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Sample records for complicating subarachnoid haemorrhage

  1. Subarachnoid Haemorrhage and Sports

    PubMed Central

    Sousa Nanji, Liliana; Melo, Teresa P.; Canhão, Patrícia; Fonseca, Ana Catarina; Ferro, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Some cases of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) have been associated with vigorous physical activity, including sports. Our research aimed to describe the association between SAH and sports and to identify the types of sports that were more frequently found as precipitating factors in a tertiary single-centre SAH register. Methods We retrieved information from a prospectively collected SAH registry and reviewed discharge notes of acute SAH patients admitted to the Stroke Unit of Hospital de Santa Maria, Lisbon, between 1995 and 2014. Results Out of 738 patients included in the analysis, 424 (57.5%) cases of SAH were preceded by physical activity. Nine cases (1.2%) were associated with sports, namely running (2 cases), aerobics (2 cases), cycling, body balance, dance, surf and windsurf. Patients with SAH while practicing sports were younger than controls (average age 43.1 vs. 57.0 years; p = 0.007). In 1 patient, there was a report of trauma to the neck. Patients in the sports group only had Hunt and Hess scale grades 1 (11.1%) or 2 (88.9%) at admission, while patients in the control group had a wider distribution in severity. Conclusions Our findings indicate that SAH precipitated by sports is not very frequent and is uncommonly related to trauma. Patients who suffered SAH associated with sports were younger and apparently had a milder clinical presentation. PMID:26648972

  2. [Depression remitted after subarachnoid haemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Lauritsen, Lise; Vinberg, Maj

    2015-01-26

    A 65-year-old man was seen in a specialized ambulatory for mood disorders because of treatment-resistant depression. He was treated throughout a period of three years with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, dual action, lithium, nortriptyline, reboxetine, aripiprazole, benzodiazepines, isocarboxazide and lamotrigine with no significant effect. However, the psychiatric symptoms resolved abruptly after a subarachnoid haemorrhage. The patient was turned over to his general practitioner 15 months after the incidence with continuously complete remission. PMID:25612950

  3. Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage from a neuroimaging perspective.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Manoel, Airton Leonardo; Mansur, Ann; Murphy, Amanda; Turkel-Parrella, David; Macdonald, Matt; Macdonald, R Loch; Montanera, Walter; Marotta, Thomas R; Bharatha, Aditya; Effendi, Khaled; Schweizer, Tom A

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging is a key element in the management of patients suffering from subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). In this article, we review the current literature to provide a summary of the existing neuroimaging methods available in clinical practice. Noncontrast computed tomography is highly sensitive in detecting subarachnoid blood, especially within 6 hours of haemorrhage. However, lumbar puncture should follow a negative noncontrast computed tomography scan in patients with symptoms suspicious of SAH. Computed tomography angiography is slowly replacing digital subtraction angiography as the first-line technique for the diagnosis and treatment planning of cerebral aneurysms, but digital subtraction angiography is still required in patients with diffuse SAH and negative initial computed tomography angiography. Delayed cerebral ischaemia is a common and serious complication after SAH. The modern concept of delayed cerebral ischaemia monitoring is shifting from modalities that measure vessel diameter to techniques focusing on brain perfusion. Lastly, evolving modalities applied to assess cerebral physiological, functional and cognitive sequelae after SAH, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging or positron emission tomography, are discussed. These new techniques may have the advantage over structural modalities due to their ability to assess brain physiology and function in real time. However, their use remains mainly experimental and the literature supporting their practice is still scarce. PMID:25673429

  4. Subarachnoid haemorrhage in children caused by cerebral tumour.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, G; Knuckey, N W; Gubbay, S S

    1983-01-01

    Subarachnoid haemorrhage in children is uncommon. In a review of 110 children with an intracranial tumour over a 20 year period there were four patients (3.6%) who presented with the typical features of a subarachnoid haemorrhage. During the same period of time there were 15 children who presented with subarachnoid haemorrhage of which 26% were secondary to a cerebral tumour. This study suggests that cerebral tumour is a common cause of subarachnoid haemorrhage in children. PMID:6101222

  5. Experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage results in multifocal axonal injury.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Terrance T; Magnoni, Sandra; MacDonald, Christine L; Dikranian, Krikor; Milner, Eric; Sorrell, James; Conte, Valeria; Benetatos, Joey J; Zipfel, Gregory J; Brody, David L

    2015-09-01

    The great majority of acute brain injury results from trauma or from disorders of the cerebrovasculature, i.e. ischaemic stroke or haemorrhage. These injuries are characterized by an initial insult that triggers a cascade of injurious cellular processes. The nature of these processes in spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage is poorly understood. Subarachnoid haemorrhage, a particularly deadly form of intracranial haemorrhage, shares key pathophysiological features with traumatic brain injury including exposure to a sudden pressure pulse. Here we provide evidence that axonal injury, a signature characteristic of traumatic brain injury, is also a prominent feature of experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage. Using histological markers of membrane disruption and cytoskeletal injury validated in analyses of traumatic brain injury, we show that axonal injury also occurs following subarachnoid haemorrhage in an animal model. Consistent with the higher prevalence of global as opposed to focal deficits after subarachnoid haemorrhage and traumatic brain injury in humans, axonal injury in this model is observed in a multifocal pattern not limited to the immediate vicinity of the ruptured artery. Ultrastructural analysis further reveals characteristic axonal membrane and cytoskeletal changes similar to those associated with traumatic axonal injury. Diffusion tensor imaging, a translational imaging technique previously validated in traumatic axonal injury, from these same specimens demonstrates decrements in anisotropy that correlate with histological axonal injury and functional outcomes. These radiological indicators identify a fibre orientation-dependent gradient of axonal injury consistent with a barotraumatic mechanism. Although traumatic and haemorrhagic acute brain injury are generally considered separately, these data suggest that a signature pathology of traumatic brain injury-axonal injury-is also a functionally significant feature of subarachnoid haemorrhage, raising the prospect of common diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic approaches to these conditions. PMID:26115676

  6. Subarachnoid haemorrhage mimicking transient ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Lai, C-H; Juan, Y-H; Chang, S-L; Lee, W-L; How, C-K; Hsu, T-F

    2015-08-01

    Patients often present to the emergency department with loss of consciousness. The differential diagnosis of such condition may be difficult because of limited clinical information. The authors present a case of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) with initial electrocardiographic (ECG) finding mimicking ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), which was confirmed to resolve in a follow-up study. Accurate and timely diagnosis of SAH-related ST-segment elevation was important, as the therapeutic strategy for SAH is completely different from that for STEMI. If the clinicians do not have other tools for diagnosis, the follow-up ECG may help us make a most possible diagnosis. PMID:26032227

  7. Retroperitoneal haemorrhage and neuropathy complicating anticoagulant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Curry, P. V. L.; Bacon, P. A.

    1974-01-01

    Nine cases of retroperitoneal haemorrhage complicating anticoagulant therapy are reported. Six cases were receiving heparin for myocardial infarction: an incidence of 4·3% of patients on such treatment. All the cases presented with pain, six had neurological involvement and one patient died. The incidence of this complication is higher than previously noted. Retroperitoneal haemorrhage requires a high index of clinical suspicion for early diagnosis and treatment if serious sequaelae are to be prevented. PMID:4464499

  8. [Early diagnostic for vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Piednoir, P; Geeraerts, T; Leblanc, P-E; Tazarourte, K; Duranteau, J; Vigué, B

    2007-11-01

    Vasospasm is the leading cause of sequelae or deaths after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. Vasospasm occurs 2-10 days after haemorrhage and that justifies close monitoring during this period. Because clinical signs appear often to late to reverse ischaemia, paraclinic tools have been developed. Arteriography is the historical gold standard for diagnosis but no clear validated rules exist to measure vessel sections. Diagnosis of vasospasm is, thus, relatively subjective and only reflects one moment of arteries status. Transcranial doppler is a non-invasive and easily repeatable method but sensibility and specificity for vasospasm diagnosis are low compared to arteriography. However, day-to-day changes of arterial blood cells velocities can help to determine vasospasm risk and/or indicate time for arteriography. CT-scanner, PET-scan or IRM can help to evaluate ratio between perfusion and metabolism. Nevertheless, as arteriography, it is only a one-time measurement without control of treatment effects. Waiting for improvement of diagnosis techniques, arteriography stays the gold standard. To choose the right moment for invasive methods, intensivists need to use clinical and transcranial doppler data and start treatment as early as possible to be efficacious. PMID:17935934

  9. Bleeding in the subarachnoid space: a possible complication during laser therapy for equine progressive ethmoid haematoma.

    PubMed

    Vreman, S; Wiemer, P; Keesler, R I

    2013-10-01

    A 10-year-old KWPN (Royal Warmblood Studbook of the Netherlands) gelding was euthanized after developing severe neurological symptoms preceded by severe epistaxis during laser treatment for progressive ethmoid haematoma (PEH) in the right nasal cavity. Postmortem examination of the head revealed a large amount of clotted blood between the right ventral and dorsal conchae in the nasal cavity and acute haemorrhage in the right subarachnoid space. Histologically, there was moderate, acute polioencephalomalacia in the neuropil adjacent to the haemorrhage. The haemorrhages were most likely caused by the laser treatment and therefore should be considered a possible complication that could lead to severe peracute neurological symptoms. PMID:24199337

  10. [Endovascular treatment of haemorrhagic complication of HELLP syndrome].

    PubMed

    Garcarek, Jerzy; Kurcz, Jacek; Guzi?ski, Maciej; Orchowska-Jedrzejewska, Agnieszka; Janczak, Dariusz

    2012-01-01

    HELLP syndrome, which consists of haemolytic anaemia, elevated liver enzymes and thrombocytopenia, typically occurs in women in perinatal period. Rare life-threatening complications of this syndrome include haemorrhages, in particular these originating from hepatic artery branches for they usually result in subcapsular hematoma formation. The rupture of hepatic capsule secondary to hepatomegaly results in intraperitoneal haemorrhage. In case of suspicion of HELLP syndrome complicated by hepatic haemorrhage it is crucial to perform imaging modalities as emergency, first of all US and CT of abdomen and pelvis. Selective embolization of hepatic artery branches seems to be a valuable, alternative or complementary to surgery method of stopping the bleeding. PMID:23276043

  11. Neurosurgical versus endovascular treatment of subarachnoid haemorrhage caused by ruptured cerebral aneurysm: comparison of patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kamensky, J

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this critical review is to determine whether endovascular treatment (EVT) of a subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) has better patient outcomes than neurosurgical treatment (NST). A review of six cohort studies (listed in Table 1) was carried out and the main findings were summarised in the conclusion. In addition the list of author's recommendations is included at the end of the paper. Theatre practitioners involved in neurosurgery might find this review useful in enhancing their understanding of how SAH is currently treated. It could also bring some insights about the reasons why a particular modality of the treatment was chosen for their patient. PMID:26016283

  12. Focal subarachnoid haemorrhage mimicking transient ischaemic attack - do we really need MRI in the acute stage?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute non-traumatic focal subarachnoid haemorrhage (fSAH) is a rare transient ischaemic attack (TIA)-mimic. MRI is considered to be indispensable by some authors in order to avoid misdiagnosis, and subsequent improper therapy. We therefore evaluated the role of CT and MRI in the diagnosis of fSAH patients by comparing our cases to those from the literature. Methods From 01/2010 to 12/2012 we retrospectively identified seven patients with transient neurological episodes due to fSAH, who had received unenhanced thin-sliced multiplanar CT and subsequent MRI within 3 days on a 1.5 T scanner. MRI protocol included at least fast-field-echo (FFE), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and time-of-flight (TOF) MRA sequences. By using MRI as gold-standard, we re-evaluated images and data from recent publications regarding the sensitivity to detect fSAH in unenhanced CT. Results fSAH was detected by CT and by FFE and FLAIR on MRI in all of our own cases. However, DWI and T2w-spin-echo sequences revealed fSAH in 3 of 7 and 4 of 6 cases respectively. Vascular imaging was negative in all cases. FFE-MRI revealed additional multiple microbleeds and superficial siderosis in 4 of 7 patients and 5 of 7 patients respectively. Including data from recently published literature CT scans delivered positive results for fSAH in 95 of 100 cases (95%), whereas MRI was positive for fSAH in 69 of 69 cases (100%). Conclusions Thin-sliced unenhanced CT is a valuable emergency diagnostic tool to rule out intracranial haemorrhage including fSAH in patients with acute transient neurological episodes if immediate MRI is not available. However, MRI work-up is crucial and mandatorily has to be completed within the next 24–72 hours. PMID:24720867

  13. The role of transcranial Doppler in the management of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage--a review.

    PubMed

    Lindegaard, K F

    1999-01-01

    Introduced 15 years ago, transcranial Doppler (TCD) recordings of blood-velocity in patients with recent subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) have two objectives: to detect elevated blood velocities suggesting cerebral vasospasm (VSP) and to identify patients at risk for delayed cerebral ischemic deficits (DID). The pathophysiological cascade causing DID is complex. Discrepancies between blood velocities and DID (presuming that there actually is an "ischemic threshold" for blood velocity in absolute terms, which seems most unlikely) have been demonstrated, particularly in patients with elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) levels. Furthermore, the vessel showing the highest blood velocity is not always the one perfusing the area where ischemic symptoms arise, nor does the site of the greatest subarachnoid blood clot always relate to the ischemic brain region. Moreover, it is probable that the complex haemodynamic changes following SAH and the subsequent development of VSP may be underestimated if only considering the crude intracranial artery blood velocities. Cerebral blood flow measurements combined with TCD to assess both flow and velocity have emphasised this point. Despite these findings and ignoring the basic principles of cerebral haemodynamics, cerebral vasospasm is still being assessed from the intracranial velocity measurement alone. The addition of at least a careful measurement from the extracranial internal carotid artery--using the same TCD equipment and taking only a few short minutes to perform--allows a much more accurate assessment of the degree and the effects of vasospasm. This probably explains why the clinical value of TCD is still debated. There is still uncertainty as to the best method to prevent and to treat VSP, and the overall outcome after SAH depends on so many factors besides VSP. Conclusive evidence may therefore be hard to obtain, and it appears sound to conclude that even with advanced investigation technology available, proper selection, pre- peri- and postoperative care and timing of surgery remain cornerstones in the management of these patients,--equal in importance to their treatment in the operating room or in the interventional angiography suite. PMID:10337413

  14. The 5-hydroxytryptamine antagonist ketanserin inhibits the vasoconstrictor activity of per-operative CSF, from subarachnoid haemorrhage patients, on isolated tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Tagari, P C; Kaye, A H; Teddy, P J; Schachter, M; Adams, C B; Boullin, D J

    1983-01-01

    Peri-aneurysmal CSF was obtained at operation from 13 patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysms. The 5-hydroxytryptamine antagonist ketanserin inhibited contractions of isolated human intracranial arteries, elicited by this CSF. The presence of 5-HT in CSF was confirmed by high performance liquid chromatography. The use of ketanserin in the therapy of postoperative cerebral vasospasm is discussed. PMID:6188804

  15. Benefit of cerebrospinal fluid spectrophotometry in the assessment of CT scan negative suspected subarachnoid haemorrhage: a diagnostic accuracy study.

    PubMed

    Hann, Angus; Chu, Kevin; Greenslade, Jaimi; Williams, Julian; Brown, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine if performing cerebrospinal fluid spectrophotometry in addition to visual inspection detects more ruptured cerebral aneurysms than performing cerebrospinal fluid visual inspection alone in patients with a normal head CT scan but suspected of suffering an aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). We performed a single-centre retrospective study of patients presenting to the emergency department of a tertiary hospital who underwent both head CT scan and lumbar puncture to exclude SAH. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of an approach utilising both spectrophotometry and visual inspection (combined approach) was compared to visual inspection alone. A total of 409 patients (mean age 37.8 years, 56.2% female) were recruited and six (1.5%) had a cerebral aneurysm on angiography. The sensitivity of visual inspection was 50% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.4-82.6%), specificity was 99% (95% CI: 97.5-99.7%), PPV was 42.9% (95% CI: 10.4-81.3%) and NPV was 99.2% (95% CI: 97.8-99.8%). The combined approach had a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI: 54.1-100%), specificity of 79.7% (95% CI: 75.4-83.5%), PPV of 6.8% (95% CI: 2.6-14.3%) and a NPV of 100% (95% CI: 98.8-100%). The sensitivity of the combined approach was not significantly different to that of visual inspection alone (p=0.25). Visual inspection had a significantly higher specificity than the combined approach (p<0.01). The combined approach detected more cases of aneurysmal SAH than visual inspection alone, however the difference in sensitivity was not statistically significant. Visual xanthochromia should prompt angiography because of a superior specificity and PPV. Due to its reduced sensitivity, caution should be applied when using only visual inspection of the supernatant. PMID:25439758

  16. Topiramate attenuates early brain injury following subarachnoid haemorrhage in rats via duplex protection against inflammation and neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yong; Guo, Song-Xue; Li, Jian-Ru; Du, Hang-Gen; Wang, Chao-Hui; Zhang, Jian-Min; Wu, Qun

    2015-10-01

    Early brain injury (EBI) following aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) insults contributes to the poor prognosis and high mortality observed in SAH patients. Topiramate (TPM) is a novel, broad-spectrum, antiepileptic drug with a reported protective effect against several brain injuries. The current study aimed to investigate the potential of TPM for neuroprotection against EBI after SAH and the possible dose-dependency of this effect. An endovascular perforation SAH model was established in rats, and TPM was administered by intraperitoneal injection after surgery at three different doses (20mg/kg, 40mg/kg, and 80mg/kg). The animals' neurological scores and brain water content were evaluated, and ELISA, Western blotting and immunostaining assays were conducted to assess the effect of TPM. The results revealed that TPM lowers the elevated levels of myeloperoxidase and proinflammatory mediators observed after SAH in a dose-related fashion, and the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) signalling pathway is the target of neuroinflammation regulation. In addition, TPM ameliorated SAH-induced cortical neuronal apoptosis by influencing Bax, Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-3 protein expression, and the effect of TPM was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner. Various dosages of TPM also upregulated the protein expression of the ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic signalling molecules, GABAA receptor (GABAAR) ?1, GABAAR ?2, and K(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter 2 (KCC2) together and downregulated Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter 1 (NKCC1) expression. Thus, TPM may be an effective neuroprotectant in EBI after SAH by regulating neuroinflammation and neuronal cell death. PMID:26086367

  17. Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Subarachnoid Haemorrhage and Vasospasm Enhances Endothelin Contraction in Rat Cerebral Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Assenzio, Barbara; Martin, Erica L.; Stankevicius, Edgaras; Civiletti, Federica; Fontanella, Marco; Boccaletti, Riccardo; Berardino, Maurizio; Mazzeo, AnnaTeresa; Ducati, Alessandro; Simonsen, Ulf; Mascia, Luciana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies have suggested that cerebrospinal fluid from patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) leads to pronounced vasoconstriction in isolated arteries. We hypothesized that only cerebrospinal fluid from SAH patients with vasospasm would produce an enhanced contractile response to endothelin-1 in rat cerebral arteries, involving both endothelin ETA and ETB receptors. Methods Intact rat basilar arteries were incubated for 24 hours with cerebrospinal fluid from 1) SAH patients with vasospasm, 2) SAH patients without vasospasm, and 3) control patients. Arterial segments with and without endothelium were mounted in myographs and concentration-response curves for endothelin-1 were constructed in the absence and presence of selective and combined ETA and ETB receptor antagonists. Endothelin concentrations in culture medium and receptor expression were measured. Results Compared to the other groups, the following was observed in arteries exposed to cerebrospinal fluid from patients with vasospasm: 1) larger contractions at lower endothelin concentrations (p<0.05); 2) the increased endothelin contraction was absent in arteries without endothelium; 3) higher levels of endothelin secretion in the culture medium (p<0.05); 4) there was expression of ETA receptors and new expression of ETB receptors was apparent; 5) reduction in the enhanced response to endothelin after ETB blockade in the low range and after ETA blockade in the high range of endothelin concentrations; 6) after combined ETA and ETB blockade a complete inhibition of endothelin contraction was observed. Conclusions Our experimental findings showed that in intact rat basilar arteries exposed to cerebrospinal fluid from patients with vasospasm endothelin contraction was enhanced in an endothelium-dependent manner and was blocked by combined ETA and ETB receptor antagonism. Therefore we suggest that combined blockade of both receptors may play a role in counteracting vasospasm in patients with SAH. PMID:25629621

  18. Cortical spreading ischaemia is a novel process involved in ischaemic damage in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Major, Sebastian; Manning, Andrew; Woitzik, Johannes; Drenckhahn, Chistoph; Steinbrink, Jens; Tolias, Christos; Oliveira-Ferreira, Ana I.; Fabricius, Martin; Hartings, Jed A.; Vajkoczy, Peter; Lauritzen, Martin; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Bohner, Georg; Strong, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    The term cortical spreading depolarization (CSD) describes a wave of mass neuronal depolarization associated with net influx of cations and water. Clusters of prolonged CSDs were measured time-locked to progressive ischaemic damage in human cortex. CSD induces tone alterations in resistance vessels, causing either transient hyperperfusion (physiological haemodynamic response) in healthy tissue; or hypoperfusion [inverse haemodynamic response = cortical spreading ischaemia (CSI)] in tissue at risk for progressive damage, which has so far only been shown experimentally. Here, we performed a prospective, multicentre study in 13 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage, using novel subdural opto-electrode technology for simultaneous laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and direct current-electrocorticography, combined with measurements of tissue partial pressure of oxygen (ptiO2). Regional cerebral blood flow and electrocorticography were simultaneously recorded in 417 CSDs. Isolated CSDs occurred in 12 patients and were associated with either physiological, absent or inverse haemodynamic responses. Whereas the physiological haemodynamic response caused tissue hyperoxia, the inverse response led to tissue hypoxia. Clusters of prolonged CSDs were measured in five patients in close proximity to structural brain damage as assessed by neuroimaging. Clusters were associated with CSD-induced spreading hypoperfusions, which were significantly longer in duration (up to 144 min) than those of isolated CSDs. Thus, oxygen depletion caused by the inverse haemodynamic response may contribute to the establishment of clusters of prolonged CSDs and lesion progression. Combined electrocorticography and perfusion monitoring also revealed a characteristic vascular signature that might be used for non-invasive detection of CSD. Low-frequency vascular fluctuations (LF-VF) (f < 0.1 Hz), detectable by functional imaging methods, are determined by the brain's resting neuronal activity. CSD provides a depolarization block of the resting activity, recorded electrophysiologically as spreading depression of high-frequency-electrocorticography activity. Accordingly, we observed a spreading suppression of LF-VF, which accompanied spreading depression of high-frequency-electrocorticography activity, independently of whether CSD was associated with a physiological, absent or inverse haemodynamic response. Spreading suppressions of LF-VF thus allow the differentiation of progressive ischaemia and repair phases in a fashion similar to that shown previously for spreading depressions of high-frequency-electrocorticography activity. In conclusion, it is suggested that (i) CSI is a novel human disease mechanism associated with lesion development and a potential target for therapeutic intervention in stroke; and that (ii) prolonged spreading suppressions of LF-VF are a novel ‘functional marker’ for progressive ischaemia. PMID:19420089

  19. Psychosocial outcomes at three and nine months after good neurological recovery from aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: predictors and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Powell, J; Kitchen, N; Heslin, J; Greenwood, R

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate (1) the prevalence of various aspects of cognitive and psychosocial dysfunction, including post-traumatic stress symptoms, over nine months after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH); (2) whether SAH is preceded by increased life stress; (3) to what extent adverse outcomes may be predicted from preillness life stress, early neurological impairment, age, and sex; and (4) relations between emotional and functional outcomes. Methods: 52 patients with good neurological recovery after surgery for SAH were each matched for age, sex, and occupation with a healthy control participant. SAH patients were assessed three and nine months postdischarge on measures of cognitive functioning, mood, and social functioning. Objective stressors and subjective life change during the preceding year were rated retrospectively. Controls completed measures of mood and social functioning once only. Results: Compared with controls, SAH patients showed increased mood disturbance, subtle cognitive impairment, and abnormally low independence and participation on measures of social functioning. 60% showed clinically significant post-traumatic stress symptomatology (intrusive thoughts or avoidance of reminders) at three months and 30% at nine months. Independence in activities of daily living was greatly reduced in half to a third of the sample at both three and nine months. Productive employment was below the 10th percentile of the control group for 75% of patients at three months and for 56% at nine months; this outcome could not be predicted from selected demographic, premorbid, or clinical variables but dependence on others for organisational activities was predicted by impaired prose recall. Mood at nine months was strongly predicted by prior mental health problems, poor physical health, dysphasia, and impaired prose recall at three months. There was no evidence of an abnormally high level of stressful life events in the year before SAH, although patients rated their subjective level of stress in this period slightly more highly than did the control participants. Conclusions: These findings highlight the need for structured support and treatment after surgery for SAH to reduce persisting mood disturbance and increase independence and participation. PMID:12023423

  20. The Effect of Fenestration of Lamina Terminalis on the Vasospasm and Shunt-Dependent Hydrocephalus in Patients Following Subarachnoid Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hatefi, Masoud; Azhary, Shirzad; Naebaghaee, Hussein; Mohamadi, Hasan Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: SAH (Sub Arachnoid Haemorrhage) is a life threatening that is associated with complications such as vasospasm and shunt-dependent hydrocephalus. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of FLT (Fenestration of Lamina Terminalis) on the incidence of vasospasm and shunt-dependent hydrocephalus in ACoA (Anterior Communicating Artery) aneurismal in SAH. Materials and Methods: The data of 50 ruptured ACoA aneurism patients were selected during the year 2001-2009 admitted to Imam Hussein hospital, Tehran, IR. In a randomized double-blind trial patients assigned in two group {with fenestration (FLT, n=25), without fenestration (No FLT, n=25)}. All patients underwent craniotomy by a single neurosurgeon. Patient’s age, sex, Hunt-Hess grade, Fisher grade, vasospasm, presence of hydrocephalus and incidences of shunt-dependent hydrocephalus were compared between groups. Results: There were no significant differences among groups in relation to demographic characteristics, neurological scale scores (Hunt-Hess grade) and the severity of the SAH (Fisher grade) (p>0.05). The rate of hydrocephalus on admission, were 24% and 16% in FLT and no FLT group respectively (p>0.05). The shunt placement postoperatively in FLT and no FLT group were 16% and 12% respectively (p>0.05). The clinical vasospasm was 20% and 24% in FLT and no FLT group respectively (p>0.05). Conclusion: Despite FLT can be a safe method there were not significant differences of FLT on the incidence of vasospasm and shunt-dependent hydrocephalus. A systematic evaluation with multisurgeon, multicentre and with greater sample size to disclose reality is suggested. PMID:26393164

  1. Systemic lupus erythematosus complicated by diffuse alveolar haemorrhage: risk factors, therapy and survival

    PubMed Central

    Kazzaz, Nayef M; Coit, Patrick; Lewis, Emily E; McCune, W Joseph; Sawalha, Amr H; Knight, Jason S

    2015-01-01

    Objectives While diffuse alveolar haemorrhage (DAH) is recognised as a life-threatening complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), little is known about its risk factors and response to treatment. We describe 22 cases of DAH in a US lupus cohort of approximately 1000 patients, and compare them to 66 controls from the same outpatient cohort. Methods We captured variables pertaining to diagnoses of SLE and secondary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), and analysed them by univariate testing. Those variables with p values <0.05 were then further considered in a multivariate model. Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed for each group, and survival was analysed by Log-rank test. Results Of the 22 patients with DAH, 59% were diagnosed with DAH within 5?years of lupus diagnosis. By univariate testing, several manifestations of SLE and APS were more common in patients with DAH, including history of thrombocytopenia, cardiac valve disease, low C3, leucopenia, neuropsychiatric features, haemolysis, arterial thrombosis, lupus anticoagulant, secondary APS and low C4. On multivariate analysis, history of thrombocytopenia and low C3 were maintained as independent risk factors. Importantly, only two patients had platelet counts <50?000/µL at the time of the DAH episode, arguing that DAH was not simply a haemorrhagic complication of thrombocytopenia. All patients were treated with increased immunosuppression, including various combinations of corticosteroids, plasmapheresis, cyclophosphamide, rituximab and mycophenolate mofetil. Notably, all patients in the cohort survived their initial episode of DAH. While the patients with DAH did well in the short-term, their long-term survival was significantly worse than controls. Several of the deaths were attributable to thrombotic complications after recovering from DAH. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest case–control study of lupus DAH to date. History of thrombocytopenia was strongly predictive of DAH (OR ?40). A number of APS manifestations correlated with DAH by univariate analysis, and deserve further consideration in larger studies. PMID:26430514

  2. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    MedlinePLUS

    ... into the compartment surrounding the brain, the subarachnoid space and is therefore also known as a subarachnoid ... leak into the CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) in the space around the brain (subarachnoid space). The pool of ...

  3. High-volume hemofiltration and prone ventilation in subarachnoid hemorrhage complicated by severe acute respiratory distress syndrome and refractory septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo, Rodrigo; Romero, Carlos; Ugalde, Diego; Bustos, Patricio; Diaz, Gonzalo; Galvez, Ricardo; Llanos, Osvaldo; Tobar, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    We report the successful treatment of two patients with aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage complicated by severe respiratory failure and refractory septic shock using simultaneous prone position ventilation and high-volume hemofiltration. These rescue therapies allowed the patients to overcome the critical situation without associated complications and with no detrimental effects on the intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures. Prone position ventilation is now an accepted therapy for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, and high-volume hemofiltration is a non-conventional hemodynamic support that has several potential mechanisms for improving septic shock. In this manuscript, we briefly review these therapies and the related evidence. When other conventional treatments are insufficient for providing safe limits of oxygenation and perfusion as part of basic neuroprotective care in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients, these rescue therapies should be considered on a case-by-case basis by an experienced critical care team. PMID:25028955

  4. Postpartum Pyomyoma, a Rare Complication of Sepsis Associated with Chorioamnionitis and Massive Postpartum Haemorrhage Treated with an Intrauterine Balloon

    PubMed Central

    Kaler, Mandeep; Gailer, Ruth; Iskaros, Joseph; David, Anna L.

    2015-01-01

    We report the successful treatment of a postpartum pyomyoma, a rare but serious complication of uterine leiomyomata in a 28-year-old primigravida. The patient was treated for an Escherichia Coli (E. Coli) urinary tract infection (UTI) at 16 weeks of gestation. She had asymptomatic short cervical length on ultrasound scan at 20 weeks that was managed conservatively due to the presence of further UTI and received antibiotics. She was known to have a left sided intramural leiomyoma. She presented with abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding at 23+1 weeks of gestation and the next day she had spontaneous vaginal delivery and collapsed with E. Coli septic shock, massive postpartum haemorrhage, and disseminated intravascular coagulation and was successfully treated with oxytocic drugs, a Rusch intrauterine balloon, and intravenous antibiotics. Eleven days postnatally she re-presented with systemic sepsis and was treated for retained products of conception. Sepsis persisted and investigations showed a postpartum pyomyoma that was initially managed with intravenous antibiotics to avoid surgery. Ultimately she required laparotomy, drainage of pyomyoma, and myomectomy. Postoperative recovery was good and the patient had a successful pregnancy two years later. PMID:26199774

  5. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a Stroke? Ischemic Stroke Intracerebral Hemorrhage Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Pediatric Stroke Warning Signs Stroke Statistics When a cerebral aneurysm ruptures, blood will fill the space surrounding the ...

  6. Inverted Takotsubo-Like Left Ventricular Dysfunction with Pulmonary Oedema Developed after Caesarean Delivery Complicated by Massive Haemorrhage in a Severe Preeclamptic Parturient with a Prolonged Painful Labour

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hyejin; Lee, Seongheon; Jeong, Cheolwon; Lee, Jongun; Jeong, Seongtae; Chung, Sungsu; Yoo, Kyungyeon

    2011-01-01

    Inverted takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC), a variant of stress-induced cardiomyopathy, features transient myocardial dysfunction characterized by a hyperdynamic left ventricular apex and akinesia of the base. Herein, we describe a 38-year-old primigravida with severe preeclampsia who had active labour for 4?h followed by an emergency caesarean delivery. She developed postpartum haemorrhage due to uterine atony complicated by pulmonary oedema, which was managed with large-volume infusion and hysterectomy. Her haemodynamic instability was associated with cardiac biomarkers indicative of diffuse myocardial injury and echocardiographic findings of an “inverted” TTC. The patient was almost fully recovered one month later. Our case shows that a reversible inverted TTC may result from a prolonged painful labour. TTC should be listed in the differential diagnosis of the patient presenting with pulmonary oedema of unknown origin, especially in patients with severe preeclampsia. PMID:22606381

  7. Gastroduodenal haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Grime, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    Before the First World War the treatment of gastroduodenal haemorrhage was predominantly medical, though the results, especially with recurrent haemorrhage, were far less satisfactory than was claimed by some physicians. It was not until Finsterer, in 1939, demonstrated the virtues of early operation that surgery began to take its place in the treatment of this condition, mainly by gastric resection. Results remained poor, however, until 1958 with the introduction of conservative treatment by vagotomy, pyloroplasty, and under-running of the bleeding point. Personal experience, both with partial gastrectomy in the 1950s and 1960s and with mainly conservative treatment between 1967 and 1970, is described and the results presented. PMID:373573

  8. Subarachnoid hemorrhage

    MedlinePLUS

    ... brain CT scan angiography (using contrast dye) Transcranial Doppler ultrasound, to look at blood flow in the ... Other complications include: Complications of surgery Medicine side effects Seizures Stroke

  9. Giant malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with cauda equina syndrome and subarachnoid hemorrhage: Complications in a case of type 1 neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Patil, Tushar B; Singh, Maneesh Kumar; Lalla, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 neurofibromatosis (NF1), which mainly involves ectodermal tissue arising from the neural crest, can increase the risk of developing malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), soft tissue sarcomas and subarachnoid hemorrhage. We describe a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 who developed soft tissue sarcoma, MPNST, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. A 22-year-old male reported right focal seizures consequence to severe headache. He had a weakness in both legs, could walk only with the support of a stick for the last 3 months and suffered from constipation and intermittent urinary retention for the past 1 week. The patient had a history of swelling in the back of left thigh for which surgical resection was done 6 months back. Cutaneous examination revealed multiple nodules of varying sizes all over the body, along with many café-au-lait spots and Lisch nodule in iris. Patient had weakness in bilateral hip abduction, extension, knee flexion, extension and ankle dorsiflexion and plantiflexion. Bilateral ankle reflexes were absent while other deep tendon reflexes were sub-optimal. A noncontrast computed tomography brain indicated subarachnoid hemorrhage in left perisylvian region. Ultrasound of left thigh showed a hypoechoic solid lesion in the posterior aspect of left thigh in muscle plane. Histopathology of the lesion following resection showed features suggestive of a low-grade pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma. Histology of cutaneous nodules was consistent with neurofibroma. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine demonstrated a tumor arising from cauda equina. Histopathological examination of the tumor suggested high-grade MPNST. Unfortunately, the patient's MPNST was inoperable, and he received palliative radiotherapy for local control of the disease. The care of a patient with neurofibromatosis requires a comprehensive multisystem evaluation. MPNST occurs in 8-13% patients with neurofibromatosis. Early diagnosis and surgical resection are key to prolong survival. Though rare, rhabdomyosarcoma can occur with a higher frequency in NF1, necessitating through clinical investigation. Subarachnoid hemorrhage can occur due to aneurismal rupture or vascular friability in NF1 patients. PMID:26283846

  10. Subconjunctival haemorrhage from bronchoscopy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Huey Ying; Puah, Ser Hon; Ang, Leslie Jonathan P.S.; Teo, En Qi; Lau, Sabrina Y.; Goh, Kee San; Lim, Albert Y.H.; Tai, Dessmon Y.H.; Abisheganaden, John; Verma, Akash

    2015-01-01

    Flexible bronchoscopy has been available for almost five decades. It has evolved as one of the most commonly used invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedure in pulmonology, and its scope of applications is progressively expanding with the addition of new adjunct technologies such as endobronchial ultrasound, bronchial Thermoplasty, and navigational bronchoscopy. It is a safe procedure with complications ranging from fever, infiltrates, hypoxemia, bleeding, pneumothoraces and death, with most significant complications being bleeding and pneumothorax. We report a case of subconjuctival haemorrhage as an immediate complication of bronchoscopy. To our knowledge this is the first report documenting this rare complication.

  11. Nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to tuberculous meningitis: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Steve Ting-Yuan; Lee, Wei-Jing; Lin, Huey-Juan; Chen, Chin-Yu; Te, Antonio Leo; Lin, Hung-Jung

    2003-10-01

    Nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage, one of the life-threatening diseases seen in Emergency Departments, is rarely caused by conditions other than rupture of saccular aneurysms. We report two cases of suspected tuberculous meningitis complicated with nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage confirmed by conventional cerebral angiography. Tuberculous meningitis should be considered in the differential diagnoses in cases of nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, especially in tuberculosis endemic areas. PMID:14585453

  12. Managing Major Postpartum Haemorrhage following Acute Uterine Inversion with Rusch Balloon Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Keriakos, Remon; Chaudhuri, Smriti Ray

    2011-01-01

    Acute postpartum uterine inversion is a relatively rare complication. The uterus inverts and the uterine fundus prolapses to or through the dilated cervix. It is associated with major postpartum haemorrhage with or without shock. Shock is sometimes out of proportion to the haemorrhage. Minimal maternal morbidity and mortality can be achieved when uterine inversion is promptly and aggressively managed. We present this report of three cases of acute uterine inversion complicated with major postpartum haemorrhage and managed with Rusch balloon. The paper highlights the importance of early recognition and the safety of the use of intrauterine balloon to manage major postpartum haemorrhage in these cases. PMID:24826322

  13. Peripheral retinal haemorrhages with papilloedema.

    PubMed Central

    Galvin, R; Sanders, M D

    1980-01-01

    Two cases are described with severe intracranial hypertension, papilloedema, and a hitherto unreported haemorrhagic peripheral retinopathy. The marked disc swelling in these patients has probably contributed to a venous occlusive element resulting in the haemorrhagic retinopathy. Images PMID:7387960

  14. Variant Neurogenic Stunned Myocardium in a Young Female After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mahanna, Elizabeth; Edwards, David A; Tarante, Nicki; Rahman, Maryam; Petersen, John W; Bihorac, Azra

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic stunned myocardium is a significant complication of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Diagnosis of neurogenic stunned myocardium is complicated by variable presentation. We present a case of a 23-year-old woman admitted with a subarachnoid hemorrhage from an arteriovenous malformation and associated aneurysm. Postoperatively, she developed pulmonary edema and mildly elevated cardiac biomarkers. Echocardiography showed hypokinesis of the basal left ventricular segments and normal contraction of the apical left ventricular segments consistent with a variant form of neurogenic stunned myocardium. We describe characteristics and outcomes of neurogenic stunned myocardium in this young patient with arteriovenous malformation-associated aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:26422453

  15. Ruptured distal anterior choroidal artery aneurysm presenting with casting intraventricular haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yoneoka, Y; Ezuka, I; Takai, N; Oda, T; Tamura, T; Yamashita, S

    1998-01-01

    This report describes a rare case of a distal anterior choroidal artery aneurysm which developed intraventricular haemorrhage without subarachnoid haemorrhage as shown on computerized tomographic (CT) scan. A 69-year-old hypertensive man suddenly became unconscious. An emergency CT scan showed a severe intraventricular haemorrhage and a small round low-dense lesion within the haematoma at the right trigone. The haematoma with obstructive hydrocephalus made the lateral ventricles larger on the right than on the left. CT scan could not detect any subarachnoid haemorrhage. Right interal carotid angiography revealed a saccular aneurysm at the plexal point of the right anterior choroidal artery. We approached the aneurysm and the small round lesion through the trigone via a right temporo-occipital corticotomy. We could clip the aneurysmal neck and remove the intraventricular haematoma and the papillary cystic mass (corresponding to the small round lesion on CT scan) totally in one sitting. Histological examination revealed the aneurysm to be a true one and the papillary cystic mass to be a choroid plexus cyst. PMID:10399000

  16. Concerns and challenges during anesthetic management of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Sriganesh, Kamath; Venkataramaiah, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Anesthetic management of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is challenging because of the emergency nature of the presentation, complex pathology, varied intracranial and systemic manifestations and need for special requirements during the course of management. Successful perioperative outcome depends on overcoming these challenges by thorough understanding of pathophysiology of Subarachnoid hemorrhage, knowledge about associated complications, preoperative optimization, choice of definitive therapy, a good anesthetic and surgical technique, vigilant monitoring and optimal postoperative care. Guidelines based on randomized studies and provided by various societies are helpful in the routine management of these patients and wherever there is a lack of high quality evidence, the available data is provided for practical management. PMID:26240552

  17. Necrotizing arteritis and spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage in Sjögren syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alexander, E L; Craft, C; Dorsch, C; Moser, R L; Provost, T T; Alexander, G E

    1982-06-01

    A 37-year-old woman with primary Sjögren syndrome developed mixed cryoglobulinemia and systemic vasculitis. Subarachnoid hemorrhage occurred as a result of necrotizing anterior spinal arteritis. Although rarely seen in mixed cryoglobulinemia, central nervous system complications have recently been documented in Sjögren syndrome. The patient's serum contained antibodies to the Ro(SSA) cytoplasmic antigen, and these antibodies were concentrated in the cryoglobulin fraction. Anti-Ro(SSA) antibodies are associated with the occurrence of vasculitis in patients with Sjögren syndrome, which suggests that the spinal arteritis and subarachnoid hemorrhage in this patient may have been directly related to the underlying connective tissue disorder. PMID:6126150

  18. [Subarachnoid hemorrhage in young patients].

    PubMed

    Naggara, Olivier; Nataf, François

    2013-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) accounts for 5 % of strokes with a high rate of death and morbidity. It occurs in young patients, often hypertensive and smoking. Patients usually present with sudden headache. Initial clinical evaluation uses a prognosis grading scale including level of consciousness and motor deficit on admission (WFNS scale). Unenhanced CT brain imaging demonstrates the SHA together with evaluation of the initial blood amount, predictive of the occurrence of cerebral vasospasm that may lead to delayed cerebral ischemia. After referral to a multidisciplinary center with neurovascular expertise, MR, CT and/or catheter angiography detects the ruptured aneurysm, the cause of SAH in 85 % of cases. Since rebleeding is an imminent danger, occlusion of the aneurysm should be performed, as soon as possible and within the first 72 heures, either by an endovascular or microsurgical approach. Medical management includes early detection of hydrocephalus and cerebral vasospasm is a devastating complication inducing death and functional impairment. Prevention strategies remain limited and include maintenance of normovolemia and calcium antagonists such as nimodipine. Treatment of cerebral vasospasm associates maintenance of cerebral perfusion and more invasive techniques such as chemical or mechanical angioplasty. PMID:24167898

  19. Frequency, types and causes of intraventricular haemorrhage in lethal blunt head injuries.

    PubMed

    Maxeiner, H; Schirmer, Cynthia

    2009-11-01

    Autopsy findings and neuropathological examination of formalin-fixed brains in 676 deaths due to blunt head injury, here with special attention to injuries of the inner (periventricular) cerebral structures and haemorrhages into the ventricles. Intraventricular haemorrhage of any degree was present in 17.6%, considering only distinct and massive haemorrhage in 10% of all cases. Considering the types of trauma, the frequency was lowest in ground level falls and highest in traffic accidents (pedestrians with head contact to the car) - indicating a relation between the severity of impacts and the likelihood of ventricular haemorrhage. They predominantly resulted from periventricular injuries (27%) or retrograde expansions of infratentorial lesion with subarachnoid bleeding (19%), from massive contrecoup lesions (14%) or deep intracerebral ruptures (13%). In cases with predominant lesions of the cerebral surface the rate was lower than in those with more diffuse or internal damages. Injuries of the internal cerebral regions (away from cortex and subcortical white matter) were classified into those directly affecting the periventricular structures (9.1-13.5%; half of them affecting corpus callosum and/or fornix) and lesions of deep white matter or basal ganglia not adjoining the ventricular walls (4.0-5.9%). Intraventricular haemorrhage as well as injuries of the inner cerebral structures mostly are one element of a complex and severe blunt head injury. Solitary lesions - without other intracranial findings clearly indicating a trauma and therefore cases producing difficulties in forensic classification (spontaneous? traumatic?) - are rarities according to literature as well as our experiences. PMID:19828352

  20. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  1. Neurogenic pulmonary edema in subarachnoid hemorrage.

    PubMed

    Piazza, O; Venditto, A; Tufano, R

    2011-09-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), in addition to the direct effects of the initial hemorrhage and secondary neurological complications, predisposes to medical complications. The proportion of deaths caused by non-neurological medical complications (cardiac, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, renal, hematological) equals that from neurological complications. In particular, pulmonary complications are responsible for 50% of all deaths from medical complications. Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is an increase of interstitial and alveolar fluid occurring as direct consequence of any acute central nervous system injury. Two different pathogenetic mechanisms of NPE have been hypothesized: i) hemodynamic (an increase of pulmonary vascular pressure due to an ?-adrenergic response produces hydrostatic edema) and ii) inflammatory mechanism (brain cytokines and chemokines determinates an increase in the permeability of pulmonary capillaries causing exudative edema). Recent studies postulate that both mechanisms may be implicated in the pathogenesis of NPE. Brain injury is known to determine increased levels of S100B, a Ca- binding protein, in cerebrospinal fluid and in blood. Moreover, amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation (APUD) cells located in the respiratory tract produce and release S100B. This protein may contribute to the pathogenesis of NPE binding RAGE receptors in alveolar epithelial type I pneumocytes and amplifying the immune and inflammatory response causing lung injury. S100B can be the link between the brain and the lung and may be among the multiple pathological pathways that determine the development of pulmonary edema after bleeding. PMID:21775947

  2. Massive retroperitoneal haemorrhage after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL).

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiromasa; Kamphausen, Thomas; Bajanowski, Thomas; Trübner, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    A 76-year-old male suffering from nephrolithiasis developed a shock syndrome 5 days after extracorporal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). CT scan of the abdomen showed massive haemorrhage around the right kidney. Although nephrectomy was performed immediately, the haemorrhage could not be controlled. Numerous units of erythrocytes were transfused, but the patient died. The autopsy revealed massive retroperitoneal haemorrhage around the right kidney. The kidney showed a subcapsular haematoma and a rupture of the capsule. The right renal artery was dissected. The inferior vena cava was lacerated. Accordingly, a hemorrhagic shock as the cause of death was determined, which might mainly have resulted from the laceration of the inferior vena cava due to ESWL. ESWL seems to be a relatively non-invasive modality, but one of its severe complications is perirenal hematoma. The injuries of the blood vessels might have been caused by excessive shock waves. Subsequently, anticoagulation therapy had been resumed 3 days after EWSL, which might have triggered the haemorrhage. Physicians should note that a haemorrhage after an ESWL can occur and they should pay attention to the postoperative management in aged individuals especially when they are under anticoagulation therapy. PMID:20623295

  3. Ebolavirus and Haemorrhagic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Matua, Gerald A.; Van der Wal, Dirk M.; Locsin, Rozzano C.

    2015-01-01

    The Ebola virus is a highly virulent, single-stranded ribonucleic acid virus which affects both humans and apes and has fast become one of the world’s most feared pathogens. The virus induces acute fever and death, with haemorrhagic syndrome occurring in up to 90% of patients. The known species within the genus Ebolavirus are Bundibugyo, Sudan, Zaïre, Reston and Taï Forest. Although endemic in Africa, Ebola has caused worldwide anxiety due to media hype and concerns about its international spread, including through bioterrorism. The high fatality rate is attributed to unavailability of a standard treatment regimen or vaccine. The disease is frightening since it is characterised by rapid immune suppression and systemic inflammatory response, causing multi-organ and system failure, shock and often death. Currently, disease management is largely supportive, with containment efforts geared towards mitigating the spread of the virus. This review describes the classification, morphology, infective process, natural ecology, transmission, epidemic patterns, diagnosis, clinical features and immunology of Ebola, including management and epidemic containment strategies. PMID:26052448

  4. Pulmonary hypertension in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Vorselaars, Veronique MM; Velthuis, Sebastiaan; Snijder, Repke J; Vos, Jan Albert; Mager, Johannes J; Post, Martijn C

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterised by vascular malformations in predominantly the brain, liver and lungs. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is increasingly recognised as a severe complication of HHT. PH may be categorised into two distinct types in patients with HHT. Post-capillary PH most often results from a high pulmonary blood flow that accompanies the high cardiac output state associated with liver arteriovenous malformations. Less frequently, the HHT-related gene mutations in ENG or ACVRL1 appear to predispose patients with HHT to develop pre-capillary pulmonary arterial hypertension. Differentiation between both forms of PH by right heart catheterisation is essential, since both entities are associated with severe morbidity and mortality with different treatment options. Therefore all HHT patients should be referred to an HHT centre. PMID:26015855

  5. Subarachnoid hemorrhage in a patient with Abiotrophia defectiva endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Kohok, Dhanashri D; Parashar, Akash; Punnam, Vinay; Tandar, Anwar

    2011-02-01

    Endocarditis caused by Abiotrophia accounts for 5% of all cases of infective endocarditis (Roberts et al, Rev Infect Dis. 1979;1:955-66) and 5% to 6% of all cases of streptococcal endocarditis (Bouvet, Eur Heart J. 1995;16(suppl B):24-7; Brouqui et al, Clin Microbiol Rev. 2001;14:177-207). This endocarditis is associated with a high rate of embolization and treatment failure (Bouvet, Eur Heart J. 1995;16(suppl B):24-7). Neurological complications occur in 20% to 40% of all cases of infective endocarditis (Ossorio et al, Hosp Physician. 2003;39:21-4). Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a rare but devastating neurological complication. The authors presented a case of massive fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage in a patient with Abiotrophia defectiva endocarditis. To our knowledge, there are only 2 reported cases of mycotic aneurysms in Abiotrophia endocarditis, 1 of which was associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage (Leonard et al, N Engl J Med. 2001;344:233-4; Yang et al, Am J Med Sci. 2010;339:190-1). PMID:21030855

  6. Subarachnoid hemorrhage mimicking myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Benninger, Felix; Raphaeli, Guy; Steiner, Israel

    2015-12-01

    We discuss a patient with an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) presenting with chest pain, electrocardiogram changes compatible with myocardial infarction, and headache. SAH is a medical emergency but an initial misdiagnosis is common, and diagnosis can be delayed due to atypical presentations. The delay of diagnosis of SAH may endanger the life of the patient. Electrocardiogram abnormalities have been described previously in aneurysmal SAH, and can obscure the correct diagnosis. PMID:26183304

  7. [Dengue as haemorrhagic fever].

    PubMed

    Olszy?ska-Krowicka, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus is distributed in tropical and subtropical regions and transmitted by mosquitoes of the genus Aedes. In September 2010 two cases of indigenous dengue fever were diagnosed in metropolitan France for the first time and next DENV infection was diagnosed in a German traveler returning from a trip to Croatia. The Aedes albopictus mosquitoes were found in several European countries (for example in greenhouses in Netherlands). The indigenous DENV infections in Europe are rare diseases, probably acquired after bites of infected mosquitoes imported by airplanes from endemic areas. Nonspecific symptoms including: fever (up to 39 degrees C), chills, arthralagia, headache, myalgia and abnormalities in laboratory tests such as: thrombocytopaenia, leukopaenia and liver tests cause problems with differential diagnosis ofhematologic and hepatologic syndromes. The most serious complications are associated with dengue shock syndrome with mortality rate of 50%. PMID:22390040

  8. Progressive post traumatic tearing of an arachnoid cyst membrane resulting in intracystic and subdural haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Heather M; Phal, Pramit M; King, James A J

    2015-05-01

    We report the case of a 43-year-old man with a middle cranial fossa arachnoid cyst who presented post trauma with neurological symptoms. The initial CT scan of the brain did not detect acute changes in the arachnoid cyst but subsequent imaging revealed abnormalities which progressed over time. Arachnoid cysts are usually a benign and incidental finding. Rare complications such as intracystic haemorrhage and subdural haemorrhage can occur. It is important to be aware of these complications so that patients with arachnoid cysts are appropriately investigated when presenting with neurological symptoms. PMID:25769260

  9. Late complications of hemispherectomy: report of a case relieved by surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Ninan T.; Abraham, Jacob; Chandy, Jacob

    1970-01-01

    A case of Sturge-Weber disease treated with left hemispherectomy presented, 11 years later, with complications related to delayed intracranial haemorrhage. A loculation syndrome of the right lateral ventricle was detected and it was corrected by a ventriculoatrial shunt operation. The side of the hemispherectomy was evacuated of all the chronic products of haemorrhage, including the subdural membrane. The patient was relieved of her symptoms. It is considered that complications related to delayed haemorrhage after hemispherectomy are remediable. Images PMID:5310892

  10. Management of variceal haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, S. G.; Westaby, D.

    1994-01-01

    Fig 2 gives an algorithm for the treatment of bleeding oesophageal varices. Initial resuscitation of the patient is of paramount importance, ideally followed by early interventional endoscopy. Recent advances in available endoscopic techniques enable the endoscopist to suit the therapeutic approach to the clinical situation. Injection sclerotherapy remains the initial treatment of choice in bleeding patients. Endoscopic banding ligation is an alternative, best used in patients who have spontaneously stopped bleeding or as a complementary treatment a few days after the initial session of injection sclerotherapy. The tissue adhesives and thrombin can be used to treat bleeding gastric varices. [table: see text] Should the endoscopic expertise not be available, drug treatment (with somatostatin or octreotide) or balloon tamponade are the treatments of choice. Transjugular intrahepatic portal-systemic stent shunt is a new effective technique, not yet widely available, which has a documented complication rate that has yet to be fully defined. It is a good alternative to surgery as a "rescue" procedure for patients who continue to bleed despite two sessions of endoscopic intervention. PMID:8180541

  11. Increased brain edema in aqp4-null mice in an experimental model of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Tait, Matthew J.; Saadoun, Samira; Bell, B. Anthony; Verkman, Alan S.; Papadopoulos, Marios C.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the role of the glial water channel protein aquaporin-4 in brain edema in a mouse model of subarachnoid haemorrhage in which thirty microliters of blood was injected into the basal cisterns. Brain water content, intracranial pressure and neurological score were compared in wildtype and aquaporin-4 null mice. We also measured blood-brain barrier permeability, and the osmotic permeability of the glia limitans, one of the routes of edema elimination. Wildtype and aquaporin-4 null mice had comparable baseline brain water content, intracranial pressure and neurological score. At six hours after blood injection, aquaporin-4 null mice developed more brain swelling than wildtype mice. Brain water content increased by 1.5 ± 0.1 vs. 0.5 ± 0.2 % (Mean ± Standard Error, P < 0.0005) and intracranial pressure by 36 ± 5 vs. 21 ± 3 mmHg (P < 0.05) above pre-injection baseline, and neurological score was worse at 18.0 vs. 24.5 (median, P < 0.05), respectively. Although subarachnoid hemorrhage produced comparable increases in blood-brain barrier permeability in wildtype and aquaporin-4 null mice, aquaporin-4 null mice had a twofold reduction in glia limitans osmotic permeability. We conclude that aquaporin-4 null mice manifest increased brain edema following subarachnoid hemorrhage as a consequence of reduced elimination of excess brain water. PMID:20132873

  12. Case Studies in Cardiac Dysfunction After Acute Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Jason C.; Korn-Naveh, Lauren; Crago, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acute aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) often present with more than just neurological compromise. A wide spectrum of complicating cardiopulmonary abnormalities have been documented in patients with acute SAH, presenting additional challenges to the healthcare providers who attempt to treat and stabilize these patients. The patients described in this article presented with both acute aneurysmal SAH and cardiopulmonary compromise. Education and further research on this connection is needed to provide optimal care and outcomes for this vulnerable population. Nurses play a key role in balancing the critical and diverse needs of patients presenting with these symptoms. PMID:18856247

  13. UK guidelines on the management of variceal haemorrhage in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Dhiraj; Stanley, Adrian J; Hayes, Peter C; Patch, David; Millson, Charles; Mehrzad, Homoyon; Austin, Andrew; Ferguson, James W; Olliff, Simon P; Hudson, Mark; Christie, John M

    2015-11-01

    These updated guidelines on the management of variceal haemorrhage have been commissioned by the Clinical Services and Standards Committee (CSSC) of the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) under the auspices of the liver section of the BSG. The original guidelines which this document supersedes were written in 2000 and have undergone extensive revision by 13 members of the Guidelines Development Group (GDG). The GDG comprises elected members of the BSG liver section, representation from British Association for the Study of the Liver (BASL) and Liver QuEST, a nursing representative and a patient representative. The quality of evidence and grading of recommendations was appraised using the AGREE II tool.The nature of variceal haemorrhage in cirrhotic patients with its complex range of complications makes rigid guidelines inappropriate. These guidelines deal specifically with the management of varices in patients with cirrhosis under the following subheadings: (1) primary prophylaxis; (2) acute variceal haemorrhage; (3) secondary prophylaxis of variceal haemorrhage; and (4) gastric varices. They are not designed to deal with (1) the management of the underlying liver disease; (2) the management of variceal haemorrhage in children; or (3) variceal haemorrhage from other aetiological conditions. PMID:25887380

  14. UK guidelines on the management of variceal haemorrhage in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Dhiraj; Stanley, Adrian J; Hayes, Peter C; Patch, David; Millson, Charles; Mehrzad, Homoyon; Austin, Andrew; Ferguson, James W; Olliff, Simon P; Hudson, Mark; Christie, John M

    2015-01-01

    These updated guidelines on the management of variceal haemorrhage have been commissioned by the Clinical Services and Standards Committee (CSSC) of the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) under the auspices of the liver section of the BSG. The original guidelines which this document supersedes were written in 2000 and have undergone extensive revision by 13 members of the Guidelines Development Group (GDG). The GDG comprises elected members of the BSG liver section, representation from British Association for the Study of the Liver (BASL) and Liver QuEST, a nursing representative and a patient representative. The quality of evidence and grading of recommendations was appraised using the AGREE II tool. The nature of variceal haemorrhage in cirrhotic patients with its complex range of complications makes rigid guidelines inappropriate. These guidelines deal specifically with the management of varices in patients with cirrhosis under the following subheadings: (1) primary prophylaxis; (2) acute variceal haemorrhage; (3) secondary prophylaxis of variceal haemorrhage; and (4) gastric varices. They are not designed to deal with (1) the management of the underlying liver disease; (2) the management of variceal haemorrhage in children; or (3) variceal haemorrhage from other aetiological conditions. PMID:25887380

  15. High frequency of spinal involvement in patients with basal subarachnoid neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Callacondo, D.; Garcia, H.H.; Gonzales, I.; Escalante, D.; Gilman, Robert H.; Tsang, Victor C.W.; Gonzalez, Armando; Lopez, Maria T.; Gavidia, Cesar M.; Martinez, Manuel; Alvarado, Manuel; Porras, Miguel; Saavedra, Herbert; Rodriguez, Silvia; Verastegui, Manuela; Mayta, Holger; Herrera, Genaro; Lescano, Andres G.; Zimic, Mirko; Gonzalvez, Guillermo; Moyano, Luz M.; Ayvar, Viterbo; Diaz, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of spinal neurocysticercosis (NCC) in patients with basal subarachnoid NCC compared with that in individuals with viable limited intraparenchymal NCC (?20 live cysts in the brain). Methods: We performed a prospective observational case-control study of patients with NCC involving the basal cisterns or patients with only limited intraparenchymal NCC. All patients underwent MRI examinations of the brain and the entire spinal cord to assess spinal involvement. Results: Twenty-seven patients with limited intraparenchymal NCC, and 28 patients with basal subarachnoid NCC were included in the study. Spinal involvement was found in 17 patients with basal subarachnoid NCC and in only one patient with limited intraparenchymal NCC (odds ratio 40.18, 95% confidence interval 4.74–340.31; p < 0.0001). All patients had extramedullary (intradural) spinal NCC, and the lumbosacral region was the most frequently involved (89%). Patients with extensive spinal NCC more frequently had ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement (7 of 7 vs 3 of 11; p = 0.004) and tended to have a longer duration of neurologic symptoms than those with regional involvement (72 months vs 24 months; p = 0.062). Conclusions: The spinal subarachnoid space is commonly involved in patients with basal subarachnoid NCC, compared with those with only intraparenchymal brain cysts. Spinal cord involvement probably explains serious late complications including chronic meningitis and gait disorders that were described before the introduction of antiparasitic therapy. MRI of the spine should be performed in basal subarachnoid disease to document spinal involvement, prevent complications, and monitor for recurrent disease. PMID:22517102

  16. Anti-shock garment in postpartum haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Miller, Suellen; Martin, Hilarie B; Morris, Jessica L

    2008-12-01

    The non-pneumatic anti-shock garment (NASG) is a first-aid device that reverses hypovolaemic shock and decreases obstetric haemorrhage. It consists of articulated neoprene segments that close tightly with Velcro, shunting blood from the lower body to the core organs, elevating blood pressure and increasing preload and cardiac output. This chapter describes the controversial history of the predecessors of NASG, pneumatic anti-shock garments (PASGs), relates case studies of PASG for obstetric haemorrhage, compares pneumatic and non-pneumatic devices and posits why the NASG is more appropriate for low-resource settings. This chapter discusses the only evidence available about NASGs for obstetric haemorrhage - two pre-post pilot trials and three case series - and describes recently initiated randomized cluster trials in Africa. Instructions and an algorithm for ASGs in haemorrhage and shock management are included. Much remains unknown about the NASG, a promising intervention for obstetric haemorrhage management. PMID:18805742

  17. Ventricular shunting for hydrocephalus following intraventricular haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Roberts, J P; Burge, D M

    1989-12-01

    31 patients underwent ventricular shunting (17 VA and 14 VP) for post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus over 11 years. The mean gestational age was 31.8 +/- 4.17 (1 SD) weeks and birth weight 1.83 +/- 0.77 (1 SD) kg, with no differences between the VA and VP groups. Shunts inserted less than 5 weeks of age failed more frequently than those inserted after 5 weeks. There were 5 early (less than 30 days) blocks all in VP shunts (p = 0.023) but no difference in distal catheter blockage rate (p = 0.14). There were no early infections. In later follow-up, 35% of patients had block episodes and 22% infective episodes with no significant difference between the type of shunt used. Overall mortality was 6.5% and not related to shunt complications. Revisions were more frequent in VP shunts (0.9 revisions/shunt year) than VA shunts (0.6 revs/shunt year). Using life table analysis 60% of VP and 30% of VA shunts failed within 2 years of insertion. PMID:2623959

  18. Visual outcome of 25-gauge microincision vitrectomy surgery in diabetic vitreous haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Burhan Abdul Majid; Rizvi, Syed Fawad; Mahmood, Syed Asaad; Mal, Washoo; Zafar, Shakir

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the visual outcome and complications of 25-gauge micro incision vitrectomy surgery (MIVS) in diabetic vitreous haemorrhage. Methods: This Quasi Experimental study was conducted at LRBT, Tertiary eye care hospital Karachi, from February 2012 to January 2013. Sixty eyes of sixty patients with uncontrolled type II diabetes mellitus (DM) were included. There were 43 (71.7%) males and 17 (28.3%) females. Age range was 40 – 60 years. All randomly selected patients underwent 25-gauge sutureless micro incision vitrectomy surgery for diabetic vitreous haemorrhage. Main outcomes measured were best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) assessed with logMAR and post-operative complications. Follow ups were at one day, one week, one month, three months and six months post-operatively. Result: Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) gradually improved in majority of subjects in each subsequent follow up visit. Preoperative visual acuity was 1.023 ±0.226 logMAR, which was improved after final follow up to 0.457±0.256 and P-value was < 0.001. Five patients developed recurrent vitreous haemorrhage during study period, one patient developed cataract (1.7%), one (1.7%) had ocular hypotony defined as intraocular pressure < 5 mmHg and one (1.7%) developed endophthalmitis. Conclusion: 25-gauge micro incision vitrectomy surgery (MIVS) is an effective sutureless parsplana vitrectomy surgery which has good visual outcome in diabetic vitreous haemorrhage with minimum manageable complications.

  19. Surgical Craniotomy for Intracerebral Haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mendelow, A David

    2015-11-01

    Craniotomy is probably indicated for patients with superficial spontaneous lobar supratentorial intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) when the level of consciousness drops below 13 within the first 8 h of the onset of the haemorrhage. Once the level drops below 9, it is probably too late to consider craniotomy for these patients, so clinical vigilance is paramount. While this statement is only backed up by evidence that is moderately strong, meta-analysis of available data suggests that it is true in the rather limited number of patients with ICH. Meta-analyses like this can often predict the results of future prospective randomised controlled trials a decade or more before the trials are completed and published. Countless such examples exist in the literature, as is the case for thrombolysis in patients with myocardial infarction in the last millennium: meta-analysis determined the efficacy more than a decade BEFORE the last trial (ISIS-2) confirmed the benefit of thrombolysis for myocardial infarction. Careful examination of the meta-analysis' Forest plots in this chapter will demonstrate why this statement is made at the outset. Other meta-analyses of surgery for ICH have also indicated that minimal interventional techniques using topical thrombolysis or endoscopy via burrholes or even twist drill aspiration may be particularly successful for the treatment of supratentorial ICH, especially when the clot is deep seated. Ongoing clinical trials (CLEAR III and MISTIE III) should confirm this in the fullness of time. There are 2 exceptions to these generalisations. First, based on trial evidence, aneurysmal ICH is best treated with surgery. Second, cerebellar ICH represents a special case because of the development of hydrocephalus, which may require expeditious drainage as the intracranial pressure rises. The cerebellar clot will then require evacuation, usually via posterior fossa craniectomy, rather than craniotomy. Technical advances suggest that image-guided surgery may improve the completeness of surgical evacuation and outcomes, regardless of which surgical technique is employed. PMID:26588582

  20. The role of recombinant activated Factor VII in major obstetric haemorrhage: the Farnborough experience.

    PubMed

    Wissa, I; Ebeid, E; El-Shawarby, S; Chandakas, S; Kamal, T; Hill, N

    2009-01-01

    Major obstetric haemorrhage is one of the commonest causes of maternal mortality and morbidity worldwide. It may result in coagulopathy and diffuse pelvic or vaginal bleeding. Correction of coagulopathy when administering Factor VII may be crucial to the management of selected cases. We report the use of recombinant activated factor in three cases of massive obstetric haemorrhage. Prolonged international normalised ratio, activated partial thromboplastin time, and reduced fibrinogen were the trigger to use rFVIIa. It was effective to halt the process of coagulopathy, secure haemostasis and improve laboratory parameters in all three patients. We review the relevant literature and discuss its indications, the potential benefits and possible complications. Recombinant activated Factor VII is a potential haemostatic agent in massive obstetric haemorrhage. Its successful use has been reported in post-surgical bleeding and consumptive coagulopathy. It may abolish the need for hysterectomy, which has a devastating effect on the patient future fertility and psychological well-being. PMID:19280490

  1. Pharmacologic Management of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Young, Adam M H; Karri, Surya K; Helmy, Adel; Budohoski, Karol P; Kirollos, Ramez W; Bulters, Diederik O; Kirkpatrick, Peter J; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Trivedi, Rikin A

    2015-07-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remains a condition with suboptimal functional outcomes, especially in the young population. Pharmacotherapy has an accepted role in several aspects of the disease and an emerging role in several others. No preventive pharmacologic interventions for SAH currently exist. Antiplatelet medications as well as anticoagulation have been used to prevent thromboembolic events after endovascular coiling. However, the main focus of pharmacologic treatment of SAH is the prevention of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Currently the only evidence-based medical intervention is nimodipine. Other calcium channel blockers have been evaluated without convincing efficacy. Anti-inflammatory drugs such as statins have demonstrated early potential; however, they failed to provide significant evidence for the use in preventing DCI. Similar findings have been reported for magnesium, which showed potential in experimental studies and a phase 2 trial. Clazosentane, a potent endothelin receptor antagonist, did not translate to improve functional outcomes. Various other neuroprotective agents have been used to prevent DCI; however, the results have been, at best inconclusive. The prevention of DCI and improvement in functional outcome remain the goals of pharmacotherapy after the culprit lesion has been treated in aneurysmal SAH. Therefore, further research to elucidate the exact mechanisms by which DCI is propagated is clearly needed. In this article, we review the current pharmacologic approaches that have been evaluated in SAH and highlight the areas in which further research is needed. PMID:25701766

  2. Post-operative bilateral adrenal haemorrhage: A case report

    PubMed Central

    McNicol, R.E.; Bradley, A.; Griffin, J.; Duncan, G.; Eriksen, C.A.; Guthrie, G.J.K.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Bilateral adrenal haemorrhage is a rare, but serious, illness carrying an estimated 15% mortality.1,2 The majority of cases occur in patients with acute, stressful illness, however the exact mechanism underlying adrenal haemorrhage remains unclear. This medical emergency carries significant diagnostic difficulty4 with non-specific clinical symptoms and variations in electrolyte abnormalities. Timely treatment is important as it prevents both the acute and long-term sequelae of adrenal failure. PRESENTATION OF CASE This report describes a medical emergency in a surgical patient following emergency surgery for intra-abdominal sepsis. The patient reported non-specific symptoms of confusion, mild pyrexia and vague abdominal pain during the post-operative phase, with subtle electrolyte abnormalities and a low serum cortisol suggestive of adrenal crisis. Timely medical treatment, with intravenous hydrocortisone and intensive monitoring, and appropriate medical follow-up with addition of long-term fludrocortisone resulted in a satisfactory outcome. DISCUSSION This report describes a potentially life-threatening complication of intra-abdominal sepsis with adrenal crisis secondary to bilateral adrenal haemorrhage. In particular, this case highlights the diagnostic difficulty in such surgical patients due to vague symptoms and, in this case, the presence of a presentation variant with acute hyponatraemia and normal potassium. CONCLUSION This case highlights the importance of awareness of both the symptoms and signs and variation in electrolyte profile when assessing surgical patients post-operatively. In addition, this case highlights the benefit of early recognition and initiation of treatment and the importance of follow-up as long-term medical management is often required to prevent further relapse. PMID:25437659

  3. Early Cerebral Infarction after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Wong, George Kwok Chu; Leung, Joyce Hoi Ying; Yu, Janice Wong Li; Lam, Sandy Wai; Chan, Emily Kit Ying; Poon, Wai Sang; Abrigo, Jill; Siu, Deyond Yun Woon

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious disease with high case fatality and morbidity. Early cerebral infarction has been suggested as a risk factor for poor outcome. We aimed to assess the pattern of early and delayed cerebral infarction after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. We prospectively enrolled consecutive aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients presenting to an academic neurosurgical referral center (Prince of Wales Hospital, the Chinese University of Hong Kong) in Hong Kong. Cerebral infarction occurred in 24 (48 %) patients, in which 14 (28 %) had early cerebral infarction and 14 (28 %) had delayed cerebral infarction. Early anterior cerebral infarction occurred in a similar proportion of anterior and posterior circulation aneurysms (24 % vs. 21 %), whereas posterior circulation aneurysm patients had a higher proportion of early posterior cerebral infarction compared with anterior circulation aneurysm patients (18 % vs. 2 %). In conclusion, early cerebral infarction was common and different from delayed cerebral infarction. PMID:26463941

  4. Signaling Pathway in Cerebral Vasospasm After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: News Update.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lingyun; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) caused by ruptured intracranial aneurysms is a serious threat to human health and life. Although advances in surgical and anesthetic techniques have improved the prognosis of patients with aneurysms, the rate of death and disability caused by SAH remains high, predominantly due to cerebral vasospasm (CVS) after SAH and early brain damage. In particular, CVS is a common complication after SAH. However, its pathogenesis has not yet been fully elucidated, and clinically effective prevention and treatment measures are still lacking. Spasm of blood vessels can decrease cerebral blood flow, leading to ischemia and hypoxia in brain tissues and ultimately severe neurological dysfunction. Currently, there is no comprehensive theory that can fully explain the mechanisms underlying SAH-caused CVS. However, studies on signal transduction, apoptosis, and glial cell-mediated mechanisms in recent years have shed new light on the treatment of CVS. PMID:26463942

  5. Life-threatening haemorrhage in patients without pulmonary embolism who received anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    van den Oever, Huub; Schreurs, John W G M; Huisman, Menno

    2015-01-01

    Local and international guidelines recommend that anticoagulation should be initiated before diagnostic work up has been completed, in patients with high clinical probability of pulmonary embolism (PE). However, many patients receiving anticoagulants for suspected PE do not have this disease. We present three cases of life-threatening bleeding complications after treatment with low-molecular-weight heparins for suspected PE. A 35-year-old woman had acute chest pain and died of a ruptured thoracic aneurysm. A man with herpes encephalitis developed acute dyspnoea, and died of intracerebral haemorrhage. And a woman with mild chest trauma had a complicated recovery after life-threatening intrapleural haemorrhage. Neither of these patients had PE. These cases emphasise that delaying diagnostics may pose a risk in patients with acute chest symptoms. An early CT scan may avoid unnecessary anticoagulation in patients without PE, and may help to direct attention to the actual cause. PMID:26628305

  6. Neuroprotection in a rabbit model of intraventricular haemorrhage by cyclooxygenase-2, prostanoid receptor-1 or tumour necrosis factor-alpha inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Vinukonda, Govindaiah; Csiszar, Anna; Hu, Furong; Dummula, Krishna; Pandey, Nishi Kant; Zia, Muhammad T.; Ferreri, Nicholas R.; Ungvari, Zoltan; LaGamma, Edmund F.

    2010-01-01

    Intraventricular haemorrhage is a major complication of prematurity that results in neurological dysfunctions, including cerebral palsy and cognitive deficits. No therapeutic options are currently available to limit the catastrophic brain damage initiated by the development of intraventricular haemorrhage. As intraventricular haemorrhage leads to an inflammatory response, we asked whether cyclooxygenase-2, its derivative prostaglandin E2, prostanoid receptors and pro-inflammatory cytokines were elevated in intraventricular haemorrhage; whether their suppression would confer neuroprotection; and determined how cyclooxygenase-2 and cytokines were mechanistically-linked. To this end, we used our rabbit model of intraventricular haemorrhage where premature pups, delivered by Caesarian section, were treated with intraperitoneal glycerol at 2 h of age to induce haemorrhage. Intraventricular haemorrhage was diagnosed by head ultrasound at 6 h of age. The pups with intraventricular haemorrhage were treated with inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2, prostanoid receptor-1 or tumour necrosis factor-?; and cell-infiltration, cell-death and gliosis were compared between treated-pups and vehicle-treated controls during the first 3 days of life. Neurobehavioural performance, myelination and gliosis were assessed in pups treated with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor compared to controls at Day 14. We found that both protein and messenger RNA expression of cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E2, prostanoid receptor-1, tumour necrosis factor-? and interleukin-1? were consistently higher in the forebrain of pups with intraventricular haemorrhage relative to pups without intraventricular haemorrhage. However, cyclooxygenase-1 and prostanoid receptor 2–4 levels were comparable in pups with and without intraventricular haemorrhage. Cyclooxygenase-2, prostanoid receptor-1 or tumour necrosis factor-? inhibition reduced inflammatory cell infiltration, apoptosis, neuronal degeneration and gliosis around the ventricles of pups with intraventricular haemorrhage. Importantly, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition alleviated neurological impairment, improved myelination and reduced gliosis at 2 weeks of age. Cyclooxygenase-2 or prostanoid receptor-1 inhibition reduced tumour necrosis factor-? level, but not interleukin-1?. Conversely, tumour necrosis factor-? antagonism did not affect cyclooxygenase-2 expression. Hence, prostanoid receptor-1 and tumour necrosis factor-? are downstream to cyclooxygenase-2 in the inflammatory cascade induced by intraventricular haemorrhage, and cyclooxygenase-2-inhibition or suppression of downstream molecules—prostanoid receptor-1 or tumour necrosis factor-?—might be a viable neuroprotective strategy for minimizing brain damage in premature infants with intraventricular haemorrhage. PMID:20488889

  7. Haemorrhagic stroke after thrombolysis with streptokinase.

    PubMed

    Arzu, J; Muqueet, M A; Sweety, S A; Iqbal, A M; Kabir, F I; Mahmood, M

    2014-10-01

    A 54 years old male presented with central chest pain for five hours in a local hospital, Comilla. He was diagnosed as a case of acute STEMI (Extensive Anterior) and was thrombolized with Streptokinase 1.5 million IU. His pain was relieved, ST segment was depressed by >50% after thrombolysis. While in hospital, he developed weakness of his left limbs with gradually deteriorating level of consciousness. A CT scan of brain showed haemorrhage in the right frontoparietal region. This is a rare case of haemorrhagic stroke after thrombolysis with streptokinase. PMID:25481610

  8. Remote site intracranial haemorrhage: a clinical series of five patients with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Borkar, Sachin Anil; Lakshmiprasad, G; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar; Mahapatra, Ashok Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Post-operative haematoma is a well-known complication following the intracranial surgery, the surgical site itself being the most frequent and usually results from inadequate haemostasis. Remote site intracranial haemorrhage, that is, haemorrhage occurring at a distant site from the site of craniotomy, is relatively rare and may occasionally cause significant morbidity or even mortality. Authors report a clinical series of five patients who developed remote site haemorrhage following intracranial surgery. Out of 2500 cranial surgeries performed at the authors' institute in the year 2010, only five patients developed this complication (0.002%). One of these patients developed infratentorial haematoma following supratentorial surgery and one patient developed supratentorial haematoma following infratentorial surgery. All the patients were diagnosed by CT scan in the post-operative period. Four patients were operated and made a good recovery while one patient with cerebellar haematoma rapidly deteriorated and developed brain death and hence was not operated. The pertinent literature is reviewed regarding pathophysiology and management of this rare condition. PMID:23808679

  9. Methemoglobin Is an Endogenous Toll-Like Receptor 4 Ligand—Relevance to Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Min Seong; Woo, Seung Kyoon; Kurland, David B.; Yoon, Sung Hwan; Palmer, Andre F.; Banerjee, Uddyalok; Iqbal, Sana; Ivanova, Svetlana; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J. Marc

    2015-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is a well-recognized consequence of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and may be responsible for important complications of SAH. Signaling by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated nuclear factor ?B (NF?B) in microglia plays a critical role in neuronal damage after SAH. Three molecules derived from erythrocyte breakdown have been postulated to be endogenous TLR4 ligands: methemoglobin (metHgb), heme and hemin. However, poor water solubility of heme and hemin, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contamination have confounded our understanding of these molecules as endogenous TLR4 ligands. We used a 5-step process to obtain highly purified LPS-free metHgb, as confirmed by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance mass spectrometry and by the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. Using this preparation, we show that metHgb is a TLR4 ligand at physiologically relevant concentrations. metHgb caused time- and dose-dependent secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF?), from microglial and macrophage cell lines, with secretion inhibited by siRNA directed against TLR4, by the TLR4-specific inhibitors, Rs-LPS and TAK-242, and by anti-CD14 antibodies. Injection of purified LPS-free metHgb into the rat subarachnoid space induced microglial activation and TNF? upregulation. Together, our findings support the hypothesis that, following SAH, metHgb in the subarachnoid space can promote widespread TLR4-mediated neuroinflammation. PMID:25751721

  10. A case of subarachnoid hemorrhage revealed by an acute coronary syndrome (ACS)

    PubMed Central

    Hatim, Abdedaim; El Otmani, Wafae; Houssa, Mehdi Ait; Atmani, Noureddine; Moutakiallah, Younes; Haimeur, Charqui; Drissi, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    The subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is definitely the best descriptive model of the interaction between cardiovascular system and cerebral damage. The underlying mechanism of cardiovascular alterations after SAH is linked to the adrenergic discharge related to aneurysm rupture. Cardiac and pulmonary complications are common after severe brain injury, especially the aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Acute neurogenic pulmonary edema is not exceptional; it may occur in 20% of cases and commonly follows a severe subarachnoid hemorrhage. Severe myocardial damage with cardiogenic shock may possibly reveal the SAH (3% of cases) and mislead to wrong diagnosis of ACS with dramatic therapeutic consequences. The contribution of CT and cerebral angiography is essential for diagnosis and treatment. Surgical or endovascular treatment depends on location, size and shape of the aneurysm, on patient's age, neurological status and existence of concomitant diseases. We report the case of a 58 years old patient, with a past medical history of diabetes and hypertension, admitted for acute pulmonary edema with cardiogenic shock. This case illustrates an unusual presentation of aneurismal SAH in a patient presenting with an acute coronary syndrome. PMID:26309459

  11. High-grade intracranial chondrosarcoma presenting with haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Little, Anjuli; Chung, Caroline; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Mikulis, David; Valiante, Taufik A

    2013-10-01

    Chondrosarcomas are rare sarcomas that produce malignant cartilage, infrequently arising as a primary intracranial tumour. We present a patient with intracranial chondrosarcoma with intratumoural haemorrhage arising in an unusual location and with unusual imaging findings. A 46-year-old man presented with headache, nausea, and vomiting over the previous 24 hours. Physical and neurological examinations were normal. Cranial CT scans and MRI revealed a large right pre-frontal (subdural) and interhemispheric heterogeneous density associated with a frontal, partially calcified mass and midline shift. An awake craniotomy was performed. With the intra-operative quick section favouring subdural hematoma, the lesion was subtotally resected. Follow-up imaging confirmed residual mass. Pathology examination revealed a high-grade malignant neoplasm with chondroid differentiation, diagnosed as conventional Grade III chondrosarcoma. The patient was referred to oncology for follow-up and radiation therapy. Intracranial chondrosarcoma was first reported in 1899, and since then continues to be an extremely rare malignancy of the brain. These tumours commonly present as extra-axial masses, originating from the skull base, and produce symptoms due to progressive enlargement and compression of local structures. Unusual presentations of these tumours, such as vascularity, intratumoural haemorrhage, and intra-axial location, may complicate pre-surgical decision making by altering the provisional diagnosis prior to intervention. This patient emphasises the importance of careful analysis and incorporation of imaging findings into surgical decision making. Specific imaging characteristics that, in such unusual situations, are suggestive of chondrosarcoma should motivate an aggressive surgical approach to optimise adjuvant interventions. PMID:23746570

  12. Epidemiology of Intracranial Haemorrhages Associated with Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in Spain: TAC Registry

    PubMed Central

    Zapata-Wainberg, Gustavo; Ximénez-Carrillo Rico, Álvaro; Benavente Fernández, Lorena; Masjuan Vallejo, Jaime; Gállego Culleré, Jaime; Freijó Guerrero, María del Mar; Egido, José; Gómez Sánchez, José Carlos; Martínez Domeño, Alejandro; Purroy García, Francisco; Vives Pastor, Bárbara; Blanco González, Miguel; Vivancos, José

    2015-01-01

    Background Vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (VKA-OACs) are effective for primary and secondary prevention of embolic events. The rate of haemorrhagic neurological complications in patients admitted to neurology departments in Spain is not yet known. Aims We aimed to determine the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients with intracranial haemorrhage secondary to VKA-OACs as well as the incidence of this severe complication. Methods We conducted a retrospective, descriptive, multi-centre study using information from the medical records of all patients admitted to neurology departments, diagnosed with spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage, and treated with VKA-OACs within a 1-year period. We collected demographic and care data from centres, patients' medical records [demographic data, medical history, haemorrhage origin, vascular risk factors, concomitant treatment, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores], and patients' outcome at 3 months [independence (modified Rankin Scale score <3) and mortality rate]. Results Twenty-one hospitals serving a population of 8,155,628 inhabitants participated in the study. The total number of cases was 235, the mean age was 78.2 (SD 9.4) years, and the baseline NIHSS score was 11.6 (SD 9.5; median 9; interquartile range 14). The VKA-OACs used were acenocoumarol in 95.3% (224 patients) and warfarin in 4.7% (11 patients). The haemorrhage origin was deep in 29.8%, lobar in 25.5%, intraventricular in 11.5%, extensive in 17.4% (>100 ml), cerebellar in 12.3%, and in the brainstem in 3.4%. The international normalised ratio was within therapeutic ranges at admission (according to indication) in 29.4% (69 patients). The global incidence (cases per 100,000 inhabitants per year) is 2.88. The in-hospital mortality rate was 40%, and 24.3% of the patients were independent at 3 months, while the mortality at 3 months was 42.6%. Conclusion VKA-OAC treatment is associated with a large percentage of all cases of spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage, an event leading to high dependence and mortality rates. PMID:26600798

  13. Neurological complications of childhood leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, R H; Marshall, W C; Chessells, J M

    1977-01-01

    We have reviewed the neurological complications not directly attributable to leukaemic infiltration in a group of 438 children with leukaemia or lymphoma. 61 children had one or more complications due chiefly to bleeding, infection, or drug toxicity. Early death from intracranial haemorrhage occurred in 1% of children with lymphoblastic leukaemia and 7% of children with myeloblastic leukaemia. Measles and chicken pox were the most serious infective complications; one child remains severely retarded after presumed measles encephalitis, one child with chicken pox died, and a second remains disabled. 2 additional cases of measles encephalitis and one of progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy are described. Drugs which caused neurotoxicity included vincristine, cytosine arabinoside, L-asparaginase, and phenothiazines, but most problems were caused by methotrexate. Methotrexate toxicity was more prevalent and more serious in children who had had previous central nervous system leukaemia. We conclude that viral infections and methotrexate pose the greatest neurological hazards to children with leukaemia. PMID:596922

  14. Bevacizumab in vitreous haemorrhage secondary to radiation retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Montero, Javier Antonio; Yanez-Castro, Giovanni; Sanchis-Merino, Maria Eugenia; Ruiz-Moreno, Jose Maria

    2014-01-01

    Radiation retinopathy is a delayed-onset side effect of radiation exposure caused by retinal ischaemia that may induce proliferative retinopathy with neovascularisation, vitreous haemorrhage and macular oedema. An otherwise healthy, 51-year-old male patient who had been diagnosed with olfactory neuroblastoma and undergone complete surgical removal of the lesion followed by cranial irradiation developed bilateral cataracts and radiation retinopathy. The patient was treated by panretinal photocoagulation (PRP), followed by three-port pars-plana vitrectomy. Recurrent episodes of vitreous haemorrhages occurred following surgery and the patient was successfully treated by one intravitreal injection of bevacizumab with resolution of vitreous blood. Vitreous haemorrhage recurred 6 months later and a scheduled treatment with intravitreal bevacizumab every 4 months was established, preventing further haemorrhagic episodes. Six months after the last injection, a new episode of vitreous haemorrhage occurred. Scheduled intravitreal bevacizumab injections may help prevent recurrent vitreous haemorrhages in vitrectomised patients with radiation retinopathy. PMID:24510700

  15. Comparative Efficacy of Meloxicam and Placebo in Vasospasm of Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ghodsi, Seyed Mohammad; Mohebbi, Niayesh; Naderi, Soheil; Anbarloie, Mousareza; Aoude, Ahmad; Habibi Pasdar, Seyed Sohail

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm considered to be a serious cause of morbidity and mortality following subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH).Despite several available therapeutic options, current protocols do not prevent major consequences of vasospasm. Inflammation is believed to play an important role in post-haemorrhagic vasospasm. Meloxicam is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of meloxicam versus placebo on vasospasm in patients with SAH. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, SAH patients randomly received 7.5 mg meloxicam or placebo twice daily for 7 days. End points were, middle cerebral artery velocity obtained with transcranial doppler, in-hospital mortality, hospital stay and discharge Glasgow Outcome Scale. Eighty-one patients enrolled in the study. (40 received meloxicam, 41 received placebo). Baseline characteristics were similar between the groups. There were no differences in length of hospitalization (17.4 ± 3.1 vs 18.6 ± 4.2 days; p = 0.145), in-hospital mortality rate (15 vs 22%; p-value=0.569), or GOS (p = 0.972) between the two groups. MCA velocity were slightly less in patients who had received meloxicam, but not to a significant degree (p-value=0. 564(. No side effect has been detected for meloxicam. This study did not prove meloxicam efficacy in vasospasm of SAH patients. But it demonstrated that clinical trial of meloxicam in these patients is feasible and probably safe. The effectiveness of meloxicam on cerebral vasospasm has to be studied in larger trials. PMID:25561918

  16. Periprocedural complications in endovascular stroke treatment.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Suha H; Yilmaz, Guliz

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular stroke treatment is a neurointerventional emergency where the main goal is the early recanalization of the occlusion within the critical time window, as safely as possible. Although the time window and rate of complications for endovascular stroke treatment differ with anterior and posterior circulation strokes, awareness of potential periprocedural complications is important, as they affect patient morbidity and mortality. Periprocedural complications are classified as haemorrhagic complications, procedure-/device-related, puncture site complications, and late-onset events including vascular stenosis. We present the digital subtraction angiography and CT imaging findings related to these complications in a study of 56 stroke patients, as they relate to previous findings in the literature. PMID:26529228

  17. [Perioperative management of abdominal aortic balloon occlusion in patients complicated with placenta percteta: a case report].

    PubMed

    Zeng, H; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Guo, X Y

    2015-12-18

    When placenta previa complicated with placenta percreta, the exposure of operative field is difficult and the routine methods are difficult to effectively control the bleeding, even causing life-threatening results. A 31-year-old woman, who had been diagnosed with a complete type of placenta previa and placenta percreta with bladder invasion at 34 weeks gestation. Her ultrasound results showed a complete type of placenta previa and there was a loss of the decidual interface between the placenta and the myometrium on the lower part of the uterus, suggestive of placenta increta. For further evaluation of the placenta, pelvis magnetic resonance imaging was performed, which revealed findings suspicious of a placenta percreta. She underwent elective cecarean section at 36 weeks of gestation. Firstly, two ureteral stents were placed into the bilateral ureter through the cystoscope. After the infrarenal abdominal aorta catheter was inserted via the femoral artery (9 F sheath ), subarachnoid anesthesia had been established. A healthy 2 510 g infant was delivered, with Apgar scores of 10 at 1 min and 10 at 5 min. Immediately after the baby was delivered, following which there was massive haemorrhage and general anaesthesia was induced. The balloon catheter was immediately inflated until the wave of dorsal artery disappeared. With the placenta retained within the uterus, a total hysterectomy was performed. The occluding time was 30 min. The intraoperative blood loss was 2 500 mL. The occluding balloon was deflated at the end of the operation. The patient had stable vital signs and normal laboratory findings during the recovery period and the hemoglobin was 116 g/L. She was discharged six days after delivery without intervention-related complications. This case illustrates that temporary occlusion of the infrarenal abdominal aorta using balloon might be a safe and effective treatment option for patients with placenta previa complicated with placenta percreta, who were at high risk for peripartum hemorrhage. Early removal of the endovascular catheter and close postoperative surveillance of the vascular system are required with this procedure to minimize the risk of vascular complications. However, further studies are needed to determine whether the potential benefits of temporary occlusion of the infrarenal abdominal aorta using balloon outweigh the potential risks. PMID:26679671

  18. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Models: Do They Need a Fix?

    PubMed Central

    Sehba, Fatima A.; Pluta, Ryszard M.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of tissue plasminogen activator to treat acute stroke is a success story of research on preventing brain injury following transient cerebral ischemia (TGI). That this discovery depended upon development of embolic animal model reiterates that proper stroke modeling is the key to develop new treatments. In contrast to TGI, despite extensive research, prevention or treatment of brain injury following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) has not been achieved. A lack of adequate aSAH disease model may have contributed to this failure. TGI is an important component of aSAH and shares mechanism of injury with it. We hypothesized that modifying aSAH model using experience acquired from TGI modeling may facilitate development of treatment for aSAH and its complications. This review focuses on similarities and dissimilarities between TGI and aSAH, discusses the existing TGI and aSAH animal models, and presents a modified aSAH model which effectively mimics the disease and has a potential of becoming a better resource for studying the brain injury mechanisms and developing a treatment. PMID:23878760

  19. Inflammation, Vasospasm, and Brain Injury after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Brandon A.

    2014-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) can lead to devastating neurological outcomes, and there are few pharmacologic treatments available for treating this condition. Both animal and human studies provide evidence of inflammation being a driving force behind the pathology of SAH, leading to both direct brain injury and vasospasm, which in turn leads to ischemic brain injury. Several inflammatory mediators that are elevated after SAH have been studied in detail. While there is promising data indicating that blocking these factors might benefit patients after SAH, there has been little success in clinical trials. One of the key factors that complicates clinical trials of SAH is the variability of the initial injury and subsequent inflammatory response. It is likely that both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the variability of patients' post-SAH inflammatory response and that this confounds trials of anti-inflammatory therapies. Additionally, systemic inflammation from other conditions that affect patients with SAH could contribute to brain injury and vasospasm after SAH. Continuing work on biomarkers of inflammation after SAH may lead to development of patient-specific anti-inflammatory therapies to improve outcome after SAH. PMID:25105123

  20. Chronic alveolar haemorrhage in a paediatric patient: a diagnostic and treatment challenge.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Ana; Senra, Virgílio; Marinho, António; Guedes, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary haemosiderosis is characterised by chronic alveolar haemorrhage, which can lead to serious cardiorespiratory complications. Although considered idiopathic in most patients, there are many possible aetiologies. We present a case of an 18-year-old woman with pulmonary haemosiderosis since 4 years of age, with an inconclusive initial study, who was treated with systemic corticosteroids and hydroxychloroquine until the age of 12 years, and azathioprine since then. Multiple exacerbations led to interstitial lung disease with restrictive functional pattern. Unilateral cochlear deafness was diagnosed at the age of 12 years and occasional polyarthralgias were recorded. When she was 16 years of age the study revealed an atypical myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA) pattern. Cyclophosphamide and rituximab were administered with resolution of respiratory insufficiency and functional disability, without new episodes of alveolar haemorrhage. This case of chronic pulmonary haemorrhage was revealed to be an ANCA vasculitis, the diagnosis of which was possible only after 12 years of symptoms, with clinical and functional improvement with the association of cyclophosphamide and rituximab. PMID:25899510

  1. Cerebral Infarction After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Kenji; Suzuki, Hidenori; Taki, Waro

    2016-01-01

    Predictors for cerebral infarction, an important cause of poor outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), were examined. This study used data from the Prospective Registry of Subarachnoid Aneurysms Treatment (PRESAT) cohort, which included 579 patients whose ruptured aneurysms were treated with either clipping or coiling within 12 days of onset. Patient, clinical, radiographic, and treatment variables associated with cerebral infarction were determined. Ruptured aneurysms were clipped in 282 patients and coiled in 297 patients. Cerebral infarction occurred in 162 patients (28.0 %): 101 patients by cerebral vasospasm, 34 patients by clipping, and 33 patients by coiling. Univariate analyses showed that significant factors associated with cerebral infarction development were Fisher computed tomography (CT) group 3 on admission, premature aneurysm rupture during clipping procedure, cerebrospinal fluid drainage, symptomatic vasospasm, endovascular treatment for vasospasm, and shunt-dependent hydrocephalus. Multivariable logistic regression analyses showed that cerebral infarction was significantly associated with Fisher CT group 3 on admission, larger aneurysm dome size, ruptured posterior circulation aneurysms, premature aneurysm rupture during clipping procedure, symptomatic vasospasm, and infection, while endovascular treatment for vasospasm significantly decreased the development of cerebral infarction. The most important potentially treatable factor associated with cerebral infarction was symptomatic vasospasm. PMID:26463943

  2. Midbrain and thalamic haemorrhage as first presentation of intracerebral glioma.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh T; Wray, Alison C; Laidlaw, John D

    2005-11-01

    A case of spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (midbrain and thalamic, with intraventricular extension) as the first presentation of an anaplastic astrocytoma is presented. Multiple CT scans and cerebral angiography failed to identify any vascular or neoplastic cause for the haemorrhage, and a presumptive diagnosis of hypertensive haemorrhage was made. Shunting of hydrocephalus was followed by early clinical improvement. However, delayed progressive deterioration necessitated MRI scan, which demonstrated a mass lesion in the basal ganglia and midbrain. This was subsequently found to be anaplastic astrocytoma on biopsy. The literature regarding this uncommon presentation of spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage from an occult brain tumour is reviewed. The need for investigation and close follow-up of presumed hypertensive haemorrhage is emphasised by this case. PMID:16326274

  3. Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: prognostic features and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tamargo, R J; Walter, K A; Oshiro, E M

    1997-11-01

    The prognostic features and outcomes associated with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are reviewed. In the first section, the epidemiology of SAH is discussed with emphasis on prevalence, incidence, risk factors, heredity, activity, and seasonal variability. In the second section, the presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with aneurysmal SAH is briefly reviewed. In the third section, the prognostic features associated with aneurysmal SAH are discussed with emphasis on neurologic condition and SAH grading scales, patient's age, aneurysm size and location, repeat hemorrhage, vasospasm, systemic disease, hypertensive response, computed tomograph features, hydrocephalus, timing of surgery, and expertise of the aneurysm center. Also in the third section, the prognostic features associated with unruptured aneurysms are discussed with emphasis on the actuarial risk of rupture, aneurysm size and location, and multiplicity of lesions. In the fourth and final section, the outcomes of aneurysmal SAH over the past 60 yrs are reviewed. PMID:9433989

  4. Endovascular Perforation Murine Model of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Du, Guo Jia; Lu, Gang; Zheng, Zhi Yuan; Poon, Wai Sang; Wong, Kwok Chu George

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a subtype of stroke with disastrous outcomes of high disability and mortality. A variety of endeavors have been developed to explore a SAH animal model for investigation of the disease. Among these models, the endovascular perforation SAH model was considered to be the most simulative to the clinical human SAH because it reproduces several pathophysiology procedures and presents some of the most important post-hemorrhage features. An applicable SAH animal model should have the characteristics of low mortality rate, limited surgical manipulation, and adaptation to many species, which permits reproducibility and standardization. An intensive discussion of how to improve the techniques and refine the procedure has taken place in the last decade. This report describes our experiences with a murine model of SAH. We aim to standardize and optimize the procedures to establish a relatively stable animal model for SAH research. PMID:26463927

  5. Exsanguinated uterus after massive atonic postpartum haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Mahadik, Kalpana V; Swami, M B; Pandey, Neha; Pathak, Ashish

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses issues related to pregnancy anaemia and late referral by a village birth attendant in resource poor setting in a central state of India. A young anaemic woman had labour onset at her village, a birth attendant tried to deliver her but failed. When she came to our hospital, had established septicaemia and absolutely non-reassurable uterine tone leading to intractable atonic postpartum haemorrhage. She died after 5?days because of coagulopathy and multiorgan failure. Huge budgets are being spent for the promotion of institutional deliveries but still the maternal mortality ratio has not reduced. The epidemiology of childbirth, social awareness for safe labour and administrative lethargy towards implementation of government programmes have not changed. The tertiary care—blood and components—multidisciplinary approach could not prevent the death of an anaemic woman. Unless there is a grassroot level change in the healthcare delivery system at the village level, the scenario might not change. PMID:23853190

  6. Viral haemorrhagic fevers in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Richards, Guy A; Weyer, Jacqueline; Blumberg, Lucille H

    2015-09-01

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) include a diverse array of diseases caused by a broad range of viruses transmitted from various animal hosts and originating from almost all the continents in the world. These are potentially fatal and highly transmissible diseases without specific treatments or prophylactic vaccines. As has been demonstrated during the Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa, the consequences of VHFs are not limited to specific countries - they may become epidemic, and may have considerable economic impact and disrupt local public health and social service structures. Intensive public health intervention is necessary to contain these diseases. Here we provide a concise overview of the VHFs that are of current public health importance to South Africa. PMID:26428973

  7. [Anticoagulants after intracerebral haemorrhage in frail elderly].

    PubMed

    Olde Rikkert, Marcel; Claassen, Jurgen

    2015-01-01

    Restarting anticoagulants in frail older patients who have had an intracerebral haemorrhage as an adverse reaction to anticoagulant therapy is a major dilemma, and one which is not specifically addressed in the state-of-the-art paper on restarting anticoagulants elsewhere in this issue. Frail older persons have the highest risk of recurrent bleeding, but, in theory, also have the most benefit from anticoagulants due to the high absolute risk for ischemic events in atrial fibrillation, which is the major indication. However, frail older persons are largely excluded from trials with anticoagulants, which makes it impossible to solve this dilemma in an evidence-based way. Therefore, we argue that sound decision making cannot only be based on neurological or cardiological expertise, as proposed by others, but should include an overall comprehensive geriatric assessment, and, most importantly, patients and caregivers should be included in shared goal setting and shared decision making. PMID:25873225

  8. Doctors' Knowledge of Viral Haemorrhagic Fevers.

    PubMed

    Lisk, Clifford; Snell, Luke; Haji-Coll, Michael; Ellis, Jayne; Sufi, Saaidullah; Raj, Rohit; Sharma, A; Smith, C

    2015-01-01

    Viral Haemorrhagic Fevers (VHF) such as Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) are of increasing concern to clinicians and public heath bodies across Europe and America due to the on-going epidemic in West Africa. We conducted an online study to assess clinicians' knowledge of VHF across six hospital sites in London. This showed suboptimal knowledge of Public Health England guidance, EVD epidemiology and the risk factors for acquiring VHF. Knowledge about VHF was dependent on seniority of grade with the most junior grade of doctors performing worse in several areas of the survey. Poor knowledge raises concerns that those at risk of VHF will be inappropriately risk stratified and managed. Education of doctors and other healthcare professionals about VHF is necessary to address these knowledge gaps. PMID:26305080

  9. Ventriculomammary shunt: an unusual ventriculoperitoneal shunt complication.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Nauman S; Johnson, Jeremiah N; Morcos, Jacques J

    2015-02-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt malfunctions are common and can result in significant consequences for patients. Despite the prevalence of breast augmentation surgery and breast surgery for other pathologies, few breast related VP shunt complications have been reported. A 54-year-old woman with hydrocephalus post-subarachnoid hemorrhage returned 1 month after VP shunt placement complaining of painful unilateral breast enlargement. After investigation, it was determined that the distal VP shunt catheter had migrated from the peritoneal cavity into the breast and wrapped around her breast implant. The breast enlargement was the result of cerebrospinal fluid retention. We detail this unusual case and review all breast related VP shunt complications reported in the literature. To avoid breast related complications related to VP shunt procedures, it is important to illicit pre-procedural history regarding breast implants, evade indwelling implants during catheter tunneling and carefully securing the abdominal catheter to prevent retrograde catheter migration to the breast. PMID:25127261

  10. Impact of Comorbidity on Early Outcome of Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Caused by Cerebral Aneurysm Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Avdagic, Selma Sijercic; Brkic, Harun; Avdagic, Harun; Smajic, Jasmina; Hodzic, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the complications aneurysms subarachnoid hemorrhage is the development of vasospasm, which is the leading cause of disability and death from ruptured cerebral aneurysm. Aim: To evaluate the significance of previous comorbidities on early outcome of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by rupture of a cerebral aneurysm in the prevention of vasospasm. Patients and methods: The study had prospective character in which included 50 patients, whose diagnosed with SAH caused by the rupture of a brain aneurysm in the period from 2011to 2013. Two groups of patients were formed. Group I: patients in addition to the standard initial treatment and “3H therapy” administered nimodipine at a dose of 15-30 mg / kg bw / h (3-10 ml) for the duration of the initial treatment. Group II: patients in addition to the standard initial treatment and “3H therapy” administered with MgSO4 at a dose of 12 grams in 500 ml of 0.9% NaCl / 24 h during the initial treatment. Results: Two-thirds of the patients (68%) from both groups had a good outcome measured with values according to GOS scales, GOS IV and V. The poorer outcome, GOS III had 20% patients, the GOS II was at 2% and GOS I within 10% of patients. If we analyze the impact of comorbidity on the outcome, it shows that there is a significant relationship between the presence of comorbidity and outcomes. The patients without comorbidity (83.30%) had a good outcome (GOS IV and V), the same outcome was observed (59.4%) with comorbidities, which has a statistically significant difference (p = 0.04). Patients without diabetes (32%) had a good outcome (GOS IV and V), while the percentage of patients with diabetes less frequent (2%) with a good outcome, a statistically significant difference (p = 0.009). Conclusion: The outcome of treatment 30 days after the subarachnoid hemorrhage analyzed values WFNS and GOS, is not dependent on the method of prevention and treatment of vasospasm. Most concomitant diseases in patients with SAH which, requiring additional treatment measures are arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus. The best predictors in the initial treatment of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by rupture of a cerebral aneurysm has the presence of comorbidity, which has statistical significance. PMID:26622076

  11. Decorin alleviated chronic hydrocephalus via inhibiting TGF-?1/Smad/CTGF pathway after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Chen, Yujie; Li, Lingyong; Jiang, Jiaode; Wu, Guangyong; Zuo, Yuchun; Zhang, John H; Feng, Hua; Yan, Xiaoxin; Liu, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hydrocephalus is one of the severe complications after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). However, there is no efficient treatment for the prevention of chronic hydrocephalus, partially due to poor understanding of underlying pathogenesis, subarachnoid fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-?1(TGF-?1) is a potent fibrogenic factor implicated in wide range of fibrotic diseases. To investigate whether decorin, a natural antagonist for TGF-?1, protects against subarachnoid fibrosis and chronic hydrocephalus after SAH, two-hemorrhage-injection SAH model was conducted in 6-week-old rats. Recombinant human decorin(rhDecorin) (30ug/2ul) was administered before blood injection and on the 10th day after SAH. TGF-?1, p-Smad2/3, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), collagen I and pro-collagen I c-terminal propeptide were assessed via western blotting, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, radioimmunoassay and immunofluorescence. And neurobehavioral tests and Morris water maze were employed to evaluate long-term neurological functions after SAH. We found that SAH induced heightened activation of TGF-?1/Smad/CTGF axis, presenting as a two peak response of TGF-?1 in cerebrospinal fluid, elevation of TGF-?1, p-Smad2/3, CTGF, collagen I in brain parenchyma and pro-collagen I c-terminal propeptide in cerebrospinal fluid, and increased lateral ventricle index. rhDecorin treatment effectively inhibited up-regulation of TGF-?1, p-Smad2/3, CTGF, collagen I and pro-collagen I c-terminal propeptide after SAH. Moreover, rhDecorin treatment significantly reduced lateral ventricular index and incidence of chronic hydrocephalus after SAH. Importantly, rhDecorin improved neurocognitive deficits after SAH. In conclusion, rhDecorin suppresses extracellular matrix accumulation and following subarachnoid fibrosis via inhibiting TGF-?1/Smad/CTGF pathway, preventing development of hydrocephalus and attenuating long-term neurocognitive defects after SAH. PMID:26556770

  12. Rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) and rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV): a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) is a calicivirus of the genus Lagovirus that causes rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) in adult European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). First described in China in 1984, the virus rapidly spread worldwide and is nowadays considered as endemic in several countries. In Australia and New Zealand where rabbits are pests, RHDV was purposely introduced for rabbit biocontrol. Factors that may have precipitated RHD emergence remain unclear, but non-pathogenic strains seem to pre-date the appearance of the pathogenic strains suggesting a key role for the comprehension of the virus origins. All pathogenic strains are classified within one single serotype, but two subtypes are recognised, RHDV and RHDVa. RHD causes high mortality in both domestic and wild adult animals, with individuals succumbing between 48-72 h post-infection. No other species has been reported to be fatally susceptible to RHD. The disease is characterised by acute necrotising hepatitis, but haemorrhages may also be found in other organs, in particular the lungs, heart, and kidneys due to disseminated intravascular coagulation. Resistance to the disease might be explained in part by genetically determined absence or weak expression of attachment factors, but humoral immunity is also important. Disease control in rabbitries relies mainly on vaccination and biosecurity measures. Such measures are difficult to be implemented in wild populations. More recent research has indicated that RHDV might be used as a molecular tool for therapeutic applications. Although the study of RHDV and RHD has been hampered by the lack of an appropriate cell culture system for the virus, several aspects of the replication, epizootology, epidemiology and evolution have been disclosed. This review provides a broad coverage and description of the current knowledge on the disease and the virus. PMID:22325049

  13. Foot Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your feet or toes may also cause problems. Neuropathy Although it can hurt, diabetic nerve damage can ... Diabetes Forecast® magazine: cc-feet-and-hands-peripheral-neuropathy, In this section Living With Diabetes Complications Skin ...

  14. The metabolic effects of moderately severe upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in man.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, K. J.; Alberti, K. G.; Binder, C.; Holdstock, G.; Karran, S. J.; Smith, C. L.; Talbot, S.; Turnell, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The metabolic effects of moderately severe gastrointestinal haemorrhage were investigated in man. Before resuscitation, patients had raised circulating concentrations of glucose, lactate, alanine, glycerol and cortisol. After urgent operation for haemorrhage, metabolite concentrations were similar to those of control patients having elective abdominal surgery, but insulin concentrations were higher and cortisol lower in haemorrhage patients. There were no significant differences in nitrogen excretion between haemorrhage patients and their controls, but urinary 3-methyl-histidine excretion by haemorrhage patients was lower indicating decreased muscle protein breakdown. Decreased amino acid release from muscle might account for previously reported imparied wound healing after haemorrhage. PMID:7045838

  15. Benign enlargement of sub-arachnoid spaces in infancy

    PubMed Central

    Kuruvilla, Linu Cherian

    2014-01-01

    Benign enlargement of sub-arachnoid spaces (BESS) is one of the causes of macrocephaly in infants. It is a self-limiting condition and does not require any active medical or surgical treatment. We report a case of an infant aged 4 months who was referred for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain as the head circumference of the infant had increased rapidly from the 50th percentile in the 3rd month to more than the 95th percentile in the 4th month of age. MRI revealed enlarged anterior sub-arachnoid spaces and mild prominence of all the ventricles. A possibility of BESS was suspected since the child was neurodevelopmentally normal. A follow-up MRI done at the age of 18 months showed a reduction in the size of the sub-arachnoid spaces with normal sized ventricles. PMID:25250066

  16. Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome complicating pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    González-Mesa, Ernesto; Blasco, Marta; Andérica, José; Herrera, José

    2012-01-01

    The Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is a rare congenital disorder that affects one or more limbs. It is characterised by cutaneous vascular nevi, venous malformations and hypertrophy of soft tissues and bone. There are very few cases reported in pregnant women, so the level of uncertainty is high when it appears during gestation. It is a disease that increases obstetric risk and can exacerbate complications, mainly thromboembolic and haemorrhagic. We report below the case of a pregnant woman diagnosed with this syndrome and the multidisciplinary management held in our centre. PMID:22854239

  17. A review of current and future medical therapies for cerebral vasospasm following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mocco, J; Zacharia, Brad E; Komotar, Ricardo J; Connolly, E Sander

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to help clarify the current state of medical therapy for cerebral vasospasm, the authors reviewed the relevant literature on the established medical therapies used for cerebral vasospasm following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and they discuss burgeoning areas of investigation. Despite advances in the treatment of aneurysmal SAH, cerebral vasospasm remains a common complication and has been correlated with a 1.5- to threefold increase in death during the first 2 weeks after hemorrhage. A number of medical, pharmacological, and surgical therapies are currently in use or being investigated in an attempt to reverse cerebral vasospasm, but only a few have proven to be useful. Although much has been elucidated regarding its pathophysiology, the treatment of cerebral vasospasm remains a dilemma. Although a poor understanding of SAH-induced cerebral vasospasm pathophysiology has, to date, hampered the development of therapeutic interventions, current research efforts promise the eventual production of new medical therapies. PMID:17029348

  18. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome with thalamic involvement during vasopressor treatment of vertebrobasilar vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Madaelil, Thomas Philip; Dhar, Rajat

    2015-01-01

    Hemodynamic augmentation is the primary medical intervention employed to reverse neurological deficits associated with vasospasm and delayed cerebral ischemia following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Failure to improve despite induced hypertension (IH) may raise concern for persistent hypoperfusion and prompt even more aggressive blood pressure augmentation. However, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a hyperperfusion syndrome reported as a rare complication of IH that may confound this picture. We report a case of PRES with prominent thalamic involvement and impaired level of consciousness secondary to blood pressure augmentation for the treatment of symptomatic vertebrobasilar vasospasm. Recognition of this syndrome in distinction to worsening ischemia is particularly critical, as normalization of blood pressure should lead to rapid clinical improvement. PMID:26655666

  19. Basal Ganglia Damage in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haining; Okubo, Shuichi; Hua, Ya; Keep, Richard F; Xi, Guohua

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that early brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a primary therapeutic target, and early SAH-induced basal ganglia injury is not well studied. The present study examined basal ganglia injury in a rat model of SAH. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n?=?78) weighing 275-300 g underwent endovascular perforation to mimic aneurysmal SAH. Sham rats (n?=?12) underwent the same procedure but without perforation. Magnetic resonance imaging (T2 MRI) was performed at 24 h after SAH to measure ventricle volumes and brain T2 lesion. Hydrocephalus in SAH rats was defined as a ventricular volume greater than three standard deviations above that in shams. Western blotting and immunochemistry were utilized to assess basal ganglia damage. Sixty rats survived the SAH and 40 % of those animals had T2 lesions in the basal ganglia. Twenty-six SAH rats had hydrocephalus. Rats with hydrocephalus had higher incidence of basal ganglia lesion (69 vs. 18 % in rats without hydrocephalus; p?

  20. The collagen-binding protein of Streptococcus mutans is involved in haemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Kazuhiko; Hokamura, Kazuya; Taniguchi, Naho; Wada, Koichiro; Kudo, Chiho; Nomura, Ryota; Kojima, Ayuchi; Naka, Shuhei; Muranaka, Yoshinori; Thura, Min; Nakajima, Atsushi; Masuda, Katsuhiko; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Speziale, Pietro; Shimada, Nobumitsu; Amano, Atsuo; Kamisaki, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Tokutaro; Umemura, Kazuo; Ooshima, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Although several risk factors for stroke have been identified, one-third remain unexplained. Here we show that infection with Streptococcus mutans expressing collagen-binding protein (CBP) is a potential risk factor for haemorrhagic stroke. Infection with serotype k S. mutans, but not a standard strain, aggravates cerebral haemorrhage in mice. Serotype k S. mutans accumulates in the damaged, but not the contralateral hemisphere, indicating an interaction of bacteria with injured blood vessels. The most important factor for high-virulence is expression of CBP, which is a common property of most serotype k strains. The detection frequency of CBP-expressing S. mutans in haemorrhagic stroke patients is significantly higher than in control subjects. Strains isolated from haemorrhagic stroke patients aggravate haemorrhage in a mouse model, indicating that they are haemorrhagic stroke-associated. Administration of recombinant CBP causes aggravation of haemorrhage. Our data suggest that CBP of S. mutans is directly involved in haemorrhagic stroke. PMID:21952219

  1. The collagen-binding protein of Streptococcus mutans is involved in haemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Kazuhiko; Hokamura, Kazuya; Taniguchi, Naho; Wada, Koichiro; Kudo, Chiho; Nomura, Ryota; Kojima, Ayuchi; Naka, Shuhei; Muranaka, Yoshinori; Thura, Min; Nakajima, Atsushi; Masuda, Katsuhiko; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Speziale, Pietro; Shimada, Nobumitsu; Amano, Atsuo; Kamisaki, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Tokutaro; Umemura, Kazuo; Ooshima, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Although several risk factors for stroke have been identified, one-third remain unexplained. Here we show that infection with Streptococcus mutans expressing collagen-binding protein (CBP) is a potential risk factor for haemorrhagic stroke. Infection with serotype k S. mutans, but not a standard strain, aggravates cerebral haemorrhage in mice. Serotype k S. mutans accumulates in the damaged, but not the contralateral hemisphere, indicating an interaction of bacteria with injured blood vessels. The most important factor for high-virulence is expression of CBP, which is a common property of most serotype k strains. The detection frequency of CBP-expressing S. mutans in haemorrhagic stroke patients is significantly higher than in control subjects. Strains isolated from haemorrhagic stroke patients aggravate haemorrhage in a mouse model, indicating that they are haemorrhagic stroke-associated. Administration of recombinant CBP causes aggravation of haemorrhage. Our data suggest that CBP of S. mutans is directly involved in haemorrhagic stroke. PMID:21952219

  2. A new NOTCH3 mutation presenting as primary intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Pradotto, Luca; Orsi, Laura; Daniele, Dino; Caroppo, Paola; Lauro, Danilo; Milesi, Alessandra; Sellitti, Luigi; Mauro, Alessandro

    2012-04-15

    Primary intracerebral haemorrhages (PICH) are defined as haemorrhages within the brain parenchyma in the absence of readily identifiable causes. CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy) is a hereditary vascular disease and its mainly clinical manifestations are early-onset infarcts. Spontaneous lobar haematomas are a rare occurrence. We report a very unusual presentation of CADASIL in a 65 year-old man carrying a new NOTCH3 mutation. The clinical onset of the disease was related to an intracerebral haematoma following colon surgery and causing a delirium. In brief, our report suggests that CADASIL must be considered in patient with PICH. PMID:22206696

  3. Serodiagnosis of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed Central

    Burt, F. J.; Leman, P. A.; Abbott, J. C.; Swanepoel, R.

    1994-01-01

    Several methods for demonstrating antibody to Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus were compared on serum samples taken from 101 patients during the acute stage of illness and at intervals for up to 59 months thereafter, with emphasis on early detection of the immune response. The deaths of 23 patients on days 5-14 of illness were ascribed to the effects of the disease; two patients died later from other causes. Very few of the patients who died from the acute illness mounted an antibody response detectable by the methods tested. Four patients who died and 18 who recovered were treated with immune plasma collected from recovered patients. Treated patients acquired IgG antibody from the plasma, but it was possible to discern the onset of an endogenous IgM response in those individuals who survived the disease by all of the methods tested. Indirect immunofluorescence (IF) tests detected IgM and/or IgG antibodies at the earliest on day 4 of illness in about 10% of patients who survived the disease, and by day 9 all survivors had antibodies demonstrable by IF. A biotin-streptavidin IF technique offered no advantage over the standard IF test for the early detection of IgG antibody, but demonstrated higher antibody titres and detected IgM antibody earlier in about a quarter of the patients tested. An IgM-capture enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) and an IgG sandwich ELISA demonstrated higher antibody titres than did IF tests, and detected antibody responses at an earlier stage of infection than did IF tests in about one-fifth of patients, but the reverse was true in a similar proportion of instances. A competition ELISA, which detected total antibody activity, produced lower titres than did the IgM and IgG ELISAs, but yielded results which were in close agreement with the findings in IF tests. It was concluded that the IF tests were most convenient for use in making a rapid serodiagnosis of the disease. PMID:7995364

  4. Diffuse alveolar haemorrhage associated with aerosol propellant use

    PubMed Central

    Kelchen, Phillip; Jamous, Fady; Huntington, Mark K

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar haemorrhage (DAH) is a clinical syndrome resulting from injury to the alveolar microcirculation, most commonly associated with not only autoimmune disorders or connective tissue disease, but also a variety of infections, neoplasms and toxins. We report here a case of an otherwise healthy young man with DAH attributable to an inhalation injury resulting from use of aerosol spray paint. PMID:23955981

  5. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy with atypical imagingfindings of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Tempaku, Akira; Ikeda, Hidetoshi; Nitta, Kazumi

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is observed in most cases of nonhypertensive subcortical hemorrhage involving elderly patients. We herein describe the case of a female in whom a convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage was observed at 55 years of age. The cerebral hemorrhage occurred repeatedly; however, no obvious vascular lesions were observed on a cerebral angiography, and no signs of microbleeding or lesions in the deep white matter were identified on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Partial excision of the right frontal cortex and hematoma evacuation were performed, and histopathological examination showed deposition of an acidophilic substance with positive staining for Direct Fast Scarlet (DFS) in the cerebral vascular wall. Finally, brain hemorrhage due to CAA was diagnosed. This case suggests that CAA is an important differential diagnosis in patients with localized non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the convexity sulcus. PMID:26705433

  6. Seizures and Epilepsy following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage : Incidence and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyu-Sun; Chun, Hyoung-Joon; Ko, Yong; Kim, Young-Soo; Kim, Jae-Min

    2009-01-01

    Objective Although prophylactic antiepileptic drug (AED) use in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a common practice, lack of uniform definitions and guidelines for seizures and AEDs rendered this prescription more habitual instead of evidence-based manner. We herein evaluated the incidence and predictive factors of seizure and complications about AED use. Methods From July 1999 to June 2007, data of a total of 547 patients with aneurysmal SAH who underwent operative treatments were reviewed. For these, the incidence and risk factors of seizures and epilepsy were assessed, in addition to complications of AEDs. Results Eighty-three patients (15.2%) had at least one seizure following SAH. Forty-three patients (7.9%) had onset seizures, 34 (6.2%) had perioperative seizures, and 17 (3.1%) had late epilepsy. Younger age (< 40 years), poor clinical grade, thick hemorrhage, acute hydrocephalus, and rebleeding were related to the occurrence of onset seizures. Cortical infarction and thick hemorrhage were independent risk factors for the occurrence of late epilepsy. Onset seizures were not predictive of late epilepsy. Moreover, adverse drug effects were identified in 128 patients (23.4%) with AEDs. Conclusion Perioperative seizures are not significant predictors for late epilepsy. Instead, initial amount of SAH and surgery-induced cortical damage should be seriously considered as risk factors for late epilepsy. Because AEDs can not prevent early postoperative seizures (< 1 week) and potentially cause unexpected side effects, long-term use should be readjusted in high-risk patients. PMID:19763209

  7. Acute complications of spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Ellen Merete

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of acute complications of spinal cord injury (SCI). Along with motor and sensory deficits, instabilities of the cardiovascular, thermoregulatory and broncho-pulmonary system are common after a SCI. Disturbances of the urinary and gastrointestinal systems are typical as well as sexual dysfunction. Frequent complications of cervical and high thoracic SCI are neurogenic shock, bradyarrhythmias, hypotension, ectopic beats, abnormal temperature control and disturbance of sweating, vasodilatation and autonomic dysreflexia. Autonomic dysreflexia is an abrupt, uncontrolled sympathetic response, elicited by stimuli below the level of injury. The symptoms may be mild like skin rash or slight headache, but can cause severe hypertension, cerebral haemorrhage and death. All personnel caring for the patient should be able to recognize the symptoms and be able to intervene promptly. Disturbance of respiratory function are frequent in tetraplegia and a primary cause of both short and long-term morbidity and mortality is pulmonary complications. Due to physical inactivity and altered haemostasis, patients with SCI have a higher risk of venous thromboembolism and pressure ulcers. Spasticity and pain are frequent complications which need to be addressed. The psychological stress associated with SCI may lead to anxiety and depression. Knowledge of possible complications during the acute phase is important because they may be life threatening and/ or may lead to prolonged rehabilitation. PMID:25621207

  8. Acute complications of spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Ellen Merete

    2015-01-18

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of acute complications of spinal cord injury (SCI). Along with motor and sensory deficits, instabilities of the cardiovascular, thermoregulatory and broncho-pulmonary system are common after a SCI. Disturbances of the urinary and gastrointestinal systems are typical as well as sexual dysfunction. Frequent complications of cervical and high thoracic SCI are neurogenic shock, bradyarrhythmias, hypotension, ectopic beats, abnormal temperature control and disturbance of sweating, vasodilatation and autonomic dysreflexia. Autonomic dysreflexia is an abrupt, uncontrolled sympathetic response, elicited by stimuli below the level of injury. The symptoms may be mild like skin rash or slight headache, but can cause severe hypertension, cerebral haemorrhage and death. All personnel caring for the patient should be able to recognize the symptoms and be able to intervene promptly. Disturbance of respiratory function are frequent in tetraplegia and a primary cause of both short and long-term morbidity and mortality is pulmonary complications. Due to physical inactivity and altered haemostasis, patients with SCI have a higher risk of venous thromboembolism and pressure ulcers. Spasticity and pain are frequent complications which need to be addressed. The psychological stress associated with SCI may lead to anxiety and depression. Knowledge of possible complications during the acute phase is important because they may be life threatening and/ or may lead to prolonged rehabilitation. PMID:25621207

  9. Bilobed Wide Neck Posterior Cerebral Artery Aneurysm Associated with Fusiform Basilar Aneurysm, Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Siauw Koan, Tan

    2003-01-01

    Summary A 56 year-old woman presented with a ruptured bilobed wide neck aneurysm of the P2 segment of the PCA, atherosclerotic fusiform basilar artery aneurysm, subarachnoid bleeding with negative CT scan and chronic renal failure. She was managed by a cooperative approach involving neurosurgeons, neuroradiologist, neurointensivist, emergency room physicians, nurses and technicians. She underwent operation by proximal clipping for the aneurysm of the PCA. Postoperative neurological deficits include homonymous hemianopsia and ipsilateral third nerve palsy. The operation was performed through asubtemporal approach. At surgery, the aneurysm was located in the distal of the P2 segment of PCA, bilobed up and down, no definitive neck with small distal branches, and was treated by proximal clipping of the PCA aneurysm. The fusiform basilar artery aneurysm was severely atherosclerotic and left untouched. This is a rare case which required a high index of suspicion to detect subarachnoid bleeding from ruptured posterior fossa aneurysm, accurate prediction of the site of bleeding and the location of aneurysm location by conventional angiogram, MRI and MRA, and careful planned surgical strategy with the right approach for the P2 segment of the PCA aneurysm, complicated post operative care with airway management, triple H therapy, nutrition, additional measures and multiple hemodialysis. PMID:20591269

  10. Pneumonitis and pulmonary haemorrhage after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Parasuraman, Sathish K; Teo, Alison Ic; Millar, Colin Gm; Noman, Awsan

    2015-12-01

    A 55-year-old man presented with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction. He received rescue angioplasty with one drug eluting stent. He developed marked breathlessness and haemoptysis two days later. Investigations led to the diagnosis of pulmonary haemorrhage, possibly from pneumonitis caused by ticagrelor. He was successfully managed with high-dose steroids and ticagrelor was replaced with clopidogrel. On stopping the steroids a month later, mild haemoptysis recurred and this was managed conservatively. Pneumonitis and pulmonary haemorrhage is rarely reported with acute myocardial infarction, but poses serious challenge to the patient and the clinician. Diagnosis may be delayed as breathlessness can occur due to myriad causes after myocardial infarction. Interrupting dual anti-platelet therapy after angioplasty could lead to devastating stent thrombosis. PMID:26621956

  11. Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II) Protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Within the spectrum of spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage there are some patients with large or space occupying haemorrhage who require surgery for neurological deterioration and others with small haematomas who should be managed conservatively. There is equipoise about the management of patients between these two extremes. In particular there is some evidence that patients with lobar haematomas and no intraventricular haemorrhage might benefit from haematoma evacuation. The STICH II study will establish whether a policy of earlier surgical evacuation of the haematoma in selected patients will improve outcome compared to a policy of initial conservative treatment. Methods/Design an international multicentre randomised parallel group trial. Only patients for whom the treating neurosurgeon is in equipoise about the benefits of early craniotomy compared to initial conservative treatment are eligible. All patients must have a CT scan confirming spontaneous lobar intracerebral haemorrhage (?1 cm from the cortex surface of the brain and 10-100 ml in volume). Any clotting or coagulation problems must be corrected and randomisation must take place within 48 hours of ictus. With 600 patients, the study will be able to demonstrate a 12% benefit from surgery (2p < 0.05) with 80% power. Stratified randomisation is undertaken using a central 24 hour randomisation service accessed by telephone or web. Patients randomised to early surgery should have the operation within 12 hours. Information about the status (Glasgow Coma Score and focal signs) of all patients through the first five days of their trial progress is also collected in addition to another CT scan at about five days (+/- 2 days). Outcome is measured at six months via a postal questionnaire to the patient. Primary outcome is death or severe disability defined using a prognosis based 8 point Glasgow Outcome Scale. Secondary outcomes include: Mortality, Rankin, Barthel, EuroQol, and Survival. Trial Registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN22153967 PMID:21586127

  12. Prevention of upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage: current controversies and clinical guidance

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Johanne; Warburton, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a common medical emergency and associated with significant morbidly and mortality. The risk of bleeding from peptic ulceration and oesophagogastric varices can be reduced by appropriate primary and secondary preventative strategies. Helicobacter pylori eradication and risk stratification with appropriate gastroprotection strategies when used with antiplatelet drugs and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are effective in preventing peptic ulcer bleeding, whilst endoscopic screening and either nonselective beta blockade or endoscopic variceal ligation are effective at reducing the risk of variceal haemorrhage. For secondary prevention of variceal haemorrhage, the combination of beta blockade and endoscopic variceal ligation is more effective. Recent data on the possible interactions of aspirin and NSAIDs, clopidogrel and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), and the increased risk of cardiovascular adverse events associated with all nonaspirin cyclo-oxygenase (COX) inhibitors have increased the complexity of choices for preventing peptic ulcer bleeding. Such choices should consider both the GI and cardiovascular risk profiles. In patients with a moderately increased risk of GI bleeding, a NSAID plus a PPI or a COX-2 selective agent alone appear equivalent but for those at highest risk of bleeding (especially those with previous ulcer or haemorrhage) the COX-2 inhibitor plus PPI combination is superior. However naproxen seems the safest NSAID for those at increased cardiovascular risk. Clopidogrel is associated with a significant risk of GI haemorrhage and the most recent data concerning the potential clinical interaction of clopidogrel and PPIs are reassuring. In clopidogrel-treated patients at highest risk of GI bleeding, some form of GI prevention is indicated. PMID:23997925

  13. Methadone, codeine and acute haemorrhagic necrotising pancreatitis: which came first?

    PubMed

    Tormey, William P; Sabah, Muna; Moore, Tara M

    2013-03-10

    Acute haemorrhagic necrotising pancreatitis lead to the death at home of a young female who was on a methadone maintenance programme. Toxic levels of codeine with potentially lethal levels of methadone and morphine were found at post-mortem. Whether opiates caused the pancreatitis or were the consequence of self-medication for pain is impossible to differentiate. Forensic toxicology may pose the question but be unable to provide the answer. PMID:23395525

  14. Catastrophic gastrointestinal complication of systemic immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lyn Alexandra; Gangopadhyay, Mitali; Gaya, Daniel R

    2015-02-28

    We present a case of acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in a patient with systemic vasculitis immunosuppressed on cyclophosphamide and prednisolone. The patient presented with a diffuse haemorrhagic oesophagitis and a non-specific duodenitis. Biopsies taken from the oesophagus and duodenum demonstrated infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) respectively. Viral infection of the upper gastrointestinal tract is a recognised complication of immunosuppression and HSV is one of the most common pathogens. CMV on the other hand most commonly causes a colitis or less commonly oesophagitis. CMV enteritis is rare as is the synchronous infection with two viral agents in an immunocompromised patient having being described in a few case series only. Viral infection of the gastrointestinal tract in immunocompromised patients should be treated with systemic anti-viral medication and consideration to withdrawal of the immunosuppressive therapy if possible and appropriate. The authors highlight the need for a high suspicion of viral infection in immunosuppressed patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:25741165

  15. Vestibular Schwannomas presenting with haemorrhage: clinical presentation and histopathological evaluation of an unusual entity.

    PubMed

    Dehdashti, Amir R; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Guha, Abhijit

    2009-08-01

    Gross intratumoral haemorrhage is rare in vestibular schwannomas. The authors describe the clinical features of this entity in 6 patients, the histopathologic findings in 5 of them, and discuss possible factors predisposing to haemorrhage in these tumors. Detailed radiological and histopathological evaluation identified two factors which may be associated with higher likelihood of haemorrhage, namely preoperative radiation therapy and vascular abnormalities. Tumor size may not be a major risk factor for haemorrhage. Good outcomes can be achieved with microsurgical management. The histological features presented here differ clearly from findings in previously published case reports. PMID:19637016

  16. Propofol Attenuates Early Brain Injury After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Song-Sheng; Zhang, Hua-Bin; Wang, Chun-Hua; Yang, Wei-Zhong; Liang, Ri-Sheng; Chen, Ye; Tu, Xian-Kun

    2015-12-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that propofol protects rat brain against focal cerebral ischemia. However, whether propofol attenuates early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats remains unknown until now. The present study was performed to evaluate the effect of propofol on early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats and further explore the potential mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by endovascular perforation then received treatment with propofol (10 or 50 mg/kg) or vehicle after 2 and 12 h of SAH. SAH grading, neurological scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, the myeloperoxidase activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were measured 24 h after SAH. Expression of nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) p65, and aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in rat brain were detected by Western blot. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Expressions of tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) and interleukin-1? (IL-1?) were assessed by ELISA. Neurological scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, the myeloperoxidase activity, and MDA content were significantly reduced by propofol. Furthermore, expression of Nrf2 in rat brain was upregulated by propofol, and expression of NF-?B p65, AQP4, COX-2, MMP-9, TNF-?, and IL-1? in rat brain were attenuated by propofol. Our results demonstrated that propofol improves neurological scores, reduces brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, inflammatory reaction, and lipid peroxidation in rats of SAH. Propofol exerts neuroprotection against SAH-induced early brain injury, which might be associated with the inhibition of inflammation and lipid peroxidation. PMID:26342279

  17. Matrix Metalloproteinases in Cerebral Vasospasm following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Vivek; Russin, Jonathan; Spirtos, Alexandra; He, Shuhan; Adamczyk, Peter; Amar, Arun P.; Mack, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Delayed cerebral vasospasm is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). While the cellular mechanisms underlying vasospasm remain unclear, it is believed that inflammation may play a critical role in vasospasm. Matrix metalloproteinasees (MMPs) are a family of extracellular and membrane-bound proteases capable of degrading the blood-rain barrier (BBB). As such, MMP upregulation following SAH may result in a proinflammatory extravascular environment capable of inciting delayed cerebral vasospasm. This paper presents an overview of MMPs and describes existing data pertinent to delayed cerebral vasospasm. PMID:23691315

  18. Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma with Simultaneous Cranial Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hwan-Su; Kim, Sang Woo

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma is reported at a rare level of incidence, and is frequently associated with underlying coagulopathy or those receiving anticoagulant or antiplatelet agents; some cases accompany concomitant intracranial hemorrhage. The spontaneous development of spinal subdural hemorrhage (SDH) is a neurological emergency; therefore, early diagnosis, the discontinuation of anticoagulant, and urgent surgical decompression are required to enable neurological recovery. In this report, we present a simultaneous spinal subdural hematoma and cranial subarachnoid hemorrhage, which mimicked an aneurysmal origin in a female patient who had been taking warfarin due to aortic valve replacement surgery. PMID:26113966

  19. Intravenous magnesium sulfate after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a prospective randomized pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wong, George K C; Chan, Matthew T V; Boet, Ronald; Poon, Wai S; Gin, Tony

    2006-04-01

    We performed a randomized, double-blind, pilot study on magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) infusion for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH).Sixty patients with SAH were randomly allocated to receive either MgSO4 80 mmol/day or saline infusion for 14 days. Patients also received intravenous nimodipine. Episodes of vasospasm were treated with hypertensive and hypervolemic therapy. Neurologic status was assessed 6 months after hemorrhage using the Barthel index and Glasgow Outcome Scale. Incidences of cardiac and pulmonary complications were also recorded. Patient characteristics, severity of SAH, and surgical treatment did not differ between groups. The incidence of symptomatic vasospasm decreased from 43% in the saline group to 23% in patients receiving MgSO4 infusion, but it did not reach statistical significance, P=0.06. For patients who had transcranial Doppler-detected vasospasm, defined as mean flow velocity >120 cm/s and a Lindegaard index >3, the duration was shorter in the magnesium group compared with controls (P<0.01). There was, however, no difference between groups in functional recovery or Glasgow Outcome Scale score. The incidence of adverse events such as brain swelling, hydrocephalus, and nosocomial infection was also similar in patients receiving MgSO4 or saline. In this small pilot study, MgSO4 infusion for aneurysmal SAH is feasible. On the basis of the preliminary data, a larger study recruiting approximately 800 patients is required to test for a possible neuroprotective effect of magnesium after SAH. PMID:16628069

  20. Prevention of postpartum haemorrhage with the oxytocin analogue carbetocin.

    PubMed

    Rath, Werner

    2009-11-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage is the leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide: 67-80% of cases are caused by uterine atony. Preventive measures include prophylactic drug use to aid uterine contraction after delivery, thus avoiding severe blood loss and reducing maternal morbidity and mortality. Carbetocin is a synthetic analogue of oxytocin with a half-life approximately 4-10 times longer than that reported for oxytocin. It combines the safety and tolerability profile of oxytocin with the sustained uterotonic activity of injectable ergot alkaloids. Furthermore, carbetocin can be administered as a single dose injection either intravenously or intramuscularly rather than as an infusion over several hours as is the case with oxytocin. Carbetocin is currently indicated for prevention of uterine atony after delivery by caesarean section in spinal or epidural anaesthesia. Data from three randomised controlled trials in caesarean delivery and a meta-analysis indicate that carbetocin significantly reduces the need for additional uterotonic agents or uterine massage to prevent excessive bleeding compared with placebo or oxytocin. The risk of headache, tremor, hypotension, flushing, nausea, abdominal pain, pruritus and feeling of warmth was similar in women who received carbetocin or oxytocin. The findings from two more recent double-blind randomised trials and one retrospective study suggest that carbetocin may also represent a good alternative to conventional uterotonic agents for prevention of postpartum haemorrhage after vaginal deliveries. A reduced need for additional uterotonics was observed with carbetocin vs. oxytocin in high-risk women and carbetocin was at least as effective as syntometrine in low-risk women. In these studies of vaginal deliveries, carbetocin was associated with a low incidence of adverse effects and demonstrated a better tolerability profile than syntometrine. Carbetocin had a long duration of action compared with intravenous oxytocin alone and a better cardiovascular side effect profile compared with syntometrine. In addition to being an effective treatment for the prevention of postpartum haemorrhage following caesarean delivery, carbetocin may also become the drug of choice for postpartum haemorrhage prevention after vaginal delivery in high-risk women and those who suffer from hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. Preeclampsia is still a contraindication to the administration of carbetocin in the EU, and further studies would be required to assess the cardiovascular effects of carbetocin before it can be advocated for routine use in preeclamptic patients. Further research is required to assess whether prophylactic carbetocin is superior to conventional uterotonic agents following vaginal delivery in low-risk women. PMID:19616358

  1. An unusual cause for an optic disc haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Julia; Kailasanathan, Anusha; Chen, Hean

    2011-01-01

    A 51-year-old male on chemotherapy for myeloma presented initially with a unilateral optic disc haemorrhage and signs of optic neuropathy. This rapidly progressed to affect both eyes and within a few days he developed retinal features suggestive of progressive outer retinal necrosis. He was treated with intravenous acyclovir that was subsequently changed to ganciclovir when serological tests for cytomegalovirus were found to be positive for immunoglobulin M antibodies. His visual loss continued to deteriorate despite treatment, and he subsequently developed a retinal detachment in one eye. The causes of optic neuropathy in immunocompromised patients and the importance of eliminating an infective cause are discussed. PMID:22707367

  2. Pregnancy Complications/Health Problems Complication Explanation

    E-print Network

    Stromswold, Karin

    1 Pregnancy Complications/Health Problems Complication Explanation Preterm Labor Labor that starts and uterine tenderness. Gestational Diabetes Pregnancy induced high blood sugar. Diabetes that begins in pregnancy and goes away after delivery. Preeclampsia (hypertension) Pregnancy induced high blood pressure

  3. Prolonged Paroxysmal Sympathetic Storming Associated with Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Jolly, Suneil; Pokala, Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Paroxysmal sympathetic storming (PSS) is a rare disorder characterized by acute onset of nonstimulated tachycardia, hypertension, tachypnea, hyperthermia, external posturing, and diaphoresis. It is most frequently associated with severe traumatic brain injuries and has been reported in intracranial tumors, hydrocephalous, severe hypoxic brain injury, and intracerebral hemorrhage. Although excessive release of catecholamine and therefore increased sympathetic activities have been reported in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), there is no descriptive report of PSS primarily caused by spontaneous SAH up to date. Here, we report a case of prolonged PSS in a patient with spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage and consequent vasospasm. The sympathetic storming started shortly after patient was rewarmed from hypothermia protocol and symptoms responded to Labetalol, but intermittent recurrence did not resolve until 3 weeks later with treatment involving Midazolam, Fentanyl, Dexmedetomidine, Propofol, Bromocriptine, and minimizing frequency of neurological and vital checks. In conclusion, prolonged sympathetic storming can also be caused by spontaneous SAH. In this case, vasospasm might be a precipitating factor. Paralytics and hypothermia could mask the manifestations of PSS. The treatment of the refractory case will need both timely adjustment of medications and minimization of exogenous stressors or stimuli. PMID:23476663

  4. Acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea syndrome in dogs: 108 cases.

    PubMed

    Mortier, F; Strohmeyer, K; Hartmann, K; Unterer, S

    2015-06-13

    No prospective studies including large numbers of dogs with acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea syndrome (AHDS) are published so far. The aim of this case-control study was to describe signalment, history, clinical signs, laboratory values and course of disease in dogs with AHDS. Dogs (108) with idiopathic acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea (<3?days) were prospectively enrolled. Clinical assessment was performed by calculation of the 'AHDS index' (0-18). The hospital population and 21 healthy dogs served as control groups. Dogs with AHDS had a significantly lower body weight (median 9.8?kg) and age (median five years) than other dogs of the hospital population (20?kg; 10?years) (P<0.001). Predisposed breeds were Yorkshire terrier, miniature pinscher, miniature schnauzer and Maltese. The syndrome was more likely to occur during winter. Vomiting preceded the onset of bloody diarrhoea in 80 per cent of dogs and haematemesis was observed in half of those cases. Median AHDS index at presentation was 12 (range 3-17). Haematocrit was generally high (median 57.1 per cent; range 33-76 per cent), but exceeded 60 per cent only in 31.4 per cent of dogs. Haematocrit of 48.1 per cent of dogs was above reference range, as was monocyte (50.0 per cent), segmented (59.6 per cent) and band neutrophil count (45.2 per cent). A rapid clinical improvement occurred during the first 48?hours. PMID:26023146

  5. A clinical characteristic analysis of pregnancy-associated intracranial haemorrhage in China

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhu-Wei; Lin, Li; Gao, Wan-Li; Feng, Li-Min

    2015-01-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) occurring during pregnancy and the puerperium is an infrequent but severe complication with a high mortality and poor prognosis. Until recently, previous studies have mainly focused on the effect of different treatments on prognosis. However, few studies have provided solid evidence to clarify the key predisposing factors affecting the prognosis of ICH. In the present study, based on a unique sample with a high ICH incidence and mortality rate, we described the main clinical characteristics of ICH patients and found that the prognosis of patients who underwent surgical intervention was not better than that of patients who received other treatment modalities. However, pre-eclampsia patients had higher maternal and neonatal mortality rates than other aetiology groups. Furthermore, univariate regression analysis identified onset to diagnosis time (O-D time) and pre-eclampsia as the only factors showing independent correlation with poor maternal outcomes (modified Rankin Scale, mRS ? 3), and only O-D time was identified as a predictor of maternal mortality. These results revealed that the aetiology of ICH and O-D time might be crucial predisposing factors to prognosis, especially for patients with pre-eclampsia. The study highlighted a novel direction to effectively improve the prognosis of pregnancy-associated ICH. PMID:25819941

  6. Massive postpartum haemorrhage as a cause of maternal morbidity in a large tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Hazra, S; Chilaka, V N; Rajendran, S; Konje, J C

    2004-08-01

    All cases of massive PPH (defined as estimated blood loss > 1500 ml within 24 hours of delivery) were identified from the obstetric database of the unit for the period 1997-2001 (inclusive). The casenotes of the patients were retrieved and various variables collected for analyses. Over the 5-year period, there were 145 cases of massive PPH of the 27,106 deliveries; an incidence of five per 1000 deliveries (0.5%). Most (42%) of the women were nulliparous and 12 (8%) had four or more previous deliveries. There was associated antepartum haemorrhage in 12 (8%) cases, five of which were placental abruptions. Risk factors identified to be associated with massive PPH included prolonged labour, emergency caesarean section (CS) for failure to progress, especially in the second stage (34), and placenta praevia (10). Four women had an abdominal hysterectomy. Massive PPH remains an important cause of severe maternal morbidity; risk factors, which are independent of parity, include CS in the late first stage or second stage and previous CS (irrespective of parity). A high index of suspicion is necessary for these cases, as timely intervention is more likely to minimise the complications and its consequences. PMID:15369931

  7. Review and recommendations on management of refractory raised intracranial pressure in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Calvin Hoi Kwan; Lu, Yeow Yuen; Wong, George Kwok Chu

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension is commonly encountered in poor-grade aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage patients. Refractory raised intracranial pressure is associated with poor prognosis. The management of raised intracranial pressure is commonly referenced to experiences in traumatic brain injury. However, pathophysiologically, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is different from traumatic brain injury. Currently, there is a paucity of consensus on the management of refractory raised intracranial pressure in spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage. We discuss in this paper the role of hyperosmolar agents, hypothermia, barbiturates, and decompressive craniectomy in managing raised intracranial pressure refractory to first-line treatment, in which preliminary data supported the use of hypertonic saline and secondary decompressive craniectomy. Future clinical trials should be carried out to delineate better their roles in management of raised intracranial pressure in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage patients. PMID:23874101

  8. Diagnosis and Management of Hyponatremia in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Marupudi, Neena I.; Mittal, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Hyponatremia is the most common, clinically-significant electrolyte abnormality seen in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Controversy continues to exist regarding both the cause and treatment of hyponatremia in this patient population. Lack of timely diagnosis and/or providing inadequate or inappropriate treatment can increase the risk of morbidity and mortality. We review recent literature on hyponatremia in subarachnoid hemorrhage and present currently recommended protocols for diagnosis and management. PMID:25937938

  9. Pseudo-subarachnoid hemorrhage and cortical visual impairment as the presenting sign of gliomatosis cerebri.

    PubMed

    Belsare, Geeta; Lee, Andrew G; Maley, Joan; Kirby, Patricia; St Louis, Erik K; Follett, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    A 49-year-old white male presented with a pseudo-subarachnoid hemorrhage and diffuse brain edema. Neuroimaging showed brain edema causing the unusual findings of a pseudo-subarachnoid hemorrhage and bilateral occipital lobe infarcts following herniation and compression of the posterior cerebral arteries. An enlarged corpus callosum was noted which led to a brain biopsy and a diagnosis of gliomatosis cerebri. PMID:15590541

  10. Relationship between Postmenopausal Estrogen Deficiency and Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Tabuchi, Sadaharu

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is one of the most severe forms of stroke, which results from the rupture of a cerebral aneurysm. SAH is the only type of stroke with a female predominance, suggesting that reproductive factors may play a significant role in the etiology. Estrogen has important effects on vascular physiology and pathophysiology of cerebral aneurysm and SAH and, thus, potential therapeutic implications. There have been growing bodies of epidemiological and experimental studies which support the hypothesis of a significant relationship between estrogen deficiency and cerebral aneurysm formation with subsequent SAH. This hypothesis is the focus of this review as well as possible pathology-based therapeutics with regard to aspects of molecular pathophysiology, especially related to women's health. PMID:26538819

  11. [Severe anaphylactic reaction to metamizol during subarachnoid anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Moltó, L; Pallarés, R; Castillo, J; Gallart, L L; Escolano, F

    2004-03-01

    A 59-year-old man with no relevant medical history underwent a right saphenectomy under subarachnoid anesthesia with mepivacaine. Administration of intravenous metamizol for postoperative analgesia was followed by severe anaphylactic reaction with respiratory failure and ventricular fibrillation. The patient recovered after orotracheal intubation and defibrillation. High serum tryptase levels 2 and 6 hours after the episode and positive skin prick tests confirmed the diagnosis of anaphylactic reaction mediated by immunoglobulin-E antibodies. Anaphylactic reactions to metamizol may be more common than would appear based on reports in the literature. When signs present suddenly with cardiovascular or respiratory involvement, symptomatic treatment should be started even in the absence of cutaneous or mucosal signs and allergy tests should be carried out immediately. PMID:15200187

  12. Subarachnoid epithelial cyst of the cerebellum. Immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies.

    PubMed

    Ho, K L; Chason, J L

    1989-01-01

    This report describes the immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies of a subarachnoid epithelial cyst of the cerebellum found incidentally at autopsy of a 76-year-old man. The cyst was composed of an inner epithelial layer, a middle connective tissue layer and an outer arachnoid membrane. The epithelial layer was strongly positive for cytokeratin, carcinoembryonic antigen and epithelial membrane antigen, but negative for glial fibrillary acidic protein, S-100 protein, neuron-specific enolase and vimentin. Ultrastructurally, the epithelial layer had four distinct types of cells: ciliated cells, non-ciliated cells with coated microvilli, basal cells with tonofilaments and desmosomes, and cells with dense-core secretory granules (Kulchitsky cells). The latter two types of cells have not been described previously in epithelial cysts of the CNS. The lining epithelium closely resembled the upper respiratory epithelium. The findings suggest that the cyst was of endodermal rather than neuroectodermal origin. PMID:2473596

  13. Clinical Neurochemistry of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Toward Predicting Individual Outcomes via Biomarkers of Brain Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tholance, Yannick; Barcelos, Gleicy; Dailler, Frederic; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Renaud, Bernard

    2015-12-16

    The functional outcome of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage is difficult to predict at the individual level. The monitoring of brain energy metabolism has proven to be useful in improving the pathophysiological understanding of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Nonetheless, brain energy monitoring has not yet clearly been included in official guidelines for the management of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients, likely because previous studies compared only biological data between two groups of patients (unfavorable vs favorable outcomes) and did not determine decision thresholds that could be useful in clinical practice. Therefore, this Viewpoint discusses recent findings suggesting that monitoring biomarkers of brain energy metabolism at the level of individuals can be used to predict the outcomes of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients. Indeed, by taking into account specific neurochemical patterns obtained by local or global monitoring of brain energy metabolism, it may become possible to predict routinely, and with sufficient sensitivity and specificity, the individual outcomes of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients. Moreover, combining both local and global monitoring improves the overall performance of individual outcome prediction. Such a combined neurochemical monitoring approach may become, after prospective clinical validation, an important component in the management of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients to adapt individualized therapeutic interventions. PMID:26595414

  14. Outcome after intracranial haemorrhage from dural arteriovenous fistulae; a systematic review and case-series.

    PubMed

    Jolink, W M T; van Dijk, J M C; van Asch, C J J; de Kort, G A P; Algra, A; Groen, R J M; Rinkel, G J E; Klijn, C J M

    2015-12-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistulae (DAVFs) are a rare cause of intracranial haemorrhage. We aimed to investigate outcome of patients with intracranial haemorrhage from a DAVF. We performed a systematic literature search for studies reporting outcome after intracranial haemorrhage caused by a DAVF. We used predefined selection criteria and assessed the quality of the studies. In addition, we studied outcome in all patients with DAVF who had presented with intracranial haemorrhage at two university centers in the Netherlands, between January 2007 and April 2012. We calculated case fatality and proportions of patients with poor outcome (defined as modified Rankin Scale ? 3 or Glasgow Outcome Scale ? 3) during follow-up. We investigated mean age, sex, mid-year of study and percentage of patients with parenchymal haemorrhage as determinants of case fatality and poor outcome. The literature search yielded 16 studies, all but two retrospective and all hospital-based. Combined with our cohort of 29 patients the total number of patients with DAVF-related intracranial haemorrhage was 326 (58 % intracerebral haemorrhage). At a median follow-up of 12 months case fatality was 4.7 % (95 % CI 2.5-7.5; 17 cohorts) and the proportion of patients with poor outcome 8.3 % (95 % CI 3.1-15.7; nine cohorts). We found no effect of mean age, sex, mid-year of the cohorts and percentage of patients with parenchymal haemorrhage on either outcome. Hospital based case-series suggest a relatively low risk of death and poor outcome in patients with intracranial haemorrhage due to rupture of a DAVF. These risks may be underestimated because of bias. PMID:26410748

  15. Consent for Brain Tissue Donation after Intracerebral Haemorrhage: A Community-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Samarasekera, Neshika; Lerpiniere, Christine; Farrall, Andrew J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; White, Philip M.; Torgersen, Antonia; Ironside, James W.; Smith, Colin; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam

    2015-01-01

    Background Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage is a devastating form of stroke and its incidence increases with age. Obtaining brain tissue following intracerebral haemorrhage helps to understand its cause. Given declining autopsy rates worldwide, the feasibility of establishing an autopsy-based collection and its generalisability are uncertain. Methods We used multiple overlapping sources of case ascertainment to identify every adult diagnosed with intracerebral haemorrhage between 1st June 2010-31st May 2012, whilst resident in the Lothian region of Scotland. We sought consent from patients with intracerebral haemorrhage (or their nearest relative if the patient lacked mental capacity) to conduct a research autopsy. Results Of 295 adults with acute intracerebral haemorrhage, 110 (37%) could not be approached to consider donation. Of 185 adults/relatives approached, 91 (49%) consented to research autopsy. There were no differences in baseline demographic variables or markers of intracerebral haemorrhage severity between consenters and non-consenters. Adults who died and became donors (n = 46) differed from the rest of the cohort (n = 249) by being older (median age 80, IQR 76–86 vs. 75, IQR 65–83, p = 0.002) and having larger haemorrhages (median volume 23ml, IQR 13–50 vs. 13ml, IQR 4–40; p = 0.002). Conclusions Nearly half of those approached consent to brain tissue donation after acute intracerebral haemorrhage. The characteristics of adults who gave consent were comparable to those in an entire community, although those who donate early are older and have larger haemorrhage volumes. PMID:26302447

  16. Haemorrhagic pneumonia caused by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in two newborns.

    PubMed

    Guzoglu, Nilufer; Demirkol, Fatma Nur; Aliefendioglu, Didem

    2015-05-01

    Invasive procedures and antibiotic treatment increase the risk of nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care units. Early identification and appropriate treatment is important. Herein we report two cases of massive hemorrhagic pneumonia caused by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. The first case was diagnosed with congenital pneumonia; a chest tube was inserted because of pneumothorax on the third day of life. The second case had been referred with respiratory distress syndrome, and bilateral pneumothorax was present on admission. Upon follow up, the cases' clinical condition worsened; acute respiratory distress syndrome and massive pulmonary haemorrhage developed. After Stenotrophomonas maltophilia was isolated in blood cultures, the cases were treated successfully using a combination of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and fluoroquinolone. PMID:25989175

  17. Haemorrhage, hyponatraemia and more than just a hack.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mitsu; Kandil, Hala

    2014-01-01

    A 43-year-old previously healthy solicitor presented with a 9-day history of cough productive of yellow sputum with a prodrome of sore throat and myalgia. The cough was paroxysmal in nature and severe enough to cause extensive bilateral subconjunctival haemorrhages and cough syncopes multiple times a day, with one bout of associated haematemesis on the day of admission. He was isolated, treated for a presumed atypical chest infection with tazocin and clarithromycin, and monitored carefully until the hyponatraemia on presentation was resolved. Atypical screen and blood cultures were sent off, though unexciting at first, eventually confirmed the unlikely; Bordetella pertussis, much to the surprise of many who had Legionella as the top differential. PMID:24943139

  18. Autopsy findings in fatal dengue haemorrhagic fever – 06 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, K.R.; Arora, M.M.; Sahai, K.; Tripathi, S.; Singh, S.P.; Raman, D.K.; Anand, K.B.

    2012-01-01

    Background During recent outbreak of dengue fever in Delhi, there has been a significant increase in dengue-associated admission in hospitals. To better understand the pathology of dengue haemorrhagic fever, we conducted autopsies of dengue infections deaths within our hospital. Method This was an autopsy study of dengue-associated deaths at a large tertiary care hospital. Results From Sep 2009 to Dec 2010, a total of 1032 patients with serological evidence of dengue infection were admitted to our hospital. There were twelve deaths and autopsies were conducted in six. Adult respiratory distress syndrome, bleeding diathesis, hypotension, hepatic failure and acute renal failure were the common causes of death despite early hospitalization, intravenous fluid, and blood-product support. Conclusion Dengue is associated with severe disease, and deaths do occur despite current supportive management. Early predictors of disease severity and better clinical interventions are needed. PMID:24600119

  19. How to manage patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Geisthoff, Urban W; Nguyen, Ha-Long; Röth, Alexander; Seyfert, Ulrich

    2015-11-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia is a rare systemic autosomal dominantly inherited disorder of the fibrovascular tissue with a wide variety of clinical manifestations. Diagnosis is based on the clinical Curaçao criteria or molecular genetic testing. Dilated vessels can develop into telangiectases or larger vascular malformations in various organs, calling for an interdisciplinary approach. Epistaxis and gastrointestinal bleeding can result from these vascular defects. Various conservative and interventional treatments have been described for these conditions. However, no optimal therapy exists. Treatment can become especially difficult due to progressive anaemia or when anticoagulant or anti-thrombotic therapy becomes necessary. Screening for pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM) should be performed in all confirmed and suspected patients. Treatment by percutaneous transcatheter embolotherapy and antibiotic prophylaxis is normally effective for PAVM. Cerebral or hepatic vascular malformations and rare manifestations need to be evaluated on a case-by-case basis to determine the best course of action for treatment. PMID:26205234

  20. Spontaneous pulmonary haemorrhage into an existing emphysematous bulla.

    PubMed

    Withey, Samuel; Tamimi, Asad

    2016-01-01

    A patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and pulmonary fibrosis presented dyspnoeic with productive cough and large-volume haemoptysis, 1?month after coronary stenting and commencement of clopidogrel. A chest radiograph showed a well-circumscribed opacity in the left lower zone with surrounding consolidation, where previously an emphysematous bulla had been. A CT scan of the thorax confirmed a 14?cm bulla in the left lower lobe, which was 70% filled with blood with associated surrounding consolidation. A diagnosis of pulmonary haemorrhage into an existing emphysematous bulla with co-existing infective exacerbation of COPD was performed. Owing to his significant comorbidities, the patient was managed conservatively, returning to baseline over several days. He had two further admissions due to pulmonary infection over 2?months, where the haematoma was nominally smaller, and died during the second of these. PMID:26744537

  1. Rodent control programmes in areas affected by Bolivian haemorrhagic fever

    PubMed Central

    Mercado R., Rodolfo

    1975-01-01

    Bolivian haemorrhagic fever (BHF) caused by Machupo virus is acquired by contact with the excretions and secretions of Calomys callosus, an indigenous cricetine rodent which is preadapted to peridomestic habitats. It competes successfully with Mus musculus, but not with Rattus rattus. A successful disease control programme has functioned in Beni Department since 1964. It is based on trapping surveys and the detection of splenomegaly in Calomys rodents as an index of chronic virus infection. Mass trapping and poisoning are used initially, and regular trapping is employed to control Calomys populations in towns where disease has occurred. More than 1000 cases of BHF were recorded from 1960-1964, but less than 200 in the past 10 years. The cost of this programme is approximately $30 000 annually. PMID:182405

  2. The effect of head orientation on subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid distribution and its implications for neurophysiological modulation and recording techniques.

    PubMed

    Bijsterbosch, Janine D; Lee, Kwang-Hyuk; Hunter, Michael D; Wilkinson, Iain D; Farrow, Tom; Barker, Anthony T; Woodruff, Peter W R

    2013-03-01

    Gravitational forces may lead to local changes in subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) layer thickness, which has important implications for neurophysiological modulation and recording techniques. This study examines the effect of gravitational pull associated with different head positions on the distribution of subarachnoid CSF using structural magnetic resonance imaging. Images of seven subjects in three different positions (supine, left lateral and prone) were statistically compared. Results suggest that subarachnoid CSF volume decreases on the side of the head closest to the ground, due to downward brain movement with gravity. These findings warrant future research into currently unexplored gravitation-induced changes in regional subarachnoid CSF thickness. PMID:23400029

  3. Subarachnoid hemorrhage due to aneurysm rupture in a young woman with Alagille syndrome - A rare cause of sudden death.

    PubMed

    Doberentz, E; Kuchelmeister, K; Madea, B

    2015-09-01

    The Alagille syndrome (AGS) or arteriohepatic dysplasia is a rare, autosomal dominant inherited disease with a prevalence of approximately 1:100,000. AGS was first described in 1969 and affects liver, heart, arterial blood vessels, skeleton and the eyes. The expression of AGS is variable. In severe cases a liver transplantation is required. Presented is the case of a 25-year-old woman with AGS. At the age of 7 and 8years she had liver transplantations. Other typical findings associated with Alagille syndrome (e.g. pulmonary or renal anomalies) were also present. The young woman apparently died suddenly and unexpectedly in a good health condition despite regular medical treatment. Cause of death was a subarachnoid hemorrhage with invasion of the hemorrhage into the ventricle system caused by a rupture of previously unknown large aneurysm in the terminal basilary artery. Intracranial vascular malformations are a common finding in patients with AGS and cause death in up to 16% of them. Life expectancy in AGS patients depends on the severity of changes of the affected liver. But AGS is also responsible for various vascular abnormalities in several other organs which can cause lethal complications. Due to the high rate of vascular complications and intracranial hemorrhage with the leading cause of mortality in patients with AGS, vascular screening by the use of noninvasive imaging techniques (CT or MR angiography) is required to avoid unexpected sudden death. PMID:25813756

  4. Practical Incidence and Risk Factors of Terson's Syndrome: A Retrospective Analysis in 322 Consecutive Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gun-Ill; Choi, Kyu-Sun; Han, Myung-Hoon; Byoun, Hyoung-Soo; Lee, Byung-Ro

    2015-01-01

    Objective Terson's syndrome, a complication of visual function, has occasionally been reported in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), however the factors responsible for Terson's syndrome in aneurysmal SAH patients have not yet been fully clarified. In this study, we report on potential risk factors for prediction and diagnosis of Terson's syndrome in the earlier stage of the disease course in patients with aneurysmal SAH. Materials and Methods The authors retrospectively analyzed the data of 322 consecutive patients who suffered from aneurysmal SAH in a single institution between Jan. 2007 and Dec. 2013. Medical records including demographics, neurologic examination, and radiologic images were collected to clarify the risk factors of Terson's syndrome. Patients with visual problem were consulted to the Department of Ophthalmology. Results Among 332 patients with aneurysmal SAH, 34 patients were diagnosed as Terson's syndrome. Four individual factors, including World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) grade at admission, aneurysm size, method of operation, and Glasgow outcome scale showed statistically significant association with occurrence of Terson's syndrome. Of these, WFNS grade at admission, aneurysm size, and method of operation showed strong association with Terson's syndrome in multivariate analysis. Terson's syndrome accompanied by papilledema due to increased intracranial pressure led to permanent visual complication. Conclusion In patients with aneurysmal SAH, the patients' WFNS grade at admission, the size of the aneurysms, particularly the diameter of the aneurysm dome, and the method of operation might influence development of Terson's syndrome. PMID:26526120

  5. Predictors and Outcomes of Suspected Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Brijesh P.; Sims, John R.; Baccin, Carlos E.; Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele M.; Ogilvy, Christopher S.; Nogueira, Raul G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a dreaded complication of heparin-related products and correlates with a worse outcome in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients. Objective To study the risk factors and outcomes of SAH patients suspected of having HIT, confirmed as present or absent by the platelet factor 4 (PF4) antibody test. Methods All patients with presumed aneurysmal, nontraumatic SAH and having undergone a PF4 test were identified through our research patient database. Charts, laboratory values and images were analyzed retrospectively. Results We identified 166 patients with SAH who were tested for HIT; 42 patients (25%) had a positive antibody test. There was no difference in platelet profiles or mean platelet nadirs of HIT+ and HIT- patients (147 ± 93 vs. 153 ± 86 ×109/l, respectively). Univariate analysis identified gender, magnesium prophylaxis, Fisher group 3, clipping versus coiling, presence of angiographic vasospasm, number of vasospasm treatments, and day of HIT testing as potential risk factors associated with HIT. A multivariate analysis indicated that female gender (OR 8.2, 95% CI 2.0-33.2), greater number of vasospasm treatments (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.2-2.0), later day of HIT testing (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.1-1.3), and clipping (OR 5.0, 95% CI 1.42-10.0) were independently associated with HIT positivity. HIT+ patients showed more infarcts on CT, longer ICU and hospital stays and worse modified Rankin Scale scores on discharge. Conclusion The presence of HIT in SAH has adverse consequences and is more likely in female patients who have undergone aneurysm clipping and require multiple endovascular vasospasm treatments. PMID:25337085

  6. The Effect of Gender on Acute Hydrocephalus after Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Shishido, Hajime; Zhang, Haining; Okubo, Shuichi; Hua, Ya; Keep, Richard F; Xi, Guohua

    2016-01-01

    Acute hydrocephalus is a common complication of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We investigated the effect of gender on acute hydrocephalus development in a rat SAH model. SAH was induced in adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats using endovascular perforation. Sham rats underwent the same procedure without perforation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed 24 h after SAH to determine ventricular volume. Hydrocephalus was defined as a ventricular volume that was more than 3 standard deviations from the mean value in sham-operated animals. After MRI, animals were euthanized and the extent of SAH was assessed using a modified grading system. No sham animals died. Mortality rates after SAH induction in male and female animals were 27 and 22 %, respectively. SAH induced significant ventricular enlargement compared with sham-operated rats (p?

  7. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension: the syndrome and its complications.

    PubMed

    Couch, James R

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is a syndrome that was largely unknown until the advent of MRI. The incidence of SIH is estimated at 5 per 100,000, which is half the incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage. The major feature is a postural headache of acute or subacute onset. This headache is absent or minimal when the patient is lying down and rapidly worsens to great intensity when the patient sits or stands. Other features may include nausea, vomiting, vertigo, tinnitus, and marked exacerbation by Valsalva maneuver. SIH is due to a leak of cerebrospinal fluid from a tear in the dural membrane, which occurs most often at the exit zones where the cervical spinal roots leave the subarachnoid space. Other leak sites may be the vestibular system, the cribriform plate, or the pituitary fossa. If the leak continues, the brain loses buoyancy within the cranial space and sags toward the foramen magnum. This, in turn, may produce subdural hygroma or hematoma, brainstem compression, focal cranial nerve palsies, or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The initial therapy is generally strict bed rest. If this fails, an epidural blood patch is usually successful in sealing the leak and restoring brain buoyancy. A significant minority of patients require a repeat epidural blood patch. If the blood patch fails, a surgical approach may be needed. Repair of the leak and restoration of brain buoyancy will stop the postural headache and, in most cases, will reverse the complications. PMID:18325294

  8. Pancreaticoduodenectomy: expected post-operative anatomy and complications

    PubMed Central

    Lavelle, L P; Hoare, S M; O'Neill, A C; Awan, F N; Malone, D E; Ryan, E R; McCann, J W; Heffernan, E J

    2014-01-01

    Pancreaticoduodenectomy is a complex, high-risk surgical procedure performed for tumours of the pancreatic head and other periampullary structures. The rate of perioperative mortality has decreased in the past number of years but perioperative morbidity remains high. This pictorial review illustrates expected findings in early and late post-operative periods, including mimickers of pathology. It aims to familiarize radiologists with the imaging appearances of common and unusual post-operative complications. These are classified into early non-vascular complications such as delayed gastric emptying, post-operative collections, pancreatic fistulae and bilomas; late non-vascular complications, for example, biliary strictures and hepatic abscesses; and vascular complications including haemorrhage and ischaemia. Options for minimally invasive image-guided management of vascular and non-vascular complications are discussed. Familiarity with normal anatomic findings is essential in order to distinguish expected post-operative change from surgical complications or recurrent disease. This review summarizes the normal and abnormal radiological findings following pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:25026968

  9. A suprasellar arachnoid cyst resulting from an intraventricular haemorrhage and showing complete resolution following endoscopic fenestration.

    PubMed

    Palin, Martin; Anderson, Ian; O'Reilly, Gerard; Goodden, John Robert

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a premature neonate who developed a large, acquired arachnoid cyst as a consequence of intraventricular haemorrhage. The child was managed with endoscopic fenestration and made an excellent recovery. PMID:25926587

  10. Contrecoup haemorrhage in a patient with left pubic fracture but right obturator artery bleeding.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying C; Liu, Peter; Su, Jenn-Shyan; Lin, Yi-Lii

    2007-08-01

    Contrecoup injury following head trauma is well known. It is caused by the acceleration-deceleration mechanism that can be fully explained by Newton's first law of motion. We report on a victim of a motor vehicle accident with non-displacement left pubis fracture but haemorrhage from the right obturator artery. Contrecoup haemorrhage should be excluded first in unstable patients without evidence of significant trauma but with a minor pelvic fracture. PMID:17652697

  11. Paediatric pulmonary haemorrhage: Independent lung ventilation as effective strategy in management

    PubMed Central

    Murkute, Amol; Angadi, Ullas; Jain, Pawan; Sharique, Tanzila; Hegde, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary haemorrhage is an uncommon symptom in paediatrics with the etiology varying among the series by age, location, and the diagnostic tests employed. Once airway protection and volume resuscitation are ensured, localization of the anatomic site of bleeding, isolation of the involved airway, control of haemorrhage and treatment of the underlying cause of becomes essential. In localized persistent bleeding, airway control may be achieved by lung isolation with double lumen endotracheal tube and synchronous independent lung ventilation PMID:25316981

  12. Historical overview and review of current day treatment in the management of acute variceal haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Rajoriya, Neil; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2014-01-01

    Variceal haemorrhage is one of the most devastating consequences of portal hypertension, with a 1-year mortality of 40%. With the passage of time, acute management strategies have developed with improved survival. The major historical treatment landmarks in the management of variceal haemorrhage can be divided into surgical, medical, endoscopic and radiological breakthroughs. We sought to provide a historical overview of the management of variceal haemorrhage and how treatment modalities over time have impacted on clinical outcomes. A PubMed search of the following terms: portal hypertension, variceal haemorrhage, gastric varices, oesophageal varices, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt was performed. To complement this, Google™ was searched with the aforementioned terms. Other relevant references were identified after review of the reference lists of articles. The review of therapeutic advances was conducted divided into pre-1970s, 1970/80s, 1990s, 2000-2010 and post-2010. Also, a summary and review on the pathophysiology of portal hypertension and clinical outcomes in variceal haemorrhage was performed. Aided by the development of endoscopic therapies, medication and improved radiological interventions; the management of variceal haemorrhage has changed over recent decades with improved survival from an often-terminating event in recent past. PMID:24914369

  13. Subarachnoid hemorrhage in Kashmir: Causes, risk factors, and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Abdul Rashid; AfzalWani, Mohammed; Kirmani, Altaf R.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Kashmir, a snow bound and mountain locked valley, is populated by about 7 million ethnic and non-migratory Kashmiris who have specific dietary and social habits than rest of the world. The neurological disorders are common in Kashmiri population. Aims: To study the prevalence and outcome of spontaneous intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in Kashmir compared withother parts of the world. Settings and Design: A retrospective and hospital based study from 1982 to 2010 in the single and only Neurosurgical Centre of the State of Jammu and Kashmir. Materials and Methods: A hospital based study, in which, information concerning all Kashmiri patients was collected from the case sheets, patient files, discharge certificates, death certificates, and telephonic conversations with the help of Medical Records Department and Central Admission Register of Sher–i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Kashmir India. Statistical Analysis: Analysis of variance and students T-test were used at occasions. Results: Incidence of SAH in Kashmiris is about 13/100,000 persons per year. SAH comprises 31.02% of total strokes and aneurysmal ruptures are cause of 54.35% SAHs. The female suffers 1.78 times more than the male. Total mortality of 36.60% was recorded against a good recovery of 14.99%. The familial SAHs and multiple aneurysms were also common. Intra-operative finding of larger aneurysmal size than recorded on pre-operative computed tomography (CT) angiogram of same patients was noteworthy. In 493 patients of SAH, the angiography revealed 705 aneurysms. Conclusion: Spontaneous intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage, due to aneurysmal rupture, is common in Kashmir, with worst outcome. Food habits like “salt-tea twice a day”, group-smoking of wet tobacco like “Jejeer”, winter season, female gender, hypertension, and inhalation of “Kangri” smoke are special risk factorsof SAH, in Kashmiris. The plain CT brain and CT angiography are best diagnostic tools. The preventive measures for aneurysmal formation and rupture seems most promising management of future. The detachable endovascular aneurysmal occupying video assisted micro-camera capsules or plugs may be future treatment. PMID:22347326

  14. Skin Complications of IBD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home > Resources > Skin Complications of IBD Go Back Skin Complications of IBD Email Print + Share After arthritis, ... about 5% of people with inflammatory bowel disease. SKIN DISORDERS COMMONLY SEEN IN IBD ERHTHEMA NODOSUM The ...

  15. Eye Complications in IBD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home > Resources > Eye Complications in IBD Go Back Eye Complications in IBD Email Print + Share Approximately 10% ... doctor’s attention sooner rather than later. TYPES OF EYE DISORDERS UVEITIS One of the most common eye ...

  16. Neurological Complications of AIDS

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurological Complications of AIDS Information Page Feature Federal domestic HIV/AIDS information ... resources from MedlinePlus What are Neurological Complications of AIDS? AIDS is primarily an immune system disorder caused ...

  17. Histology and Morphology of the Brain Subarachnoid Trabeculae

    PubMed Central

    Saboori, Parisa; Sadegh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The interface between the brain and the skull consists of three fibrous tissue layers, dura mater, arachnoid, and pia mater, known as the meninges, and strands of collagen tissues connecting the arachnoid to the pia mater, known as trabeculae. The space between the arachnoid and the pia mater is filled with cerebrospinal fluid which stabilizes the shape and position of the brain during head movements or impacts. The histology and architecture of the subarachnoid space trabeculae in the brain are not well established in the literature. The only recognized fact about the trabeculae is that they are made of collagen fibers surrounded by fibroblast cells and they have pillar- and veil-like structures. In this work the histology and the architecture of the brain trabeculae were studied, via a series of in vivo and in vitro experiments using cadaveric and animal tissue. In the cadaveric study fluorescence and bright field microscopy were employed while scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used for the animal studies. The results of this study reveal that the trabeculae are collagen based type I, and their architecture is in the form of tree-shaped rods, pillars, and plates and, in some regions, they have a complex network morphology. PMID:26090230

  18. Neuroprotective Effect of Radix Trichosanthis Saponins on Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Sun, Haiyan; Huang, Liyong; Li, Juxiang; Zhou, Wenke; Chang, Jingling

    2015-01-01

    Redox homeostasis has been implicated in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). As a result, antioxidants and/or free radical scavengers have become an important therapeutic modality. Considering that radix trichosanthis (RT) saponins exhibited strong antioxidant ability both in vivo and in vitro, the present study aimed to reveal whether the neuroprotective activities of RT saponins were mediated by p38/p53 signal pathway after SAH. An established SAH model was used and superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nitric oxide (NO), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), p-p38, and p53 activation were detected after 48?h of SAH. The results showed that RT saponins inhibited iNOS expression to restore NO to basal level. Moreover, compared with Cu/Zn-SOD, RT saponins (2?mg/kg/d dosage) significantly increased Mn-SOD activity after SAH. Accompanied with lowered NO and elevated SOD, decreased p38 phosphorylation and p53 activities were observed, especially for RT saponins at 2?mg/kg/d dosage. In this setting, the neurological outcome was also improved with less neuronal cells damage after RT saponins pretreatment. Our findings demonstrated the beneficial effects of RT saponins in enhancing neuroprotective effects by deducing iNOS activity, normalizing SOD level, and inhibiting p-p38 and p53 expression, hence offering significant therapeutic implications for SAH. PMID:26089937

  19. Controversies and Evolving New Mechanisms in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng; Feng, Hua; Sherchan, Prativa; Klebe, Damon; Zhao, Gang; Sun, Xiaochuan; Zhang, Jianmin; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Despite decades of study, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) continues to be a serious and significant health problem in the United States and worldwide. The mechanisms contributing to brain injury after SAH remain unclear. Traditionally, most in vivo research has heavily emphasized the basic mechanisms of SAH over the pathophysiological or morphological changes of delayed cerebral vasospasm after SAH. Unfortunately, the results of clinical trials based on this premise have mostly been disappointing, implicating some other pathophysiological factors, independent of vasospasm, as contributors to poor clinical outcomes. Delayed cerebral vasospasm is no longer the only culprit. In this review, we summarize recent data from both experimental and clinical studies of SAH and discuss the vast array of physiological dysfunctions following SAH that ultimately lead to cell death. Based on the progress in neurobiological understanding of SAH, the terms “early brain injury” and “delayed brain injury” are used according to the temporal progression of SAH-induced brain injury. Additionally, a new concept of the vasculo-neuronal-glia triad model for SAH study is highlighted and presents the challenges and opportunities of this model for future SAH applications. PMID:24076160

  20. Brain Volume Determination in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Using Rats.

    PubMed

    Lekic, Tim; Hardy, Maurice; Fujii, Mutsumi; McBride, Devin W; Zhang, John H

    2016-01-01

    Brain edema is routinely measured using the wet-dry method. Volume, however, is the sum total of all cerebral tissues, including water. Therefore, volumetric change following injury may not be adequately quantified using percentage of edema. We thus tested the hypothesis that dried brains can be reconstituted with water and then re-measured to determine the actual volume. Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was induced by endovascular perforation in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n?=?30). Animals were euthanized at 24 and 72 h after evaluation of neurobehavior for determination of brain water content. Dried brains were thereafter reconstituted with equal parts of water (lost from brain edema) and centrifuged to remove air bubbles. The total volume was quantified using hydrostatic (underwater) physics principles that 1 ml water (mass)?=?1 cm(3) (volume). The amount of additional water needed to reach a preset level marked on 2-ml test tubes was added to that lost from brain edema, and from the brain itself, to determine the final volume. SAH significantly increased both brain water and volume while worsening neurological function in affected rats. Volumetric measurements demonstrated significant brain swelling after SAH, in addition to the brain edema approach. This modification of the "wet-dry" method permits brain volume determination using valuable post hoc dried brain tissue. PMID:26463930

  1. Viral haemorrhagic disease of rabbits and human health.

    PubMed Central

    Carman, J. A.; Garner, M. G.; Catton, M. G.; Thomas, S.; Westbury, H. A.; Cannon, R. M.; Collins, B. J.; Tribe, I. G.

    1998-01-01

    Viral haemorrhagic disease of rabbits (VHD), a potential biological control for wild rabbits in Australia and New Zealand, escaped from quarantined field trials on Wardang Island and spread to the mainland of Australia in October 1995. This study looked for any evidence of infection or illness in people occupationally exposed to the virus. Two hundred and sixty-nine people were interviewed and 259 blood samples were collected. Exposures to VHD-infected rabbits ranged from nil to very high. No VHD antibodies were detected in any of the 259 sera when tested by VHD competitive enzyme immunoassay, which had been validated with 1013 VHDV-specific antibody negative sera. A questionnaire designed to elicit symptoms of disease in a range of organ systems found no significant differences between illness in those exposed and those not exposed to VHD, nor could an association be found between exposure and subsequent episodes of illness. The findings are consistent with the view that exposure to VHD is not associated with infection or disease in humans. PMID:9825794

  2. Clinical and epidemiological patterns of Argentine haemorrhagic fever

    PubMed Central

    Maiztegui, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    The epidemiology of Argentine haemorrhagic fever (AHF) is closely related to cricetine rodents acting as natural hosts of Junin virus. The endemo-epidemic area, which has increased 5 times since the disease was first recognized 15-20 years ago, is located in a densely populated region of Argentina. It has been shown that the virus of LCM is active in humans and rodents of the AHF endemic area; this demonstrates the simultaneous presence of two arenaviruses pathogenic for man in a given geographic location. The disease is characterized by haematological, renal, neurological and cardiovascular changes. Electron microscopy and immunohistochemical studies have shown cytopathic changes, characteristic intracellular virus-like particles, and antigenic determinants of Junin virus in different organs from 9 cases of AHF. No deposits of immunoglobulins or C3 were found in the kidneys; in addition, an absence of fibrinogen and C3 in the hepatocytes and of immunoglobulins in the spleen was observed. These findings suggest a direct viral pathogenic action in the human disease. Ultrastructural and immunofluorescence studies in tissues of guinea-pigs inoculated with two strains of Junin virus revealed the presence of the same types of virus-like particles and antigenic determinants of Junin virus as were encountered in the human subjects with AHF. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:1085212

  3. Imaging cerebral haemorrhage with magnetic induction tomography: numerical modelling.

    PubMed

    Zolgharni, M; Ledger, P D; Armitage, D W; Holder, D S; Griffiths, H

    2009-06-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a new electromagnetic imaging modality which has the potential to image changes in the electrical conductivity of the brain due to different pathologies. In this study the feasibility of detecting haemorrhagic cerebral stroke with a 16-channel MIT system operating at 10 MHz was investigated. The finite-element method combined with a realistic, multi-layer, head model comprising 12 different tissues, was used for the simulations in the commercial FE package, Comsol Multiphysics. The eddy-current problem was solved and the MIT signals computed for strokes of different volumes occurring at different locations in the brain. The results revealed that a large, peripheral stroke (volume 49 cm(3)) produced phase changes that would be detectable with our currently achievable instrumentation phase noise level (17 m degrees ) in 70 (27%) of the 256 exciter/sensor channel combinations. However, reconstructed images showed that a lower noise level than this, of 1 m degrees , was necessary to obtain good visualization of the strokes. The simulated MIT measurements were compared with those from an independent transmission-line-matrix model in order to give confidence in the results. PMID:19491437

  4. Rabbit haemorrhagic disease: virus persistence and adaptation in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Schwensow, Nina I; Cooke, Brian; Kovaliski, John; Sinclair, Ron; Peacock, David; Fickel, Joerns; Sommer, Simone

    2014-01-01

    In Australia, the rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) has been used since 1996 to reduce numbers of introduced European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) which have a devastating impact on the native Australian environment. RHDV causes regular, short disease outbreaks, but little is known about how the virus persists and survives between epidemics. We examined the initial spread of RHDV to show that even upon its initial spread, the virus circulated continuously on a regional scale rather than persisting at a local population level and that Australian rabbit populations are highly interconnected by virus-carrying flying vectors. Sequencing data obtained from a single rabbit population showed that the viruses that caused an epidemic each year seldom bore close genetic resemblance to those present in previous years. Together, these data suggest that RHDV survives in the Australian environment through its ability to spread amongst rabbit subpopulations. This is consistent with modelling results that indicated that in a large interconnected rabbit meta-population, RHDV should maintain high virulence, cause short, strong disease outbreaks but show low persistence in any given subpopulation. This new epidemiological framework is important for understanding virus–host co-evolution and future disease management options of pest species to secure Australia's remaining natural biodiversity. PMID:25553067

  5. Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever in adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Tantawichien, Terapong

    2012-05-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is endemic in tropical and subtropical zones and the prevalence is increasing across South-east Asia, Africa, the Western Pacific and the Americas. In recent years, the spread of unplanned urbanisation, with associated substandard housing, overcrowding and deterioration in water, sewage and waste management systems, has created ideal conditions for increased transmission of the dengue virus in tropical urban centres. While dengue infection has traditionally been considered a paediatric disease, the age distribution of dengue has been rising and more cases have been observed in adolescents and adults. Furthermore, the development of tourism in the tropics has led to an increase in the number of tourists who become infected, most of whom are adults. Symptoms and risk factors for dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and severe dengue differ between children and adults, with co-morbidities and incidence in more elderly patients associated with greater risk of mortality. Treatment options for DF and DHF in adults, as for children, centre round fluid replacement (either orally or intravenously, depending on severity) and antipyretics. Further data are needed on the optimal treatment of adult patients. PMID:22668446

  6. Subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage in patients with churg-strauss syndrome: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Go, Myeong Hoon; Park, Jeong Un; Kang, Jae Gyu; Lim, Yong Cheol

    2012-09-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a systemic necrotizing vasculitis of the small and medium vessels, associated with extravascular eosinophilic granulomas, peripheral eosinophilia, and asthma. The exact etiology of CSS is unknown. This syndrome commonly affects the lungs, peripheral nerves, skin, heart, and gastrointestinal tract, but rarely the central nervous system. Subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage in CSS patients is extremely rare; however, clinicians should consider that CSS may be a cause of intracranial hemorrhage and its high rate of mortality and morbidity. The authors report on two cases of subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage with CSS and discuss a brief review of CSS. PMID:23210058

  7. The Role of Matricellular Proteins in Brain Edema after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hidenori; Fujimoto, Masashi; Shiba, Masato; Kawakita, Fumihiro; Liu, Lei; Ichikawa, Naoki; Kanamaru, Kenji; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko; Yoshida, Toshimichi

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence suggests that blood-brain barrier disruption or brain edema is an important pathologic manifestation for poor outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Many molecules may be involved, acting simultaneously or at different stages during blood-brain barrier disruption via multiple independent or interconnected signaling pathways. Matricellular protein is a class of nonstructural, secreted, and multifunctional extracellular matrix proteins, which potentially mediates brain edema formation. This study reviews the role of osteopontin and tenascin-C, representatives of matricellular proteins, in the context of brain edema formation after subarachnoid hemorrhage in both clinical and experimental settings. PMID:26463940

  8. Facial Filler Complications.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Julie; Khan, Tanya; Martin, John

    2015-11-01

    The use of facial fillers has greatly expanded over the past several years. Along with increased use comes a rise in documented complications, ranging from poor cosmetic result to nodules, granulomas, necrosis, and blindness. Awareness of the potential types of complications and options for management, in addition to the underlying facial anatomy, are imperative to delivering the best patient care. This article defines the complications and how to treat them and provides suggestions to avoid serious adverse outcomes. PMID:26505541

  9. Neurologic Complications in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cuero, Mauricio Ruiz; Varelas, Panayiotis N

    2016-01-01

    Pregnant women are subject to the same complications as the general population, as well to specific neurologic complications associated with pregnancy, such as preeclampsia or eclampsia. The hormonal and physiologic changes during pregnancy lead to altered incidences of these complications, which usually present during the late period of pregnancy, labor, or the puerperium. In addition, the treatment of these conditions is different from that of nonpregnant women, because special attention is paid to avoid any abnormalities or death of the fetus. This article discusses the most common of these neurologic complications. PMID:26600443

  10. Complications of nephrotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Se Jin

    2011-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is one of the most common glomerular diseases that affect children. Renal histology reveals the presence of minimal change nephrotic syndrome (MCNS) in more than 80% of these patients. Most patients with MCNS have favorable outcomes without complications. However, a few of these children have lesions of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, suffer from severe and prolonged proteinuria, and are at high risk for complications. Complications of NS are divided into two categories: disease-associated and drug-related complications. Disease-associated complications include infections (e.g., peritonitis, sepsis, cellulitis, and chicken pox), thromboembolism (e.g., venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism), hypovolemic crisis (e.g., abdominal pain, tachycardia, and hypotension), cardiovascular problems (e.g., hyperlipidemia), acute renal failure, anemia, and others (e.g., hypothyroidism, hypocalcemia, bone disease, and intussusception). The main pathomechanism of disease-associated complications originates from the large loss of plasma proteins in the urine of nephrotic children. The majority of children with MCNS who respond to treatment with corticosteroids or cytotoxic agents have smaller and milder complications than those with steroid-resistant NS. Corticosteroids, alkylating agents, cyclosporin A, and mycophenolate mofetil have often been used to treat NS, and these drugs have treatment-related complications. Early detection and appropriate treatment of these complications will improve outcomes for patients with NS. PMID:22087198

  11. Substantial radiation exposure for patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Gelfand, Amy A; Josephson, S Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Increasing attention is being paid to the cancer risk conferred by imaging modalities such as computed tomography (CT). Patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) often are critically ill and require numerous imaging studies. A nonradiating diagnostic modality, transcranial Doppler (TCD), effectively screens for cerebral vasospasm. But when TCD is not available, CT angiography or conventional angiography may be ordered, increasing a patient's total radiation dose. This study investigated the total amount of radiation to which patients with SAH are exposed, and whether that amount was decreased by the availability of TCD. Patients with nontraumatic SAH who were admitted to an intensive care unit within 48 hours of symptom onset and who survived and remained hospitalized for at least 7 days were eligible. TCD was available for one group (TCD group) but not for the other group (no-TCD group). The total radiation dose for each patient was tallied. There were no differences in demographic variables or significant difference in radiation exposure between the 2 groups. Average total radiation exposure was 82.03 mSv in the TCD group and 89.79 mSv in the no-TCD group (P=.60). Head imaging accounted for 97.2% of the total radiation exposure in the TCD group and 90% of that in the no-TCD group. Patients with SAH are exposed to a substantial amount of radiation, almost all of which is centered on the head. Using Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation VII cancer risk estimates, the average lifetime attributable risk from SAH management was approximately 1 in 125. Methods for decreasing radiation exposure are needed. PMID:20621510

  12. Melatonin attenuates neurogenic pulmonary edema via the regulation of inflammation and apoptosis after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingyin; Qian, Cong; Duan, Hongyu; Cao, Shenglong; Yu, Xiaobo; Li, Jianru; Gu, Chi; Yan, Feng; Wang, Lin; Chen, Gao

    2015-11-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is a serious non-neurological complication that can occur after a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and is associated with decreased survival and a poor neurological outcome. Melatonin is a strong antioxidant that has beneficial effects against SAH in rats, including reduced mortality and reduced neurological deficits. The molecular mechanisms underlying these clinical effects in the SAH model, however, have not been clearly identified. This study was undertaken to determine the influence of melatonin on SAH-induced NPE and the potential mechanism of these effects using the filament perforation model of SAH in male Sprague Dawley rats. Either melatonin (150 mg/kg) or a vehicle was given via an intraperitoneal injection 2 hr after an SAH induction. Lung samples were extracted 24 hr after SAH. The results show that the melatonin treatment attenuated SAH-induced NPE by preventing alveolar-capillary barrier dysfunctions via inhibiting the disruption of tight junction proteins (ZO-1 and occludin). Moreover, the treatment downregulated the levels of mature interleukin (IL) -1?, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and matrix metallopeptidase (MMP) 9 expression/activation, which were increased in the lung; also, melatonin treatment improved neurological deficits. Furthermore, the melatonin treatment markedly reduced caspase-3 activity and the number of TUNEL-positive cells in the lung. Taken together, these findings show that administration of melatonin attenuates NPE by preventing alveolar-capillary barrier dysfunctions via repressing the inflammatory response and by anti-apoptosis effects after SAH. PMID:26383078

  13. Shunt-dependent hydrocephalus following subarachnoid hemorrhage correlates with increased S100B levels in cerebrospinal fluid and serum.

    PubMed

    Brandner, S; Xu, Y; Schmidt, C; Emtmann, Irene; Buchfelder, Michael; Kleindienst, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus requiring permanent ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement is a major complication of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). High S100B serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels are considered to reflect the severity of brain injury. We prospectively assessed whether S100B levels in serum and CSF were predictive parameters for permanent shunt requirement following aneurysmal SAH. In patients suffering from aneurysmal SAH and treated with an external ventricular drain (EVD), S100B levels in serum and CSF were measured daily as long as the EVD was in place. S100B levels of patients who passed their EVD challenge were compared with those patients who required a permanent ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement. Out of 68 patients included in the study, 43 patients (63.2%) passed the EVD challenge and in 25 patients (36.8%) permanent ventriculoperitoneal shunting was performed. Group comparison revealed that in patients who required shunt placement, S100B was significantly higher in CSF (p < 0.05 at days 2, 4, 6, 10; p < 0.005 at days 1, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9) and serum (p < 0.05 at days 4-7) compared with patients who could be weaned from the EVD. Assessment of S100B levels in CSF and serum may be useful as a predictive parameter for shunt dependency in patients with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus following aneurysmal SAH. PMID:22327696

  14. Diagnostic yield and accuracy of CT angiography, MR angiography, and digital subtraction angiography for detection of macrovascular causes of intracerebral haemorrhage: prospective, multicentre cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Velthuis, Birgitta K; Rinkel, Gabriël J E; Algra, Ale; de Kort, Gérard A P; Witkamp, Theo D; de Ridder, Johanna C M; van Nieuwenhuizen, Koen M; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik; Schonewille, Wouter J; de Kort, Paul L M; Dippel, Diederik W; Raaymakers, Theodora W M; Hofmeijer, Jeannette; Wermer, Marieke J H; Kerkhoff, Henk; Jellema, Korné; Bronner, Irene M; Remmers, Michel J M; Bienfait, Henri Paul; Witjes, Ron J G M; Greving, Jacoba P; Klijn, Catharina J M

    2015-01-01

    Study question What are the diagnostic yield and accuracy of early computed tomography (CT) angiography followed by magnetic resonance imaging/angiography (MRI/MRA) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in patients with non-traumatic intracerebral haemorrhage? Methods This prospective diagnostic study enrolled 298 adults (18-70 years) treated in 22 hospitals in the Netherlands over six years. CT angiography was performed within seven days of haemorrhage. If the result was negative, MRI/MRA was performed four to eight weeks later. DSA was performed when the CT angiography or MRI/MRA results were inconclusive or negative. The main outcome was a macrovascular cause, including arteriovenous malformation, aneurysm, dural arteriovenous fistula, and cavernoma. Three blinded neuroradiologists independently evaluated the images for macrovascular causes of haemorrhage. The reference standard was the best available evidence from all findings during one year’s follow-up. Study answer and limitations A macrovascular cause was identified in 69 patients (23%). 291 patients (98%) underwent CT angiography; 214 with a negative result underwent additional MRI/MRA and 97 with a negative result for both CT angiography and MRI/MRA underwent DSA. Early CT angiography detected 51 macrovascular causes (yield 17%, 95% confidence interval 13% to 22%). CT angiography with MRI/MRA identified two additional macrovascular causes (18%, 14% to 23%) and these modalities combined with DSA another 15 (23%, 18% to 28%). This last extensive strategy failed to detect a cavernoma, which was identified on MRI during follow-up (reference strategy). The positive predictive value of CT angiography was 72% (60% to 82%), of additional MRI/MRA was 35% (14% to 62%), and of additional DSA was 100% (75% to 100%). None of the patients experienced complications with CT angiography or MRI/MRA; 0.6% of patients who underwent DSA experienced permanent sequelae. Not all patients with negative CT angiography and MRI/MRA results underwent DSA. Although the previous probability of finding a macrovascular cause was lower in patients who did not undergo DSA, some small arteriovenous malformations or dural arteriovenous fistulas may have been missed. What this study adds CT angiography is an appropriate initial investigation to detect macrovascular causes of non-traumatic intracerebral haemorrhage, but accuracy is modest. Additional MRI/MRA may find cavernomas or alternative diagnoses, but DSA is needed to diagnose macrovascular causes undetected by CT angiography or MRI/MRA. Funding, competing interests, data sharing Dutch Heart Foundation and The Netherlands Organisation for Health Research and Development, ZonMw. The authors have no competing interests. Direct requests for additional data to the corresponding author. PMID:26553142

  15. Leptospirosis among the self-supporting convicts of Andaman Island during the 1920s - the first report on pulmonary haemorrhage in leptospirosis?

    PubMed Central

    Vijayachari, P.; Sugunan, A.P.; Singh, S.S.; Mathur, P.P.

    2015-01-01

    Several researchers had carried out investigations on the possibility of existence of Weil's disease in Andaman Islands during early 20th century. The first report of a series of confirmed cases of leptospirosis that occurred during1929 was published in 1931. There were several reports during 1995 to 2009 that described detailed account of leptospirosis including various clinical syndromes. The possibility of pulmonary involvement in leptospirosis being a manifestation historically overlooked rather than newly emerged during the past two decades is examined in this review in the context of Andaman Islands. Two case series of leptospirosis, one occurred in 1929 and the other in 1996-1997 were reviewed with special emphasis on pulmonary involvement and haemorrhagic manifestations. The similarities and differences in the clinical profile of patients of the two case series were analysed. The review shows that respiratory system involvement and pulmonary haemorrhage as evidenced by presence of haemoptysis as a complication of leptospirosis was occurring during 1920s in Andaman Islands. The incidence of pulmonary involvement, however, rose from 9.4 per cent during 1929 to 52 per cent in 1996-1997. The case fatality ratio in patients with pulmonary involvement, which was 50 per cent during 1929 and 42.9 per cent during 1996-1997, was higher than that in cases without pulmonary involvement. Fever, conjunctival congestion, jaundice, vomiting, diarrhoea, hepatomagaly, haemoptysis, haematemesis and subconjunctival haemorrhage were common in both series. The case series in Andaman Islands in 1929 was probably the first report of pulmonary haemorrhage as a manifestation of leptospirosis. The increase in the incidence of pulmonary involvement in leptospirosis in the recent past is probably due to the increase in the density and diversityof its animal vectors, the broadening of the range of circulating serovars and the interactions between the vector and the agent. An increased virulence of Leptospira through gene acquisition and loss on an evolutionary time scale and the resulting change in the gene content, gene order and gene expression cannot be ruled out. PMID:26261162

  16. Amniocentesis: indications and complications.

    PubMed

    Vrettos, A S; Koliopoulos, C; Panayotou, P P

    1975-02-01

    Transabdominal amniocentesis is described and our experience with this method is presented. No severe maternal complications were recorded. In two cases accidental puncture of fetal blood vessels in pregnancies over 40 weeks led to delivery by cesarean section. We believe that, although fetal complications are rare, the indications for amniocentesis should be significant enough to discount the hazards of the procedure. PMID:1116906

  17. UCD Diabetes Complications Research Centre

    E-print Network

    UCD Diabetes Complications Research Centre The UCD Diabetes Complications Research Centre (DCRC) investigates the microvascular complications of diabetes. Our work focuses on identifying novel drivers innovative therapeutic paradigms and biomarkers. Diabetes Complications Research Centre The DCRC comprises

  18. The Role of Bone Subtraction Computed Tomographic Angiography in Determining Intracranial Aneurysms in Non-Traumatic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kayhan, Aysegul; Koc, Osman; Keskin, Suat; Keskin, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    Background: The presence of blood in the subarachnoid space is an acute pathology with a serious risk of death and complications. The most common etiology (approximately 80%) is intracranial aneurysm. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the role of bone subtracted computed tomographic angiography (BSCTA), a novel and noninvasive method for determining and characterizing intracranial aneurysms. Patients and Methods: Sixty consecutive patients with clinically suspected non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) were considered to enter the study. The subtraction quality was inadequate in ten patients; thus, they were excluded, leaving 50 patients (84.4%) in the study. Bone subtracted and non-subtracted 3D images were obtained from the BSCTA raw data sets. All images obtained by digital subtraction angiography (DSA), BSCTA, and computed tomographic angiography (CTA) were evaluated for the presence or absence of an aneurysm and the location, minimal sac diameter, and neck size ratio of the aneurysm. DSA was considered as the gold standard during the evaluation of the data. Results: Of the 50 patients who participated in this study, 11 had no aneurysms as determined by both CTA and DSA. Examination of the remaining 39 patients revealed the presence of 51 aneurysms. While 3D-CTA could not detect six aneurysms that were located in the base of the skull, 3D-BSCTA easily detected them. Moreover, five aneurysms were only partially detected by 3D-CTA. According to this data, the sensitivity of 3D-BSCTA and 3D-CTA was calculated as 98% and 86.3%, respectively; the specificity was calculated as 100% and 90.9%, respectively, per aneurysm; and the sensitivity of 100% for 3D-BSCTA and 98% for 3D-CTA was achieved by using combined images with multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) and maximum intensity projection (MIP). BSCTA detected and characterized the aneurysms as well as DSA, and BSCTA and DSA gave concordant results in detecting aneurysms. Conclusions: BSCTA is easily accessible, less time consuming, and most importantly, a non-invasive technique for detecting intracranial aneurysms. It is also suitable for patients who have been referred to emergency services. Therefore, it can be used in emergency conditions and as a first-line diagnostic method in patients with non-traumatic SAH. PMID:25035697

  19. Infrequent Hemorrhagic Complications Following Surgical Drainage of Chronic Subdural Hematomas

    PubMed Central

    Sangiorgi, Simone; Bifone, Lidia; Balbi, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas mainly occur amongst elderly people and usually develop after minor head injuries. In younger patients, subdural collections may be related to hypertension, coagulopathies, vascular abnormalities, and substance abuse. Different techniques can be used for the surgical treatment of symptomatic chronic subdural hematomas : single or double burr-hole evacuation, with or without subdural drainage, twist-drill craniostomies and classical craniotomies. Failure of the brain to re-expand, pneumocephalus, incomplete evacuation, and recurrence of the fluid collection are common complications following these procedures. Acute subdural hematomas may also occur. Rarely reported hemorrhagic complications include subarachnoid, intracerebral, intraventricular, and remote cerebellar hemorrhages. The causes of such uncommon complications are difficult to explain and remain poorly understood. Overdrainage and intracranial hypotension, rapid brain decompression and shift of the intracranial contents, cerebrospinal fluid loss, vascular dysregulation and impairment of venous outflow are the main mechanisms discussed in the literature. In this article we report three cases of different post-operative intracranial bleeding and review the related literature. PMID:26113968

  20. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related atraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage: an ARIA before the tsunami.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lizana, Eva; Carmona-Iragui, María; Alcolea, Daniel; Gómez-Choco, Manuel; Vilaplana, Eduard; Sánchez-Saudinós, María B; Clarimón, Jordi; Hernández-Guillamon, Mar; Munuera, Josep; Gelpi, Ellen; Gómez-Anson, Beatriz; de Juan-Delago, Manel; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Montaner, Joan; Ois, Angel; Amaro, Sergi; Blesa, Rafael; Martí-Fàbregas, Joan; Lleó, Alberto; Fortea, Juan

    2015-05-01

    Atraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage (cSAH) in elderly patients is a rare entity that has been associated with cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and intracerebral hematomas (ICH). To characterize this entity and to study these associations, 22 patients over 60 with cSAH were included in a multicenter ambispective cohort study. Clinical data, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, APOE genotyping, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers were evaluated. Results were compared with data from healthy controls (HC), non-cSAH CAA patients (CAAo), and Alzheimer disease patients. Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage presented with transient sensory or motor symptoms. At follow-up (median 30.7 months), 5 patients had died, 6 survivors showed functional disability (modified Rankins Scale (mRS)>2), and 12 cognitive impairment. Four patients had prior ICH and six had an ICH during follow-up. CSF-Aß40 and Aß42 levels were lower in cSAH and CAAo compared with HC. Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage presented an APOE-?2 overrepresentation and CAAo had an APOE-?4 overrepresentation. On MRI, all patients fulfilled CAA-modified Boston criteria and 9 showed cortical ischemia in the surrounding cortex or the vicinity of superficial siderosis. The neuropathologic study, available in one patient, showed severe CAA and advanced Alzheimer-type pathology. Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the elderly is associated with cognitive impairment and lobar ICH occurrence. Our findings support the existence of an underlying CAA pathology. PMID:25735919

  1. Progressive Manifestations of Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome Presenting with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage, Intracerebral Hemorrhage, and Cerebral Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyu-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by sudden-onset headache with focal neurologic deficit and prolonged but reversible multifocal narrowing of the distal cerebral arteries. Stroke, either hemorrhagic or ischemic, is a relatively frequent presentation in RCVS, but progressive manifestations of subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, cerebral infarction in a patient is seldom described. We report a rare case of a 56-year-old woman with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome consecutively presenting as cortical subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, and cerebral infarction. When she complained of severe headache with subtle cortical subarachnoid hemorrhage, her angiography was non-specific. But, computed tomographic angiography showed typical angiographic features of this syndrome after four days. Day 12, she suffered mental deterioration and hemiplegia due to contralateral intracerebral hematoma, and she was surgically treated. For recurrent attacks of headache, medical management with calcium channel blockers has been instituted. Normalized angiographic features were documented after 8 weeks. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome should be considered as differential diagnosis of non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, and repeated angiography is recommended for the diagnosis of this under-recognized syndrome. PMID:25535520

  2. Accumulation of intimal platelets in cerebral arteries following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in cats

    SciTech Connect

    Haining, J.L.; Clower, B.R.; Honma, Y.; Smith, R.R.

    1988-07-01

    From 2 hours to 23 days following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage, the accumulation of indium-111-labeled platelets on the intimal surface of the middle cerebral artery was studied in 23 cats. Subarachnoid hemorrhage was produced by transorbital rupture of the right middle cerebral artery. Of the 23 cats, 17 exhibited right middle cerebral artery/left middle cerebral artery radioactivity ratios of greater than 1.25. When these results were compared with those of 12 control cats, 0.001 less than p less than 0.005 (chi2 test). Thus, the results from the control and experimental groups are significantly different and indicate early (after 2 hours) preferential accumulation of intimal platelets in the ruptured right middle cerebral artery compared with the unruptured left middle cerebral artery and new platelet deposition continuing for up to 23 days. However, the experimental group did not reveal a clear pattern for platelet accumulation following subarachnoid hemorrhage. There was no simple correlation between the magnitude of the radioactivity ratios and the time after hemorrhage when the cats were killed although the ratios for 2 hours to 7 days seemed greater than those for 8 to 23 days. Assuming the pivotal role of platelets in the angiopathy of subarachnoid hemorrhage, the administration of antiplatelet agents as soon as possible following its occurrence may be of value.

  3. [Hypobaric metameric subarachnoid anaesthesia for anaesthetic management in vertebral reinforcement techniques. Our experience in 6 cases].

    PubMed

    Cuchillo-Sastriques, J V; Monsma-Muñoz, M; García-Claudio, N; Barberá-Alacreu, M

    2014-01-01

    Vertebral reinforcement techniques, such as percutaneous vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty, are minimally invasive procedures used in the treatment of fractured or collapsed vertebras. The anaesthetic techniques employed during these procedures are diverse and with variable results. We report 6 cases, vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty using subarachnoid metameric anaesthesia with a hypobaric technique. Haemodynamic stability and analgesia were satisfactory in all of them. PMID:23810405

  4. Changes in the metabolism of sphingolipids after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Testai, Fernando D; Xu, Hao-Liang; Kilkus, John; Suryadevara, Vidyani; Gorshkova, Irina; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Pelligrino, Dale A; Dawson, Glyn

    2015-05-01

    We previously described how ceramide (Cer), a mediator of cell death, increases in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients. This study investigates the alterations of biochemical pathways involved in Cer homeostasis in SAH. Cer, dihydroceramide (DHC), sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), and the activities of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase), neutral sphingomyelinase (NSMase), sphingomyelinase synthase (SMS), S1P-lyase, and glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) were determined in the CSF of SAH subjects and in brain homogenate of SAH rats. Compared with controls (n?=?8), SAH patients (n?=?26) had higher ASMase activity (10.0?±?3.5 IF/µl· min vs. 15.0?±?4.6 IF/µl • min; P?=?0.009) and elevated levels of Cer (11.4?±?8.8 pmol/ml vs. 33.3?±?48.3 pmol/ml; P?=?0.001) and DHC (1.3?±?1.1 pmol/ml vs. 3.8?±?3.4 pmol/ml; P?=?0.001) in the CSF. The activities of GCS, NSMase, and SMS in the CSF were undetectable. Brain homogenates from SAH animals had increased ASMase activity (control: 9.7?±?1.2 IF/µg • min; SAH: 16.8?±?1.6 IF/µg • min; P?

  5. Plasma Catecholamine Profile of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Patients with Neurogenic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Moussouttas, Michael; Mearns, Elizabeth; Walters, Arthur; DeCaro, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the connection between sympathetic function and neurogenic cardiomyopathy (NC), and to determine whether NC is mediated primarily by circulating adrenal epinephrine (EPI) or neuronally transmitted norepinephrine (NE), following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods This is a prospective observational investigation of consecutive severe-grade SAH patients. All participants had transthoracic echocardiography and serological assays for catecholamine levels – dopamine (DA), NE and EPI – within 48 h of hemorrhage onset. Clinical and serological independent predictors of NC were determined using multivariate logistic regression analyses, and the accuracy of predictors was assessed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Multivariate linear regression analyses were used to evaluate correlations among the catecholamines. Results The investigation included a total of 94 subjects: the mean age was 55 years, 81% were female and 57% were Caucasian. NC was identified in approximately 10% (9/94) of cases. Univariate analyses revealed associations between NC and worse clinical severity (p = 0.019), plasma DA (p = 0.018) and NE levels (p = 0.024). Plasma NE correlated with DA levels (? = 0.206, p = 0.046) and EPI levels (? = 0.392, p < 0.001), but was predicted only by plasma EPI in bivariate [parameter estimate (PE) = 1.95, p < 0.001] and multivariate (PE = 1.89, p < 0.001) linear regression models. Multivariate logistic regression analyses consistently demonstrated the predictive value of clinical grade for NC (p < 0.05 for all analyses) except in models incorporating plasma NE, where NC was independently predicted by NE level (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.01-1.55) over clinical grade (OR 4.19, 95% CI 0.874-20.1). ROC curves similarly revealed the greater accuracy of plasma NE [area under the curve (AUC) 0.727, 95% CI 0.56-0.90, p = 0.02] over clinical grade (AUC 0.704, 95% CI 0.55-0.86, p = 0.05) for identifying the presence or absence of NC. Conclusions Following SAH, the development of NC is primarily related to elevated plasma NE levels. Findings implicate a predominantly neurogenic process mediated by neuronal NE (and not adrenal EPI), but cannot exclude synergy between the catecholamines. PMID:26120322

  6. Complications of Pathologic Myopia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Bum-Joo; Shin, Joo Young; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2016-01-01

    Pathologic myopia (PM) is one of the leading causes of visual impairment worldwide. The pathophysiology of PM is not fully understood, but the axial elongation of the eye followed by chorioretinal thinning is suggested as a key mechanism. Pathologic myopia may lead to many complications such as chorioretinal atrophy, foveoschisis, choroidal neovascularization, rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, cataract, and glaucoma. Some complications affect visual acuity significantly, showing poor visual prognosis. This article aims to review the types, pathophysiology, treatment, and visual outcome of the complications of PM. PMID:26649982

  7. Severe rectal haemorrhage after treatment for faecal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Taggarshe, Deepa; Visco, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Bulking agent injected submucosally is an alternative effective treatment for faecal incontinence in elderly patients who fail conservative measures. Since most elderly patients are on antiplatelet therapy and are sometimes unaware of their medication, this can lead to serious complications. PMID:25180215

  8. Dose response study of subarachnoid diamorphine for analgesia after elective caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Skilton, R W; Kinsella, S M; Smith, A; Thomas, T A

    1999-10-01

    Subarachnoid diamorphine provides excellent analgesia after elective caesarean section but the optimum dose is still uncertain. We therefore investigated the effects of three regimens of subarachnoid diamorphine. Forty parturients were assigned to one of four groups. A control group received no diamorphine in their subarachnoid bupivacaine and three study groups received 0.1 mg, 0.2 mg or 0.3 mg diamorphine added to 12.5 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% in a semi-blind randomised design study. All women received a 100 mg diclofenac suppository at the end of the caesarean section and were provided with morphine patient controlled analgesia (PCA) postoperatively. The patients were assessed for pain, morphine usage and side-effects at 2, 4, 8 and 24 h after the subarachnoid injection. Postoperative visual analogue scores for pain and PCA morphine consumption were significantly lower, and mean time to first use of morphine was significantly longer in the 0.3 mg diamorphine group. The mean (SD) dose of PCA morphine used over 24 h was 39.4 (14.7), 25.6 (16.5), 21.6 (15.9) and 3.1 (3.6) mg, and mean time to first use of morphine was 1.6 (0.5), 3.0 (1.4), 3.4 (2.4) and 14.1 (9.4) h, in the 0, 0.1 mg, 0.2 mg and 0.3 mg groups respectively. Side-effects of pruritus, nausea and vomiting were dependent on the dose of spinal diamorphine but did not require treatment in any patients. We conclude that 0.3 mg subarachnoid diamorphine provides significantly better postoperative pain relief than the smaller doses with an acceptable increase in side-effects. PMID:15321116

  9. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... friendly Fact Sheet Pertussis Vaccination Pregnancy and Whooping Cough Clinicians Disease Specifics Treatment Clinical Features Clinical Complications ...

  10. Dental Implant Complications.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging. PMID:26589696

  11. Complications of Mumps

    MedlinePLUS

    ... IgM Serology Publications and Resources MMWR Articles Outbreak Articles Related Links World Health Organization Medline Plus Complications of Mumps Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ...

  12. Management of medical complications.

    PubMed

    Dohle, Carolin I; Reding, Michael J

    2011-06-01

    Medical comorbidities and complications are expected following stroke, traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord injury. The neurorehabilitation physician's role is to manage these comorbidities, prevent complications, and serve as a medical and neurologic resource for the patient, family, and neurorehabilitation team. The most common comorbidities are similar to those found in the general population, namely hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and ischemic heart disease. Frequent complications encountered in the neurorehabilitation unit relate to medication side effects, medical comorbidities, and the direct effect of the neurologic injury. They include orthostatic hypotension; syncope or presyncope; cardiac arrhythmia; bowel and bladder dysfunction; seizures; pressure sores; dysphagia-related pneumonia, dehydration, and malnutrition; venous thromboembolism; falls; and sexual dysfunction. This article discusses strategies for managing comorbidities and avoiding complications. PMID:22810865

  13. Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... but some less serious ones occur more frequently. Kidney stones These are probably the most commonly encountered kidney complications of IBD—particularly oxalate stones. Kidney stones are more common in Crohn's patients with disease ...

  14. Pregnancy Complications: Bacterial Vaginosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Global Map Premature birth report card Careers Archives Pregnancy Before or between pregnancies Nutrition, weight & fitness Prenatal ... complications > Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy Now playing: E-mail to a friend Please ...

  15. Complications of shoulder dystocia.

    PubMed

    Dajani, Nafisa K; Magann, Everett F

    2014-06-01

    Complications of shoulder dystocia are divided into fetal and maternal. Fetal brachial plexus injury (BPI) is the most common fetal complication occurring in 4-40% of cases. BPI has also been reported in abdominal deliveries and in deliveries not complicated by shoulder dystocia. Fractures of the fetal humerus and clavicle occur in about 10.6% of cases of shoulder dystocia and usually heal with no sequel. Hypoxic ischemic brain injury is reported in 0.5-23% of cases of shoulder dystocia. The risk correlates with the duration of head-to-body delivery and is especially increased when the duration is >5 min. Fetal death is rare and is reported in 0.4% of cases. Maternal complications of shoulder dystocia include post-partum hemorrhage, vaginal lacerations, anal tears, and uterine rupture. The psychological stress impact of shoulder dystocia is under-recognized and deserves counseling prior to home discharge. PMID:24863025

  16. Intestinal Complications of IBD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... treated with topical creams or sitz baths. MALABSORPTION & MALNUTRITION Another complication in people with Crohn’s disease is ... the gut that absorbs most nutrients. Malabsorption and malnutrition usually do not develop unless the disease is ...

  17. Tetanus: Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the muscles of the jaw, or "lockjaw". Tetanus symptoms include: Headache Jaw cramping Sudden, involuntary muscle ... sweating High blood pressure and fast heart rate Tetanus complications include: Uncontrolled/involuntary muscular contraction of the ...

  18. [Type 2 diabetes complications].

    PubMed

    Schlienger, Jean-Louis

    2013-05-01

    People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many complications, which are mainly due to complex and interconnected mechanisms such as hyperglycemia, insulino-resistance, low-grade inflammation and accelerated atherogenesis. Cardi-cerebrovascular disease are frequently associated to type 2 diabetes and may become life threatening, particularly coronaropathy, stroke and heart failure. Their clinical picture are sometimes atypical and silencious for a long time. Type 2 diabetes must be considered as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Nephropathy is frequent in type 2 diabetes but has a mixed origin. Now it is the highest cause of end-stage renal disease. Better metabolic and blood pressure control and an improved management of microalbuminuria are able to slowdown the course of the disease. Retinopathy which is paradoxically slightly progressive must however be screened and treated in these rather old patients which are globally at high ophthalmologic risk. Diabetic foot is a severe complication secondary to microangiopathy, microangiopathy and neuropathy. It may be considered as a super-complication of several complications. Its screening must be done on a routine basis. Some cancer may be considered as an emerging complication of type 2 diabetes as well as cognitive decline, sleep apnea syndrome, mood disorders and bone metabolism impairments. Most of the type 2 diabetes complications may be prevented by a strategy combining a systematic screening and multi-interventional therapies. PMID:23528336

  19. Hepatic transplantation: postoperative complications.

    PubMed

    Itri, Jason N; Heller, Matthew T; Tublin, Mitchell E

    2013-12-01

    Advances in surgical techniques and immunosuppression have made orthotopic liver transplantation a first-line treatment for many patients with end-stage liver disease. The early detection and treatment of postoperative complications has contributed significantly to improved graft and patient survival with imaging playing a critical role in detection. Complications that can lead to graft failure or patient mortality include vascular abnormalities, biliary abnormalities, allograft rejection, and recurrent or post-transplant malignancy. Vascular abnormalities include stenosis and thrombosis of the hepatic artery, portal vein, and inferior vena cava, as well as hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous fistula, and celiac stenosis. Biliary abnormalities include strictures, bile leak, obstruction, recurrent disease, and infection. While imaging is not used to diagnose allograft rejection, it plays an important role in identifying complications that can mimic rejection. Ultrasound is routinely performed as the initial imaging modality for the detection and follow-up of both early and delayed complications. Cholangiography and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography are used to characterize biliary complications and computed tomography is used to confirm abnormal findings on ultrasound or for the evaluation of postoperative collections. The purpose of this article is to describe and illustrate the imaging appearances and management of complications associated with liver transplantation. PMID:23644931

  20. Arrest of Liver Haemorrhage Secondary to Percutaneous Liver Biopsy of a Haemangioma with Fibrin Glue

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Elijah

    2002-01-01

    Background Haemorrhage resulting from blunt and penetrating injury to the liver remains a difficult therapeutic problem, often resulting in massive intraperitoneal blood loss. Perihepatic liver packing and inflow occlusive techniques in combination with finger fracture exploration of injuries to allow vessel ligation are the mainstays if treatment with normal liver parenchyma. More recently fibrin glue haemostatic agents have been used to arrest traumatic haemorrhage from the liver. We report a case of the use of fibrin glue to arrest the bleeding caused by the percutaneous biopsy of a liver haemangioma. Case Outline A 42 year-old woman underwent percutaneous diagnostic biopsy of a liver lesion and subsequently experienced shock secondary to massive bleeding from the biopsy site. At laparotomy there was massive bleeding from the puncture site of the liver lesion. Control of haemorrhage was obtained by injecting fibrin glue down the biopsy site tract. This manoeuvre resulted in complete arrest of haemorrhage with no adverse effect. Discussion The use of fibrin glue as a haemostatic agent in trauma is an important adjunct to perihepatic liver packing and finger fracture exploration of injuries. It may have exceptional utility in patients with penetrating trauma to the liver by direct intraparenchymal injection. This case illustrates that fibrin glue can be used to arrest bleeding from vascular tumours such as haemangiomas. It may help to minimise bleeding for all percutaneous liver biopsies. PMID:18332950

  1. Computational Intelligence Method for Early Diagnosis Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever Using Fuzzy on Mobile Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Afan; Lina, Yen; Simon, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Mortality from Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (DHF) is still increasing in Indonesia particularly in Jakarta. Diagnosis of the dengue shall be made as early as possible so that first aid can be given in expectation of decreasing death risk. The Study will be conducted by developing expert system based on Computational Intelligence Method. On the first year, study will use the Fuzzy Inference System (FIS) Method to diagnose Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever particularly in Mobile Device consist of smart phone. Expert system application which particularly using fuzzy system can be applied in mobile device and it is useful to make early diagnosis of Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever that produce outcome faster than laboratory test. The evaluation of this application is conducted by performing accuracy test before and after validation using data of patient who has the Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever. This expert system application is easy, convenient, and practical to use, also capable of making the early diagnosis of Dengue Haemorraghic to avoid mortality in the first stage.

  2. Maternal mortality: what can we learn from stories of postpartum haemorrhage?

    PubMed

    Homer, Caroline; Clements, Vanessa; McDonnell, Nolan; Peek, Michael; Sullivan, Elizabeth

    2009-09-01

    Death from pregnancy is rare in developed countries such as Australia but is still common in third world and developing countries. The investigation of each maternal death yields valuable information and lessons that all health care providers involved with the care of women can learn from. The aim of these investigations is to prevent future maternal morbidity and mortality. Obstetric haemorrhage remains a leading cause of maternal death internationally. It is the most common cause of death in developing countries. In Australia and the United Kingdom, obstetric haemorrhage is ranked as the 4th and 3rd most common cause of direct maternal death respectively. In a number of cases there are readily identifiable factors associated with the care that the women received that may have contributed to their death. It is from these identifiable factors that both midwives and doctors can learn to help prevent similar episodes from occurring. This article will identify some of the lessons that can be learnt from the recent Australian and UK maternal death reports. This paper presents an overview of the process and systems for the reporting of maternal death in Australia. It will then specifically focus on obstetric haemorrhage, with a focus on postpartum haemorrhage, for the 12-year period, 1994-2005. Vignettes from the maternal mortality reports in Australia and the United Kingdom are used to highlight the important lessons for providers of maternity care. PMID:19278912

  3. Experimental respiratory Marburg virus haemorrhagic fever infection in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus)

    PubMed Central

    Smither, Sophie J; Nelson, Michelle; Eastaugh, Lin; Laws, Thomas R; Taylor, Christopher; Smith, Simon A; Salguero, Francisco J; Lever, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    Marburg virus causes a highly infectious and lethal haemorrhagic fever in primates and may be exploited as a potential biothreat pathogen. To combat the infection and threat of Marburg haemorrhagic fever, there is a need to develop and license appropriate medical countermeasures. To determine whether the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) would be an appropriate model to assess therapies against Marburg haemorrhagic fever, initial susceptibility, lethality and pathogenesis studies were performed. Low doses of virus, between 4 and 28 TCID50, were sufficient to cause a lethal, reproducible infection. Animals became febrile between days 5 and 6, maintaining a high fever before succumbing to disease between 8 and 11 days postchallenge. Typical signs of Marburg virus infection were observed including haemorrhaging and a transient rash. In pathogenesis studies, virus was isolated from the animals’ lungs from day 3 postchallenge and from the liver, spleen and blood from day 5 postchallenge. Early signs of histopathology were apparent in the kidney and liver from day 3. The most striking features were observed in animals exhibiting severe clinical signs, which included high viral titres in all organs, with the highest levels in the blood, increased levels in liver function enzymes and blood clotting times, decreased levels in platelets, multifocal moderate-to-severe hepatitis and perivascular oedema. PMID:23441639

  4. A Novel Intravital Method to Evaluate Cerebral Vasospasm in Rat Models of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Study with Synchrotron Radiation Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Falei; Chen, Lujia; He, Chuan; Bao, Yuhai; Chen, Zuoquan; Lou, Meiqing; Xia, Weiliang; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Ling, Feng

    2012-01-01

    Precise in vivo evaluation of cerebral vasospasm caused by subarachnoid hemorrhage has remained a critical but unsolved issue in experimental small animal models. In this study, we used synchrotron radiation angiography to study the vasospasm of anterior circulation arteries in two subarachnoid hemorrhage models in rats. Synchrotron radiation angiography, laser Doppler flowmetry-cerebral blood flow measurement, [125I]N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine cerebral blood flow measurement and terminal examinations were applied to evaluate the changes of anterior circulation arteries in two subarachnoid hemorrhage models made by blood injection into cisterna magna and prechiasmatic cistern. Using synchrotron radiation angiography technique, we detected cerebral vasospasm in subarachnoid hemorrhage rats compared to the controls (p<0.05). We also identified two interesting findings: 1) both middle cerebral artery and anterior cerebral artery shrunk the most at day 3 after subarachnoid hemorrhage; 2) the diameter of anterior cerebral artery in the prechiasmatic cistern injection group was smaller than that in the cisterna magna injection group (p<0.05), but not for middle cerebral artery. We concluded that synchrotron radiation angiography provided a novel technique, which could directly evaluate cerebral vasospasm in small animal experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage models. The courses of vasospasm in these two injection models are similar; however, the model produced by prechiasmatic cistern injection is more suitable for study of anterior circulation vasospasm. PMID:22428033

  5. HIV and the Risk of Direct Obstetric Complications: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Calvert, Clara; Ronsmans, Carine

    2013-01-01

    Background Women of reproductive age in parts of sub-Saharan Africa are faced both with high levels of HIV and the threat of dying from the direct complications of pregnancy. Clinicians practicing in such settings have reported a high incidence of direct obstetric complications among HIV-infected women, but the evidence supporting this is unclear. The aim of this systematic review is to establish whether HIV-infected women are at increased risk of direct obstetric complications. Methods and findings Studies comparing the frequency of obstetric haemorrhage, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, dystocia and intrauterine infections in HIV-infected and uninfected women were identified. Summary estimates of the odds ratio (OR) for the association between HIV and each obstetric complication were calculated through meta-analyses. In total, 44 studies were included providing 66 data sets; 17 on haemorrhage, 19 on hypertensive disorders, five on dystocia and 25 on intrauterine infections. Meta-analysis of the OR from studies including vaginal deliveries indicated that HIV-infected women had over three times the risk of a puerperal sepsis compared with HIV-uninfected women [pooled OR: 3.43, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.00–5.85]; this figure increased to nearly six amongst studies only including women who delivered by caesarean (pooled OR: 5.81, 95% CI: 2.42–13.97). For other obstetric complications the evidence was weak and inconsistent. Conclusions The higher risk of intrauterine infections in HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women may require targeted strategies involving the prophylactic use of antibiotics during labour. However, as the huge excess of pregnancy-related mortality in HIV-infected women is unlikely to be due to a higher risk of direct obstetric complications, reducing this mortality will require non obstetric interventions involving access to ART in both pregnant and non-pregnant women. PMID:24124458

  6. Elevated Baseline C-Reactive Protein as a Predictor of Outcome After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Data From the Simvastatin in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage (STASH) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Budohoski, Karol; Smith, Christopher; Hutchinson, Peter J.; Kirkpatrick, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There remains a proportion of patients with unfavorable outcomes after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, of particular relevance in those who present with a good clinical grade. A forewarning of those at risk provides an opportunity towards more intensive monitoring, investigation, and prophylactic treatment prior to the clinical manifestation of advancing cerebral injury. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether biochemical markers sampled in the first days after the initial hemorrhage can predict poor outcome. METHODS: All patients recruited to the multicenter Simvastatin in Aneurysmal Hemorrhage Trial (STASH) were included. Baseline biochemical profiles were taken between time of ictus and day 4 post ictus. The t-test compared outcomes, and a backwards stepwise binary logistic regression was used to determine the factors providing independent prediction of an unfavorable outcome. RESULTS: Baseline biochemical data were obtained in approximately 91% of cases from 803 patients. On admission, 73% of patients were good grade (World Federation of Neurological Surgeons grades 1 or 2); however, 84% had a Fisher grade 3 or 4 on computed tomographic scan. For patients presenting with good grade on admission, higher levels of C-reactive protein, glucose, and white blood cells and lower levels of hematocrit, albumin, and hemoglobin were associated with poor outcome at discharge. C-reactive protein was found to be an independent predictor of outcome for patients presenting in good grade. CONCLUSION: Early recording of C-reactive protein may prove useful in detecting those good grade patients who are at greater risk of clinical deterioration and poor outcome. ABBREVIATIONS: ALP, alkaline phosphatase ALT, alanine aminotransferase CK, creatine kinase CRP, C-reactive protein EVD, external ventricular drainage ICH GCP, International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines for good clinical practice mRS, modified Rankin Scale SAH, subarachnoid hemorrhage STASH, Simvastatin in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Trial WBC, white blood cells WFNS, World Federation of Neurological Surgeons PMID:26280117

  7. Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Lyme Disease - Neurological Complications ... resources from MedlinePlus What are Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease? Lyme disease is caused by a bacterial ...

  8. Anesthetic Complications in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hoefnagel, Amie; Yu, Albert; Kaminski, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Anesthesia complications in the parturient can be divided into 2 categories: those related to airway manipulation and those related to neuraxial anesthesia. Physiologic changes of pregnancy can lead to challenging intubating conditions in a patient at risk of aspiration. Neuraxial techniques are used to provide analgesia for labor and anesthesia for surgical delivery. Therefore, complications associated with neuraxial techniques are often seen in this population. In the event of maternal cardiac arrest, modification to advanced cardiac life support algorithms must be made to accommodate the gravid uterus and to deliver the fetus if return of maternal circulation is not prompt. PMID:26600441

  9. Orthopedic complications in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gehling, Daniel J; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Ebraheim, Nabil A

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with a number of lower extremity orthopedic conditions and complications including fractures, Charcot neuroarthropathy, plantar ulcers, and infection. These complications are of significant clinical concern in terms of morbidity, mortality, and socioeconomic costs. A review of each condition is discussed, with particular emphasis on the clinical importance, diagnostic considerations, and orthopedic treatment recommendations. The goal of the article is to provide a clinical picture of the challenges that orthopedic surgeons confront, and highlight the need for specific clinical guidelines in diabetic patients. PMID:26211990

  10. Orbital Complications of Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Radovani, Pjerin; Vasili, Dritan; Xhelili, Mirela; Dervishi, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Background: Despite the modern antibiotherapies applied in the practice of otorhinolaryngology, the orbital complications of sinusitis are still considered a serious threat to essential functions of the eye, including loss of vision, and at worst, life threatening symptoms. Aims: The goal of this study is to consider and analyse patients who were treated for these complications in the last decade in our hospital, which is the only tertiary hospital in our country. Study Design: Retrospective analysis of cases. Methods: In our practice, cases treated in the hospital are rhinosinusitis cases where surgical intervention is necessary, or those with a suspicion of complications. Between the years 1999 and 2009 there were 177 cases, the clinical charts of which were reviewed. The cases that are omitted from this study are those involving soft tissues, bone, and intracranial complications. The diagnoses were determined based on anamnesis, anterior rhinoscopy, x-rays of the sinuses with the Water’s projection or where there was a suspicion of a complication, and CT scans with coronal and axial projections. In all cases, intensive treatment was initiated with a combination of cefalosporines, aminoglycosides and Proetz manoeuvre. When an improvement in the conditions did not occur within 24–48 hours, we intervened with a surgical procedure, preferably the Lynch-Patterson external frontoethmoidectomy. Results: In our study, we encountered 35 cases (19.8%) of orbital complications with an average age of 25 (range: 3–75); Palpebral inflammatory oedema (15), orbital cellulitis (10), subperiosteal abscess (6), orbital abscess (3), and cavernous sinus thrombosis (1 patient). The average time that patients remained in hospital was 4.6 days; for those with orbital complications this was 7 days. Conclusion: Orbital complications of sinusitis are considered to be severe pathologies. The appearance of oedema in the corner of the eye should be evaluated immediately and the means to exclude acute sinusitis should be taken under serious consideration. Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment are key to the reduction of these unwanted manifestations. PMID:25207092

  11. [The treatment of cerebral aneurysm in elderly patients in the acute period of subarachnoid hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Krylov, V V; Luk'ianchikov, V A

    2008-01-01

    Seven hundreds and forty-nine patients after subarachnoid hemorrhage developed as a result of the rupture of cerebral aneurysm, including 117 (15.6%) people aged 60 years and over (elderly patients) and 632 (83.4%) patients younger than 60 years old, were examined. In these groups severity of a patient's state before the surgery, presence of concomitant pathology, data of instrumental examination, outcome of the surgery were compared. The fatal outcome after the surgery was higher in elderly patients than in younger ones (17.4% versus 12.4%) that might be explained by the greater severity of their state after the development of subarachnoid hemorrhage and higher incidence of hypertensive disease and other concomitant diseases. Clinically significant angiospasm and non-resorptive hydrocephalus were observed in this group most frequently. PMID:19431245

  12. [Case of direct carotid-cavernous fistula presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Asano, Takeshi; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Moriwaki, Takuya; Niiya, Yoshimasa; Mabuchi, Shyouji

    2012-03-01

    We report a case of longstanding asymptomatic direct carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) which caused fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A 91-year-old female with no history of previous head trauma and optic symptoms presented acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. Angiography revealed a left direct carotid-cavernous fistula draining only into the contralateral cavernous sinus with leptomeningeal venous reflux and small varix on the pontine bridging vein. The affected cavernous sinus was markedly dilated and there was no septum between the left cavernous sinus and the internal carotid artery. The patient underwent transvenous coil embolization for intercavernous sinus and leptomeningeal venous reflux was successfully obliterated and opacification of the varix was diminished. The past history of this patient and angiographical findings strongly suggest long standing asymptomatic CCF caused SAH. PMID:22392752

  13. Complicating Visual Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daiello, Vicki; Hathaway, Kevin; Rhoades, Mindi; Walker, Sydney

    2006-01-01

    Arguing for complicating the study of visual culture, as advocated by James Elkins, this article explicates and explores Lacanian psychoanalytic theory and pedagogy in view of its implications for art education practice. Subjectivity, a concept of import for addressing student identity and the visual, steers the discussion informed by pedagogical…

  14. Cardiovascular Complications of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gongora, Maria Carolina; Wenger, Nanette K.

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy causes significant metabolic and hemodynamic changes in a woman’s physiology to allow for fetal growth. The inability to adapt to these changes might result in the development of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (hypertension, preeclampsia or eclampsia), gestational diabetes and preterm birth. Contrary to previous beliefs these complications are not limited to the pregnancy period and may leave permanent vascular and metabolic damage. There is in addition, a direct association between these disorders and increased risk of future cardiovascular disease (CVD, including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, heart failure and stroke) and diabetes mellitus. Despite abundant evidence of this association, women who present with these complications of pregnancy do not receive adequate postpartum follow up and counseling regarding their increased risk of future CVD. The postpartum period in these women represents a unique opportunity to intervene with lifestyle modifications designed to reduce the development of premature cardiovascular complications. In some cases it allows early diagnosis and treatment of chronic hypertension or diabetes mellitus. The awareness of this relationship is growing in the medical community, especially among obstetricians and primary care physicians, who play a pivotal role in detecting these complications and assuring appropriate follow up. PMID:26473833

  15. Neurological Complications of Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Amy A.; Graus, Francesc; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the preferred treatment for an expanding range of neoplastic and nonmalignant conditions. Increasing numbers of solid organ transplantations (SOTs) add an additional population of immunosuppressed patients with multiple potential neurological problems. While the spectrum of neurological complications varies with conditioning procedure and hematopoietic cell or solid organ source, major neurological complications occur with all transplantation procedures. This 2 part review emphasizes a practical consultative approach to central and peripheral nervous system problems related to HCT or SOT with clinical and neuroimaging examples from the authors’ institutional experience with the following conditions: the diversity of manifestations of common infections such as varicella zoster virus, Aspergillus, and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), drug therapy-related complications, stroke mechanisms, the spectrum of graft versus host disease (GVHD), and neurologically important syndromes of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). These complications preferentially occur at specific intervals after HCT and SOT, and neurological consultants must recognize an extensive spectrum of syndromes in order to effect timely diagnosis and expedite appropriate treatment. PMID:23983885

  16. [Subarachnoid anesthesia and peridural anesthesia: which are the causes of total failure? A clinical case].

    PubMed

    Mastroianni, A; Novelli, M T; Belforte, G; Sodano, R; Aiassa, M

    1992-11-01

    The paper reports the case of patient undergoing cystoscopy and subsequently radical cystectomy suffering from BPCO and pulmonary emphysema who received sub-arachnoid anesthesia during the first operation and peridural anesthesia during the second, with total failure both times. The techniques were correctly performed and on both occasions it was necessary to resort to general anesthesia in order to perform the operation. PMID:1294909

  17. Classification of Surgical Complications

    PubMed Central

    Dindo, Daniel; Demartines, Nicolas; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Although quality assessment is gaining increasing attention, there is still no consensus on how to define and grade postoperative complications. This shortcoming hampers comparison of outcome data among different centers and therapies and over time. Patients and Methods: A classification of complications published by one of the authors in 1992 was critically re-evaluated and modified to increase its accuracy and its acceptability in the surgical community. Modifications mainly focused on the manner of reporting life-threatening and permanently disabling complications. The new grading system still mostly relies on the therapy used to treat the complication. The classification was tested in a cohort of 6336 patients who underwent elective general surgery at our institution. The reproducibility and personal judgment of the classification were evaluated through an international survey with 2 questionnaires sent to 10 surgical centers worldwide. Results: The new ranking system significantly correlated with complexity of surgery (P < 0.0001) as well as with the length of the hospital stay (P < 0.0001). A total of 144 surgeons from 10 different centers around the world and at different levels of training returned the survey. Ninety percent of the case presentations were correctly graded. The classification was considered to be simple (92% of the respondents), reproducible (91%), logical (92%), useful (90%), and comprehensive (89%). The answers of both questionnaires were not dependent on the origin of the reply and the level of training of the surgeons. Conclusions: The new complication classification appears reliable and may represent a compelling tool for quality assessment in surgery in all parts of the world. PMID:15273542

  18. Effects of Prophylactic Antiepileptic Drugs on Clinical Outcomes in Patients with a Good Clinical Grade Suffering from Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Seon Jin; Joo, Jin-Yang; Kim, Yong Bae; Hong, Chang-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Objective Routine use of prophylactic antiepileptic drugs (AED) has been debated. We retrospectively evaluated the effects of prophylactic AED on clinical outcomes in patients with a good clinical grade suffering from aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Materials and Methods Between September 2012 and December 2014, 84 patients who met the following criteria were included: (1) presence of a ruptured aneurysm; (2) Hunt-Hess grade 1, 2, or 3; and (3) without seizure presentation. Patients were divided into two groups; the AED group (n = 44) and the no AED group (n = 40). Clinical data and outcomes were compared between the two groups. Results Prophylactic AEDs were used more frequently in patients who underwent microsurgery (84.1%) compared to those who underwent endovascular surgery (15.9%, p < 0.001). Regardless of prophylactic AED use, seizure episodes were not observed during the six-month follow-up period. No statistical difference in clinical outcomes at discharge (p = 0.607) and after six months of follow-up (p = 0.178) were between the two groups. After six months, however, favorable outcomes in the no AED group tended to increase and poor outcomes tended to decrease. Conclusion No difference in the clinical outcomes and systemic complications at discharge and after six months of follow-up was observed between the two groups. However, favorable outcomes in the no AED group showed a slight increase after six months. These findings suggest that discontinuation of the current practice of using prophylactic AED might be recommended in patients with a good clinical grade. PMID:26526008

  19. A Comparative Study of Peripheral Immune Responses to Taenia solium in Individuals with Parenchymal and Subarachnoid Neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Tuero, Iskra; Palma, Sandra; Cabeza, Franco; Saleemi, Sarah; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gonzales, Isidro; Mayta, Holger; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Garcia, Hector H.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Background The ability of Taenia solium to modulate the immune system likely contributes to their longevity in the human host. We tested the hypothesis that the nature of the immune response is related to the location of parasite and clinical manifestations of infection. Methodology Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were obtained from untreated patients with neurocysticercosis (NCC), categorized as having parenchymal or subarachnoid infection by the presence of cysts exclusively within the parenchyma or in subarachnoid spaces of the brain, and from uninfected (control) individuals matched by age and gender to each patient. Using multiplex detection technology, sera from NCC patients and controls and cytokine production by PBMC after T. solium antigen (TsAg) stimulation were assayed for levels of inflammatory and regulatory cytokines. PBMC were phenotyped by flow cytometry ex vivo and following in vitro stimulation with TsAg. Principal Findings Sera from patients with parenchymal NCC demonstrated significantly higher Th1 (IFN-?/IL-12) and Th2 (IL-4/IL-13) cytokine responses and trends towards higher levels of IL-1?/IL-8/IL-5 than those obtained from patients with subarachnoid NCC. Also higher in vitro antigen-driven TNF-? secretion was detected in PBMC supernatants from parenchymal than in subarachnoid NCC. In contrast, there was a significantly higher IL-10 response to TsAg stimulation in patients with subarachnoid NCC compared to parenchymal NCC. Although no differences in regulatory T cells (Tregs) frequencies were found ex vivo, there was a trend towards greater expansion of Tregs upon TsAg stimulation in subarachnoid than in parenchymal NCC when data were normalized for the corresponding controls. Conclusions/Significance T. solium infection of the subarachnoid space is associated with an enhanced regulatory immune response compared to infection in the parenchyma. The resulting anti-inflammatory milieu may represent a parasite strategy to maintain a permissive environment in the host or diminish inflammatory damage from the host immune response in the central nervous system. PMID:26506532

  20. Menses, fertility and pregnancy following the use of balloon tamponade technology in the management of postpartum haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Christos

    2014-06-01

    This manuscript describes five cases of pregnancies and births in women that have previously required the uterine-specific Bakri™ balloon in the management of postpartum haemorrhage. In addition, this manuscript reviews the impact on menses, fertility and subsequent pregnancies as potential surrogate effects on the myometrium and endometrium, when balloon tamponade technology is used as a 'uterine-sparing' second-line approach in the management of postpartum haemorrhage. PMID:24506416

  1. Bereavement and Complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Ghesquiere, Angela; Glickman, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Bereavement is a common experience in adults age 60 and older. Loss of a loved one usually leads to acute grief characterized by yearning and longing, decreased interest in ongoing activities, and frequent thoughts of the deceased. For most, acute grief naturally evolves into a state of integrated grief, where the bereaved is able to reengage with everyday activities and find interest or pleasure. About 7% of bereaved older adults, however, will develop the mental health condition of Complicated Grief (CG). In CG, the movement from acute to integrated grief is derailed, and grief symptoms remain severe and impairing. This article reviews recent publications on the diagnosis of CG, risk factors for the condition, and evidenced-based treatments for CG. Greater attention to complicated grief detection and treatment in older adults is needed. PMID:24068457

  2. Early complications. Chylothorax.

    PubMed

    Vallières, E; Karmy-Jones, R; Wood, D E

    1999-08-01

    Postpneumonectomy chylothorax is a very common but serious complication. Drainage of the pneumonectomy space, metabolic and nutritional support with TPN, and absolute enteral rest may lead to control of the leak. Failure of these measures to obtain a rapid resolution of the chyle losses should be followed by early surgical intervention in most instances in an effort to alleviate the chronic metabolic, nutritional, and immunological consequences of prolonged chyle losses. PMID:10459431

  3. [Respiratory complications after transfusion].

    PubMed

    Bernasinski, M; Mertes, P-M; Carlier, M; Dupont, H; Girard, M; Gette, S; Just, B; Malinovsky, J-M

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory complications of blood transfusion have several possible causes. Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) is often the first mentioned. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), better defined since the consensus conference of Toronto in 2004, is rarely mentioned. French incidence is low. Non-hemolytic febrile reactions, allergies, infections and pulmonary embolism are also reported. The objective of this work was to determine the statistical importance of the different respiratory complications of blood transfusion. This work was conducted retrospectively on transfusion accidents in six health centers in Champagne-Ardenne, reported to Hemovigilance between 2000 and 2009 and having respiratory symptoms. The analysis of data was conducted by an expert committee. Eighty-three cases of respiratory complications are found (316,864 blood products). We have counted 26 TACO, 12 TRALI (only 6 cases were identified in the original investigation of Hemovigilance), 18 non-hemolytic febrile reactions, 16 cases of allergies, 5 transfusions transmitted bacterial infections and 2 pulmonary embolisms. Six new TRALI were diagnosed previously labeled TACO for 2 of them, allergy and infection in 2 other cases and diagnosis considered unknown for the last 2. Our study found an incidence of TRALI 2 times higher than that reported previously. Interpretation of the data by a multidisciplinary committee amended 20% of diagnoses. This study shows the imperfections of our system for reporting accidents of blood transfusion when a single observer analyses the medical records. PMID:24814817

  4. Thrombophilia and Pregnancy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Simcox, Louise E.; Ormesher, Laura; Tower, Clare; Greer, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of strong evidence associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and thrombophilia in pregnancy. These problems include both early (recurrent miscarriage) and late placental vascular-mediated problems (fetal loss, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption and intra-uterine growth restriction). Due to poor quality case-control and cohort study designs, there is often an increase in the relative risk of these complications associated with thrombophilia, particularly recurrent early pregnancy loss, late fetal loss and pre-eclampsia, but the absolute risk remains very small. It appears that low-molecular weight heparin has other benefits on the placental vascular system besides its anticoagulant properties. Its use is in the context of antiphospholipid syndrome and recurrent pregnancy loss and also in women with implantation failure to improve live birth rates. There is currently no role for low-molecular weight heparin to prevent late placental-mediated complications in patients with inherited thrombophilia and this may be due to small patient numbers in the studies involved in summarising the evidence. There is potential for low-molecular weight heparin to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with prior severe vascular complications of pregnancy such as early-onset intra-uterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia but further high quality randomised controlled trials are required to answer this question. PMID:26633369

  5. Safety and efficacy of an inactivated Carbopol-adjuvanted goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus vaccine for domestic geese.

    PubMed

    Gelfi, Jacqueline; Pappalardo, Michael; Claverys, Carine; Peralta, Brigitte; Guerin, Jean-Luc

    2010-04-01

    Haemorrhagic nephritis enteritis of the goose (HNEG) is an epizootic viral disease in domestic geese. The causal agent is a polyomavirus, namely goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus. To help control the disease, an inactivated vaccine was developed, based on viral particles produced in goose kidney cells. Viral material was quantified using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, inactivated with beta-propiolactone and adjuvanted with Carbopol, an acrylic acid polymer. Carbopol proved to be more immunogenic than aluminium hydroxide and was totally safe when administered to young goslings and breeders alike. Carbopol-adjuvanted vaccine induced a high serological response. Moreover, goslings hatched from vaccinated breeders were protected against viral challenge, indicating that maternally-derived neutralizing antibodies (MDA) were efficiently transferred. MDA were still detectable 15 days post-hatch. Clinical trials will be necessary to accurately evaluate a vaccine-based HNEG control strategy under field conditions. PMID:20390545

  6. Successful treatment of bleeding gastro-intestinal angiodysplasia in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia with thalidomide

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Mohamed Aftab; Sami, Sarmad; Babu, Sathish

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by epistaxis, cutaneous telangiectasia and visceral arterio-venous malformations (AVMs). It affects approximately one in 5000 people. Control of sustained and repeated haemorrhages from telangiectasias in the nose and gut in patients who may be transfusion dependent is clinically challenging. After repeated endoscopic coagulations, multiple lesions often recur at other sites of gastro-intestinal tract, where endoscopic therapy or surgical resection is not possible. Hormonal therapy has been employed for more than 50 years but has recently been shown to be ineffective. Thalidomide, with its antiangiogenic mechanism of action, seems to be promising drug as a treatment option where other modalities have been unsuccessful. In this article, the authors discuss a novel treatment of bleeding gastro-intestinal angiodysplasia. PMID:22674103

  7. Laparoscopic Bipolar Coagulation of Hypogastric Artery in Postpartum Haemorrhage: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Panuccio, Enrico; Volpi, Eugenio; Ferrero, Annamaria; Sismondi, Piero

    2011-01-01

    Background. Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is a significant contributor to worldwide maternal morbidity and mortality. When PPH continues despite aggressive medical treatment, early consideration should be given to surgical intervention. Various surgical interventions may be used but conservative interventions are recommended primarily. Case. This case report describes laparoscopic coagulation of hypogastric artery technique in a patient with PPH. Conclusions. Laparoscopic ligature of the hypogastric artery for PPH treatment can be a valid alternative to laparotomy in patients with vaginal delivery. PMID:22567499

  8. Laparoscopic bipolar coagulation of hypogastric artery in postpartum haemorrhage: a case report.

    PubMed

    Panuccio, Enrico; Volpi, Eugenio; Ferrero, Annamaria; Sismondi, Piero

    2011-01-01

    Background. Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is a significant contributor to worldwide maternal morbidity and mortality. When PPH continues despite aggressive medical treatment, early consideration should be given to surgical intervention. Various surgical interventions may be used but conservative interventions are recommended primarily. Case. This case report describes laparoscopic coagulation of hypogastric artery technique in a patient with PPH. Conclusions. Laparoscopic ligature of the hypogastric artery for PPH treatment can be a valid alternative to laparotomy in patients with vaginal delivery. PMID:22567499

  9. Simultaneous intracerebral haemorrhages; which came first, the supra-tentoral or the infra-tentorial one?

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Osama Shukir Muhammed; Rasheed, Ata H; Ahmed, Soran M

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of simultaneous spontaneous non-traumatic hypertensive intracerebral haemorrhages (ICHs) is a rare event that carries a considerable morbidity and mortality. These haematomas constitute 0.7–2% of all hypertensive ICHs. We report a 42-year-old man with ischaemic heart disease who presented with sudden severe pancephalic headache, repeated vomiting and left-sided weakness. His work-up revealed two right-sided ICHs: putamenal and cerebellar. PMID:22766571

  10. Dengue virus and antiplatelet autoantibodies synergistically induce haemorrhage through Nlrp3-inflammasome and Fc?RIII.

    PubMed

    Lien, Te-Sheng; Sun, Der-Shan; Chang, Chia-Ming; Wu, Cheng-Yeu; Dai, Ming-Shen; Chan, Hao; Wu, Wen-Sheng; Su, Shu-Hui; Lin, You-Yen; Chang, Hsin-Hou

    2015-05-01

    Dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) typically occurs during secondary infections with dengue viruses (DENVs). Although it is generally accepted that antibody-dependent enhancement is the primary reason why patients with secondary infection are at an increased risk of developing DHF, a growing body of evidence shows that other mechanisms, such as the elicitation of antiplatelet autoantibodies by DENV nonstructural protein NS1, also play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of DHF. In this study, we developed a "two-hit" model of secondary DENV infection to examine the respective roles of DENV (first hit) and antiplatelet Igs (second hit) on the induction of haemorrhage. Mice were first exposed to DENV and then exposed to antiplatelet or anti-NS1 Igs 24 hours later. The two-hit treatment induced substantial haemorrhage, coagulopathy, and cytokine surge, and additional treatment with antagonists of TNF-?, IL-1, caspase-1, and Fc?RIII ameliorated such effects. In addition, knockout mice lacking the Fc? receptor III, Toll-like receptor 3, and inflammasome components Nlrp3 and caspase-1 exhibited considerably fewer pathological alterations than did wild type controls. These findings may provide new perspectives for developing feasible approaches to treat patients with DHF. PMID:25740324

  11. Update on the Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II): statistical analysis plan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies had suggested that the outcome for patients with spontaneous lobar intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) and no intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) might be improved with early evacuation of the haematoma. The Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II) set out to establish whether a policy of earlier surgical evacuation of the haematoma in selected patients with spontaneous lobar ICH would improve outcome compared to a policy of initial conservative treatment. It is an international, multi-centre, prospective randomised parallel group trial of early surgery in patients with spontaneous lobar ICH. Outcome is measured at six months via a postal questionnaire. Results Recruitment to the study began on 27 November 2006 and closed on 15 August 2012 by which time 601 patients had been recruited. The protocol was published in Trials (http://www.trialsjournal.com/content/12/1/124/). This update presents the analysis plan for the study without reference to the unblinded data. The trial data will not be unblinded until after follow-up is completed in early 2013. The main trial results will be presented in spring 2013 with the aim to publish in a peer-reviewed journal at the same time. Conclusion The data from the trial will provide evidence on the benefits and risks of early surgery in patients with lobar ICH. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN22153967 PMID:23171588

  12. [Infectious complications of lymphedema].

    PubMed

    Vaillant, L; Gironet, N

    2002-06-01

    Erysipelas and lymphangitis are frequent complications of lymphedemas (20 to 30%). The most important risk factor for erysipelas is lymphedema since this is a protein rich edema that contributes to the risk of infection. In case of lymphedema the treatment is the usual consensus treatment for erysipelas. A prophylactic treatment with penicillin is requested as soon as the first recurrence. This prophylactic treatment includes skin care, particularly treatment of injuries and intertrigos. Hyperplastic skin leads to maceration and then mycoses. Physiotherapy does not increase the risk for infection. Moreover an infection needs a complex decongestive physiotherapy which decreases risks of recurrence. PMID:12162204

  13. Complications of Macular Peeling

    PubMed Central

    Asencio-Duran, Mónica; Manzano-Muñoz, Beatriz; Vallejo-García, José Luis; García-Martínez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Macular peeling refers to the surgical technique for the removal of preretinal tissue or the internal limiting membrane (ILM) in the macula for several retinal disorders, ranging from epiretinal membranes (primary or secondary to diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment…) to full-thickness macular holes, macular edema, foveal retinoschisis, and others. The technique has evolved in the last two decades, and the different instrumentations and adjuncts have progressively advanced turning into a safer, easier, and more useful tool for the vitreoretinal surgeon. Here, we describe the main milestones of macular peeling, drawing attention to its associated complications. PMID:26425351

  14. Overweight and pregnancy complications.

    PubMed

    Abrams, B; Parker, J

    1988-01-01

    The association between increased prepregnancy weight for height and seven pregnancy complications was studied in a multi-racial sample of more than 4100 recent deliveries. Body mass indices were calculated and used to classify women as average weight (90-119 percent of ideal or BMI 19.21-25.60), moderately overweight (120-135 percent ideal or BMI 25.61-28.90), and very overweight (greater than 135 percent ideal or BMI greater than 28.91) prior to pregnancy. Compared to women of average weight for height, very overweight women had a higher risk of diabetes, hypertension, pregnancy-induced hypertension and primary cesarean section delivery. Moderately overweight women were also at higher risk than average for diabetes, pregnancy-induced hypertension and primary cesarean deliveries but the relative risks were of a smaller magnitude than for very overweight women. With women of average prepregnancy body mass as reference, moderately elevated, but not significant relative risks were found for perinatal mortality in the very overweight group, for urinary tract infections in both overweight groups, and a decreased risk for anemia was found in the very overweight group. However, post-hoc power analyses indicated that the number of overweight women in the sample did not allow adequate statistical power to detect these small differences in risk. To overcome limitations associated with low statistical power, the results of three recent studies of these outcomes in very overweight pregnant women were combined and summarized using Mantel-Haenzel techniques. This second, larger analysis suggested that very overweight women are at significantly higher risk for all seven outcomes studied. Summary results for moderately overweight women could not be calculated, since only two of the studies had evaluated moderately overweight women separately. These latter results support other findings that both moderate overweight and very overweight are risk factors during pregnancy, with the highest risk occurring in the heaviest group. Although these results indicate that moderate overweight is a risk factor during pregnancy, additional studies are needed to confirm the impact of being 20-35 percent above ideal weight prior to pregnancy. The results of this analysis also imply that since the baseline incidence of many perinatal complications is low, studies relating overweight and pregnancy complications should include large enough samples of overweight women so that there is adequate statistical power to reliably detect differences in complication rates. PMID:3058615

  15. Risk Factors for Intracranial Haemorrhage in Accidents Associated with the Shower or Bathtub

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Thomas C.; Kreher, Jannes; Ricklin, Meret E.; Haider, Dominik G.; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K.

    2015-01-01

    Background There has been little research on bathroom accidents. It is unknown whether the shower or bathtub are connected with special dangers in different age groups or whether there are specific risk factors for adverse outcomes. Methods This cross-sectional analysis included all direct admissions to the Emergency Department at the Inselspital Bern, Switzerland from 1 January 2000 to 28 February 2014 after accidents associated with the bathtub or shower. Time, age, location, mechanism and diagnosis were assessed and special risk factors were examined. Patient groups with and without intracranial bleeding were compared with the Mann-Whitney U test.The association of risk factors with intracranial bleeding was investigated using univariate analysis with Fisher's exact test or logistic regression. The effects of different variables on cerebral bleeding were analysed by multivariate logistic regression. Results Two hundred and eighty (280) patients with accidents associated with the bathtub or shower were included in our study. Two hundred and thirty-five (235) patients suffered direct trauma by hitting an object (83.9%) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) was detected in 28 patients (10%). Eight (8) of the 27 patients with mild traumatic brain injuries (GCS 13–15), (29.6%) exhibited intracranial haemorrhage. All patients with intracranial haemorrhage were older than 48 years and needed in-hospital treatment. Patients with intracranial haemorrhage were significantly older and had higher haemoglobin levels than the control group with TBI but without intracranial bleeding (p<0.05 for both).In univariate analysis, we found that intracranial haemorrhage in patients with TBI was associated with direct trauma in general and with age (both p<0.05), but not with the mechanism of the fall, its location (shower or bathtub) or the gender of the patient. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified only age as a risk factor for cerebral bleeding (p<0.05; OR 1.09 (CI 1.01;1.171)) Conclusion In patients with ED admissions associated with the bathtub or shower direct trauma and age are risk factors for intracranial haemorrhage. Additional effort in prevention should be considered, especially in the elderly. PMID:26513749

  16. Common surgery, uncommon complication

    PubMed Central

    Akdeniz, Hande; Ozer, Kadri; Dikmen, Adile; Kocer, Uger

    2015-01-01

    Ingrown nail surgery is the one of the most common surgeries in outpatient clinics that are generally perfomed in response to patient complaints. Still, making simple observations, taking patient histories and conducting further tests are often neglected by outpatient clinics. Consequently, it is important to be aware if ingrown nail is associated with any underlying diseases that can lead to major complications. In this article, we report on two cases ending in amputation that were performed with Winograd’s partial matrix excision procedure for ingrown nails. Such a complication is rare, unexpected, and most unwanted in forefoot surgery. After a detailed analysis of the situation, we discovered that both patients were smokers, and one of them had Buerger’s disease. These conditions led to the ingrown nails in addition to poor wound healing. This case report emphasizes the fact that even when performing minor procedures, obtaining a detailed history and conducting an examination are of paramount importance. Patient selection is also a considerable factor, especially for patients who are smokers, who may experience a worst case surgical scenario. PMID:26693080

  17. Common surgery, uncommon complication.

    PubMed

    Akdeniz, Hande; Ozer, Kadri; Dikmen, Adile; Kocer, Uger

    2015-10-01

    Ingrown nail surgery is the one of the most common surgeries in outpatient clinics that are generally perfomed in response to patient complaints. Still, making simple observations, taking patient histories and conducting further tests are often neglected by outpatient clinics. Consequently, it is important to be aware if ingrown nail is associated with any underlying diseases that can lead to major complications. In this article, we report on two cases ending in amputation that were performed with Winograd's partial matrix excision procedure for ingrown nails. Such a complication is rare, unexpected, and most unwanted in forefoot surgery. After a detailed analysis of the situation, we discovered that both patients were smokers, and one of them had Buerger's disease. These conditions led to the ingrown nails in addition to poor wound healing. This case report emphasizes the fact that even when performing minor procedures, obtaining a detailed history and conducting an examination are of paramount importance. Patient selection is also a considerable factor, especially for patients who are smokers, who may experience a worst case surgical scenario. PMID:26693080

  18. Long term complications of diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... much you need. DO NOT smoke. Smoking makes diabetes complications worse. If you do smoke, work with your ... Brownlee M, Aiello LP, Cooper ME, et al. Complications of diabetes mellitus. In: Mehmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg ...

  19. Septic arthritis: a unique complication of nasal septal abscess.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Steven M; Koch, Cody A; Ekbom, Dale C

    2015-03-01

    Nasal septal abscesses (NSAs) occur between the mucoperichondrium and the nasal septum. They most often arise when an untreated septal hematoma becomes infected. The most commonly reported sequela is a loss of septal cartilage support, which can result in a nasal deformity. Other sequelae include potentially life-threatening conditions such as meningitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, brain abscess, and subarachnoid empyema. We report the case of a 17-year-old boy who developed an NSA after he had been struck in the face with a basketball. He presented to his primary care physician 5 days after the injury and again the next day, but his condition was not correctly diagnosed. Finally, 7 days after his injury, he presented to an emergency department with more serious symptoms, and he was correctly diagnosed with NSA. He was admitted to the intensive care unit, and he remained hospitalized for 6 days. Among the abscess sequelae he experienced was septic arthritis, which has heretofore not been reported as a complication of NSA. He responded well to appropriate treatment, although he lost a considerable amount of septal cartilage. He was discharged home on intravenous antibiotic therapy, and his condition improved. Reconstruction of the nasal septum will likely need to be pursued in the future. PMID:25738728

  20. Relevance of 3D magnetic resonance imaging sequences in diagnosing basal subarachnoid neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Carrillo Mezo, Roger; Lara García, Javier; Arroyo, Mariana; Fleury, Agnès

    2015-12-01

    Imagenological diagnosis of subarachnoid neurocysticercosis is usually difficult when classical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences are used. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the advantages of 3D MRI sequences (Fast Imaging Employing Steady-state Acquisition (FIESTA) and Spoiled Gradient Recalled Echo (SPGR)) with respect to classical sequences (Fluid Attenuation Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) and T1) in visualizing Taenia solium cyst in these locations. Forty-seven T. solium cysts located in the basal cisterns of the subarachnoid space were diagnosed in eighteen Mexican patients. A pre-treatment MRI was performed on all patients, and all four sequences (FIESTA, FLAIR, T1 SPGR, and T2) were evaluated independently by two neuroradiologists. The sensitivity of each sequence to detect the parasite membrane and scolex was evaluated, along with its capacity to detect differences in signal intensity between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and cysts. FIESTA sequences allowed the visualization of cyst membrane in 87.2% of the parasites evaluated, FLAIR in 38.3%, SPGR in 23.4%, and T2 in 17.0%. The superiority of FIESTA sequences over the other three imaging methods was statistically significant (P<0.001). Scolices were detected by FIESTA twice as much as the other sequences did, although this difference was not significant (P>0.05). Differences in signal intensity between CSF and parasite cysts were significant in FIESTA (P<0.0001), SPGR (P<0.0001), and FLAIR (P=0.005) sequences. For the first time, the usefulness of 3D MRI sequences to diagnose T. solium cysts located in the basal cisterns of the subarachnoid space was demonstrated. The routine use of these sequences could favor an earlier diagnosis and greatly improve the prognosis of patients affected by this severe form of the disease. PMID:26327445

  1. Idiopathic Spinal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Moore, Justin M; Jithoo, Rondhir; Hwang, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Study Design?Case report. Objective?Spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SSAH) makes up less than 1.5% of all the cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Most cases of spontaneous SSAH occur in association with coagulopathy, lumbar punctures, or minor trauma. Idiopathic SSAH is extremely rare with only 17 cases published. Idiopathic SSAH presents a diagnostic dilemma, and the appropriate investigations and treatment remain a matter of controversy. We report a case of idiopathic SSAH and a review of the literature regarding its clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment. Methods?A 73-year-old woman presented to the emergency department after spontaneously developing severe right leg and lower back pain while bending over to vomit. After a review of the patient's history and examination, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the thoracolumbar spine revealed T1 hyperintensity and T2 hypointensity, a diffusion-restricted collection at the T11-T12 level, and a posterior collection from L3 to S1 producing a mild displacement of the thecal sac. Results?The patient was taken for an L5 laminectomy. Intraoperatively, rust-colored, xanthochromic fluid was drained from the subarachnoid space, confirming SSAH. The thecal sac was decompressed. The cultures and Gram stains were negative. Computer tomography (CT) and CT angiography of the brain were normal. She recovered postoperatively with resolution of the pain and no further episodes of hemorrhage after 2 years of follow-up. Repeat thoracolumbar MRI, selective spinal angiogram, and six-vessel cerebral angiogram did not reveal pathology. Conclusion?We suggest a clinical algorithm to aid in the diagnosis and management of such patients. PMID:26430603

  2. The Contribution of Chemoreceptor-Network Injury to the Development of Respiratory Arrest Following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Mehmet Dumlu; Eroglu, Atilla; Turkyilmaz, Atila; Erdem, Ali Fuat; Al?c?, Hac? Ahmet; Aydin, Nazan; Altas, Sare; Unal, Bunyami

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Respiratory arrest following brainstem herniation has been attributed to injuries resulting from compression of the respiratory centers. While it is widely perceived that the chemoreceptor network, consisting of the glossopharyngeal nerve and carotid body (GPN-CB), is essential for the modulation of respiration, its contribution to the development of respiratory arrest has not been investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether injury to the GPN-CB occurs in animals with respiratory arrest caused by experimentally-induced subarachnoid hemorrhage. Materials and Methods: Eighteen hybrid rabbits were used in this study. Four rabbits (n=4) were used to determine the normal structure of the GPN-CB. The remaining rabbits (n=14) received an autologous blood injection into the cisterna magna to produce a subarachnoid hemorrhage, after which they were observed for 20 days. The number of axons and the neuron density in the glossopharyngeal nerve and carotid body, respectively, were counted by stereological methods. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to analyze the results. Results: Six of 14 rabbits died within the first week, likely due to brain swelling and crushing injuries that were observed in the brain stem and related structures. In control rabbits, the average neuronal density of the carotid body was 4250 ±1250/mm3, while the axonal density in the glossopharyngeal nerve was 18000±5100 mm2. Conversely, in the dead rabbits, the degenerated neuron density of the carotid body was 2100±500/mm3, while the degenerated axon density in the glossopharyngeal nerve was 8500±2550 mm2. In addition, histopathological lesions were more severe in the dead rabbits in terms of their glossopharyngeal nerve and carotid body. Conclusion: There is an important relationship between neurodegeneration in the GPN-CB and mortality rates following experimentally-induced hemorrhage. This relationship suggests that injury to the GPN-CB network disrupts the breathing reflex and results in respiratory arrest following a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). PMID:25610122

  3. Ocular Ultrasound as an Easy Applicable Tool for Detection of Terson's Syndrome after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Knospe, Volker; Richard, Gisbert; Vettorazzi, Eik; Wagenfeld, Lars; Westphal, Manfred; Regelsberger, Jan; Skevas, Christos

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Intraocular hemorrhage in patients suffering from aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is known as Terson's syndrome and is an underestimated but common pathology. We therefore designed a prospective single-blinded study to evaluate the validity of ocular ultrasound compared to the gold standard indirect funduscopy in the diagnosis of Terson's syndrome. Material and Methods Fifty-two patients (104 eyes in total) suffering from aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage were enrolled in this study. Two investigators independently performed a single-blinded ocular ultrasound using a standard intensive care ultrasound system to detect an intraocular hemorrhage. Indirect funduscopy following iatrogenic mydriasis served as the gold standard for confirmation or exclusion of an intraocular hemorrhage. Statistical analyses were performed to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity, positive and negative predictive values of the method as well as the learning curve of ocular ultrasound. Results Indirect funduscopy detected Terson's syndrome in 11 of 52 (21.2%) respectively in 21 of 104 (20.2%) eyes in patients suffering from subarachnoid hemorrhage. Sensitivity and specificity increased with the number of ocular ultrasound examinations for both investigators, reaching 81.8% and 100% respectively. Positive and negative predictive values were different for both investigators (63.6% vs. 100% positive and 100% vs. 95.7% negative) but were both correlated to the amount of intraocular hemorrhage. A low Glasgow Coma scale (p?=?0.015) and high Hunt & Hess grade (p?=?0.003) was associated with a higher rate of Terson's syndrome. Conclusions Ocular ultrasound using standard ultrasound equipment has been confirmed as a reliable, easy-to-handle bedside screening tool for detecting Terson's syndrome. Nevertheless funduscopy remains the gold standard to detect Terson's syndrome. PMID:25502695

  4. Spontaneous nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage without cerebrovascular malformations in a maintenance hemodialysis patient

    PubMed Central

    Jayasurya, R.; Murugesan, N.; Kumar, R.; Dubey, A. K.; Priyamvada, P. S.; Swaminathan, R. P.; Parameswaran, S.

    2015-01-01

    Nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in a dialysis patient is an uncommon occurrence and is often associated with high mortality. We report for the first time in India, a case of spontaneous nontraumatic, nonaneurysmal SAH without any cerebrovascular malformation in a maintenance hemodialysis patient, following a session of hemodialysis. The dialysis prescription needs to be modified in these patients, in order to prevent worsening of cerebral edema and progression of hemorrhage. Where available, continuous forms of renal replacement therapies, with regional anticoagulation seem to be the best option for such patients, till neurologic stabilization is achieved.

  5. Early timing of endovascular treatment for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage achieves improved outcomes.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zenghui; Peng, Tangming; Liu, Aihua; Li, Youxiang; Jiang, Chuhan; Yang, Hongchao; Wu, Jing; Kang, Huibin; Wu, Zhongxue

    2014-02-01

    Timing of treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage has been controversial. This retrospective study was designed to access the safety and efficacy among cohorts of different timing of endovascular treatment patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A database of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage was analyzed who were confirmed by CT, and underwent endovascular treatment between January 2005 and January 2012,. The patients were grouped into four cohorts according to the timing of treatment: ultra-early cohort (within 24 hours of onset which was confirmed by CT), early cohort (between 24 and 72 hours of onset which was confirmed by CT), intermediate cohort (between 4 and 10 days of onset which was confirmed by CT) and delayed cohort (after 11 days of onset which was confirmed by CT). Patient demographics, aneurysms features and clinical outcomes were analyzed to evaluate safety and efficacy for timing of endovascular treatment among four cohorts. In our series of 664 patients, 269 patients were grouped into ultra-early cohort, 62 patients in early cohort, 218 patients in intermediate cohort, and 115 patients in delayed cohort. The patient demographics, aneurysm characteristics and neurological conditions on admission among groups showed no statistical significance. As a result of the 9-month follow-up with 513 patients, good outcome (mRS<2) was achieved in 78% patients in "ultra-early" cohort compared with that of 57% in the "intermediate" group(p=0.000), whereas other comparisons showed no statistical significance(p<0.05) among the four groups. Dividing the patients with dichotomized mRS into "good outcome" group and "poor outcome" group (mRS<2) at the 9-month follow-up, the results showed lower Hunt-Hess scores (p=0.000) and smaller size of aneurysms (p=.001) which were correlated with the good outcome. Hypertension (p=0.776), age (p=0.327), sex (p=0.551) and location (p=0.901) showed no statistical significance between groups. Endovascular treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage which was confirmed by CT within 72 hours achieved better outcomes than that confirmed after 72 hours, especially in those patients treated within 24 hours of onset in comparison with patients treated between 4 and 10 days. PMID:24320010

  6. Complicated bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ashwin; Martin, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    Common bile duct stones (CBDSs) are solid deposits that can either form within the gallbladder or migrate to the common bile duct (CBD), or form de novo in the biliary tree. In the USA around 15% of the population have gallstones and of these, 3% present with symptoms annually. Because of this, there have been major advancements in the management of gallstones and related conditions. Management is based on the patient's risk profile; young and healthy patients are likely to be recommended for surgery and elderly patients with comorbidities are usually recommended for endoscopic procedures. Imaging of gallstones has advanced in the last 30?years with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography evolving from a diagnostic to a therapeutic procedure in removing CBDSs. We present a complicated case of a patient with a CBDS and periampullary diverticulum and discuss the techniques used to diagnose and remove the stone from the biliary system. PMID:23946532

  7. Ocular complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sayin, Nihat; Kara, Necip; Pekel, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a important health problem that induces ernestful complications and it causes significant morbidity owing to specific microvascular complications such as, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as, ischaemic heart disease, and peripheral vasculopathy. It can affect children, young people and adults and is becoming more common. Ocular complications associated with DM are progressive and rapidly becoming the world’s most significant cause of morbidity and are preventable with early detection and timely treatment. This review provides an overview of five main ocular complications associated with DM, diabetic retinopathy and papillopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and ocular surface diseases. PMID:25685281

  8. Stent-Grafts in the Management of Hemorrhagic Complications Related to Hemostatic Closure Devices: Report of Two Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Giansante Abud, Daniel; Mounayer, Charbel; Saint-Maurice, Jean Pierre; Salles Rezende, Marco Tulio; Houdart, Emmanuel; Moret, Jacques

    2007-02-15

    We report 2 cases of hemorrhagic complications related to use of the Angio-Seal hemostatic closure device that were successfully managed with stent-grafts. Two patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage were referred to our departments for endovascular treatment of ruptured intracranial aneurysms. The treatment was performed through a femoral access; the sheaths were removed immediately after the procedures, and the punctures sites closed by Angio-Seals. Both patients presented clinical signs of hypovolemic shock after treatment. The diagnosis of active bleeding through the puncture site was made by emergency digital subtraction angiography. The lesions were managed with stent-grafts. The use of stent-grafts proved to be efficient in the management of these life-threatening hemorrhagic complications following the use of the Angio-Seal hemostatic closure device.

  9. A global compendium of human Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus occurrence.

    PubMed

    Messina, Jane P; Pigott, David M; Duda, Kirsten A; Brownstein, John S; Myers, Monica F; George, Dylan B; Hay, Simon I

    2015-01-01

    In order to map global disease risk, a geographic database of human Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) occurrence was produced by surveying peer-reviewed literature and case reports, as well as informal online sources. Here we present this database, comprising occurrence data linked to geographic point or polygon locations dating from 1953 to 2013. We fully describe all data collection, geo-positioning, database management and quality-control procedures. This is the most comprehensive database of confirmed CCHF occurrence in humans to-date, containing 1,721 geo-positioned occurrences in total. PMID:25977820

  10. Viral haemorrhagic fever in Sweden: experiences from management of a case.

    PubMed

    Foberg, U; Frydén, A; Isaksson, B; Jahrling, P; Johnson, A; McKee, K; Niklasson, B; Normann, B; Peters, C; Bengtsson, M

    1991-01-01

    The first recognized case in Scandinavia with potential man to man transmission of viral haemorrhagic fever occurred in Linköping, Sweden, in January 1990. Following a visit to Kenya a 21-year-old male student suffered a very severe illness including extremely prolonged high grade fever, rash, disseminated intravascular coagulation with thrombocytopenia and severe bleedings. This necessitated one month of intensive care support including respirator treatment. The patient was discharged after 2 1/2 months in good condition, with a partial femoral nerve paresis. About 100 medical personnel were exposed to aerosol or blood before a strict containment regimen was established. No secondary cases occurred. PMID:1853161

  11. Complications of radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dalinka, M.K.; Mazzeo, V.P. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The skeletal effects of radiation are dependent upon many variables, but the pathologic features are consistent. Radiation may cause immediate or delayed cell death, cellular injury with recovery, arrest of cellular division, or abnormal repair with neoplasia. Radiation necrosis and radiation-induced neoplasm still occur despite the use of supervoltage therapy. Complications of radiotherapy are well known and have led to more judicious use of this therapeutic modality. With few exceptions, benign bone tumors are no longer treated with irradiation. Radiation necrosis may be difficult to differentiate from sarcoma arising in irradiated bone. They both occur within the field of irradiation. Radiation necrosis often has a long latent period which is, of course, the rule in radiation-induced neoplasia. A soft tissue mass favors the diagnosis of neoplasia, while its absence suggests radiation necrosis. Lack of pain favors necrosis. Calcification may occur in radiation necrosis and does not indicate neoplasia. A lack of progression on serial roentgenograms also favors radiation necrosis. 76 references.

  12. Subpial Hematoma and Extravasation in the Interhemispheric Fissure with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kazufumi; Matsuoka, Go; Abe, Kayoko; Okada, Yoshikazu; Sakai, Shuji

    2015-06-01

    A recent report on computed tomography (CT) findings of contrast extravasation in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with Sylvian hematoma suggests that the occurrence of the hematoma is secondary to bleeding in the subpial space. Our patient was in his sixties and was admitted to the hospital because of loss of consciousness (Glasgow Coma Scale E4V1M4). SAH was diagnosed in plain head CT, and growing hematomas were observed in the Sylvian and interhemispheric fissures following a subarachnoid hemorrhage. CT angiography (CTA) using a dual-phase scan protocol revealed contrast extravasation in both the fissures in the latter phase, and hematoma in the interhemispheric fissure contained multiple bleeding points. This case indicates that the occurrence of subpial hematoma such as Sylvian hematoma can be a secondary event following subpial bleeding from damaged small vessels elsewhere in the cranium. Instead of four-dimensional (4D) CT, the dual-phase CTA technique may help detect minor extravasations with usual helical CT scanner. PMID:25963159

  13. Successfully Treated Isolated Posterior Spinal Artery Aneurysm Causing Intracranial Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Horio, Yoshinobu; Katsuta, Toshiro; Samura, Kazuhiro; Wakuta, Naoki; Fukuda, Kenji; Higashi, Toshio; Inoue, Tooru

    2015-12-15

    There are very few published reports of rupture of an isolated posterior spinal artery (PSA) aneurysm, and consequently the optimal therapeutic strategy is debatable. An 84-year-old man presented with sudden onset of restlessness and disorientation. Neuroradiological imaging showed an intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with no visible intracranial vascular lesion. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detected a localized subarachnoid hematoma at Th10-11. Both contrast-enhanced spinal computed tomography and enhanced MRI and magnetic resonance angiography revealed an area of enhancement within the hematoma. Superselective angiography of the left Th12 intercostal artery demonstrated a faintly enhanced spot in the venous phase. Thirteen days after the onset of symptoms, a small fusiform aneurysm situated on the radiculopial artery was resected. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful and he was eventually discharged in an ambulatory condition. To our knowledge, this 84-year-old man is the oldest reported case of surgical management of a ruptured isolated PSA aneurysm. This case illustrates both the validity and efficacy of this therapeutic approach. PMID:26522607

  14. A fatal accidental subarachnoid injection of lidocaine and levobupivacaine during a lumbar paravertebral block.

    PubMed

    Busardò, Francesco Paolo; Tritapepe, Luigi; Montana, Angelo; Indorato, Francesca; Zaami, Simona; Romano, Guido

    2015-11-01

    Paravertebral block (PVB) is the technique of injecting a local anesthetic solution alongside the vertebral column, close to where the spinal nerves emerge, resulting in unilateral somatic and sympathetic nerve blockade. Here is reported a fatal case involving a 60-year-old woman with spondylitis arthropathy, who developed cardiac and respiratory arrest 40min after receiving an accidental subarachnoid injection (L5-S1 bilaterally) of depomedrol lidocaine and levobupivacaine. A complete autopsy including histological and toxicological analyses was performed in order to establish the cause of death. Liquid/liquid extraction (LLE) and GC-MS analysis were performed according to a previously published method. Lidocaine and bupivacaine were detected both in blood, at concentrations of 14.8mg/L and 13.3mg/L respectively, and in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at concentrations of 287.1mg/L and 464.2mg/L respectively. Both lidocaine and bupivacaine were also detected in the urine. The toxicological findings along with the autopsy allowed us to establish that the accidental subarachnoid injection of lidocaine and levobupivacaine had led to a progressive hypotension and normovolaemic shock caused by a severe ganglionic block, determining the patient's death. PMID:26332046

  15. Does carbetocin for prevention of postpartum haemorrhage at caesarean section provide clinical or financial benefit compared with oxytocin?

    PubMed

    Higgins, L; Mechery, J; Tomlinson, A J

    2011-11-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage is a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. A recent Cochrane review of carbetocin (long-acting oxytocin analogue) concluded that its use decreased additional uterotonic requirements, however, no included studies compared its use against intravenous bolus oxytocin. The majority of studies of carbetocin have considered its use in vaginal delivery; no studies have examined the economic implications of its use. This study describes a clinical and financial evaluation undertaken at a United Kingdom District General Hospital surrounding the introduction of carbetocin for prophylaxis against postpartum haemorrhage at caesarean deliveries. A range of clinical outcomes were observed including frequency of postpartum haemorrhage, estimated blood loss, transfusion requirements, change in haemoglobin or haemodynamics, use of additional uterotonics and perioperative recovery. Finally, a composite financial analysis was performed. No clinically significant benefit was found, however associated costs increased by £18.52/patient. PMID:22085065

  16. Immunohistochemical detection of IgM and IgG in lung tissue of dogs with leptospiral pulmonary haemorrhage syndrome (LPHS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leptospiral pulmonary haemorrhage syndrome (LPHS) is a severe form of leptospirosis. Pathogenic mechanisms are poorly understood. Lung tissues from 26 dogs with LPHS, 5 dogs with pulmonary haemorrhage due to other causes and 6 healthy lungs were labelled for IgG, IgM and leptospiral antigens. Three ...

  17. [Prognostic factors of pregnancy and delivery complications in Senegalese adolescents and their newborn].

    PubMed

    Dia, A T; Diallo, I; Guillemin, F; Deschamps, J P

    2001-01-01

    Developing countries exhibit the highest adolescent fertility rate in the world. Undesirable outcome frequency during adolescents' pregnancy and delivery is debated. The aim of this study is to determine the incidence of these events and the factors predicting their occurrence among pregnant Senegalese adolescents and their newborn. The study was conducted between August 1st, 1999 and July 31st, 2000 in a national sample of 435 women attending prenatal clinics after a 20-week gestation. The data were collected by interviews: sociodemographic characteristics, obstetrical antecedents, current pregnancy history before inclusion in the study; the clinical characteristics were determined at inclusion. Then pregnancy and delivery complication occurrences were observed for mothers and their newborn during follow-up. Logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the factors associated with each complication, controlling the effects of other sociodemographic and clinical factors. The most frequent pregnancy complications were pregnancy-induced hypertension and toxaemia (17.5%). Anemia occurred in 25% of the women. At delivery, at least one of dystocia, eclampsia, or placenta haemorrhage complications occurred in 46% of women. The caesarian rate was 20% and the mortality rate was 71%. When planned, caesarian interventions lowered mortality. Forty percent of the newborns presented a neonatal distress while 17.9% of them weighed less than 2,500 g. The pregnancy-induced hypertension and toxaemia incidence rates were higher when the weight at onset of pregnancy was unknown (OR = 3.7 [1.9-7.5] for hypertension and 3.1 [1.3-7.6] for toxaemia). When a woman with a narrow pelvis was less than 1.50 m tall, the delivery was more frequently assisted by forceps and extracting action in breech delivery. Dystocia, eclampsia, placenta haemorrhage and premature delivery were associated with high mortality. Overall, complications were not more frequent in the youngest (16 years and below), as suggested in previous studies. Those results suggest that undesirable events occur frequently during adolescents' pregnancy and delivery, and in their newborn, while attendance in prenatal clinics is adequate. The prognostic factors of these complications are identified. These complications can be avoided by improving ante- and perinatal care quality. PMID:11861197

  18. Sequencing and phylogenetic characterisation of a fatal Crimean - Congo haemorrhagic fever case imported into the United Kingdom, October 2012.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, B; Latham, J; Chamberlain, J; Logue, C; O'Donoghue, L; Osborne, J; Carson, G; Brooks, T; Carroll, M; Jacobs, M; Hopkins, S; Hewson, R

    2012-01-01

    A patient with fever, and haemorrhagic symptoms was admitted to a hospital in Glasgow on 2 October 2012. Since he had returned from Afghanistan, serum samples were sent for diagnosis at the Rare and Imported Pathogens Laboratory, where a real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR diagnosis of Crimean – Congo haemorrhagic fever was made within 3 hrs after receipt of the sample. Hereafter the patient was transferred to a high-security infectious diseases unit in London but died on 6 October. PMID:23218389

  19. [Medical complications of extracorporeal lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Legrand, F; Idrissi Kaitouni, M; Roumeguère, T

    2013-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is one of the most frequently applied procedures for the treatment of urolithiasis. ESWL breaks and splits stones by the means of repeated acoustic shock waves. Despite its non invasive nature, ESWL has been intuitively associated with potential complications, mostly related to residual stone fragments. While non stone-related complications are rare (< 1 %), awareness and identification of these complications could help clinicians to prevent and manage them safely and effectively. The current study reviews the pathophysiology, predicting factors and possible preventive measures of non stone-related medical complications after ESWL. PMID:23951856

  20. Blood, sweat and tears: androgenic-anabolic steroid misuse and recurrent primary post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Fox, Richard; Varadharajan, Kiran; Patel, Bhavesh; Beegun, Issa

    2014-01-01

    A 30-year-old male body builder and androgenic-anabolic steroid and insulin abuser was admitted for day case elective tonsillectomy (bipolar). He returned with primary post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage 18 h after the operation and required bipolar cautery to the multiple small bleeding points in the right and left tonsillar fossa. Thorough coagulation screen was normal. Recurrent primary haemorrhage occurred 3 h post-operatively requiring immediate surgical intervention, removal of the inferior poles, precautionary throat packs, intubation and observation on the intensive treatment unit (ITU). Re-examination in theatre revealed a bleeding left superior pole that was under-run to achieve haemostasis and the patient returned to ITU. Hypertensive episodes were noted in the emergency department and intraoperatively including one recording >200 mm Hg. Haemostasis was eventually achieved once the blood pressure was adequately controlled. A slow wean of steroids was also instigated and the patient was managed on a surgical ward for 2 weeks post-tonsillectomy. PMID:25398921

  1. Epidemic outbreak of acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis caused by coxsackievirus A24 in Thailand, 2014.

    PubMed

    Chansaenroj, J; Vongpunsawad, S; Puenpa, J; Theamboonlers, A; Vuthitanachot, V; Chattakul, P; Areechokchai, D; Poovorawan, Y

    2015-10-01

    Acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis outbreaks are often attributed to viral infection. In 2014, an unprecedented nationwide outbreak of infectious conjunctivitis occurred in Thailand, which affected >300 000 individuals over 3 months. To identify and characterize the virus responsible for the epidemic, eye swab specimens from 119 patients were randomly collected from five different provinces. Conserved regions in the enteroviral 5'-UTR and adenovirus hexon gene were analysed. Enterovirus was identified in 71·43% (85/119) of the samples, while no adenovirus was detected. From enterovirus-positive samples, the coxsackievirus A24 variant (70·59%, 84/119) and echovirus (0·84%, 1/119) were identified. Additional sequencing of full-length VP1 and 3C genes and subsequent phylogenetic analysis revealed that these clinical isolates form a new lineage cluster related to genotype IV-C5. In summary, the coxsackievirus A24 variant was identified as an aetiological agent for the recent acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis outbreak in Thailand. PMID:25824006

  2. Resilience to orthostasis and haemorrhage: A pilot study of common genetic and conditioning mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Davydov, Dmitry M.; Zhdanov, Renad I.; Dvoenosov, Vladimir G.; Kravtsova, Olga A.; Voronina, Elena N.; Filipenko, Maxim L.

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge presently is not only to identify the genetic polymorphisms increasing risk to diseases, but to also find out factors and mechanisms, which can counteract a risk genotype by developing a resilient phenotype. The objective of this study was to examine acquired and innate vagal mechanisms that protect against physical challenges and haemorrhages in 19 athletes and 61 non-athletes. These include examining change in heart rate variability (HF-HRV; an indicator of vagus activity) in response to orthostatic challenge, platelet count (PLT), mean platelet volume (MPV), and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes that encode several coagulation factors, PAI-1, and MTHFR. Individual differences in PLT and MPV were significant predictors, with opposite effects, of the profiles of the HF-HRV changes in response to orthostasis. Regular physical training of athletes indirectly (through MPV) modifies the genetic predisposing effects of some haemostatic factors (PAI-1 and MTHFR) on vagal tone and reactivity. Individual differences in vagal tone were also associated with relationships between Factor 12 C46T and Factor 11 C22771T genes polymorphisms. This study showed that genetic predispositions for coagulation are modifiable. Its potential significance is promoting advanced protection against haemorrhages in a variety of traumas and injuries, especially in individuals with coagulation deficits. PMID:26024428

  3. Role of platelet-activating factor antagonism in haemorrhagic shock in pigs.

    PubMed

    Abu-Zidan, F M; Walther, S; Lennquist, S

    1995-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the role of platelet-activating factor (PAF) antagonism in haemorrhagic shock in juvenile pigs. The animals were bled to a mean arterial pressure of 30 mm Hg which was maintained for 30 min, then they were resuscitated using normal saline 50 ml/kg. Seven pigs received BB-882 (a potent novel PAF antagonist) 1 mg/kg as bolus during resuscitation followed by continuous infusion of 1 mg/kg/h. Seven pigs received only vehicle. The group treated with BB-882 had significantly higher central venous pressure, mean pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. The mean arterial pressure and cardiac output were similar in the two groups, while the systemic vascular resistance was significantly reduced by the drug. The BB-882 group had significantly more tachycardia and less arterial pH. Oxygen delivery and consumption and lactic acidaemia were similar in the two groups. These effects were not attributed to anaerobic metabolism and may indicate that PAF antagonism protected against ischaemia and improved the microcirculation in the haemorrhagic shock in pigs. PMID:8542923

  4. Pulmonary complications of cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Huffmyer, Julie L; Groves, Danja S

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary complications after the use of extracorporeal circulation are common, and they range from transient hypoxemia with altered gas exchange to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), with variable severity. Similar to other end-organ dysfunction after cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation, pulmonary complications are attributed to the inflammatory response, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and reactive oxygen species liberated as a result of cardiopulmonary bypass. Several factors common in cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation may worsen the risk of pulmonary complications including atelectasis, transfusion requirement, older age, heart failure, emergency surgery, and prolonged duration of bypass. There is no magic bullet to prevent or treat pulmonary complications, but supportive care with protective ventilation is important. Targets for the prevention of pulmonary complications include mechanical, surgical, and anesthetic interventions that aim to reduce the contact activation, systemic inflammatory response, leukocyte sequestration, and hemodilution associated with extracorporeal circulation. PMID:26060028

  5. Neurological Complications of Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jerry Clay

    2015-12-01

    Obesity has attained pandemic proportions, and bariatric surgery is increasingly being employed resulting in turn to more neurological complications which must be recognized and managed. Neurological complications may result from mechanical or inflammatory mechanisms but primarily result from micro-nutritional deficiencies. Vitamin B12, thiamine, and copper constitute the most frequent deficiencies. Neurological complications may occur at reasonably predictable times after bariatric surgery and are associated with the type of surgery used. During the early post-operative period, compressive or stretch peripheral nerve injury, rhabdomyolysis, Wernicke's encephalopathy, and inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy may occur. Late complications ensue after months to years and include combined system degeneration (vitamin B12 deficiency) and hypocupric myelopathy. Bariatric surgery patients require careful nutritional follow-up with routine monitoring of micronutrients at 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months post-operatively and then annually after surgery and multivitamin supplementation for life. Sustained vigilance for common and rare neurological complications is essential. PMID:26493558

  6. A critical review of anaesthetised animal models and alternatives for military research, testing and training, with a focus on blast damage, haemorrhage and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Combes, Robert D

    2013-11-01

    Military research, testing, and surgical and resuscitation training, are aimed at mitigating the consequences of warfare and terrorism to armed forces and civilians. Traumatisation and tissue damage due to explosions, and acute loss of blood due to haemorrhage, remain crucial, potentially preventable, causes of battlefield casualties and mortalities. There is also the additional threat from inhalation of chemical and aerosolised biological weapons. The use of anaesthetised animal models, and their respective replacement alternatives, for military purposes -- particularly for blast injury, haemorrhaging and resuscitation training -- is critically reviewed. Scientific problems with the animal models include the use of crude, uncontrolled and non-standardised methods for traumatisation, an inability to model all key trauma mechanisms, and complex modulating effects of general anaesthesia on target organ physiology. Such effects depend on the anaesthetic and influence the cardiovascular system, respiration, breathing, cerebral haemodynamics, neuroprotection, and the integrity of the blood-brain barrier. Some anaesthetics also bind to the NMDA brain receptor with possible differential consequences in control and anaesthetised animals. There is also some evidence for gender-specific effects. Despite the fact that these issues are widely known, there is little published information on their potential, at best, to complicate data interpretation and, at worst, to invalidate animal models. There is also a paucity of detail on the anaesthesiology used in studies, and this can hinder correct data evaluation. Welfare issues relate mainly to the possibility of acute pain as a side-effect of traumatisation in recovered animals. Moreover, there is the increased potential for animals to suffer when anaesthesia is temporary, and the procedures invasive. These dilemmas can be addressed, however, as a diverse range of replacement approaches exist, including computer and mathematical dynamic modelling of the human body, cadavers, interactive human patient simulators for training, in vitro techniques involving organotypic cultures of target organs, and epidemiological and clinical studies. While the first four of these have long proven useful for developing protective measures and predicting the consequences of trauma, and although many phenomena and their sequelae arising from different forms of trauma in vivo can be induced and reproduced in vitro, non-animal approaches require further development, and their validation and use need to be coordinated and harmonised. Recommendations to these ends are proposed, and the scientific and welfare problems associated with animal models are addressed, with the future focus being on the use of batteries of complementary replacement methods deployed in integrated strategies, and on greater transparency and scientific cooperation. PMID:24329746

  7. Isolation of a haemorrhagic protein toxin (SA-HT) from the Indian venomous butterfish (Scatophagus argus, Linn) sting extract.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, S; Muhuri, D C; Dasgupta, S C; Nagchaudhuri, A K; Gomes, A

    2004-05-01

    A haemorrhagic protein toxin (SA-HT) was isolated and purified from the spine extract of the Indian venomous butterfish, S. argus Linn, by two step ion exchange chromatography. The toxin was homogeneous in native and SDS-PAGE gel. SDS-molecular weight of the toxin was found to be 18.1 +/- 0.09 kDa. SA-HT produced severe haemorrhage on stomach wall but devoid of cutaneous haemorrhage. UV, EDTA, trypsin, protease, cyproheptadine, indomethacin, acetylsalicylic acid and BW755C treatment significantly antagonized the haemorrhagic activity of SA-HT. The toxin produced dose and time dependent oedema on mice hind paw, which was significantly encountered by cyproheptadine, indomethacin and BW755C. SA-HT increased capillary permeability on guinea pig dorsal flank. On isolated guineapig ileum, rat fundus and uterus, SA-HT produced slow contraction which was completely antagonised by prostaglandin blocker SC19220. On isolated rat duodenum, SA-HT produced slow relaxation. SA-HT significantly increased plasma plasmin, serum MDA level and decreased serum SOD level indicating the possible involvement of cyclooxygenase and lipooxygenase pathway. PMID:15233468

  8. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Asian Haemorrhagic Septicaemia-Associated Strains of Pasteurella multocida Identifies More than 90 Haemorrhagic Septicaemia-Specific Genes

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Ahmed M.; Seemann, Torsten; Gladman, Simon; Adler, Ben; Harper, Marina; Boyce, John D.; Bennett, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is the primary causative agent of a range of economically important diseases in animals, including haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS), a rapidly fatal disease of ungulates. There is limited information available on the diversity of P. multocida strains that cause HS. Therefore, we determined draft genome sequences of ten disease-causing isolates and two vaccine strains and compared these genomes using a range of bioinformatic analyses. The draft genomes of the 12 HS strains were between 2,298,035 and 2,410,300 bp in length. Comparison of these genomes with the North American HS strain, M1404, and other available P. multocida genomes (Pm70, 3480, 36950 and HN06) identified a core set of 1,824 genes. A set of 96 genes was present in all HS isolates and vaccine strains examined in this study, but absent from Pm70, 3480, 36950 and HN06. Moreover, 59 genes were shared only by the Asian B:2 strains. In two Pakistani isolates, genes with high similarity to genes in the integrative and conjugative element, ICEPmu1 from strain 36950 were identified along with a range of other antimicrobial resistance genes. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the HS strains formed clades based on their country of isolation. Future analysis of the 96 genes unique to the HS isolates will aid the identification of HS-specific virulence attributes and facilitate the development of disease-specific diagnostic tests. PMID:26151935

  9. The evolving roles of pericyte in early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yujie; Li, Qiang; Tang, Jiping; Feng, Hua; Zhang, John H

    2015-10-14

    Despite accumulated understanding on the mechanisms of early brain injury and improved management of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), it is still one of the serious and refractory health problems around the world. Traditionally, pericyte, served as capillary contraction handler, is recently considered as the main participant of microcirculation regulation in SAH pathophysiology. However, accumulate evidences indicate that pericyte is much more than we already know. Therefore, we briefly review the characteristics, regulation pathways and functions of pericyte, aim to summarize the evolving new pathophysiological roles of pericyte that are implicated in early brain injury after SAH and to improve our understanding in order to explore potential novel therapeutic options for patients with SAH. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Cell Interactions In Stroke. PMID:25982598

  10. Determining the critical size of intracranial aneurysm predisposing to subarachnoid hemorrhage in the Saudi population

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jehani, Hosam; Najjar, Ahmad; Sheikh, Bassem Y.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating event with a high rate of morbidity and mortality. With the improvement of diagnostic modalities and the adoption of different screening strategies, more aneurysms are being diagnosed prior to rupture. Based on large multi-center trials, size has become the most important determinant of treatment decisions. Unfortunately, these studies did not take into account the regional and racial variations, challenging the generalizability of their results. Material and Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis on a series of 192 patients harboring 213 aneurysms. Results: The critical finding in our study is that the majority of patients presenting with SAH due to ruptured aneurysms are <10 mm in size. Conclusion: Decision to treatment of a given unruptured intracranial aneurysm should be individually assessed and not taken from general international literature as this may mistakenly apply factors from one population to another. PMID:25685215

  11. Carotid rete mirabile associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage from intracranial aneurysm: A case report and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Paschoal, Eric Homero Albuquerque; Yamaki, Vitor Nagai; Júnior, Fernando Mendes Paschoal; Piske, Ronie Leo; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson

    2015-02-01

    Carotid rete mirabile (CRM) is a rare physiological vascular network in humans that is most often found in Eastern populations. This paper describes a CRM associated with an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) and discusses the details of the patient's treatment. A 28-year-old woman was admitted to our service with clinical signs and symptoms of a spontaneous aSAH. Computed tomography revealed a diffuse and extensive SAH (Fisher group IV), while an angiogram showed an abnormal collateral network in the right carotid system and a hypoplastic aspect to the internal carotid artery (ICA) on the same side. In addition, a saccular aneurysm with a diameter of 9.5?mm was present in the ophthalmic segment of the left ICA. This case is extremely uncommon. To avoid rebleeding in the patient, we successfully treated the patient by clipping the aneurysmal lesion. No procedure was performed for the CRM. PMID:25934776

  12. Lycopene attenuates early brain injury and inflammation following subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, An; Liu, Rongcai; Dai, Weimin; Jie, Yuanqing; Yu, Guofeng; Fan, Xiaofeng; Huang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Early brain injury (EBI), following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), includes blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and consequent edema formation. This study aims to evaluate the effect of lycopene on early brain injury and inflammation in SAH. Neurological deficits, brain water content and Evans blue dye extravasation were evaluated after the treatment with lycopene. Besides neuronal apoptosis,some inflammatory cytokines were also detected. The results suggested that administration of lycopene following SAH significantly ameliorated EBI, including brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) impairment, cortical apoptosis, and neurological deficits. In addition, it also ameliorated inflammation triggered by SAH. In conclusion, post-SAH lycopene administration may attenuate EBI in SAH, possibly through ameliorating neuronal apoptosis, maintaining BBB integrity and attenuating inflammation. PMID:26550416

  13. Memantine Attenuates Delayed Vasospasm after Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage via Modulating Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chih-Yuan; Wang, Liang-Chao; Shan, Yan-Shen; Pan, Chia-Hsin; Tsai, Kuen-Jer

    2015-01-01

    Delayed cerebral vasospasm is an important pathological feature of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The cause of vasospasm is multifactorial. Impairs nitric oxide availability and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) dysfunction has been reported to underlie vasospasm. Memantine, a low-affinity uncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) blocker has been proven to reduce early brain injury after SAH. This study investigated the effect of memantine on attenuation of vasospasm and restoring eNOS functionality. Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 350–450 g were randomly divided into three weight-matched groups, sham surgery, SAH + vehicle, and SAH + memantine groups. The effects of memantine on SAH were evaluated by assessing the severity of vasospasm and the expression of eNOS. Memantine effectively ameliorated cerebral vasospasm by restoring eNOS functionality. Memantine can prevent vasospasm in experimental SAH. Treatment strategies may help combat SAH-induced vasospasm in the future. PMID:26110388

  14. Memantine Attenuates Delayed Vasospasm after Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage via Modulating Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Yuan; Wang, Liang-Chao; Shan, Yan-Shen; Pan, Chia-Hsin; Tsai, Kuen-Jer

    2015-01-01

    Delayed cerebral vasospasm is an important pathological feature of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The cause of vasospasm is multifactorial. Impairs nitric oxide availability and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) dysfunction has been reported to underlie vasospasm. Memantine, a low-affinity uncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) blocker has been proven to reduce early brain injury after SAH. This study investigated the effect of memantine on attenuation of vasospasm and restoring eNOS functionality. Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 350-450 g were randomly divided into three weight-matched groups, sham surgery, SAH + vehicle, and SAH + memantine groups. The effects of memantine on SAH were evaluated by assessing the severity of vasospasm and the expression of eNOS. Memantine effectively ameliorated cerebral vasospasm by restoring eNOS functionality. Memantine can prevent vasospasm in experimental SAH. Treatment strategies may help combat SAH-induced vasospasm in the future. PMID:26110388

  15. Melatonin mitigate cerebral vasospasm after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage: a study of synchrotron radiation angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, J.; He, C.; Chen, L.; Han, T.; Huang, S.; Huang, Y.; Bai, Y.; Bao, Y.; Zhang, H.; Ling, F.

    2013-06-01

    Cerebral vasospasm (CV) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating and unsolved clinical issue. In this study, the rat models, which had been induced SAH by prechiasmatic cistern injection, were treated with melatonin. Synchrotron radiation angiography (SRA) was employed to detect and evaluate CV of animal models. Neurological scoring and histological examinations were used to assess the neurological deficits and CV as well. Using SRA techniques and histological analyses, the anterior cerebral artery diameters of SAH rats with melatonin administration were larger than those without melatonin treatment (p < 0.05). The neurological deficits of SAH rats treated with melatonin were less than those without melatonin treatment (p < 0.05). We concluded that SRA was a precise and in vivo tool to observe and evaluate CV of SAH rats; intraperitoneally administration of melatonin could mitigate CV after experimental SAH.

  16. [Guidelines for the treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A consensus conference].

    PubMed

    Dorfman, B S; Previgliano, I J

    2000-01-01

    The subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by aneurysmatic rupture is responsible for 6% of the cerebral vascular accidents. The cerebral aneurysms are present in 0.2-9.9% of the population and the bleeding rate is of 10 out of 100,000 inhabitants per year. The consensus conference analyzed the different schemes of treatment and made therapeutic recommendations according to the criteria of medicine based on evidence. Levels of evidence were determined from I to V. The recommendation degrees were classified in: A, determined by evidence level I, B by evidence level II, and C suggested by evidence levels III, IV and V. These recommendations should be adapted to each patient. However, grade A recommendations are treatment standards. Seriousness of patients was evaluated on the basis of Hunt and Hess scale upon admission. Successive analyses covered: general medical treatment measures, cerebral vasospasm, diagnostic procedures and treatment of the hyponatremia and convulsion prevention. PMID:11050821

  17. Acute subarachnoid hemorrhage in posterior condylar canal dural arteriovenous fistula: imaging features with endovascular management.

    PubMed

    Mondel, Prabath Kumar; Saraf, Rashmi; Limaye, Uday S

    2015-07-01

    A 43-year-old man presented with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. He was investigated and found to have a rare posterior condylar canal dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF). DAVFs of the posterior condylar canal are rare. Venous drainage of the DAVF was through a long, tortuous, and aneurysmal bridging vein. We describe the clinical presentation, cross sectional imaging, angiographic features, and endovascular management of this patient. The patient was treated by transarterial embolization of the fistula through the ascending pharyngeal artery. This is the first report of an acutely bled posterior condylar canal DAVF treated by transarterial Onyx embolization with balloon protection in the vertebral artery. The patient recovered without any neurological deficit and had an excellent outcome. On 6 month follow-up angiogram, there was stable occlusion of the dural fistula. PMID:25006042

  18. Incidental splenic littoral cell angioma complicating a case of Rolon cancer: A case report.

    PubMed

    George, S A; Al Bader, I

    2015-09-01

    Littoral cell angioma (LCA) is a recently described rare generally benign primary vascular neoplasm of the spleen originating from the lining cells of the splenic red pulp sinuses that is usually discovered incidentally. LCA may be associated with epithelial malignancies and may itself also have malignant potential. We report the case of a 71-year-old woman who presented with intraoperative bleeding from the spleen during sigmoidectomy for colonic adenocarcinoma. Histopathological examination of the removed spleen revealed multiple haemorrhagic lesions diagnosed as littoral cell angioma. This case has been reported due to its rarity and to highlight how its accidental detection, unique and unexpected presentation complicated a case of colonic carcinoma. Individuals diagnosed with this tumour must be carefully evaluated to exclude primary, secondary and synchronous malignancies. PMID:26499824

  19. Genetic variation in soluble epoxide hydrolase is associated with outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Ross P; Ward, Jonathan; Siler, Dominic; Eastman, Jamie M; Nelson, Jonathan; Borkar, Rohan; Alkayed, Nabil; Dogan, Aclan; Cetas, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Object Patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are at high risk for delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and stroke. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) play an important role in cerebral blood flow regulation and neuroprotection after brain injury. Polymorphisms in the gene for the enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), which inactivates EETs, are associated with ischemic stroke risk and neuronal survival after ischemia. In this prospective observational study of patients with SAH we compare vital and neurologic outcomes based on functional polymorphisms of sEH. Methods Allelic discrimination based on quantitative real-time PCR was used to differentiate wild type (WT) sEH from K55R heterozygotes (predictive of increased sEH activity and reduced EETs) and R287Q heterozygotes (predictive of decreased sEH activity and increased EETs). The primary outcome was new stroke after SAH. Secondary outcomes were mortality, Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) score and neurologic deterioration attributable to delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Results Multivariable logistic regression models adjusted for admission age and Glasgow coma scale revealed an increase in the odds of new stroke (OR 5.48 (1.51–19.91) and mortality (OR 7.62 (1.19–48.7) in the K55R group, but no change in the odds of new stroke 0.56 (0.16–1.96) or death 3.09 (0.51–18.52) in patients with R287Q genotype, compared to wild-type sEH. R287Q genotype was associated with reduced odds of having a GOS ? 3 (0.23 (0.06–0.82)). There were no significant differences in the odds of neurologic deterioration due to DCI. Conclusions Genetic polymorphisms of sEH are associated with neurologic and vital outcomes after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:25216066

  20. Protective effects of perfluorooctyl-bromide nanoparticles on early brain injuries following subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huan; Xu, Rui; Xie, Fei; Xu, Wei; Zeng, Meng-Fei; Wang, Xin; Zhu, Ji

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the protective effects of perfluorooctyl-bromide (PFOB) nanoparticles on early brain injury (EBI) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a total of 120 rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: Sham operation group (n = 40), SAH group (n = 40), and SAH + PFOB group (n = 40). Endovascular perforation was performed to induce subarachnoid hemorrhage. Brain water content was measured 24 h after surgery. Meanwhile, morphological changes in the rat hippocampal CA1 region were examined using light and transmission electron microscopy. The rate of neuronal apoptosis in rat hippocampal CA1 region was determined using TUNEL assay. Protein and mRNA expression levels of Caspase-3, Bax, and Bcl-2 were measured using western blot and RT-PCR assays 12, 24, 48, and 72 h after surgery. Compared to the SAH group, the SAH + PFOB group had significantly lower brain water content (P<0.01), with alleviated morphological abnormalities in HE-stained neurons and significantly decreased neurons with karyopyknosis and hyperchromatism in the hippocampal CA1 region. Electron microscopy revealed reduction of neuronal apoptosis, alleviation of glial cell swelling, and mitigation of perivascular edema in the hippocampal region. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the expression of apoptosis-related factors Caspase-3 and Bax was significantly reduced, while that of the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2 was significantly increased. TUNEL staining showed that neuronal apoptosis was significantly reduced in the hippocampal CA1 region (P<0.01). RT-PCR and Western-blot data indicated that expressions of Caspase-3 and Bax were both significantly reduced, while bcl-2 expression was increased significantly at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h after SAH (P<0.01). Together, our data support that PFOB nanoparticles with high oxygen content could counteract ischemia and hypoxia, block neuronal apoptotic pathways, reduce neuronal apoptosis, and therefore, achieve neuroprotective effects in EBI following SAH. PMID:26396671

  1. Sensitivity of a Clinical Decision Rule and Early Computed Tomography in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Dustin G.; Kene, Mamata V.; Udaltsova, Natalia; Vinson, David R.; Ballard, Dustin W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Application of a clinical decision rule for subarachnoid hemorrhage, in combination with cranial computed tomography (CT) performed within six hours of ictus (early cranial CT), may be able to reasonably exclude a diagnosis of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). This study’s objective was to examine the sensitivity of both early cranial CT and a previously validated clinical decision rule among emergency department (ED) patients with aSAH and a normal mental status. Methods Patients were evaluated in the 21 EDs of an integrated health delivery system between January 2007 and June 2013. We identified by chart review a retrospective cohort of patients diagnosed with aSAH in the setting of a normal mental status and performance of early cranial CT. Variables comprising the SAH clinical decision rule (age ?40, presence of neck pain or stiffness, headache onset with exertion, loss of consciousness at headache onset) were abstracted from the chart and assessed for inter-rater reliability. Results One hundred fifty-five patients with aSAH met study inclusion criteria. The sensitivity of early cranial CT was 95.5% (95% CI [90.9–98.2]). The sensitivity of the SAH clinical decision rule was also 95.5% (95% CI [90.9–98.2]). Since all false negative cases for each diagnostic modality were mutually independent, the combined use of both early cranial CT and the clinical decision rule improved sensitivity to 100% (95% CI [97.6–100.0]). Conclusion Neither early cranial CT nor the SAH clinical decision rule demonstrated ideal sensitivity for aSAH in this retrospective cohort. However, the combination of both strategies might optimize sensitivity for this life-threatening disease. PMID:26587089

  2. Preemptive analgesia of oral clonidine during subarachnoid block for laparoscopic gynecological procedures: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kumkum; Singh, Ivesh; Singh, V. P.; Gupta, Prashant K.; Tiwari, Vaibhav

    2014-01-01

    Background: Preemptive analgesia is known modality to control the peri-operative pain. The present study was aimed to evaluate the effects of oral clonidine on subarachnoid block characteristics, hemodynamic changes, sedation and respiratory efficiency in patients undergoing laparoscopic gynecological procedures. Patients and Methods: A total of 64 adult consenting females of American Society of Anesthesiologist physical status I and II were randomized double blindly into two groups of 32 patients each. Patients in the clonidine group received oral clonidine (100 ?g) and patients of the control group received placebo capsule, 90 min before subarachnoid block with 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (3.5 ml). The onset of sensory and motor block, maximum cephalic sensory level and regression times of sensory and motor blockade were assessed. Intra-operative hemodynamic changes, respiratory efficiency, shoulder pain and sedation score were recorded. The other side-effects, if any were noted and managed. Results: The onset of sensory blockade was earlier in patients of clonidine group with prolonged duration of analgesia (216.4 ± 23.3 min vs. 165.8 ± 37.2 min, P < 0.05), but no significant difference was observed on motor blockade between groups. The hemodynamic parameters and respiratory efficiency were maintained within physiological limits in patients of clonidine group and no patient experienced shoulder pain. The Ramsey sedation score was 2.96 ± 0.75. In the control group, 17 patients experienced shoulder pain, which was effectively managed with small doses of ketamine and 15 patients required midazolam for anxiety. Conclusion: Premedication with oral clonidine (100 ?g) has enhanced the onset and prolonged the duration of spinal analgesia, provided sedation with no respiratory depression. The hemodynamic parameters remained stabilized during the pneumoperitoneum. PMID:25886224

  3. Haemorrhagic smolt syndrome (HSS) in Norway: pathology and associated virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Nylund, A; Plarre, H; Hodneland, K; Devold, M; Aspehaug, V; Aarseth, M; Koren, C; Watanabe, K

    2003-03-17

    Atlantic salmon Salmo salar pre-smolt, smolt and post-smolt, with clinical signs of haemorrhagic smolt syndrome (HSS) have been found in several locations along the Norwegian coast (Rogaland to Troms). Affected fish had pale gills and bleeding at the fin bases, but seemed to be in good physical condition with no obvious weight loss. The internal organs and body cavity showed distinct bleedings. Petechiae were found on the gastrointestinal tract, swim bladder and peritoneum, visceral adipose tissue, heart and somatic musculature. The liver was bright yellow and sometimes mottled with petechiae and ecchymoses. Acitic fluid was found in the visceral cavity and fluid was also present in the pericardial cavity. Histological examination revealed haemorrhage in most organs. The glomeruli were degenerated and the renal tubules were filled with erythrocytes. The aims of this study were to describe the pathology and discover, if possible, the aetiology of the HSS. Tissues were collected for light and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immunofluorescence (IFAT), reverse transcription (RT)-PCR diagnostics (screening for infectious salmon anaemia virus [ISAV], viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus [VHSV], salmon pancreas disease virus [SPDV], sleeping disease virus [SDV] and infectious haematopoetic necrosis virus [IHNV]), and tissue homogenates (heart, liver, kidney and spleen) were sterile-filtered and inoculated into cell cultures. Homogenates made from several tissues were also injected intraperitoneally into salmon and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. The diagnostic tests revealed no consistent findings of any pathogens, with the exception of TEM which showed 2 types of virus-like particles: Type I was 50 to 60 nm in diameter and Type II about 50 nm in diameter. These virus-like particles were found in salmon from all farms affected by HSS and screened by TEM. Several different cells, blood vessel endothelial cells, endocardial cells, heart myofibres, and leukocytes were associated with the 2 virus-like particles. The Type I particle seems to be an infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN)-like virus, while (based on the number of target cells, particle morphology, budding and uptake into target cells) Type II particle could be a togavirus. PMID:12718466

  4. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    MedlinePLUS

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  5. Psychological complications of pediatric obesity.

    PubMed

    Vander Wal, Jillon S; Mitchell, Elisha R

    2011-12-01

    Psychological complications associated with pediatric obesity include low self-esteem, depression, body dissatisfaction, loss-of-control eating, unhealthy and extreme weight control behaviors, impaired social relationships, obesity stigma, and decreased health-related quality of life. Bioecological models offer a framework for understanding the interaction between pediatric obesity and psychological complications and illustrate system-level approaches for prevention and intervention. As the medical setting is often the first point of contact for families, pediatricians are instrumental in the identification and referral of children with psychological complications. Motivational interviewing, patient talking points, brief screening measures, and referral resources are important tools in this process. PMID:22093858

  6. PEG tubes: dealing with complications.

    PubMed

    Malhi, Hardip; Thompson, Rosie

    A percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy tube can be used to deliver nutrition, hydration and medicines directly into the patient's stomach. Patients will require a tube if they are unable to swallow safely, putting them at risk of aspiration of food, drink and medicines into their lungs. It is vital that nurses are aware of the complications that may arise when caring for a patient with a PEG tube. It is equally important that nurses know how to deal with these complications or from where tc seek advice. This article provides a quick troubleshooting guide to help nurses deal with complications that can arise with PEG feeding. PMID:26016095

  7. Profound bilateral visual loss after hysterectomy indicated for severe postpartum haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ostri, Christoffer; Zibrandtsen, Nathalie; Larsen, Michael; Hamann, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of a patient with bilateral posterior ischaemic optic neuropathy in the previously unreported setting of hysterectomy indicated for severe postpartum haemorrhage. The diagnosis was based on clinical and paraclinical examinations, including MRI of the head, electroretinography (ERG) and visual evoked potentials (VEP) testing. During 1?year of follow-up, repeated optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans demonstrated optic disc atrophy, which was interpreted as a sign of direct retrograde ganglion cell degeneration after ischaemic damage to the retrolaminar part of the optic nerves. The diagnosis of perioperative posterior ischaemic optic neuropathy is mostly a clinical diagnosis. However, MRI plays a major role in excluding other causes of visual loss, and VEP, ERG and OCT are valuable supplemental diagnostic tools. PMID:24395872

  8. Emergence of a new lagovirus related to Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Since summer 2010, numerous cases of Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease (RHD) have been reported in north-western France both in rabbitries, affecting RHD-vaccinated rabbits, and in wild populations. We demonstrate that the aetiological agent was a lagovirus phylogenetically distinct from other lagoviruses and which presents a unique antigenic profile. Experimental results show that the disease differs from RHD in terms of disease duration, mortality rates, higher occurrence of subacute/chronic forms and that partial cross-protection occurs between RHDV and the new RHDV variant, designated RHDV2. These data support the hypothesis that RHDV2 is a new member of the Lagovirus genus. A molecular epidemiology study detected RHDV2 in France a few months before the first recorded cases and revealed that one year after its discovery it had spread throughout the country and had almost replaced RHDV strains. RHDV2 was detected in continental Italy in June 2011, then four months later in Sardinia. PMID:24011218

  9. Viral haemorrhagic disease of rabbit: purification and characterization of a strain isolated in France.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, G; Boilletot, E; Morisse, J P

    1992-01-01

    The causative agent of rabbit viral haemorrhagic disease (VHD) was purified by CsCl density gradient centrifugation from liver homogenates of rabbits infected with a strain of VHD virus isolated in France. Electron microscopy observations revealed that the virions were icosahedral with a diameter of 33-35 nm, and with an average buoyant density of 1.33. Structural proteins were investigated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and western blotting. The results indicated the presence of a major structural protein of 64 kDa and other minor proteins of molecular weight of 43, 36 and 32 kDa, the last presumably resulting from the proteolytic degradation of VP 64. These results correspond with the description made by the different authors who identify the VHD virus as a member of the Caliciviridae family. PMID:1335715

  10. Orofacial hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: high power diode laser in early and advanced lesion treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempesta, Angela; Franco, Simonetta; Miccoli, Simona; Suppressa, Patrizia; De Falco, Vincenzo; Crincoli, Vito; Lacaita, Mariagrazia; Giuliani, Michele; Favia, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) is a muco-cutaneous inherited disease. Symptoms are epistaxis, visceral arterio-venous malformations, multiple muco-cutaneous telangiectasia with the risk of number increasing enlargement, bleeding, and super-infection. The aim of this work is to show the dual Diode Laser efficacy in preventive treatment of Early Lesions (EL < 2mm) and therapeutic treatment of Advanced Lesions (AL < 2mm). 21 patients affected by HHT with 822 muco-cutaneous telangiectatic nodules have been treated in several sessions with local anaesthesia and cooling of treated sites. EL preventive treatment consists of single Laser impulse (fibre 320) in ultrapulsed mode (2 mm single point spot). AL therapeutic treatment consists of repeated Laser impulses in pulsed mode (on 200ms / off 400ms). According to the results, Diode Laser used in pulsed and ultra-pulsed mode is very effective as noninvasive treatment both in early and advanced oral and perioral telangiectasia.

  11. Molecular epidemiology of African and Asian Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Burt, F. J.; Swanepoel, R.

    2005-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships were examined for 70 Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) isolates from southern, central and West Africa, the Middle East and Greece using sequence data determined for a region of the S segment of the genome. Analysis revealed up to 18% genetic differences. Tree topology supports previous evidence for the existence of three groups of genetically related isolates, A, B and C. Within group A there are two clades: an African clade and a predominantly Asian clade comprising isolates from Pakistan, China, Iran, Russia and Madagascar. Group B includes isolates from southern and West Africa and Iran, and group C includes a single isolate from Greece. Despite the potential which exists for dispersal of the virus between Africa and Eurasia, it appears that circulation of the virus is largely compartmentalized within the two land masses, and the inference is that the geographic distribution of phylogenetic groups is related to the distribution and dispersal of tick vectors of the virus. PMID:16050511

  12. Haemorrhagic septicaemia by Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida in a black-tip reef shark (Carcharhinus melanopterus).

    PubMed

    Briones, V; Fernández, A; Blanco, M; Ramiro, F; de Vicente, M L; García, J; Méndez, J L; Goyache, J

    1998-09-01

    One black-tip reef shark (Carcharhinus melanopterus) was found dead without previous signs of disease. Major lesions consisted in cutaneous erythema, mainly at the base of the fins, focal to diffuse inflammatory lesions in gills and intestinal wall, and discrete haemorrhages in the same organs, liver and kidneys. Microcolonies of Gram-negative rods were observed in the lamina propia of gills, underneath the intestinal mucosa and randomly distributed in the renal and hepatic parenchymas. Also, emboli containing Gram-negative rods were observed in capillaries of these organs. Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida was isolated in pure culture from gills, liver and intestine. Specific immunostaining confirmed the relationship between the isolate and lesion-associated bacteria. No previous reports on this infection in sharks have been found in the literature. PMID:9780832

  13. Immunosuppression abrogates resistance of young rabbits to Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease (RHD)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease (RHD) is caused by a calicivirus (RHDV) that kills 90% of infected adult European rabbits within 3 days. Remarkably, young rabbits are resistant to RHD. We induced immunosuppression in young rabbits by treatment with methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) and challenged the animals with RHDV by intramuscular injection. All of these young rabbits died within 3 days of infection due to fulminant hepatitis, presenting a large number of RHDV-positive dead or apoptotic hepatocytes, and a significant seric increase in cytokines, features that are similar to those of naïve adult rabbits infected by RHDV. We conclude that MPA-induced immunosuppression abrogates the resistance of young rabbits to RHD, indicating that there are differences in the innate immune system between young and adult rabbits that contribute to their distinct resistance/susceptibility to RHDV infection. PMID:24490832

  14. The influence of a simple blood transfusion policy on overtransfusion in acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Adam; Thompson, Clare; Clegg, Andrew; Snook, Jonathon

    2015-08-01

    Blood transfusion is widely used in the management of acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage (AUGIH). Trial data suggests that excessive transfusion may be detrimental, yet overtransfusion remains commonplace. This study reports the impact of introducing a simple cross-match policy in a district general hospital, which resulted in a substantial fall in the prevalence of overtransfusion (odds ratio 0.43; 95% confidence interval 0.19-0.98), with potential patient benefits in terms of rebleeding, and a reduction in the total blood transfused from 162 to 121 units per 100 patients with AUGIH. For the cost of blood alone, this corresponds to projected savings across the NHS in England in excess of £2 million per annum. PMID:26407379

  15. Clinical and laboratory studies on haemorrhagic fever in Burma, 1970-72*

    PubMed Central

    Ming, C. Khai; Thein, Soe; Thaung, U; Tin, U; Myint, Khin Saw; Swe, Than; Halstead, S. B.; Diwan, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    This three-year serologic study of 2 060 children with a clinical diagnosis of haemorrhagic fever, who were admitted to the Children's Hospital and other hospitals in Rangoon, has shown that the etiology of the illness was multiple. Of all these patients, 347 (16.8%) had a dengue infection (96 with primary and 251 with secondary dengue infections), 510 (24.7%) had chikungunya infections, 55 (2.7%) had simultaneous chikungunya and dengue, 263 (12.8%) had influenza A infections, 62 (3.0%) had influenza B, 12 (0.6%) had measles, and there were 811 (39.4%) for whom no etiology could be established. Epidemiological and clinical features and laboratory findings are discussed. Evidence is presented for human infections with all four types of denguevirus in Rangoon. PMID:4282477

  16. Diabetic Complications and Amputation Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... because of two complications of diabetes: nerve damage (neuropathy) and poor circulation. Neuropathy causes loss of feeling in your feet, taking ... to the bone. Because of poor circulation and neuropathy in the feet, cuts or blisters can easily ...

  17. Intramuscular injection-site complications.

    PubMed

    Greenblatt, D J; Allen, M D

    1978-08-11

    Among 26,294 hospitalized medical patients monitored by the Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program, 46% received at least one intramuscular (IM) injection. Drugs for which IM injection was the route of administration in more than 80% of all exposures included penicillin G procaine, mercurial diuretics, cyanocobalamin, streptomycin sulfate, colistimethate sodium, meperidine hydrochloride, cephaloridine, scopolamine hydrobromide, kanamycin sulfate, and iron dextran injection. Local complications of IM injection were reported in a total of only 48 patients (0.4% of all IM recipients). Local complications were most commonly associated with IM injection of cephalothin sodium. Clinically important local complications are uncommonly associated with IM injections in general. However, certain drugs, eg, cephalothin, produce injection-site complications with relatively high frequency; the clinical role of IM injection of such drugs should be reevaluated. PMID:671665

  18. Complications in cochlear implant surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gheorghe, DC; Zamfir-Chiru-Anton, A

    2015-01-01

    For the last 6 years, cochlear implantation has become a standard practice in our department. The number of patients rose from 5 to 21/ year. Using multiple types of cochlear implants and indicating the surgery also to malformed inner ears led to the encounter of some complications. Objective: to present the surgical complications from our department. Material: all the patients admitted and operated in our clinic have been reviewed. Results: 9 complications (8,86%) have occurred: the impossibility of establishing a reliable cochleostomy (due to ossification), air in the cochlea through lack of sealing of the cochleostomy (exteriorization of the electrode array), cochlear implant postoperative migration from its bed, weak hearing discrimination due to “double electrodes” in the scala tympani, gusher. Conclusions: cochlear implanting needs to respect the technical steps of the surgery and the best technical/ tactical solution has to be found to whatever complications arise in complex or malformed cases! PMID:26351535

  19. Complications in Pediatric Facial Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Mimi T.; Losee, Joseph E.

    2009-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of pediatric facial fractures, little has been published on the complications of these fractures. The existing literature is highly variable regarding both the definition and the reporting of adverse events. Although the incidence of pediatric facial fractures is relative low, they are strongly associated with other serious injuries. Both the fractures and their treatment may have long-term consequence on growth and development of the immature face. This article is a selective review of the literature on facial fracture complications with special emphasis on the complications unique to pediatric patients. We also present our classification system to evaluate adverse outcomes associated with pediatric facial fractures. Prospective, long-term studies are needed to fully understand and appreciate the complexity of treating children with facial fractures and determining the true incidence, subsequent growth, and nature of their complications. PMID:22110803

  20. Endoplasmic reticulum quality control is involved in the mechanism of endoglin-mediated hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Ali, Bassam R; Ben-Rebeh, Imen; John, Anne; Akawi, Nadia A; Milhem, Reham M; Al-Shehhi, Nouf A; Al-Ameri, Mouza M; Al-Shamisi, Shamma A; Al-Gazali, Lihadh

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant genetic condition affecting the vascular system and is characterised by epistaxis, arteriovenous malformations and mucocutaneous and gastrointestinal telangiectases. This disorder affects approximately 1 in 8,000 people worldwide. Significant morbidity is associated with this condition in affected individuals, and anaemia can be a consequence of repeated haemorrhages from telangiectasia in the gut and nose. In the majority of the cases reported, the condition is caused by mutations in either ACVRL1 or endoglin genes, which encode components of the TGF-beta signalling pathway. Numerous missense mutations in endoglin have been reported as causative defects for HHT but the exact underlying cellular mechanisms caused by these mutations have not been fully established despite data supporting a role for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control machinery. For this reason, we examined the subcellular trafficking of twenty-five endoglin disease-causing missense mutations. The mutant proteins were expressed in HeLa and HEK293 cell lines, and their subcellular localizations were established by confocal fluorescence microscopy alongside the analysis of their N-glycosylation profiles. ER quality control was found to be responsible in eight (L32R, V49F, C53R, V125D, A160D, P165L, I271N and A308D) out of eleven mutants located on the orphan extracellular domain in addition to two (C363Y and C382W) out of thirteen mutants in the Zona Pellucida (ZP) domain. In addition, a single intracellular domain missense mutant was examined and found to traffic predominantly to the plasma membrane. These findings support the notion of the involvement of the ER's quality control in the mechanism of a significant number, but not all, missense endoglin mutants found in HHT type 1 patients. Other mechanisms including loss of interactions with signalling partners as well as adverse effects on functional residues are likely to be the cause of the mutant proteins' loss of function. PMID:22022569

  1. Unusual Complications of Quinalphos Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Stalin

    2013-01-01

    This 40-year-old man was treated for suicidal quinalphos 25%EC consumption. He developed intermediate syndrome with normal response to repetitive nerve stimulation, pancreatitis with high enzyme elevations, and normal computed tomography and excreted black, brown, and orange urine sequentially over the first nine days of hospitalization. The last complication has not been previously reported with any organophosphate compound. He finally succumbed to complication of ventilator associated pneumonia related septic shock and ventricular tachycardia. PMID:23762661

  2. Complications corner: Anterior thoracic disc surgery with dural tear/CSF fistula and low-pressure pleural drain led to severe intracranial hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Oudeman, Eline A.; Tewarie, Rishi D. S. Nandoe; Jöbsis, G. Joost; Arts, Mark P.; Kruyt, Nyika D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thoracic disc surgery can lead to a life-threatening complication: intracranial hypotension due to a subarachnoid-pleural fistula. Case Description: We report a 63-year-old male with paraparesis due to multiple herniated thoracic discs, with compressive myelopathy. The patient required a circumferential procedure including a laminectomy/fusion followed by an anterior thoracic decompression to address both diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) anteriorly and posterior stenosis. The postoperative course was complicated by severe intracranial hypotension attributed to the erroneous placement of a low-pressure drain placed in the pleural cavity instead of a lumbar drain; this resulted in subdural hematoma's necessitating subsequent surgery. Conclusion: Severe neurological deterioration occurring after thoracic decompressive surgery may rarely be attributed to intracranial hypotension due to a subarachnoid-pleural fistula. Patients should be treated with external lumbar drainage of cerebrospinal fluid for 3–5 days rather than a low-pressure pleural drain to avoid the onset of intracranial hypotension leading to symptomatic subdural hematomas. PMID:26005575

  3. Dopamine D2-Receptor-Mediated Increase in Vascular and Endothelial NOS Activity Ameliorates Cerebral Vasospasm After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Caudell, Danielle N.; Cooper, Matthew; Clark, Joseph F.; Shutter, Lori A.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious complication resulting in delayed neurological deficit, increased morbidity, mortality, longer hospital stays, and rehabilitation time. It afflicts approximately 35 per 100,000 Americans per year, and there is currently no effective therapy. We present in vitro data suggesting that increasing intrinsic nitric oxide relaxation pathways in vascular smooth muscle via dopaminergic agonism ameliorates cerebral vasospasm after SAH. Methods Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with cerebral vasospasm after SAH (CSFV) was used to induce vasospasm in porcine carotid artery in vitro. Dopamine was added to test its ability to reverse spasm, and specific dopamine receptor antagonists were used to determine which receptor mediated the protection. Immunohistochemical techniques confirmed the presence of dopamine receptor subtypes and the involvement of NOS in the mechanism of dopamine protection. Results Dopamine receptor 1, 2, and 3 subtypes are all present in porcine carotid artery. Dopamine significantly reversed spasm in vitro (67% relaxation), and this relaxation was prevented by Haloperidol, a D2R antagonist (10% relaxation, P < 0.05), but not by D1 or D3-receptor antagonism. Both eNOS and iNOS expression were increased significantly in response to CSFV alone, and this was significantly enhanced by addition of dopamine, and blocked by Haloperidol. Conclusion Cerebral vasospasm is significantly reversed in a functional measure of vasospasm in vitro by dopamine, via a D2R-mediated pathway. The increase in NOS protein seen in both the endothelium and vascular smooth muscle in response to CSFV is enhanced by dopamine, also in a D2R-dependent mechanism. PMID:18807216

  4. Cerebral atrophy and subdural haemorrhage after cerebellar and cerebral infarcts in an 8-month-old child after having been stung by a scorpion.

    PubMed

    S???rc?, Ahmet; Öztürk, Mehmet; Yak?nc?, Cengiz

    2014-01-01

    A scorpion sting causing cerebellar and cerebral infarctions with corpus callosum involvement and bilateral cerebral atrophy with subdural haemorrhage in an 8-month-old girl, has not been previously described to the best of our knowledge. PMID:24962491

  5. Severe complications of herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Volpi, Antonio

    2007-09-01

    The usual presentation of herpes zoster is as a self-limiting vesicular rash, often accompanied by post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN), its most common complication. However, herpes zoster can give rise to other complications, many of which have unusual presentations and serious sequelae. The incidence and burden of many of these less common complications are poorly understood. Ocular complications of ophthalmic zoster are relatively frequent but, with early antiviral therapy, need not be sight-threatening. Delayed contralateral hemiparesis is a rare complication of ophthalmic zoster that may present as stroke, temporally remote from the zoster episode. Ramsay Hunt syndrome is caused by reactivation of varicella zoster virus (VZV) involving the facial nerve; facial paralysis, ear pain and vesicles in the ear are diagnostic. Facial paralysis in the absence of vesicles may indicate zoster sine herpete, which can be mistaken for Bell's palsy. Herpetic facial palsies may respond to combination therapy with an antiviral plus steroid, but further research is needed to determine the benefit of such treatments. PMID:17939894

  6. Complications

    MedlinePLUS

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  7. Neurological complications of underwater diving.

    PubMed

    Rosi?ska, Justyna; ?ukasik, Maria; Kozubski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The diver's nervous system is extremely sensitive to high ambient pressure, which is the sum of atmospheric and hydrostatic pressure. Neurological complications associated with diving are a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. They occur in both commercial and recreational diving and are connected with increasing interest in the sport of diving. Hence it is very important to know the possible complications associated with this kind of sport. Complications of the nervous system may result from decompression sickness, pulmonary barotrauma associated with cerebral arterial air embolism (AGE), otic and sinus barotrauma, high pressure neurological syndrome (HPNS) and undesirable effect of gases used for breathing. The purpose of this review is to discuss the range of neurological symptoms that can occur during diving accidents and also the role of patent foramen ovale (PFO) and internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection in pathogenesis of stroke in divers. PMID:25666773

  8. Attachment, loss, and complicated grief.

    PubMed

    Shear, Katherine; Shair, Harry

    2005-11-01

    Bereavement is a highly disruptive experience that is usually followed by a painful but time-limited period of acute grief. An unfortunate minority of individuals experience prolonged and impairing complicated grief, an identifiable syndrome that differs from usual grief, major depression, and other DSM IV diagnostic entities. Underlying processes guiding symptoms are not well understood for either usual or complicated grief. We propose a provisional model of bereavement, guided by Myron Hofer's question "What exactly is lost when a loved one dies?" We integrate insights about biobehavioral regulation from Hofer's animal studies of infant separation, research on adult human attachment, and new ideas from bereavement research. In this model, death of an attachment figure produces a state of traumatic loss and symptoms of acute grief. These symptoms usually resolve following revision of the internalized representation of the deceased to incorporate the reality of the death. Failure to accomplish this integration results in the syndrome of complicated grief. PMID:16252293

  9. Association between haemorrhages and treatment with selective and non-selective serotonergic antidepressants: Possible implications of quantitative signal detection.

    PubMed

    Gahr, Maximilian; Zeiss, René; Lang, Dirk; Connemann, Bernhard J; Hiemke, Christoph; Muche, Rainer; Freudenmann, Roland W; Schönfeldt-Lecuona, Carlos

    2015-09-30

    Inhibition of serotonin uptake in platelets seems to be the crucial mechanism underlying SSRI-associated haemorrhages. This effect is also present in antidepressants featuring non-selective serotonin reuptake inhibition (non-SSRI). Impact of selectivity of serotonin reuptake and/or affinity to the serotonin reuptake transporter on the bleeding risk have not yet been studied sufficiently. We retrieved country- and SSRI-/non-SSRI-specific data from the Uppsala Monitoring Centre and used a case/non-case approach to calculate substance-specific reporting odds ratios (ROR) to evaluate the statistical association of treatment with SSRI/non-SSRI and haemorrhages. Country-specific analysis revealed no clear trends towards an increased risk of bleeding related to particular agents of group SSRI/non-SSRI (sporadically ROR>1 for citalopram, duloxetine, escitalopram, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, sertraline, St. John's wort). There was a clear trend in the total dataset towards a "reduced protective effect" (suggested by ROR<1) on the development of haemorrhages with agents featuring comparatively high affinity to the 5-HTT and/or selective serotonin reuptake inhibition (as with escitalopram, citalopram, duloxetine or venlafaxine) in comparison to agents with lower affinity or non-selective serotonin reuptake inhibition (as with mirtazapine or doxepin). Comparison of group-specific aggregated data (SSRI vs. non-SSRI) revealed significant differences regarding the "protective effect" on the development of haemorrhages between groups SSRI vs. non-SSRI in favour of non-SSRI in nearly all countries as well as in the total dataset. Our findings provide preliminary evidence that agents with increased affinity to the 5-HTT and/or selective serotonin reuptake inhibition may be associated with an increased risk of bleeding. PMID:26208982

  10. Kallikrein inhibitors limit kinin B2 antagonist-induced progression of oedematous to haemorrhagic pancreatitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Griesbacher, T; Rainer, I; Tiran, B; Peskar, B A

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Exocrine hyperstimulation with caerulein is an established model for oedematous acute pancreatitis. Prevention of oedema formation by bradykinin B2 receptor antagonists induces a progression to a haemorrhagic course in this model. We have investigated whether increased kallikrein activity in the pancreas is responsible for vascular damage and whether this could be prevented by selective kallikrein inhibitors. Experimental approach: Caerulein was infused i.v. and vascular damage was assessed by histological evaluation and determination of haemoglobin accumulation in the tissue. In addition, oedema formation, tissue and plasma kallikrein (PK) activities and the endogenous kallikrein inhibitors ?1-antitrypsin (?1-AT) and ?2-macroglobulin (?2-M) were measured. Key results: Haemorrhagic lesions induced by icatibant in caerulein-induced pancreatitis were associated with a reduction in ?1-AT and ?2-M in the pancreas and a concomitant augmentation of tissue kallikrein (TK) activity. The TK inhibitor VA999024 (previously FE999024), or its combination with the PK inhibitor VA999026 (previously FE999026), inhibited oedema formation to the same extent but did not induce vascular damage. Furthermore, VA999024 inhibited TK activity. When icatibant was combined with VA999024 and VA999026, progression from oedematous to haemorrhagic pancreatitis was abolished. Conclusions and implications: Reduced oedema formation by B2 antagonists prevented influx of endogenous kallikrein inhibitors and led to an excessive activity of kallikrein in the pancreas leading to vascular damage. This can be prevented by a combined inhibition of both tissue-type and plasma-type kallikrein. Kallikrein inhibitors thus should be further evaluated for their therapeutic potential in preventing haemorrhagic lesions in acute pancreatitis. PMID:18695645

  11. The role of fibrinogen and haemostatic assessment in postpartum haemorrhage: preparations for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wikkelsø, Anne Juul

    2015-04-01

    Pregnancy is a state of hypercoagulobility that might be an evolutionary way of protecting parturients from exsanguination following child birth. Observational studies suggest an association between a low level of fibrinogen (coagulation factor I) at the start of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) and subsequent severity of bleeding. Fibrinogen concentrate may be prescribed to correct acquired hypofibrinogenaemia, but evidence is lacking regarding the treatment efficacy. This thesis assesses the current evidence for the use of fibrinogen concentrate and haemostatic assessment in bleeding patients with special attention to the obstetrical population. It includes five papers: In Paper I the benefits or harms of fibrinogen concentrate in bleeding patients in general was evaluated using a systematic Cochrane review methodology with metaanalysis of all published randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Six trials with high risk of bias were included (248 patients). Fibrinogen appeared to reduce the need of allogenic transfusions by 53%. However, the included trials were conducted only in an elective surgical setting with a population of mainly cardiac surgical patients. Paper II was also a systematic review based on Cochrane methodology evaluating the use of viscoelastic haemostatic assays to guide haemostatic transfusion in bleeding patients. Nine RCTs (776 patients) with high risk of bias were included primarily in elective cardiac surgical patients and none were specific for the obstetric subpopulation. Viscoelastic haemostatic assay guided transfusion algorithm reduced blood loss and the proportion of patients exposed to fresh frozen plasma (FFP) or platelets. In both studies, we were unable to make firm conclusion on our primary outcome, "all cause mortality" due to lack of adequate data. Paper III was based on two national Danish registries evaluating the predictability of postpartum blood transfusion. Prediction was found difficult. However, retained placental parts seemed to be the strongest predictor. Since this diagnosis is made very late and often in association with the onset of bleeding, tools to perform an early diagnosis is highly warranted. Paper IV includes recommendations of the European Society of Anaesthesiology regarding the use of fibrinogen concentrate in PPH, and is based on very weak (GRADE 2) evidence and low confidence in estimates of effect (GRADE C). Paper V describes the protocol for a RCT of early fibrinogen supplementation in women with severe postpartum haemorrhage. Several practical, ethical and trial management challenges need to be addressed when conducting independent clinical research involving parturients with severe bleeding, placebo-controlled and blinded administration of a drug in a multicenter set-up with enrolments during the entire day and with many personnel involved. PMID:25872542

  12. Not to Complicate Matters, but ...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacoby, Russell

    2008-01-01

    The writer discusses the current academic enthrallment with complicating seemingly every aspect of every event or phenomenon, arguing that the fashion elevates confusion from a transitional stage into an end goal. Rather than scholarly clarification, says Jacoby, people celebrate the fact that everything can be "problematized," rejoicing in…

  13. Surgical complications of amyloid disease.

    PubMed Central

    O'Doherty, D. P.; Neoptolemos, J. P.; Bouch, D. C.; Wood, K. F.

    1987-01-01

    The case of a man with primary systemic amyloidosis without myelomatosis and long-term survival is described. The patient has had major surgical complications from large amyloid deposits in the colon, dorsal spine and peritoneal cavity. The patient remains well 14 years after diagnosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3684836

  14. Major Depression and Complicated Grief

    MedlinePLUS

    ... grief process Next Topic Coping with loss Major depression and complicated grief Depression It’s common for people to have sadness, pain, ... might be getting worse—going into a major depression. About 1 in 5 bereaved people will develop ...

  15. Anaesthetic complications in plastic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Soumya Sankar; Roy, Debashis; Ansari, Farrukh; Pawar, Sundeep T.

    2013-01-01

    Anaesthesia related complications in plastic surgeries are fortunately rare, but potentially catastrophic. Maintaining patient safety in the operating room is a major concern of anaesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitals and surgical facilities. Circumventing preventable complications is essential and pressure to avoid these complications in cosmetic surgery is increasing. Key aspects of patient safety in the operating room are outlined, including patient positioning, airway management and issues related to some specific conditions, essential for minimizing post-operative morbidity. Risks associated with extremes of age in the plastic surgery population, may be minimised by a better understanding of the physiologic changes as well as the pre-operative and post-operative considerations in caring for this special group of patients. An understanding of the anaesthesiologist's concerns during paediatric plastic surgical procedures can facilitate the coordination of efforts between the multiple services involved in the care of these children. Finally, the reader will have a better understanding of the perioperative care of unique populations including the morbidly obese and the elderly. Attention to detail in these aspects of patient safety can help avoid unnecessary complication and significantly improve the patients’ experience and surgical outcome. PMID:24501480

  16. Neurological Complications of VZV Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review Varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation results in zoster, which may be complicated by postherpetic neuralgia, myelitis, meningoencephalitis and VZV vasculopathy. This review highlights the clinical features, laboratory abnormalities, imaging changes and optimal treatment of each of those conditions. Because all of these neurological disorders produced by VZV reactivation can occur in the absence of rash, the virological tests proving that VZV caused disease are discussed. Recent findings After primary infection, VZV becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. With a decline in VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity, VZV reactivates from ganglia and travels anterograde to the skin to cause zoster, which is often complicated by postherpetic neuralgia. VZV can also travel retrograde to produce meningoencephaltis, myelitis and stroke. When these complications occur without rash, VZV-induced disease can be diagnosed by detection of VZV DNA or anti-VZV antibody in CSF and treated with intravenous acyclovir. Summary Awareness of the expanding spectrum of neurological complications caused by VZV reactivation with and without rash will improve diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24792344

  17. Complications of high grade liver injuries: management and outcomewith focus on bile leaks

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although liver injury scale does not predict need for surgical intervention, a high-grade complex liver injury should alert the physician to expect an increased risk of hepatic complications following trauma. The aim of the current study was to define hepatic related morbidity in patients sustaining high-grade hepatic injuries that could be safely managed non-operatively. Patients and methods This is a retrospective study of patients with liver injury admitted to Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Centre over a 10-year period. Grade 3-5 injuries were considered to be high grade. Collected data included the number and types of liver-related complications. Interventions which were required for these complications in patients who survived longer than 24 hours were analysed. Results Of 398 patients with liver trauma, 64 (16%) were found to have high-grade liver injuries. Mechanism of injury was blunt trauma in 43 cases, and penetrating in 21. Forty patients (62%) required operative treatment. Among survivors 22 patients (47.8%) developed liver-related complications which required additional interventional treatment. Bilomas and bile leaks were diagnosed in 16 cases post-injury. The diagnosis of bile leaks was suspected with abdominal CT scan, which revealed intraabdominal collections (n = 6), and ascites (n = 2). Three patients had continuous biliary leak from intraabdominal drains left after laparotomy. Nine patients required ERCP with biliary stent placement, and 2 required percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. ERCP failed in one case. Four angioembolizations (AE) were performed in 3 patients for rebleeding. Surgical treatment was found to be associated with higher complication rate. AE at admission was associated with a significantly higher rate of biliary complications. There were 24 deaths (37%), the majority from uncontrolled haemorrhage (18 patients). There were only 2 hepatic-related mortalities due to liver failure. Conclusions A high complication rate following high-grade liver injuries should be anticipated. In patients with clinical evidence of biliary complications, CT scan is a useful diagnostic and therapeutic tool. AE, ERCP and temporary internal stenting, together with percutaneous drainage of intra-abdominal or intrahepatic bile collections, represents a safe and effective strategy for the management of complications following both blunt and penetrating hepatic trauma. PMID:22444252

  18. Differential effects of activity and climate on onset of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kawai, K; Nonaka, K; Suzuki, H; Kirino, T; Tamura, A

    2001-05-01

    Conflicting findings of the effect of climate on onset of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) may result from the influence of strenuous activities which can trigger aneurysmal rupture independent of climatological factors. The effect of climate and patient activities on onset of SAH were analyzed. The clinical records of 786 consecutive patients with aneurysmal SAH admitted to our hospital for 10 years were reviewed. Activities at onset were categorized according to the intensity of strain at onset. Seasonal variation, circannual cyclic trend, and association with 90 meteorological factors were examined in each category and the results were compared between categories. Bimonthly occurrence in the light strain group showed a significant seasonal variation and cyclic trend with two peaks in early spring and fall, whereas no significant trend was detected in the overall patients and in the heavy strain group. The significant meteorological factors were global solar radiation, sunshine hours, changes in mean and minimum temperature and mean vapor pressure from the previous day, and minimum pressure in the previous 7 days. Lower global solar radiation in the light strain group was associated with onset with the lowest p value (p = 0.0046). No factors were significant in the heavy strain group. There is some evidence of the possible influence of climatological factors on onset of SAH without strenuous activity. Strenuous activity seems to affect onset more strongly, which masks any effect of climate. PMID:11396302

  19. Astragaloside IV alleviates early brain injury following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Shao, Anwen; Guo, Songxue; Tu, Sheng; Ammar, Al-baadani; Tang, Junjia; Hong, Yuan; Wu, Haijian; Zhang, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Astragaloside IV, one of the main effective components isolated from Astragalus membranaceus, has multiple neuroprotective properties, while the effects of astragaloside IV on the attenuation of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced early brain injury (EBI) and its possible mechanisms are unknown. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether astragaloside IV could inhibit oxidative stress, reduce neuronal apoptosis, and improve neurological deficits after experimental SAH in rats. Rats (n=68) were randomly divided into the following groups: Sham group, SAH group, SAH+vehicle group, and SAH+astragaloside IV group. Astragaloside IV or an equal volume of vehicle was administered at 1 h and 6 h after SAH, all the rats were subsequently sacrificed at 24 h after SAH. Mortality, neurological scores, and brain edema were assessed, biochemical tests and histological studies were also performed at that point. SAH induced an increase in the malondialdehyde (MDA) level, neuronal apoptosis, cleaved caspase 3, brain edema and decreased activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). Astragaloside IV treatment reversed these changes and improved neurobehavioral outcomes of SAH rats. Our findings suggested that astragaloside IV may alleviate EBI after SAH through antioxidative and anti-apoptotic effects. PMID:25136262

  20. Astragaloside IV Alleviates Early Brain Injury Following Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Anwen; Guo, Songxue; Tu, Sheng; Ammar, Al-baadani; Tang, Junjia; Hong, Yuan; Wu, Haijian; Zhang, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Astragaloside IV, one of the main effective components isolated from Astragalus membranaceus, has multiple neuroprotective properties, while the effects of astragaloside IV on the attenuation of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced early brain injury (EBI) and its possible mechanisms are unknown. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether astragaloside IV could inhibit oxidative stress, reduce neuronal apoptosis, and improve neurological deficits after experimental SAH in rats. Rats (n=68) were randomly divided into the following groups: Sham group, SAH group, SAH+vehicle group, and SAH+astragaloside IV group. Astragaloside IV or an equal volume of vehicle was administered at 1 h and 6 h after SAH, all the rats were subsequently sacrificed at 24 h after SAH. Mortality, neurological scores, and brain edema were assessed, biochemical tests and histological studies were also performed at that point. SAH induced an increase in the malondialdehyde (MDA) level, neuronal apoptosis, cleaved caspase 3, brain edema and decreased activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). Astragaloside IV treatment reversed these changes and improved neurobehavioral outcomes of SAH rats. Our findings suggested that astragaloside IV may alleviate EBI after SAH through antioxidative and anti-apoptotic effects. PMID:25136262

  1. Measuring Serum Amyloid A for Infection Prediction in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Azurmendi, Leire; Degos, Vincent; Tiberti, Natalia; Kapandji, Natacha; Sanchez, Paola; Sarrafzadeh, Asita; Puybasset, Louis; Turck, Natacha; Sanchez, Jean-Charles

    2015-09-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity. Nosocomial infections, such as pneumonia or urinary tract infections, are among the main causes of worsening outcomes and death. The aim of this study was to discover a biomarker to predict infection in aSAH patients. For this purpose, the plasma of infected and noninfected patients was compared using quantitative mass spectrometry. The most interesting differentially expressed proteins were selected for validation by immunoassays on plasma samples taken from patients (n = 81) over 10 days of hospitalization. Predictive performances were established using Mann-Whitney U tests and receiver operating characteristic curves. Quantitative proteomics identified 17 significantly regulated proteins. Of these, levels of serum amyloid A (SAA) were significantly higher in infected patients (p < 0.007). ELISA confirmed that the concentrations were significantly higher (p < 0.002) already at hospital admission in patients who subsequently developed an infection during their hospitalization, (AUC of 76%) for a cutoff value of 90.9 ?g/mL. Our data suggested that measuring SAA could be an efficient means of detecting patients susceptible of developing an infection during hospitalization after an aSAH. Its predictive capacity could lead to earlier antibiotherapy, improved patient management, and potentially better long-term outcomes. PMID:26198378

  2. Distribution of /sup 3/H-morphine following lumbar subarachnoid injection in unanesthetized rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.C.; Hiller, J.M.; Simon, E.J.; Hillman, D.E.; Rosenberg, C.; Turndorf, H.

    1989-05-01

    Morphine sulfate (40-100 micrograms) and /sup 3/H-morphine (125-200 pmol) were injected into the lumbar subarachnoid space of 18 unanesthetized rabbits through a surgically implanted catheter. Radioactivity remaining in the spinal cord 2, 4, 6, and 12 h later revealed recovery (mean +/- SEM) of 45 +/- 5.6% (n = 3), 30.5 +/- 14.1% (n = 4), 11.23 +/- 4.4% (n = 3), and 3.7 +/- 1.1% (n = 3), respectively, of the injected radioactivity. Tritiated morphine was found to be predominantly centered around the injection site, with limited rostral and caudal spread in the cord. No significant radioactivity was detected in plasma or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from the cisterna magna taken at 5, 15, 30, min and 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 h after receiving radioactive labeled drug (with the exception of that in one rabbit). Of the injected radioactivity, 75% was recovered in the urine in 12 h. These results suggest that the persistence of morphine in the spinal cord could account for its prolonged analgesic effect following intrathecal administration.

  3. Intravenous Flat-Detector Computed Tomography Angiography for Symptomatic Cerebral Vasospasm following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jin Pyeong; Sheen, Seung Hun; Cho, Yong-Jun

    2014-01-01

    The study evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of intravenous flat-detector computed tomography (IV FDCT) angiography in assessing hemodynamically significant cerebral vasospasm in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) as the reference. DSA and IV FDCT were conducted concurrently in patients suspected of having symptomatic cerebral vasospasm postoperatively. The presence and severity of vasospasm were estimated according to location (proximal versus distal). Vasospasm >50% was defined as having hemodynamic significance. Vasospasms <30% were excluded from this analysis to avoid spectrum bias. Twenty-nine patients (311 vessel segments) were measured. The intra- and interobserver agreements were excellent for depicting vasospasm (k = 0.84 and 0.74, resp.). IV FDCT showed a sensitivity of 95.7%, specificity of 92.3%, positive predictive value of 93.6%, and negative predictive value of 94.7% for detecting vasospasm (>50%) with DSA as the reference. Bland-Altman plots revealed good agreement of assessing vasospasm between the two tests. The discrepancy of vasospasm severity was more noted in the distal location with high-severity. However, it was not statistically significant (Spearman's rank test; r = 0.15, P = 0.35). Therefore, IV FDCT could be a feasible noninvasive test to evaluate suspected significant vasospasm in SAH. PMID:25383367

  4. Effect of APOE Gene Polymorphism on Early Cerebral Perfusion After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chongjie; Jiang, Li; Yang, Yanhong; Wu, Haitao; Huang, Zhijian; Sun, Xiaochuan

    2015-12-01

    High mortality following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) occurs in the early phase, but the underlying mechanism of early brain injury (EBI) in aSAH was less elucidated. In this study, we aimed to investigate the association of apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotypes and early cerebral perfusion after aSAH. We collected venous blood of aSAH patients on admission for APOE genotype identification, applying computed tomography perfusion (CTP) scanning within 24 h after onset. The CTP parameters between patients with different APOE genotypes were compared. Then, a positive item was chosen for separate uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses to seek its risk factors. Our results showed mean transit time (MTT) rather than other parameters was significantly longer in patients with the APOE?4 allele, compared to those without APOE?4 (6.45?±?1.17 versus 5.83?±?0.84 s, P?=?0.019). APOE?4 acted as an independent risk factor for MTT prolongation (>5.9 s) in uni- (P?=?0.031, OR?=?3.960, 95 % CI?=?1.131-13.863) and multivariate (P?=?0.019, OR?=?9.822, 95 % CI?=?1.458-66.193) logistic regression analyses, respectively. APOE?4 may induce cerebral perfusion impairment in the early phase, contributing to EBI following aSAH, and assessment of APOE genotypes could serve as a useful tool in the prognostic evaluation and therapeutic management of aSAH. PMID:26370543

  5. Neurogenic pulmonary edema induced by subarachnoid hemorrhage:; case report on diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Guenter; Meyer, Frank

    2015-04-01

    An exemplary rare case of neurogenic pulmonary edema induced by intracranial hemorrhage was reported including diagnostic and therapeutic implications as well as management recommendations. A 35-year old man who was treated first by a neurosurgical approach because of a subarachnoid hemorrhage (bore hole trepanation) and subsequently on a surgical intensive care unit because of severe postoperative hemodynamic, cardiocirculatory, and pulmonary disruptions. To monitor cardiopulmonary condition and treatment effects, a Swan-Ganz catheter was placed in the pulmonary artery, since after trepanation, a critical cardiopulmonary status developed during postoperative mechanical ventilation and catecholamine administration. This condition was indicated by neurogenic pulmonary edema detected by control chest X-ray film and high oxygen load in the inspiratory air required for sufficient arterial oxygenation. After use of high positive end-exspiratory pressure (PEEP) (initially directed against neurogenic lesion), adaptation of initial dobutamine doses, initiation of norepinephrine administration, and substitution of fluids, the patient's blood pressure finally rose sufficiently to sustain regular cerebral blood perfusion and achieve better arterial oxygenation. Thus, the patient's cardiopulmonary condition stabilized and temporary cardiac insufficiency could be overcome. Subsequently, it became possible to decrease PEEP according to requirements to prevent or limit cerebral edema and to diminish catecholamine doses. PMID:26146119

  6. Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: relationship to solar activity in the United States, 1988-2010.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Benjamin P; Weil, Robert J

    2014-07-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a common condition treated by neurosurgeons. The inherent variability in the incidence and presentation of ruptured cerebral aneurysms has been investigated in association with seasonality, circadian rhythm, lunar cycle, and climate factors. We aimed to identify an association between solar activity (solar flux and sunspots) and the incidence of aneurysmal SAH, all of which appear to behave in periodic fashions over long time periods. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) provided longitudinal, retrospective data on patients hospitalized with SAH in the United States, from 1988 to 2010, who underwent aneurysmal clipping or coiling. Solar activity and SAH incidence data were modeled with the cosinor methodology and a 10-year periodic cycle length. The NIS database contained 32,281 matching hospitalizations from 1988 to 2010. The acrophase (time point in the cycle of highest amplitude) for solar flux and for sunspots were coincident. The acrophase for aneurysmal SAH incidence was out of phase with solar activity determined by non-overlapping 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Aneurysmal SAH incidence peaks appear to be delayed behind solar activity peaks by 64 months (95% CI; 56-73 months) when using a modeled 10-year periodic cycle. Solar activity (solar flux and sunspots) appears to be associated with the incidence of aneurysmal SAH. As solar activity reaches a relative maximum, the incidence of aneurysmal SAH reaches a relative minimum. These observations may help identify future trends in aneurysmal SAH on a population basis. PMID:24979701

  7. Memantine alleviates brain injury and neurobehavioral deficits after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Yuan; Wang, Liang-Chao; Wang, Hao-Kuang; Pan, Chia-Hsin; Cheng, Ya-Yun; Shan, Yan-Shen; Chio, Chung-Ching; Tsai, Kuen-Jer

    2015-06-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) causes brain injury via glutamate excitotoxicity, which leads to an excessive Ca(2+) influx and this starts an apoptotic cascade. Memantine has been proven to reduce brain injury in several types of brain insults. This study investigated the neuro-protective potential of memantine after SAH and explored the underlying mechanisms. An endovascular perforation rat model of SAH was used and Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into sham surgery, SAH?+?vehicle, and SAH?+?memantine groups. The effects of memantine on SAH were evaluated by assessing the neuro-behavioral functions, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and neuronal cell preservation. The mechanisms of action of memantine, with its N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonistic characteristics on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression and peroxynitrite formation, were also investigated. The apoptotic cascade after SAH was suppressed by memantine. Neuronal NOS (nNOS) expression, peroxynitrite formation, and subsequent oxidative/nitrosative stress were also reduced. Memantine effectively preserved BBB integrity, rescued neuronal injury, and improved neurological outcome in experimental SAH. Memantine has neuro-protective potential in experimental SAH and may help combat SAH-induced brain damage in the future. PMID:24952609

  8. Changes in responsiveness of the canine basilar artery to endothelin-1 after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Kamata, Katsuo; Nishiyama, Hiroshi; Kasuya, Yutaka ); Miyata, Noriyuki )

    1991-01-01

    The effect of endothelin-1 (ET-1) on the basilar arteries from control and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) dogs were examined. The maximal contraction of the basilar artery in response to ET-1 was markedly decreased in the SAH group. Treatment with 10{sup {minus}8}M phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) reduced the contractile responses to ET-1 in the basilar arteries from control dogs. ET-1-induced contractions of the basilar arteries from control dogs were similar to those in strips from SAH dogs by the treatment with 10{sup {minus}8}M PMA. Ca{sup 2+}-induced contraction of the basilar arteries which were depolarized with isotonic K{sup +} were significantly attenuated in SAH dogs. Treatment with PMA also reduced the contractile responses to Ca{sup 2+} in the basilar arteries from control dogs. These results indicate that decreased contractile responses of the basilar arteries to ET-1 and Ca{sup 2+} in the SAH group may be related to changes in the activity of the protein kinase C in vascular smooth muscle.

  9. Developing Patient-centered Outcome Measures for Evaluating Vasospasm in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Reichman, Melissa B.; Greenberg, Eddie D.; Gold, Rachel L.; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Patient-centered outcome measures have become an essential focus in research methodology in recent years. This may be particularly challenging in imaging research at the technology assessment level to incorporate patient-centeredness. A primary issue in this field is designing a reference standard that is applicable to the entire study population. Materials and Methods This important element is necessary for translation of findings into clinical practice. In our work, computed tomographic perfusion imaging is being evaluated as a new technology used in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage patients to detect cerebral vasospasm. We have developed a new reference standard employing a multistage hierarchical design incorporating both clinical and imaging criteria to determine a diagnosis of vasospasm. Results A flowchart of the reference standard levels is provided for illustration. The limitations and potential biases that may occur using this reference standard are discussed. Conclusions This reference standard will be applicable to the entire study population, including those with and without symptoms or further imaging with digital subtraction angiography. PMID:19345894

  10. Microglia regulate blood clearance in subarachnoid hemorrhage by heme oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Schallner, Nils; Pandit, Rambhau; LeBlanc, Robert; Thomas, Ajith J.; Ogilvy, Christopher S.; Zuckerbraun, Brian S.; Gallo, David; Otterbein, Leo E.; Hanafy, Khalid A.

    2015-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) carries a 50% mortality rate. The extravasated erythrocytes that surround the brain contain heme, which, when released from damaged red blood cells, functions as a potent danger molecule that induces sterile tissue injury and organ dysfunction. Free heme is metabolized by heme oxygenase (HO), resulting in the generation of carbon monoxide (CO), a bioactive gas with potent immunomodulatory capabilities. Here, using a murine model of SAH, we demonstrated that expression of the inducible HO isoform (HO-1, encoded by Hmox1) in microglia is necessary to attenuate neuronal cell death, vasospasm, impaired cognitive function, and clearance of cerebral blood burden. Initiation of CO inhalation after SAH rescued the absence of microglial HO-1 and reduced injury by enhancing erythrophagocytosis. Evaluation of correlative human data revealed that patients with SAH have markedly higher HO-1 activity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compared with that in patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Furthermore, cisternal hematoma volume correlated with HO-1 activity and cytokine expression in the CSF of these patients. Collectively, we found that microglial HO-1 and the generation of CO are essential for effective elimination of blood and heme after SAH that otherwise leads to neuronal injury and cognitive dysfunction. Administration of CO may have potential as a therapeutic modality in patients with ruptured cerebral aneurysms. PMID:26011640

  11. Altered Resting-State Connectivity within Executive Networks after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Monica; Churchill, Nathan W.; de Oliveira Manoel, Airton Leonardo; Graham, Simon J.; Macdonald, R. Loch; Schweizer, Tom A.

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is associated with significant mortality rates, and most survivors experience significant cognitive deficits across multiple domains, including executive function. It is critical to determine the neural basis for executive deficits in aSAH, in order to better understand and improve patient outcomes. This study is the first examination of resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a group of aSAH patients, used to characterize changes in functional connectivity of the frontoparietal network. We scanned 14 aSAH patients and 14 healthy controls, and divided patients into “impaired” and “unimpaired” groups based on a composite executive function score. Impaired patients exhibited significantly lower quality of life and neuropsychological impairment relative to controls, across multiple domains. Seed-based functional connectivity analysis demonstrated that unimpaired patients were not significantly different from controls, but impaired patients had increased frontoparietal connectivity. Patients evidenced increased frontoparietal connectivity as a function of decreased executive function and decreased mood (i.e. quality of life). In addition, T1 morphometric analysis demonstrated that these changes are not attributable to local cortical atrophy among aSAH patients. These results establish significant, reliable changes in the endogenous brain dynamics of aSAH patients, that are related to cognitive and mood outcomes. PMID:26172281

  12. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Brain Edema Formation After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Fujimoto, Masashi; Kawakita, Fumihiro; Ichikawa, Naoki; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of brain edema formation after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). In this study, we evaluated the effect of anti-VEGF antibody neutralization on brain edema formation after experimental SAH in mice. Mice underwent sham operation or filament puncture SAH and were assigned to sham, SAH?+?vehicle, or SAH?+?anti-VEGF antibody groups. Vehicle or anti-VEGF antibody was administrated by an intracerebroventricular injection at 30 min post-SAH. After 24 h of SAH modeling, neurological score was recorded to evaluate neurobehavioral functions, brain water content was calculated to assess the level of brain edema, and immunohistochemistry of immunoglobulin (Ig) G was performed to evaluate the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Anti-VEGF antibody significantly ameliorated neurological score and brain edema after SAH compared with the SAH?+?vehicle group. Immunohistochemistry showed that post-SAH IgG extravasation in brain tissue was suppressed by anti-VEGF antibody. This study suggests that VEGF is involved in brain edema formation after SAH, and that anti-VEGF antibody can decrease BBB permeability, suppress brain edema formation, and improve functional outcome after 24 h of SAH. PMID:26463944

  13. Rosiglitazone attenuates early brain injury after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chi; Wang, Yifei; Li, Jianru; Chen, Jingyin; Yan, Feng; Wu, Cheng; Chen, Gao

    2015-10-22

    Early brain injury (EBI) plays a crucial role in the pathological progress of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). This study was designed to determine whether rosiglitazone protects the brain against EBI in rats, and discuss the role of the anti-apoptotic mechanism mediated by Bcl-2 family proteins in this neuroprotection. 86 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the sham group, the SAH+ vehicle group and the SAH+ rosiglitazone group. SAH was induced via an endovascular perforation technique and rosiglitazone (3mg/kg) or vehicle was administered. Mortality, neurological scores, brain water content, Evans blue dye assay, TUNEL stain assay, Gelatin zymography, and western blot analysis were performed. Rosiglitazone significantly improved mortality, neurological scores, brain water content, blood brain barrier (BBB) and apoptosis compared with the vehicle group within 24h after SAH. The TUNEL staining assay demonstrated that apoptosis was ameliorated. Cleaved Caspase-3 and MMP-9 expression was reduced, whereas Bcl-2 and p-Bad was markedly preserved by rosiglitazone. A significant elevation of p-Akt was detected after rosiglitazone treatment. Our study demonstrated that rosiglitazone plays a neuroprotective role in EBI after SAH via attenuation of BBB disruption, brain edema and apoptosis. PMID:26220473

  14. Geographical Analysis of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Japan Utilizing Publically-Accessible DPC Database

    PubMed Central

    Fukuhara, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Since the launch of the novel medical reimbursement system Diagnosis Procedure Combination (DPC) in 2003 in Japan, inpatient data has been accumulated over time as part of a Japanese governmental nationwide database. This is partially accessible by the public, and this study examined the adequacy of this database as epidemiological research material by extracting the data relating to aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) with special attention given to the limitations that this involves. Datasets after 2010 are considered suitable for analysis because of the numbers of participating hospitals and the analysis term. Extracting the data by prefecture, those with a continuously high aSAH incidence were Aomori, Iwate, Akita, Yamagata, Kochi and Kumamoto Prefectures, and those with low aSAH incidence were Kanagawa, Shiga, Kyoto, Shimane and Ehime Prefectures. Although these obtained results are informative, a publically-accessible DPC database has several limitations. Some limitations have been resolved: the analyzed term each year is now 12-months and the number of participating hospitals seems to have stabilized around 1700. However, other limitations such as masking the numbers in each hospital reporting less than 10 patients still exist, so careful and critical interpretation is necessary in utilizing a publically-accessible DPC database. Considering the potential of this database as material for epidemiological research, future analysis of the entire DPC database by qualified researchers is desirable. PMID:25811480

  15. Comparison of Incidence and Risk Factors for Shunt-dependent Hydrocephalus in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bae, In-Seok; Choi, Kyu-Sun; Chun, Hyoung-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of ventricular shunt placement for shunt-dependent hydrocephalus (SDHC) after clipping versus coiling of ruptured aneurysms. Materials and Methods A retrospective review was conducted in 215 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) who underwent surgical clipping or endovascular coiling during the period from May 2008 to December 2011. Relevant clinical and radiographic data were analyzed with regard to the incidence of hydrocephalus and ventriculo-peritoneal shunt (VPS). Patients treated with clipping were assigned to Group A, while those treated with coiling were assigned to Group B. Results Of 215 patients (157 clipping, 58 coiling), no significant difference in the incidence of final VPS was observed between treatment modalities (15.3% vs. 10.3%) (p = 0.35). Independent risk factors for VPS for treatment of chronic hydrocephalus were as follows: (1) older than 65 years, (2) poorer Hunt-Hess grade IV and V, (3) Fisher grade III and IV, and (4) particularly initial presence of an intraventricular hemorrhage. Conclusion In this study comparing two modalities for treatment of aneurysm, there was no difference in the incidence of chronic hydrocephalus requiring VPS. A significantly higher rate of shunt dependency was observed for age older than 65 years, poor initial neurological status, and thick SAH with presence of initial intraventricular hemorrhage. By understanding these factors related to development of SDHC and results, it is expected that management of aneurysmal SAH will result in a better prognosis. PMID:25045646

  16. Pharmacologic reduction of angiographic vasospasm in experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Zoerle, Tommaso; Ilodigwe, Don; Wan, Hoyee; Lakovic, Katarina; Sabri, Mohammed; Ai, Jinglu; Macdonald, R Loch

    2013-01-01

    Animal models have been developed to simulate angiographic vasospasm secondary to subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and to test pharmacologic treatments. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of pharmacologic treatments that have been tested in humans and in preclinical studies to determine if animal models inform results reported in humans. A systematic review and meta-analysis of SAH studies was performed. We investigated predictors of -translation from animals to humans with multivariate logistic regression. Pharmacologic reduction of vasospasm was effective in mice, rats, rabbits, dogs, nonhuman primates, and humans. Animal studies were generally of poor methodologic quality, and there was evidence of publication bias. Fresh blood injection to simulate SAH (vs. clot placement) and evaluation of vasospasm more than 3 days after SAH were independently associated with successful translation. We conclude that reduction of vasospasm is effective in animals and humans, and that injection of fresh blood and evaluation of vasospasm more than 3 days after SAH may be preferable for preclinical models. PMID:22890676

  17. Role of Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter in Early Brain Injury After Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huiying; Zhang, Dingding; Hao, Shuangying; Li, Kuanyu; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that mitochondrial Ca(2+) is undertaken by mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU), and its accumulation is associated with the development of many diseases. However, little was known about the role of MCU in early brain injury (EBI) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). MCU can be opened by spermine under a physiological condition and inhibited by ruthenium red (RR). Herein, we investigated the effects of RR and spermine to reveal the role of MCU in SAH animal model. The data obtained with biochemical and histological assays showed that mitochondrial Ca(2+) concentration was significantly increased in the temporal cortex of rats 1, 2, and 3 days after SAH, consistent with constant high levels of cellular Ca(2+) concentration. In agreement with the observation in the acute phase, SAH rats showed an obvious increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and decrease of ATP production. Blockage of MCU prevented Ca(2+) accumulation, abated the level of oxidative stress, and improved the energy supply. Translocation of cytochrome c, increased cleaved caspase-3, and a large amount of apoptotic cells after SAH were reversed by RR administration. Surprisingly, exogenous spermine did not increase cellular Ca(2+) concentration, but lessened the Ca(2+) accumulation after SAH to benefit the rats. Taken together, our results demonstrated that blockage of MCU or prevention of Ca(2+) accumulation after SAH is essential in EBI after SAH. These findings suggest that MCU is considered to be a therapeutic target for patients suffering from SAH. PMID:25370932

  18. Diagnostic value of a ghrelin test for the diagnosis of GH deficiency after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Blijdorp, K; Khajeh, L; Ribbers, G M; Sneekes, E M; Heijenbrok-Kal, M H; van den Berg-Emons, H J G; van der Lely, A J; van Kooten, F; Neggers, S J C M M

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the diagnostic value of a ghrelin test in the diagnosis of GH deficiency (GHD) shortly after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Design Prospective single-center observational cohort study. Methods A ghrelin test was assessed after the acute phase of SAH and a GH-releasing hormone (GHRH)–arginine test 6 months post SAH. Primary outcome was the diagnostic value of a ghrelin test compared with the GHRH–arginine test in the diagnosis of GHD. The secondary outcome was to assess the safety of the ghrelin test, including patients' comfort, adverse events, and idiosyncratic reactions. Results Forty-three survivors of SAH were included (15 males, 35%, mean age 56.6±11.7). Six out of 43 (14%) SAH survivors were diagnosed with GHD by GHRH–arginine test. In GHD subjects, median GH peak during ghrelin test was significantly lower than that of non-GHD subjects (5.4 vs 16.6, P=0.002). Receiver operating characteristics analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.869. A cutoff limit of a GH peak of 15??g/l corresponded with a sensitivity of 100% and a false-positive rate of 40%. No adverse events or idiosyncratic reactions were observed in subjects undergoing a ghrelin test, except for one subject who reported flushing shortly after ghrelin infusion. Conclusion Owing to its convenience, validity, and safety, the ghrelin test might be a valuable GH provocative test, especially in the early phase of SAH. PMID:24037787

  19. Signaling Pathway in Early Brain Injury after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: News Update.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chengyuan; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The annual incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) caused by intracranial aneurysm rupture is approximately 10.5/10 million people in China, making SAH the third most frequently occurring hemorrhage of the intracranial type after cerebral embolism and hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage. SAH caused by ruptured aneurysm leads to a mortality rate as high as 67 %, and, because of the sudden onset of this disease, approximately 12-15 % of patients die before they can receive effective treatment. Early brain injury (EBI) is the brain damage occurring within the first 72 h after SAH. Two-thirds of mortality caused by SAH occurs within 48 h, mainly as a result of EBI. With the development of molecular biology and medicine microscopy techniques, various signaling pathways involved in EBI after SAH have been revealed. Understanding these signaling pathways may help clinicians treat EBI after SAH and improve long-term prognosis of SAH patients. This chapter summarizes several important signaling pathways implicated in EBI caused by SAH. PMID:26463934

  20. Assessment of the Correlations Between Brain Weight and Brain Edema in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yu; Suzuki, Hidenori; Nakagawa, Takashi; Uekawa, Ken; Koibuchi, Nobutaka; Kawano, Takayuki; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei

    2016-01-01

    Because brain edema is correlated with poor outcome in clinical subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), appropriate evaluation methods for brain edema are important in experimental SAH studies. Although brain water content (BWC) is widely used to evaluate brain edema in stroke research, the usefulness of brain weight is undetermined. In this study, we examined the role of brain weight in the evaluation of brain edema in experimental SAH. The endovascular perforation model of SAH was used, and rats were assessed by neurological scoring (NS). The brains were quickly removed at 24 h after the operation, and the weights of wet cerebrum (WWC) and dry cerebrum (WDC) were measured to determine the brain water content (BWC). The correlations of those values with each other and to body weight (BW) were then examined to reveal the significance of brain weight. The rats were assigned to sham-operated (n?=?8) and SAH (n?=?16) groups. There were no significant differences in WWC between the groups (p?=?0.61). WWC was correlated with BWC but not with NS in all rats. In addition, WWC was clearly correlated with BW and WDC, which is thought to substitute for the original brain weight. From these results, we suggest that the measurement of brain weight as an evaluation of brain edema is limited and that BW and original brain volume can be confounding factors in evaluation. PMID:26463928

  1. Lipocalin 2 and Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption in White Matter after Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Egashira, Yusuke; Hua, Ya; Keep, Richard F; Iwama, Toru; Xi, Guohua

    2016-01-01

    We reported previously that subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) causes acute white matter injury in mice. In this study, we investigated lipocalin 2 (LCN2) mediated blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in white matter, which may lead to subsequent injury. SAH was induced by endovascular perforation in wild-type (WT) and LCN2-knockout (LCN2(-/-)) mice. Sham mice underwent the same procedure without perforation. Mice underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 24 h after SAH to confirm the development of T2-hyperintensity in white matter. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were performed to elucidate the mechanisms of LCN2-mediated white matter injury and BBB disruption. It was confirmed that LCN2 expression was significantly increased in white matter of WT mice after SAH by Western blotting (versus sham; p?

  2. Complications of immobilization and bed rest. Part 2: Other complications.

    PubMed Central

    Teasell, R.; Dittmer, D. K.

    1993-01-01

    Prolonged immobilization affects almost every organ system. Respiratory complications include decreased ventilation, atelectasis, and pneumonia. Decreased basal metabolic rate, increased diuresis, natriuresis, and nitrogen and calcium depletion affect metabolism. Genitourinary problems include renal stones and more frequent urinary tract infections. Glucose intolerance, anorexia, constipation, and pressure sores might develop. Central nervous system changes could affect balance and coordination and lead to increasing dependence on caregivers. Images Figure 1 PMID:8324412

  3. A mortality event in wrasse species (Labridae) associated with the presence of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus.

    PubMed

    Munro, E S; McIntosh, R E; Weir, S J; Noguera, P A; Sandilands, J M; Matejusova, I; Mayes, A S; Smith, R

    2015-04-01

    Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) is an infectious disease of farmed and wild fish and has an extensive host range in both freshwater and marine environments. In December 2012, a wrasse population consisting of ballan, Labrus bergylta (Ascanius), corkwing, Symphodus melops (L.), cuckoo, Labrus mixtus L., goldsinny, Ctenolabrus rupestris (L.), and rock cook, Centrolabrus exoletus (L.), held at a marine hatchery in the Shetland Isles, Scotland, experienced a mortality event. Approximately 10 000 wrasse were being held at the facility on behalf of an Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., aquaculture company prior to being deployed for the biological control of parasites on marine pen Atlantic salmon, aquaculture sites. Fish Health Inspectors from Marine Scotland Science initiated a diagnostic investigation, and subsequent diagnostic testing confirmed the site to be VHSV positive by qRT-PCR and virus isolation followed by ELISA. A VHSV genotype-specific qRT-PCR assay revealed that the isolates belonged to genotype III, the European marine strain of the virus. The virus genotype was further confirmed by nucleic acid sequencing of the partial nucleoprotein (N) and glycoprotein (G) genes followed by BLAST nucleotide searches. This study reports for the first time the detection of VHSV within multiple wrasse species and highlights the need for a comprehensive risk-based approach to the use of wrasse and other finfish species as biological controls within the aquaculture industry. PMID:24661037

  4. Epidemiological, serological and herd immunity of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever in Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Humolli, Isme; Dedushaj, Isuf; Zupanac, Tatjana Avsic; Muçaj, Sefedin

    2010-01-01

    Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) is primarily a zoonotic disease, mostly present as sporadic cases, but outbreaks also occur, especially in the family. Disease as endemic form is presents in some countries of Africa, Europe and Asia. In 2001, outbreak of CCHF was registered in Kosova, Albania, Pakistan, Iran, and South Africa. Goal of the research was to establish a pattern of the disease, its natural flow and herd immunity. For this purpose we used epidemiological methods, laboratory confirmation (ELISA, PCR) and t-test and chi2-test for results significance verification. Morbidity rate of the disease for the period of fifteen years (1995-2009) is 0.49 in 100,000 inhabitants, and lethality rate is 26.76 deaths on 100 lab confirmed cases. CCHF in Kosovo is present in 50% of the territory with common characteristics: altitude, hot climate, low bush and farming. Hyper endemic zones are in Central and South West of Kosovo. Seroprevalence in entire healthy population is found to be 24.3%. Presence of the CCHF antibodies was found in 14% of livestock, and in 32.6% of sheep. A phylogenetic aspect of the CCHFvirus isolated in Kosovo is the same as of the virus isolated in Drosdov (Russia). PMID:20514773

  5. Carbetocin versus oxytocin in caesarean section with high risk of post-partum haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Larciprete, Giovanni; Montagnoli, Carlotta; Frigo, Mariagrazia; Panetta, Valentina; Todde, Cristina; Zuppani, Benedetta; Centonze, Chiara; Bompiani, Alessandro; Malandrenis, Ioannis; Cirese, Alio; Valensise, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objectives the aims of the present study were to compare the haemodynamic effects of oxytocin and carbetocin and to assess the efficacy of these two drugs in terms of blood loss and the additional uterotonic needed in caesarean section at high risk of primary post-partum haemorrhage. Methods women in the carbetocin group (group A) received a bolus of 100 ?g IV; women in the control group (group B) received 20 IU of oxytocin in 1000 ml of 0,9% Na-Cl solution IV (150 mL/hour). The main parameter evaluated was the haemodynamic effects of drugs and the need for additional uterotonic agents. In addition we compared the drop in haemoglobin level, the uterine tone, the uterine fundal state and the diuresis. Results regarding the haemodynamic effects, both drugs have a hypotensive effect, but we found a greater reduction in blood pressure within the oxytocin group. Significantly more women needed additional uterotonic agents in the oxytocin group (23,5% vs 0%, p<0.01), though there was no significant difference in estimated blood loss and in the drop haemoglobin level (p>0.05). There was a significant difference in the diuresis, higher in carbetocin group (1300 ml ± 450 ml vs 1100 ml ± 250 ml, p=0.01). Conclusions a single injection of carbetocin appears to be more effective than a continuous infusion of oxytocin to prevent the PPH, with a similar haemodynamic profile and minor antidiuretic effect. PMID:23741542

  6. Environmental correlates of crimean-congo haemorrhagic fever incidence in Bulgaria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) is a zoonotic viral disease transmitted by ixodid tick bites, mainly of Hyalomma spp., or through contact with blood/tissues from infected people or animals. CCHF is endemic in the Balkan area, including Bulgaria, where it causes both sporadic cases and community outbreaks. Methods We described trends of CCHF in Bulgaria between 1997 and 2009 and investigated the associations between CCHF incidence and a selection of environmental factors using a zero-inflated modelling approach. Results A total of 159 CCHF cases (38 women and 121 men) were identified between 1997 and 2009. The incidence was 0.13 cases per 100,000 population/year with a fatality rate of 26%. An epidemic peak was detected close to the Turkish border in the summer of 2002. Most cases were reported between April and September. Increasing mean temperature, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), savannah-type land coverage or habitat fragmentation increased significantly the incidence of CCHF in the CCHF-affected areas. Similar to that observed in Turkey, we found that areas with warmer temperatures in the autumn prior to the case-reporting year had an increased probability of reporting zero CCHF cases. Conclusions We identified environmental correlates of CCHF incidence in Bulgaria that may support the prospective implementation of public health interventions. PMID:23270399

  7. Molecular epidemiology of Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease Virus (RHDV) in Australia: when one became many

    PubMed Central

    Kovaliski, John; Sinclair, Ron; Mutze, Greg; Peacock, David; Strive, Tanja; Abrantes, Joana; Esteves, Pedro J.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2015-01-01

    Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease Virus (RHDV) was introduced into Australia in 1995 as a biological control agent against the wild European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). We evaluated its evolution over a 16 year period (1995–2011) by examining 50 isolates collected throughout Australia, as well as the original inoculum strains. Phylogenetic analysis of capsid protein VP60 sequences of the Australian isolates, compared to those sampled globally, revealed that they form a monophyletic group with the inoculum strains (CAPM V-351 and RHDV351INOC). Strikingly, despite more than 3000 re-releases of RHDV351INOC since 1995, only a single viral lineage has sustained its transmission in the long-term, indicative of a major competitive advantage. In addition, we find evidence for widespread viral gene flow, in which multiple lineages entered individual geographic locations, resulting in a marked turnover of viral lineages with time, as well as a continual increase in viral genetic diversity. The rate of RHDV evolution recorded in Australia – 4.0 (3.3 – 4.7) × 10?3 nucleotide substitutions per site per year – was higher than previously observed in RHDV, and evidence for adaptive evolution was obtained at two VP60 residues. Finally, more intensive study of a single rabbit population (Turretfield) in South Australia provided no evidence for viral persistence between outbreaks, with genetic diversity instead generated by continual strain importation. PMID:24251353

  8. Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus in Kazakhstan (1948-2013).

    PubMed

    Nurmakhanov, Talgat; Sansyzbaev, Yerlan; Atshabar, Bakhyt; Deryabin, Pavel; Kazakov, Stanislav; Zholshorinov, Aitmagambet; Matzhanova, Almagul; Sadvakassova, Alya; Saylaubekuly, Ratbek; Kyraubaev, Kakimzhan; Hay, John; Atkinson, Barry; Hewson, Roger

    2015-09-01

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a pathogenic and often fatal arboviral disease with a distribution spanning large areas of Africa, Europe and Asia. The causative agent is a negative-sense single-stranded RNA virus classified within the Nairovirus genus of the Bunyaviridae family. Cases of CCHF have been officially recorded in Kazakhstan since the disease was first officially reported in modern medicine. Serological surveillance of human and animal populations provide evidence that the virus was perpetually circulating in a local enzoonotic cycle involving mammals, ticks and humans in the southern regions of the country. Most cases of human disease were associated with agricultural professions such as farming, shepherding and fruit-picking; the typical route of infection was via tick-bite although several cases of contact transmission associated with caring for sick patients have been documented. In total, 704 confirmed human cases of CCHF have been registered in Kazakhstan from 1948-2013 with an overall case fatality rate of 14.8% for cases with a documented outcome. The southern regions of Kazakhstan should be considered endemic for CCHF with cases reported from these territories on an annual basis. Modern diagnostic technologies allow for rapid clinical diagnosis and for surveillance studies to monitor for potential expansion in known risk areas. PMID:26183415

  9. Risk factors associated with an outbreak of dengue fever/dengue haemorrhagic fever in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Toan, D T T; Hoat, L N; Hu, W; Wright, P; Martens, P

    2015-06-01

    Dengue fever/dengue haemorrhagic fever (DF/DHF) appears to be emerging in Hanoi in recent years. A case-control study was performed to investigate risk factors for the development of DF/DHF in Hanoi. A total of 73 patients with DF/DHF and 73 control patients were included in the study. The risk factor analysis indicated that living in rented housing, living near uncovered sewers, and living in a house discharging sewage directly into to ponds were all significantly associated with DF/DHF. People living in rented houses were 2·2 times more at risk of DF/DHF than those living in their own homes [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 2·2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·1-4·6]. People living in an unhygienic house, or in a house discharging sewage directly to the ponds were 3·4 times and 4·3 times, respectively, more likely to be associated with DF/DHF (aOR 3·4, 95% CI 1-11·7; aOR 4·3, 95% CI 1·1-16·9). These results contribute to the understanding of the dynamics of dengue transmission in Hanoi, which is needed to implement dengue prevention and control programmes effectively and efficiently. PMID:25308711

  10. Rare complications of cesarean scar

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Divyesh; Kang, Mandeep; Sandhu, Manavjit Singh; Jain, Vanita; Kalra, Naveen; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) and cesarean scar dehiscence (CSD) are the most dreaded complications of cesarean scar (CS). As the incidence of CS is increasing worldwide, so is the incidence of CSP, especially in cases with assisted reproduction techniques. It is of utmost importance to diagnose CSP in the early first trimester, as it can lead to myometrial rupture with fatal outcome. On the other hand, CSD may be encountered during pregnancy or in the postpartum period. CSD in the postpartum period is very rare and can cause secondary postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) leading to increased maternal morbidity or even death if not diagnosed and managed promptly. Both complications can be diagnosed on ultrasonography (USG) and confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These two conditions carry high morbidity and mortality. In this article, we highlight the role of imaging in the early diagnosis and management of these conditions. PMID:24347858

  11. Suicide bereavement and complicated grief

    PubMed Central

    Tal Young, Ilanit; Iglewicz, Alana; Glorioso, Danielle; Lanouette, Nicole; Seay, Kathryn; Ilapakurti, Manjusha; Zisook, Sidney

    2012-01-01

    Losing a loved to suicide is one is one of life's most painful experiences. The feelings of loss, sadness, and loneliness experienced after any death of a loved one are often magnified in suicide survivors by feelings of quilt, confusion, rejection, shame, anger, and the effects of stigma and trauma. Furthermore, survivors of suicide loss are at higher risk of developing major depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and suicidal behaviors, as well as a prolonged form of grief called complicated grief. Added to the burden is the substantial stigma, which can keep survivors away from much needed support and healing resources. Thus, survivors may require unique supportive measures and targeted treatment to cope with their loss. After a brief description of the epidemiology and circumstances of suicide, we review the current state of research on suicide bereavement, complicated grief in suicide survivors, and grief treatment for survivors of suicide. PMID:22754290

  12. [Body piercing complications in otorhinolaryngology].

    PubMed

    García Callejo, F J; Martínez Beneito, M P; Ortega Navarro, M C

    1998-05-01

    Piercing is used to designate an ornamentation technique used on skin and mucosa in any site of the body, which consists of perforation and placement of studs, hoops, or earrings for esthetic or attention-seeking purposes. This fashion has spread in Spain in the last decade and although practitioners and users consider it to be inoffensive, we have observed an increasing number of hospital consultations resulting from the placement of such ornaments in ears, nose, tongue and lips. Local infection, bleeding, and contact dermatitis are the most frequent complications. The lack of legislation and health education of the practitioners can be expected to increase the number and intensity of the complications. PMID:9707749

  13. The Laurentian Great Lakes strain (MI03) of the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus is highly pathogenic for juvenile muskellunge, Esox masquinongy (Mitchill).

    PubMed

    Kim, R K; Faisal, M

    2010-06-01

    The Great Lakes strain of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) isolated from adult subclinical muskellunge, Esox masquinongy (Mitchill), in Lake St. Clair, MI, USA was shown to be highly pathogenic in juvenile muskellunge through intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection and waterborne challenge. Mortality began as early as 3 days after exposure in waterborne challenged fish, whereas fish infected by the i.p. route experienced the first mortality by 5 days post-infection (p.i.). The median lethal intraperitoneal injection dose (IP-LD(50)) was approximately 2.21 plaque forming units (PFU) as opposed to the median lethal immersion challenge dose (IM-LD(50)) of 1.7 x 10(4) PFU mL(-1). A high, medium and low dose of infection caused acute, subacute and chronic progression of the disease, respectively, as was evident by the cumulative mortality data. Clinical signs of disease observed in dead and moribund fish were very pale gills, dermal petechial haemorrhages along the flanks, severe nuchal haemorrhages, intramuscular haemorrhages at the fin-muscle junction and focal haemorrhaging on the caudal peduncle. Internal lesions included livers that were pale, discoloured and friable, and kidneys that were either congested or degenerative in appearance, and petechial to ecchymotic haemorrhages on the swim bladder wall. Histopathologic examination demonstrated massive haemorrhages in the swimbladder wall and muscle, severe vacuolation and multifocal necrosis of the liver, multifocal necrosis of the gills and depletion of lymphoid tissues within the spleen. Kidney tissues also exhibited a mixed pattern of degeneration that included tubular necrosis, interstitial oedema and congestion. Virus was recovered from kidney and spleen tissues through tissue culture and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). PMID:20367742

  14. Prevalence Estimates of Complicated Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, Julia C; Pedersen, Rolf; Marra, Christina M; Kerani, Roxanne P; Golden, Matthew R

    2015-12-01

    We reviewed 68 cases of possible neurosyphilis among 573 syphilis cases in King County, WA, from 3rd January 2012 to 30th September 2013; 7.9% (95% confidence interval, 5.8%-10.5%) had vision or hearing changes, and 3.5% (95% confidence interval, 2.2%-5.4%) had both symptoms and objective confirmation of complicated syphilis with either abnormal cerebrospinal fluid or an abnormal ophthalmologic examination. PMID:26562700

  15. Management of complicated duodenal diverticula.

    PubMed

    Oukachbi, N; Brouzes, S

    2013-06-01

    The duodenum is the second most common location of intestinal diverticula after the colon. Duodenal diverticulum (DD) is usually located in the second portion of the duodenum (D2), close to the papilla. Most duodenal diverticula are extraluminal and acquired rather than congenital; more rare is the congenital, intraluminal diverticulum. DD is usually asymptomatic and discovered incidentally, but can become symptomatic in 1% to 5% of cases when complicated by gastroduodenal, biliary and/or pancreatic obstruction, by perforation or by hemorrhage. Endoscopic treatment is the most common first-line treatment for biliopancreatic complications caused by juxtapapillary diverticula and also for bleeding. Conservative treatment of perforated DD based on fasting and broad-spectrum antibiotics may be offered in some selected cases when diagnosis is made early in stable patients, or in elderly patients with comorbidities who are poor operative candidates. Surgical treatment is currently reserved for failure of endoscopic or conservative treatment. The main postoperative complication of diverticulectomy is duodenal leak or fistula, which carries up to a 30% mortality rate. PMID:23810155

  16. Plasma Estrogen Levels Are Associated With Severity of Injury and Outcomes After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Crago, Elizabeth A.; Sherwood, Paula R.; Bender, Catherine; Balzer, Jeffrey; Ren, Dianxu; Poloyac, Samuel M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Biochemical mediators alter cerebral perfusion and have been implicated in delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and poor outcomes after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Estrogens (estrone [E1] and estradiol [E2]) are mediators with neuroprotective properties that could play a role in DCI. This study explored associations between plasma estrogen levels and outcomes following aSAH. Methods Plasma samples from 1–4, 4–6, and 7–10 days after hemorrhage from 99 adult aSAH patients were analyzed for estrogen levels using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. DCI was operationalized as radiographic/ultrasonic evidence of impaired cerebral blood flow accompanied by neurological deterioration. Outcomes were assessed using the Modified Rankin Scale at 3 and 12 months after hemorrhage. Statistical analysis included correlation, regression, and group-based trajectory. Results Higher E1 and E2 levels were associated with higher Hunt and Hess grade (E1, p = .01; E2, p = .03), the presence of DCI (E1, p = .02; E2, p = .02), and poor 3-month outcomes (E1, p = .002; E2, p = .002). Trajectory analysis identified distinct populations over time for E1 (61 % E1 high) and E2 {68% E2 high). Patients in higher trajectory groups had higher Fisher grades (E1, p = .008; E2, p = .01), more frequent DCI (E1, p = .04; E2, p = .08), and worse 3-month outcomes (E1, p = .01; E2, p = .004) than low groups. Conclusions These results provide the first clinical evidence that plasma El and E2 concentrations are associated with severity of injury and outcomes after aSAH. PMID:25548393

  17. Importance of accessory outflow pathways in hydrocephalus after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Griebel, R.W.; Black, P.M.; Pile-Spellman, J.; Strauss, H.W.

    1989-02-01

    This study evaluated the changes in pathways of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) outflow that accompanied acute and compensated hydrocephalus in the rabbit. Intraventricularly injected 99mTc antimony sulfide was used as a tracer of outflow pathways, and specified structures were counted 12 to 24 hours after injection. Fifteen rabbits were divided into three groups: 1) an acutely hydrocephalic group in which 3 cisternal injections of blood were followed by a study of CSF pressure, ventricular size, and CSF outflow pathways 1 week after the last injection; 2) a control group treated according to the same protocol, except that sterile saline was injected instead of blood; and 3) a chronic group also treated according to the same protocol but in which the animals were maintained an average of 4 weeks after the last blood injection. Ventricular size was measured by computed digitation and expressed as an area ratio of ventricle to brain (VBR). In control animals, 11.8% of the injected colloid dosage was found in cranial perineural lymphatic channels, and 4.8% appeared in the spinal cord. The mean CSF pressure was 149 +/- 20.2 mm H20 (mean +/- SE) and the mean VBR was 0.040 +/- 0.003. In animals evaluated 1 week after subarachnoid injection, accessory cranial perineural lymphatic outflow decreased significantly to 3.4%, and spinal cord activity increased to 9.8% (P less than 0.05, two-tailed t-test). These animals were hydrocephalic and had CSF pressure of 247 +/- 25.1 mm H20 (mean +/- SE) and VBR of 0.083 +/- 0.009.

  18. Early cerebral infarction following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: frequency, risk factors, patterns, and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chao; Yu, Weidong; Sun, Libo; Li, Dongyuan; Zhao, Conghai

    2013-11-01

    Early cerebral infarction (ECI) following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) remains poorly understood. This study aims to determine the frequency and risk factors of this special episode, as well as to assess the relationship between its patterns and outcome. We retrospectively enrolled 243 patients who underwent aneurysm treatment within 60 hours of SAH. ECI was defined as one or more new hypodense abnormalities on computed tomography within 3 days after SAH, rather than lesions attributable to edema, retraction effect, and ventricular drain placement. Risk factors were tested by multivariate analysis. The infarct was classified by an established grading system (single or multiple, cortical or deep or combined). Poor outcome was defined as the Glasgow Outcome Score of severe disability or worse. Sixty-five patients (26.7%) had early infarction. Acute hydrocephalus (odds ratio [OR] 6.67; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.59-27.95), admission plasma glucose level (OR 1.42 per mmol/L; 95% CI 1.16-1.73), and treatment modality (OR 16.27; 95% CI 4.05-65.28) were independent predictors of ECI. The pattern was single cortical in 19 patients (29.2%), single deep in 9 (13.8%), multiple cortical in 8 (12.3%), multiple deep in 14 (21.5%), and multiple combined in 15 (23.1%). ECI was associated with delayed cerebral infarction (DCI) (P = 0.002) and poor outcome (P < 0.001). Multiple combined infarction was related to poor outcome (P = 0.001). In summary, the occurrence of ECI, which is associated with surgical treatment, acute hydrocephalus and high admission plasma glucose, may potentially predict DCI and unfavorable outcome. Further studies are warranted to reveal the underlying mechanisms of this event and thereby minimize it. PMID:24016219

  19. Health-Related Quality-of-Life Outcomes: Comparing Patients With Aneurysmal and Nonaneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Arthur P; Thomas, Ajith

    2015-10-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is divided into two major types (aneurysmal [ASAH] and nonaneurysmal [NASAH]) because, in approximately 15% of the patients who experience SAH, no source of hemorrhage can be identified. Anecdotal evidence and contradictory research suggest that patients with NASAH experience some of the same health-related quality of life (HRQOL) issues as patients with ASAH. This quantitative survey design study compared 1-3 years after hemorrhage the HRQOL in patients who had experienced an NASAH with those who had experienced an ASAH. This is the first U.S. study to specifically investigate HRQOL in NASAH and the second to compare HRQOL outcomes between patients with ASAH and NASAH. These study results corroborate those of the first-that the two groups are much more similar than different. It confirms that the impact on employment for both hemorrhage groups is significant, and it also finds an even greater inability to return to work for the patients with NASAH. Physical symptom complaints were more common in the group with NASAH, whereas the group with ASAH experienced more emotional symptoms. Both groups had low levels of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), with those levels not differing significantly between groups. However, PTSD and social support were shown to impact HRQOL for both groups. The authors recommend that clinicians assess all patients with SAH for PTSD and institute treatment early. This may include offering psychological services or social work early in the hospital course. Further research and policy changes are needed to assist in interventions that improve vocational reintegration after SAH. Patients with NASAH should no longer be described as having experienced a "benign hemorrhage." They have had a life-changing hemorrhage that may forever change their lives and impact their HRQOL. PMID:26348436

  20. Elevated relative risk of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage with colder weather in the mid-Atlantic region.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Lara, Lucia; Kowalski, Robert G; Schneider, Eric B; Tamargo, Rafael J; Nyquist, Paul

    2015-10-01

    We have previously reported an increase of 0.6% in the relative risk of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) in response to every 1°F decrease in the maximum daily temperature (Tmax) in colder seasons from patients presenting to our regional tertiary care center. We hypothesized that this relationship would also be observed in the warmer summer months with ambient temperatures greater than 70°F. From prospectively collected incidence data for aSAH patients, we investigated absolute Tmax, average daily temperatures, intraday temperature ranges, and the variation of daily Tmax relative to 70°F to assess associations with aSAH incidence for patients admitted to our institution between 1991 and 2009 during the hottest months and days on which Tmax>70°F. For all days treated as a group, the mean Tmax (± standard deviation) was lower when aSAH occurred than when it did not (64.4±18.2°F versus 65.8±18.3°F; p=0.016). During summer months, the odds ratio (OR) of aSAH incidence increased with lower mean Tmax (OR 1.019; 95% confidence interval 1.001-1.037; p=0.043). The proportion of days with aSAH admissions was lower on hotter days than the proportion of days with no aSAH (96% versus 98%; p=0.006). aSAH were more likely to occur during the summer and on days with a temperature fluctuation less than 10°F (8% versus 4%; p=0.002). During the hottest months of the year in the mid-Atlantic region, colder maximum daily temperatures, a smaller heat burden above 70°F, and smaller intraday temperature fluctuations are associated with increased aSAH admissions in a similar manner to colder months. These findings support the hypothesis that aSAH incidence is more likely with drops in temperature, even in the warmer months. PMID:26149403

  1. Serum lipid profile spectrum and delayed cerebral ischemia following subarachnoid hemorrhage: Is there a relation?

    PubMed Central

    Dhandapani, Sivashanmugam; Aggarwal, Ashish; Srinivasan, Anirudh; Meena, Rajesh; Gaudihalli, Sachin; Singh, Harnarayan; Dhandapani, Manju; Mukherjee, Kanchan K.; Gupta, Sunil K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Serum lipid abnormalities are known to be important risk factors for vascular disorders. However, their role in delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI), the major cause of morbidity after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remains unclear. This study was an attempt to evaluate the spectrum of lipid profile changes in SAH compared to matched controls, and their relation with the occurrence of DCI. Methods: Admission serum lipid profile levels were measured in patients of SAH and prospectively studied in relation to various factors and clinical development of DCI. Results: Serum triglyceride (TG) levels were significantly lower among SAH patients compared to matched controls (mean [±standard deviation (SD)] mg/dL: 117.3 [±50.4] vs. 172.8 [±89.1], P = 0.002), probably because of energy consumption due to hypermetabolic response. Patients who developed DCI had significantly higher TG levels compared to those who did not develop DCI (mean [±SD] mg/dL: 142.1 [±56] vs. 111.9 [±54], P = 0.05). DCI was noted in 62% of patients with TG >150 mg/dL, compared to 22% among the rest (P = 0.01). Total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and lipoprotein (a) neither showed a significant difference between SAH and controls and nor any significant association with DCI. Multivariate analysis using binary logistic regression adjusting for the effects of age, sex, systemic disease, World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies grade, Fisher grade, and clipping/coiling, revealed higher TG levels to have significant independent association with DCI (P = 0.01). Conclusions: Higher serum TG levels appear to be significantly associated with DCI while other lipid parameters did not show any significant association. This may be due to their association with remnant cholesterol or free fatty acid-induced lipid peroxidation. PMID:26664869

  2. Nasal Administration of Recombinant Osteopontin Attenuates Early Brain Injury after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Topkoru, Basak Caner; Altay, Orhan; Duris, Kamil; Krafft, Paul R.; Yan, Junhao; Zhang, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Neuronal apoptosis is a key pathological process in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced early brain injury (EBI). Given that recombinant osteopontin (rOPN), a promising neuroprotectant, cannot pass through the blood-brain barrier (BBB), we aimed to examine whether nasal administration of rOPN prevents neuronal apoptosis after experimental SAH. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=144) were subjected to the endovascular perforation SAH model. rOPN was administered via the nasal route and neurological scores as well as brain water content were evaluated at 24 and 72 hours after SAH-induction. The expressions of cleaved caspase-3 (CC3), phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (p-FAK), and phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt) were examined using Western blot analysis. Neuronal cell death was demonstrated with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). We also administered FAK inhibitor 14 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, Wortmannin, prior to rOPN to establish its neuroprotective mechanism. ELISA was used to measure rOPN delivery into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Results CSF level of rOPN increased after its nasal administration. This was associated with improved neurological scores and reduced brain edema at 24 hours after SAH. rOPN increased p-FAK and p-Akt expressions and decreased caspase-3 cleavage, resulting in attenuation of neuronal cell death within the cerebral cortex. These effects were abolished by FAK inhibitor 14 and Wortmannin. Conclusion Nasal administration of rOPN decreased neuronal cell death and brain edema and improved the neurological status in SAH rats, possibly through FAKPI3K-Akt-induced inhibition of capase-3 cleavage. PMID:24008574

  3. Vasospasm Risk in Surgical ICU Patients With Grade I Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lessen, Samantha; Keene, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with high mortality. The initial hemorrhage causes death in approximately 25% of patients, with most subsequent mortality being attributable to delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Delayed cerebral ischemia generally occurs on post-bleed days 4 through 20, with the incidence peaking at day 8. Because of the risks of DCI, patients with SAH are usually monitored in an intensive care unit (ICU) for 14 to 21 days. Unfortunately, prolonged ICU admissions are expensive and are associated with well-documented risks to patients. We hypothesized that a subset of patients who are at low risk of DCI should be safe to transfer out of the ICU early. All patients admitted to Montefiore Medical Center from 2008 to 2013 with grade I SAH who had their aneurysms successfully protected, had an uncomplicated postoperative course, and had no clinical or ultrasonographic evidence of DCI after day 8 were retrospectively studied. The primary outcome was clinical or ultrasonographic evidence of the development of DCI after day 8. Secondary outcomes included length of ICU and hospital stay and hospital mortality. Forty patients who met the above-mentioned criteria were identified. Of these, only 1 (2.5%) developed ultrasonographic evidence of DCI after day 8 but required no intervention. The mean length of stay in the ICU was until post-bleed day 13, and the mean hospital length of stay was until post-bleed day 14. The in-hospital mortality was 0 of 40. Thus, we identified a low-risk subset of patients with grade I SAH who may be candidates for early transfer out of the ICU.

  4. Whole Blood Gene Expression Profiles of Patients with a Past Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    van ’t Hof, Femke N. G.; Ruigrok, Ynte M.; Medic, Jelena; Sanjabi, Bahram; van der Vlies, Pieter; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Veldink, Jan H.

    2015-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of development and rupture of intracranial aneurysms (IA) is largely unknown. Also, screening for IA to prevent aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is inefficient, as disease markers are lacking. We investigated gene expression profiles in blood of previous aSAH patients, who are still at risk for future IA, aiming to gain insight into the pathogenesis of IA and aSAH, and to make a first step towards improvement of aSAH risk prediction. Methods and Results We collected peripheral blood of 119 patients with aSAH at least two years prior, and 118 controls. We determined gene expression profiles using Illumina HumanHT-12v4 BeadChips. After quality control, we divided the dataset in a discovery (2/3) and replication set (1/3), identified differentially expressed genes, and applied (co-)differential co-expression to identify disease-related gene networks. No genes with a significant (false-discovery rate <5%) differential expression were observed. We detected one gene network with significant differential co-expression, but did not find biologically meaningful gene networks related to a history of aSAH. Next, we applied prediction analysis of microarrays to find a gene set that optimally predicts absence or presence of a history of aSAH. We found no gene sets with a correct disease state prediction higher than 40%. Conclusions No gene expression differences were present in blood of previous aSAH patients compared to controls, besides one differentially co-expressed gene network without a clear relevant biological function. Our findings suggest that gene expression profiles, as detected in blood of previous aSAH patients, do not reveal the pathogenesis of IA and aSAH, and cannot be used for aSAH risk prediction. PMID:26439625

  5. Correlation Between ED Symptoms and Clinical Outcomes in the Patient with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Adkins, Kristin; Crago, Elizabeth; Kuo, Chien-Wen J.; Horowitz, Michael; Sherwood, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is a devastating neurologic insult often presenting to the emergency department as a headache. Recognition and prompt treatment are important to good outcomes. The purpose of this analysis was to examine the presentation of aSAH patients to the emergency department and determine whether presentation predicts length of stay or death. Methods This is a retrospective review of data gathered from 2 existing studies. Data from patients diagnosed with acute aSAH were reviewed for symptoms, clinical presentation, history, demographics, and laboratory results. Statistical analysis was completed by use of ?2 and regression analysis. Results This sample of 193 adult aSAH patients confirmed headache as well as meningeal signs as the most frequent symptom on presentation to the emergency department, and this was cited as the most common reason for seeking medical treatment. Symptom presentation did not appear to affect length of stay; however, survival analysis showed that patients who presented with a Hunt and Hess grade greater than 3 along with bradycardia were 15.6 times more likely to die within the first month of aSAH. Discussion Although aSAH presentation remains the same, this analysis did find a correlation between poor clinical grade and bradycardia to be a significant predictor of death at 30 days. Additional study may help to determine whether any intervention could lessen this effect. Although patient diagnosis and referral from the community emergency department to a tertiary center were relatively quick, there was a wide window of time between patient recognition of symptoms and seeking medical treatment. PMID:22578393

  6. Blockage of mitochondrial calcium uniporter prevents iron accumulation in a model of experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Huiying; Hao, Shuangying; Sun, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Dingding; Gao, Xin; Yu, Zhuang; Li, Kuanyu; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2015-01-24

    Highlights: • Iron accumulation was involved in the acute phase following SAH. • Blockage of MCU could attenuate cellular iron accumulation following SAH. • Blockage of MCU could decrease ROS generation and improve cell energy supply following SAH. • Blockage of MCU could alleviate apoptosis and brain injury following SAH. - Abstract: Previous studies have shown that iron accumulation is involved in the pathogenesis of brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and chelation of iron reduced mortality and oxidative DNA damage. We previously reported that blockage of mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) provided benefit in the early brain injury after experimental SAH. This study was undertaken to identify whether blockage of MCU could ameliorate iron accumulation-associated brain injury following SAH. Therefore, we used two reagents ruthenium red (RR) and spermine (Sper) to inhibit MCU. Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into four groups including sham, SAH, SAH + RR, and SAH + Sper. Biochemical analysis and histological assays were performed. The results confirmed the iron accumulation in temporal lobe after SAH. Interestingly, blockage of MCU dramatically reduced the iron accumulation in this area. The mechanism was revealed that inhibition of MCU reversed the down-regulation of iron regulatory protein (IRP) 1/2 and increase of ferritin. Iron–sulfur cluster dependent-aconitase activity was partially conserved when MCU was blocked. In consistence with this and previous report, ROS levels were notably reduced and ATP supply was rescued; levels of cleaved caspase-3 dropped; and integrity of neurons in temporal lobe was protected. Taken together, our results indicated that blockage of MCU could alleviate iron accumulation and the associated injury following SAH. These findings suggest that the alteration of calcium and iron homeostasis be coupled and MCU be considered to be a therapeutic target for patients suffering from SAH.

  7. Characteristics of Cerebrovascular Injury in the Hyperacute Phase After Induced Severe Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yu; Suzuki, Hidenori; Uekawa, Ken; Kawano, Takayuki; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei

    2015-12-01

    Although there have been several investigations regarding acute brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), the pathological conditions of severe SAH are unclear. In this study, we pursued the characteristics of cerebrovascular injury in the hyperacute phase after experimentally induced severe SAH. Twenty-three male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to sham or SAH operation using the endovascular perforation method and were evaluated for brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, and arterial endothelial cell injury at 5 min after SAH (experiment 1). Next, animals were examined for functional and morphological changes of cerebral artery for 30 min after an acetazolamide injection administered 5 min after SAH (experiment 2). In experiment 1, while cerebral blood flow (CBF) was reduced, brain edema was not observed in SAH-operated rats. BBB permeability detected by immunoglobulin G extravasation was observed in the optic tract and was accompanied by the upregulation of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-positive astrocytes. In addition, the number of phosphorylated ERK-positive endothelial cell in the distal middle cerebral artery (MCA) was significantly increased by SAH. In experiment 2, CBF in non-lethal SAH rats was reduced, and no response to acetazolamide was detected. Conversely, CBF in lethal SAH increased due to acetazolamide, although the value of CBF was low. Furthermore, there was significant narrowing of the MCA in SAH-operated rats. The findings suggest that the optic tract and the cerebral artery are the most vulnerable areas regarding cerebrovascular injury in a hyperacute phase after severe SAH and that they are associated with fatal outcomes. PMID:26358229

  8. Understanding the Role of Autoimmune Disorders on the Initial Presentation of Cardiovascular Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-20

    Myocardial Infarction; Ischemic Stroke; Stroke; Subarachnoid Haemorrhage; Venous Thrombosis; Transient Ischemic Attack; Stable Angina Pectoris; Unstable Angina; Heart Failure; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

  9. Social Deprivation and Initial Presentation of 12 Cardiovascular Diseases: a CALIBER Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-03

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm; Coronary Heart Disease NOS; Unheralded Corronary Death; Intracerebral Haemorrhage; Heart Failure; Ischemic Stroke; Myocardial Infarction; Stroke; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Stable Angina Pectoris; Subarachnoid Haemorrhage; Transient Ischemic Attack; Unstable Angina; Cardiac Arrest, Sudden Cardiac Death

  10. Heart Rate and Initial Presentation of Cardiovascular Diseases (Caliber)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-17

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm; Coronary Heart Disease NOS; Unheralded Coronary Death; Intracerebral Haemorrhage; Heart Failure; Ischemic Stroke; Myocardial Infarction; Stroke; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Stable Angina Pectoris; Subarachnoid Haemorrhage; Transient Ischemic Attack; Unstable Angina; Cardiac Arrest, Sudden Cardiac Death

  11. Ethnicity and Onset of Cardiovascular Disease: A CALIBER Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-01

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm; Coronary Heart Disease; Sudden Cardiac Death; Intracerebral Haemorrhage; Heart Failure; Ischemic Stroke; Myocardial Infarction; Stroke; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Stable Angina Pectoris; Subarachnoid Haemorrhage; Transient Ischemic Attack; Unstable Angina; Cardiac Arrest

  12. Late complications of operative hysteroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cooper, J M; Brady, R M

    2000-06-01

    The late complications of operative hysteroscopy result from either persistent endometrium after ablation or myometrial damage during surgery. Residual endometrium can become neoplastic, cause pain, or support a pregnancy. Myometrial damage can produce catastrophic consequences during a later pregnancy. These long-term problems place the impetus on the operating physician to select patients carefully, prepare the endometrium, and operate in such a way as to minimize the likelihood of residual endometrium and unnecessary myometrial damage. The value of operative hysteroscopy for infertility secondary to adhesions and uterine septa is unequivocal. Hysteroscopic surgery offers increased fertility rates while avoiding the risks of open surgery. For the treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding, endometrial ablation can be performed safely, and the long-term benefits are durable. As more operative hysteroscopy is performed, more delayed complications will arise. Easy-to-perform global ablation techniques and multifunctional operative hysteroscopes have enticed more gynecologists to test the waters of endometrial ablation and operative hysteroscopy. Although they empower the hysteroscopist to offer more advanced and more valuable minimally invasive options to patients, these tools simultaneously can tempt the surgeon to forego meticulous preoperative evaluation. Evidence exists that too often women undergo surgery without complete diagnostic assessment. In one study, 50% of women underwent hysterectomy without any diagnostic evaluation of the endometrium. Hysterectomy possesses a saving grace in that it provides cover for many missed diagnoses. Conservative, nonextirpative procedures offer no such life raft. Meticulous diagnostic assessment and preoperative consideration of risk factors for residual endometrium and future pregnancy remain the keys to minimizing late complications. PMID:10857126

  13. Long Non-Coding RNA Expression Profiles in Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Tørring, Pernille M.; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Kjeldsen, Anette D.; Ousager, Lilian Bomme; Tan, Qihua; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominantly inherited vascular disease characterized by the presence of mucocutaneous telangiectasia and arteriovenous malformations in visceral organs. HHT is predominantly caused by mutations in ENG and ACVRL1, which both belong to the TGF-? signalling pathway. The exact mechanism of how haploinsufficiency of ENG and ACVRL1 leads to HHT manifestations remains to be identified. As long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are increasingly recognized as key regulators of gene expression and constitute a sizable fraction of the human transcriptome, we wanted to assess whether lncRNAs play a role in the molecular pathogenesis of HHT manifestations. By microarray technology, we profiled lncRNA transcripts from HHT nasal telangiectasial and non-telangiectasial tissue using a paired design. The microarray probes were annotated using the GENCODE v.16 dataset, identifying 4,810 probes mapping to 2,811 lncRNAs. Comparing HHT telangiectasial tissue with HHT non-telangiectasial tissue, we identified 42 lncRNAs that are differentially expressed (q<0.001). Using GREAT, a tool that assumes cis-regulation, we showed that differently expressed lncRNAs are enriched for genomic loci involved in key pathways concerning HHT. Our study identified lncRNAs that are aberrantly expressed in HHT telangiectasia and indicates that lncRNAs may contribute to regulate protein-coding loci in HHT. These results suggest that the lncRNA component of the transcriptome deserves more attention in HHT. A deeper understanding of lncRNAs and their role in telangiectasia formation possesses potential for discovering therapeutic targets in HHT. PMID:24603890

  14. Do imports of rainbow trout carcasses risk introducing viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus into England and Wales?

    PubMed

    Pearce, F M; Oidtmann, B C; Thrush, M A; Dixon, P F; Peeler, E J

    2014-06-01

    A qualitative import risk assessment was undertaken to assess the likelihood of introduction and establishment of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) genotype 1a in England and Wales (E&W), via the processing of imported rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) carcasses from continental Europe. The likelihood was estimated for one import from an infected farm. Four main routes by which susceptible populations could be exposed to VHSV via processing waste were considered: (i) run-off from solid waste to watercourses, (ii) contamination of birds or rodents with VHSV by scavenging solid waste, (iii) discharge of liquid waste to mains drainage, and (iv) discharge of liquid waste directly to watercourses. Data on the biophysical characteristics of VHSV, its epidemiology, fish processing practices and waste management were collected. Likelihoods for each step of the four pathways were estimated. Pathway 4 (discharge of liquid waste to a watercourse) was judged as the most likely to result in infection of susceptible individuals. Levels of virus entering the aquatic environment via pathways 1-3 were judged to be many times lower than pathway 4 due mainly to the treatment of solid waste (pathways 1 and 2) and high levels of dilution (pathways 1, 2 and 3). Thirty-four trout farms process fish, of which seven have imported carcasses for processing. Compared with other processing facilities, on-farm processing results in a higher likelihood of VHSV exposure and establishment via all four pathways. Data availability was an issue; the analysis was particularly constrained by a lack of data on the prevalence of VHSV in Europe, volume of trade of carcasses into the UK and processing practices in E&W. It was concluded that the threat of VHSV introduction into E&W could be reduced by treatment of liquid effluent from processing plants and by sourcing carcasses for on-farm processing only from approved VHSV free areas. PMID:23095349

  15. Functional diffusion map as an imaging predictor of functional outcome in patients with primary intracerebral haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Y-H; Hsu, L-M; Weng, H-H; Lee, M-H; Yang, J-T; Lin, C-P

    2013-01-01

    Objective Predicting outcome in patients with primary intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) in the acute stage can provide information to determine the best therapeutic and rehabilitation strategies. We prospectively investigated the predictive value of the functional diffusion map (fDM) in the acute stage of ICH. Methods 47 patients with ICH were enrolled for clinical evaluation and MRI within 24 h of symptom onset and 5 days after ICH. Functional diffusion mapping prospectively monitored the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps of perihaematomal oedema. Consequently, the change in perihaematomal oedema was classified into three categories: increased, decreased, or no significant change. Clinical outcomes were evaluated 6 months after ICH according to the modified Rankin Scale. Correlation between clinical outcome and the fDMs was performed. Results Among the clinical variables, thalamic haematoma, serum glucose level and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores were significantly different between the good- and poor-outcome groups. The percentage of oedematous tissue undergoing significant change between baseline and Day 5 was also significantly different between the groups. Conclusion fDMs allow for spatial voxel-by-voxel tracking of changes in ADC values. It may be feasible to use fDMs to predict the functional outcome of patients with ICH during the acute stage. Advances in knowledge The use of fDMs for stroke study is demonstrated. fDMs may be more suitable to reflect the pathophysiological heterogeneity within oedemas and may facilitate another thinking process for imaging study of stroke and other neurological diseases. PMID:23255534

  16. Retinal haemorrhages and related findings in abusive and non-abusive head trauma: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, S A; Watts, P O; Shaw, A D; Holden, S; Taylor, R H; Watkins, W J; Mann, M K; Tempest, V; Kemp, A M

    2013-01-01

    Aim To report the retinal signs that distinguish abusive head trauma (AHT) from non-abusive head trauma (nAHT). Methods A systematic review of literature, 1950–2009, was conducted with standardised critical appraisal. Inclusion criteria were a strict confirmation of the aetiology, children aged <11 years and details of an examination conducted by an ophthalmologist. Post mortem data, organic disease of eye, and inadequate examinations were excluded. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine odds ratios (OR) and probabilities for AHT. Results Of the 62 included studies, 13 provided prevalence data (998 children, 504 AHT). Overall, retinal haemorrhages (RH) were found in 78% of AHT vs 5% of nAHT. In a child with head trauma and RH, the OR that this is AHT is 14.7 (95% confidence intervals 6.39, 33.62) and the probability of abuse is 91%. Where recorded, RH were bilateral in 83% of AHT compared with 8.3% in nAHT. RH were numerous in AHT, and few in nAHT located in the posterior pole, with only 10% extending to periphery. True prevalence of additional features, for example, retinal folds, could not be determined. Conclusions Our systematic review confirms that although certain patterns of RH were far commoner in AHT, namely large numbers of RH in both the eyes, present in all layers of the retina, and extension into the periphery, there was no retinal sign that was unique to abusive injury. RH are rare in accidental trauma and, when present, are predominantly unilateral, few in number and in the posterior pole. PMID:23079748

  17. Virulence of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) genotype III in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takafumi; Kurita, Jun; Mori, Koh-Ichiro; Olesen, Niels J

    2016-01-01

    In general, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) isolates from marine fish species in European waters (genotypes GIb, GII and GIII) are non- to low virulent in rainbow trout. However, a VHSV isolation was made in 2007 from a disease outbreak in sea farmed rainbow trout in Norway. The isolate, named NO-2007-50-385, was demonstrated to belong to GIII. This isolate has attracted attention to assess which of the viral genome/proteins might be associated with the virulence in rainbow trout. In this study, we describe the difference of virulence in rainbow trout between the NO-2007-50-385 and 4p168 isolates as representatives of virulent and non-virulent GIII isolates, respectively. Rainbow trout were bath challenged with VHSV NO-2007-50-385 for 1 and 6 h, resulting in cumulative mortalities of 5 and 35%, respectively. No mortality was observed in the rainbow trout groups immersed with the genotype III VHSV isolate 4p168 for 1 and 6 h. The viral titre in organs from fish challenged with NO-2007-50-385 for 6 h increased more rapidly than those exposed for 1 h. By in vitro studies it was demonstrated that the final titres of VHSV DK-3592B (GI), NO-2007-50-385 and 4p168 inoculated on EPC cells were very similar, whereas when inoculated on the rainbow trout cell line RTG-2 the titre of the non-virulent 4p168 isolate was 3-4 logs below the two other VHSV isolates. Based on a comparative analysis of the entire genome of the genotype III isolates, we suggest that substitutions of amino acids in positions 118-123 of the nucleo-protein are candidates for being related to virulence of VHSV GIII in rainbow trout. PMID:26743807

  18. Homology Modeling and Conformational Epitope Prediction of Envelope Protein of Alkhumra Haemorrhagic Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Poorinmohammad, Naghmeh; Mohabatkar, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to generate in silico 3D-structure of the envelope protein of AHFV using homology modeling method to further predict its conformational epitopes and help other studies to investigate its structural features using the model. Methods: A 3D-structure prediction was developed for the envelope protein of Alkhumra haemorrhagic fever virus (AHFV), an emerging tick-borne flavivirus, based on a homology modeling method using M4T and Modweb servers, as the 3D-structure of the protein is not available yet. Modeled proteins were validated using Modfold 4 server and their accuracies were calculated based on their RSMDs. Having the 3D predicted model with high quality, conformational epitopes were predicted using DiscoTope 2.0. Results: Model generated by M4T was more acceptable than the Modweb-generated model. The global score and P-value calculated by Modfold 4 ensured that a certifiable model was generated by M4T, since its global score was almost near 1 which is the score for a high resolution X-ray crystallography structure. Furthermore, itsthe P-value was much lower than 0.001 which means that the model is completely acceptable. Having 0.46 Å rmsd, this model was shown to be highly accurate. Results from DiscoTope 2.0 showed 26 residues as epitopes, forming conformational epitopes of the modeled protein. Conclusion: The predicted model and epitopes for envelope protein of AHFV can be used in several therapeutic and diagnostic approaches including peptide vaccine development, structure based drug design or diagnostic kit development in order to facilitate the time consuming experimental epitope mapping process. PMID:26114149

  19. Amyopathic Dermatomyositis Complicated by Pneumomediastinum

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Randy; Green, Justin J.

    2013-01-01

    Dermatomyositis is an inflammatory disease of unclear etiology with characteristic cutaneous and musculoskeletal findings. Amyopathic dermatomyositis is a subtype without musculoskeletal involvement. Many cases of dermatomyositis are associated with underlying malignancy, but pulmonary manifestations can also be seen, the most common of which is interstitial lung disease. Pneumomediastinum is a rare complication that is important for clinicians to recognize, as it may be fatal if left untreated. The sudden onset of facial edema and shortness of breath in the setting of dermatomyositis should raise the suspicion of this condition. PMID:23556036

  20. Neurological complications of coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Pengiran, T; Wills, A; Holmes, G

    2002-01-01

    A variety of neurological disorders have been reported in association with coeliac disease including epilepsy, ataxia, neuropathy, and myelopathy. The nature of this association is unclear and whether a specific neurological complication occurs in coeliac disease remains unproved. Malabsorption may lead to vitamin and trace element deficiencies. Therefore, patients who develop neurological dysfunction should be carefully screened for these. However, malabsorption does not satisfactorily explain the pathophysiology and clinical course of many of the associated neurological disorders. Other mechanisms proposed include altered autoimmunity, heredity, and gluten toxicity. This review attempts to summarise the literature and suggests directions for future research. PMID:12151653

  1. Complications of Rigid Internal Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Chris A.; Lin, Kant Y.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, there have been many advances in the development of bone fixation systems used in the practice of craniomaxillofacial surgery. As surgical practices have evolved, the complications of each technologic advance have changed accordingly. Interfragmentary instability of interosseous wiring has been replaced by the risk of exposure, infection, and palpability of plate and screw fixation systems. The improved rigidity of plate fixation requires anatomic alignment of fracture fragments. Failure to obtain proper alignment has led to the phenomenon known as “open internal fixation” of fracture fragments without proper reduction. The size of the plates has decreased to minimize palpability and exposure. However limitations in their application have been encountered due to the physiologic forces of the muscles of mastication and bone healing. In the pediatric population, the long-standing presence of plates in the cranial vault resulted in reports of transcranial migration and growth restriction. These findings led to the development of resorbable plating systems, which are associated with self-limited plate palpability and soft tissue inflammatory reactions. Any rigid system including these produces growth restriction in varying amounts. In this discussion, we review the reported complication rates of miniplating and microplating systems as well as absorptive plating systems in elective and traumatic craniofacial surgery. PMID:22110796

  2. Bacterial infections complicating tongue piercing

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Catherine HY; Minnema, Brian J; Gold, Wayne L

    2010-01-01

    Tongue piercing has become an increasingly popular form of body art. However, this procedure can occasionally be complicated by serious bacterial infections. The present article reports a case of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by a Gemella species in a patient with a pierced tongue, and reviews 18 additional cases of local and systemic bacterial infections associated with tongue piercing. Infections localized to the oral cavity and head and neck region included molar abscess, glossal abscess, glossitis, submandibular lymphadenitis, submandibular sialadenitis, Ludwig’s angina and cephalic tetanus. Infections distal to the piercing site included eight cases of infective endocarditis, one case of chorioamnionitis and one case of cerebellar abscess. Oropharyngeal flora were isolated from all cases. While bacterial infections following tongue piercing are rare, there are reports of potentially life-threatening infections associated with the procedure. Both piercers and their clients should be aware of these potential complications, and standardized infection prevention and control practices should be adopted by piercers to reduce the risk. PMID:21358880

  3. Clinical Applications of Cine Balanced Steady-State Free Precession MRI for the Evaluation of the Subarachnoid Spaces.

    PubMed

    Li, A E; Wilkinson, M D; McGrillen, K M; Stoodley, M A; Magnussen, J S

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the physiology of normal brain and spinal cord motion in the subarachnoid space, principles of cine balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), clinical applications, and the pitfalls encountered with this technique.The brain and spinal cord are dynamic structures that move with each heartbeat due to transmitted arterial pulse waves. Conventional MRI sequences do not allow anatomic evaluation of the pulsatile movement of the neural structures in the subarachnoid space due to limitations in temporal resolution. Cine bSSFP MRI uses cardiac gating to evaluate dynamically the brain and spinal cord with high contrast and temporal resolution.Cine bSSFP can be used in the evaluation of idiopathic syringomyelia to assess an underlying treatable cause, including arachnoid bands, which are usually not well visualized with conventional MR sequences due to motion artifact. This MRI technique is also useful in the evaluation of intraspinal and intracranial arachnoid cysts and the degree of mass effect on the cord. Other applications include preoperative and postoperative evaluation of Chiari I malformation and the evaluation of lateral ventricular asymmetry. The major limitation of cine bSSFP is the presence of banding artifacts, which can be reduced by shimming and modifying other scan parameters. PMID:25854921

  4. Long-Term Complications of Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... only thing that determines a person's risk for diabetes complications. Other factors, like genes, can also play a ... the body that can be most affected by diabetes complications are the: eyes kidneys nerves heart and blood ...

  5. Managing Complications of Diabetes in Later Life

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Download PDF Managing Complications of Diabetes in Later Life Download Join our e-newsletter! Resources Managing Complications of Diabetes in Later Life Tools and Tips Printer-friendly PDF Click here ...

  6. Post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracotomy.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Saikat

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the post-operative period after thoracotomy. The type of complications and the severity of complications depend on the type of thoracic surgery that has been performed as well as on the patient's pre-operative medical status. Risk stratification can help in predicting the possibility of the post-operative complications. Certain airway complications are more prone to develop with thoracic surgery. Vocal cord injuries, bronchopleural fistulae, pulmonary emboli and post-thoracic surgery non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema are some of the unique complications that occur in this subset of patients. The major pulmonary complications such as atelectasis, bronchospasm and pneumonia can lead to respiratory failure. This review was compiled after a search for search terms within 'post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracic surgery and thoracotomy' on search engines including PubMed and standard text references on the subject from 2000 to 2015. PMID:26556921

  7. Twin gestations: I. Antenatal care and complications.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, B W; Kirschbaum, T H; Paul, R H

    1989-09-01

    In order to determine the occurrence of antenatal complications in twin pregnancies, we examined the medical records of 939 consecutive twin gestations delivered at Women's Hospital, Los Angeles County/University of Southern California Medical Center between 1980-1985. The rates of occurrence of the eight most common antenatal complications were determined and compared with their incidence in singleton gestations. In addition, complication rates were related to zygosity, levels of antenatal care, and time of antenatal diagnosis. Twin gestations had an 83% incidence of antenatal complications, in contrast to a 32% incidence in singleton gestations. The increased complication rate was due to the disproportionate increase in three complications: preterm labor, pregnancy-induced hypertension, and fetal death. Other complications did not occur more frequently in twin gestations than in singleton gestations. Monozygotic gestations were more frequently complicated by fetal death, and dizygotic gestations by pregnancy-induced hypertension. PMID:2761906

  8. Post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Saikat

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the post-operative period after thoracotomy. The type of complications and the severity of complications depend on the type of thoracic surgery that has been performed as well as on the patient's pre-operative medical status. Risk stratification can help in predicting the possibility of the post-operative complications. Certain airway complications are more prone to develop with thoracic surgery. Vocal cord injuries, bronchopleural fistulae, pulmonary emboli and post-thoracic surgery non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema are some of the unique complications that occur in this subset of patients. The major pulmonary complications such as atelectasis, bronchospasm and pneumonia can lead to respiratory failure. This review was compiled after a search for search terms within ‘post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracic surgery and thoracotomy’ on search engines including PubMed and standard text references on the subject from 2000 to 2015. PMID:26556921

  9. Kawasaki Disease: Complications, Treatment and Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Resources Stroke More Kawasaki Disease: Complications, Treatment and Prevention Updated:Jul 24,2013 Complications The possibility of ... problems that did not show up right away. Prevention There is no known prevention for Kawasaki disease. ...

  10. A Functional Polymorphism in the Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Gene is a Risk Factor for Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Normotensive Patients with Intracranial Aneurysms

    E-print Network

    Spirtes, Peter

    for Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Normotensive Patients with Intracranial Aneurysms Amin Kassam, M.D., Yue-Fang Chang to be important environmental factors associated with the formation and rupture of intracranial aneurysms (ICA polymorphisms examined were found. The comparison within aneurysm patients only, without stratification

  11. Risk of intracranial haemorrhage in antidepressant users with concurrent use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: nationwide propensity score matched study

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ju-Young; Lee, Shin Haeng; Choi, So-Hyun; Kim, Mi-Hee; Choi, Nam-Kyong; Lee, Joongyub

    2015-01-01

    Objective To define the risk of intracranial haemorrhage among patients treated with antidepressants and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), compared with the risk among those treated with antidepressants without NSAIDs. Design Retrospective nationwide propensity score matched cohort study. Setting Korean nationwide health insurance database between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2013. Participants Patients who began receiving antidepressants for the first time (index date) without a history of having received a prescription for antidepressants during the preceding year. Patients who had been diagnosed as having cerebrovascular diseases within a year before the index date were excluded. Main outcome measure Time to first hospital admission with intracranial haemorrhage within 30 days after drug use. Matched Cox regression models were used to compare the risk of intracranial haemorrhage among patients who were treated with antidepressants with and without NSAIDs, after propensity score matching with a 1:1 ratio. Results After propensity score estimation and matching in a 1:1 ratio, the cohort used in the analysis included 4?145?226 people. The 30 day risk of intracranial haemorrhage during the entire study period was higher for combined use of antidepressants and NSAIDs than for use of antidepressants without NSAIDs (hazard ratio 1.6, 95% confidence interval 1.32 to 1.85). No statistically meaningful differences were found in risk of intracranial haemorrhage between the antidepressant drug classes. Conclusions Combined use of antidepressants and NSAIDs was associated with an increased risk of intracranial haemorrhage within 30 days of initial combination. PMID:26173947

  12. Progeria syndrome with cardiac complications.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, Saadia; Ilyas, Hajira; Hameed, Abdul; Ilyas, Muhammad

    2013-09-01

    A case report of 6-year-old boy with progeria syndrome, with marked cardiac complications is presented. The boy had cardiorespiratory failure. Discoloured purpuric skin patches, alopecia, prominent forehead, protuberant eyes, flattened nasal cartilage, malformed mandible, hypodentition, and deformed rigid fingers and toes were observed on examination. The boy was unable to speak. A sclerotic systolic murmur was audible over the mitral and aortic areas. Chest x-rays showed cardiac enlargement and the electrocardiogram (ECG) showed giant peaked P waves (right atrial hypertrophy) and right ventricular hypertrophy. Atherosclerotic dilated ascending aorta, thickened sclerotic aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valves with increased echo texture, left and right atrial and right ventricular dilatation, reduced left ventricular cavity, and thickened speckled atrial and ventricular septa were observed on echocardiography. PMID:24601202

  13. Skeletal complications of eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Abigail A; Gordon, Catherine M

    2015-09-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric illness with profound medical consequences. Among the many adverse physical sequelae of AN, bone health is impacted by starvation and can be permanently impaired over the course of the illness. In this review of skeletal complications associated with eating disorders, we discuss the epidemiology, neuroendocrine changes, adolescent vs. adult skeletal considerations, orthopedic concerns, assessment of bone health, and treatment options for individuals with AN. The focus of the review is the skeletal sequelae associated with anorexia nervosa, but we also briefly consider other eating disorders that may afflict adolescents and young adults. The review presents updates to the field of bone health in AN, and also suggests knowledge gaps and areas for future investigation. PMID:26166318

  14. Can statins prevent pregnancy complications?

    PubMed

    Girardi, Guillermina

    2014-03-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis. The beneficial effects of the statins in preventing cardiovascular diseases are not entirely due to cholesterol reduction. Numerous studies suggest that the benefits observed with statins may be mediated by pleiotropic effects that are cholesterol-independent. There is now compelling evidence that statin therapy may diminish inflammation and oxidative stress, increase angiogenesis, inhibit the coagulation cascade and protect the endothelium. Several animal studies demonstrated that statins prevent pregnancy complications such as recurrent miscarriages and preeclampsia. Epidemiological data collected to date suggest that statins are not major teratogens. Clinical trials should be performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of statins in preventing bad pregnancy outcomes in women. Some of these trials recently started. This article summarizes the numerous effects of statins that can contribute to the pregnancy protection observed in animal models. PMID:24012117

  15. Pulmonary hypertension complicating multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Tomer M.; Niesvizky, Ruben; Sobol, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an infrequently reported complication of multiple myeloma (MM). PH has been more commonly associated with amyloidosis, myeloproliferative diseases, and the POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal protein, skin changes) syndrome. PH in MM is typically mild to moderate and may be secondary to a variety of conditions, which include left ventricular dysfunction, high-output cardiac failure, chronic kidney disease, treatment-related toxicities, and precapillary involvement. We describe 3 patients with MM and severe PH. Each patient underwent right heart catheterization. All patients demonstrated elevated pulmonary pressures, transpulmonary gradients, and pulmonary vascular resistance. Each patient was ultimately treated with pulmonary vasodilator therapy with improvement in cardiopulmonary symptoms. Additional studies are needed to define the prevalence, prognosis, and pathogenesis of PH in this complex population and to help clarify who may benefit from targeted PH therapy. PMID:26401262

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of a non-haemorrhagic fibrin(ogen)olytic metalloproteinase from the venom of Agkistrodon acutus

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Jing; Li, Ming; Chen, Jiashu; Qiu, Pengxin; Liang, Xiuxia; Lou, Zhiyong; Rao, Zihe; Yan, Guangmei

    2005-04-01

    Crystals of a non-haemorrhagic fibrin(ogen)olytic metalloproteinase from the venom of A. acutus have been obtained and characterized by X-ray diffraction. A non-haemorrhagic fibrin(ogen)olytic metalloproteinase from the venom of Agkistrodon acutus has been crystallized by the hanging-drop method. The crystals belong to space group P3{sub 1}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 80.57, c = 66.77 Å and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.86 Å resolution.

  17. The effect of immunosuppression on the development of cerebral oedema in an experimental model of intracerebral haemorrhage: whole body and regional irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kane, P J; Modha, P; Strachan, R D; Cook, S; Chambers, I R; Clayton, C B; Mendelow, A D

    1992-09-01

    The oedema which forms around an intracerebral haemorrhage has a complex aetiology. The immune response may have a role in its formation. There is clinical and experimental evidence that circulating leucocytes and platelets may mediate oedema formation. Global depletion of circulating leucocytes and platelets by whole body irradiation in a rodent model of intracerebral haemorrhage was found to confer protection against both ischaemia and oedema formation. This was not a direct effect of irradiation of the brain. The possible mechanisms for this protection are discussed. PMID:1402968

  18. Functional response of cerebral blood flow induced by somatosensory stimulation in rats with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiguo; Huang, Qin; Liu, Peng; Li, Pengcheng; Ma, Lianting; Lu, Jinling

    2015-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is often accompanied by cerebral vasospasm (CVS), which is the phenomenon of narrowing of large cerebral arteries, and then can produce delayed ischemic neurological deficit (DIND) such as lateralized sensory dysfunction. CVS was regarded as a major contributor to DIND in patients with SAH. However, therapy for preventing vasospasm after SAH to improve the outcomes may not work all the time. It is important to find answers to the relationship between CVS and DIND after SAH. How local cerebral blood flow (CBF) is regulated during functional activation after SAH still remains poorly understood, whereas, the regulation of CBF may play an important role in weakening the impact of CVS on cortex function. Therefore, it is worthwhile to evaluate the functional response of CBF in the activated cortex in an SAH animal model. Most evaluation of the effect of SAH is presently carried out by neurological behavioral scales. The functional imaging of cortical activation during sensory stimulation may help to reflect the function of the somatosensory cortex more locally than the behavioral scales do. We investigated the functional response of CBF in the somatosensory cortex induced by an electrical stimulation to contralateral forepaw via laser speckle imaging in a rat SAH model. Nineteen Sprague-Dawley rats from two groups (control group, n=10 and SAH group, n=9) were studied. SAH was induced in rats by double injection of autologous blood into the cisterna magna after CSF aspiration. The same surgical procedure was applied in the control group without CSF aspiration or blood injection. Significant CVS was found in the SAH group. Meanwhile, we observed a delayed peak of CBF response in rats with SAH compared with those in the control group, whereas no significant difference was found in magnitude, duration, and areas under curve of relative CBF changes between the two groups. The results suggest that the regulation function of local CBF during functional activation induced by somatosensory stimulation might not be seriously impaired in the somatosensory cortex of rats with SAH. Therefore, our findings might help to understand the clinical phenomenon that DIND might not occur even when CVS was found in SAH patients. PMID:26358821

  19. Hormone replacement therapy and the risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Malik, Ahmed A; Saeed, Omar; Defillo, Archie; Sherr, Gregory T; Suri, M Fareed K

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT The incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) increases after menopause. Anecdotal data suggest that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may reduce the rate of SAH and aneurysm formation in women. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of HRT on occurrence of SAH in a large prospective cohort of postmenopausal women. METHODS The data were analyzed for 93, 676 women 50-79 years of age who were enrolled in the observational arm of the Women's Health Initiative Study. The effect of HRT on risk of SAH was determined over a period of 12 ± 1 years (mean ± SD) using Cox proportional hazards analysis after adjusting for potential confounders. Additional analysis was performed to identify the risk associated with "estrogen only" and "estrogen and progesterone" HRT among women. RESULTS Of the 93, 676 participants, 114 (0.1%) developed SAH during the follow-up period. The rate of SAH was higher among women on active HRT compared with those without HRT used (0.14% vs 0.11%, absolute difference 0.03%, p < 0.0001). In unadjusted analysis, participants who reported active use of HRT were 60% more likely to suffer an SAH (RR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.3). Compared with women without HRT use, the risk of SAH continued to be higher among women reporting active use of HRT (RR 1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.2) after adjusting for age, systolic blood pressure, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, body mass index, race/ethnicity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. The risk of SAH was nonsignificantly higher among women on "estrogen only" HRT (RR 1.4, 95% CI 0.91-2.0) than "estrogen and progesterone" HRT(RR 1.2, 95% CI 0.8-2.1) after adjusting for the above-mentioned confounders. CONCLUSIONS Postmenopausal women, particularly those at risk for SAH due to presence of unruptured aneurysms, family history, or cardiovascular risk factors, should be counseled against use of HRT. PMID:26162033

  20. Safety and Complications of Double-Lumen Tunnelled Cuffed Central Venous Dialysis Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Rana S.; Kakaria, Anupam K.; Khan, Saif A.; Mohammed, Saja; Al-Sukaiti, Rashid; Al-Riyami, Dawood; Al-Mula Abed, Yasser W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess the technical success, safety and immediate and delayed complications of double-lumen tunnelled cuffed central venous catheters (TVCs) at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), Muscat, Oman. Methods: This retrospective study took place between January 2012 and October 2013. The clinical records and radiological data of all patients who underwent ultrasound- and fluoroscopy-guided TVC placement at SQUH during the study period were reviewed. Demographic data and information regarding catheter placement, technical success and peri- and post-procedure complications (such as catheter-related infections or thrombosis) were collected. Results: A total of 204 TVCs were placed in 161 patients. Of these, 68 were female (42.2%) and 93 were male (57.8%). The mean age of the patients was 54.4 ± 17.3 years. The most common reason for catheter placement was the initiation of dialysis (63.4%). A total of 203 procedures were technically successful (99.5%). The right internal jugular vein was the most common site of catheter placement (74.9%). Mild haemorrhage which resolved spontaneously occurred in 11 cases (5.4%). No other complications were observed. Subsequent follow-up data was available for 132 catheters (65.0%); of these, thrombosis-related catheter malfunction was observed in 22 cases (16.7%) and catheter-related infection in 29 cases (22.0%). Conclusion: Radiological-guided placement of tunnelled haemodialysis catheters can be performed safely with excellent technical success. The success rate of catheter insertion at SQUH was favourable in comparison with other studies reported in the literature. PMID:26629377

  1. Comparative quantitative monitoring of rabbit haemorrhagic disease viruses in rabbit kittens

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Only one strain (the Czech CAPM-v351) of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) has been released in Australia and New Zealand to control pest populations of the European rabbit O. cuniculus. Antigenic variants of RHDV known as RHDVa strains are reportedly replacing RHDV strains in other parts of the world, and Australia is currently investigating the usefulness of RHDVa to complement rabbit biocontrol efforts in Australia and New Zealand. RHDV efficiently kills adult rabbits but not rabbit kittens, which are more resistant to RHD the younger they are and which may carry the virus without signs of disease for prolonged periods. These different infection patterns in young rabbits may significantly influence RHDV epidemiology in the field and hence attempts to control rabbit numbers. Methods We quantified RHDV replication and shedding in 4–5 week old rabbits using quantitative real time PCR to assess their potential to shape RHDV epidemiology by shedding and transmitting virus. We further compared RHDV-v351 with an antigenic variant strain of RHDVa in kittens that is currently being considered as a potential RHDV strain for future release to improve rabbit biocontrol in Australia. Results Kittens were susceptible to infection with virus doses as low as 10 ID50. Virus growth, shedding and transmission after RHDVa infection was found to be comparable or non-significantly lower compared to RHDV. Virus replication and shedding was observed in all kittens infected, but was low in comparison to adult rabbits. Both viruses were shed and transmitted to bystander rabbits. While blood titres indicated that 4–5 week old kittens mostly clear the infection even in the absence of maternal antibodies, virus titres in liver, spleen and mesenteric lymph node were still high on day 5 post infection. Conclusions Rabbit kittens are susceptible to infection with very low doses of RHDV, and can transmit virus before they seroconvert. They may therefore play an important role in RHDV field epidemiology, in particular for virus transmission within social groups during virus outbreaks. PMID:24913134

  2. An afferent pathway for the selective release of vasopressin in response to carotid occlusion and haemorrhage in the cat.

    PubMed

    Clark, B J; Silva MR Jr, E

    1967-08-01

    1. The release of neurohypophysial hormones in response to carotid occlusion and haemorrhage has been studied in anaesthetized cats. Samples of jugular venous blood were extracted with alcohol and the extracts assayed for antidiuretic and milk-ejecting activity.2. The release of vasopressin in response to bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries has been confirmed in the cat; this effect was abolished when the sinus nerves were divided.3. Using a new sensitive preparation for the assay of milk-ejecting activity in blood extracts, it has been shown that no oxytocin accompanies the release of vasopressin during carotid occlusion.4. The independent release of vasopressin without oxytocin during haemorrhage has also been confirmed, and the role of the sinus nerves and vagi in this response investigated. Bilateral division of either nerve reduced the response, but the vagus appeared to be of greater importance than the sinus nerve.5. A reflex arc for the selective release of vasopressin has been proposed, of which the fibres of the sinus nerves and vagi form the afferent component and the neurones of the supraoptic nucleus the efferent component. PMID:6051793

  3. Thermal stress and diabetic complications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshinori; Yabunaka, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Ichiro; Noro, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Agishi, Yuko

    1995-06-01

    Activities of erythrocyte aldose reductase were compared in 34 normal subjects, 45 diabetic patients, and nine young men following immersion in water at 25, 39, and 42° C. Mean basal enzyme activity was 1.11 (SEM 0.12) U/g Hb and 2.07 (SEM 0.14) U/g Hb in normal controls and diabetic patients, respectively ( P<0.0001). Activities of the enzyme showed a good correlation with hemaglobin A1 (HbA1) concentrations ( P<0.01) but not with fasting plasma glucose concentrations. After immersion at 42° C for 10 min, enzyme activity was increased by 37.6% ( P<0.01); however, the activity decreased by 52.2% ( P<0.005) after immersion for 10 min at 39° C and by 47.0% ( P<0.05) at 25° C. These changes suggest that heat stress might aggravate diabetic complications, and body exposure to hot environmental conditions is not recommended for diabetic patients.

  4. [Complications of synthetic hair implantation].

    PubMed

    Lange-Ionescu, S; Frosch, P J

    1995-01-01

    Five men (average age 35 years) suffering from the sequelae of hair implants were examined in the course of claims for legal compensation. Polyether amide hair fibres had been implanted, 1000 per patient and session. In all cases the improved implantation technique with a fine needle and subcutaneous knotting had been used in a total of three institutions. Three patients developed bacterial folliculitis after 4-8 weeks; in the other two patients this developed later, after 3-6 months. In two patients the possible triggering event was the wearing of a motorcycle helmet and a vacation in a tropical climate respectively. In another patient the artificial hair curled considerably after he visited a sauna. The implanted hair had fallen out almost completely in all cases (100% in two patients after 9-12 months, 50-75% in three patients after 7 months to 2 years). All patients showed cosmetically disturbing small scars and pigmentary changes. Despite an apparently improved complication rate, the new technique of hair fibre implantation remains a doubtful procedure and cannot be recommended in view of possible permanent sequelae. PMID:7875965

  5. Zebrafish sex: a complicated affair

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Woei Chang

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we provide a detailed overview of studies on the elusive sex determination (SD) and gonad differentiation mechanisms of zebrafish (Danio rerio). We show that the data obtained from most studies are compatible with polygenic sex determination (PSD), where the decision is made by the allelic combinations of several loci. These loci are typically dispersed throughout the genome, but in some teleost species a few of them might be located on a preferential pair of (sex) chromosomes. The PSD system has a much higher level of variation of SD genotypes both at the level of gametes and the sexual genotype of individuals, than that of the chromosomal sex determination systems. The early sexual development of zebrafish males is a complicated process, as they first develop a ‘juvenile ovary’, that later undergoes a transformation to give way to a testis. To date, three major developmental pathways were shown to be involved with gonad differentiation through the modulation of programmed cell death. In our opinion, there are more pathways participating in the regulation of zebrafish gonad differentiation/transformation. Introduction of additional powerful large-scale genomic approaches into the analysis of zebrafish reproduction will result in further deepening of our knowledge as well as identification of additional pathways and genes associated with these processes in the near future. PMID:24148942

  6. Chronic complications of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Nebahat; Akku?, Selami; U?urlu, Fatma Gülçin

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a serious medical condition that causes functional, psychological and socioeconomic disorder. Therefore, patients with SCI experience significant impairments in various aspects of their life. The goals of rehabilitation and other treatment approaches in SCI are to improve functional level, decrease secondary morbidity and enhance health-related quality of life. Acute and long-term secondary medical complications are common in patients with SCI. However, chronic complications especially further negatively impact on patients’ functional independence and quality of life. Therefore, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of chronic secondary complications in patients with SCI is critical for limiting these complications, improving survival, community participation and health-related quality of life. The management of secondary chronic complications of SCI is also important for SCI specialists, families and caregivers as well as patients. In this paper, we review data about common secondary long-term complications after SCI, including respiratory complications, cardiovascular complications, urinary and bowel complications, spasticity, pain syndromes, pressure ulcers, osteoporosis and bone fractures. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of risk factors, signs, symptoms, prevention and treatment approaches for secondary long-term complications in patients with SCI. PMID:25621208

  7. Effects of Low-Dose Unfractionated Heparin Pretreatment on Early Brain Injury after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Mice.

    PubMed

    Altay, Orhan; Suzuki, Hidenori; Hasegawa, Yu; Sorar, Mehmet; Chen, Han; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2016-01-01

    Heparin is a pleiotropic drug that antagonizes many pathophysiological mechanisms. In this study, we evaluated whether heparin prevents early brain injury (EBI) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in mice. SAH was induced by endovascular perforation in mice randomly assigned to sham-operated (n?=?8), SAH?+?vehicle (n?=?12), SAH?+?10 U heparin pretreatment (n?=?11), and SAH?+?30 U heparin pretreatment (n?=?14) groups. At 24 h post-SAH, severity of SAH, neurological scores, and brain water content were evaluated. Low-dose heparin pretreatment improved neurobehavioral function, and decreased brain edema in the ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere to the perforation side. High-dose heparin had a tendency for increased SAH, which obscured the neuroprotective effects by heparin. Low-dose heparin pretreatment may decrease the development of post-SAH EBI. PMID:26463935

  8. Transient unilateral facial paralysis induced by perimesencephalic non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    WEN, HUI-JUN; YANG, JIN-SHUO; LI, YONG-QIANG

    2015-01-01

    The present study is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report of a rare, transient form of unilateral facial paralysis induced by perimesencephalic non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. The paralysis may have resulted from the compression of a part of the facial nerve by the flow of the hemorrhage into the cavum subarachnoidale; alternatively, the paralysis may have been caused by disorder of the blood supply of the facial nucleus, with the hemorrhage leading to brainstem vasospasm. The patient underwent hemostatic therapy, administration of a symptomatic antiemetic and dehydration. The facial nerve compression was released due to the absorption of the hemorrhage or the rapid improvement of the facial nucleus blood supply following the resolution of the vasospasm. Consequently, the facial nerve function was fully recovered, and the facial paralysis disappeared.

  9. Hidden dense middle cerebral artery sign in a 4-year-old boy with traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bum-Joon; Choi, Jong-Il; Ha, Sung-Kon; Lim, Dong-Jun; Kim, Sang-Dae

    2014-12-01

    A 4-year-old boy was admitted with acute onset of hemiplegia of the right side that was secondary to a traffic accident. Initial computed tomography revealed a traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage, and follow-up computed tomography showed a more localized hematoma of the left sylvian cistern. After a few days of conservative treatment, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a cerebral infarction of the left lenticulostriate territory, even though magnetic resonance angiography showed preserved middle cerebral artery flow. Thus, we realized that the hematoma of the sylvian cistern was the so-called dense middle cerebral artery sign. This case of posttraumatic infarction suggested the importance of meticulous investigations and clinical correlations of imaging studies in pediatric patients with head injuries. PMID:24282184

  10. Global emergency medicine journal club: social media responses to the January 2014 online emergency medicine journal club on subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chan, Teresa M; Rosenberg, Hans; Lin, Michelle

    2014-07-01

    From January 20 to 24, 2014, Annals continued a successful collaboration with an academic Web site, Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM), to host another Global Emergency Medicine Journal Club session featuring the 2013 Journal of the American Medical Association article "Clinical Decision Rules to Rule Out Subarachnoid Hemorrhage for Acute Headache" by Perry et al. This online journal club used the power of rapid Twitter conversations, a live videocast with the authors, and more detailed discussions hosted on the ALiEM Web site's comment section. There were more than 1,431 individuals from 501 cities in 59 countries who viewed the blog post. During this 5-day event, 28 comments (average word count 153 words) and 206 tweets were made. This summary article details the community discussion, shared insights, and analytic data generated during this novel, multiplatform approach. PMID:24951414

  11. Preventive effect of continuous cisternal irrigation with magnesium sulfate solution on angiographic cerebral vasospasms associated with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhages: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takuji; Mori, Kentaro; Esaki, Takanori; Nakao, Yasuaki; Tokugawa, Joji; Watanabe, Mitsuya

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Although cerebral vasospasm (CV) is one of the most important predictors for the outcome in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), no treatment has yet been established for this condition. This study investigated the efficacy of continuous direct infusion of magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) solution into the intrathecal cistern in patients with an aneurysmal SAH. METHODS An SAH caused by a ruptured aneurysm was identified on CT scans within 72 hours after SAH onset. All patients were treated by surgical clipping and randomized into 2 groups: a control group of patients undergoing a standard treatment and a magnesium (Mg) group of patients additionally undergoing continuous infusion of 5 mmol/L MgSO4 solution for 14 days. The Mg(2+) concentrations in serum and CSF were recorded daily. Neurological examinations were performed by intensive care clinicians. Delayed cerebral ischemia was monitored by CT or MRI. To assess the effect of the Mg treatment on CV, the CVs were graded on the basis of the relative degree of constriction visible on cerebral angiograms taken on Day 10 after the SAH, and transcranial Doppler ultrasonography was performed daily to measure blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Neurological outcomes and mortality rates were evaluated with the Glasgow Outcome Scale and modified Rankin Scale at 3 months after SAH onset. RESULTS Seventy-three patients admitted during the period of April 2008 to March 2013 were eligible and enrolled in this study. Three patients were excluded because of violation of protocol requirements. The 2 groups did not significantly differ in age, sex, World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies grade, or Fisher grade. In the Mg group, the Mg(2+) concentration in CSF gradually increased from Day 4 after initiation of the continuous MgSO4 intrathecal administration. No such increase was observed in the control group. No significant changes in the serum Mg(2+) levels were observed for 14 days, and no cardiovascular complications such as bradycardia or hypotension were observed in any of the patients. However, bradypnea was noted among patients in the Mg group. The Mg group had a significantly better CV grade than the control group (p < 0.05). Compared with the patients in the Mg group, those in the control group had a significantly elevated blood flow velocity in the MCA. Both groups were similar in the incidences of cerebral infarction, and the 2 groups also did not significantly differ in clinical outcomes. CONCLUSIONS Continuous cisternal irrigation with MgSO4 solution starting on Day 4 and continuing to Day 14 significantly inhibited CV in patients with aneurysmal SAH without severe cardiovascular complications. However, this improvement in CV neither reduced the incidence of delayed cerebral ischemia nor improved the functional outcomes in patients with SAH. PMID:26230471

  12. Intraoperative laparoscopic complications for urological cancer procedures

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Sergio Fernández-Pello; Rodríguez, Ivan Gonzalez; Ugarteburu, Rodrigo Gil; Villamil, Luis Rodríguez; Mendez, Begoña Diaz; Gil, Patricio Suarez; Madera, Javier Mosquera

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To structure the rate of intraoperative complications that requires an intraoperative or perioperative resolution. METHODS: We perform a literature review of Medline database. The research was focused on intraoperative laparoscopic procedures inside the field of urological oncology. General rate of perioperative complications in laparoscopic urologic surgery is described to be around 12.4%. Most of the manuscripts published do not make differences between pure intraoperative, intraoperative with postoperative consequences and postoperative complications. RESULTS: We expose a narrative statement of complications, possible solutions and possible preventions for most frequent retroperitoneal and pelvic laparoscopic surgery. We expose the results with the following order: retroperitoneal laparoscopic surgery (radical nephrectomy, partial nephrectomy, nephroureterectomy and adrenalectomy) and pelvic laparoscopic surgery (radical prostatectomy and radical cystectomy). CONCLUSION: Intraoperative complications vary from different series. More scheduled reports should be done in order to better understand the real rates of complications. PMID:25984519

  13. Extravascular complications following abdominal organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Low, G; Jaremko, J L; Lomas, D J

    2015-08-01

    A variety of transplants have been performed in the abdomen including liver, kidney, pancreas and islet, bowel, and multivisceral transplants. Imaging plays an important role in graft surveillance particularly to exclude post-transplant complications. When complications occur, therapeutic image-guided interventions are invaluable as these may be graft-saving and even life-saving. Vascular complications following transplantation have been extensively reported in recent reviews. The focus of this review is to discuss post-transplant complications that are primarily extravascular in location. This includes biliary, urological, intestinal, malignancy, infections, and miscellaneous complications. Familiarity with the imaging appearances of these complications is helpful for radiologists as accurate diagnosis and expedient treatment has an impact on graft and patient survival. PMID:25979853

  14. Haptoglobin phenotype predicts the development of focal and global cerebral vasospasm and may influence outcomes after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Leclerc, Jenna L.; Blackburn, Spiros; Neal, Dan; Mendez, Nicholas V.; Wharton, Jeffrey A.; Waters, Michael F.; Doré, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm (CV) and the resulting delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) significantly contribute to poor outcomes following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Free hemoglobin (Hb) within the subarachnoid space has been implicated in the pathogenesis of CV. Haptoglobin (Hp) binds free pro-oxidant Hb, thereby modulating its harmful effects. Humans can be of three Hp phenotypes: Hp1-1, Hp2-1, or Hp2-2. In several disease states, the Hp2-2 protein has been associated with reduced ability to protect against toxic free Hb. We hypothesized that individuals with the Hp2-2 phenotype would have more CV, DCI, mortality, and worse functional outcomes after aSAH. In a sample of 74 aSAH patients, Hp2-2 phenotype was significantly associated with increased focal moderate (P = 0.014) and severe (P = 0.008) CV and more global CV (P = 0.014) after controlling for covariates. Strong trends toward increased mortality (P = 0.079) and worse functional outcomes were seen for the Hp2-2 patients with modified Rankin scale at 6 wk (P = 0.076) and at 1 y (P = 0.051) and with Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended at discharge (P = 0.091) and at 1 y (P = 0.055). In conclusion, Hp2-2 phenotype is an independent risk factor for the development of both focal and global CV and also predicts poor functional outcomes and mortality after aSAH. Hp phenotyping may serve as a clinically useful tool in the critical care management of aSAH patients by allowing for early prediction of those patients who require increased vigilance due to their inherent genetic risk for the development of CV and resulting DCI and poor outcomes. PMID:25583472

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is associated with neuroprotection against apoptosis via autophagy activation in a rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yan, Feng; Li, Jianru; Chen, Jingyin; Hu, Qiang; Gu, Chi; Lin, Wang; Chen, Gao

    2014-03-20

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress might play an important role in a range of neurological diseases; however, this phenomenon's role in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remains unclear. In this study, we explored the potential role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in early brain injury following SAH.84 rats were used for an endovascular perforation-induced subarachnoid hemorrhage model. The rats were intraperitoneally pretreated with the ER stress inducer tunicamycin (Tm) or with the inhibitor tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) before SAH onset. An intracerebral ventricular infusion of autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) was also used to determine the relation between autophagy and ER stress in early brain injury following SAH. At 24h, rats were neurologically evaluated, and their brains were extracted for molecular biological and histological studies. ER stress was activated in rats after 24h of SAH. Enhanced ER stress via Tm pretreatment significantly improved neurological deficits, attenuated the expression of pro-apoptotic molecules of caspase-3 and reduced the number of TUNEL-positive cells. In contrast, the ER stress inhibitor TUDCA aggravated neurological deficits and apoptotic cell death. Western blot analysis revealed that levels of the autophagic protein Beclin 1 and the ratio of LC3-II to LC3-I were both increased by Tm infusion and reduced by TUDCA administration. The suppression of autophagic activity with 3-MA attenuated Tm-induced anti-apoptotic effects. Our study indicates that ER stress alleviates early brain injury following SAH via inhibiting apoptosis. This neuroprotective effect is most likely exerted by autophagy activation. PMID:24513235

  16. Skull base fractures and their complications.

    PubMed

    Baugnon, Kristen L; Hudgins, Patricia A

    2014-08-01

    Basilar skull fractures are a relatively frequent occurrence in significant head trauma, and their detection is important, as even linear nondisplaced fractures can be associated with critical complications. The management of skull base fractures depends on the location and extent of these associated complications. This article reviews skull base anatomy; morphology of the common fracture patterns within the anterior, central, and posterior skull base; associated complications; imaging findings; and possible pitfalls in imaging of skull base trauma. PMID:25086806

  17. Management of biliary complications after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Memeo, Riccardo; Piardi, Tullio; Sangiuolo, Federico; Sommacale, Daniele; Pessaux, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Biliary complications (BC) currently represent a major source of morbidity after liver transplantation. Although refinements in surgical technique and medical therapy have had a positive influence on the reduction of postoperative morbidity, BC affect 5% to 25% of transplanted patients. Bile leak and anastomotic strictures represent the most common complications. Nowadays, a multidisciplinary approach is required to manage such complications in order to prevent liver failure and retransplantation. PMID:26689137

  18. Video-assisted thoracic surgery complications

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Józef

    2014-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is a miniinvasive technique commonly applied worldwide. Indications for VATS are very broad and include the diagnosis of mediastinal, lung and pleural diseases, as well as large resection procedures such as pneumonectomy. The most frequent complication is prolonged postoperative air leak. The other significant complications are bleeding, infections, postoperative pain and recurrence at the port site. Different complications of VATS procedures can occur with variable frequency in various diseases. Despite the large number of their types, such complications are rare and can be avoided through the proper selection of patients and an appropriate surgical technique. PMID:25561984

  19. Pulmonary Hypertension Complicating Fibrosing Mediastinitis.

    PubMed

    Seferian, Andrei; Steriade, Alexandru; Jaïs, Xavier; Planché, Olivier; Savale, Laurent; Parent, Florence; Amar, David; Jovan, Roland; Fadel, Elie; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David

    2015-11-01

    Fibrosing mediastinitis is caused by a proliferation of fibrous tissue in the mediastinum with encasement of mediastinal viscera and compression of mediastinal bronchovascular structures. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of fibrosing mediastinitis caused by extrinsic compression of the pulmonary arteries and/or veins.We have conducted a retrospective observational study reviewing clinical, functional, hemodynamic, radiological characteristics, and outcome of 27 consecutive cases of PH associated with fibrosing mediastinitis diagnosed between 2003 and 2014 at the French Referral Centre for PH.Fourteen men and 13 women with a median age of 60 years (range 18-84) had PH confirmed on right heart catheterization. The causes of fibrosing mediastinitis were sarcoidosis (n?=?13), tuberculosis-infection confirmed or suspected (n?=?9), mediastinal irradiation (n?=?2), and idiopathic (n?=?3). Sixteen patients (59%) were in NYHA functional class III and IV. Right heart catheterization confirmed moderate to severe PH with a median mean pulmonary artery pressure of 42 mm Hg (range 27-90) and a median cardiac index of 2.8 L/min/m (range 1.6-4.3). Precapillary PH was found in 22 patients, postcapillary PH in 2, and combined postcapillary and precapillary PH in 3. Severe extrinsic compression of pulmonary arteries (>60% reduction in diameter) was evidenced in 2, 8, and 12 patients at the main, lobar, or segmental levels, respectively. Fourteen patients had at least one severe pulmonary venous compression with associated pleural effusion in 6 of them. PAH therapy was initiated in 7 patients and corticosteroid therapy (0.5-1?mg/kg/day) was initiated in 3 patients with sarcoidosis, with 9 other being already on low-dose corticosteroids. At 1-year follow-up, 3 patients had died and among the 21 patients evaluated, 3 deteriorated, 14 were stable, and only 4 patients with sarcoidosis improved (4 receiving corticosteroids and 1 receiving corticosteroids and PAH therapy). Survival was 88%, 73%, and 56% at 1, 3, and 5 years, respectively.We found no clear clinical improvement with the use of specific PAH therapy. Corticosteroid therapy may be associated with clinical improvement, in some patients with fibrosing mediastinitis due to sarcoidosis. Although never performed for this indication, lung transplantation may be proposed in eligible patients with severe PH and fibrosing mediastinitis. PMID:26554778

  20. Duplex Real-Time RT-PCR Assays for the Detection and Typing of Epizootic Haemorrhagic Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Viarouge, Cyril; Breard, Emmanuel; Zientara, Stephan; Vitour, Damien; Sailleau, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) may cause severe clinical episodes in some species of deer and sometimes in cattle. Laboratory diagnosis provides a basis for the design and timely implementation of disease control measures. There are seven distinct EHDV serotypes, VP2 coding segment 2 being the target for serotype specificity. This paper reports the development and validation of eight duplex real-time RT-PCR assays to simultaneously amplify the EHDV target (S9 for the pan-EHDV real-time RT-PCR assay and S2 for the serotyping assays) and endogenous control gene Beta-actin. Analytical and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, inter- and intra-assay variation and efficiency were evaluated for each assay. All were shown to be highly specific and sensitive. PMID:26161784

  1. A Novel Vaccine against Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever Protects 100% of Animals against Lethal Challenge in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Buttigieg, Karen R.; Dowall, Stuart D.; Findlay-Wilson, Stephen; Miloszewska, Aleksandra; Rayner, Emma; Hewson, Roger; Carroll, Miles W.

    2014-01-01

    Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) is a severe tick-borne disease, endemic in many countries in Africa, the Middle East, Eastern Europe and Asia. Between 15–70% of reported cases are fatal. There is no approved vaccine available, and preclinical protection in vivo by an experimental vaccine has not been demonstrated previously. In the present study, the attenuated poxvirus vector, Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara, was used to develop a recombinant candidate vaccine expressing the CCHF virus glycoproteins. Cellular and humoral immunogenicity was confirmed in two mouse strains, including type I interferon receptor knockout mice, which are susceptible to CCHF disease. This vaccine protected all recipient animals from lethal disease in a challenge model adapted to represent infection via a tick bite. Histopathology and viral load analysis of protected animals confirmed that they had been exposed to challenge virus, even though they did not exhibit clinical signs. This is the first demonstration of efficacy of a CCHF vaccine. PMID:24621656

  2. Metastatic choriocarcinoma induced separate simultaneous intracerebral haemorrhages: a very rare occurrence and its novel association with Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Joret, Maximilian Olavi; Starke, Robert M; Scotter, John; Heppner, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Non-traumatic separate simultaneous intracerebral haemorrhages (SSIHs) are rare. Relevant aetiologies are diverse and their diagnosis challenging. We report a unique case of SSIH in an 18-year-old male with a background of previously undiagnosed testicular choriocarcinoma and Klinefelter syndrome. The patient was admitted to Auckland City Hospital with headaches, drowsiness and vomiting. A CT scan revealed SSIH in a background of tumorous lesions. His ? human chorionic gonadotropin titre was elevated at 355?000?IU/L. The SSIH and the associated tumorous lesions were acutely surgically resected and the patient started on bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin combination chemotherapy with excellent results. In this article, we underline choriocarcinoma as a rare aetiology of SSIH and present an example of the clinical presentation, investigation and management of this very rare pathological entity. PMID:26564116

  3. Hantavirus infection in rodents and haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in Shaanxi province, China, 1984-2012.

    PubMed

    Yu, P B; Tian, H Y; Ma, C F; Ma, C A; Wei, J; Lu, X L; Wang, Z; Zhou, S; Li, S; Dong, J H; Xu, J R; Xu, B; Wang, J J

    2015-01-01

    The transmission of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is deeply influenced by the reservoir and hantavirus prevalence rate. In this study, a surveillance on human HFRS cases, relative rodent abundance, and hantavirus infection prevalence was conducted in Shaanxi province, China, during 1984-2012. A generalized linear model with Poisson-distributed residuals and a log link was used to quantify the relationship between reservoir, virus and HFRS cases. The result indicated that there was a significant association of HFRS incidence with relative rodent density and the prevalence rate. This research provides evidence that the changes of infection prevalence in the reservoir could lead directly to the emergence of a new epidemic. It was concluded that the measurement of a number of these variables could be used in disease surveillance to give useful advance warning of potential disease epidemics. PMID:24787374

  4. Increased virulence of Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease Virus associated with genetic resistance in wild Australian rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

    PubMed Central

    Elsworth, Peter; Cooke, Brian D.; Kovaliski, John; Sinclair, Ronald; Holmes, Edward C.; Strive, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    The release of myxoma virus (MYXV) and Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease Virus (RHDV) in Australia with the aim of controlling overabundant rabbits has provided a unique opportunity to study the initial spread and establishment of emerging pathogens, as well as their co-evolution with their mammalian hosts. In contrast to MYXV, which attenuated shortly after its introduction, rapid attenuation of RHDV has not been observed. By studying the change in virulence of recent field isolates at a single field site we show, for the first time, that RHDV virulence has increased through time, likely because of selection to overcome developing genetic resistance in Australian wild rabbits. High virulence also appears to be favoured as rabbit carcasses, rather than diseased animals, are the likely source of mechanical insect transmission. These findings not only help elucidate the co-evolutionary interaction between rabbits and RHDV, but reveal some of the key factors shaping virulence evolution. PMID:25146599

  5. Serological and virological features of dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever in Thailand from 1999 to 2002.

    PubMed Central

    Anantapreecha, S.; Chanama, S.; A-nuegoonpipat, A.; Naemkhunthot, S.; Sa-Ngasang, A.; Sawanpanyalert, P.; Kurane, I.

    2005-01-01

    Serological and virological features of dengue fever (DF) and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) in Thailand were analysed in 2715 patients from 1999 to 2002. The illness was caused by DEN-1 in 45%, DEN-2 in 32%, DEN-3 in 18% and DEN-4 in 5% of patients. Almost all of the DHF cases caused by DEN-2 and DEN-4 were in secondary infection, while approximately 20% of the DHF cases caused by DEN-1 and DEN-3 were in primary infection. Male:female ratio and age distribution were not different among four serotypes in primary and secondary infections. These results indicate that DEN-1 and DEN-3 induce DHF in both primary and secondary infections, and suggest that DEN-2 and DEN-4 in Thailand are less likely to cause DHF in primary infections. PMID:15962557

  6. [Complication management in prolapse and incontinence surgery].

    PubMed

    Hampel, C; Roos, F; Neisius, A; Thüroff, J W; Thomas, C

    2014-07-01

    Tension-free alloplastic slings (TFAS) have revolutionized surgery for female stress urinary incontinence for more than 20 years. The procedure is easy to perform, minimally invasive with a short operating time in an outpatient setting and has proven efficacy comparable to retropubic colposuspension. The frequency of surgery for female stress incontinence has tripled within one decade which has to have an impact on the number of complications. In contrast, sacrocolpopexy has remained the gold standard in urological prolapse surgery as none of the new techniques has reached similar efficacy or safety; however, possible complications have to be named and their causes have to be understood to maintain the highest quality of care in the future. Possible complications of TFAS are potentially underestimated with respect to prevalence and manageability. Possible complications of prolapse and incontinence surgery are presented and the underlying causes are identified. Knowledge of the pathophysiology and the cause of complications together with the results of a postoperative diagnostic work-up, allow complication management to be tailored to each individual patient. To prevent complications all conservative treatment options should have been tried preoperatively and a complete evaluation (including urodynamics) should have been carried out for every patient. Postoperative urodynamics may help to document treatment success and to identify and quantify complications. PMID:25023238

  7. Complications with Outpatient Angiography and Interventional Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Noel; Chi, Ka-Kit; Ajaka, Joe; McKay, Lesa; O'Neill, Diane; Wong, Kai Ping

    2002-03-15

    Purpose: To prospectively identify the complications, and rates of complication, in outpatient angiography and interventional procedures. Methods: There were 1050 consecutive patients, 646 men and 404 women, aged 17-89 years, with a total of 1239 procedures studied in a 2-year period, 1997 to 1999. Results: There were 560 cases of aorto-femoral angiography,resulting in 124 complications (22%), with pain or hematoma in 110.There were 206 cases of neck and cerebral angiography, resulting in 51 complications (25%), with pain and hematoma in 34, transient ischemic attack in 2 and cerebrovascular accident in 1. There were 197 interfentional procedures, with 177 being balloon dilatations, resulting in 68 complications (35%), with 2 having hematomas and 1 having hematoma/abscess requiring active treatment. There were 276 cases having various 'other' procedures (e.g., renal angiography),resulting in 65 complications (24%), with pain and hematoma in 61. No procedure-related death occurred. Eighteen cases (1.5%) had significant complications, with contrast allergy in eight. Conclusion: Outpatient angiography and intervention are relatively safe, with low significant complication rates.

  8. [Neurological complications of surgery for spinal deformities].

    PubMed

    Michel, F; Rubini, J; Grand, C; Bérard, J; Kohler, R; Michel, C R

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this study was to precisely analyse the physio-pathogenic mechanisms, bring to light the risk factors, and find a more practical way of proceeding in spinal surgery. Out of 667 spinal instrumentation surgical operations carried out between 1980-1989, we found 33 (4.8 per cent) neurological complications and have divided them into 2 groups: 7 peripheral complications, 26 cord and central complications. After further analysis, especially of the cord complications (2.5 per cent), we were able to pick out the factors which influence the rate of neurological complications and their evolution: secondary aetiology and the kyphotic composition of spinal deformation, and above all the notion of cord at risk. The delay of cord complications and especially the relation between the severity of the neurological syndrome and its evolution is extremely important. Somesthesic evoked potential monitoring confirmed that per operative diagnosis of a cord injury is possible. The steps to take when confronted with neurological complications, depend on the results of many examinations: pre and post-operative neurological evaluations electrophysiological exploration of the cord and neuro radiological explorations (myelography, scanner and IRM). This helps to complete aetiology and eliminate mechanical causes, which are the only positive indications of iterative surgery. The problems of instrumentation removal in emergency and the legal-medical aspect brought on by this type of complication are discussed. PMID:1410727

  9. Sedation-related complications in gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Amornyotin, Somchai

    2013-01-01

    Sedation practices for gastrointestinal endoscopic (GIE) procedures vary widely in different countries depending on health system regulations and local circumstances. The goal of procedural sedation is the safe and effective control of pain and anxiety, as well as to provide an appropriate degree of memory loss or decreased awareness. Sedation-related complications in gastrointestinal endoscopy, once occurred, can lead to significant morbidity and occasional mortality in patients. The risk factors of these complications include the type, dose and mode of administration of sedative agents, as well as the patient’s age and underlying medical diseases. Complications attributed to moderate and deep sedation levels are more often associated with cardiovascular and respiratory systems. However, sedation-related complications during GIE procedures are commonly transient and of a mild degree. The risk for these complications while providing any level of sedation is greatest when caring for patients already medically compromised. Significant unwanted complications can generally be prevented by careful pre-procedure assessment and preparation, appropriate monitoring and support, as well as post-procedure management. Additionally, physicians must be prepared to manage these complications. This article will review sedation-related complications during moderate and deep sedation for GIE procedures and also address their appropriate management. PMID:24255744

  10. Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation (PDQ)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Research Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation (PDQ®) General Information About Oral Complications Key Points ... bleeding in the mouth. Nerve damage. Complications of radiation therapy Oral complications caused by radiation therapy to ...

  11. Complications of surgery for radiotherapy skin damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, R.

    1982-08-01

    Complications of modern surgery for radiotherapy skin damage reviewed in 28 patients who had 42 operations. Thin split-thickness skin grafts for ulcer treatment had a 100 percent complication rate, defined as the need for further surgery. Local flaps, whether delayed or not, also had a high rate of complications. Myocutaneous flaps for ulcers had a 43 percent complication rate, with viable flaps lifting off radiated wound beds. Only myocutaneous flaps for breast reconstruction and omental flaps with skin grafts and Marlex mesh had no complications. The deeper tissue penetration of modern radiotherapy techniques may make skin grafts and flaps less useful. In reconstruction of radiation ulcers, omental flaps and myocutaneous flaps are especially useful, particularly if the radiation damage can be fully excised. The pull of gravity appears detrimental to myocutaneous flap healing and, if possible, should be avoided by flap design.

  12. Ocular Complications of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mady, Rana; Grover, Will; Butrus, Salim

    2015-01-01

    Though inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has a specific predilection for the intestinal tract, it is a systemic inflammatory disorder affecting multiple organs, including the eye. Ocular complications directly related to IBD are categorized as primary and secondary. Primary complications are usually temporally associated with IBD exacerbations and tend to resolve with systemic treatment of the intestinal inflammation. These include keratopathy, episcleritis, and scleritis. Secondary complications arise from primary complications. Examples include cataract formation due to treatment with corticosteroids, scleromalacia due to scleritis, and dry eye due to hypovitaminosis A following gut resection. Some ocular manifestations of IBD can lead to significant visual morbidity and temporally associated complications can also be a herald of disease control. Furthermore, ocular manifestations of IBD can occasionally manifest before the usual intestinal manifestations, leading to an earlier diagnosis. Thus, it is important to understand the clinical presentation of possible ocular manifestations in order to initiate appropriate treatment and to help prevent significant visual morbidity. PMID:25879056

  13. Global and regional burden of first-ever ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke during 1990–2010: findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthi, Rita V; Feigin, Valery L; Forouzanfar, Mohammad H; Mensah, George A; Connor, Myles; Bennett, Derrick A; Moran, Andrew E; Sacco, Ralph L; Anderson, Laurie M; Truelsen, Thomas; O’Donnell, Martin; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Barker-Collo, Suzanne; Lawes, Carlene M M; Wang, Wenzhi; Shinohara, Yukito; Witt, Emma; Ezzati, Majid; Naghavi, Mohsen; Murray, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The burden of ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke varies between regions and over time. With differences in prognosis, prevalence of risk factors, and treatment strategies, knowledge of stroke pathological type is important for targeted region-specific health-care planning for stroke and could inform priorities for type-specific prevention strategies. We used data from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2010 (GBD 2010) to estimate the global and regional burden of first-ever ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke during 1990–2010. Methods We searched Medline, Embase, LILACS, Scopus, PubMed, Science Direct, Global Health Database, the WHO library, and regional databases from 1990 to 2012 to identify relevant studies published between 1990 and 2010. We applied the GBD 2010 analytical technique (DisMod-MR) to calculate regional and country-specific estimates for ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke incidence, mortality, mortality-to-incidence ratio, and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) lost, by age group (aged <75 years, ?75 years, and in total) and country income level (high-income and low-income and middle-income) for 1990, 2005, and 2010. Findings We included 119 studies (58 from high-income countries and 61 from low-income and middle-income countries). Worldwide, the burden of ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke increased significantly between 1990 and 2010 in terms of the absolute number of people with incident ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke (37% and 47% increase, respectively), number of deaths (21% and 20% increase), and DALYs lost (18% and 14% increase). In the past two decades in high-income countries, incidence of ischaemic stroke reduced significantly by 13% (95% CI 6–18), mortality by 37% (19–39), DALYs lost by 34% (16–36), and mortality-to-incidence ratios by 21% (10–27). For haemorrhagic stroke, incidence reduced significantly by 19% (1–15), mortality by 38% (32–43), DALYs lost by 39% (32–44), and mortality-to-incidence ratios by 27% (19–35). By contrast, in low-income and middle-income countries, we noted a significant increase of 22% (5–30) in incidence of haemorrhagic stroke and a 6% (–7 to 18) non-significant increase in the incidence of ischaemic stroke. Mortality rates for ischaemic stroke fell by 14% (9–19), DALYs lost by 17% (–11 to 21%), and mortality-to-incidence ratios by 16% (–12 to 22). For haemorrhagic stroke in low-income and middle-income countries, mortality rates reduced by 23% (–18 to 25%), DALYs lost by 25% (–21 to 28), and mortality-to-incidence ratios by 36% (–34 to 28). Interpretation Although age-standardised mortality rates for ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke have decreased in the past two decades, the absolute number of people who have these stroke types annually, and the number with related deaths and DALYs lost, is increasing, with most of the burden in low-income and middle-income countries. Further study is needed in these countries to identify which subgroups of the population are at greatest risk and who could be targeted for preventive efforts. PMID:25104492

  14. Management of Chronic Subdural Haematoma in a Case of Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Patnaik, Ashis; Mishra, Sudhansu S.; Senapati, Satya B.; Pattajoshi, Acharya S.

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage is a rare devastating complication of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), mostly presenting as intraparenchymal or subarachnoid haemorrhage. Isolated chronic subdural haematoma (SDH) is still very rare and the optimal management is unsettled. Spontaneous resolution of chronic SDH in patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura is possible. We report a case of spontaneous chronic SDH in a patient with ITP with hemiparesis where the haematoma significantly decreased in size with complete resolution of hemiparesis as a result of platelet transfusions and continuing therapy with steroids. Surgical treatment of subdural haematoma with consequent bleeding complications can be avoided in this scenario. PMID:23741595

  15. Complications of Intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin

    PubMed Central

    Macleod, Liam C.; Ngo, Tin C.; Gonzalgo, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is an important treatment for the management of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer because of its proven efficacy and favourable safety profile. The most common complications associated with BCG treatment are relatively minor. They include urinary frequency, cystitis, fever, and hematuria. Although serious complications are rare, patients can develop severe, life-threatening sepsis with disseminated mycobacterial infection. We report a rare case of periurethral diverticulum formation after intravesical BCG and review the literature on the potential complications of this treatment modality. PMID:25210559

  16. Medical Complications of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia.

    PubMed

    Westmoreland, Patricia; Krantz, Mori J; Mehler, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are serious psychiatric illnesses related to disordered eating and distorted body images. They both have significant medical complications associated with the weight loss and malnutrition of anorexia nervosa, as well as from the purging behaviors that characterize bulimia nervosa. No body system is spared from the adverse sequelae of these illnesses, especially as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa become more severe and chronic. We review the medical complications that are associated with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, as well as the treatment for the complications. We also discuss the epidemiology and psychiatric comorbidities of these eating disorders. PMID:26169883

  17. Late complication of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Dakwar, Anthony; Assalia, Ahmad; Khamaysi, Iyad; Kluger, Yoram; Mahajna, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is gaining popularity for the treatment of morbid obesity. It is a simple, low-cost procedure resulting in significant weight loss within a short period of time. LSG is a safe procedure with a low complication rate. The complications encountered nevertheless can result in morbidity and even mortality. The most significant complications are staple-line bleeding, stricture, and staple-line leak. The purpose of this paper is to present a patient who suffered from a staple-line leak presenting 16 months after LSG. Review of the current literature regarding this complication as well as outline of a strategy for the management of post-LSG gastric leaks is suggested. PMID:23662218

  18. Late Complication of Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Assalia, Ahmad; Kluger, Yoram

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is gaining popularity for the treatment of morbid obesity. It is a simple, low-cost procedure resulting in significant weight loss within a short period of time. LSG is a safe procedure with a low complication rate. The complications encountered nevertheless can result in morbidity and even mortality. The most significant complications are staple-line bleeding, stricture, and staple-line leak. The purpose of this paper is to present a patient who suffered from a staple-line leak presenting 16 months after LSG. Review of the current literature regarding this complication as well as outline of a strategy for the management of post-LSG gastric leaks is suggested. PMID:23662218

  19. Post-transplant urological and vascular complications.

    PubMed

    Safa, Javid; Nezami, Nariman; Tarzamni, Mohammd K; Zarforooshan, Shahriyar; Rahimi-Ardabili, Babak; Bohlouli, Abolfazl

    2009-09-01

    To determine the prevalence of urological and vascular complications in renal trans-plant recipients (RTx) at Tabriz Renal Transplant Center, we studied 55 recipients of renal allo-grafts (25 male and 29 female patients with a mean age of 38.3 +/- 13.4 years) from October 2005 to November 2006. The surgical complications in our study included hematomas: 20.4%, renal artery stenosis: 20.4%, calculi: 7.4%, hydronephrosis or ureteral stricture: 5.6%, urinary leakage: 5.6%, lymphoceles: 1.9%, and renal vein thrombosis: 1.9%. We conclude that the most common urologic complications in our center were ureteric strictures and urine leaks, and the most common vascular complication was renal artery stenosis. PMID:19736494

  20. Antibiotics May Not Help After 'Complicated' Appendectomy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_155473.html Antibiotics May Not Help After 'Complicated' Appendectomy Use of ... 2, 2015 MONDAY, Nov. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Antibiotics may not reduce the risk of infections in ...

  1. [Temporal bone surgery. Surgical sequelae and complications].

    PubMed

    Linder, T E; Lin, F

    2011-10-01

    The saying "no surgery, no surgical complications" is certainly true for all specialties. Three categories of undesired events may occur following surgery: surgical sequelae, failure to cure and complications. A critical self-analysis of surgical complications often reveals that these arise in vexing fashion according to Murphy's law, i.e. "what can go wrong, will go wrong". Incomplete preoperative evaluation, insufficient exposure of the surgical field, failure to identify surgical landmarks and misjudgment of the patient's preoperative complaints may culminate in an undesired surgical outcome. Modern preoperative radiology, the possibilities of actual or even virtual temporal bone drilling in the laboratory and the surgeon's level of experience all ensure the relative rarity of relevant surgical complications in otology. PMID:21858517

  2. Prevention of Complications in Chemical Peeling

    PubMed Central

    Anitha, B

    2010-01-01

    Chemical peeling is a simple, safe and cost-effective office procedure. Complications can be best avoided by proper patient selection, proper patient counseling, adequate priming and good intra-peel and post-peel care. PMID:21430836

  3. Diabetes Complications - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... List of All Topics All Diabetes Complications - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chinese - Simplified (????) French (français) Hindi (??????) Japanese (???) Korean (???) Russian (???????) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) ...

  4. Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is known as "invasive disease." Depending on what type of invasive infection the bacteria cause, the complications can be different. For example, if meningitis (infection of the covering of the brain and ...

  5. [Complications of purulent meningoencephalitis in children].

    PubMed

    Rubin, A N; Shcherbuk, Yu A; Lyapin, A P

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of 19 cases of meningoencephalitis was made in infants aged under one year old. The disease was complicated by chronic subdural hematomas in 11 patients and by hydrocephalus in 8 patients. The article presents the strategy, treatment results and diagnostic procedures volume. Based on their work, the authors made a conclusion that meningoencephalitis required an emergency neurosurgical interference in order to avoid complications in convalescence period. PMID:25962294

  6. Complications of pericardiocentesis: A clinical synopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajan; Sinha, Archana; Lin, Maggie J; Uchino, Reina; Butryn, Tracy; O’Mara, M Shay; Nanda, Sudip; Shirani, Jamshid; Stawicki, Stanislaw P

    2015-01-01

    Pericardiocentesis (PC) is both a diagnostic and a potentially life-saving therapeutic procedure. Currently echocardiography-guided pericardiocentesis is considered the standard clinical practice in the treatment of large pericardial effusions and cardiac tamponade. Although considered relatively safe, this invasive procedure may be associated with certain risks and potentially serious complications. This review provides a summary of pericardiocentesis and a focused overview of the potential complications of this procedure. PMID:26557491

  7. Pleural space complications associated with lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Andrew; Boffa, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Lung transplantation represents a life-saving option for some end-stage lung diseases. Despite the magnitude of anatomic manipulation and the fragility of the patient population, the procedures have become progressively safer. Perioperative morbidity, however, remains high. Pleural space complications are particularly common. This article discusses hemothorax, chylothorax, air leak or pneumothorax, recurrent effusion, empyema, trapped lung, and chronic pleural complications. PMID:25430432

  8. Complication Avoidance in Endoscopic Skull Base Surgery.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Peleg M; DiNapoli, Vincent; Su, Shirley Y; Raza, Shaan M

    2016-02-01

    Endoscopic endonasal approaches to the skull base pathology have developed and evolved dramatically over the past 2 decades, particularly with collaboration between neurosurgery and otolaryngology physicians. These advances have increased significantly the use of such approaches beyond just resection of pituitary adenomas, including a variety of skull base pathologies. As the field has evolved, so has our understanding of the complications accompanying endoscopic skull base surgery, as well as techniques to both avoid and manage these complications. These are discussed here. PMID:26614840

  9. Vascular ring complicates accidental button battery ingestion.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Ronald W; Schwartz, Matthew C; Stephany, Joshua; Donnelly, Lane F; Franciosi, James P; Epelman, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Button battery ingestion can lead to dangerous complications, including vasculoesophageal fistula formation. The presence of a vascular ring may complicate battery ingestion if the battery lodges at the level of the ring and its important vascular structures. We report a 4-year-old boy with trisomy 21 who was diagnosed with a vascular ring at the time of button battery ingestion and died 9 days after presentation due to massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding from esophageal erosion and vasculoesophageal fistula formation. PMID:25662210

  10. A clinical and epidemiological study of an epidemic of febrile illness with haemorrhagic manifestations which occurred at Kanpur, India, in 1968.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, U C; Kapoor, A K; Mathur, A; Chandra, D; Khan, A M; Mehrotra, R M

    1970-01-01

    An epidemic of febrile illness associated with haemorrhagic manifestations and shock occurred at Kanpur, India, during 1968. The epidemic was widespread in the city, involving about one-tenth of the population; cases were more frequent in thickly populated localities with poor sanitary conditions. Those affected were mainly adolescents and adults of both sexes and multiple cases occurred in families. The disease was characterized by the sudden onset of fever, associated with severe headache and low backache. A number of patients had bradycardia, vomiting and diarrhoea and macular skin rashes associated with itching. A small percentage of the patients had haemorrhagic manifestations in the form of haematemesis, haemoptysis, melaena, haematuria and bleeding per vaginum. The mortality was very low. Dengue type 4 virus has been implicated in the epidemic. PMID:4249614

  11. Detection of the new emerging rabbit haemorrhagic disease type 2 virus (RHDV2) in Sicily from rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and Italian hare (Lepus corsicanus).

    PubMed

    Camarda, A; Pugliese, N; Cavadini, P; Circella, E; Capucci, L; Caroli, A; Legretto, M; Mallia, E; Lavazza, A

    2014-12-01

    Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV), a member of the genus Lagovirus, causes rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD), a fatal hepatitis of rabbits, not previously reported in hares. Recently, a new RHDV-related virus emerged, called RHDV2. This lagovirus can cause RHD in rabbits and disease and mortality in Lepus capensis (Cape hare). Here we describe a case of RHDV2 infection in another hare species, Lepus corsicanus, during a concurrent RHD outbreak in a group of wild rabbits. The same RHDV2 strain infected rabbits and a hare, also causing a RHD-like syndrome in the latter. Our findings confirmed the capability of RHDV2 to infect hosts other than rabbits and improve the knowledge about the epidemiology and the host range of this new lagovirus. PMID:25458493

  12. Diabetic complications and dysregulated innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Graves, Dana T; Kayal, Rayyan A

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that leads to the development of a number of complications. The etiology of each diabetic complication is undoubtedly multifactorial. We will focus on one potential component that may be common in many diabetic complications, dysregulation of innate immunity associated with an increased inflammatory response. High glucose levels lead to shunting through the polyol pathway, an increase in diacylglycerol which activates protein kinase C, an increase in the release of electrons that react with oxygen molecules to form superoxides, and the non-enzymatic glycosylation of proteins that result in greater formation of advanced glycation end products. Each of these can lead to aberrant cell signalling that affects innate immunity for example, by activating the MAP kinase pathway or inducing activation of transcription factors such as NF-kappaB. This may be a common feature of several complications including periodontal disease, atherosclerosis, nephropathy, impaired healing and retinopathy. These complications are frequently associated with increased expression of inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and IL-6 and enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species. Cause and effect relationship between dysregulation of key components of innate immunity and diabetic complications in many instances have been demonstrated with the use of cytokine blockers and antioxidants. PMID:17981625

  13. [Complications during myelographic examination in dogs].

    PubMed

    Sevcík, A; Ledecký, V; Legáth, J

    1996-06-01

    The occurrence of spinal disease in dogs is quite frequent. Clinical examination and survey radiography do not allow to make an exact diagnosis in many cases. Therefore the radiographic method-myelograhy is used to make an exact diagnosis and to locate the pathological process in the spinal cord. Myelography can be accompanied by some complications caused by a contrast medium of anaesthesia. In this study, the occurrence of complications was evaluated when the contrast medium Dimer X and three types of general anaesthesia were used: xylazine-ketamine, chlorpromazine-piritramide, chlorpromazine-pentobarbital. Certain relations between the origin of complications, dog weight and total time of anaesthesia are indicated. The results obtained show that the highest number of cases with complicated regeneration was observed after the use of the combination xylazine-ketamine when the average duration of anesthesia was 31.1 minutes comparing to the combination chlorpromazine-pentobarbitale with average duration of anaesthesia was 127.7 minutes with the lowest number of complications. We also refer to certain relations between weight and the occurrence of complications where the highest correlation (r = 0.59) was recorded for xylazine-ketamine anaesthesia. The correlation coefficient (r = 0.27) for chlorpromazine-pentobarbital documents very low correlations of the followed values. PMID:8711878

  14. Efficacy of a glycoprotein DNA vaccine against viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) in Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii Valenciennes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, L.M.; Lorenzen, Niels; LaPatra, S.E.; Grady, C.A.; Roon, S.E.; O’Reilly, J.; Gregg, J.L.; Hershberger, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) and its associated disease state, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS), is hypothesized to be a proximate factor accounting for the decline and failed recovery of Pacific herring populations in Prince William Sound, AK (Marty et al. 1998, 2003, 2010). Survivors of laboratory-induced VHSV epizootics develop resistance to subsequent viral exposure (Kocan et al. 2001; Hershberger et al. 2007, 2010), which is likely the result of immune system recognition of the viral glycoprotein (G) (Lecocq-Xhonneux et al. 1994), a surface antigen that contains neutralizing epitopes (Lorenzen, Olesen & Jorgensen 1990; Jørgensen et al. 1995) and cell attachment domains (Lecocq-Xhonneux et al. 1994; Estepa & Coll 1996). These properties have proven useful in the development of G-gene-based DNA vaccines for VHSV and a related rhabdovirus, infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) (Anderson et al. 1996; Heppell et al. 1998; Corbeil et al. 1999; Einer-Jensen et al. 2009). Rainbow trout fingerlings, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), vaccinated with 1 µg of either the VHS or IHN vaccine are protected from VHS when exposed to virus as early as 4 days (44 degree days) post-vaccination (p.v.) (Lorenzen et al. 2002). At later time points (80 days p.v.; 880 degree days), the level of cross-protection against VHS by IHN vaccination is either completely lost (60 days p.v.; 660 degree days) (3 g rainbow trout; 1 µg vaccine dose) (Lorenzen et al. 2002) or present at intermediate levels (6.5 g rainbow trout; 1 µg vaccine dose) (Einer-Jensen et al. 2009). Comparatively, VHS vaccination remains effective as long as 9 months (2520 degree days) p.v. (100 g rainbow trout; 0.5 µg vaccine dose) (McLauchlan et al. 2003). These results suggest that IHN and VHS vaccination activate a rapid transitory innate immune response against VHSV that is followed by long-term adaptive immunity in VHS-vaccinated trout (Lorenzen et al. 2002).

  15. Intracerebral haemorrhage in a population-based stroke registry (LuSSt): incidence, aetiology, functional outcome and mortality.

    PubMed

    Palm, F; Henschke, N; Wolf, J; Zimmer, K; Safer, A; Schröder, R J; Inselmann, G; Brenke, C; Becher, H; Grau, A J

    2013-10-01

    Data on incidence of intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) vary widely. Population-based data on predictors of ICH survival and functional outcome are rare. The Ludwigshafen Stroke Study is a prospective, population-based stroke registry which started in January 2006. All residents of the city of Ludwigshafen, Germany, who suffer from acute stroke or transient ischaemic attack are registered. Patients with first-ever primary intracerebral haemorrhage (FE-pICH) between 2006 and 2010 were included in the present analysis. Between January 1st, 2006 and December 31st, 2010, 152 patients suffered a FE-pICH. Crude and age-adjusted incidence rates per 100,000 for FE-pICH were 18.7 (95 % CI 15.9-21.9) and 11.9 (95 % CI 10.2-14.0), respectively, and remained stable over time. Case-fatality rates for FE-pICH were 27.0, 34.9 and 44.1 % at days 28, 90 and 365, respectively. In 21 patients, an (21.3 %) early do-not resuscitate-order was documented. Excluding these patients from multivariate analyses, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) (OR 1.22, 95 % CI 1.08-1.36), hypercholesterolemia (OR 0.16, 95 % CI 0.05-0.55) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) prior to stroke (OR 1.56, 95 % CI 1.06-2.3) were independently associated with risk of 1-year mortality, whereas NIHSS (OR 1.41, 95 % CI 1.20-1.66) and leukocyte count on admission (OR 1.48, 95 % CI 1.16-1.89) were independently associated with good or moderate functional outcome (mRS ? 3) after 1 year. Incidence of FE-ICH is in the lower range of those reported from other registries and remained stable over the observation period. Higher treatment rates for hypertension might partly account for this. Stroke severity as indicated by NIHSS was independently associated with mortality and functional outcome after 1 year. We found no association between aetiology and outcome in ICH patients. PMID:23812642

  16. Serotyping of foot and mouth disease virus and Pasteurella multocida from Indian gaurs (Bos gaurus), concurrently infected with foot and mouth disease and haemorrhagic septicaemia.

    PubMed

    Chandranaik, Basavegowdanadoddi Marinaik; Hegde, Raveendra; Shivashankar, Beechagondahalli Papanna; Giridhar, Papanna; Muniyellappa, Handenahally Kaverappa; Kalge, Rajeshwar; Sumathi, Benamanahalli Raju; Nithinprabhu, Kumble; Chandrashekara, Narasimhaiah; Manjunatha, Venkataramanappa; Jaisingh, Nirupama; Mayanna, Asha; Chandrakala, Gowda Kallenahalli; Kanaka, Sermaraja; Venkatesha, Mudalagiri Dasappagupta

    2015-06-01

    We report the serotyping of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) and Pasteurella multocida from Indian gaurs which were concurrently infected with foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) and haemorrhagic septicaemia. Bannerghatta biological park (BBP), a national park located in the outskirts of Bengaluru city, Karnataka, India, is bordered by several villages. These villages witnessed massive outbreaks of FMD which spread rapidly to the herbivores at BBP. Post-mortem was conducted on carcasses of two Indian gaurs that died with symptoms of FMD. The salient gross findings included extensive vesicular lesions on the tongue, gums, cheeks, upper palate and hooves. Haemorrhagic tracheitis and ecchymotic haemorrhages on the heart were characteristic. The vesicular lesions of oral cavity were positive for 'O' type of FMD virus by sandwich enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA). The heart blood and spleen samples yielded growth of pure cultures of P. multocida. The isolates were typed as P. multocida type B using KTSP61 and KTT72 primers yielding specific amplicons of 620 bp. The phylogenetic analysis of the isolates was carried by sequencing of 1.4-Kbp nucleotides on the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of the isolates. PMID:25894817

  17. Progesterone Attenuates Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage-Induced Vasospasm by Upregulation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase via Akt Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Mao; Su, Yu-Feng; Chang, Chih-Zen; Tsai, Yee-Jean; Loh, Joon-Khim

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in patients after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). However, the mechanism and adequate treatment of vasospasm are still elusive. In the present study, we evaluate the effect and possible mechanism of progesterone on SAH-induced vasospasm in a two-hemorrhage rodent model of SAH. Progesterone (8?mg/kg) was subcutaneously injected in ovariectomized female Sprague-Dawley rats one hour after SAH induction. The degree of vasospasm was determined by averaging the cross-sectional areas of basilar artery 7 days after first SAH. Expressions of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and phosphorylated Akt (phospho-Akt) in basilar arteries were evaluated. Prior to perfusion fixation, there were no significant differences among the control and treated groups in physiological parameters recorded. Progesterone treatment significantly (P < 0.01) attenuated SAH-induced vasospasm. The SAH-induced suppression of eNOS protein and phospho-Akt were relieved by progesterone treatment. This result further confirmed that progesterone is effective in preventing SAH-induced vasospasm. The beneficial effect of progesterone might be in part related to upregulation of expression of eNOS via Akt signaling pathway after SAH. Progesterone holds therapeutic promise in the treatment of cerebral vasospasm following SAH. PMID:24949428

  18. Purpurogallin, a Natural Phenol, Attenuates High-Mobility Group Box 1 in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Induced Vasospasm in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Zen; Wu, Shu-Chuan; Kwan, Aij-Lie

    2014-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) was shown to be an important extracellular mediator involved in vascular inflammation of animals following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). This study is of interest to examine the efficacy of purpurogallin, a natural phenol, on the alternation of cytokines and HMGB1 in a SAH model. A rodent double hemorrhage SAH model was employed. Basilar arteries (BAs) were harvested to examine HMGB1 mRNA and protein expression (Western blot). CSF samples were to examine IL-1?, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-? (rt-PCR). Deformed endothelial wall, tortuous elastic lamina, and necrotic smooth muscle were observed in the vessels of SAH groups but were absent in the purpurogallin group. IL-1?, IL-6, and TNF-? in the SAH only and SAH plus vehicle groups were significantly elevated (P < 0.01). Purpurgallin dose-dependently reduced HMGB1 protein expression. Likewise, high dose purpurogallin reduced TNF-? and HMGB1 mRNA levels. In conclusion, purpurogallin exerts its neuroinflammation effect through the dual effect of inhibiting IL-6 and TNF-? mRNA expression and reducing HMGB1 protein and mRNA expression. This study supports purpurogallin could attenuate both proinflammatory cytokines and late-onset inflammasome in SAH induced vasospasm. PMID:25485154

  19. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage-Triggered Acute Hypotension Is Associated with Left Ventricular Cardiomyocyte Apoptosis in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Mutsumi; Sherchan, Prativa; Soejima, Yoshiteru; Doycheva, Desislava; Zhang, John H

    2016-01-01

    Whether hypotension that occurs due to neurogenic stunned myocardium after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with cardiomyocyte apoptotic cell death remains unknown. In this study, 18 male rats were subjected to sham or the endovascular perforation model of SAH surgery. Based on the mean arterial pressure (MAP) after SAH, rats were separated into SAH with hypotension (SAH hypotension) or SAH with blood pressure preservation (SAH BP preservation) groups. All animals were euthanized 2 h after the surgical procedure. Hearts were removed and separated transversely into base and apex parts, then Western blot analyses and immunohistochemistry were performed only in the apex part. One rat died as a result of severe SAH and two rats with mild SAH were excluded. We analyzed data from 15 rats that were divided into three groups: sham, SAH hypotension, and SAH BP preservation (n?=?5, each). There was a significantly higher cleaved caspase-3/caspase-3 ratio in the SAH hypotension group compared with sham and the SAH BP preservation group. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis was demonstrated in the SAH rats. This is the first experimental report that describes SAH-induced neurogenic stunned myocardium with ensuing hypotension may result from the acute apoptotic cardiomyocyte cell death in the left ventricle. PMID:26463939

  20. Hydrogen-rich saline injection into the subarachnoid cavity within 2 weeks promotes recovery after acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Long; Zhang, Qing-Shan; Zhu, Kai-di; Sun, Jian-Feng; Zhang, Ze-Peng; Sun, Jian-Wen; Zhang, Ke-Xiang

    2015-06-01

    Hydrogen can relieve tissue-damaging oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis. Injection of hydrogen-rich saline is an effective method for transporting molecular hydrogen. We hypothesized that hydrogen-rich saline would promote the repair of spinal cord injury induced by Allen's method in rats. At 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 hours after injury, then once daily for 2 weeks, 0.25 mL/kg hydrogen-rich saline was infused into the subarachnoid space through a catheter. Results at 24 hours, 48 hours, 1 week and 2 weeks after injury showed that hydrogen-rich saline markedly reduced cell death, inflammatory cell infiltration, serum malondialdehyde content, and caspase-3 immunoreactivity, elevated serum superoxide dismutase activity and calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactivity, and improved motor function in the hindlimb. The present study confirms that hydrogen-rich saline injected within 2 weeks of injury effectively contributes to the repair of spinal cord injury in the acute stage. PMID:26199614

  1. The Relationship between Clinical Outcome in Subarachnoidal Hemorrhage Patients with Emergency Medical Service Usage and Interhospital Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Prompt diagnosis and appropriate transport of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is critical. We aimed to study differences in clinical outcomes by emergency medical services (EMS) usage and interhospital transfer in patients with SAH. We analyzed the CAVAS (CArdioVAscular disease Surveillance) database which is an emergency department-based, national cohort of cardiovascular disease in Korea. Eligible patients were adults with non-traumatic SAH diagnosed between January 2007 and December 2012. We excluded those whose EMS use and intershopital transfer data was unknown. The primary and secondary outcomes were mortality and neurologic status at discharge respectively. We compared the outcomes between each group using multivariable logistic regressions, adjusting for sex, age, underlying disease, visit time and social history. Of 5,461 patients with SAH, a total of 2,645 were enrolled. Among those, 258 used EMS and were transferred from another hospital, 686 used EMS only, 1,244 were transferred only, and 457 did not use EMS nor were transferred. In the regression analysis, mortality was higher in patients who used EMS and were transferred (OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.02-1.92), but neurologic disability was not meaningfully different by EMS usage and interhospital transfer. In Korea, SAH patients' mortality is higher in the case of EMS use or receiving interhospital transfer. PMID:26713067

  2. Hydrogen-rich saline injection into the subarachnoid cavity within 2 weeks promotes recovery after acute spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-long; Zhang, Qing-shan; Zhu, Kai-di; Sun, Jian-feng; Zhang, Ze-peng; Sun, Jian-wen; Zhang, Ke-xiang

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen can relieve tissue-damaging oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis. Injection of hydrogen-rich saline is an effective method for transporting molecular hydrogen. We hypothesized that hydrogen-rich saline would promote the repair of spinal cord injury induced by Allen's method in rats. At 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 hours after injury, then once daily for 2 weeks, 0.25 mL/kg hydrogen-rich saline was infused into the subarachnoid space through a catheter. Results at 24 hours, 48 hours, 1 week and 2 weeks after injury showed that hydrogen-rich saline markedly reduced cell death, inflammatory cell infiltration, serum malondialdehyde content, and caspase-3 immunoreactivity, elevated serum superoxide dismutase activity and calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactivity, and improved motor function in the hindlimb. The present study confirms that hydrogen-rich saline injected within 2 weeks of injury effectively contributes to the repair of spinal cord injury in the acute stage. PMID:26199614

  3. Carnosine attenuates early brain injury through its antioxidative and anti-apoptotic effects in a rat experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zong-yong; Sun, Bao-liang; Yang, Ming-feng; Li, Da-wei; Fang, Jie; Zhang, Shuai

    2015-03-01

    Carnosine (?-alanyl-L-histidine) has been demonstrated to provide antioxidative and anti-apoptotic roles in the animal of ischemic brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this study was to examine whether carnosine prevents subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced early brain injury (EBI) in rats. We found that intraperitoneal administration of carnosine improved neurobehavioral deficits, attenuated brain edema and blood-brain barrier permeability, and decreased reactive oxygen species level at 48 h following SAH in rat models. Carnosine treatment increased tissue copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) enzymatic activities, and reduced post-SAH elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA), 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHDG), interleukin (IL)-1?, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) in rats. Furthermore, carnosine treatment attenuated SAH-induced microglia activation and cortical neuron apoptosis. These results indicated that administration of carnosine may provide neuroprotection in EBI following SAH in rat models. PMID:25179154

  4. Cannabinoid Receptor Type 2 Agonist Attenuates Acute Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema by Preventing Neutrophil Migration after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Mutsumi; Sherchan, Prativa; Soejima, Yoshiteru; Doycheva, Desislava; Zhao, Diana; Zhang, John H

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated whether JWH133, a selective cannabinoid type 2 receptor (CB2R) agonist, prevented neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by attenuating inflammation. Adult male rats were assigned to six groups: sham-operated, SAH with vehicle, SAH with JWH133 (0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/kg) treatment 1 h after surgery, and SAH with JWH133 (1.0 mg/kg) at 1 h with a selective CB2R antagonist, SR144528 (3.0 mg/kg). The perforation model of SAH was performed and pulmonary wet-to-dry weight ratio was evaluated 24 and 72 h after surgery. Western blot analyses and immunohistochemistry were evaluated 24 h after surgery. JWH133 (1.0 mg/kg) significantly and most strongly improved lung edema 24 h after SAH. SR144528 administration significantly reversed the effects of JWH133 (1.0 mg/kg). SAH-induced increasing levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and decreasing levels of a tight junction (TJ) protein, junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-A, were ameliorated by JWH133 (1.0 mg/kg) administration 24 h after SAH. Immunohistochemical assessment also confirmed substantial leukocyte infiltration in the outside of vessels in SAH, which were attenuated by JWH133 (1.0 mg/kg) injection. CB2R agonist ameliorated lung permeability by inhibiting leukocyte trafficking and protecting tight junction proteins in the lung of NPE after SAH. PMID:26463937

  5. Intraventricular Injection of Noncellular Cerebrospinal Fluid from Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Patient into Rat Ventricles Leads to Ventricular Enlargement and Periventricular Injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Peiliang; Chaudhary, Neeraj; Gemmete, Joseph J; Thompson, B Gregory; Hua, Ya; Xi, Guohua; Pandey, Aditya S

    2016-01-01

    Early brain injury and hydrocephalus (HCP) are important mediators of poor outcome in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients. We aim to understand the development of HCP and subependymal cellular injury after intraventricular injection of noncellular human SAH cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) into rat ventricles. Two-hundred microliters of noncellular CSF from SAH patients or normal controls were injected into the right lateral ventricle of seven adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Propidium iodide (PI) was simultaneously injected to detect necrotic cellular death. Rats were then sacrificed 24 h after surgery and the brain specimens were cut and stained for heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), an oxidative stress marker. We found that the ventricular area at the bregma level in the CSF injection group was significantly larger than that in the control group (p?

  6. Astaxanthin Alleviates Early Brain Injury Following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats: Possible Involvement of Akt/Bad Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang-Sheng; Zhang, Xin; Wu, Qi; Li, Wei; Zhang, Qing-Rong; Wang, Chun-Xi; Zhou, Xiao-Ming; Li, Hua; Shi, Ji-Xin; Zhou, Meng-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis has been proven to play a crucial role in early brain injury pathogenesis and to represent a target for the treatment of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Previously, we demonstrated that astaxanthin (ATX) administration markedly reduced neuronal apoptosis in the early period after SAH. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain obscure. In the present study, we tried to investigate whether ATX administration is associated with the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt (PI3K/Akt) pathway, which can play an important role in the signaling of apoptosis. Our results showed that post-SAH treatment with ATX could cause a significant increase of phosphorylated Akt and Bad levels, along with a significant decrease of cleaved caspase-3 levels in the cortex after SAH. In addition to the reduced neuronal apoptosis, treatment with ATX could also significantly reduce secondary brain injury characterized by neurological dysfunction, cerebral edema and blood-brain barrier disruption. In contrast, the PI3K/Akt inhibitor, LY294002, could partially reverse the neuroprotection of ATX in the early period after SAH by downregulating ATX-induced activation of Akt/Bad and upregulating cleaved caspase-3 levels. These results provided the evidence that ATX could attenuate apoptosis in a rat SAH model, potentially, in part, through modulating the Akt/Bad pathway. PMID:25072152

  7. [The relationship between aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and meteorological parameters based on a series of 236 French patients].

    PubMed

    Rué, M; Camiade, E; Jecko, V; Bauduer, F; Vignes, J-R

    2014-10-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a sudden and potentially severe event with mortality rates ranging between 24 and 30 % depending on the initial clinical condition. Studies have attempted to assess the possible influence of meteorological parameters on the occurrence of SAH. However, this idea remains very controversial and the results vary widely from one study to another. Our study is the second largest French series, and first performed in a homogeneous series of patients. The aim of our study was to attempt to establish a relationship between the weather (i.e.) temperature variations and daily variations of atmospheric pressure in the days before the onset of SAH and the same day and the occurrence of non-traumatic SAH in a homogeneous population of 236 patients from a single center, over a period of 7 years (2002 to 2008). This retrospective study does not suggest any relationship between the occurrence of SAH and meteorological data studied. Moreover, no relationship was observed between mean changes in temperature or pressure and the occurrence of SAH, that the day of the bleeding or the days preceding the SAH. However, a female predominance was observed and a relatively high mortality rate of 18.3 %. The distribution of the occurrence of an SAH was random. As it seems impossible to provide logistics and organization of care for non-traumatic SAH, the care system must remain vigilant throughout the year. PMID:24856315

  8. Effective use of sertraline for pathological laughing after severe vasospasm due to aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: case report.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hayato; Iwamoto, Kazuhide; Mukai, Mao; Fujita, Tomoaki; Tsujino, Hitoshi; Iwamoto, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Pathological laughing, one subgroup of psuedobulbar affect, is known as laughter inappropriate to the patient's external circumstances and unrelated to the patient's internal emotional state. The authors present the case of a 76-year-old woman with no significant medical history who experienced pathological laughing after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to rupture of an aneurysm, which was successfully treated with craniotomy for aneurysm clipping. In the acute stage after the operation she suffered from severe vasospasm and resulting middle cerebral artery territory infarction and conscious disturbance. As she regained consciousness she was afflicted by pathological laughing 6 months after the onset of SAH. Her involuntary laughter was inappropriate to the situation and was incongruent with the emotional state, and she could not control by herself. Finally the diagnosis of pathological laughing was made and treatment with sertraline, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), effectively cured the symptoms. Her pathological laughing was estimated to be consequence of infarction in the right prefrontal cortex and/or corona radiata, resulting from vasospasm. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of pathological laughing after aneurysmal SAH. The authors offer insight into the pathophysiology of this rare phenomenon. Effectiveness of sertraline would widen the treatment modality against pathological laughing. PMID:24201096

  9. Brain edema formation correlates with perfusion deficit during the first six hours after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Severe brain edema is observed in a number of patients suffering from subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Little is known about its pathogenesis and time-course in the first hours after SAH. This study was performed to investigate the development of brain edema and its correlation with brain perfusion after experimental SAH. Methods Male Sprague–Dawley rats, randomly assigned to one of six groups (n = 8), were subjected to SAH using the endovascular filament model or underwent a sham operation. Animals were sacrificed 15, 30, 60, 180 or 360 minutes after SAH. Intracranial pressure (ICP), mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) and bilateral local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) were continuously measured. Brain water content (BWC) was determined by the wet/dry-weight method. Results After SAH, CPP and LCBF rapidly decreased. The decline of LCBF markedly exceeded the decline of CPP and persisted until the end of the observation period. BWC continuously increased. A significant correlation was observed between the BWC and the extent of the perfusion deficit in animals sacrificed after 180 and 360 minutes. Conclusions The significant correlation with the perfusion deficit after SAH suggests that the development of brain edema is related to the extent of ischemia and acute vasoconstriction in the first hours after SAH. PMID:22551223

  10. Effective Use of Sertraline for Pathological Laughing after Severe Vasospasm Due to Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    TAKEUCHI, Hayato; IWAMOTO, Kazuhide; MUKAI, Mao; FUJITA, Tomoaki; TSUJINO, Hitoshi; IWAMOTO, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Pathological laughing, one subgroup of psuedobulbar affect, is known as laughter inappropriate to the patient's external circumstances and unrelated to the patient's internal emotional state. The authors present the case of a 76-year-old woman with no significant medical history who experienced pathological laughing after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to rupture of an aneurysm, which was successfully treated with craniotomy for aneurysm clipping. In the acute stage after the operation she suffered from severe vasospasm and resulting middle cerebral artery territory infarction and conscious disturbance. As she regained consciousness she was afflicted by pathological laughing 6 months after the onset of SAH. Her involuntary laughter was inappropriate to the situation and was incongruent with the emotional state, and she could not control by herself. Finally the diagnosis of pathological laughing was made and treatment with sertraline, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), effectively cured the symptoms. Her pathological laughing was estimated to be consequence of infarction in the right prefrontal cortex and/or corona radiata, resulting from vasospasm. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of pathological laughing after aneurysmal SAH. The authors offer insight into the pathophysiology of this rare phenomenon. Effectiveness of sertraline would widen the treatment modality against pathological laughing. PMID:24201096

  11. Complications Following Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Tear Repair

    PubMed Central

    Audigé, Laurent; Blum, Raphael; Müller, Andreas M.; Flury, Matthias; Durchholz, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Background Valid comparison of outcomes after surgical procedures requires consensus on which instruments and parameters should be used, including the recording and evaluation of surgical complications. An international standard outlining the terminology and definitions of surgical complications in orthopaedics is lacking. Purpose This study systematically reviewed the literature for terms and definitions related to the occurrence of negative events or complications after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) with specific focus on shoulder stiffness. Study Design Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and Scopus databases were searched for reviews, clinical studies, and case reports of complications associated with ARCR. Reference lists of selected articles were also screened. The terminology of complications and their definitions were extracted from all relevant original articles by a single reviewer and verified by a second reviewer. Definitions of shoulder stiffness or equivalent terms were tabulated. Results Of 654 references published after 2007 and obtained from the search, 233 full-text papers (44 reviews, 155 studies, 31 case reports, and 3 surgical technique presentations) were reviewed. Twenty-two additional references cited for a definition were checked. One report defined the term surgical complication. There were 242 different terms used to describe local events and 64 to describe nonlocal events. Furthermore, 16 definitions of terms such as frozen shoulder, shoulder stiffness, or stiff painful shoulder were identified. Diagnosis criteria for shoulder stiffness differed widely; 12 various definitions for restriction in range of motion were noted. One definition included a gradation of stiffness severity, whereas another considered the patient’s subjective assessment of motion. Conclusion The literature does not consistently report on complications after ARCR, making valid comparison of the incidence of these events among published reports impossible. Specifically, the variation in criteria used to diagnose shoulder stiffness is problematic for valid and accurate reporting of this event. A standard for reporting this event and other complications after ARCR is needed. Clinical Relevance This review serves as the basis for the development of a uniform documentation process for shoulder stiffness and the standardization of complication definitions in ARCR following international consensus.

  12. Gut microbiota-related complications in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Hurtado, Isabel; Such, José; Sanz, Yolanda; Francés, Rubén

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbiota plays an important role in cirrhosis. The liver is constantly challenged with commensal bacteria and their products arriving through the portal vein in the so-called gut-liver axis. Bacterial translocation from the intestinal lumen through the intestinal wall and to mesenteric lymph nodes is facilitated by intestinal bacterial overgrowth, impairment in the permeability of the intestinal mucosal barrier, and deficiencies in local host immune defences. Deranged clearance of endogenous bacteria from portal and systemic circulation turns the gut into the major source of bacterial-related complications. Liver function may therefore be affected by alterations in the composition of the intestinal microbiota and a role for commensal flora has been evidenced in the pathogenesis of several complications arising in end-stage liver disease such as hepatic encephalopathy, splanchnic arterial vasodilatation and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. The use of antibiotics is the main therapeutic pipeline in the management of these bacteria-related complications. However, other strategies aimed at preserving intestinal homeostasis through the use of pre-, pro- or symbiotic formulations are being studied in the last years. In this review, the role of intestinal microbiota in the development of the most frequent complications arising in cirrhosis and the different clinical and experimental studies conducted to prevent or improve these complications by modifying the gut microbiota composition are summarized. PMID:25400446

  13. Avoiding Complications in Endoscopic Third Ventriculostomy.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay Singh; Ratre, Shailendra; Kher, Yatin

    2015-11-01

    Endoscopic neurosurgical techniques hold the potential for reducing morbidity. But they are also associated with limitations such as the initial learning curve, proximal blind spot, visual obscurity, difficulty in controlling bleeding, disorientation, and loss of stereoscopic image. Although some of the surgical techniques in neuroendoscopy and microsurgery are similar, endoscopy requires additional skills. A thorough understanding of endoscopic techniques and their limitations is required to get maximal benefit. Knowledge of possible complications and techniques to avoid such complications can improve results in endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV). The surgeon must be able to manage complications and have a second strategy such as a cerebrospinal fluid shunt if ETV fails. It is better to abandon the procedure if there is disorientation or a higher risk of complications such as bleeding or a thick and opaque floor without any clear visualization of anatomy. Attending live workshops, practice on models and simulators, simpler case selection in the initial learning curve, and hands-on cadaveric workshops can reduce complications. Proper case selection, good surgical technique, and better postoperative care are essential for a good outcome in ETV. Although it is difficult to make a preoperative diagnosis of complex hydrocephalus (combination of communicating and obstructive), improving methods to detect the exact type of hydrocephalus before surgery could increase the success rate of ETV and avoid an unnecessary ETV procedure in such cases. PMID:26140421

  14. Spinal cord injury rehabilitation. 2. Medical complications.

    PubMed

    Bergman, S B; Yarkony, G M; Stiens, S A

    1997-03-01

    This self-directed learning module highlights new advances in understanding medical complications of spinal cord injury through the lifespan. It is part of the chapter on spinal cord injury rehabilitation in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. This article covers reasons for transferring patients to specialized spinal cord injury centers once they have been stabilized, and the management of common medical problems, including fever, autonomic dysreflexia, urinary tract infection, acute and chronic abdominal complications, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary complications, and heterotopic ossification. Formulation of an educational program for prevention of late complications is also discussed, including late renal complications, syringomyelia, myelomalacia, burns, pathologic fractures, pressure ulcers, and cardiovascular disease. New advances covered in this section include new information on old problems, and a discussion of exercise tolerance in persons with tetraplegia, the pathophysiology of late neurologic deterioration after spinal cord injury, and a view of the care of these patients across the lifespan. PMID:9084368

  15. Complications of Microsurgery of Vestibular Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Zv??ina, Eduard; Balogová, Zuzana; Sk?ivan, Ji?í; Kraus, Josef; Syka, Josef; Chovanec, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to analyze complications of vestibular schwannoma (VS) microsurgery. Material and Methods. A retrospective study was performed in 333 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma indicated for surgical treatment between January 1997 and December 2012. Postoperative complications were assessed immediately after VS surgery as well as during outpatient followup. Results. In all 333 patients microsurgical vestibular schwannoma (Koos grade 1: 12, grade 2: 34, grade 3: 62, and grade 4: 225) removal was performed. The main neurological complication was facial nerve dysfunction. The intermediate and poor function (HB III–VI) was observed in 124 cases (45%) immediately after surgery and in 104 cases (33%) on the last followup. We encountered disordered vestibular compensation in 13%, permanent trigeminal nerve dysfunction in 1%, and transient lower cranial nerves (IX–XI) deficit in 6%. Nonneurological complications included CSF leakage in 63% (lateral/medial variant: 99/1%), headache in 9%, and intracerebral hemorrhage in 5%. We did not encounter any case of meningitis. Conclusions. Our study demonstrates that despite the benefits of advanced high-tech equipment, refined microsurgical instruments, and highly developed neuroimaging technologies, there are still various and significant complications associated with vestibular schwannomas microsurgery. PMID:24987677

  16. Complications of Radical Cystectomy and Orthotopic Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wei Shen; Lamb, Benjamin W.; Kelly, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Radical cystectomy and orthotopic reconstruction significant morbidity and mortality despite advances in minimal invasive and robotic technology. In this review, we will discuss early and late complications, as well as describe efforts to minimize morbidity and mortality, with a focus on ileal orthotopic bladder substitute (OBS). We summarise efforts to minimize morbidity and mortality including enhanced recovery as well as early and late complications seen after radical cystectomy and OBS. Centralisation of complex cancer services in the UK has led to a fall in mortality and high volume institutions have a significantly lower rate of 30-day mortality compared to low volume institutions. Enhanced recovery pathways have resulted in shorter length of hospital stay and potentially a reduction in morbidity. Early complications of radical cystectomy occur as a direct result of the surgery itself while late complications, which can occur even after 10 years after surgery, are due to urinary diversion. OBS represents the ideal urinary diversion for patients without contraindications. However, all patients with OBS should have regular long term follow-up for oncological surveillance and to identify complications should they arise. PMID:26697063

  17. Liver biopsy: complications and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Thampanitchawong, Pornpen; Piratvisuth, Teerha

    1999-01-01

    AIM: To study the complications and the risk factors of percutaneous liver biopsy, and to compare the complication rate between the periods o f 1987-1993 and 1994-1996. METHODS: Medical records of all patients undergoing percutaneous liver biopsy between January 1, 1987 to September 31, 1996 in Songklanagarind Hospital were reviewed retrospectively. RESULTS: There were 484 percutaneous liver biopsies performed. The total complication rate was 6.4%, of which 4.5% were due to major bleeding; the death rate was 1.6%. The important risk factors correlated with bleeding complications and deaths were a platelet count of 70 × 109/L or less, a prolonged prothrombin time of > 3 s over control, or a prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time of > 10 s over control. Although physician inexperience was not statistically significantly associated with bleeding complications and deaths, there was a reduction of death rate from 2.2% in 1987-1993 to 0% in 1993-1996. This reduction is thought to result from both increased experience o f senior staff and increased supervision of residents. CONCLUSIONS: Screening of platelet count, prothrombin time, and activated partial thromboplastin time should be done and need to be corrected in case of abnormality before liver biopsy. Percutaneous liver biopsy should be performed or supervised by an expert in gastrointestinal diseases, especially in high risk cases. PMID:11819452

  18. Transcriptome analysis of rainbow trout in response to non-virion (NV) protein of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV).

    PubMed

    Chinchilla, Blanca; Encinas, Paloma; Estepa, Amparo; Coll, Julio M; Gomez-Casado, Eduardo

    2015-02-01

    The non-virion (NV) protein of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), an economically important fish novirhabdovirus, has been implicated in the interference of some host innate mechanisms (i.e. apoptosis) in vitro. This work aimed to characterise the immune-related transcriptome changes in rainbow trout induced by NV protein that have not yet been established in vivo. For that purpose, immune-targeted microarrays were used to analyse the transcriptomes from head kidney and spleen of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) after injection of recombinant NV (rNV). Results showed the extensive downregulation (and in some cases upregulation) of many innate and adaptive immune response genes not related previously to VHSV infection. The newly identified genes belonged to VHSV-induced genes (vigs), tumour necrosis factors, Toll-like receptors, antigen processing and presentation, immune co-stimulatory molecules, interleukins, macrophage chemotaxis, transcription factors, etc. Classification of differentially downregulated genes into rainbow trout immune pathways identified stat1 and jun/atf1 transcription factor genes as the most representative of the multipath gene targets of rNV. Altogether, these results contribute to define the role and effects of NV in trout by orchestrating an immunosuppression of the innate immune responses for favouring viral replication upon VHSV infection. Finally, these transcriptome results open up the possibility to find out new strategies against VHSV and better understand the interrelationships between some immune pathways in trout. PMID:25592735

  19. Epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus in Reunion Island: evidence for the circulation of a new serotype and associated risk factors.

    PubMed

    Cêtre-Sossah, Catherine; Roger, Matthieu; Sailleau, Corinne; Rieau, Lorène; Zientara, Stephan; Bréard, Emmanuel; Viarouge, Cyril; Beral, Marina; Esnault, Olivier; Cardinale, Eric

    2014-06-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) and epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) are members of the Orbivirus genus of the Reoviridae family transmitted between ruminants by the bites of Culicoides midges. BTV went undetected in Reunion Island between its first documented emergence in 1979 and two other serious outbreaks with both BTV-3 and EHDV-6 in 2003, and both EHDV-6 and BTV-2 in 2009. In these outbreaks, infected animals developed symptoms including hyperthermia, anorexia, congestion, prostration and nasal discharge. Samples were collected in 2011 to assess the prevalence of BT and EHD in ruminants native to Reunion Island by serological analysis. A cross-sectional study was undertaken on 67 farms, including a total of 276 cattle, 142 sheep and 71 goats. The prevalence rates of BT and EHD were 58% (95% CI [54.03-62.94]) and 38% (95% CI [33.85-42.63], respectively. Two further suspected outbreaks were confirmed to involve EHDV and BTV/EHDV. A new circulating EHDV serotype 1 of unknown origin was isolated. Our results confirm that the prevalence of both BT and EHD is high and that both are likely currently circulating. A high risk of BTV and EHDV infections was associated with the introduction of ruminants from neighbouring farms without quarantine, the presence of organic and other waste on the farm, and treatment against ectoparasites and insects. PMID:24636165

  20. Transmission of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in china and the role of climate factors: a review.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Alana; Cameron, Scott; Liu, Qiyong; Sun, Yehuan; Weinstein, Philip; Williams, Craig; Han, Gil-Soo; Bi, Peng

    2015-04-01

    Haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is a rodent-borne disease that poses a serious public health threat in China. HFRS is caused by hantaviruses, mainly Seoul virus in urban areas and Hantaan virus in agricultural areas. Although preventive measures including vaccination programs and rodent control measures have resulted in a decline in cases in recent years, there has been an increase in incidence in some areas and new endemic areas have emerged. This review summarises the recent literature relating to the effects of climatic factors on the incidence of HFRS in China and discusses future research directions. Temperature, precipitation and humidity affect crop yields, rodent breeding patterns and disease transmission, and these can be influenced by a changing climate. Detailed surveillance of infections caused by Hantaan and Seoul viruses and further research on the viral agents will aid in interpretation of spatiotemporal patterns and a better understanding of the environmental and ecological drivers of HFRS amid China's rapidly urbanising landscape and changing climate. PMID:25704595

  1. A mathematical model for Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever: tick-borne dynamics with conferred host immunity.

    PubMed

    Switkes, J; Nannyonga, B; Mugisha, J Y T; Nakakawa, J

    2016-12-01

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a highly contagious tick-borne disease that impacts many countries in parts of Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East. Outbreaks are episodic, but deadly. Due to the highly contagious nature of this disease, suspected cases are taken extremely serious, with very strong control measures implemented almost immediately. It is primarily those living on farms, livestock workers, and medical workers who are at risk. The virus responsible for CCHF is transmitted asymptomatically and transiently to livestock, and symptomatically to humans. The fatality rate in human cases can be very high. The number of methods and directions of viral transmission is large, including tick-to-tick, tick-to-livestock, tick-to-human, livestock-to-tick, livestock-to-human, and human-to-human. We model CCHF using a deterministic system of nonlinear differential equations. This compartment model allows us to analyse threshold parameters and equilibria describing the magnitude and progression of cases of the disease in a hypothetical outbreak. PMID:26550705

  2. Importation of Hyalomma marginatum, vector of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, into the United Kingdom by migratory birds.

    PubMed

    Jameson, Lisa J; Morgan, Peter J; Medlock, Jolyon M; Watola, George; Vaux, Alexander G C

    2012-04-01

    Hyalomma marginatum ticks are an important vector of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus which can result in a severe and potentially fatal disease in humans. Given the continued emergence of clinical cases in Eurasia and focalised upsurges of H. marginatum populations in Europe, it seemed prudent to assess the potential of this vector species to be introduced into the United Kingdom. Immature forms of H. marginatum are frequent ectoparasites of passerine birds many of which migrate from Africa to the UK each spring. Incoming birds were inspected for ticks during the spring migration in 2010 and 2011. A total of 68 ticks was collected from 971 birds (29 bird species), 21% (14) of the ticks were identified as H. marginatum. Oenanthe oenanthe (Northern wheatear) and Sylvia communis (Whitethroat) were found to be infested by this tick in both years and with multiple ticks. Single specimens were also removed from Acrocephalus schoenobaenus (Sedge warbler) and Phoenicurus phoenicurus (Common redstart) in 2010. This study provides the first contemporary evidence for substantial importation of this tick species into the UK. PMID:22300969

  3. Curcumin: a pleiotropic phytonutrient in diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Jeenger, Manish Kumar; Shrivastava, Shweta; Yerra, Veera Ganesh; Naidu, V G M; Ramakrishna, Sistla; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2015-02-01

    Curcumin is the major polyphenolic constituent of an indigenous herb, Curcuma longa, found to have a wide range of applications right from its kitchen use as a spicy ingredient to therapeutic and medicinal applications in various diseases. Curcumin has been identified to have a plethora of biologic and pharmacologic properties owing to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. This pleiotropic regulation of redox balance of cell and inflammation might be the basis of curcumin's beneficial activities in various pathologic conditions including diabetic complications. This review summarizes various in vitro, in vivo studies done on curcumin and its therapeutic utility in diabetic micro-vascular complications. This review also emphasizes the importance of curcumin in addition to the existing therapeutic modalities in diabetic complications. PMID:25441584

  4. Pathophysiology of pulmonary complications of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Browne, George W; Pitchumoni, CS

    2006-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis in its severe form is complicated by multiple organ system dysfunction, most importantly by pulmonary complications which include hypoxia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, atelectasis, and pleural effusion. The pathogenesis of some of the above complications is attributed to the production of noxious cytokines. Clinically significant is the early onset of pleural effusion, which heralds a poor outcome of acute pancreatitis. The role of circulating trypsin, phospholipase A2, platelet activating factor, release of free fatty acids, chemoattractants such as tumor necrsosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, IL-8, fMet-leu-phe (a bacterial wall product), nitric oxide, substance P, and macrophage inhibitor factor is currently studied. The hope is that future management of acute pancreatitis with a better understanding of the pathogenesis of lung injury will be directed against the production of noxious cytokines. PMID:17131469

  5. Hemorrhagic vascular complications of endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, L M; Briganti, F; Cappabianca, P; Maiuri, F; Valente, V; Tortora, F; Volpe, A; Messina, A; Elefante, A; De Divitiis, E

    2004-06-01

    Two hundred and fifty consecutive patients operated on by an endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach were retrospectively analyzed in order to evaluate hemorrhagic vascular complications occurring during or after the surgical procedure and their appropriate management. Vascular complications of endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery are identical to those of a microsurgical transsphenoidal approach. Damage to the sphenopalatine artery and to the internal carotid artery (ICA), which are the most frequent vascular troubles, may require technical tricks because of some aspects connected to the approach itself and of the physical properties of the endoscope. Furthermore, the progress in interventional neuroradiology in the last decades offers new solutions in respect to the past, where the use of the surgical microscope was already a tremendous progress. The anatomic substrate of each complication is discussed, along with the peculiar surgical details related to it. PMID:15343429

  6. Management of gallstones and its related complications.

    PubMed

    Portincasa, P; Di Ciaula, A; de Bari, O; Garruti, G; Palmieri, V O; Wang, Dq-H

    2016-01-01

    The majority of gallstone patients remain asymptomatic; however, interest toward the gallstone disease is continuing because of the high worldwide prevalence and management costs and the development of gallstone symptoms and complications. For cholesterol gallstone disease, moreover, a strong link exists between this disease and highly prevalent metabolic disorders such as obesity, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes, hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia and the metabolic syndrome. Information on the natural history as well as the diagnostic, surgical (mainly laparoscopic cholecystectomy) and medical tools available to facilitate adequate management of cholelithiasis and its complications are, therefore, crucial to prevent the negative outcomes of gallstone disease. Moreover, some risk factors for gallstone disease are modifiable and some preventive strategies have become necessary to reduce the onset and the severity of complications. PMID:26560258

  7. Neurological Complications of Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Amy A.; Graus, Francesc; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2013-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation (SOT) is the preferred treatment for an expanding range of conditions whose successful therapy has produced a growing population of chronically immunosuppressed patients with potential neurological problems. While the spectrum of neurological complications varies with the type of organ transplanted, the indication for the procedure, and the intensity of long-term required immunosuppression, major neurological complications occur with all SOT types. The second part of this 2-part article on transplantation neurology reviews central and peripheral nervous system problems associated with SOT with clinical and neuroimaging examples from the authors’ institutional experience. Particular emphasis is given to conditions acquired from the donated organ or tissue, problems specific to types of organs transplanted and drug therapy-related complications likely to be encountered by hospitalists. Neurologically important syndromes such as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) are readdressed in the context of SOT. PMID:24167649

  8. Complications and Great Escapes: Equipment and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Rory; Buckenham, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    All endovascular procedures have the potential for complications. The primary aims should always be avoidance of preventable complications and to minimize the impact of any complication. The core principles of an effective preventive strategy are: involving the interventional and clinical teams in a clear outline of the procedure and its potential adverse outcomes; ensuring an adequate inventory of required and backup equipment; the use of “time-out” to minimize wrong patient/wrong side adverse events; and an active audit program to identify areas of improvement. In the event of an adverse outcome there are many strategies that can be employed to rectify the situation or minimize the iatrogenic injury. This article provides a case-based discussion highlighting some of these techniques and how they can be used in a clinical setting. PMID:25435662

  9. Complications of cirrhosis. A 50 years flashback.

    PubMed

    Møller, Søren; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2015-06-01

    In patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension, it is largely the frequency and severity of complications relating to the diseased liver, degree of portal hypertension and hemodynamic derangement that determine the prognosis. It can be considered as a multiple organ failure that apart from the liver involves the heart, lungs, kidneys, the immune systems and other organ systems. Progressive fibrosis of the liver and subsequent metabolic impairment leads to a systemic and splanchnic arteriolar vasodilatation. With the progression of the disease development of portal hypertension leads to formation of esophageal varices and ascites. The circulation becomes hyperdynamic with cardiac, pulmonary as well as renal consequences for dysfunction and reduced survival. Infections and a changed cardiac function known as cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may be involved in further aggravation of other complications such as renal failure precipitating the hepatorenal syndrome. Patients with end-stage liver disease and related complications as for example the hepatopulmonary syndrome can only radically be treated by liver transplantation. PMID:25881709

  10. Multiple Gastrointestinal Complications of Crack Cocaine Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, Neal; Nguyen, Nhat; DePasquale, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine and its alkaloid free base “crack-cocaine” have long since been substances of abuse. Drug abuse of cocaine via oral, inhalation, intravenous, and intranasal intake has famously been associated with a number of medical complications. Intestinal ischemia and perforation remain the most common manifestations of cocaine associated gastrointestinal disease and have historically been associated with oral intake of cocaine. Here we find a rare case of two relatively uncommon gastrointestinal complications of hemorrhage and pancreatitis presenting within a single admission in a chronic crack cocaine abuser. PMID:24839446

  11. Management of postoperative complications: general approach.

    PubMed

    Sanguineti, V Ana; Wild, Jason R; Fain, Mindy J

    2014-05-01

    The goal of postoperative management is to promote early mobility and avoid postoperative complications, recognizing the potentially devastating impact of complications on elderly patients with hip fracture. The recommended approach involves early mobilization; freedom from tethers (indwelling urinary catheters and other devices); effective pain control; treating malnutrition; preventing pressure ulcers; reducing risk for pulmonary, urinary, and wound infections; and managing cognition. This carefully structured and patient-centered management provides older, vulnerable patients their best chance of returning to their previous level of functioning as quickly and safety as possible. PMID:24721365

  12. [Intravitreal injection. Monitoring to avoid postoperative complications].

    PubMed

    Meyer, C H; Ziemssen, F; Heimann, H

    2008-02-01

    Intravitreal injection is generally regarded as safe. Many of the potential complications caused by this procedure are extremely rare and can be avoided by careful inspection beforehand and proper performance of the injection. In rare cases, however, the administered drugs may cause various pharmacological side effects. This article summarizes the safety profiles of Macugen and Lucentis from the drug approval studies and describes initial findings on possible or observed side effects after intravitreal administration of Avastin. In addition, important points to observe in order to avoid intra- and postoperative complications are provided. PMID:18256842

  13. Neuromuscular complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ruzhansky, Katherine M; Brannagan, Thomas H

    2015-10-01

    Neuromuscular diseases such as polymyositis, dermatomyositis, peripheral neuropathy, and disorders of neuromuscular transmission are reported to be complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Although cases have been reported with allogeneic HSCT in the setting of chronic graft versus host disease, they are also known to occur without evidence thereof and even occur in the setting of autologous HSCT. The 2005 National Institutes of Health Consensus Criteria classify polymyositis and dermatomyositis as "distinctive" features, and neuropathy and MG as "other" features. These neuromuscular complications present very similarly to the idiopathic autoimmune disorders and respond to similar treatment modalities. Muscle Nerve, 2015 Muscle Nerve 52: 480-487, 2015. PMID:26044357

  14. Characteristics, Complications, and Treatment of Acute Pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Kloos, Janet A

    2015-12-01

    Acute pericarditis occurs most frequently after a viral attack. Other causes are autoimmune conditions, infection, chest trauma, cardiac surgery, or cardiac procedure. The presenting symptom is retrosternal chest pain. A pericardial rub is characteristic. Diffuse upward sloping ST segments are found with electrocardiogram. Pericardial effusions may be demonstrated with an echocardiogram. High-dose nonsteroidal antiinflammatory medications are the primary treatment. Adding colchicine reduces recurrence. It responds well to pharmacologic therapy within 1 to 2 weeks. Monitoring for complications is essential. The most serious complication is cardiac tamponade. For this, prompt diagnosis and treatment can be life-saving. PMID:26567493

  15. Late complications of Hodgkin's disease management

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.C.; Bookman, M.A.; Longo, D.L. )

    1990-01-01

    In the past several decades, Hodgkin's disease has been transformed from a uniformly fatal illness to one that can be treated with the expectation of long-term remission or cure in the majority of patients. Because patients now survive for long periods after curative intervention, various complications have been identified. The spectrum of complications following curative therapy is quite diverse and includes immunologic, cardiovascular, pulmonary, thyroid, and gonadal dysfunction. In addition, second malignant neoplasms in the form of acute leukemia as well as secondary solid tumors have now been documented to occur with increased frequency in patients cured of Hodgkin's disease. 80 references.

  16. Endocrine and Metabolic Complications After Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jammah, Anwar A.

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective therapeutic option for obese patients; however, it carries substantial risks, including procedure-related complications, malabsorption, and hormonal disturbance. Recent years have seen an increase in the bariatric surgeries performed utilizing either an independent or a combination of restrictive and malabsorptive procedures. We review some complications of bariatric procedures more specifically, hypoglycemia and osteoporosis, the recommended preoperative assessment and then regular follow up, and the therapeutic options. Surgeon, internist, and the patient must be aware of the multiple risks of this kind of surgery and the needed assessment and follow up. PMID:26458852

  17. Hypertension and the pregnancy complicated by diabetes.

    PubMed

    Leguizamón, Gustavo F; Zeff, Natalia P; Fernández, Alberto

    2006-08-01

    Diabetes is a frequent complication of pregnancy. Type 1 diabetes is associated with an increased incidence of preeclampsia and pregnancy-induced hypertension. When renal dysfunction is present, the incidence of these complications is remarkably increased. White's class, poor glycemic control during the first half of pregnancy, and early blood pressure elevation are also independent risk factors for developing preeclampsia. Whether gestational diabetes increases the background incidence of preeclampsia is still debated. Because therapeutic interventions such as low-dose aspirin and antioxidants have not been shown to be effective, preventive measures rely on tight blood glucose control, as well as adequate blood pressure treatment. PMID:16879782

  18. Complications when augmenting the posterior maxilla.

    PubMed

    Fugazzotto, Paul; Melnick, Philip R; Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad

    2015-01-01

    The maxillary posterior edentulous region presents a challenge when planning for restoring missing teeth with a dental implant. The available bone in such cases is often not dense and not adequate for the placement of a properly sized implant because of maxillary sinus pneumatization and alveolar bone loss. Maxillary sinus lift is a predictable procedure to provide adequate bone height for the purpose of implant placement. However, complications are encountered during or after the execution of the sinus lift procedure. In this article, the prevention and management of maxillary sinus complications are discussed. PMID:25434561

  19. [Incidence of postoperative complications in geriatric gynecology].

    PubMed

    Rummler, S

    1984-01-01

    The results of a retrospective-study concerning postoperative complications after gynecologic geriatric surgery (506 patients, aged 60 years and over) at the Departement of Gynecology and Obstetrics of the District Hospital Stralsund/GDR are presented. In 106 patients (10,94 per cent) we have registered post-operative complications, in particular anaemia, fever and wound-period (1967 to 1971 = 8,22%, 1977 to 1981 = 13,29%). Gynecologic surgery in the aged requires a carefully clinical management in preoperative diagnostic and an intensive postoperative care. PMID:6475112

  20. Complications of trichobezoars: a 30-year experience.

    PubMed

    Wadlington, W B; Rose, M; Holcomb, G W

    1992-10-01

    We have reported the case of a mildly retarded woman in whom an obsessive-compulsive disorder of hair eating (trichophagia) had begun between 2 and 3 years of age. Over the next 30 years, multiple complications of trichophagia included trichobezoars, malnutrition, intestinal obstruction, and ulceration with bleeding. One of the bouts of intestinal obstruction was associated with the superior mesenteric artery blocking the duodenum. This complication has not been reported previously in this disorder. The patient's trichotillomania (hair pulling) was treated with psychotherapy, behavior modification, and various medications, without success. The tricyclic antidepressant clomipramine (Anafranil) may be of benefit in such cases. PMID:1411722