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Sample records for compo composite motif

  1. Composite motifs integrating multiple protein structures increase sensitivity for function prediction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Brian Y; Bryant, Drew H; Cruess, Amanda E; Bylund, Joseph H; Fofanov, Viacheslav Y; Kristensen, David M; Kimmel, Marek; Lichtarge, Olivier; Kavraki, Lydia E

    2007-01-01

    The study of disease often hinges on the biological function of proteins, but determining protein function is a difficult experimental process. To minimize duplicated effort, algorithms for function prediction seek characteristics indicative of possible protein function. One approach is to identify substructural matches of geometric and chemical similarity between motifs representing known active sites and target protein structures with unknown function. In earlier work, statistically significant matches of certain effective motifs have identified functionally related active sites. Effective motifs must be carefully designed to maintain similarity to functionally related sites (sensitivity) and avoid incidental similarities to functionally unrelated protein geometry (specificity). Existing motif design techniques use the geometry of a single protein structure. Poor selection of this structure can limit motif effectiveness if the selected functional site lacks similarity to functionally related sites. To address this problem, this paper presents composite motifs, which combine structures of functionally related active sites to potentially increase sensitivity. Our experimentation compares the effectiveness of composite motifs with simple motifs designed from single protein structures. On six distinct families of functionally related proteins, leave-one-out testing showed that composite motifs had sensitivity comparable to the most sensitive of all simple motifs and specificity comparable to the average simple motif. On our data set, we observed that composite motifs simultaneously capture variations in active site conformation, diminish the problem of selecting motif structures, and enable the fusion of protein structures from diverse data sources. PMID:17951837

  2. Motif types, motif locations and base composition patterns around the RNA polyadenylation site in microorganisms, plants and animals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The polyadenylation of RNA is critical for gene functioning, but the conserved sequence motifs (often called signal or signature motifs), motif locations and abundances, and base composition patterns around mRNA polyadenylation [poly(A)] sites are still uncharacterized in most species. The evolutionary tendency for poly(A) site selection is still largely unknown. Results We analyzed the poly(A) site regions of 31 species or phyla. Different groups of species showed different poly(A) signal motifs: UUACUU at the poly(A) site in the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi; UGUAAC (approximately 13 bases upstream of the site) in the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii; UGUUUG (or UGUUUGUU) at mainly the fourth base downstream of the poly(A) site in the parasite Blastocystis hominis; and AAUAAA at approximately 16 bases and approximately 19 bases upstream of the poly(A) site in animals and plants, respectively. Polyadenylation signal motifs are usually several hundred times more abundant around poly(A) sites than in whole genomes. These predominant motifs usually had very specific locations, whether upstream of, at, or downstream of poly(A) sites, depending on the species or phylum. The poly(A) site was usually an adenosine (A) in all analyzed species except for B. hominis, and there was weak A predominance in C. reinhardtii. Fungi, animals, plants, and the protist Phytophthora infestans shared a general base abundance pattern (or base composition pattern) of “U-rich—A-rich—U-rich—Poly(A) site—U-rich regions”, or U-A-U-A-U for short, with some variation for each kingdom or subkingdom. Conclusion This study identified the poly(A) signal motifs, motif locations, and base composition patterns around mRNA poly(A) sites in protists, fungi, plants, and animals and provided insight into poly(A) site evolution. PMID:25052519

  3. FR3D: finding local and composite recurrent structural motifs in RNA 3D structures.

    PubMed

    Sarver, Michael; Zirbel, Craig L; Stombaugh, Jesse; Mokdad, Ali; Leontis, Neocles B

    2008-01-01

    New methods are described for finding recurrent three-dimensional (3D) motifs in RNA atomic-resolution structures. Recurrent RNA 3D motifs are sets of RNA nucleotides with similar spatial arrangements. They can be local or composite. Local motifs comprise nucleotides that occur in the same hairpin or internal loop. Composite motifs comprise nucleotides belonging to three or more different RNA strand segments or molecules. We use a base-centered approach to construct efficient, yet exhaustive search procedures using geometric, symbolic, or mixed representations of RNA structure that we implement in a suite of MATLAB programs, "Find RNA 3D" (FR3D). The first modules of FR3D preprocess structure files to classify base-pair and -stacking interactions. Each base is represented geometrically by the position of its glycosidic nitrogen in 3D space and by the rotation matrix that describes its orientation with respect to a common frame. Base-pairing and base-stacking interactions are calculated from the base geometries and are represented symbolically according to the Leontis/Westhof basepairing classification, extended to include base-stacking. These data are stored and used to organize motif searches. For geometric searches, the user supplies the 3D structure of a query motif which FR3D uses to find and score geometrically similar candidate motifs, without regard to the sequential position of their nucleotides in the RNA chain or the identity of their bases. To score and rank candidate motifs, FR3D calculates a geometric discrepancy by rigidly rotating candidates to align optimally with the query motif and then comparing the relative orientations of the corresponding bases in the query and candidate motifs. Given the growing size of the RNA structure database, it is impossible to explicitly compute the discrepancy for all conceivable candidate motifs, even for motifs with less than ten nucleotides. The screening algorithm that we describe finds all candidate motifs whose

  4. FR3D: finding local and composite recurrent structural motifs in RNA 3D structures

    PubMed Central

    Sarver, Michael; Stombaugh, Jesse; Mokdad, Ali; Leontis, Neocles B.

    2010-01-01

    New methods are described for finding recurrent three-dimensional (3D) motifs in RNA atomic-resolution structures. Recurrent RNA 3D motifs are sets of RNA nucleotides with similar spatial arrangements. They can be local or composite. Local motifs comprise nucleotides that occur in the same hairpin or internal loop. Composite motifs comprise nucleotides belonging to three or more different RNA strand segments or molecules. We use a base-centered approach to construct efficient, yet exhaustive search procedures using geometric, symbolic, or mixed representations of RNA structure that we implement in a suite of MATLAB programs, “Find RNA 3D” (FR3D). The first modules of FR3D preprocess structure files to classify base-pair and -stacking interactions. Each base is represented geometrically by the position of its glycosidic nitrogen in 3D space and by the rotation matrix that describes its orientation with respect to a common frame. Base-pairing and base-stacking interactions are calculated from the base geometries and are represented symbolically according to the Leontis/Westhof basepairing classification, extended to include base-stacking. These data are stored and used to organize motif searches. For geometric searches, the user supplies the 3D structure of a query motif which FR3D uses to find and score geometrically similar candidate motifs, without regard to the sequential position of their nucleotides in the RNA chain or the identity of their bases. To score and rank candidate motifs, FR3D calculates a geometric discrepancy by rigidly rotating candidates to align optimally with the query motif and then comparing the relative orientations of the corresponding bases in the query and candidate motifs. Given the growing size of the RNA structure database, it is impossible to explicitly compute the discrepancy for all conceivable candidate motifs, even for motifs with less than ten nucleotides. The screening algorithm that we describe finds all candidate motifs

  5. Motif composition, conservation and condition-specificity of single and alternative transcription start sites in the Drosophila genome

    PubMed Central

    Rach, Elizabeth A; Yuan, Hsiang-Yu; Majoros, William H; Tomancak, Pavel; Ohler, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    Background Transcription initiation is a key component in the regulation of gene expression. mRNA 5' full-length sequencing techniques have enhanced our understanding of mammalian transcription start sites (TSSs), revealing different initiation patterns on a genomic scale. Results To identify TSSs in Drosophila melanogaster, we applied a hierarchical clustering strategy on available 5' expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and identified a high quality set of 5,665 TSSs for approximately 4,000 genes. We distinguished two initiation patterns: 'peaked' TSSs, and 'broad' TSS cluster groups. Peaked promoters were found to contain location-specific sequence elements; conversely, broad promoters were associated with non-location-specific elements. In alignments across other Drosophila genomes, conservation levels of sequence elements exceeded 90% within the melanogaster subgroup, but dropped considerably for distal species. Elements in broad promoters had lower levels of conservation than those in peaked promoters. When characterizing the distributions of ESTs, 64% of TSSs showed distinct associations to one out of eight different spatiotemporal conditions. Available whole-genome tiling array time series data revealed different temporal patterns of embryonic activity across the majority of genes with distinct alternative promoters. Many genes with maternally inherited transcripts were found to have alternative promoters utilized later in development. Core promoters of maternally inherited transcripts showed differences in motif composition compared to zygotically active promoters. Conclusions Our study provides a comprehensive map of Drosophila TSSs and the conditions under which they are utilized. Distinct differences in motif associations with initiation pattern and spatiotemporal utilization illustrate the complex regulatory code of transcription initiation. PMID:19589141

  6. A C. elegans genome-scale microRNA network contains composite feedback motifs with high flux capacity

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Natalia J.; Ow, Maria C.; Barrasa, M. Inmaculada; Hammell, Molly; Sequerra, Reynaldo; Doucette-Stamm, Lynn; Roth, Frederick P.; Ambros, Victor R.; Walhout, Albertha J.M.

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and transcription factors (TFs) are primary metazoan gene regulators. Whereas much attention has focused on finding the targets of both miRNAs and TFs, the transcriptional networks that regulate miRNA expression remain largely unexplored. Here, we present the first genome-scale Caenorhabditis elegans miRNA regulatory network that contains experimentally mapped transcriptional TF → miRNA interactions, as well as computationally predicted post-transcriptional miRNA → TF interactions. We find that this integrated miRNA network contains 23 miRNA ↔ TF composite feedback loops in which a TF that controls a miRNA is itself regulated by that same miRNA. By rigorous network randomizations, we show that such loops occur more frequently than expected by chance and, hence, constitute a genuine network motif. Interestingly, miRNAs and TFs in such loops are heavily regulated and regulate many targets. This “high flux capacity” suggests that loops provide a mechanism of high information flow for the coordinate and adaptable control of miRNA and TF target regulons. PMID:18794350

  7. Incorporating substrate sequence motifs and spatial amino acid composition to identify kinase-specific phosphorylation sites on protein three-dimensional structures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein phosphorylation catalyzed by kinases plays crucial regulatory roles in cellular processes. Given the high-throughput mass spectrometry-based experiments, the desire to annotate the catalytic kinases for in vivo phosphorylation sites has motivated. Thus, a variety of computational methods have been developed for performing a large-scale prediction of kinase-specific phosphorylation sites. However, most of the proposed methods solely rely on the local amino acid sequences surrounding the phosphorylation sites. An increasing number of three-dimensional structures make it possible to physically investigate the structural environment of phosphorylation sites. Results In this work, all of the experimental phosphorylation sites are mapped to the protein entries of Protein Data Bank by sequence identity. It resulted in a total of 4508 phosphorylation sites containing the protein three-dimensional (3D) structures. To identify phosphorylation sites on protein 3D structures, this work incorporates support vector machines (SVMs) with the information of linear motifs and spatial amino acid composition, which is determined for each kinase group by calculating the relative frequencies of 20 amino acid types within a specific radial distance from central phosphorylated amino acid residue. After the cross-validation evaluation, most of the kinase-specific models trained with the consideration of structural information outperform the models considering only the sequence information. Furthermore, the independent testing set which is not included in training set has demonstrated that the proposed method could provide a comparable performance to other popular tools. Conclusion The proposed method is shown to be capable of predicting kinase-specific phosphorylation sites on 3D structures and has been implemented as a web server which is freely accessible at http://csb.cse.yzu.edu.tw/PhosK3D/. Due to the difficulty of identifying the kinase-specific phosphorylation

  8. Mining Conditional Phosphorylation Motifs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Wu, Jun; Gong, Haipeng; Deng, Shengchun; He, Zengyou

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylation motifs represent position-specific amino acid patterns around the phosphorylation sites in the set of phosphopeptides. Several algorithms have been proposed to uncover phosphorylation motifs, whereas the problem of efficiently discovering a set of significant motifs with sufficiently high coverage and non-redundancy still remains unsolved. Here we present a novel notion called conditional phosphorylation motifs. Through this new concept, the motifs whose over-expressiveness mainly benefits from its constituting parts can be filtered out effectively. To discover conditional phosphorylation motifs, we propose an algorithm called C-Motif for a non-redundant identification of significant phosphorylation motifs. C-Motif is implemented under the Apriori framework, and it tests the statistical significance together with the frequency of candidate motifs in a single stage. Experiments demonstrate that C-Motif outperforms some current algorithms such as MMFPh and Motif-All in terms of coverage and non-redundancy of the results and efficiency of the execution. The source code of C-Motif is available at: https://sourceforge. net/projects/cmotif/. PMID:26356863

  9. The Motif of Meeting in Digital Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheail, Philippa

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on theoretical work which considers the composition of meetings, in order to think about the form of the meeting in digital environments for higher education. To explore the motif of meeting, I undertake a "compositional interpretation" (Rose, 2012) of the default interface offered by "Collaborate", an…

  10. Fast approximate motif statistics.

    PubMed

    Nicodème, P

    2001-01-01

    We present in this article a fast approximate method for computing the statistics of a number of non-self-overlapping matches of motifs in a random text in the nonuniform Bernoulli model. This method is well suited for protein motifs where the probability of self-overlap of motifs is small. For 96% of the PROSITE motifs, the expectations of occurrences of the motifs in a 7-million-amino-acids random database are computed by the approximate method with less than 1% error when compared with the exact method. Processing of the whole PROSITE takes about 30 seconds with the approximate method. We apply this new method to a comparison of the C. elegans and S. cerevisiae proteomes. PMID:11535175

  11. Complementarity of Binding Motifs is a General Property of HLA-A and HLA-B Molecules and Does Not Seem to Effect HLA Haplotype Composition.

    PubMed

    Rao, Xiangyu; De Boer, Rob J; van Baarle, Debbie; Maiers, Martin; Kesmir, Can

    2013-01-01

    Different human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotypes (i.e., the specific combinations of HLA-A, -B, -DR alleles inherited together from one parent) are observed in different frequencies in human populations. Some haplotypes, like HLA-A1-B8, are very frequent, reaching up to 10% in the Caucasian population, while others are very rare. Numerous studies have identified associations between HLA haplotypes and diseases, and differences in haplotype frequencies can in part be explained by these associations: the stronger the association with a severe (autoimmune) disease, the lower the expected HLA haplotype frequency. The peptide repertoires of the HLA molecules composing a haplotype can also influence the frequency of a haplotype. For example, it would seem advantageous to have HLA molecules with non-overlapping binding specificities within a haplotype, as individuals expressing such an haplotype would present a diverse set of peptides from viruses and pathogenic bacteria on the cell surface. To test this hypothesis, we collect the proteome data from a set of common viruses, and estimate the total ligand repertoire of HLA class I haplotypes (HLA-A-B) using in silico predictions. We compare the size of these repertoires to the HLA haplotype frequencies reported in the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP). We find that in most HLA-A and HLA-B pairs have fairly distinct binding motifs, and that the observed haplotypes do not contain HLA-A and -B molecules with more distinct binding motifs than random HLA-A and HLA-B pairs. In addition, the population frequency of a haplotype is not correlated to the distinctness of its HLA-A and HLA-B peptide binding motifs. These results suggest that there is a not a strong selection pressure on the haplotype level favoring haplotypes having HLA molecules with distinct binding motifs, which would result the largest possible presented peptide repertoires in the context of infectious diseases. PMID:24294213

  12. Efficient exact motif discovery

    PubMed Central

    Marschall, Tobias; Rahmann, Sven

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: The motif discovery problem consists of finding over-represented patterns in a collection of biosequences. It is one of the classical sequence analysis problems, but still has not been satisfactorily solved in an exact and efficient manner. This is partly due to the large number of possibilities of defining the motif search space and the notion of over-representation. Even for well-defined formalizations, the problem is frequently solved in an ad hoc manner with heuristics that do not guarantee to find the best motif. Results: We show how to solve the motif discovery problem (almost) exactly on a practically relevant space of IUPAC generalized string patterns, using the p-value with respect to an i.i.d. model or a Markov model as the measure of over-representation. In particular, (i) we use a highly accurate compound Poisson approximation for the null distribution of the number of motif occurrences. We show how to compute the exact clump size distribution using a recently introduced device called probabilistic arithmetic automaton (PAA). (ii) We define two p-value scores for over-representation, the first one based on the total number of motif occurrences, the second one based on the number of sequences in a collection with at least one occurrence. (iii) We describe an algorithm to discover the optimal pattern with respect to either of the scores. The method exploits monotonicity properties of the compound Poisson approximation and is by orders of magnitude faster than exhaustive enumeration of IUPAC strings (11.8 h compared with an extrapolated runtime of 4.8 years). (iv) We justify the use of the proposed scores for motif discovery by showing our method to outperform other motif discovery algorithms (e.g. MEME, Weeder) on benchmark datasets. We also propose new motifs on Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Availability and Implementation: The method has been implemented in Java. It can be obtained from http://ls11-www

  13. Seeing the B-A-C-H motif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catravas, Palmyra

    2005-09-01

    Musical compositions can be thought of as complex, multidimensional data sets. Compositions based on the B-A-C-H motif (a four-note motif of the pitches of the last name of Johann Sebastian Bach) span several centuries of evolving compositional styles and provide an intriguing set for analysis since they contain a common feature, the motif, buried in dissimilar contexts. We will present analyses which highlight the content of this unusual set of pieces, with emphasis on visual display of information.

  14. Aztec, Incan and Mayan Motifs...Lead to Distinctive Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Joanne

    2001-01-01

    Describes an art project for seventh-grade students in which they choose motifs based on Incan, Aztec, and Mayan Indian materials to incorporate into two-dimensional designs. Explains that the activity objective is to create a unified, balanced and pleasing composition using a minimum of three motifs. (CMK)

  15. Ballast: A Ball-based Algorithm for Structural Motifs

    PubMed Central

    He, Lu; Vandin, Fabio; Pandurangan, Gopal

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Structural motifs encapsulate local sequence-structure-function relationships characteristic of related proteins, enabling the prediction of functional characteristics of new proteins, providing molecular-level insights into how those functions are performed, and supporting the development of variants specifically maintaining or perturbing function in concert with other properties. Numerous computational methods have been developed to search through databases of structures for instances of specified motifs. However, it remains an open problem how best to leverage the local geometric and chemical constraints underlying structural motifs in order to develop motif-finding algorithms that are both theoretically and practically efficient. We present a simple, general, efficient approach, called Ballast (ball-based algorithm for structural motifs), to match given structural motifs to given structures. Ballast combines the best properties of previously developed methods, exploiting the composition and local geometry of a structural motif and its possible instances in order to effectively filter candidate matches. We show that on a wide range of motif-matching problems, Ballast efficiently and effectively finds good matches, and we provide theoretical insights into why it works well. By supporting generic measures of compositional and geometric similarity, Ballast provides a powerful substrate for the development of motif-matching algorithms. PMID:23383999

  16. [Personal motif in art].

    PubMed

    Gerevich, József

    2015-01-01

    One of the basic questions of the art psychology is whether a personal motif is to be found behind works of art and if so, how openly or indirectly it appears in the work itself. Analysis of examples and documents from the fine arts and literature allow us to conclude that the personal motif that can be identified by the viewer through symbols, at times easily at others with more difficulty, gives an emotional plus to the artistic product. The personal motif may be found in traumatic experiences, in communication to the model or with other emotionally important persons (mourning, disappointment, revenge, hatred, rivalry, revolt etc.), in self-searching, or self-analysis. The emotions are expressed in artistic activity either directly or indirectly. The intention nourished by the artist's identity (Kunstwollen) may stand in the way of spontaneous self-expression, channelling it into hidden paths. Under the influence of certain circumstances, the artist may arouse in the viewer, consciously or unconsciously, an illusionary, misleading image of himself. An examination of the personal motif is one of the important research areas of art therapy. PMID:26202617

  17. Rim1 and rabphilin-3 bind Rab3-GTP by composite determinants partially related through N-terminal alpha -helix motifs.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Hu, B; Zimmermann, B; Kilimann, M W

    2001-08-31

    Rim1 is a protein of the presynaptic active zone, the area of the plasma membrane specialized for neurotransmitter exocytosis, and interacts with Rab3, a small GTPase implicated in neurotransmitter vesicle dynamics. Here, we have studied the molecular determinants of Rim1 that are responsible for Rab3 binding, employing surface plasmon resonance and recombinant, bacterially expressed Rab3 and Rim1 proteins. A site that binds GTP- but not GDP-saturated Rab3 was localized to a short alpha-helical sequence near the Rim1 N terminus (amino acids 19-55). Rab3 isoforms A, C, and D were bound with similar affinities (K(d) = 1-2 microm). Low affinity binding of Rab6A-GTP was also observed (K(d) = 16 microm), whereas Rab1B, -5, -7, -8, or -11A did not bind. Adjacent sequences up to amino acid 387, encompassing differentially spliced sequences, the zinc finger module, and the SGAWFF motif of Rim1, did not significantly contribute to the strength or the specificity of Rab3 binding, whereas a point mutation within the helix (R33G) abolished binding. This Rab3 binding site of Rim1 is reminiscent of the N-terminal alpha-helix that is part of the Rab3-binding region of rabphilin-3, and indeed we observed low affinity, specific binding of Rab3A (K(d) on the order of magnitude of 10-100 microm) to this region of rabphilin-3 alone (amino acids 40-88), whereas additional sequences up to amino acid 178 are needed for high affinity Rab3A binding to rabphilin-3 (K(d) = 10-20 nm). In contrast, an N-terminal alpha-helix motif in aczonin, with sequence similarity to the Rab3-binding site of Rim1, did not bind Rab3A, -C, or -D or several other Rab proteins. These results were qualitatively confirmed in pull-down experiments with native, prenylated Rab3 from brain lysate in Triton X-100. Munc13 bound to the zinc finger domain of Rim1 but not to the rabphilin-3 or aczonin zinc fingers. Pull-down experiments from brain lysate in the presence of cholate as detergent detected binding to

  18. Mining protein sequences for motifs.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Giri; Bu, Changsong; Gao, Yuan; Wang, Xuning; Xu, Ning; Mathee, Kalai

    2002-01-01

    We use methods from Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery to design an algorithm for detecting motifs in protein sequences. The algorithm assumes that a motif is constituted by the presence of a "good" combination of residues in appropriate locations of the motif. The algorithm attempts to compile such good combinations into a "pattern dictionary" by processing an aligned training set of protein sequences. The dictionary is subsequently used to detect motifs in new protein sequences. Statistical significance of the detection results are ensured by statistically determining the various parameters of the algorithm. Based on this approach, we have implemented a program called GYM. The Helix-Turn-Helix motif was used as a model system on which to test our program. The program was also extended to detect Homeodomain motifs. The detection results for the two motifs compare favorably with existing programs. In addition, the GYM program provides a lot of useful information about a given protein sequence. PMID:12487759

  19. Genome editing with CompoZr custom zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs).

    PubMed

    Hansen, Keith; Coussens, Matthew J; Sago, Jack; Subramanian, Shilpi; Gjoka, Monika; Briner, Dave

    2012-01-01

    Genome editing is a powerful technique that can be used to elucidate gene function and the genetic basis of disease. Traditional gene editing methods such as chemical-based mutagenesis or random integration of DNA sequences confer indiscriminate genetic changes in an overall inefficient manner and require incorporation of undesirable synthetic sequences or use of aberrant culture conditions, potentially confusing biological study. By contrast, transient ZFN expression in a cell can facilitate precise, heritable gene editing in a highly efficient manner without the need for administration of chemicals or integration of synthetic transgenes. Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) are enzymes which bind and cut distinct sequences of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). A functional CompoZr ZFN unit consists of two individual monomeric proteins that bind a DNA "half-site" of approximately 15-18 nucleotides (see Figure 1). When two ZFN monomers "home" to their adjacent target sites the DNA-cleavage domains dimerize and create a double-strand break (DSB) in the DNA. Introduction of ZFN-mediated DSBs in the genome lays a foundation for highly efficient genome editing. Imperfect repair of DSBs in a cell via the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) DNA repair pathway can result in small insertions and deletions (indels). Creation of indels within the gene coding sequence of a cell can result in frameshift and subsequent functional knockout of a gene locus at high efficiency. While this protocol describes the use of ZFNs to create a gene knockout, integration of transgenes may also be conducted via homology-directed repair at the ZFN cut site. The CompoZr Custom ZFN Service represents a systematic, comprehensive, and well-characterized approach to targeted gene editing for the scientific community with ZFN technology. Sigma scientists work closely with investigators to 1) perform due diligence analysis including analysis of relevant gene structure, biology, and model system pursuant to the

  20. Structural alphabet motif discovery and a structural motif database.

    PubMed

    Ku, Shih-Yen; Hu, Yuh-Jyh

    2012-01-01

    This study proposes a general framework for structural motif discovery. The framework is based on a modular design in which the system components can be modified or replaced independently to increase its applicability to various studies. It is a two-stage approach that first converts protein 3D structures into structural alphabet sequences, and then applies a sequence motif-finding tool to these sequences to detect conserved motifs. We named the structural motif database we built the SA-Motifbase, which provides the structural information conserved at different hierarchical levels in SCOP. For each motif, SA-Motifbase presents its 3D view; alphabet letter preference; alphabet letter frequency distribution; and the significance. SA-Motifbase is available at http://bioinfo.cis.nctu.edu.tw/samotifbase/. PMID:22099701

  1. The Molecular Evolution of the Qo Motif

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Wei-Chun; Hunte, Carola

    2014-01-01

    Quinol oxidation in the catalytic quinol oxidation site (Qo site) of cytochrome (cyt) bc1 complexes is the key step of the Q cycle mechanism, which laid the ground for Mitchell’s chemiosmotic theory of energy conversion. Bifurcated electron transfer upon quinol oxidation enables proton uptake and release on opposite membrane sides, thus generating a proton gradient that fuels ATP synthesis in cellular respiration and photosynthesis. The Qo site architecture formed by cyt b and Rieske iron–sulfur protein (ISP) impedes harmful bypass reactions. Catalytic importance is assigned to four residues of cyt b formerly described as PEWY motif in the context of mitochondrial complexes, which we now denominate Qo motif as comprehensive evolutionary sequence analysis of cyt b shows substantial natural variance of the motif with phylogenetically specific patterns. In particular, the Qo motif is identified as PEWY in mitochondria, α- and ε-Proteobacteria, Aquificae, Chlorobi, Cyanobacteria, and chloroplasts. PDWY is present in Gram-positive bacteria, Deinococcus–Thermus and haloarchaea, and PVWY in β- and γ-Proteobacteria. PPWF only exists in Archaea. Distinct patterns for acidophilic organisms indicate environment-specific adaptations. Importantly, the presence of PDWY and PEWY is correlated with the redox potential of Rieske ISP and quinone species. We propose that during evolution from low to high potential electron-transfer systems in the emerging oxygenic atmosphere, cyt bc1 complexes with PEWY as Qo motif prevailed to efficiently use high potential ubiquinone as substrate, whereas cyt b with PDWY operate best with low potential Rieske ISP and menaquinone, with the latter being the likely composition of the ancestral cyt bc1 complex. PMID:25115012

  2. Dissection of recognition determinants of Escherichia coli σ32 suggests a composite −10 region with an ‘extended −10’ motif and a core −10 element

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Byoung-Mo; Rhodius, Virgil A.; Campbell, Elizabeth A.; Gross, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary σ32 controls expression of heat shock genes in Escherichia coli and is widely distributed in proteobacteria. The distinguishing feature of σ32 promoters is a long −10 region (CCCCATNT) whose tetra-C motif is important for promoter activity. Using alanine-scanning mutagenesis of σ32 and in vivo and in vitro assays, we identified promoter recognition determinants of this motif. The most downstream C (−13) is part of the −10 motif; our work confirms and extends recognition determinants of −13C. Most importantly, our work suggests that the two upstream Cs (−16, −15) constitute an ‘extended −10’ recognition motif that is recognized by K130, a residue universally conserved in β- and γ-proteobacteria. This residue is located in the α-helix of σDomain 3 that mediates recognition of the extended −10 promoter motif in other δs. K130 is not conserved in α- and δ-/εproteobacteria and we found that σ32 from the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus does not need the extended −10 motif for high promoter activity. This result supports the idea that K130 mediates extended −10 recognition. σ32 is the first Group 3σ shown to use the ‘extended −10’ recognition motif. PMID:19400791

  3. The Annotation of RNA Motifs

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    The recent deluge of new RNA structures, including complete atomic-resolution views of both subunits of the ribosome, has on the one hand literally overwhelmed our individual abilities to comprehend the diversity of RNA structure, and on the other hand presented us with new opportunities for comprehensive use of RNA sequences for comparative genetic, evolutionary and phylogenetic studies. Two concepts are key to understanding RNA structure: hierarchical organization of global structure and isostericity of local interactions. Global structure changes extremely slowly, as it relies on conserved long-range tertiary interactions. Tertiary RNA–RNA and quaternary RNA–protein interactions are mediated by RNA motifs, defined as recurrent and ordered arrays of non-Watson–Crick base-pairs. A single RNA motif comprises a family of sequences, all of which can fold into the same three-dimensional structure and can mediate the same interaction(s). The chemistry and geometry of base pairing constrain the evolution of motifs in such a way that random mutations that occur within motifs are accepted or rejected insofar as they can mediate a similar ordered array of interactions. The steps involved in the analysis and annotation of RNA motifs in 3D structures are: (a) decomposition of each motif into non-Watson–Crick base-pairs; (b) geometric classification of each basepair; (c) identification of isosteric substitutions for each basepair by comparison to isostericity matrices; (d) alignment of homologous sequences using the isostericity matrices to identify corresponding positions in the crystal structure; (e) acceptance or rejection of the null hypothesis that the motif is conserved. PMID:18629252

  4. Redox active motifs in selenoproteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Lutz, Patricia B; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Arnér, Elias S J; Bayse, Craig A; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2014-05-13

    Selenoproteins use the rare amino acid selenocysteine (Sec) to act as the first line of defense against oxidants, which are linked to aging, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. Many selenoproteins are oxidoreductases in which the reactive Sec is connected to a neighboring Cys and able to form a ring. These Sec-containing redox motifs govern much of the reactivity of selenoproteins. To study their fundamental properties, we have used (77)Se NMR spectroscopy in concert with theoretical calculations to determine the conformational preferences and mobility of representative motifs. This use of (77)Se as a probe enables the direct recording of the properties of Sec as its environment is systematically changed. We find that all motifs have several ring conformations in their oxidized state. These ring structures are most likely stabilized by weak, nonbonding interactions between the selenium and the amide carbon. To examine how the presence of selenium and ring geometric strain governs the motifs' reactivity, we measured the redox potentials of Sec-containing motifs and their corresponding Cys-only variants. The comparisons reveal that for C-terminal motifs the redox potentials increased between 20-25 mV when the selenenylsulfide bond was changed to a disulfide bond. Changes of similar magnitude arose when we varied ring size or the motifs' flanking residues. This suggests that the presence of Sec is not tied to unusually low redox potentials. The unique roles of selenoproteins in human health and their chemical reactivities may therefore not necessarily be explained by lower redox potentials, as has often been claimed. PMID:24769567

  5. [Prediction of Promoter Motifs in Virophages].

    PubMed

    Gong, Chaowen; Zhou, Xuewen; Pan, Yingjie; Wang, Yongjie

    2015-07-01

    Virophages have crucial roles in ecosystems and are the transport vectors of genetic materials. To shed light on regulation and control mechanisms in virophage--host systems as well as evolution between virophages and their hosts, the promoter motifs of virophages were predicted on the upstream regions of start codons using an analytical tool for prediction of promoter motifs: Multiple EM for Motif Elicitation. Seventeen potential promoter motifs were identified based on the E-value, location, number and length of promoters in genomes. Sputnik and zamilon motif 2 with AT-rich regions were distributed widely on genomes, suggesting that these motifs may be associated with regulation of the expression of various genes. Motifs containing the TCTA box were predicted to be late promoter motif in mavirus; motifs containing the ATCT box were the potential late promoter motif in the Ace Lake mavirus . AT-rich regions were identified on motif 2 in the Organic Lake virophage, motif 3 in Yellowstone Lake virophage (YSLV)1 and 2, motif 1 in YSLV3, and motif 1 and 2 in YSLV4, respectively. AT-rich regions were distributed widely on the genomes of virophages. All of these motifs may be promoter motifs of virophages. Our results provide insights into further exploration of temporal expression of genes in virophages as well as associations between virophages and giant viruses. PMID:26524912

  6. Sequential visibility-graph motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacovacci, Jacopo; Lacasa, Lucas

    2016-04-01

    Visibility algorithms transform time series into graphs and encode dynamical information in their topology, paving the way for graph-theoretical time series analysis as well as building a bridge between nonlinear dynamics and network science. In this work we introduce and study the concept of sequential visibility-graph motifs, smaller substructures of n consecutive nodes that appear with characteristic frequencies. We develop a theory to compute in an exact way the motif profiles associated with general classes of deterministic and stochastic dynamics. We find that this simple property is indeed a highly informative and computationally efficient feature capable of distinguishing among different dynamics and robust against noise contamination. We finally confirm that it can be used in practice to perform unsupervised learning, by extracting motif profiles from experimental heart-rate series and being able, accordingly, to disentangle meditative from other relaxation states. Applications of this general theory include the automatic classification and description of physical, biological, and financial time series.

  7. Redox active motifs in selenoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fei; Lutz, Patricia B.; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Arnér, Elias S. J.; Bayse, Craig A.; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Selenoproteins use the rare amino acid selenocysteine (Sec) to act as the first line of defense against oxidants, which are linked to aging, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. Many selenoproteins are oxidoreductases in which the reactive Sec is connected to a neighboring Cys and able to form a ring. These Sec-containing redox motifs govern much of the reactivity of selenoproteins. To study their fundamental properties, we have used 77Se NMR spectroscopy in concert with theoretical calculations to determine the conformational preferences and mobility of representative motifs. This use of 77Se as a probe enables the direct recording of the properties of Sec as its environment is systematically changed. We find that all motifs have several ring conformations in their oxidized state. These ring structures are most likely stabilized by weak, nonbonding interactions between the selenium and the amide carbon. To examine how the presence of selenium and ring geometric strain governs the motifs’ reactivity, we measured the redox potentials of Sec-containing motifs and their corresponding Cys-only variants. The comparisons reveal that for C-terminal motifs the redox potentials increased between 20–25 mV when the selenenylsulfide bond was changed to a disulfide bond. Changes of similar magnitude arose when we varied ring size or the motifs’ flanking residues. This suggests that the presence of Sec is not tied to unusually low redox potentials. The unique roles of selenoproteins in human health and their chemical reactivities may therefore not necessarily be explained by lower redox potentials, as has often been claimed. PMID:24769567

  8. The Thiamin Pyrophosphate-Motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, P.; Ciszak, E.

    2003-01-01

    Using databases the authors have identified a common thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP)-motif in the family of functionally diverse TPP-dependent enzymes. This common motif consists of multimeric organization of subunits and two catalytic centers. Each catalytic center (PP:PYR) is formed at the interface of the PP-domain binding the magnesium ion, pyrophosphate and amhopyrimidine ring of TPP, and the PYR-domain binding the aminopyrimidine ring of that cofactor. A pair of these catalytic centers constitutes the catalytic core (PP:PYR)(sub 2) within these enzymes. Analysis of the structural elements of this catalytic core reveals novel definition of the common amino acid sequences, which are GXPhiX(sub 4)(G)PhiXXGQ and GDGX(sub 25-30)NN in the PP-domain, and the EX(sub 4)(G)PhiXXGPhi in the PYR-domain, where Phi corresponds to a hydrophobic amino acid. This TPP-motif provides a novel tool for annotation of TPP-dependent enzymes useful in advancing functional proteomics.

  9. The Thiamin Pyrophosphate-Motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, Paulina M.; Ciszak, Ewa M.

    2003-01-01

    Using databases the authors have identified a common thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP)-motif in the family of functionally diverse TPP-dependent enzymes. This common motif consists of multimeric organization of subunits, two catalytic centers, common amino acid sequence, and specific contacts to provide a flip-flop, or alternate site, mechanism of action. Each catalytic center [PP:PYR] is formed at the interface of the PP-domain binding the magnesium ion, pyrophosphate and aminopyrimidine ring of TPP, and the PYR-domain binding the aminopyrimidine ring of that cofactor. A pair of these catalytic centers constitutes the catalytic core [PP:PYR]* within these enzymes. Analysis of the structural elements of this catalytic core reveals novel definition of the common amino acid sequences, which are GX@&(G)@XXGQ, and GDGX25-30 within the PP- domain, and the E&(G)@XXG@ within the PYR-domain, where Q, corresponds to a hydrophobic amino acid. This TPP-motif provides a novel tool for annotation of TPP-dependent enzymes useful in advancing functional proteomics.

  10. Comprehensive discovery of DNA motifs in 349 human cells and tissues reveals new features of motifs

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yiyu; Li, Xiaoman; Hu, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive motif discovery under experimental conditions is critical for the global understanding of gene regulation. To generate a nearly complete list of human DNA motifs under given conditions, we employed a novel approach to de novo discover significant co-occurring DNA motifs in 349 human DNase I hypersensitive site datasets. We predicted 845 to 1325 motifs in each dataset, for a total of 2684 non-redundant motifs. These 2684 motifs contained 54.02 to 75.95% of the known motifs in seven large collections including TRANSFAC. In each dataset, we also discovered 43 663 to 2 013 288 motif modules, groups of motifs with their binding sites co-occurring in a significant number of short DNA regions. Compared with known interacting transcription factors in eight resources, the predicted motif modules on average included 84.23% of known interacting motifs. We further showed new features of the predicted motifs, such as motifs enriched in proximal regions rarely overlapped with motifs enriched in distal regions, motifs enriched in 5′ distal regions were often enriched in 3′ distal regions, etc. Finally, we observed that the 2684 predicted motifs classified the cell or tissue types of the datasets with an accuracy of 81.29%. The resources generated in this study are available at http://server.cs.ucf.edu/predrem/. PMID:25505144

  11. False occurrences of functional motifs in protein sequences highlight evolutionary constraints

    PubMed Central

    Via, Allegra; Gherardini, Pier Federico; Ferraro, Enrico; Ausiello, Gabriele; Scalia Tomba, Gianpaolo; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2007-01-01

    Background False occurrences of functional motifs in protein sequences can be considered as random events due solely to the sequence composition of a proteome. Here we use a numerical approach to investigate the random appearance of functional motifs with the aim of addressing biological questions such as: How are organisms protected from undesirable occurrences of motifs otherwise selected for their functionality? Has the random appearance of functional motifs in protein sequences been affected during evolution? Results Here we analyse the occurrence of functional motifs in random sequences and compare it to that observed in biological proteomes; the behaviour of random motifs is also studied. Most motifs exhibit a number of false positives significantly similar to the number of times they appear in randomized proteomes (=expected number of false positives). Interestingly, about 3% of the analysed motifs show a different kind of behaviour and appear in biological proteomes less than they do in random sequences. In some of these cases, a mechanism of evolutionary negative selection is apparent; this helps to prevent unwanted functionalities which could interfere with cellular mechanisms. Conclusion Our thorough statistical and biological analysis showed that there are several mechanisms and evolutionary constraints both of which affect the appearance of functional motifs in protein sequences. PMID:17331242

  12. Detecting correlations among functional-sequence motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirino, Davide; Rigosa, Jacopo; Ledda, Alice; Ferretti, Luca

    2012-06-01

    Sequence motifs are words of nucleotides in DNA with biological functions, e.g., gene regulation. Identification of such words proceeds through rejection of Markov models on the expected motif frequency along the genome. Additional biological information can be extracted from the correlation structure among patterns of motif occurrences. In this paper a log-linear multivariate intensity Poisson model is estimated via expectation maximization on a set of motifs along the genome of E. coli K12. The proposed approach allows for excitatory as well as inhibitory interactions among motifs and between motifs and other genomic features like gene occurrences. Our findings confirm previous stylized facts about such types of interactions and shed new light on genome-maintenance functions of some particular motifs. We expect these methods to be applicable to a wider set of genomic features.

  13. Detecting correlations among functional-sequence motifs.

    PubMed

    Pirino, Davide; Rigosa, Jacopo; Ledda, Alice; Ferretti, Luca

    2012-06-01

    Sequence motifs are words of nucleotides in DNA with biological functions, e.g., gene regulation. Identification of such words proceeds through rejection of Markov models on the expected motif frequency along the genome. Additional biological information can be extracted from the correlation structure among patterns of motif occurrences. In this paper a log-linear multivariate intensity Poisson model is estimated via expectation maximization on a set of motifs along the genome of E. coli K12. The proposed approach allows for excitatory as well as inhibitory interactions among motifs and between motifs and other genomic features like gene occurrences. Our findings confirm previous stylized facts about such types of interactions and shed new light on genome-maintenance functions of some particular motifs. We expect these methods to be applicable to a wider set of genomic features. PMID:23005179

  14. Analysis of interactions between ribosomal proteins and RNA structural motifs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background One important goal of structural bioinformatics is to recognize and predict the interactions between protein binding sites and RNA. Recently, a comprehensive analysis of ribosomal proteins and their interactions with rRNA has been done. Interesting results emerged from the comparison of r-proteins within the small subunit in T. thermophilus and E. coli, supporting the idea of a core made by both RNA and proteins, conserved by evolution. Recent work showed also that ribosomal RNA is modularly composed. Motifs are generally single-stranded sequences of consecutive nucleotides (ssRNA) with characteristic folding. The role of these motifs in protein-RNA interactions has been so far only sparsely investigated. Results This work explores the role of RNA structural motifs in the interaction of proteins with ribosomal RNA (rRNA). We analyze composition, local geometries and conformation of interface regions involving motifs such as tetraloops, kink turns and single extruded nucleotides. We construct an interaction map of protein binding sites that allows us to identify the common types of shared 3-D physicochemical binding patterns for tetraloops. Furthermore, we investigate the protein binding pockets that accommodate single extruded nucleotides either involved in kink-turns or in arbitrary RNA strands. This analysis reveals a new structural motif, called tripod. It corresponds to small pockets consisting of three aminoacids arranged at the vertices of an almost equilateral triangle. We developed a search procedure for the recognition of tripods, based on an empirical tripod fingerprint. Conclusion A comparative analysis with the overall RNA surface and interfaces shows that contact surfaces involving RNA motifs have distinctive features that may be useful for the recognition and prediction of interactions. PMID:20122215

  15. A survey of DNA motif finding algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Das, Modan K; Dai, Ho-Kwok

    2007-01-01

    Background Unraveling the mechanisms that regulate gene expression is a major challenge in biology. An important task in this challenge is to identify regulatory elements, especially the binding sites in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) for transcription factors. These binding sites are short DNA segments that are called motifs. Recent advances in genome sequence availability and in high-throughput gene expression analysis technologies have allowed for the development of computational methods for motif finding. As a result, a large number of motif finding algorithms have been implemented and applied to various motif models over the past decade. This survey reviews the latest developments in DNA motif finding algorithms. Results Earlier algorithms use promoter sequences of coregulated genes from single genome and search for statistically overrepresented motifs. Recent algorithms are designed to use phylogenetic footprinting or orthologous sequences and also an integrated approach where promoter sequences of coregulated genes and phylogenetic footprinting are used. All the algorithms studied have been reported to correctly detect the motifs that have been previously detected by laboratory experimental approaches, and some algorithms were able to find novel motifs. However, most of these motif finding algorithms have been shown to work successfully in yeast and other lower organisms, but perform significantly worse in higher organisms. Conclusion Despite considerable efforts to date, DNA motif finding remains a complex challenge for biologists and computer scientists. Researchers have taken many different approaches in developing motif discovery tools and the progress made in this area of research is very encouraging. Performance comparison of different motif finding tools and identification of the best tools have proven to be a difficult task because tools are designed based on algorithms and motif models that are diverse and complex and our incomplete understanding of

  16. The Thiamine-Pyrophosphate-Motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Dominiak, Paulina

    2004-01-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP), a derivative of vitamin B1, is a cofactor for enzymes performing catalysis in pathways of energy production including the well known decarboxylation of a-keto acid dehydrogenases followed by transketolation. TPP-dependent enzymes constitute a structurally and functionally diverse group exhibiting multimeric subunit organization, multiple domains and two chemically equivalent catalytic centers. Annotation of functional TPP-dependcnt enzymes, therefore, has not been trivial due to low sequence similarity related to this complex organization. Our approach to analysis of structures of known TPP-dependent enzymes reveals for the first time features common to this group, which we have termed the TPP-motif. The TPP-motif consists of specific spatial arrangements of structural elements and their specific contacts to provide for a flip-flop, or alternate site, enzymatic mechanism of action. Analysis of structural elements entrained in the flip-flop action displayed by TPP-dependent enzymes reveals a novel definition of the common amino acid sequences. These sequences allow for annotation of TPP-dependent enzymes, thus advancing functional proteomics. Further details of three-dimensional structures of TPP-dependent enzymes will be discussed.

  17. Synthetic biology with RNA motifs.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hirohide; Inoue, Tan

    2009-02-01

    Structural motifs in naturally occurring RNAs and RNPs can be employed as new molecular parts for synthetic biology to facilitate the development of novel devices and systems that modulate cellular functions. In this review, we focus on the following: (i) experimental evolution techniques of RNA molecules in vitro and (ii) their applications for regulating gene expression systems in vivo. For experimental evolution, new artificial RNA aptamers and RNA enzymes (ribozymes) have been selected in vitro. These functional RNA molecules are likely to be applicable in the reprogramming of existing gene regulatory systems. Furthermore, they may be used for designing hypothetical RNA-based living systems in the so-called RNA world. For the regulation of gene expressions in living cells, the development of new riboswitches allows us to modulate the target gene expression in a tailor-made manner. Moreover, recently RNA-based synthetic genetic circuits have been reported by employing functional RNA molecules, expanding the repertory of synthetic biology with RNA motifs. PMID:18775792

  18. DILIMOT: discovery of linear motifs in proteins.

    PubMed

    Neduva, Victor; Russell, Robert B

    2006-07-01

    Discovery of protein functional motifs is critical in modern biology. Small segments of 3-10 residues play critical roles in protein interactions, post-translational modifications and trafficking. DILIMOT (DIscovery of LInear MOTifs) is a server for the prediction of these short linear motifs within a set of proteins. Given a set of sequences sharing a common functional feature (e.g. interaction partner or localization) the method finds statistically over-represented motifs likely to be responsible for it. The input sequences are first passed through a set of filters to remove regions unlikely to contain instances of linear motifs. Motifs are then found in the remaining sequence and ranked according to a statistic that measure over-representation and conservation across homologues in related species. The results are displayed via a visual interface for easy perusal. The server is available at http://dilimot.embl.de. PMID:16845024

  19. A Further Study on Mining DNA Motifs Using Fuzzy Self-Organizing Maps.

    PubMed

    Tapan, Sarwar; Wang, Dianhui

    2016-01-01

    Self-organizing map (SOM)-based motif mining, despite being a promising approach for problem solving, mostly fails to offer a consistent interpretation of clusters with respect to the mixed composition of signal and noise in the nodes. The main reason behind this shortcoming comes from the similarity metrics used in data assignment, specially designed with the biological interpretation for this domain, which are not meant to consider the inevitable noise mixture in the clusters. This limits the explicability of the majority of clusters that are supposedly noise dominated, degrading the overall system clarity in motif discovery. This paper aims to improve the explicability aspect of learning process by introducing a composite similarity function (CSF) that is specially designed for the k -mer-to-cluster similarity measure with respect to the degree of motif properties and embedded noise in the cluster. Our proposed motif finding algorithm in this paper is built on our previous work robust elicitation algorithms for discovering (READ) [1] and termed READ Deoxyribonucleic acid motifs using CSFs (READ(csf)), which performs slightly better than READ and shows some remarkable improvements over SOM-based SOMBRERO and SOMEA tools in terms of F-measure on the testing data sets. A real data set containing multiple motifs is used to explore the potential of the READ(csf) for more challenging biological data mining tasks. Visual comparisons with the verified logos extracted from JASPAR database demonstrate that our algorithm is promising to discover multiple motifs simultaneously. PMID:26068877

  20. Bridge and brick motifs in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chung-Yuan; Sun, Chuen-Tsai; Cheng, Chia-Ying; Hsieh, Ji-Lung

    2007-04-01

    Acknowledging the expanding role of complex networks in numerous scientific contexts, we examine significant functional and topological differences between bridge and brick motifs for predicting network behaviors and functions. After observing similarities between social networks and their genetic, ecological, and engineering counterparts, we identify a larger number of brick motifs in social networks and bridge motifs in the other three types. We conclude that bridge and brick motif content analysis can assist researchers in understanding the small-world and clustering properties of network structures when investigating network functions and behaviors.

  1. A survey of motif finding Web tools for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ngoc Tam L; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2014-01-01

    ChIP-Seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing) has provided the advantage for finding motifs as ChIP-Seq experiments narrow down the motif finding to binding site locations. Recent motif finding tools facilitate the motif detection by providing user-friendly Web interface. In this work, we reviewed nine motif finding Web tools that are capable for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data. We showed each motif finding Web tool has its own advantages for detecting motifs that other tools may not discover. We recommended the users to use multiple motif finding Web tools that implement different algorithms for obtaining significant motifs, overlapping resemble motifs, and non-overlapping motifs. Finally, we provided our suggestions for future development of motif finding Web tool that better assists researchers for finding motifs in ChIP-Seq data. PMID:24555784

  2. Temporal motifs in time-dependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovanen, Lauri; Karsai, Márton; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertész, János; Saramäki, Jari

    2011-11-01

    Temporal networks are commonly used to represent systems where connections between elements are active only for restricted periods of time, such as telecommunication, neural signal processing, biochemical reaction and human social interaction networks. We introduce the framework of temporal motifs to study the mesoscale topological-temporal structure of temporal networks in which the events of nodes do not overlap in time. Temporal motifs are classes of similar event sequences, where the similarity refers not only to topology but also to the temporal order of the events. We provide a mapping from event sequences to coloured directed graphs that enables an efficient algorithm for identifying temporal motifs. We discuss some aspects of temporal motifs, including causality and null models, and present basic statistics of temporal motifs in a large mobile call network.

  3. Sampling Motif-Constrained Ensembles of Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Rico; Leitão, Jorge C.; Peixoto, Tiago P.; Altmann, Eduardo G.

    2015-10-01

    The statistical significance of network properties is conditioned on null models which satisfy specified properties but that are otherwise random. Exponential random graph models are a principled theoretical framework to generate such constrained ensembles, but which often fail in practice, either due to model inconsistency or due to the impossibility to sample networks from them. These problems affect the important case of networks with prescribed clustering coefficient or number of small connected subgraphs (motifs). In this Letter we use the Wang-Landau method to obtain a multicanonical sampling that overcomes both these problems. We sample, in polynomial time, networks with arbitrary degree sequences from ensembles with imposed motifs counts. Applying this method to social networks, we investigate the relation between transitivity and homophily, and we quantify the correlation between different types of motifs, finding that single motifs can explain up to 60% of the variation of motif profiles.

  4. Stochastic motif extraction using hidden Markov model

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Yukiko; Asogawa, Minoru; Konagaya, Akihiko

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, we study the application of an HMM (hidden Markov model) to the problem of representing protein sequences by a stochastic motif. A stochastic protein motif represents the small segments of protein sequences that have a certain function or structure. The stochastic motif, represented by an HMM, has conditional probabilities to deal with the stochastic nature of the motif. This HMM directive reflects the characteristics of the motif, such as a protein periodical structure or grouping. In order to obtain the optimal HMM, we developed the {open_quotes}iterative duplication method{close_quotes} for HMM topology learning. It starts from a small fully-connected network and iterates the network generation and parameter optimization until it achieves sufficient discrimination accuracy. Using this method, we obtained an HMM for a leucine zipper motif. Compared to the accuracy of a symbolic pattern representation with accuracy of 14.8 percent, an HMM achieved 79.3 percent in prediction. Additionally, the method can obtain an HMM for various types of zinc finger motifs, and it might separate the mixed data. We demonstrated that this approach is applicable to the validation of the protein databases; a constructed HMM b as indicated that one protein sequence annotated as {open_quotes}lencine-zipper like sequence{close_quotes} in the database is quite different from other leucine-zipper sequences in terms of likelihood, and we found this discrimination is plausible.

  5. Automated Motif Discovery from Glycan Array Data

    PubMed Central

    Cholleti, Sharath R.; Agravat, Sanjay; Morris, Tim; Saltz, Joel H.; Song, Xuezheng

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Assessing interactions of a glycan-binding protein (GBP) or lectin with glycans on a microarray generates large datasets, making it difficult to identify a glycan structural motif or determinant associated with the highest apparent binding strength of the GBP. We have developed a computational method, termed GlycanMotifMiner, that uses the relative binding of a GBP with glycans within a glycan microarray to automatically reveal the glycan structural motifs recognized by a GBP. We implemented the software with a web-based graphical interface for users to explore and visualize the discovered motifs. The utility of GlycanMotifMiner was determined using five plant lectins, SNA, HPA, PNA, Con A, and UEA-I. Data from the analyses of the lectins at different protein concentrations were processed to rank the glycans based on their relative binding strengths. The motifs, defined as glycan substructures that exist in a large number of the bound glycans and few non-bound glycans, were then discovered by our algorithm and displayed in a web-based graphical user interface (http://glycanmotifminer.emory.edu). The information is used in defining the glycan-binding specificity of GBPs. The results were compared to the known glycan specificities of these lectins generated by manual methods. A more complex analysis was also carried out using glycan microarray data obtained for a recombinant form of human galectin-8. Results for all of these lectins show that GlycanMotifMiner identified the major motifs known in the literature along with some unexpected novel binding motifs. PMID:22877213

  6. Automated motif discovery from glycan array data.

    PubMed

    Cholleti, Sharath R; Agravat, Sanjay; Morris, Tim; Saltz, Joel H; Song, Xuezheng; Cummings, Richard D; Smith, David F

    2012-10-01

    Assessing interactions of a glycan-binding protein (GBP) or lectin with glycans on a microarray generates large datasets, making it difficult to identify a glycan structural motif or determinant associated with the highest apparent binding strength of the GBP. We have developed a computational method, termed GlycanMotifMiner, that uses the relative binding of a GBP with glycans within a glycan microarray to automatically reveal the glycan structural motifs recognized by a GBP. We implemented the software with a web-based graphical interface for users to explore and visualize the discovered motifs. The utility of GlycanMotifMiner was determined using five plant lectins, SNA, HPA, PNA, Con A, and UEA-I. Data from the analyses of the lectins at different protein concentrations were processed to rank the glycans based on their relative binding strengths. The motifs, defined as glycan substructures that exist in a large number of the bound glycans and few non-bound glycans, were then discovered by our algorithm and displayed in a web-based graphical user interface ( http://glycanmotifminer.emory.edu ). The information is used in defining the glycan-binding specificity of GBPs. The results were compared to the known glycan specificities of these lectins generated by manual methods. A more complex analysis was also carried out using glycan microarray data obtained for a recombinant form of human galectin-8. Results for all of these lectins show that GlycanMotifMiner identified the major motifs known in the literature along with some unexpected novel binding motifs. PMID:22877213

  7. RSAT peak-motifs: motif analysis in full-size ChIP-seq datasets.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Herrmann, Carl; Defrance, Matthieu; Sand, Olivier; Thieffry, Denis; van Helden, Jacques

    2012-02-01

    ChIP-seq is increasingly used to characterize transcription factor binding and chromatin marks at a genomic scale. Various tools are now available to extract binding motifs from peak data sets. However, most approaches are only available as command-line programs, or via a website but with size restrictions. We present peak-motifs, a computational pipeline that discovers motifs in peak sequences, compares them with databases, exports putative binding sites for visualization in the UCSC genome browser and generates an extensive report suited for both naive and expert users. It relies on time- and memory-efficient algorithms enabling the treatment of several thousand peaks within minutes. Regarding time efficiency, peak-motifs outperforms all comparable tools by several orders of magnitude. We demonstrate its accuracy by analyzing data sets ranging from 4000 to 1,28,000 peaks for 12 embryonic stem cell-specific transcription factors. In all cases, the program finds the expected motifs and returns additional motifs potentially bound by cofactors. We further apply peak-motifs to discover tissue-specific motifs in peak collections for the p300 transcriptional co-activator. To our knowledge, peak-motifs is the only tool that performs a complete motif analysis and offers a user-friendly web interface without any restriction on sequence size or number of peaks. PMID:22156162

  8. Automated classification of RNA 3D motifs and the RNA 3D Motif Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Anton I.; Zirbel, Craig L.; Leontis, Neocles B.

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of atomic-resolution RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures reveals that many internal and hairpin loops are modular, recurrent, and structured by conserved non-Watson–Crick base pairs. Structurally similar loops define RNA 3D motifs that are conserved in homologous RNA molecules, but can also occur at nonhomologous sites in diverse RNAs, and which often vary in sequence. To further our understanding of RNA motif structure and sequence variability and to provide a useful resource for structure modeling and prediction, we present a new method for automated classification of internal and hairpin loop RNA 3D motifs and a new online database called the RNA 3D Motif Atlas. To classify the motif instances, a representative set of internal and hairpin loops is automatically extracted from a nonredundant list of RNA-containing PDB files. Their structures are compared geometrically, all-against-all, using the FR3D program suite. The loops are clustered into motif groups, taking into account geometric similarity and structural annotations and making allowance for a variable number of bulged bases. The automated procedure that we have implemented identifies all hairpin and internal loop motifs previously described in the literature. All motif instances and motif groups are assigned unique and stable identifiers and are made available in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas (http://rna.bgsu.edu/motifs), which is automatically updated every four weeks. The RNA 3D Motif Atlas provides an interactive user interface for exploring motif diversity and tools for programmatic data access. PMID:23970545

  9. CodingMotif: exact determination of overrepresented nucleotide motifs in coding sequences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It has been increasingly appreciated that coding sequences harbor regulatory sequence motifs in addition to encoding for protein. These sequence motifs are expected to be overrepresented in nucleotide sequences bound by a common protein or small RNA. However, detecting overrepresented motifs has been difficult because of interference by constraints at the protein level. Sampling-based approaches to solve this problem based on codon-shuffling have been limited to exploring only an infinitesimal fraction of the sequence space and by their use of parametric approximations. Results We present a novel O(N(log N)2)-time algorithm, CodingMotif, to identify nucleotide-level motifs of unusual copy number in protein-coding regions. Using a new dynamic programming algorithm we are able to exhaustively calculate the distribution of the number of occurrences of a motif over all possible coding sequences that encode the same amino acid sequence, given a background model for codon usage and dinucleotide biases. Our method takes advantage of the sparseness of loci where a given motif can occur, greatly speeding up the required convolution calculations. Knowledge of the distribution allows one to assess the exact non-parametric p-value of whether a given motif is over- or under- represented. We demonstrate that our method identifies known functional motifs more accurately than sampling and parametric-based approaches in a variety of coding datasets of various size, including ChIP-seq data for the transcription factors NRSF and GABP. Conclusions CodingMotif provides a theoretically and empirically-demonstrated advance for the detection of motifs overrepresented in coding sequences. We expect CodingMotif to be useful for identifying motifs in functional genomic datasets such as DNA-protein binding, RNA-protein binding, or microRNA-RNA binding within coding regions. A software implementation is available at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/chuanglab/codingmotif.tar PMID

  10. Short sequence motifs, overrepresented in mammalian conservednon-coding sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Minovitsky, Simon; Stegmaier, Philip; Kel, Alexander; Kondrashov,Alexey S.; Dubchak, Inna

    2007-02-21

    Background: A substantial fraction of non-coding DNAsequences of multicellular eukaryotes is under selective constraint. Inparticular, ~;5 percent of the human genome consists of conservednon-coding sequences (CNSs). CNSs differ from other genomic sequences intheir nucleotide composition and must play important functional roles,which mostly remain obscure.Results: We investigated relative abundancesof short sequence motifs in all human CNSs present in the human/mousewhole-genome alignments vs. three background sets of sequences: (i)weakly conserved or unconserved non-coding sequences (non-CNSs); (ii)near-promoter sequences (located between nucleotides -500 and -1500,relative to a start of transcription); and (iii) random sequences withthe same nucleotide composition as that of CNSs. When compared tonon-CNSs and near-promoter sequences, CNSs possess an excess of AT-richmotifs, often containing runs of identical nucleotides. In contrast, whencompared to random sequences, CNSs contain an excess of GC-rich motifswhich, however, lack CpG dinucleotides. Thus, abundance of short sequencemotifs in human CNSs, taken as a whole, is mostly determined by theiroverall compositional properties and not by overrepresentation of anyspecific short motifs. These properties are: (i) high AT-content of CNSs,(ii) a tendency, probably due to context-dependent mutation, of A's andT's to clump, (iii) presence of short GC-rich regions, and (iv) avoidanceof CpG contexts, due to their hypermutability. Only a small number ofshort motifs, overrepresented in all human CNSs are similar to bindingsites of transcription factors from the FOX family.Conclusion: Human CNSsas a whole appear to be too broad a class of sequences to possess strongfootprints of any short sequence-specific functions. Such footprintsshould be studied at the level of functional subclasses of CNSs, such asthose which flank genes with a particular pattern of expression. Overallproperties of CNSs are affected by patterns in

  11. MotifMiner: A Table Driven Greedy Algorithm for DNA Motif Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeja, K. R.; Alam, M. A.; Jain, S. K.

    DNA motif discovery is a much explored problem in functional genomics. This paper describes a table driven greedy algorithm for discovering regulatory motifs in the promoter sequences of co-expressed genes. The proposed algorithm searches both DNA strands for the common patterns or motifs. The inputs to the algorithm are set of promoter sequences, the motif length and minimum Information Content. The algorithm generates subsequences of given length from the shortest input promoter sequence. It stores these subsequences and their reverse complements in a table. Then it searches the remaining sequences for good matches of these subsequences. The Information Content score is used to measure the goodness of the motifs. The algorithm has been tested with synthetic data and real data. The results are found promising. The algorithm could discover meaningful motifs from the muscle specific regulatory sequences.

  12. DNA Motif Databases and Their Uses.

    PubMed

    Stormo, Gary D

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) recognize and bind to specific DNA sequences. The specificity of a TF is usually represented as a position weight matrix (PWM). Several databases of DNA motifs exist and are used in biological research to address important biological questions. This overview describes PWMs and some of the most commonly used motif databases, as well as a few of their common applications. PMID:26334922

  13. Do short, frequent DNA sequence motifs mould the epigenome?

    PubMed

    Quante, Timo; Bird, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    'Epigenome' refers to the panoply of chemical modifications borne by DNA and its associated proteins that locally affect genome function. Epigenomic patterns are thought to be determined by external constraints resulting from development, disease and the environment, but DNA sequence is also a potential influence. We propose that domains of relatively uniform DNA base composition may modulate the epigenome through cell type-specific proteins that recognize short, frequent sequence motifs. Differential recruitment of epigenomic modifiers may adjust gene expression in multigene blocks as an alternative to tuning the activity of each gene separately, thus simplifying gene expression programming. PMID:26837845

  14. Basic OSF/Motif programming and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, D. ); Novak, B. )

    1992-09-15

    When users refer to Motif, they are usually talking about mwm, the window manager. However, when programmers mention Motif they are usually discussing the programming toolkit. This toolkit is used to develop new or modify existing applications. In this presentation, the term Motif will refer to the toolkit. Motif comes with a number of features that help users effectively use the applications built with it. The term look and feel may be overused; nonetheless, a consistent and well designed look and feel assists the user in Teaming and using new applications. The term point and click generally refers to using a mouse to select program commands. While Motif supports point and click, the toolkit also supports using the keyboard as a substitute for many operations. This gives a good typist a distinct advantage when using a familiar application. We will give an overview of the toolkit, touching on the user interface features and general programming considerations. Since the source code for many useful Motif programs is readily available, we will explain how to get these sources and touch on derived benefits. We win also point to other sources of on-line help and documentation. Finally, we will present some practical experiences developing applications.

  15. Detecting seeded motifs in DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Pizzi, Cinzia; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Bisognin, Andrea; Coppe, Alessandro; Danieli, Gian Antonio

    2005-01-01

    The problem of detecting DNA motifs with functional relevance in real biological sequences is difficult due to a number of biological, statistical and computational issues and also because of the lack of knowledge about the structure of searched patterns. Many algorithms are implemented in fully automated processes, which are often based upon a guess of input parameters from the user at the very first step. In this paper, we present a novel method for the detection of seeded DNA motifs, composed by regions with a different extent of variability. The method is based on a multi-step approach, which was implemented in a motif searching web tool (MOST). Overrepresented exact patterns are extracted from input sequences and clustered to produce motifs core regions, which are then extended and scored to generate seeded motifs. The combination of automated pattern discovery algorithms and different display tools for the evaluation and selection of results at several analysis steps can potentially lead to much more meaningful results than complete automation can produce. Experimental results on different yeast and human real datasets proved the methodology to be a promising solution for finding seeded motifs. MOST web tool is freely available at http://telethon.bio.unipd.it/bioinfo/MOST. PMID:16141193

  16. Detecting seeded motifs in DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Pizzi, Cinzia; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Bisognin, Andrea; Coppe, Alessandro; Danieli, Gian Antonio

    2005-01-01

    The problem of detecting DNA motifs with functional relevance in real biological sequences is difficult due to a number of biological, statistical and computational issues and also because of the lack of knowledge about the structure of searched patterns. Many algorithms are implemented in fully automated processes, which are often based upon a guess of input parameters from the user at the very first step. In this paper, we present a novel method for the detection of seeded DNA motifs, composed by regions with a different extent of variability. The method is based on a multi-step approach, which was implemented in a motif searching web tool (MOST). Overrepresented exact patterns are extracted from input sequences and clustered to produce motifs core regions, which are then extended and scored to generate seeded motifs. The combination of automated pattern discovery algorithms and different display tools for the evaluation and selection of results at several analysis steps can potentially lead to much more meaningful results than complete automation can produce. Experimental results on different yeast and human real datasets proved the methodology to be a promising solution for finding seeded motifs. MOST web tool is freely available at . PMID:16141193

  17. Space-related pharma-motifs for fast search of protein binding motifs and polypharmacological targets

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To discover a compound inhibiting multiple proteins (i.e. polypharmacological targets) is a new paradigm for the complex diseases (e.g. cancers and diabetes). In general, the polypharmacological proteins often share similar local binding environments and motifs. As the exponential growth of the number of protein structures, to find the similar structural binding motifs (pharma-motifs) is an emergency task for drug discovery (e.g. side effects and new uses for old drugs) and protein functions. Results We have developed a Space-Related Pharmamotifs (called SRPmotif) method to recognize the binding motifs by searching against protein structure database. SRPmotif is able to recognize conserved binding environments containing spatially discontinuous pharma-motifs which are often short conserved peptides with specific physico-chemical properties for protein functions. Among 356 pharma-motifs, 56.5% interacting residues are highly conserved. Experimental results indicate that 81.1% and 92.7% polypharmacological targets of each protein-ligand complex are annotated with same biological process (BP) and molecular function (MF) terms, respectively, based on Gene Ontology (GO). Our experimental results show that the identified pharma-motifs often consist of key residues in functional (active) sites and play the key roles for protein functions. The SRPmotif is available at http://gemdock.life.nctu.edu.tw/SRP/. Conclusions SRPmotif is able to identify similar pharma-interfaces and pharma-motifs sharing similar binding environments for polypharmacological targets by rapidly searching against the protein structure database. Pharma-motifs describe the conservations of binding environments for drug discovery and protein functions. Additionally, these pharma-motifs provide the clues for discovering new sequence-based motifs to predict protein functions from protein sequence databases. We believe that SRPmotif is useful for elucidating protein functions and drug discovery

  18. Dietary composition and weight loss: can we individualize dietary prescriptions according to insulin sensitivity or secretion status?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is considerable uncertainty over whether any one dietary pattern broadly facilitates weight loss or maintenance of weight loss, and current dietary guidelines recommend a spectrum of dietary composition for the general population. However, emerging evidence suggests that specific dietary compo...

  19. Identifying combinatorial regulation of transcription factors and binding motifs

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Mamoru; Hata, Naoya; Banerjee, Nilanjana; Futcher, Bruce; Zhang, Michael Q

    2004-01-01

    Background Combinatorial interaction of transcription factors (TFs) is important for gene regulation. Although various genomic datasets are relevant to this issue, each dataset provides relatively weak evidence on its own. Developing methods that can integrate different sequence, expression and localization data have become important. Results Here we use a novel method that integrates chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data with microarray expression data and with combinatorial TF-motif analysis. We systematically identify combinations of transcription factors and of motifs. The various combinations of TFs involved multiple binding mechanisms. We reconstruct a new combinatorial regulatory map of the yeast cell cycle in which cell-cycle regulation can be drawn as a chain of extended TF modules. We find that the pairwise combination of a TF for an early cell-cycle phase and a TF for a later phase is often used to control gene expression at intermediate times. Thus the number of distinct times of gene expression is greater than the number of transcription factors. We also see that some TF modules control branch points (cell-cycle entry and exit), and in the presence of appropriate signals they can allow progress along alternative pathways. Conclusions Combining different data sources can increase statistical power as demonstrated by detecting TF interactions and composite TF-binding motifs. The original picture of a chain of simple cell-cycle regulators can be extended to a chain of composite regulatory modules: different modules may share a common TF component in the same pathway or a TF component cross-talking to other pathways. PMID:15287978

  20. SVM2Motif--Reconstructing Overlapping DNA Sequence Motifs by Mimicking an SVM Predictor.

    PubMed

    Vidovic, Marina M-C; Görnitz, Nico; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Rätsch, Gunnar; Kloft, Marius

    2015-01-01

    Identifying discriminative motifs underlying the functionality and evolution of organisms is a major challenge in computational biology. Machine learning approaches such as support vector machines (SVMs) achieve state-of-the-art performances in genomic discrimination tasks, but--due to its black-box character--motifs underlying its decision function are largely unknown. As a remedy, positional oligomer importance matrices (POIMs) allow us to visualize the significance of position-specific subsequences. Although being a major step towards the explanation of trained SVM models, they suffer from the fact that their size grows exponentially in the length of the motif, which renders their manual inspection feasible only for comparably small motif sizes, typically k ≤ 5. In this work, we extend the work on positional oligomer importance matrices, by presenting a new machine-learning methodology, entitled motifPOIM, to extract the truly relevant motifs--regardless of their length and complexity--underlying the predictions of a trained SVM model. Our framework thereby considers the motifs as free parameters in a probabilistic model, a task which can be phrased as a non-convex optimization problem. The exponential dependence of the POIM size on the oligomer length poses a major numerical challenge, which we address by an efficient optimization framework that allows us to find possibly overlapping motifs consisting of up to hundreds of nucleotides. We demonstrate the efficacy of our approach on a synthetic data set as well as a real-world human splice site data set. PMID:26690911

  1. The Verrucomicrobia LexA-Binding Motif: Insights into the Evolutionary Dynamics of the SOS Response

    PubMed Central

    Erill, Ivan; Campoy, Susana; Kılıç, Sefa; Barbé, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    The SOS response is the primary bacterial mechanism to address DNA damage, coordinating multiple cellular processes that include DNA repair, cell division, and translesion synthesis. In contrast to other regulatory systems, the composition of the SOS genetic network and the binding motif of its transcriptional repressor, LexA, have been shown to vary greatly across bacterial clades, making it an ideal system to study the co-evolution of transcription factors and their regulons. Leveraging comparative genomics approaches and prior knowledge on the core SOS regulon, here we define the binding motif of the Verrucomicrobia, a recently described phylum of emerging interest due to its association with eukaryotic hosts. Site directed mutagenesis of the Verrucomicrobium spinosum recA promoter confirms that LexA binds a 14 bp palindromic motif with consensus sequence TGTTC-N4-GAACA. Computational analyses suggest that recognition of this novel motif is determined primarily by changes in base-contacting residues of the third alpha helix of the LexA helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif. In conjunction with comparative genomics analysis of the LexA regulon in the Verrucomicrobia phylum, electrophoretic shift assays reveal that LexA binds to operators in the promoter region of DNA repair genes and a mutagenesis cassette in this organism, and identify previously unreported components of the SOS response. The identification of tandem LexA-binding sites generating instances of other LexA-binding motifs in the lexA gene promoter of Verrucomicrobia species leads us to postulate a novel mechanism for LexA-binding motif evolution. This model, based on gene duplication, successfully addresses outstanding questions in the intricate co-evolution of the LexA protein, its binding motif and the regulatory network it controls. PMID:27489856

  2. The Verrucomicrobia LexA-Binding Motif: Insights into the Evolutionary Dynamics of the SOS Response.

    PubMed

    Erill, Ivan; Campoy, Susana; Kılıç, Sefa; Barbé, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    The SOS response is the primary bacterial mechanism to address DNA damage, coordinating multiple cellular processes that include DNA repair, cell division, and translesion synthesis. In contrast to other regulatory systems, the composition of the SOS genetic network and the binding motif of its transcriptional repressor, LexA, have been shown to vary greatly across bacterial clades, making it an ideal system to study the co-evolution of transcription factors and their regulons. Leveraging comparative genomics approaches and prior knowledge on the core SOS regulon, here we define the binding motif of the Verrucomicrobia, a recently described phylum of emerging interest due to its association with eukaryotic hosts. Site directed mutagenesis of the Verrucomicrobium spinosum recA promoter confirms that LexA binds a 14 bp palindromic motif with consensus sequence TGTTC-N4-GAACA. Computational analyses suggest that recognition of this novel motif is determined primarily by changes in base-contacting residues of the third alpha helix of the LexA helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif. In conjunction with comparative genomics analysis of the LexA regulon in the Verrucomicrobia phylum, electrophoretic shift assays reveal that LexA binds to operators in the promoter region of DNA repair genes and a mutagenesis cassette in this organism, and identify previously unreported components of the SOS response. The identification of tandem LexA-binding sites generating instances of other LexA-binding motifs in the lexA gene promoter of Verrucomicrobia species leads us to postulate a novel mechanism for LexA-binding motif evolution. This model, based on gene duplication, successfully addresses outstanding questions in the intricate co-evolution of the LexA protein, its binding motif and the regulatory network it controls. PMID:27489856

  3. Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemanich, Donald, Ed.

    1974-01-01

    The articles in this special issue of the "Illinois English Bulletin" concern the state of composition instruction at the secondary and college levels. The titles and authors are "Monologues or Dialogues? A Plea for Literacy" by Dr. Alfred J. Lindsey, "Teaching Composition: Curiouser and Curiouser" by Denny Brandon, and "Teaching Writing to High…

  4. MEME Suite: tools for motif discovery and searching

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Timothy L.; Boden, Mikael; Buske, Fabian A.; Frith, Martin; Grant, Charles E.; Clementi, Luca; Ren, Jingyuan; Li, Wilfred W.; Noble, William S.

    2009-01-01

    The MEME Suite web server provides a unified portal for online discovery and analysis of sequence motifs representing features such as DNA binding sites and protein interaction domains. The popular MEME motif discovery algorithm is now complemented by the GLAM2 algorithm which allows discovery of motifs containing gaps. Three sequence scanning algorithms—MAST, FIMO and GLAM2SCAN—allow scanning numerous DNA and protein sequence databases for motifs discovered by MEME and GLAM2. Transcription factor motifs (including those discovered using MEME) can be compared with motifs in many popular motif databases using the motif database scanning algorithm Tomtom. Transcription factor motifs can be further analyzed for putative function by association with Gene Ontology (GO) terms using the motif-GO term association tool GOMO. MEME output now contains sequence LOGOS for each discovered motif, as well as buttons to allow motifs to be conveniently submitted to the sequence and motif database scanning algorithms (MAST, FIMO and Tomtom), or to GOMO, for further analysis. GLAM2 output similarly contains buttons for further analysis using GLAM2SCAN and for rerunning GLAM2 with different parameters. All of the motif-based tools are now implemented as web services via Opal. Source code, binaries and a web server are freely available for noncommercial use at http://meme.nbcr.net. PMID:19458158

  5. Calendar motifs on Getashen hydria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrtanesyan, Garegin

    2015-07-01

    Getashen hydria was found in the tombs of the middle bronze age (the first third of the second Millennium B.C.) in Armenia (Lake Sevan). It shows a scene consisting of three friezes. On the lower frieze depicts six zoomorphic figures, on an average six frieze waterfowl, and on top, is the graphic signs. Calendar motives of this composition have a numeric expression, six zoomorphic figures on the lower and middle friezes. Division of the annual cycle into two parts is known in the calendars of the ancient Indo-Iranian ("great summer" and "the great winter"). Animals on the lower frieze of the second mark, "winter" road of the Sun, because in this period are the most important events, ensuring the reproduction of the economy of the society. This rut ungulates - wild (deer) and domestic (goats). Moreover, the gon goats end in December, almost coinciding with the onset of the winter solstice. A couple of dogs on the lower frieze marks the version of the myth, imprisoned in the rock hero - the Sun (Mihr - Artavazd), to which his dogs have to chew the chains, anticipating his exit at the winter solstice. This is indicated by the direction of their movement, the Sun moves from left to right for an observer, only when located on the South side of the sky (i.e., beginning with the autumnal equinox). The most important event of the period of "summer road" of the Sun is the vernal equinox, which coincide with the arrival of waterfowl (ducks, geese). Their direction on the second frieze (left to right) corresponds to the position of the observer, facing North.

  6. Genomic analysis of membrane protein families: abundance and conserved motifs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Engelman, Donald M; Gerstein, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Background Polytopic membrane proteins can be related to each other on the basis of the number of transmembrane helices and sequence similarities. Building on the Pfam classification of protein domain families, and using transmembrane-helix prediction and sequence-similarity searching, we identified a total of 526 well-characterized membrane protein families in 26 recently sequenced genomes. To this we added a clustering of a number of predicted but unclassified membrane proteins, resulting in a total of 637 membrane protein families. Results Analysis of the occurrence and composition of these families revealed several interesting trends. The number of assigned membrane protein domains has an approximately linear relationship to the total number of open reading frames (ORFs) in 26 genomes studied. Caenorhabditis elegans is an apparent outlier, because of its high representation of seven-span transmembrane (7-TM) chemoreceptor families. In all genomes, including that of C. elegans, the number of distinct membrane protein families has a logarithmic relation to the number of ORFs. Glycine, proline, and tyrosine locations tend to be conserved in transmembrane regions within families, whereas isoleucine, valine, and methionine locations are relatively mutable. Analysis of motifs in putative transmembrane helices reveals that GxxxG and GxxxxxxG (which can be written GG4 and GG7, respectively; see Materials and methods) are among the most prevalent. This was noted in earlier studies; we now find these motifs are particularly well conserved in families, however, especially those corresponding to transporters, symporters, and channels. Conclusions We carried out a genome-wide analysis on patterns of the classified polytopic membrane protein families and analyzed the distribution of conserved amino acids and motifs in the transmembrane helix regions in these families. PMID:12372142

  7. A survey of motif finding Web tools for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract ChIP-Seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing) has provided the advantage for finding motifs as ChIP-Seq experiments narrow down the motif finding to binding site locations. Recent motif finding tools facilitate the motif detection by providing user-friendly Web interface. In this work, we reviewed nine motif finding Web tools that are capable for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data. We showed each motif finding Web tool has its own advantages for detecting motifs that other tools may not discover. We recommended the users to use multiple motif finding Web tools that implement different algorithms for obtaining significant motifs, overlapping resemble motifs, and non-overlapping motifs. Finally, we provided our suggestions for future development of motif finding Web tool that better assists researchers for finding motifs in ChIP-Seq data. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Prof. Sandor Pongor, Dr. Yuriy Gusev, and Dr. Shyam Prabhakar (nominated by Prof. Limsoon Wong). PMID:24555784

  8. DNA motif elucidation using belief propagation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Chan, Tak-Ming; Peng, Chengbin; Li, Yue; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2013-09-01

    Protein-binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughout platform that can measure the DNA-binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. A typical PBM experiment can measure binding signal intensities of a protein to all the possible DNA k-mers (k=8∼10); such comprehensive binding affinity data usually need to be reduced and represented as motif models before they can be further analyzed and applied. Since proteins can often bind to DNA in multiple modes, one of the major challenges is to decompose the comprehensive affinity data into multimodal motif representations. Here, we describe a new algorithm that uses Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) and can derive precise and multimodal motifs using belief propagations. We describe an HMM-based approach using belief propagations (kmerHMM), which accepts and preprocesses PBM probe raw data into median-binding intensities of individual k-mers. The k-mers are ranked and aligned for training an HMM as the underlying motif representation. Multiple motifs are then extracted from the HMM using belief propagations. Comparisons of kmerHMM with other leading methods on several data sets demonstrated its effectiveness and uniqueness. Especially, it achieved the best performance on more than half of the data sets. In addition, the multiple binding modes derived by kmerHMM are biologically meaningful and will be useful in interpreting other genome-wide data such as those generated from ChIP-seq. The executables and source codes are available at the authors' websites: e.g. http://www.cs.toronto.edu/∼wkc/kmerHMM. PMID:23814189

  9. Pressure-dependent formation of i-motif and G-quadruplex DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, S; Sugimoto, N

    2015-12-14

    Pressure is an important physical stimulus that can influence the fate of cells by causing structural changes in biomolecules such as DNA. We investigated the effect of high pressure on the folding of duplex, DNA i-motif, and G-quadruplex (G4) structures; the non-canonical structures may be modulators of expression of genes involved in cancer progression. The i-motif structure was stabilized by high pressure, whereas the G4 structure was destabilized. The melting temperature of an intramolecular i-motif formed by 5'-dCGG(CCT)10CGG-3' increased from 38.8 °C at atmospheric pressure to 61.5 °C at 400 MPa. This effect was also observed in the presence of 40 wt% ethylene glycol, a crowding agent. In the presence of 40 wt% ethylene glycol, the G4 structure was less destabilized than in the absence of the crowding agent. P-T stability diagrams of duplex DNA with a telomeric sequence indicated that the duplex is more stable than G4 and i-motif structures under low pressure, but the i-motif dominates the structural composition under high pressure. Under crowding conditions, the P-T diagrams indicated that the duplex does not form under high pressure, and i-motif and G4 structures dominate. Our findings imply that temperature regulates the formation of the duplex structure, whereas pressure triggers the formation of non-canonical DNA structures like i-motif and G4. These results suggest that pressure impacts the function of nucleic acids by stabilizing non-canonical structures; this may be relevant to deep sea organisms and during evolution under prebiotic conditions. PMID:26387909

  10. Overlapping ETS and CRE Motifs ((G/C)CGGAAGTGACGTCA) preferentially bound by GABPα and CREB proteins.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Raghunath; Zhao, Jianfei; He, Ximiao; Shlyakhtenko, Andrey; Mann, Ishminder; Waterfall, Joshua J; Meltzer, Paul; Sathyanarayana, B K; FitzGerald, Peter C; Vinson, Charles

    2012-10-01

    Previously, we identified 8-bps long DNA sequences (8-mers) that localize in human proximal promoters and grouped them into known transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). We now examine split 8-mers consisting of two 4-mers separated by 1-bp to 30-bps (X(4)-N(1-30)-X(4)) to identify pairs of TFBS that localize in proximal promoters at a precise distance. These include two overlapping TFBS: the ETS⇔ETS motif ((C/G)CCGGAAGCGGAA) and the ETS⇔CRE motif ((C/G)CGGAAGTGACGTCAC). The nucleotides in bold are part of both TFBS. Molecular modeling shows that the ETS⇔CRE motif can be bound simultaneously by both the ETS and the B-ZIP domains without protein-protein clashes. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) shows that the ETS protein GABPα and the B-ZIP protein CREB preferentially bind to the ETS⇔CRE motif only when the two TFBS overlap precisely. In contrast, the ETS domain of ETV5 and CREB interfere with each other for binding the ETS⇔CRE. The 11-mer (CGGAAGTGACG), the conserved part of the ETS⇔CRE motif, occurs 226 times in the human genome and 83% are in known regulatory regions. In vivo GABPα and CREB ChIP-seq peaks identified the ETS⇔CRE as the most enriched motif occurring in promoters of genes involved in mRNA processing, cellular catabolic processes, and stress response, suggesting that a specific class of genes is regulated by this composite motif. PMID:23050235

  11. CombiMotif: A new algorithm for network motifs discovery in protein-protein interaction networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jiawei; Li, Guanghui; Song, Dan; Liang, Cheng

    2014-12-01

    Discovering motifs in protein-protein interaction networks is becoming a current major challenge in computational biology, since the distribution of the number of network motifs can reveal significant systemic differences among species. However, this task can be computationally expensive because of the involvement of graph isomorphic detection. In this paper, we present a new algorithm (CombiMotif) that incorporates combinatorial techniques to count non-induced occurrences of subgraph topologies in the form of trees. The efficiency of our algorithm is demonstrated by comparing the obtained results with the current state-of-the art subgraph counting algorithms. We also show major differences between unicellular and multicellular organisms. The datasets and source code of CombiMotif are freely available upon request.

  12. A Conserved Motif Provides Binding Specificity to the PP2A-B56 Phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Emil Peter Thrane; Kruse, Thomas; Davey, Norman E; López-Méndez, Blanca; Sigurðsson, Jón Otti; Montoya, Guillermo; Olsen, Jesper V; Nilsson, Jakob

    2016-08-18

    Dynamic protein phosphorylation is a fundamental mechanism regulating biological processes in all organisms. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is the main source of phosphatase activity in the cell, but the molecular details of substrate recognition are unknown. Here, we report that a conserved surface-exposed pocket on PP2A regulatory B56 subunits binds to a consensus sequence on interacting proteins, which we term the LxxIxE motif. The composition of the motif modulates the affinity for B56, which in turn determines the phosphorylation status of associated substrates. Phosphorylation of amino acid residues within the motif increases B56 binding, allowing integration of kinase and phosphatase activity. We identify conserved LxxIxE motifs in essential proteins throughout the eukaryotic domain of life and in human viruses, suggesting that the motifs are required for basic cellular function. Our study provides a molecular description of PP2A binding specificity with broad implications for understanding signaling in eukaryotes. PMID:27453045

  13. Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.; McCullough, R.L.; Pipes, R.B.

    1986-10-01

    The degree of control over material properties that is typified by hybrid composites is transforming engineering design. In part because homogeneous materials such as metals and alloys do not offer comparable control, specifying a material and designing a component have traditionally taken place separately. As composites begin to replace traditional materials in fields and such as aerospace, component design and the specification of a material are merging and becoming aspects of a single process. The controllable microstructure of a composite allows it to be tailored to match the distribution of stresses to which it will be subject. At the same time components must come to reflect the distinctive nature of composites: their directional properties and the intricate forms they can be given through processes such as injection molding, filament winding and three-dimensional weaving. The complexity inherent in conceiving components and their materials at the same time suggests engineering design will grow increasingly dependent on computers and multidisciplinary teams. Such an approach will harness the full potential of composites for the technologies of the future. 10 figures.

  14. Functional Motifs in Biochemical Reaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, John J.; Novák, Béla

    2013-01-01

    The signal-response characteristics of a living cell are determined by complex networks of interacting genes, proteins, and metabolites. Understanding how cells respond to specific challenges, how these responses are contravened in diseased cells, and how to intervene pharmacologically in the decision-making processes of cells requires an accurate theory of the information-processing capabilities of macromolecular regulatory networks. Adopting an engineer’s approach to control systems, we ask whether realistic cellular control networks can be decomposed into simple regulatory motifs that carry out specific functions in a cell. We show that such functional motifs exist and review the experimental evidence that they control cellular responses as expected. PMID:20055671

  15. A Basic Set of Homeostatic Controller Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Drengstig, T.; Jolma, I.W.; Ni, X.Y.; Thorsen, K.; Xu, X.M.; Ruoff, P.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation and homeostasis are essential properties of all living systems. However, our knowledge about the reaction kinetic mechanisms leading to robust homeostatic behavior in the presence of environmental perturbations is still poor. Here, we describe, and provide physiological examples of, a set of two-component controller motifs that show robust homeostasis. This basic set of controller motifs, which can be considered as complete, divides into two operational work modes, termed as inflow and outflow control. We show how controller combinations within a cell can integrate uptake and metabolization of a homeostatic controlled species and how pathways can be activated and lead to the formation of alternative products, as observed, for example, in the change of fermentation products by microorganisms when the supply of the carbon source is altered. The antagonistic character of hormonal control systems can be understood by a combination of inflow and outflow controllers. PMID:23199928

  16. Anticipated synchronization in neuronal network motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matias, F. S.; Gollo, L. L.; Carelli, P. V.; Copelli, M.; Mirasso, C. R.

    2013-01-01

    Two identical dynamical systems coupled unidirectionally (in a so called master-slave configuration) exhibit anticipated synchronization (AS) if the one which receives the coupling (the slave) also receives a negative delayed self-feedback. In oscillatory neuronal systems AS is characterized by a phase-locking with negative time delay τ between the spikes of the master and of the slave (slave fires before the master), while in the usual delayed synchronization (DS) regime τ is positive (slave fires after the master). A 3-neuron motif in which the slave self-feedback is replaced by a feedback loop mediated by an interneuron can exhibits both AS and DS regimes. Here we show that AS is robust in the presence of noise in a 3 Hodgkin-Huxley type neuronal motif. We also show that AS is stable for large values of τ in a chain of connected slaves-interneurons.

  17. Motifs, modules and games in bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Denise M.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2003-04-01

    Global explorations of regulatory network dynamics, organization and evolution have become tractable thanks to high-throughput sequencing and molecular measurement of bacterial physiology. From these, a nascent conceptual framework is developing, that views the principles of regulation in term of motifs, modules and games. Motifs are small, repeated, and conserved biological units ranging from molecular domains to small reaction networks. They are arranged into functional modules, genetically dissectible cellular functions such as the cell cycle, or different stress responses. The dynamical functioning of modules defines the organism's strategy to survive in a game, pitting cell against cell, and cell against environment. Placing pathway structure and dynamics into an evolutionary context begins to allow discrimination between those physical and molecular features that particularize a species to its surroundings, and those that provide core physiological function. This approach promises to generate a higher level understanding of cellular design, pathway evolution and cellular bioengineering.

  18. Analyzing network reliability using structural motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorramzadeh, Yasamin; Youssef, Mina; Eubank, Stephen; Mowlaei, Shahir

    2015-04-01

    This paper uses the reliability polynomial, introduced by Moore and Shannon in 1956, to analyze the effect of network structure on diffusive dynamics such as the spread of infectious disease. We exhibit a representation for the reliability polynomial in terms of what we call structural motifs that is well suited for reasoning about the effect of a network's structural properties on diffusion across the network. We illustrate by deriving several general results relating graph structure to dynamical phenomena.

  19. Bioinformatics Approaches for Predicting Disordered Protein Motifs.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Pallab; Guharoy, Mainak; Tompa, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Short, linear motifs (SLiMs) in proteins are functional microdomains consisting of contiguous residue segments along the protein sequence, typically not more than 10 consecutive amino acids in length with less than 5 defined positions. Many positions are 'degenerate' thus offering flexibility in terms of the amino acid types allowed at those positions. Their short length and degenerate nature confers evolutionary plasticity meaning that SLiMs often evolve convergently. Further, SLiMs have a propensity to occur within intrinsically unstructured protein segments and this confers versatile functionality to unstructured regions of the proteome. SLiMs mediate multiple types of protein interactions based on domain-peptide recognition and guide functions including posttranslational modifications, subcellular localization of proteins, and ligand binding. SLiMs thus behave as modular interaction units that confer versatility to protein function and SLiM-mediated interactions are increasingly being recognized as therapeutic targets. In this chapter we start with a brief description about the properties of SLiMs and their interactions and then move on to discuss algorithms and tools including several web-based methods that enable the discovery of novel SLiMs (de novo motif discovery) as well as the prediction of novel occurrences of known SLiMs. Both individual amino acid sequences as well as sets of protein sequences can be scanned using these methods to obtain statistically overrepresented sequence patterns. Lists of putatively functional SLiMs are then assembled based on parameters such as evolutionary sequence conservation, disorder scores, structural data, gene ontology terms and other contextual information that helps to assess the functional credibility or significance of these motifs. These bioinformatics methods should certainly guide experiments aimed at motif discovery. PMID:26387106

  20. [Conserved motifs in voltage sensing proteins].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chang-He; Xie, Zhen-Li; Lv, Jian-Wei; Yu, Zhi-Dan; Shao, Shu-Li

    2012-08-25

    This paper was aimed to study conserved motifs of voltage sensing proteins (VSPs) and establish a voltage sensing model. All VSPs were collected from the Uniprot database using a comprehensive keyword search followed by manual curation, and the results indicated that there are only two types of known VSPs, voltage gated ion channels and voltage dependent phosphatases. All the VSPs have a common domain of four helical transmembrane segments (TMS, S1-S4), which constitute the voltage sensing module of the VSPs. The S1 segment was shown to be responsible for membrane targeting and insertion of these proteins, while S2-S4 segments, which can sense membrane potential, for protein properties. Conserved motifs/residues and their functional significance of each TMS were identified using profile-to-profile sequence alignments. Conserved motifs in these four segments are strikingly similar for all VSPs, especially, the conserved motif [RK]-X(2)-R-X(2)-R-X(2)-[RK] was presented in all the S4 segments, with positively charged arginine (R) alternating with two hydrophobic or uncharged residues. Movement of these arginines across the membrane electric field is the core mechanism by which the VSPs detect changes in membrane potential. The negatively charged aspartate (D) in the S3 segment is universally conserved in all the VSPs, suggesting that the aspartate residue may be involved in voltage sensing properties of VSPs as well as the electrostatic interactions with the positively charged residues in the S4 segment, which may enhance the thermodynamic stability of the S4 segments in plasma membrane. PMID:22907298

  1. Dynamic motifs in socio-economic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Shao, Shuai; Stanley, H. Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

    2014-12-01

    Socio-economic networks are of central importance in economic life. We develop a method of identifying and studying motifs in socio-economic networks by focusing on “dynamic motifs,” i.e., evolutionary connection patterns that, because of “node acquaintances” in the network, occur much more frequently than random patterns. We examine two evolving bi-partite networks: i) the world-wide commercial ship chartering market and ii) the ship build-to-order market. We find similar dynamic motifs in both bipartite networks, even though they describe different economic activities. We also find that “influence” and “persistence” are strong factors in the interaction behavior of organizations. When two companies are doing business with the same customer, it is highly probable that another customer who currently only has business relationship with one of these two companies, will become customer of the second in the future. This is the effect of influence. Persistence means that companies with close business ties to customers tend to maintain their relationships over a long period of time.

  2. Occurrence probability of structured motifs in random sequences.

    PubMed

    Robin, S; Daudin, J-J; Richard, H; Sagot, M-F; Schbath, S

    2002-01-01

    The problem of extracting from a set of nucleic acid sequences motifs which may have biological function is more and more important. In this paper, we are interested in particular motifs that may be implicated in the transcription process. These motifs, called structured motifs, are composed of two ordered parts separated by a variable distance and allowing for substitutions. In order to assess their statistical significance, we propose approximations of the probability of occurrences of such a structured motif in a given sequence. An application of our method to evaluate candidate promoters in E. coli and B. subtilis is presented. Simulations show the goodness of the approximations. PMID:12614545

  3. ET-Motif: Solving the Exact (l, d)-Planted Motif Problem Using Error Tree Structure.

    PubMed

    Al-Okaily, Anas; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2016-07-01

    Motif finding is an important and a challenging problem in many biological applications such as discovering promoters, enhancers, locus control regions, transcription factors, and more. The (l, d)-planted motif search, PMS, is one of several variations of the problem. In this problem, there are n given sequences over alphabets of size [Formula: see text], each of length m, and two given integers l and d. The problem is to find a motif m of length l, where in each sequence there is at least an l-mer at a Hamming distance of [Formula: see text] of m. In this article, we propose ET-Motif, an algorithm that can solve the PMS problem in [Formula: see text] time and [Formula: see text] space. The time bound can be further reduced by a factor of m with [Formula: see text] space. In case the suffix tree that is built for the input sequences is balanced, the problem can be solved in [Formula: see text] time and [Formula: see text] space. Similarly, the time bound can be reduced by a factor of m using [Formula: see text] space. Moreover, the variations of the problem, namely the edit distance PMS and edited PMS (Quorum), can be solved using ET-Motif with simple modifications but upper bands of space and time. For edit distance PMS, the time and space bounds will be increased by [Formula: see text], while for edited PMS the increase will be of [Formula: see text] in the time bound. PMID:27152692

  4. Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, John G.

    The Composites market is arguably the most challenging and profitable market for phenolic resins aside from electronics. The variety of products and processes encountered creates the challenges, and the demand for high performance in critical operations brings value. Phenolic composite materials are rendered into a wide range of components to supply a diverse and fragmented commercial base that includes customers in aerospace (Space Shuttle), aircraft (interiors and brakes), mass transit (interiors), defense (blast protection), marine, mine ducting, off-shore (ducts and grating) and infrastructure (architectural) to name a few. For example, phenolic resin is a critical adhesive in the manufacture of honeycomb sandwich panels. Various solvent and water based resins are described along with resin characteristics and the role of metal ions for enhanced thermal stability of the resin used to coat the honeycomb. Featured new developments include pultrusion of phenolic grating, success in RTM/VARTM fabricated parts, new ballistic developments for military vehicles and high char yield carbon-carbon composites along with many others. Additionally, global regional market resin volumes and sales are presented and compared with other thermosetting resin systems.

  5. CLIMP: Clustering Motifs via Maximal Cliques with Parallel Computing Design

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong

    2016-01-01

    A set of conserved binding sites recognized by a transcription factor is called a motif, which can be found by many applications of comparative genomics for identifying over-represented segments. Moreover, when numerous putative motifs are predicted from a collection of genome-wide data, their similarity data can be represented as a large graph, where these motifs are connected to one another. However, an efficient clustering algorithm is desired for clustering the motifs that belong to the same groups and separating the motifs that belong to different groups, or even deleting an amount of spurious ones. In this work, a new motif clustering algorithm, CLIMP, is proposed by using maximal cliques and sped up by parallelizing its program. When a synthetic motif dataset from the database JASPAR, a set of putative motifs from a phylogenetic foot-printing dataset, and a set of putative motifs from a ChIP dataset are used to compare the performances of CLIMP and two other high-performance algorithms, the results demonstrate that CLIMP mostly outperforms the two algorithms on the three datasets for motif clustering, so that it can be a useful complement of the clustering procedures in some genome-wide motif prediction pipelines. CLIMP is available at http://sqzhang.cn/climp.html. PMID:27487245

  6. CLIMP: Clustering Motifs via Maximal Cliques with Parallel Computing Design.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaoqiang; Chen, Yong

    2016-01-01

    A set of conserved binding sites recognized by a transcription factor is called a motif, which can be found by many applications of comparative genomics for identifying over-represented segments. Moreover, when numerous putative motifs are predicted from a collection of genome-wide data, their similarity data can be represented as a large graph, where these motifs are connected to one another. However, an efficient clustering algorithm is desired for clustering the motifs that belong to the same groups and separating the motifs that belong to different groups, or even deleting an amount of spurious ones. In this work, a new motif clustering algorithm, CLIMP, is proposed by using maximal cliques and sped up by parallelizing its program. When a synthetic motif dataset from the database JASPAR, a set of putative motifs from a phylogenetic foot-printing dataset, and a set of putative motifs from a ChIP dataset are used to compare the performances of CLIMP and two other high-performance algorithms, the results demonstrate that CLIMP mostly outperforms the two algorithms on the three datasets for motif clustering, so that it can be a useful complement of the clustering procedures in some genome-wide motif prediction pipelines. CLIMP is available at http://sqzhang.cn/climp.html. PMID:27487245

  7. No tradeoff between versatility and robustness in gene circuit motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Joshua L.

    2016-05-01

    Circuit motifs are small directed subgraphs that appear in real-world networks significantly more often than in randomized networks. In the Boolean model of gene circuits, most motifs are realized by multiple circuit genotypes. Each of a motif's constituent circuit genotypes may have one or more functions, which are embodied in the expression patterns the circuit forms in response to specific initial conditions. Recent enumeration of a space of nearly 17 million three-gene circuit genotypes revealed that all circuit motifs have more than one function, with the number of functions per motif ranging from 12 to nearly 30,000. This indicates that some motifs are more functionally versatile than others. However, the individual circuit genotypes that constitute each motif are less robust to mutation if they have many functions, hinting that functionally versatile motifs may be less robust to mutation than motifs with few functions. Here, I explore the relationship between versatility and robustness in circuit motifs, demonstrating that functionally versatile motifs are robust to mutation despite the inherent tradeoff between versatility and robustness at the level of an individual circuit genotype.

  8. The RNA 3D Motif Atlas: Computational methods for extraction, organization and evaluation of RNA motifs.

    PubMed

    Parlea, Lorena G; Sweeney, Blake A; Hosseini-Asanjan, Maryam; Zirbel, Craig L; Leontis, Neocles B

    2016-07-01

    RNA 3D motifs occupy places in structured RNA molecules that correspond to the hairpin, internal and multi-helix junction "loops" of their secondary structure representations. As many as 40% of the nucleotides of an RNA molecule can belong to these structural elements, which are distinct from the regular double helical regions formed by contiguous AU, GC, and GU Watson-Crick basepairs. With the large number of atomic- or near atomic-resolution 3D structures appearing in a steady stream in the PDB/NDB structure databases, the automated identification, extraction, comparison, clustering and visualization of these structural elements presents an opportunity to enhance RNA science. Three broad applications are: (1) identification of modular, autonomous structural units for RNA nanotechnology, nanobiology and synthetic biology applications; (2) bioinformatic analysis to improve RNA 3D structure prediction from sequence; and (3) creation of searchable databases for exploring the binding specificities, structural flexibility, and dynamics of these RNA elements. In this contribution, we review methods developed for computational extraction of hairpin and internal loop motifs from a non-redundant set of high-quality RNA 3D structures. We provide a statistical summary of the extracted hairpin and internal loop motifs in the most recent version of the RNA 3D Motif Atlas. We also explore the reliability and accuracy of the extraction process by examining its performance in clustering recurrent motifs from homologous ribosomal RNA (rRNA) structures. We conclude with a summary of remaining challenges, especially with regard to extraction of multi-helix junction motifs. PMID:27125735

  9. Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, M.; Nosewicz, S.; Pietrzak, K.; Rojek, J.; Strojny-Nędza, A.; Mackiewicz, S.; Dutkiewicz, J.

    2014-11-01

    It is commonly known that the properties of sintered materials are strongly related to technological conditions of the densification process. This paper shows the sintering behavior of a NiAl-Al2O3 composite, and its individual components sintered separately. Each kind of material was processed via the powder metallurgy route (hot pressing). The progress of sintering at different stages of the process was tested. Changes in the microstructure were examined using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Metal-ceramics interface was clean and no additional phases were detected. Correlation between the microstructure, density, and mechanical properties of the sintered materials was analyzed. The values of elastic constants of NiAl/Al2O3 were close to intermetallic ones due to the volume content of the NiAl phase particularly at low densities, where small alumina particles had no impact on the composite's stiffness. The influence of the external pressure of 30 MPa seemed crucial for obtaining satisfactory stiffness for three kinds of the studied materials which were characterized by a high dense microstructure with a low number of isolated spherical pores.

  10. A designed DNA binding motif that recognizes extended sites and spans two adjacent major grooves†

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Jéssica; Mosquera, Jesús; García-Fandiño, Rebeca; Vázquez, M. Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L.

    2016-01-01

    We report the rational design of a DNA-binding peptide construct composed of the DNA-contacting regions of two transcription factors (GCN4 and GAGA) linked through an AT-hook DNA anchor. The resulting chimera, which represents a new, non-natural DNA binding motif, binds with high affinity and selectivity to a long composite sequence of 13 base pairs (TCAT-AATT-GAGAG). PMID:27252825

  11. Cross-Disciplinary Detection and Analysis of Network Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Ngoc Tam L; DeLuccia, Luke; McDonald, Aidan F; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2015-01-01

    The detection of network motifs has recently become an important part of network analysis across all disciplines. In this work, we detected and analyzed network motifs from undirected and directed networks of several different disciplines, including biological network, social network, ecological network, as well as other networks such as airlines, power grid, and co-purchase of political books networks. Our analysis revealed that undirected networks are similar at the basic three and four nodes, while the analysis of directed networks revealed the distinction between networks of different disciplines. The study showed that larger motifs contained the three-node motif as a subgraph. Topological analysis revealed that similar networks have similar small motifs, but as the motif size increases, differences arise. Pearson correlation coefficient showed strong positive relationship between some undirected networks but inverse relationship between some directed networks. The study suggests that the three-node motif is a building block of larger motifs. It also suggests that undirected networks share similar low-level structures. Moreover, similar networks share similar small motifs, but larger motifs define the unique structure of individuals. Pearson correlation coefficient suggests that protein structure networks, dolphin social network, and co-authorships in network science belong to a superfamily. In addition, yeast protein–protein interaction network, primary school contact network, Zachary’s karate club network, and co-purchase of political books network can be classified into a superfamily. PMID:25983553

  12. Transcription factor motif quality assessment requires systematic comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kibet, Caleb Kipkurui; Machanick, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding site prediction remains a challenge in gene regulatory research due to degeneracy and potential variability in binding sites in the genome. Dozens of algorithms designed to learn binding models (motifs) have generated many motifs available in research papers with a subset making it to databases like JASPAR, UniPROBE and Transfac. The presence of many versions of motifs from the various databases for a single TF and the lack of a standardized assessment technique makes it difficult for biologists to make an appropriate choice of binding model and for algorithm developers to benchmark, test and improve on their models. In this study, we review and evaluate the approaches in use, highlight differences and demonstrate the difficulty of defining a standardized motif assessment approach. We review scoring functions, motif length, test data and the type of performance metrics used in prior studies as some of the factors that influence the outcome of a motif assessment. We show that the scoring functions and statistics used in motif assessment influence ranking of motifs in a TF-specific manner. We also show that TF binding specificity can vary by source of genomic binding data. We also demonstrate that information content of a motif is not in isolation a measure of motif quality but is influenced by TF binding behaviour. We conclude that there is a need for an easy-to-use tool that presents all available evidence for a comparative analysis. PMID:27092243

  13. Cross-disciplinary detection and analysis of network motifs.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ngoc Tam L; DeLuccia, Luke; McDonald, Aidan F; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2015-01-01

    The detection of network motifs has recently become an important part of network analysis across all disciplines. In this work, we detected and analyzed network motifs from undirected and directed networks of several different disciplines, including biological network, social network, ecological network, as well as other networks such as airlines, power grid, and co-purchase of political books networks. Our analysis revealed that undirected networks are similar at the basic three and four nodes, while the analysis of directed networks revealed the distinction between networks of different disciplines. The study showed that larger motifs contained the three-node motif as a subgraph. Topological analysis revealed that similar networks have similar small motifs, but as the motif size increases, differences arise. Pearson correlation coefficient showed strong positive relationship between some undirected networks but inverse relationship between some directed networks. The study suggests that the three-node motif is a building block of larger motifs. It also suggests that undirected networks share similar low-level structures. Moreover, similar networks share similar small motifs, but larger motifs define the unique structure of individuals. Pearson correlation coefficient suggests that protein structure networks, dolphin social network, and co-authorships in network science belong to a superfamily. In addition, yeast protein-protein interaction network, primary school contact network, Zachary's karate club network, and co-purchase of political books network can be classified into a superfamily. PMID:25983553

  14. RMOD: a tool for regulatory motif detection in signaling network.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinki; Yi, Gwan-Su

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory motifs are patterns of activation and inhibition that appear repeatedly in various signaling networks and that show specific regulatory properties. However, the network structures of regulatory motifs are highly diverse and complex, rendering their identification difficult. Here, we present a RMOD, a web-based system for the identification of regulatory motifs and their properties in signaling networks. RMOD finds various network structures of regulatory motifs by compressing the signaling network and detecting the compressed forms of regulatory motifs. To apply it into a large-scale signaling network, it adopts a new subgraph search algorithm using a novel data structure called path-tree, which is a tree structure composed of isomorphic graphs of query regulatory motifs. This algorithm was evaluated using various sizes of signaling networks generated from the integration of various human signaling pathways and it showed that the speed and scalability of this algorithm outperforms those of other algorithms. RMOD includes interactive analysis and auxiliary tools that make it possible to manipulate the whole processes from building signaling network and query regulatory motifs to analyzing regulatory motifs with graphical illustration and summarized descriptions. As a result, RMOD provides an integrated view of the regulatory motifs and mechanism underlying their regulatory motif activities within the signaling network. RMOD is freely accessible online at the following URL: http://pks.kaist.ac.kr/rmod. PMID:23874612

  15. Structural motifs and the stability of fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, S.J.; Fowler, P.W.; Manolopoulos, D.E.; Orlandi, G.; Zerbetto, F.

    1995-05-18

    Full geometry optimization has been performed within the semiempirical QCFF/PI model for the 1812 fullerene structural isomers of C{sub 60} formed by 12 pentagons and 20 hexagons. All are local minima on the potential energy hypersurface. Correlations of total energy with many structural motifs yield highly scattered diagrams, but some exhibit linear trends. Penalty and merit functions can be assigned to certain motifs: inclusion of a fused pentagon pair entails an average penalty of 111 kJ mol{sup -1}; a generic hexagon triple costs 23 kJ mol{sup -1}; a triple (open or fused) comprising a pentagon between two hexagonal neighbors gives a stabilization of 19 kJ mol{sup -1}. These results can be understood in terms of the curved nature of fullerene molecules: pentagons should be isolated to avoid sharp local curvature, hexagon triples are costly because they enforce local planarity and hence imply high curvature in another part of the fullerene surface, but hexagon-pentagon-hexagon triples allow the surface to distribute steric strain by warping. The best linear fit is found for H, the second moment of the hexagon-neighbor-index signature, which fits the total energies with a standard deviation of only 53 kJ mol{sup -1} and must be minimized for stability; this index too can be interpreted in terms of curvature. 26 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Structural motifs of pre-nucleation clusters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Türkmen, I R; Wassermann, B; Erko, A; Rühl, E

    2013-10-01

    Structural motifs of pre-nucleation clusters prepared in single, optically levitated supersaturated aqueous aerosol microparticles containing CaBr2 as a model system are reported. Cluster formation is identified by means of X-ray absorption in the Br K-edge regime. The salt concentration beyond the saturation point is varied by controlling the humidity in the ambient atmosphere surrounding the 15-30 μm microdroplets. This leads to the formation of metastable supersaturated liquid particles. Distinct spectral shifts in near-edge spectra as a function of salt concentration are observed, in which the energy position of the Br K-edge is red-shifted by up to 7.1 ± 0.4 eV if the dilute solution is compared to the solid. The K-edge positions of supersaturated solutions are found between these limits. The changes in electronic structure are rationalized in terms of the formation of pre-nucleation clusters. This assumption is verified by spectral simulations using first-principle density functional theory and molecular dynamics calculations, in which structural motifs are considered, explaining the experimental results. These consist of solvated CaBr2 moieties, rather than building blocks forming calcium bromide hexahydrates, the crystal system that is formed by drying aqueous CaBr2 solutions. PMID:24116574

  17. Chromatin states modify network motifs contributing to cell-specific functions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongying; Liu, Tingting; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Guanxiong; Pang, Lin; Yu, Fulong; Fan, Huihui; Ping, Yanyan; Wang, Li; Xu, Chaohan; Xiao, Yun; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic modification can affect many important biological processes, such as cell proliferation and apoptosis. It can alter chromatin conformation and contribute to gene regulation. To investigate how chromatin states associated with network motifs, we assembled chromatin state-modified regulatory networks by combining 269 ChIP-seq data and chromatin states in four cell types. We found that many chromatin states were significantly associated with network motifs, especially for feedforward loops (FFLs). These distinct chromatin state compositions contribute to different expression levels and translational control of targets in FFLs. Strikingly, the chromatin state-modified FFLs were highly cell-specific and, to a large extent, determined cell-selective functions, such as the embryonic stem cell-specific bivalent modification-related FFL with an important role in poising developmentally important genes for expression. Besides, comparisons of chromatin state-modified FFLs between cancerous/stem and primary cell lines revealed specific type of chromatin state alterations that may act together with motif structural changes cooperatively contribute to cell-to-cell functional differences. Combination of these alterations could be helpful in prioritizing candidate genes. Together, this work highlights that a dynamic epigenetic dimension can help network motifs to control cell-specific functions. PMID:26169043

  18. Network Motifs: Simple Building Blocks of Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milo, R.; Shen-Orr, S.; Itzkovitz, S.; Kashtan, N.; Chklovskii, D.; Alon, U.

    2002-10-01

    Complex networks are studied across many fields of science. To uncover their structural design principles, we defined ``network motifs,'' patterns of interconnections occurring in complex networks at numbers that are significantly higher than those in randomized networks. We found such motifs in networks from biochemistry, neurobiology, ecology, and engineering. The motifs shared by ecological food webs were distinct from the motifs shared by the genetic networks of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae or from those found in the World Wide Web. Similar motifs were found in networks that perform information processing, even though they describe elements as different as biomolecules within a cell and synaptic connections between neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans. Motifs may thus define universal classes of networks. This approach may uncover the basic building blocks of most networks.

  19. A Gibbs sampler for motif detection in phylogenetically close sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddharthan, Rahul; van Nimwegen, Erik; Siggia, Eric

    2004-03-01

    Genes are regulated by transcription factors that bind to DNA upstream of genes and recognize short conserved ``motifs'' in a random intergenic ``background''. Motif-finders such as the Gibbs sampler compare the probability of these short sequences being represented by ``weight matrices'' to the probability of their arising from the background ``null model'', and explore this space (analogous to a free-energy landscape). But closely related species may show conservation not because of functional sites but simply because they have not had sufficient time to diverge, so conventional methods will fail. We introduce a new Gibbs sampler algorithm that accounts for common ancestry when searching for motifs, while requiring minimal ``prior'' assumptions on the number and types of motifs, assessing the significance of detected motifs by ``tracking'' clusters that stay together. We apply this scheme to motif detection in sporulation-cycle genes in the yeast S. cerevisiae, using recent sequences of other closely-related Saccharomyces species.

  20. Detecting DNA regulatory motifs by incorporating positional trendsin information content

    SciTech Connect

    Kechris, Katherina J.; van Zwet, Erik; Bickel, Peter J.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2004-05-04

    On the basis of the observation that conserved positions in transcription factor binding sites are often clustered together, we propose a simple extension to the model-based motif discovery methods. We assign position-specific prior distributions to the frequency parameters of the model, penalizing deviations from a specified conservation profile. Examples with both simulated and real data show that this extension helps discover motifs as the data become noisier or when there is a competing false motif.

  1. Gibbs motif sampling: detection of bacterial outer membrane protein repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Neuwald, A. F.; Liu, J. S.; Lawrence, C. E.

    1995-01-01

    The detection and alignment of locally conserved regions (motifs) in multiple sequences can provide insight into protein structure, function, and evolution. A new Gibbs sampling algorithm is described that detects motif-encoding regions in sequences and optimally partitions them into distinct motif models; this is illustrated using a set of immunoglobulin fold proteins. When applied to sequences sharing a single motif, the sampler can be used to classify motif regions into related submodels, as is illustrated using helix-turn-helix DNA-binding proteins. Other statistically based procedures are described for searching a database for sequences matching motifs found by the sampler. When applied to a set of 32 very distantly related bacterial integral outer membrane proteins, the sampler revealed that they share a subtle, repetitive motif. Although BLAST (Altschul SF et al., 1990, J Mol Biol 215:403-410) fails to detect significant pairwise similarity between any of the sequences, the repeats present in these outer membrane proteins, taken as a whole, are highly significant (based on a generally applicable statistical test for motifs described here). Analysis of bacterial porins with known trimeric beta-barrel structure and related proteins reveals a similar repetitive motif corresponding to alternating membrane-spanning beta-strands. These beta-strands occur on the membrane interface (as opposed to the trimeric interface) of the beta-barrel. The broad conservation and structural location of these repeats suggests that they play important functional roles. PMID:8520488

  2. Motif-Role-Fingerprints: The Building-Blocks of Motifs, Clustering-Coefficients and Transitivities in Directed Networks

    PubMed Central

    McDonnell, Mark D.; Yaveroğlu, Ömer Nebil; Schmerl, Brett A.; Iannella, Nicolangelo; Ward, Lawrence M.

    2014-01-01

    Complex networks are frequently characterized by metrics for which particular subgraphs are counted. One statistic from this category, which we refer to as motif-role fingerprints, differs from global subgraph counts in that the number of subgraphs in which each node participates is counted. As with global subgraph counts, it can be important to distinguish between motif-role fingerprints that are ‘structural’ (induced subgraphs) and ‘functional’ (partial subgraphs). Here we show mathematically that a vector of all functional motif-role fingerprints can readily be obtained from an arbitrary directed adjacency matrix, and then converted to structural motif-role fingerprints by multiplying that vector by a specific invertible conversion matrix. This result demonstrates that a unique structural motif-role fingerprint exists for any given functional motif-role fingerprint. We demonstrate a similar result for the cases of functional and structural motif-fingerprints without node roles, and global subgraph counts that form the basis of standard motif analysis. We also explicitly highlight that motif-role fingerprints are elemental to several popular metrics for quantifying the subgraph structure of directed complex networks, including motif distributions, directed clustering coefficient, and transitivity. The relationships between each of these metrics and motif-role fingerprints also suggest new subtypes of directed clustering coefficients and transitivities. Our results have potential utility in analyzing directed synaptic networks constructed from neuronal connectome data, such as in terms of centrality. Other potential applications include anomaly detection in networks, identification of similar networks and identification of similar nodes within networks. Matlab code for calculating all stated metrics following calculation of functional motif-role fingerprints is provided as S1 Matlab File. PMID:25486535

  3. Invisible RNA state dynamically couples distant motifs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Janghyun; Dethoff, Elizabeth A.; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2014-01-01

    Using on- and off-resonance carbon and nitrogen R1ρ NMR relaxation dispersion in concert with mutagenesis and NMR chemical shift fingerprinting, we show that the transactivation response element RNA from the HIV-1 exists in dynamic equilibrium with a transient state that has a lifetime of ∼2 ms and population of ∼0.4%, which simultaneously remodels the structure of a bulge, stem, and apical loop. This is accomplished by a global change in strand register, in which bulge residues pair up with residues in the upper stem, causing a reshuffling of base pairs that propagates to the tip of apical loop, resulting in the creation of three noncanonical base pairs. Our results show that transient states can remodel distant RNA motifs and possibly give rise to mechanisms for rapid long-range communication in RNA that can be harnessed in processes such as cooperative folding and ribonucleoprotein assembly. PMID:24979799

  4. An RNA motif that binds ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassanfar, M.; Szostak, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    RNAs that contain specific high-affinity binding sites for small molecule ligands immobilized on a solid support are present at a frequency of roughly one in 10(10)-10(11) in pools of random sequence RNA molecules. Here we describe a new in vitro selection procedure designed to ensure the isolation of RNAs that bind the ligand of interest in solution as well as on a solid support. We have used this method to isolate a remarkably small RNA motif that binds ATP, a substrate in numerous biological reactions and the universal biological high-energy intermediate. The selected ATP-binding RNAs contain a consensus sequence, embedded in a common secondary structure. The binding properties of ATP analogues and modified RNAs show that the binding interaction is characterized by a large number of close contacts between the ATP and RNA, and by a change in the conformation of the RNA.

  5. Encoded Expansion: An Efficient Algorithm to Discover Identical String Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Azmi, Aqil M.; Al-Ssulami, Abdulrakeeb

    2014-01-01

    A major task in computational biology is the discovery of short recurring string patterns known as motifs. Most of the schemes to discover motifs are either stochastic or combinatorial in nature. Stochastic approaches do not guarantee finding the correct motifs, while the combinatorial schemes tend to have an exponential time complexity with respect to motif length. To alleviate the cost, the combinatorial approach exploits dynamic data structures such as trees or graphs. Recently (Karci (2009) Efficient automatic exact motif discovery algorithms for biological sequences, Expert Systems with Applications 36:7952–7963) devised a deterministic algorithm that finds all the identical copies of string motifs of all sizes in theoretical time complexity of and a space complexity of where is the length of the input sequence and is the length of the longest possible string motif. In this paper, we present a significant improvement on Karci's original algorithm. The algorithm that we propose reports all identical string motifs of sizes that occur at least times. Our algorithm starts with string motifs of size 2, and at each iteration it expands the candidate string motifs by one symbol throwing out those that occur less than times in the entire input sequence. We use a simple array and data encoding to achieve theoretical worst-case time complexity of and a space complexity of Encoding of the substrings can speed up the process of comparison between string motifs. Experimental results on random and real biological sequences confirm that our algorithm has indeed a linear time complexity and it is more scalable in terms of sequence length than the existing algorithms. PMID:24871320

  6. Mitochondrial and Y chromosome haplotype motifs as diagnostic markers of Jewish ancestry: a reconsideration

    PubMed Central

    Tofanelli, Sergio; Taglioli, Luca; Bertoncini, Stefania; Francalacci, Paolo; Klyosov, Anatole; Pagani, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Several authors have proposed haplotype motifs based on site variants at the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) and the non-recombining portion of the Y chromosome (NRY) to trace the genealogies of Jewish people. Here, we analyzed their main approaches and test the feasibility of adopting motifs as ancestry markers through construction of a large database of mtDNA and NRY haplotypes from public genetic genealogical repositories. We verified the reliability of Jewish ancestry prediction based on the Cohen and Levite Modal Haplotypes in their “classical” 6 STR marker format or in the “extended” 12 STR format, as well as four founder mtDNA lineages (HVS-I segments) accounting for about 40% of the current population of Ashkenazi Jews. For this purpose we compared haplotype composition in individuals of self-reported Jewish ancestry with the rest of European, African or Middle Eastern samples, to test for non-random association of ethno-geographic groups and haplotypes. Overall, NRY and mtDNA based motifs, previously reported to differentiate between groups, were found to be more represented in Jewish compared to non-Jewish groups. However, this seems to stem from common ancestors of Jewish lineages being rather recent respect to ancestors of non-Jewish lineages with the same “haplotype signatures.” Moreover, the polyphyly of haplotypes which contain the proposed motifs and the misuse of constant mutation rates heavily affected previous attempts to correctly dating the origin of common ancestries. Accordingly, our results stress the limitations of using the above haplotype motifs as reliable Jewish ancestry predictors and show its inadequacy for forensic or genealogical purposes. PMID:25431579

  7. Mitochondrial and Y chromosome haplotype motifs as diagnostic markers of Jewish ancestry: a reconsideration.

    PubMed

    Tofanelli, Sergio; Taglioli, Luca; Bertoncini, Stefania; Francalacci, Paolo; Klyosov, Anatole; Pagani, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Several authors have proposed haplotype motifs based on site variants at the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) and the non-recombining portion of the Y chromosome (NRY) to trace the genealogies of Jewish people. Here, we analyzed their main approaches and test the feasibility of adopting motifs as ancestry markers through construction of a large database of mtDNA and NRY haplotypes from public genetic genealogical repositories. We verified the reliability of Jewish ancestry prediction based on the Cohen and Levite Modal Haplotypes in their "classical" 6 STR marker format or in the "extended" 12 STR format, as well as four founder mtDNA lineages (HVS-I segments) accounting for about 40% of the current population of Ashkenazi Jews. For this purpose we compared haplotype composition in individuals of self-reported Jewish ancestry with the rest of European, African or Middle Eastern samples, to test for non-random association of ethno-geographic groups and haplotypes. Overall, NRY and mtDNA based motifs, previously reported to differentiate between groups, were found to be more represented in Jewish compared to non-Jewish groups. However, this seems to stem from common ancestors of Jewish lineages being rather recent respect to ancestors of non-Jewish lineages with the same "haplotype signatures." Moreover, the polyphyly of haplotypes which contain the proposed motifs and the misuse of constant mutation rates heavily affected previous attempts to correctly dating the origin of common ancestries. Accordingly, our results stress the limitations of using the above haplotype motifs as reliable Jewish ancestry predictors and show its inadequacy for forensic or genealogical purposes. PMID:25431579

  8. Identifying novel sequence variants of RNA 3D motifs

    PubMed Central

    Zirbel, Craig L.; Roll, James; Sweeney, Blake A.; Petrov, Anton I.; Pirrung, Meg; Leontis, Neocles B.

    2015-01-01

    Predicting RNA 3D structure from sequence is a major challenge in biophysics. An important sub-goal is accurately identifying recurrent 3D motifs from RNA internal and hairpin loop sequences extracted from secondary structure (2D) diagrams. We have developed and validated new probabilistic models for 3D motif sequences based on hybrid Stochastic Context-Free Grammars and Markov Random Fields (SCFG/MRF). The SCFG/MRF models are constructed using atomic-resolution RNA 3D structures. To parameterize each model, we use all instances of each motif found in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas and annotations of pairwise nucleotide interactions generated by the FR3D software. Isostericity relations between non-Watson–Crick basepairs are used in scoring sequence variants. SCFG techniques model nested pairs and insertions, while MRF ideas handle crossing interactions and base triples. We use test sets of randomly-generated sequences to set acceptance and rejection thresholds for each motif group and thus control the false positive rate. Validation was carried out by comparing results for four motif groups to RMDetect. The software developed for sequence scoring (JAR3D) is structured to automatically incorporate new motifs as they accumulate in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas when new structures are solved and is available free for download. PMID:26130723

  9. Stochastic EM-based TFBS motif discovery with MITSU

    PubMed Central

    Kilpatrick, Alastair M.; Ward, Bruce; Aitken, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: The Expectation–Maximization (EM) algorithm has been successfully applied to the problem of transcription factor binding site (TFBS) motif discovery and underlies the most widely used motif discovery algorithms. In the wider field of probabilistic modelling, the stochastic EM (sEM) algorithm has been used to overcome some of the limitations of the EM algorithm; however, the application of sEM to motif discovery has not been fully explored. Results: We present MITSU (Motif discovery by ITerative Sampling and Updating), a novel algorithm for motif discovery, which combines sEM with an improved approximation to the likelihood function, which is unconstrained with regard to the distribution of motif occurrences within the input dataset. The algorithm is evaluated quantitatively on realistic synthetic data and several collections of characterized prokaryotic TFBS motifs and shown to outperform EM and an alternative sEM-based algorithm, particularly in terms of site-level positive predictive value. Availability and implementation: Java executable available for download at http://www.sourceforge.net/p/mitsu-motif/, supported on Linux/OS X. Contact: a.m.kilpatrick@sms.ed.ac.uk PMID:24931999

  10. Identifying novel sequence variants of RNA 3D motifs.

    PubMed

    Zirbel, Craig L; Roll, James; Sweeney, Blake A; Petrov, Anton I; Pirrung, Meg; Leontis, Neocles B

    2015-09-01

    Predicting RNA 3D structure from sequence is a major challenge in biophysics. An important sub-goal is accurately identifying recurrent 3D motifs from RNA internal and hairpin loop sequences extracted from secondary structure (2D) diagrams. We have developed and validated new probabilistic models for 3D motif sequences based on hybrid Stochastic Context-Free Grammars and Markov Random Fields (SCFG/MRF). The SCFG/MRF models are constructed using atomic-resolution RNA 3D structures. To parameterize each model, we use all instances of each motif found in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas and annotations of pairwise nucleotide interactions generated by the FR3D software. Isostericity relations between non-Watson-Crick basepairs are used in scoring sequence variants. SCFG techniques model nested pairs and insertions, while MRF ideas handle crossing interactions and base triples. We use test sets of randomly-generated sequences to set acceptance and rejection thresholds for each motif group and thus control the false positive rate. Validation was carried out by comparing results for four motif groups to RMDetect. The software developed for sequence scoring (JAR3D) is structured to automatically incorporate new motifs as they accumulate in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas when new structures are solved and is available free for download. PMID:26130723

  11. The phenomenon of astral motifs on late mediaeval tombstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mijatović, V.; Ninković, S.; Vemić, D.

    2003-10-01

    The authors study astral motifs present on some mediaeval tombstones found in present-day Serbia and Montenegro and in the neighbouring countries (especially in Bosnia and Herzegovina). The authors discern some important astral motifs, explain them and present a short review concerning their frequency.

  12. DETAIL VIEW, MAIN ENTRANCE GATES, SHOWING A WINGED HOURGLASS MOTIF, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW, MAIN ENTRANCE GATES, SHOWING A WINGED HOURGLASS MOTIF, WHICH REFERS TO THE QUICK PASSAGE OF TIME AND THE SHORTNESS OF HUMAN LIFE. USE OF THIS MOTIF WAS A CARRYOVER FROM THE MCARTHUR GATES. - Woodlands Cemetery, 4000 Woodlands Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  13. Role of GxxxG Motifs in Transmembrane Domain Interactions.

    PubMed

    Teese, Mark G; Langosch, Dieter

    2015-08-25

    Transmembrane (TM) helices of integral membrane proteins can facilitate strong and specific noncovalent protein-protein interactions. Mutagenesis and structural analyses have revealed numerous examples in which the interaction between TM helices of single-pass membrane proteins is dependent on a GxxxG or (small)xxx(small) motif. It is therefore tempting to use the presence of these simple motifs as an indicator of TM helix interactions. In this Current Topic review, we point out that these motifs are quite common, with more than 50% of single-pass TM domains containing a (small)xxx(small) motif. However, the actual interaction strength of motif-containing helices depends strongly on sequence context and membrane properties. In addition, recent studies have revealed several GxxxG-containing TM domains that interact via alternative interfaces involving hydrophobic, polar, aromatic, or even ionizable residues that do not form recognizable motifs. In multipass membrane proteins, GxxxG motifs can be important for protein folding, and not just oligomerization. Our current knowledge thus suggests that the presence of a GxxxG motif alone is a weak predictor of protein dimerization in the membrane. PMID:26244771

  14. Differences in local genomic context of bound and unbound motifs

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Loren; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo; Landsman, David

    2012-01-01

    Understanding gene regulation is a major objective in molecular biology research. Frequently, transcription is driven by transcription factors (TFs) that bind to specific DNA sequences. These motifs are usually short and degenerate, rendering the likelihood of multiple copies occurring throughout the genome due to random chance as high. Despite this, TFs only bind to a small subset of sites, thus prompting our investigation into the differences between motifs that are bound by TFs and those that remain unbound. Here we constructed vectors representing various chromatin- and sequence-based features for a published set of bound and unbound motifs representing nine TFs in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using a machine learning approach, we identified a set of features that can be used to discriminate between bound and unbound motifs. We also discovered that some TFs bind most or all of their strong motifs in intergenic regions. Our data demonstrate that local sequence context can be strikingly different around motifs that are bound compared to motifs that are unbound. We concluded that there are multiple combinations of genomic features that characterize bound or unbound motifs. PMID:22692006

  15. ELM: the status of the 2010 eukaryotic linear motif resource

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Cathryn M.; Diella, Francesca; Via, Allegra; Puntervoll, Pål; Gemünd, Christine; Chabanis-Davidson, Sophie; Michael, Sushama; Sayadi, Ahmed; Bryne, Jan Christian; Chica, Claudia; Seiler, Markus; Davey, Norman E.; Haslam, Niall; Weatheritt, Robert J.; Budd, Aidan; Hughes, Tim; Paś, Jakub; Rychlewski, Leszek; Travé, Gilles; Aasland, Rein; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Linding, Rune; Gibson, Toby J.

    2010-01-01

    Linear motifs are short segments of multidomain proteins that provide regulatory functions independently of protein tertiary structure. Much of intracellular signalling passes through protein modifications at linear motifs. Many thousands of linear motif instances, most notably phosphorylation sites, have now been reported. Although clearly very abundant, linear motifs are difficult to predict de novo in protein sequences due to the difficulty of obtaining robust statistical assessments. The ELM resource at http://elm.eu.org/ provides an expanding knowledge base, currently covering 146 known motifs, with annotation that includes >1300 experimentally reported instances. ELM is also an exploratory tool for suggesting new candidates of known linear motifs in proteins of interest. Information about protein domains, protein structure and native disorder, cellular and taxonomic contexts is used to reduce or deprecate false positive matches. Results are graphically displayed in a ‘Bar Code’ format, which also displays known instances from homologous proteins through a novel ‘Instance Mapper’ protocol based on PHI-BLAST. ELM server output provides links to the ELM annotation as well as to a number of remote resources. Using the links, researchers can explore the motifs, proteins, complex structures and associated literature to evaluate whether candidate motifs might be worth experimental investigation. PMID:19920119

  16. Organelle RNA recognition motif-containing (ORRM) proteins are plastid and mitochondrial editing factors in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaowen; Bentolila, Stephane; Hanson, Maureen R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Post-transcriptional C-to-U RNA editing occurs at specific sites in plastid and plant mitochondrial transcripts. Members of the Arabidopsis pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) motif-containing protein family and RNA-editing factor Interacting Protein (RIP, also known as MORF) family have been characterized as essential components of the RNA editing apparatus. Recent studies reveal that several organelle-targeted RNA recognition motif (RRM)-containing proteins are involved in either plastid or mitochondrial RNA editing. ORRM1 (Organelle RRM protein 1) is essential for plastid editing, whereas ORRM2, ORRM3 and ORRM4 are involved in mitochondrial RNA editing. The RRM domain of ORRM1, ORRM3 and ORRM4 is required for editing activity, whereas the auxiliary RIP and Glycine-Rich (GR) domains mediate the ORRM proteins' interactions with other editing factors. The identification of the ORRM proteins as RNA editing factors further expands our knowledge of the composition of the editosome. PMID:27082488

  17. Organelle RNA recognition motif-containing (ORRM) proteins are plastid and mitochondrial editing factors in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaowen; Bentolila, Stephane; Hanson, Maureen R

    2016-05-01

    Post-transcriptional C-to-U RNA editing occurs at specific sites in plastid and plant mitochondrial transcripts. Members of the Arabidopsis pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) motif-containing protein family and RNA-editing factor Interacting Protein (RIP, also known as MORF) family have been characterized as essential components of the RNA editing apparatus. Recent studies reveal that several organelle-targeted RNA recognition motif (RRM)-containing proteins are involved in either plastid or mitochondrial RNA editing. ORRM1 (Organelle RRM protein 1) is essential for plastid editing, whereas ORRM2, ORRM3 and ORRM4 are involved in mitochondrial RNA editing. The RRM domain of ORRM1, ORRM3 and ORRM4 is required for editing activity, whereas the auxiliary RIP and Glycine-Rich (GR) domains mediate the ORRM proteins' interactions with other editing factors. The identification of the ORRM proteins as RNA editing factors further expands our knowledge of the composition of the editosome. PMID:27082488

  18. Structural motifs, mixing, and segregation effects in 38-atom binary clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Borbón, Lauro Oliver; Johnston, Roy L.; Barcaro, Giovanni; Fortunelli, Alessandro

    2008-04-01

    Thirty eight-atom binary clusters composed of elements from groups 10 and 11 of the Periodic Table mixing a second-row with a third-row transition metal (TM) (i.e., clusters composed of the four pairs: Pd-Pt, Ag-Au, Pd-Au, and Ag-Pt) are studied through a combined empirical-potential (EP)/density functional (DF) method. A "system comparison" approach is adopted in order to analyze a wide diversity of structural motifs, and the energy competition among different structural motifs is studied at the DF level for these systems, mainly focusing on the composition 24-14 (the first number refers to the second-row TM atom) but also considering selected motifs with compositions 19-19 (of interest for investigating surface segregation effects) and 32-6 (also 14-24 and 6-32 for the Pd-Au pair). The results confirm the EP predictions about the stability of crystalline structures at this size for the Au-Pd pair but with decahedral or mixed fivefold-symmetric/closed-packed structures in close competition with fcc motifs for the Ag-Au or Ag-Pt and Pd-Pt pairs, respectively. Overall, the EP description is found to be reasonably accurate for the Pd-Pt and Au-Pd pairs, whereas it is less reliable for the Ag-Au and Ag-Pt pairs due to electronic structure (charge transfer or directionality) effects. The driving force to core-shell chemical ordering is put on a quantitative basis, and surface segregation of the most cohesive element into the core is confirmed, with the exception of the Ag-Au pair for which charge transfer effects favor the segregation of Au to the surface of the clusters.

  19. De Novo Regulatory Motif Discovery Identifies Significant Motifs in Promoters of Five Classes of Plant Dehydrin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Zolotarov, Yevgen; Strömvik, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Plants accumulate dehydrins in response to osmotic stresses. Dehydrins are divided into five different classes, which are thought to be regulated in different manners. To better understand differences in transcriptional regulation of the five dehydrin classes, de novo motif discovery was performed on 350 dehydrin promoter sequences from a total of 51 plant genomes. Overrepresented motifs were identified in the promoters of five dehydrin classes. The Kn dehydrin promoters contain motifs linked with meristem specific expression, as well as motifs linked with cold/dehydration and abscisic acid response. KS dehydrin promoters contain a motif with a GATA core. SKn and YnSKn dehydrin promoters contain motifs that match elements connected with cold/dehydration, abscisic acid and light response. YnKn dehydrin promoters contain motifs that match abscisic acid and light response elements, but not cold/dehydration response elements. Conserved promoter motifs are present in the dehydrin classes and across different plant lineages, indicating that dehydrin gene regulation is likely also conserved. PMID:26114291

  20. Distance preferences in the arrangement of binding motifs and hierarchical levels in organization of transcription regulatory information

    PubMed Central

    Makeev, Vsevolod J.; Lifanov, Alexander P.; Nazina, Anna G.; Papatsenko, Dmitri A.

    2003-01-01

    We explored distance preferences in the arrangement of binding motifs for five transcription factors (Bicoid, Krüppel, Hunchback, Knirps and Caudal) in a large set of Drosophila cis-regulatory modules (CRMs). Analysis of non-overlapping binding motifs revealed the presence of periodic signals specific to particular combinations of binding motifs. The most striking periodic signals (10 bp for Bicoid and 11 bp for Hunchback) suggest preferential positioning of some binding site combinations on the same side of the DNA helix. We also analyzed distance preferences in arrangements of highly correlated overlapping binding motifs, such as Bicoid and Krüppel. Based on the distance analysis, we extracted preferential binding site arrangements and proposed models for potential composite elements (CEs) and antagonistic motif pairs involved in the function of developmental CRMs. Our results suggest that there are distinct hierarchical levels in the organization of transcription regulatory information. We discuss the role of the hierarchy in understanding transcriptional regulation and in detection of transcription regulatory regions in genomes. PMID:14530449

  1. Tripartite motif 32 prevents pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lijuan; Huang, Jia; Ji, Yanxiao; Zhang, Xiaojing; Wang, Pixiao; Deng, Keqiong; Jiang, Xi; Ma, Genshan; Li, Hongliang

    2016-05-01

    TRIM32 (tripartite motif 32) is widely accepted to be an E3 ligase that interacts with and eventually ubiquitylates multiple substrates. TRIM32 mutants have been associated with LGMD-2H (limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2H). However, whether TRIM32 is involved in cardiac hypertrophy induced by biomechanical stresses and neurohumoral mediators remains unclear. We generated mice and isolated NRCMs (neonatal rat cardiomyocytes) that overexpressed or were deficient in TRIM32 to investigate the effect of TRIM32 on AB (aortic banding) or AngII (angiotensin II)-mediated cardiac hypertrophy. Echocardiography and both pathological and molecular analyses were used to determine the extent of cardiac hypertrophy and subsequent fibrosis. Our results showed that overexpression of TRIM32 in the heart significantly alleviated the hypertrophic response induced by pressure overload, whereas TRIM32 deficiency dramatically aggravated pathological cardiac remodelling. Similar results were also found in cultured NRCMs incubated with AngII. Mechanistically, the present study suggests that TRIM32 exerts cardioprotective action by interruption of Akt- but not MAPK (mitogen-dependent protein kinase)-dependent signalling pathways. Additionally, inactivation of Akt by LY294002 offset the exacerbated hypertrophic response induced by AB in TRIM32-deficient mice. In conclusion, the present study indicates that TRIM32 plays a protective role in AB-induced pathological cardiac remodelling by blocking Akt-dependent signalling. Therefore TRIM32 could be a novel therapeutic target for the prevention of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. PMID:26884348

  2. Tripartite motif 32 prevents pathological cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jia; Ji, Yanxiao; Zhang, Xiaojing; Wang, Pixiao; Deng, Keqiong; Jiang, Xi; Ma, Genshan

    2016-01-01

    TRIM32 (tripartite motif 32) is widely accepted to be an E3 ligase that interacts with and eventually ubiquitylates multiple substrates. TRIM32 mutants have been associated with LGMD-2H (limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2H). However, whether TRIM32 is involved in cardiac hypertrophy induced by biomechanical stresses and neurohumoral mediators remains unclear. We generated mice and isolated NRCMs (neonatal rat cardiomyocytes) that overexpressed or were deficient in TRIM32 to investigate the effect of TRIM32 on AB (aortic banding) or AngII (angiotensin II)-mediated cardiac hypertrophy. Echocardiography and both pathological and molecular analyses were used to determine the extent of cardiac hypertrophy and subsequent fibrosis. Our results showed that overexpression of TRIM32 in the heart significantly alleviated the hypertrophic response induced by pressure overload, whereas TRIM32 deficiency dramatically aggravated pathological cardiac remodelling. Similar results were also found in cultured NRCMs incubated with AngII. Mechanistically, the present study suggests that TRIM32 exerts cardioprotective action by interruption of Akt- but not MAPK (mitogen-dependent protein kinase)-dependent signalling pathways. Additionally, inactivation of Akt by LY294002 offset the exacerbated hypertrophic response induced by AB in TRIM32-deficient mice. In conclusion, the present study indicates that TRIM32 plays a protective role in AB-induced pathological cardiac remodelling by blocking Akt-dependent signalling. Therefore TRIM32 could be a novel therapeutic target for the prevention of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. PMID:26884348

  3. Triadic motifs in the dependence networks of virtual societies.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen-Jie; Li, Ming-Xia; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2014-01-01

    In friendship networks, individuals have different numbers of friends, and the closeness or intimacy between an individual and her friends is heterogeneous. Using a statistical filtering method to identify relationships about who depends on whom, we construct dependence networks (which are directed) from weighted friendship networks of avatars in more than two hundred virtual societies of a massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG). We investigate the evolution of triadic motifs in dependence networks. Several metrics show that the virtual societies evolved through a transient stage in the first two to three weeks and reached a relatively stable stage. We find that the unidirectional loop motif (M9) is underrepresented and does not appear, open motifs are also underrepresented, while other close motifs are overrepresented. We also find that, for most motifs, the overall level difference of the three avatars in the same motif is significantly lower than average, whereas the sum of ranks is only slightly larger than average. Our findings show that avatars' social status plays an important role in the formation of triadic motifs. PMID:24912755

  4. Recurrent Structural Motifs in Non-Homologous Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Maria U.; Zoete, Vincent; Guex, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    We have extracted an extensive collection of recurrent structural motifs (RSMs), which consist of sequentially non-contiguous structural motifs (4–6 residues), each of which appears with very similar conformation in three or more mutually unrelated protein structures. We find that the proteins in our set are covered to a substantial extent by the recurrent non-contiguous structural motifs, especially the helix and strand regions. Computational alanine scanning calculations indicate that the average folding free energy changes upon alanine mutation for most types of non-alanine residues are higher for amino acids that are present in recurrent structural motifs than for amino acids that are not. The non-alanine amino acids that are most common in the recurrent structural motifs, i.e., phenylalanine, isoleucine, leucine, valine and tyrosine and the less abundant methionine and tryptophan, have the largest folding free energy changes. This indicates that the recurrent structural motifs, as we define them, describe recurrent structural patterns that are important for protein stability. In view of their properties, such structural motifs are potentially useful for inter-residue contact prediction and protein structure refinement. PMID:23574940

  5. BlockLogo: visualization of peptide and sequence motif conservation.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Kudahl, Ulrich Johan; Simon, Christian; Sun, Jing; Schönbach, Christian; Reinherz, Ellis L; Zhang, Guang Lan; Brusic, Vladimir

    2013-12-31

    BlockLogo is a web-server application for the visualization of protein and nucleotide fragments, continuous protein sequence motifs, and discontinuous sequence motifs using calculation of block entropy from multiple sequence alignments. The user input consists of a multiple sequence alignment, selection of motif positions, type of sequence, and output format definition. The output has BlockLogo along with the sequence logo, and a table of motif frequencies. We deployed BlockLogo as an online application and have demonstrated its utility through examples that show visualization of T-cell epitopes and B-cell epitopes (both continuous and discontinuous). Our additional example shows a visualization and analysis of structural motifs that determine the specificity of peptide binding to HLA-DR molecules. The BlockLogo server also employs selected experimentally validated prediction algorithms to enable on-the-fly prediction of MHC binding affinity to 15 common HLA class I and class II alleles as well as visual analysis of discontinuous epitopes from multiple sequence alignments. It enables the visualization and analysis of structural and functional motifs that are usually described as regular expressions. It provides a compact view of discontinuous motifs composed of distant positions within biological sequences. BlockLogo is available at: http://research4.dfci.harvard.edu/cvc/blocklogo/ and http://met-hilab.bu.edu/blocklogo/. PMID:24001880

  6. Multiple Dileucine-like Motifs Direct VGLUT1 Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Foss, Sarah M.; Li, Haiyan; Santos, Magda S.; Edwards, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    The vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) package glutamate into synaptic vesicles, and the two principal isoforms VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 have been suggested to influence the properties of release. To understand how a VGLUT isoform might influence transmitter release, we have studied their trafficking and previously identified a dileucine-like endocytic motif in the C terminus of VGLUT1. Disruption of this motif impairs the activity-dependent recycling of VGLUT1, but does not eliminate its endocytosis. We now report the identification of two additional dileucine-like motifs in the N terminus of VGLUT1 that are not well conserved in the other isoforms. In the absence of all three motifs, rat VGLUT1 shows limited accumulation at synaptic sites and no longer responds to stimulation. In addition, shRNA-mediated knockdown of clathrin adaptor proteins AP-1 and AP-2 shows that the C-terminal motif acts largely via AP-2, whereas the N-terminal motifs use AP-1. Without the C-terminal motif, knockdown of AP-1 reduces the proportion of VGLUT1 that responds to stimulation. VGLUT1 thus contains multiple sorting signals that engage distinct trafficking mechanisms. In contrast to VGLUT1, the trafficking of VGLUT2 depends almost entirely on the conserved C-terminal dileucine-like motif: without this motif, a substantial fraction of VGLUT2 redistributes to the plasma membrane and the transporter's synaptic localization is disrupted. Consistent with these differences in trafficking signals, wild-type VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 differ in their response to stimulation. PMID:23804088

  7. Coherent feedforward transcriptional regulatory motifs enhance drug resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlebois, Daniel A.; Balázsi, Gábor; Kærn, Mads

    2014-05-01

    Fluctuations in gene expression give identical cells access to a spectrum of phenotypes that can serve as a transient, nongenetic basis for natural selection by temporarily increasing drug resistance. In this study, we demonstrate using mathematical modeling and simulation that certain gene regulatory network motifs, specifically coherent feedforward loop motifs, can facilitate the development of nongenetic resistance by increasing cell-to-cell variability and the time scale at which beneficial phenotypic states can be maintained. Our results highlight how regulatory network motifs enabling transient, nongenetic inheritance play an important role in defining reproductive fitness in adverse environments and provide a selective advantage subject to evolutionary pressure.

  8. Thermodynamic Features of Structural Motifs Formed by β-L-RNA

    PubMed Central

    Szabat, Marta; Gudanis, Dorota; Kotkowiak, Weronika; Gdaniec, Zofia; Kierzek, Ryszard; Pasternak, Anna

    2016-01-01

    This is the first report to provide comprehensive thermodynamic and structural data concerning duplex, hairpin, quadruplex and i-motif structures in β-L-RNA series. Herein we confirm that, within the limits of experimental error, the thermodynamic stability of enantiomeric structural motifs is the same as that of naturally occurring D-RNA counterparts. In addition, formation of D-RNA/L-RNA heterochiral duplexes is also observed; however, their thermodynamic stability is significantly reduced in reference to homochiral D-RNA duplexes. The presence of three locked nucleic acid (LNA) residues within the D-RNA strand diminishes the negative effect of the enantiomeric, complementary L-RNA strand in the formation of heterochiral RNA duplexes. Similar behavior is also observed for heterochiral LNA-2′-O-methyl-D-RNA/L-RNA duplexes. The formation of heterochiral duplexes was confirmed by 1H NMR spectroscopy. The CD curves of homochiral L-RNA structural motifs are always reversed, whereas CD curves of heterochiral duplexes present individual features dependent on the composition of chiral strands. PMID:26908023

  9. Recognition of 27-Class Protein Folds by Adding the Interaction of Segments and Motif Information

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhenxing; Hu, Xiuzhen

    2014-01-01

    The recognition of protein folds is an important step for the prediction of protein structure and function. After the recognition of 27-class protein folds in 2001 by Ding and Dubchak, prediction algorithms, prediction parameters, and new datasets for the prediction of protein folds have been improved. However, the influences of interactions from predicted secondary structure segments and motif information on protein folding have not been considered. Therefore, the recognition of 27-class protein folds with the interaction of segments and motif information is very important. Based on the 27-class folds dataset built by Liu et al., amino acid composition, the interactions of secondary structure segments, motif frequency, and predicted secondary structure information were extracted. Using the Random Forest algorithm and the ensemble classification strategy, 27-class protein folds and corresponding structural classification were identified by independent test. The overall accuracy of the testing set and structural classification measured up to 78.38% and 92.55%, respectively. When the training set and testing set were combined, the overall accuracy by 5-fold cross validation was 81.16%. In order to compare with the results of previous researchers, the method above was tested on Ding and Dubchak's dataset which has been widely used by many previous researchers, and an improved overall accuracy 70.24% was obtained. PMID:25136571

  10. Identify Beta-Hairpin Motifs with Quadratic Discriminant Algorithm Based on the Chemical Shifts

    PubMed Central

    YongE, Feng; GaoShan, Kou

    2015-01-01

    Successful prediction of the beta-hairpin motif will be helpful for understanding the of the fold recognition. Some algorithms have been proposed for the prediction of beta-hairpin motifs. However, the parameters used by these methods were primarily based on the amino acid sequences. Here, we proposed a novel model for predicting beta-hairpin structure based on the chemical shift. Firstly, we analyzed the statistical distribution of chemical shifts of six nuclei in not beta-hairpin and beta-hairpin motifs. Secondly, we used these chemical shifts as features combined with three algorithms to predict beta-hairpin structure. Finally, we achieved the best prediction, namely sensitivity of 92%, the specificity of 94% with 0.85 of Mathew’s correlation coefficient using quadratic discriminant analysis algorithm, which is clearly superior to the same method for the prediction of beta-hairpin structure from 20 amino acid compositions in the three-fold cross-validation. Our finding showed that the chemical shift is an effective parameter for beta-hairpin prediction, suggesting the quadratic discriminant analysis is a powerful algorithm for the prediction of beta-hairpin. PMID:26422468

  11. A million peptide motifs for the molecular biologist.

    PubMed

    Tompa, Peter; Davey, Norman E; Gibson, Toby J; Babu, M Madan

    2014-07-17

    A molecular description of functional modules in the cell is the focus of many high-throughput studies in the postgenomic era. A large portion of biomolecular interactions in virtually all cellular processes is mediated by compact interaction modules, referred to as peptide motifs. Such motifs are typically less than ten residues in length, occur within intrinsically disordered regions, and are recognized and/or posttranslationally modified by structured domains of the interacting partner. In this review, we suggest that there might be over a million instances of peptide motifs in the human proteome. While this staggering number suggests that peptide motifs are numerous and the most understudied functional module in the cell, it also holds great opportunities for new discoveries. PMID:25038412

  12. 10. DETAIL OF CORNICE MOULDING WITH RAM'S HEAD MOTIF. EIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL OF CORNICE MOULDING WITH RAM'S HEAD MOTIF. EIGHT SHADES OF GOLD LEAF AND BURNISHED GOLD LEAF WERE USED FOR THE INTERIOR FINISHES - Anaconda Historic District, Washoe Theater, 305 Main Street, Anaconda, Deer Lodge County, MT

  13. DETAIL OF CORNICE MOULDING WITH RAM'S HEAD MOTIF. EIGHT SHADES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF CORNICE MOULDING WITH RAM'S HEAD MOTIF. EIGHT SHADES OF GOLD LEAF AND BURNISHED GOLD LEAF WERE USED FOR THE INTERIOR FINISHES. - Anaconda Historic District, Washoe Theater, 305 Main Street, Anaconda, Deer Lodge County, MT

  14. The building blocks and motifs of RNA architecture

    PubMed Central

    Leontis, Neocles B; Lescoute, Aurelie; Westhof, Eric

    2010-01-01

    RNA motifs can be defined broadly as recurrent structural elements containing multiple intramolecular RNA–RNA interactions, as observed in atomic-resolution RNA structures. They constitute the modular building blocks of RNA architecture, which is organized hierarchically. Recent work has focused on analyzing RNA backbone conformations to identify, define and search for new instances of recurrent motifs in X-ray structures. One current view asserts that recurrent RNA strand segments with characteristic backbone configurations qualify as independent motifs. Other considerations indicate that, to characterize modular motifs, one must take into account the larger structural context of such strand segments. This follows the biologically relevant motivation, which is to identify RNA structural characteristics that are subject to sequence constraints and that thus relate RNA architectures to sequences. PMID:16713707

  15. Network motifs emerge from interconnections that favour stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo, Marco Tulio; Liu, Yang-Yu; Slotine, Jean-Jacques

    2015-10-01

    The microscopic principles organizing dynamic units in complex networks--from proteins to power generators--can be understood in terms of network `motifs’: small interconnection patterns that appear much more frequently in real networks than expected in random networks. When considered as small subgraphs isolated from a large network, these motifs are more robust to parameter variations, easier to synchronize than other possible subgraphs, and can provide specific functionalities. But one can isolate these subgraphs only by assuming, for example, a significant separation of timescales, and the origin of network motifs and their functionalities when embedded in larger networks remain unclear. Here we show that most motifs emerge from interconnection patterns that best exploit the intrinsic stability characteristics at different scales of interconnection, from simple nodes to whole modules. This functionality suggests an efficient mechanism to stably build complex systems by recursively interconnecting nodes and modules as motifs. We present direct evidence of this mechanism in several biological networks.

  16. Direct vs 2-stage approaches to structured motif finding

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The notion of DNA motif is a mathematical abstraction used to model regions of the DNA (known as Transcription Factor Binding Sites, or TFBSs) that are bound by a given Transcription Factor to regulate gene expression or repression. In turn, DNA structured motifs are a mathematical counterpart that models sets of TFBSs that work in concert in the gene regulations processes of higher eukaryotic organisms. Typically, a structured motif is composed of an ordered set of isolated (or simple) motifs, separated by a variable, but somewhat constrained number of “irrelevant” base-pairs. Discovering structured motifs in a set of DNA sequences is a computationally hard problem that has been addressed by a number of authors using either a direct approach, or via the preliminary identification and successive combination of simple motifs. Results We describe a computational tool, named SISMA, for the de-novo discovery of structured motifs in a set of DNA sequences. SISMA is an exact, enumerative algorithm, meaning that it finds all the motifs conforming to the specifications. It does so in two stages: first it discovers all the possible component simple motifs, then combines them in a way that respects the given constraints. We developed SISMA mainly with the aim of understanding the potential benefits of such a 2-stage approach w.r.t. direct methods. In fact, no 2-stage software was available for the general problem of structured motif discovery, but only a few tools that solved restricted versions of the problem. We evaluated SISMA against other published tools on a comprehensive benchmark made of both synthetic and real biological datasets. In a significant number of cases, SISMA outperformed the competitors, exhibiting a good performance also in most of the cases in which it was inferior. Conclusions A reflection on the results obtained lead us to conclude that a 2-stage approach can be implemented with many advantages over direct approaches. Some of these

  17. Robust and Adaptive MicroRNA-Mediated Incoherent Feedforward Motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng-Dan; Liu, Zeng-Rong; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Shen, Jian-Wei

    2009-02-01

    We integrate transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation into microRNA-mediated incoherent feedforward motifs and analyse their dynamical behaviour and functions. The analysis show that the behaviour of the system is almost uninfluenced by the varying input in certain ranges and by introducing of delay and noise. The results indicate that microRNA-mediated incoherent feedforward motifs greatly enhance the robustness of gene regulation.

  18. Network motif-based method for identifying coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    LI, YIN; CONG, YAN; ZHAO, YUN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to develop a more efficient method for identifying coronary artery disease (CAD) than the conventional method using individual differentially expressed genes (DEGs). GSE42148 gene microarray data were downloaded, preprocessed and screened for DEGs. Additionally, based on transcriptional regulation data obtained from ENCODE database and protein-protein interaction data from the HPRD, the common genes were downloaded and compared with genes annotated from gene microarrays to screen additional common genes in order to construct an integrated regulation network. FANMOD was then used to detect significant three-gene network motifs. Subsequently, GlobalAncova was used to screen differential three-gene network motifs between the CAD group and the normal control data from GSE42148. Genes involved in the differential network motifs were then subjected to functional annotation and pathway enrichment analysis. Finally, clustering analysis of the CAD and control samples was performed based on individual DEGs and the top 20 network motifs identified. In total, 9,008 significant three-node network motifs were detected from the integrated regulation network; these were categorized into 22 interaction modes, each containing a minimum of one transcription factor. Subsequently, 1,132 differential network motifs involving 697 genes were screened between the CAD and control group. The 697 genes were enriched in 154 gene ontology terms, including 119 biological processes, and 14 KEGG pathways. Identifying patients with CAD based on the top 20 network motifs provided increased accuracy compared with the conventional method based on individual DEGs. The results of the present study indicate that the network motif-based method is more efficient and accurate for identifying CAD patients than the conventional method based on individual DEGs. PMID:27347046

  19. Transcriptional Network Growing Models Using Motif-Based Preferential Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Abdelzaher, Ahmed F.; Al-Musawi, Ahmad F.; Ghosh, Preetam; Mayo, Michael L.; Perkins, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding relationships between architectural properties of gene-regulatory networks (GRNs) has been one of the major goals in systems biology and bioinformatics, as it can provide insights into, e.g., disease dynamics and drug development. Such GRNs are characterized by their scale-free degree distributions and existence of network motifs – i.e., small-node subgraphs that occur more abundantly in GRNs than expected from chance alone. Because these transcriptional modules represent “building blocks” of complex networks and exhibit a wide range of functional and dynamical properties, they may contribute to the remarkable robustness and dynamical stability associated with the whole of GRNs. Here, we developed network-construction models to better understand this relationship, which produce randomized GRNs by using transcriptional motifs as the fundamental growth unit in contrast to other methods that construct similar networks on a node-by-node basis. Because this model produces networks with a prescribed lower bound on the number of choice transcriptional motifs (e.g., downlinks, feed-forward loops), its fidelity to the motif distributions observed in model organisms represents an improvement over existing methods, which we validated by contrasting their resultant motif and degree distributions against existing network-growth models and data from the model organism of the bacterium Escherichia coli. These models may therefore serve as novel testbeds for further elucidating relationships between the topology of transcriptional motifs and network-wide dynamical properties. PMID:26528473

  20. Discovering Motifs in Biological Sequences Using the Micron Automata Processor.

    PubMed

    Roy, Indranil; Aluru, Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    Finding approximately conserved sequences, called motifs, across multiple DNA or protein sequences is an important problem in computational biology. In this paper, we consider the (l, d) motif search problem of identifying one or more motifs of length l present in at least q of the n given sequences, with each occurrence differing from the motif in at most d substitutions. The problem is known to be NP-complete, and the largest solved instance reported to date is (26,11). We propose a novel algorithm for the (l,d) motif search problem using streaming execution over a large set of non-deterministic finite automata (NFA). This solution is designed to take advantage of the micron automata processor, a new technology close to deployment that can simultaneously execute multiple NFA in parallel. We demonstrate the capability for solving much larger instances of the (l, d) motif search problem using the resources available within a single automata processor board, by estimating run-times for problem instances (39,18) and (40,17). The paper serves as a useful guide to solving problems using this new accelerator technology. PMID:26886735

  1. Finding specific RNA motifs: Function in a zeptomole world?

    PubMed Central

    KNIGHT, ROB; YARUS, MICHAEL

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a new method for estimating the abundance of any modular (piecewise) RNA motif within a longer random region. We have used this method to estimate the size of the active motifs available to modern SELEX experiments (picomoles of unique sequences) and to a plausible RNA World (zeptomoles of unique sequences: 1 zmole = 602 sequences). Unexpectedly, activities such as specific isoleucine binding are almost certainly present in zeptomoles of molecules, and even ribozymes such as self-cleavage motifs may appear (depending on assumptions about the minimal structures). The number of specified nucleotides is not the only important determinant of a motif’s rarity: The number of modules into which it is divided, and the details of this division, are also crucial. We propose three maxims for easily isolated motifs: the Maxim of Minimization, the Maxim of Multiplicity, and the Maxim of the Median. These maxims together state that selected motifs should be small and composed of as many separate, equally sized modules as possible. For evenly divided motifs with four modules, the largest accessible activity in picomole scale (1–1000 pmole) pools of length 100 is about 34 nucleotides; while for zeptomole scale (1–1000 zmole) pools it is about 20 specific nucleotides (50% probability of occurrence). This latter figure includes some ribozymes and aptamers. Consequently, an RNA metabolism apparently could have begun with only zeptomoles of RNA molecules. PMID:12554865

  2. Motif for controllable toggle switch in gene regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chen; Bin, Ao; Ye, Weiming; Fan, Ying; Di, Zengru

    2015-02-01

    Toggle switch as a common phenomenon in gene regulatory networks has been recognized important for biological functions. Despite much effort dedicated to understanding the toggle switch and designing synthetic biology circuit to achieve the biological function, we still lack a comprehensive understanding of the intrinsic dynamics behind such phenomenon and the minimum structure that is imperative for producing toggle switch. In this paper, we discover a minimum structure, a motif that enables a controllable toggle switch. In particular, the motif consists of a transformative double negative feedback loop (DNFL) that is regulated by an additional driver node. By enumerating all possible regulatory configurations from the driver node, we identify two types of motifs associated with the toggle switch that is captured by the existence of bistable states. The toggle switch is controllable in the sense that the gap between the bistable states is adjustable as determined by the regulatory strength from the driver nodes. We test the effect of the motifs in self-oscillating gene regulatory network (SON) with respect to the interplay between the motifs and the other genes, and find that the switching dynamics of the whole network can be successfully controlled insofar as the network contains a single motif. Our findings are important to uncover the underlying nonlinear dynamics of controllable toggle switch and can have implications in devising biology circuit in the field of synthetic biology.

  3. Heparin-Binding Motifs and Biofilm Formation by Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Green, Julianne V.; Orsborn, Kris I.; Zhang, Minlu; Tan, Queenie K. G.; Greis, Kenneth D.; Porollo, Alexey; Andes, David R.; Long Lu, Jason; Hostetter, Margaret K.

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is a leading pathogen in infections of central venous catheters, which are frequently infused with heparin. Binding of C. albicans to medically relevant concentrations of soluble and plate-bound heparin was demonstrable by confocal microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A sequence-based search identified 34 C. albicans surface proteins containing ≥1 match to linear heparin-binding motifs. The virulence factor Int1 contained the most putative heparin-binding motifs (n = 5); peptides encompassing 2 of 5 motifs bound to heparin-Sepharose. Alanine substitution of lysine residues K805/K806 in 804QKKHQIHK811 (motif 1 of Int1) markedly attenuated biofilm formation in central venous catheters in rats, whereas alanine substitution of K1595/R1596 in 1593FKKRFFKL1600 (motif 4 of Int1) did not impair biofilm formation. Affinity-purified immunoglobulin G (IgG) recognizing motif 1 abolished biofilm formation in central venous catheters; preimmune IgG had no effect. After heparin treatment of C. albicans, soluble peptides from multiple C. albicans surface proteins were detected, such as Eno1, Pgk1, Tdh3, and Ssa1/2 but not Int1, suggesting that heparin changes candidal surface structures and may modify some antigens critical for immune recognition. These studies define a new mechanism of biofilm formation for C. albicans and a novel strategy for inhibiting catheter-associated biofilms. PMID:23904295

  4. Directed network motifs in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Eric J; Young, Karl; Tremper, Graham; Liang, Jason; Landsberg, Adam S; Schuff, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Directed network motifs are the building blocks of complex networks, such as human brain networks, and capture deep connectivity information that is not contained in standard network measures. In this paper we present the first application of directed network motifs in vivo to human brain networks, utilizing recently developed directed progression networks which are built upon rates of cortical thickness changes between brain regions. This is in contrast to previous studies which have relied on simulations and in vitro analysis of non-human brains. We show that frequencies of specific directed network motifs can be used to distinguish between patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and normal control (NC) subjects. Especially interesting from a clinical standpoint, these motif frequencies can also distinguish between subjects with mild cognitive impairment who remained stable over three years (MCI) and those who converted to AD (CONV). Furthermore, we find that the entropy of the distribution of directed network motifs increased from MCI to CONV to AD, implying that the distribution of pathology is more structured in MCI but becomes less so as it progresses to CONV and further to AD. Thus, directed network motifs frequencies and distributional properties provide new insights into the progression of Alzheimer's disease as well as new imaging markers for distinguishing between normal controls, stable mild cognitive impairment, MCI converters and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25879535

  5. cWINNOWER Algorithm for Finding Fuzzy DNA Motifs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Shoudan

    2003-01-01

    The cWINNOWER algorithm detects fuzzy motifs in DNA sequences rich in protein-binding signals. A signal is defined as any short nucleotide pattern having up to d mutations differing from a motif of length l. The algorithm finds such motifs if multiple mutated copies of the motif (i.e., the signals) are present in the DNA sequence in sufficient abundance. The cWINNOWER algorithm substantially improves the sensitivity of the winnower method of Pevzner and Sze by imposing a consensus constraint, enabling it to detect much weaker signals. We studied the minimum number of detectable motifs qc as a function of sequence length N for random sequences. We found that qc increases linearly with N for a fast version of the algorithm based on counting three-member sub-cliques. Imposing consensus constraints reduces qc, by a factor of three in this case, which makes the algorithm dramatically more sensitive. Our most sensitive algorithm, which counts four-member sub-cliques, needs a minimum of only 13 signals to detect motifs in a sequence of length N = 12000 for (l,d) = (15,4).

  6. Sequence Motifs in Transit Peptides Act as Independent Functional Units and Can Be Transferred to New Sequence Contexts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Wook; Woo, Seungjin; Geem, Kyoung Rok; Hwang, Inhwan

    2015-09-01

    A large number of nuclear-encoded proteins are imported into chloroplasts after they are translated in the cytosol. Import is mediated by transit peptides (TPs) at the N termini of these proteins. TPs contain many small motifs, each of which is critical for a specific step in the process of chloroplast protein import; however, it remains unknown how these motifs are organized to give rise to TPs with diverse sequences. In this study, we generated various hybrid TPs by swapping domains between Rubisco small subunit (RbcS) and chlorophyll a/b-binding protein, which have highly divergent sequences, and examined the abilities of the resultant TPs to deliver proteins into chloroplasts. Subsequently, we compared the functionality of sequence motifs in the hybrid TPs with those of wild-type TPs. The sequence motifs in the hybrid TPs exhibited three different modes of functionality, depending on their domain composition, as follows: active in both wild-type and hybrid TPs, active in wild-type TPs but inactive in hybrid TPs, and inactive in wild-type TPs but active in hybrid TPs. Moreover, synthetic TPs, in which only three critical motifs from RbcS or chlorophyll a/b-binding protein TPs were incorporated into an unrelated sequence, were able to deliver clients to chloroplasts with a comparable efficiency to RbcS TP. Based on these results, we propose that diverse sequence motifs in TPs are independent functional units that interact with specific translocon components at various steps during protein import and can be transferred to new sequence contexts. PMID:26149569

  7. A comprehensive analysis of the La-motif protein superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet-Antonelli, Cécile; Deragon, Jean-Marc

    2009-01-01

    The extremely well-conserved La motif (LAM), in synergy with the immediately following RNA recognition motif (RRM), allows direct binding of the (genuine) La autoantigen to RNA polymerase III primary transcripts. This motif is not only found on La homologs, but also on La-related proteins (LARPs) of unrelated function. LARPs are widely found amongst eukaryotes and, although poorly characterized, appear to be RNA-binding proteins fulfilling crucial cellular functions. We searched the fully sequenced genomes of 83 eukaryotic species scattered along the tree of life for the presence of LAM-containing proteins. We observed that these proteins are absent from archaea and present in all eukaryotes (except protists from the Plasmodium genus), strongly suggesting that the LAM is an ancestral motif that emerged early after the archaea-eukarya radiation. A complete evolutionary and structural analysis of these proteins resulted in their classification into five families: the genuine La homologs and four LARP families. Unexpectedly, in each family a conserved domain representing either a classical RRM or an RRM-like motif immediately follows the LAM of most proteins. An evolutionary analysis of the LAM-RRM/RRM-L regions shows that these motifs co-evolved and should be used as a single entity to define the functional region of interaction of LARPs with their substrates. We also found two extremely well conserved motifs, named LSA and DM15, shared by LARP6 and LARP1 family members, respectively. We suggest that members of the same family are functional homologs and/or share a common molecular mode of action on different RNA baits. PMID:19299548

  8. In vivo analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans noncoding RNA promoter motifs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiantian; He, Housheng; Wang, Yunfei; Zheng, Haixia; Skogerbø, Geir; Chen, Runsheng

    2008-01-01

    Background Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) play important roles in a variety of cellular processes. Characterizing the transcriptional activity of ncRNA promoters is therefore a critical step toward understanding the complex cellular roles of ncRNAs. Results Here we present an in vivo transcriptional analysis of three C. elegans ncRNA upstream motifs (UM1-3). Transcriptional activity of all three motifs has been demonstrated, and mutational analysis revealed differential contributions of different parts of each motif. We showed that upstream motif 1 (UM1) can drive the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP), and utilized this for detailed analysis of temporal and spatial expression patterns of 5 SL2 RNAs. Upstream motifs 2 and 3 do not drive GFP expression, and termination at consecutive T runs suggests transcription by RNA polymerase III. The UM2 sequence resembles the tRNA promoter, and is actually embedded within its own short-lived, primary transcript. This is a structure which is also found at a few plant and yeast loci, and may indicate an evolutionarily very old dicistronic transcription pattern in which a tRNA serves as a promoter for an adjacent snoRNA. Conclusion The study has demonstrated that the three upstream motifs UM1-3 have promoter activity. The UM1 sequence can drive expression of GFP, which allows for the use of UM1::GFP fusion constructs to study temporal-spatial expression patterns of UM1 ncRNA loci. The UM1 loci appear to act in concert with other upstream sequences, whereas the transcriptional activities of the UM2 and UM3 are confined to the motifs themselves. PMID:18680611

  9. Discovering Motifs in Ranked Lists of DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Eden, Eran; Lipson, Doron; Yogev, Sivan; Yakhini, Zohar

    2007-01-01

    Computational methods for discovery of sequence elements that are enriched in a target set compared with a background set are fundamental in molecular biology research. One example is the discovery of transcription factor binding motifs that are inferred from ChIP–chip (chromatin immuno-precipitation on a microarray) measurements. Several major challenges in sequence motif discovery still require consideration: (i) the need for a principled approach to partitioning the data into target and background sets; (ii) the lack of rigorous models and of an exact p-value for measuring motif enrichment; (iii) the need for an appropriate framework for accounting for motif multiplicity; (iv) the tendency, in many of the existing methods, to report presumably significant motifs even when applied to randomly generated data. In this paper we present a statistical framework for discovering enriched sequence elements in ranked lists that resolves these four issues. We demonstrate the implementation of this framework in a software application, termed DRIM (discovery of rank imbalanced motifs), which identifies sequence motifs in lists of ranked DNA sequences. We applied DRIM to ChIP–chip and CpG methylation data and obtained the following results. (i) Identification of 50 novel putative transcription factor (TF) binding sites in yeast ChIP–chip data. The biological function of some of them was further investigated to gain new insights on transcription regulation networks in yeast. For example, our discoveries enable the elucidation of the network of the TF ARO80. Another finding concerns a systematic TF binding enhancement to sequences containing CA repeats. (ii) Discovery of novel motifs in human cancer CpG methylation data. Remarkably, most of these motifs are similar to DNA sequence elements bound by the Polycomb complex that promotes histone methylation. Our findings thus support a model in which histone methylation and CpG methylation are mechanistically linked. Overall

  10. Novel Structural and Functional Motifs in cellulose synthase (CesA) Genes of Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum, L.).

    PubMed

    Kaur, Simerjeet; Dhugga, Kanwarpal S; Gill, Kulvinder; Singh, Jaswinder

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose is the primary determinant of mechanical strength in plant tissues. Late-season lodging is inversely related to the amount of cellulose in a unit length of the stem. Wheat is the most widely grown of all the crops globally, yet information on its CesA gene family is limited. We have identified 22 CesA genes from bread wheat, which include homoeologs from each of the three genomes, and named them as TaCesAXA, TaCesAXB or TaCesAXD, where X denotes the gene number and the last suffix stands for the respective genome. Sequence analyses of the CESA proteins from wheat and their orthologs from barley, maize, rice, and several dicot species (Arabidopsis, beet, cotton, poplar, potato, rose gum and soybean) revealed motifs unique to monocots (Poales) or dicots. Novel structural motifs CQIC and SVICEXWFA were identified, which distinguished the CESAs involved in the formation of primary and secondary cell wall (PCW and SCW) in all the species. We also identified several new motifs specific to monocots or dicots. The conserved motifs identified in this study possibly play functional roles specific to PCW or SCW formation. The new insights from this study advance our knowledge about the structure, function and evolution of the CesA family in plants in general and wheat in particular. This information will be useful in improving culm strength to reduce lodging or alter wall composition to improve biofuel production. PMID:26771740

  11. Novel Structural and Functional Motifs in cellulose synthase (CesA) Genes of Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum, L.)

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Simerjeet; Dhugga, Kanwarpal S.; Gill, Kulvinder; Singh, Jaswinder

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose is the primary determinant of mechanical strength in plant tissues. Late-season lodging is inversely related to the amount of cellulose in a unit length of the stem. Wheat is the most widely grown of all the crops globally, yet information on its CesA gene family is limited. We have identified 22 CesA genes from bread wheat, which include homoeologs from each of the three genomes, and named them as TaCesAXA, TaCesAXB or TaCesAXD, where X denotes the gene number and the last suffix stands for the respective genome. Sequence analyses of the CESA proteins from wheat and their orthologs from barley, maize, rice, and several dicot species (Arabidopsis, beet, cotton, poplar, potato, rose gum and soybean) revealed motifs unique to monocots (Poales) or dicots. Novel structural motifs CQIC and SVICEXWFA were identified, which distinguished the CESAs involved in the formation of primary and secondary cell wall (PCW and SCW) in all the species. We also identified several new motifs specific to monocots or dicots. The conserved motifs identified in this study possibly play functional roles specific to PCW or SCW formation. The new insights from this study advance our knowledge about the structure, function and evolution of the CesA family in plants in general and wheat in particular. This information will be useful in improving culm strength to reduce lodging or alter wall composition to improve biofuel production. PMID:26771740

  12. Interconnected Network Motifs Control Podocyte Morphology and Kidney Function

    PubMed Central

    Azeloglu, Evren U.; Hardy, Simon V.; Eungdamrong, Narat John; Chen, Yibang; Jayaraman, Gomathi; Chuang, Peter Y.; Fang, Wei; Xiong, Huabao; Neves, Susana R.; Jain, Mohit R.; Li, Hong; Ma’ayan, Avi; Gordon, Ronald E.; He, John Cijiang; Iyengar, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Podocytes are kidney cells with specialized morphology that is required for glomerular filtration. Diseases, such as diabetes, or drug exposure that causes disruption of the podocyte foot process morphology results in kidney pathophysiology. Proteomic analysis of glomeruli isolated from rats with puromycin-induced kidney disease and control rats indicated that protein kinase A (PKA), which is activated by adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP), is a key regulator of podocyte morphology and function. In podocytes, cAMP signaling activates cAMP response element–binding protein (CREB) to enhance expression of the gene encoding a differentiation marker, synaptopodin, a protein that associates with actin and promotes its bundling. We constructed and experimentally verified a β-adrenergic receptor–driven network with multiple feedback and feedforward motifs that controls CREB activity. To determine how the motifs interacted to regulate gene expression, we mapped multicompartment dynamical models, including information about protein subcellular localization, onto the network topology using Petri net formalisms. These computational analyses indicated that the juxtaposition of multiple feedback and feedforward motifs enabled the prolonged CREB activation necessary for synaptopodin expression and actin bundling. Drug-induced modulation of these motifs in diseased rats led to recovery of normal morphology and physiological function in vivo. Thus, analysis of regulatory motifs using network dynamics can provide insights into pathophysiology that enable predictions for drug intervention strategies to treat kidney disease. PMID:24497609

  13. BC1 RNA motifs required for dendritic transport in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Robeck, Thomas; Skryabin, Boris V.; Rozhdestvensky, Timofey S.; Skryabin, Anastasiya B.; Brosius, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    BC1 RNA is a small brain specific non-protein coding RNA. It is transported from the cell body into dendrites where it is involved in the fine-tuning translational control. Due to its compactness and established secondary structure, BC1 RNA is an ideal model for investigating the motifs necessary for dendritic localization. Previously, microinjection of in vitro transcribed BC1 RNA mutants into the soma of cultured primary neurons suggested the importance of RNA motifs for dendritic targeting. These ex vivo experiments identified a single bulged nucleotide (U22) and a putative K-turn (GA motif) structure required for dendritic localization or distal transport, respectively. We generated six transgenic mouse lines (three founders each) containing neuronally expressing BC1 RNA variants on a BC1 RNA knockout mouse background. In contrast to ex vivo data, we did not find indications of reduction or abolition of dendritic BC1 RNA localization in the mutants devoid of the GA motif or the bulged nucleotide. We confirmed the ex vivo data, which showed that the triloop terminal sequence had no consequence on dendritic transport. Interestingly, changing the triloop supporting structure completely abolished dendritic localization of BC1 RNA. We propose a novel RNA motif important for dendritic transport in vivo. PMID:27350115

  14. MALISAM: a database of structurally analogous motifs in proteins.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hua; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Grishin, Nick V

    2008-01-01

    MALISAM (manual alignments for structurally analogous motifs) represents the first database containing pairs of structural analogs and their alignments. To find reliable analogs, we developed an approach based on three ideas. First, an insertion together with a part of the evolutionary core of one domain family (a hybrid motif) is analogous to a similar motif contained within the core of another domain family. Second, a motif at an interface, formed by secondary structural elements (SSEs) contributed by two or more domains or subunits contacting along that interface, is analogous to a similar motif present in the core of a single domain. Third, an artificial protein obtained through selection from random peptides or in sequence design experiments not biased by sequences of a particular homologous family, is analogous to a structurally similar natural protein. Each analogous pair is superimposed and aligned manually, as well as by several commonly used programs. Applications of this database may range from protein evolution studies, e.g. development of remote homology inference tools and discriminators between homologs and analogs, to protein-folding research, since in the absence of evolutionary reasons, similarity between proteins is caused by structural and folding constraints. The database is publicly available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/malisam. PMID:17855399

  15. DynaMIT: the dynamic motif integration toolkit

    PubMed Central

    Dassi, Erik; Quattrone, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    De-novo motif search is a frequently applied bioinformatics procedure to identify and prioritize recurrent elements in sequences sets for biological investigation, such as the ones derived from high-throughput differential expression experiments. Several algorithms have been developed to perform motif search, employing widely different approaches and often giving divergent results. In order to maximize the power of these investigations and ultimately be able to draft solid biological hypotheses, there is the need for applying multiple tools on the same sequences and merge the obtained results. However, motif reporting formats and statistical evaluation methods currently make such an integration task difficult to perform and mostly restricted to specific scenarios. We thus introduce here the Dynamic Motif Integration Toolkit (DynaMIT), an extremely flexible platform allowing to identify motifs employing multiple algorithms, integrate them by means of a user-selected strategy and visualize results in several ways; furthermore, the platform is user-extendible in all its aspects. DynaMIT is freely available at http://cibioltg.bitbucket.org. PMID:26253738

  16. Mining tertiary structural motifs for assessment of designability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Grigoryan, Gevorg

    2013-01-01

    The observation of a limited secondary-structural alphabet in native proteins, with significant sequence preferences, has profoundly influenced the fields of protein design and structure prediction (Simons, Kooperberg, Huang, & Baker, 1997; Verschueren et al., 2011). In the era of structural genomics, as the size of the structural dataset continues to grow rapidly, it is becoming possible to extend this analysis to tertiary structural motifs and their sequences. For a hypothetical tertiary motif, the rate of its utilization in natural proteins may be used to assess its designability-the ease with which the motif can be realized with natural amino acids. This requires a structural similarity search methodology, which rather than looking for global topological agreement (more appropriate for categorization of full proteins or domains), identifies detailed geometric matches. In this chapter, we introduce such a method, called MaDCaT, and demonstrate its use by assessing the designability landscapes of two tertiary structural motifs. We also show that such analysis can establish structure/sequence links by providing the sequence constraints necessary to encode designable motifs. As logical extension of their secondary-structure counterparts, tertiary structural preferences will likely prove extremely useful in de novo protein design and structure prediction. PMID:23422424

  17. BC1 RNA motifs required for dendritic transport in vivo.

    PubMed

    Robeck, Thomas; Skryabin, Boris V; Rozhdestvensky, Timofey S; Skryabin, Anastasiya B; Brosius, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    BC1 RNA is a small brain specific non-protein coding RNA. It is transported from the cell body into dendrites where it is involved in the fine-tuning translational control. Due to its compactness and established secondary structure, BC1 RNA is an ideal model for investigating the motifs necessary for dendritic localization. Previously, microinjection of in vitro transcribed BC1 RNA mutants into the soma of cultured primary neurons suggested the importance of RNA motifs for dendritic targeting. These ex vivo experiments identified a single bulged nucleotide (U22) and a putative K-turn (GA motif) structure required for dendritic localization or distal transport, respectively. We generated six transgenic mouse lines (three founders each) containing neuronally expressing BC1 RNA variants on a BC1 RNA knockout mouse background. In contrast to ex vivo data, we did not find indications of reduction or abolition of dendritic BC1 RNA localization in the mutants devoid of the GA motif or the bulged nucleotide. We confirmed the ex vivo data, which showed that the triloop terminal sequence had no consequence on dendritic transport. Interestingly, changing the triloop supporting structure completely abolished dendritic localization of BC1 RNA. We propose a novel RNA motif important for dendritic transport in vivo. PMID:27350115

  18. cWINNOWER algorithm for finding fuzzy dna motifs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, S.; Samanta, M. P.; Biegel, B. A.

    2004-01-01

    The cWINNOWER algorithm detects fuzzy motifs in DNA sequences rich in protein-binding signals. A signal is defined as any short nucleotide pattern having up to d mutations differing from a motif of length l. The algorithm finds such motifs if a clique consisting of a sufficiently large number of mutated copies of the motif (i.e., the signals) is present in the DNA sequence. The cWINNOWER algorithm substantially improves the sensitivity of the winnower method of Pevzner and Sze by imposing a consensus constraint, enabling it to detect much weaker signals. We studied the minimum detectable clique size qc as a function of sequence length N for random sequences. We found that qc increases linearly with N for a fast version of the algorithm based on counting three-member sub-cliques. Imposing consensus constraints reduces qc by a factor of three in this case, which makes the algorithm dramatically more sensitive. Our most sensitive algorithm, which counts four-member sub-cliques, needs a minimum of only 13 signals to detect motifs in a sequence of length N = 12,000 for (l, d) = (15, 4). Copyright Imperial College Press.

  19. Robustness to noise in synchronization of network motifs: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscarino, Arturo; Fortuna, Luigi; Frasca, Mattia; Iachello, Marco; Pham, Viet-Thanh

    2012-12-01

    In this work, we experimentally investigate the robustness to noise of synchronization in all the four-nodes network motifs. The experimental setup consists of four Chua's circuits diffusively coupled in order to implement the six different undirected network motifs that can be obtained with four nodes. In this experimental setup, synchronization in the presence of noise injected in one of the network nodes is investigated and network motifs are compared in terms of the synchronization error obtained. The analysis has been then extended to some selected case studies of networks with five and six nodes. Numerical simulations have been also performed and results in agreement with experiments have been obtained. A correlation between node degree and robustness to noise has been found also in these networks.

  20. Identification of high-molecular-weight proteins with multiple EGF-like motifs by motif-trap screening.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, M; Nakajima, D; Nagase, T; Nomura, N; Seki, N; Ohara, O

    1998-07-01

    To identify large proteins with an EGF-like-motif in a systematic manner, we developed a computer-assisted method called motif-trap screening. The method exploits 5'-end single-pass sequence data obtained from a pool of cDNAs whose sizes exceed 5 kb. Using this screening procedure, we were able to identify five known and nine new genes for proteins with multiple EGF-like-motifs from 8000 redundant human brain cDNA clones. These new genes were found to encode a novel mammalian homologue of Drosophila fat protein, two seven-transmembrane proteins containing multiple cadherin and EGF-like motifs, two mammalian homologues of Drosophila slit protein, an unidentified LDL receptor-like protein, and three totally uncharacterized proteins. The organization of the domains in the proteins, together with their expression profiles and fine chromosomal locations, has indicated their biological significance, demonstrating that motif-trap screening is a powerful tool for the discovery of new genes that have been difficult to identify by conventional methods. PMID:9693030

  1. Selection against spurious promoter motifs correlates withtranslational efficiency across bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, Jeffrey L.; Francino, M. Pilar

    2007-05-01

    Because binding of RNAP to misplaced sites could compromise the efficiency of transcription, natural selection for the optimization of gene expression should regulate the distribution of DNA motifs capable of RNAP-binding across the genome. Here we analyze the distribution of the -10 promoter motifs that bind the {sigma}{sup 70} subunit of RNAP in 42 bacterial genomes. We show that selection on these motifs operates across the genome, maintaining an over-representation of -10 motifs in regulatory sequences while eliminating them from the nonfunctional and, in most cases, from the protein coding regions. In some genomes, however, -10 sites are over-represented in the coding sequences; these sites could induce pauses effecting regulatory roles throughout the length of a transcriptional unit. For nonfunctional sequences, the extent of motif under-representation varies across genomes in a manner that broadly correlates with the number of tRNA genes, a good indicator of translational speed and growth rate. This suggests that minimizing the time invested in gene transcription is an important selective pressure against spurious binding. However, selection against spurious binding is detectable in the reduced genomes of host-restricted bacteria that grow at slow rates, indicating that components of efficiency other than speed may also be important. Minimizing the number of RNAP molecules per cell required for transcription, and the corresponding energetic expense, may be most relevant in slow growers. These results indicate that genome-level properties affecting the efficiency of transcription and translation can respond in an integrated manner to optimize gene expression. The detection of selection against promoter motifs in nonfunctional regions also implies that no sequence may evolve free of selective constraints, at least in the relatively small and unstructured genomes of bacteria.

  2. Specific RNA self-assembly with minimal paranemic motifs

    PubMed Central

    Afonin, Kirill A.; Cieply, Dennis J.; Leontis, Neocles B.

    2016-01-01

    The paranemic crossover (PX) is a motif for assembling two nucleic acid molecules using Watson-Crick (WC) basepairing without unfolding pre-formed secondary structure in the individual molecules. Once formed, the paranemic assembly motif comprises adjacent parallel double helices that cross over at every possible point over the length of the motif. The interaction is reversible as it does not require denaturation of basepairs internal to each interacting molecular unit. Paranemic assembly has been demonstrated for DNA but not for RNA, and only for motifs with four or more cross-over points and lengths of five or more helical half-turns. Here we report the design of RNA molecules that paranemically assemble with the minimum number of two cross-overs spanning the major groove to form paranemic motifs with a length of three half-turns (3HT). Dissociation constants (Kds) were measured for series of molecules in which the number of basepairs between the cross-over points was varied from five to eight basepairs. The paranemic 3HT complex with six basepairs (3HT_6M) was found to be the most stable with Kd = 1×10−8 M. The half-time for kinetic exchange of the 3HT_6M complex was determined to be ~100 minutes, from which we calculated association and dissociation rate constants ka = 5.11×103 M−1sec−1 and kd = 5.11×10−5 sec−1. RNA paranemic assembly of 3HT and 5HT complexes is blocked by single-base substitutions that disrupt individual inter-molecular Watson-Crick basepairs and is restored by compensatory substitutions that restore those basepairs. The 3HT motif appears suitable for specific, programmable, and reversible tecto-RNA self-assembly for constructing artificial RNA molecular machines. PMID:18072767

  3. SPIC: A novel similarity metric for comparing transcription factor binding site motifs based on information contents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Discovering transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) is one of primary challenges to decipher complex gene regulatory networks encrypted in a genome. A set of short DNA sequences identified by a transcription factor (TF) is known as a motif, which can be expressed accurately in matrix form such as a position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM) and a position frequency matrix. Very frequently, we need to query a motif in a database of motifs by seeking its similar motifs, merge similar TFBS motifs possibly identified by the same TF, separate irrelevant motifs, or filter out spurious motifs. Therefore, a novel metric is required to seize slight differences between irrelevant motifs and highlight the similarity between motifs of the same group in all these applications. While there are already several metrics for motif similarity proposed before, their performance is still far from satisfactory for these applications. Methods A novel metric has been proposed in this paper with name as SPIC (Similarity with Position Information Contents) for measuring the similarity between a column of a motif and a column of another motif. When defining this similarity score, we consider the likelihood that the column of the first motif's PFM can be produced by the column of the second motif's PSSM, and multiply the likelihood by the information content of the column of the second motif's PSSM, and vise versa. We evaluated the performance of SPIC combined with a local or a global alignment method having a function for affine gap penalty, for computing the similarity between two motifs. We also compared SPIC with seven existing state-of-the-arts metrics for their capability of clustering motifs from the same group and retrieving motifs from a database on three datasets. Results When used jointly with the Smith-Waterman local alignment method with an affine gap penalty function (gap open penalty is equal to1, gap extension penalty is equal to 0.5), SPIC outperforms the seven

  4. Using the Gibbs Motif Sampler for Phylogenetic Footprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, William; Conlan, Sean; McCue, Lee Ann; Lawrence, Charles

    2007-07-01

    The Gibbs Motif Sampler (Gibbs) (1) is a software package used to predict conserved elements in biopolymer sequences. While the software can be used to locate conserved motifs in protein sequences, its most common use is the prediction of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in promoters upstream of gene sequences. We will describe approaches that use Gibbs to locate TFBSs in a collection of orthologous nucleotide sequences, i.e. phylogenetic footprinting. To illustrate this technique, we present examples that use Gibbs to detect binding sites for the transcription factor LexA in orthologous sequence data from representative species belonging to two different proteobacterial divisions.

  5. Nephila clavipes Flagelliform silk-like GGX motifs contribute to extensibility and spacer motifs contribute to strength in synthetic spider silk fibers.

    PubMed

    Adrianos, Sherry L; Teulé, Florence; Hinman, Michael B; Jones, Justin A; Weber, Warner S; Yarger, Jeffery L; Lewis, Randolph V

    2013-06-10

    Flagelliform spider silk is the most extensible silk fiber produced by orb weaver spiders, though not as strong as the dragline silk of the spider. The motifs found in the core of the Nephila clavipes flagelliform Flag protein are GGX, spacer, and GPGGX. Flag does not contain the polyalanine motif known to provide the strength of dragline silk. To investigate the source of flagelliform fiber strength, four recombinant proteins were produced containing variations of the three core motifs of the Nephila clavipes flagelliform Flag protein that produces this type of fiber. The as-spun fibers were processed in 80% aqueous isopropanol using a standardized process for all four fiber types, which produced improved mechanical properties. Mechanical testing of the recombinant proteins determined that the GGX motif contributes extensibility and the spacer motif contributes strength to the recombinant fibers. Recombinant protein fibers containing the spacer motif were stronger than the proteins constructed without the spacer that contained only the GGX motif or the combination of the GGX and GPGGX motifs. The mechanical and structural X-ray diffraction analysis of the recombinant fibers provide data that suggests a functional role of the spacer motif that produces tensile strength, though the spacer motif is not clearly defined structurally. These results indicate that the spacer is likely a primary contributor of strength, with the GGX motif supplying mobility to the protein network of native N. clavipes flagelliform silk fibers. PMID:23646825

  6. Redemptive Journey: The Storytelling Motif in Andersen's "The Snow Queen."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misheff, Sue

    1989-01-01

    Discusses how Hans Christian Andersen's "The Snow Queen" uses the motif of storytelling to describe the journey taken by the heroine Gerda. Identifies a story as that which is alive and active and which causes catharsis for those who participate in it. (MG)

  7. Fast, Sensitive Discovery of Conserved Genome-Wide Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Ihuegbu, Nnamdi E.; Buhler, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Regulatory sites that control gene expression are essential to the proper functioning of cells, and identifying them is critical for modeling regulatory networks. We have developed Magma (Multiple Aligner of Genomic Multiple Alignments), a software tool for multiple species, multiple gene motif discovery. Magma identifies putative regulatory sites that are conserved across multiple species and occur near multiple genes throughout a reference genome. Magma takes as input multiple alignments that can include gaps. It uses efficient clustering methods that make it about 70 times faster than PhyloNet, a previous program for this task, with slightly greater sensitivity. We ran Magma on all non-coding DNA conserved between Caenorhabditis elegans and five additional species, about 70 Mbp in total, in <4 h. We obtained 2,309 motifs with lengths of 6–20 bp, each occurring at least 10 times throughout the genome, which collectively covered about 566 kbp of the genomes, approximately 0.8% of the input. Predicted sites occurred in all types of non-coding sequence but were especially enriched in the promoter regions. Comparisons to several experimental datasets show that Magma motifs correspond to a variety of known regulatory motifs. PMID:22300316

  8. Motifs in triadic random graphs based on Steiner triple systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Marco; Reichardt, Jörg

    2013-08-01

    Conventionally, pairwise relationships between nodes are considered to be the fundamental building blocks of complex networks. However, over the last decade, the overabundance of certain subnetwork patterns, i.e., the so-called motifs, has attracted much attention. It has been hypothesized that these motifs, instead of links, serve as the building blocks of network structures. Although the relation between a network's topology and the general properties of the system, such as its function, its robustness against perturbations, or its efficiency in spreading information, is the central theme of network science, there is still a lack of sound generative models needed for testing the functional role of subgraph motifs. Our work aims to overcome this limitation. We employ the framework of exponential random graph models (ERGMs) to define models based on triadic substructures. The fact that only a small portion of triads can actually be set independently poses a challenge for the formulation of such models. To overcome this obstacle, we use Steiner triple systems (STSs). These are partitions of sets of nodes into pair-disjoint triads, which thus can be specified independently. Combining the concepts of ERGMs and STSs, we suggest generative models capable of generating ensembles of networks with nontrivial triadic Z-score profiles. Further, we discover inevitable correlations between the abundance of triad patterns, which occur solely for statistical reasons and need to be taken into account when discussing the functional implications of motif statistics. Moreover, we calculate the degree distributions of our triadic random graphs analytically.

  9. DNA containing CpG motifs induces angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Mei; Klinman, Dennis M.; Gierynska, Malgorzata; Rouse, Barry T.

    2002-06-01

    New blood vessel formation in the cornea is an essential step in the pathogenesis of a blinding immunoinflammatory reaction caused by ocular infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV). By using a murine corneal micropocket assay, we found that HSV DNA (which contains a significant excess of potentially bioactive "CpG" motifs when compared with mammalian DNA) induces angiogenesis. Moreover, synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides containing CpG motifs attract inflammatory cells and stimulate the release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which in turn triggers new blood vessel formation. In vitro, CpG DNA induces the J774A.1 murine macrophage cell line to produce VEGF. In vivo CpG-induced angiogenesis was blocked by the administration of anti-mVEGF Ab or the inclusion of "neutralizing" oligodeoxynucleotides that specifically oppose the stimulatory activity of CpG DNA. These findings establish that DNA containing bioactive CpG motifs induces angiogenesis, and suggest that CpG motifs in HSV DNA may contribute to the blinding lesions of stromal keratitis.

  10. 5. DETAIL VIEW OF THE EGYPTIAN MOTIF DECORATIVE ELEMENTS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL VIEW OF THE EGYPTIAN MOTIF DECORATIVE ELEMENTS OF BUILDING 1'S MAIN ENTRY TOWER (INCLUDING THE ENGAGED COLUMN CAPITALS, PILASTERS & CAPITALS, CORNICES, AND TERRA COTTA EAGLES); LOOKING SW FROM THE E WING ROOF. (Ryan) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Building No. 1, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

  11. Variable structure motifs for transcription factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Classically, models of DNA-transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) have been based on relatively few known instances and have treated them as sites of fixed length using position weight matrices (PWMs). Various extensions to this model have been proposed, most of which take account of dependencies between the bases in the binding sites. However, some transcription factors are known to exhibit some flexibility and bind to DNA in more than one possible physical configuration. In some cases this variation is known to affect the function of binding sites. With the increasing volume of ChIP-seq data available it is now possible to investigate models that incorporate this flexibility. Previous work on variable length models has been constrained by: a focus on specific zinc finger proteins in yeast using restrictive models; a reliance on hand-crafted models for just one transcription factor at a time; and a lack of evaluation on realistically sized data sets. Results We re-analysed binding sites from the TRANSFAC database and found motivating examples where our new variable length model provides a better fit. We analysed several ChIP-seq data sets with a novel motif search algorithm and compared the results to one of the best standard PWM finders and a recently developed alternative method for finding motifs of variable structure. All the methods performed comparably in held-out cross validation tests. Known motifs of variable structure were recovered for p53, Stat5a and Stat5b. In addition our method recovered a novel generalised version of an existing PWM for Sp1 that allows for variable length binding. This motif improved classification performance. Conclusions We have presented a new gapped PWM model for variable length DNA binding sites that is not too restrictive nor over-parameterised. Our comparison with existing tools shows that on average it does not have better predictive accuracy than existing methods. However, it does provide more interpretable

  12. Discovering common stem–loop motifs in unaligned RNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Gorodkin, Jan; Stricklin, Shawn L.; Stormo, Gary D.

    2001-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression is often accomplished by proteins binding to specific sequence motifs in mRNA molecules, to affect their translation or stability. The motifs are often composed of a combination of sequence and structural constraints such that the overall structure is preserved even though much of the primary sequence is variable. While several methods exist to discover transcriptional regulatory sites in the DNA sequences of coregulated genes, the RNA motif discovery problem is much more difficult because of covariation in the positions. We describe the combined use of two approaches for RNA structure prediction, FOLDALIGN and COVE, that together can discover and model stem–loop RNA motifs in unaligned sequences, such as UTRs from post-transcriptionally coregulated genes. We evaluate the method on two datasets, one a section of rRNA genes with randomly truncated ends so that a global alignment is not possible, and the other a hyper-variable collection of IRE-like elements that were inserted into randomized UTR sequences. In both cases the combined method identified the motifs correctly, and in the rRNA example we show that it is capable of determining the structure, which includes bulge and internal loops as well as a variable length hairpin loop. Those automated results are quantitatively evaluated and found to agree closely with structures contained in curated databases, with correlation coefficients up to 0.9. A basic server, Stem–Loop Align SearcH (SLASH), which will perform stem–loop searches in unaligned RNA sequences, is available at http://www.bioinf.au.dk/slash/. PMID:11353083

  13. An Integrated Procedure for the Structural Design of a Composite Rotor-Hydrofoil of a Water Current Turbine (WCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oller Aramayo, S. A.; Nallim, L. G.; Oller, S.

    2013-12-01

    This paper shows an integrated structural design optimization of a composite rotor-hydrofoil of a water current turbine by means the finite elements method (FEM), using a Serial/Parallel mixing theory (Rastellini et al. Comput. Struct. 86:879-896, 2008, Martinez et al., 2007, Martinez and Oller Arch. Comput. Methods. 16(4):357-397, 2009, Martinez et al. Compos. Part B Eng. 42(2011):134-144, 2010) coupled with a fluid-dynamic formulation and multi-objective optimization algorithm (Gen and Cheng 1997, Lee et al. Compos. Struct. 99:181-192, 2013, Lee et al. Compos. Struct. 94(3):1087-1096, 2012). The composite hydrofoil of the turbine rotor has been design using a reinforced laminate composites, taking into account the optimization of the carbon fiber orientation to obtain the maximum strength and lower rotational-inertia. Also, these results have been compared with a steel hydrofoil remarking the different performance on both structures. The mechanical and geometrical parameters involved in the design of this fiber-reinforced composite material are the fiber orientation, number of layers, stacking sequence and laminate thickness. Water pressure in the rotor of the turbine is obtained from a coupled fluid-dynamic simulation (CFD), whose detail can be found in the reference Oller et al. (2012). The main purpose of this paper is to achieve a very low inertia rotor minimizing the start-stop effect, because it is applied in axial water flow turbine currently in design by the authors, in which is important to take the maximum advantage of the kinetic energy. The FEM simulation codes are engineered by CIMNE (International Center for Numerical Method in Engineering, Barcelona, Spain), COMPack for the solids problem application, KRATOS for fluid dynamic application and RMOP for the structural optimization. To validate the procedure here presented, many turbine rotors made of composite materials are analyzed and three of them are compared with the steel one.

  14. FPGA implementation of motifs-based neuronal network and synchronization analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Bin; Zhu, Zechen; Yang, Shuangming; Wei, Xile; Wang, Jiang; Yu, Haitao

    2016-06-01

    Motifs in complex networks play a crucial role in determining the brain functions. In this paper, 13 kinds of motifs are implemented with Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) to investigate the relationships between the networks properties and motifs properties. We use discretization method and pipelined architecture to construct various motifs with Hindmarsh-Rose (HR) neuron as the node model. We also build a small-world network based on these motifs and conduct the synchronization analysis of motifs as well as the constructed network. We find that the synchronization properties of motif determine that of motif-based small-world network, which demonstrates effectiveness of our proposed hardware simulation platform. By imitation of some vital nuclei in the brain to generate normal discharges, our proposed FPGA-based artificial neuronal networks have the potential to replace the injured nuclei to complete the brain function in the treatment of Parkinson's disease and epilepsy.

  15. Determination of Sectional Constancy of Organic Coal-Water Fuel Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrienko, Margarita A.; Nyashina, Galina S.; Strizhak, Pavel A.

    2016-02-01

    To use widespreadly the waste of coals and oils processing in the great and the small-scale power generation, the key parameter, which is sectional constancy of promising organic coal-water fuels (OCWF), was studied. The compo-sitions of OCWF from brown and bituminous coals, filter cakes, used motor, turbine and dielectrical oils, water-oil emul-sion and special wetting agent (plasticizer) were investigated. Two modes of preparation were considered. They are with homogenizer and cavitator. It was established that the constancy did not exceed 5-7 days for the compositions of OCWF with brown coals, and 12-15 days for that compositions with bituminous coals and filter cakes. The injection of used oils in a composition of OCWF led to increase in viscosity of fuel compositions and their sectional constancy.

  16. Characterization of an RNA receptor motif that recognizes a GCGA tetraloop.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Airi; Maejima, Takaya; Matsumura, Shigeyoshi; Ikawa, Yoshiya

    2016-07-01

    Tertiary interactions between a new RNA motif and RNA tetraloops were analyzed to determine whether this new motif shows preference for a GCGA tetraloop. In the structural context of a ligase ribozyme, this motif discriminated GCGA loop from 3 other tetraloops. The affinity between the GCGA loop and its receptor is strong enough to carry out the ribozyme activity. PMID:26967268

  17. Identifiability and inference of pathway motifs by epistasis analysis.

    PubMed

    Phenix, Hilary; Perkins, Theodore; Kærn, Mads

    2013-06-01

    The accuracy of genetic network inference is limited by the assumptions used to determine if one hypothetical model is better than another in explaining experimental observations. Most previous work on epistasis analysis-in which one attempts to infer pathway relationships by determining equivalences among traits following mutations-has been based on Boolean or linear models. Here, we delineate the ultimate limits of epistasis-based inference by systematically surveying all two-gene network motifs and use symbolic algebra with arbitrary regulation functions to examine trait equivalences. Our analysis divides the motifs into equivalence classes, where different genetic perturbations result in indistinguishable experimental outcomes. We demonstrate that this partitioning can reveal important information about network architecture, and show, using simulated data, that it greatly improves the accuracy of genetic network inference methods. Because of the minimal assumptions involved, equivalence partitioning has broad applicability for gene network inference. PMID:23822501

  18. Distance conservation of transcriptional and splicing regulatory motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jun; Ding, Changjiang

    2012-09-01

    The distance conservation is a new kind of genomic evolutionary conservation. The transcriptional and splicing regulatory k-mer motifs are functionally important DNA sequence elements. We demonstrated that there exist the evolutionarily conservation of the distance between these k-mer pairs in genomic sequences. This kind of conservation is not based on the strict location of bases in genome sequences, and does not depend on excess frequency of occurrence of k-mers. By utilizing the conservation of k-mer distance it is possible to design a non-alignment-based approach to quickly identify transcriptional or splicing regulatory motifs on the genome-wide scale. In this paper we will summarize our previous studies on distance conservation, introduce the method of distance conservation and indicate the prospects of its application.

  19. A new motif for inhibitors of geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Foust, Benjamin J; Allen, Cheryl; Holstein, Sarah A; Wiemer, David F

    2016-08-15

    The enzyme geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (GGDPS) is believed to receive the substrate farnesyl diphosphate through one lipophilic channel and release the product geranylgeranyl diphosphate through another. Bisphosphonates with two isoprenoid chains positioned on the α-carbon have proven to be effective inhibitors of this enzyme. Now a new motif has been prepared with one isoprenoid chain on the α-carbon, a second included as a phosphonate ester, and the potential for a third at the α-carbon. The pivaloyloxymethyl prodrugs of several compounds based on this motif have been prepared and the resulting compounds have been tested for their ability to disrupt protein geranylgeranylation and induce cytotoxicity in myeloma cells. The initial biological studies reveal activity consistent with GGDPS inhibition, and demonstrate a structure-function relationship which is dependent on the nature of the alkyl group at the α-carbon. PMID:27338660

  20. Identifiability and inference of pathway motifs by epistasis analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phenix, Hilary; Perkins, Theodore; Kærn, Mads

    2013-06-01

    The accuracy of genetic network inference is limited by the assumptions used to determine if one hypothetical model is better than another in explaining experimental observations. Most previous work on epistasis analysis—in which one attempts to infer pathway relationships by determining equivalences among traits following mutations—has been based on Boolean or linear models. Here, we delineate the ultimate limits of epistasis-based inference by systematically surveying all two-gene network motifs and use symbolic algebra with arbitrary regulation functions to examine trait equivalences. Our analysis divides the motifs into equivalence classes, where different genetic perturbations result in indistinguishable experimental outcomes. We demonstrate that this partitioning can reveal important information about network architecture, and show, using simulated data, that it greatly improves the accuracy of genetic network inference methods. Because of the minimal assumptions involved, equivalence partitioning has broad applicability for gene network inference.

  1. Motif, the basics: an overview of the widget set

    SciTech Connect

    McClurg, F.R.

    1992-10-01

    The Motif library provides programmers with a rich set of tools for building a graphical user interface with a three-dimensional appearance and a consistent method of interaction for controlling an Unix application. This Xt-based, high-level library presents an object-oriented'' approach to program design for programmers and allows end-users the flexibility to modify attributes of the interface.

  2. Motif, the basics: an overview of the widget set

    SciTech Connect

    McClurg, F.R.

    1992-10-01

    The Motif library provides programmers with a rich set of tools for building a graphical user interface with a three-dimensional appearance and a consistent method of interaction for controlling an Unix application. This Xt-based, high-level library presents an ``object-oriented`` approach to program design for programmers and allows end-users the flexibility to modify attributes of the interface.

  3. Biosynthesis of caffeine underlying the diversity of motif B' methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Fumiyo; Mizuno, Kouichi; Kato, Misako

    2015-05-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) and theobromine (3,7-dimethylxanthine) are well-known purine alkaloids in Camellia, Coffea, Cola, Paullinia, Ilex, and Theobroma spp. The caffeine biosynthetic pathway depends on the substrate specificity of N-methyltransferases, which are members of the motif B' methyl-transferase family. The caffeine biosynthetic pathways in purine alkaloid-containing plants might have evolved in parallel with one another, consistent with different catalytic properties of the enzymes involved in these pathways. PMID:26058161

  4. Graph animals, subgraph sampling, and motif search in large networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskerville, Kim; Grassberger, Peter; Paczuski, Maya

    2007-09-01

    We generalize a sampling algorithm for lattice animals (connected clusters on a regular lattice) to a Monte Carlo algorithm for “graph animals,” i.e., connected subgraphs in arbitrary networks. As with the algorithm in [N. Kashtan , Bioinformatics 20, 1746 (2004)], it provides a weighted sample, but the computation of the weights is much faster (linear in the size of subgraphs, instead of superexponential). This allows subgraphs with up to ten or more nodes to be sampled with very high statistics, from arbitrarily large networks. Using this together with a heuristic algorithm for rapidly classifying isomorphic graphs, we present results for two protein interaction networks obtained using the tandem affinity purification (TAP) method: one of Escherichia coli with 230 nodes and 695 links, and one for yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) with roughly ten times more nodes and links. We find in both cases that most connected subgraphs are strong motifs ( Z scores >10 ) or antimotifs ( Z scores <-10 ) when the null model is the ensemble of networks with fixed degree sequence. Strong differences appear between the two networks, with dominant motifs in E. coli being (nearly) bipartite graphs and having many pairs of nodes that connect to the same neighbors, while dominant motifs in yeast tend towards completeness or contain large cliques. We also explore a number of methods that do not rely on measurements of Z scores or comparisons with null models. For instance, we discuss the influence of specific complexes like the 26S proteasome in yeast, where a small number of complexes dominate the k cores with large k and have a decisive effect on the strongest motifs with 6-8 nodes. We also present Zipf plots of counts versus rank. They show broad distributions that are not power laws, in contrast to the case when disconnected subgraphs are included.

  5. A Monte Carlo-based framework enhances the discovery and interpretation of regulatory sequence motifs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Discovery of functionally significant short, statistically overrepresented subsequence patterns (motifs) in a set of sequences is a challenging problem in bioinformatics. Oftentimes, not all sequences in the set contain a motif. These non-motif-containing sequences complicate the algorithmic discovery of motifs. Filtering the non-motif-containing sequences from the larger set of sequences while simultaneously determining the identity of the motif is, therefore, desirable and a non-trivial problem in motif discovery research. Results We describe MotifCatcher, a framework that extends the sensitivity of existing motif-finding tools by employing random sampling to effectively remove non-motif-containing sequences from the motif search. We developed two implementations of our algorithm; each built around a commonly used motif-finding tool, and applied our algorithm to three diverse chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data sets. In each case, the motif finder with the MotifCatcher extension demonstrated improved sensitivity over the motif finder alone. Our approach organizes candidate functionally significant discovered motifs into a tree, which allowed us to make additional insights. In all cases, we were able to support our findings with experimental work from the literature. Conclusions Our framework demonstrates that additional processing at the sequence entry level can significantly improve the performance of existing motif-finding tools. For each biological data set tested, we were able to propose novel biological hypotheses supported by experimental work from the literature. Specifically, in Escherichia coli, we suggested binding site motifs for 6 non-traditional LexA protein binding sites; in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we hypothesize 2 disparate mechanisms for novel binding sites of the Cse4p protein; and in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, we discoverd subtle differences in a general transcription factor (GTF) binding site motif across several data sets. We

  6. Linear motifs confer functional diversity onto splice variants

    PubMed Central

    Weatheritt, Robert J.; Davey, Norman E.; Gibson, Toby J.

    2012-01-01

    The pre-translational modification of messenger ribonucleic acids (mRNAs) by alternative promoter usage and alternative splicing is an important source of pleiotropy. Despite intensive efforts, our understanding of the functional implications of this dynamically created diversity is still incomplete. Using the available knowledge of interaction modules, particularly within intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs), we analysed the occurrences of protein modules within alternative exons. We find that regions removed or included by pre-translational variation are enriched in linear motifs suggesting that the removal or inclusion of exons containing these interaction modules is an important regulatory mechanism. In particular, we observe that PDZ-, PTB-, SH2- and WW-domain binding motifs are more likely to occur within alternative exons. We also determine that regions removed or included by alternative promoter usage are enriched in IDRs suggesting that protein isoform diversity is tightly coupled to the modulation of IDRs. This study, therefore, demonstrates that short linear motifs are key components for establishing protein diversity between splice variants. PMID:22638587

  7. Structure and ubiquitin binding of the ubiquitin-interacting motif

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher,R.; Wang, B.; Alam, S.; Higginson, D.; Robinson, H.; Sundquist, C.; Hill, C.

    2003-01-01

    Ubiquitylation is used to target proteins into a large number of different biological processes including proteasomal degradation, endocytosis, virus budding, and vacuolar protein sorting (Vps). Ubiquitylated proteins are typically recognized using one of several different conserved ubiquitin binding modules. Here, we report the crystal structure and ubiquitin binding properties of one such module, the ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM). We found that UIM peptides from several proteins involved in endocytosis and vacuolar protein sorting including Hrs, Vps27p, Stam1, and Eps15 bound specifically, but with modest affinity (K{sub d} = 0.1-1 mM), to free ubiquitin. Full affinity ubiquitin binding required the presence of conserved acidic patches at the N and C terminus of the UIM, as well as highly conserved central alanine and serine residues. NMR chemical shift perturbation mapping experiments demonstrated that all of these UIM peptides bind to the I44 surface of ubiquitin. The 1.45 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the second yeast Vps27p UIM (Vps27p-2) revealed that the ubiquitin-interacting motif forms an amphipathic helix. Although Vps27p-2 is monomeric in solution, the motif unexpectedly crystallized as an antiparallel four-helix bundle, and the potential biological implications of UIM oligomerization are therefore discussed.

  8. Maximum likelihood density modification by pattern recognition of structural motifs

    DOEpatents

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2004-04-13

    An electron density for a crystallographic structure having protein regions and solvent regions is improved by maximizing the log likelihood of a set of structures factors {F.sub.h } using a local log-likelihood function: (x)+p(.rho.(x).vertline.SOLV)p.sub.SOLV (x)+p(.rho.(x).vertline.H)p.sub.H (x)], where p.sub.PROT (x) is the probability that x is in the protein region, p(.rho.(x).vertline.PROT) is the conditional probability for .rho.(x) given that x is in the protein region, and p.sub.SOLV (x) and p(.rho.(x).vertline.SOLV) are the corresponding quantities for the solvent region, p.sub.H (x) refers to the probability that there is a structural motif at a known location, with a known orientation, in the vicinity of the point x; and p(.rho.(x).vertline.H) is the probability distribution for electron density at this point given that the structural motif actually is present. One appropriate structural motif is a helical structure within the crystallographic structure.

  9. TOPDOM: database of conservatively located domains and motifs in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Julia; Dobson, László; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The TOPDOM database—originally created as a collection of domains and motifs located consistently on the same side of the membranes in α-helical transmembrane proteins—has been updated and extended by taking into consideration consistently localized domains and motifs in globular proteins, too. By taking advantage of the recently developed CCTOP algorithm to determine the type of a protein and predict topology in case of transmembrane proteins, and by applying a thorough search for domains and motifs as well as utilizing the most up-to-date version of all source databases, we managed to reach a 6-fold increase in the size of the whole database and a 2-fold increase in the number of transmembrane proteins. Availability and implementation: TOPDOM database is available at http://topdom.enzim.hu. The webpage utilizes the common Apache, PHP5 and MySQL software to provide the user interface for accessing and searching the database. The database itself is generated on a high performance computer. Contact: tusnady.gabor@ttk.mta.hu. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153630

  10. Event Networks and the Identification of Crime Pattern Motifs.

    PubMed

    Davies, Toby; Marchione, Elio

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the use of network analysis to characterise patterns of clustering in spatio-temporal events. Such clustering is of both theoretical and practical importance in the study of crime, and forms the basis for a number of preventative strategies. However, existing analytical methods show only that clustering is present in data, while offering little insight into the nature of the patterns present. Here, we show how the classification of pairs of events as close in space and time can be used to define a network, thereby generalising previous approaches. The application of graph-theoretic techniques to these networks can then offer significantly deeper insight into the structure of the data than previously possible. In particular, we focus on the identification of network motifs, which have clear interpretation in terms of spatio-temporal behaviour. Statistical analysis is complicated by the nature of the underlying data, and we provide a method by which appropriate randomised graphs can be generated. Two datasets are used as case studies: maritime piracy at the global scale, and residential burglary in an urban area. In both cases, the same significant 3-vertex motif is found; this result suggests that incidents tend to occur not just in pairs, but in fact in larger groups within a restricted spatio-temporal domain. In the 4-vertex case, different motifs are found to be significant in each case, suggesting that this technique is capable of discriminating between clustering patterns at a finer granularity than previously possible. PMID:26605544

  11. Motif structure and cooperation in real-world complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, Mostafa; Rabiee, Hamid R.; Jalili, Mahdi

    2010-12-01

    Networks of dynamical nodes serve as generic models for real-world systems in many branches of science ranging from mathematics to physics, technology, sociology and biology. Collective behavior of agents interacting over complex networks is important in many applications. The cooperation between selfish individuals is one of the most interesting collective phenomena. In this paper we address the interplay between the motifs’ cooperation properties and their abundance in a number of real-world networks including yeast protein-protein interaction, human brain, protein structure, email communication, dolphins’ social interaction, Zachary karate club and Net-science coauthorship networks. First, the amount of cooperativity for all possible undirected subgraphs with three to six nodes is calculated. To this end, the evolutionary dynamics of the Prisoner’s Dilemma game is considered and the cooperativity of each subgraph is calculated as the percentage of cooperating agents at the end of the simulation time. Then, the three- to six-node motifs are extracted for each network. The significance of the abundance of a motif, represented by a Z-value, is obtained by comparing them with some properly randomized versions of the original network. We found that there is always a group of motifs showing a significant inverse correlation between their cooperativity amount and Z-value, i.e. the more the Z-value the less the amount of cooperativity. This suggests that networks composed of well-structured units do not have good cooperativity properties.

  12. Event Networks and the Identification of Crime Pattern Motifs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the use of network analysis to characterise patterns of clustering in spatio-temporal events. Such clustering is of both theoretical and practical importance in the study of crime, and forms the basis for a number of preventative strategies. However, existing analytical methods show only that clustering is present in data, while offering little insight into the nature of the patterns present. Here, we show how the classification of pairs of events as close in space and time can be used to define a network, thereby generalising previous approaches. The application of graph-theoretic techniques to these networks can then offer significantly deeper insight into the structure of the data than previously possible. In particular, we focus on the identification of network motifs, which have clear interpretation in terms of spatio-temporal behaviour. Statistical analysis is complicated by the nature of the underlying data, and we provide a method by which appropriate randomised graphs can be generated. Two datasets are used as case studies: maritime piracy at the global scale, and residential burglary in an urban area. In both cases, the same significant 3-vertex motif is found; this result suggests that incidents tend to occur not just in pairs, but in fact in larger groups within a restricted spatio-temporal domain. In the 4-vertex case, different motifs are found to be significant in each case, suggesting that this technique is capable of discriminating between clustering patterns at a finer granularity than previously possible. PMID:26605544

  13. GxxxG motifs hold the TIM23 complex together.

    PubMed

    Demishtein-Zohary, Keren; Marom, Milit; Neupert, Walter; Mokranjac, Dejana; Azem, Abdussalam

    2015-06-01

    Approximately 99% of the mitochondrial proteome is nucleus-encoded, synthesized in the cytosol, and subsequently imported into and sorted to the correct compartment in the organelle. The translocase of the inner mitochondrial membrane 23 (TIM23) complex is the major protein translocase of the inner membrane, and is responsible for translocation of proteins across the inner membrane and their insertion into the inner membrane. Tim23 is the central component of the complex that forms the import channel. A high-resolution structure of the import channel is still missing, and structural elements important for its function are unknown. In the present study, we analyzed the importance of the highly abundant GxxxG motifs in the transmembrane segments of Tim23 for the structural integrity of the TIM23 complex. Of 10 glycines present in the GxxxG motifs in the first, second and third transmembrane segments of Tim23, mutations of three of them in transmembrane segments 1 and 2 resulted in a lethal phenotype, and mutations of three others in a temperature-sensitive phenotype. The remaining four caused no obvious growth phenotype. Importantly, none of the mutations impaired the import and membrane integration of Tim23 precursor into mitochondria. However, the severity of growth impairment correlated with the destabilization of the TIM23 complex. We conclude that the GxxxG motifs found in the first and second transmembrane segments of Tim23 are necessary for the structural integrity of the TIM23 complex. PMID:25765297

  14. QuateXelero: An Accelerated Exact Network Motif Detection Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Khakabimamaghani, Sahand; Sharafuddin, Iman; Dichter, Norbert; Koch, Ina; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Finding motifs in biological, social, technological, and other types of networks has become a widespread method to gain more knowledge about these networks’ structure and function. However, this task is very computationally demanding, because it is highly associated with the graph isomorphism which is an NP problem (not known to belong to P or NP-complete subsets yet). Accordingly, this research is endeavoring to decrease the need to call NAUTY isomorphism detection method, which is the most time-consuming step in many existing algorithms. The work provides an extremely fast motif detection algorithm called QuateXelero, which has a Quaternary Tree data structure in the heart. The proposed algorithm is based on the well-known ESU (FANMOD) motif detection algorithm. The results of experiments on some standard model networks approve the overal superiority of the proposed algorithm, namely QuateXelero, compared with two of the fastest existing algorithms, G-Tries and Kavosh. QuateXelero is especially fastest in constructing the central data structure of the algorithm from scratch based on the input network. PMID:23874498

  15. An update on cell surface proteins containing extensin-motifs.

    PubMed

    Borassi, Cecilia; Sede, Ana R; Mecchia, Martin A; Salgado Salter, Juan D; Marzol, Eliana; Muschietti, Jorge P; Estevez, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    In recent years it has become clear that there are several molecular links that interconnect the plant cell surface continuum, which is highly important in many biological processes such as plant growth, development, and interaction with the environment. The plant cell surface continuum can be defined as the space that contains and interlinks the cell wall, plasma membrane and cytoskeleton compartments. In this review, we provide an updated view of cell surface proteins that include modular domains with an extensin (EXT)-motif followed by a cytoplasmic kinase-like domain, known as PERKs (for proline-rich extensin-like receptor kinases); with an EXT-motif and an actin binding domain, known as formins; and with extracellular hybrid-EXTs. We focus our attention on the EXT-motifs with the short sequence Ser-Pro(3-5), which is found in several different protein contexts within the same extracellular space, highlighting a putative conserved structural and functional role. A closer understanding of the dynamic regulation of plant cell surface continuum and its relationship with the downstream signalling cascade is a crucial forthcoming challenge. PMID:26475923

  16. QuateXelero: an accelerated exact network motif detection algorithm.

    PubMed

    Khakabimamaghani, Sahand; Sharafuddin, Iman; Dichter, Norbert; Koch, Ina; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Finding motifs in biological, social, technological, and other types of networks has become a widespread method to gain more knowledge about these networks' structure and function. However, this task is very computationally demanding, because it is highly associated with the graph isomorphism which is an NP problem (not known to belong to P or NP-complete subsets yet). Accordingly, this research is endeavoring to decrease the need to call NAUTY isomorphism detection method, which is the most time-consuming step in many existing algorithms. The work provides an extremely fast motif detection algorithm called QuateXelero, which has a Quaternary Tree data structure in the heart. The proposed algorithm is based on the well-known ESU (FANMOD) motif detection algorithm. The results of experiments on some standard model networks approve the overal superiority of the proposed algorithm, namely QuateXelero, compared with two of the fastest existing algorithms, G-Tries and Kavosh. QuateXelero is especially fastest in constructing the central data structure of the algorithm from scratch based on the input network. PMID:23874498

  17. A combinatorial approach to the repertoire of RNA kissing motifs; towards multiplex detection by switching hairpin aptamers.

    PubMed

    Durand, Guillaume; Dausse, Eric; Goux, Emma; Fiore, Emmanuelle; Peyrin, Eric; Ravelet, Corinne; Toulmé, Jean-Jacques

    2016-05-19

    Loop-loop (also known as kissing) interactions between RNA hairpins are involved in several mechanisms in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes such as the regulation of the plasmid copy number or the dimerization of retroviral genomes. The stability of kissing complexes relies on loop parameters (base composition, sequence and size) and base combination at the loop-loop helix - stem junctions. In order to identify kissing partners that could be used as regulatory elements or building blocks of RNA scaffolds, we analysed a pool of 5.2 × 10(6) RNA hairpins with randomized loops. We identified more than 50 pairs of kissing RNA hairpins. Two kissing motifs, 5'CCNY and 5'RYRY, generate highly stable complexes with KDs in the low nanomolar range. Such motifs were introduced in the apical loop of hairpin aptamers that switch between unfolded and folded state upon binding to their cognate target molecule, hence their name aptaswitch. The aptaswitch-ligand complex is specifically recognized by a second RNA hairpin named aptakiss through loop-loop interaction. Taking advantage of our kissing motif repertoire we engineered aptaswitch-aptakiss modules for purine derivatives, namely adenosine, GTP and theophylline and demonstrated that these molecules can be specifically and simultaneously detected by surface plasmon resonance or by fluorescence anisotropy. PMID:27067541

  18. A combinatorial approach to the repertoire of RNA kissing motifs; towards multiplex detection by switching hairpin aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Guillaume; Dausse, Eric; Goux, Emma; Fiore, Emmanuelle; Peyrin, Eric; Ravelet, Corinne; Toulmé, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Loop–loop (also known as kissing) interactions between RNA hairpins are involved in several mechanisms in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes such as the regulation of the plasmid copy number or the dimerization of retroviral genomes. The stability of kissing complexes relies on loop parameters (base composition, sequence and size) and base combination at the loop–loop helix - stem junctions. In order to identify kissing partners that could be used as regulatory elements or building blocks of RNA scaffolds, we analysed a pool of 5.2 × 106 RNA hairpins with randomized loops. We identified more than 50 pairs of kissing RNA hairpins. Two kissing motifs, 5′CCNY and 5′RYRY, generate highly stable complexes with KDs in the low nanomolar range. Such motifs were introduced in the apical loop of hairpin aptamers that switch between unfolded and folded state upon binding to their cognate target molecule, hence their name aptaswitch. The aptaswitch–ligand complex is specifically recognized by a second RNA hairpin named aptakiss through loop–loop interaction. Taking advantage of our kissing motif repertoire we engineered aptaswitch–aptakiss modules for purine derivatives, namely adenosine, GTP and theophylline and demonstrated that these molecules can be specifically and simultaneously detected by surface plasmon resonance or by fluorescence anisotropy. PMID:27067541

  19. Fabrication and characterization of reaction bonded silicon carbide/carbon nanotube composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thostenson, Erik T.; Karandikar, Prashant G.; Chou, Tsu-Wei

    2005-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes have generated considerable excitement in the scientific and engineering communities because of their exceptional mechanical and physical properties observed at the nanoscale. Carbon nanotubes possess exceptionally high stiffness and strength combined with high electrical and thermal conductivities. These novel material properties have stimulated considerable research in the development of nanotube-reinforced composites (Thostenson et al 2001 Compos. Sci. Technol. 61 1899, Thostenson et al 2005 Compos. Sci. Technol. 65 491). In this research, novel reaction bonded silicon carbide nanocomposites were fabricated using melt infiltration of silicon. A series of multi-walled carbon nanotube-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (NT-CMCs) were fabricated and the structure and properties were characterized. Here we show that carbon nanotubes are present in the as-fabricated NT-CMCs after reaction bonding at temperatures above 1400 °C. Characterization results reveal that a very small volume content of carbon nanotubes, as low as 0.3 volume %, results in a 75% reduction in electrical resistivity of the ceramic composites. A 96% decrease in electrical resistivity was observed for the ceramics with the highest nanotube volume fraction of 2.1%.

  20. Multiple Weak Linear Motifs Enhance Recruitment and Processivity in SPOP-Mediated Substrate Ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Wendy K; Grace, Christy R; Lee, Jihun; Nourse, Amanda; Marzahn, Melissa R; Watson, Edmond R; High, Anthony A; Peng, Junmin; Schulman, Brenda A; Mittag, Tanja

    2016-03-27

    Primary sequence motifs, with millimolar affinities for binding partners, are abundant in disordered protein regions. In multivalent interactions, such weak linear motifs can cooperate to recruit binding partners via avidity effects. If linear motifs recruit modifying enzymes, optimal placement of weak motifs may regulate access to modification sites. Weak motifs may thus exert physiological relevance stronger than that suggested by their affinities, but molecular mechanisms of their function are still poorly understood. Herein, we use the N-terminal disordered region of the Hedgehog transcriptional regulator Gli3 (Gli3(1-90)) to determine the role of weak motifs encoded in its primary sequence for the recruitment of its ubiquitin ligase CRL3(SPOP) and the subsequent effect on ubiquitination efficiency. The substrate adaptor SPOP binds linear motifs through its MATH (meprin and TRAF homology) domain and forms higher-order oligomers through its oligomerization domains, rendering SPOP multivalent for its substrates. Gli3 has multiple weak SPOP binding motifs. We map three such motifs in Gli3(1-90), the weakest of which has a millimolar dissociation constant. Multivalency of ligase and substrate for each other facilitates enhanced ligase recruitment and stimulates Gli3(1-90) ubiquitination in in vitro ubiquitination assays. We speculate that the weak motifs enable processivity through avidity effects and by providing steric access to lysine residues that are otherwise not prioritized for polyubiquitination. Weak motifs may generally be employed in multivalent systems to act as gatekeepers regulating post-translational modification. PMID:26475525

  1. A Novel Alignment-Free Method for Comparing Transcription Factor Binding Site Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Minli; Su, Zhengchang

    2010-01-01

    Background Transcription factor binding site (TFBS) motifs can be accurately represented by position frequency matrices (PFM) or other equivalent forms. We often need to compare TFBS motifs using their PFMs in order to search for similar motifs in a motif database, or cluster motifs according to their binding preference. The majority of current methods for motif comparison involve a similarity metric for column-to-column comparison and a method to find the optimal position alignment between the two compared motifs. In some applications, alignment-free methods might be preferred; however, few such methods with high accuracy have been described. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe a novel alignment-free method for quantifying the similarity of motifs using their PFMs by converting PFMs into k-mer vectors. The motifs could then be compared by measuring the similarity among their corresponding k-mer vectors. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrate that our method in general achieves similar performance or outperforms the existing methods for clustering motifs according to their binding preference and identifying similar motifs of transcription factors of the same family. PMID:20098703

  2. Motif-based analysis of large nucleotide data sets using MEME-ChIP

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenxiu; Noble, William S; Bailey, Timothy L

    2014-01-01

    MEME-ChIP is a web-based tool for analyzing motifs in large DNA or RNA data sets. It can analyze peak regions identified by ChIP-seq, cross-linking sites identified by cLIP-seq and related assays, as well as sets of genomic regions selected using other criteria. MEME-ChIP performs de novo motif discovery, motif enrichment analysis, motif location analysis and motif clustering, providing a comprehensive picture of the DNA or RNA motifs that are enriched in the input sequences. MEME-ChIP performs two complementary types of de novo motif discovery: weight matrix–based discovery for high accuracy; and word-based discovery for high sensitivity. Motif enrichment analysis using DNA or RNA motifs from human, mouse, worm, fly and other model organisms provides even greater sensitivity. MEME-ChIP’s interactive HTML output groups and aligns significant motifs to ease interpretation. this protocol takes less than 3 h, and it provides motif discovery approaches that are distinct and complementary to other online methods. PMID:24853928

  3. Agonist and antagonist switch DNA motifs recognized by human androgen receptor in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhong; Lan, Xun; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Wu, Dayong; Liu, Xiangtao; Ye, Zhenqing; Wang, Liguo; Sunkel, Benjamin; Grenade, Cassandra; Chen, Junsheng; Zynger, Debra L; Yan, Pearlly S; Huang, Jiaoti; Nephew, Kenneth P; Huang, Tim H-M; Lin, Shili; Clinton, Steven K; Li, Wei; Jin, Victor X; Wang, Qianben

    2015-01-01

    Human transcription factors recognize specific DNA sequence motifs to regulate transcription. It is unknown whether a single transcription factor is able to bind to distinctly different motifs on chromatin, and if so, what determines the usage of specific motifs. By using a motif-resolution chromatin immunoprecipitation-exonuclease (ChIP-exo) approach, we find that agonist-liganded human androgen receptor (AR) and antagonist-liganded AR bind to two distinctly different motifs, leading to distinct transcriptional outcomes in prostate cancer cells. Further analysis on clinical prostate tissues reveals that the binding of AR to these two distinct motifs is involved in prostate carcinogenesis. Together, these results suggest that unique ligands may switch DNA motifs recognized by ligand-dependent transcription factors in vivo. Our findings also provide a broad mechanistic foundation for understanding ligand-specific induction of gene expression profiles. PMID:25535248

  4. Agonist and antagonist switch DNA motifs recognized by human androgen receptor in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Lan, Xun; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Wu, Dayong; Liu, Xiangtao; Ye, Zhenqing; Wang, Liguo; Sunkel, Benjamin; Grenade, Cassandra; Chen, Junsheng; Zynger, Debra L; Yan, Pearlly S; Huang, Jiaoti; Nephew, Kenneth P; Huang, Tim H-M; Lin, Shili; Clinton, Steven K; Li, Wei; Jin, Victor X; Wang, Qianben

    2015-02-12

    Human transcription factors recognize specific DNA sequence motifs to regulate transcription. It is unknown whether a single transcription factor is able to bind to distinctly different motifs on chromatin, and if so, what determines the usage of specific motifs. By using a motif-resolution chromatin immunoprecipitation-exonuclease (ChIP-exo) approach, we find that agonist-liganded human androgen receptor (AR) and antagonist-liganded AR bind to two distinctly different motifs, leading to distinct transcriptional outcomes in prostate cancer cells. Further analysis on clinical prostate tissues reveals that the binding of AR to these two distinct motifs is involved in prostate carcinogenesis. Together, these results suggest that unique ligands may switch DNA motifs recognized by ligand-dependent transcription factors in vivo. Our findings also provide a broad mechanistic foundation for understanding ligand-specific induction of gene expression profiles. PMID:25535248

  5. DNA nanotechnology based on i-motif structures.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuanchen; Yang, Zhongqiang; Liu, Dongsheng

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: Most biological processes happen at the nanometer scale, and understanding the energy transformations and material transportation mechanisms within living organisms has proved challenging. To better understand the secrets of life, researchers have investigated artificial molecular motors and devices over the past decade because such systems can mimic certain biological processes. DNA nanotechnology based on i-motif structures is one system that has played an important role in these investigations. In this Account, we summarize recent advances in functional DNA nanotechnology based on i-motif structures. The i-motif is a DNA quadruplex that occurs as four stretches of cytosine repeat sequences form C·CH(+) base pairs, and their stabilization requires slightly acidic conditions. This unique property has produced the first DNA molecular motor driven by pH changes. The motor is reliable, and studies show that it is capable of millisecond running speeds, comparable to the speed of natural protein motors. With careful design, the output of these types of motors was combined to drive micrometer-sized cantilevers bend. Using established DNA nanostructure assembly and functionalization methods, researchers can easily integrate the motor within other DNA assembled structures and functional units, producing DNA molecular devices with new functions such as suprahydrophobic/suprahydrophilic smart surfaces that switch, intelligent nanopores triggered by pH changes, molecular logic gates, and DNA nanosprings. Recently, researchers have produced motors driven by light and electricity, which have allowed DNA motors to be integrated within silicon-based nanodevices. Moreover, some devices based on i-motif structures have proven useful for investigating processes within living cells. The pH-responsiveness of the i-motif structure also provides a way to control the stepwise assembly of DNA nanostructures. In addition, because of the stability of the i-motif, this

  6. SURVEY AND SUMMARY: Unusual DNA duplex and hairpin motifs

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Shan-Ho; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Wang, Andrew H.-J.

    2003-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA or double-stranded DNA has the potential to adopt a wide variety of unusual duplex and hairpin motifs in the presence (trans) or absence (cis) of ligands. Several principles for the formation of those unusual structures have been established through the observation of a number of recurring structural motifs associated with different sequences. These include: (i) internal loops of consecutive mismatches can occur in a B-DNA duplex when sheared base pairs are adjacent to each other to confer extensive cross- and intra-strand base stacking; (ii) interdigitated (zipper-like) duplex structures form instead when sheared G·A base pairs are separated by one or two pairs of purine·purine mismatches; (iii) stacking is not restricted to base, deoxyribose also exhibits the potential to do so; (iv) canonical G·C or A·T base pairs are flexible enough to exhibit considerable changes from the regular H-bonded conformation. The paired bases become stacked when bracketed by sheared G·A base pairs, or become extruded out and perpendicular to their neighboring bases in the presence of interacting drugs; (v) the purine-rich and pyrimidine-rich loop structures are notably different in nature. The purine-rich loops form compact triloop structures closed by a sheared G·A, A·A, A·C or sheared-like Ganti·Csyn base pair that is stacked by a single residue. On the other hand, the pyrimidine-rich loops with a thymidine in the first position exhibit no base pairing but are characterized by the folding of the thymidine residue into the minor groove to form a compact loop structure. Identification of such diverse duplex or hairpin motifs greatly enlarges the repertoire for unusual DNA structural formation. PMID:12736295

  7. Bioconjugatable Porphyrins Bearing a Compact Swallowtail Motif for Water Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Borbas, K. Eszter; Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.; Lindsey, Jonathan S.

    2011-01-01

    A broad range of applications requires access to water-soluble, bioconjugatable porphyrins. Branched alkyl groups attached at the branching site to the porphyrin meso position are known to impart high organic solubility. Such “swallowtail” motifs bearing a polar group (hydroxy, dihydroxyphosphoryl, dihydroxyphosphoryloxy) at the terminus of each branch have now been incorporated at a meso site in trans-AB-porphyrins. The incorporation of the swallowtail motif relies on rational synthetic methods whereby a 1,9-bis(N-propylimino)dipyrromethane (bearing a bioconjugatable tether at the 5-position) is condensed with a dipyrromethane (bearing a protected 1,5-dihydroxypent-3-yl unit at the 5-position). The two hydroxy groups in the swallowtail motif of each of the resulting zinc porphyrins can be transformed to the corresponding diphosphate or diphosphonate product. A 4-(carboxymethyloxy)phenyl group provides the bioconjugatable tether. The six such porphyrins reported here are highly water-soluble (≥20 mM at room temperature in water at pH 7) as determined by visual inspection, UV–vis absorption spectroscopy, or 1H NMR spectroscopy. Covalent attachment was carried out in aqueous solution with the unprotected porphyrin diphosphonate and a monoclonal antibody against the T-cell receptor CD3ε. The resulting conjugate performed comparably to a commercially available fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled antibody with Jurkat cells in flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy assays. Taken together, this work enables preparation of useful quantities of water-soluble, bioconjugatable porphyrins in a compact architecture for applications in the life sciences. PMID:16704201

  8. Sequence-Based Classification Using Discriminatory Motif Feature Selection

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Hao; Capurso, Daniel; Sen, Śaunak; Segal, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Most existing methods for sequence-based classification use exhaustive feature generation, employing, for example, all -mer patterns. The motivation behind such (enumerative) approaches is to minimize the potential for overlooking important features. However, there are shortcomings to this strategy. First, practical constraints limit the scope of exhaustive feature generation to patterns of length , such that potentially important, longer () predictors are not considered. Second, features so generated exhibit strong dependencies, which can complicate understanding of derived classification rules. Third, and most importantly, numerous irrelevant features are created. These concerns can compromise prediction and interpretation. While remedies have been proposed, they tend to be problem-specific and not broadly applicable. Here, we develop a generally applicable methodology, and an attendant software pipeline, that is predicated on discriminatory motif finding. In addition to the traditional training and validation partitions, our framework entails a third level of data partitioning, a discovery partition. A discriminatory motif finder is used on sequences and associated class labels in the discovery partition to yield a (small) set of features. These features are then used as inputs to a classifier in the training partition. Finally, performance assessment occurs on the validation partition. Important attributes of our approach are its modularity (any discriminatory motif finder and any classifier can be deployed) and its universality (all data, including sequences that are unaligned and/or of unequal length, can be accommodated). We illustrate our approach on two nucleosome occupancy datasets and a protein solubility dataset, previously analyzed using enumerative feature generation. Our method achieves excellent performance results, with and without optimization of classifier tuning parameters. A Python pipeline implementing the approach is available at http

  9. Identification of imine reductase-specific sequence motifs.

    PubMed

    Fademrecht, Silvia; Scheller, Philipp N; Nestl, Bettina M; Hauer, Bernhard; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Chiral amines are valuable building blocks for the production of a variety of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and other specialty chemicals. Only recently, imine reductases (IREDs) were discovered which catalyze the stereoselective reduction of imines to chiral amines. Although several IREDs were biochemically characterized in the last few years, knowledge of the reaction mechanism and the molecular basis of substrate specificity and stereoselectivity is limited. To gain further insights into the sequence-function relationships, the Imine Reductase Engineering Database (www.IRED.BioCatNet.de) was established and a systematic analysis of 530 putative IREDs was performed. A standard numbering scheme based on R-IRED-Sk was introduced to facilitate the identification and communication of structurally equivalent positions in different proteins. A conservation analysis revealed a highly conserved cofactor binding region and a predominantly hydrophobic substrate binding cleft. Two IRED-specific motifs were identified, the cofactor binding motif GLGxMGx5 [ATS]x4 Gx4 [VIL]WNR[TS]x2 [KR] and the active site motif Gx[DE]x[GDA]x[APS]x3 {K}x[ASL]x[LMVIAG]. Our results indicate a preference toward NADPH for all IREDs and explain why, despite their sequence similarity to β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases (β-HADs), no conversion of β-hydroxyacids has been observed. Superfamily-specific conservations were investigated to explore the molecular basis of their stereopreference. Based on our analysis and previous experimental results on IRED mutants, an exclusive role of standard position 187 for stereoselectivity is excluded. Alternatively, two standard positions 139 and 194 were identified which are superfamily-specifically conserved and differ in R- and S-selective enzymes. Proteins 2016; 84:600-610. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26857686

  10. Nucleic Acid i-Motif Structures in Analytical Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Alba, Joan Josep; Sadurní, Anna; Gargallo, Raimundo

    2016-09-01

    Under the appropriate experimental conditions of pH and temperature, cytosine-rich segments in DNA or RNA sequences may produce a characteristic folded structure known as an i-motif. Besides its potential role in vivo, which is still under investigation, this structure has attracted increasing interest in other fields due to its sharp, fast and reversible pH-driven conformational changes. This "on/off" switch at molecular level is being used in nanotechnology and analytical chemistry to develop nanomachines and sensors, respectively. This paper presents a review of the latest applications of this structure in the field of chemical analysis. PMID:26939549

  11. Topological defect motifs in two-dimensional Coulomb clusters.

    PubMed

    Radzvilavičius, A; Anisimovas, E

    2011-09-28

    We study the distribution of topological defects in two-dimensional Coulomb clusters with parabolic lateral confinement. The minima hopping algorithm based on molecular dynamics is used to efficiently locate the ground- and low-energy metastable states, and their structure is analysed by means of the Delaunay triangulation. The size, structure and distribution of geometry-induced lattice imperfections strongly depends on the system size and the energetic state. Besides isolated disclinations and dislocations, classification of defect motifs includes defect compounds-grain boundaries, rosette defects, vacancies and interstitial particles. Proliferation of defects in metastable configurations destroys the orientational order of the Wigner lattice. PMID:21891854

  12. Genome wide identification of regulatory motifs in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Mwangi, Michael M; Siggia, Eric D

    2003-01-01

    Background To explain the vastly different phenotypes exhibited by the same organism under different conditions, it is essential that we understand how the organism's genes are coordinately regulated. While there are many excellent tools for predicting sequences encoding proteins or RNA genes, few algorithms exist to predict regulatory sequences on a genome wide scale with no prior information. Results To identify motifs involved in the control of transcription, an algorithm was developed that searches upstream of operons for improbably frequent dimers. The algorithm was applied to the B. subtilis genome, which is predicted to encode for approximately 200 DNA binding proteins. The dimers found to be over-represented could be clustered into 317 distinct groups, each thought to represent a class of motifs uniquely recognized by some transcription factor. For each cluster of dimers, a representative weight matrix was derived and scored over the regions upstream of the operons to predict the sites recognized by the cluster's factor, and a putative regulon of the operons immediately downstream of the sites was inferred. The distribution in number of operons per predicted regulon is comparable to that for well characterized transcription factors. The most highly over-represented dimers matched σA, the T-box, and σW sites. We have evidence to suggest that at least 52 of our clusters of dimers represent actual regulatory motifs, based on the groups' weight matrix matches to experimentally characterized sites, the functional similarity of the component operons of the groups' regulons, and the positional biases of the weight matrix matches. All predictions are assigned a significance value, and thresholds are set to avoid false positives. Where possible, we examine our false negatives, drawing examples from known regulatory motifs and regulons inferred from RNA expression data. Conclusions We have demonstrated that in the case of B. subtilis our algorithm allows for the

  13. Fast and Accurate Discovery of Degenerate Linear Motifs in Protein Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Emmanuel D.; Michnick, Stephen W.

    2014-01-01

    Linear motifs mediate a wide variety of cellular functions, which makes their characterization in protein sequences crucial to understanding cellular systems. However, the short length and degenerate nature of linear motifs make their discovery a difficult problem. Here, we introduce MotifHound, an algorithm particularly suited for the discovery of small and degenerate linear motifs. MotifHound performs an exact and exhaustive enumeration of all motifs present in proteins of interest, including all of their degenerate forms, and scores the overrepresentation of each motif based on its occurrence in proteins of interest relative to a background (e.g., proteome) using the hypergeometric distribution. To assess MotifHound, we benchmarked it together with state-of-the-art algorithms. The benchmark consists of 11,880 sets of proteins from S. cerevisiae; in each set, we artificially spiked-in one motif varying in terms of three key parameters, (i) number of occurrences, (ii) length and (iii) the number of degenerate or “wildcard” positions. The benchmark enabled the evaluation of the impact of these three properties on the performance of the different algorithms. The results showed that MotifHound and SLiMFinder were the most accurate in detecting degenerate linear motifs. Interestingly, MotifHound was 15 to 20 times faster at comparable accuracy and performed best in the discovery of highly degenerate motifs. We complemented the benchmark by an analysis of proteins experimentally shown to bind the FUS1 SH3 domain from S. cerevisiae. Using the full-length protein partners as sole information, MotifHound recapitulated most experimentally determined motifs binding to the FUS1 SH3 domain. Moreover, these motifs exhibited properties typical of SH3 binding peptides, e.g., high intrinsic disorder and evolutionary conservation, despite the fact that none of these properties were used as prior information. MotifHound is available (http://michnick.bcm.umontreal.ca or http

  14. A fast weak motif-finding algorithm based on community detection in graphs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Identification of transcription factor binding sites (also called ‘motif discovery’) in DNA sequences is a basic step in understanding genetic regulation. Although many successful programs have been developed, the problem is far from being solved on account of diversity in gene expression/regulation and the low specificity of binding sites. State-of-the-art algorithms have their own constraints (e.g., high time or space complexity for finding long motifs, low precision in identification of weak motifs, or the OOPS constraint: one occurrence of the motif instance per sequence) which limit their scope of application. Results In this paper, we present a novel and fast algorithm we call TFBSGroup. It is based on community detection from a graph and is used to discover long and weak (l,d) motifs under the ZOMOPS constraint (zero, one or multiple occurrence(s) of the motif instance(s) per sequence), where l is the length of a motif and d is the maximum number of mutations between a motif instance and the motif itself. Firstly, TFBSGroup transforms the (l, d) motif search in sequences to focus on the discovery of dense subgraphs within a graph. It identifies these subgraphs using a fast community detection method for obtaining coarse-grained candidate motifs. Next, it greedily refines these candidate motifs towards the true motif within their own communities. Empirical studies on synthetic (l, d) samples have shown that TFBSGroup is very efficient (e.g., it can find true (18, 6), (24, 8) motifs within 30 seconds). More importantly, the algorithm has succeeded in rapidly identifying motifs in a large data set of prokaryotic promoters generated from the Escherichia coli database RegulonDB. The algorithm has also accurately identified motifs in ChIP-seq data sets for 12 mouse transcription factors involved in ES cell pluripotency and self-renewal. Conclusions Our novel heuristic algorithm, TFBSGroup, is able to quickly identify nearly exact matches for long

  15. Automated protein motif generation in the structure-based protein function prediction tool ProMOL.

    PubMed

    Osipovitch, Mikhail; Lambrecht, Mitchell; Baker, Cameron; Madha, Shariq; Mills, Jeffrey L; Craig, Paul A; Bernstein, Herbert J

    2015-12-01

    ProMOL, a plugin for the PyMOL molecular graphics system, is a structure-based protein function prediction tool. ProMOL includes a set of routines for building motif templates that are used for screening query structures for enzyme active sites. Previously, each motif template was generated manually and required supervision in the optimization of parameters for sensitivity and selectivity. We developed an algorithm and workflow for the automation of motif building and testing routines in ProMOL. The algorithm uses a set of empirically derived parameters for optimization and requires little user intervention. The automated motif generation algorithm was first tested in a performance comparison with a set of manually generated motifs based on identical active sites from the same 112 PDB entries. The two sets of motifs were equally effective in identifying alignments with homologs and in rejecting alignments with unrelated structures. A second set of 296 active site motifs were generated automatically, based on Catalytic Site Atlas entries with literature citations, as an expansion of the library of existing manually generated motif templates. The new motif templates exhibited comparable performance to the existing ones in terms of hit rates against native structures, homologs with the same EC and Pfam designations, and randomly selected unrelated structures with a different EC designation at the first EC digit, as well as in terms of RMSD values obtained from local structural alignments of motifs and query structures. This research is supported by NIH grant GM078077. PMID:26573864

  16. Systematic discovery and characterization of regulatory motifs in ENCODE TF binding experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kheradpour, Pouya; Kellis, Manolis

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in technology have led to a dramatic increase in the number of available transcription factor ChIP-seq and ChIP-chip data sets. Understanding the motif content of these data sets is an important step in understanding the underlying mechanisms of regulation. Here we provide a systematic motif analysis for 427 human ChIP-seq data sets using motifs curated from the literature and also discovered de novo using five established motif discovery tools. We use a systematic pipeline for calculating motif enrichment in each data set, providing a principled way for choosing between motif variants found in the literature and for flagging potentially problematic data sets. Our analysis confirms the known specificity of 41 of the 56 analyzed factor groups and reveals motifs of potential cofactors. We also use cell type-specific binding to find factors active in specific conditions. The resource we provide is accessible both for browsing a small number of factors and for performing large-scale systematic analyses. We provide motif matrices, instances and enrichments in each of the ENCODE data sets. The motifs discovered here have been used in parallel studies to validate the specificity of antibodies, understand cooperativity between data sets and measure the variation of motif binding across individuals and species. PMID:24335146

  17. Intragenic motifs regulate the transcriptional complexity of Pkhd1/PKHD1

    PubMed Central

    Boddu, Ravindra; Yang, Chaozhe; O’Connor, Amber K.; Hendrickson, Robert Curtis; Boone, Braden; Cui, Xiangqin; Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel; Igarashi, Peter; Onuchic, Luiz F.; Germino, Gregory G.

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) results from mutations in the human PKHD1 gene. Both this gene, and its mouse ortholog, Pkhd1, are primarily expressed in renal and biliary ductal structures. The mouse protein product, fibrocystin/polyductin complex (FPC), is a 445-kDa protein encoded by a 67-exon transcript that spans >500 kb of genomic DNA. In the current study, we observed multiple alternatively spliced Pkhd1 transcripts that varied in size and exon composition in embryonic mouse kidney, liver, and placenta samples, as well as among adult mouse pancreas, brain, heart, lung, testes, liver, and kidney. Using reverse transcription PCR and RNASeq, we identified 22 novel Pkhd1 kidney transcripts with unique exon junctions. Various mechanisms of alternative splicing were observed, including exon skipping, use of alternate acceptor/donor splice sites, and inclusion of novel exons. Bioinformatic analyses identified, and exon-trapping minigene experiments validated, consensus binding sites for serine/arginine-rich proteins that modulate alternative splicing. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we examined the functional importance of selected splice enhancers. In addition, we demonstrated that many of the novel transcripts were polysome bound, thus likely translated. Finally, we determined that the human PKHD1 R760H missense variant alters a splice enhancer motif that disrupts exon splicing in vitro and is predicted to truncate the protein. Taken together, these data provide evidence of the complex transcriptional regulation of Pkhd1/PKHD1 and identified motifs that regulate its splicing. Our studies indicate that Pkhd1/PKHD1 transcription is modulated, in part by intragenic factors, suggesting that aberrant PKHD1 splicing represents an unappreciated pathogenic mechanism in ARPKD. PMID:24984783

  18. Prevalent RNA recognition motif duplication in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yihsuan S; Gomez, Shawn M; Wang, Zefeng

    2014-05-01

    The sequence-specific recognition of RNA by proteins is mediated through various RNA binding domains, with the RNA recognition motif (RRM) being the most frequent and present in >50% of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Many RBPs contain multiple RRMs, and it is unclear how each RRM contributes to the binding specificity of the entire protein. We found that RRMs within the same RBP (i.e., sibling RRMs) tend to have significantly higher similarity than expected by chance. Sibling RRM pairs from RBPs shared by multiple species tend to have lower similarity than those found only in a single species, suggesting that multiple RRMs within the same protein might arise from domain duplication followed by divergence through random mutations. This finding is exemplified by a recent RRM domain duplication in DAZ proteins and an ancient duplication in PABP proteins. Additionally, we found that different similarities between sibling RRMs are associated with distinct functions of an RBP and that the RBPs tend to contain repetitive sequences with low complexity. Taken together, this study suggests that the number of RBPs with multiple RRMs has expanded in mammals and that the multiple sibling RRMs may recognize similar target motifs in a cooperative manner. PMID:24667216

  19. Proline rich motifs as drug targets in immune mediated disorders.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Mythily; Dunker, A Keith

    2012-01-01

    The current version of the human immunome network consists of nearly 1400 interactions involving approximately 600 proteins. Intermolecular interactions mediated by proline-rich motifs (PRMs) are observed in many facets of the immune response. The proline-rich regions are known to preferentially adopt a polyproline type II helical conformation, an extended structure that facilitates transient intermolecular interactions such as signal transduction, antigen recognition, cell-cell communication and cytoskeletal organization. The propensity of both the side chain and the backbone carbonyls of the polyproline type II helix to participate in the interface interaction makes it an excellent recognition motif. An advantage of such distinct chemical features is that the interactions can be discriminatory even in the absence of high affinities. Indeed, the immune response is mediated by well-orchestrated low-affinity short-duration intermolecular interactions. The proline-rich regions are predominantly localized in the solvent-exposed regions such as the loops, intrinsically disordered regions, or between domains that constitute the intermolecular interface. Peptide mimics of the PRM have been suggested as potential antagonists of intermolecular interactions. In this paper, we discuss novel PRM-mediated interactions in the human immunome that potentially serve as attractive targets for immunomodulation and drug development for inflammatory and autoimmune pathologies. PMID:22666276

  20. Phosphotyrosine Substrate Sequence Motifs for Dual Specificity Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bryan M.; Keasey, Sarah L.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Lountos, George T.; Dyas, Beverly K.; Cherry, Scott; Raran-Kurussi, Sreejith; Waugh, David S.; Ulrich, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases dephosphorylate tyrosine residues of proteins, whereas, dual specificity phosphatases (DUSPs) are a subgroup of protein tyrosine phosphatases that dephosphorylate not only Tyr(P) residue, but also the Ser(P) and Thr(P) residues of proteins. The DUSPs are linked to the regulation of many cellular functions and signaling pathways. Though many cellular targets of DUSPs are known, the relationship between catalytic activity and substrate specificity is poorly defined. We investigated the interactions of peptide substrates with select DUSPs of four types: MAP kinases (DUSP1 and DUSP7), atypical (DUSP3, DUSP14, DUSP22 and DUSP27), viral (variola VH1), and Cdc25 (A-C). Phosphatase recognition sites were experimentally determined by measuring dephosphorylation of 6,218 microarrayed Tyr(P) peptides representing confirmed and theoretical phosphorylation motifs from the cellular proteome. A broad continuum of dephosphorylation was observed across the microarrayed peptide substrates for all phosphatases, suggesting a complex relationship between substrate sequence recognition and optimal activity. Further analysis of peptide dephosphorylation by hierarchical clustering indicated that DUSPs could be organized by substrate sequence motifs, and peptide-specificities by phylogenetic relationships among the catalytic domains. The most highly dephosphorylated peptides represented proteins from 29 cell-signaling pathways, greatly expanding the list of potential targets of DUSPs. These newly identified DUSP substrates will be important for examining structure-activity relationships with physiologically relevant targets. PMID:26302245

  1. A motif for reversible nitric oxide interactions in metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiyu; Melzer, Marie M; Sen, S Nermin; Çelebi-Ölçüm, Nihan; Warren, Timothy H

    2016-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) participates in numerous biological processes, such as signalling in the respiratory system and vasodilation in the cardiovascular system. Many metal-mediated processes involve direct reaction of NO to form a metal-nitrosyl (M-NO), as occurs at the Fe(2+) centres of soluble guanylate cyclase or cytochrome c oxidase. However, some copper electron-transfer proteins that bear a type 1 Cu site (His2Cu-Cys) reversibly bind NO by an unknown motif. Here, we use model complexes of type 1 Cu sites based on tris(pyrazolyl)borate copper thiolates [Cu(II)]-SR to unravel the factors involved in NO reactivity. Addition of NO provides the fully characterized S-nitrosothiol adduct [Cu(I)](κ(1)-N(O)SR), which reversibly loses NO on purging with an inert gas. Computational analysis outlines a low-barrier pathway for the capture and release of NO. These findings suggest a new motif for reversible binding of NO at bioinorganic metal centres that can interconvert NO and RSNO molecular signals at copper sites. PMID:27325092

  2. Ultrasensitive response motifs: basic amplifiers in molecular signalling networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Bhattacharya, Sudin; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2013-01-01

    Multi-component signal transduction pathways and gene regulatory circuits underpin integrated cellular responses to perturbations. A recurring set of network motifs serve as the basic building blocks of these molecular signalling networks. This review focuses on ultrasensitive response motifs (URMs) that amplify small percentage changes in the input signal into larger percentage changes in the output response. URMs generally possess a sigmoid input–output relationship that is steeper than the Michaelis–Menten type of response and is often approximated by the Hill function. Six types of URMs can be commonly found in intracellular molecular networks and each has a distinct kinetic mechanism for signal amplification. These URMs are: (i) positive cooperative binding, (ii) homo-multimerization, (iii) multistep signalling, (iv) molecular titration, (v) zero-order covalent modification cycle and (vi) positive feedback. Multiple URMs can be combined to generate highly switch-like responses. Serving as basic signal amplifiers, these URMs are essential for molecular circuits to produce complex nonlinear dynamics, including multistability, robust adaptation and oscillation. These dynamic properties are in turn responsible for higher-level cellular behaviours, such as cell fate determination, homeostasis and biological rhythm. PMID:23615029

  3. Evolutionary optimization of transcription factor binding motif detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhao; Wang, Ze; Mai, Guoqin; Luo, Youxi; Zhao, Miaomiao; Zhou, Fengfeng

    2015-01-01

    All the cell types are under strict control of how their genes are transcribed into expressed transcripts by the temporally dynamic orchestration of the transcription factor binding activities. Given a set of known binding sites (BSs) of a given transcription factor (TF), computational TFBS screening technique represents a cost efficient and large scale strategy to complement the experimental ones. There are two major classes of computational TFBS prediction algorithms based on the tertiary and primary structures, respectively. A tertiary structure based algorithm tries to calculate the binding affinity between a query DNA fragment and the tertiary structure of the given TF. Due to the limited number of available TF tertiary structures, primary structure based TFBS prediction algorithm is a necessary complementary technique for large scale TFBS screening. This study proposes a novel evolutionary algorithm to randomly mutate the weights of different positions in the binding motif of a TF, so that the overall TFBS prediction accuracy is optimized. The comparison with the most widely used algorithm, Position Weight Matrix (PWM), suggests that our algorithm performs better or the same level in all the performance measurements, including sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and Matthews correlation coefficient. Our data also suggests that it is necessary to remove the widely used assumption of independence between motif positions. The supplementary material may be found at: http://www.healthinformaticslab.org/supp/ . PMID:25387969

  4. Applying Side-chain Flexibility in Motifs for Protein Docking

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Lin, Feng; Yang, Jian-Li; Wang, Hong-Rui; Liu, Xiu-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Conventional rigid docking algorithms have been unsatisfactory in their computational results, largely due to the fact that protein structures are flexible in live environments. In response, we propose to introduce the side-chain flexibility in protein motif into the docking. First, the Morse theory is applied to curvature labeling and surface region growing, for segmentation of the protein surface into smaller patches. Then, the protein is described by an ensemble of conformations that incorporate the flexibility of interface side chains and are sampled using rotamers. Next, a 3D rotation invariant shape descriptor is proposed to deal with the flexible motifs and surface patches; thus, pairwise complementarity matching is needed only between the convex patches of ligand and the concave patches of receptor. The iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm is implemented for geometric alignment of the two 3D protein surface patches. Compared with the fast Fourier transform-based global geometric matching algorithm and other methods, our FlexDock system generates much less false-positive docking results, which benefits identification of the complementary candidates. Our computational experiments show the advantages of the proposed flexible docking algorithm over its counterparts. PMID:26508871

  5. Applying Side-chain Flexibility in Motifs for Protein Docking.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Lin, Feng; Yang, Jian-Li; Wang, Hong-Rui; Liu, Xiu-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Conventional rigid docking algorithms have been unsatisfactory in their computational results, largely due to the fact that protein structures are flexible in live environments. In response, we propose to introduce the side-chain flexibility in protein motif into the docking. First, the Morse theory is applied to curvature labeling and surface region growing, for segmentation of the protein surface into smaller patches. Then, the protein is described by an ensemble of conformations that incorporate the flexibility of interface side chains and are sampled using rotamers. Next, a 3D rotation invariant shape descriptor is proposed to deal with the flexible motifs and surface patches; thus, pairwise complementarity matching is needed only between the convex patches of ligand and the concave patches of receptor. The iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm is implemented for geometric alignment of the two 3D protein surface patches. Compared with the fast Fourier transform-based global geometric matching algorithm and other methods, our FlexDock system generates much less false-positive docking results, which benefits identification of the complementary candidates. Our computational experiments show the advantages of the proposed flexible docking algorithm over its counterparts. PMID:26508871

  6. Proline Rich Motifs as Drug Targets in Immune Mediated Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Mythily; Dunker, A. Keith

    2012-01-01

    The current version of the human immunome network consists of nearly 1400 interactions involving approximately 600 proteins. Intermolecular interactions mediated by proline-rich motifs (PRMs) are observed in many facets of the immune response. The proline-rich regions are known to preferentially adopt a polyproline type II helical conformation, an extended structure that facilitates transient intermolecular interactions such as signal transduction, antigen recognition, cell-cell communication and cytoskeletal organization. The propensity of both the side chain and the backbone carbonyls of the polyproline type II helix to participate in the interface interaction makes it an excellent recognition motif. An advantage of such distinct chemical features is that the interactions can be discriminatory even in the absence of high affinities. Indeed, the immune response is mediated by well-orchestrated low-affinity short-duration intermolecular interactions. The proline-rich regions are predominantly localized in the solvent-exposed regions such as the loops, intrinsically disordered regions, or between domains that constitute the intermolecular interface. Peptide mimics of the PRM have been suggested as potential antagonists of intermolecular interactions. In this paper, we discuss novel PRM-mediated interactions in the human immunome that potentially serve as attractive targets for immunomodulation and drug development for inflammatory and autoimmune pathologies. PMID:22666276

  7. Computing distribution of scale independent motifs in biological sequences

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Jonas S; Vinga, Susana

    2006-01-01

    The use of Chaos Game Representation (CGR) or its generalization, Universal Sequence Maps (USM), to describe the distribution of biological sequences has been found objectionable because of the fractal structure of that coordinate system. Consequently, the investigation of distribution of symbolic motifs at multiple scales is hampered by an inexact association between distance and sequence dissimilarity. A solution to this problem could unleash the use of iterative maps as phase-state representation of sequences where its statistical properties can be conveniently investigated. In this study a family of kernel density functions is described that accommodates the fractal nature of iterative function representations of symbolic sequences and, consequently, enables the exact investigation of sequence motifs of arbitrary lengths in that scale-independent representation. Furthermore, the proposed kernel density includes both Markovian succession and currently used alignment-free sequence dissimilarity metrics as special solutions. Therefore, the fractal kernel described is in fact a generalization that provides a common framework for a diverse suite of sequence analysis techniques. PMID:17049089

  8. Over-represented localized sequence motifs in ribosomal protein gene promoters of basal metazoans.

    PubMed

    Perina, Drago; Korolija, Marina; Roller, Maša; Harcet, Matija; Jeličić, Branka; Mikoč, Andreja; Cetković, Helena

    2011-07-01

    Equimolecular presence of ribosomal proteins (RPs) in the cell is needed for ribosome assembly and is achieved by synchronized expression of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) with promoters of similar strengths. Over-represented motifs of RPG promoter regions are identified as targets for specific transcription factors. Unlike RPs, those motifs are not conserved between mammals, drosophila, and yeast. We analyzed RPGs proximal promoter regions of three basal metazoans with sequenced genomes: sponge, cnidarian, and placozoan and found common features, such as 5'-terminal oligopyrimidine tracts and TATA-boxes. Furthermore, we identified over-represented motifs, some of which displayed the highest similarity to motifs abundant in human RPG promoters and not present in Drosophila or yeast. Our results indicate that humans over-represented motifs, as well as corresponding domains of transcription factors, were established very early in metazoan evolution. The fast evolving nature of RPGs regulatory network leads to formation of other, lineage specific, over-represented motifs. PMID:21457775

  9. Hydrogen-bond motifs in the crystals of hydrophobic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Fábián, László; Chisholm, James A; Galek, Peter T A; Motherwell, W D Samuel; Feeder, Neil

    2008-08-01

    A computer program has been developed to survey a set of crystal structures for hydrogen-bond motifs. Possible ring and chain motifs are generated automatically from a user-defined list of interacting molecular fragments and intermolecular interactions. The new program was used to analyse the hydrogen-bond networks in the crystals of 52 zwitterionic alpha-amino acids. All the possible chain motifs (repeating 1-4 molecules) are frequent, while the frequency of ring motifs (2-6 molecules) ranges from 0 to 85% of the structures. The list of motifs displayed by each structure reveals structural similarities and it can be used to compare polymorphs. The motifs formed in cocrystals of alpha-amino acids and in crystals of beta- and gamma-amino acids are similar to those of alpha-amino acids. PMID:18641453

  10. Coordinated Action of Two Double-Stranded RNA Binding Motifs and an RGG Motif Enables Nuclear Factor 90 To Flexibly Target Different RNA Substrates.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Tobias; Knick, Paul; Lilie, Hauke; Friedrich, Susann; Golbik, Ralph Peter; Behrens, Sven-Erik

    2016-02-16

    The mechanisms of how RNA binding proteins (RBP) bind to and distinguish different RNA molecules are yet uncertain. Here, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the RNA binding properties of multidomain RBP nuclear factor 90 (NF90) by investigating specifically the functional activities of two double-stranded RNA binding motifs (dsRBM) and an RGG motif in the protein's unstructured C-terminus. By comparison of the RNA binding affinities of several NF90 variants and their modes of binding to a set of defined RNA molecules, the activities of the motifs turned out to be very different. While dsRBM1 contributes little to RNA binding, dsRBM2 is essential for effective binding of double-stranded RNA. The protein's immediate C-terminus, including the RGG motif, is indispensable for interactions of the protein with single-stranded RNA, and the RGG motif decisively contributes to NF90's overall RNA binding properties. Conformational studies, which compared wild-type NF90 with a variant that contains a pseudophosphorylated residue in the RGG motif, suggest that the NF90 C-terminus is involved in conformational changes in the protein after RNA binding, with the RGG motif acting as a central regulatory element. In summary, our data propose a concerted action of all RNA binding motifs within the frame of the full-length protein, which may be controlled by regulation of the activity of the RGG motif, e.g., by phosphorylation. This multidomain interplay enables the RBP NF90 to discriminate RNA features by dynamic and adaptable interactions. PMID:26795062

  11. Transition from winnerless competition to synchronization in time-delayed neuronal motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Li, P. J.; Wu, F. P.; Wu, W. J.; Jiang, M.; Chen, L.; Qi, G. X.; Huang, H. B.

    2012-03-01

    The dynamics of brain functional motifs are studied. It is shown that different rhythms can occur in the motifs when time delay is taken into account. These rhythms include synchronization, winnerless competition (WLC) and "two plus one" (TPO). The main discovery is that the transition from WLC to synchronization can be induced simply by time delay. It is also concluded that some medium time delay is needed to achieve WLC in the realistic case. The motifs composed of heterogeneous neurons are also considered.

  12. Repulsive parallel MCMC algorithm for discovering diverse motifs from large sequence sets

    PubMed Central

    Ikebata, Hisaki; Yoshida, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: The motif discovery problem consists of finding recurring patterns of short strings in a set of nucleotide sequences. This classical problem is receiving renewed attention as most early motif discovery methods lack the ability to handle large data of recent genome-wide ChIP studies. New ChIP-tailored methods focus on reducing computation time and pay little regard to the accuracy of motif detection. Unlike such methods, our method focuses on increasing the detection accuracy while maintaining the computation efficiency at an acceptable level. The major advantage of our method is that it can mine diverse multiple motifs undetectable by current methods. Results: The repulsive parallel Markov chain Monte Carlo (RPMCMC) algorithm that we propose is a parallel version of the widely used Gibbs motif sampler. RPMCMC is run on parallel interacting motif samplers. A repulsive force is generated when different motifs produced by different samplers near each other. Thus, different samplers explore different motifs. In this way, we can detect much more diverse motifs than conventional methods can. Through application to 228 transcription factor ChIP-seq datasets of the ENCODE project, we show that the RPMCMC algorithm can find many reliable cofactor interacting motifs that existing methods are unable to discover. Availability and implementation: A C++ implementation of RPMCMC and discovered cofactor motifs for the 228 ENCODE ChIP-seq datasets are available from http://daweb.ism.ac.jp/yoshidalab/motif. Contact: ikebata.hisaki@ism.ac.jp, yoshidar@ism.ac.jp Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available from Bioinformatics online. PMID:25583120

  13. Transcription factor and microRNA-regulated network motifs for cancer and signal transduction networks

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Molecular networks are the basis of biological processes. Such networks can be decomposed into smaller modules, also known as network motifs. These motifs show interesting dynamical behaviors, in which co-operativity effects between the motif components play a critical role in human diseases. We have developed a motif-searching algorithm, which is able to identify common motif types from the cancer networks and signal transduction networks (STNs). Some of the network motifs are interconnected which can be merged together and form more complex structures, the so-called coupled motif structures (CMS). These structures exhibit mixed dynamical behavior, which may lead biological organisms to perform specific functions. Results In this study, we integrate transcription factors (TFs), microRNAs (miRNAs), miRNA targets and network motifs information to build the cancer-related TF-miRNA-motif networks (TMMN). This allows us to examine the role of network motifs in cancer formation at different levels of regulation, i.e. transcription initiation (TF → miRNA), gene-gene interaction (CMS), and post-transcriptional regulation (miRNA → target genes). Among the cancer networks and STNs we considered, it is found that there is a substantial amount of crosstalking through motif interconnections, in particular, the crosstalk between prostate cancer network and PI3K-Akt STN. Conclusions To validate the role of network motifs in cancer formation, several examples are presented which demonstrated the effectiveness of the present approach. A web-based platform has been set up which can be accessed at: http://ppi.bioinfo.asia.edu.tw/pathway/. It is very likely that our results can supply very specific CMS missing information for certain cancer types, it is an indispensable tool for cancer biology research. PMID:25707690

  14. Methods and compositions for targeting macromolecules into the nucleus

    DOEpatents

    Chook, Yuh Min

    2013-06-25

    The present invention includes compositions, methods and kits for directing an agent across the nuclear membrane of a cell. The present invention includes a Karyopherin beta2 translocation motif in a polypeptide having a slightly positively charged region or a slightly hydrophobic region and one or more R/K/H-X.sub.(2-5)-P-Y motifs. The polypeptide targets the agent into the cell nucleus.

  15. D-MATRIX: A web tool for constructing weight matrix of conserved DNA motifs

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Naresh; Mishra, Manoj; Khan, Feroz; Meena, Abha; Sharma, Ashok

    2009-01-01

    Despite considerable efforts to date, DNA motif prediction in whole genome remains a challenge for researchers. Currently the genome wide motif prediction tools required either direct pattern sequence (for single motif) or weight matrix (for multiple motifs). Although there are known motif pattern databases and tools for genome level prediction but no tool for weight matrix construction. Considering this, we developed a D-MATRIX tool which predicts the different types of weight matrix based on user defined aligned motif sequence set and motif width. For retrieval of known motif sequences user can access the commonly used databases such as TFD, RegulonDB, DBTBS, Transfac. D­MATRIX program uses a simple statistical approach for weight matrix construction, which can be converted into different file formats according to user requirement. It provides the possibility to identify the conserved motifs in the co­regulated genes or whole genome. As example, we successfully constructed the weight matrix of LexA transcription factor binding site with the help of known sos­box cis­regulatory elements in Deinococcus radiodurans genome. The algorithm is implemented in C-Sharp and wrapped in ASP.Net to maintain a user friendly web interface. D­MATRIX tool is accessible through the CIMAP domain network. Availability http://203.190.147.116/dmatrix/ PMID:19759861

  16. Comparative genomic analysis of upstream miRNA regulatory motifs in Caenorhabditis.

    PubMed

    Jovelin, Richard; Krizus, Aldis; Taghizada, Bakhtiyar; Gray, Jeremy C; Phillips, Patrick C; Claycomb, Julie M; Cutter, Asher D

    2016-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) comprise a class of short noncoding RNA molecules that play diverse developmental and physiological roles by controlling mRNA abundance and protein output of the vast majority of transcripts. Despite the importance of miRNAs in regulating gene function, we still lack a complete understanding of how miRNAs themselves are transcriptionally regulated. To fill this gap, we predicted regulatory sequences by searching for abundant short motifs located upstream of miRNAs in eight species of Caenorhabditis nematodes. We identified three conserved motifs across the Caenorhabditis phylogeny that show clear signatures of purifying selection from comparative genomics, patterns of nucleotide changes in motifs of orthologous miRNAs, and correlation between motif incidence and miRNA expression. We then validated our predictions with transgenic green fluorescent protein reporters and site-directed mutagenesis for a subset of motifs located in an enhancer region upstream of let-7 We demonstrate that a CT-dinucleotide motif is sufficient for proper expression of GFP in the seam cells of adult C. elegans, and that two other motifs play incremental roles in combination with the CT-rich motif. Thus, functional tests of sequence motifs identified through analysis of molecular evolutionary signatures provide a powerful path for efficiently characterizing the transcriptional regulation of miRNA genes. PMID:27140965

  17. Analysis of Genomic Sequence Motifs for Deciphering Transcription Factor Binding and Transcriptional Regulation in Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boeva, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes contain a variety of structured patterns: repetitive elements, binding sites of DNA and RNA associated proteins, splice sites, and so on. Often, these structured patterns can be formalized as motifs and described using a proper mathematical model such as position weight matrix and IUPAC consensus. Two key tasks are typically carried out for motifs in the context of the analysis of genomic sequences. These are: identification in a set of DNA regions of over-represented motifs from a particular motif database, and de novo discovery of over-represented motifs. Here we describe existing methodology to perform these two tasks for motifs characterizing transcription factor binding. When applied to the output of ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments, or to promoter regions of co-modulated genes, motif analysis techniques allow for the prediction of transcription factor binding events and enable identification of transcriptional regulators and co-regulators. The usefulness of motif analysis is further exemplified in this review by how motif discovery improves peak calling in ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments and, when coupled with information on gene expression, allows insights into physical mechanisms of transcriptional modulation. PMID:26941778

  18. WordSpy: identifying transcription factor binding motifs by building a dictionary and learning a grammar

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guandong; Yu, Taotao; Zhang, Weixiong

    2005-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding sites or motifs (TFBMs) are functional cis-regulatory DNA sequences that play an essential role in gene transcriptional regulation. Although many experimental and computational methods have been developed, finding TFBMs remains a challenging problem. We propose and develop a novel dictionary based motif finding algorithm, which we call WordSpy. One significant feature of WordSpy is the combination of a word counting method and a statistical model which consists of a dictionary of motifs and a grammar specifying their usage. The algorithm is suitable for genome-wide motif finding; it is capable of discovering hundreds of motifs from a large set of promoters in a single run. We further enhance WordSpy by applying gene expression information to separate true TFBMs from spurious ones, and by incorporating negative sequences to identify discriminative motifs. In addition, we also use randomly selected promoters from the genome to evaluate the significance of the discovered motifs. The output from WordSpy consists of an ordered list of putative motifs and a set of regulatory sequences with motif binding sites highlighted. The web server of WordSpy is available at . PMID:15980501

  19. Analysis of Genomic Sequence Motifs for Deciphering Transcription Factor Binding and Transcriptional Regulation in Eukaryotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Boeva, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes contain a variety of structured patterns: repetitive elements, binding sites of DNA and RNA associated proteins, splice sites, and so on. Often, these structured patterns can be formalized as motifs and described using a proper mathematical model such as position weight matrix and IUPAC consensus. Two key tasks are typically carried out for motifs in the context of the analysis of genomic sequences. These are: identification in a set of DNA regions of over-represented motifs from a particular motif database, and de novo discovery of over-represented motifs. Here we describe existing methodology to perform these two tasks for motifs characterizing transcription factor binding. When applied to the output of ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments, or to promoter regions of co-modulated genes, motif analysis techniques allow for the prediction of transcription factor binding events and enable identification of transcriptional regulators and co-regulators. The usefulness of motif analysis is further exemplified in this review by how motif discovery improves peak calling in ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments and, when coupled with information on gene expression, allows insights into physical mechanisms of transcriptional modulation. PMID:26941778

  20. A general approach for discriminative de novo motif discovery from high-throughput data

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Jan; Posch, Stefan; Grosse, Ivo; Keilwagen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    De novo motif discovery has been an important challenge of bioinformatics for the past two decades. Since the emergence of high-throughput techniques like ChIP-seq, ChIP-exo and protein-binding microarrays (PBMs), the focus of de novo motif discovery has shifted to runtime and accuracy on large data sets. For this purpose, specialized algorithms have been designed for discovering motifs in ChIP-seq or PBM data. However, none of the existing approaches work perfectly for all three high-throughput techniques. In this article, we propose Dimont, a general approach for fast and accurate de novo motif discovery from high-throughput data. We demonstrate that Dimont yields a higher number of correct motifs from ChIP-seq data than any of the specialized approaches and achieves a higher accuracy for predicting PBM intensities from probe sequence than any of the approaches specifically designed for that purpose. Dimont also reports the expected motifs for several ChIP-exo data sets. Investigating differences between in vitro and in vivo binding, we find that for most transcription factors, the motifs discovered by Dimont are in good accordance between techniques, but we also find notable exceptions. We also observe that modeling intra-motif dependencies may increase accuracy, which indicates that more complex motif models are a worthwhile field of research. PMID:24057214

  1. A structural-alphabet-based strategy for finding structural motifs across protein families.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chih Yuan; Chen, Yao Chi; Lim, Carmay

    2010-08-01

    Proteins with insignificant sequence and overall structure similarity may still share locally conserved contiguous structural segments; i.e. structural/3D motifs. Most methods for finding 3D motifs require a known motif to search for other similar structures or functionally/structurally crucial residues. Here, without requiring a query motif or essential residues, a fully automated method for discovering 3D motifs of various sizes across protein families with different folds based on a 16-letter structural alphabet is presented. It was applied to structurally non-redundant proteins bound to DNA, RNA, obligate/non-obligate proteins as well as free DNA-binding proteins (DBPs) and proteins with known structures but unknown function. Its usefulness was illustrated by analyzing the 3D motifs found in DBPs. A non-specific motif was found with a 'corner' architecture that confers a stable scaffold and enables diverse interactions, making it suitable for binding not only DNA but also RNA and proteins. Furthermore, DNA-specific motifs present 'only' in DBPs were discovered. The motifs found can provide useful guidelines in detecting binding sites and computational protein redesign. PMID:20525797

  2. DNA Crossover Motifs Associated with Epigenetic Modifications Delineate Open Chromatin Regions in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Shilo, Shay; Melamed-Bessudo, Cathy; Barkai, Naama

    2015-01-01

    The rate of crossover, the reciprocal exchanges of homologous chromosomal segments, is not uniform along chromosomes differing between male and female meiocytes. To better understand the factors regulating this variable landscape, we performed a detailed genetic and epigenetic analysis of 737 crossover events in Arabidopsis thaliana. Crossovers were more frequent than expected in promoters. Three DNA motifs enriched in crossover regions and less abundant in crossover-poor pericentric regions were identified. One of these motifs, the CCN repeat, was previously unknown in plants. The A-rich motif was preferentially associated with promoters, while the CCN repeat and the CTT repeat motifs were preferentially associated with genes. Analysis of epigenetic modifications around the motifs showed, in most cases, a specific epigenetic architecture. For example, we show that there is a peak of nucleosome occupancy and of H3K4me3 around the CCN and CTT repeat motifs while nucleosome occupancy was lowest around the A-rich motif. Cytosine methylation levels showed a gradual decrease within ∼2 kb of the three motifs, being lowest at sites where crossover occurred. This landscape was conserved in the decreased DNA methylation1 mutant. In summary, the crossover motifs are associated with epigenetic landscapes corresponding to open chromatin and contributing to the nonuniformity of crossovers in Arabidopsis. PMID:26381163

  3. Bacteria-mimicking nanoparticle surface functionalization with targeting motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Mei-Hsiu; Clay, Nicholas E.; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, surface modification of nanocarriers with targeting motifs has been explored to modulate delivery of various diagnostic, sensing and therapeutic molecular cargo to desired sites of interest in in vitro bioengineering platforms and in vivo pathologic tissue. However, most surface functionalization approaches are often plagued by complex chemical modifications and effortful purifications. To resolve such challenges, this study demonstrates a unique method to immobilize antibodies that can act as targeting motifs on the surfaces of nanocarriers, inspired by a process that bacteria use for immobilization of the host's antibodies. We hypothesized that alkylated Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SpA) would self-assemble with micelles and subsequently induce stable coupling of antibodies to the micelles. We examined this hypothesis by using poly(2-hydroxyethyl-co-octadecyl aspartamide) (PHEA-g-C18) as a model polymer to form micelles. The self-assembly between the micelles and alkylated SpA became more thermodynamically favorable by increasing the degree of substitution of octadecyl chains to PHEA-g-C18, due to a positive entropy change. Lastly, the mixing of SpA-PA-coupled micelles with antibodies resulted in the coating of micelles with antibodies, as confirmed with a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay. The micelles coated with antibodies to VCAM-1 or integrin αv displayed a higher binding affinity to substrates coated with VCAM-1 and integrin αvβ3, respectively, than other controls, as evaluated with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy and a circulation-simulating flow chamber. We envisage that this bacteria-inspired protein immobilization approach will be useful to improve the quality of targeted delivery of nanoparticles, and can be extended to modify the surface of a wide array of nanocarriers.In recent years, surface modification of nanocarriers with targeting motifs has been explored to modulate delivery of various

  4. Study on online community user motif using web usage mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alphy, Meera; Sharma, Ajay

    2016-04-01

    The Web usage mining is the application of data mining, which is used to extract useful information from the online community. The World Wide Web contains at least 4.73 billion pages according to Indexed Web and it contains at least 228.52 million pages according Dutch Indexed web on 6th august 2015, Thursday. It’s difficult to get needed data from these billions of web pages in World Wide Web. Here is the importance of web usage mining. Personalizing the search engine helps the web user to identify the most used data in an easy way. It reduces the time consumption; automatic site search and automatic restore the useful sites. This study represents the old techniques to latest techniques used in pattern discovery and analysis in web usage mining from 1996 to 2015. Analyzing user motif helps in the improvement of business, e-commerce, personalisation and improvement of websites.

  5. RNA Sociology: Group Behavioral Motifs of RNA Consortia

    PubMed Central

    Witzany, Guenther

    2014-01-01

    RNA sociology investigates the behavioral motifs of RNA consortia from the social science perspective. Besides the self-folding of RNAs into single stem loop structures, group building of such stem loops results in a variety of essential agents that are highly active in regulatory processes in cellular and non-cellular life. RNA stem loop self-folding and group building do not depend solely on sequence syntax; more important are their contextual (functional) needs. Also, evolutionary processes seem to occur through RNA stem loop consortia that may act as a complement. This means the whole entity functions only if all participating parts are coordinated, although the complementary building parts originally evolved for different functions. If complementary groups, such as rRNAs and tRNAs, are placed together in selective pressure contexts, new evolutionary features may emerge. Evolution initiated by competent agents in natural genome editing clearly contrasts with statistical error replication narratives. PMID:25426799

  6. Normalized Texture Motifs and Their Application to Statistical Object Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Newsam, S D

    2004-03-09

    A fundamental challenge in applying texture features to statistical object modeling is recognizing differently oriented spatial patterns. Rows of moored boats in remote sensed images of harbors should be consistently labeled regardless of the orientation of the harbors, or of the boats within the harbors. This is not straightforward to do, however, when using anisotropic texture features to characterize the spatial patterns. We here propose an elegant solution, termed normalized texture motifs, that uses a parametric statistical model to characterize the patterns regardless of their orientation. The models are learned in an unsupervised fashion from arbitrarily orientated training samples. The proposed approach is general enough to be used with a large category of orientation-selective texture features.

  7. Sequential dynamics in the motif of excitatory coupled elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkov, Alexander G.; Kazakov, Alexey O.; Osipov, Grigory V.

    2015-11-01

    In this article a new model of motif (small ensemble) of neuron-like elements is proposed. It is built with the use of the generalized Lotka-Volterra model with excitatory couplings. The main motivation for this work comes from the problems of neuroscience where excitatory couplings are proved to be the predominant type of interaction between neurons of the brain. In this paper it is shown that there are two modes depending on the type of coupling between the elements: the mode with a stable heteroclinic cycle and the mode with a stable limit cycle. Our second goal is to examine the chaotic dynamics of the generalized three-dimensional Lotka-Volterra model.

  8. Junctions between i-motif tetramers in supramolecular structures

    PubMed Central

    Guittet, Eric; Renciuk, Daniel; Leroy, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    The symmetry of i-motif tetramers gives to cytidine-rich oligonucleotides the capacity to associate into supramolecular structures (sms). In order to determine how the tetramers are linked together in such structures, we have measured by gel filtration chromatography and NMR the formation and dissociation kinetics of sms built by oligonucleotides containing two short C stretches separated by a non-cytidine-base. We show that a stretch of only two cytidines either at the 3′- or 5′-end is long enough to link the tetramers into sms. The analysis of the properties of sms formed by oligonucleotides differing by the length of the oligo-C stretches, the sequence orientation and the nature of the non-C base provides a model of the junction connecting the tetramers in sms. PMID:22362739

  9. Bacteria-mimicking nanoparticle surface functionalization with targeting motifs.

    PubMed

    Lai, Mei-Hsiu; Clay, Nicholas E; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2015-04-21

    In recent years, surface modification of nanocarriers with targeting motifs has been explored to modulate delivery of various diagnostic, sensing and therapeutic molecular cargo to desired sites of interest in in vitro bioengineering platforms and in vivo pathologic tissue. However, most surface functionalization approaches are often plagued by complex chemical modifications and effortful purifications. To resolve such challenges, this study demonstrates a unique method to immobilize antibodies that can act as targeting motifs on the surfaces of nanocarriers, inspired by a process that bacteria use for immobilization of the host's antibodies. We hypothesized that alkylated Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SpA) would self-assemble with micelles and subsequently induce stable coupling of antibodies to the micelles. We examined this hypothesis by using poly(2-hydroxyethyl-co-octadecyl aspartamide) (PHEA-g-C18) as a model polymer to form micelles. The self-assembly between the micelles and alkylated SpA became more thermodynamically favorable by increasing the degree of substitution of octadecyl chains to PHEA-g-C18, due to a positive entropy change. Lastly, the mixing of SpA-PA-coupled micelles with antibodies resulted in the coating of micelles with antibodies, as confirmed with a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay. The micelles coated with antibodies to VCAM-1 or integrin αv displayed a higher binding affinity to substrates coated with VCAM-1 and integrin αvβ3, respectively, than other controls, as evaluated with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy and a circulation-simulating flow chamber. We envisage that this bacteria-inspired protein immobilization approach will be useful to improve the quality of targeted delivery of nanoparticles, and can be extended to modify the surface of a wide array of nanocarriers. PMID:25804130

  10. Bacterium-Mimicking Nanoparticle Surface Functionalization with Targeting Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Mei-Hsiu; Clay, Nicholas E.; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, surface modification of nanocarriers with targeting motifs has been explored to modulate delivery of various diagnostic, sensing and therapeutic molecular cargos to desired sites of interest in in vitro bioengineering platforms and in vivo pathologic tissue. However, most surface functionalization approaches are often plagued by complex chemical modifications and effortful purifications. To resolve such challenges, this study demonstrates a unique method to immobilize antibodies that can act as targeting motifs on the surfaces of nanocarriers, inspired by a process that bacteria use for immobilization of the host’s antibodies. We hypothesized that alkylated Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SpA) would self-assemble with micelles and subsequently induce stable coupling of antibodies to the micelles. We examined this hypothesis by using poly(2-hydroxyethyl-co-octadecyl aspartamide) (PHEA-g-C18) as a model polymer to form micelles. The self-assembly between micelles and alkylated SpA became more thermodynamically favorable by increasing the degree of substitution of octadecyl chains to PHEA-g-C18, due to a positive entropy change. Lastly, the simple mixing of SpA-PA-coupled micelles with antibodies resulted in the micelles coated by antibodies, as confirmed with a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay. The micelles coated by antibodies to VCAM-1 or integrin αv displayed higher binding affinity to a substrate coated by VCAM-1 and integrin αvβ3, respectively, than other controls, as evaluated with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy and a circulation-simulating flow chamber. We envisage this bacterium-inspired protein immobilization approach will be useful to improving the quality of targeted delivery of nanoparticles, and can be extended to modify the surface of a wide array of nanocarriers. PMID:25804130

  11. Different motifs regulate trafficking of SorCS1 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Morten S; Keat, Sady J; Hamati, Jida W; Madsen, Peder; Gutzmann, Jakob J; Engelsberg, Arne; Pedersen, Karen M; Gustafsen, Camilla; Nykjaer, Anders; Gliemann, Jørgen; Hermans-Borgmeyer, Irm; Kuhl, Dietmar; Petersen, Claus M; Hermey, Guido

    2008-06-01

    The type I transmembrane protein SorCS1 is a member of the Vps10p-domain receptor family comprised of Sortilin, SorLA and SorCS1, -2 and -3. Current information indicates that Sortilin and SorLA mediate intracellular protein trafficking and sorting, but little is known about the cellular functions of the SorCS subgroup. SorCS1 binds platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) and is expressed in isoforms differing only in their cytoplasmic domains. Here, we identify two novel isoforms of mouse SorCS1 designated m-SorCS1c and -d. In situ hybridization revealed a combinatorial expression pattern of the variants in brain and embryonic tissues. We demonstrate that among the mouse variants, only SorCS1c mediates internalization and that the highly conserved SorCS1c is internalized through a canonical tyrosine-based motif. In contrast, human SorCS1a, whose cytoplasmic domain is completely different from mouse SorCS1a, is internalized through a DXXLL motif. We report that the human SorCS1a cytoplasmic domain interacts with the alphaC/sigma2 subunits of the adaptor protein (AP)-2 complex, and internalization of human SorCS1a and -c is mediated by AP-2. Our results suggest that the endocytic isoforms target internalized cargo to lysosomes but are not engaged in Golgi-endosomal transport to a significant degree. PMID:18315530

  12. Novel Mycobacteria Antigen 85 Complex Binding Motif on Fibronectin*

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chih-Jung; Bell, Hannah; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Ptak, Christopher P.; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2012-01-01

    The members of the antigen 85 protein family (Ag85), consisting of members Ag85A, Ag85B, and Ag85C, are the predominantly secreted proteins of mycobacteria and possess the ability to specifically interact with fibronectin (Fn). Because Fn-binding proteins are likely to be important virulence factors of Mycobacterium spp., Ag85 may contribute to the adherence, invasion, and dissemination of organisms in host tissue. In this study, we reported the Fn binding affinity of Ag85A, Ag85B, and Ag85C from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) (KD values were determined from 33.6 to 68.4 nm) and mapped the Ag85-binding motifs of Fn. Fn14, a type III module located on the heparin-binding domain II (Hep-2) of Fn, was discovered to interact with Ag85 from MAP. The peptide inhibition assay subsequently demonstrated that a peptide consisting of residues 17–26 from Fn14 (17SLLVSWQPPR26, termed P17–26) could interfere with Ag85B binding to Fn (73.3% reduction). In addition, single alanine substitutions along the sequence of P17–26 revealed that the key residues involved in Ag85-Fn binding likely contribute through hydrophobic and charge interactions. Moreover, binding of Ag85 on Fn siRNA-transfected Caco2 cells was dramatically reduced (44.6%), implying the physiological significance of the Ag85-Fn interaction between mycobacteria and host cells during infection. Our results indicate that Ag85 binds to Fn at a novel motif and plays a critical role in mycobacteria adherence to host cells by initiating infection. Ag85 might serve as an important colonization factor potentially contributing to mycobacterial virulence. PMID:22128161

  13. Stabilization of i-motif structures by 2'-β-fluorination of DNA.

    PubMed

    Assi, Hala Abou; Harkness, Robert W; Martin-Pintado, Nerea; Wilds, Christopher J; Campos-Olivas, Ramón; Mittermaier, Anthony K; González, Carlos; Damha, Masad J

    2016-06-20

    i-Motifs are four-stranded DNA structures consisting of two parallel DNA duplexes held together by hemi-protonated and intercalated cytosine base pairs (C:CH(+)). They have attracted considerable research interest for their potential role in gene regulation and their use as pH responsive switches and building blocks in macromolecular assemblies. At neutral and basic pH values, the cytosine bases deprotonate and the structure unfolds into single strands. To avoid this limitation and expand the range of environmental conditions supporting i-motif folding, we replaced the sugar in DNA by 2-deoxy-2-fluoroarabinose. We demonstrate that such a modification significantly stabilizes i-motif formation over a wide pH range, including pH 7. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments reveal that 2-deoxy-2-fluoroarabinose adopts a C2'-endo conformation, instead of the C3'-endo conformation usually found in unmodified i-motifs. Nevertheless, this substitution does not alter the overall i-motif structure. This conformational change, together with the changes in charge distribution in the sugar caused by the electronegative fluorine atoms, leads to a number of favorable sequential and inter-strand electrostatic interactions. The availability of folded i-motifs at neutral pH will aid investigations into the biological function of i-motifs in vitro, and will expand i-motif applications in nanotechnology. PMID:27166371

  14. Construction of DNA logic gates utilizing a H+/Ag+ induced i-motif structure.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yunhua; Sun, Hongxia; Xiang, Junfeng; Chen, Hongbo; Yang, Qianfan; Guan, Aijiao; Li, Qian; Yu, Lijia; Tang, Yalin

    2014-12-18

    A simple technology to construct diverse DNA logic gates (OR and INHIBIT) has been designed utilizing a H(+) and/or Ag(+) induced i-motif structure. The logic gates are easily controlled and also show a real time response towards inputs. The research provides a new insight for designing DNA logic gates using an i-motif DNA structure. PMID:25349963

  15. Wayward Warriors: The Viking Motif in Swedish and English Children's Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundmark, Björn

    2014-01-01

    In this article the Viking motif in children's literature is explored--from its roots in (adult) nationalist and antiquarian discourse, over pedagogical and historical texts for children, to the eventual diversification (or dissolution) of the motif into different genres and forms. The focus is on Swedish Viking narratives, but points of…

  16. The PXDLS linear motif regulates circadian rhythmicity through protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Shalev, Moran; Aviram, Rona; Adamovich, Yaarit; Kraut-Cohen, Judith; Shamia, Tal; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Golik, Marina; Asher, Gad

    2014-01-01

    The circadian core clock circuitry relies on interlocked transcription-translation feedback loops that largely count on multiple protein interactions. The molecular mechanisms implicated in the assembly of these protein complexes are relatively unknown. Our bioinformatics analysis of short linear motifs, implicated in protein interactions, reveals an enrichment of the Pro-X-Asp-Leu-Ser (PXDLS) motif within circadian transcripts. We show that the PXDLS motif can bind to BMAL1/CLOCK and disrupt circadian oscillations in a cell-autonomous manner. Remarkably, the motif is evolutionary conserved in the core clock protein REV-ERBα, and additional proteins implicated in the clock's function (NRIP1, CBP). In this conjuncture, we uncover a novel cross talk between the two principal core clock feedback loops and show that BMAL/CLOCK and REV-ERBα interact and that the PXDLS motif of REV-ERBα participates in their binding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the PXDLS motifs of NRIP1 and CBP are involved in circadian rhythmicity. Our findings suggest that the PXDLS motif plays an important role in circadian rhythmicity through regulation of protein interactions within the clock circuitry and that short linear motifs can be employed to modulate circadian oscillations. PMID:25260595

  17. Physical-chemical property based sequence motifs and methods regarding same

    DOEpatents

    Braun, Werner; Mathura, Venkatarajan S.; Schein, Catherine H.

    2008-09-09

    A data analysis system, program, and/or method, e.g., a data mining/data exploration method, using physical-chemical property motifs. For example, a sequence database may be searched for identifying segments thereof having physical-chemical properties similar to the physical-chemical property motifs.

  18. Mid deck in-orbit crew portrait taken in flag motif shirts.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Mid deck in orbit portraits of the entire crew taken in flag motif shirts. Flag motif jersey portraits - front row, left to right, Mission Specialists Kathy Thornton and Rick Heib, middlle row, left to right, Mission Specialists Pierre Thuot and Tom Akers, back row, left to right, Mission Commander Dan Brandenstein, Mission Pilot Kevin Chilton and Mission Specialist Bruce Melnick.

  19. A Fast Cluster Motif Finding Algorithm for ChIP-Seq Data Sets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yipu; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    New high-throughput technique ChIP-seq, coupling chromatin immunoprecipitation experiment with high-throughput sequencing technologies, has extended the identification of binding locations of a transcription factor to the genome-wide regions. However, the most existing motif discovery algorithms are time-consuming and limited to identify binding motifs in ChIP-seq data which normally has the significant characteristics of large scale data. In order to improve the efficiency, we propose a fast cluster motif finding algorithm, named as FCmotif, to identify the (l,  d) motifs in large scale ChIP-seq data set. It is inspired by the emerging substrings mining strategy to find the enriched substrings and then searching the neighborhood instances to construct PWM and cluster motifs in different length. FCmotif is not following the OOPS model constraint and can find long motifs. The effectiveness of proposed algorithm has been proved by experiments on the ChIP-seq data sets from mouse ES cells. The whole detection of the real binding motifs and processing of the full size data of several megabytes finished in a few minutes. The experimental results show that FCmotif has advantageous to deal with the (l,  d) motif finding in the ChIP-seq data; meanwhile it also demonstrates better performance than other current widely-used algorithms such as MEME, Weeder, ChIPMunk, and DREME. PMID:26236718

  20. Construction of a Three-Dimensional Motif Dictionary for Protein Structural Data Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroaki, Kato; Tadokoro, Tetsuo; Miyata, Hiroyuki; Chikamatsu, Shin-Ichi; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Abe, Hidetsugu

    With the rapidly increasing number of proteins of which three-dimensional (3D) structures are known, the protein structure database is one of the key elements in many attempts being made to derive the knowledge of structure-function relationships of proteins. In this work, the authors have developed a software tool to assist in constructing the 3D protein motif dictionary that is closely related to the PROSITE sequence motif database. In the PROSITE, a structural feature called motif is described by a sequence pattern of amino acid residues with the regular expression defined in the database. The present system allows us to automatically find the related sites for all the 3D protein structures taken from a protein structure database such as the Protein Data Bank (PDB), and to make a dictionary of the 3D motifs related to the PROSITE sequence motif patterns. A computational trial was carried out for a subset of the PDB's structure data file. The structural feature analysis resulted with the tool showed that there are many different 3D motif patterns but having a particular PROSITE sequence pattern. For this reason, the authors also tried to classify the 3D motif patterns into several groups on the basis of distance similarity matrix, and to determine a representative pattern for each group in preparing the dictionary. The usefulness of the additional approach for preparing the 3D motif dictionary is also discussed with an illustrative example.

  1. JAR3D Webserver: Scoring and aligning RNA loop sequences to known 3D motifs.

    PubMed

    Roll, James; Zirbel, Craig L; Sweeney, Blake; Petrov, Anton I; Leontis, Neocles

    2016-07-01

    Many non-coding RNAs have been identified and may function by forming 2D and 3D structures. RNA hairpin and internal loops are often represented as unstructured on secondary structure diagrams, but RNA 3D structures show that most such loops are structured by non-Watson-Crick basepairs and base stacking. Moreover, different RNA sequences can form the same RNA 3D motif. JAR3D finds possible 3D geometries for hairpin and internal loops by matching loop sequences to motif groups from the RNA 3D Motif Atlas, by exact sequence match when possible, and by probabilistic scoring and edit distance for novel sequences. The scoring gauges the ability of the sequences to form the same pattern of interactions observed in 3D structures of the motif. The JAR3D webserver at http://rna.bgsu.edu/jar3d/ takes one or many sequences of a single loop as input, or else one or many sequences of longer RNAs with multiple loops. Each sequence is scored against all current motif groups. The output shows the ten best-matching motif groups. Users can align input sequences to each of the motif groups found by JAR3D. JAR3D will be updated with every release of the RNA 3D Motif Atlas, and so its performance is expected to improve over time. PMID:27235417

  2. Stabilization of i-motif structures by 2′-β-fluorination of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Assi, Hala Abou; Harkness, Robert W.; Martin-Pintado, Nerea; Wilds, Christopher J.; Campos-Olivas, Ramón; Mittermaier, Anthony K.; González, Carlos; Damha, Masad J.

    2016-01-01

    i-Motifs are four-stranded DNA structures consisting of two parallel DNA duplexes held together by hemi-protonated and intercalated cytosine base pairs (C:CH+). They have attracted considerable research interest for their potential role in gene regulation and their use as pH responsive switches and building blocks in macromolecular assemblies. At neutral and basic pH values, the cytosine bases deprotonate and the structure unfolds into single strands. To avoid this limitation and expand the range of environmental conditions supporting i-motif folding, we replaced the sugar in DNA by 2-deoxy-2-fluoroarabinose. We demonstrate that such a modification significantly stabilizes i-motif formation over a wide pH range, including pH 7. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments reveal that 2-deoxy-2-fluoroarabinose adopts a C2′-endo conformation, instead of the C3′-endo conformation usually found in unmodified i-motifs. Nevertheless, this substitution does not alter the overall i-motif structure. This conformational change, together with the changes in charge distribution in the sugar caused by the electronegative fluorine atoms, leads to a number of favorable sequential and inter-strand electrostatic interactions. The availability of folded i-motifs at neutral pH will aid investigations into the biological function of i-motifs in vitro, and will expand i-motif applications in nanotechnology. PMID:27166371

  3. Genome adaptations of a tripartite motif protein for retroviral defense in cattle and sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tripartite motif (TRIM) genes encode proteins composed of RING, B-box, and coiled coil motif domains. Primate TRIM5' has been shown to be a primary determinant of retroviral host cell range restriction in primates. TRIM5 restriction was originally thought to be a primate-specific defense mechanism...

  4. MOTIFSIM: A web tool for detecting similarity in multiple DNA motif datasets.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ngoc Tam L; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2015-07-01

    Currently, there are a number of motif detection tools available that possess unique functionality. These tools often report different motifs, and therefore use of multiple tools is generally advised since common motifs reported by multiple tools are more likely to be biologically significant. However, results produced by these different tools need to be compared and existing similarity detection tools only allow comparison between two data sets. Here, we describe a motif similarity detection tool (MOTIFSIM) possessing a web-based, user-friendly interface that is capable of detecting similarity from multiple DNA motif data sets concurrently. Results can either be viewed online or downloaded. Users may also download and run MOTIFSIM as a command-line tool in stand-alone mode. The web tool, along with its command-line version, user manuals, and source codes, are freely available at http://biogrid-head.engr.uconn.edu/motifsim/. PMID:26156781

  5. Combinatorial Information Theoretical Measurement of the Semantic Significance of Semantic Graph Motifs

    SciTech Connect

    Joslyn, Cliff A.; al-Saffar, Sinan; Haglin, David J.; Holder, Larry

    2011-06-14

    Given an arbitrary semantic graph data set, perhaps one lacking in explicit ontological information, we wish to first identify its significant semantic structures, and then measure the extent of their significance. Casting a semantic graph dataset as an edge-labeled, directed graph, this task can be built on the ability to mine frequent {\\em labeled} subgraphs in edge-labeled, directed graphs. We begin by considering the fundamentals of the enumerative combinatorics of subgraph motif structures in edge-labeled directed graphs. We identify its frequent labeled, directed subgraph motif patterns, and measure the significance of the resulting motifs by the information gain relative to the expected value of the motif based on the empirical frequency distribution of the link types which compose them, assuming indpendence. We illustrate the method on a small test graph, and discuss results obtained for small linear motifs (link type bigrams and trigrams) in a larger graph structure.

  6. Identification and preliminary characterization of a protein motif related to the zinc finger.

    PubMed Central

    Lovering, R; Hanson, I M; Borden, K L; Martin, S; O'Reilly, N J; Evan, G I; Rahman, D; Pappin, D J; Trowsdale, J; Freemont, P S

    1993-01-01

    We have identified a protein motif, related to the zinc finger, which defines a newly discovered family of proteins. The motif was found in the sequence of the human RING1 gene, which is proximal to the major histocompatibility complex region on chromosome six. We propose naming this motif the "RING finger" and it is found in 27 proteins, all of which have putative DNA binding functions. We have synthesized a peptide corresponding to the RING1 motif and examined a number of properties, including metal and DNA binding. We provide evidence to support the suggestion that the RING finger motif is the DNA binding domain of this newly defined family of proteins. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:7681583

  7. The Host Targeting motif in exported Plasmodium proteins is cleaved in the parasite endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Andrew R.; Speicher, Kaye D.; Tamez, Pamela A.; Bhattacharjee, Souvik; Speicher, David W.; Haldar, Kasturi

    2010-01-01

    During the blood stage of its lifecycle, the malaria parasite resides and replicates inside a membrane vacuole within its host cell, the human erythrocyte. The parasite exports many proteins across the vacuole membrane and into the host cell cytoplasm. Most exported proteins are characterized by the presence of a Host Targeting (HT) motif, also referred to as a Plasmodium Export Element (PEXEL), which corresponds to the consensus sequence RxLxE/D/Q. During export the HT motif is cleaved by an unknown protease. Here, we generate parasite lines expressing HT motif containing proteins that are localized to different compartments within the parasite or host cell. We find that the HT motif in a protein that is retained in the parasite endoplasmic reticulum, is cleaved and N-acetylated as efficiently as a protein that is exported. This shows that cleavage of the HT motif occurs early in the secretory pathway, in the parasite endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:20117149

  8. RSAT::Plants: Motif Discovery Within Clusters of Upstream Sequences in Plant Genomes.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Castro-Mondragon, Jaime A; Rioualen, Claire; Cantalapiedra, Carlos P; van Helden, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The plant-dedicated mirror of the Regulatory Sequence Analysis Tools (RSAT, http://plants.rsat.eu ) offers specialized options for researchers dealing with plant transcriptional regulation. The website contains whole-sequenced genomes from species regularly updated from Ensembl Plants and other sources (currently 40), and supports an array of tasks frequently required for the analysis of regulatory sequences, such as retrieving upstream sequences, motif discovery, motif comparison, and pattern matching. RSAT::Plants also integrates the footprintDB collection of DNA motifs. This protocol explains step-by-step how to discover DNA motifs in regulatory regions of clusters of co-expressed genes in plants. It also explains how to empirically control the significance of the result, and how to associate the discovered motifs with putative binding factors. PMID:27557774

  9. An improved poly(A) motifs recognition method based on decision level fusion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanxin; Han, Jiuqiang; Liu, Jun; Zheng, Jiguang; Liu, Ruiling

    2015-02-01

    Polyadenylation is the process of addition of poly(A) tail to mRNA 3' ends. Identification of motifs controlling polyadenylation plays an essential role in improving genome annotation accuracy and better understanding of the mechanisms governing gene regulation. The bioinformatics methods used for poly(A) motifs recognition have demonstrated that information extracted from sequences surrounding the candidate motifs can differentiate true motifs from the false ones greatly. However, these methods depend on either domain features or string kernels. To date, methods combining information from different sources have not been found yet. Here, we proposed an improved poly(A) motifs recognition method by combing different sources based on decision level fusion. First of all, two novel prediction methods was proposed based on support vector machine (SVM): one method is achieved by using the domain-specific features and principle component analysis (PCA) method to eliminate the redundancy (PCA-SVM); the other method is based on Oligo string kernel (Oligo-SVM). Then we proposed a novel machine-learning method for poly(A) motif prediction by marrying four poly(A) motifs recognition methods, including two state-of-the-art methods (Random Forest (RF) and HMM-SVM), and two novel proposed methods (PCA-SVM and Oligo-SVM). A decision level information fusion method was employed to combine the decision values of different classifiers by applying the DS evidence theory. We evaluated our method on a comprehensive poly(A) dataset that consists of 14,740 samples on 12 variants of poly(A) motifs and 2750 samples containing none of these motifs. Our method has achieved accuracy up to 86.13%. Compared with the four classifiers, our evidence theory based method reduces the average error rate by about 30%, 27%, 26% and 16%, respectively. The experimental results suggest that the proposed method is more effective for poly(A) motif recognition. PMID:25594576

  10. Distance-based identification of structure motifs in proteins using constrained frequent subgraph mining.

    PubMed

    Huan, Jun; Bandyopadhyay, Deepak; Prins, Jan; Snoeyink, Jack; Tropsha, Alexander; Wang, Wei

    2006-01-01

    Structure motifs are amino acid packing patterns that occur frequently within a set of protein structures. We define a labeled graph representation of protein structure in which vertices correspond to amino acid residues and edges connect pairs of residues and are labeled by (1) the Euclidian distance between the C(alpha) atoms of the two residues and (2) a boolean indicating whether the two residues are in physical/chemical contact. Using this representation, a structure motif corresponds to a labeled clique that occurs frequently among the graphs representing the protein structures. The pairwise distance constraints on each edge in a clique serve to limit the variation in geometry among different occurrences of a structure motif. We present an efficient constrained subgraph mining algorithm to discover structure motifs in this setting. Compared with contact graph representations, the number of spurious structure motifs is greatly reduced. Using this algorithm, structure motifs were located for several SCOP families including the Eukaryotic Serine Proteases, Nuclear Binding Domains, Papain-like Cysteine Proteases, and FAD/NAD-linked Reductases. For each family, we typically obtain a handful of motifs within seconds of processing time. The occurrences of these motifs throughout the PDB were strongly associated with the original SCOP family, as measured using a hyper-geometric distribution. The motifs were found to cover functionally important sites like the catalytic triad for Serine Proteases and co-factor binding sites for Nuclear Binding Domains. The fact that many motifs are highly family-specific can be used to classify new proteins or to provide functional annotation in Structural Genomics Projects. PMID:17369641

  11. Clostridium difficile surface proteins are anchored to the cell wall using CWB2 motifs that recognise the anionic polymer PSII.

    PubMed

    Willing, Stephanie E; Candela, Thomas; Shaw, Helen Alexandra; Seager, Zoe; Mesnage, Stéphane; Fagan, Robert P; Fairweather, Neil F

    2015-05-01

    Gram-positive surface proteins can be covalently or non-covalently anchored to the cell wall and can impart important properties on the bacterium in respect of cell envelope organisation and interaction with the environment. We describe here a mechanism of protein anchoring involving tandem CWB2 motifs found in a large number of cell wall proteins in the Firmicutes. In the Clostridium difficile cell wall protein family, we show the three tandem repeats of the CWB2 motif are essential for correct anchoring to the cell wall. CWB2 repeats are non-identical and cannot substitute for each other, as shown by the secretion into the culture supernatant of proteins containing variations in the patterns of repeats. A conserved Ile Leu Leu sequence within the CWB2 repeats is essential for correct anchoring, although a preceding proline residue is dispensable. We propose a likely genetic locus encoding synthesis of the anionic polymer PSII and, using RNA knock-down of key genes, reveal subtle effects on cell wall composition. We show that the anionic polymer PSII binds two cell wall proteins, SlpA and Cwp2, and these interactions require the CWB2 repeats, defining a new mechanism of protein anchoring in Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:25649385

  12. Materiaux composites supraconducteurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerjouan, Philippe; Boterel, Florence; Lostec, Jean; Bertot, Jean-Paul; Haussonne, Jean-Marie

    1991-11-01

    The new superconductor materials with a high critical current own a large importance as well in the electronic components or in the electrotechnical devices fields. The deposit of such materials with the thick films technology is to be more and more developped in the years to come. Therefore, we tried to realize such thick films screen printed on alumina, and composed mainly of the YBa2CU3O{7-δ} material. We first realized a composite material glass/YBa2CU3O{7-δ}, by analogy with the classical screen-printed inks where the glass ensures the bonding with the substrate. We thus realized different materials by using some different classes of glass. These materials owned a superconducting transition close to the one of the pure YBa2CU3O{7-δ} material. We made a slurry with the most significant composite materials and binders, and screen-printed them on an alumina substrate preliminary or not coated with a diffusion barrier layer. After firing, we studied the thick films adhesion, the alumina/glass/composite material interfaces, and their superconducting properties. Les nouveaux matériaux supraconducteurs à haute température critique ont potentiellement un rôle important à jouer dans le domaine de l'électronique et de l'électrotechnique. En particulier, le dépôt d'oxydes supraconducteurs sur divers types de substrats est une technologie amenée à se développer. Nous avons donc entrepris une étude dont l'objet est la réalisation de conducteurs sérigraphiés sur alumine et composés essentiellement du matériau YBa2CU3O{7-δ}. Nous avons tout d'abord cherché à réaliser un composite verre/YBa2CU3O{7-δ}, par analogie au principe de réalisation de couches conductrices sérigraphiées, le verre permettant d'obtenir une liaison physico-chimique avec le substrat. Une étude préliminaire a permis de réaliser divers matériaux composites massifs, utilisant différentes familles de verres. Ces matériaux massifs, se présentant sous la forme de barreaux de

  13. Varying levels of complexity in transcription factor binding motifs

    PubMed Central

    Keilwagen, Jens; Grau, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Binding of transcription factors to DNA is one of the keystones of gene regulation. The existence of statistical dependencies between binding site positions is widely accepted, while their relevance for computational predictions has been debated. Building probabilistic models of binding sites that may capture dependencies is still challenging, since the most successful motif discovery approaches require numerical optimization techniques, which are not suited for selecting dependency structures. To overcome this issue, we propose sparse local inhomogeneous mixture (Slim) models that combine putative dependency structures in a weighted manner allowing for numerical optimization of dependency structure and model parameters simultaneously. We find that Slim models yield a substantially better prediction performance than previous models on genomic context protein binding microarray data sets and on ChIP-seq data sets. To elucidate the reasons for the improved performance, we develop dependency logos, which allow for visual inspection of dependency structures within binding sites. We find that the dependency structures discovered by Slim models are highly diverse and highly transcription factor-specific, which emphasizes the need for flexible dependency models. The observed dependency structures range from broad heterogeneities to sparse dependencies between neighboring and non-neighboring binding site positions. PMID:26116565

  14. Peptide motif analysis predicts alphaviruses as triggers for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hogeboom, Charissa

    2015-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) develops in response to both genetic and environmental factors. The strongest genetic determinant is HLA-DR, where polymorphisms within the P4 and P6 binding pockets confer elevated risk. However, low disease concordance across monozygotic twin pairs underscores the importance of an environmental factor, probably infectious. The goal of this investigation was to predict the microorganism most likely to interact with HLA-DR to trigger RA under the molecular mimicry hypothesis. A set of 185 structural proteins from viruses or intracellular bacteria was scanned for regions of sequence homology with a collagen peptide that binds preferentially to DR4; candidates were then evaluated against a motif required for T cell cross-reactivity. The plausibility of the predicted agent was evaluated by comparison of microbial prevalence patterns to epidemiological characteristics of RA. Peptides from alphavirus capsid proteins provided the closest fit. Variations in the P6 position suggest that the HLA binding preference may vary by species, with Ross River virus, Chikungunya virus, and Mayaro virus peptides binding preferentially to DR4, and peptides from Sindbis/Ockelbo virus showing stronger affinity to DR1. The predicted HLA preference is supported by epidemiological studies of post-infection chronic arthralgia. Parallels between the cytokine profiles of RA and chronic alphavirus infection are discussed. PMID:26476978

  15. Eukaryotic Penelope-Like Retroelements Encode Hammerhead Ribozyme Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Cervera, Amelia; De la Peña, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    Small self-cleaving RNAs, such as the paradigmatic Hammerhead ribozyme (HHR), have been recently found widespread in DNA genomes across all kingdoms of life. In this work, we found that new HHR variants are preserved in the ancient family of Penelope-like elements (PLEs), a group of eukaryotic retrotransposons regarded as exceptional for encoding telomerase-like retrotranscriptases and spliceosomal introns. Our bioinformatic analysis revealed not only the presence of minimalist HHRs in the two flanking repeats of PLEs but also their massive and widespread occurrence in metazoan genomes. The architecture of these ribozymes indicates that they may work as dimers, although their low self-cleavage activity in vitro suggests the requirement of other factors in vivo. In plants, however, PLEs show canonical HHRs, whereas fungi and protist PLEs encode ribozyme variants with a stable active conformation as monomers. Overall, our data confirm the connection of self-cleaving RNAs with eukaryotic retroelements and unveil these motifs as a significant fraction of the encoded information in eukaryotic genomes. PMID:25135949

  16. Network motifs that stabilize the hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal phenotype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Jia, Dongya; Tripathi, Satyendra; Hanash, Samir; Mani, Sendurai; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Levine, Herbert

    Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and its reverse - MET - are hallmarks of cancer metastasis. While transitioning between E and M phenotypes, cells can also attain a hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal (E/M) phenotype that enables collective cell migration as a cluster of Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs). These clusters can form 50-times more tumors than individually migrating CTCs, underlining their importance in metastasis. However, this hybrid E/M phenotype has been hypothesized to be only a transient one that is attained en route EMT. Here, via mathematically modeling, we identify certain `phenotypic stability factors' that couple with the core three-way decision-making circuit (miR-200/ZEB) and can maintain or stabilize the hybrid E/M phenotype. Further, we show experimentally that this phenotype can be maintained stably at a single-cell level, and knockdown of these factors impairs collective cell migration. We also show that these factors enable the association of hybrid E/M with high stemness or tumor-initiating potential. Finally, based on these factors, we deduce specific network motifs that can maintain the E/M phenotype. Our framework can be used to elucidate the effect of other players in regulating cellular plasticity during metastasis. This work was supported by NSF PHY-1427654 (Center for Theoretical Biological Physics) and the CPRIT Scholar in Cancer Research of the State of Texas at Rice University.

  17. Ab Initio Coordination Chemistry for Nickel Chelation Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Jesu Jaya Sudan, R.; Lesitha Jeeva Kumari, J.; Sudandiradoss, C.

    2015-01-01

    Chelation therapy is one of the most appreciated methods in the treatment of metal induced disease predisposition. Coordination chemistry provides a way to understand metal association in biological structures. In this work we have implemented coordination chemistry to study nickel coordination due to its high impact in industrial usage and thereby health consequences. This paper reports the analysis of nickel coordination from a large dataset of nickel bound structures and sequences. Coordination patterns predicted from the structures are reported in terms of donors, chelate length, coordination number, chelate geometry, structural fold and architecture. The analysis revealed histidine as the most favored residue in nickel coordination. The most common chelates identified were histidine based namely HHH, HDH, HEH and HH spaced at specific intervals. Though a maximum coordination number of 8 was observed, the presence of a single protein donor was noted to be mandatory in nickel coordination. The coordination pattern did not reveal any specific fold, nevertheless we report preferable residue spacing for specific structural architecture. In contrast, the analysis of nickel binding proteins from bacterial and archeal species revealed no common coordination patterns. Nickel binding sequence motifs were noted to be organism specific and protein class specific. As a result we identified about 13 signatures derived from 13 classes of nickel binding proteins. The specifications on nickel coordination presented in this paper will prove beneficial for developing better chelation strategies. PMID:25985439

  18. Metagenome fragment classification based on multiple motif-occurrence profiles.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Naoki; Seno, Shigeto; Takenaka, Yoichi; Matsuda, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    A vast amount of metagenomic data has been obtained by extracting multiple genomes simultaneously from microbial communities, including genomes from uncultivable microbes. By analyzing these metagenomic data, novel microbes are discovered and new microbial functions are elucidated. The first step in analyzing these data is sequenced-read classification into reference genomes from which each read can be derived. The Naïve Bayes Classifier is a method for this classification. To identify the derivation of the reads, this method calculates a score based on the occurrence of a DNA sequence motif in each reference genome. However, large differences in the sizes of the reference genomes can bias the scoring of the reads. This bias might cause erroneous classification and decrease the classification accuracy. To address this issue, we have updated the Naïve Bayes Classifier method using multiple sets of occurrence profiles for each reference genome by normalizing the genome sizes, dividing each genome sequence into a set of subsequences of similar length and generating profiles for each subsequence. This multiple profile strategy improves the accuracy of the results generated by the Naïve Bayes Classifier method for simulated and Sargasso Sea datasets. PMID:25210663

  19. Conserved rhodopsin intradiscal structural motifs mediate stabilization: effects of zinc.

    PubMed

    Gleim, Scott; Stojanovic, Aleksandar; Arehart, Eric; Byington, Daniel; Hwa, John

    2009-03-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a neurodegenerative disorder, can arise from single point mutations in rhodopsin, leading to a cascade of protein instability, misfolding, aggregation, rod cell death, retinal degeneration, and ultimately blindness. Divalent cations, such as zinc and copper, have allosteric effects on misfolded aggregates of comparable neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease, prion diseases, and ALS. We report that two structurally conserved low-affinity zinc coordination motifs, located among a cluster of RP mutations in the intradiscal loop region, mediate dose-dependent rhodopsin destabilization. Disruption of native interactions involving histidines 100 and 195, through site-directed mutagenesis or exogenous zinc coordination, results in significant loss of receptor stability. Furthermore, chelation with EDTA stabilizes the structure of both wild-type rhodopsin and the most prevalent rhodopsin RP mutation, P(23)H. These interactions suggest that homeostatic regulation of trace metal concentrations in the rod outer segment of the retina may be important both physiologically and for an important cluster of RP mutations. Furthermore, with a growing awareness of allosteric zinc binding domains on a diverse range of GPCRs, such principles may apply to many other receptors and their associated diseases. PMID:19206210

  20. Conserved rhodopsin intradiscal structural motifs mediate stabilization; effects of zinc†

    PubMed Central

    Gleim, Scott; Stojanovic, Aleksandar; Arehart, Eric; Byington, Daniel; Hwa, John

    2009-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a neurodegenerative disorder, can arise from single point mutations in rhodopsin, leading to a cascade of protein instability, misfolding, aggregation, rod cell death, retinal degeneration, and ultimately blindness. Divalent cations, such as zinc and copper, have allosteric effects on misfolded aggregates of comparable neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease, prion diseases, and ALS. We report that two structurally conserved low-affinity zinc coordination motifs, located among a cluster of RP mutations in the intradiscal loop region, mediate dose-dependent rhodopsin destabilization. Disruption of native interactions involving histidines 100 and 195, through site-directed mutagenesis or exogenous zinc coordination, results in significant loss of receptor stability. Furthermore, chelation with EDTA stabilizes the structure of both wild type rhodopsin and the most prevalent rhodopsin RP mutation, P23H. These interactions suggest that homeostatic regulation of trace metal concentrations in the rod outer segment of the retina may be important both physiologically and for an important cluster of RP mutations. Furthermore, with a growing awareness of allosteric zinc binding domains on a diverse range of GPCRs, such principles may apply to many other receptors and their associated diseases. PMID:19206210

  1. Squash inhibitors: from structural motifs to macrocyclic knottins.

    PubMed

    Chiche, Laurent; Heitz, Annie; Gelly, Jean-Christophe; Gracy, Jérôme; Chau, Pham T T; Ha, Phan T; Hernandez, Jean-François; Le-Nguyen, Dung

    2004-10-01

    In this article, we will first introduce the squash inhibitor, a well established family of highly potent canonical serine proteinase inhibitors isolated from Cucurbitaceae. The squash inhibitors were among the first discovered proteins with the typical knottin fold shared by numerous peptides extracted from plants, animals and fungi. Knottins contain three knotted disulfide bridges, two of them arranged as a Cystine-Stabilized Beta-sheet motif. In contrast to cyclotides for which no natural linear homolog is known, most squash inhibitors are linear. However, Momordica cochinchinensis Trypsin Inhibitor-I and (MCoTI-I and -II), 34-residue squash inhibitors isolated from seeds of a common Cucurbitaceae from Vietnam, were recently shown to be macrocyclic. In these circular squash inhibitors, a short peptide linker connects residues that correspond to the N- and C-termini in homologous linear squash inhibitors. In this review we present the isolation, characterization, chemical synthesis, and activity of these macrocyclic knottins. The solution structure of MCoTI-II will be compared with topologically similar cyclotides, homologous linear squash inhibitors and other knottins, and potential applications of such scaffolds will be discussed. PMID:15551519

  2. Phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins: sequence motifs in structural and evolutionary analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wyckoff, Gerald J.; Solidar, Ada; Yoden, Marilyn D.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITP) are a family of monomeric proteins that bind and transfer phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine between membrane compartments. They are required for production of inositol and diacylglycerol second messengers, and are found in most metazoan organisms. While PITPs are known to carry out crucial cell-signaling roles in many organisms, the structure, function and evolution of the majority of family members remains unexplored; primarily because the ubiquity and diversity of the family thwarts traditional methods of global alignment. To surmount this obstacle, we instead took a novel approach, using MEME and a parsimony-based analysis to create a cladogram of conserved sequence motifs in 56 PITP family proteins from 26 species. In keeping with previous functional annotations, three clades were supported within our evolutionary analysis; two classes of soluble proteins and a class of membrane-associated proteins. By, focusing on conserved regions, the analysis allowed for in depth queries regarding possible functional roles of PITP proteins in both intra- and extra- cellular signaling.

  3. Plasticity of the RNA Kink Turn Structural Motif

    SciTech Connect

    Antonioli, A.; Cochrane, J; Lipchock, S; Strobel, S

    2010-01-01

    The kink turn (K-turn) is an RNA structural motif found in many biologically significant RNAs. While most examples of the K-turn have a similar fold, the crystal structure of the Azoarcus group I intron revealed a novel RNA conformation, a reverse kink turn bent in the direction opposite that of a consensus K-turn. The reverse K-turn is bent toward the major grooves rather than the minor grooves of the flanking helices, yet the sequence differs from the K-turn consensus by only a single nucleotide. Here we demonstrate that the reverse bend direction is not solely defined by internal sequence elements, but is instead affected by structural elements external to the K-turn. It bends toward the major groove under the direction of a tetraloop-tetraloop receptor. The ability of one sequence to form two distinct structures demonstrates the inherent plasticity of the K-turn sequence. Such plasticity suggests that the K-turn is not a primary element in RNA folding, but instead is shaped by other structural elements within the RNA or ribonucleoprotein assembly.

  4. C-X-C motif receptor 7 in gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    YUN, HWAN-JUNG; RYU, HYEWON; CHOI, YOON SEOK; SONG, IK-CHAN; JO, DEOG-YEON; KIM, SAMYONG; LEE, HYO JIN

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine receptors are key mediators of normal physiology and numerous pathological conditions, including inflammation and cancer. This receptor family is an emerging target for anticancer drug development. C-X-C motif receptor 7 (CXCR7) is an atypical chemokine receptor that was first cloned from a canine cDNA library as an orphan receptor and was initially named receptor dog cDNA 1 (RDC1). Shortly after demonstrating that RDC1 binds with its ligand, stromal cell-derived factor-1α and interferon-inducible T-cell α chemoattractant, RDC1 was officially deorphanized and renamed CXCR7, as the seventh receptor in the CXC class of the chemokine receptor family. Recent accumulating evidence has demonstrated that CXCR7 expression is augmented in the majority of tumor cells compared with their normal counterparts and is involved in cell proliferation, survival, migration, invasion and angiogenesis during the initiation and progression of breast, lung and prostate cancer. In the present review, the expression and role of CXCR7, as well as its clinical relevance in cancer of the gastrointestinal system, were investigated. In addition, the potential of this chemokine receptor as a therapeutic target in the treatment of gastrointestinal cancer was discussed. PMID:26622655

  5. Motif mimetic of epsin perturbs tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yunzhou; Wu, Hao; Rahman, H.N. Ashiqur; Liu, Yanjun; Pasula, Satish; Tessneer, Kandice L.; Cai, Xiaofeng; Liu, Xiaolei; Chang, Baojun; McManus, John; Hahn, Scott; Dong, Jiali; Brophy, Megan L.; Yu, Lili; Song, Kai; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Saunders, Debra; Njoku, Charity; Song, Hoogeun; Mehta-D’Souza, Padmaja; Towner, Rheal; Lupu, Florea; McEver, Rodger P.; Xia, Lijun; Boerboom, Derek; Srinivasan, R. Sathish; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critical for cancer progression. In multiple murine models, endothelium-specific epsin deficiency abrogates tumor progression by shifting the balance of VEGFR2 signaling toward uncontrolled tumor angiogenesis, resulting in dysfunctional tumor vasculature. Here, we designed a tumor endothelium–targeting chimeric peptide (UPI) for the purpose of inhibiting endogenous tumor endothelial epsins by competitively binding activated VEGFR2. We determined that the UPI peptide specifically targets tumor endothelial VEGFR2 through an unconventional binding mechanism that is driven by unique residues present only in the epsin ubiquitin–interacting motif (UIM) and the VEGFR2 kinase domain. In murine models of neoangiogenesis, UPI peptide increased VEGF-driven angiogenesis and neovascularization but spared quiescent vascular beds. Further, in tumor-bearing mice, UPI peptide markedly impaired functional tumor angiogenesis, tumor growth, and metastasis, resulting in a notable increase in survival. Coadministration of UPI peptide with cytotoxic chemotherapeutics further sustained tumor inhibition. Equipped with localized tumor endothelium–specific targeting, our UPI peptide provides potential for an effective and alternative cancer therapy. PMID:26571402

  6. Motif mediated protein-protein interactions as drug targets.

    PubMed

    Corbi-Verge, Carles; Kim, Philip M

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPI) are involved in virtually every cellular process and thus represent an attractive target for therapeutic interventions. A significant number of protein interactions are frequently formed between globular domains and short linear peptide motifs (DMI). Targeting these DMIs has proven challenging and classical approaches to inhibiting such interactions with small molecules have had limited success. However, recent new approaches have led to the discovery of potent inhibitors, some of them, such as Obatoclax, ABT-199, AEG-40826 and SAH-p53-8 are likely to become approved drugs. These novel inhibitors belong to a wide range of different molecule classes, ranging from small molecules to peptidomimetics and biologicals. This article reviews the main reasons for limited success in targeting PPIs, discusses how successful approaches overcome these obstacles to discovery promising inhibitors for human protein double minute 2 (HDM2), B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), and provides a summary of the promising approaches currently in development that indicate the future potential of PPI inhibitors in drug discovery. PMID:26936767

  7. Atomic Force Microscopy of Arrays of Asymmetrical DNA Motifs

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, W.B.; Mudalige, T.K.

    2012-03-21

    DNA can easily be assembled into wide and relatively flat nanostructures that lend themselves to study via Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). It is often important to know which side of an assembly the AFM is imaging. This is particularly crucial for characterizing nanomachines, where the movement must be measured relative to fiducial features visible to the AFM. We have developed a cheap and simple technique for building DNA arrays with distinguishable sides, a technique requiring 10 or fewer strands - dozens or hundreds of strands fewer than used for these purposes previously. Our approach involves constructing arrays out of DNA tiles that have low apparent symmetry when imaged via AFM. We have surveyed the effects of varying degrees of motif asymmetry in AFM micrographs. Even at resolutions where the individual tiles cannot be resolved (either because of sub-optimal tip quality, or very gentle tapping by the AFM tip) the larger scale features of the arrays have predictable structures that allow the determination of which side of the array is facing up. We have used this information to verify that DNA hairpins attached to either the up- or down-facing side of an array on mica can be detected in AFM height scans. We have also characterized differences in appearance between hairpins attached to different sides of the arrays.

  8. Sulfur-induced structural motifs on copper and gold surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walen, Holly

    The interaction of sulfur with copper and gold surfaces plays a fundamental role in important phenomena that include coarsening of surface nanostructures, and self-assembly of alkanethiols. Here, we identify and analyze unique sulfur-induced structural motifs observed on the low-index surfaces of these two metals. We seek out these structures in an effort to better understand the fundamental interactions between these metals and sulfur that lends to the stability and favorability of metal-sulfur complexes vs. chemisorbed atomic sulfur. We choose very specific conditions: very low temperature (5 K), and very low sulfur coverage (≤ 0.1 monolayer). In this region of temperature-coverage space, which has not been examined previously for these adsorbate-metal systems, the effects of individual interactions between metals and sulfur are most apparent and can be assessed extensively with the aid of theory and modeling. Furthermore, at this temperature diffusion is minimal and relatively-mobile species can be isolated, and at low coverage the structures observed are not consumed by an extended reconstruction. The primary experimental technique is scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The experimental observations presented here---made under identical conditions---together with extensive DFT analyses, allow comparisons and insights into factors that favor the existence of metal-sulfur complexes, vs. chemisorbed atomic sulfur, on metal terraces. We believe this data will be instrumental in better understanding the complex phenomena occurring between the surfaces of coinage metals and sulfur.

  9. Defense-Inducing Volatiles: In Search of the Active Motif

    PubMed Central

    Lion, Ulrich; Boland, Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    Herbivore-induced volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are widely appreciated as an indirect defense mechanism since carnivorous arthropods use VOCs as cues for host localization and then attack herbivores. Another function of VOCs is plant–plant signaling. That VOCs elicit defensive responses in neighboring plants has been reported from various species, and different compounds have been found to be active. In order to search for a structural motif that characterizes active VOCs, we used lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus), which responds to VOCs released from damaged plants with an increased secretion of extrafloral nectar (EFN). We exposed lima bean to (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate, a substance naturally released from damaged lima bean and known to induce EFN secretion, and to several structurally related compounds. (E)-3-hexenyl acetate, (E)-2-hexenyl acetate, 5-hexenyl acetate, (Z)-3-hexenylisovalerate, and (Z)-3-hexenylbutyrate all elicited significant increases in EFN secretion, demonstrating that neither the (Z)-configuration nor the position of the double-bond nor the size of the acid moiety are critical for the EFN-inducing effect. Our result is not consistent with previous concepts that postulate reactive electrophile species (Michael-acceptor-systems) for defense-induction in Arabidopsis. Instead, we postulate that physicochemical processes, including interactions with odorant binding proteins and resulting in changes in transmembrane potentials, can underlie VOCs-mediated signaling processes. PMID:18408973

  10. Tyrosine motifs are required for prestin basolateral membrane targeting

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yifan; Moeini-Naghani, Iman; Bai, JunPing; Santos-Sacchi, Joseph; Navaratnam, Dhasakumar S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Prestin is targeted to the lateral wall of outer hair cells (OHCs) where its electromotility is critical for cochlear amplification. Using MDCK cells as a model system for polarized epithelial sorting, we demonstrate that prestin uses tyrosine residues, in a YXXΦ motif, to target the basolateral surface. Both Y520 and Y667 are important for basolateral targeting of prestin. Mutation of these residues to glutamine or alanine resulted in retention within the Golgi and delayed egress from the Golgi in Y667Q. Basolateral targeting is restored upon mutation to phenylalanine suggesting the importance of a phenol ring in the tyrosine side chain. We also demonstrate that prestin targeting to the basolateral surface is dependent on AP1B (μ1B), and that prestin uses transferrin containing early endosomes in its passage from the Golgi to the basolateral plasma membrane. The presence of AP1B (μ1B) in OHCs, and parallels between prestin targeting to the basolateral surface of OHCs and polarized epithelial cells suggest that outer hair cells resemble polarized epithelia rather than neurons in this important phenotypic measure. PMID:25596279

  11. A duplicated motif controls assembly of zona pellucida domain proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovine, Luca; Qi, Huayu; Williams, Zev; Litscher, Eveline S.; Wassarman, Paul M.

    2004-04-01

    Many secreted eukaryotic glycoproteins that play fundamental roles in development, hearing, immunity, and cancer polymerize into filaments and extracellular matrices through zona pellucida (ZP) domains. ZP domain proteins are synthesized as precursors containing C-terminal propeptides that are cleaved at conserved sites. However, the consequences of this processing and the mechanism by which nascent proteins assemble are unclear. By microinjection of mutated DNA constructs into growing oocytes and mammalian cell transfection, we have identified a conserved duplicated motif [EHP (external hydrophobic patch)/IHP (internal hydrophobic patch)] regulating the assembly of mouse ZP proteins. Whereas the transmembrane domain (TMD) of ZP3 can be functionally replaced by an unrelated TMD, mutations in either EHP or IHP do not hinder secretion of full-length ZP3 but completely abolish its assembly. Because mutants truncated before the TMD are not processed, we conclude that the conserved TMD of mammalian ZP proteins does not engage them in specific interactions but is essential for C-terminal processing. Cleavage of ZP precursors results in loss of the EHP, thereby activating secreted polypeptides to assemble by using the IHP within the ZP domain. Taken together, these findings suggest a general mechanism for assembly of ZP domain proteins.

  12. Motif-directed flexible backbone design of functional interactions

    PubMed Central

    Havranek, James J; Baker, David

    2009-01-01

    Computational protein design relies on a number of approximations to efficiently search the huge sequence space available to proteins. The fixed backbone and rotamer approximations in particular are important for formulating protein design as a discrete combinatorial optimization problem. However, the resulting coarse-grained sampling of possible side-chain terminal positions is problematic for the design of protein function, which depends on precise positioning of side-chain atoms. Although backbone flexibility can greatly increase the conformation freedom of side-chain functional groups, it is not obvious which backbone movements will generate the critical constellation of atoms responsible for protein function. Here, we report an automated method for identifying protein backbone movements that can give rise to any specified set of desired side-chain atomic placements and interactions, using protein–DNA interfaces as a model system. We use a library of previously observed protein–DNA interactions (motifs) and a rotamer-based description of side-chain conformation freedom to identify placements for the protein backbone that can give rise to a favorable side-chain interaction with DNA. We describe a tree-search algorithm for identifying those combinations of interactions from the library that can be realized with minimal perturbation of the protein backbone. We compare the efficiency of this method with the alternative approach of building and screening alternate backbone conformations. PMID:19472357

  13. Opposing Effects of a Tyrosine-Based Sorting Motif and a PDZ-Binding Motif Regulate Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Envelope Trafficking▿

    PubMed Central

    Ilinskaya, Anna; Heidecker, Gisela; Derse, David

    2010-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein mediates binding of the virus to its receptor on the surface of target cells and subsequent fusion of virus and cell membranes. To better understand the mechanisms that control HTLV-1 Env trafficking and activity, we have examined two protein-protein interaction motifs in the cytoplasmic domain of Env. One is the sequence YSLI, which matches the consensus YXXΦ motifs that are known to interact with various adaptor protein complexes; the other is the sequence ESSL at the C terminus of Env, which matches the consensus PDZ-binding motif. We show here that mutations that destroy the YXXΦ motif increased Env expression on the cell surface and increased cell-cell fusion activity. In contrast, mutation of the PDZ-binding motif greatly diminished Env expression in cells, which could be restored to wild-type levels either by mutating the YXXΦ motif or by silencing AP2 and AP3, suggesting that interactions with PDZ proteins oppose an Env degradation pathway mediated by AP2 and AP3. Silencing of the PDZ protein hDlg1 did not affect Env expression, suggesting that hDlg1 is not a binding partner for Env. Substitution of the YSLI sequence in HTLV-1 Env with YXXΦ elements from other cell or virus membrane-spanning proteins resulted in alterations in Env accumulation in cells, incorporation into virions, and virion infectivity. Env variants containing YXXΦ motifs that are predicted to have high-affinity interaction with AP2 accumulated to lower steady-state levels. Interestingly, mutations that destroy the YXXΦ motif resulted in viruses that were not infectious by cell-free or cell-associated routes of infection. Unlike YXXΦ, the function of the PDZ-binding motif manifests itself only in the producer cells; AP2 silencing restored the incorporation of PDZ-deficient Env into virus-like particles (VLPs) and the infectivity of these VLPs to wild-type levels. PMID:20463077

  14. Switch-like Transitions Insulate Network Motifs to Modularize Biological Networks.

    PubMed

    Atay, Oguzhan; Doncic, Andreas; Skotheim, Jan M

    2016-08-01

    Cellular decisions are made by complex networks that are difficult to analyze. Although it is common to analyze smaller sub-networks known as network motifs, it is unclear whether this is valid, because these motifs are embedded in complex larger networks. Here, we address the general question of modularity by examining the S. cerevisiae pheromone response. We demonstrate that the feedforward motif controlling the cell-cycle inhibitor Far1 is insulated from cell-cycle dynamics by the positive feedback switch that drives reentry to the cell cycle. Before cells switch on positive feedback, the feedforward motif model predicts the behavior of the larger network. Conversely, after the switch, the feedforward motif is dismantled and has no discernable effect on the cell cycle. When insulation is broken, the feedforward motif no longer predicts network behavior. This work illustrates how, despite the interconnectivity of networks, the activity of motifs can be insulated by switches that generate well-defined cellular states. PMID:27453443

  15. Aquatic proteins with repetitive motifs provide insights to bioengineering of novel biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun Jung; Jung, Dooyup; Yang, Byeongseon; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2014-12-01

    Proteins with repetitive motifs play vital structural and adhesive functions in nature. Some repeat proteins in particular have adapted to harsh aquatic surroundings to support the survival and reproduction of organisms. Significant effort has been made to identify aquatic repeat proteins with attractive properties and functions to be used as novel biomaterials. Examples of such proteins include matrix proteins from pearl oysters, minicollagens from sea anemones, cement proteins from sandcastle worms, and byssal proteins from marine mussels. Here, several repetitive motifs from aquatic proteins are reviewed, and their characteristic properties are linked to practical uses in three aspects of aquatic life: defense, shelter, and attachment. Some repetitive motifs interact with minerals and consequently generate strong outer cover of shells, and some motifs relate with sticky nature, which contribute to organisms' habitation by adhering themselves in harsh aquatic environments. Other motifs, such as silk- or collagen-like motifs, are also involved in structural rigidity as shown in mussel's byssus and egg membrane. Thus, understanding aquatic repetitive motifs will provide clues about biomedical and biotechnological applications of engineered biomaterials in wet environments. PMID:25208823

  16. Two Di-Leucine Motifs Regulate Trafficking of Mucolipin-1 to Lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Vergarajauregui, Silvia; Puertollano, Rosa

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in the mucolipin-1 gene have been linked to mucolipidosis type IV, a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by severe neurological and ophthalmologic abnormalities. Mucolipin-1 is a membrane protein containing six putative transmembrane domains with both its N- and C-termini localized facing the cytosol. To gain information on the sorting motifs that mediate the trafficking of this protein to lysosomes, we have generated chimeras in which the N- and C- terminal tail portions of mucolipin-1 were fused to a reporter gene. In this article, we report the identification of two separate di-leucine-type motifs that co-operate to regulate the transport of mucolipin-1 to lysosomes. One di-leucine motif is positioned at the N-terminal cytosolic tail and mediates direct transport to lysosomes, whereas the other di-leucine motif is found at the C-terminal tail and functions as an adaptor protein 2-dependent internalization motif. We have also found that the C-terminal tail of mucolipin-1 is palmitoylated and that this modification might regulate the efficiency of endocytosis. Finally, the mutagenesis of both di-leucine motifs abrogated lysosomal accumulation and resulted in cell-surface redistribution of mucolipin-1. Taken together, these results reveal novel information regarding the motifs that regulate mucolipin-1 trafficking and suggest a role for palmitoylation in protein sorting. PMID:16497227

  17. Coagulase and Efb of Staphylococcus aureus Have a Common Fibrinogen Binding Motif

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Ya-Ping; Kang, Mingsong; Ganesh, Vannakambadi K.; Ravirajan, Dharmanand; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Coagulase (Coa) and Efb, secreted Staphylococcus aureus proteins, are important virulence factors in staphylococcal infections. Coa interacts with fibrinogen (Fg) and induces the formation of fibrin(ogen) clots through activation of prothrombin. Efb attracts Fg to the bacterial surface and forms a shield to protect the bacteria from phagocytic clearance. This communication describes the use of an array of synthetic peptides to identify variants of a linear Fg binding motif present in Coa and Efb which are responsible for the Fg binding activities of these proteins. This motif represents the first Fg binding motif identified for any microbial protein. We initially located the Fg binding sites to Coa’s C-terminal disordered segment containing tandem repeats by using recombinant fragments of Coa in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-type binding experiments. Sequence analyses revealed that this Coa region contained shorter segments with sequences similar to the Fg binding segments in Efb. An alanine scanning approach allowed us to identify the residues in Coa and Efb that are critical for Fg binding and to define the Fg binding motifs in the two proteins. In these motifs, the residues required for Fg binding are largely conserved, and they therefore constitute variants of a common Fg binding motif which binds to Fg with high affinity. Defining a specific motif also allowed us to identify a functional Fg binding register for the Coa repeats that is different from the repeat unit previously proposed. PMID:26733070

  18. MODA: an efficient algorithm for network motif discovery in biological networks.

    PubMed

    Omidi, Saeed; Schreiber, Falk; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2009-10-01

    In recent years, interest has been growing in the study of complex networks. Since Erdös and Rényi (1960) proposed their random graph model about 50 years ago, many researchers have investigated and shaped this field. Many indicators have been proposed to assess the global features of networks. Recently, an active research area has developed in studying local features named motifs as the building blocks of networks. Unfortunately, network motif discovery is a computationally hard problem and finding rather large motifs (larger than 8 nodes) by means of current algorithms is impractical as it demands too much computational effort. In this paper, we present a new algorithm (MODA) that incorporates techniques such as a pattern growth approach for extracting larger motifs efficiently. We have tested our algorithm and found it able to identify larger motifs with more than 8 nodes more efficiently than most of the current state-of-the-art motif discovery algorithms. While most of the algorithms rely on induced subgraphs as motifs of the networks, MODA is able to extract both induced and non-induced subgraphs simultaneously. The MODA source code is freely available at: http://LBB.ut.ac.ir/Download/LBBsoft/MODA/ PMID:20154426

  19. Roles of two ATPase-motif-containing domains in cyanobacterial circadian clock protein KaiC.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Fumio; Itoh, Noriyo; Uzumaki, Tatsuya; Iwase, Ryo; Tsuchiya, Yuka; Yamakawa, Hisanori; Morishita, Megumi; Onai, Kiyoshi; Itoh, Shigeru; Ishiura, Masahiro

    2004-12-10

    Cyanobacterial clock protein KaiC has a hexagonal, pot-shaped structure composed of six identical dumbbell-shaped subunits. Each subunit has duplicated domains, and each domain has a set of ATPase motifs. The two spherical regions of the dumbbell are likely to correspond to two domains. We examined the role of the two sets of ATPase motifs by analyzing the in vitro activity of ATPgammaS binding, AMPPNP-induced hexamerization, thermostability, and phosphorylation of KaiC and by in vivo rhythm assays both in wild type KaiC (KaiCWT) and KaiCs carrying mutations in either Walker motif A or deduced catalytic Glu residues. We demonstrated that 1) the KaiC subunit had two types of ATP-binding sites, a high affinity site in N-terminal ATPase motifs and a low affinity site in C-terminal ATPase motifs, 2) the N-terminal motifs were responsible for hexamerization, and 3) the C-terminal motifs were responsible for both stabilization and phosphorylation of the KaiC hexamer. We proposed the following reaction mechanism. ATP preferentially binds to the N-terminal high affinity site, inducing the hexamerization of KaiC. Additional ATP then binds to the C-terminal low affinity site, stabilizing and phosphorylating the hexamer. We discussed the effect of these KaiC mutations on circadian bioluminescence rhythm in cells of cyanobacteria. PMID:15377674

  20. Recurrent motifs as resonant attractor states in the narrative field: a testable model of archetype.

    PubMed

    Goodwyn, Erik

    2013-06-01

    At the most basic level, archetypes represented Jung's attempt to explain the phenomenon of recurrent myths and folktale motifs (Jung 1956, 1959, para. 99). But the archetype remains controversial as an explanation of recurrent motifs, as the existence of recurrent motifs does not prove that archetypes exist. Thus, the challenge for contemporary archetype theory is not merely to demonstrate that recurrent motifs exist, since that is not disputed, but to demonstrate that archetypes exist and cause recurrent motifs. The present paper proposes a new model which is unlike others in that it postulates how the archetype creates resonant motifs. This model necessarily clarifies and adapts some of Jung's seminal ideas on archetype in order to provide a working framework grounded in contemporary practice and methodologies. For the first time, a model of archetype is proposed that can be validated on empirical, rather than theoretical grounds. This is achieved by linking the archetype to the hard data of recurrent motifs rather than academic trends in other fields. PMID:23750942

  1. Trend Motif: A Graph Mining Approach for Analysis of Dynamic Complex Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, R; McCallen, S; Almaas, E

    2007-05-28

    Complex networks have been used successfully in scientific disciplines ranging from sociology to microbiology to describe systems of interacting units. Until recently, studies of complex networks have mainly focused on their network topology. However, in many real world applications, the edges and vertices have associated attributes that are frequently represented as vertex or edge weights. Furthermore, these weights are often not static, instead changing with time and forming a time series. Hence, to fully understand the dynamics of the complex network, we have to consider both network topology and related time series data. In this work, we propose a motif mining approach to identify trend motifs for such purposes. Simply stated, a trend motif describes a recurring subgraph where each of its vertices or edges displays similar dynamics over a userdefined period. Given this, each trend motif occurrence can help reveal significant events in a complex system; frequent trend motifs may aid in uncovering dynamic rules of change for the system, and the distribution of trend motifs may characterize the global dynamics of the system. Here, we have developed efficient mining algorithms to extract trend motifs. Our experimental validation using three disparate empirical datasets, ranging from the stock market, world trade, to a protein interaction network, has demonstrated the efficiency and effectiveness of our approach.

  2. Characterization of the tandem CWCH2 sequence motif: a hallmark of inter-zinc finger interactions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The C2H2 zinc finger (ZF) domain is widely conserved among eukaryotic proteins. In Zic/Gli/Zap1 C2H2 ZF proteins, the two N-terminal ZFs form a single structural unit by sharing a hydrophobic core. This structural unit defines a new motif comprised of two tryptophan side chains at the center of the hydrophobic core. Because each tryptophan residue is located between the two cysteine residues of the C2H2 motif, we have named this structure the tandem CWCH2 (tCWCH2) motif. Results Here, we characterized 587 tCWCH2-containing genes using data derived from public databases. We categorized genes into 11 classes including Zic/Gli/Glis, Arid2/Rsc9, PacC, Mizf, Aebp2, Zap1/ZafA, Fungl, Zfp106, Twincl, Clr1, and Fungl-4ZF, based on sequence similarity, domain organization, and functional similarities. tCWCH2 motifs are mostly found in organisms belonging to the Opisthokonta (metazoa, fungi, and choanoflagellates) and Amoebozoa (amoeba, Dictyostelium discoideum). By comparison, the C2H2 ZF motif is distributed widely among the eukaryotes. The structure and organization of the tCWCH2 motif, its phylogenetic distribution, and molecular phylogenetic analysis suggest that prototypical tCWCH2 genes existed in the Opisthokonta ancestor. Within-group or between-group comparisons of the tCWCH2 amino acid sequence identified three additional sequence features (site-specific amino acid frequencies, longer linker sequence between two C2H2 ZFs, and frequent extra-sequences within C2H2 ZF motifs). Conclusion These features suggest that the tCWCH2 motif is a specialized motif involved in inter-zinc finger interactions. PMID:20167128

  3. Identification of a putative nuclear export signal motif in human NANOG homeobox domain

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung-Won; Do, Hyun-Jin; Huh, Sun-Hyung; Sung, Boreum; Uhm, Sang-Jun; Song, Hyuk; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Hwan

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found the putative nuclear export signal motif within human NANOG homeodomain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Leucine-rich residues are important for human NANOG homeodomain nuclear export. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CRM1-specific inhibitor LMB blocked the potent human NANOG NES-mediated nuclear export. -- Abstract: NANOG is a homeobox-containing transcription factor that plays an important role in pluripotent stem cells and tumorigenic cells. To understand how nuclear localization of human NANOG is regulated, the NANOG sequence was examined and a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) motif ({sup 125}MQELSNILNL{sup 134}) was found in the homeodomain (HD). To functionally validate the putative NES motif, deletion and site-directed mutants were fused to an EGFP expression vector and transfected into COS-7 cells, and the localization of the proteins was examined. While hNANOG HD exclusively localized to the nucleus, a mutant with both NLSs deleted and only the putative NES motif contained (hNANOG HD-{Delta}NLSs) was predominantly cytoplasmic, as observed by nucleo/cytoplasmic fractionation and Western blot analysis as well as confocal microscopy. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis of the putative NES motif in a partial hNANOG HD only containing either one of the two NLS motifs led to localization in the nucleus, suggesting that the NES motif may play a functional role in nuclear export. Furthermore, CRM1-specific nuclear export inhibitor LMB blocked the hNANOG potent NES-mediated export, suggesting that the leucine-rich motif may function in CRM1-mediated nuclear export of hNANOG. Collectively, a NES motif is present in the hNANOG HD and may be functionally involved in CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway.

  4. Identification of Novel N-Glycosylation Sites at Noncanonical Protein Consensus Motifs.

    PubMed

    Lowenthal, Mark S; Davis, Kiersta S; Formolo, Trina; Kilpatrick, Lisa E; Phinney, Karen W

    2016-07-01

    N-glycosylation of proteins is well known to occur at asparagine residues that fall within the canonical consensus sequence N-X-S/T but has also been identified at a small number of asparagine residues within N-X-C motifs, including the N491 residue of human serotransferrin. Here we report novel glycosylation sites within noncanonical consensus motifs, in the conformation N-X-C, based on mass spectrometry analysis of partially deglycosylated glycopeptide targets. Alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (A1AG) and serotransferrin (Tf) were observed for the first time to be N-glycosylated on asparagine residues within a total of six unique noncanonical motifs. N-glycosylation was initially predicted in silico based on the evolutionary conservation of the N-X-C motif among related mammalian species and demonstrated experimentally in A1AG from porcine, canine, and feline sources and in human serotransferrin. High-resolution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was employed to collect fragmentation data of predicted GlcNAcylated peptides and to assign modification sites within N-X-C motifs. A combination of targeted analytical techniques that includes complementary mass spectrometry platforms, enzymatic digestions, and partial-deglycosylation procedures was developed to confirm the novel observations. Additionally, we found that A1AG in porcine and canine sources is highly N-glycosylated at a noncanonical motif (N-Q-C) based on semiquantitative multiple reaction monitoring analysis-the first report of an N-X-C motif exhibiting substantial N-glycosylation. Although reports of N-X-C motif N-glycosylation are relatively uncommon in the literature, this work adds to a growing list of glycoproteins reported with glycosylation at various forms of noncanonical motifs. PMID:27246700

  5. Miz-1 Activates Gene Expression via a Novel Consensus DNA Binding Motif

    PubMed Central

    Barrilleaux, Bonnie L.; Burow, Dana; Lockwood, Sarah H.; Yu, Abigail; Segal, David J.; Knoepfler, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor Miz-1 can either activate or repress gene expression in concert with binding partners including the Myc oncoprotein. The genomic binding of Miz-1 includes both core promoters and more distal sites, but the preferred DNA binding motif of Miz-1 has been unclear. We used a high-throughput in vitro technique, Bind-n-Seq, to identify two Miz-1 consensus DNA binding motif sequences—ATCGGTAATC and ATCGAT (Mizm1 and Mizm2)—bound by full-length Miz-1 and its zinc finger domain, respectively. We validated these sequences directly as high affinity Miz-1 binding motifs. Competition assays using mutant probes indicated that the binding affinity of Miz-1 for Mizm1 and Mizm2 is highly sequence-specific. Miz-1 strongly activates gene expression through the motifs in a Myc-independent manner. MEME-ChIP analysis of Miz-1 ChIP-seq data in two different cell types reveals a long motif with a central core sequence highly similar to the Mizm1 motif identified by Bind-n-Seq, validating the in vivo relevance of the findings. Miz-1 ChIP-seq peaks containing the long motif are predominantly located outside of proximal promoter regions, in contrast to peaks without the motif, which are highly concentrated within 1.5 kb of the nearest transcription start site. Overall, our results indicate that Miz-1 may be directed in vivo to the novel motif sequences we have identified, where it can recruit its specific binding partners to control gene expression and ultimately regulate cell fate. PMID:24983942

  6. ELM 2016—data update and new functionality of the eukaryotic linear motif resource

    PubMed Central

    Dinkel, Holger; Van Roey, Kim; Michael, Sushama; Kumar, Manjeet; Uyar, Bora; Altenberg, Brigitte; Milchevskaya, Vladislava; Schneider, Melanie; Kühn, Helen; Behrendt, Annika; Dahl, Sophie Luise; Damerell, Victoria; Diebel, Sandra; Kalman, Sara; Klein, Steffen; Knudsen, Arne C.; Mäder, Christina; Merrill, Sabina; Staudt, Angelina; Thiel, Vera; Welti, Lukas; Davey, Norman E.; Diella, Francesca; Gibson, Toby J.

    2016-01-01

    The Eukaryotic Linear Motif (ELM) resource (http://elm.eu.org) is a manually curated database of short linear motifs (SLiMs). In this update, we present the latest additions to this resource, along with more improvements to the web interface. ELM 2016 contains more than 240 different motif classes with over 2700 experimentally validated instances, manually curated from more than 2400 scientific publications. In addition, more data have been made available as individually searchable pages and are downloadable in various formats. PMID:26615199

  7. ELM 2016--data update and new functionality of the eukaryotic linear motif resource.

    PubMed

    Dinkel, Holger; Van Roey, Kim; Michael, Sushama; Kumar, Manjeet; Uyar, Bora; Altenberg, Brigitte; Milchevskaya, Vladislava; Schneider, Melanie; Kühn, Helen; Behrendt, Annika; Dahl, Sophie Luise; Damerell, Victoria; Diebel, Sandra; Kalman, Sara; Klein, Steffen; Knudsen, Arne C; Mäder, Christina; Merrill, Sabina; Staudt, Angelina; Thiel, Vera; Welti, Lukas; Davey, Norman E; Diella, Francesca; Gibson, Toby J

    2016-01-01

    The Eukaryotic Linear Motif (ELM) resource (http://elm.eu.org) is a manually curated database of short linear motifs (SLiMs). In this update, we present the latest additions to this resource, along with more improvements to the web interface. ELM 2016 contains more than 240 different motif classes with over 2700 experimentally validated instances, manually curated from more than 2400 scientific publications. In addition, more data have been made available as individually searchable pages and are downloadable in various formats. PMID:26615199

  8. Elongated Polyproline Motifs Facilitate Enamel Evolution through Matrix Subunit Compaction

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Xianghong; Dangaria, Smit; Walker, Cameron; Allen, Michael; Kulkarni, Ashok; Gibson, Carolyn; Braatz, Richard; Liao, Xiubei; Diekwisch, Thomas G. H.

    2009-01-01

    Vertebrate body designs rely on hydroxyapatite as the principal mineral component of relatively light-weight, articulated endoskeletons and sophisticated tooth-bearing jaws, facilitating rapid movement and efficient predation. Biological mineralization and skeletal growth are frequently accomplished through proteins containing polyproline repeat elements. Through their well-defined yet mobile and flexible structure polyproline-rich proteins control mineral shape and contribute many other biological functions including Alzheimer's amyloid aggregation and prolamine plant storage. In the present study we have hypothesized that polyproline repeat proteins exert their control over biological events such as mineral growth, plaque aggregation, or viscous adhesion by altering the length of their central repeat domain, resulting in dramatic changes in supramolecular assembly dimensions. In order to test our hypothesis, we have used the vertebrate mineralization protein amelogenin as an exemplar and determined the biological effect of the four-fold increased polyproline tandem repeat length in the amphibian/mammalian transition. To study the effect of polyproline repeat length on matrix assembly, protein structure, and apatite crystal growth, we have measured supramolecular assembly dimensions in various vertebrates using atomic force microscopy, tested the effect of protein assemblies on crystal growth by electron microscopy, generated a transgenic mouse model to examine the effect of an abbreviated polyproline sequence on crystal growth, and determined the structure of polyproline repeat elements using 3D NMR. Our study shows that an increase in PXX/PXQ tandem repeat motif length results (i) in a compaction of protein matrix subunit dimensions, (ii) reduced conformational variability, (iii) an increase in polyproline II helices, and (iv) promotion of apatite crystal length. Together, these findings establish a direct relationship between polyproline tandem repeat fragment

  9. Peptoid nanosheets exhibit a new secondary-structure motif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannige, Ranjan V.; Haxton, Thomas K.; Proulx, Caroline; Robertson, Ellen J.; Battigelli, Alessia; Butterfoss, Glenn L.; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; Whitelam, Stephen

    2015-10-01

    A promising route to the synthesis of protein-mimetic materials that are capable of complex functions, such as molecular recognition and catalysis, is provided by sequence-defined peptoid polymers--structural relatives of biologically occurring polypeptides. Peptoids, which are relatively non-toxic and resistant to degradation, can fold into defined structures through a combination of sequence-dependent interactions. However, the range of possible structures that are accessible to peptoids and other biological mimetics is unknown, and our ability to design protein-like architectures from these polymer classes is limited. Here we use molecular-dynamics simulations, together with scattering and microscopy data, to determine the atomic-resolution structure of the recently discovered peptoid nanosheet, an ordered supramolecular assembly that extends macroscopically in only two dimensions. Our simulations show that nanosheets are structurally and dynamically heterogeneous, can be formed only from peptoids of certain lengths, and are potentially porous to water and ions. Moreover, their formation is enabled by the peptoids' adoption of a secondary structure that is not seen in the natural world. This structure, a zigzag pattern that we call a Σ(`sigma')-strand, results from the ability of adjacent backbone monomers to adopt opposed rotational states, thereby allowing the backbone to remain linear and untwisted. Linear backbones tiled in a brick-like way form an extended two-dimensional nanostructure, the Σ-sheet. The binary rotational-state motif of the Σ-strand is not seen in regular protein structures, which are usually built from one type of rotational state. We also show that the concept of building regular structures from multiple rotational states can be generalized beyond the peptoid nanosheet system.

  10. The ADAMTS (A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase with Thrombospondin motifs) family.

    PubMed

    Kelwick, Richard; Desanlis, Ines; Wheeler, Grant N; Edwards, Dylan R

    2015-01-01

    The ADAMTS (A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase with Thrombospondin motifs) enzymes are secreted, multi-domain matrix-associated zinc metalloendopeptidases that have diverse roles in tissue morphogenesis and patho-physiological remodeling, in inflammation and in vascular biology. The human family includes 19 members that can be sub-grouped on the basis of their known substrates, namely the aggrecanases or proteoglycanases (ADAMTS1, 4, 5, 8, 9, 15 and 20), the procollagen N-propeptidases (ADAMTS2, 3 and 14), the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein-cleaving enzymes (ADAMTS7 and 12), the von-Willebrand Factor proteinase (ADAMTS13) and a group of orphan enzymes (ADAMTS6, 10, 16, 17, 18 and 19). Control of the structure and function of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is a central theme of the biology of the ADAMTS, as exemplified by the actions of the procollagen-N-propeptidases in collagen fibril assembly and of the aggrecanases in the cleavage or modification of ECM proteoglycans. Defects in certain family members give rise to inherited genetic disorders, while the aberrant expression or function of others is associated with arthritis, cancer and cardiovascular disease. In particular, ADAMTS4 and 5 have emerged as therapeutic targets in arthritis. Multiple ADAMTSs from different sub-groupings exert either positive or negative effects on tumorigenesis and metastasis, with both metalloproteinase-dependent and -independent actions known to occur. The basic ADAMTS structure comprises a metalloproteinase catalytic domain and a carboxy-terminal ancillary domain, the latter determining substrate specificity and the localization of the protease and its interaction partners; ancillary domains probably also have independent biological functions. Focusing primarily on the aggrecanases and proteoglycanases, this review provides a perspective on the evolution of the ADAMTS family, their links with developmental and disease mechanisms, and key questions for the future. PMID:26025392

  11. DNA motifs determining the accuracy of repeat duplication during CRISPR adaptation in Haloarcula hispanica.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Li, Ming; Gong, Luyao; Hu, Songnian; Xiang, Hua

    2016-05-19

    Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) acquire new spacers to generate adaptive immunity in prokaryotes. During spacer integration, the leader-preceded repeat is always accurately duplicated, leading to speculations of a repeat-length ruler. Here in Haloarcula hispanica, we demonstrate that the accurate duplication of its 30-bp repeat requires two conserved mid-repeat motifs, AACCC and GTGGG. The AACCC motif was essential and needed to be ∼10 bp downstream from the leader-repeat junction site, where duplication consistently started. Interestingly, repeat duplication terminated sequence-independently and usually with a specific distance from the GTGGG motif, which seemingly served as an anchor site for a molecular ruler. Accordingly, altering the spacing between the two motifs led to an aberrant duplication size (29, 31, 32 or 33 bp). We propose the adaptation complex may recognize these mid-repeat elements to enable measuring the repeat DNA for spacer integration. PMID:27085805

  12. Single base pair differences in a shared motif determine differential Rhodopsin expression

    PubMed Central

    Rister, Jens; Razzaq, Ansa; Boodram, Pamela; Desai, Nisha; Tsanis, Cleopatra; Chen, Hongtao; Jukam, David; Desplan, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The final identity and functional properties of a neuron are specified by terminal differentiation genes, which are controlled by specific motifs in compact regulatory regions. To determine how these sequences integrate inputs from transcription factors that specify cell types, we compared the regulatory mechanism of Drosophila Rhodopsin genes that are expressed in subsets of photoreceptors to that of phototransduction genes that are expressed broadly, in all photoreceptors. Both sets of genes share an 11bp activator motif. Broadly expressed genes contain a palindromic version that mediates expression in all photoreceptors. In contrast, each Rhodopsin exhibits unique single bp substitutions that break the symmetry of the palindrome and generate activator or repressor motifs critical for restricting expression to photoreceptor subsets. Novel sensory neuron subtypes can therefore evolve through single base pair changes in short regulatory motifs, allowing the discrimination of a wide spectrum of stimuli. PMID:26785491

  13. DNA motifs determining the accuracy of repeat duplication during CRISPR adaptation in Haloarcula hispanica

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Li, Ming; Gong, Luyao; Hu, Songnian; Xiang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) acquire new spacers to generate adaptive immunity in prokaryotes. During spacer integration, the leader-preceded repeat is always accurately duplicated, leading to speculations of a repeat-length ruler. Here in Haloarcula hispanica, we demonstrate that the accurate duplication of its 30-bp repeat requires two conserved mid-repeat motifs, AACCC and GTGGG. The AACCC motif was essential and needed to be ∼10 bp downstream from the leader-repeat junction site, where duplication consistently started. Interestingly, repeat duplication terminated sequence-independently and usually with a specific distance from the GTGGG motif, which seemingly served as an anchor site for a molecular ruler. Accordingly, altering the spacing between the two motifs led to an aberrant duplication size (29, 31, 32 or 33 bp). We propose the adaptation complex may recognize these mid-repeat elements to enable measuring the repeat DNA for spacer integration. PMID:27085805

  14. Multi-scale modularity and motif distributional effect in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shang; Chen, Alan; Rahmani, Ali; Zeng, Jia; Tan, Mehmet; Alhajj, Reda; Rokne, Jon; Demetrick, Douglas; Wei, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Metabolism is a set of fundamental processes that play important roles in a plethora of biological and medical contexts. It is understood that the topological information of reconstructed metabolic networks, such as modular organization, has crucial implications on biological functions. Recent interpretations of modularity in network settings provide a view of multiple network partitions induced by different resolution parameters. Here we ask the question: How do multiple network partitions affect the organization of metabolic networks? Since network motifs are often interpreted as the super families of evolved units, we further investigate their impact under multiple network partitions and investigate how the distribution of network motifs influences the organization of metabolic networks. We studied Homo sapiens, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli metabolic networks; we analyzed the relationship between different community structures and motif distribution patterns. Further, we quantified the degree to which motifs participate in the modular organization of metabolic networks. PMID:26412791

  15. Structural characterization of a capping protein interaction motif defines a family of actin filament regulators

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Valladares, Maria; Kim, Taekyung; Kannan, Balakrishnan; Tung, Alvin; Aguda, Adeleke H; Larsson, Mårten; Cooper, John A; Robinson, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    Capping protein (CP) regulates actin dynamics by binding the barbed ends of actin filaments. Removal of CP may be one means to harness actin polymerization for processes such as cell movement and endocytosis. Here we structurally and biochemically investigated a CP interaction (CPI) motif present in the otherwise unrelated proteins CARMIL and CD2AP. The CPI motif wraps around the stalk of the mushroom-shaped CP at a site distant from the actin-binding interface, which lies on the top of the mushroom cap. We propose that the CPI motif may act as an allosteric modulator, restricting CP to a low-affinity, filament-binding conformation. Structure-based sequence alignments extend the CPI motif–containing family to include CIN85, CKIP-1, CapZIP and a relatively uncharacterized protein, WASHCAP (FAM21). Peptides comprising these CPI motifs are able to inhibit CP and to uncap CP-bound actin filaments. PMID:20357771

  16. Circular code motifs in transfer and 16S ribosomal RNAs: a possible translation code in genes.

    PubMed

    Michel, Christian J

    2012-04-01

    In 1996, a common trinucleotide circular code, called X, is identified in genes of eukaryotes and prokaryotes (Arquès and Michel, 1996). This circular code X is a set of 20 trinucleotides allowing the reading frames in genes to be retrieved locally, i.e. anywhere in genes and in particular without start codons. This reading frame retrieval needs a window length l of 12 nucleotides (l ≥ 12). With a window length strictly less than 12 nucleotides (l < 12), some words of X, called ambiguous words, are found in the shifted frames (the reading frame shifted by one or two nucleotides) preventing the reading frame in genes to be retrieved. Since 1996, these ambiguous words of X were never studied. In the first part of this paper, we identify all the ambiguous words of the common trinucleotide circular code X. With a length l varying from 1 to 11 nucleotides, the type and the occurrence number (multiplicity) of ambiguous words of X are given in each shifted frame. Maximal ambiguous words of X, words which are not factors of another ambiguous words, are also determined. Two probability definitions based on these results show that the common trinucleotide circular code X retrieves the reading frame in genes with a probability of about 90% with a window length of 6 nucleotides, and a probability of 99.9% with a window length of 9 nucleotides (100% with a window length of 12 nucleotides, by definition of a circular code). In the second part of this paper, we identify X circular code motifs (shortly X motifs) in transfer RNA and 16S ribosomal RNA: a tRNA X motif of 26 nucleotides including the anticodon stem-loop and seven 16S rRNA X motifs of length greater or equal to 15 nucleotides. Window lengths of reading frame retrieval with each trinucleotide of these X motifs are also determined. Thanks to the crystal structure 3I8G (Jenner et al., 2010), a 3D visualization of X motifs in the ribosome shows several spatial configurations involving mRNA X motifs, A-tRNA and E-tRNA X

  17. An artificial intelligence approach to motif discovery in protein sequences: application to steriod dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Bailey, T L; Baker, M E; Elkan, C P

    1997-05-01

    MEME (Multiple Expectation-maximization for Motif Elicitation) is a unique new software tool that uses artificial intelligence techniques to discover motifs shared by a set of protein sequences in a fully automated manner. This paper is the first detailed study of the use of MEME to analyse a large, biologically relevant set of sequences, and to evaluate the sensitivity and accuracy of MEME in identifying structurally important motifs. For this purpose, we chose the short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase superfamily because it is large and phylogenetically diverse, providing a test of how well MEME can work on sequences with low amino acid similarity. Moreover, this dataset contains enzymes of biological importance, and because several enzymes have known X-ray crystallographic structures, we can test the usefulness of MEME for structural analysis. The first six motifs from MEME map onto structurally important alpha-helices and beta-strands on Streptomyces hydrogenans 20beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. We also describe MAST (Motif Alignment Search Tool), which conveniently uses output from MEME for searching databases such as SWISS-PROT and Genpept. MAST provides statistical measures that permit a rigorous evaluation of the significance of database searches with individual motifs or groups of motifs. A database search of Genpept90 by MAST with the log-odds matrix of the first six motifs obtained from MEME yields a bimodal output, demonstrating the selectivity of MAST. We show for the first time, using primary sequence analysis, that bacterial sugar epimerases are homologs of short-chain dehydrogenases. MEME and MAST will be increasingly useful as genome sequencing provides large datasets of phylogenetically divergent sequences of biomedical interest. PMID:9366496

  18. A Nucleotide Binding Motif in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) NS4B Mediates HCV RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Einav, Shirit; Elazar, Menashe; Danieli, Tsafi; Glenn, Jeffrey S.

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of viral hepatitis. There is no effective therapy for most patients. We have identified a nucleotide binding motif (NBM) in one of the virus's nonstructural proteins, NS4B. This structural motif binds and hydrolyzes GTP and is conserved across HCV isolates. Genetically disrupting the NBM impairs GTP binding and hydrolysis and dramatically inhibits HCV RNA replication. These results have exciting implications for the HCV life cycle and novel antiviral strategies. PMID:15452248

  19. Excluded volume effects on the kinetic assembling of a structural motif for RNA catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Ariel

    1991-09-01

    We establish the role of excluded volume effects on the loss of conformational entropy due to pseudoknot formation in RNA. This pseudoknot appears to be the structural motif responsible for shaping the splicing site of certain noncoding RNA transcriptional products. Focusing on the illustrative example of the YC4 intron, we show that the emergence of this motif is kinetically driven and prevails over competing catalytically inert secondary structure due to excluded volume effects which favor the correlation of interacting intramolecular loops.

  20. Computational discovery of cis-regulatory modules in Drosophila without prior knowledge of motifs

    PubMed Central

    Ivan, Andra; Halfon, Marc S; Sinha, Saurabh

    2008-01-01

    We consider the problem of predicting cis-regulatory modules without knowledge of motifs. We formulate this problem in a pragmatic setting, and create over 30 new data sets, using Drosophila modules, to use as a 'benchmark'. We propose two new methods for the problem, and evaluate these, as well as two existing methods, on our benchmark. We find that the challenge of predicting cis-regulatory modules ab initio, without any input of relevant motifs, is a realizable goal. PMID:18226245

  1. A novel zinc-binding motif found in two ubiquitous deaminase families.

    PubMed Central

    Reizer, J.; Buskirk, S.; Bairoch, A.; Reizer, A.; Saier, M. H.

    1994-01-01

    Two families of deaminases, one specific for cytidine, the other for deoxycytidylate, are shown to possess a novel zinc-binding motif, here designated ZBS. We have (1) identified the protein members of these 2 families, (2) carried out sequence analyses that allow specification of this zinc-binding motif, and (3) determined signature sequences that will allow identification of additional members of these families as their sequences become available. PMID:8061614

  2. Bioinformatic identification of novel regulatory DNA sequence motifs in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Studholme, David J; Bentley, Stephen D; Kormanec, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Background Streptomyces coelicolor is a bacterium with a vast repertoire of metabolic functions and complex systems of cellular development. Its genome sequence is rich in genes that encode regulatory proteins to control these processes in response to its changing environment. We wished to apply a recently published bioinformatic method for identifying novel regulatory sequence signals to gain new insights into regulation in S. coelicolor. Results The method involved production of position-specific weight matrices from alignments of over-represented words of DNA sequence. We generated 2497 weight matrices, each representing a candidate regulatory DNA sequence motif. We scanned the genome sequence of S. coelicolor against each of these matrices. A DNA sequence motif represented by one of the matrices was found preferentially in non-coding sequences immediately upstream of genes involved in polysaccharide degradation, including several that encode chitinases. This motif (TGGTCTAGACCA) was also found upstream of genes encoding components of the phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransfer system (PTS). We hypothesise that this DNA sequence motif represents a regulatory element that is responsive to availability of carbon-sources. Other motifs of potential biological significance were found upstream of genes implicated in secondary metabolism (TTAGGTtAGgCTaACCTAA), sigma factors (TGACN19TGAC), DNA replication and repair (ttgtCAGTGN13TGGA), nucleotide conversions (CTACgcNCGTAG), and ArsR (TCAGN12TCAG). A motif found upstream of genes involved in chromosome replication (TGTCagtgcN7Tagg) was similar to a previously described motif found in UV-responsive promoters. Conclusions We successfully applied a recently published in silico method to identify conserved sequence motifs in S. coelicolor that may be biologically significant as regulatory elements. Our data are broadly consistent with and further extend data from previously published studies. We invite experimental testing of

  3. Remarkable enhancement in PLD activity from Streptoverticillium cinnamoneum by substituting serine residue into the GG/GS motif.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Chiaki; Daido, Hidenori; Ohmura, Yuka; Takada, Namiko; Itou, Yoshiki; Kondo, Akihiko; Fukuda, Hideki; Shimizu, Nobuaki

    2007-06-01

    The gene that encodes phospholipase D (PLD) from Streptoverticillium cinnamoneum contains three consensus regions (Region I, II and IV as shown in Fig. 1A) that are conserved among the PLD superfamily. The glycine-glycine (GG) motif in Region I and the glycine-serine (GS) motif in Region IV are also conserved in the PLD superfamily. These (GG and GS) motifs are located 7 residues downstream from each HKD motif. In an investigation of fifteen GG/GS motif mutants, generated as fusion proteins with maltose-binding protein (MBP-PLDs), three highly active mutants were identified. Three of the mutants (G215S, G216S, and G216S-S489G) contained a serine residue in the GG motif, and exhibited approximately a 9-27-fold increased transphosphatidylation activity to DPPC compared with recombinant wild type MBP-PLD. When heat stability was compared between three mutants and the recombinant wild type, only G216S-S489G showed heat labile properties. It appears that the 489th serine residue in the GS motif also contributes to the thermal stability of the enzyme. In addition, the GG/GS motif was very close to the active center residue, including two HKD motifs, as shown by computer modeling. The findings suggest that the GG/GS motif of PLD is a key motif that affects catalytic function and enzymatic stability. PMID:17499030

  4. Creation of Hybrid Nanorods From Sequences of Natural Trimeric Fibrous Proteins Using the Fibritin Trimerization Motif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanikolopoulou, Katerina; van Raaij, Mark J.; Mitraki, Anna

    Stable, artificial fibrous proteins that can be functionalized open new avenues in fields such as bionanomaterials design and fiber engineering. An important source of inspiration for the creation of such proteins are natural fibrous proteins such as collagen, elastin, insect silks, and fibers from phages and viruses. The fibrous parts of this last class of proteins usually adopt trimeric, β-stranded structural folds and are appended to globular, receptor-binding domains. It has been recently shown that the globular domains are essential for correct folding and trimerization and can be successfully substituted by a very small (27-amino acid) trimerization motif from phage T4 fibritin. The hybrid proteins are correctly folded nanorods that can withstand extreme conditions. When the fibrous part derives from the adenovirus fiber shaft, different tissue-targeting specificities can be engineered into the hybrid proteins, which therefore can be used as gene therapy vectors. The integration of such stable nanorods in devices is also a big challenge in the field of biomechanical design. The fibritin foldon domain is a versatile trimerization motif and can be combined with a variety of fibrous motifs, such as coiled-coil, collagenous, and triple β-stranded motifs, provided the appropriate linkers are used. The combination of different motifs within the same fibrous molecule to create stable rods with multiple functions can even be envisioned. We provide a comprehensive overview of the experimental procedures used for designing, creating, and characterizing hybrid fibrous nanorods using the fibritin trimerization motif.

  5. Subgraph Covers: An Information-Theoretic Approach to Motif Analysis in Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, Anatol E.

    2014-10-01

    Many real-world networks contain a statistically surprising number of certain subgraphs, called network motifs. In the prevalent approach to motif analysis, network motifs are detected by comparing subgraph frequencies in the original network with a statistical null model. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach to motif analysis where network motifs are defined to be connectivity patterns that occur in a subgraph cover that represents the network using minimal total information. A subgraph cover is defined to be a set of subgraphs such that every edge of the graph is contained in at least one of the subgraphs in the cover. Some recently introduced random graph models that can incorporate significant densities of motifs have natural formulations in terms of subgraph covers, and the presented approach can be used to match networks with such models. To prove the practical value of our approach, we also present a heuristic for the resulting NP hard optimization problem and give results for several real-world networks.

  6. Functional characterization of transcription factor motifs using cross-species comparison across large evolutionary distances.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaebum; Cunningham, Ryan; James, Brian; Wyder, Stefan; Gibson, Joshua D; Niehuis, Oliver; Zdobnov, Evgeny M; Robertson, Hugh M; Robinson, Gene E; Werren, John H; Sinha, Saurabh

    2010-01-01

    We address the problem of finding statistically significant associations between cis-regulatory motifs and functional gene sets, in order to understand the biological roles of transcription factors. We develop a computational framework for this task, whose features include a new statistical score for motif scanning, the use of different scores for predicting targets of different motifs, and new ways to deal with redundancies among significant motif-function associations. This framework is applied to the recently sequenced genome of the jewel wasp, Nasonia vitripennis, making use of the existing knowledge of motifs and gene annotations in another insect genome, that of the fruitfly. The framework uses cross-species comparison to improve the specificity of its predictions, and does so without relying upon non-coding sequence alignment. It is therefore well suited for comparative genomics across large evolutionary divergences, where existing alignment-based methods are not applicable. We also apply the framework to find motifs associated with socially regulated gene sets in the honeybee, Apis mellifera, using comparisons with Nasonia, a solitary species, to identify honeybee-specific associations. PMID:20126523

  7. A systematic evaluation of sorting motifs in the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS).

    PubMed

    Darrouzet, Elisabeth; Graslin, Fanny; Marcellin, Didier; Tcheremisinova, Iulia; Marchetti, Charles; Salleron, Lisa; Pognonec, Philippe; Pourcher, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    The sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) is an integral membrane protein that plays a crucial role in iodide accumulation, especially in the thyroid. As for many other membrane proteins, its intracellular sorting and distribution have a tremendous effect on its function, and constitute an important aspect of its regulation. Many short sequences have been shown to contribute to protein trafficking along the sorting or endocytic pathways. Using bioinformatics tools, we identified such potential sites on human NIS [tyrosine-based motifs, SH2-(Src homology 2), SH3- and PDZ (post-synaptic density-95/discs large tumour suppressor/zonula occludens-1)-binding motifs, and diacidic, dibasic and dileucine motifs] and analysed their roles using mutagenesis. We found that several of these sites play a role in protein stability and/or targeting to the membrane. Aside from the mutation at position 178 (SH2 plus tyrosine-based motif) that affects iodide uptake, the most drastic effect is associated with the mutation of an internal PDZ-binding motif at position 121 that completely abolishes NIS expression at the plasma membrane. Mutating the sites located on the C-terminal domain of the protein has no effect except for the creation of a diacidic motif that decreases the total NIS protein level without affecting its expression at the plasma membrane. PMID:26831514

  8. Ordered cyclic motifs contribute to dynamic stability in biological and engineered networks

    PubMed Central

    Ma'ayan, Avi; Cecchi, Guillermo A.; Wagner, John; Rao, A. Ravi; Iyengar, Ravi; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2008-01-01

    Representation and analysis of complex biological and engineered systems as directed networks is useful for understanding their global structure/function organization. Enrichment of network motifs, which are over-represented subgraphs in real networks, can be used for topological analysis. Because counting network motifs is computationally expensive, only characterization of 3- to 5-node motifs has been previously reported. In this study we used a supercomputer to analyze cyclic motifs made of 3–20 nodes for 6 biological and 3 technological networks. Using tools from statistical physics, we developed a theoretical framework for characterizing the ensemble of cyclic motifs in real networks. We have identified a generic property of real complex networks, antiferromagnetic organization, which is characterized by minimal directional coherence of edges along cyclic subgraphs, such that consecutive links tend to have opposing direction. As a consequence, we find that the lack of directional coherence in cyclic motifs leads to depletion in feedback loops, where the number of nodes affected by feedback loops appears to be at a local minimum compared with surrogate shuffled networks. This topology provides more dynamic stability in large networks. PMID:19033453

  9. Leveraging cross-link modification events in CLIP-seq for motif discovery.

    PubMed

    Bahrami-Samani, Emad; Penalva, Luiz O F; Smith, Andrew D; Uren, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput protein-RNA interaction data generated by CLIP-seq has provided an unprecedented depth of access to the activities of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), the key players in co- and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Motif discovery forms part of the necessary follow-up data analysis for CLIP-seq, both to refine the exact locations of RBP binding sites, and to characterize them. The specific properties of RBP binding sites, and the CLIP-seq methods, provide additional information not usually present in the classic motif discovery problem: the binding site structure, and cross-linking induced events in reads. We show that CLIP-seq data contains clear secondary structure signals, as well as technology- and RBP-specific cross-link signals. We introduce Zagros, a motif discovery algorithm specifically designed to leverage this information and explore its impact on the quality of recovered motifs. Our results indicate that using both secondary structure and cross-link modifications can greatly improve motif discovery on CLIP-seq data. Further, the motifs we recover provide insight into the balance between sequence- and structure-specificity struck by RBP binding. PMID:25505146

  10. Leveraging cross-link modification events in CLIP-seq for motif discovery

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami-Samani, Emad; Penalva, Luiz O.F.; Smith, Andrew D.; Uren, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput protein–RNA interaction data generated by CLIP-seq has provided an unprecedented depth of access to the activities of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), the key players in co- and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Motif discovery forms part of the necessary follow-up data analysis for CLIP-seq, both to refine the exact locations of RBP binding sites, and to characterize them. The specific properties of RBP binding sites, and the CLIP-seq methods, provide additional information not usually present in the classic motif discovery problem: the binding site structure, and cross-linking induced events in reads. We show that CLIP-seq data contains clear secondary structure signals, as well as technology- and RBP-specific cross-link signals. We introduce Zagros, a motif discovery algorithm specifically designed to leverage this information and explore its impact on the quality of recovered motifs. Our results indicate that using both secondary structure and cross-link modifications can greatly improve motif discovery on CLIP-seq data. Further, the motifs we recover provide insight into the balance between sequence- and structure-specificity struck by RBP binding. PMID:25505146

  11. Predicting candidate genomic sequences that correspond to synthetic functional RNA motifs

    PubMed Central

    Laserson, Uri; Gan, Hin Hark; Schlick, Tamar

    2005-01-01

    Riboswitches and RNA interference are important emerging mechanisms found in many organisms to control gene expression. To enhance our understanding of such RNA roles, finding small regulatory motifs in genomes presents a challenge on a wide scale. Many simple functional RNA motifs have been found by in vitro selection experiments, which produce synthetic target-binding aptamers as well as catalytic RNAs, including the hammerhead ribozyme. Motivated by the prediction of Piganeau and Schroeder [(2003) Chem. Biol., 10, 103–104] that synthetic RNAs may have natural counterparts, we develop and apply an efficient computational protocol for identifying aptamer-like motifs in genomes. We define motifs from the sequence and structural information of synthetic aptamers, search for sequences in genomes that will produce motif matches, and then evaluate the structural stability and statistical significance of the potential hits. Our application to aptamers for streptomycin, chloramphenicol, neomycin B and ATP identifies 37 candidate sequences (in coding and non-coding regions) that fold to the target aptamer structures in bacterial and archaeal genomes. Further energetic screening reveals that several candidates exhibit energetic properties and sequence conservation patterns that are characteristic of functional motifs. Besides providing candidates for experimental testing, our computational protocol offers an avenue for expanding natural RNA's functional repertoire. PMID:16254081

  12. A systematic approach to identify functional motifs within vertebrate developmental enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Ritter, Deborah; Yang, Nan; Dong, Zhiqiang; Li, Hao; Chuang, Jeffrey H.; Guo, Su

    2012-01-01

    Uncovering the cis-regulatory logic of developmental enhancers is critical to understanding the role of non-coding DNA in development. However, it is cumbersome to identify functional motifs within enhancers, and thus few vertebrate enhancers have their core functional motifs revealed. Here we report a combined experimental and computational approach for discovering regulatory motifs in developmental enhancers. Making use of the zebrafish gene expression database, we computationally identified conserved non-coding elements (CNEs) likely to have a desired tissue-specificity based on the expression of nearby genes. Through a high throughput and robust enhancer assay, we tested the activity of ~100 such CNEs and efficiently uncovered developmental enhancers with desired spatial and temporal expression patterns in the zebrafish brain. Application of de novo motif prediction algorithms on a group of forebrain enhancers identified five top-ranked motifs, all of which were experimentally validated as critical for forebrain enhancer activity. These results demonstrate a systematic approach to discover important regulatory motifs in vertebrate developmental enhancers. Moreover, this dataset provides a useful resource for further dissection of vertebrate brain development and function. PMID:19850031

  13. Identifying the Preferred RNA Motifs and Chemotypes that Interact by Probing Millions of Combinations

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Tuan; Disney, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    RNA is an important therapeutic target but information about RNA-ligand interactions is limited. Here we report a screening method that probes over 3,000,000 combinations of RNA motif-small molecule interactions to identify the privileged RNA structures and chemical spaces that interact. Specifically, a small molecule library biased for binding RNA was probed for binding to over 70,000 unique RNA motifs in a high throughput solution-based screen. The RNA motifs that specifically bind each small molecule were identified by microarray-based selection. In this library-versus-library or multidimensional combinatorial screening approach, hairpin loops (amongst a variety of RNA motifs) were the preferred RNA motif space that binds small molecules. Furthermore, it was shown that indole, 2-phenyl indole, 2-phenyl benzimidazole, and pyridinium chemotypes allow for specific recognition of RNA motifs. Since targeting RNA with small molecules is an extremely challenging area, these studies provide new information on RNA-ligand interactions that has many potential uses. PMID:23047683

  14. Identifying the preferred RNA motifs and chemotypes that interact by probing millions of combinations.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tuan; Disney, Matthew D

    2012-01-01

    RNA is an important therapeutic target but information about RNA-ligand interactions is limited. Here, we report a screening method that probes over 3,000,000 combinations of RNA motif-small molecule interactions to identify the privileged RNA structures and chemical spaces that interact. Specifically, a small molecule library biased for binding RNA was probed for binding to over 70,000 unique RNA motifs in a high throughput solution-based screen. The RNA motifs that specifically bind each small molecule were identified by microarray-based selection. In this library-versus-library or multidimensional combinatorial screening approach, hairpin loops (among a variety of RNA motifs) were the preferred RNA motif space that binds small molecules. Furthermore, it was shown that indole, 2-phenyl indole, 2-phenyl benzimidazole and pyridinium chemotypes allow for specific recognition of RNA motifs. As targeting RNA with small molecules is an extremely challenging area, these studies provide new information on RNA-ligand interactions that has many potential uses. PMID:23047683

  15. Orientation and Dynamics of Synthetic Transbilayer Polypeptides Containing GpATM Dimerization Motifs

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Mark C.; Booth, Valerie; Morrow, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Deuterium NMR spectroscopy was used to study how the positioning of a dimerization motif within a transbilayer polypeptide influences its orientation and dynamics in bilayers. Three polypeptide variants comprising glycophorin A transmembrane (GpATM) dimerization motifs incorporated into lysine-terminated poly-leucine-alanine helices were mixed into 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine multilamellar vesicles. The variants differed in orientation of the motif segment around the helix axis with respect to the peptide ends. Polypeptides were labeled with methyl-deuterated alanines at positions that were identically situated relative to the peptide ends (Ala-20 and Ala-22) and at two positions within the motif. An analysis of quadrupole splittings revealed similar tilts and orientations of the peptide ends for all three variants, suggesting that average orientations were dominated by interactions at the bilayer surface. For one variant, however, fast orientational fluctuations about the helix axis were significantly smaller. This may indicate some perturbation of peptide dynamics and conformation by interactions that are sensitive to the motif orientation relative to the peptide ends. For the variant that displayed distinct dynamics, one orientation consistent with observed splittings corresponded to the motif being situated such that its two glycines were particularly accessible to adjacent peptides. PMID:21281580

  16. SLiMPrints: conservation-based discovery of functional motif fingerprints in intrinsically disordered protein regions

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Norman E.; Cowan, Joanne L.; Shields, Denis C.; Gibson, Toby J.; Coldwell, Mark J.; Edwards, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Large portions of higher eukaryotic proteomes are intrinsically disordered, and abundant evidence suggests that these unstructured regions of proteins are rich in regulatory interaction interfaces. A major class of disordered interaction interfaces are the compact and degenerate modules known as short linear motifs (SLiMs). As a result of the difficulties associated with the experimental identification and validation of SLiMs, our understanding of these modules is limited, advocating the use of computational methods to focus experimental discovery. This article evaluates the use of evolutionary conservation as a discriminatory technique for motif discovery. A statistical framework is introduced to assess the significance of relatively conserved residues, quantifying the likelihood a residue will have a particular level of conservation given the conservation of the surrounding residues. The framework is expanded to assess the significance of groupings of conserved residues, a metric that forms the basis of SLiMPrints (short linear motif fingerprints), a de novo motif discovery tool. SLiMPrints identifies relatively overconstrained proximal groupings of residues within intrinsically disordered regions, indicative of putatively functional motifs. Finally, the human proteome is analysed to create a set of highly conserved putative motif instances, including a novel site on translation initiation factor eIF2A that may regulate translation through binding of eIF4E. PMID:22977176

  17. Identification of disease-specific motifs in the antibody specificity repertoire via next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Pantazes, Robert J; Reifert, Jack; Bozekowski, Joel; Ibsen, Kelly N; Murray, Joseph A; Daugherty, Patrick S

    2016-01-01

    Disease-specific antibodies can serve as highly effective biomarkers but have been identified for only a relatively small number of autoimmune diseases. A method was developed to identify disease-specific binding motifs through integration of bacterial display peptide library screening, next-generation sequencing (NGS) and computational analysis. Antibody specificity repertoires were determined by identifying bound peptide library members for each specimen using cell sorting and performing NGS. A computational algorithm, termed Identifying Motifs Using Next- generation sequencing Experiments (IMUNE), was developed and applied to discover disease- and healthy control-specific motifs. IMUNE performs comprehensive pattern searches, identifies patterns statistically enriched in the disease or control groups and clusters the patterns to generate motifs. Using celiac disease sera as a discovery set, IMUNE identified a consensus motif (QPEQPF[PS]E) with high diagnostic sensitivity and specificity in a validation sera set, in addition to novel motifs. Peptide display and sequencing (Display-Seq) coupled with IMUNE analysis may thus be useful to characterize antibody repertoires and identify disease-specific antibody epitopes and biomarkers. PMID:27481573

  18. Identification of disease-specific motifs in the antibody specificity repertoire via next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Pantazes, Robert J.; Reifert, Jack; Bozekowski, Joel; Ibsen, Kelly N.; Murray, Joseph A.; Daugherty, Patrick S.

    2016-01-01

    Disease-specific antibodies can serve as highly effective biomarkers but have been identified for only a relatively small number of autoimmune diseases. A method was developed to identify disease-specific binding motifs through integration of bacterial display peptide library screening, next-generation sequencing (NGS) and computational analysis. Antibody specificity repertoires were determined by identifying bound peptide library members for each specimen using cell sorting and performing NGS. A computational algorithm, termed Identifying Motifs Using Next- generation sequencing Experiments (IMUNE), was developed and applied to discover disease- and healthy control-specific motifs. IMUNE performs comprehensive pattern searches, identifies patterns statistically enriched in the disease or control groups and clusters the patterns to generate motifs. Using celiac disease sera as a discovery set, IMUNE identified a consensus motif (QPEQPF[PS]E) with high diagnostic sensitivity and specificity in a validation sera set, in addition to novel motifs. Peptide display and sequencing (Display-Seq) coupled with IMUNE analysis may thus be useful to characterize antibody repertoires and identify disease-specific antibody epitopes and biomarkers. PMID:27481573

  19. Conservation defines functional motifs in the squint/nodal-related 1 RNA dorsal localization element

    PubMed Central

    Gilligan, Patrick C.; Kumari, Pooja; Lim, Shimin; Cheong, Albert; Chang, Alex; Sampath, Karuna

    2011-01-01

    RNA localization is emerging as a general principle of sub-cellular protein localization and cellular organization. However, the sequence and structural requirements in many RNA localization elements remain poorly understood. Whereas transcription factor-binding sites in DNA can be recognized as short degenerate motifs, and consensus binding sites readily inferred, protein-binding sites in RNA often contain structural features, and can be difficult to infer. We previously showed that zebrafish squint/nodal-related 1 (sqt/ndr1) RNA localizes to the future dorsal side of the embryo. Interestingly, mammalian nodal RNA can also localize to dorsal when injected into zebrafish embryos, suggesting that the sequence motif(s) may be conserved, even though the fish and mammal UTRs cannot be aligned. To define potential sequence and structural features, we obtained ndr1 3′-UTR sequences from approximately 50 fishes that are closely, or distantly, related to zebrafish, for high-resolution phylogenetic footprinting. We identify conserved sequence and structural motifs within the zebrafish/carp family and catfish. We find that two novel motifs, a single-stranded AGCAC motif and a small stem-loop, are required for efficient sqt RNA localization. These findings show that comparative sequencing in the zebrafish/carp family is an efficient approach for identifying weak consensus binding sites for RNA regulatory proteins. PMID:21149265

  20. Form and function in gene regulatory networks: the structure of network motifs determines fundamental properties of their dynamical state space

    PubMed Central

    Ahnert, S. E.; Fink, T. M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Network motifs have been studied extensively over the past decade, and certain motifs, such as the feed-forward loop, play an important role in regulatory networks. Recent studies have used Boolean network motifs to explore the link between form and function in gene regulatory networks and have found that the structure of a motif does not strongly determine its function, if this is defined in terms of the gene expression patterns the motif can produce. Here, we offer a different, higher-level definition of the ‘function’ of a motif, in terms of two fundamental properties of its dynamical state space as a Boolean network. One is the basin entropy, which is a complexity measure of the dynamics of Boolean networks. The other is the diversity of cyclic attractor lengths that a given motif can produce. Using these two measures, we examine all 104 topologically distinct three-node motifs and show that the structural properties of a motif, such as the presence of feedback loops and feed-forward loops, predict fundamental characteristics of its dynamical state space, which in turn determine aspects of its functional versatility. We also show that these higher-level properties have a direct bearing on real regulatory networks, as both basin entropy and cycle length diversity show a close correspondence with the prevalence, in neural and genetic regulatory networks, of the 13 connected motifs without self-interactions that have been studied extensively in the literature. PMID:27440255

  1. Disparate requirements for the Walker A and B ATPase motifs ofhuman RAD51D in homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Wiese, Claudia; Hinz, John M.; Tebbs, Robert S.; Nham, Peter B.; Urbin, Salustra S.; Collins, David W.; Thompson, Larry H.; Schild, David

    2006-04-21

    In vertebrates, homologous recombinational repair (HRR) requires RAD51 and five RAD51 paralogs (XRCC2, XRCC3, RAD51B, RAD51C, and RAD51D) that all contain conserved Walker A and B ATPase motifs. In human RAD51D we examined the requirement for these motifs in interactions with XRCC2 and RAD51C, and for survival of cells in response to DNA interstrand crosslinks. Ectopic expression of wild type human RAD51D or mutants having a non-functional A or B motif was used to test for complementation of a rad51d knockout hamster CHO cell line. Although A-motif mutants complement very efficiently, B-motif mutants do not. Consistent with these results, experiments using the yeast two- and three-hybrid systems show that the interactions between RAD51D and its XRCC2 and RAD51C partners also require a functional RAD51D B motif, but not motif A. Similarly, hamster Xrcc2 is unable to bind to the non-complementing human RAD51D B-motif mutants in co-immunoprecipitation assays. We conclude that a functional Walker B motif, but not A motif, is necessary for RAD51D's interactions with other paralogs and for efficient HRR. We present a model in which ATPase sites are formed in a bipartite manner between RAD51D and other RAD51 paralogs.

  2. The Frequency of Internal Shine–Dalgarno-like Motifs in Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Diwan, Gaurav D; Agashe, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    In prokaryotes, translation initiation typically depends on complementary binding between a G-rich Shine–Dalgarno (SD) motif in the 5′ untranslated region of mRNAs, and the 3′ tail of the 16S ribosomal RNA (the anti-SD sequence). In some cases, internal SD-like motifs in the coding region generate “programmed” ribosomal pauses that are beneficial for protein folding or accurate targeting. On the other hand, such pauses can also reduce protein production, generating purifying selection against internal SD-like motifs. This selection should be stronger in GC-rich genomes that are more likely to harbor the G-rich SD motif. However, the nature and consequences of selection acting on internal SD-like motifs within genomes and across species remains unclear. We analyzed the frequency of SD-like hexamers in the coding regions of 284 prokaryotes (277 with known anti-SD sequences and 7 without a typical SD mechanism). After accounting for GC content, we found that internal SD-like hexamers are avoided in 230 species, including three without a typical SD mechanism. The degree of avoidance was higher in GC-rich genomes, mesophiles, and N-terminal regions of genes. In contrast, 54 species either showed no signature of avoidance or were enriched in internal SD-like motifs. C-terminal gene regions were relatively enriched in SD-like hexamers, particularly for genes in operons or those followed closely by downstream genes. Together, our results suggest that the frequency of internal SD-like hexamers is governed by multiple factors including GC content and genome organization, and further empirical work is necessary to understand the evolution and functional roles of these motifs. PMID:27189998

  3. Identification of Biomarker and Co-Regulatory Motifs in Lung Adenocarcinoma Based on Differential Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Zhiqiang; Li, Kening; Zhang, Rui; Zhou, Yuanshuai; Qiu, Fujun; Han, Xiaole; Xu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Changes in intermolecular interactions (differential interactions) may influence the progression of cancer. Specific genes and their regulatory networks may be more closely associated with cancer when taking their transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels and dynamic and static interactions into account simultaneously. In this paper, a differential interaction analysis was performed to detect lung adenocarcinoma-related genes. Furthermore, a miRNA-TF (transcription factor) synergistic regulation network was constructed to identify three kinds of co-regulated motifs, namely, triplet, crosstalk and joint. Not only were the known cancer-related miRNAs and TFs (let-7, miR-15a, miR-17, TP53, ETS1, and so on) were detected in the motifs, but also the miR-15, let-7 and miR-17 families showed a tendency to regulate the triplet, crosstalk and joint motifs, respectively. Moreover, several biological functions (i.e., cell cycle, signaling pathways and hemopoiesis) associated with the three motifs were found to be frequently targeted by the drugs for lung adenocarcinoma. Specifically, the two 4-node motifs (crosstalk and joint) based on co-expression and interaction had a closer relationship to lung adenocarcinoma, and so further research was performed on them. A 10-gene biomarker (UBC, SRC, SP1, MYC, STAT3, JUN, NR3C1, RB1, GRB2 and MAPK1) was selected from the joint motif, and a survival analysis indicated its significant association with survival. Among the ten genes, JUN, NR3C1 and GRB2 are our newly detected candidate lung adenocarcinoma-related genes. The genes, regulators and regulatory motifs detected in this work will provide potential drug targets and new strategies for individual therapy. PMID:26402252

  4. The Consensus 5' Splice Site Motif Inhibits mRNA Nuclear Export

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eliza S.; Akef, Abdalla; Mahadevan, Kohila; Palazzo, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, mRNAs are synthesized in the nucleus and then exported to the cytoplasm where they are translated into proteins. We have mapped an element, which when present in the 3’terminal exon or in an unspliced mRNA, inhibits mRNA nuclear export. This element has the same sequence as the consensus 5’splice site motif that is used to define the start of introns. Previously it was shown that when this motif is retained in the mRNA, it causes defects in 3’cleavage and polyadenylation and promotes mRNA decay. Our new data indicates that this motif also inhibits nuclear export and promotes the targeting of transcripts to nuclear speckles, foci within the nucleus which have been linked to splicing. The motif, however, does not disrupt splicing or the recruitment of UAP56 or TAP/Nxf1 to the RNA, which are normally required for nuclear export. Genome wide analysis of human mRNAs, lncRNA and eRNAs indicates that this motif is depleted from naturally intronless mRNAs and eRNAs, but less so in lncRNAs. This motif is also depleted from the beginning and ends of the 3’terminal exons of spliced mRNAs, but less so for lncRNAs. Our data suggests that the presence of the 5’splice site motif in mature RNAs promotes their nuclear retention and may help to distinguish mRNAs from misprocessed transcripts and transcriptional noise. PMID:25826302

  5. An Analysis of Multi-type Relational Interactions in FMA Using Graph Motifs with Disjointness Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guo Qiang; Luo, Lingyun; Ogbuji, Chime; Joslyn, Cliff A.; Mejino, Jose; Sahoo, Satya S.

    2012-11-24

    The interaction of multiple types of relationships among anatomical classes in the Foundational Model of Anatomy (FMA) can provide inferred information valuable for quality assurance. This paper introduces a method called Motif Checking (MOCH) to study the effects of such multi-relation type interactions. MOCH represents patterns of multitype interaction as small labeled sub-graph motifs, whose nodes represent class variables, and labeled edges represent relational types. By representing FMA as an RDF graph and motifs as SPARQL queries, fragments of FMA are automatically obtained as auditing candidates. Leveraging the scalability and reconfigurability of Semantic Web Technology (OWL, RDF and SPARQL) and Virtuoso, we performed exhaustive analyses of three 2-node motifs, resulting in 638 matching FMA configurations; twelve 3-node motifs, resulting in 202,960 configurations. Using the Principal Ideal Explorer (PIE) methodology as an extension of MOCH, we were able to identify 755 root nodes with 4,100 respective descendants with opposing antonyms in their class names for arbitrary-length motifs. With possible disjointness implied by antonyms, we performed manual inspection of a subset of the resulting FMA fragments and tracked down a source of abnormal inferred conclusions (captured by the motifs), coming from a gender-neutral class being modeled as a part of gender-specific class, such as “Urinary system” is a part of “Female human body.” Our results demonstrate that MOCH and PIE provide a unique source of valuable information for quality assurance. Since our approach is general, it is applicable to any ontological system with an OWL representation.

  6. Structural Basis for WDR5 Interaction (Win) Motif Recognition in Human SET1 Family Histone Methyltransferases*

    PubMed Central

    Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Lee, Jeong-Heon; Patel, Anamika; Skalnik, David G.; Cosgrove, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Translocations and amplifications of the mixed lineage leukemia-1 (MLL1) gene are associated with aggressive myeloid and lymphocytic leukemias in humans. MLL1 is a member of the SET1 family of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferases, which are required for transcription of genes involved in hematopoiesis and development. MLL1 associates with a subcomplex containing WDR5, RbBP5, Ash2L, and DPY-30 (WRAD), which together form the MLL1 core complex that is required for sequential mono- and dimethylation of H3K4. We previously demonstrated that WDR5 binds the conserved WDR5 interaction (Win) motif of MLL1 in vitro, an interaction that is required for the H3K4 dimethylation activity of the MLL1 core complex. In this investigation, we demonstrate that arginine 3765 of the MLL1 Win motif is required to co-immunoprecipitate WRAD from mammalian cells, suggesting that the WDR5-Win motif interaction is important for the assembly of the MLL1 core complex in vivo. We also demonstrate that peptides that mimic SET1 family Win motif sequences inhibit H3K4 dimethylation by the MLL1 core complex with varying degrees of efficiency. To understand the structural basis for these differences, we determined structures of WDR5 bound to six different naturally occurring Win motif sequences at resolutions ranging from 1.9 to 1.2 Å. Our results reveal that binding energy differences result from interactions between non-conserved residues C-terminal to the Win motif and to a lesser extent from subtle variation of residues within the Win motif. These results highlight a new class of methylation inhibitors that may be useful for the treatment of MLL1-related malignancies. PMID:22665483

  7. The Frequency of Internal Shine-Dalgarno-like Motifs in Prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Diwan, Gaurav D; Agashe, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    In prokaryotes, translation initiation typically depends on complementary binding between a G-rich Shine-Dalgarno (SD) motif in the 5' untranslated region of mRNAs, and the 3' tail of the 16S ribosomal RNA (the anti-SD sequence). In some cases, internal SD-like motifs in the coding region generate "programmed" ribosomal pauses that are beneficial for protein folding or accurate targeting. On the other hand, such pauses can also reduce protein production, generating purifying selection against internal SD-like motifs. This selection should be stronger in GC-rich genomes that are more likely to harbor the G-rich SD motif. However, the nature and consequences of selection acting on internal SD-like motifs within genomes and across species remains unclear. We analyzed the frequency of SD-like hexamers in the coding regions of 284 prokaryotes (277 with known anti-SD sequences and 7 without a typical SD mechanism). After accounting for GC content, we found that internal SD-like hexamers are avoided in 230 species, including three without a typical SD mechanism. The degree of avoidance was higher in GC-rich genomes, mesophiles, and N-terminal regions of genes. In contrast, 54 species either showed no signature of avoidance or were enriched in internal SD-like motifs. C-terminal gene regions were relatively enriched in SD-like hexamers, particularly for genes in operons or those followed closely by downstream genes. Together, our results suggest that the frequency of internal SD-like hexamers is governed by multiple factors including GC content and genome organization, and further empirical work is necessary to understand the evolution and functional roles of these motifs. PMID:27189998

  8. Comparative genomics of metabolic capacities of regulons controlled by cis-regulatory RNA motifs in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In silico comparative genomics approaches have been efficiently used for functional prediction and reconstruction of metabolic and regulatory networks. Riboswitches are metabolite-sensing structures often found in bacterial mRNA leaders controlling gene expression on transcriptional or translational levels. An increasing number of riboswitches and other cis-regulatory RNAs have been recently classified into numerous RNA families in the Rfam database. High conservation of these RNA motifs provides a unique advantage for their genomic identification and comparative analysis. Results A comparative genomics approach implemented in the RegPredict tool was used for reconstruction and functional annotation of regulons controlled by RNAs from 43 Rfam families in diverse taxonomic groups of Bacteria. The inferred regulons include ~5200 cis-regulatory RNAs and more than 12000 target genes in 255 microbial genomes. All predicted RNA-regulated genes were classified into specific and overall functional categories. Analysis of taxonomic distribution of these categories allowed us to establish major functional preferences for each analyzed cis-regulatory RNA motif family. Overall, most RNA motif regulons showed predictable functional content in accordance with their experimentally established effector ligands. Our results suggest that some RNA motifs (including thiamin pyrophosphate and cobalamin riboswitches that control the cofactor metabolism) are widespread and likely originated from the last common ancestor of all bacteria. However, many more analyzed RNA motifs are restricted to a narrow taxonomic group of bacteria and likely represent more recent evolutionary innovations. Conclusions The reconstructed regulatory networks for major known RNA motifs substantially expand the existing knowledge of transcriptional regulation in bacteria. The inferred regulons can be used for genetic experiments, functional annotations of genes, metabolic reconstruction and

  9. Structural basis for the binding of tryptophan-based motifs by δ-COP

    PubMed Central

    Suckling, Richard J.; Poon, Pak Phi; Travis, Sophie M.; Majoul, Irina V.; Hughson, Frederick M.; Evans, Philip R.; Duden, Rainer; Owen, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Coatomer consists of two subcomplexes: the membrane-targeting, ADP ribosylation factor 1 (Arf1):GTP-binding βγδζ-COP F-subcomplex, which is related to the adaptor protein (AP) clathrin adaptors, and the cargo-binding αβ’ε-COP B-subcomplex. We present the structure of the C-terminal μ-homology domain of the yeast δ-COP subunit in complex with the WxW motif from its binding partner, the endoplasmic reticulum-localized Dsl1 tether. The motif binds at a site distinct from that used by the homologous AP μ subunits to bind YxxΦ cargo motifs with its two tryptophan residues sitting in compatible pockets. We also show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Arf GTPase-activating protein (GAP) homolog Gcs1p uses a related WxxF motif at its extreme C terminus to bind to δ-COP at the same site in the same way. Mutations designed on the basis of the structure in conjunction with isothermal titration calorimetry confirm the mode of binding and show that mammalian δ-COP binds related tryptophan-based motifs such as that from ArfGAP1 in a similar manner. We conclude that δ-COP subunits bind Wxn(1–6)[WF] motifs within unstructured regions of proteins that influence the lifecycle of COPI-coated vesicles; this conclusion is supported by the observation that, in the context of a sensitizing domain deletion in Dsl1p, mutating the tryptophan-based motif-binding site in yeast causes defects in both growth and carboxypeptidase Y trafficking/processing. PMID:26578768

  10. The Geometry of Plasticity-Induced Sensitization in Isoinhibitory Rate Motifs.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gautam; Ching, ShiNung

    2016-09-01

    A well-known phenomenon in sensory perception is desensitization, wherein behavioral responses to persistent stimuli become attenuated over time. In this letter, our focus is on studying mechanisms through which desensitization may be mediated at the network level and, specifically, how sensitivity changes arise as a function of long-term plasticity. Our principal object of study is a generic isoinhibitory motif: a small excitatory-inhibitory network with recurrent inhibition. Such a motif is of interest due to its overrepresentation in laminar sensory network architectures. Here, we introduce a sensitivity analysis derived from control theory in which we characterize the fixed-energy reachable set of the motif. This set describes the regions of the phase-space that are more easily (in terms of stimulus energy) accessed, thus providing a holistic assessment of sensitivity. We specifically focus on how the geometry of this set changes due to repetitive application of a persistent stimulus. We find that for certain motif dynamics, this geometry contracts along the stimulus orientation while expanding in orthogonal directions. In other words, the motif not only desensitizes to the persistent input, but heightens its responsiveness (sensitizes) to those that are orthogonal. We develop a perturbation analysis that links this sensitization to both plasticity-induced changes in synaptic weights and the intrinsic dynamics of the network, highlighting that the effect is not purely due to weight-dependent disinhibition. Instead, this effect depends on the relative neuronal time constants and the consequent stimulus-induced drift that arises in the motif phase-space. For tightly distributed (but random) parameter ranges, sensitization is quite generic and manifests in larger recurrent E-I networks within which the motif is embedded. PMID:27391684

  11. Subtle Changes in Motif Positioning Cause Tissue-Specific Effects on Robustness of an Enhancer's Activity

    PubMed Central

    Erceg, Jelena; Saunders, Timothy E.; Girardot, Charles; Devos, Damien P.; Hufnagel, Lars; Furlong, Eileen E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Deciphering the specific contribution of individual motifs within cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) is crucial to understanding how gene expression is regulated and how this process is affected by sequence variation. But despite vast improvements in the ability to identify where transcription factors (TFs) bind throughout the genome, we are limited in our ability to relate information on motif occupancy to function from sequence alone. Here, we engineered 63 synthetic CRMs to systematically assess the relationship between variation in the content and spacing of motifs within CRMs to CRM activity during development using Drosophila transgenic embryos. In over half the cases, very simple elements containing only one or two types of TF binding motifs were capable of driving specific spatio-temporal patterns during development. Different motif organizations provide different degrees of robustness to enhancer activity, ranging from binary on-off responses to more subtle effects including embryo-to-embryo and within-embryo variation. By quantifying the effects of subtle changes in motif organization, we were able to model biophysical rules that explain CRM behavior and may contribute to the spatial positioning of CRM activity in vivo. For the same enhancer, the effects of small differences in motif positions varied in developmentally related tissues, suggesting that gene expression may be more susceptible to sequence variation in one tissue compared to another. This result has important implications for human eQTL studies in which many associated mutations are found in cis-regulatory regions, though the mechanism for how they affect tissue-specific gene expression is often not understood. PMID:24391522

  12. A genome-wide identification of basic helix-loop-helix motifs in Pediculus humanus corporis (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu-Hua; Wang, Yong; Zhang, De-Bao; Liu, A-Ke; Yao, Qin; Chen, Ke-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins comprise a large superfamily of transcription factors, which are involved in the regulation of various developmental processes. bHLH family members are widely distributed in various eukaryotes including yeast, fruit fly, zebrafish, mouse, and human. In this study, we identified 55 bHLH motifs encoded in genome sequence of the human body louse, Pediculus humanus corporis (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae). Phylogenetic analyses of the identified P. humanus corporis bHLH (PhcbHLH) motifs revealed that there are 23, 11, 9, 1, 10, and 1 member(s) in groups A, B, C, D, E, and F, respectively. Examination to GenBank annotations of the 55 PhcbHLH members indicated that 29 PhcbHLH proteins were annotated in consistence with our analytical result, 8 were annotated different with our analytical result, 12 were merely annotated as hypothetical protein, and the rest 6 were not deposited in GenBank. A comparison on insect bHLH gene composition revealed that human body louse possibly has more hairy and E(spl) genes than other insect species. Because hairy and E(spl) genes have been found to negatively regulate the differentiation of insect preneural cells, it is suggested that the existence of additional hairy and E(spl) genes in human body louse is probably the consequence of its long period adaptation to the relatively dark and stable environment. These data provide good references for further studies on regulatory functions of bHLH proteins in the growth and development of human body louse. PMID:25434030

  13. Superatoms and Metal-Semiconductor Motifs for Cluster Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Castleman, A. W.

    2013-10-11

    A molecular understanding of catalysis and catalytically active materials is of fundamental importance in designing new substances for applications in energy and fuels. We have performed reactivity studies and ultrafast ionization and coulomb explosion studies on a variety of catalytically-relevant materials, including transition metal oxides of Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ti, V, Nb, and Ta. We demonstrate that differences in charge state, geometry, and elemental composition of clusters of such materials determine chemical reactivity and ionization behavior, crucial steps in improving performance of catalysts.

  14. Composition-dependent stability of the medium-range order responsible for metallic glass formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Feng; Ji, Min; Fang, Xiao-Wei; Sun, Yang; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Mendelev, Mikhail I.; Kramer, M. J.; Napolitano, Ralph E.; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2014-09-18

    The competition between the characteristic medium-range order corresponding to amorphous alloys and that in ordered crystalline phases is central to phase selection and morphology evolution under various processing conditions. We examine the stability of a model glass system, Cu–Zr, by comparing the energetics of various medium-range structural motifs over a wide range of compositions using first-principles calculations. Furthermore, we focus specifically on motifs that represent possible building blocks for competing glassy and crystalline phases, and we employ a genetic algorithm to efficiently identify the energetically favored decorations of each motif for specific compositions. These results show that a Bergman-type motif with crystallization-resisting icosahedral symmetry is energetically most favorable in the composition range 0.63 < xCu < 0.68, and is the underlying motif for one of the three optimal glass-forming ranges observed experimentally for this binary system (Li et al., 2008). This work establishes an energy-based methodology to evaluate specific medium-range structural motifs which compete with stable crystalline nuclei in deeply undercooled liquids.

  15. A structure-based flexible search method for motifs in RNA.

    PubMed

    Veksler-Lublinsky, Isana; Ziv-Ukelson, Michal; Barash, Danny; Kedem, Klara

    2007-09-01

    The discovery of non-coding RNA (ncRNA) motifs and their role in regulating gene expression has recently attracted considerable attention. The goal is to discover these motifs in a sequence database. Current RNA motif search methods start from the primary sequence and only then take into account secondary structure considerations. One can think of developing a flexible structure-based motif search method that will filter datasets based on secondary structure first, while allowing extensive primary sequence factors and additional factors such as potential pseudoknots as constraints. Since different motifs vary in structure rigidity and in local sequence constraints, there is a need for algorithms and tools that can be fine-tuned according to the searched RNA motif, but differ in their approach from the RNAMotif descriptor language. We present an RNA motif search tool called STRMS (Structural RNA Motif Search), which takes as input the secondary structure of the query, including local sequence and structure constraints, and a target sequence database. It reports all occurrences of the query in the target, ranked by their similarity to the query, and produces an html file that displays graphical images of the predicted structures for both the query and the candidate hits. Our tool is flexible and takes into account a large number of sequence options and existence of potential pseudoknots as dictated by specific queries. Our approach combines pre-folding and an O(m n) RNA pattern matching algorithm based on subtree homeomorphism for ordered, rooted trees. An O(n(2) log n) extension is described that allows the search engine to take into account the pseudoknots typical to riboswitches. We employed STRMS in search for both new and known RNA motifs (riboswitches and tRNAs) in large target databases. Our results point to a number of additional purine bacterial riboswitch candidates in newly sequenced bacteria, and demonstrate high sensitivity on known riboswitches and t

  16. Disruption of the RAG2 zinc finger motif impairs protein stability and causes immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Liu, Haifeng; Shi, Zhubing; Song, Guangrong; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Yuzhang; Zhou, Zhaocai; Liu, Xiaolong

    2016-04-01

    Although the RAG2 core domain is the minimal region required for V(D)J recombination, the noncore region also plays important roles in the regulation of recombination, and mutations in this region are often related to severe combined immunodeficiency. A complete understanding of the functions of the RAG2 noncore region and the potential contributions of its individual residues has not yet been achieved. Here, we show that the zinc finger motif within the noncore region of RAG2 is indispensable for maintaining the stability of the RAG2 protein. The zinc finger motif in the noncore region of RAG2 is highly conserved from zebrafish to humans. Knock-in mice carrying a zinc finger mutation (C478Y) exhibit decreased V(D)J recombination efficiency and serious impairment in T/B-cell development due to RAG2 instability. Further studies also reveal the importance of the zinc finger motif for RAG2 stability. Moreover, mice harboring a RAG2 noncore region mutation (N474S), which is located near C478 but is not zinc-binding, exhibit no impairment in either RAG2 stability or T/B-cell development. Taken together, our findings contribute to defining critical functions of the RAG2 zinc finger motif and provide insights into the relationships between the mutations within this motif and immunodeficiency diseases. PMID:26692406

  17. GENOMIC ANALYSIS OF CANCER TISSUE REVEALS THAT SOMATIC MUTATIONS COMMONLY OCCUR IN A SPECIFIC MOTIF

    PubMed Central

    Makridakis, Nick M; Ferraz, Lúcio Fábio Caldas; Reichardt, Juergen KV

    2009-01-01

    Somatic mutations are hallmarks of cancer progression. We sequenced 26 matched human prostate tumor and constitutional DNA samples for somatic alterations in the SRD5A2, HPRT, and HSD3B2 genes, and identified 71 nucleotide substitutions. 79% (56/71) of these substitutions occur within a WKVnRRRnVWK sequence (THEMIS motif; W= A/T, K= G/T, V= G/A/C, R= purine (A/G) and n= any nucleotide), with one mismatch allowed. Literature searches identified this motif with one mismatch allowed in 66% (37/ 56) of the somatic prostate cancer mutations and in 74% (90/ 122) of the somatic breast cancer mutations found in all human genes analyzed. We also found the THEMIS motif with one allowed mismatch in 88% (23/26) of the ras1 gene somatic mutations formed in the SENCAR (SENsitive to skin CARcinogenesis) mouse model, after induction of error-prone DNA repair following mutagenic treatment. The high prevalence of the motif in each of the above mentioned cases cannot be explained by chance (p < 0.046). We further identified 27 somatic mutations in the error-prone DNA polymerase genes pol η, pol κ and pol β in these prostate cancer patients. The data suggest that most somatic nucleotide substitutions in human cancer may occur in sites that conform to the THEMIS motif. These mutations may be caused by “mutator” mutations in error-prone DNA polymerase genes. PMID:18623241

  18. Intronic motif pairs cooperate across exons to promote pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A very early step in splice site recognition is exon definition, a process that is as yet poorly understood. Communication between the two ends of an exon is thought to be required for this step. We report genome-wide evidence for exons being defined through the combinatorial activity of motifs located in flanking intronic regions. Results Strongly co-occurring motifs were found to specifically reside in four intronic regions surrounding a large number of human exons. These paired motifs occur around constitutive and alternative exons but not pseudo exons. Most co-occurring motifs are limited to intronic regions within 100 nucleotides of the exon. They are preferentially associated with weaker exons. Their pairing is conserved in evolution and they exhibit a lower frequency of single nucleotide polymorphism when paired. Paired motifs display specificity with respect to distance from the exon borders and in constitutive versus alternative splicing. Many resemble binding sites for heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins. Specific pairs are associated with tissue-specific genes, the higher expression of which coincides with that of the pertinent RNA binding proteins. Tested pairs acted synergistically to enhance exon inclusion, and this enhancement was found to be exon-specific. Conclusions The exon-flanking sequence pairs identified here by genomic analysis promote exon inclusion and may play a role in the exon definition step in pre-mRNA splicing. We propose a model in which multiple concerted interactions are required between exonic sequences and flanking intronic sequences to effect exon definition. PMID:20704715

  19. A Conserved Di-Basic Motif of Drosophila Crumbs Contributes to Efficient ER Export.

    PubMed

    Kumichel, Alexandra; Kapp, Katja; Knust, Elisabeth

    2015-06-01

    The Drosophila type I transmembrane protein Crumbs is an apical determinant required for the maintenance of apico-basal epithelial cell polarity. The level of Crumbs at the plasma membrane is crucial, but how it is regulated is poorly understood. In a genetic screen for regulators of Crumbs protein trafficking we identified Sar1, the core component of the coat protein complex II transport vesicles. sar1 mutant embryos show a reduced plasma membrane localization of Crumbs, a defect similar to that observed in haunted and ghost mutant embryos, which lack Sec23 and Sec24CD, respectively. By pulse-chase assays in Drosophila Schneider cells and analysis of protein transport kinetics based on Endoglycosidase H resistance we identified an RNKR motif in Crumbs, which contributes to efficient ER export. The motif identified fits the highly conserved di-basic RxKR motif and mediates interaction with Sar1. The RNKR motif is also required for plasma membrane delivery of transgene-encoded Crumbs in epithelial cells of Drosophila embryos. Our data are the first to show that a di-basic motif acts as a signal for ER exit of a type I plasma membrane protein in a metazoan organism. PMID:25753515

  20. ATtRACT—a database of RNA-binding proteins and associated motifs

    PubMed Central

    Giudice, Girolamo; Sánchez-Cabo, Fátima; Torroja, Carlos; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play a crucial role in key cellular processes, including RNA transport, splicing, polyadenylation and stability. Understanding the interaction between RBPs and RNA is key to improve our knowledge of RNA processing, localization and regulation in a global manner. Despite advances in recent years, a unified non-redundant resource that includes information on experimentally validated motifs, RBPs and integrated tools to exploit this information is lacking. Here, we developed a database named ATtRACT (available at http://attract.cnic.es) that compiles information on 370 RBPs and 1583 RBP consensus binding motifs, 192 of which are not present in any other database. To populate ATtRACT we (i) extracted and hand-curated experimentally validated data from CISBP-RNA, SpliceAid–F, RBPDB databases, (ii) integrated and updated the unavailable ASD database and (iii) extracted information from Protein-RNA complexes present in Protein Data Bank database through computational analyses. ATtRACT provides also efficient algorithms to search a specific motif and scan one or more RNA sequences at a time. It also allows discovering de novo motifs enriched in a set of related sequences and compare them with the motifs included in the database. Database URL: http:// attract. cnic. es PMID:27055826

  1. Return of the GDI: the GoLoco motif in cell division.

    PubMed

    Willard, Francis S; Kimple, Randall J; Siderovski, David P

    2004-01-01

    The GoLoco motif is a 19-amino-acid sequence with guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor activity against G-alpha subunits of the adenylyl-cyclase-inhibitory subclass. The GoLoco motif is present as an independent element within multidomain signaling regulators, such as Loco, RGS12, RGS14, and Rap1GAP, as well as in tandem arrays in proteins, such as AGS3, G18, LGN, Pcp-2/L7, and Partner of Inscuteable (Pins/Rapsynoid). Here we discuss the biochemical mechanisms of GoLoco motif action on G-alpha subunits in light of the recent crystal structure of G-alpha-i1 bound to the RGS14 GoLoco motif. Currently, there is sparse evidence for GoLoco motif regulation of canonical G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. Rather, studies of asymmetric cell division in Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans, as well as mammalian mitosis, implicate GoLoco proteins, such as Pins, GPR-1/GPR-2, LGN, and RGS14, in mitotic spindle organization and force generation. We discuss potential mechanisms by which GoLoco/Galpha complexes might modulate spindle dynamics. PMID:15189163

  2. Mechano-chemical selections of two competitive unfolding pathways of a single DNA i-motif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yue; Chen, Hu; Qu, Yu-Jie; Artem, K. Efremov; Li, Ming; Ouyang, Zhong-Can; Liu, Dong-Sheng; Yan, Jie

    2014-06-01

    The DNA i-motif is a quadruplex structure formed in tandem cytosine-rich sequences in slightly acidic conditions. Besides being considered as a building block of DNA nano-devices, it may also play potential roles in regulating chromosome stability and gene transcriptions. The stability of i-motif is crucial for these functions. In this work, we investigated the mechanical stability of a single i-motif formed in the human telomeric sequence 5'-(CCCTAA)3CCC, which revealed a novel pH and loading rate-dependent bimodal unfolding force distribution. Although the cause of the bimodal unfolding force species is not clear, we proposed a phenomenological model involving a direct unfolding favored at lower loading rate or higher pH value, which is subject to competition with another unfolding pathway through a mechanically stable intermediate state whose nature is yet to be determined. Overall, the unique mechano—chemical responses of i-motif-provide a new perspective to its stability, which may be useful to guide designing new i-motif-based DNA mechanical nano-devices.

  3. DXD motif-dependent and -independent effects of the chlamydia trachomatis cytotoxin CT166.

    PubMed

    Bothe, Miriam; Dutow, Pavel; Pich, Andreas; Genth, Harald; Klos, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    The Gram-negative, intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis causes acute and chronic urogenital tract infection, potentially leading to infertility and ectopic pregnancy. The only partially characterized cytotoxin CT166 of serovar D exhibits a DXD motif, which is important for the enzymatic activity of many bacterial and mammalian type A glycosyltransferases, leading to the hypothesis that CT166 possess glycosyltransferase activity. CT166-expressing HeLa cells exhibit actin reorganization, including cell rounding, which has been attributed to the inhibition of the Rho-GTPases Rac/Cdc42. Exploiting the glycosylation-sensitive Ras(27H5) antibody, we here show that CT166 induces an epitope change in Ras, resulting in inhibited ERK and PI3K signaling and delayed cell cycle progression. Consistent with the hypothesis that these effects strictly depend on the DXD motif, CT166 with the mutated DXD motif causes neither Ras-ERK inhibition nor delayed cell cycle progression. In contrast, CT166 with the mutated DXD motif is still capable of inhibiting cell migration, suggesting that CT166 with the mutated DXD motif cannot be regarded as inactive in any case. Taken together, CT166 affects various fundamental cellular processes, strongly suggesting its importance for the intracellular survival of chlamydia. PMID:25690695

  4. DXD Motif-Dependent and -Independent Effects of the Chlamydia trachomatis Cytotoxin CT166

    PubMed Central

    Bothe, Miriam; Dutow, Pavel; Pich, Andreas; Genth, Harald; Klos, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative, intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis causes acute and chronic urogenital tract infection, potentially leading to infertility and ectopic pregnancy. The only partially characterized cytotoxin CT166 of serovar D exhibits a DXD motif, which is important for the enzymatic activity of many bacterial and mammalian type A glycosyltransferases, leading to the hypothesis that CT166 possess glycosyltransferase activity. CT166-expressing HeLa cells exhibit actin reorganization, including cell rounding, which has been attributed to the inhibition of the Rho-GTPases Rac/Cdc42. Exploiting the glycosylation-sensitive Ras(27H5) antibody, we here show that CT166 induces an epitope change in Ras, resulting in inhibited ERK and PI3K signaling and delayed cell cycle progression. Consistent with the hypothesis that these effects strictly depend on the DXD motif, CT166 with the mutated DXD motif causes neither Ras-ERK inhibition nor delayed cell cycle progression. In contrast, CT166 with the mutated DXD motif is still capable of inhibiting cell migration, suggesting that CT166 with the mutated DXD motif cannot be regarded as inactive in any case. Taken together, CT166 affects various fundamental cellular processes, strongly suggesting its importance for the intracellular survival of chlamydia. PMID:25690695

  5. A novel secondary structure based on fused five-membered rings motif

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Jesmita; Kishore, Raghuvansh; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2016-01-01

    An analysis of protein structures indicates the existence of a novel, fused five-membered rings motif, comprising of two residues (i and i + 1), stabilized by interresidue Ni+1–H∙∙∙Ni and intraresidue Ni+1–H∙∙∙O=Ci+1 hydrogen bonds. Fused-rings geometry is the common thread running through many commonly occurring motifs, such as β-turn, β-bulge, Asx-turn, Ser/Thr-turn, Schellman motif, and points to its structural robustness. A location close to the beginning of a β-strand is rather common for the motif. Devoid of side chain, Gly seems to be a key player in this motif, occurring at i, for which the backbone torsion angles cluster at ~(−90°, −10°) and (70°, 20°). The fused-rings structures, distant from each other in sequence, can hydrogen bond with each other, and the two segments aligned to each other in a parallel fashion, give rise to a novel secondary structure, topi, which is quite common in proteins, distinct from two major secondary structures, α-helix and β-sheet. Majority of the peptide segments making topi are identified as aggregation-prone and the residues tend to be conserved among homologous proteins. PMID:27511362

  6. Cofunctional Subpathways Were Regulated by Transcription Factor with Common Motif, Common Family, or Common Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Su, Fei; Shang, Desi; Xu, Yanjun; Feng, Li; Yang, Haixiu; Liu, Baoquan; Su, Shengyang; Chen, Lina; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Dissecting the characteristics of the transcription factor (TF) regulatory subpathway is helpful for understanding the TF underlying regulatory function in complex biological systems. To gain insight into the influence of TFs on their regulatory subpathways, we constructed a global TF-subpathways network (TSN) to analyze systematically the regulatory effect of common-motif, common-family, or common-tissue TFs on subpathways. We performed cluster analysis to show that the common-motif, common-family, or common-tissue TFs that regulated the same pathway classes tended to cluster together and contribute to the same biological function that led to disease initiation and progression. We analyzed the Jaccard coefficient to show that the functional consistency of subpathways regulated by the TF pairs with common motif, common family, or common tissue was significantly greater than the random TF pairs at the subpathway level, pathway level, and pathway class level. For example, HNF4A (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4, alpha) and NR1I3 (nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group I, member 3) were a pair of TFs with common motif, common family, and common tissue. They were involved in drug metabolism pathways and were liver-specific factors required for physiological transcription. In short, we inferred that the cofunctional subpathways were regulated by common-motif, common-family, or common-tissue TFs. PMID:26688819

  7. A conserved motif mediates both multimer formation and allosteric activation of phosphoglycerate mutase 5.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Jordan M; McConnell, Cyrus; Tipton, Peter A; Hannink, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Phosphoglycerate mutase 5 (PGAM5) is an atypical mitochondrial Ser/Thr phosphatase that modulates mitochondrial dynamics and participates in both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. The mechanisms that regulate the phosphatase activity of PGAM5 are poorly understood. The C-terminal phosphoglycerate mutase domain of PGAM5 shares homology with the catalytic domains found in other members of the phosphoglycerate mutase family, including a conserved histidine that is absolutely required for catalytic activity. However, this conserved domain is not sufficient for maximal phosphatase activity. We have identified a highly conserved amino acid motif, WDXNWD, located within the unique N-terminal region, which is required for assembly of PGAM5 into large multimeric complexes. Alanine substitutions within the WDXNWD motif abolish the formation of multimeric complexes and markedly reduce phosphatase activity of PGAM5. A peptide containing the WDXNWD motif dissociates the multimeric complex and reduces but does not fully abolish phosphatase activity. Addition of the WDXNWD-containing peptide in trans to a mutant PGAM5 protein lacking the WDXNWD motif markedly increases phosphatase activity of the mutant protein. Our results are consistent with an intermolecular allosteric regulation mechanism for the phosphatase activity of PGAM5, in which the assembly of PGAM5 into multimeric complexes, mediated by the WDXNWD motif, results in maximal activation of phosphatase activity. Our results suggest the possibility of identifying small molecules that function as allosteric regulators of the phosphatase activity of PGAM5. PMID:25012655

  8. Designing synthetic RNAs to determine the relevance of structural motifs in picornavirus IRES elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Lozano, Gloria; Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Ramajo, Jorge; Dotu, Ivan; Clote, Peter; Martinez-Salas, Encarnacion

    2016-04-01

    The function of Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) elements is intimately linked to their RNA structure. Viral IRES elements are organized in modular domains consisting of one or more stem-loops that harbor conserved RNA motifs critical for internal initiation of translation. A conserved motif is the pyrimidine-tract located upstream of the functional initiation codon in type I and II picornavirus IRES. By computationally designing synthetic RNAs to fold into a structure that sequesters the polypyrimidine tract in a hairpin, we establish a correlation between predicted inaccessibility of the pyrimidine tract and IRES activity, as determined in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Our data supports the hypothesis that structural sequestration of the pyrimidine-tract within a stable hairpin inactivates IRES activity, since the stronger the stability of the hairpin the higher the inhibition of protein synthesis. Destabilization of the stem-loop immediately upstream of the pyrimidine-tract also decreases IRES activity. Our work introduces a hybrid computational/experimental method to determine the importance of structural motifs for biological function. Specifically, we show the feasibility of using the software RNAiFold to design synthetic RNAs with particular sequence and structural motifs that permit subsequent experimental determination of the importance of such motifs for biological function.

  9. A Conserved Motif Mediates both Multimer Formation and Allosteric Activation of Phosphoglycerate Mutase 5*

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Jordan M.; McConnell, Cyrus; Tipton, Peter A.; Hannink, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoglycerate mutase 5 (PGAM5) is an atypical mitochondrial Ser/Thr phosphatase that modulates mitochondrial dynamics and participates in both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. The mechanisms that regulate the phosphatase activity of PGAM5 are poorly understood. The C-terminal phosphoglycerate mutase domain of PGAM5 shares homology with the catalytic domains found in other members of the phosphoglycerate mutase family, including a conserved histidine that is absolutely required for catalytic activity. However, this conserved domain is not sufficient for maximal phosphatase activity. We have identified a highly conserved amino acid motif, WDXNWD, located within the unique N-terminal region, which is required for assembly of PGAM5 into large multimeric complexes. Alanine substitutions within the WDXNWD motif abolish the formation of multimeric complexes and markedly reduce phosphatase activity of PGAM5. A peptide containing the WDXNWD motif dissociates the multimeric complex and reduces but does not fully abolish phosphatase activity. Addition of the WDXNWD-containing peptide in trans to a mutant PGAM5 protein lacking the WDXNWD motif markedly increases phosphatase activity of the mutant protein. Our results are consistent with an intermolecular allosteric regulation mechanism for the phosphatase activity of PGAM5, in which the assembly of PGAM5 into multimeric complexes, mediated by the WDXNWD motif, results in maximal activation of phosphatase activity. Our results suggest the possibility of identifying small molecules that function as allosteric regulators of the phosphatase activity of PGAM5. PMID:25012655

  10. Structural Implications of Homopyrimidine Base Pairs in the Parallel-Stranded d(YGA) Motif.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Shailesh; Paukstelis, Paul J

    2016-06-16

    DNA can adopt many other structures beyond the canonical B-form double helix. These alternative DNA structures have become increasingly significant as new biological roles are found for them. Additionally, there has been a growing interest in using non-canonical base pairs to provide structural diversity for designing DNA architectures for nanotechnology applications. We recently described the crystal structure of d(ACTCGGATGAT), which forms a tetraplex through parallel-stranded homo-base pairs and nucleobase intercalation. The homoduplex region contains a d(YGA⋅YGA) motif observed in crystal and solution structures. Here, we examine the structural implications of the homopyrimidine base pair within this motif. We determined crystal structures of two variants that differ from the original structure in the homopyrimidine base pairs and number of d(YGA) motifs. Our results show that the intercalation-locked tetraplex motif is predictable in these different sequence contexts and that substituting C⋅C base pairs for T⋅T base pairs introduces asymmetry to the homoduplex. These results have important implications for utilizing d(YGA) motifs in DNA crystal design and could provide a basis for understanding how local structures could be associated with repeat expansions. PMID:26629965

  11. Imogene: identification of motifs and cis-regulatory modules underlying gene co-regulation

    PubMed Central

    Rouault, Hervé; Santolini, Marc; Schweisguth, François; Hakim, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) and motifs play a central role in tissue and condition-specific gene expression. Here we present Imogene, an ensemble of statistical tools that we have developed to facilitate their identification and implemented in a publicly available software. Starting from a small training set of mammalian or fly CRMs that drive similar gene expression profiles, Imogene determines de novo cis-regulatory motifs that underlie this co-expression. It can then predict on a genome-wide scale other CRMs with a regulatory potential similar to the training set. Imogene bypasses the need of large datasets for statistical analyses by making central use of the information provided by the sequenced genomes of multiple species, based on the developed statistical tools and explicit models for transcription factor binding site evolution. We test Imogene on characterized tissue-specific mouse developmental CRMs. Its ability to identify CRMs with the same specificity based on its de novo created motifs is comparable to that of previously evaluated ‘motif-blind’ methods. We further show, both in flies and in mammals, that Imogene de novo generated motifs are sufficient to discriminate CRMs related to different developmental programs. Notably, purely relying on sequence data, Imogene performs as well in this discrimination task as a previously reported learning algorithm based on Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data for multiple transcription factors at multiple developmental stages. PMID:24682824

  12. qPMS9: An Efficient Algorithm for Quorum Planted Motif Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolae, Marius; Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar

    2015-01-01

    Discovering patterns in biological sequences is a crucial problem. For example, the identification of patterns in DNA sequences has resulted in the determination of open reading frames, identification of gene promoter elements, intron/exon splicing sites, and SH RNAs, location of RNA degradation signals, identification of alternative splicing sites, etc. In protein sequences, patterns have led to domain identification, location of protease cleavage sites, identification of signal peptides, protein interactions, determination of protein degradation elements, identification of protein trafficking elements, discovery of short functional motifs, etc. In this paper we focus on the identification of an important class of patterns, namely, motifs. We study the (l, d) motif search problem or Planted Motif Search (PMS). PMS receives as input n strings and two integers l and d. It returns all sequences M of length l that occur in each input string, where each occurrence differs from M in at most d positions. Another formulation is quorum PMS (qPMS), where the motif appears in at least q% of the strings. We introduce qPMS9, a parallel exact qPMS algorithm that offers significant runtime improvements on DNA and protein datasets. qPMS9 solves the challenging DNA (l, d)-instances (28, 12) and (30, 13). The source code is available at https://code.google.com/p/qpms9/.

  13. Novel septin 9 repeat motifs altered in neuralgic amyotrophy bind and bundle microtubules.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiaobo; Bowen, Jonathan R; Knox, Tara K; Zhou, Kaifeng; Pendziwiat, Manuela; Kuhlenbäumer, Gregor; Sindelar, Charles V; Spiliotis, Elias T

    2013-12-23

    Septin 9 (SEPT9) interacts with microtubules (MTs) and is mutated in hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (HNA), an autosomal-dominant neuropathy. The mechanism of SEPT9 interaction with MTs and the molecular basis of HNA are unknown. Here, we show that the N-terminal domain of SEPT9 contains the novel repeat motifs K/R-x-x-E/D and R/K-R-x-E, which bind and bundle MTs by interacting with the acidic C-terminal tails of β-tubulin. Alanine scanning mutagenesis revealed that the K/R-R/x-x-E/D motifs pair electrostatically with one another and the tails of β-tubulin, enabling septin–septin interactions that link MTs together. SEPT9 isoforms lacking repeat motifs or containing the HNA-linked mutation R88W, which maps to the R/K-R-x-E motif, diminished intracellular MT bundling and impaired asymmetric neurite growth in PC-12 cells. Thus, the SEPT9 repeat motifs bind and bundle MTs, and thereby promote asymmetric neurite growth. These results provide the first insight into the mechanism of septin interaction with MTs and the molecular and cellular basis of HNA. PMID:24344182

  14. Designing synthetic RNAs to determine the relevance of structural motifs in picornavirus IRES elements

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Lozano, Gloria; Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Ramajo, Jorge; Dotu, Ivan; Clote, Peter; Martinez-Salas, Encarnacion

    2016-01-01

    The function of Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) elements is intimately linked to their RNA structure. Viral IRES elements are organized in modular domains consisting of one or more stem-loops that harbor conserved RNA motifs critical for internal initiation of translation. A conserved motif is the pyrimidine-tract located upstream of the functional initiation codon in type I and II picornavirus IRES. By computationally designing synthetic RNAs to fold into a structure that sequesters the polypyrimidine tract in a hairpin, we establish a correlation between predicted inaccessibility of the pyrimidine tract and IRES activity, as determined in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Our data supports the hypothesis that structural sequestration of the pyrimidine-tract within a stable hairpin inactivates IRES activity, since the stronger the stability of the hairpin the higher the inhibition of protein synthesis. Destabilization of the stem-loop immediately upstream of the pyrimidine-tract also decreases IRES activity. Our work introduces a hybrid computational/experimental method to determine the importance of structural motifs for biological function. Specifically, we show the feasibility of using the software RNAiFold to design synthetic RNAs with particular sequence and structural motifs that permit subsequent experimental determination of the importance of such motifs for biological function. PMID:27053355

  15. Key Structural Motifs To Predict the Cage Topology in Endohedral Metallofullerenes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Díaz-Tendero, Sergio; Martín, Fernando; Alcamí, Manuel

    2016-02-10

    We show that the relative isomer stability of fullerene anions is essentially governed by a few simple structural motifs, requiring only the connectivity information between atoms. Relative energies of a large number of isomers of fullerene anions, C(2n)(q) (2n = 68-104; q = -2, -4, -6), can be satisfactorily reproduced by merely counting the numbers of seven kinds of hexagon-based motifs. The dependence of stability on these motifs varies with the charge state, which reflects the fact that the isomeric form of the carbon cage in endohedral metallofullerenes (EMFs) often differs from that in neutral empty fullerenes. The chemical origin of the stabilization differences between motifs is discussed on the basis of electronic and strain effects as well as aromaticity. On the basis of this simple model, the extraordinary abundance of the icosahedral C80 cage in EMFs can be easily understood. We also provide an explanation for why the well-known isolated pentagon rule is often violated in smaller EMFs. Finally, simple topological indices are proposed for quantitatively predicting the relative stability of fullerene anions, allowing a rapid determination of suitable hosting cages in EMFs by just counting three simple structural motifs. PMID:26762322

  16. Two motifs target Batten disease protein CLN3 to lysosomes in transfected nonneuronal and neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Kyttälä, Aija; Ihrke, Gudrun; Vesa, Jouni; Schell, Michael J; Luzio, J Paul

    2004-03-01

    Batten disease is a neurodegenerative disorder resulting from mutations in CLN3, a polytopic membrane protein, whose predominant intracellular destination in nonneuronal cells is the lysosome. The topology of CLN3 protein, its lysosomal targeting mechanism, and the development of Batten disease are poorly understood. We provide experimental evidence that both the N and C termini and one large loop domain of CLN3 face the cytoplasm. We have identified two lysosomal targeting motifs that mediate the sorting of CLN3 in transfected nonneuronal and neuronal cells: an unconventional motif in the long C-terminal cytosolic tail consisting of a methionine and a glycine separated by nine amino acids [M(X)9G], and a more conventional dileucine motif, located in the large cytosolic loop domain and preceded by an acidic patch. Each motif on its own was sufficient to mediate lysosomal targeting, but optimal efficiency required both. Interestingly, in primary neurons, CLN3 was prominently seen both in lysosomes in the cell body and in endosomes, containing early endosomal antigen-1 along neuronal processes. Because there are few lysosomes in axons and peripheral parts of dendrites, the presence of CLN3 in endosomes of neurons may be functionally important. Endosomal association of the protein was independent of the two lysosomal targeting motifs. PMID:14699076

  17. Theme and variations: evolutionary diversification of the HET-s functional amyloid motif

    PubMed Central

    Daskalov, Asen; Dyrka, Witold; Saupe, Sven J.

    2015-01-01

    In mammals and fungi, Nod-like receptors (NLR) activate downstream cell death execution proteins by a prion-like mechanism. In Podospora anserina, the NWD2 NLR activates the HET-S Helo-domain pore-forming protein by converting its prion-forming domain into a characteristic β-solenoid amyloid fold. The amyloid forming region of HET-S/s comprises two repetitions of a 21 amino acid motif. Herein, we systematically analyze the sequences of C-terminal regions of fungal HeLo and HeLo-like domain proteins to identify HET-s-related amyloid motifs (HRAM). We now identify four novel HRAM subfamilies in addition to the canonical HET-S/s subfamily. These novel motifs share the pseudo-repeat structure of HET-S/s and a specific pattern of distribution of hydrophobic and polar residues. Sequence co-variance analyses predict parallel in-register β-stacking of the two repeats and residue-residue interactions compatible with the β-solenoid fold. As described for HET-S, most genes encoding the HeLo proteins are adjacent to genes encoding NLRs also displaying HRAMs. The motifs of the NLRs are similar to those of their cognate HeLo-domain protein, indicating concerted evolution between repeats. This study shows that HET-s-related amyloid motifs are more common than anticipated and that they have diversified into discrete subfamilies that apparently share a common overall fold. PMID:26219477

  18. FoldMiner and LOCK 2: protein structure comparison and motif discovery on the web.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Jessica; Brutlag, Douglas

    2004-07-01

    The FoldMiner web server (http://foldminer.stanford.edu/) provides remote access to methods for protein structure alignment and unsupervised motif discovery. FoldMiner is unique among such algorithms in that it improves both the motif definition and the sensitivity of a structural similarity search by combining the search and motif discovery methods and using information from each process to enhance the other. In a typical run, a query structure is aligned to all structures in one of several databases of single domain targets in order to identify its structural neighbors and to discover a motif that is the basis for the similarity among the query and statistically significant targets. This process is fully automated, but options for manual refinement of the results are available as well. The server uses the Chime plugin and customized controls to allow for visualization of the motif and of structural superpositions. In addition, we provide an interface to the LOCK 2 algorithm for rapid alignments of a query structure to smaller numbers of user-specified targets. PMID:15215444

  19. CHEM-PATH-TRACKER: An automated tool to analyze chemical motifs in molecular structures.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, João V; Cerqueira, N M F S A; Fernandes, Pedro A; Ramos, Maria J

    2014-07-01

    In this article, we propose a method for locating functionally relevant chemical motifs in protein structures. The chemical motifs can be a small group of residues or structure protein fragments with highly conserved properties that have important biological functions. However, the detection of chemical motifs is rather difficult because they often consist of a set of amino acid residues separated by long, variable regions, and they only come together to form a functional group when the protein is folded into its three-dimensional structure. Furthermore, the assemblage of these residues is often dependent on non-covalent interactions among the constituent amino acids that are difficult to detect or visualize. To simplify the analysis of these chemical motifs and give access to a generalized use for all users, we developed chem-path-tracker. This software is a VMD plug-in that allows the user to highlight and reveal potential chemical motifs requiring only a few selections. The analysis is based on atoms/residues pair distances applying a modified version of Dijkstra's algorithm, and it makes possible to monitor the distances of a large pathway, even during a molecular dynamics simulation. This tool turned out to be very useful, fast, and user-friendly in the performed tests. The chem-path-tracker package is distributed as an independent platform and can be found at http://www.fc.up.pt/PortoBioComp/database/doku.php?id=chem-path-tracker. PMID:24775806

  20. Belief-propagation algorithm and the Ising model on networks with arbitrary distributions of motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, S.; Goltsev, A. V.; Dorogovtsev, S. N.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2011-10-01

    We generalize the belief-propagation algorithm to sparse random networks with arbitrary distributions of motifs (triangles, loops, etc.). Each vertex in these networks belongs to a given set of motifs (generalization of the configuration model). These networks can be treated as sparse uncorrelated hypergraphs in which hyperedges represent motifs. Here a hypergraph is a generalization of a graph, where a hyperedge can connect any number of vertices. These uncorrelated hypergraphs are treelike (hypertrees), which crucially simplifies the problem and allows us to apply the belief-propagation algorithm to these loopy networks with arbitrary motifs. As natural examples, we consider motifs in the form of finite loops and cliques. We apply the belief-propagation algorithm to the ferromagnetic Ising model with pairwise interactions on the resulting random networks and obtain an exact solution of this model. We find an exact critical temperature of the ferromagnetic phase transition and demonstrate that with increasing the clustering coefficient and the loop size, the critical temperature increases compared to ordinary treelike complex networks. However, weak clustering does not change the critical behavior qualitatively. Our solution also gives the birth point of the giant connected component in these loopy networks.

  1. Effects of Rate-Limiting Steps in Transcription Initiation on Genetic Filter Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Häkkinen, Antti; Tran, Huy; Yli-Harja, Olli; Ribeiro, Andre S.

    2013-01-01

    The behavior of genetic motifs is determined not only by the gene-gene interactions, but also by the expression patterns of the constituent genes. Live single-molecule measurements have provided evidence that transcription initiation is a sequential process, whose kinetics plays a key role in the dynamics of mRNA and protein numbers. The extent to which it affects the behavior of cellular motifs is unknown. Here, we examine how the kinetics of transcription initiation affects the behavior of motifs performing filtering in amplitude and frequency domain. We find that the performance of each filter is degraded as transcript levels are lowered. This effect can be reduced by having a transcription process with more steps. In addition, we show that the kinetics of the stepwise transcription initiation process affects features such as filter cutoffs. These results constitute an assessment of the range of behaviors of genetic motifs as a function of the kinetics of transcription initiation, and thus will aid in tuning of synthetic motifs to attain specific characteristics without affecting their protein products. PMID:23940576

  2. Experimental detection of short regulatory motifs in eukaryotic proteins: tips for good practice as well as for bad.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Toby J; Dinkel, Holger; Van Roey, Kim; Diella, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    It has become clear in outline though not yet in detail how cellular regulatory and signalling systems are constructed. The essential machines are protein complexes that effect regulatory decisions by undergoing internal changes of state. Subcomponents of these cellular complexes are assembled into molecular switches. Many of these switches employ one or more short peptide motifs as toggles that can move between one or more sites within the switch system, the simplest being on-off switches. Paradoxically, these motif modules (termed short linear motifs or SLiMs) are both hugely abundant but difficult to research. So despite the many successes in identifying short regulatory protein motifs, it is thought that only the "tip of the iceberg" has been exposed. Experimental and bioinformatic motif discovery remain challenging and error prone. The advice presented in this article is aimed at helping researchers to uncover genuine protein motifs, whilst avoiding the pitfalls that lead to reports of false discovery. PMID:26581338

  3. Evaluating the effects of charged oligopeptide motifs coupled with RGD on osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Feng-Yi; Yin, Wei-Na; Fan, Jin-Xuan; Tao, Li; Qin, Si-Yong; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells, due to their multilineage differentiation potential, have emerged as a promising cell candidate for cell-based therapy. In recent years, biomaterials were artificially synthesized to control the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. In this study, a series of charged or neutral oligopeptide motifs coupled with RGD were synthesized and used for surface modification using quartz substrates as model. Cell behaviors on the modified surfaces with different charged oligopeptide motifs were studied. It was found that these different charged oligopeptide motifs coupled with RGD were biocompatible for cell proliferation and adhesion. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the positively charged oligopeptide motif could inhibit osteogenic differentiation, while the negatively charged and neutral oligopeptide motifs could enhance osteogenic differentiation in the presence of RGD. This work may bring us enlightenment that different charged oligopeptide motifs coupled with RGD may be used for biomaterial surface modification for different stem cell-based therapies. PMID:25748883

  4. IQ-motif selectivity in human IQGAP2 and IQGAP3: binding of calmodulin and myosin essential light chain.

    PubMed

    Atcheson, Erwan; Hamilton, Elaine; Pathmanathan, Sevvel; Greer, Brett; Harriott, Pat; Timson, David J

    2011-10-01

    The IQGAP [IQ-motif-containing GAP (GTPase-activating protein)] family members are eukaryotic proteins that act at the interface between cellular signalling and the cytoskeleton. As such they collect numerous inputs from a variety of signalling pathways. A key binding partner is the calcium-sensing protein CaM (calmodulin). This protein binds mainly through a series of IQ-motifs which are located towards the middle of the primary sequence of the IQGAPs. In some IQGAPs, these motifs also provide binding sites for CaM-like proteins such as myosin essential light chain and S100B. Using synthetic peptides and native gel electrophoresis, the binding properties of the IQ-motifs from human IQGAP2 and IQGAP3 have been mapped. The second and third IQ-motifs in IQGAP2 and all four of the IQ-motifs of IQGAP3 interacted with CaM in the presence of calcium ions. However, there were differences in the type of interaction: while some IQ-motifs were able to form complexes with CaM which were stable under the conditions of the experiment, others formed more transient interactions. The first IQ-motifs from IQGAP2 and IQGAP3 formed transient interactions with CaM in the absence of calcium and the first motif from IQGAP3 formed a transient interaction with the myosin essential light chain Mlc1sa. None of these IQ-motifs interacted with S100B. Molecular modelling suggested that all of the IQ-motifs, except the first one from IQGAP2 formed α-helices in solution. These results extend our knowledge of the selectivity of IQ-motifs for CaM and related proteins. PMID:21299499

  5. IQ-motif selectivity in human IQGAP2 and IQGAP3: binding of calmodulin and myosin essential light chain

    PubMed Central

    Atcheson, Erwan; Hamilton, Elaine; Pathmanathan, Sevvel; Greer, Brett; Harriott, Pat; Timson, David J.

    2011-01-01

    The IQGAP [IQ-motif-containing GAP (GTPase-activating protein)] family members are eukaryotic proteins that act at the interface between cellular signalling and the cytoskeleton. As such they collect numerous inputs from a variety of signalling pathways. A key binding partner is the calcium-sensing protein CaM (calmodulin). This protein binds mainly through a series of IQ-motifs which are located towards the middle of the primary sequence of the IQGAPs. In some IQGAPs, these motifs also provide binding sites for CaM-like proteins such as myosin essential light chain and S100B. Using synthetic peptides and native gel electrophoresis, the binding properties of the IQ-motifs from human IQGAP2 and IQGAP3 have been mapped. The second and third IQ-motifs in IQGAP2 and all four of the IQ-motifs of IQGAP3 interacted with CaM in the presence of calcium ions. However, there were differences in the type of interaction: while some IQ-motifs were able to form complexes with CaM which were stable under the conditions of the experiment, others formed more transient interactions. The first IQ-motifs from IQGAP2 and IQGAP3 formed transient interactions with CaM in the absence of calcium and the first motif from IQGAP3 formed a transient interaction with the myosin essential light chain Mlc1sa. None of these IQ-motifs interacted with S100B. Molecular modelling suggested that all of the IQ-motifs, except the first one from IQGAP2 formed α-helices in solution. These results extend our knowledge of the selectivity of IQ-motifs for CaM and related proteins. PMID:21299499

  6. The GoLoco motif: heralding a new tango between G protein signaling and cell division.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Randall J; Willard, Francis S; Siderovski, David P

    2002-04-01

    The Galpha and Gbetagamma components of heterotrimeric G proteins, typically associated with cell-surface receptor signaling, also partake in the macromolecular interactions that underlie cell polarity and cell division. Proteins with Galpha-binding GoLoco motifs, such as Drosophila melanogaster Pins (for Partner of Inscuteable) and its mammalian counterpart LGN, participate in multi-protein complexes that maintain cellular asymmetry and orderly segregation of chromosomal content and daughter cell bodies. The GoLoco motif was recently identified as a selective Galpha-binding partner: the GoLoco-Galpha interaction can displace Gbetagamma and inhibit guanine nucleotide release from the bound Galpha subunit. Recent x-ray crystallographic studies suggest ways in which GoLoco-motif peptides may modulate heterotrimeric G protein signaling. Such peptides could be exploited to help dissect the signals that underpin cell polarity and cell division processes. PMID:14993354

  7. The exploration of network motifs as potential drug targets from post-translational regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Song, Jiangning; Bork, Peer; Zhao, Xing-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation and proteolysis are among the most common post-translational modifications (PTMs), and play critical roles in various biological processes. More recent discoveries imply that the crosstalks between these two PTMs are involved in many diseases. In this work, we construct a post-translational regulatory network (PTRN) consists of phosphorylation and proteolysis processes, which enables us to investigate the regulatory interplays between these two PTMs. With the PTRN, we identify some functional network motifs that are significantly enriched with drug targets, some of which are further found to contain multiple proteins targeted by combinatorial drugs. These findings imply that the network motifs may be used to predict targets when designing new drugs. Inspired by this, we propose a novel computational approach called NetTar for predicting drug targets using the identified network motifs. Benchmarking results on real data indicate that our approach can be used for accurate prediction of novel proteins targeted by known drugs. PMID:26853265

  8. CPI motif interaction is necessary for capping protein function in cells

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Marc; McConnell, Patrick; Schafer, Dorothy A.; Cooper, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Capping protein (CP) has critical roles in actin assembly in vivo and in vitro. CP binds with high affinity to the barbed end of actin filaments, blocking the addition and loss of actin subunits. Heretofore, models for actin assembly in cells generally assumed that CP is constitutively active, diffusing freely to find and cap barbed ends. However, CP can be regulated by binding of the ‘capping protein interaction' (CPI) motif, found in a diverse and otherwise unrelated set of proteins that decreases, but does not abolish, the actin-capping activity of CP and promotes uncapping in biochemical experiments. Here, we report that CP localization and the ability of CP to function in cells requires interaction with a CPI-motif-containing protein. Our discovery shows that cells target and/or modulate the capping activity of CP via CPI motif interactions in order for CP to localize and function in cells. PMID:26412145

  9. Experimental Support for the Evolution of Symmetric Protein Architecture from a Simple Peptide Motif

    SciTech Connect

    J Lee; M Blaber

    2011-12-31

    The majority of protein architectures exhibit elements of structural symmetry, and 'gene duplication and fusion' is the evolutionary mechanism generally hypothesized to be responsible for their emergence from simple peptide motifs. Despite the central importance of the gene duplication and fusion hypothesis, experimental support for a plausible evolutionary pathway for a specific protein architecture has yet to be effectively demonstrated. To address this question, a unique 'top-down symmetric deconstruction' strategy was utilized to successfully identify a simple peptide motif capable of recapitulating, via gene duplication and fusion processes, a symmetric protein architecture (the threefold symmetric {beta}-trefoil fold). The folding properties of intermediary forms in this deconstruction agree precisely with a previously proposed 'conserved architecture' model for symmetric protein evolution. Furthermore, a route through foldable sequence-space between the simple peptide motif and extant protein fold is demonstrated. These results provide compelling experimental support for a plausible evolutionary pathway of symmetric protein architecture via gene duplication and fusion processes.

  10. How motif environment influences transcription factor search dynamics: Finding a needle in a haystack.

    PubMed

    Dror, Iris; Rohs, Remo; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2016-07-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) have to find their binding sites, which are distributed throughout the genome. Facilitated diffusion is currently the most widely accepted model for this search process. Based on this model the TF alternates between one-dimensional sliding along the DNA, and three-dimensional bulk diffusion. In this view, the non-specific associations between the proteins and the DNA play a major role in the search dynamics. However, little is known about how the DNA properties around the motif contribute to the search. Accumulating evidence showing that TF binding sites are embedded within a unique environment, specific to each TF, leads to the hypothesis that the search process is facilitated by favorable DNA features that help to improve the search efficiency. Here, we review the field and present the hypothesis that TF-DNA recognition is dictated not only by the motif, but is also influenced by the environment in which the motif resides. PMID:27192961

  11. NetExplore: a web server for modeling small network motifs

    PubMed Central

    Papatsenko, Dmitri; Lemischka, Ihor R.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Quantitative and qualitative assessment of biological data often produces small essential recurrent networks, containing 3–5 components called network motifs. In this context, model solutions for small network motifs represent very high interest. Results: Software package NetExplore has been created in order to generate, classify and analyze solutions for network motifs including up to six network components. NetExplore allows plotting and visualization of the solution's phase spaces and bifurcation diagrams. Availability and implementation: The current version of NetExplore has been implemented in Perl-CGI and is accessible at the following locations: http://line.bioinfolab.net/nex/NetExplore.htm and http://nex.autosome.ru/nex/NetExplore.htm. Contact: dmitri.papatsenko@gmail.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25637559

  12. The exploration of network motifs as potential drug targets from post-translational regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Song, Jiangning; Bork, Peer; Zhao, Xing-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation and proteolysis are among the most common post-translational modifications (PTMs), and play critical roles in various biological processes. More recent discoveries imply that the crosstalks between these two PTMs are involved in many diseases. In this work, we construct a post-translational regulatory network (PTRN) consists of phosphorylation and proteolysis processes, which enables us to investigate the regulatory interplays between these two PTMs. With the PTRN, we identify some functional network motifs that are significantly enriched with drug targets, some of which are further found to contain multiple proteins targeted by combinatorial drugs. These findings imply that the network motifs may be used to predict targets when designing new drugs. Inspired by this, we propose a novel computational approach called NetTar for predicting drug targets using the identified network motifs. Benchmarking results on real data indicate that our approach can be used for accurate prediction of novel proteins targeted by known drugs. PMID:26853265

  13. The extracellular matrix protein Del1 induces apoptosis via its epidermal growth factor motif.

    PubMed

    Kitano, Hisataka; Kokubun, Shinichiro; Hidai, Chiaki

    2010-03-19

    Mouse Del1 is an extracellular matrix protein mainly expressed in the developing embryo. Del1 has three EGF motifs and two discoidin domains. The second EGF motif reportedly contains an RGD sequence that binds to integrin receptors. Here, we provide evidence that Del1 protein induces cell death in vitro. Chromatin condensation and DNA laddering were observed, suggestive of apoptosis. The results of analysis using the TUNEL method and annexin V staining were also consistent with apoptosis. The apoptosis-inducing activity of Del1 could be mapped to the third EGF motif, which fitted the consensus sequence CX(D/N)XXXX(F/Y)XCXC, wherein the aspartic acid residue (D) could be beta-hydroxylated. As little as twenty-five picomolar of recombinant E3 could induce apoptosis. PMID:20171188

  14. Classification of protein motifs based on subcellular localization uncovers evolutionary relationships at both sequence and functional levels

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most proteins have evolved in specific cellular compartments that limit their functions and potential interactions. On the other hand, motifs define amino acid arrangements conserved between protein family members and represent powerful tools for assigning function to protein sequences. The ideal motif would identify all members of a protein family but in practice many motifs identify both family members and unrelated proteins, referred to as True Positive (TP) and False Positive (FP) sequences, respectively. Results To address the relationship between protein motifs, protein function and cellular localization, we systematically assigned subcellular localization data to motif sequences from the comprehensive PROSITE sequence motif database. Using this data we analyzed relationships between localization and function. We find that TPs and FPs have a strong tendency to localize in different compartments. When multiple localizations are considered, TPs are usually distributed between related cellular compartments. We also identified cases where FPs are concentrated in particular subcellular regions, indicating possible functional or evolutionary relationships with TP sequences of the same motif. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the systematic examination of subcellular localization has the potential to uncover evolutionary and functional relationships between motif-containing sequences. We believe that this type of analysis complements existing motif annotations and could aid in their interpretation. Our results shed light on the evolution of cellular organelles and potentially establish the basis for new subcellular localization and function prediction algorithms. PMID:23865897

  15. QGRS-Conserve: a computational method for discovering evolutionarily conserved G-quadruplex motifs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nucleic acids containing guanine tracts can form quadruplex structures via non-Watson-Crick base pairing. Formation of G-quadruplexes is associated with the regulation of important biological functions such as transcription, genetic instability, DNA repair, DNA replication, epigenetic mechanisms, regulation of translation, and alternative splicing. G-quadruplexes play important roles in human diseases and are being considered as targets for a variety of therapies. Identification of functional G-quadruplexes and the study of their overall distribution in genomes and transcriptomes is an important pursuit. Traditional computational methods map sequence motifs capable of forming G-quadruplexes but have difficulty in distinguishing motifs that occur by chance from ones which fold into G-quadruplexes. Results We present Quadruplex forming ‘G’-rich sequences (QGRS)-Conserve, a computational method for calculating motif conservation across exomes and supports filtering to provide researchers with more precise methods of studying G-quadruplex distribution patterns. Our method quantitatively evaluates conservation between quadruplexes found in homologous nucleotide sequences based on several motif structural characteristics. QGRS-Conserve also efficiently manages overlapping G-quadruplex sequences such that the resulting datasets can be analyzed effectively. Conclusions We have applied QGRS-Conserve to identify a large number of G-quadruplex motifs in the human exome conserved across several mammalian and non-mammalian species. We have successfully identified multiple homologs of many previously published G-quadruplexes that play post-transcriptional regulatory roles in human genes. Preliminary large-scale analysis identified many homologous G-quadruplexes in the 5′- and 3′-untranslated regions of mammalian species. An expectedly smaller set of G-quadruplex motifs was found to be conserved across larger phylogenetic distances. QGRS-Conserve provides means

  16. Self-association motifs in the enteroaggregative Escherichia coli heat-resistant agglutinin 1.

    PubMed

    Glaubman, Jessica; Hofmann, Jennifer; Bonney, Megan E; Park, Sumin; Thomas, Jessica M; Kokona, Bashkim; Ramos Falcón, Laura I; Chung, Yoonjie K; Fairman, Robert; Okeke, Iruka N

    2016-07-01

    The heat-resistant agglutinin 1 (Hra1) is an integral outer membrane protein found in strains of Escherichia coli that are exceptional colonizers. Hra1 from enteroaggregative E. coli strain 042 is sufficient to confer adherence to human epithelial cells and to cause bacterial autoaggregation. Hra1 is closely related to the Tia invasin, which also confers adherence, but not autoaggregation. Here, we have demonstrated that Hra1 mediates autoaggregation by self-association and we hypothesize that at least some surface-exposed amino acid sequences that are present in Hra1, but absent in Tia, represent autoaggregation motifs. We inserted FLAG tags along the length of Hra1 and used immune-dot blots to verify that four in silico-predicted outer loops were indeed surface exposed. In Hra1 we swapped nine candidate motifs in three of these loops, ranging from one to ten amino acids in length, to the corresponding sequences in Tia. Three of the motifs were required for Hra1-mediated autoaggregation. The database was searched for other surface proteins containing these motifs; the GGXWRDDXK motif was also present in a surface-exposed region of Rck, a Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium complement resistance protein. Cloning and site-specific mutagenesis demonstrated that Rck can confer weak, GGXWRDDXK-dependent autoaggregation by self-association. Hra1 and Rck appear to form heterologous associations and GGXWRDDXK is required on both molecules for Hra1-Rck association. However, a GGYWRDDLKE peptide was not sufficient to interfere with Hra1-mediated autoaggregation. In the present study, three autoaggregation motifs in an integral outer membrane protein have been identified and it was demonstrated that at least one of them works in the context of a different cell surface. PMID:27166217

  17. Selection against spurious promoter motifs correlates with translational efficiency across bacteria.

    PubMed

    Froula, Jeffrey L; Francino, M Pilar

    2007-01-01

    Because binding of RNAP to misplaced sites could compromise the efficiency of transcription, natural selection for the optimization of gene expression should regulate the distribution of DNA motifs capable of RNAP-binding across the genome. Here we analyze the distribution of the -10 promoter motifs that bind the sigma(70) subunit of RNAP in 42 bacterial genomes. We show that selection on these motifs operates across the genome, maintaining an over-representation of -10 motifs in regulatory sequences while eliminating them from the nonfunctional and, in most cases, from the protein coding regions. In some genomes, however, -10 sites are over-represented in the coding sequences; these sites could induce pauses effecting regulatory roles throughout the length of a transcriptional unit. For nonfunctional sequences, the extent of motif under-representation varies across genomes in a manner that broadly correlates with the number of tRNA genes, a good indicator of translational speed and growth rate. This suggests that minimizing the time invested in gene transcription is an important selective pressure against spurious binding. However, selection against spurious binding is detectable in the reduced genomes of host-restricted bacteria that grow at slow rates, indicating that components of efficiency other than speed may also be important. Minimizing the number of RNAP molecules per cell required for transcription, and the corresponding energetic expense, may be most relevant in slow growers. These results indicate that genome-level properties affecting the efficiency of transcription and translation can respond in an integrated manner to optimize gene expression. The detection of selection against promoter motifs in nonfunctional regions also confirms previous results indicating that no sequence may evolve free of selective constraints, at least in the relatively small and unstructured genomes of bacteria. PMID:17710145

  18. The BsaHI restriction-modification system: Cloning, sequencing and analysis of conserved motifs

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Robert K; Roberts, Richard J

    2008-01-01

    Background Restriction and modification enzymes typically recognise short DNA sequences of between two and eight bases in length. Understanding the mechanism of this recognition represents a significant challenge that we begin to address for the BsaHI restriction-modification system, which recognises the six base sequence GRCGYC. Results The DNA sequences of the genes for the BsaHI methyltransferase, bsaHIM, and restriction endonuclease, bsaHIR, have been determined (GenBank accession #EU386360), cloned and expressed in E. coli. Both the restriction endonuclease and methyltransferase enzymes share significant similarity with a group of 6 other enzymes comprising the restriction-modification systems HgiDI and HgiGI and the putative HindVP, NlaCORFDP, NpuORFC228P and SplZORFNP restriction-modification systems. A sequence alignment of these homologues shows that their amino acid sequences are largely conserved and highlights several motifs of interest. We target one such conserved motif, reading SPERRFD, at the C-terminal end of the bsaHIR gene. A mutational analysis of these amino acids indicates that the motif is crucial for enzymatic activity. Sequence alignment of the methyltransferase gene reveals a short motif within the target recognition domain that is conserved among enzymes recognising the same sequences. Thus, this motif may be used as a diagnostic tool to define the recognition sequences of the cytosine C5 methyltransferases. Conclusion We have cloned and sequenced the BsaHI restriction and modification enzymes. We have identified a region of the R. BsaHI enzyme that is crucial for its activity. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of the BsaHI methyltransferase enzyme led us to propose two new motifs that can be used in the diagnosis of the recognition sequence of the cytosine C5-methyltransferases. PMID:18479503

  19. Phosphorylation Modulates the Mechanical Stability of the Cardiac Myosin-Binding Protein C Motif

    PubMed Central

    Michalek, Arthur J.; Howarth, Jack W.; Gulick, James; Previs, Michael J.; Robbins, Jeffrey; Rosevear, Paul R.; Warshaw, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) is a thick-filament-associated protein that modulates cardiac contractility through interactions of its N-terminal immunoglobulin (Ig)-like C0-C2 domains with actin and/or myosin. These interactions are modified by the phosphorylation of at least four serines located within the motif linker between domains C1 and C2. We investigated whether motif phosphorylation alters its mechanical properties by characterizing force-extension relations using atomic force spectroscopy of expressed mouse N-terminal cMyBP-C fragments (i.e., C0-C3). Protein kinase A phosphorylation or serine replacement with aspartic acids did not affect persistence length (0.43 ± 0.04 nm), individual Ig-like domain unfolding forces (118 ± 3 pN), or Ig extension due to unfolding (30 ± 0.38 nm). However, phosphorylation did significantly decrease the C0-C3 mean contour length by 24 ± 2 nm. These results suggest that upon phosphorylation, the motif, which is freely extensible in the nonphosphorylated state, adopts a more stable and/or different structure. Circular dichroism and dynamic light scattering data for shorter expressed C1-C2 fragments with all four serines replaced by aspartic acids confirmed that the motif did adopt a more stable structure that was not apparent in the nonphosphorylated motif. These biophysical data provide both a mechanical and structural basis for cMyBP-C regulation by motif phosphorylation. PMID:23442866

  20. Mitogen-activated protein kinase 4-like carrying an MEY motif instead of a TXY motif is involved in ozone tolerance and regulation of stomatal closure in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Yuki; Yoda, Hiroshi; Osaki, Kohei; Amano, Yuta; Aono, Mitsuko; Seo, Shigemi; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki; Mitsuhara, Ichiro

    2016-05-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs/MPKs) are important factors in the regulation of signal transduction in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Previously, we characterized a MAPK from tobacco, Nicotiana tabacum MPK4 (NtMPK4). Here, we found a highly homologous gene, NtMPK4-like (NtMPK4L), in tobacco as well as other species in Solanaceae and Gramineae. Deduced amino acid sequences of their translation products carried MEY motifs instead of conserved TXY motifs of the MAPK family. We isolated the full length NtMPK4L gene and examined the physiological functions of NtMPK4L. We revealed that NtMPK4L was activated by wounding, like NtMPK4. However, a constitutively active salicylic acid-induced protein kinase kinase (SIPKK(EE)), which phosphorylates NtMPK4, did not phosphorylate NtMPK4L. Moreover, a tyrosine residue in the MEY motif was not involved in NtMPK4L activation. We also found that NtMPK4L-silenced plants showed rapid transpiration caused by remarkably open stomata. In addition, NtMPK4L-silenced plants completely lost the ability to close stomata upon ozone treatment and were highly sensitive to ozone, suggesting that this atypical MAPK plays a role in ozone tolerance through stomatal regulation. PMID:27126796

  1. Mitogen-activated protein kinase 4-like carrying an MEY motif instead of a TXY motif is involved in ozone tolerance and regulation of stomatal closure in tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Yanagawa, Yuki; Yoda, Hiroshi; Osaki, Kohei; Amano, Yuta; Aono, Mitsuko; Seo, Shigemi; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki; Mitsuhara, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs/MPKs) are important factors in the regulation of signal transduction in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Previously, we characterized a MAPK from tobacco, Nicotiana tabacum MPK4 (NtMPK4). Here, we found a highly homologous gene, NtMPK4-like (NtMPK4L), in tobacco as well as other species in Solanaceae and Gramineae. Deduced amino acid sequences of their translation products carried MEY motifs instead of conserved TXY motifs of the MAPK family. We isolated the full length NtMPK4L gene and examined the physiological functions of NtMPK4L. We revealed that NtMPK4L was activated by wounding, like NtMPK4. However, a constitutively active salicylic acid-induced protein kinase kinase (SIPKKEE), which phosphorylates NtMPK4, did not phosphorylate NtMPK4L. Moreover, a tyrosine residue in the MEY motif was not involved in NtMPK4L activation. We also found that NtMPK4L-silenced plants showed rapid transpiration caused by remarkably open stomata. In addition, NtMPK4L-silenced plants completely lost the ability to close stomata upon ozone treatment and were highly sensitive to ozone, suggesting that this atypical MAPK plays a role in ozone tolerance through stomatal regulation. PMID:27126796

  2. A MOF platform for incorporation of complementary organic motifs for CO2 binding.

    PubMed

    Deria, Pravas; Li, Song; Zhang, Hongda; Snurr, Randall Q; Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

    2015-08-11

    CO2 capture is essential for reducing the carbon footprint of coal-fired power plants. Here we show, both experimentally and computationally, a new design strategy for capturing CO2 in nanoporous adsorbents. The approach involves 'complementary organic motifs' (COMs), which have a precise alignment of charge densities that is complementary to the CO2 quadrupole. Two promising COMs were post-synthetically incorporated into a robust metal-organic framework (MOF) material using solvent-assisted ligand incorporation (SALI). We demonstrate that these COM-functionalized MOFs exhibit high capacity and selectivity for CO2 relative to other reported motifs. PMID:26145451

  3. The Phe-Phe Motif for Peptide Self-Assembly in Nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Marchesan, Silvia; Vargiu, Attilio V; Styan, Katie E

    2015-01-01

    Since its discovery, the Phe-Phe motif has gained in popularity as a minimalist building block to drive the self-assembly of short peptides and their analogues into nanostructures and hydrogels. Molecules based on the Phe-Phe motif have found a range of applications in nanomedicine, from drug delivery and biomaterials to new therapeutic paradigms. Here we discuss the various production methods for this class of compounds, and the characterization, nanomorphologies, and application of their self-assembled nanostructures. We include the most recent findings on their remarkable properties, which hold substantial promise for the creation of the next generation nanomedicines. PMID:26540034

  4. Three step synthesis of single diastereoisomers of the vicinal trifluoro motif

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Vincent A; Slawin, Alexandra M Z

    2009-01-01

    Summary A three step route to single diastereoisomers of the vicinal trifluoromethyl motif is described. The route starts from either syn- or anti-α,β-epoxy alcohols and takes a direct approach in that each of the three steps introduces a fluorine atom in a regio- and stereo-specific manner. Starting from either the syn- or the anti-α,β-epoxy alcohol, stereospecific reactions generate two separate diastereoisomeric series of this motif. The route is a significant improvement on an earlier six step strategy. PMID:20300509

  5. Computational study enlightens the structural role of the alcohol acyltransferase DFGWG motif.

    PubMed

    Morales-Quintana, Luis; Moya-León, María Alejandra; Herrera, Raúl

    2015-08-01

    Alcohol acyltransferases (AAT) catalyze the esterification reaction of alcohols and acyl-CoA into esters in fruits and flowers. Despite the high divergence between AAT enzymes, two important and conserved motifs are shared: the catalytic HxxxD motif, and the DFGWG motif. The latter is proposed to play a structural role; however, its function remains unclear. The DFGWG motif is located in loop 21 and stabilized by a hydrogen bond between residues Y52 and D381. Also, this motif is distant from the HxxxD motif, and most probably without a direct role in the substrate interaction. To evaluate the role of the DFGWG motif, in silico analysis was performed in the VpAAT1 protein. Three mutants (Y52F, D381A and D381E) were evaluated. Major changes (size and shape) in the solvent channels were found, although no differences were revealed in the entire 3D structure. Molecular dynamics simulations and docking studies described unfavorable energies for interaction of the mutant proteins with different substrates, as well as unfavored ligand orientations in the solvent channel. Additionally, we examined the contribution of different energetic parameters to the total free energy of protein-ligand complexes by the MM-GBSA method. The complexes differed mainly in their van der Waals contributions and have unfavorable electrostatic interactions. VpAAT1, Y52F and D381A mutants showed a dramatic reduction in the binding capacity to several substrates, which is related to differences in electrostatic potential on the protein surfaces, suggesting that D381 from the DFGWG motif and residue Y52 play a crucial role in maintenance of the adequate solvent channel structure required for catalysis. Graphical abstract Molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and MM-GBSA free energy calculations were employed to obtain quantitative estimates for the binding free energies of wild type Vasconcellea pubescens alcohol acyltransferase (VpAAT1-WT) and the protein mutants. Left VpAAT1

  6. Corannulene-Helicene Hybrids: Chiral π-Systems Comprising Both Bowl and Helical Motifs.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Takao; Preda, Dorin V; Segawa, Yasutomo; Itami, Kenichiro; Scott, Lawrence T

    2016-08-19

    Two distinct structural elements that render π-systems nonplanar, i.e., geodesic curvature and helical motifs, have been combined into new polyarenes that contain both features. The resultant corannulene-[n]helicenes (n = 5, 6) show unique molecular dynamics in their enantiomerization processes, including inversion motions of both the bowl and the helix. Optical resolution of a corannulene-based skeletally chiral molecule was also achieved for the first time, and the influence of the bowl-motif annulation on the chiroptical properties was investigated. PMID:27490184

  7. Members of the Meloidogyne avirulence protein family contain multiple plant ligand-like motifs.

    PubMed

    Rutter, William B; Hewezi, Tarek; Maier, Tom R; Mitchum, Melissa G; Davis, Eric L; Hussey, Richard S; Baum, Thomas J

    2014-08-01

    Sedentary plant-parasitic nematodes engage in complex interactions with their host plants by secreting effector proteins. Some effectors of both root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) and cyst nematodes (Heterodera and Globodera spp.) mimic plant ligand proteins. Most prominently, cyst nematodes secrete effectors that mimic plant CLAVATA3/ESR-related (CLE) ligand proteins. However, only cyst nematodes have been shown to secrete such effectors and to utilize CLE ligand mimicry in their interactions with host plants. Here, we document the presence of ligand-like motifs in bona fide root-knot nematode effectors that are most similar to CLE peptides from plants and cyst nematodes. We have identified multiple tandem CLE-like motifs conserved within the previously identified Meloidogyne avirulence protein (MAP) family that are secreted from root-knot nematodes and have been shown to function in planta. By searching all 12 MAP family members from multiple Meloidogyne spp., we identified 43 repetitive CLE-like motifs composing 14 unique variants. At least one CLE-like motif was conserved in each MAP family member. Furthermore, we documented the presence of other conserved sequences that resemble the variable domains described in Heterodera and Globodera CLE effectors. These findings document that root-knot nematodes appear to use CLE ligand mimicry and point toward a common host node targeted by two evolutionarily diverse groups of nematodes. As a consequence, it is likely that CLE signaling pathways are important in other phytonematode pathosystems as well. PMID:25014776

  8. Nuclear localization of the dehydrin OpsDHN1 is determined by histidine-rich motif

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Sánchez, Itzell E.; Maruri-López, Israel; Ferrando, Alejandro; Carbonell, Juan; Graether, Steffen P.; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan F.

    2015-01-01

    The cactus OpsDHN1 dehydrin belongs to a large family of disordered and highly hydrophilic proteins known as Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins, which accumulate during the late stages of embryogenesis and in response to abiotic stresses. Herein, we present the in vivo OpsDHN1 subcellular localization by N-terminal GFP translational fusion; our results revealed a cytoplasmic and nuclear localization of the GFP::OpsDHN1 protein in Nicotiana benthamiana epidermal cells. In addition, dimer assembly of OpsDHN1 in planta using a Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) approach was demonstrated. In order to understand the in vivo role of the histidine-rich motif, the OpsDHN1-ΔHis version was produced and assayed for its subcellular localization and dimer capability by GFP fusion and BiFC assays, respectively. We found that deletion of the OpsDHN1 histidine-rich motif restricted its localization to cytoplasm, but did not affect dimer formation. In addition, the deletion of the S-segment in the OpsDHN1 protein affected its nuclear localization. Our data suggest that the deletion of histidine-rich motif and S-segment show similar effects, preventing OpsDHN1 from getting into the nucleus. Based on these results, the histidine-rich motif is proposed as a targeting element for OpsDHN1 nuclear localization. PMID:26442018

  9. Nuclear localization of the dehydrin OpsDHN1 is determined by histidine-rich motif.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Sánchez, Itzell E; Maruri-López, Israel; Ferrando, Alejandro; Carbonell, Juan; Graether, Steffen P; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan F

    2015-01-01

    The cactus OpsDHN1 dehydrin belongs to a large family of disordered and highly hydrophilic proteins known as Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins, which accumulate during the late stages of embryogenesis and in response to abiotic stresses. Herein, we present the in vivo OpsDHN1 subcellular localization by N-terminal GFP translational fusion; our results revealed a cytoplasmic and nuclear localization of the GFP::OpsDHN1 protein in Nicotiana benthamiana epidermal cells. In addition, dimer assembly of OpsDHN1 in planta using a Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) approach was demonstrated. In order to understand the in vivo role of the histidine-rich motif, the OpsDHN1-ΔHis version was produced and assayed for its subcellular localization and dimer capability by GFP fusion and BiFC assays, respectively. We found that deletion of the OpsDHN1 histidine-rich motif restricted its localization to cytoplasm, but did not affect dimer formation. In addition, the deletion of the S-segment in the OpsDHN1 protein affected its nuclear localization. Our data suggest that the deletion of histidine-rich motif and S-segment show similar effects, preventing OpsDHN1 from getting into the nucleus. Based on these results, the histidine-rich motif is proposed as a targeting element for OpsDHN1 nuclear localization. PMID:26442018

  10. Use of a Probabilistic Motif Search to Identify Histidine Phosphotransfer Domain-Containing Proteins.

    PubMed

    Surujon, Defne; Ratner, David I

    2016-01-01

    The wealth of newly obtained proteomic information affords researchers the possibility of searching for proteins of a given structure or function. Here we describe a general method for the detection of a protein domain of interest in any species for which a complete proteome exists. In particular, we apply this approach to identify histidine phosphotransfer (HPt) domain-containing proteins across a range of eukaryotic species. From the sequences of known HPt domains, we created an amino acid occurrence matrix which we then used to define a conserved, probabilistic motif. Examination of various organisms either known to contain (plant and fungal species) or believed to lack (mammals) HPt domains established criteria by which new HPt candidates were identified and ranked. Search results using a probabilistic motif matrix compare favorably with data to be found in several commonly used protein structure/function databases: our method identified all known HPt proteins in the Arabidopsis thaliana proteome, confirmed the absence of such motifs in mice and humans, and suggests new candidate HPts in several organisms. Moreover, probabilistic motif searching can be applied more generally, in a manner both readily customized and computationally compact, to other protein domains; this utility is demonstrated by our identification of histones in a range of eukaryotic organisms. PMID:26751210

  11. Platelet immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) signaling and vascular integrity.

    PubMed

    Boulaftali, Yacine; Hess, Paul R; Kahn, Mark L; Bergmeier, Wolfgang

    2014-03-28

    Platelets are well-known for their critical role in hemostasis, that is, the prevention of blood loss at sites of mechanical vessel injury. Inappropriate platelet activation and adhesion, however, can lead to thrombotic complications, such as myocardial infarction and stroke. To fulfill its role in hemostasis, the platelet is equipped with various G protein-coupled receptors that mediate the response to soluble agonists such as thrombin, ADP, and thromboxane A2. In addition to G protein-coupled receptors, platelets express 3 glycoproteins that belong to the family of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif receptors: Fc receptor γ chain, which is noncovalently associated with the glycoprotein VI collagen receptor, C-type lectin 2, the receptor for podoplanin, and Fc receptor γII A, a low-affinity receptor for immune complexes. Although both genetic and chemical approaches have documented a critical role for platelet G protein-coupled receptors in hemostasis, the contribution of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif receptors to this process is less defined. Studies performed during the past decade, however, have identified new roles for platelet immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling in vascular integrity in utero and at sites of inflammation. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent findings on how platelet immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling controls vascular integrity, both in the presence and absence of mechanical injury. PMID:24677237

  12. Temporal motifs reveal collaboration patterns in online task-oriented networks.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Qi; Fang, Huiting; Fu, Chenbo; Filkov, Vladimir

    2015-05-01

    Real networks feature layers of interactions and complexity. In them, different types of nodes can interact with each other via a variety of events. Examples of this complexity are task-oriented social networks (TOSNs), where teams of people share tasks towards creating a quality artifact, such as academic research papers or software development in commercial or open source environments. Accomplishing those tasks involves both work, e.g., writing the papers or code, and communication, to discuss and coordinate. Taking into account the different types of activities and how they alternate over time can result in much more precise understanding of the TOSNs behaviors and outcomes. That calls for modeling techniques that can accommodate both node and link heterogeneity as well as temporal change. In this paper, we report on methodology for finding temporal motifs in TOSNs, limited to a system of two people and an artifact. We apply the methods to publicly available data of TOSNs from 31 Open Source Software projects. We find that these temporal motifs are enriched in the observed data. When applied to software development outcome, temporal motifs reveal a distinct dependency between collaboration and communication in the code writing process. Moreover, we show that models based on temporal motifs can be used to more precisely relate both individual developer centrality and team cohesion to programmer productivity than models based on aggregated TOSNs. PMID:26066218

  13. Using machine learning to predict gene expression and discover sequence motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuejing

    Recently, large amounts of experimental data for complex biological systems have become available. We use tools and algorithms from machine learning to build data-driven predictive models. We first present a novel algorithm to discover gene sequence motifs associated with temporal expression patterns of genes. Our algorithm, which is based on partial least squares (PLS) regression, is able to directly model the flow of information, from gene sequence to gene expression, to learn cis regulatory motifs and characterize associated gene expression patterns. Our algorithm outperforms traditional computational methods e.g. clustering in motif discovery. We then present a study of extending a machine learning model for transcriptional regulation predictive of genetic regulatory response to Caenorhabditis elegans. We show meaningful results both in terms of prediction accuracy on the test experiments and biological information extracted from the regulatory program. The model discovers DNA binding sites ab initio. We also present a case study where we detect a signal of lineage-specific regulation. Finally we present a comparative study on learning predictive models for motif discovery, based on different boosting algorithms: Adaptive Boosting (AdaBoost), Linear Programming Boosting (LPBoost) and Totally Corrective Boosting (TotalBoost). We evaluate and compare the performance of the three boosting algorithms via both statistical and biological validation, for hypoxia response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  14. Aryl-triazole foldamers incorporating a pyridinium motif for halide anion binding in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jie; Zhao, Wei; Li, Xichen; Wang, Ying; Jiang, Hua

    2016-03-15

    Aryl-triazole oligomers incorporating a pyridinium motif have been synthesized from their pyridine precursors. Anion binding studies show that methylation of the pyridine units can significantly enhance the halide anion affinities of the folded oligomers so that the foldamers are capable of binding halide anions in aqueous solutions. PMID:26933696

  15. ATtRACT-a database of RNA-binding proteins and associated motifs.

    PubMed

    Giudice, Girolamo; Sánchez-Cabo, Fátima; Torroja, Carlos; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play a crucial role in key cellular processes, including RNA transport, splicing, polyadenylation and stability. Understanding the interaction between RBPs and RNA is key to improve our knowledge of RNA processing, localization and regulation in a global manner. Despite advances in recent years, a unified non-redundant resource that includes information on experimentally validated motifs, RBPs and integrated tools to exploit this information is lacking. Here, we developed a database named ATtRACT (available athttp://attract.cnic.es) that compiles information on 370 RBPs and 1583 RBP consensus binding motifs, 192 of which are not present in any other database. To populate ATtRACT we (i) extracted and hand-curated experimentally validated data from CISBP-RNA, SpliceAid-F, RBPDB databases, (ii) integrated and updated the unavailable ASD database and (iii) extracted information from Protein-RNA complexes present in Protein Data Bank database through computational analyses. ATtRACT provides also efficient algorithms to search a specific motif and scan one or more RNA sequences at a time. It also allows discoveringde novomotifs enriched in a set of related sequences and compare them with the motifs included in the database.Database URL:http:// attract. cnic. es. PMID:27055826

  16. Analysis of tetra- and hepta-nucleotides motifs promoting -1 ribosomal frameshifting in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Virag; Prère, Marie-Françoise; Canal, Isabelle; Firth, Andrew E.; Atkins, John F.; Baranov, Pavel V.; Fayet, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Programmed ribosomal -1 frameshifting is a non-standard decoding process occurring when ribosomes encounter a signal embedded in the mRNA of certain eukaryotic and prokaryotic genes. This signal has a mandatory component, the frameshift motif: it is either a Z_ZZN tetramer or a X_XXZ_ZZN heptamer (where ZZZ and XXX are three identical nucleotides) allowing cognate or near-cognate repairing to the -1 frame of the A site or A and P sites tRNAs. Depending on the signal, the frameshifting frequency can vary over a wide range, from less than 1% to more than 50%. The present study combines experimental and bioinformatics approaches to carry out (i) a systematic analysis of the frameshift propensity of all possible motifs (16 Z_ZZN tetramers and 64 X_XXZ_ZZN heptamers) in Escherichia coli and (ii) the identification of genes potentially using this mode of expression amongst 36 Enterobacteriaceae genomes. While motif efficiency varies widely, a major distinctive rule of bacterial -1 frameshifting is that the most efficient motifs are those allowing cognate re-pairing of the A site tRNA from ZZN to ZZZ. The outcome of the genomic search is a set of 69 gene clusters, 59 of which constitute new candidates for functional utilization of -1 frameshifting. PMID:24875478

  17. Analysis of tetra- and hepta-nucleotides motifs promoting -1 ribosomal frameshifting in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Virag; Prère, Marie-Françoise; Canal, Isabelle; Firth, Andrew E; Atkins, John F; Baranov, Pavel V; Fayet, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Programmed ribosomal -1 frameshifting is a non-standard decoding process occurring when ribosomes encounter a signal embedded in the mRNA of certain eukaryotic and prokaryotic genes. This signal has a mandatory component, the frameshift motif: it is either a Z_ZZN tetramer or a X_XXZ_ZZN heptamer (where ZZZ and XXX are three identical nucleotides) allowing cognate or near-cognate repairing to the -1 frame of the A site or A and P sites tRNAs. Depending on the signal, the frameshifting frequency can vary over a wide range, from less than 1% to more than 50%. The present study combines experimental and bioinformatics approaches to carry out (i) a systematic analysis of the frameshift propensity of all possible motifs (16 Z_ZZN tetramers and 64 X_XXZ_ZZN heptamers) in Escherichia coli and (ii) the identification of genes potentially using this mode of expression amongst 36 Enterobacteriaceae genomes. While motif efficiency varies widely, a major distinctive rule of bacterial -1 frameshifting is that the most efficient motifs are those allowing cognate re-pairing of the A site tRNA from ZZN to ZZZ. The outcome of the genomic search is a set of 69 gene clusters, 59 of which constitute new candidates for functional utilization of -1 frameshifting. PMID:24875478

  18. Bayesian Markov models consistently outperform PWMs at predicting motifs in nucleotide sequences.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Matthias; Söding, Johannes

    2016-07-27

    Position weight matrices (PWMs) are the standard model for DNA and RNA regulatory motifs. In PWMs nucleotide probabilities are independent of nucleotides at other positions. Models that account for dependencies need many parameters and are prone to overfitting. We have developed a Bayesian approach for motif discovery using Markov models in which conditional probabilities of order k - 1 act as priors for those of order k This Bayesian Markov model (BaMM) training automatically adapts model complexity to the amount of available data. We also derive an EM algorithm for de-novo discovery of enriched motifs. For transcription factor binding, BaMMs achieve significantly (P    =  1/16) higher cross-validated partial AUC than PWMs in 97% of 446 ChIP-seq ENCODE datasets and improve performance by 36% on average. BaMMs also learn complex multipartite motifs, improving predictions of transcription start sites, polyadenylation sites, bacterial pause sites, and RNA binding sites by 26-101%. BaMMs never performed worse than PWMs. These robust improvements argue in favour of generally replacing PWMs by BaMMs. PMID:27288444

  19. [Conserved motifs in the primary and secondary ITS1 structures in bryophytes].

    PubMed

    Milyutina, I A; Ignatov, M S

    2015-01-01

    A study of the ITS1 nucleotide sequences of 1000 moss species of 62 families, 11 liverwort species from five orders, and one hornwort Anthoceros agrestis identified five highly conserved motifs (CM1-CM5), which are presumably involved in pre-rRNA processing. Although the ITS1 sequences substantially differ in length and the extent of divergence, the conserved motifs are found in all of them. ITS1 secondary structures were constructed for 76 mosses, and main regularities at conserved motif positioning were observed. The positions of processing sites in the ITS1 secondary structure of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were found to be similar to the positions of the conserved motifs in the ITS1 secondary structures of mosses and liverworts. In addition, a potential hairpin formation in the putative secondary structure of a pre-rRNA fragment was considered for the region between ITS1 CM4-CM5 and a highly conserved region between hairpins 49 and 50 (H49 and H50) of the 18S rRNA. PMID:26107892

  20. Inferring the evolutionary history of primate microRNA binding sites: overcoming motif counting biases.

    PubMed

    Simkin, Alfred T; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Gao, Fen-Biao; Jensen, Jeffrey D

    2014-07-01

    The first microRNAs (miRNAs) were identified as essential, conserved regulators of gene expression, targeting the same genes across nearly all bilaterians. However, there are also prominent examples of conserved miRNAs whose functions appear to have shifted dramatically, sometimes over very brief periods of evolutionary time. To determine whether the functions of conserved miRNAs are stable or dynamic over evolutionary time scales, we have here defined the neutral turnover rates of short sequence motifs in predicted primate 3'-UTRs. We find that commonly used approaches to quantify motif turnover rates, which use a presence/absence scoring in extant lineages to infer ancestral states, are inherently biased to infer the accumulation of new motifs, leading to the false inference of continually increasing regulatory complexity over time. Using a maximum likelihood approach to reconstruct individual ancestral nucleotides, we observe that binding sites of conserved miRNAs in fact have roughly equal numbers of gain and loss events relative to ancestral states and turnover extremely slowly relative to nearly identical permutations of the same motif. Contrary to case studies showing examples of functional turnover, our systematic study of miRNA binding sites suggests that in primates, the regulatory roles of conserved miRNAs are strongly conserved. Our revised methodology may be used to quantify the mechanism by which regulatory networks evolve. PMID:24723422

  1. Crystal structure of SEL1L: Insight into the roles of SLR motifs in ERAD pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hanbin; Sim, Hyo Jung; Song, Eun Kyung; Lee, Hakbong; Ha, Sung Chul; Jun, Youngsoo; Park, Tae Joo; Lee, Changwook

    2016-01-01

    Terminally misfolded proteins are selectively recognized and cleared by the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. SEL1L, a component of the ERAD machinery, plays an important role in selecting and transporting ERAD substrates for degradation. We have determined the crystal structure of the mouse SEL1L central domain comprising five Sel1-Like Repeats (SLR motifs 5 to 9; hereafter called SEL1Lcent). Strikingly, SEL1Lcent forms a homodimer with two-fold symmetry in a head-to-tail manner. Particularly, the SLR motif 9 plays an important role in dimer formation by adopting a domain-swapped structure and providing an extensive dimeric interface. We identified that the full-length SEL1L forms a self-oligomer through the SEL1Lcent domain in mammalian cells. Furthermore, we discovered that the SLR-C, comprising SLR motifs 10 and 11, of SEL1L directly interacts with the N-terminus luminal loops of HRD1. Therefore, we propose that certain SLR motifs of SEL1L play a unique role in membrane bound ERAD machinery. PMID:27064360

  2. The identification of short linear motif-mediated interfaces within the human interactome

    PubMed Central

    Weatheritt, R. J.; Luck, K.; Petsalaki, E.; Davey, N. E.; Gibson, T. J.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Eukaryotic proteins are highly modular, containing multiple interaction interfaces that mediate binding to a network of regulators and effectors. Recent advances in high-throughput proteomics have rapidly expanded the number of known protein–protein interactions (PPIs); however, the molecular basis for the majority of these interactions remains to be elucidated. There has been a growing appreciation of the importance of a subset of these PPIs, namely those mediated by short linear motifs (SLiMs), particularly the canonical and ubiquitous SH2, SH3 and PDZ domain-binding motifs. However, these motif classes represent only a small fraction of known SLiMs and outside these examples little effort has been made, either bioinformatically or experimentally, to discover the full complement of motif instances. Results: In this article, interaction data are analysed to identify and characterize an important subset of PPIs, those involving SLiMs binding to globular domains. To do this, we introduce iELM, a method to identify interactions mediated by SLiMs and add molecular details of the interaction interfaces to both interacting proteins. The method identifies SLiM-mediated interfaces from PPI data by searching for known SLiM–domain pairs. This approach was applied to the human interactome to identify a set of high-confidence putative SLiM-mediated PPIs. Availability: iELM is freely available at http://elmint.embl.de Contact: toby.gibson@embl.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22328783

  3. Structural basis for the indispensable role of a unique zinc finger motif in LNX2 ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Digant; Sivaraman, J.

    2015-01-01

    LNX (Ligand of Numb Protein-X) proteins, LNX1 and LNX2, are RING- and PDZ-based E3-ubiquitin ligases known to interact with Numb. Silencing of LNX2 has been reported to down-regulate WNT and NOTCH, two key signaling pathways in tumorigenesis. Here we report the identification of the domain boundary of LNX2 to confer its ubiquitination activity, its crystal structure along with functional studies. We show that the RING domain in LNX2 is flanked by two Zinc-binding motifs (Zn-RING-Zn), in which the N-terminal Zinc-binding motif adopts novel conformation. Although this motif follows the typical Cys2His2-type zinc finger configuration, it is devoid of any secondary structure and forms an open circle conformation, which has not been reported yet. This unique N-terminal Zn-finger motif is indispensable for the activity and stability of LNX2, as verified using mutational studies. The Zn-RING-Zn domain of LNX2 is a dimer and assumes a rigid elongated structure that undergoes autoubiquitination and undergoes N-terminal polyubiquitination. The ubiquitin chains consist of all seven possible isopeptide linkages. These results were validated using full-length LNX2. Moreover we have demonstrated the ubiquitination of cell fate determinant protein, Numb by LNX2. Our study provides a structural basis for the functional machinery of LNX2 and thus provides the opportunity to investigate suitable drug targets against LNX2. PMID:26451611

  4. Numb directs the subcellular localization of EAAT3 through binding the YxNxxF motif.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin-Feng; Wei, Jian; Li, Pei-Shan; Miao, Hong-Hua; Ma, Yong-Chao; Qu, Yu-Xiu; Xu, Jie; Qin, Jie; Li, Bo-Liang; Song, Bao-Liang; Xu, Zheng-Ping; Luo, Jie

    2016-08-15

    Excitatory amino acid transporter type 3 (EAAT3, also known as SLC1A1) is a high-affinity, Na(+)-dependent glutamate carrier that localizes primarily within the cell and at the apical plasma membrane. Although previous studies have reported proteins and sequence regions involved in EAAT3 trafficking, the detailed molecular mechanism by which EAAT3 is distributed to the correct location still remains elusive. Here, we identify that the YVNGGF sequence in the C-terminus of EAAT3 is responsible for its intracellular localization and apical sorting in rat hepatoma cells CRL1601 and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, respectively. We further demonstrate that Numb, a clathrin adaptor protein, directly binds the YVNGGF motif and regulates the localization of EAAT3. Mutation of Y503, N505 and F508 within the YVNGGF motif to alanine residues or silencing Numb by use of small interfering RNA (siRNA) results in the aberrant localization of EAAT3. Moreover, both Numb and the YVNGGF motif mediate EAAT3 endocytosis in CRL1601 cells. In summary, our study suggests that Numb is a pivotal adaptor protein that mediates the subcellular localization of EAAT3 through binding the YxNxxF (where x stands for any amino acid) motif. PMID:27358480

  5. Discovering active motifs in sets of related protein sequences and using them for classification.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J T; Marr, T G; Shasha, D; Shapiro, B A; Chirn, G W

    1994-01-01

    We describe a method for discovering active motifs in a set of related protein sequences. The method is an automatic two step process: (1) find candidate motifs in a small sample of the sequences; (2) test whether these motifs are approximately present in all the sequences. To reduce the running time, we develop two optimization heuristics based on statistical estimation and pattern matching techniques. Experimental results obtained by running these algorithms on generated data and functionally related proteins demonstrate the good performance of the presented method compared with visual method of O'Farrell and Leopold. By combining the discovered motifs with an existing fingerprint technique, we develop a protein classifier. When we apply the classifier to the 698 groups of related proteins in the PROSITE catalog, it gives information that is complementary to the BLOCKS protein classifier of Henikoff and Henikoff. Thus, using our classifier in conjunction with theirs, one can obtain high confidence classifications (if BLOCKS and our classifier agree) or suggest a new hypothesis (if the two disagree). PMID:8052532

  6. A cell-surface-anchored ratiometric i-motif sensor for extracellular pH detection.

    PubMed

    Ying, Le; Xie, Nuli; Yang, Yanjing; Yang, Xiaohai; Zhou, Qifeng; Yin, Bincheng; Huang, Jin; Wang, Kemin

    2016-06-14

    A FRET-based sensor is anchored on the cell surface through streptavidin-biotin interactions. Due to the excellent properties of the pH-sensitive i-motif structure, the sensor can detect extracellular pH with high sensitivity and excellent reversibility. PMID:27241716

  7. Cellular microRNAs up-regulate transcription via interaction with promoter TATA-box motifs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yijun; Fan, Miaomiao; Zhang, Xue; Huang, Feng; Wu, Kang; Zhang, Junsong; Liu, Jun; Huang, Zhuoqiong; Luo, Haihua; Tao, Liang; Zhang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    The TATA box represents one of the most prevalent core promoters where the pre-initiation complexes (PICs) for gene transcription are assembled. This assembly is crucial for transcription initiation and well regulated. Here we show that some cellular microRNAs (miRNAs) are associated with RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and TATA box-binding protein (TBP) in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Among them, let-7i sequence specifically binds to the TATA-box motif of interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene and elevates IL-2 mRNA and protein production in CD4+ T-lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo. Through direct interaction with the TATA-box motif, let-7i facilitates the PIC assembly and transcription initiation of IL-2 promoter. Several other cellular miRNAs, such as mir-138, mir-92a or mir-181d, also enhance the promoter activities via binding to the TATA-box motifs of insulin, calcitonin or c-myc, respectively. In agreement with the finding that an HIV-1–encoded miRNA could enhance viral replication through targeting the viral promoter TATA-box motif, our data demonstrate that the interaction with core transcription machinery is a novel mechanism for miRNAs to regulate gene expression. PMID:25336585

  8. Position Weight Matrix, Gibbs Sampler, and the Associated Significance Tests in Motif Characterization and Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xuhua

    2012-01-01

    Position weight matrix (PWM) is not only one of the most widely used bioinformatic methods, but also a key component in more advanced computational algorithms (e.g., Gibbs sampler) for characterizing and discovering motifs in nucleotide or amino acid sequences. However, few generally applicable statistical tests are available for evaluating the significance of site patterns, PWM, and PWM scores (PWMS) of putative motifs. Statistical significance tests of the PWM output, that is, site-specific frequencies, PWM itself, and PWMS, are in disparate sources and have never been collected in a single paper, with the consequence that many implementations of PWM do not include any significance test. Here I review PWM-based methods used in motif characterization and prediction (including a detailed illustration of the Gibbs sampler for de novo motif discovery), present statistical and probabilistic rationales behind statistical significance tests relevant to PWM, and illustrate their application with real data. The multiple comparison problem associated with the test of site-specific frequencies is best handled by false discovery rate methods. The test of PWM, due to the use of pseudocounts, is best done by resampling methods. The test of individual PWMS for each sequence segment should be based on the extreme value distribution. PMID:24278755

  9. Application of Motif-Based Tools on Evolutionary Analysis of Multipartite Single-Stranded DNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsiang-Iu; Chang, Chih-Hung; Lin, Po-Heng; Fu, Hui-Chuan; Tang, ChuanYi; Yeh, Hsin-Hung

    2013-01-01

    Multipartite viruses contain more than one distinctive genome component, and the origin of multipartite viruses has been suggested to evolve from a non-segmented wild-type virus. To explore whether recombination also plays a role in the evolution of the genomes of multipartite viruses, we developed a systematic approach that employs motif-finding tools to detect conserved motifs from divergent genomic regions and applies statistical approaches to select high-confidence motifs. The information that this approach provides helps us understand the evolution of viruses. In this study, we compared our motif-based strategy with current alignment-based recombination-detecting methods and applied our methods to the analysis of multipartite single-stranded plant DNA viruses, including bipartite begomoviruses, Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) (consisting of 6 genome components) and Faba bean necrotic yellows virus (FBNYV) (consisting of 8 genome components). Our analysis revealed that recombination occurred between genome components in some begomoviruses, BBTV and FBNYV. Our data also show that several unusual recombination events have contributed to the evolution of BBTV genome components. We believe that similar approaches can be applied to resolve the evolutionary history of other viruses. PMID:23936517

  10. Temporal motifs reveal collaboration patterns in online task-oriented networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Qi; Fang, Huiting; Fu, Chenbo; Filkov, Vladimir

    2015-05-01

    Real networks feature layers of interactions and complexity. In them, different types of nodes can interact with each other via a variety of events. Examples of this complexity are task-oriented social networks (TOSNs), where teams of people share tasks towards creating a quality artifact, such as academic research papers or software development in commercial or open source environments. Accomplishing those tasks involves both work, e.g., writing the papers or code, and communication, to discuss and coordinate. Taking into account the different types of activities and how they alternate over time can result in much more precise understanding of the TOSNs behaviors and outcomes. That calls for modeling techniques that can accommodate both node and link heterogeneity as well as temporal change. In this paper, we report on methodology for finding temporal motifs in TOSNs, limited to a system of two people and an artifact. We apply the methods to publicly available data of TOSNs from 31 Open Source Software projects. We find that these temporal motifs are enriched in the observed data. When applied to software development outcome, temporal motifs reveal a distinct dependency between collaboration and communication in the code writing process. Moreover, we show that models based on temporal motifs can be used to more precisely relate both individual developer centrality and team cohesion to programmer productivity than models based on aggregated TOSNs.

  11. Identification of sequence–structure RNA binding motifs for SELEX-derived aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Hoinka, Jan; Zotenko, Elena; Friedman, Adam; Sauna, Zuben E.; Przytycka, Teresa M.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential Enrichment (SELEX) represents a state-of-the-art technology to isolate single-stranded (ribo)nucleic acid fragments, named aptamers, which bind to a molecule (or molecules) of interest via specific structural regions induced by their sequence-dependent fold. This powerful method has applications in designing protein inhibitors, molecular detection systems, therapeutic drugs and antibody replacement among others. However, full understanding and consequently optimal utilization of the process has lagged behind its wide application due to the lack of dedicated computational approaches. At the same time, the combination of SELEX with novel sequencing technologies is beginning to provide the data that will allow the examination of a variety of properties of the selection process. Results: To close this gap we developed, Aptamotif, a computational method for the identification of sequence–structure motifs in SELEX-derived aptamers. To increase the chances of identifying functional motifs, Aptamotif uses an ensemble-based approach. We validated the method using two published aptamer datasets containing experimentally determined motifs of increasing complexity. We were able to recreate the author's findings to a high degree, thus proving the capability of our approach to identify binding motifs in SELEX data. Additionally, using our new experimental dataset, we illustrate the application of Aptamotif to elucidate several properties of the selection process. Contact: przytyck@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov, Zuben.Sauna@fda.hhs.gov PMID:22689764

  12. From ligands to binding motifs and beyond; the enhanced versatility of nanocrystal surfaces.

    PubMed

    De Roo, J; De Keukeleere, K; Hens, Z; Van Driessche, I

    2016-09-14

    Surface chemistry bridges the gap between nanocrystal synthesis and their applications. In this respect, the discovery of complex ligand binding motifs on semiconductor quantum dots and metal oxide nanocrystals opens a gateway to new areas of research. The implications are far-reaching, from catalytic model systems to the performance of solar cells. PMID:27461488

  13. Use of a Probabilistic Motif Search to Identify Histidine Phosphotransfer Domain-Containing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Surujon, Defne; Ratner, David I.

    2016-01-01

    The wealth of newly obtained proteomic information affords researchers the possibility of searching for proteins of a given structure or function. Here we describe a general method for the detection of a protein domain of interest in any species for which a complete proteome exists. In particular, we apply this approach to identify histidine phosphotransfer (HPt) domain-containing proteins across a range of eukaryotic species. From the sequences of known HPt domains, we created an amino acid occurrence matrix which we then used to define a conserved, probabilistic motif. Examination of various organisms either known to contain (plant and fungal species) or believed to lack (mammals) HPt domains established criteria by which new HPt candidates were identified and ranked. Search results using a probabilistic motif matrix compare favorably with data to be found in several commonly used protein structure/function databases: our method identified all known HPt proteins in the Arabidopsis thaliana proteome, confirmed the absence of such motifs in mice and humans, and suggests new candidate HPts in several organisms. Moreover, probabilistic motif searching can be applied more generally, in a manner both readily customized and computationally compact, to other protein domains; this utility is demonstrated by our identification of histones in a range of eukaryotic organisms. PMID:26751210

  14. Rate Motifs Tune Auxin/Indole-3-Acetic Acid Degradation Dynamics1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Britney L.; Mao, Haibin; Guseman, Jessica M.; Hinds, Thomas R.; Hellmuth, Antje; Kovenock, Marlies; Noorassa, Anisa; Lanctot, Amy; Villalobos, Luz Irina A. Calderón; Zheng, Ning; Nemhauser, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation is a common feature in diverse plant cell signaling pathways; however, the factors that control the dynamics of regulated protein turnover are largely unknown. One of the best-characterized families of E3 ubiquitin ligases facilitates ubiquitination of auxin (aux)/indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) repressor proteins in the presence of auxin. Rates of auxin-induced degradation vary widely within the Aux/IAA family, and sequences outside of the characterized degron (the minimum region required for auxin-induced degradation) can accelerate or decelerate degradation. We have used synthetic auxin degradation assays in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and in plants to characterize motifs flanking the degron that contribute to tuning the dynamics of Aux/IAA degradation. The presence of these rate motifs is conserved in phylogenetically distant members of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Aux/IAA family, as well as in their putative Brassica rapa orthologs. We found that rate motifs can act by enhancing interaction between repressors and the E3, but that this is not the only mechanism of action. Phenotypes of transgenic plants expressing a deletion in a rate motif in IAA28 resembled plants expressing degron mutations, underscoring the functional relevance of Aux/IAA degradation dynamics in regulating auxin responses. PMID:26149575

  15. Coupling caspase cleavage and proteasomal degradation of proteins carrying PEST motif.

    PubMed

    Belizario, José E; Alves, Juliano; Garay-Malpartida, Miguel; Occhiucci, João Marcelo

    2008-06-01

    The degradation is critical to activation and deactivation of regulatory proteins involved in signaling pathways to cell growth, differentiation, stress responses and physiological cell death. Proteins carry domains and sequence motifs that function as prerequisite for their proteolysis by either individual proteases or the 26S multicomplex proteasomes. Two models for entry of substrates into the proteasomes have been considered. In one model, it is proposed that the ubiquitin chain attached to the protein serves as recognition element to drag them into the 19S regulatory particle, which promotes the unfolding required to its access into the 20S catalytic chamber. In second model, it is proposed that an unstructured tail located at amino or carboxyl terminus directly track proteins into the 26S/20S proteasomes. Caspases are cysteinyl aspartate proteases that control diverse signaling pathways, promoting the cleavage at one or two sites of hundreds of structural and regulatory protein substrates. Caspase cleavage sites are commonly found within PEST motifs, which are segments rich in proline (P), glutamic acid (D), aspartic acid (E) and serine (S) or threonine (T) residues. Considering that N- and C- terminal peptide carrying PEST motifs form disordered loops in the globular proteins after caspase cleavage, it is postulated here that these exposed termini serve as unstructured initiation site, coupling caspase cleavage and ubiquitin-proteasome dependent and independent degradation of short-lived proteins. This could explain the inherent susceptibility to proteolysis among proteins containing PEST motif. PMID:18537676

  16. The MRE11 GAR motif regulates DNA double-strand break processing and ATR activation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhenbao; Vogel, Gillian; Coulombe, Yan; Dubeau, Danielle; Spehalski, Elizabeth; Hébert, Josée; Ferguson, David O; Masson, Jean Yves; Richard, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    The MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex is the primary sensor rapidly recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). MRE11 is known to be arginine methylated by PRMT1 within its glycine-arginine-rich (GAR) motif. In this study, we report a mouse knock-in allele of Mre11 that substitutes the arginines with lysines in the GAR motif and generates the MRE11RK protein devoid of methylated arginines. The Mre11RK/RK mice were hypersensitive to γ-irradiation (IR) and the cells from these mice displayed cell cycle checkpoint defects and chromosome instability. Moreover, the Mre11RK/RK MEFs exhibited ATR/CHK1 signaling defects and impairment in the recruitment of RPA and RAD51 to the damaged sites. The MRKRN complex formed and localized to the sites of DNA damage and normally activated the ATM pathway in response to IR. The MRKRN complex exhibited exonuclease and DNA-binding defects in vitro responsible for the impaired DNA end resection and ATR activation observed in vivo in response to IR. Our findings provide genetic evidence for the critical role of the MRE11 GAR motif in DSB repair, and demonstrate a mechanistic link between post-translational modifications at the MRE11 GAR motif and DSB processing, as well as the ATR/CHK1 checkpoint signaling. PMID:21826105

  17. Functional analysis of the putative integrin recognition motif on adeno-associated virus 9.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shen; Berry, Garrett E; Castellanos Rivera, Ruth M; Cheung, Roland Y; Troupes, Andrew N; Brown, Sarah M; Kafri, Tal; Asokan, Aravind

    2015-01-16

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) display a highly conserved NGR motif on the capsid surface. Earlier studies have established this tripeptide motif as being essential for integrin-mediated uptake of recombinant AAV serotype 2 (AAV2) in cultured cells. However, functional attributes of this putative integrin recognition motif in other recombinant AAV serotypes displaying systemic transduction in vivo remain unknown. In this study, we dissect the biology of an integrin domain capsid mutant derived from the human isolate AAV9 in mice. The AAV9/NGA mutant shows decreased systemic transduction in mice. This defective phenotype was accompanied by rapid clearance of mutant virions from the blood circulation and nonspecific sequestration by the spleen. Transient vascular hyperpermeability, induced by histamine coinjection, exacerbated AAV9/NGA uptake by the spleen but not the liver. However, such treatment did not affect AAV9 virions, suggesting a potential entry/post-entry defect for the mutant in different tissues. Further characterization revealed modestly decreased cell surface binding but a more pronounced defect in the cellular entry of mutant virions. These findings were corroborated by the observation that blocking multiple integrins adversely affected recombinant AAV9 transduction in different cell types, albeit with variable efficiencies. From a structural perspective, we observed that the integrin recognition motif is located in close proximity to the galactose binding footprint on AAV9 capsids and postulate that this feature could influence cell surface attachment, cellular uptake at the tissue level, and systemic clearance by the reticuloendothelial system. PMID:25404742

  18. Rate Motifs Tune Auxin/Indole-3-Acetic Acid Degradation Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Moss, Britney L; Mao, Haibin; Guseman, Jessica M; Hinds, Thomas R; Hellmuth, Antje; Kovenock, Marlies; Noorassa, Anisa; Lanctot, Amy; Villalobos, Luz Irina A Calderón; Zheng, Ning; Nemhauser, Jennifer L

    2015-09-01

    Ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation is a common feature in diverse plant cell signaling pathways; however, the factors that control the dynamics of regulated protein turnover are largely unknown. One of the best-characterized families of E3 ubiquitin ligases facilitates ubiquitination of auxin (aux)/indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) repressor proteins in the presence of auxin. Rates of auxin-induced degradation vary widely within the Aux/IAA family, and sequences outside of the characterized degron (the minimum region required for auxin-induced degradation) can accelerate or decelerate degradation. We have used synthetic auxin degradation assays in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and in plants to characterize motifs flanking the degron that contribute to tuning the dynamics of Aux/IAA degradation. The presence of these rate motifs is conserved in phylogenetically distant members of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Aux/IAA family, as well as in their putative Brassica rapa orthologs. We found that rate motifs can act by enhancing interaction between repressors and the E3, but that this is not the only mechanism of action. Phenotypes of transgenic plants expressing a deletion in a rate motif in IAA28 resembled plants expressing degron mutations, underscoring the functional relevance of Aux/IAA degradation dynamics in regulating auxin responses. PMID:26149575

  19. Computational study of stability of an H-H-type pseudoknot motif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Zhao, Yunjie; Wang, Jian; Xiao, Yi

    2015-12-01

    Motifs in RNA tertiary structures are important to their structural organizations and biological functions. Here we consider an H-H-type pseudoknot (HHpk) motif that consists of two hairpins connected by a junction loop and with kissing interactions between the two hairpin loops. Such a tertiary structural motif is recurrently found in RNA tertiary structures, but is difficult to predict computationally. So it is important to understand the mechanism of its formation and stability. Here we investigate the stability of the HHpk tertiary structure by using an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation. The results indicate that the HHpk tertiary structure is stable. However, it is found that this stability is not due to the helix-helix packing, as is usually expected, but is maintained by the combined action of the kissing hairpin loops and junctions, although the former plays the main role. Stable HHpk motifs may form structural platforms for the molecules to realize their biological functions. These results are useful for understanding the construction principle of RNA tertiary structures and structure prediction.

  20. An SOS Regulon under Control of a Noncanonical LexA-Binding Motif in the Betaproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Alberola, Neus; Campoy, Susana; Emerson, David; Barbé, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The SOS response is a transcriptional regulatory network governed by the LexA repressor that activates in response to DNA damage. In the Betaproteobacteria, LexA is known to target a palindromic sequence with the consensus sequence CTGT-N8-ACAG. We report the characterization of a LexA regulon in the iron-oxidizing betaproteobacterium Sideroxydans lithotrophicus. In silico and in vitro analyses show that LexA targets six genes by recognizing a binding motif with the consensus sequence GAACGaaCGTTC, which is strongly reminiscent of the Bacillus subtilis LexA-binding motif. We confirm that the closely related Gallionella capsiferriformans shares the same LexA-binding motif, and in silico analyses indicate that this motif is also conserved in the Nitrosomonadales and the Methylophilales. Phylogenetic analysis of LexA and the alpha subunit of DNA polymerase III (DnaE) reveal that the organisms harboring this noncanonical LexA form a compact taxonomic cluster within the Betaproteobacteria. However, their lexA gene is unrelated to the standard Betaproteobacteria lexA, and there is evidence of its spread through lateral gene transfer. In contrast to other reported cases of noncanonical LexA-binding motifs, the regulon of S. lithotrophicus is comparable in size and function to that of many other Betaproteobacteria, suggesting that a convergent SOS regulon has reevolved under the control of a new LexA protein. Analysis of the DNA-binding domain of S. lithotrophicus LexA reveals little sequence similarity with that of other LexA proteins targeting similar binding motifs, suggesting that network structure may limit site evolution or that structural constrains make the B. subtilis-type motif an optimal interface for multiple LexA sequences. IMPORTANCE Understanding the evolution of transcriptional systems enables us to address important questions in microbiology, such as the emergence and transfer potential of different regulatory systems to regulate virulence or

  1. HARE-Mediated Endocytosis of Hyaluronan and Heparin Is Targeted by Different Subsets of Three Endocytic Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Madhu S.; Harris, Edward N.; Weigel, Paul H.

    2015-01-01

    The hyaluronan (HA) receptor for endocytosis (HARE) is a multifunctional recycling clearance receptor for 14 different ligands, including HA and heparin (Hep), which bind to discrete nonoverlapping sites. Four different functional endocytic motifs (M) in the cytoplasmic domain (CD) target coated pit mediated uptake: (YSYFRI2485 (M1), FQHF2495 (M2), NPLY2519 (M3), and DPF2534 (M4)). We previously found (Pandey et al. J. Biol. Chem. 283, 21453, 2008) that M1, M2, and M3 mediate endocytosis of HA. Here we assessed the ability of HARE variants with a single-motif deletion or containing only a single motif to endocytose HA or Hep. Single-motif deletion variants lacking M1, M3, or M4 (a different subset than involved in HA uptake) showed decreased Hep endocytosis, although M3 was the most active; the remaining redundant motifs did not compensate for loss of other motifs. Surprisingly, a HARE CD variant with only M3 internalized both HA and Hep, whereas variants with either M2 or M4 alone did not endocytose either ligand. Internalization of HA and Hep by HARE CD mutants was dynamin-dependent and was inhibited by hyperosmolarity, confirming clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The results indicate a complicated relationship among multiple CD motifs that target coated pit uptake and a more fundamental role for motif M3. PMID:25883656

  2. SiO2 nanoparticles modified CPE as a biosensor for determination of i-motif DNA/Tamoxifen interaction.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Elham; Raoof, Jahan Bakhsh; Ojani, Reza; Bagheryan, Zahra

    2016-08-01

    Cytosine-rich DNA sequences can form a highly ordered structure known as i-motif in slightly acidic solutions. The stability of the folded i-motif structure is a good strategy to inhibit the telomerase reaction in cancer cells. The electrochemical biosensor was prepared by modifying carbon paste electrode with SiO2 nanoparticles to investigate drugs which can stabilize this structure. Tamoxifen (Tam), an antiestrogen hormonal agent for treatment of breast cancer, was chosen as the model ligand and its interaction with i-motif structure was examined. The interaction between i-motif DNA and Tam was studied in PBS buffer and [Fe(CN)6](3-) through the cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry methods. The oxidation peak of Tam, due to the i-motif DNA/Tam interaction, was observed after i-motif immobilized on the surface of the electrode. The i-motif formation was investigated by circular dichroism spectroscopy and the results showed that this structure can certainly be made with pH around 4.5, but its stability reduced by going to the more alkaline pH. The selectivity which was studied in the presence of complementary strand demonstrated that i-motif structure could be stabilized in acidic pH even in the presence of its complementary strand. PMID:27151665

  3. Dry Sliding Wear Behaviour of Flyash Reinforced ZA-27 Alloy Based Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. C.; Krishna, M.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to evaluate the wear rate of ZA-27 alloy composites reinforced with fly ash particles from 1 to 3 wt% in steps of 1 wt%. The compo-casting method has been used to fabricate the composites using Raichur fly ash of average size 3-5 microns. The wear specimens are tested under dry conditions using a pin-on-disc sliding wear testing machine with wear loads of 20-120 N in steps of 20 N, and the sliding distances in the range of 0.5 km to 2.5 km. The results indicate that the wear rate of the composites is less than that of the matrix alloy and it further decreases with the increase in fly ash content. However, the material loss in terms of wear rate and wear volume increases with the increase in load and sliding distance, both in the cases of composites and the matrix alloy. An increase in the applied load increases the wear severity by changing the wear mechanism from abrasion to particle-cracking induced delamination wear. It is found that with the increase in fly ash content, the wear resistance increases monotonically. The observations have been explained using scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis of the worn surfaces of the composites.

  4. Magnesium and manganese binding sites on proteins have the same predominant motif of secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Khrustalev, Vladislav Victorovich; Barkovsky, Eugene Victorovich; Khrustaleva, Tatyana Aleksandrovna

    2016-04-21

    Manganese ion (Mn(2+)) can substitute magnesium ion (Mg(2+)) in active sites of numerous enzymes. Binding sites for these two ions have been studied in two sets of protein 3D structures from the Protein Data Bank with the homology level lower than 25%. The structural motif "beta strand - binder - random coil" is predominant in both Mn(2+) and Mg(2+) coordination spheres, especially in functionally relevant ones. That predominant motif works as an active binder of those divalent cations which can then attract additional ligands, such as different phosphate-containing compounds. In contrast, such Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) binding motif as "GK(T/S)T" being the N-terminal part of alpha helices works as an active binder of phosphates which can then attract divalent cations. There are few differences between Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) coordination spheres responsible of the cation specificity. His residues are underrepresented in certain positions around Asp and Glu residues involved in Mg(2+) coordination, while they are overrepresented in certain positions around Asp and Glu residues coordinating Mn(2+). The random coil region in the "beta strand - random coil - alpha helix" motif for Mg(2+) binding is usually shorter than that in the same motif for Mn(2+) coordination. This feature is associated with the lower number of binding amino acids (and lower levels of usage of such "major" binders as Asp and Glu) for Mg(2+) (which is a hard Lewis acid) in comparison with those for Mn(2+) (an intermediate Lewis acid). PMID:26876751

  5. Studies of the properties of human origin recognition complex and its Walker A motif mutants.

    PubMed

    Giordano-Coltart, Jennifer; Ying, Carol Y; Gautier, Jean; Hurwitz, Jerard

    2005-01-01

    The eukaryotic six-subunit origin recognition complex (ORC) governs the initiation site of DNA replication and formation of the prereplication complex. In this report we describe the isolation of the wild-type Homo sapiens (Hs)ORC and variants containing a Walker A motif mutation in the Orc1, Orc4, or Orc5 subunit using the baculovirus-expression system. Coexpression of all six HsORC subunits yielded a stable complex containing HsOrc subunits 1-5 (HsORC1-5) with virtually no Orc6 protein (Orc6p). We examined the ATPase, DNA-binding, and replication activities of these complexes. Similar to other eukaryotic ORCs, wild-type HsORC1-5 possesses ATPase activity that is stimulated only 2-fold by single-stranded DNA. HsORC1-5 with a mutated Walker A motif in Orc1p contains no ATPase activity, whereas a similar mutation of either the Orc4 or Orc5 subunit did not affect this activity. The DNA-binding activity of HsORC1-5, using lamin B2 DNA as substrate, is stimulated by ATP 3- to 5-fold. Mutations in the Walker A motif of Orc1p, Orc4p, or Orc5p reduced the binding efficiency of HsORC1-5 modestly (2- to 5-fold). Xenopus laevis ORC-depleted extracts supplemented with HsORC1-5 supported prereplication complex formation and X. laevis sperm DNA replication, whereas the complex with a mutation in the Walker A motif of the Orc1, Orc4, or Orc5 subunit did not. These studies indicate that the ATP-binding motifs of Orc1, Orc4, and Orc5 are all essential for the replication activity associated with HsORC. PMID:15618391

  6. An efficient identification strategy of clonal tea cultivars using long-core motif SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rang Jian; Gao, Xiang Feng; Kong, Xiang Rui; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), especially those with long-core motifs (tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexa-nucleotide) represent an excellent tool for DNA fingerprinting. SSRs with long-core motifs are preferred since neighbor alleles are more easily separated and identified from each other, which render the interpretation of electropherograms and the true alleles more reliable. In the present work, with the purpose of characterizing a set of core SSR markers with long-core motifs for well fingerprinting clonal cultivars of tea (Camellia sinensis), we analyzed 66 elite clonal tea cultivars in China with 33 initially-chosen long-core motif SSR markers covering all the 15 linkage groups of tea plant genome. A set of 6 SSR markers were conclusively selected as core SSR markers after further selection. The polymorphic information content (PIC) of the core SSR markers was >0.5, with ≤5 alleles in each marker containing 10 or fewer genotypes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the core SSR markers were not strongly correlated with the trait 'cultivar processing-property'. The combined probability of identity (PID) between two random cultivars for the whole set of 6 SSR markers was estimated to be 2.22 × 10(-5), which was quite low, confirmed the usefulness of the proposed SSR markers for fingerprinting analyses in Camellia sinensis. Moreover, for the sake of quickly discriminating the clonal tea cultivars, a cultivar identification diagram (CID) was subsequently established using these core markers, which fully reflected the identification process and provided the immediate information about which SSR markers were needed to identify a cultivar chosen among the tested ones. The results suggested that long-core motif SSR markers used in the investigation contributed to the accurate and efficient identification of the clonal tea cultivars and enabled the protection of intellectual property. PMID:27504250

  7. Does the proposed DSE motif form the active center in the Hermes transposase?

    PubMed

    Michel, K; O'Brochta, D A; Atkinson, P W

    2002-10-01

    Donor cleavage and strand transfer are two functions performed by transposases during transposition of class II transposable elements. Within transposable elements, the only active center described, to date, facilitating both functions, is the so-called DDE motif. A second motif, R-K-H/K-R-H/W-Y, is found in the site-specific recombinases of the tyrosine recombinase family. While present in many bacterial insertion sequences as well as in the eukaryotic family of mariner/Tc1 elements, the DDE motif was considered absent in other classes of eukaryotic class II elements such as P, and hAT and piggyBac. Based on sequence alignments of a hobo-like element from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, to a variety of other hAT transposases and several members of the mariner/Tc1 group, Bigot et al. [Gene 174 (1996) 265] proposed the presence of a DSE motif in hAT transposases. In the present study we tested if each of these three residues is required for transposition of the Hermes element, a member of the hAT family commonly used for insect transformation. While D402N and E572Q mutations lead to knock-out of Hermes function, mutations S535A and S535D did not affect transposition frequency or the choice of integration sites. These data give the first experimental support that D402 and E572 are indeed required for transposition of Hermes. Furthermore, this study indicates that the active center of the Hermes transposase differs from the proposed DSE motif. It remains to be shown if other residues also form the active site of this transposase. PMID:12426102

  8. GRISOTTO: A greedy approach to improve combinatorial algorithms for motif discovery with prior knowledge

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Position-specific priors (PSP) have been used with success to boost EM and Gibbs sampler-based motif discovery algorithms. PSP information has been computed from different sources, including orthologous conservation, DNA duplex stability, and nucleosome positioning. The use of prior information has not yet been used in the context of combinatorial algorithms. Moreover, priors have been used only independently, and the gain of combining priors from different sources has not yet been studied. Results We extend RISOTTO, a combinatorial algorithm for motif discovery, by post-processing its output with a greedy procedure that uses prior information. PSP's from different sources are combined into a scoring criterion that guides the greedy search procedure. The resulting method, called GRISOTTO, was evaluated over 156 yeast TF ChIP-chip sequence-sets commonly used to benchmark prior-based motif discovery algorithms. Results show that GRISOTTO is at least as accurate as other twelve state-of-the-art approaches for the same task, even without combining priors. Furthermore, by considering combined priors, GRISOTTO is considerably more accurate than the state-of-the-art approaches for the same task. We also show that PSP's improve GRISOTTO ability to retrieve motifs from mouse ChiP-seq data, indicating that the proposed algorithm can be applied to data from a different technology and for a higher eukaryote. Conclusions The conclusions of this work are twofold. First, post-processing the output of combinatorial algorithms by incorporating prior information leads to a very efficient and effective motif discovery method. Second, combining priors from different sources is even more beneficial than considering them separately. PMID:21513505

  9. Conserved motif of CDK5RAP2 mediates its localization to centrosomes and the Golgi complex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Wu, Tao; Shi, Lin; Zhang, Lin; Zheng, Wei; Qu, Jianan Y; Niu, Ruifang; Qi, Robert Z

    2010-07-16

    As the primary microtubule-organizing centers, centrosomes require gamma-tubulin for microtubule nucleation and organization. Located in close vicinity to centrosomes, the Golgi complex is another microtubule-organizing organelle in interphase cells. CDK5RAP2 is a gamma-tubulin complex-binding protein and functions in gamma-tubulin attachment to centrosomes. In this study, we find that CDK5RAP2 localizes to the Golgi complex in an ATP- and centrosome-dependent manner and associates with Golgi membranes independently of microtubules. CDK5RAP2 contains a centrosome-targeting domain with its core region highly homologous to the Motif 2 (CM2) of centrosomin, a functionally related protein in Drosophila. This sequence, referred to as the CM2-like motif, is also conserved in related proteins in chicken and zebrafish. Therefore, CDK5RAP2 may undertake a conserved mechanism for centrosomal localization. Using a mutational approach, we demonstrate that the CM2-like motif plays a crucial role in the centrosomal and Golgi localization of CDK5RAP2. Furthermore, the CM2-like motif is essential for the association of the centrosome-targeting domain to pericentrin and AKAP450. The binding with pericentrin is required for the centrosomal and Golgi localization of CDK5RAP2, whereas the binding with AKAP450 is required for the Golgi localization. Although the CM2-like motif possesses the activity of Ca(2+)-independent calmodulin binding, binding of calmodulin to this sequence is dispensable for centrosomal and Golgi association. Altogether, CDK5RAP2 may represent a novel mechanism for centrosomal and Golgi localization. PMID:20466722

  10. The position of the Gly-xxx-Gly motif in transmembrane segments modulates dimer affinity.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rachel M; Rath, Arianna; Deber, Charles M

    2006-12-01

    Although the intrinsic low solubility of membrane proteins presents challenges to their high-resolution structure determination, insight into the amino acid sequence features and forces that stabilize their folds has been provided through study of sequence-dependent helix-helix interactions between single transmembrane (TM) helices. While the stability of helix-helix partnerships mediated by the Gly-xxx-Gly (GG4) motif is known to be generally modulated by distal interfacial residues, it has not been established whether the position of this motif, with respect to the ends of a given TM segment, affects dimer affinity. Here we examine the relationship between motif position and affinity in the homodimers of 2 single-spanning membrane protein TM sequences: glycophorin A (GpA) and bacteriophage M13 coat protein (MCP). Using the TOXCAT assay for dimer affinity on a series of GpA and MCP TM segments that have been modified with either 4 Leu residues at each end or with 8 Leu residues at the N-terminal end, we show that in each protein, centrally located GG4 motifs are capable of stronger helix-helix interactions than those proximal to TM helix ends, even when surrounding interfacial residues are maintained. The relative importance of GG4 motifs in stabilizing helix-helix interactions therefore must be considered not only in its specific residue context but also in terms of the location of the interactive surface relative to the N and C termini of alpha-helical TM segments. PMID:17215886

  11. A RecB-family nuclease motif in the Type I restriction endonuclease EcoR124I

    PubMed Central

    Šišáková, Eva; Stanley, Louise K.; Weiserová, Marie; Szczelkun, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    The Type I restriction-modification enzyme EcoR124I is an ATP-dependent endonuclease that uses dsDNA translocation to locate and cleave distant non-specific DNA sites. Bioinformatic analysis of the HsdR subunits of EcoR124I and related Type I enzymes showed that in addition to the principal PD-(E/D)xK Motifs, I, II and III, a QxxxY motif is also present that is characteristic of RecB-family nucleases. The QxxxY motif resides immediately C-terminal to Motif III within a region of predicted α-helix. Using mutagenesis, we examined the role of the Q and Y residues in DNA binding, translocation and cleavage. Roles for the QxxxY motif in coordinating the catalytic residues or in stabilizing the nuclease domain on the DNA are discussed. PMID:18511464

  12. Effect of Thermally Softened Bronze Matrix on the Fracturing Behavior of Diamond Particles in Hybrid Sprayed Bronze/Diamond Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Hyuntaek; Bae, Gyuyeol; Kang, Kicheol; Kim, Hyungjun; Kim, Jay-Jung; Lee, Changhee

    2010-09-01

    In our previous study (Na et al., Compos Sci Technol 69:463-468, 2009), optimized thickness of protective nickel film was proposed for smaller diamond feedstock to obtain reduced impact stress and uniform flight behavior of particles during kinetic (or cold) spraying. However, in this study, nickel-coated diamond particles were severely fractured with increasing particle size due to high kinetic energy. Hence, an innovative hybrid spraying technique (a combination of kinetic and thermal spraying) was introduced to embed relatively large diamond particles into the bronze matrix. Size distributions of the diamond particles in the composite coatings were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, an electron probe micro analyzer, and image analysis methods. In addition, impact behaviors of diamond particles in kinetic and hybrid gas flows were simulated through finite element analysis (ABAQUS/Explicit 6.7-2). Diamond fracturing was significantly minimized by the reduced impact energy afforded by the thermally softened bronze matrix through hybrid spraying.

  13. qPMS7: a fast algorithm for finding (ℓ, d)-motifs in DNA and protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Hieu; Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar; Davila, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    Detection of rare events happening in a set of DNA/protein sequences could lead to new biological discoveries. One kind of such rare events is the presence of patterns called motifs in DNA/protein sequences. Finding motifs is a challenging problem since the general version of motif search has been proven to be intractable. Motifs discovery is an important problem in biology. For example, it is useful in the detection of transcription factor binding sites and transcriptional regulatory elements that are very crucial in understanding gene function, human disease, drug design, etc. Many versions of the motif search problem have been proposed in the literature. One such is the (ℓ, d)-motif search (or Planted Motif Search (PMS)). A generalized version of the PMS problem, namely, Quorum Planted Motif Search (qPMS), is shown to accurately model motifs in real data. However, solving the qPMS problem is an extremely difficult task because a special case of it, the PMS Problem, is already NP-hard, which means that any algorithm solving it can be expected to take exponential time in the worse case scenario. In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm named qPMS7 that tackles the qPMS problem on real data as well as challenging instances. Experimental results show that our Algorithm qPMS7 is on an average 5 times faster than the state-of-art algorithm. The executable program of Algorithm qPMS7 is freely available on the web at http://pms.engr.uconn.edu/downloads/qPMS7.zip. Our online motif discovery tools that use Algorithm qPMS7 are freely available at http://pms.engr.uconn.edu or http://motifsearch.com. PMID:22848493

  14. C lostridium difficile surface proteins are anchored to the cell wall using CWB2 motifs that recognise the anionic polymer PSII

    PubMed Central

    Willing, Stephanie E.; Candela, Thomas; Shaw, Helen Alexandra; Seager, Zoe; Mesnage, Stéphane; Fagan, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Gram‐positive surface proteins can be covalently or non‐covalently anchored to the cell wall and can impart important properties on the bacterium in respect of cell envelope organisation and interaction with the environment. We describe here a mechanism of protein anchoring involving tandem CWB2 motifs found in a large number of cell wall proteins in the Firmicutes. In the Clostridium difficile cell wall protein family, we show the three tandem repeats of the CWB2 motif are essential for correct anchoring to the cell wall. CWB2 repeats are non‐identical and cannot substitute for each other, as shown by the secretion into the culture supernatant of proteins containing variations in the patterns of repeats. A conserved Ile Leu Leu sequence within the CWB2 repeats is essential for correct anchoring, although a preceding proline residue is dispensable. We propose a likely genetic locus encoding synthesis of the anionic polymer PSII and, using RNA knock‐down of key genes, reveal subtle effects on cell wall composition. We show that the anionic polymer PSII binds two cell wall proteins, SlpA and Cwp2, and these interactions require the CWB2 repeats, defining a new mechanism of protein anchoring in Gram‐positive bacteria. PMID:25649385

  15. SLiMScape 3.x: a Cytoscape 3 app for discovery of Short Linear Motifs in protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Olorin, Emily; O'Brien, Kevin T.; Palopoli, Nicolas; Pérez-Bercoff, Åsa; Shields, Denis C.; Edwards, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Short linear motifs (SLiMs) are small protein sequence patterns that mediate a large number of critical protein-protein interactions, involved in processes such as complex formation, signal transduction, localisation and stabilisation. SLiMs show rapid evolutionary dynamics and are frequently the targets of molecular mimicry by pathogens. Identifying enriched sequence patterns due to convergent evolution in non-homologous proteins has proven to be a successful strategy for computational SLiM prediction. Tools of the SLiMSuite package use this strategy, using a statistical model to identify SLiM enrichment based on the evolutionary relationships, amino acid composition and predicted disorder of the input proteins. The quality of input data is critical for successful SLiM prediction. Cytoscape provides a user-friendly, interactive environment to explore interaction networks and select proteins based on common features, such as shared interaction partners. SLiMScape embeds tools of the SLiMSuite package for de novo SLiM discovery (SLiMFinder and QSLiMFinder) and identifying occurrences/enrichment of known SLiMs (SLiMProb) within this interactive framework. SLiMScape makes it easier to (1) generate high quality hypothesis-driven datasets for these tools, and (2) visualise predicted SLiM occurrences within the context of the network. To generate new predictions, users can select nodes from a protein network or provide a set of Uniprot identifiers. SLiMProb also requires additional query motif input. Jobs are then run remotely on the SLiMSuite server ( http://rest.slimsuite.unsw.edu.au) for subsequent retrieval and visualisation. SLiMScape can also be used to retrieve and visualise results from jobs run directly on the server. SLiMScape and SLiMSuite are open source and freely available via GitHub under GNU licenses. PMID:26674271

  16. Composition-dependent stability of the medium-range order responsible for metallic glass formation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Feng; Ji, Min; Fang, Xiao-Wei; Sun, Yang; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Mendelev, Mikhail I.; Kramer, M. J.; Napolitano, Ralph E.; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2014-09-18

    The competition between the characteristic medium-range order corresponding to amorphous alloys and that in ordered crystalline phases is central to phase selection and morphology evolution under various processing conditions. We examine the stability of a model glass system, Cu–Zr, by comparing the energetics of various medium-range structural motifs over a wide range of compositions using first-principles calculations. Furthermore, we focus specifically on motifs that represent possible building blocks for competing glassy and crystalline phases, and we employ a genetic algorithm to efficiently identify the energetically favored decorations of each motif for specific compositions. These results show that a Bergman-type motifmore » with crystallization-resisting icosahedral symmetry is energetically most favorable in the composition range 0.63 < xCu < 0.68, and is the underlying motif for one of the three optimal glass-forming ranges observed experimentally for this binary system (Li et al., 2008). This work establishes an energy-based methodology to evaluate specific medium-range structural motifs which compete with stable crystalline nuclei in deeply undercooled liquids.« less

  17. A relational extension of the notion of motifs: application to the common 3D protein substructures searching problem.

    PubMed

    Pisanti, Nadia; Soldano, Henry; Carpentier, Mathilde; Pothier, Joel

    2009-12-01

    The geometrical configurations of atoms in protein structures can be viewed as approximate relations among them. Then, finding similar common substructures within a set of protein structures belongs to a new class of problems that generalizes that of finding repeated motifs. The novelty lies in the addition of constraints on the motifs in terms of relations that must hold between pairs of positions of the motifs. We will hence denote them as relational motifs. For this class of problems, we present an algorithm that is a suitable extension of the KMR paradigm and, in particular, of the KMRC as it uses a degenerate alphabet. Our algorithm contains several improvements that become especially useful when-as it is required for relational motifs-the inference is made by partially overlapping shorter motifs, rather than concatenating them. The efficiency, correctness and completeness of the algorithm is ensured by several non-trivial properties that are proven in this paper. The algorithm has been applied in the important field of protein common 3D substructure searching. The methods implemented have been tested on several examples of protein families such as serine proteases, globins and cytochromes P450 additionally. The detected motifs have been compared to those found by multiple structural alignments methods. PMID:20047489

  18. Sequence-motif Detection of NAD(P)-binding Proteins: Discovery of a Unique Antibacterial Drug Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Yun Hao; Wu, Chih Yuan; Sargsyan, Karen; Lim, Carmay

    2014-09-01

    Many enzymes use nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)) as essential coenzymes. These enzymes often do not share significant sequence identity and cannot be easily detected by sequence homology. Previously, we determined all distinct locally conserved pyrophosphate-binding structures (3d motifs) from NAD(P)-bound protein structures, from which 1d sequence motifs were derived. Here, we aim to establish the precision of these 3d and 1d motifs to annotate NAD(P)-binding proteins. We show that the pyrophosphate-binding 3d motifs are characteristic of NAD(P)-binding proteins, as they are rarely found in nonNAD(P)-binding proteins. Furthermore, several 1d motifs could distinguish between proteins that bind only NAD and those that bind only NADP. They could also distinguish between NAD(P)-binding proteins from nonNAD(P)-binding ones. Interestingly, one of the pyrophosphate-binding 3d and corresponding 1d motifs was found only in enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductases, which are enzymes essential for bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis. This unique 3d motif serves as an attractive novel drug target, as it is conserved across many bacterial species and is not found in human proteins.

  19. A comprehensive classification and nomenclature of carboxyl–carboxyl(ate) supramolecular motifs and related catemers: implications for biomolecular systems

    PubMed Central

    D’Ascenzo, Luigi; Auffinger, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Carboxyl and carboxylate groups form important supramolecular motifs (synthons). Besides carboxyl cyclic dimers, carboxyl and carboxylate groups can associate through a single hydrogen bond. Carboxylic groups can further form polymeric-like catemer chains within crystals. To date, no exhaustive classification of these motifs has been established. In this work, 17 association types were identified (13 carboxyl–carboxyl and 4 carboxyl–carboxylate motifs) by taking into account the syn and anti carboxyl conformers, as well as the syn and anti lone pairs of the O atoms. From these data, a simple rule was derived stating that only eight distinct catemer motifs involving repetitive combinations of syn and anti carboxyl groups can be formed. Examples extracted from the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) for all identified dimers and catemers are presented, as well as statistical data related to their occurrence and conformational preferences. The inter-carboxyl(ate) and carboxyl(ate)–water hydrogen-bond properties are described, stressing the occurrence of very short (strong) hydrogen bonds. The precise characterization and classification of these supramolecular motifs should be of interest in crystal engineering, pharmaceutical and also biomolecular sciences, where similar motifs occur in the form of pairs of Asp/Glu amino acids or motifs involving ligands bearing carboxyl(ate) groups. Hence, we present data emphasizing how the analysis of hydrogen-containing small molecules of high resolution can help understand structural aspects of larger and more complex biomolecular systems of lower resolution. PMID:25827369

  20. IQ motif selectivity in human IQGAP1: binding of myosin essential light chain and S100B.

    PubMed

    Pathmanathan, Sevvel; Elliott, Sarah F; McSwiggen, Sara; Greer, Brett; Harriott, Pat; Irvine, G Brent; Timson, David J

    2008-11-01

    IQGAPs are cytoskeletal scaffolding proteins which link signalling pathways to the reorganisation of actin and microtubules. Human IQGAP1 has four IQ motifs each of which binds to calmodulin. The same region has been implicated in binding to two calmodulin-like proteins, the myosin essential light chain Mlc1sa and the calcium and zinc ion binding protein S100B. Using synthetic peptides corresponding to the four IQ motifs of human IQGAP1, we showed by native gel electrophoresis that only the first IQ motif interacts with Mlc1sa. This IQ motif, and also the fourth, interacts with the budding yeast myosin essential light chain Mlc1p. The first and second IQ motifs interact with S100B in the presence of calcium ions. This clearly establishes that S100B can interact with its targets through IQ motifs in addition to interacting via previously reported sequences. These results are discussed in terms of the function of IQGAP1 and IQ motif recognition. PMID:18587628

  1. Sequence-motif Detection of NAD(P)-binding Proteins: Discovery of a Unique Antibacterial Drug Target

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yun Hao; Wu, Chih Yuan; Sargsyan, Karen; Lim, Carmay

    2014-01-01

    Many enzymes use nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)) as essential coenzymes. These enzymes often do not share significant sequence identity and cannot be easily detected by sequence homology. Previously, we determined all distinct locally conserved pyrophosphate-binding structures (3d motifs) from NAD(P)-bound protein structures, from which 1d sequence motifs were derived. Here, we aim to establish the precision of these 3d and 1d motifs to annotate NAD(P)-binding proteins. We show that the pyrophosphate-binding 3d motifs are characteristic of NAD(P)-binding proteins, as they are rarely found in nonNAD(P)-binding proteins. Furthermore, several 1d motifs could distinguish between proteins that bind only NAD and those that bind only NADP. They could also distinguish between NAD(P)-binding proteins from nonNAD(P)-binding ones. Interestingly, one of the pyrophosphate-binding 3d and corresponding 1d motifs was found only in enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductases, which are enzymes essential for bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis. This unique 3d motif serves as an attractive novel drug target, as it is conserved across many bacterial species and is not found in human proteins. PMID:25253464

  2. DistAMo: A Web-Based Tool to Characterize DNA-Motif Distribution on Bacterial Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Sobetzko, Patrick; Jelonek, Lukas; Strickert, Marc; Han, Wenxia; Goesmann, Alexander; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Short DNA motifs are involved in a multitude of functions such as for example chromosome segregation, DNA replication or mismatch repair. Distribution of such motifs is often not random and the specific chromosomal pattern relates to the respective motif function. Computational approaches which quantitatively assess such chromosomal motif patterns are necessary. Here we present a new computer tool DistAMo (Distribution Analysis of DNA Motifs). The algorithm uses codon redundancy to calculate the relative abundance of short DNA motifs from single genes to entire chromosomes. Comparative genomics analyses of the GATC-motif distribution in γ-proteobacterial genomes using DistAMo revealed that (i) genes beside the replication origin are enriched in GATCs, (ii) genome-wide GATC distribution follows a distinct pattern, and (iii) genes involved in DNA replication and repair are enriched in GATCs. These features are specific for bacterial chromosomes encoding a Dam methyltransferase. The new software is available as a stand-alone or as an easy-to-use web-based server version at http://www.computational.bio.uni-giessen.de/distamo. PMID:27014208

  3. DistAMo: A Web-Based Tool to Characterize DNA-Motif Distribution on Bacterial Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Sobetzko, Patrick; Jelonek, Lukas; Strickert, Marc; Han, Wenxia; Goesmann, Alexander; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Short DNA motifs are involved in a multitude of functions such as for example chromosome segregation, DNA replication or mismatch repair. Distribution of such motifs is often not random and the specific chromosomal pattern relates to the respective motif function. Computational approaches which quantitatively assess such chromosomal motif patterns are necessary. Here we present a new computer tool DistAMo (Distribution Analysis of DNA Motifs). The algorithm uses codon redundancy to calculate the relative abundance of short DNA motifs from single genes to entire chromosomes. Comparative genomics analyses of the GATC-motif distribution in γ-proteobacterial genomes using DistAMo revealed that (i) genes beside the replication origin are enriched in GATCs, (ii) genome-wide GATC distribution follows a distinct pattern, and (iii) genes involved in DNA replication and repair are enriched in GATCs. These features are specific for bacterial chromosomes encoding a Dam methyltransferase. The new software is available as a stand-alone or as an easy-to-use web-based server version at http://www.computational.bio.uni-giessen.de/distamo. PMID:27014208

  4. A PP1-binding motif present in BRCA1 plays a role in its DNA repair function

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Young-Mi; Pace, Serena M.; Allen, Susan R.; Deng, Chu-Xia; Hsu, Lih-Ching

    2008-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1α (PP1α) regulates phosphorylation of BRCA1, which contains a PP1-binding motif 898KVTF901. Mutation of this motif greatly reduces the interaction between BRCA1 and PP1α. Here we show that mutation of the PP1-binding motif abolishes the ability of BRCA1 to enhance survival of Brca1-deficient mouse mammary tumor cells after DNA damage. The Rad51 focus formation and comet assays revealed that the DNA repair function of BRCA1 was impaired when the PP1-binding motif was mutated. Analysis of subnuclear localization of GFP-tagged BRCA1 demonstrated that mutation of the PP1-binding motif affected BRCA1 redistribution in response to DNA damage. BRCA1 is required for the formation of Rad51 subnuclear foci after DNA damage. Mutation of the PP1-binding motif in BRCA1 also affected recruitment of Rad51 to sites of DNA damage. Consistent with these findings, knockdown of PP1α in BRCA1-proficient cells by small interfering RNA also significantly reduced Rad51 focus formation induced by DNA damage. Further analysis indicated that mutation of the PP1-binding motif compromised BRCA1 activities in homologous recombination. Altogether, our data implicate that interaction with PP1α is important for BRCA1 function in DNA repair. PMID:18953404

  5. Functional Analysis of Semi-conserved Transit Peptide Motifs and Mechanistic Implications in Precursor Targeting and Recognition.

    PubMed

    Holbrook, Kristen; Subramanian, Chitra; Chotewutmontri, Prakitchai; Reddick, L Evan; Wright, Sarah; Zhang, Huixia; Moncrief, Lily; Bruce, Barry D

    2016-09-01

    Over 95% of plastid proteins are nuclear-encoded as their precursors containing an N-terminal extension known as the transit peptide (TP). Although highly variable, TPs direct the precursors through a conserved, posttranslational mechanism involving translocons in the outer (TOC) and inner envelope (TOC). The organelle import specificity is mediated by one or more components of the Toc complex. However, the high TP diversity creates a paradox on how the sequences can be specifically recognized. An emerging model of TP design is that they contain multiple loosely conserved motifs that are recognized at different steps in the targeting and transport process. Bioinformatics has demonstrated that many TPs contain semi-conserved physicochemical motifs, termed FGLK. In order to characterize FGLK motifs in TP recognition and import, we have analyzed two well-studied TPs from the precursor of RuBisCO small subunit (SStp) and ferredoxin (Fdtp). Both SStp and Fdtp contain two FGLK motifs. Analysis of large set mutations (∼85) in these two motifs using in vitro, in organello, and in vivo approaches support a model in which the FGLK domains mediate interaction with TOC34 and possibly other TOC components. In vivo import analysis suggests that multiple FGLK motifs are functionally redundant. Furthermore, we discuss how FGLK motifs are required for efficient precursor protein import and how these elements may permit a convergent function of this highly variable class of targeting sequences. PMID:27378725

  6. Role of two sequence motifs of mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor in its survival-promoting activity

    PubMed Central

    Mätlik, K; Yu, Li-ying; Eesmaa, A; Hellman, M; Lindholm, P; Peränen, J; Galli, E; Anttila, J; Saarma, M; Permi, P; Airavaara, M; Arumäe, U

    2015-01-01

    Mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF) is a prosurvival protein that protects the cells when applied intracellularly in vitro or extracellularly in vivo. Its protective mechanisms are poorly known. Here we studied the role of two short sequence motifs within the carboxy-(C) terminal domain of MANF in its neuroprotective activity: the CKGC sequence (a CXXC motif) that could be involved in redox reactions, and the C-terminal RTDL sequence, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal. We mutated these motifs and analyzed the antiapoptotic effect and intracellular localization of these mutants of MANF when overexpressed in cultured sympathetic or sensory neurons. As an in vivo model for studying the effect of these mutants after their extracellular application, we used the rat model of cerebral ischemia. Even though we found no evidence for oxidoreductase activity of MANF, the mutation of CXXC motif completely abolished its protective effect, showing that this motif is crucial for both MANF's intracellular and extracellular activity. The RTDL motif was not needed for the neuroprotective activity of MANF after its extracellular application in the stroke model in vivo. However, in vitro the deletion of RTDL motif inactivated MANF in the sympathetic neurons where the mutant protein localized to Golgi, but not in the sensory neurons where the mutant localized to the ER, showing that intracellular MANF protects these peripheral neurons in vitro only when localized to the ER. PMID:26720341

  7. Influence of Finishing/Polishing Procedures on the Surface Texture of Two Resin Composites

    PubMed Central

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Nakazawa, Taeko; Haruyama, Akiko; Haruyama, Chikahiro; Hosaka, Makoto; Hirai, Yoshito

    2008-01-01

    This study compared surface roughness and gloss produced by different finishing/polishing procedures for two resin composites, Clearfil AP-X (AP-X) and Estelite Σ (ES). A total of 70 composite discs (n=35 for each resin composite) were prepared and divided at random into seven finishing/polishing groups (n=5): glass-pressed control; using a super-fine-grit diamond bur (SF); using CompoMaster (CM) after SF-finishing (SF+CM); using White Point (WP) after SF-finishing (SF+WP); using CM after SF+WP-finishing (SF+WP+CM); using Stainbuster (SB) after SF-finishing (SF+SB); and using CM after SF+SB-finishing (SF+SB+CM). After the finishing/polishing procedures, average surface roughness (Ra) and surface gloss (Gs(60°)) of all specimens were assessed with a surface profilometer and specimen gloss meter, respectively. Glass-pressed controls for both AP-X and ES composites showed the best surface finish in terms of both Ra and Gs(60°). SF-finishing produced the roughest surface and led to almost complete loss of gloss. While additional polishing with CM reduced Ra and increased Gs(60°), the additional finishing effect of WP or SB between SF-finishing and CM-polishing was not found for either AP-X or ES. PMID:19088883

  8. Multiple Binding Modes between HNF4[alpha] and the LXXLL Motifs of PGC-1[alpha] Lead to Full Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Rha, Geun Bae; Wu, Guangteng; Shoelson, Steven E.; Chi, Young-In

    2010-04-15

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4{alpha} (HNF4{alpha}) is a novel nuclear receptor that participates in a hierarchical network of transcription factors regulating the development and physiology of such vital organs as the liver, pancreas, and kidney. Among the various transcriptional coregulators with which HNF4{alpha} interacts, peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) coactivator 1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) represents a novel coactivator whose activation is unusually robust and whose binding mode appears to be distinct from that of canonical coactivators such as NCoA/SRC/p160 family members. To elucidate the potentially unique molecular mechanism of PGC-1{alpha} recruitment, we have determined the crystal structure of HNF4{alpha} in complex with a fragment of PGC-1{alpha} containing all three of its LXXLL motifs. Despite the presence of all three LXXLL motifs available for interactions, only one is bound at the canonical binding site, with no additional contacts observed between the two proteins. However, a close inspection of the electron density map indicates that the bound LXXLL motif is not a selected one but an averaged structure of more than one LXXLL motif. Further biochemical and functional studies show that the individual LXXLL motifs can bind but drive only minimal transactivation. Only when more than one LXXLL motif is involved can significant transcriptional activity be measured, and full activation requires all three LXXLL motifs. These findings led us to propose a model wherein each LXXLL motif has an additive effect, and the multiple binding modes by HNF4{alpha} toward the LXXLL motifs of PGC-1{alpha} could account for the apparent robust activation by providing a flexible mechanism for combinatorial recruitment of additional coactivators and mediators.

  9. Native characterization of nucleic acid motif thermodynamics via non-covalent catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunyan; Bae, Jin H.; Zhang, David Yu

    2016-01-01

    DNA hybridization thermodynamics is critical for accurate design of oligonucleotides for biotechnology and nanotechnology applications, but parameters currently in use are inaccurately extrapolated based on limited quantitative understanding of thermal behaviours. Here, we present a method to measure the ΔG° of DNA motifs at temperatures and buffer conditions of interest, with significantly better accuracy (6- to 14-fold lower s.e.) than prior methods. The equilibrium constant of a reaction with thermodynamics closely approximating that of a desired motif is numerically calculated from directly observed reactant and product equilibrium concentrations; a DNA catalyst is designed to accelerate equilibration. We measured the ΔG° of terminal fluorophores, single-nucleotide dangles and multinucleotide dangles, in temperatures ranging from 10 to 45 °C. PMID:26782977

  10. Making sense of G-quadruplex and i-motif functions in oncogene promoters

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Tracy A.; Kendrick, Samantha; Hurley, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    The presence and biological importance of DNA secondary structures in eukaryotic promoters are becoming increasingly recognized among chemists and biologists as bioinformatics, in vitro, and in vivo evidence for these structures in the c-Myc, c-Kit, KRAS, PDGF-A, hTERT, Rb, RET and Hif-1α promoters accumulates. Nevertheless, the evidence remains largely circumstantial. This minireview differs from previous ones in that here we examine the diversity of G-quadruplex and i-motif structures in promoter elements and attempt to categorize the different types of arrangements in which they are found. For the c-Myc G-quadruplex and Bcl-2 i-motif, we summarize recent biological and structural studies. PMID:20670278

  11. Improved detection of helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motifs in protein sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, I B; Egan, J B

    1990-01-01

    We present an update of our method for systematic detection and evaluation of potential helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motifs in protein sequences [Dodd, I. and Egan, J. B. (1987) J. Mol. Biol. 194, 557-564]. The new method is considerably more powerful, detecting approximately 50% more likely helix-turn-helix sequences without an increase in false predictions. This improvement is due almost entirely to the use of a much larger reference set of 91 presumed helix-turn-helix sequences. The scoring matrix derived from this reference set has been calibrated against a large protein sequence database so that the score obtained by a sequence can be used to give a practical estimation of the probability that the sequence is a helix-turn-helix motif. PMID:2402433

  12. The CXXC motif: imperatives for the formation of native disulfide bonds in the cell.

    PubMed Central

    Chivers, P T; Laboissière, M C; Raines, R T

    1996-01-01

    The rapid formation of native disulfide bonds in cellular proteins is necessary for the efficient use of cellular resources. This process is catalyzed in vitro by protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), with the PDI1 gene being essential for the viability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PDI is a member of the thioredoxin (Trx) family of proteins, which have the active-site motif CXXC. PDI contains two Trx domains as well as two domains unrelated to the Trx family. We find that the gene encoding Escherichia coli Trx is unable to complement PDI1 null mutants of S.cerevisiae. Yet, Trx can replace PDI if it is mutated to have a CXXC motif with a disulfide bond of high reduction potential and a thiol group of low pKa. Thus, an enzymic thiolate is both necessary and sufficient for the formation of native disulfide bonds in the cell. Images PMID:8654363

  13. An essential GT motif in the lamin A promoter mediates activation by CREB-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Janaki Ramaiah, M.; Parnaik, Veena K. . E-mail: veenap@ccmb.res.in

    2006-09-29

    Lamin A is an important component of nuclear architecture in mammalian cells. Mutations in the human lamin A gene lead to highly degenerative disorders that affect specific tissues. In studies directed towards understanding the mode of regulation of the lamin A promoter, we have identified an essential GT motif at -55 position by reporter gene assays and mutational analysis. Binding of this sequence to Sp transcription factors has been observed in electrophoretic mobility shift assays and by chromatin immunoprecipitation studies. Further functional analysis by co-expression of recombinant proteins and ChIP assays has shown an important regulatory role for CREB-binding protein in promoter activation, which is mediated by the GT motif.

  14. The nitrogen responsive transcriptome in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) reveals significant gene regulatory motifs.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, José Héctor; Tai, Helen H; Lagüe, Martin; Zebarth, Bernie J; Strömvik, Martina V

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is the most important nutrient for the growth of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). Foliar gene expression in potato plants with and without N supplementation at 180 kg N ha(-1) was compared at mid-season. Genes with consistent differences in foliar expression due to N supplementation over three cultivars and two developmental time points were examined. In total, thirty genes were found to be over-expressed and nine genes were found to be under-expressed with supplemented N. Functional relationships between over-expressed genes were found. The main metabolic pathway represented among differentially expressed genes was amino acid metabolism. The 1000 bp upstream flanking regions of the differentially expressed genes were analysed and nine overrepresented motifs were found using three motif discovery algorithms (Seeder, Weeder and MEME). These results point to coordinated gene regulation at the transcriptional level controlling steady state potato responses to N sufficiency. PMID:27193058

  15. Crystal structure and functional characterization of a light-driven chloride pump having an NTQ motif.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kuglae; Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Jun, Sung-Hoon; Cha, Jeong Seok; Kim, Hoyoung; Lee, Weontae; Kim, Jihyun F; Cho, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    A novel light-driven chloride-pumping rhodopsin (ClR) containing an 'NTQ motif' in its putative ion conduction pathway has been discovered and functionally characterized in a genomic analysis study of a marine bacterium. Here we report the crystal structure of ClR from the flavobacterium Nonlabens marinus S1-08(T) determined under two conditions at 2.0 and 1.56 Å resolutions. The structures reveal two chloride-binding sites, one around the protonated Schiff base and the other on a cytoplasmic loop. We identify a '3 omega motif' formed by three non-consecutive aromatic amino acids that is correlated with the B-C loop orientation. Detailed ClR structural analyses with functional studies in E. coli reveal the chloride ion transduction pathway. Our results help understand the molecular mechanism and physiological role of ClR and provide a structural basis for optogenetic applications. PMID:27554809

  16. A Common Structural Motif in the Binding of Virulence Factors to Bacterial Secretion Chaperones

    SciTech Connect

    Lilic,M.; Vujanac, M.; Stebbins, C.

    2006-01-01

    Salmonella invasion protein A (SipA) is translocated into host cells by a type III secretion system (T3SS) and comprises two regions: one domain binds its cognate type III secretion chaperone, InvB, in the bacterium to facilitate translocation, while a second domain functions in the host cell, contributing to bacterial uptake by polymerizing actin. We present here the crystal structures of the SipA chaperone binding domain (CBD) alone and in complex with InvB. The SipA CBD is found to consist of a nonglobular polypeptide as well as a large globular domain, both of which are necessary for binding to InvB. We also identify a structural motif that may direct virulence factors to their cognate chaperones in a diverse range of pathogenic bacteria. Disruption of this structural motif leads to a destabilization of several chaperone-substrate complexes from different species, as well as an impairment of secretion in Salmonella.

  17. Sequence-specific intramembrane proteolysis: identification of a recognition motif in rhomboid substrates.

    PubMed

    Strisovsky, Kvido; Sharpe, Hayley J; Freeman, Matthew

    2009-12-25

    Members of the widespread rhomboid family of intramembrane proteases cleave transmembrane domain (TMD) proteins to regulate processes as diverse as EGF receptor signaling, mitochondrial dynamics, and invasion by apicomplexan parasites. However, lack of information about their substrates means that the biological role of most rhomboids remains obscure. Knowledge of how rhomboids recognize their substrates would illuminate their mechanism and might also allow substrate prediction. Previous work has suggested that rhomboid substrates are specified by helical instability in their TMD. Here we demonstrate that rhomboids instead primarily recognize a specific sequence surrounding the cleavage site. This recognition motif is necessary for substrate cleavage, it determines the cleavage site, and it is more strictly required than TM helix-destabilizing residues. Our work demonstrates that intramembrane proteases can be sequence specific and that genome-wide substrate prediction based on their recognition motifs is feasible. PMID:20064469

  18. Native characterization of nucleic acid motif thermodynamics via non-covalent catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunyan; Bae, Jin H.; Zhang, David Yu

    2016-01-01

    DNA hybridization thermodynamics is critical for accurate design of oligonucleotides for biotechnology and nanotechnology applications, but parameters currently in use are inaccurately extrapolated based on limited quantitative understanding of thermal behaviours. Here, we present a method to measure the ΔG° of DNA motifs at temperatures and buffer conditions of interest, with significantly better accuracy (6- to 14-fold lower s.e.) than prior methods. The equilibrium constant of a reaction with thermodynamics closely approximating that of a desired motif is numerically calculated from directly observed reactant and product equilibrium concentrations; a DNA catalyst is designed to accelerate equilibration. We measured the ΔG° of terminal fluorophores, single-nucleotide dangles and multinucleotide dangles, in temperatures ranging from 10 to 45 °C.

  19. Pioneer Transcription Factors Target Partial DNA Motifs on Nucleosomes to Initiate Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Soufi, Abdenour; Garcia, Meilin Fernandez; Jaroszewicz, Artur; Osman, Nebiyu; Pellegrini, Matteo; Zaret, Kenneth S.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Pioneer transcription factors (TFs) access silent chromatin and initiate cell fate changes, using diverse types of DNA binding domains (DBDs). FoxA, the paradigm pioneer TF, has a winged helix DBD that resembles linker histone and thereby binds its target sites on nucleosomes and in compacted chromatin. Herein we compare the nucleosome and chromatin targeting activities of Oct4 (POU DBD), Sox2 (HMG box DBD), Klf4 (zinc finger DBD), and c-Myc (bHLH DBD), which together reprogram somatic cells to pluripotency. Purified Oct4, Sox2, and Klf4 proteins can bind nucleosomes in vitro, and in vivo they preferentially target silent sites enriched for nucleosomes. Pioneer activity relates simply to the ability of a given DBD to target partial motifs displayed on the nucleosome surface. Such partial motif recognition can occur by coordinate binding between factors. Our findings provide insight into how pioneer factors can target naïve chromatin sites. PMID:25892221

  20. Super-transient scaling in time-delay autonomous Boolean network motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Huys, Otti; Lohmann, Johannes; Haynes, Nicholas D.; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2016-09-01

    Autonomous Boolean networks are commonly used to model the dynamics of gene regulatory networks and allow for the prediction of stable dynamical attractors. However, most models do not account for time delays along the network links and noise, which are crucial features of real biological systems. Concentrating on two paradigmatic motifs, the toggle switch and the repressilator, we develop an experimental testbed that explicitly includes both inter-node time delays and noise using digital logic elements on field-programmable gate arrays. We observe transients that last millions to billions of characteristic time scales and scale exponentially with the amount of time delays between nodes, a phenomenon known as super-transient scaling. We develop a hybrid model that includes time delays along network links and allows for stochastic variation in the delays. Using this model, we explain the observed super-transient scaling of both motifs and recreate the experimentally measured transient distributions.

  1. The nitrogen responsive transcriptome in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) reveals significant gene regulatory motifs

    PubMed Central

    Gálvez, José Héctor; Tai, Helen H.; Lagüe, Martin; Zebarth, Bernie J.; Strömvik, Martina V.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is the most important nutrient for the growth of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). Foliar gene expression in potato plants with and without N supplementation at 180 kg N ha−1 was compared at mid-season. Genes with consistent differences in foliar expression due to N supplementation over three cultivars and two developmental time points were examined. In total, thirty genes were found to be over-expressed and nine genes were found to be under-expressed with supplemented N. Functional relationships between over-expressed genes were found. The main metabolic pathway represented among differentially expressed genes was amino acid metabolism. The 1000 bp upstream flanking regions of the differentially expressed genes were analysed and nine overrepresented motifs were found using three motif discovery algorithms (Seeder, Weeder and MEME). These results point to coordinated gene regulation at the transcriptional level controlling steady state potato responses to N sufficiency. PMID:27193058

  2. Exploration of tetrahedral structures in silicate cathodes using a motif-network scheme

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhao, Xin; Wu, Shunqing; Lv, Xiaobao; Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Lin, Zijing; Zhu, Zi -Zhong; Ho, Kai -Ming

    2015-10-26

    Using a motif-network search scheme, we studied the tetrahedral structures of the dilithium/disodium transition metal orthosilicates A2MSiO4 with A = Li or Na and M = Mn, Fe or Co. In addition to finding all previously reported structures, we discovered many other different tetrahedral-network-based crystal structures which are highly degenerate in energy. In addition, these structures can be classified into structures with 1D, 2D and 3D M-Si-O frameworks. A clear trend of the structural preference in different systems was revealed and possible indicators that affect the structure stabilities were introduced. For the case of Na systems which have been muchmore » less investigated in the literature relative to the Li systems, we predicted their ground state structures and found evidence for the existence of new structural motifs.« less

  3. A Convex Atomic-Norm Approach to Multiple Sequence Alignment and Motif Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Ian E. H.; Lin, Xin; Zhang, Jiong; Ravikumar, Pradeep; Dhillon, Inderjit S.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple Sequence Alignment and Motif Discovery, known as NP-hard problems, are two fundamental tasks in Bioinformatics. Existing approaches to these two problems are based on either local search methods such as Expectation Maximization (EM), Gibbs Sampling or greedy heuristic methods. In this work, we develop a convex relaxation approach to both problems based on the recent concept of atomic norm and develop a new algorithm, termed Greedy Direction Method of Multiplier, for solving the convex relaxation with two convex atomic constraints. Experiments show that our convex relaxation approach produces solutions of higher quality than those standard tools widely-used in Bioinformatics community on the Multiple Sequence Alignment and Motif Discovery problems. PMID:27559428

  4. Edge usage, motifs, and regulatory logic for cell cycling genetic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagorski, M.; Krzywicki, A.; Martin, O. C.

    2013-01-01

    The cell cycle is a tightly controlled process, yet it shows marked differences across species. Which of its structural features follow solely from the ability to control gene expression? We tackle this question in silico by examining the ensemble of all regulatory networks which satisfy the constraint of producing a given sequence of gene expressions. We focus on three cell cycle profiles coming from baker's yeast, fission yeast, and mammals. First, we show that the networks in each of the ensembles use just a few interactions that are repeatedly reused as building blocks. Second, we find an enrichment in network motifs that is similar in the two yeast cell cycle systems investigated. These motifs do not have autonomous functions, yet they reveal a regulatory logic for cell cycling based on a feed-forward cascade of activating interactions.

  5. Exploration of tetrahedral structures in silicate cathodes using a motif-network scheme

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin; Wu, Shunqing; Lv, Xiaobao; Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Lin, Zijing; Zhu, Zi-Zhong; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Using a motif-network search scheme, we studied the tetrahedral structures of the dilithium/disodium transition metal orthosilicates A2MSiO4 with A = Li or Na and M = Mn, Fe or Co. In addition to finding all previously reported structures, we discovered many other different tetrahedral-network-based crystal structures which are highly degenerate in energy. These structures can be classified into structures with 1D, 2D and 3D M-Si-O frameworks. A clear trend of the structural preference in different systems was revealed and possible indicators that affect the structure stabilities were introduced. For the case of Na systems which have been much less investigated in the literature relative to the Li systems, we predicted their ground state structures and found evidence for the existence of new structural motifs. PMID:26497381

  6. Carboxylic-Acid-passivated metal oxide nanocrystals: ligand exchange characteristics of a new binding motif.

    PubMed

    De Roo, Jonathan; Justo, Yolanda; De Keukeleere, Katrien; Van den Broeck, Freya; Martins, José C; Van Driessche, Isabel; Hens, Zeger

    2015-05-26

    Ligand exchange is central in the processing of inorganic nanocrystals (NCs) and requires understanding of surface chemistry. Studying sterically stabilized HfO2 and ZrO2 NCs using (1) H solution NMR and IR spectroscopy as well as elemental analysis, this paper demonstrates the reversible exchange of initial oleic acid ligands for octylamine and self-adsorption of oleic acid at NC surfaces. Both processes are incompatible with an X-type binding motif of carboxylic acids as reported for sulfide and selenide NCs. We argue that this behavior stems from the dissociative adsorption of carboxylic acids at the oxide surface. Both proton and carboxylate moieties must be regarded as X-type ligands yielding a combined X2 binding motif that allows for self-adsorption and exchange for L-type ligands. PMID:25866095

  7. Beta-turn propensities as paradigms for the analysis of structural motifs to engineer protein stability.

    PubMed Central

    Ohage, E. C.; Graml, W.; Walter, M. M.; Steinbacher, S.; Steipe, B.

    1997-01-01

    The thermodynamic stability of a protein provides an experimental metric for the relationship of protein sequence and native structure. We have investigated an approach based on an analysis of the structural database for stability engineering of an immunoglobulin variable domain. The most frequently occurring residues in specific positions of beta-turn motifs were predicted to increase the folding stability of mutants that were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. Even in positions in which different residues are conserved in immunoglobulin sequences, the predictions were confirmed. Frequently, mutants with increased beta-turn propensities display increased folding cooperativities, suggesting pronounced effects on the unfolded state independent of the expected effect on conformational entropy. We conclude that structural motifs with predominantly local interactions can serve as templates with which patterns of sequence preferences can be extracted from the database of protein structures. Such preferences can predict the stability effects of mutations for protein engineering and design. PMID:9007995

  8. Stabilizing Motifs in Autonomous Boolean Networks and the Yeast Cell Cycle Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevim, Volkan; Gong, Xinwei; Socolar, Joshua

    2009-03-01

    Synchronously updated Boolean networks are widely used to model gene regulation. Some properties of these model networks are known to be artifacts of the clocking in the update scheme. Autonomous updating is a less artificial scheme that allows one to introduce small timing perturbations and study stability of the attractors. We argue that the stabilization of a limit cycle in an autonomous Boolean network requires a combination of motifs such as feed-forward loops and auto-repressive links that can correct small fluctuations in the timing of switching events. A recently published model of the transcriptional cell-cycle oscillator in yeast contains the motifs necessary for stability under autonomous updating [1]. [1] D. A. Orlando, et al. Nature (London), 4530 (7197):0 944--947, 2008.

  9. Regulation of α2B-Adrenerigc Receptor Export Trafficking by Specific Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guangyu; Davis, Jason E.; Zhang, Maoxiang

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular trafficking and precise targeting to specific locations of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) control the physiological functions of the receptors. Compared to the extensive efforts dedicated to understanding the events involved in the endocytic and recycling pathways, the molecular mechanisms underlying the transport of the GPCR superfamily from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through the Golgi to the plasma membrane are relatively less well defined. Over the past years, we have used α2B-adrenergic receptor (α2B-AR) as a model to define the factors that control GPCR export trafficking. In this chapter, we will review specific motifs identified to mediate the export of nascent α2B-AR from the ER and the Golgi and discuss the possible underlying mechanisms. As these motifs are highly conserved among GPCRs, they may provide common mechanisms for export trafficking of these receptors. PMID:26055061

  10. PROSITE: a documented database using patterns and profiles as motif descriptors.

    PubMed

    Sigrist, Christian J A; Cerutti, Lorenzo; Hulo, Nicolas; Gattiker, Alexandre; Falquet, Laurent; Pagni, Marco; Bairoch, Amos; Bucher, Philipp

    2002-09-01

    Among the various databases dedicated to the identification of protein families and domains, PROSITE is the first one created and has continuously evolved since. PROSITE currently consists of a large collection of biologically meaningful motifs that are described as patterns or profiles, and linked to documentation briefly describing the protein family or domain they are designed to detect. The close relationship of PROSITE with the SWISS-PROT protein database allows the evaluation of the sensitivity and specificity of the PROSITE motifs and their periodic reviewing. In return, PROSITE is used to help annotate SWISS-PROT entries. The main characteristics and the techniques of family and domain identification used by PROSITE are reviewed in this paper. PMID:12230035

  11. Exploration of tetrahedral structures in silicate cathodes using a motif-network scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin; Wu, Shunqing; Lv, Xiaobao; Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Lin, Zijing; Zhu, Zi -Zhong; Ho, Kai -Ming

    2015-10-26

    Using a motif-network search scheme, we studied the tetrahedral structures of the dilithium/disodium transition metal orthosilicates A2MSiO4 with A = Li or Na and M = Mn, Fe or Co. In addition to finding all previously reported structures, we discovered many other different tetrahedral-network-based crystal structures which are highly degenerate in energy. In addition, these structures can be classified into structures with 1D, 2D and 3D M-Si-O frameworks. A clear trend of the structural preference in different systems was revealed and possible indicators that affect the structure stabilities were introduced. For the case of Na systems which have been much less investigated in the literature relative to the Li systems, we predicted their ground state structures and found evidence for the existence of new structural motifs.

  12. Spectral Barcoding of Quantum Dots: Deciphering Structural Motifs from the Excitonic Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Mlinar, V.; Zunger, A.

    2009-01-01

    Self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) show in high-resolution single-dot spectra a multitude of sharp lines, resembling a barcode, due to various neutral and charged exciton complexes. Here we propose the 'spectral barcoding' method that deciphers structural motifs of dots by using such barcode as input to an artificial-intelligence learning system. Thus, we invert the common practice of deducing spectra from structure by deducing structure from spectra. This approach (i) lays the foundation for building a much needed structure-spectra understanding for large nanostructures and (ii) can guide future design of desired optical features of QDs by controlling during growth only those structural motifs that decide given optical features.

  13. The TCT motif, a key component of an RNA polymerase II transcription system for the translational machinery

    PubMed Central