaxine use (RR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.3, 2.6). There was no drug–drug interaction between warfarin anticoagulation and antidepressant use. CONCLUSIONS This study supports a small increased risk of upper GI haemorrhage with the use of SSRI antidepressants compared with the older TCA drugs, but to a lesser extent than previously reported due to confounding by alcohol use. The small elevation in risk of GI haemorrhage with SSRI and venlafaxine should be weighed against the therapeutic benefit of their use. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT The known biological effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) on platelets are consistent with an increased risk of gastrointestinal haemorrhage in patients on SSRI therapy.Previous research supports this increased risk among SSRI users with a large increase in bleeding risk observed. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS This large study was able to compare the effects of different classes of antidepressant as

  17. Tuberculous radiculomyelitis complicating tuberculous meningitis: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Albújar, S; Arribas, J R; Royo, A; González-García, J J; Peña, J M; Vázquez, J J

    2000-06-01

    Tuberculous radiculomyelitis (TBRM) is a complication of tuberculous meningitis (TBM), which has been reported rarely in the modern medical literature. We describe a case of TBRM that developed in an human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patient, despite prompt antituberculous treatment. To our knowledge, this is the second case of TBRM reported in an HIV-infected patient. We also review 74 previously reported cases of TBRM. TBRM develops at various periods after TBM, even in adequately treated patients after sterilization of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The most common symptoms are subacute paraparesis, radicular pain, bladder disturbance, and subsequent paralysis. CSF evaluation usually shows an active inflammatory response with a very high protein level. MRI and CT scan are critical for diagnosis, revealing loculation and obliteration of the subarachnoid space along with linear intradural enhancement. As in other forms of paradoxical reactions to antituberculous treatment, there is evidence that steroid treatment might have a beneficial effect. PMID:10854362

  18. Antecedents of periventricular haemorrhage in infants weighing 1250 g or less at birth.

    PubMed Central

    Szymonowicz, W; Yu, V Y; Wilson, F E

    1984-01-01

    Fifty infants who weighed 1250 g or less at birth were studied with serial real time cerebral ultrasound to evaluate the temporal relation of various perinatal factors to the onset and progression of periventricular haemorrhage (PVH). The significant antecedents of PVH were severe bruising at birth, low birthweight, short gestation, ratio of arterial oxygen pressure (PaO2) to fractional inspired oxygen (FiO2), and haematocrit on admission, hyaline membrane disease, assisted ventilation, pneumothorax, administration of tubocurarine, hypercapnia, hypoxaemia, and hypotension. Case control studies, in which infants with PVH at 26 weeks' and 28 weeks' gestation were compared with matched infants without PVH, confirmed that the antecedents identified were independent of gestational influences. A multivariate discriminant analysis for the antecedents of PVH showed that hyaline membrane disease, hypercapnia, and short gestation correctly classified presence or absence of PVH in 78% of the study group. A similar analysis comparing infants with germinal layer haemorrhage or intraventricular haemorrhage with those who developed intracerebral extension of haemorrhage showed that three factors found on admission (hypothermia, a low PaO2:FiO2 ratio, and severe bruising) combined to classify correctly 90% of the haemorrhages. Our data suggest that prevention of perinatal trauma and asphyxia as well as respiratory illness, especially hyaline membrane disease, and stabilisation of blood gas tensions, blood pressure, and haematocrit within the physiological range, are likely to be the most effective ways of preventing PVH in extremely preterm infants. PMID:6696488

  19. Central nervous system haemorrhage causing early death in acute promyelocytic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Borowska, Anna; Stelmaszczyk-Emmel, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) is a rare type of paediatric leukaemia characterised by a specific genetic mutation and life-threatening coagulopathy. The discovery of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which acts directly on promyelocytic locus-retinoic acid receptor α (PML-RARα) gene product, brought a revolution to the therapy of this disorder. Unfortunately, despite an improvement in the complete remission rate, the early death (ED) rate has not changed significantly, and the haemorrhages remain a major problem. The most common bleeding site, which accounts for about 65-80% of haemorrhages, is the central nervous system. Second in line are pulmonary haemorrhages (32%), while gastrointestinal bleedings are relatively rare. Haemorrhages result from thrombocytopaenia, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC), and systemic fibrinolysis. Herein we present a boy aged one year and nine months with APL. The patient was not eligible for ATRA administration due to poor clinical condition. He developed bleeding diathesis that presented as disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and led to intracranial haemorrhage, which resulted in the patient's death. PMID:26862315

  20. Haemorrhagic disease of the newborn in the British Isles: two year prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    McNinch, A W; Tripp, J H

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the incidence of haemorrhagic disease of the newborn in the British Isles, study risk factors, and examine the effect of vitamin K prophylaxis. DESIGN--Prospective survey of all possible cases of haemorrhagic disease of the newborn as reported by consultant paediatricians using the monthly notification cards of the British Paediatric Surveillance Unit and a follow up questionnaire for each case to validate the diagnosis and accrue further data. SETTING--Britain (England, Scotland, and Wales) and Ireland (Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic) during December 1987 to March 1990. PATIENTS--27 infants classified as having confirmed (n = 25) or probable (n = 2) haemorrhagic disease of the newborn. RESULTS--24 of the 27 infants were solely breast fed. 10 suffered intracranial haemorrhage; two of these died and there was clinical concern about the remainder. 20 infants had received no vitamin K prophylaxis, and seven had received oral prophylaxis. Relative risk ratios for these groups compared with babies who had received intramuscular vitamin K were 81:1 and 13:1 respectively. Six infants had hepatitis (alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency in four), unsuspected until presentation with haemorrhagic disease of the newborn, of whom four had received oral prophylaxis. One other baby had prolonged jaundice. One mother had taken phenytoin during pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS--All newborn infants should receive vitamin K prophylaxis. Intramuscular vitamin K is more effective than oral prophylactic regimens currently used in the British Isles. PMID:1747578

  1. Development and validation of the Essen Intracerebral Haemorrhage Score

    PubMed Central

    Weimar, C; Benemann, J; Diener, H‐C

    2006-01-01

    Background Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) accounts for the highest in‐hospital mortality of all stroke types. Nevertheless, outcome is favourable in about 30% of patients. Only one model for the prediction of favourable outcome has been validated so far. Objective To describe the development and validation of the Essen ICH score. Methods Inception cohorts were assessed on the National Institutes of Health stroke scale (NIH‐SS) on admission and after follow up of 100 days. On the basis of previously validated clinical variables, a simple clinical score was developed to predict mortality and complete recovery (Barthel index after 100 days ⩾95) in 340 patients with acute ICH. Subscores for age (<60 = 0; 60–69 = 1; 70–79 = 2; ⩾80 = 3), NIH‐SS level of consciousness (alert = 0; drowsy = 1; stuporose = 2; comatose = 3), and NIH‐SS total score (0–5 = 0; 6–10 = 1; 11–15 = 2; 16–20 = 3; >20 or coma = 4) were combined into a prognostic scale with <3 predicting complete recovery and >7 predicting death. The score was subsequently validated in an external cohort of 371 patients. Results The Essen ICH score showed a high prognostic accuracy for complete recovery and death in both the development and validation cohort. For prediction of complete recovery on the Barthel index after 100 days, the Essen ICH score was superior to the physicians' prognosis and to two previous prognostic scores developed for a slightly modified outcome. Conclusions The Essen ICH score provides an easy to use scale for outcome prediction following ICH. Its high positive predictive values for adverse outcomes and easy applicability render it useful for individual prognostic indications or the design of clinical studies. In contrast, physicians tended to predict outcome too pessimistically. PMID:16354736

  2. Massive haemorrhage in liver transplantation: Consequences, prediction and management

    PubMed Central

    Cleland, Stuart; Corredor, Carlos; Ye, Jia Jia; Srinivas, Coimbatore; McCluskey, Stuart A

    2016-01-01

    From its inception the success of liver transplantation has been associated with massive blood loss. Massive transfusion is classically defined as > 10 units of red blood cells within 24 h, but describing transfusion rates over a shorter period of time may reduce the potential for survival bias. Both massive haemorrhage and transfusion are associated with increased risk of mortality and morbidity (need for dialysis/surgical site infection) following liver transplantation although causality is difficult to prove due to the observational design of most trials. The blood loss associated with liver transplantation is multifactorial. Portal hypertension secondary to cirrhosis results in extensive collateral circulation, which can bleed during hepatectomy particular if portal pressures are increased. Avoiding volume loading and maintenance of a low central venous pressure together with the use of vasopressors have been shown to reduce blood loss and transfusion during liver transplantation, but may increase the risk of renal impairment post-operatively. Coagulation defects may be present pre-transplant, but haemostasis is often re-balanced due to a deficit in both pro- and anti-coagulation factors. Further derangement of haemostasis may develop in the anhepatic and neohepatic phases due to absent hepatic metabolic function, hyperfibrinolysis and platelet sequestration in the donor liver. Point-of-care tests of coagulation such as the viscoelastic tests rotation thromboelastometry/thromboelastometry allow and more accurate and rapid assessment of these derangements in coagulation and guide the use of factor replacement and antifibrinolytics. Transfusion protocols guided by these tests have been shown to reduce transfusion rates compared with conventional coagulation tests, but have not shown improvements in mortality or morbidity. Pre-operative factors associated with massive transfusion include previous surgery, re-do transplantation, the aetiology and severity of liver

  3. Massive haemorrhage in liver transplantation: Consequences, prediction and management.

    PubMed

    Cleland, Stuart; Corredor, Carlos; Ye, Jia Jia; Srinivas, Coimbatore; McCluskey, Stuart A

    2016-06-24

    From its inception the success of liver transplantation has been associated with massive blood loss. Massive transfusion is classically defined as > 10 units of red blood cells within 24 h, but describing transfusion rates over a shorter period of time may reduce the potential for survival bias. Both massive haemorrhage and transfusion are associated with increased risk of mortality and morbidity (need for dialysis/surgical site infection) following liver transplantation although causality is difficult to prove due to the observational design of most trials. The blood loss associated with liver transplantation is multifactorial. Portal hypertension secondary to cirrhosis results in extensive collateral circulation, which can bleed during hepatectomy particular if portal pressures are increased. Avoiding volume loading and maintenance of a low central venous pressure together with the use of vasopressors have been shown to reduce blood loss and transfusion during liver transplantation, but may increase the risk of renal impairment post-operatively. Coagulation defects may be present pre-transplant, but haemostasis is often re-balanced due to a deficit in both pro- and anti-coagulation factors. Further derangement of haemostasis may develop in the anhepatic and neohepatic phases due to absent hepatic metabolic function, hyperfibrinolysis and platelet sequestration in the donor liver. Point-of-care tests of coagulation such as the viscoelastic tests rotation thromboelastometry/thromboelastometry allow and more accurate and rapid assessment of these derangements in coagulation and guide the use of factor replacement and antifibrinolytics. Transfusion protocols guided by these tests have been shown to reduce transfusion rates compared with conventional coagulation tests, but have not shown improvements in mortality or morbidity. Pre-operative factors associated with massive transfusion include previous surgery, re-do transplantation, the aetiology and severity of liver

  4. Acute intracerebral haemorrhage: grounds for optimism in management.

    PubMed

    Delcourt, Candice; Anderson, Craig

    2012-12-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is one of the most devastating types of stroke, which has considerable disease burden in "non-white" ethnic groups where the population-attributable risks of elevated blood pressure are very high. Since the treatment of ICH remains largely supportive and expectant, nihilism and the early withdrawal of active therapy influence management decisions in clinical practice. However, approaches to management are now better defined on the basis of evidence that both survival and speed (and degree) of recovery are critically dependent on the location, size, and degree of expansion and extension into the intraventricular system of the haematoma of the ICH. Although no medical treatment has been shown to improve outcome in ICH, several promising avenues have emerged that include haemostatic therapy and intensive control of elevated blood pressure. Conversely, there is continued controversy over the role of evacuation of the haematoma of ICH via open craniotomy. Despite being an established practice for several decades, and having undergone evaluation in multiple randomised trials, there is uncertainty over which patients have the most to gain from an intervention with clear procedural risk. Minimally invasive surgery via local anaesthetic applied drill-puncture of the cranium and infusion of a thrombolytic agent is an attractive option for patients requiring critical management of the haematoma, not just in low resource settings but arguably also in specialist centres of western countries. With several ongoing clinical trials nearing completion, these treatments could enter routine practice within the next few years, further justifying the urgency of "time is brain" and that active management within well-organized, comprehensive acute stroke care units includes patients with ICH. PMID:23088860

  5. Trans aqueductal, third ventricle – Cervical subarachnoid stenting: An adjuvant cerebro spinal fluid diversion procedure in midline posterior fossa tumors with hydrocephalus: The technical note and case series

    PubMed Central

    Teegala, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Persistent or progressive hydrocephalus is one of the complex problems of posterior fossa tumors associated with hydrocephalus. The author evaluated the effectiveness of single-stage tumor decompression associated with a stent technique (trans aqueductal third ventricle – Cervical subarachnoid stenting) as an adjuvant cerebro spinal fluid (CSF) diversion procedure in controlling the midline posterior fossa tumors with hydrocephalus. Materials and Methods: Prospective clinical case series of 15 patients was evaluated from July 2006 to April 2012. Fifteen clinicoradiological diagnosed cases of midline posterior fossa tumors with hydrocephalus were included in this study. All the tumors were approached through the cerebello medullary (telo velo tonsilar) fissure technique. Following the excision of the posterior fossa tumor, a sizable stent was placed across the aqueduct from the third ventricle to the cervical subarachnoid space. Results: There were nine male and six female patients with an average age of 23 years. Complete tumor excision could be achieved in 12 patients and subtotal excision with clearance of aqueduct in remaining three patients. Hydrocephalus was controlled effectively in all the patients. There were no stent-related complications. Conclusions: This study showed the reliability of single-stage tumor excision followed by placement of aqueductal stent. The success rate of this technique is comparable to those of conventional CSF diversion procedures. This is a simple, safe, and effective procedure for the management of persistent and or progressive hydrocephalus. This technique may be very useful in situations where the patient's follow-up is compromised and the patients who are from a poor economic background. Long-term results need further evaluation to assess the overall functioning of this stent technique. PMID:27366254

  6. Transient ST elevation and left ventricular asynergy associated with normal coronary artery and Tc-99m PYP Myocardial Infarct Scan in subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chang, P C; Lee, S H; Hung, H F; Kaun, P; Cheng, J J

    1998-01-31

    A 72-year-old woman who presented with transient electrocardiographic ST segment elevation and left ventricular asynergy in an acute phase of subarachnoid hemorrhage was found to have normal coronary angiogram and normal Tc-99m PYP myocardial infarct scan. These findings suggested that noninvasive Tc-99m PYP myocardial infarct scan could substitute coronary angiogram for differentiating wall motion and electrocardiographic abnormalities secondary to subarachnoid hemorrhage from those caused by coronary artery disease in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:9510495

  7. Monotherapy with stenting in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) after middle cerebral artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Puri, Ajit S; Gounis, Matthew J; Massari, Francesco; Howk, Mary; Weaver, John; Wakhloo, Ajay K

    2016-04-01

    Isolated middle cerebral artery dissection is a rare clinical entity, with descriptions limited to a few case reports and case series. Symptomatic dissection in the anterior circulation can present as an ischemic stroke in a young population; however, it is rarely associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage. We describe a young patient who presented with acute headache from a subarachnoid hemorrhage that was ultimately determined to be due to a vascular dissection in the middle cerebral artery. The initial angiogram showed vascular irregularities in this area with stenosis. Repeat imaging 4 days after presentation identified a pseudoaneurysm proximal to the stenosis. The patient was successfully treated with a self-expanding nitinol stent and followed up with serial angiography during postoperative recovery in the hospital; additional angiograms were performed approximately 1 and 6 months after treatment. Serial angiograms demonstrated incremental healing of the dissection. The patient was discharged and remains neurologically intact at the 6-month follow-up. PMID:25854687

  8. Effect of anatomical fine structure on the flow of cerebrospinal fluid in the spinal subarachnoid space.

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, Harlan Wheelock

    2005-01-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method is used to model oscillatory flow in the spinal subarachnoid space. The effect of obstacles such as trabeculae, nerve bundles, and ligaments on fluid velocity profiles appears to be small, when the flow is averaged over the length of a vertebra. Averaged fluid flow in complex models is little different from flow in corresponding elliptical annular cavities. However, the obstacles stir the flow locally and may be more significant in studies of tracer dispersion.

  9. Temporary trigeminal disorder as a result of pneumocephalus after subarachnoid block.

    PubMed

    Cosío, F; Bermejo-Alvarez, M A; Fervienza, P; Jiménez, L J; Castañón, E; Díaz, M L

    2003-09-01

    A patient was scheduled for inguinal herniorrhaphy under subarachnoid block. Lumbar puncture was difficult and several attempts were needed before it could be achieved. During the immediate postoperative period, the patient developed paraesthesia and anaesthesia on the right side of the face, mostly in the nose, cheek and upper lip areas. A CT scan showed a small pneumocephalus at the level of the brainstem. The symptoms persisted for approximately 70 min, after which they disappeared. PMID:12925487

  10. Chickenpox (Varicella) Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Varicella Complications . Serious complications from chickenpox include bacterial infections of the skin and soft tissues in children including Group A streptococcal infections pneumonia infection or inflammation of the brain (encephalitis, cerebellar ...

  11. Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders Go Back Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders Email Print + Share The kidneys filter the ... but some less serious ones occur more frequently. Kidney stones These are probably the most commonly encountered ...

  12. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  13. Pregnancy Complications: Preexisting Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Preexisting diabetes Preexisting diabetes E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... and your baby are healthy. What is preexisting diabetes? About 9 out of 100 women (9 percent) ...

  14. Diagnostic yield and accuracy of CT angiography, MR angiography, and digital subtraction angiography for detection of macrovascular causes of intracerebral haemorrhage: prospective, multicentre cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Velthuis, Birgitta K; Rinkel, Gabriël J E; Algra, Ale; de Kort, Gérard A P; Witkamp, Theo D; de Ridder, Johanna C M; van Nieuwenhuizen, Koen M; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik; Schonewille, Wouter J; de Kort, Paul L M; Dippel, Diederik W; Raaymakers, Theodora W M; Hofmeijer, Jeannette; Wermer, Marieke J H; Kerkhoff, Henk; Jellema, Korné; Bronner, Irene M; Remmers, Michel J M; Bienfait, Henri Paul; Witjes, Ron J G M; Greving, Jacoba P; Klijn, Catharina J M

    2015-01-01

    Study question What are the diagnostic yield and accuracy of early computed tomography (CT) angiography followed by magnetic resonance imaging/angiography (MRI/MRA) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in patients with non-traumatic intracerebral haemorrhage? Methods This prospective diagnostic study enrolled 298 adults (18-70 years) treated in 22 hospitals in the Netherlands over six years. CT angiography was performed within seven days of haemorrhage. If the result was negative, MRI/MRA was performed four to eight weeks later. DSA was performed when the CT angiography or MRI/MRA results were inconclusive or negative. The main outcome was a macrovascular cause, including arteriovenous malformation, aneurysm, dural arteriovenous fistula, and cavernoma. Three blinded neuroradiologists independently evaluated the images for macrovascular causes of haemorrhage. The reference standard was the best available evidence from all findings during one year’s follow-up. Study answer and limitations A macrovascular cause was identified in 69 patients (23%). 291 patients (98%) underwent CT angiography; 214 with a negative result underwent additional MRI/MRA and 97 with a negative result for both CT angiography and MRI/MRA underwent DSA. Early CT angiography detected 51 macrovascular causes (yield 17%, 95% confidence interval 13% to 22%). CT angiography with MRI/MRA identified two additional macrovascular causes (18%, 14% to 23%) and these modalities combined with DSA another 15 (23%, 18% to 28%). This last extensive strategy failed to detect a cavernoma, which was identified on MRI during follow-up (reference strategy). The positive predictive value of CT angiography was 72% (60% to 82%), of additional MRI/MRA was 35% (14% to 62%), and of additional DSA was 100% (75% to 100%). None of the patients experienced complications with CT angiography or MRI/MRA; 0.6% of patients who underwent DSA experienced permanent sequelae. Not all patients with negative CT angiography and

  15. Leptospirosis among the self-supporting convicts of Andaman Island during the 1920s - the first report on pulmonary haemorrhage in leptospirosis?

    PubMed Central

    Vijayachari, P.; Sugunan, A.P.; Singh, S.S.; Mathur, P.P.

    2015-01-01

    Several researchers had carried out investigations on the possibility of existence of Weil's disease in Andaman Islands during early 20th century. The first report of a series of confirmed cases of leptospirosis that occurred during1929 was published in 1931. There were several reports during 1995 to 2009 that described detailed account of leptospirosis including various clinical syndromes. The possibility of pulmonary involvement in leptospirosis being a manifestation historically overlooked rather than newly emerged during the past two decades is examined in this review in the context of Andaman Islands. Two case series of leptospirosis, one occurred in 1929 and the other in 1996-1997 were reviewed with special emphasis on pulmonary involvement and haemorrhagic manifestations. The similarities and differences in the clinical profile of patients of the two case series were analysed. The review shows that respiratory system involvement and pulmonary haemorrhage as evidenced by presence of haemoptysis as a complication of leptospirosis was occurring during 1920s in Andaman Islands. The incidence of pulmonary involvement, however, rose from 9.4 per cent during 1929 to 52 per cent in 1996-1997. The case fatality ratio in patients with pulmonary involvement, which was 50 per cent during 1929 and 42.9 per cent during 1996-1997, was higher than that in cases without pulmonary involvement. Fever, conjunctival congestion, jaundice, vomiting, diarrhoea, hepatomagaly, haemoptysis, haematemesis and subconjunctival haemorrhage were common in both series. The case series in Andaman Islands in 1929 was probably the first report of pulmonary haemorrhage as a manifestation of leptospirosis. The increase in the incidence of pulmonary involvement in leptospirosis in the recent past is probably due to the increase in the density and diversityof its animal vectors, the broadening of the range of circulating serovars and the interactions between the vector and the agent. An increased

  16. Early treatment of acute submacular haemorrhage secondary to wet AMD using intravitreal tissue plasminogen activator, C3F8, and an anti-VEGF agent.

    PubMed

    de Silva, S R; Bindra, M S

    2016-07-01

    PurposeAcute submacular haemorrhage secondary to wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has a poor prognosis for which there is currently no 'gold standard' treatment. We evaluated the efficacy of early treatment using intravitreal triple therapy of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), expansile gas, and an anti-VEGF agent.MethodsThis retrospective case series included eight patients presenting with acute submacular haemorrhage involving the fovea. All patients received treatment with 50 μg (0.05 ml) tPA, 0.3 ml 100% perfluoropropane (C3F8), and an anti-VEGF agent (0.05 mg Ranibizumab or 1.25 mg Bevacizumab in 0.05 ml) administered via intravitreal injection. An anterior chamber paracentesis post injection or vitreous tap was performed before injection to prevent retinal vascular occlusion secondary to raised intra-ocular pressure. Outcomes assessed were visual acuity, change in macular morphology, and complications.ResultsPatients presented promptly with delay between symptom onset and clinic review being 1.9±0.6 days (mean±SD). Treatment was delivered quickly with interval from presentation to treatment being 1.1±1.2 days. Symptom onset to treatment was 3.0±1.0 days. Subfoveal haemorrhage was effectively displaced in all patients. LogMAR visual acuity improved from 1.67±0.47 at presentation to 0.63±0.33 at final follow-up (P<0.0001), a mean of 7.9±4.8 months after treatment. Central retinal thickness improved from 658.1±174.2 μm at presentation to 316.6±142.4 μm at final follow-up (P=0.0028).ConclusionsEarly treatment of submacular haemorrhage using intravitreal tPA, C3F8, and anti-VEGF was effective in significantly improving visual acuity in this series of patients who presented soon after symptom onset. Treatment was well tolerated in this group of elderly and potentially frail patients. PMID:27080482

  17. Hair implant complications.

    PubMed

    Hanke, C W; Norins, A L; Pantzer, J G; Bennett, J E

    1981-04-01

    Four men who underwent hair implantation for pattern baldness were treated for complications such as infection, foreign-body reaction, pruritus, and scarring. The complications were similar to those reported with synthetic modacrylic fiber implants that have been used for the same purpose. Although we believe this is the first article to report complications from hair implants, the illogical basis of the procedure suggests that complications will occur in many unsuspecting patients who undergo hair implantation. PMID:7009899

  18. ECMO Rescue Therapy in Diffuse Alveolar Haemorrhage: A Case Report with Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Gautam; Kumar, Raj; Yadav, Sankalp

    2016-06-01

    Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) has evolved as a treatment option for patients having potentially reversible severe respiratory failure who are deteriorating on conventional ventilation. During ECMO, systemic anticoagulation is needed to maintain patency of the circuit. Therefore, ongoing haemorrhage remains a relative contra-indication to ECMO as it can further increase the bleeding. There is only limited evidence available for the use of ECMO in patients with alveolar haemorrhage. Most of these patients did not receive any anticoagulation during ECMO. We describe our experience with a patient who received intravenous anticoagulation during ECMO for refractory hypoxemic respiratory failure due to Diffuse Alveolar Haemorrhage (DAH) associated with Granulomatosis polyangitis (Wegner's GPA). ECMO sustained life by maintaining gas exchange support and provided the time for the immunotherapy to be effective. We report the successful use of anticoagulation during ECMO in a patient with DAH. PMID:27504336

  19. Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia Presenting as Bilateral Retinal Haemorrhages with Multiple Retinal Infiltrates

    PubMed Central

    Barot, Rakesh K.; Gohel, Devadatta Jayantilal; Bhagat, Nupur

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia (CML) causes retinopathy manifesting as venous dilation and tortuosity, perivascular sheathing, retinal haemorrhages, microaneurysms, cotton-wool spots and optic nerve infiltration. Retina is the most commonly involved intraocular structure in CML. However, retinal involvement is a rare form of presentation of CML and few cases have been reported. We report a case of CML presenting as unilateral sudden visual loss. Fundus showed multiple white centered retinal haemorrhages in both eyes with unilateral macular oedema. Blood work-up showed raised WBC count, high platelet count and low Haemoglobin. Cytological analysis of bone marrow biopsy confirmed Philadelphia chromosome. After a course of Imatinib, visual acuity improved and haemorrhages resolved with normalization of macular thickness. In our case, patient presented early, leading to early detection producing better visual prognosis. This highlights the importance of detailed hematological work up in patients with retinal involvement to rule out leukaemic retinopathy.

  20. Mosquito-borne haemorrhagic fevers of South and South-East Asia.

    PubMed

    Halstead, S B

    1966-01-01

    During the past decade outbreaks of a severe haemorrhagic disease caused by dengue viruses of multiple types have been reported in the Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia, Viet-Nam and eastern India. In many of these outbreaks chikungunya virus, a group A arbovirus, was simultaneously the cause of similar but probably milder disease. Both these viruses appear to be able to be able to produce classical dengue fever in some individuals and disease with haemorrhagic manifestations in others. Because of the growing public health importance and the progressive spread of this disease a unified review of its clinical and epidemiological features has been needed. This paper presents the history and salient clinical features of mosquito-borne haemorrhagic fever and summarizes recent epidemiological studies and current diagnostic and control methods. PMID:5297536

  1. Dating of Acute and Subacute Subdural Haemorrhage: A Histo-Pathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Murali G; Vashista, Rakesh Kumar; Sharma, Suresh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Microscopic study of the organization of the Subdural Haemorrhage (SDH) verified against the time period can help us in the determination of its age which has serious medico-legal implications. Very few studies concerning the dating of SDH are present in the literature. Aim This study was conducted for dating the early subdural haemorrhage by routine histopathological stains. Materials and Methods A prospective analytical study was conducted during July 2009 to December 2010. A total of 100 cases (50 males and 50 females) fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in this study. Routine histopathological staining of the subdural haematoma was done. Results Correlation between the frequency of a given histomorphological phenomenon and the length of the Post-Traumatic Interval (PTI) was evidential. All the histomorphological features, when correlated with PTI groups, were found to be statistically significant, except for Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes (PMN). Conclusion We concluded that routine histopathology was reliable in the dating of early subdural haemorrhages.

  2. Mosquito-borne haemorrhagic fevers of South and South-East Asia*

    PubMed Central

    Halstead, Scott B.

    1966-01-01

    During the past decade outbreaks of a severe haemorrhagic disease caused by dengue viruses of multiple types have been reported in the Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia, Viet-Nam and eastern India. In many of these outbreaks chikungunya virus, a group A arbovirus, was simultaneously the cause of similar but probably milder disease. Both these viruses appear to be able to be able to produce classical dengue fever in some individuals and disease with haemorrhagic manifestations in others. Because of the growing public health importance and the progressive spread of this disease a unified review of its clinical and epidemiological features has been needed. This paper presents the history and salient clinical features of mosquito-borne haemorrhagic fever and summarizes recent epidemiological studies and current diagnostic and control methods. ImagesFIG. 4 PMID:5297536

  3. ECMO Rescue Therapy in Diffuse Alveolar Haemorrhage: A Case Report with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raj; Yadav, Sankalp

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) has evolved as a treatment option for patients having potentially reversible severe respiratory failure who are deteriorating on conventional ventilation. During ECMO, systemic anticoagulation is needed to maintain patency of the circuit. Therefore, ongoing haemorrhage remains a relative contra-indication to ECMO as it can further increase the bleeding. There is only limited evidence available for the use of ECMO in patients with alveolar haemorrhage. Most of these patients did not receive any anticoagulation during ECMO. We describe our experience with a patient who received intravenous anticoagulation during ECMO for refractory hypoxemic respiratory failure due to Diffuse Alveolar Haemorrhage (DAH) associated with Granulomatosis polyangitis (Wegner’s GPA). ECMO sustained life by maintaining gas exchange support and provided the time for the immunotherapy to be effective. We report the successful use of anticoagulation during ECMO in a patient with DAH.

  4. Spontaneous idiopathic bilateral adrenal haemorrhage: a rare cause of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Salik; Sivarajah, Surendra; Fiscus, Valena; York, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a 62-year-old woman with a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease who presented to the emergency department with left lower quadrant abdominal pain, flank pain with nausea and no history of preceding trauma. The patient had finished a course of azithromycin and oral methylprednisolone 1 day prior to presentation. Abdominal and pelvic CT scan identified changes suggestive of bilateral adrenal haemorrhage. The patient did not show signs of acute adrenal insufficiency but was started on steroid replacement therapy because of concerns about possible disease progression. All recognised causes of adrenal haemorrhage were excluded suggesting this was a case of spontaneous idiopathic bilateral adrenal haemorrhage, a rarely reported phenomenon in the literature. The patient was discharged after clinical improvement following 6 days in hospital, taking oral steroid replacement. PMID:27166002

  5. Complications of skin biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Abhishek, Kumar; Khunger, Niti

    2015-01-01

    Skin biopsy is the most commonly performed procedure by the dermatologist. Though it is a safe and easy procedure yet complications may arise. Post operative complications like wound infection and bleeding may occur. It is essential to keep the potential complications of skin biopsy in mind and be meticulous in the technique, for better patient outcomes. PMID:26865792

  6. Acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in west of Scotland: case ascertainment study.

    PubMed Central

    Blatchford, O.; Davidson, L. A.; Murray, W. R.; Blatchford, M.; Pell, J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence and case fatality of acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in the west of Scotland and to identify associated factors. DESIGN: Case ascertainment study. SETTING: All hospitals treating adults with acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in the west of Scotland. SUBJECTS: 1882 patients aged 15 years and over treated in hospitals for acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage during a six month period. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incidence of acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage per 100,000 population per year, and case fatality. RESULTS: The annual incidence was 172 per 100,000 people aged 15 and over. The annual population mortality was 14.0 per 100,000. Both were higher among elderly people, men, and patients resident in areas of greater social deprivation. Overall case fatality was 8.2%. This was higher among those who bled as inpatients after admission for other reasons (42%) and those admitted as tertiary referrals (16%). Factors associated with increased case fatality were age, uraemia, pre-existing malignancy, hepatic failure, hypotension, cardiac failure, and frank haematemesis or a history of syncope at presentation. Social deprivation, sex, and anaemia were not associated with increased case fatality after adjustment for other factors. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage was 67% greater than the highest previously reported incidence in the United Kingdom, which may be partially attributable to the greater social deprivation in the west of Scotland and may be related to the increased prevalence of Helicobacter pylori. Fatality after acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage was associated with age, comorbidity, hypotension, and raised blood urea concentrations on admission. Although deprivation was associated with increased incidence, it was not related to the risk of fatality. PMID:9329304

  7. Novel bivalent vectored vaccine for control of myxomatosis and rabbit haemorrhagic disease.

    PubMed

    Spibey, N; McCabe, V J; Greenwood, N M; Jack, S C; Sutton, D; van der Waart, L

    2012-03-24

    A novel, recombinant myxoma virus-rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) vaccine has been developed for the prevention of myxomatosis and rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD). A number of laboratory studies are described illustrating the safety and efficacy of the vaccine following subcutaneous administration in laboratory rabbits from four weeks of age onwards. In these studies, both vaccinated and unvaccinated control rabbits were challenged using pathogenic strains of RHD and myxoma viruses, and 100 per cent of the vaccinated rabbits were protected against both myxomatosis and RHD. PMID:22266680

  8. Complications of Strabismus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Olitsky, Scott E.; Coats, David K.

    2015-01-01

    All surgeries carry risks of complications, and there is no way to avoid ever having a complication. Strabismus surgery is no different in this regard. There are methods to reduce the risk of a complication during or after surgery, and these steps should always be taken. When a complication occurs, it is important to first recognize it and then manage it appropriately to allow for the best outcome possible. This article will discuss some of the more common and/or most devastating complications that can occur during or after strabismus surgery as well as thoughts on how to avoid them and manage them should they happen. PMID:26180463

  9. Use of cervical spinal cord stimulation in treatment and prevention of arterial vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Technical details.

    PubMed

    Slavin, K V; Vannemreddy, P S S V; Goellner, E; Alaraj, A M; Aydin, S; Eboli, P; Mlinarevich, N; Watson, K S; Walters, L E; Amin-Hanjani, S; Deveshwar, R; Aletich, V; Charbel, F T

    2011-03-29

    Based on past laboratory and anecdotal clinical experience, we hypothesized that prolonged cervical spinal cord stimulation (SCS) in the acute settings of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) would be both safe and feasible, and that 2-week stimulation will reduce incidence of cerebral arterial vasospasm. The goal of our clinical study was to establish feasibility and safety of cervical SCS in a small group of selected aSAH patients. Single-arm non-randomized prospective study of cSCS in aSAH patients involved percutaneous implantation of 8-contact electrode in 12 consecutive aSAH patients that satisfied strict inclusion criteria. The electrode insertion was performed immediately upon surgical or endovascular securing of the ruptured aneurysm while the patient was still under general anesthesia. Patients were stimulated for 14 consecutive days or until discharge. There were no complications related to the electrode insertion or to SCS during the study and no long-term side effects of SCS during 1-year follow-up. There was 1 unrelated death and two electrode pullouts. This article summarizes technical details of SCS electrode insertion and the stimulation parameters used in the research study. Our study of SCS for prevention of vasospasm after aSAH conclusively shows both safety and feasibility of this promising treatment approach. Despite high level of acuity in aSAH patients, impaired level of consciousness, frequent patient re-positioning, need in multiple tests and variety of monitors, SCS electrodes may be safely implanted and maintained for the two-week period. Long-term follow up shows no adverse effects of cervical SCS in this patient category. PMID:24059581

  10. Severe rectal haemorrhage after treatment for faecal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Taggarshe, Deepa; Visco, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Bulking agent injected submucosally is an alternative effective treatment for faecal incontinence in elderly patients who fail conservative measures. Since most elderly patients are on antiplatelet therapy and are sometimes unaware of their medication, this can lead to serious complications. PMID:25180215

  11. Imaging of the neurological complications of infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Kim, S J; Lee, J Y; Kim, T H; Kim, S C; Choi, Y H; Pai, H; Choi, W S

    1998-02-01

    We describe the findings on CT or MRI in five patients with neurological symptoms and underlying infective endocarditis (IE). We noted the size, number, and distribution of lesions, the presence or absence of haemorrhage, and contrast enhancement patterns. The number of lesions ranged from 4 to more than 10 in each patient. Their size varied from punctate to 6 cm; they were distributed throughout the brain. The lesions could be categorized into four patterns based on imaging features. A cortical infarct pattern was seen in all patients. Patchy lesions, which did not enhance, were found in the white matter or basal ganglia in three. Isolated, tiny, nodular or ring-enhancing white matter lesions were seen in three patients, and parenchymal haemorrhages in four. In addition to the occurrence of multiple lesions with various patterns in the same patient, isolated, tiny, enhancing lesions in the white matter seemed to be valuable features which could help to differentiate the neurological complications of IE from other thromboembolic infarcts. PMID:9541921

  12. Delayed postpartum haemorrhage secondary to a ruptured uterine artery pseudo-aneurysm, successfully treated by transarterial embolisation

    PubMed Central

    Moatti, Zoe; Nisner, Tamar; Saini, Ashish; Karoshi, Mahantesh

    2011-01-01

    A 29-year-old woman (gravida 1, para 1) had an uneventful first pregnancy and a delivery by emergency caesarean section at term. The caesarean section was complicated by a massive obstetric haemorrhage of 5000 ml. After closure, an immediate re-laparotomy was indicated due to heavy vaginal bleeding. The site of bleeding was identified as an extension of the uterine incision, and was sutured. She was stabilised by transfusion of blood and blood products in the intensive therapy unit, and discharged 5 days later. The patient was re-admitted 6 weeks later with brisk, painless vaginal bleeding, passing large clots from a well-contracted uterus. Her haemoglobin decreased from 11.8 to 7.8 g/dl overnight. In view of her history, an urgent CT angiogram was performed, which revealed the presence of a pseudo-aneurysm arising from the left uterine artery. This was successfully occluded by transarterial embolisation, obviating the need for further surgical exploration. PMID:22674937

  13. Delayed postpartum haemorrhage secondary to a ruptured uterine artery pseudo-aneurysm, successfully treated by transarterial embolisation.

    PubMed

    Moatti, Zoe; Nisner, Tamar; Saini, Ashish; Karoshi, Mahantesh

    2011-01-01

    A 29-year-old woman (gravida 1, para 1) had an uneventful first pregnancy and a delivery by emergency caesarean section at term. The caesarean section was complicated by a massive obstetric haemorrhage of 5000 ml. After closure, an immediate re-laparotomy was indicated due to heavy vaginal bleeding. The site of bleeding was identified as an extension of the uterine incision, and was sutured. She was stabilised by transfusion of blood and blood products in the intensive therapy unit, and discharged 5 days later. The patient was re-admitted 6 weeks later with brisk, painless vaginal bleeding, passing large clots from a well-contracted uterus. Her haemoglobin decreased from 11.8 to 7.8 g/dl overnight. In view of her history, an urgent CT angiogram was performed, which revealed the presence of a pseudo-aneurysm arising from the left uterine artery. This was successfully occluded by transarterial embolisation, obviating the need for further surgical exploration. PMID:22674937

  14. Infrequent Hemorrhagic Complications Following Surgical Drainage of Chronic Subdural Hematomas

    PubMed Central

    Sangiorgi, Simone; Bifone, Lidia; Balbi, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas mainly occur amongst elderly people and usually develop after minor head injuries. In younger patients, subdural collections may be related to hypertension, coagulopathies, vascular abnormalities, and substance abuse. Different techniques can be used for the surgical treatment of symptomatic chronic subdural hematomas : single or double burr-hole evacuation, with or without subdural drainage, twist-drill craniostomies and classical craniotomies. Failure of the brain to re-expand, pneumocephalus, incomplete evacuation, and recurrence of the fluid collection are common complications following these procedures. Acute subdural hematomas may also occur. Rarely reported hemorrhagic complications include subarachnoid, intracerebral, intraventricular, and remote cerebellar hemorrhages. The causes of such uncommon complications are difficult to explain and remain poorly understood. Overdrainage and intracranial hypotension, rapid brain decompression and shift of the intracranial contents, cerebrospinal fluid loss, vascular dysregulation and impairment of venous outflow are the main mechanisms discussed in the literature. In this article we report three cases of different post-operative intracranial bleeding and review the related literature. PMID:26113968

  15. Infrequent Hemorrhagic Complications Following Surgical Drainage of Chronic Subdural Hematomas.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, Angelo; Sangiorgi, Simone; Bifone, Lidia; Balbi, Sergio

    2015-05-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas mainly occur amongst elderly people and usually develop after minor head injuries. In younger patients, subdural collections may be related to hypertension, coagulopathies, vascular abnormalities, and substance abuse. Different techniques can be used for the surgical treatment of symptomatic chronic subdural hematomas : single or double burr-hole evacuation, with or without subdural drainage, twist-drill craniostomies and classical craniotomies. Failure of the brain to re-expand, pneumocephalus, incomplete evacuation, and recurrence of the fluid collection are common complications following these procedures. Acute subdural hematomas may also occur. Rarely reported hemorrhagic complications include subarachnoid, intracerebral, intraventricular, and remote cerebellar hemorrhages. The causes of such uncommon complications are difficult to explain and remain poorly understood. Overdrainage and intracranial hypotension, rapid brain decompression and shift of the intracranial contents, cerebrospinal fluid loss, vascular dysregulation and impairment of venous outflow are the main mechanisms discussed in the literature. In this article we report three cases of different post-operative intracranial bleeding and review the related literature. PMID:26113968

  16. Fetal intracranial haemorrhages caused by fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: an observational cohort study of 43 cases from an international multicentre registry

    PubMed Central

    Tiller, Heidi; Kamphuis, Marije M; Flodmark, Olof; Papadogiannakis, Nikos; David, Anna L; Sainio, Susanna; Koskinen, Sinikka; Javela, Kaija; Wikman, Agneta Taune; Kekomaki, Riitta; Kanhai, Humphrey H H; Oepkes, Dick; Husebekk, Anne; Westgren, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Objective To characterise pregnancies where the fetus or neonate was diagnosed with fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) and suffered from intracranial haemorrhage (ICH), with special focus on time of bleeding onset. Design Observational cohort study of all recorded cases of ICH caused by FNAIT from the international No IntraCranial Haemorrhage (NOICH) registry during the period 2001–2010. Setting 13 tertiary referral centres from nine countries across the world. Participants 37 mothers and 43 children of FNAIT pregnancies complicated by fetal or neonatal ICH identified from the NOICH registry was included if FNAIT diagnosis and ICH was confirmed. Primary and secondary outcome measures Gestational age at onset of ICH, type of ICH and clinical outcome of ICH were the primary outcome measures. General maternal and neonatal characteristics of pregnancies complicated by fetal/neonatal ICH were secondary outcome measures. Results From a total of 592 FNAIT cases in the registry, 43 confirmed cases of ICH due to FNAIT were included in the study. The majority of bleedings (23/43, 54%) occurred before 28 gestational weeks and often affected the first born child (27/43, 63%). One-third (35%) of the children died within 4 days after delivery. 23 (53%) children survived with severe neurological disabilities and only 5 (12%) were alive and well at time of discharge. Antenatal treatment was not given in most (91%) cases of fetal/neonatal ICH. Conclusions ICH caused by FNAIT often occurs during second trimester and the clinical outcome is poor. In order to prevent ICH caused by FNAIT, at-risk pregnancies must be identified and prevention and/or interventions should start early in the second trimester. PMID:23524102

  17. [Anesthesia in the pleuropulmonary complications surgery of tuberculosis: a 79 cases study].

    PubMed

    Kane, O; Diouf, E; Beye, M D; Diarra, O; Ndoye Diop, M; Diouf, M; Ndiaye, M; Ka Sall, B

    2003-01-01

    Reported is a retrospective study carried out from Aristide Le Dantec Hospital in patients who underwent pleuropulmonary surgery after tuberculosis complication, from June 1995 to June 1999. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anaesthesiology procedures and outcomes of tuberculosis pleuropulmonary complications surgery. Seventy nine patients were studied. Their mean age was 34.63 years, and the sex ratio was 3.14. They all underwent general anaesthesia procedures with barbituric, morphinics et myorelaxants drugs. The peroperative complications noted were distributed as follow: 50 cases of haemorrhage needing transfusion, 18 cases of hypotension associated to the anaesthesia. In the intensive care period, we have noticed 30 atelectasia cases associated to a spastic bronchopathy, 3 cases of pulmonary oedema and 1 case of pulmonary infarctus. In the postoperative period, 8 cases of hemodynamic instability occurred, including 5 cases of cardiovascular collapsus treated by filling, and 2 septic shocks cases. An infectious bronchopneumopathy was noticed on 11 patients with two cases of septicaemia. The mortality rate was 6.3% (5 cases of death). The pleuropulmonary surgery in tuberculosis complication is very haemorrhagic, and therefore require an adequate preoperative preparation. PMID:15776622

  18. Complicated Perianal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Abhishek; Yadav, Amitabh; Mehta, Naimish; Varma, Vibha; Kumaran, Vinay; Nundy, Samiran

    2015-12-01

    Management of benign anorectal conditions like abscesses and haemorrhoids is usually uneventful. However, complicated perianal complications can result and have sparsely been reported in literature. Hereby, we report a series of seven patients who presented with rare sequelae like necrotising fasciitis, intraperitoneal or retroperitoneal involvement. All patients responded well to surgical management. Accordingly, complicated perianal sepsis warrants a timely and aggressive surgical intervention. PMID:27011454

  19. Facial Filler Complications.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Julie; Khan, Tanya; Martin, John

    2015-11-01

    The use of facial fillers has greatly expanded over the past several years. Along with increased use comes a rise in documented complications, ranging from poor cosmetic result to nodules, granulomas, necrosis, and blindness. Awareness of the potential types of complications and options for management, in addition to the underlying facial anatomy, are imperative to delivering the best patient care. This article defines the complications and how to treat them and provides suggestions to avoid serious adverse outcomes. PMID:26505541

  20. Computational Intelligence Method for Early Diagnosis Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever Using Fuzzy on Mobile Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Afan; Lina, Yen; Simon, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Mortality from Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (DHF) is still increasing in Indonesia particularly in Jakarta. Diagnosis of the dengue shall be made as early as possible so that first aid can be given in expectation of decreasing death risk. The Study will be conducted by developing expert system based on Computational Intelligence Method. On the first year, study will use the Fuzzy Inference System (FIS) Method to diagnose Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever particularly in Mobile Device consist of smart phone. Expert system application which particularly using fuzzy system can be applied in mobile device and it is useful to make early diagnosis of Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever that produce outcome faster than laboratory test. The evaluation of this application is conducted by performing accuracy test before and after validation using data of patient who has the Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever. This expert system application is easy, convenient, and practical to use, also capable of making the early diagnosis of Dengue Haemorraghic to avoid mortality in the first stage.

  1. Acute haemorrhagic leucoencephalitis localised to the brainstem and cerebellum: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, Jean; Helle, Todd L

    1982-01-01

    Two cases of acute haemorrhagic leucoencephalitis localised to the brainstem and cerebellum are reported. One followed the insertion of a ventriculoatrial shunt and the other an upper respiratory tract infection. The rare previously reported cases of this condition involving mainly the posterior fossa structures are reviewed. Images PMID:7069428

  2. Feasibility of electrical impedance tomography in haemorrhagic stroke treatment using adaptive mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasehi Tehrani, J.; Anderson, C.; Jin, C.; van Schaik, A.; Holder, D.; McEwan, A.

    2010-04-01

    EIT has been proposed for acute stroke differentiation, specifically to determine the type of stroke, either ischaemia (clot) or haemorrhage (bleed) to allow the rapid use of clot-busting drugs in the former (Romsauerova et al 2006) . This addresses an important medical need, although there is little treatment offered in the case of haemorrhage. Also the demands on EIT are high with usually no availability to take a 'before' measurement, ruling out time difference imaging. Recently a new treatment option for haemorrhage has been proposed and is being studied in international randomised controlled trial: the early reduction of elevated blood pressure to attenuate the haematoma. This has been shown via CT to reduce bleeds by up to 1mL by Anderson et al 2008. The use of EIT as a continuous measure is desirable here to monitor the effect of blood pressure reduction. A 1mL increase of haemorrhagic lesion located near scalp on the right side of head caused a boundary voltage change of less than 0.05% at 50 kHz. This could be visually observed in a time difference 3D reconstruction with no change in electrode positions, mesh, background conductivity or drift when baseline noise was less than 0.005% but not when noise was increased to 0.01%. This useful result informs us that the EIT system must have noise of less than 0.005% at 50 kHz including instrumentation, physiological and other biases.

  3. Large bilateral adrenal haemorrhages in a newborn with unrepaired cyanotic CHD.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Lerraughn M; Austin, Erle H; Holland, Brian J

    2016-06-01

    Management of newborns with cyanotic CHD and bilateral adrenal haemorrhages has not previously been described in the literature. These abnormalities present unique challenges due to the potential for haemodynamic instability, need for open heart surgery and associated systemic anticoagulation in the newborn period, and the risk of catastrophic bleeding. PMID:27056035

  4. Trends in maternal mortality due to haemorrhage: two decades of Indian rural observations.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, S; Sirohi, Ritu

    2004-01-01

    Obstetric haemorrhage continues to be a major cause of maternal mortality. Our analysis of records of over a period of 20 years from April 1982 to March 2002 reveals that it was a contributory cause of maternal mortality in 19.9% of cases. The majority of deaths, (65%) had occurred within 24 hours of admission and in 47.5% of cases there was severe anaemia on admission; 17.5% had died due to an atonic PPH, which was the largest category, followed by ruptured uterus (15%), abruptio placenta (15%) and retained placenta (12.5%). Deaths due to obstetric haemorrhage because of a ruptured uterus, retained placenta and abortion have decreased from 22.22% between 1982 and 1987 to zero in the last 5 years and an increase was seen in deaths due to haemorrhage because of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia and ectopic pregnancy, from 1.69% to 4.87%, unclassified haemorrhage 1.96% to 7.31% and placenta praevia from zero between 1982 and 1987 to 4.87% between 1997 and 2002. PMID:14675979

  5. Bilateral subhyaloid haemorrhage in a conscious patient: a new spectrum of ocular involvement by Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Abdali, Nasar; Malik, Azharuddin Mohammed; Shamim, Md Dilawez; Rizvi, Syed Wajahat Ali

    2014-01-01

    A 24-year-old woman presented with a history of high-grade fever with rigours since 3 days and bilateral sudden loss of vision since 6 h. She was conscious, oriented and her vitals were stable. She had a temperature of 101°F, anaemia, thrombocytopaenia, normal white cell count and moderate splenomegaly. On testing visual activity, she could only perceive hand movements although her pupils were bilaterally equal, and normal in size and reaction. On indirect ophthalmoscopy, optic discs were normal bilaterally; however, fovea of both eyes was masked by subhyaloid haemorrhage. Peripheral smear showed gametocytes of Plasmodium falciparum. The patient was started on arteminsinin-combined therapy and advised to be in propped-up position to help resolution of the haemorrhage. The patient was afebrile in 4 days and follow-up fundus examination showed gradual resolution of the haemorrhage. After two months, the patient regained normal visual acuity in both eyes; however, it took nearly 3 months for complete resolution of the haemorrhage. PMID:24862605

  6. Biochemical and functional characterization of Bothropoidin: the first haemorrhagic metalloproteinase from Bothrops pauloensis snake venom.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Mário Sérgio R; Naves de Souza, Dayane L; Guimarães, Denise O; Lopes, Daiana S; Mamede, Carla C N; Gimenes, Sarah Natalie C; Achê, David C; Rodrigues, Renata S; Yoneyama, Kelly A G; Borges, Márcia H; de Oliveira, Fábio; Rodrigues, Veridiana M

    2015-03-01

    We present the biochemical and functional characterization of Bothropoidin, the first haemorrhagic metalloproteinase isolated from Bothrops pauloensis snake venom. This protein was purified after three chromatographic steps on cation exchange CM-Sepharose fast flow, size-exclusion column Sephacryl S-300 and anion exchange Capto Q. Bothropoidin was homogeneous by SDS-PAGE under reducing and non-reducing conditions, and comprised a single chain of 49,558 Da according to MALDI TOF analysis. The protein presented an isoelectric point of 3.76, and the sequence of six fragments obtained by MS (MALDI TOF\\TOF) showed a significant score when compared with other PIII Snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs). Bothropoidin showed proteolytic activity on azocasein, Aα-chain of fibrinogen, fibrin, collagen and fibronectin. The enzyme was stable at pH 6-9 and at lower temperatures when assayed on azocasein. Moreover, its activity was inhibited by EDTA, 1.10-phenanthroline and β-mercaptoethanol. Bothropoidin induced haemorrhage [minimum haemorrhagic dose (MHD) = 0.75 µg], inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen and ADP, and interfered with viability and cell adhesion when incubated with endothelial cells in a dose and time-dependent manner. Our results showed that Bothropoidin is a haemorrhagic metalloproteinase that can play an important role in the toxicity of B. pauloensis envenomation and might be used as a tool for studying the effects of SVMPs on haemostatic disorders and tumour metastasis. PMID:25261583

  7. Experimental respiratory Marburg virus haemorrhagic fever infection in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus)

    PubMed Central

    Smither, Sophie J; Nelson, Michelle; Eastaugh, Lin; Laws, Thomas R; Taylor, Christopher; Smith, Simon A; Salguero, Francisco J; Lever, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    Marburg virus causes a highly infectious and lethal haemorrhagic fever in primates and may be exploited as a potential biothreat pathogen. To combat the infection and threat of Marburg haemorrhagic fever, there is a need to develop and license appropriate medical countermeasures. To determine whether the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) would be an appropriate model to assess therapies against Marburg haemorrhagic fever, initial susceptibility, lethality and pathogenesis studies were performed. Low doses of virus, between 4 and 28 TCID50, were sufficient to cause a lethal, reproducible infection. Animals became febrile between days 5 and 6, maintaining a high fever before succumbing to disease between 8 and 11 days postchallenge. Typical signs of Marburg virus infection were observed including haemorrhaging and a transient rash. In pathogenesis studies, virus was isolated from the animals’ lungs from day 3 postchallenge and from the liver, spleen and blood from day 5 postchallenge. Early signs of histopathology were apparent in the kidney and liver from day 3. The most striking features were observed in animals exhibiting severe clinical signs, which included high viral titres in all organs, with the highest levels in the blood, increased levels in liver function enzymes and blood clotting times, decreased levels in platelets, multifocal moderate-to-severe hepatitis and perivascular oedema. PMID:23441639

  8. Superselective embolization in an errosive haemorrhage of a carcinoma in the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Feifel, H; Volle, E; Riediger, D; Gustorf-Aeckerle, R

    1991-12-01

    Haemorrhage due to errosion of blood vessels in tumors of the head and neck are a dramatic event. Superselective embolization plays an important role in the treatment of these entities. A therapeutic approach and method of embolization is described. PMID:1770245

  9. Complications of nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, Se Jin; Shin, Jae Il

    2011-08-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is one of the most common glomerular diseases that affect children. Renal histology reveals the presence of minimal change nephrotic syndrome (MCNS) in more than 80% of these patients. Most patients with MCNS have favorable outcomes without complications. However, a few of these children have lesions of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, suffer from severe and prolonged proteinuria, and are at high risk for complications. Complications of NS are divided into two categories: disease-associated and drug-related complications. Disease-associated complications include infections (e.g., peritonitis, sepsis, cellulitis, and chicken pox), thromboembolism (e.g., venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism), hypovolemic crisis (e.g., abdominal pain, tachycardia, and hypotension), cardiovascular problems (e.g., hyperlipidemia), acute renal failure, anemia, and others (e.g., hypothyroidism, hypocalcemia, bone disease, and intussusception). The main pathomechanism of disease-associated complications originates from the large loss of plasma proteins in the urine of nephrotic children. The majority of children with MCNS who respond to treatment with corticosteroids or cytotoxic agents have smaller and milder complications than those with steroid-resistant NS. Corticosteroids, alkylating agents, cyclosporin A, and mycophenolate mofetil have often been used to treat NS, and these drugs have treatment-related complications. Early detection and appropriate treatment of these complications will improve outcomes for patients with NS. PMID:22087198

  10. Spontaneous Bilateral Adrenal Haemorrhage after Duodenopancreatectomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Guglielmo, N; Montalto, G M; Della Pietra, F; Garofalo, M; Mennini, G; Melandro, F; Berloco, P B

    2015-01-01

    it is difficult to diagnose because of its nonspecific presentation. This condition frequently occurs in association with an extreme physical stress and may lead to acute adrenal insufficiency or death if not promptly and properly treated. We report a rare case of acute bilateral adrenal hemorrhage with adrenal insufficiency following duodenopancreatectomy for ampulloma in absence of surgical complications. Early diagnosis and corticosteroid replacement with aggressive management of the precipitating pathology are essential to enable a successful outcome. PMID:25945442

  11. Early complications following haematopoietic SCT in children.

    PubMed

    Miano, M; Faraci, M; Dini, G; Bordigoni, P

    2008-06-01

    Early complications can be defined as those occurring within 100 days after transplant. Both epithelial and endothelial damage represent the pathogenetic basis for the onset of the most frequent complications. Clinical features related to endothelial damage depend on the involved district or on the grade and type of general distribution. Veno-occlusive disease (VOD) most often occurs within the first 20 days of haematopoietic SCT (HSCT) and is characterized by the obstruction of small intrahepatic venules and is caused by an initial injury of the sinusoid endothelial cells. The incidence in children ranges between 27 and 40%, and symptoms include hepatomegaly, portal hypertension and ascites. Early intervention with defibrotide (DF) proved to be effective for the treatment; however, overall mortality ranges between 20 and 50%. Thrombotic microangiopathy (TAM) incidence is 4-13%. It is often associated with the use of CYA or tacrolimus, and symptoms include haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopenia and renal and/or central nervous system impairment. Treatment includes plasmapheresis and supportive care. The promising role of DF needs to be confirmed. The onset of engraftment syndrome may occur 1 or 2 days before the neutrophil count in peripheral blood increases. Clinical symptoms include fever not related to infection, respiratory involvement with pulmonary infiltrates or hypoxia and skin rash. Treatment consists of steroid administration for a few days. Haemorrhagic cystitis (HC) may occur early or later following transplant. Early-onset HC is related to mucosal damage caused by the catabolites of chemotherapy drugs, and late-onset HC is mostly caused by viral infections. The incidence ranges between 1 and 25%. Clinical symptoms include haematuria and dysuria without infections. Treatment includes hyperhydration and platelet support. In case of vescical clots, bladder irrigation is indicated. In advanced cases, hyperbaric oxygen administration or surgery may be useful

  12. Factors influencing occurrence of postpartum haemorrhage in pregnant women with hepatitis E infection and deranged coagulation profile

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Manju; Patra, Sharda; Singh, Preeti; Malhotra, Nidhi; Trivedi, Shubha Sagar; Sharma, Sunita; Kumar, Ashish; Sarin, Shiv Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Coagulopathy is an important complication associated with hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in pregnant women. Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) remains a serious risk while managing the labour of these women. The aim of this paper is to study the factors influencing the occurrence of PPH in pregnant women with hepatitis E infection with coagulopathy. The labours of 38 pregnant women with hepatitis E and deranged coagulation profile were followed. Factors that may predict postpartum bleeding complications in women with HEV infection and deranged coagulation profile were statistically analysed. Of 38 pregnant women with acute viral hepatitis due to HEV, 13 (34%) suffered a PPH while 25 (66%) did not. On univariate analysis low alanine aminotransferase (P = 0.016), high international normalized ratio (P = 0.003), high levels of d-dimer (P = 0.008), presence of hepatic encephalopathy (P = 0.028), intrauterine fetal death (P = 0.001) and gastrointestinal bleeding (P = 0.004) were found to predict PPH. However, on multivariate analysis the only independent variable that predicted PPH was the presence gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding (odds ratio [OR] 11.363; 95% CI: 1.003, 125; P = 0.050). Women with GI bleeding have 11 times higher risk of PPH than those without a GI bleed; however, the confidence interval is very wide. Administration of fresh frozen plasma in the peripartum period reduces the risk of PPH. In conclusion, early recognition of factors which predict the risk of PPH and timely intervention with judicious use of blood and blood components in the peripartum period can improve the outcome of pregnant women with HEV infection with deranged coagulation.

  13. Prognosis Predicting Score for Endovascular Treatment of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Risk Modeling Study for Individual Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Duan, Guoli; Yang, Pengfei; Li, Qiang; Zuo, Qiao; Zhang, Lei; Hong, Bo; Xu, Yi; Zhao, Wenyuan; Liu, Jianmin; Huang, Qinghai

    2016-02-01

    The elderly patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) have a greater risk of poor clinical outcome after endovascular treatment (EVT) than younger patients do. Hence, it is necessary to explore which factors are associated with poor outcome and develop a predictive score specifically for elderly patients with aSAH receiving EVT. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a predictive score for 1-year outcomes in individual elderly patients with aSAH underwent EVT.In this 10-year prospective study, 520 consecutive aSAH elderly (age ≥ 60 years) patients underwent EVT in a single center were included. The risk factors, periprocedural, and 1-year follow-up data of all patients were entered in a specific prospective database. The modified Rankin scale was used for evaluating clinical outcome. To optimize the model's predictive capacity, the original matrix was randomly divided in 2 submatrices (learning and testing). The predictive score was developed using Arabic numerals for all variables based on the variable coefficients (β) of multivariable logistic regression analysis in the learning set and the predictive performance evaluation was assessed in the testing set. The risk classes were constructed using classification criteria based on sensitivity and specificity. The poor outcome rate at 1 year was 26.15%. Six risk factors, including age, hypertension, Hunt-Hess scale, Fisher scale, aneurysm location, and periprocedural complications, were independently associated with poor outcome and assembled the Changhai score. The discriminative power analysis with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of the Changhai score was statistically significant (0.864, 0.824-0.904, P < 0.001). The sensitivity and specificity of the Changhai score were 82.07% and 78.06%, respectively. Our study indicated that age, hypertension, Hunt-Hess scale, Fisher scale, aneurysm location, and periprocedural complications were independent risk

  14. Evidence that venoconstriction reverses the phase II sympathoinhibitory and bradycardic response to haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Potas, J R; Dampney, R A L

    2004-03-31

    Severe hypotensive haemorrhage results in a biphasic response, characterized by an initial increase in heart rate and sympathetic vasomotor activity (phase I) followed by a life-threatening hypotension, accompanied by profound sympathoinhibition and bradycardia (phase II). The phase II response is believed to be dependent on inputs from cardiopulmonary receptors, and may be triggered by the reduction in venous return and cardiac filling associated with severe haemorrhage. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the phase II response could be reversed by venoconstriction, which is known to enhance venous return and cardiac filling, by comparing the effects of phenylephrine (which constricts veins as well as arterioles) with that of vasopressin (which constricts arterioles but not veins). In sodium pentobarbitone-anaesthetised rats, haemorrhage evoked an initial increase in heart rate (HR) and renal sympathetic activity (RSNA) followed by a large decrease in both variables to levels below the pre-haemorrhage baseline levels (phase II response). During the phase II response, an intravenous injection of phenylephrine, sufficient to restore mean arterial pressure to the pre-haemorrhage level, resulted in a gradually developing increase (over 3-4 min) in HR and RSNA back to the baseline levels. In contrast, intravenous injection of an equipressor dose of vasopressin did not result in any increase in RSNA and only a transient increase in HR. Injection of phenylephrine, but not vasopressin, also increased the pulsatile component of central venous pressure, indicative of reduced venous capacitance. The findings indicate that venoconstriction reverses the phase II sympathoinhibition and bradycardia. PMID:15109933

  15. Intracisternal naloxone and cardiac nerve blockade prevent vasodilatation during simulated haemorrhage in awake rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, R G; Ludbrook, J; Potocnik, S J

    1989-01-01

    1. Acute haemorrhage was simulated in five unanaesthetized rabbits, by inflating a cuff on the inferior vena cava so that cardiac output fell by 8.3% of its resting level per minute. Simulated haemorrhage was performed after sham treatment, after graded doses of intravenous and intracisternal naloxone, and after cardiac nerve blockade with intrapericardial procaine. 2. After sham treatment, the haemodynamic response to simulated haemorrhage was biphasic. During the first phase, systemic vascular conductance fell steadily, heart rate rose steadily, and arterial pressure fell only slightly. A second decompensatory phase began abruptly when cardiac output had fallen to approximately 55% of its resting level. Vascular conductance rose steeply, heart rate fell slowly, and arterial pressure fell precipitately. 3. Treatment with naloxone (intravenous, 0.04-0.4 mg kg-1; intracisternal, 0.2-2 micrograms kg-1) did not affect either phase of the haemodynamic response to simulated haemorrhage. 4. After treatment with larger doses of naloxone (intravenous, 4-8 mg kg-1; intracisternal, 4-69 micrograms kg-1), the first phase was unaffected, but the second phase no longer occurred. Throughout simulated haemorrhage, systemic vascular conductance fell steadily, heart rate rose, and arterial pressure was well maintained. The dose of intracisternal naloxone which prevented the second phase was 90-900 times less than the corresponding intravenous dose. The second phase was also prevented by cardiac nerve blockade. 5. We conclude that an endogenous opiate mechanism is responsible for the haemodynamic decompensation that occurs when cardiac output falls to a critical level. The mechanism is located within the central nervous system. It is triggered by a signal from the heart. PMID:2585286

  16. Intrathecal Opioid-Induced Hypothermia Following Subarachnoid Block With Morphine Injection for Elective Cesarean Delivery: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mach, John; Van Havel, Teresa; Gadwood, John; Biegner, M Andrew

    2016-02-01

    Opioids have been administered intrathecally with subarachnoid block for postoperative pain relief in parturients undergoing elective cesarean deliveries. This case report presents the uncommon occurrence of intrathecal opioid-induced hypothermia in the latent phase of recovery following elective cesarean delivery. There are few case reports on the occurrence of latent-phase postanesthesia care hypothermia in patients receiving subarachnoid block with morphine sulfate injection (Duramorph). Hypothermia can occur postoperatively for many reasons and can be life-threatening. In this case, hypothermia developed and progressed throughout the postoperative period. The causes of hypothermia were evaluated and treated without success initially. Thyroid dysfunction and alternative differential diagnoses were ruled out. Further assessment determined that the morphine injection might have been a contributing factor. Naloxone at 40-μg increments was administered intravenously and corrected the hypothermia. Awareness of hypothermia postoperatively with associated morphine administration through subarachnoid block must be ruled out in cases of progressing hypothermia. PMID:26939385

  17. Dysregulation of oxygen hemodynamic responses to synaptic train stimulation in a rat hippocampal model of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Galeffi, Francesca; Degan, Simone; Britz, Gavin; Turner, Dennis A

    2016-04-01

    We investigated microvascular reactivity to synaptic train stimulation after induction of subarachnoid hemorrhage in adult rats, analyzing tissue oxygen levels [pO2] in intact hippocampus. In control rats, hippocampal pO2averaged 11.4 mm Hg whereas hemodynamic responses averaged 13.1 mm Hg (to a 25 s train). After subarachnoid hemorrhage (at 2 days), we recorded a dramatic elevation in baseline pO2in the hippocampus (to 68.4 mm Hg) accompanied by inverted pO2responses to synaptic train stimulation (-9.46 mm Hg). These significant changes in baseline hippocampal pO2and inverted pO2responses after subarachnoid hemorrhage indicate severe alterations of neurovascular coupling and neuronal viability. PMID:26721394

  18. [Papilledema and echographically detectable retro-orbital dilatation of the sub-arachnoidal space with open fontanelle - six case reports].

    PubMed

    Gusek-Schneider, G C; Mardin, C Y; Trollmann, R; Eyüpoglu, I Y; Ganslandt, O

    2011-11-01

    This paper analyses the case reports for three children in which a papilledema occurred before the age of one year. Furthermore, an analysis is also given of three further case reports for children aged less than one year in which, in spite of open fontanelle, no papilledema was found, however, a dilatation of the sub-arachnoidal space was demonstrated echographically. Even in children less than one year of age in which an open fontanelle still exists and in whom a neuro-paediatric clarification of internal hydrocepalus is made, in spite of opththalmoscopically inconspicuous findings for the papilla an echography is indispensable for the evaluation of the sub-arachnoidal space. Here, the early recognition of a dilatation of the retro-bulbar sub-arachnoidal space can possibly prevent the occurrence of a consecutive optic atrophy. At the present time, the data available do not allow the recommendation of an upper age limit for an echographic examination. PMID:21901662

  19. Complications of Transjugular Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Navuluri, Rakesh; Ahmed, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Transvenous biopsy was first performed in 1964 by Charles Dotter. Now routinely performed in the liver and kidney by interventional radiologists, the transjugular approach to biopsy has assumed a central role in coagulopathic patients. Major arterial complications from transjugular liver and renal biopsy are rare. In this article, the authors describe such complications in both organs that necessitated selective endovascular coil embolization. PMID:25762847

  20. Complications in knee arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Reigstad, Ole; Grimsgaard, Christian

    2006-05-01

    All simple arthroscopic procedures during 1999 through 2001 performed at Baerum community hospital were retrospectively examined. Procedures were excluded when being part of more complex procedures. A total of 876 procedures performed on 785 patients were left for examination. Complications were registered from the patient record and all received a written questionnaire or phone call. The answer was obtained from 97.6%. The overall complications rate was low, giving total of 5.00%. A total of 0.68% of the complications had therapeutic consequences. There were two superficial infections, one thromboembolic event/pulmonary embolus and one reoperation due to scar tissue. Other complications were considered minor, and had none or little consequence for the patient comprising preoperative bradycardial episodes, asthmatic events, subcutaneous infusion of total intravenous anaesthetics (TIVA), instrument breakage and conversion to arthrotomi. Postoperatively registered complications included swelling, haemarthros, portal bleeding and fistulation, temporary sensory loss and longstanding pain. Duration of surgery was the only predicting factor for postoperative complications. Simple arthroscopic surgery is safe and has few serious complications. The use of TIVA or tourniquet does not increase the morbidity or complication rate, and prophylaxis against thromboembolism was not necessary. PMID:16208459

  1. "Complicating" Educational Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Colleen S.

    Administrators desiring to lead organizations that will adapt and survive in a complex environment like today's public schools need to develop what Karl Weick calls "complicated" understanding of "requisite variety." The law of requisite variety states that a diverse and complicated environment demands similar diversity from its inhabitants if…

  2. Pellagra complicating Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, I.; Millard, L.

    1995-01-01

    We report a 53-year-old patient with clinical features of pellagra as a complication of Crohn's disease. His symptoms improved rapidly on taking oral nicotinic acid and vitamin B complex. We suggest the paucity of reported cases of pellagra in Crohn's disease is a reflection of poor recognition of this complication. Images Figure PMID:7567761

  3. COMPLICATIONS IN HIP ARTHROSCOPY

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Marcos Emílio Kuschnaroff; Hoffmann, Rafael Barreiros; de Araújo, Lúcio Cappelli Toledo; Dani, William Sotau; José Berral, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of complications in a series of consecutive cases of hip arthroscopy; to assess the progression of the sample through a learning curve; and to recognize the causes of complications in arthroscopic hip operations. Method: 150 consecutive cases that underwent hip arthroscopy between May 2004 and December 2008 were evaluated. The complications encountered were classified in three ways: organic system affected, severity and groups of 50 consecutive cases. The data were analyzed by means of descriptive statistics and Fisher's exact test. Results: We observed 15 complications in this study (10%): ten were neurological, two were osteoarticular, one was vascular-ischemic and two were cutaneous. In the classification of severity, three were classified as major, 12 as intermediate and none as minor. The incidence of complications over the course of the learning curve did not present any statistically significant difference (p = 0.16). Conclusions: Hip arthroscopy is a surgical procedure that involves low morbidity, but which presents complications in some cases. These complications are frequently neurological and transitory, and mainly occur because of joint traction. The complication rate did not decrease with progression of our sample. PMID:27022521

  4. Erythropoietin for the Treatment of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Feasible Ingredient for a Successful Medical Recipe

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Giovanni; Tomasello, Giovanni; Noto, Marcello; Alafaci, Concetta; Cappello, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) following aneurysm bleeding accounts for 6% to 8% of all cerebrovascular accidents. Although an aneurysm can be effectively managed by surgery or endovascular therapy, delayed cerebral ischemia is diagnosed in a high percentage of patients resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Cerebral vasospasm occurs in more than half of all patients after aneurysm rupture and is recognized as the leading cause of delayed cerebral ischemia after SAH. Hemodynamic strategies and endovascular procedures may be considered for the treatment of cerebral vasospasm. In recent years, the mechanisms contributing to the development of vasospasm, abnormal reactivity of cerebral arteries and cerebral ischemia following SAH, have been investigated intensively. A number of pathological processes have been identified in the pathogenesis of vasospasm, including endothelial injury, smooth muscle cell contraction from spasmogenic substances produced by the subarachnoid blood clots, changes in vascular responsiveness and inflammatory response of the vascular endothelium. To date, the current therapeutic interventions remain ineffective as they are limited to the manipulation of systemic blood pressure, variation of blood volume and viscosity and control of arterial carbon dioxide tension. In this scenario, the hormone erythropoietin (EPO) has been found to exert neuroprotective action during experimental SAH when its recombinant form (rHuEPO) is administered systemically. However, recent translation of experimental data into clinical trials has suggested an unclear role of recombinant human EPO in the setting of SAH. In this context, the aim of the current review is to present current evidence on the potential role of EPO in cerebrovascular dysfunction following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:26581085

  5. Relevance of 3D magnetic resonance imaging sequences in diagnosing basal subarachnoid neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Carrillo Mezo, Roger; Lara García, Javier; Arroyo, Mariana; Fleury, Agnès

    2015-12-01

    Imagenological diagnosis of subarachnoid neurocysticercosis is usually difficult when classical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences are used. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the advantages of 3D MRI sequences (Fast Imaging Employing Steady-state Acquisition (FIESTA) and Spoiled Gradient Recalled Echo (SPGR)) with respect to classical sequences (Fluid Attenuation Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) and T1) in visualizing Taenia solium cyst in these locations. Forty-seven T. solium cysts located in the basal cisterns of the subarachnoid space were diagnosed in eighteen Mexican patients. A pre-treatment MRI was performed on all patients, and all four sequences (FIESTA, FLAIR, T1 SPGR, and T2) were evaluated independently by two neuroradiologists. The sensitivity of each sequence to detect the parasite membrane and scolex was evaluated, along with its capacity to detect differences in signal intensity between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and cysts. FIESTA sequences allowed the visualization of cyst membrane in 87.2% of the parasites evaluated, FLAIR in 38.3%, SPGR in 23.4%, and T2 in 17.0%. The superiority of FIESTA sequences over the other three imaging methods was statistically significant (P<0.001). Scolices were detected by FIESTA twice as much as the other sequences did, although this difference was not significant (P>0.05). Differences in signal intensity between CSF and parasite cysts were significant in FIESTA (P<0.0001), SPGR (P<0.0001), and FLAIR (P=0.005) sequences. For the first time, the usefulness of 3D MRI sequences to diagnose T. solium cysts located in the basal cisterns of the subarachnoid space was demonstrated. The routine use of these sequences could favor an earlier diagnosis and greatly improve the prognosis of patients affected by this severe form of the disease. PMID:26327445

  6. Prevalence and incidence of intracranial haemorrhage in a population of children with haemophilia. The Hemophilia Growth and Development Study.

    PubMed

    Nelson, M D; Maeder, M A; Usner, D; Mitchell, W G; Fenstermacher, M J; Wilson, D A; Gomperts, E D

    1999-09-01

    The prevalence of intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) in our population of haemophiliacs was 12%. The incidence of ICH was approximately 2% per year. At entry, 7% (21/309) had clinical histories of ICH without MRI evidence of old haemorrhage, indicating that either the haemorrhages had completely resolved, that routine MRI sequences are not particularly sensitive for the detection of old blood products, or a combination of both of these factors. One half (4/8) of the ICHs documented by entry MRI were clinically silent, and three of the 11 incident cases documented by MRI were clinically silent. HIV infection did not increase the risk of ICH. PMID:10583511

  7. Complications in septoplasty.

    PubMed

    Rettinger, Gerhard; Kirsche, Hanspeter

    2006-11-01

    The most frequent complications of septoplasty are deformities, infections, and perforations. The effects of each of these complications, however, can be very different. Dislocations and deformities of the septum may result not only in an impaired airway but also in visible deformities of the entire nasal base and dorsum. A patient who underwent septoplasty can be "stigmatized." Infections may lead not only to septal abscess but also to endocranial complications such as meningitis or septicemia with endocarditis. Permanent perforations of the nasal septum can result in significant symptoms if they are located in the anterior part of the nose. Surgical closure is the treatment of choice, with a high success rate if the patients are selected properly. Besides these three major types of complications there are many others, from smell disturbances to blindness. Causes, prevention, and correction of selected complications are presented and data of the recent literature reported. PMID:17131271

  8. Anorexia nervosa - medical complications.

    PubMed

    Mehler, Philip S; Brown, Carrie

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to other mental health disorders, eating disorders have a high prevalence of concomitant medical complications. Specifically, patients suffering from anorexia nervosa (AN) have a litany of medical complications which are commonly present as part of their eating disorders. Almost every body system can be adversely, affected by this state of progressive malnutrition. Moreover, some of the complications can have permanent adverse effects even after there is a successful program of nutritional rehabilitation and weight restoration. Within this article we will review all body systems affected by AN. There is also salient information about both, how to diagnose these medical complications and which are the likely ones to result in permanent sequelae if not diagnosed and addressed early in the course of AN. In a subsequent article, the definitive medical treatment for these complications will be presented in a clinically practical manner. PMID:25834735

  9. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage After Lumboperitoneal Shunt for Fulminant Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fok, Anthony; Chandra, Ronil V; Gutman, Matthew; Ligtermoet, Matthew; Seneviratne, Udaya; Kempster, Peter

    2016-06-01

    A 33-year-old woman presented with severe visual loss from fulminant idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Her lumbar puncture opening pressure was 97 cm H2O. Soon after lumboperitoneal shunt surgery, she had a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated frontal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and neuroimaging findings consistent with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). We hypothesize that an abrupt drop in intracranial pressure after lumboperitoneal shunting led to maladjustment of cerebral vascular autoregulation, which caused SAH and PRES. PMID:26919070

  10. Rare anatomical variations of persistent trigeminal artery in two patients with non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Samaniego, Edgar A; Dabus, Guilherme; Andreone, Vincenzo; Linfante, Italo

    2011-09-01

    Carotid-basilar anastomoses are remnants of the fetal circulation and although rare, they may become symptomatic and should be recognized during cerebral angiography. Two patients are described with non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and persistent trigeminal arteries (PTA) found on cerebral angiography. In the first patient, the PTA ended in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) and posterior inferior cerebellar artery. The second patient had a PTA terminating in the AICA and superior cerebellar artery. These rare anatomical PTA variants should be recognized on cerebral angiography. PMID:21990842

  11. Spontaneous nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage without cerebrovascular malformations in a maintenance hemodialysis patient

    PubMed Central

    Jayasurya, R.; Murugesan, N.; Kumar, R.; Dubey, A. K.; Priyamvada, P. S.; Swaminathan, R. P.; Parameswaran, S.

    2015-01-01

    Nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in a dialysis patient is an uncommon occurrence and is often associated with high mortality. We report for the first time in India, a case of spontaneous nontraumatic, nonaneurysmal SAH without any cerebrovascular malformation in a maintenance hemodialysis patient, following a session of hemodialysis. The dialysis prescription needs to be modified in these patients, in order to prevent worsening of cerebral edema and progression of hemorrhage. Where available, continuous forms of renal replacement therapies, with regional anticoagulation seem to be the best option for such patients, till neurologic stabilization is achieved. PMID:26628800

  12. Biomarkers as outcome predictors in subarachnoid hemorrhage – a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Caron M.; Tosun, Cigdem; Kurland, David B.; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Schreibman, David; Simard, J. Marc

    2015-01-01

    Context Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has a high fatality rate and many suffer from delayed neurological deficits. Biomarkers may aid in the identification of high-risk patients, guide treatment/management and improve outcome. Objective The aim of this review was to summarize biomarkers of SAH associated with outcome. Methods An electronic database query was completed, including an additional review of reference lists to include all potential human studies. Results A total of 298 articles were identified; 112 were reviewed; 55 studies were included. Conclusion This review details biomarkers of SAH that correlate with outcome. It provides the basis for research investigating their possible translation into the management of SAH patients. PMID:24499240

  13. Spontaneous intradural disc herniation with focal distension of the subarachnoid space in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Barnoon, Itai; Chai, Orit; Srugo, Itai; Peeri, Dana; Konstantin, Lilach; Brenner, Ori; Shamir, Merav H.

    2012-01-01

    Myelo-computed tomography of a paraparetic 14-year-old dog revealed subarachnoid distension with an intradural filling defect above the T13–L1 disc space. T12–L1 hemilaminectomy followed by durotomy allowed removal of a large piece of degenerated disc material that compressed the spinal parenchyma. Full return to function was achieved 10 days post-surgery. The distension was likely secondary to the intradural herniation, and is a rare and distinct finding. PMID:23633713

  14. Complications in late pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Meguerdichian, David

    2012-11-01

    Complications of late pregnancy are managed infrequently in the emergency department and, thus, can pose a challenge when the emergency physician encounters acute presentations. An expert understanding of the anatomic and physiologic changes and possible complications of late pregnancy is vital to ensure proper evaluation and care for both mother and fetus. This article focuses on the late pregnancy issues that the emergency physician will face, from the bleeding and instability of abruptio placentae to the wide spectrum of complications and management strategies encountered with preterm labor. PMID:23137403

  15. Anesthetic Complications and Deaths

    PubMed Central

    Pender, John W.

    1968-01-01

    Anesthesiologists should fully inform patients of the possible complications from anesthesia. For rapport with the patient, with whom they usually have no acquaintance until a day or so before an operative procedure, the anesthesiologist should enlist the help of the internist or surgeon who already has established an atmosphere of trust. The extent of morbidity and minor complications from anesthesia has not been adequately recorded. One out of every 1,000 to 2,000 anesthetized patients dies of complications primarily due to or contributed to by anesthesia. Leading causes of death vary from study to study and from year to year. PMID:5652756

  16. [Complications of hip arthroscopies].

    PubMed

    Dienst, M; Grün, U

    2008-11-01

    Surgical complications of hip arthroscopies are rare in the hands of experienced hip arthroscopists. However, when performed by beginners and in more demanding situations such as marginal distraction of the head and socket and technically advanced procedures, the risk increases. This report describes possible complications which may happen during positioning and traction, portal placement, and diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Possible causes of soft tissue lesions of the portal area, perineum and foot, intra-articular lesions of the labrum and cartilage, direct and traction-related indirect neurovascular lesions, and other rare complications are analyzed. PMID:18854972

  17. Complications of Pathologic Myopia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Bum-Joo; Shin, Joo Young; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2016-01-01

    Pathologic myopia (PM) is one of the leading causes of visual impairment worldwide. The pathophysiology of PM is not fully understood, but the axial elongation of the eye followed by chorioretinal thinning is suggested as a key mechanism. Pathologic myopia may lead to many complications such as chorioretinal atrophy, foveoschisis, choroidal neovascularization, rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, cataract, and glaucoma. Some complications affect visual acuity significantly, showing poor visual prognosis. This article aims to review the types, pathophysiology, treatment, and visual outcome of the complications of PM. PMID:26649982

  18. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... friendly Fact Sheet Pertussis Vaccination Pregnancy and Whooping Cough Clinicians Disease Specifics Treatment Clinical Features Clinical Complications ...

  19. Complications of Measles (Rubeola)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Measles and Rubella Initiative World Health Organization Pan American Health Organization Complications of Measles Language: English ... Links Measles and Rubella Initiative World Health Organization Pan American Health Organization Language: English Español (Spanish) File ...

  20. Infection and Other Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stage 3 Infection and Other Complications NLN Position Papers Lymphedema Awareness Campaign Education Kits Educational Videos What ... Patients (8) LymphLink Articles (175) FAQ's (6) Position Papers (9) LSAP Perspective (9) Become a member now » ...

  1. Intestinal Complications of IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... treated with topical creams or sitz baths. MALABSORPTION & MALNUTRITION Another complication in people with Crohn’s disease is ... the gut that absorbs most nutrients. Malabsorption and malnutrition usually do not develop unless the disease is ...

  2. Obstetric (nonfetal) complications.

    PubMed

    Shanbhogue, Alampady K P; Menias, Christine O; Lalwani, Neeraj; Lall, Chandana; Khandelwal, Ashish; Nagar, Arpit

    2013-11-01

    Pregnancy predisposes women to a wide array of obstetric and gynecological complications which are often complex, challenging and sometimes life-threatening. While some of these are unique to pregnancy, a few that occur in nonpregnant women are more common during pregnancy. Imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of pregnancy-related obstetric and gynecologic complications. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging confer the least risk to the fetus and should be the preferred examinations for evaluating these complications. Multidetector computed tomography should be used after carefully weighing the risk-benefit ratio based on the clinical condition in question. Interventional radiology is emerging as a preferred, noninvasive or minimally invasive treatment option that can obviate surgery and its antecedent short term and long term complications. Knowledge of appropriateness of imaging and image guided intervention is necessary for accurate patient management. PMID:24210440

  3. [Neurological complications in uremia].

    PubMed

    Fong, Chin-Shih

    2008-06-01

    Neurological complications due to the uremic state or hemodialysis, contribute to the important cause of mortality in patients with uremia. Despite continuous advances in uremic treatment, many neurological complications of uremia, like uremic encephalopathy, peripheral neuropathy and myopathy fail to fully respond to hemodialysis. Moreover, hemodialysis or kidney transplantation may even induce neurological complications. Hemodialysis can directly or indirectly be associated with Wernicke's encephalopathy, dialytic dementia, dysequilibrium syndrome, cerebrovascular accidents, osmotic myelinolysis and mononeuropathy. Renal transplantation can give rise to rejection encephalopathy and acute femoral neuropathy. The use of immunosuppressive drugs after renal transplantation can cause reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy encephalopathy. The clinical, pathophysiological and therapeutical aspects of central nervous system, peripheral nervous system and myopathy complications in uremia are reviewed. PMID:18686653

  4. Tetanus: Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Tetanus Vaccination Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination Symptoms and Complications Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... the muscles of the jaw, or "lockjaw". Tetanus symptoms include: Headache Jaw cramping Sudden, involuntary muscle tightening ...

  5. Assessment of Basilar Artery Reactivity in Stroke and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Using Wire Myograph.

    PubMed

    Ghantous, Crystal M; Azrak, Zeina; Rahman, Farah Abdel; Itani, Hana A; Zeidan, Asad

    2016-01-01

    Blood flow regulation of normal cerebral arteries is a critical and important factor to supply the brain tissue with nutrients and oxygen. Stroke insult results in a disruption or reduction in cerebral arteries' blood flow with subsequent brain tissue damage. Hemorrhagic stroke is one type of stroke and accounts for about 13 % of all of stroke insults. In this type of stroke, the cerebral artery breaks open and causes bleeding in or surrounding the brain. Subsequently, this bleeding causes blood vessels to constrict in a process called vasospasm, in which the vessels narrow and impede the blood flow to brain tissue. Hemorrhagic stroke is the major cause of prolonged constriction of cerebral arteries. This leads to partial brain damage and sometimes death in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Among the key delicate techniques to assess small blood vessel functionality is the wire myograph, which can be utilized in several cerebral injury models including stroke. The wire myograph is a device that provides information about the reactivity, stiffness, and elasticity of small blood vessels under isometric conditions. In this book chapter, we describe the techniques involved in wire myography assessment and the different measures and parameters recorded; we describe the utility of this technique in evaluating the effects of subarachnoid hemorrhage on basilar artery sensitivity to different agonists. PMID:27604742

  6. High Risk for Seizures Following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Regardless of Referral Bias

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Kathryn L.; Westover, M. Brandon; Phillips, Michael T.; Iftimia, Nicolae A.; Buckley, Deidre A.; Ogilvy, Christopher S.; Shafi, Mouhsin M.

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the frequency, predictors, and clinical impact of electrographic seizures in patients with high clinical or radiologic grade non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), independent of referral bias. Methods We compared rates of electrographic seizures and associated clinical variables and outcomes in patients with high clinical or radiologic grade non-traumatic SAH. Rates of electrographic seizure detection before and after institution of a guideline which made continuous EEG monitoring routine in this population were compared. Results Electrographic seizures occurred in 17.6 % of patients monitored expressly because of clinically suspected subclinical seizures. In unselected patients, seizures still occurred in 9.6 % of all cases, and in 8.6 % of cases in which there was no a priori suspicion of seizures. The first seizure detected occurred 5.4 (IQR 2.9–7.3) days after onset of subarachnoid hemorrhage with three of eight patients (37.5 %) having the first recorded seizure more than 48 h following EEG initiation, and 2/8 (25 %) at more than 72 h following EEG initiation. High clinical grade was associated with poor outcome at time of hospital discharge; electrographic seizures were not associated with poor outcome. Conclusions Electrographic seizures occur at a relatively high rate in patients with non-traumatic SAH even after accounting for referral bias. The prolonged time to the first detected seizure in this cohort may reflect dynamic clinical features unique to the SAH population. PMID:24723663

  7. Successfully Treated Isolated Posterior Spinal Artery Aneurysm Causing Intracranial Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    HORIO, Yoshinobu; KATSUTA, Toshiro; SAMURA, Kazuhiro; WAKUTA, Naoki; FUKUDA, Kenji; HIGASHI, Toshio; INOUE, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    There are very few published reports of rupture of an isolated posterior spinal artery (PSA) aneurysm, and consequently the optimal therapeutic strategy is debatable. An 84-year-old man presented with sudden onset of restlessness and disorientation. Neuroradiological imaging showed an intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with no visible intracranial vascular lesion. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detected a localized subarachnoid hematoma at Th10–11. Both contrast-enhanced spinal computed tomography and enhanced MRI and magnetic resonance angiography revealed an area of enhancement within the hematoma. Superselective angiography of the left Th12 intercostal artery demonstrated a faintly enhanced spot in the venous phase. Thirteen days after the onset of symptoms, a small fusiform aneurysm situated on the radiculopial artery was resected. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful and he was eventually discharged in an ambulatory condition. To our knowledge, this 84-year-old man is the oldest reported case of surgical management of a ruptured isolated PSA aneurysm. This case illustrates both the validity and efficacy of this therapeutic approach. PMID:26522607

  8. Ehrlichia Meningitis Mimicking Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Study for Medical Decision-Making Heuristics.

    PubMed

    Dredla, Brynn; Freeman, William D

    2016-04-01

    Thunderclap headache is a sudden and severe headache that can occur after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a medical emergency that requires prompt attention and hospitalization. Patients with thunderclap headache often undergo a noncontrast head computed tomography (CT) scan to ascertain SAH bleeding and, if the scan is negative, then undergo a lumbar puncture to look for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) red blood cells (RBCs), which would be consistent with an aneurysmal leak. If the initial CT is negative and CSF is positive for RBCs, patients are usually admitted to the hospital for evaluation of intracranial aneurysm. We encountered a patient with thunderclap headache whose initial head CT was negative for SAH and whose CSF tested positive for RBCs. The patient was referred to our center for evaluation and management of aneurysmal SAH. However, on careful review of the patient's medical history, serum laboratory values, and spinal fluid values, the patient was diagnosed with Ehrlichia chaffeensis meningitis. While Ehrlichia meningitis is rare, it is important to recognize the clinical clues that could help avoid formal cerebral angiography, a costly and potentially unnecessary procedure. We present how this case represented a cognitive framing bias and anchoring heuristic as well as steps that medical providers can use to prevent such cognitive errors in diagnosis. PMID:27053985

  9. A Site-Specific, Sustained-Release Drug Delivery System for Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hänggi, Daniel; Etminan, Nima; Steiger, Hans Jakob; Johnson, Mark; Peet, M Melissa; Tice, Tom; Burton, Kevin; Hudson, Bruce; Turner, Michele; Stella, Angela; Heshmati, Parissa; Davis, Cara; Faleck, Herbert J; Macdonald, R Loch

    2016-04-01

    Nimodipine is the only drug approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration for improving outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). It has less than optimal efficacy, causes dose-limiting hypotension in a substantial proportion of patients, and is administered enterally 6 times daily. We describe development of site-specific, sustained-release nimodipine microparticles that can be delivered once directly into the subarachnoid space or cerebral ventricles for potential improvement in outcome of patients with aneurysmal SAH. Eight injectable microparticle formulations of nimodipine in poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) polymers of varying composition were tested in vitro, and 1 was advanced into preclinical studies and clinical application. Intracisternal or intraventricular injection of nimodipine-PLGA microparticles in rats and beagles demonstrated dose-dependent, sustained concentrations of nimodipine in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid for up to 29 days with minimal toxicity in the brain or systemic tissues at doses <2 mg in rats and 51 mg in beagles, which would be equivalent of up to 612-1200 mg in humans, based on scaling relative to cerebrospinal fluid volumes. Efficacy was tested in the double-hemorrhage dog model of SAH. Nimodipine-PLGA microparticles significantly attenuated angiographic vasospasm. This therapeutic approach shows promise for improving outcome after SAH and may have broader applicability for similar diseases that are confined to body cavities or spaces, are self-limited, and lack effective treatments. PMID:26935204

  10. Copeptin as a Marker for Severity and Prognosis of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Christian; De Marchis, Gian Marco; Katan, Mira; Seiler, Marleen; Arnold, Marcel; Gralla, Jan; Raabe, Andreas; Beck, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Background Grading of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is often confounded by seizure, hydrocephalus or sedation and the prediction of prognosis remains difficult. Recently, copeptin has been identified as a serum marker for outcomes in acute ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). We investigated whether copeptin might serve as a marker for severity and prognosis in aSAH. Methods Eighteen consecutive patients with aSAH had plasma copeptin levels measured with a validated chemiluminescence sandwich immunoassay. The primary endpoint was the association of copeptin levels at admission with the World Federation of Neurological Surgeons (WFNS) grade score after resuscitation. Levels of copeptin were compared across clinical and radiological scores as well as between patients with ICH, intraventricular hemorrhage, hydrocephalus, vasospasm and ischemia. Results Copeptin levels were significantly associated with the severity of aSAH measured by WFNS grade (P = 0.006), the amount of subarachnoid blood (P = 0.03) and the occurrence of ICH (P = 0.02). There was also a trend between copeptin levels and functional clinical outcome at 6-months (P = 0.054). No other clinical outcomes showed any statistically significant association. Conclusions Copeptin may indicate clinical severity of the initial bleeding and may therefore help in guiding treatment decisions in the setting of aSAH. These initial results show that copeptin might also have prognostic value for clinical outcome in aSAH. PMID:23326397

  11. A case of cerebral aneurysm rupture and subarachnoid hemorrhage associated with air travel.

    PubMed

    Cui, Victoria; Kouliev, Timur; Wood, Jason

    2014-01-01

    During air travel, passengers are exposed to unique conditions such as rapid ascent and descent that can trigger significant physiological changes. In addition, the cabins of commercial aircraft are only partially pressured to 552-632 mmHg or the equivalent terrestrial altitudes of 1,500-2,500 m (5,000-8,000 feet) above sea level. While studies in high-altitude medicine have shown that all individuals experience some degree of hypoxia, cerebral edema, and increased cerebral blood flow, the neurological effects that accompany these changes are otherwise poorly understood. In this study, we report a case of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured cerebral aneurysm associated with travel on commercial aircraft. We then review relevant cases of neurological incidents with possible air travel-related etiology and discuss the physiological factors that may have contributed to the patient's acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. In the future, this report may serve as reference for more detailed and conservative medical guidelines and recommendations regarding air travel. PMID:27147875

  12. Spreading Depolarizations: A Therapeutic Target Against Delayed Cerebral Ischemia After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chung, David Y; Oka, Fumiaki; Ayata, Cenk

    2016-06-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia is the most feared cause of secondary injury progression after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Initially thought to be a direct consequence of large artery spasm and territorial ischemia, recent data suggests that delayed cerebral ischemia represents multiple concurrent and synergistic mechanisms, including microcirculatory dysfunction, inflammation, and microthrombosis. Among these mechanisms, spreading depolarizations (SDs) are arguably the most elusive and underappreciated in the clinical setting. Although SDs have been experimentally detected and examined since the late 1970s, their widespread occurrence in human brain was not unequivocally demonstrated until relatively recently. We now know that SDs occur with very high incidence in human brain after ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke and trauma, and worsen outcomes by increasing metabolic demand, decreasing blood supply, predisposing to seizure activity, and possibly worsening brain edema. In this review, we discuss the causes and consequences of SDs in injured brain. Although much of our mechanistic knowledge comes from experimental models of focal cerebral ischemia, clinical data suggest that the same principles apply regardless of the mode of injury (i.e., ischemia, hemorrhage, or trauma). The hope is that a better fundamental understanding of SDs will lead to novel therapeutic interventions to prevent SD occurrence and its adverse consequences contributing to injury progression in subarachnoid hemorrhage and other forms of acute brain injury. PMID:27258442

  13. [A case of HELLP syndrome resulting in eclampsia with non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Yoshikane, Tsutomu; Miyazaki, Takeshi; Aoki, Showa; Kambara, Mizuki; Hagiwara, Shinya; Miyazaki, Kohji; Akiyama, Yasuhiko

    2013-02-01

    It is known that hemorrhagic stroke at the perinatal period are caused by specifics conditions like eclampsia as well as by the existing abnormal vessels. We treated a case of HELLP syndrome resulting in eclampsia with non-aneurysmal, convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage. A 34-year-old female, who had been pointed out to have a high level of urinal protein at the 37th week, was seen in the emergency department because of severe headache, vomiting and respiratory discomfort. Her systolic blood pressure was over 190mmHg, and caesarean section was selected. On the way to the operating room, she had a generalized convulsion with loss of consciousness. The delivery was carried out. The CT immediately after the caesarean section revealed faint and localized subarachnoid hemorrhage in the bilateral convexity areas. Additionally, the FLAIR image of MRI demonstrated increased intensity in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres, basal ganglion and subcortical area, suggesting vasogenic edema. The patient had a good clinical course and the abnormal signal of MRI also recovered by treatment with oral iron and zinc. Here, we report a speculation for the mechanism of this case and precautions against stroke in the perinatal period. PMID:23378389

  14. [The neuroevolutionary profile of the nursing infant with macrocephaly and benign enlargement of the subarachnoid space].

    PubMed

    Compén-Kong, R; Landeras, L

    1991-06-01

    With the purpose of studying the neuroevolutionary prognosis of children with macrocephaly (percentile 95) and the widening of the subarachnoid space, identified using head CAT scans-five cases were selected from the Pediatric-Neurology Department from the Teaching Regional Hospital of Trujillo-Perú, seen during January 1983 and January 1988 with a follow-up of 1 and 1/2 and 3 years. All of the children showed an abnormal separation of the frontal subarachnoid space, interhemispheric fissure and Silvio incision without ventriculomegaly o a minimal dilation of the ventricular system. Through neurological evaluation and the Denver Development Test, in all cases except one, a characteristic pattern of hypotony and gross motor retardation were seen during the first year of life, which was modified towards normality during the following months until the age of 24 to 40 months. This findings suggest the good prognosis and benign nature of this condition which can be spontaneously resolved and apparently related to benign family macrocephaly. PMID:1910560

  15. A case of metastatic testicular cancer complicated by tumour lysis syndrome and choriocarcinoma syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Koji; Takaoka, Ei-Ichiro; Naoi, Makito; Mori, Kensaku; Minami, Manabu; Shimazui, Toru; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2006-10-01

    A 26-year-old man was referred to our hospital for treatment of metastatic testicular cancer. The pathological diagnosis was choriocarcinoma with seminoma. Sequential computerized tomography examinations revealed rapidly progressing bulky liver metastases and a lung metastasis. Chemotherapy with bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin (BEP) was started on the day of admission. Subsequently, the patient suffered from tumour lysis syndrome (TLS) and massive haemorrhage at metastatic sites. The latter complication is also called choriocarcinoma syndrome. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of testicular cancer complicated with both critical conditions. Intensive care and radiological intervention barely prevented a fatal outcome. The urological oncologist should be aware of the potential complications TLS and choriocarcinoma syndrome in cases of rapidly progressive and high-volume choriocarcinoma. PMID:16935862

  16. Exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy: Impact on pregnancy complications and outcome.

    PubMed

    Ali, Z; Hansen, A V; Ulrik, C S

    2016-05-01

    Asthma is common among pregnant women, and the incidence of asthma exacerbations during pregnancy is high. This literature review provides an overview of the impact of exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy on pregnancy-related complications. The majority of published retrospective studies reveal that asthma exacerbations during pregnancy increase the risk of pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes, placental abruption and placenta praevia. Furthermore, these women also have higher risk for breech presentation, haemorrhage, pulmonary embolism, caesarean delivery, maternal admission to the intensive care unit and longer postpartum hospital stay. Asthma has been associated with increased risk of intrauterine growth retardation, small-for-gestational age, low birth weight, infant hypoglycaemia and preterm birth, but more recent prospective studies have not revealed significant associations with regard to these outcomes. In conclusion, asthma exacerbations during pregnancy are associated with complications of pregnancy, labour and delivery. Prevention of exacerbations is essential to reduce the risk of complications and poor outcome. PMID:26467747

  17. Labour complications remain the most important risk factors for perinatal mortality in rural Kenya.

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Renay; Ronsmans, Carine; Dorman, Ed; Jilo, Hilton; Muhoro, Anne; Shulman, Caroline

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify and quantify risk factors for perinatal mortality in a Kenyan district hospital and to assess the proportion of perinatal deaths attributable to labour complications, maternal undernutrition, malaria, anaemia and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 910 births was conducted between January 1996 and July 1997 and risk factors for perinatal mortality were analysed. FINDINGS: The perinatal mortality rate was 118 per 1000 births. Complications of labour such as haemorrhage, premature rupture of membranes/premature labour, and obstructed labour/ malpresentation increased the risk of death between 8- and 62-fold, and 53% of all perinatal deaths were attributable to labour complications. Placental malaria and maternal HIV, on the other hand, were not associated with perinatal mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Greater attention needs to be given to the quality of obstetric care provided in the rural district-hospital setting. PMID:14576887

  18. [Type 2 diabetes complications].

    PubMed

    Schlienger, Jean-Louis

    2013-05-01

    People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many complications, which are mainly due to complex and interconnected mechanisms such as hyperglycemia, insulino-resistance, low-grade inflammation and accelerated atherogenesis. Cardi-cerebrovascular disease are frequently associated to type 2 diabetes and may become life threatening, particularly coronaropathy, stroke and heart failure. Their clinical picture are sometimes atypical and silencious for a long time. Type 2 diabetes must be considered as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Nephropathy is frequent in type 2 diabetes but has a mixed origin. Now it is the highest cause of end-stage renal disease. Better metabolic and blood pressure control and an improved management of microalbuminuria are able to slowdown the course of the disease. Retinopathy which is paradoxically slightly progressive must however be screened and treated in these rather old patients which are globally at high ophthalmologic risk. Diabetic foot is a severe complication secondary to microangiopathy, microangiopathy and neuropathy. It may be considered as a super-complication of several complications. Its screening must be done on a routine basis. Some cancer may be considered as an emerging complication of type 2 diabetes as well as cognitive decline, sleep apnea syndrome, mood disorders and bone metabolism impairments. Most of the type 2 diabetes complications may be prevented by a strategy combining a systematic screening and multi-interventional therapies. PMID:23528336

  19. Complications of foam sclerotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cavezzi, A; Parsi, K

    2012-03-01

    Foam sclerotherapy may result in drug and/or gas-related complications of a generalized or localized nature. Significant complications include anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions (very rare), deep vein thrombosis (1-3%), stroke (0.01%), superficial venous thrombosis (4.4%), tissue necrosis (variable frequency), oedema (0.5%) and nerve damage (0.2%). Cosmetic complications include telangiectatic matting (15-24%) and pigmentation (10-30%). Patent foramen ovale and other cardio-pulmonary right-to-left shunts seem to play a role in the systemic gas-related complications. In conclusion, foam sclerotherapy is characterized by an overall high degree of safety, though special attention should be given to the embolic and thrombotic complications. Good technique, adequate imaging, general precautions and compliance with post-treatment instructions may help avoid some of the adverse events and an appropriate early intervention may minimize possible sequelae. Higher volumes of sclerosant foam have been attributed to local and distant thrombotic complications and should be avoided. PMID:22312067

  20. On complicity theory.

    PubMed

    Kline, A David

    2006-04-01

    The received account of whistleblowing, developed over the last quarter century, is identified with the work of Norman Bowie and Richard DeGeorge. Michael Davis has detailed three anomalies for the received view: the paradoxes of burden, missing harm and failure. In addition, he has proposed an alternative account of whistleblowing, viz., the Complicity Theory. This paper examines the Complicity Theory. The supposed anomalies rest on misunderstandings of the received view or misreadings of model cases of whistleblowing, for example, the Challenger disaster and the Ford Pinto. Nevertheless, the Complicity Theory is important for as in science the contrast with alternative competing accounts often helps us better understand the received view. Several aspects of the received view are reviewed and strengthened through comparison with Complicity Theory, including why whistleblowing needs moral justification. Complicity Theory is also critiqued. The fundamental failure of Complicity Theory is its failure to explain why government and the public encourage and protect whistleblowers despite the possibility of considerable harm to the relevant company in reputation, lost jobs, and lost shareholder value. PMID:16609713

  1. [Complications and mortality of surgery for bronchogenic cancers].

    PubMed

    Roeslin, N; Morand, G

    1992-01-01

    Resection surgery for lung cancer is beset with specific or non-specific complications which often darken the prognosis for life. The specific complications, related to surgical dissections, are mainly per- and postoperative haemorrhages of various origins and, less frequently, disturbances in respiration, nerve wound or chylothorax. Soon after pneumonectomy a bronchial fistula encouraged by different factors may appear (3.3% of the cases) and empyema, usually caused by staphylococci, may develop (3%). Non-specific complications may disturb the post-resection period, involving the lungs (atelectasia, parenchymal infections, acute respiratory failure) or the cardiovascular system (pulmonary embolism, dysarrhythmia). The overall perioperative mortality rate has decreased with time owing to advances in anaesthesia and intensive care: in the hands of certain medico-surgical teams it does not exceed 3%. It is significantly lower in lobar (mean: 4.5%) than in pulmonary (mean: 8.4%) resections. Enlarged resections and lymph node dissections are aggravating factors. Patients aged 70 or more do not tolerate these operations so well: their mean overall mortality rate is twice that observed in younger patients (8% on average and up to 20%). Resection surgery for lung cancer remains a necessarily hazardous procedure but is the only treatment that can cure the patient. Its success is directly conditioned by a good preoperative risk evaluation. PMID:1303584

  2. Abnormal cerebral vasodilation in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: use of serial 133Xe cerebral blood flow measurement plus acetazolamide to assess cerebral vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Tran Dinh, Y R; Lot, G; Benrabah, R; Baroudy, O; Cophignon, J; Seylaz, J

    1993-10-01

    A patient with cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was investigated by serial measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) using the xenon-133 emission tomography method. The CBF was measured before and after acetazolamide injection. On Day 2 after SAH, there was early local hyperperfusion in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory, ipsilateral to the left posterior communicating artery aneurysm. The regional CBF of this arterial territory decreased slightly after acetazolamide injection, probably because of vasoplegia and the "steal" phenomenon, and thus surgery was delayed. A right hemiplegia with aphasia and disturbed consciousness occurred 4 days later (on Day 6 after SAH) due to arterial vasospasm, despite treatment with a calcium-channel blocker. The initial hyperemia of the left MCA territory was followed by ischemia. The vasodilation induced by acetazolamide administration was significantly subnormal until Day 13, at which time CBF and vasoreactivity amplitude returned to normal and the patient's clinical condition improved. Surgery on Day 14 and outcome were without complication. It is concluded that serial CBF measurements plus acetazolamide injection are useful for monitoring the development of cerebral vasospasm to determine the most appropriate time for aneurysm surgery. PMID:8410215

  3. Comparison of fibreoptic endoscopy in acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in Africans and Europeans.

    PubMed

    Wicks, A C; Thomas, G E; Clain, D J

    1975-11-01

    The results of endoscopy in acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage were compared in a group of 138 Africans and one of 84 Europeans. Contrary to widely held clinical opinion, the incidence of gastric and duodenal ulceration was similar in the two races. Peptic ulcers were the main source of bleeding in both groups and were surprisingly more common than varices in the Africans. Bleeding from varices, however, was far more common in the Africans than in the Europeans. Stomal ulcers were confined to Europeans. Gastric erosions, often attributed to herbal medicines, were more common in the Africans but the difference was not significant. The study was not designed to determine reduced mortality since the introduction of endoscopy, but management, especially in the Africans, was aided by early recognition of haemorrhage from oesophageal varices and acute gastric erosions. PMID:1081417

  4. Alveolar haemorrhage in anti‐glomerular basement membrane disease without detectable antibodies by conventional assays

    PubMed Central

    Serisier, D J; Wong, R C W; Armstrong, J G

    2006-01-01

    Anti‐glomerular basement membrane (anti‐GBM) disease represents the spectrum of disease attributable to circulating anti‐GBM antibodies. While active anti‐GBM disease in the absence of circulating anti‐GBM antibodies has been described, it is considered rare with the use of current routinely available assays. We report four subjects with features consistent with active anti‐GBM antibody disease without detectable antibodies by routinely available enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblot techniques. All were smokers who presented with diffuse alveolar haemorrhage, minimal renal involvement, and undetectable anti‐GBM antibodies. Seronegative anti‐GBM disease with predominant pulmonary involvement may be more common than previously appreciated and should be part of the differential diagnosis for otherwise unexplained diffuse alveolar haemorrhage. Renal biopsy with immunofluorescent studies should be considered in the diagnostic evaluation of such subjects, including those with idiopathic pulmonary haemosiderosis. PMID:16807392

  5. Spinal Intradural Schwannoma with Acute Intratumoural Haemorrhage: Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Kongwad, Lakshman I.; Valiathan, Manna G.

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas account for around half of all intradural spinal tumours, with chronic progressive symptoms as the most common presenting features. Intratumoural haemorrhage as a presenting feature of spinal schwannoma is very rare and only 11 cases have been reported till date. Authors here report a previously asymptomatic 40-year-old male who presented with acute onset paraplegia 12 hours after a minor trauma. MR imaging revealed a C7-D3 intradural-extramedullary lesion with features of acute blood and showing no enhancement. Emergency laminectomy and complete removal of the mass was performed and histopathology revealed features of schwannoma with haemorrhage. Patient had modest improvement of his neurological deficits at a follow-up of 6 months. Pertinent literature is reviewed in brief. PMID:26894121

  6. Isolated impairment of posterior pituitary function secondary to severe postpartum haemorrhage due to uterine rupture.

    PubMed

    Adali, Ertan; Kucukaydin, Zehra; Adali, Fulya; Yildizhan, Recep

    2011-08-01

    Cranial diabetes insipidus (DI) due to postpartum haemorrhage is an extremely rare clinical event. We describe herein isolated posterior pituitary insufficiency in a 26-year-old woman who had undergone subtotal hysterectomy for severe postpartum haemorrhage because of uterine rupture. The patient experienced polyuria within 6 h postoperatively. DI was suggested by the elevated urine volumes and low urine specific gravity. The diagnosis of DI was confirmed by water deprivation test and vasopressin stimulation test. The anterior pituitary function was within normal limits. A high clinical suspicion is certainly required for the diagnosis of DI in the immediate postpartum period. To rapidly initiate appropriate therapy, the possibility of DI should always be kept in mind while evaluating patients who have polyuria and polydipsia after severe postpartum bleeding. Delay or failure to treat this condition might result in hypovolemic shock. PMID:20636230

  7. Subdural haemorrhage and severe coagulopathy resulting in transtentorial uncal herniation in a neonate undergoing therapeutic hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dianna; McMillan, Hugh; Bariciak, Erika

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to be efficacious for improving long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes following perinatal asphyxia. Thus, cooling protocols have been adopted at most tertiary neonatal centres. We present a case of a term neonate who underwent therapeutic whole-body cooling for hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy following a difficult forceps delivery. She abruptly deteriorated, exhibiting signs of transtentorial uncal herniation and severe disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. CT of the head confirmed a life-threatening subdural haematoma and a concealed skull fracture. Hypothermia has been shown to impair haemostasis in vivo and thus may potentially exacerbate occult haemorrhages in a clinical setting. Newborns that require instrument-assisted delivery are a particularly high-risk group for occult head injuries and should undergo careful clinical assessment for fractures and intracranial haemorrhage prior to initiation of therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:25100805

  8. [EHEC-associated colon stenosis after ulcerous-chronic haemorrhagic colitis and consecutive resulting ileus].

    PubMed

    Lipp, M J; Schirmer, J; Feyerabend, B; Stavrou, G A; Cordruwisch, W; Faiss, S; Oldhafer, K J

    2012-05-01

    We report on the case of a segmentally emphasised, ulcerous chronic haemorrhagic colitis with the development of granulation tissue und scarred fibrosis with consecutive resulting stenosis of the colon. A 49-year-old male patient was infected with enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli bacteria during the EHEC-epidemic in northern Germany in early summer 2011. In the course of the infection the patient suffered from haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) with acute renal failure and neurological symptoms. Haemodialysis and plasmapheresis had become mandatory. A simultaneous ileus was estimated to be of paralytic origin. One month after treatment of the acute phase of the infection a CT scan of the abdomen was performed and discovered a symptomatic stenosis of the proximal colon transversum. This obstruction needed to be treated by performing a right hemicolectomy with an ileo-transverso anastomosis. After surgery the patient recovered continuously. The histopathological examination verified an ulcerous-chronic haemorrhagic colitis on the background of an EHEC infection. PMID:22581700

  9. HIV and the Risk of Direct Obstetric Complications: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Calvert, Clara; Ronsmans, Carine

    2013-01-01

    Background Women of reproductive age in parts of sub-Saharan Africa are faced both with high levels of HIV and the threat of dying from the direct complications of pregnancy. Clinicians practicing in such settings have reported a high incidence of direct obstetric complications among HIV-infected women, but the evidence supporting this is unclear. The aim of this systematic review is to establish whether HIV-infected women are at increased risk of direct obstetric complications. Methods and findings Studies comparing the frequency of obstetric haemorrhage, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, dystocia and intrauterine infections in HIV-infected and uninfected women were identified. Summary estimates of the odds ratio (OR) for the association between HIV and each obstetric complication were calculated through meta-analyses. In total, 44 studies were included providing 66 data sets; 17 on haemorrhage, 19 on hypertensive disorders, five on dystocia and 25 on intrauterine infections. Meta-analysis of the OR from studies including vaginal deliveries indicated that HIV-infected women had over three times the risk of a puerperal sepsis compared with HIV-uninfected women [pooled OR: 3.43, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.00–5.85]; this figure increased to nearly six amongst studies only including women who delivered by caesarean (pooled OR: 5.81, 95% CI: 2.42–13.97). For other obstetric complications the evidence was weak and inconsistent. Conclusions The higher risk of intrauterine infections in HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women may require targeted strategies involving the prophylactic use of antibiotics during labour. However, as the huge excess of pregnancy-related mortality in HIV-infected women is unlikely to be due to a higher risk of direct obstetric complications, reducing this mortality will require non obstetric interventions involving access to ART in both pregnant and non-pregnant women. PMID:24124458

  10. Elevated local skin temperature impairs cutaneous vasoconstrictor responses to a simulated haemorrhagic challenge while heat stressed

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, J.; Lucas, R. A. I.; Crandall, C. G.

    2016-01-01

    During a simulated haemorrhagic challenge, syncopal symptoms develop sooner when individuals are hyperthermic relative to normothermic. This is due, in part, to a large displacement of blood to the cutaneous circulation during hyperthermia, coupled with inadequate cutaneous vasoconstriction during the hypotensive challenge. The influence of local skin temperature on these cutaneous vasoconstrictor responses is unclear. This project tested the hypothesis that local skin temperature modulates cutaneous vasoconstriction during simulated haemorrhage in hyperthermic humans. Eight healthy participants (four men and four women; 32 ± 7 years old; 75.2 ± 10.8 kg) underwent lower-body negative pressure to presyncope while heat stressed via a water-perfused suit sufficiently to increase core temperature by 1.2 ± 0.2°C. At forearm skin sites distal to the water-perfused suit, local skin temperature was either 35.2 ± 0.6 (mild heating) or 38.2 ± 0.2°C (moderate heating) throughout heat stress and lower-body negative pressure, and remained at these temperatures until presyncope. The reduction in cutaneous vascular conductance during the final 90 s of lower-body negative pressure, relative to heat-stress baseline, was greatest at the mildly heated site (−10 ± 15% reduction) relative to the moderately heated site (−2 ± 12%; P = 0.05 for the magnitude of the reduction in cutaneous vascular conductance between sites), because vasoconstriction at the moderately heated site was either absent or negligible. In hyperthermic individuals, the extent of cutaneous vasoconstriction during a simulated haemorrhage can be modulated by local skin temperature. In situations where skin temperature is at least 38°C, as is the case in soldiers operating in warm climatic conditions, a haemorrhagic insult is unlikely to be accompanied by cutaneous vasoconstriction. PMID:22903981

  11. Visual outcomes of vitrectomy for polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy-related breakthrough vitreous haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lin, H-C; Yang, C-H; Yang, C-M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the long-term visual outcomes of pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) for polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV)-associated vitreous haemorrhage (VH). Method We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients with PCV-related VH who underwent PPV. The main outcome measures were best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and fundus findings at 3 months postoperatively and final visit. Results Seventeen eyes of 17 patients with massive subretinal haemorrhage (16.7±7.1 disc size of mean subretinal haemorrhage area) were enrolled. The mean postoperative follow-up period was 25.2 months. Four eyes received intravitreal bevacizumab injections, and three eyes underwent photodynamic therapy before the onset of VH. The mean BCVA improved from logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (LogMAR) of 2.63±0.57 preoperatively to 1.43±0.82 at final visit (P<0.001). Among the eyes with initial polyps at subfoveal or juxtafoveal area, 16.70% achieved final BCVA ≥20/400 (LogMAR 1.3), whereas 87.50% of eyes with initial polyps at extrafoveal area had final BCVA ≥20/400 (Fisher's exact test, P=0.026). Conclusions PCV with massive subretinal haemorrhage is at risk for breakthrough VH. The visual prognosis in eyes with PCV-related breakthrough VH is variable after vitrectomy. Initial polyps at the extrafoveal area led to better functional outcomes. Early vitrectomy may be beneficial for visual recovery after PCV-related VH. PMID:24924445

  12. Deaths associated with dengue haemorrhagic fever: the first in Australia in over a century.

    PubMed

    McBride, William J H

    2005-07-01

    A dengue fever epidemic was recognised in the Torres Strait Islands of Queensland in late 2003. Two fatal cases of dengue haemorrhagic fever occurred in early 2004. This severe manifestation is more common when a patient is infected a second time, with a different virus serotype to the first infection. These are the first fatalities related to dengue fever in Australia in over a century. PMID:15992338

  13. Restoration of blood pressure by choline treatment in rats made hypotensive by haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Ulus, I. H.; Arslan, B. Y.; Savci, V.; Kiran, B. K.

    1995-01-01

    1. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of choline (25-150 micrograms) increased blood pressure in rats made acutely hypotensive by haemorrhage. Intraperitoneal administration of choline (60 mg kg-1) also increased blood pressure, but to a lesser extent. Following i.c.v. injection of 25 micrograms or 50 micrograms of choline, heart rate did not change, while 100 micrograms or 150 micrograms i.c.v. choline produced a slight and short lasting bradycardia. Choline (150 micrograms) failed to alter the circulating residual volume of blood in haemorrhaged rats. 2. The pressor response to i.c.v. choline (50 micrograms) in haemorrhaged rats was abolished by pretreatment with mecamylamine (50 micrograms, i.c.v.) but not atropine (10 micrograms, i.c.v.). The pressor response to choline was blocked by pretreatment with hemicholinium-3 (20 micrograms, i.c.v.). 3. The pressor response to i.c.v. choline (150 micrograms) was associated with a several fold increase in plasma levels of vasopressin and adrenaline but not of noradrenaline and plasma renin. 4. The pressor response to i.c.v. choline (150 micrograms) was not altered by bilateral adrenalectomy, but was attenuated by systemic administration of either phentolamine (10 mg kg-1) or the vasopressin antagonist [beta-mercapto-beta,beta-cyclopenta-methylenepropionyl1, O-Me-Tyr2,Arg8]-vasopressin (10 micrograms kg-1). 5. It is concluded that the precursor of acetylcholine, choline, can increase and restore blood pressure in acutely haemorrhaged rats by increasing central cholinergic neurotransmission. Nicotinic receptor activation and an increase in plasma vasopressin and adrenaline level appear to be involved in this effect of choline. PMID:8528579

  14. Pulmonary haemorrhage due to an aortopulmonary collateral artery after arterial switch.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Ai; Ota, Noritaka; Sakamoto, Kisaburo

    2016-03-01

    A neonate with transposition of the great arteries and intact ventricular septum presented without pulmonary over-circulation, and subsequently developed pulmonary haemorrhage after corrective surgery. Postoperative CT revealed an aortopulmonary collateral artery arising from the descending aorta, and we performed successful embolisation on postoperative day 9. Aggressive imaging modalities such as angiography and/or CT imaging with contrast can detect unexpected extra-pulmonary blood supply and guide further management. PMID:26144860

  15. Treating Complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Naomi M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The death of a loved one is one of life’s greatest, universal stressors to which most bereaved individuals successfully adapt without clinical intervention. For a minority of bereaved individuals, grief is complicated by superimposed problems and healing does not occur. The resulting syndrome of complicated grief causes substantial distress and functional impairment even years after a loss, yet knowing when and how to intervene can be a challenge. OBJECTIVE To discuss the differential diagnosis, risk factors for and management of complicated grief based on available evidence and clinical observations. EVIDENCE REVIEW MEDLINE was searched from January 1990 to October 2012. Additional citations were procured from references of select research and review articles. Available treatment studies targeting complicated grief were included. RESULTS A strong research literature led to inclusion of complicated grief in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fifth Edition) (termed persistent complex bereavement disorder as a subtype of other specified trauma and stressor-related disorders), although it is a condition for which more research is formally recommended, and there is still ongoing discussion about the optimal name and diagnostic criteria for the disorder. Reliable screening instruments are available, and the estimated prevalence rate is 7% of bereaved people. Randomized controlled data support the efficacy of a targeted psychotherapy including elements that foster resolution of complicating problems and facilitate the natural healing process. Preliminary studies suggest antidepressant medications may be helpful. CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE Individuals with complicated grief have greater risk of adverse health outcomes, should be diagnosed and assessed for suicide risk and comorbid conditions such as depression and posttraumatic stress disorder, and should be considered for treatment. PMID:23917292

  16. A Comparative Study of Peripheral Immune Responses to Taenia solium in Individuals with Parenchymal and Subarachnoid Neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Tuero, Iskra; Palma, Sandra; Cabeza, Franco; Saleemi, Sarah; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gonzales, Isidro; Mayta, Holger; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Garcia, Hector H.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Background The ability of Taenia solium to modulate the immune system likely contributes to their longevity in the human host. We tested the hypothesis that the nature of the immune response is related to the location of parasite and clinical manifestations of infection. Methodology Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were obtained from untreated patients with neurocysticercosis (NCC), categorized as having parenchymal or subarachnoid infection by the presence of cysts exclusively within the parenchyma or in subarachnoid spaces of the brain, and from uninfected (control) individuals matched by age and gender to each patient. Using multiplex detection technology, sera from NCC patients and controls and cytokine production by PBMC after T. solium antigen (TsAg) stimulation were assayed for levels of inflammatory and regulatory cytokines. PBMC were phenotyped by flow cytometry ex vivo and following in vitro stimulation with TsAg. Principal Findings Sera from patients with parenchymal NCC demonstrated significantly higher Th1 (IFN-γ/IL-12) and Th2 (IL-4/IL-13) cytokine responses and trends towards higher levels of IL-1β/IL-8/IL-5 than those obtained from patients with subarachnoid NCC. Also higher in vitro antigen-driven TNF-β secretion was detected in PBMC supernatants from parenchymal than in subarachnoid NCC. In contrast, there was a significantly higher IL-10 response to TsAg stimulation in patients with subarachnoid NCC compared to parenchymal NCC. Although no differences in regulatory T cells (Tregs) frequencies were found ex vivo, there was a trend towards greater expansion of Tregs upon TsAg stimulation in subarachnoid than in parenchymal NCC when data were normalized for the corresponding controls. Conclusions/Significance T. solium infection of the subarachnoid space is associated with an enhanced regulatory immune response compared to infection in the parenchyma. The resulting anti-inflammatory milieu may represent a parasite strategy to maintain a

  17. Ergometrine given during caesarean section and incidence of delayed postpartum haemorrhage due to uterine atony.

    PubMed

    Lourens, R; Paterson-Brown, S

    2007-11-01

    Delayed postpartum haemorrhage due to uterine atony after caesarean section was occurring in women in our recovery area despite many of them already having an oxytocin infusion running to prevent such a problem. We therefore decided to compare the incidence of such problems for a 2-month period before and after altering our uterotonic policy: in addition to the routine bolus dose of 5 units of oxytocin after delivery of the baby, we added 500 microg of intramuscular ergometrine during abdominal closure. We noticed a reduced number of massive postpartum haemorrhages due to an atonic uterus in the recovery room but an increased incidence of nausea and vomiting. No prophylactic anti-emetic was given during this pilot study. This small study suggests that 50 women would need to be given ergometrine at caesarean section to prevent one delayed massive haemorrhage from uterine atony and four extra women would suffer with vomiting. We feel this is reasonable and now use a prophylactic anti-emetic as well as delaying the ergometrine until closure of the rectus sheath which reduces the incidence of nausea and vomiting. PMID:18097896

  18. N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate Is Very Effective for Massive Haemorrhage during the Perinatal Period

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Suguru; Izuchi, Shinichirou; Ogawa, Yukihisa; Yoshimathu, Misako; Takizawa, Kenji; Nakajima, Yasuo; Tanaka, Mamoru; Ishizuka, Bunpei; Suzuki, Nao

    2013-01-01

    Objective The liquid embolic agent n-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) is a tissue adhesive used as an immediate and permanent embolic agent when mixed with oil-based contrast medium. In this study, the preservation of fertility with TAE using NBCA for massive haemorrhage during pregnancy or the peripartum period and the utility of this therapy were investigated. Methods Cases from January 2005 to October 2010 in which TAE was performed for massive haemorrhage in pregnant women, particularly during the peripartum period, were investigated. Results TAE was performed in 27 pregnant women. The embolic agent used was GS only in five cases, NBCA only in 19 cases, and additional embolization with NBCA when the effect with GS was insufficient in three cases, one each of abruptio placentae, cervical pregnancy, and uterine atony.A comparison of mean blood loss when each embolic agent was used for haemostasis showed a significant difference between cases in which GS only was used and cases in which NBCA only was used. In a comparison of mean transfusion volume, a significant difference was seen between cases in which both GS and NBCA were used and cases in which NBCA only was used. In a postoperative follow-up survey, menses resumed in eight patients, including four patients who later became pregnant and three who delivered. Conclusions TAE with NBCA, which has an embolic effect unrelated to clotting dysfunction for massive haemorrhage during the peripartum period, is a minimally invasive and very effective treatment method for patients with severe DIC. PMID:24223099

  19. Update on the Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II): statistical analysis plan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies had suggested that the outcome for patients with spontaneous lobar intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) and no intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) might be improved with early evacuation of the haematoma. The Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II) set out to establish whether a policy of earlier surgical evacuation of the haematoma in selected patients with spontaneous lobar ICH would improve outcome compared to a policy of initial conservative treatment. It is an international, multi-centre, prospective randomised parallel group trial of early surgery in patients with spontaneous lobar ICH. Outcome is measured at six months via a postal questionnaire. Results Recruitment to the study began on 27 November 2006 and closed on 15 August 2012 by which time 601 patients had been recruited. The protocol was published in Trials (http://www.trialsjournal.com/content/12/1/124/). This update presents the analysis plan for the study without reference to the unblinded data. The trial data will not be unblinded until after follow-up is completed in early 2013. The main trial results will be presented in spring 2013 with the aim to publish in a peer-reviewed journal at the same time. Conclusion The data from the trial will provide evidence on the benefits and risks of early surgery in patients with lobar ICH. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN22153967 PMID:23171588

  20. Late onset haemorrhagic disease in premature infants who received intravenous vitamin K1.

    PubMed

    Loughnan, P M; McDougall, P N; Balvin, H; Doyle, L W; Smith, A L

    1996-06-01

    The clinical details are reported of two premature infants who developed late onset haemorrhagic disease after receiving their initial doses of vitamin K1 prophylaxis intravenously. Both reported infants had received two doses of intravenous vitamin K1, 0.1 mg, in the 1st week of life, and a further oral dose, 1.0 mg, at 4 weeks. Bleeding due to vitamin K deficiency occurred on days 74 and 84, respectively. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding is rare in low birthweight infants, probably because it has been routine practice to give such infants intramuscular vitamin K1. One of the reported infants had cytomegalovirus hepatitis, the other did not have liver disease. These findings could be explained if intramuscular vitamin K1 were to have a longer duration of effect than intravenous vitamin K1. This may be because intramuscular vitamin K1 acts as a depot preparation. The findings suggest that intravenous vitamin K1 is less effective than intramuscular for long-term prophylaxis against late onset haemorrhagic disease. Intravenous vitamin K1 should not be used for long-term prophylaxis in the prevention of late onset haemorrhagic disease. PMID:8827551

  1. Metabolomics in diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Filla, Laura A; Edwards, James L

    2016-04-22

    With a global prevalence of 9%, diabetes is the direct cause of millions of deaths each year and is quickly becoming a health crisis. Major long-term complications of diabetes arise from persistent oxidative stress and dysfunction in multiple metabolic pathways. The most serious complications involve vascular damage and include cardiovascular disease as well as microvascular disorders such as nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. Current clinical analyses like glycated hemoglobin and plasma glucose measurements hold some value as prognostic indicators of the severity of complications, but investigations into the underlying pathophysiology are still lacking. Advancements in biotechnology hold the key to uncovering new pathways and establishing therapeutic targets. Metabolomics, the study of small endogenous molecules, is a powerful toolset for studying pathophysiological processes and has been used to elucidate metabolic signatures of diabetes in various biological systems. Current challenges in the field involve correlating these biomarkers to specific complications to provide a better prediction of future risk and disease progression. This review will highlight the progress that has been made in the field of metabolomics including technological advancements, the identification of potential biomarkers, and metabolic pathways relevant to macro- and microvascular diabetic complications. PMID:26891794

  2. Primary postpartum haemorrhage in women with von Willebrand disease or carriership of haemophilia despite specialised care: a retrospective survey.

    PubMed

    Stoof, S C M; van Steenbergen, H W; Zwagemaker, A; Sanders, Y V; Cannegieter, S C; Duvekot, J J; Leebeek, F W G; Peters, M; Kruip, M J H A; Eikenboom, J

    2015-07-01

    Pregnant women with bleeding disorders require specialised peripartum care to prevent postpartum haemorrhage (PPH). If third trimester coagulation factor levels are <0.50 IU mL(-1) , prophylactic treatment is indicated and administered according to international guidelines. However, optimal dose and duration are unknown and bleeding may still occur. The aim of this study was to investigate the outcome in women with von Willebrand disease (VWD) or haemophilia carriership treated according to current practice guidelines. From the period 2002-2011, 185 deliveries in 154 VWD women or haemophilia carriers were retrospectively included. Data on blood loss, bleeding disorder characteristics and obstetric risk factors were obtained. The outcome was primary PPH, defined as blood loss ≥500 mL within 24 h postpartum and severe PPH as blood loss ≥1000 mL. Primary PPH was observed in 62 deliveries (34%), 14 (8%) of which resulted in severe PPH. In 26 deliveries prophylactic treatment was administered due to factor levels below the 0.50 IU mL(-1) cut-off in the third trimester, 14 of which (54%) were complicated by PPH. We found an increased PPH risk in deliveries given prophylactic treatment compared with deliveries without (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.2-6.3). In conclusion, PPH incidence was highest in deliveries with the lowest factor levels in the third trimester. Currently, delivery outcome in women with bleeding disorders is unsatisfactory, given the high PPH incidence despite specialised care. Future studies are required to optimise management of deliveries in this patient population. PMID:25688733

  3. Post dengue neurological complication.

    PubMed

    Hasliza, A H; Tohid, H; Loh, K Y; Santhi, P

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is highly endemic in many tropical countries including Malaysia. However, neurological complications arising from dengue infection is not common; Gullain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is one of these infrequent complications. In this paper, we have reported a case in which a 39-year-old woman presented with a neurological complication of dengue infection without typical symptoms and signs of dengue fever. She had a history of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) followed by an upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) weeks prior to her presentation rendering GBS secondary to the post viral URTI and AGE as the most likely diagnosis. Presence of thrombocytopenia was the only clue for dengue in this case. PMID:27099661

  4. Complications of dental surgery.

    PubMed

    Lillich, J D

    1998-08-01

    Both retrospective data and clinical experience indicate that complications of dental surgery are occasionally encountered and, to some extent, are inevitable. Many of the reported complications related to dental surgery such as incomplete removal of diseased teeth or removal of the wrong tooth can be avoided with sound preoperative planning and intraoperative technique. Diseased teeth should be properly identified prior to and during surgery. In addition, complete removal of the diseased tooth must be performed. Use of intraoperative radiographic examination to confirm the location of the diseased tooth and to document its removal cannot be overemphasized. Iatrogenic fracture of the maxillary or mandibular alveolar walls or palatine bone can be avoided by proper placement of the dental punch. The chances of developing incisional drainage or secondary sinusitis can be reduced by use of appropriate systemic antibiotics. These factors should guide the surgical approach to dental surgery to reduce the likelihood of developing common complications. PMID:9742671

  5. Complications of cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Chan, Elsie; Mahroo, Omar A R; Spalton, David J

    2010-11-01

    Modern cataract surgery is safe in more than 95 per cent of patients. In the small number of cases where a serious complication occurs, the most common is an intra-operative posterior capsular rupture. This can lead to vitreous loss or a dropped nucleus and can increase the risk of post-operative cystoid macular oedema or retinal detachment. Post-operatively, posterior capsular opacification is the most common complication and can be readily treated with a YAG capsulotomy. The most devastating complication is endophthalmitis, the rate of which is now significantly decreased through the use of intracameral antibiotics. As a clinician, the most important step is to assess the patient pre-operatively to predict higher risk individuals and to counsel them appropriately. In these patients, various pre- or intra-operative management steps can be taken in addition to routine phacoemulsification to optimise their visual outcome. PMID:20735786

  6. Osteoarticular complications of brucellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Colmenero, J D; Reguera, J M; Fernández-Nebro, A; Cabrera-Franquelo, F

    1991-01-01

    Two hundred and sixty three patients with a diagnosis of brucellosis between January 1984 and December 1987 were studied prospectively. Sixty five patients (25%) developed osteoarticular complications. These patients had a more prolonged course than those with no complications. Spondylitis in 38 (58%) and sacroiliitis in 29 (45%) were the most prevalent. There were no significant laboratory, serological, or bacteriological differences between patients with and without osteoarticular complications. At diagnosis 47 patients (72%) showed radiographic abnormalities, commonly in axial sites but rarely in peripheral sites. Radionuclide bone scan was positive with no radiographic abnormalities in 17 (26%) of cases. Fifty seven patients received medical treatment alone, 51 (89%) being cured with a single course of treatment. Treatment failed or there was a relapse in six patients (11%), of whom five had spondylitis. Eight of the 65 patients (12%), all of whom had spondylitis and paravertebral or epidural abscesses, also required surgical treatment. Images PMID:1994863

  7. Late complications of tracheotomy.

    PubMed

    Wood, D E; Mathisen, D J

    1991-09-01

    Complications of tracheotomy are largely preventable. Although some authors cite these complications as indications for prolonged endotracheal intubation to avoid tracheotomy, others believe that the laryngotracheal complications of prolonged endotracheal intubation warrant early tracheotomy. Obviously, unnecessary tracheotomies should not be performed, and the controversy regarding the timing of conversion of endotracheal intubation to tracheotomy is handled in an earlier article in this issue. We feel, however, that a properly performed tracheotomy has a low incidence of complications that are more easily managed than are the complex laryngotracheal complications of prolonged endotracheal intubation. Significant post-tracheotomy tracheal stenosis occurs in 8% of patients and is secondary to an overly large tracheotomy stoma or damage at the tracheostomy tube cuff site. Stoma stenosis can be minimized by not making an overly large tracheal stoma and by prevention of undue leverage on the tracheostomy tube. Cuff stenosis can be minimized by the use of the high-volume low-pressure cuffs with careful prevention of overdistention of the cuff. Bronchoscopic dilatation, laser resection, and Silastic T-tube placement provide control of the airway until definitive surgical resection and reconstruction can be performed safely. Tracheoesophageal fistula is an uncommon but life-threatening complication that can be prevented by avoiding overdistention of the tracheostomy tube cuff and by avoiding the concomitant use of a stiff nasogastric tube. These patients are best managed conservatively until they are able to be weaned from a ventilator. A single-stage repair of both the esophagus and the trachea should then be done. Tracheoinnominate artery fistula can be avoided by correct placement of the tracheostomy stoma through the second and third tracheal rings rather than lower in the trachea and by avoidance of overinflation of tracheostomy tube cuffs. PMID:1934960

  8. Macrocephaly in infancy: benign enlargement of the subarachnoid spaces and subdural collections.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Jacqueline; Choudhary, Arabinda Kumar; Piatt, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Benign enlargement of the subarachnoid spaces (BESS) is a common finding on imaging studies indicated by macrocephaly in infancy. This finding has been associated with the presence of subdural fluid collections that are sometimes construed as suggestive of abusive head injury. The prevalence of BESS among infants with macrocephaly and the prevalence of subdural collections among infants with BESS are both poorly defined. The goal of this study was to determine the relative frequencies of BESS, hydrocephalus, and subdural collections in a large consecutive series of imaging studies performed for macrocephaly and to determine the prevalence of subdural fluid collections among patients with BESS. METHODS A text search of radiology requisitions identified studies performed for macrocephaly in patients ≤ 2 years of age. Studies of patients with hydrocephalus or acute trauma were excluded. Studies that demonstrated hydrocephalus or chronic subdural hematoma not previously recognized but responsible for macrocephaly were noted but not investigated further. The remaining studies were reviewed for the presence of incidental subdural collections and for measurement of the depth of the subarachnoid space. A 3-point scale was used to grade BESS: Grade 0, < 5 mm; Grade 1, 5-9 mm; and Grade 2, ≥ 10 mm. RESULTS After exclusions, there were 538 studies, including 7 cases of hydrocephalus (1.3%) and 1 large, bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (0.2%). There were incidental subdural collections in 21 cases (3.9%). Two hundred sixty-five studies (49.2%) exhibited Grade 1 BESS, and 46 studies (8.6%) exhibited Grade 2 BESS. The prevalence of incidental subdural collections among studies with BESS was 18 of 311 (5.8%). The presence of BESS was associated with a greater prevalence of subdural collections, and higher grades of BESS were associated with increasing prevalence of subdural collections. After controlling for imaging modality, the odds ratio of the association of

  9. Reversal of cerebral vasospasm via intravenous sodium nitrite after subarachnoid hemorrhage in primates

    PubMed Central

    Fathi, Ali Reza; Pluta, Ryszard M.; Bakhtian, Kamran D.; Qi, Meng; Lonser, Russell R.

    2016-01-01

    Object Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced vasospasm is a significant underlying cause of aneurysm rupture-related morbidity and death. While long-term intravenous infusion of sodium nitrite (NaNO2) can prevent cerebral vasospasm after SAH, it is not known if the intravenous administration of this compound can reverse established SAH-induced vasospasm. To determine if the intravenous infusion of NaNO2 can reverse established vasospasm, the authors infused primates with the compound after SAH-induced vasospasm was established. Methods Subarachnoid hemorrhage–induced vasospasm was created in 14 cynomolgus macaques via subarachnoid implantation of a 5-ml blood clot. On Day 7 after clot implantation, animals were randomized to either control (saline infusion, 5 monkeys) or treatment groups (intravenous NaNO2 infusion at 300 μg/kg/hr for 3 hours [7 monkeys] or 8 hours [2 monkeys]). Arteriographic vessel diameter was blindly analyzed to determine the degree of vasospasm before, during, and after treatment. Nitric oxide metabolites (nitrite, nitrate, and S-nitrosothiols) were measured in whole blood and CSF. Results Moderate-to-severe vasospasm was present in all animals before treatment (control, 36.2% ± 8.8% [mean ± SD]; treatment, 45.5% ± 12.5%; p = 0.9). While saline infusion did not reduce vasospasm, NaNO2 infusion significantly reduced the degree of vasospasm (26.9% ± 7.6%; p = 0.008). Reversal of the vasospasm lasted more than 2 hours after cessation of the infusion and could be maintained with a prolonged infusion. Nitrite (peak value, 3.7 ± 2.1 μmol/L), nitrate (18.2 ± 5.3 μmol/L), and S-nitrosothiols (33.4 ± 11.4 nmol/L) increased significantly in whole blood, and nitrite increased significantly in CSF. Conclusions These findings indicate that the intravenous infusion of NaNO2 can reverse SAH-induced vasospasm in primates. Further, these findings indicate that a similar treatment paradigm could be useful in reversing cerebral vasospasm after

  10. Hepatic artery reinforcement after post pancreatectomy haemorrhage caused by pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Merdrignac, Aude; Bergeat, Damien; Levi Sandri, Giovanni Battista; Agus, Marina; Boudjema, Karim; Sulpice, Laurent; Meunier, Bernard

    2016-08-01

    Post-pancreatectomy hemorrhage (PPH) is a major complication occurring in 6-8% of patients after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). Arterial bleeding is the most frequent cause. Mortality rate could reach 30% after grade C PPH according to ISGPS classification. Complete interruption of hepatic arterial flow has to be a salvage procedure because of the high risk of intrahepatic abscess following the procedure. We report a technique to perform an artery reinforcement after PPH caused by pancreatitis. A PD according to Whipple's procedure with child's reconstruction was performed in a 68-year-old man. At postoperative day 12, the patient presented a sudden violent abdominal pain with arterial hypotension and tachycardia. Computed tomography (CT) with intravenous contrast injection was performed. Arterial and venous phases showed a contrast extravasation on the hepatic artery. Origin of PPH was found as an erosion of hepatic artery caused by pancreatic leak. A peritoneal patch was placed around hepatic artery to reinforce damaged arterial wall. The peritoneal patch was harvested from right hypochondrium with a thin preperitoneal fat layer. The patch was sutured around hepatic artery with musculoaponeurotic face placed on the arterial wall. A CT was performed and hepatic artery was permeable with normal caliber in the portion of peritoneal patch reinforcement. The technique described in the present case consists in reinforcing directly arterial wall after occurrence of PPH. The use of a peritoneal patch during pancreatic surgery has first been described to replace a portion of portal vein after venous resection with the peritoneal layer placed on the intraluminal side of the vein. The present case describes a salvage technique to reinforce damaged artery after PPH in context of pancreatic leak. This simple technique could be useful to avoid complex arterial reconstruction and recurrent bleeding in septic context. PMID:27563565

  11. Hepatic artery reinforcement after post pancreatectomy haemorrhage caused by pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Merdrignac, Aude; Bergeat, Damien; Levi Sandri, Giovanni Battista; Agus, Marina; Boudjema, Karim; Sulpice, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Post-pancreatectomy hemorrhage (PPH) is a major complication occurring in 6–8% of patients after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). Arterial bleeding is the most frequent cause. Mortality rate could reach 30% after grade C PPH according to ISGPS classification. Complete interruption of hepatic arterial flow has to be a salvage procedure because of the high risk of intrahepatic abscess following the procedure. We report a technique to perform an artery reinforcement after PPH caused by pancreatitis. A PD according to Whipple’s procedure with child’s reconstruction was performed in a 68-year-old man. At postoperative day 12, the patient presented a sudden violent abdominal pain with arterial hypotension and tachycardia. Computed tomography (CT) with intravenous contrast injection was performed. Arterial and venous phases showed a contrast extravasation on the hepatic artery. Origin of PPH was found as an erosion of hepatic artery caused by pancreatic leak. A peritoneal patch was placed around hepatic artery to reinforce damaged arterial wall. The peritoneal patch was harvested from right hypochondrium with a thin preperitoneal fat layer. The patch was sutured around hepatic artery with musculoaponeurotic face placed on the arterial wall. A CT was performed and hepatic artery was permeable with normal caliber in the portion of peritoneal patch reinforcement. The technique described in the present case consists in reinforcing directly arterial wall after occurrence of PPH. The use of a peritoneal patch during pancreatic surgery has first been described to replace a portion of portal vein after venous resection with the peritoneal layer placed on the intraluminal side of the vein. The present case describes a salvage technique to reinforce damaged artery after PPH in context of pancreatic leak. This simple technique could be useful to avoid complex arterial reconstruction and recurrent bleeding in septic context. PMID:27563565

  12. Intradialytic complications during hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Andrew

    2006-04-01

    With the advent of developments and advances in hemodialysis machine technology, dialysate water purification, and dialyzers, the clinical spectrum of intradialytic complications has changed over the decades. In the pioneering days of hemodialysis, patients could develop allergic reactions to dialyzer membranes, sterilizing and reprocessing agents, coupled with machines that could not accurately control ultrafiltration rates, and chemically and bacterially contaminated dialysate. Whereas today, although cardiovascular problems remain the most common intradialytic complication, these are mainly due to the time restraints of trying to cope with excessive dialytic weight gains and achieve target dry weight on a thrice weekly schedule, coupled with an aging elderly dialysis population with increasing co-morbidity. PMID:16623668

  13. Avoiding Complications in Gigantomastia.

    PubMed

    Kling, Russell E; Tobler, William D; Gusenoff, Jeffrey A; Rubin, J Peter

    2016-04-01

    Gigantomastia is a disabling condition for patients and presents unique challenges to plastic surgeons. Presentation can occur throughout different phases of life, and treatment often begins with nonoperative measures; however, the most effective way to relieve symptoms is surgical breast reduction. Because of the large amount of tissue removed, surgeons can encounter different intraoperative and postoperative complications. By understanding this disease process and these complications, surgeons can attempt to minimize their occurrences. The authors present an overview of the cause, preoperative evaluation, techniques, and outcomes. Additionally, they present outcomes data from their center on 40 patients. PMID:27012802

  14. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Volunteer Support TeamCindy Upcoming Events Past Events Support Canada Online Store About Us BAF at a Glance Board of Directors / Staff Medical Advisory Board Sponsors Publications BAF Newsletters Annual Reports News Public Service Announcements Press Releases Blog Administrative Tax ...

  15. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    MedlinePlus

    ... The Christopher C. Getch, MD Chair of Research Carol W. Harvey Memorial Chair of Research The Karen ... The Christopher C. Getch, MD Chair of Research Carol W. Harvey Memorial Chair of Research The Karen ...

  16. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis ... UT Southwestern Medical Center. Copyright © 1997-2016 - The Internet Stroke Center. All rights reserved. The information contained ...

  17. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    MedlinePlus

    ... can result from the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm — a weakened, dilated area of a blood vessel ... blood vessels in the brain even after the aneurysm that caused the hemorrhage is treated. Most of ...

  18. Medical complications following splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Buzelé, R; Barbier, L; Sauvanet, A; Fantin, B

    2016-08-01

    Splenectomy is attended by medical complications, principally infectious and thromboembolic; the frequency of complications varies with the conditions that led to splenectomy (hematologic splenectomy, trauma, presence of portal hypertension). Most infectious complications are caused by encapsulated bacteria (Meningococcus, Pneumococcus, Hemophilus). These occur mainly in children and somewhat less commonly in adults within the first two years following splenectomy. Post-splenectomy infections are potentially severe with overwhelming post-splenectomy infection (OPSI) and this justifies preventive measures (prophylactic antibiotics, appropriate immunizations, patient education) and demands prompt antibiotic management with third-generation cephalosporins for any post-splenectomy fever. Thromboembolic complications can involve both the caval system (deep-vein thrombophlebitis, pulmonary embolism) and the portal system. Portal vein thrombosis occurs more commonly in patients with myeloproliferative disease and cirrhosis. No thromboembolic prophylaxis is recommended apart from perioperative low molecular weight heparin. However, some authors choose to prescribe a short course of anti-platelet medication if the post-splenectomy patient develops significant thrombocytosis. Thrombosis of the portal or caval venous system requires prolonged warfarin anticoagulation for 3 to 6 months. Finally, some studies have suggested an increase in the long-term incidence of cancer in splenectomized patients. PMID:27289254

  19. Hypoglycemia: The neglected complication

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Mukherjee, Jagat Jyoti; Venkataraman, Subramanium; Bantwal, Ganapathi; Shaikh, Shehla; Saboo, Banshi; Das, Ashok Kumar; Ramachandran, Ambady

    2013-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is an important complication of glucose-lowering therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. Attempts made at intensive glycemic control invariably increases the risk of hypoglycemia. A six-fold increase in deaths due to diabetes has been attributed to patients experiencing severe hypoglycemia in comparison to those not experiencing severe hypoglycemia Repeated episodes of hypoglycemia can lead to impairment of the counter-regulatory system with the potential for development of hypoglycemia unawareness. The short- and long-term complications of diabetes related hypoglycemia include precipitation of acute cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarction, neurocognitive dysfunction, retinal cell death and loss of vision in addition to health-related quality of life issues pertaining to sleep, driving, employment, recreational activities involving exercise and travel. There is an urgent need to examine the clinical spectrum and burden of hypoglycemia so that adequate control measures can be implemented against this neglected life-threatening complication. Early recognition of hypoglycemia risk factors, self-monitoring of blood glucose, selection of appropriate treatment regimens with minimal or no risk of hypoglycemia and appropriate educational programs for healthcare professionals and patients with diabetes are the major ways forward to maintain good glycemic control, minimize the risk of hypoglycemia and thereby prevent long-term complications. PMID:24083163

  20. Complicating Methodological Transparency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges-Rhoads, Sarah; Van Cleave, Jessica; Hughes, Hilary E.

    2016-01-01

    A historical indicator of the quality, validity, and rigor of qualitative research has been the documentation and disclosure of the behind-the-scenes work of the researcher. In this paper, we use what we call "methodological data" as a tool to complicate the possibility and desirability of such transparency. Specifically, we draw on our…

  1. Treatment of complicated grief

    PubMed Central

    Rosner, Rita; Pfoh, Gabriele; Kotoučová, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    Following the death of a loved one, a small group of grievers develop an abnormal grieving style, termed complicated or prolonged grief. In the effort to establish complicated grief as a disorder in DSM and ICD, several attempts have been made over the past two decades to establish symptom criteria for this form of grieving. Complicated grief is different from depression and PTSD yet often comorbid with other psychological disorders. Meta-analyses of grief interventions show small to medium effect sizes, with only few studies yielding large effect sizes. In this article, an integrative cognitive behavioral treatment manual for complicated grief disorder (CG-CBT) of 25 individual sessions is described. Three treatment phases, each entailing several treatment strategies, allow patients to stabilize, explore, and confront the most painful aspects of the loss, and finally to integrate and transform their grief. Core aspects are cognitive restructuring and confrontation. Special attention is given to practical exercises. This article includes the case report of a woman whose daughter committed suicide. PMID:22893810

  2. Cardiovascular Complications of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gongora, Maria Carolina; Wenger, Nanette K.

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy causes significant metabolic and hemodynamic changes in a woman’s physiology to allow for fetal growth. The inability to adapt to these changes might result in the development of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (hypertension, preeclampsia or eclampsia), gestational diabetes and preterm birth. Contrary to previous beliefs these complications are not limited to the pregnancy period and may leave permanent vascular and metabolic damage. There is in addition, a direct association between these disorders and increased risk of future cardiovascular disease (CVD, including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, heart failure and stroke) and diabetes mellitus. Despite abundant evidence of this association, women who present with these complications of pregnancy do not receive adequate postpartum follow up and counseling regarding their increased risk of future CVD. The postpartum period in these women represents a unique opportunity to intervene with lifestyle modifications designed to reduce the development of premature cardiovascular complications. In some cases it allows early diagnosis and treatment of chronic hypertension or diabetes mellitus. The awareness of this relationship is growing in the medical community, especially among obstetricians and primary care physicians, who play a pivotal role in detecting these complications and assuring appropriate follow up. PMID:26473833

  3. Complications and Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... successfully cure SCD. Complications from hydroxyurea therapy and stem cell transplants are rare but can be serious or life-threatening. People with SCD and their families should ask their doctors about the benefits and risks of each. Read more about treatment ...

  4. Complicating Visual Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daiello, Vicki; Hathaway, Kevin; Rhoades, Mindi; Walker, Sydney

    2006-01-01

    Arguing for complicating the study of visual culture, as advocated by James Elkins, this article explicates and explores Lacanian psychoanalytic theory and pedagogy in view of its implications for art education practice. Subjectivity, a concept of import for addressing student identity and the visual, steers the discussion informed by pedagogical…

  5. Acute subarachnoid hemorrhage in posterior condylar canal dural arteriovenous fistula: imaging features with endovascular management

    PubMed Central

    Mondel, Prabath Kumar; Saraf, Rashmi; Limaye, Uday S

    2014-01-01

    A 43-year-old man presented with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. He was investigated and found to have a rare posterior condylar canal dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF). DAVFs of the posterior condylar canal are rare. Venous drainage of the DAVF was through a long, tortuous, and aneurysmal bridging vein. We describe the clinical presentation, cross sectional imaging, angiographic features, and endovascular management of this patient. The patient was treated by transarterial embolization of the fistula through the ascending pharyngeal artery. This is the first report of an acutely bled posterior condylar canal DAVF treated by transarterial Onyx embolization with balloon protection in the vertebral artery. The patient recovered without any neurological deficit and had an excellent outcome. On 6 month follow-up angiogram, there was stable occlusion of the dural fistula. PMID:24990846

  6. Subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured intracranial aneurysm following posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nanba, Takamasa; Kashimura, Hiroshi; Saura, Hiroaki; Takeda, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Although posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is rarely associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage, to our knowledge, rupture of a concomitant cerebral aneurysm following PRES has not been reported. We describe a patient with atypical PRES involving the brainstem, thalamus, and periventricular white matter without cortical or subcortical edema of the parietooccipital lobe on magnetic resonance imaging, with rupture of a concomitant cerebral aneurysm. Preexisting extremely high blood pressure may trigger atypical PRES, and failure to lower blood pressure may lead to a concomitant aneurysm rupture. In the future treatment of hypertensive urgency with a recurrence of symptoms and mean arterial blood pressure >150 mmHg, it is advisable to immediately hospitalize the patient for aggressive blood pressure management, especially if PRES is suspected based on clinical and radiological features. PMID:27365964

  7. Melatonin mitigate cerebral vasospasm after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage: a study of synchrotron radiation angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, J.; He, C.; Chen, L.; Han, T.; Huang, S.; Huang, Y.; Bai, Y.; Bao, Y.; Zhang, H.; Ling, F.

    2013-06-01

    Cerebral vasospasm (CV) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating and unsolved clinical issue. In this study, the rat models, which had been induced SAH by prechiasmatic cistern injection, were treated with melatonin. Synchrotron radiation angiography (SRA) was employed to detect and evaluate CV of animal models. Neurological scoring and histological examinations were used to assess the neurological deficits and CV as well. Using SRA techniques and histological analyses, the anterior cerebral artery diameters of SAH rats with melatonin administration were larger than those without melatonin treatment (p < 0.05). The neurological deficits of SAH rats treated with melatonin were less than those without melatonin treatment (p < 0.05). We concluded that SRA was a precise and in vivo tool to observe and evaluate CV of SAH rats; intraperitoneally administration of melatonin could mitigate CV after experimental SAH.

  8. Spontaneous resolution of an isolated cervical anterior spinal artery aneurysm after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Pahl, Felix Hendrik; de Oliveira, Matheus Fernandes; Rotta, Marcus Alexandre Cavalcanti; Dias, Guilherme Marcos Soares; Rezende, André Luiz; Rotta, José Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Background: Isolated cervical anterior spinal artery aneurysms are extremely rare. Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) secondary to such lesions have been described only in six cases to the best of our knowledge. Case Description: We describe an unusual clinical picture of SAH due to rupture of anterior spinal artery aneurysm in a patient with previous normal angiogram. Due to the location of the aneurysm and clinical status of the patient, conservative management was proposed, and she was discharged to further follow-up. Monthly routine angiograms revealed resolution of the aneurysm 90 days after bleeding, which was highly suggestive of vascular dissection. Conclusion: We highlight the need to consider these aneurysms in the differential diagnosis of SAH, especially when occurring in the posterior fossa and when angiography findings are inconclusive. PMID:25317354

  9. A Hypothesis: Hydrogen Sulfide Might Be Neuroprotective against Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Induced Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yong-Peng; Chi, Xiang-Lin; Liu, Li-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Gases such as nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) play important roles both in normal physiology and in disease. Recent studies have shown that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) protects neurons against oxidative stress and ischemia-reperfusion injury and attenuates lipopolysaccharides (LPS) induced neuroinflammation in microglia, exhibiting anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic activities. The gas H2S is emerging as a novel regulator of important physiologic functions such as arterial diameter, blood flow, and leukocyte adhesion. It has been known that multiple factors, including oxidative stress, free radicals, and neuronal nitric oxide synthesis as well as abnormal inflammatory responses, are involved in the mechanism underlying the brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Based on the multiple physiologic functions of H2S, we speculate that it might be a promising, effective, and specific therapy for brain injury after SAH. PMID:24707204

  10. Concurrence of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Stanford Type A Acute Aortic Dissection.

    PubMed

    Inamasu, Joji; Suzuki, Takeya; Wakako, Akira; Sadato, Akiyo; Hirose, Yuichi

    2016-06-01

    We report a rare case of concurrent aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and acute aortic dissection (AAD). A 38-year-old man visited our hospital complaining of severe headache, and brain computed tomography (CT) revealed the presence of SAH. Thoracic to neck computed tomography angiography (CTA), performed in addition to brain CTA, suggested a tear in the aortic arch, and subsequent CT aortography established the diagnosis of Stanford type A AAD. The AAD in our patient, who reported no episodes of chest or back pain, was detected incidentally by thoracic to neck CTA. The imaging study has rarely been indicated for SAH except that it provides additional anatomical information in patients for whom extracranial-intracranial bypass surgery or endovascular treatment is considered. Nevertheless, our experience may highlight additional diagnostic value of thoracic to neck CTA in SAH patients. PMID:27083068

  11. Transpulmonary Thermodilution-Based Management of Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, Tatsushi; Kazumata, Ken; Ueyama-Mutoh, Tomoko; Taki, Yasuyuki; Ishikawa, Tatsuya

    2015-11-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is a potentially catastrophic but treatable systemic event after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The development of NPE most frequently occurs immediately after SAH, and the severity is usually self-limiting. Despite extensive research efforts and a breadth of collective clinical experience, accurate diagnosis of NPE can be difficult, and effective hemodynamic treatment options are limited. Recently, a bedside transpulmonary thermodilution device has been introduced that traces physiological patterns consistent with current theories regarding the mechanism (hydrostatic or permeability PE) of NPE. This article provides an overview of the clinical usefulness of the advanced technique for use in the neurointensive care unit for the diagnosis and management of post-SAH NPE. PMID:26517502

  12. Compressive Cervicothoracic Adhesive Arachnoiditis following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Rahmathulla, Gazanfar; Kamian, Kambiz

    2014-08-01

    We present the case of a 55-year-old woman with diffuse adhesive arachnoiditis in the posterior fossa and cervicothoracic spine following posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). She underwent aneurysm clipping with subsequent gradual neurologic decline associated with sensory disturbances, gait ataxia, and spastic paraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse adhesive arachnoiditis in the posterior fossa and cervicothoracic spine, syringobulbia, and multiple arachnoid cysts in the cervicothoracic spine along with syringohydromyelia. Early surgical intervention with microlysis of the adhesions and duraplasty at the clinically relevant levels resulted in clinical improvement. Although adhesive arachnoiditis, secondary arachnoid cysts, and cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities resulting in syrinx are rare following aneurysmal SAH, early recognition and appropriate intervention lead to good clinical outcomes. PMID:25083391

  13. Role of unphosphorylated transcription factor STAT3 in late cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Samraj, Ajoy K; Müller, Anne H; Grell, Anne-Sofie; Edvinsson, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms behind increased cerebral vasospasm and local inflammation in late cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are poorly elucidated. Using system biology tools and experimental SAH models, we have identified signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) transcription factor as a possible major regulatory molecule. On the basis of the presence of transcription factor binding sequence in the promoters of differentially regulated genes (significant enrichment PE: 6 × 105) and the consistent expression of STAT3 (mRNA, P=0.0159 and Protein, P=0.0467), we hypothesize that unphosphorylated STAT3 may directly DNA bind and probably affect the genes that are involved in inflammation and late cerebral ischemia to influence the pathologic progression of SAH. PMID:24517975

  14. Causal Structure of Brain Physiology after Brain Injury from Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Claassen, Jan; Rahman, Shah Atiqur; Huang, Yuxiao; Frey, Hans-Peter; Schmidt, J. Michael; Albers, David; Falo, Cristina Maria; Park, Soojin; Agarwal, Sachin; Connolly, E. Sander; Kleinberg, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    High frequency physiologic data are routinely generated for intensive care patients. While massive amounts of data make it difficult for clinicians to extract meaningful signals, these data could provide insight into the state of critically ill patients and guide interventions. We develop uniquely customized computational methods to uncover the causal structure within systemic and brain physiologic measures recorded in a neurological intensive care unit after subarachnoid hemorrhage. While the data have many missing values, poor signal-to-noise ratio, and are composed from a heterogeneous patient population, our advanced imputation and causal inference techniques enable physiologic models to be learned for individuals. Our analyses confirm that complex physiologic relationships including demand and supply of oxygen underlie brain oxygen measurements and that mechanisms for brain swelling early after injury may differ from those that develop in a delayed fashion. These inference methods will enable wider use of ICU data to understand patient physiology. PMID:27123582

  15. Subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured intracranial aneurysm following posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nanba, Takamasa; Kashimura, Hiroshi; Saura, Hiroaki; Takeda, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Although posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is rarely associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage, to our knowledge, rupture of a concomitant cerebral aneurysm following PRES has not been reported. We describe a patient with atypical PRES involving the brainstem, thalamus, and periventricular white matter without cortical or subcortical edema of the parietooccipital lobe on magnetic resonance imaging, with rupture of a concomitant cerebral aneurysm. Preexisting extremely high blood pressure may trigger atypical PRES, and failure to lower blood pressure may lead to a concomitant aneurysm rupture. In the future treatment of hypertensive urgency with a recurrence of symptoms and mean arterial blood pressure >150 mmHg, it is advisable to immediately hospitalize the patient for aggressive blood pressure management, especially if PRES is suspected based on clinical and radiological features. PMID:27365964

  16. Carotid rete mirabile associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage from intracranial aneurysm: A case report and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Yamaki, Vitor Nagai; Júnior, Fernando Mendes Paschoal; Piske, Ronie Leo; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Carotid rete mirabile (CRM) is a rare physiological vascular network in humans that is most often found in Eastern populations. This paper describes a CRM associated with an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) and discusses the details of the patient’s treatment. A 28-year-old woman was admitted to our service with clinical signs and symptoms of a spontaneous aSAH. Computed tomography revealed a diffuse and extensive SAH (Fisher group IV), while an angiogram showed an abnormal collateral network in the right carotid system and a hypoplastic aspect to the internal carotid artery (ICA) on the same side. In addition, a saccular aneurysm with a diameter of 9.5 mm was present in the ophthalmic segment of the left ICA. This case is extremely uncommon. To avoid rebleeding in the patient, we successfully treated the patient by clipping the aneurysmal lesion. No procedure was performed for the CRM. PMID:25934776

  17. Solitary ruptured aneurysm of the spinal artery of adamkiewicz with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Son, Seong; Lee, Sang-Gu; Park, Cheol-Wan

    2013-07-01

    Spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to solitary spinal aneurysm is extremely rare. A 45-year-old female patient visited the emergency department with severe headache and back pain. Imaging studies showed cerebral SAH in parietal lobe and spinal SAH in thoracolumbar level. Spinal angiography revealed a small pearl and string-like aneurysm of the Adamkiewicz artery at the T12 level. One month after onset, her back pain aggravated, and follow-up imaging study showed arachnoiditis. Two months after onset, her symptoms improved, and follow-up imaging study showed resolution of SAH. The present case of spinal SAH due to rupture of dissecting aneurysm of the Adamkiewicz artery underwent subsequent spontaneous resolution, indicating that the wait-and-see strategy may provide adequate treatment option. PMID:24044082

  18. [Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Stroke 2015: overview of the chapter on Subarachnoid Hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2016-04-01

    After an interval of 6 years, the Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Stroke were revised in 2015 in accordance with recent advances in clinical knowledge. The chapter on subarachnoid hemorrhage includes new and revised recommendations for diagnosis, treatment selection, and management of vasospasm. The chapter on diagnosis recommends re-examination of vascular images at regular intervals in cases in which cerebral aneurysm was not detected on the first examination. The section dealing with treatment selection for cerebral aneurysmal emphasizes that the method for aneurysm obliteration should be selected based on consultation with both surgical and endovascular specialists. The role of triple-H therapy(i.e., induced hypertension, hypervolemia, and hemodilution) has changed from a preventive measure to a treatment option for symptomatic cerebral vasospasm. PMID:27333759

  19. Causal Structure of Brain Physiology after Brain Injury from Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Jan; Rahman, Shah Atiqur; Huang, Yuxiao; Frey, Hans-Peter; Schmidt, J Michael; Albers, David; Falo, Cristina Maria; Park, Soojin; Agarwal, Sachin; Connolly, E Sander; Kleinberg, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    High frequency physiologic data are routinely generated for intensive care patients. While massive amounts of data make it difficult for clinicians to extract meaningful signals, these data could provide insight into the state of critically ill patients and guide interventions. We develop uniquely customized computational methods to uncover the causal structure within systemic and brain physiologic measures recorded in a neurological intensive care unit after subarachnoid hemorrhage. While the data have many missing values, poor signal-to-noise ratio, and are composed from a heterogeneous patient population, our advanced imputation and causal inference techniques enable physiologic models to be learned for individuals. Our analyses confirm that complex physiologic relationships including demand and supply of oxygen underlie brain oxygen measurements and that mechanisms for brain swelling early after injury may differ from those that develop in a delayed fashion. These inference methods will enable wider use of ICU data to understand patient physiology. PMID:27123582

  20. Protective effects of perfluorooctyl-bromide nanoparticles on early brain injuries following subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huan; Xu, Rui; Xie, Fei; Xu, Wei; Zeng, Meng-Fei; Wang, Xin; Zhu, Ji

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the protective effects of perfluorooctyl-bromide (PFOB) nanoparticles on early brain injury (EBI) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a total of 120 rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: Sham operation group (n = 40), SAH group (n = 40), and SAH + PFOB group (n = 40). Endovascular perforation was performed to induce subarachnoid hemorrhage. Brain water content was measured 24 h after surgery. Meanwhile, morphological changes in the rat hippocampal CA1 region were examined using light and transmission electron microscopy. The rate of neuronal apoptosis in rat hippocampal CA1 region was determined using TUNEL assay. Protein and mRNA expression levels of Caspase-3, Bax, and Bcl-2 were measured using western blot and RT-PCR assays 12, 24, 48, and 72 h after surgery. Compared to the SAH group, the SAH + PFOB group had significantly lower brain water content (P<0.01), with alleviated morphological abnormalities in HE-stained neurons and significantly decreased neurons with karyopyknosis and hyperchromatism in the hippocampal CA1 region. Electron microscopy revealed reduction of neuronal apoptosis, alleviation of glial cell swelling, and mitigation of perivascular edema in the hippocampal region. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the expression of apoptosis-related factors Caspase-3 and Bax was significantly reduced, while that of the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2 was significantly increased. TUNEL staining showed that neuronal apoptosis was significantly reduced in the hippocampal CA1 region (P<0.01). RT-PCR and Western-blot data indicated that expressions of Caspase-3 and Bax were both significantly reduced, while bcl-2 expression was increased significantly at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h after SAH (P<0.01). Together, our data support that PFOB nanoparticles with high oxygen content could counteract ischemia and hypoxia, block neuronal apoptotic pathways, reduce neuronal apoptosis, and therefore, achieve neuroprotective effects in EBI