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Sample records for components ce5 solutions

  1. Holographic sensors for diagnostics of solution components

    SciTech Connect

    Kraiskii, A V; Suitanov, T T; Postnikov, V A; Khamidulin, A V

    2010-02-28

    The properties of holographic sensors of two types are studied. The sensors are based on a three-dimensional polymer-network matrix of copolymers of acrylamide, acrylic acid (which are sensitive to the medium acidity and bivalent metal ions) and aminophenylboronic acid (sensitive to glucose). It is found that a change in the ionic composition of a solution results in changes in the distance between layers and in the diffraction efficiency of holograms. Variations in the shape of spectral lines, which are attributed to the inhomogeneity of a sensitive layer, and nonmonotonic changes in the emulsion thickness and diffraction efficiency were observed during transient processes. The composition of the components of a hydrogel medium is selected for systems which can be used as a base for glucose sensors with the mean holographic response in the region of physiological glucose concentration in model solutions achieving 40 nm/(mmol L{sup -1}). It is shown that the developed holographic sensors can be used for the visual and instrumental determination of the medium acidity, alcohol content, ionic strength, bivalent metal salts and the quality of water, in particular, for drinking. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  2. Component dynamics in polyvinylpyrrolidone concentrated aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Busselez, Rémi; Arbe, Arantxa; Cerveny, Silvina; Capponi, Sara; Colmenero, Juan; Frick, Bernhard

    2012-08-28

    (2)H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and neutron scattering (NS) on isotopically labelled samples have been combined to investigate the structure and dynamics of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) aqueous solutions (4 water molecules/monomeric unit). Neutron diffraction evidences the nanosegregation of polymer main-chains and water molecules leading to the presence of water clusters. NMR reveals the same characteristic times and spectral shape as those of the slower process observed by broadband dielectric spectroscopy in this system [S. Cerveny et al., J. Chem. Phys. 128, 044901 (2008)]. The temperature dependence of such relaxation time crosses over from a cooperative-like behavior at high temperatures to an Arrhenius behavior at lower temperatures. Below the crossover, NMR features the spectral shape as due to a symmetric distribution of relaxation times and the underlying motions as isotropic. NS results on the structural relaxation of both components-isolated via H/D labeling-show (i) anomalously stretched and non-Gaussian functional forms of the intermediate scattering functions and (ii) a strong dynamic asymmetry between the components that increases with decreasing temperature. Strong heterogeneities associated to the nanosegregated structure and the dynamic asymmetry are invoked to explain the observed anomalies. On the other hand, at short times the atomic displacements are strongly coupled for PVP and water, presumably due to H-bond formation and densification of the sample upon hydration. PMID:22938260

  3. Affordable WDM components: the polymer solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldada, Louay A.; Yin, Shing; Norwood, Robert A.; Yardley, James T.

    1998-02-01

    An advanced polymeric waveguide technology was developed for affordable WDM components that address the needs of both the Telecom and the Datacom industries. We engineered high- performance organic polymers that can be readily made into both multimode and single-mode optical waveguide structures of controlled numerical aperture and geometry. These materials are formed from highly-crosslinked acrylate monomers with specific linkages that determine properties such as flexibility, toughness, loss, and environmental stability. These monomers are intermiscible, providing for precise adjustment of the refractive index from 1.3 to 1.6. In polymer form, they exhibit state-of-the-art loss values, high thermal stability, high humidity resistance, low dispersion and low birefringence. Waveguides are formed photolithographically, with the liquid monomer mixture polymerizing upon illumination in the UV via either mask exposure or laser direct writing. A wide range of rigid and flexible substrates can be used, including glass, quartz, oxidized silicon, glass-filled epoxy printed circuit board substrate, and flexible polyimide film. Waveguiding structures measuring tens of inches in length can be produced on computer boards, and guides that are meters long can be printed on rolls of plastic. We describe the fabrication of both Bragg gratings and waveguide grating routes in our polymers for filtering and demultiplexing applications in Telecom WDM systems. In Datacom, we describe polymeric components that we produced for aerospace WDM sensor systems. The importance of CAD tools in designing WDM devices is emphasized in this work. We further discuss the low-cost manufacturing of WDM components in an industrial environment.

  4. Raman spectroscopy application to analyses of components in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Zhang, Guoping

    2006-09-01

    The characterization of species in aqueous solutions has presented a challenge to analytical and physical chemist, because the JR absorption of the aqueous solvent is so intense that it becomes difficult to observe the solute in the water by JR absorption. In contrast, Raman spectrum of the solute is unaffected by the water, so the weak scattering of water makes the technique well suited to aqueous samples, and the Raman spectrum exhibits well-defined bands corresponding to fundamental modes of vibration. In addition, Raman spectroscopy has some inherent advantages in aqueous solution analysis, because the spectral features of signals from different species are much more distinct, and it provides characteristic signatures for samples, such as blood, protein and cholesterol. All the advantages make Raman spectroscopy be a potential alternative for the study of aqueous solutions. Now, Raman spectroscopy has been applied to studying samples in aqueous solutions, blood serum, intracellular protein levels. Now, industrial wasted water contains many organic contaminants, and it is necessary to determine and monitor these contaminants. The paper first introduces Raman spectroscopy, and then describes its applications to determining the components in aqueous solutions, analyzes and assignes the Raman spectra of o-dichlorobenzene, o-xylene, m-xyiene and p-xylene in detail. The experimental results demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy is a particularly powerful technique for aqueous solutions analyses.

  5. A new two-component integrable system with peakon solutions

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Baoqiang; Qiao, Zhijun

    2015-01-01

    A new two-component system with cubic nonlinearity and linear dispersion: mt=bux+12[m(uv−uxvx)]x−12m(uvx−uxv),nt=bvx+12[n(uv−uxvx)]x+12n(uvx−uxv),m=u−uxx,n=v−vxx,where b is an arbitrary real constant, is proposed in this paper. This system is shown integrable with its Lax pair, bi-Hamiltonian structure and infinitely many conservation laws. Geometrically, this system describes a non-trivial one-parameter family of pseudo-spherical surfaces. In the case b=0, the peaked soliton (peakon) and multi-peakon solutions to this two-component system are derived. In particular, the two-peakon dynamical system is explicitly solved and their interactions are investigated in details. Moreover, a new integrable cubic nonlinear equation with linear dispersion mt=bux+12[m(|u|2−|ux|2)]x−12m(uux∗−uxu∗),m=u−uxx,is obtained by imposing the complex conjugate reduction v=u* to the two-component system. The complex-valued N-peakon solution and kink wave solution to this complex equation are also derived. PMID:25792956

  6. Complexation in two-component chlortetracycline-melanin solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapina, V. A.; Pershukevich, P. P.; Dontsov, A. E.; Bel'Kov, M. V.

    2008-01-01

    The spectra and kinetics of fluorescence of two-component solutions of the chlortetracycline (CHTC)-DOPA-melanin (melanin or ME) system in water have been investigated. The data obtained have been compared to similar data for solutions of CHTC-melanosome from bull eye (MB), which contains natural melanin, in K-phosphate buffer at pH 7.4. The overall results indicate the occurrence of complexation between molecules of CHTC and ME as they are being excited. The studies of complexation in the solution of CHTC-MB in the buffer are complicated by the formation of a CHTC-buffer complex. The effect of optical radiation in the range 330-750 nm on the CHTC-ME complex shows selectivity: the greatest change in the spectrum occurs when the wavelength of the exciting radiation coincides with the long-wavelength band maximum of the fluorescence excitation spectrum of the CHTC-ME complex in aqueous solution. In this range, CHTC and especially ME show high photochemical stability. The nature of the radiation effect on the studied compounds in the hard UV range (λ < 330 nm) differs greatly from that in the range 330-750 nm. It is apparently accompanied by significant photochemical transmutations of all system components. By comparing the characteristics of the CHTC-ME systems with those of the related drug doxycycline (DC-ME), the conclusion has been made that the chlorine atom plays a vital role in formation of the short-wavelength band in the fluorescence spectrum of the CHTC-ME complex.

  7. Implementation of two-component advective flow solution in XSPEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Dipak; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Mondal, Santanu

    2014-05-01

    Spectral and temporal properties of black hole candidates can be explained reasonably well using Chakrabarti-Titarchuk solution of two-component advective flow (TCAF). This model requires two accretion rates, namely the Keplerian disc accretion rate and the halo accretion rate, the latter being composed of a sub-Keplerian, low-angular-momentum flow which may or may not develop a shock. In this solution, the relevant parameter is the relative importance of the halo (which creates the Compton cloud region) rate with respect to the Keplerian disc rate (soft photon source). Though this model has been used earlier to manually fit data of several black hole candidates quite satisfactorily, for the first time, we made it user friendly by implementing it into XSPEC software of Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC)/NASA. This enables any user to extract physical parameters of the accretion flows, such as two accretion rates, the shock location, the shock strength, etc., for any black hole candidate. We provide some examples of fitting a few cases using this model. Most importantly, unlike any other model, we show that TCAF is capable of predicting timing properties from the spectral fits, since in TCAF, a shock is responsible for deciding spectral slopes as well as quasi-periodic oscillation frequencies. L86

  8. Leak testing of cryogenic components — problems and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, S. P.; Pandarkar, S. P.; Unni, T. G.; Sinha, A. K.; Mahajan, K.; Suthar, R. L.

    2008-05-01

    moderator pot was driving the MSLD out of range. Since it was very difficult to locate the leak by Tracer Probe Method, some other technique was ventured to solve the problem of leak location. Finally, it was possible to locate the leak by observing the change in Helium background reading of MSLD during masking/unmasking of the welded joints. This paper, in general describes the design and leak testing aspects of cryogenic components of Cold Neutron Source and in particular, the problems and solutions for leak testing of transfer lines and moderator pot.

  9. Perturbational Blowup Solutions to the Two-Component Dullin-Gottwald-Holm System

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We construct a family of nonradially symmetric exact solutions for the two-component DGH system by the perturbational method. Depending on the parameters, the class of solutions includes both blowup type and global existence type. PMID:27127801

  10. Magnetic, transport and thermodynamic properties of Ce5Ni2Si3 compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczyk, A.; Falkowski, M.; Toliński, T.

    2012-10-01

    The magnetization M(T,H), specific heat Cp(T,H), electrical resistivity ρ(T), magnetoresistance MR(T,H), thermal conductivity κ(T) and thermopower S(T) measurements were performed on the antiferromagnetic compound Ce5Ni2Si3 with the Néel temperature TN = 5.7 K. The estimated effective moment μeff is close to the free ion value of Ce in its trivalent state. The negative sign of the paramagnetic Curie temperature θp indicate the antiferromagnetic nature of the magnetic ordering. The variation of magnetic resistivity ρmag with temperature in Ce5Ni2Si3 can be explained by a competition of the crystal electric field (CEF) splitting, the Kondo effect and the magnetic order. Based on the thermopower and employing a simple single-ion Kondo model the Kondo temperature have been estimated. Magnetocaloric effect is small but shows a sign change, which may be caused by a metamagnetic behavior.

  11. Apparatus for continuously referenced analysis of reactive components in solution

    DOEpatents

    Bostick, William D.; Denton, Mark S.; Dinsmore, Stanley R.

    1981-01-01

    A continuously referenced apparatus for measuring the concentration of a reactive chemical species in solution comprises in combination conduit means for introducing a sample solution, means for introducing one or more reactants into a sample solution, a reaction zone in fluid communication with said conduit means wherein a first chemical reaction occurs between said species and reactants, and a stream separator disposed within the conduit means for separating the sample solution into a sample stream and a reference stream. An enzymatic reactor is disposed in fluid communication with only the sample stream wherein a second reaction takes place between the said reactants, species, and reactor enzymes causing the consumption or production of an indicator species in just the sample stream. Measurement means such as a photometric system are disposed in communication with the sample and reference streams, and the outputs of the measurement means are compared to provide a blanked measurement of the concentration of indicator species. A peristaltic pump is provided to equalize flow through the apparatus by evacuation. The apparatus is particularly suitable for measurement of isoenzymes in body tissues or fluids.

  12. Travelling wave solutions for some two-component shallow water models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutykh, Denys; Ionescu-Kruse, Delia

    2016-07-01

    In the present study we perform a unified analysis of travelling wave solutions to three different two-component systems which appear in shallow water theory. Namely, we analyze the celebrated Green-Naghdi equations, the integrable two-component Camassa-Holm equations and a new two-component system of Green-Naghdi type. In particular, we are interested in solitary and cnoidal-type solutions, as two most important classes of travelling waves that we encounter in applications. We provide a complete phase-plane analysis of all possible travelling wave solutions which may arise in these models. In particular, we show the existence of new type of solutions.

  13. Recovering four-component solutions by the inverse transformation of the infinite-order two-component wave functions

    SciTech Connect

    Barysz, Maria; Mentel, Lukasz; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2009-04-28

    The two-component Hamiltonian of the infinite-order two-component (IOTC) theory is obtained by a unitary block-diagonalizing transformation of the Dirac-Hamiltonian. Once the IOTC spin orbitals are calculated, they can be back transformed into four-component solutions. The transformed four component solutions are then used to evaluate different moments of the electron density distribution. This formally exact method may, however, suffer from certain approximations involved in its numerical implementation. As shown by the present study, with sufficiently large basis set of Gaussian functions, the Dirac values of these moments are fully recovered in spite of using the approximate identity resolution into eigenvectors of the p{sup 2} operator.

  14. Complete solutions of zoom curves of three-component zoom lenses with the second component fixed.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaohsien

    2014-10-10

    Purely algebraic algorithms are presented for solving the zoom curves of a three-component zoom lens of which the second component is fixed on zooming. Two separated algorithms for infinite and finite conjugate imaging conditions are provided. For the infinite-conjugate condition, the transverse magnifications of the second and third components are solved to match the required system focal length, resulting in solving a quadratic equation. For the finite-conjugate condition, three nonlinear simultaneous equations regarding the system magnification, the object-to-image thickness, and the position of the second component are combined into a fourth-order polynomial equation. The roots can all be directly obtained by simple algebraic calculations. As a result, the proposed algebraic algorithms provide a more efficient and complete method than do earlier algorithms adopting scanning procedures. PMID:25322432

  15. Multi-component solid solution alloys having high mixing entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Bei, Hongbin

    2015-10-06

    A multi-component high-entropy alloy includes a composition selected from the following group: VNbTaTiMoWRe, VNbTaTiMoW, VNbTaTiMoRe, VNbTaTiWRe, VNbTaMoWRe, VNbTiMoWRe, VTaTiMoWRe, NbTaTiMoWRe, VNbTaTiMo, VNbTaTiW, VNbTaMoW, VNbTiMoW, VTaTiMoW, NbTaTiMoW, VNbTaTiRe, VNbTaMoRe, VNbTiMoRe, VTaTiMoRe, NbTaTiMoRe, VNbTaWRe, VNbTiWRe, VTaTiWRe, NbTaTiWRe, VNbMoWRe, VTaMoWRe, NbTaMoWRe, VTiMoWRe, NbTiMoWRe, TaTiMoWRe, wherein relative amounts of each element vary by no more than .+-.15 atomic %.

  16. The application of GNSS in the near-Earth navigation of China’s lunar probe CE-5T1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Fan, Min; Hu, Xiaogong; Li, Peijia

    2015-08-01

    After CE-1, CE-2 and CE-3, China’s fourth lunar probe CE-5T1 was launched on 23 Oct., 2014, which goal is to test the returning capability of the lunar probe. On 31 Oct., the landing portion of CE-5T1 successfully landed in the North China. CE-5T1 is a high eccentricity orbit with apogee of about 413 thousand km. A GNSS receiver was installed in CE-5T1 to test the ability of GNSS navigation for a High Earth Orbit (HEO) spacecraft. The receiver performed well and GPS side lobe signals have been tracked when the probe was at an altitude from 10000 to 60000 km during about two 3-hours periods, and most of time it is above the altitude of the GPS constellation. In these two periods, the average GPS satellites tracked is about 8-9, and the GDOP is from 1 to 30. We processed these GNSS data after the mission, and the noise level of the differenced pseudo-range is less than 10 m. We used the GNSS data to determine the orbit of CE-5T1, compared with the use of ground based tracking data including range, Doppler and VLBI. The results are encouraging, and the position difference between orbit determination (OD) with GNSS data and ground based data is less than 100 m. In CE-5T1 mission, the separation point is about 5000 km altitude, where the lander will separate from the orbiter then return to the ground. The separation point prediction accuracy directly affects the landing position. As plan there is a maneuver about 5 hours before the separation (canceled in fact), so there is only 3-4 hours tracking data to be used to predict the separation point. Analysis shows that combination of two types of data can improve the orbit accuracy as well as the accuracy of the predicted orbit. CE-5T1 made a successful test of the GNSS using for HEO spacecraft. Obviously, GNSS can be used as a low-cost OD sensor and the use of GNSS technique can reduce the observing pressure of the ground antenna in the lunar and deep space exploration.

  17. Activities of the components in a spinel solid solution of the Fe-Al-O system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykasov, A. A.; Kimyashev, A. A.

    2011-09-01

    The conditions of the equilibrium between the Fe3O4-FeAl2O4 solution and wustite are determined by measuring the EMF of galvanic cells containing a solid electrolyte, and the activities of the components in the Fe3O4-FeAl2O4 solution are calculated by treating the results of the experiment on the equilibrium between the spinel solution and wustite. Their properties are found to be different from those of ideal solutions at temperatures of 1000-1300 K. A significant positive deviation from the Raoult's law is believed to indicate the tendency of the solution to decompose. The experimental data are treated in terms of the theory of regular solutions, assuming the energy of mixing to be a function of temperature only. The critical temperature of decomposition for the Fe3O4-FeAl2O4 solution is found to be 1084 K.

  18. Accurate and molecular-size-tolerant NMR quantitation of diverse components in solution

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Hideyasu; Nishimura, Hiroshi; Nagata, Takashi; Kigawa, Takanori; Watanabe, Takashi; Katahira, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Determining the amount of each component of interest in a mixture is a fundamental first step in characterizing the nature of the solution and to develop possible means of utilization of its components. Similarly, determining the composition of units in complex polymers, or polymer mixtures, is crucial. Although NMR is recognized as one of the most powerful methods to achieve this and is widely used in many fields, variation in the molecular sizes or the relative mobilities of components skews quantitation due to the size-dependent decay of magnetization. Here, a method to accurately determine the amount of each component by NMR was developed. This method was validated using a solution that contains biomass-related components in which the molecular sizes greatly differ. The method is also tolerant of other factors that skew quantitation such as variation in the one-bond C–H coupling constant. The developed method is the first and only way to reliably overcome the skewed quantitation caused by several different factors to provide basic information on the correct amount of each component in a solution. PMID:26883279

  19. Exact solution of Smoluchowski's continuous multi-component equation with an additive kernel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Díaz, J. M.; Gómez-García, G. J.

    2007-06-01

    Smoluchowski's equation is used to analyse the dynamics of particulate systems under aggregation processes in aerosol physics, atmospheric physics, astrophysics, polymer chemistry, colloidal chemistry, etc. Here we provide an exact analytical solution for Smoluchowski's general, continuous, multi-component equation with additive kernel, for any initial particle size distribution (PSD). Once obtained the general solution, we apply it to a case with initial gamma PSD, which can be used to test numerical methods developed for solving more general cases. We have analysed the behaviour for large sizes and time, and a scaling approximation has been obtained as Vigil and Ziff conjectured. For bi-component mixtures we prove that as time increases, for the additive kernel, we cannot use the scaling solution to describe the behaviour of the number PSD on the whole. This fact contradicts a recent affirmation on the subject done by Matsoukas et al.

  20. Calculating excess volumes of binary solutions with allowance for structural differences between mixed components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balankina, E. S.

    2016-06-01

    Analytical dependences of a volume's properties on the differences between the geometric structures of initial monosystems are obtained for binary systems simulated by a grain medium. The effect of microstructural parameter k (the ratio of volumes of molecules of mixed components) on the concentration behavior of the relative excess molar volume of different types of real binary solutions is analyzed. It is established that the contribution due to differences between the volumes of molecules and coefficients of the packing density of mixed components is ~80-100% for mutual solutions of n-alkanes and ~55-80% of the experimental value of the relative excess molar volume for water solutions of n-alcohols.

  1. Component Analysis of Multipurpose Contact Lens Solutions To Enhance Activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Leo; Kim, Janie; Chen, Hope; Kowalski, Regis; Nizet, Victor

    2016-07-01

    More than 125 million people wear contact lenses worldwide, and contact lens use is the single greatest risk factor for developing microbial keratitis. We tested the antibacterial activity of multipurpose contact lens solutions and their individual component preservatives against the two most common pathogens causing bacterial keratitis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus The in vitro antibacterial activity of five multipurpose contact lens solutions (Opti-Free GP, Boston Simplus, Boston Advance, Menicare GP, and Lobob) was assayed by the standard broth dilution method. Synergy between the preservative components found in the top performing solutions was assayed using checkerboard and time-kill assays. The ISO 14729 criteria and the standard broth dilution method were used to define an optimized contact lens solution formulation against a clinical panel of drug-susceptible and drug-resistant P. aeruginosa and S. aureus strains. Preservatives with the biguanide function group, chlorhexidine and polyaminopropylbiguanide (PAPB), had the best antistaphylococcal activity, while EDTA was the best antipseudomonal preservative. The combination of chlorhexidine and EDTA had excellent synergy against P. aeruginosa A solution formulation containing chlorhexidine (30 ppm), PAPB (5 ppm), and EDTA (5,000 ppm) had three to seven times more antipseudomonal activity than anything available to consumers today. A multipurpose contact lens solution containing a combination of chlorhexidine, PAPB, and EDTA could help to reduce the incidence of microbial keratitis for contact lens users worldwide. PMID:27139484

  2. [Fluorescence emission spectra of petroleumsulfonate and OP-10 in multi-components aqueous solutions].

    PubMed

    Bi, Z; Ye, J; Yu, J

    1998-06-01

    The determination of surfactant(s) in the alkaline/surfactant/polymer flooding solutions was an uneasy job. For this purpose, the method of fluorescence emission by phenoxy-containing surfactants in dilute solutions is suggested. The fluorescence emission intensity changes linearly with in the extent of low surfactant concentrations below the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and is not influenced by the presence of alkali, polymer PHPAM and salts. Under certain conditions the fluorescence emission by petroleum sulfonate and OP-10 in a multi-components aqueous solution can be detected independently. This method is high-selective, sensitive (the lowest detectable concentration 10(-7) mol/L) and microanalytical (the amount of test solution 2-3 microL). PMID:15810288

  3. Multi-component Wronskian solution to the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tao; Sun, Fu-Wei; Zhang, Yi; Li, Juan

    2014-01-01

    It is known that the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation can be decomposed into the first two members of the coupled Ablowitz-Kaup-Newell-Segur (AKNS) hierarchy by the binary non-linearization of Lax pairs. In this paper, we construct the N-th iterated Darboux transformation (DT) for the second- and third-order m-coupled AKNS systems. By using together the N-th iterated DT and Cramer's rule, we find that the KPII equation has the unreduced multi-component Wronskian solution and the KPI equation admits a reduced multi-component Wronskian solution. In particular, based on the unreduced and reduced two-component Wronskians, we obtain two families of fully-resonant line-soliton solutions which contain arbitrary numbers of asymptotic solitons as y → ∓∞ to the KPII equation, and the ordinary N-soliton solution to the KPI equation. In addition, we find that the KPI line solitons propagating in parallel can exhibit the bound state at the moment of collision.

  4. The existence of traveling wave solutions for a bistable three-component lattice dynamical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jong-Shenq; Wu, Chin-Chin

    2016-01-01

    We study the traveling wave solutions for a three-component lattice dynamical system. This problem arises in the modeling of three species competing two food resources in an environment with migration in which the habitat is one-dimensional and is divided into countable niches. We are concerned with the case when two species have different preferences of food and the third species has both preferences of food. To understand which species win the competition under the bistable condition, the existence of a traveling wave solution for this lattice dynamical system is proven.

  5. Quasi-periodic solutions to the hierarchy of four-component Toda lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jiao; Geng, Xianguo; Zeng, Xin

    2016-08-01

    Starting from a discrete 3×3 matrix spectral problem, the hierarchy of four-component Toda lattices is derived by using the stationary discrete zero-curvature equation. Resorting to the characteristic polynomial of the Lax matrix for the hierarchy, we introduce a trigonal curve Km-2 of genus m - 2 and present the related Baker-Akhiezer function and meromorphic function on it. Asymptotic expansions for the Baker-Akhiezer function and meromorphic function are given near three infinite points on the trigonal curve, from which explicit quasi-periodic solutions for the hierarchy of four-component Toda lattices are obtained in terms of the Riemann theta function.

  6. A scalable and adaptable solution framework within components of the CCSM

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Katherine J; Rouson, Damian; Salinger, Andy; Taylor, Mark; White III, James B; Weijer, Wilbert

    2009-01-01

    A framework for a fully implicit solution method is implemented into (1) the High Order Methods Modeling Environment (HOMME), which is a spectral element dynamical core option in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), and (2) the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) model of the global ocean. Both of these models are components of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM). HOMME is a development version of CAM and provides a scalable alternative when run with an explicit time integrator. However, it suffers the typical time step size limit to maintain stability. POP uses a time-split semi-implicit time integrator that allows larger time steps but less accuracy when used with scale interacting physics. A fully implicit solution framework allows larger time step sizes and additional climate analysis capability such as model steady state and spin-up efficiency gains without a loss in scalability. This framework is implemented into HOMME and POP using a new Fortran interface to the Trilinos solver library, ForTrilinos, which leverages several new capabilities in the current Fortran standard to maximize robustness and speed. The ForTrilinos solution template was also designed for interchangeability; other solution methods and capability improvements can be more easily implemented into the models as they are developed without severely interacting with the code structure. The utility of this approach is illustrated with a test case for each of the climate component models.

  7. The spherically averaged structures of cowpea mosaic virus components by X-ray solution scattering.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, T; Johnson, J E; Phillips, W E

    1983-05-01

    The X-ray diffraction patterns of the four components of cowpea mosaic virus isolated from a cesium chloride gradient were measured, using film methods, to 30 A resolution. Diffraction patterns were analyzed by fitting computed two-shell spherical models to the observed data. The fitting procedure was applied to data to 80 A resolution to avoid the nonspherical contribution to the pattern observed at higher resolution. At pH 7.0 all four components displayed the same external spherically averaged radius of 140 +/-2 A. The lowest density component (top), which contains no RNA, was best modeled by an empty shell with an outer radius of 140 A and an inner radius of 101 +/- 3 A. The middle component, containing 27% RNA by weight, was modeled with a uniform electron density sphere. The bottom upper and bottom lower components, which are biologically identical but display different buoyant densities in cesium chloride solutions, were analyzed independently. The bottom upper component was best modeled with a 101 A inner (RNA containing) sphere of mean electron density 0.453e-/A(3) and a 101 to 140 A outer (protein containing) shell of electron density 0.410e-/A(3). The bottom lower component was fit with the same model except that the RNA containing region displayed a mean electron density of 0.459e-/A(3). The implications of the spherically averaged component structures for the protein structure, RNA and protein hydration, and cesium binding to RNA are discussed. PMID:18638997

  8. EXAFS Phase Retrieval Solution Tracking for Complex Multi-Component System: Synthesized Topological Inverse Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jay Min; Yang, Dong-Seok; Bunker, Grant B.

    2013-04-01

    Using the FEFF kernel A(k,r), we describe the inverse computation from χ(k)-data to g(r)-solution in terms of a singularity regularization method based on complete Bayesian statistics process. In this work, we topologically decompose the system-matched invariant projection operators into two distinct types, (A+AA+A) and (AA+AA+), and achieved Synthesized Topological Inversion Computation (STIC), by employing a 12-operator-closed-loop emulator of the symplectic transformation. This leads to a numerically self-consistent solution as the optimal near-singular regularization parameters are sought, dramatically suppressing instability problems connected with finite precision arithmetic in ill-posed systems. By statistically correlating a pair of measured data, it was feasible to compute an optimal EXAFS phase retrieval solution expressed in terms of the complex-valued χ(k), and this approach was successfully used to determine the optimal g(r) for a complex multi-component system.

  9. [Component analysis of complex mixed solution based on multidimensional diffuse reflectance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Xiong, Chan; Zhao, Li-ying; Lin, Ling; Tong, Ying; Zhang, Bao-ju

    2012-02-01

    In the present paper, the authors proposed a method for component analysis of complex mixed solutions based on multidimensional diffuse reflectance spectroscopy by analyzing the information carried by spectrum signals from various optical properties of various components of the analyte. The experiment instrument was designed with supercontinuum laser source, the motorized precision translation stage and the spectrometer. The Intralipid-20% was taken as an analyte, and was diluted over a range of 1%-20% in distilled water. The diffuse reflectance spectrum signal was measured at 24 points within the distance of 1.5-13 mm (at an interval of 0.5 mm) above the incidence point. The partial least squares algorithm model was used to perform a modeling and forecasting analysis for the spectral analysis data collected from single-point and multi-point. The results showed that the most accurate calibration model was created by the spectral data acquired from the nearest 1-13 points above the incident point; the most accurate prediction model was created by the spectral signal acquired from the nearest 1-7 points above the incident point. It was proved that multidimensional diffuse reflectance spectroscopy can improve the spectral signal to noise ratio. Compared with the traditional spectrum technology using a single optical property such as absorbance or reflectance, this method increased the impact of scattering characteristics of the analyte. So the use of a variety of optical properties of the analytes can make an improvement of the accuracy of the modeling and forecasting, and also provide a basis for component analysis of the complex mixed solution based on multidimensional diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. PMID:22512196

  10. Preparation, crystallography, magnetic and magnetothermal properties of Ce5SiGe4-x alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayaraghavan, Rangarajan

    2005-05-01

    An investigation of the crystal structure and the phase relationships in the Ce{sub 5}Si{sub 4-x}Ge{sub x} system has been carried out. The crystal structures of the single phase intermetallics were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction and subsequent refinement employing the Rietveld analysis technique was performed. The intermetallic system was found to crystallize in three distinct crystal structures. The Ce{sub 5}Si{sub 4}-based solid solution extends from x = 0 to x = 2.15 and it was found to crystallize in the well-known Zr{sub 5}Si{sub 4}-type tetragonal structure. The germanium rich alloys, where 3.1 {le} x {le} 4, crystallized in the Sm{sub 5}Ge{sub 4}-type orthorhombic structure. The crystal structure of the intermediate phase, when 2.35 {le} x {le} 2.8, was found out to be of the Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}-type monoclinic structure. Microhardness tests were conducted on the samples in order to probe the trend in mechanical properties in this alloy system as a function of Ge concentration. The magnetic, thermal and magnetocaloric properties of the Ce{sub 5}Si{sub 4-x}Ge{sub x} alloy system have been investigated for x = 0, 1.0, 1.8, 2.5, 2.8, 3.5, 3.8 and 4.0. The phases with x = 0, 1.0 and 1.8 crystallize in the tetragonal Zr{sub 5}Si{sub 4} structure and those with x = 2.5, 2.8 form in the Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}-type monoclinic structure. The alloys with x = 3.5, 3.8 and 4.0 crystallize in the Sm{sub 5}Ge{sub 4}-type orthorhombic structure. The Curie temperature of the tetragonal phases increases with increasing Ge content. The ordering temperatures of the monoclinic and orthorhombic phases remain nearly unaffected by the composition, with the Curie temperatures of the latter slightly higher than those of the former. All the alloys display evidence of antiferromagnetic interactions in the ground state. The orthorhombic and the monoclinic alloys behave as ferromagnets whereas the Si-rich tetragonal phase acts more like an antiferromagnet at

  11. Microstructure development and hydrogen gas interaction of oxidized Zr65Pd35 and Zr60Pd35Ce5 amorphous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Masakuni; Kato, Shiro; Kobayashi, Katsutoshi; Yogo, Toshinobu; Yamamura, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure of composites derived from amorphous Zr65Pd35 and Zr65Pd35Ce5 alloys was studied. X-ray diffractograms, Raman spectroscopy profiles and scanning electron micrographs indicated that the mixtures containing ZrO2, metallic Pd, and PdO were formed for both amorphous alloys after heat treatment in air. The amorphous Zr60Pd35Ce5 alloy at temperatures of 280-400 °C changed to the composites in which very small Pd precipitates with a diameter less than 100 nm were embedded in a ZrO2 matrix. The hydrogen-temperature-programmed reduction was applied to study the reactivity of hydrogen gas with the oxidized Zr60Pd35Ce5 material. A rapid hydrogen absorption and release behavior was observed on the composite derived from the amorphous alloy.

  12. Preferential interactions determine protein solubility in three-component solutions: the MgCl2 system.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, T; Bhat, R; Timasheff, S N

    1990-02-20

    The correlation between protein solubility and the preferential interactions of proteins with solvent components was critically examined with aqueous MgCl2 as the solvent system. Preferential interaction and solubility measurements with three proteins, beta-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin, and lysozyme, resulted in similar patterns of interaction. At acid pH (pH 2-3) and lower salt concentrations (less than 2 M), the proteins were preferentially hydrated, while at higher salt concentrations, the interaction was either that of preferential salt binding or low salt exclusion. At pH 4.5-5, all three proteins exhibited either very low preferential hydration or preferential binding of MgCl2. These results were analyzed in terms of the balance between salt binding and salt exclusion attributed to the increase in the surface tension of water by salts, which is invariant with conditions. It was shown that the increase in salt binding at high salt concentration is a reflection of mass action, while its decrease at acid pH is due to the electrostatic repulsion between Mg2+ ions and the high net positive charge on the protein. The preferential interaction pattern was paralleled by the variation of protein solubility with solvent conditions. Calculation of the transfer free energies from water to the salt solutions for proteins in solution and in the precipitate showed dependencies on salt concentration. This indicates that the nature of interactions between proteins and solvent components is the same in solution and in the solid state, which implies no change in protein structure during precipitation. Analysis of the transfer free energies and preferential interaction parameter in terms of the salting-in, salting-out, and weak ion binding contributions has led to the conclusions that, when the weak ion binding contribution is small, the predominant protein-salt interaction must be that of preferential salt exclusion most probably caused by the increase of the surface

  13. Modeling solute redistribution and microstructural development in fusion welds of multi-component alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dupont, J.N.; Robino, C.V.; Newbury, B.D.

    1999-12-15

    Solute redistribution and microstructural evolution have been modeled for gas tungsten arc fusion welds in experimental Ni base superalloys. The multi-component alloys were modeled as a pseudo-ternary {gamma}-Nb-C system. The variation in fraction liquid and liquid composition during the primary L {r{underscore}arrow} {gamma} and eutectic type L {r{underscore}arrow} ({gamma} + NbC) stages of solidification were calculated for conditions of negligible Nb diffusion and infinitely rapid C diffusion in the solid phase. Input parameters were estimated by using the Thermo-Calc NiFe Alloy data base and compared to experimentally determined solidification parameters. The solidification model results provide useful information for qualitatively interpreting the influence of alloy composition on weld microstructure. The quantitative comparisons indicate that, for the alloy system evaluated, the thermodynamic database provides sufficiently accurate values for the distribution coefficients of Nb and C. The calculated position of the {gamma}-NbC two-fold saturation line produces inaccurate results when used as inputs for the model, indicating further refinement to the database is needed for quantitative estimates.

  14. Development of A General Principle Solution Forisoagrinet Compliant Networking System Components in Animal Husbandry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlmann, Arne; Herd, Daniel; Röβler, Benjamin; Gallmann, Eva; Jungbluth, Thomas

    In pig production software and electronic systems are widely used for process control and management. Unfortunately most devices on farms are proprietary solutions and autonomically working. To unify data communication of devices in agricultural husbandry, the international standard ISOagriNET (ISO 17532:2007) was developed. It defines data formats and exchange protocols, to link up devices like climate controls, feeding systems and sensors, but also management software. The aim of the research project, "Information and Data Collection in Livestock Systems" is to develop an ISOagriNET compliant IT system, a so called Farming Cell. It integrates all electronic components to acquire the available data and information for pig fattening. That way, an additional benefit to humans, animals and the environment regarding process control and documentation, can be generated. Developing the Farming Cell is very complex; in detail it is very difficult and long-winded to integrate hardware and software by various vendors into an ISOagriNET compliant IT system. This ISOagriNET prototype shows as a test environment the potential of this new standard.

  15. Self-Similar Nonlinear Dynamical Solutions for One-Component Nonneutral Plasma in a Time-Dependent Linear Focusing Field

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Qin and Ronald C. Davidson

    2011-07-19

    In a linear trap confining a one-component nonneutral plasma, the external focusing force is a linear function of the configuration coordinates and/or the velocity coordinates. Linear traps include the classical Paul trap and the Penning trap, as well as the newly proposed rotating-radio- frequency traps and the Mobius accelerator. This paper describes a class of self-similar nonlinear solutions of nonneutral plasma in general time-dependent linear focusing devices, with self-consistent electrostatic field. This class of nonlinear solutions includes many known solutions as special cases.

  16. REVIEW OF CLEANING SOLUTIONS FOR USE ON COMPONENTS OF THE 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.

    2013-09-30

    Several candidate cleaning products have been reviewed for use as a disinfectant on 9975 shipping package components which contain or have contacted mold. Following review of the compatibility of these products with each component, ammonia (ammonium hydroxide diluted to 1.5 wt% concentration) appears compatible with all package components that it might contact. Each of the other candidate products is incompatible with one or more package components. Accordingly, ammonia is recommended for this purpose. It is further recommended that all components which are disinfected be subsequently rinsed with di-ionized or distilled water.

  17. A Cross-Age Study on the Understanding of Chemical Solutions and Their Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calik, Muammer; Ayas, Alipasa

    2005-01-01

    The aims of this study were considered under three headings. The first was to elicit misconceptions that students had about the terms "solute", "solvent" and "solution." The second was to understand how students' prior learning affected their misconceptions. The third was to determine if students were able to make a connection between their own…

  18. Two-Component Self-Diffusion in Solutions: Trehalose and Sucrose in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feick, E. J.; von Meerwall, E. D.; Ekdawi, N.; de Pablo, J.

    2001-03-01

    Trehalose is now recognized as a superior substitute for sucrose in solution as a cryoprotectant, for preserving organs destined for transplantation. To explore some aspects of this superiority, we have used the proton NMR pulsed-gradient spin-echo method at T = 30, 50, and 85 deg. C to study the self-diffusion of solvent and solute in aqueous solutions of these molecules as function of their concentration, c. We find that both solute molecules diffuse substantially more slowly than water at the same c and T; that addition of water accelerates solute diffusion more rapidly than that of water; and that while at a given c and T water diffusion is insensitive to solute identity, trehalose diffusion is somewhat slower than sucrose diffusion, an effect which reaches a factor near two at the highest c. The results of our extensive MC and MD molecular simulations of diffusion in sucrose solutions agree quantitatively with our experimental findings at corresponding c. Free-volume theory is also employed to explore the cooperative interactions between solvent and solutes, and to guide the interpretation of both experiment and simulation.

  19. Method and apparatus for continuously referenced analysis of reactive components in solution

    DOEpatents

    Bostick, W.D.; Denton, M.S.; Dinsmore, S.R.

    1979-07-31

    A continuously referenced apparatus for measuring the concentration of a reactive chemical species in solution comprises in combination conduit means for introducing a sample solution, means for introducing one or more reactants into a sample solution, and a stream separator disposed within the conduit means for separating the sample solution into a first sample stream and a second sample stream. A reactor is disposed in fluid communication with the first sample stream. A reaction takes place between the reactants introduced and the reactive chemical species of interest, causing the consumption or production of an indicator species in the first sample stream. Measurement means such as a photometric system are disposed in communication with the first and second sample streams, and the outputs of the measurement means are compared to provide a blanked measurement of the concentration of indicator species. The apparatus is particularly suitable for measurement of isoenzymes in body tissues or fluids.

  20. Approaching Phosphorescence Lifetimes in Solution: The Two-Component Polarizable-Embedding Approximate Coupled-Cluster Method.

    PubMed

    Krause, Katharina; Bauer, Mirko; Klopper, Wim

    2016-06-14

    Theoretical description of phosphorescence lifetimes in the condensed phase requires a method that takes into account both spin-orbit coupling and solvent-solute interactions. To obtain such a method, we have coupled our recently developed two-component coupled-cluster method with singles and approximated doubles to a polarizable environment. With this new method, we investigate how different solvents effect the electronic phosphorescence energies and lifetimes of 4H-pyran-4-thione. PMID:27158835

  1. The effectiveness of components of University of Wisconsin solution in improving human pancreatic islet purification.

    PubMed

    Robertson, G S; Chadwick, D R; Davies, J; Rose, S; Contractor, H; James, R F; Bell, P R; London, N J

    1994-02-01

    The purification of human pancreatic islets before transplantation relies on the density-dependent separation of islets from exocrine fragments after collagenase digestion of the donor pancreas. The results vary among pancreases despite increasing automation of the digestion and purification processes, reflecting variations in the overlapping densities of islets and contaminating exocrine tissue. Hypothermic storage of both the pancreas and the pancreatic digest alters cell volumes and tissue densities, thereby affecting islet purification. By biochemical analysis of the isopycnic distribution of islets and exocrine tissue fragments from 23 human pancreases on linear continuous density gradients, the effect of various solutions for cold storage of pancreatic digest was studied. The use of the University of Wisconsin cold storage solution, which resulted in a significant decrease in digest volume (P = 0.006) and increase in the densities of both exocrine tissue (P = 0.001) and islets (P = 0.005), produced a significant improvement in islet purity compared with tissue culture medium (P = 0.035), predominantly due to the inclusion of a colloid, which increased the difference in density between exocrine tissue and islets. The addition of large molecular weight cellular impermeants without alteration in the concentration of permeable anions produced no effect. The results of this study support the concept that the use of solutions that minimize cell swelling throughout the process of islet purification would result in significant improvements in density-dependent islet separation, and that such solutions should contain a colloid. PMID:8108869

  2. Packaging solutions for MEMS/MOEMS using thin films as mechanical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, P.; Syms, Richard R. A.; Moore, David F.

    2002-04-01

    Optoelectronic subsystems are becoming increasingly important to reduce the costs of assembly and packaging. The mechanical properties of vapor-deposited thin films can be used to advantage; for example three-micrometer thick silicon nitride microclips to hold single mode optic fibers in place in silicon V-shaped grooves. This paper describes the proposed use of pairs of thin film microcantilevers to precisely locate an optic component such as a filter or a mirror in an optical bench. In this configuration the precision of the lithographic process for the cantilevers determines the exact location of the component in the package, and to first order the etched shape in the substrate is unimportant. Simulation software based on variational principles has been developed to examine the behavior of structures undergoing large-scale elastic deflections. The design software consists of spreadsheet front end to enter parameters, and then Visual Basic (VBA) code and Frontline 'solver' software to run simulations. The fabrication process is described for 5 micrometers thick silicon carbide beams which are then tested by bending them using a surface profiler (such as a Dektak) to deflect the fifty micrometer wide silicon nitride cantilevers through large angles. The possible consequences for more efficient optoelectronic packaging are briefly assessed.

  3. Differences in Rat and Human Erythrocytes Following Blood Component Manufacturing: The Effect of Additive Solutions

    PubMed Central

    da SilveiraCavalcante, Luciana; Acker, Jason P.; Holovati, Jelena L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Small animal models have been previously used in transfusion medicine studies to evaluate the safety of blood transfusion products. Although there are multiple studies on the effects of blood banking practices on human red blood cells (RBCs), little is known about the effect of blood component manufacturing on the quality of rat RBCs. Methods Blood from Sprague-Dawley rats and human volunteers (n = 6) was collected in CPD anticoagulant, resuspended in SAGM or AS3, and leukoreduced. In vitro quality was analyzed, including deformability, aggregation, microvesiculation, phosphatidylserine (PS) expression, percent hemolysis, ATP, 2,3-DPG, osmotic fragility, and potassium concentrations. Results Compared to human RBCs, rat RBCs had decreased deformability, membrane rigidity, aggregability, and microvesiculation after component manufacturing process. Rat RBCs in SAGM showed higher hemolysis compared to human RBCs in SAGM (rat 4.70 ± 0.83% vs. human 0.34 ± 0.07%; p = 0.002). Rat RBCs in AS3 had greater deformability and rigidity than in SAGM. The number of microparticles/µl and the percentage PS expression were lower in rat RBCs in AS3 than in rat RBCs in SAGM. Hemolysis was also significantly lower in AS3 compared to SAGM (2.21 ± 0.68% vs. 0.87 ± 0.39%; p = 0.028). Conclusion Rat RBCs significantly differ from human RBCs in metabolic and membrane-related aspects. SAGM, which is commonly used for human RBC banking, causes high hemolysis and is not compatible with rat RBCs. PMID:26195928

  4. Contribution of various components to the enhanced accuracy of GIPSY/OASIS II PPP solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayal, Adem G.; Ugur Sanli, D.

    2016-04-01

    The accuracy of GIPSY PPP has now been revised following the substantial improvements in JPL analysis strategies and product quality after the year 2007. The accuracy improvement in GIPSY solutions was due mainly to the rigorous analysis procedures adopted in computing the satellite orbits in JPL, incorporating single receiver ambiguity resolution among GIPSY modules, and applying a new 2nd order ionosphere modeling. The 2010 positioning accuracy model, which accounts for the procedures prior to 2007 enhancements, was refined in 2015 using a global set of International GNSS Service (IGS) stations and v. 6.3 of GIPSY/OASIS II software. This was just after the reprocessing of JPL final orbit products with second order ionospheric corrections (Oct/Nov 2014).The improvement in regard to precise satellite orbits was previously shared with research community by the NASA. However, comparative contribution of single receiver ambiguity resolution and 2nd order ionosphere correction into the accuracy model has not been assessed yet. Here we perform the so-called assessment and find that contribution of single receiver ambiguity resolution is comparatively greater than that of the 2nd order ionosphere modeling for our particular global sampling.

  5. Temporal Variability from the Two-Component Advective Flow Solution and Its Observational Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Broja G.; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2016-09-01

    In the propagating oscillatory shock model, the oscillation of the post-shock region, i.e., the Compton cloud, causes the observed low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). The evolution of QPO frequency is explained by the systematic variation of the Compton cloud size, i.e., the steady radial movement of the shock front, which is triggered by the cooling of the post-shock region. Thus, analysis of the energy-dependent temporal properties in different variability timescales can diagnose the dynamics and geometry of accretion flows around black holes. We study these properties for the high-inclination black hole source XTE J1550-564 during its 1998 outburst and the low-inclination black hole source GX 339-4 during its 2006–07 outburst using RXTE/PCA data, and we find that they can satisfactorily explain the time lags associated with the QPOs from these systems. We find a smooth decrease of the time lag as a function of time in the rising phase of both sources. In the declining phase, the time lag increases with time. We find a systematic evolution of QPO frequency and hard lags in these outbursts. In XTE J1550-564, the lag changes from hard to soft (i.e., from a positive to a negative value) at a crossing frequency (ν c) of ∼3.4 Hz. We present possible mechanisms to explain the lag behavior of high and low-inclination sources within the framework of a single two-component advective flow model.

  6. Mass transfer in fuel cells. [electron microscopy of components, thermal decomposition of Teflon, water transport, and surface tension of KOH solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. D., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Results of experiments on electron microscopy of fuel cell components, thermal decomposition of Teflon by thermogravimetry, surface area and pore size distribution measurements, water transport in fuel cells, and surface tension of KOH solutions are described.

  7. Isoindigo-Based Small Molecules with Varied Donor Components for Solution-Processable Organic Field Effect Transistor Devices.

    PubMed

    Patil, Hemlata; Chang, Jingjing; Gupta, Akhil; Bilic, Ante; Wu, Jishan; Sonar, Prashant; Bhosale, Sheshanath V

    2015-01-01

    Two solution-processable small organic molecules, (E)-6,6'-bis(4-(diphenylamino)phenyl)-1,1'-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-(3,3'-biindolinylidene)-2,2'-dione (coded as S10) and (E)-6,6'-di(9H-carbazol-9-yl)-1,1'-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-(3,3'-biindolinylidene)-2,2'-dione (coded as S11) were successfully designed, synthesized and fully characterized. S10 and S11 are based on a donor-acceptor-donor structural motif and contain a common electron accepting moiety, isoindigo, along with different electron donating functionalities, triphenylamine and carbazole, respectively. Ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra revealed that the use of triphenylamine donor functionality resulted in an enhanced intramolecular charge transfer transition and reduction of optical band gap, when compared with its carbazole analogue. Both of these materials were designed to be donor semiconducting components, exerted excellent solubility in common organic solvents, showed excellent thermal stability, and their promising optoelectronic properties encouraged us to scrutinize charge-carrier mobilities using solution-processable organic field effect transistors. Hole mobilities of the order of 2.2 × 10(-4) cm²/Vs and 7.8 × 10(-3) cm²/Vs were measured using S10 and S11 as active materials, respectively. PMID:26393566

  8. An improved independent component analysis model for 3D chromatogram separation and its solution by multi-areas genetic algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The 3D chromatogram generated by High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Diode Array Detector (HPLC-DAD) has been researched widely in the field of herbal medicine, grape wine, agriculture, petroleum and so on. Currently, most of the methods used for separating a 3D chromatogram need to know the compounds' number in advance, which could be impossible especially when the compounds are complex or white noise exist. New method which extracts compounds from 3D chromatogram directly is needed. Methods In this paper, a new separation model named parallel Independent Component Analysis constrained by Reference Curve (pICARC) was proposed to transform the separation problem to a multi-parameter optimization issue. It was not necessary to know the number of compounds in the optimization. In order to find all the solutions, an algorithm named multi-areas Genetic Algorithm (mGA) was proposed, where multiple areas of candidate solutions were constructed according to the fitness and distances among the chromosomes. Results Simulations and experiments on a real life HPLC-DAD data set were used to demonstrate our method and its effectiveness. Through simulations, it can be seen that our method can separate 3D chromatogram to chromatogram peaks and spectra successfully even when they severely overlapped. It is also shown by the experiments that our method is effective to solve real HPLC-DAD data set. Conclusions Our method can separate 3D chromatogram successfully without knowing the compounds' number in advance, which is fast and effective. PMID:25474487

  9. On Possible Similarity Solutions for Three-Dimensional Incompressible Laminar Boundary-Layer Flows Over Developable Surfaces and with Proportional Mainstream Velocity Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Arthur G.

    1958-01-01

    Analysis is presented on the possible similarity solutions of the three-dimensional, laminar, incompressible, boundary-layer equations referred to orthogonal, curvilinear coordinate systems. Requirements of the existence of similarity solutions are obtained for the following: flow over developable surface and flow over non-developable surfaces with proportional mainstream velocity components.

  10. Effects of solution conditions on the physicochemical properties of stratification components of extracellular polymeric substances in anaerobic digested sludge.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dongqin; Wang, Yili

    2013-01-01

    The composition and effects of solution conditions on the physicochemical properties of the stratification components of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in anaerobic digested sludge were determined. The total EPS in anaerobic digested sludge were extracted by the cation exchange resin method. Another EPS extraction method, the centrifugation and sonication technique was employed to stratify the EPS into three fractions: slime, loosely bound (LB)-EPS, and tightly bound (TB)-EPS from the outside to the inside of the anaerobic digested sludge. Proteins and polysaccharides were dispersed uniformly across the different EPS fractions, and humic-like substances were mainly partitioned in the slime, with TB-EPS second. Protein was the major constituent of the LB-EPS and TB-EPS, and the corresponding ratios ranged from 54.0% to 65.6%. The hydrophobic part in the EPS chemical components was primarily comprised of protein and DNA, while the hydrophilic part was mainly composed of polysaccharide. In the slime, the hydrophobic values of several EPS chemical components (protein, polysaccharide, humic-like substances and DNA) were all below 50%. The protein/polysaccharide ratio had a significant influence on the Zeta potentials and isoelectric point values of the EPS: the greater the protein/polysaccharide ratio of the EPS was, the greater the Zeta potential and the higher the isoelectric point value were. All Zeta potentials of the EPS showed a decreasing trend with increasing pH. The corresponding isoelectric point values (pH) were 2.8 for total EPS, 2.2 for slime, 2.7 for LB-EPS, and 2.6 for TB-EPS. As the ionic strength increased, the Zeta potentials sharply increased and then gradually became constant without charge reversal. In addition, as the temperature increased (< 40 degrees C), the apparent viscosity of the EPS decreased monotonically and then gradually became stable between 40 and 60 degrees C. PMID:23586310

  11. Rotation of EOFs by the Independent Component Analysis: Towards A Solution of the Mixing Problem in the Decomposition of Geophysical Time Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aires, Filipe; Rossow, William B.; Chedin, Alain; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Independent Component Analysis is a recently developed technique for component extraction. This new method requires the statistical independence of the extracted components, a stronger constraint that uses higher-order statistics, instead of the classical decorrelation, a weaker constraint that uses only second-order statistics. This technique has been used recently for the analysis of geophysical time series with the goal of investigating the causes of variability in observed data (i.e. exploratory approach). We demonstrate with a data simulation experiment that, if initialized with a Principal Component Analysis, the Independent Component Analysis performs a rotation of the classical PCA (or EOF) solution. This rotation uses no localization criterion like other Rotation Techniques (RT), only the global generalization of decorrelation by statistical independence is used. This rotation of the PCA solution seems to be able to solve the tendency of PCA to mix several physical phenomena, even when the signal is just their linear sum.

  12. Rotation of EOFs by the Independent Component Analysis: Towards a Solution of the Mixing Problem in the Decomposition of Geophysical Time Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aires, Filipe; Rossow, William B.; Chedin, Alain

    2000-01-01

    The Independent Component Analysis is a recently developed technique for component extraction. This new method requires the statistical independence of the extracted components, a stronger constraint that uses higher-order statistics, instead of the classical decorrelation, a weaker constraint that uses only second-order statistics. This technique has been used recently for the analysis of geophysical time series with the goal of investigating the causes of variability in observed data (i.e. exploratory approach). We demonstrate with a data simulation experiment that, if initialized with a Principal Component Analysis, the Independent Component Analysis performs a rotation of the classical PCA (or EOF) solution. This rotation uses no localization criterion like other Rotation Techniques (RT), only the global generalization of decorrelation by statistical independence is used. This rotation of the PCA solution seems to be able to solve the tendency of PCA to mix several physical phenomena, even when the signal is just their linear sum.

  13. Studies on the interactions between parabens and lipid membrane components in monolayers at the air/aqueous solution interface.

    PubMed

    Flasiński, Michał; Gawryś, Maciej; Broniatowski, Marcin; Wydro, Paweł

    2016-04-01

    The interactions between parabens (PBs) and lipid components of mammalian and bacterial cell membranes were investigated in model systems of Langmuir monolayers. Me-, Et-, Pr- and Bu-paraben studied in this paper are frequently applied as cosmetics and food preservatives, since they possess broad antimicrobial activity. The mode of PB action is connected with their incorporation into the membrane of bacterial organisms, however; it is not known what is the role of the respective lipid species in this mechanism. This problem is crucial to understand the differences in paraben activity toward individual microorganisms and to shed the light onto the problem of PB cytotoxicity reported in studies on mammalian cells. In this paper, the mentioned aspects were investigated with application of the Langmuir monolayer technique complemented with BAM and GIXD. Our experiments revealed that the influence of PBs depends on their chemical structure, solution concentration and on the class of lipid. The strongest modification of the monolayer characteristics, leading to its collapse at low surface pressure, occurred in the presence of BuPB, having the largest chain. PBs interact preferentially with the monolayers possessing low degree of condensation, whereas for LC state, the effect was weaker and observed only as modification of the 2D unit cells. In the model systems, PBs interact with phospholipids characteristic for mammalian membranes (phosphatidylcholine) stronger than with bacterial (phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin). This strong influence of parabens on the model systems composed of animal lipids may explain cytotoxic activity of these preservatives. PMID:26777770

  14. NONLINEAR OPTICAL PHENOMENA Frequency shift of Rayleigh line fine structure components in a water solution of 4-methylpyridine as a function of temperature, concentration, and light scattering angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunkin, Nikolai F.; Gorelik, Vladimir S.; Sabirov, L. M.; Semenov, D. I.; Khaidarov, Kh S.

    2010-11-01

    The frequency shift Δv of the fine structure components of Rayleigh light scattering in 4-methylpyridine water solutions is studied in the ranges of 1 — 0.1 mole fraction concentrations and temperature 10 — 80 °C. The laws of Δv variation at different light scattering angles are discussed from the viewpoint of solution structural reorganisation under the varying temperature and concentration of nonelectrolyte in water. Existence of a continuous hydrogen-bond net in the solutions is experimentally proved in a certain range of temperatures and concentrations.

  15. The Component Slope Linear Model for Calculating Intensive Partial Molar Properties: Application to Waste Glasses and Aluminate Solutions - 13099

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Jacob G.

    2013-07-01

    Partial molar properties are the changes occurring when the fraction of one component is varied while the fractions of all other component mole fractions change proportionally. They have many practical and theoretical applications in chemical thermodynamics. Partial molar properties of chemical mixtures are difficult to measure because the component mole fractions must sum to one, so a change in fraction of one component must be offset with a change in one or more other components. Given that more than one component fraction is changing at a time, it is difficult to assign a change in measured response to a change in a single component. In this study, the Component Slope Linear Model (CSLM), a model previously published in the statistics literature, is shown to have coefficients that correspond to the intensive partial molar properties. If a measured property is plotted against the mole fraction of a component while keeping the proportions of all other components constant, the slope at any given point on a graph of this curve is the partial molar property for that constituent. Actually plotting this graph has been used to determine partial molar properties for many years. The CSLM directly includes this slope in a model that predicts properties as a function of the component mole fractions. This model is demonstrated by applying it to the constant pressure heat capacity data from the NaOHNaAl(OH){sub 4}-H{sub 2}O system, a system that simplifies Hanford nuclear waste. The partial molar properties of H{sub 2}O, NaOH, and NaAl(OH){sub 4} are determined. The equivalence of the CSLM and the graphical method is verified by comparing results determined by the two methods. The CSLM model has been previously used to predict the liquidus temperature of spinel crystals precipitated from Hanford waste glass. Those model coefficients are re-interpreted here as the partial molar spinel liquidus temperature of the glass components. (authors)

  16. The component slope linear model for calculating intensive partial molar properties /application to waste glasses and aluminate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Jacob G.

    2013-01-11

    Partial molar properties are the changes occurring when the fraction of one component is varied while the fractions of all other component mole fractions change proportionally. They have many practical and theoretical applications in chemical thermodynamics. Partial molar properties of chemical mixtures are difficult to measure because the component mole fractions must sum to one, so a change in fraction of one component must be offset with a change in one or more other components. Given that more than one component fraction is changing at a time, it is difficult to assign a change in measured response to a change in a single component. In this study, the Component Slope Linear Model (CSLM), a model previously published in the statistics literature, is shown to have coefficients that correspond to the intensive partial molar properties. If a measured property is plotted against the mole fraction of a component while keeping the proportions of all other components constant, the slope at any given point on a graph of this curve is the partial molar property for that constituent. Actually plotting this graph has been used to determine partial molar properties for many years. The CSLM directly includes this slope in a model that predicts properties as a function of the component mole fractions. This model is demonstrated by applying it to the constant pressure heat capacity data from the NaOH-NaAl(OH){sub 4}-H{sub 2}O system, a system that simplifies Hanford nuclear waste. The partial molar properties of H{sub 2}O, NaOH, and NaAl(OH){sub 4} are determined. The equivalence of the CSLM and the graphical method is verified by comparing results determined by the two methods. The CSLM model has been previously used to predict the liquidus temperature of spinel crystals precipitated from Hanford waste glass. Those model coefficients are re-interpreted here as the partial molar spinel liquidus temperature of the glass components.

  17. Calorimetric and Diffractometric Evidence for the Sequential Crystallization of Buffer Components and the Consequential pH Swing in Frozen Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaramurthi, Prakash; Shalaev, Evgenyi; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2010-06-22

    Sequential crystallization of succinate buffer components in the frozen solution has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffractometry (both laboratory and synchrotron sources). The consequential pH shifts were monitored using a low-temperature electrode. When a solution buffered to pH < pK{sub a2} was cooled from room temperature (RT), the freeze-concentrate pH first increased and then decreased. This was attributed to the sequential crystallization of succinic acid, monosodium succinate, and finally disodium succinate. When buffered to pH > pK{sub a2}, the freeze-concentrate pH first decreased and then increased due to the sequential crystallization of the basic (disodium succinate) followed by the acidic (monosodium succinate and succinic acid) buffer components. XRD provided direct evidence of the crystallization events in the frozen buffer solutions, including the formation of disodium succinate hexahydrate [Na{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}COO){sub 2} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O]. When the frozen solution was warmed in a differential scanning calorimeter, multiple endotherms attributable to the melting of buffer components and ice were observed. When the frozen solutions were dried under reduced pressure, ice sublimation was followed by dehydration of the crystalline hexahydrate to a poorly crystalline anhydrate. However, crystalline succinic acid and monosodium succinate were retained in the final lyophiles. The pH and the buffer salt concentration of the prelyo solution influenced the crystalline salt content in the final lyophile. The direction and magnitude of the pH shift in the frozen solution depended on both the initial pH and the buffer concentration. In light of the pH-sensitive nature of a significant fraction of pharmaceuticals (especially proteins), extreme care is needed in both the buffer selection and its concentration.

  18. Solute partitioning in multi-component γ/γ' Co–Ni-base superalloys with near-zero lattice misfit

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Meher, S.; Carroll, L. J.; Pollock, T. M.; Carroll, M. C.

    2015-11-21

    The addition of nickel to cobalt-base alloys enables alloys with a near zero γ – γ' lattice misfit. The solute partitioning between ordered γ' precipitates and the disordered γ matrix have been investigated using atom probe tomography. Lastly, the unique shift in solute partitioning in these alloys, as compared to that in simpler Co-base alloys, derives from changes in site substitution of solutes as the relative amounts of Co and Ni change, highlighting new opportunities for the development of advanced tailored alloys.

  19. Analysis on multiple-component synchronization of ultra-fast time-interleaved analog-to-digital conversion systems and its novel parameterized hardware solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wuhuang; Wang, Houjun; Tian, Shulin; Ye, Peng; Zeng, Hao; Qiu, Duyu

    2014-10-01

    Parallelism-based technique of time-interleaved analog-to-digital conversion (TIADC) has become an effective solution for the higher sampling rate acquisition system to acquire non-repetitive waveforms. With the increase of sampling frequency, the indeterminacy of combining sequence of sampled data among multiple components has become a highlighted barrier for the reset operation of high-speed acquisition systems, and this is especially obvious for the ultra-fast TIADC systems. In this paper, we clarify the root of the problem in multiple-component synchronization (MCS) caused by such reset operation. Also we propose a novel and reliable hardware solution to precisely condition each reset signal, including three key circuit design parameters, i.e., the best time interval, required edge uncertainty, and the minimum delay precision. Besides, the designing scheme and debugging procedures are presented in detail in a generalized platform of this system type. Finally, in order to demonstrate the feasibility, parametric materialization and testing verification are gradually accomplished in a 20 Giga Samples Per Second (GSPS) TIADC system composed of four 5 GSPS ADC components. The results show that the proposed method is feasible and effective for ensuring the combined determinacy of multiple groups of sampled data and solving the MCS problem. In comparison with other existing solutions, it adopts some simple logic components more easily and flexibly, and this is significant for the development of congeneric systems or instruments featuring the MCS.

  20. Analysis on multiple-component synchronization of ultra-fast time-interleaved analog-to-digital conversion systems and its novel parameterized hardware solution.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wuhuang; Wang, Houjun; Tian, Shulin; Ye, Peng; Zeng, Hao; Qiu, Duyu

    2014-10-01

    Parallelism-based technique of time-interleaved analog-to-digital conversion (TIADC) has become an effective solution for the higher sampling rate acquisition system to acquire non-repetitive waveforms. With the increase of sampling frequency, the indeterminacy of combining sequence of sampled data among multiple components has become a highlighted barrier for the reset operation of high-speed acquisition systems, and this is especially obvious for the ultra-fast TIADC systems. In this paper, we clarify the root of the problem in multiple-component synchronization (MCS) caused by such reset operation. Also we propose a novel and reliable hardware solution to precisely condition each reset signal, including three key circuit design parameters, i.e., the best time interval, required edge uncertainty, and the minimum delay precision. Besides, the designing scheme and debugging procedures are presented in detail in a generalized platform of this system type. Finally, in order to demonstrate the feasibility, parametric materialization and testing verification are gradually accomplished in a 20 Giga Samples Per Second (GSPS) TIADC system composed of four 5 GSPS ADC components. The results show that the proposed method is feasible and effective for ensuring the combined determinacy of multiple groups of sampled data and solving the MCS problem. In comparison with other existing solutions, it adopts some simple logic components more easily and flexibly, and this is significant for the development of congeneric systems or instruments featuring the MCS. PMID:25362456

  1. A note on the regularity of the solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations via the gradient of one velocity component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalák, Zdeněk

    2014-12-01

    We present a regularity criterion for the solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations based on the gradient of one velocity component. Starting with the method developed by Cao and Titi ["Global regularity criterion for the 3D Navier-Stokes equations involving one entry of the velocity gradient tensor," Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 202, 919-932 (2011)] for the case of one entry of the velocity gradient and using further some inequalities concerning the anisotropic Sobolev spaces, we show as a main result that a weak solution u is regular on (0, T), T > 0, provided that ∇u3 ∈ Lt(0, T; Ls), where 2/t + 3/s = 3/2 + 3/(4s) and s ∈ (3/2, 2). It improves the known results for s ∈ (3/2, 15/8).

  2. Storage of porcine pancreatic digest prior to islet purification. The benefits of UW solution and the roles of its individual components.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, D R; Robertson, G S; Rose, S; Contractor, H; James, R F; Bell, P R; London, N J

    1993-08-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the beneficial effect of storage of pancreatic digest in University of Wisconsin solution on porcine islet purification, the mechanism of this effect, and the components of UW responsible. Ten porcine pancreata were collagenase-digested, and samples of digest were washed and stored for 1 hr in either UW or minimum essential medium at 4 degrees C, prior to separation on continuous linear density gradients of bovine serum albumin. Samples of digest from a further ten pancreata were similarly treated, comparing storage in MEM, UW, and five solutions varying in lactobionate:chloride ratio and raffinose content. The purity of the islet preparations and the densities of islets and exocrine tissue were determined from insulin and amylase assay of aliquots aspirated from these gradients. Washing and storage of digest in UW markedly improved islet purity, compared with MEM, due to an increase in the density of exocrine tissue. Exocrine tissue density following storage was dependent upon the control of acinar cell volume, rather than exocrine enzyme discharge, and was determined primarily by the chloride:lactobionate ratio of the storage solution. Raffinose was of little additional benefit, while the beneficial effect of UW was greater than that due to its lactobionate and raffinose content alone. In conclusion, inadequate purification of islets results from exocrine tissue swelling. This swelling is reduced by storage of the pancreatic digest in UW solution, due primarily to the replacement of chloride by lactobionate in UW. PMID:8356582

  3. In situ retreival of contaminants or other substances using a barrier system and leaching solutions and components, processes and methods relating thereto

    DOEpatents

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Walsh, Stephanie; Richardson, John G.; Dick, John R.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2005-06-28

    Processes and methods relating to treating contaminants and collecting desired substances from a zone of interest using subterranean collection and containment barriers. Tubular casings having interlock structures are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The subterranean barrier includes an effluent collection system. Treatment solutions provided to the zone of interest pass therethrough and are collected by the barrier and treated or recovered, allowing on-site remediation. Barrier components may be used to in the treatment by collecting or removing contaminants or other materials from the zone of interest.

  4. Closed-form stochastic solutions for non-equilibrium dynamics and inheritance of cellular components over many cell divisions

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Iain G.; Jones, Nick S.

    2015-01-01

    Stochastic dynamics govern many important processes in cellular biology, and an underlying theoretical approach describing these dynamics is desirable to address a wealth of questions in biology and medicine. Mathematical tools exist for treating several important examples of these stochastic processes, most notably gene expression and random partitioning at single-cell divisions or after a steady state has been reached. Comparatively little work exists exploring different and specific ways that repeated cell divisions can lead to stochastic inheritance of unequilibrated cellular populations. Here we introduce a mathematical formalism to describe cellular agents that are subject to random creation, replication and/or degradation, and are inherited according to a range of random dynamics at cell divisions. We obtain closed-form generating functions describing systems at any time after any number of cell divisions for binomial partitioning and divisions provoking a deterministic or random, subtractive or additive change in copy number, and show that these solutions agree exactly with stochastic simulation. We apply this general formalism to several example problems involving the dynamics of mitochondrial DNA during development and organismal lifetimes. PMID:26339194

  5. A peripheral component interconnect express-based scalable and highly integrated pulsed spectrometer for solution state dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yugui; Feng, Jiwen; Zhang, Zhi; Wang, Chao; Wang, Dong; Chen, Fang; Liu, Maili; Liu, Chaoyang

    2015-08-01

    High sensitivity, high data rates, fast pulses, and accurate synchronization all represent challenges for modern nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers, which make any expansion or adaptation of these devices to new techniques and experiments difficult. Here, we present a Peripheral Component Interconnect Express (PCIe)-based highly integrated distributed digital architecture pulsed spectrometer that is implemented with electron and nucleus double resonances and is scalable specifically for broad dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhancement applications, including DNP-magnetic resonance spectroscopy/imaging (DNP-MRS/MRI). The distributed modularized architecture can implement more transceiver channels flexibly to meet a variety of MRS/MRI instrumentation needs. The proposed PCIe bus with high data rates can significantly improve data transmission efficiency and communication reliability and allow precise control of pulse sequences. An external high speed double data rate memory chip is used to store acquired data and pulse sequence elements, which greatly accelerates the execution of the pulse sequence, reduces the TR (time of repetition) interval, and improves the accuracy of TR in imaging sequences. Using clock phase-shift technology, we can produce digital pulses accurately with high timing resolution of 1 ns and narrow widths of 4 ns to control the microwave pulses required by pulsed DNP and ensure overall system synchronization. The proposed spectrometer is proved to be both feasible and reliable by observation of a maximum signal enhancement factor of approximately -170 for 1H, and a high quality water image was successfully obtained by DNP-enhanced spin-echo 1H MRI at 0.35 T.

  6. A peripheral component interconnect express-based scalable and highly integrated pulsed spectrometer for solution state dynamic nuclear polarization

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yugui; Liu, Chaoyang; Feng, Jiwen; Wang, Dong; Chen, Fang; Liu, Maili; Zhang, Zhi; Wang, Chao

    2015-08-15

    High sensitivity, high data rates, fast pulses, and accurate synchronization all represent challenges for modern nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers, which make any expansion or adaptation of these devices to new techniques and experiments difficult. Here, we present a Peripheral Component Interconnect Express (PCIe)-based highly integrated distributed digital architecture pulsed spectrometer that is implemented with electron and nucleus double resonances and is scalable specifically for broad dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhancement applications, including DNP-magnetic resonance spectroscopy/imaging (DNP-MRS/MRI). The distributed modularized architecture can implement more transceiver channels flexibly to meet a variety of MRS/MRI instrumentation needs. The proposed PCIe bus with high data rates can significantly improve data transmission efficiency and communication reliability and allow precise control of pulse sequences. An external high speed double data rate memory chip is used to store acquired data and pulse sequence elements, which greatly accelerates the execution of the pulse sequence, reduces the TR (time of repetition) interval, and improves the accuracy of TR in imaging sequences. Using clock phase-shift technology, we can produce digital pulses accurately with high timing resolution of 1 ns and narrow widths of 4 ns to control the microwave pulses required by pulsed DNP and ensure overall system synchronization. The proposed spectrometer is proved to be both feasible and reliable by observation of a maximum signal enhancement factor of approximately −170 for {sup 1}H, and a high quality water image was successfully obtained by DNP-enhanced spin-echo {sup 1}H MRI at 0.35 T.

  7. Reexamining protein-protein and protein-solvent interactions from Kirkwood-Buff analysis of light scattering in multi-component solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Marco A.; Sahin, Erinc; Li, Yi; Roberts, Christopher J.

    2011-06-01

    The classic analysis of Rayleigh light scattering (LS) is re-examined for multi-component protein solutions, within the context of Kirkwood-Buff (KB) theory as well as a more generalized canonical treatment. Significant differences arise when traditional treatments that approximate constant pressure and neglect concentration fluctuations in one or more (co)solvent/co-solute species are compared with more rigorous treatments at constant volume and with all species free to fluctuate. For dilute solutions, it is shown that LS can be used to rigorously and unambiguously obtain values for the osmotic second virial coefficient (B22), in contrast with recent arguments regarding protein interactions deduced from LS experiments. For more concentrated solutions, it is shown that conventional analysis over(under)-estimates the magnitude of B22 for significantly repulsive(attractive) conditions, and that protein-protein KB integrals (G22) are the more relevant quantity obtainable from LS. Published data for α-chymotrypsinogen A and a series of monoclonal antibodies at different pH and salt concentrations are re-analyzed using traditional and new treatments. The results illustrate that while traditional analysis may be sufficient if one is interested in only the sign of B22 or G22, the quantitative values can be significantly in error. A simple approach is illustrated for determining whether protein concentration (c2) is sufficiently dilute for B22 to apply, and for correcting B22 values from traditional LS regression at higher c2 values. The apparent molecular weight M2, app obtained from LS is shown to generally not be equal to the true molecular weight, with the differences arising from a combination of protein-solute and protein-cosolute interactions that may, in principle, also be determined from LS.

  8. Solution of the Dirac equation using the Rayleigh-Ritz method: Flexible basis coupling large and small components. Results for one-electron systems.

    PubMed

    Bağcı, A; Hoggan, P E

    2016-07-01

    An algebraic solution of the Dirac equation is reinvestigated. Slater-type spinor orbitals and their corresponding system of differential equations are defined in two- and four-component formalism. They describe the radial function in components of the wave function of the Dirac equation solution to high accuracy. They constitute the matrix elements arising in a generalized eigenvalue equation. These terms are evaluated through prolate spheroidal coordinates. The corresponding integrals are calculated by the numerical global-adaptive method taking into account the Gauss-Kronrod numerical integration extension. Sample calculations are performed using flexible basis sets generated with both signs of the relativistic angular momentum quantum number κ. Applications to one-electron atoms and diatomics are detailed. Variationally optimum values for orbital parameters are obtained at given nuclear separation. Methods discussed in this work are capable of yielding highly accurate relativistic two-center integrals for all ranges of orbital parameters. This work provides an efficient way to overcome the problems that arise in relativistic calculations. PMID:27575231

  9. Design of ultraviolet wavelength and standard solution concentrations in relative response factors for simultaneous determination of multi-components with single reference standard in herbal medicines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting-Wen; Zhao, Chao; Fan, Yong; Qi, Lian-Wen; Li, Ping

    2015-10-10

    Single standard to determine multi-components (SSDMC) is a practical pattern for quality evaluation of herbal medicines (HMs). However, it remains challenging because of potential inconsistency of relative response factors (RRF) on different instruments. In this work, the effects of two key roles, i.e., ultraviolet (UV) wavelength and standard solution concentrations, on reproducibility of RRF were investigated. The effect of UV wavelength on reproducibility of RRF was studied by plotting the relationship of the peak area ratios (internal standard vs analyte) to wavelengths. The preferable wavelength should be set at the flat parts of the curve. Optimized 300 nm produced a 0.38% RSD for emodin/emodin-8-O-β-D-glucopyranoside on five instruments, much lower than 2.80% obtained from the maximum wavelength at 290 nm. Next, the effects of standard solution concentrations of emodin on its response factor (RF) were investigated. For one single point method, low concentration less than 49 b/k resulted in significant variations in RF. For emodin, when the concentration is higher than 7.00 μg mL(-1), a low standard deviation (SD) value at 0.13 was obtained, while lower than 7.00 μg mL(-1), a high SD at 3.71 was obtained. The developed SSDMC method was then applied to determination of target components in 10 Polygonum cuspidatum samples and showed comparable accuracy to conventional calibration methods with deviation less than 1%. PMID:26093242

  10. Solution of the Dirac equation using the Rayleigh-Ritz method: Flexible basis coupling large and small components. Results for one-electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baǧcı, A.; Hoggan, P. E.

    2016-07-01

    An algebraic solution of the Dirac equation is reinvestigated. Slater-type spinor orbitals and their corresponding system of differential equations are defined in two- and four-component formalism. They describe the radial function in components of the wave function of the Dirac equation solution to high accuracy. They constitute the matrix elements arising in a generalized eigenvalue equation. These terms are evaluated through prolate spheroidal coordinates. The corresponding integrals are calculated by the numerical global-adaptive method taking into account the Gauss-Kronrod numerical integration extension. Sample calculations are performed using flexible basis sets generated with both signs of the relativistic angular momentum quantum number κ . Applications to one-electron atoms and diatomics are detailed. Variationally optimum values for orbital parameters are obtained at given nuclear separation. Methods discussed in this work are capable of yielding highly accurate relativistic two-center integrals for all ranges of orbital parameters. This work provides an efficient way to overcome the problems that arise in relativistic calculations.

  11. Cation non-stoichiometry in multi-component oxide nanoparticles by solution chemistry: a case study on CaWO4 for tailored structural properties.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wanbiao; Tong, Wenming; Li, Liping; Zheng, Jing; Li, Guangshe

    2011-06-28

    Chemical composition directly determines the structure and properties of almost all bulk inorganic solids, which are however popularly dismissed in the literature as a cause of property changes when studying multi-component oxide nanostructures by solution chemistries. The current work focuses on this subject through a systematic case study on CaWO(4) nanocrystals. CaWO(4) nanocrystals were prepared using room-temperature solution chemistry, in which a capping agent of citric acid was employed for kinetic grain size control. Sample characterizations by a set of techniques indicated that 5-7 nm CaWO(4) was obtained at room temperature, showing a pure-phase of tetrahedral scheelite structure. The molar ratio of Ca(2+) to W(6+) was found to be 1.2:1, apparently deviating from the unity expected for the stoichiometric CaWO(4). Such nonstoichiometry was further modulated via iso-valent incorporation of smaller Zn(2+) to the Ca(2+)-sites in CaWO(4). It is found that with increasing the Zn(2+) content, there appeared transformation from high to low nonstoichiometry, though a pure scheelite-typed structure was retained. Such a nonstoichiometry was primarily represented by excessive cations like Zn(2+) and/or Ca(2+) within the surface disorder layers, which in turn showed a great impact on the structure and properties as demonstrated by a lattice contraction, band-gap narrowing, luminescence quenching, as well as improved conductivity. The property changes were rationalized in terms of surface structural disorder, electro-negativity discrepancy, and effective activation on the mobile protons. Consequently, systematic control over the non-stoichiometry for single-phase multi-component oxide nanostructures by solution chemistry is proven fundamentally important, which may help to achieve quantitatively the structure-property relationship for materials design and performance optimization. PMID:21556429

  12. Stabilization of Tetravalent 4f (Ce), 5d (Hf), or 5f (Th, U) Clusters by the [α-SiW9O34](10-) Polyoxometalate.

    PubMed

    Duval, Sylvain; Béghin, Sébastien; Falaise, Clément; Trivelli, Xavier; Rabu, Pierre; Loiseau, Thierry

    2015-09-01

    The reaction of Na10[α-SiW9O34] with tetravalent metallic cations such as 4f ((NH4)2Ce(NO3)6), 5d (HfCl4), or 5f (UCl4 and Th(NO3)4) in a pH 4.7 sodium acetate buffer solution leads to the formation of four sandwich-type polyoxometalates [Ce4(μ(3)-O)2(SiW9O34)2(CH3COO)2](10-) (1), [U4(μ(3)-O)2(SiW9O34)2(CH3COO)2](10-) (2), [Th3(μ(3)-O)(μ(2)-OH)3(SiW9O34)2](13-) (3), and [Hf3(μ(2)-OH)3(SiW9O34)2](11-) (4). All four compounds consist of a polynuclear cluster fragment stabilized by two [α-SiW9O34](10-) polyanions. Compounds 1 and 2 are isostructural with a tetranuclear core (Ce4, U4), while compound 3 presents a trinuclear Th3 core bearing a μ(3)-O-centered bridge. It is an unprecedented configuration in the case of the thorium(IV) cluster. Compound 4 also possesses a trinuclear Hf3 core but with the absence of the μ(3)-O bridge. The molecules have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, (183)W and (29)Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX) analysis. PMID:26301948

  13. Mapping of solution components, pH changes, protein stability and the elimination of protein precipitation during freeze-thawing of fibroblast growth factor 20.

    PubMed

    Maity, Haripada; Karkaria, Cyrus; Davagnino, Juan

    2009-08-13

    This study discusses the effect of key factors like containers, buffers and the freeze (controlled vs. flash freezing) and thawing processes on the stability of a therapeutic protein fibroblast growth factor 20 (FGF-20). The freezing profiles monitored by 15 temperature probes located at different regions in a 2-L bottle during freezing can be grouped into three categories. A rapid drop in temperature was observed at the bottom followed by the top and middle center of the bottle. The freeze-thawing behavior in a 50 ml tube is considerably uniform, as expected. Among phosphate, HEPES (4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazine ethanesulfonic acid), citrate and histidine (each containing 0.5 M arginine-sulfate) buffer systems, a minimum pH change (0.4 pH unit vs. approximately 1.7 pH unit) was observed for the phosphate buffer system. Thawing in a 50 ml tube at room temperature standing resulted in a significant phase separation in citrate, histidine and HEPES buffers; however, phase separation was least in the phosphate buffer system. These phase separations were found to be temperature dependent. No effect of Polysorbate 80 on freeze-thawing of FGF-20 was observed. Significant concentration gradients in major buffer components and protein concentration were observed during freeze-thawing in a 2-L bottle. The segregation patterns of the various components were similar with the top and bottom layers containing lowest and highest concentrations, respectively. In the formulation buffer no pH gradient was formed, and the precipitation of FGF-20 during thawing at the top layer was related to an insufficient amount of arginine-sulfate and the precipitation at the bottom layer was due to a salting out effect. The precipitate generated during thawing goes into solution easily upon mixing whole solution of the bottle and the various gradient formations do not cause any irreversible change in structure, stability and isoform distribution of FGF-20. Comparison of slow freezing and flash

  14. Three-Way Tucker2 Component Analysis Solutions of Stimuli x Responses x Individuals Data with Simple Structure and the Fewest Core Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adachi, Kohei

    2011-01-01

    Multivariate stimulus-response designs can be described by a three-way array of stimuli by responses by individuals. Its underlying structure can be represented by a network based on the Tucker2 component model in which stimulus components are connected with response components by means of the links that differ between individuals. For each…

  15. Fluorine doping: a feasible solution to enhancing the conductivity of high-resistance wide bandgap Mg0.51Zn0.49O active components

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lishu; Mei, Zengxia; Hou, Yaonan; Liang, Huili; Azarov, Alexander; Venkatachalapathy, Vishnukanthan; Kuznetsov, Andrej; Du, Xiaolong

    2015-01-01

    N-type doping of high-resistance wide bandgap semiconductors, wurtzite high-Mg-content MgxZn1–xO for instance, has always been a fundamental application-motivated research issue. Herein, we report a solution to enhancing the conductivity of high-resistance Mg0.51Zn0.49O active components, which has been reliably achieved by fluorine doping via radio-frequency plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxial growth. Fluorine dopants were demonstrated to be effective donors in Mg0.51Zn0.49O single crystal film having a solar-blind 4.43 eV bandgap, with an average concentration of 1.0 × 1019 F/cm3.The dramatically increased carrier concentration (2.85 × 1017 cm−3 vs ~1014 cm−3) and decreased resistivity (129 Ω · cm vs ~106 Ω cm) indicate that the electrical properties of semi-insulating Mg0.51Zn0.49O film can be delicately regulated by F doping. Interestingly, two donor levels (17 meV and 74 meV) associated with F were revealed by temperature-dependent Hall measurements. A Schottky type metal-semiconductor-metal ultraviolet photodetector manifests a remarkably enhanced photocurrent, two orders of magnitude higher than that of the undoped counterpart. The responsivity is greatly enhanced from 0.34 mA/W to 52 mA/W under 10 V bias. The detectivity increases from 1.89 × 109 cm Hz1/2/W to 3.58 × 1010 cm Hz1/2/W under 10 V bias at room temperature.These results exhibit F doping serves as a promising pathway for improving the performance of high-Mg-content MgxZn1-xO-based devices. PMID:26489958

  16. Fluorine doping: a feasible solution to enhancing the conductivity of high-resistance wide bandgap Mg0.51Zn0.49O active components.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lishu; Mei, Zengxia; Hou, Yaonan; Liang, Huili; Azarov, Alexander; Venkatachalapathy, Vishnukanthan; Kuznetsov, Andrej; Du, Xiaolong

    2015-01-01

    N-type doping of high-resistance wide bandgap semiconductors, wurtzite high-Mg-content MgxZn1-xO for instance, has always been a fundamental application-motivated research issue. Herein, we report a solution to enhancing the conductivity of high-resistance Mg0.51Zn0.49O active components, which has been reliably achieved by fluorine doping via radio-frequency plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxial growth. Fluorine dopants were demonstrated to be effective donors in Mg0.51Zn0.49O single crystal film having a solar-blind 4.43 eV bandgap, with an average concentration of 1.0 × 10(19) F/cm(3).The dramatically increased carrier concentration (2.85 × 10(17) cm(-3) vs ~10(14) cm(-3)) and decreased resistivity (129 Ω · cm vs ~10(6) Ω cm) indicate that the electrical properties of semi-insulating Mg0.51Zn0.49O film can be delicately regulated by F doping. Interestingly, two donor levels (17 meV and 74 meV) associated with F were revealed by temperature-dependent Hall measurements. A Schottky type metal-semiconductor-metal ultraviolet photodetector manifests a remarkably enhanced photocurrent, two orders of magnitude higher than that of the undoped counterpart. The responsivity is greatly enhanced from 0.34 mA/W to 52 mA/W under 10 V bias. The detectivity increases from 1.89 × 10(9) cm Hz(1/2)/W to 3.58 × 10(10) cm Hz(1/2)/W under 10 V bias at room temperature.These results exhibit F doping serves as a promising pathway for improving the performance of high-Mg-content MgxZn1-xO-based devices. PMID:26489958

  17. Fluorine doping: a feasible solution to enhancing the conductivity of high-resistance wide bandgap Mg0.51Zn0.49O active components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lishu; Mei, Zengxia; Hou, Yaonan; Liang, Huili; Azarov, Alexander; Venkatachalapathy, Vishnukanthan; Kuznetsov, Andrej; Du, Xiaolong

    2015-10-01

    N-type doping of high-resistance wide bandgap semiconductors, wurtzite high-Mg-content MgxZn1-xO for instance, has always been a fundamental application-motivated research issue. Herein, we report a solution to enhancing the conductivity of high-resistance Mg0.51Zn0.49O active components, which has been reliably achieved by fluorine doping via radio-frequency plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxial growth. Fluorine dopants were demonstrated to be effective donors in Mg0.51Zn0.49O single crystal film having a solar-blind 4.43 eV bandgap, with an average concentration of 1.0 × 1019 F/cm3.The dramatically increased carrier concentration (2.85 × 1017 cm-3 vs ~1014 cm-3) and decreased resistivity (129 Ω · cm vs ~106 Ω cm) indicate that the electrical properties of semi-insulating Mg0.51Zn0.49O film can be delicately regulated by F doping. Interestingly, two donor levels (17 meV and 74 meV) associated with F were revealed by temperature-dependent Hall measurements. A Schottky type metal-semiconductor-metal ultraviolet photodetector manifests a remarkably enhanced photocurrent, two orders of magnitude higher than that of the undoped counterpart. The responsivity is greatly enhanced from 0.34 mA/W to 52 mA/W under 10 V bias. The detectivity increases from 1.89 × 109 cm Hz1/2/W to 3.58 × 1010 cm Hz1/2/W under 10 V bias at room temperature.These results exhibit F doping serves as a promising pathway for improving the performance of high-Mg-content MgxZn1-xO-based devices.

  18. EXTENSION OF SELF-MODELING CURVE RESOLUTION TO MIXTURES OF MORE THAN THREE COMPONENTS: PART 2: FINDING THE COMPLETE SOLUTION. (R826238)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The previous paper [R.C. Henry, B.M. Kim, Extension of self-modeling curve resolution to mixtures of more than three components: Part 1. Finding the basic feasible region, Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems 8 (1990) 205¯216] explained an extension ...

  19. Changes in Lignin and Polysaccharide Components in 13 Cultivars of Rice Straw following Dilute Acid Pretreatment as Studied by Solution-State 2D 1H-13C NMR

    PubMed Central

    Teramura, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Kengo; Oshima, Tomoko; Aikawa, Shimpei; Matsuda, Fumio; Okamoto, Mami; Shirai, Tomokazu; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Ogino, Chiaki; Yamasaki, Masanori; Kikuchi, Jun; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    A renewable raw material, rice straw is pretreated for biorefinery usage. Solution-state two-dimensional (2D) 1H-13 C hetero-nuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, was used to analyze 13 cultivars of rice straw before and after dilute acid pretreatment, to characterize general changes in the lignin and polysaccharide components. Intensities of most (15 of 16) peaks related to lignin aromatic regions, such as p-coumarate, guaiacyl, syringyl, p-hydroxyphenyl, and cinnamyl alcohol, and methoxyl, increased or remained unchanged after pretreatment. In contrast, intensities of most (11 of 13) peaks related to lignin aliphatic linkages or ferulate decreased. Decreased heterogeneity in the intensities of three peaks related to cellulose components in acid-insoluble residues resulted in similar glucose yield (0.45–0.59 g/g-dry biomass). Starch-derived components showed positive correlations (r = 0.71 to 0.96) with glucose, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF), and formate concentrations in the liquid hydrolysates, and negative correlations (r = –0.95 to –0.97) with xylose concentration and acid-insoluble residue yield. These results showed the fate of lignin and polysaccharide components by pretreatment, suggesting that lignin aromatic regions and cellulose components were retained in the acid insoluble residues and starch-derived components were transformed into glucose, 5-HMF, and formate in the liquid hydrolysate. PMID:26083431

  20. Four-component relativistic calculations in solution with the polarizable continuum model of solvation: theory, implementation, and application to the group 16 dihydrides H2X (X = O, S, Se, Te, Po).

    PubMed

    Remigio, Roberto Di; Bast, Radovan; Frediani, Luca; Saue, Trond

    2015-05-28

    We present a formulation of four-component relativistic self-consistent field (SCF) theory for a molecular solute described within the framework of the polarizable continuum model (PCM) for solvation. The linear response function for a four-component PCM-SCF state is also derived, as well as the explicit form of the additional contributions to the first-order response equations. The implementation of such a four-component PCM-SCF model, as carried out in a development version of the DIRAC program package, is documented. In particular, we present the newly developed application programming interface PCMSolver used in the actual implementation with DIRAC. To demonstrate the applicability of the approach, we present and analyze calculations of solvation effects on the geometries, electric dipole moments, and static electric dipole polarizabilities for the group 16 dihydrides H2X (X = O, S, Se, Te, Po). PMID:25412410

  1. Reorientational dynamics of charged and neutral solutes in 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazoilum bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquids: Realization of ionic component of hydrogen bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Prabhat Kumar; Sarkar, Moloy

    2016-05-01

    Role of electrostatic interaction on rotational relaxation dynamics of two charged solutes, sodium 8-methoxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (MPTS), 1-pyrenesulfonic acid sodium salt (1-PSA) and neutral perylene has been studied in two structurally similar but chemically distinguishable imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs). Analysis of the results reveals that rotational relaxation of MPTS is significantly hindered even in the IL where acidic C2-H of the imidazolium moiety is replaced by the methyl group. Moreover, rotational relaxation of neutral perylene is found to be faster than mononegative 1-PSA which is again observed to be faster than that of tri-negative MPTS in the same ILs.

  2. Solution structure of Pyrococcus furiosus RPP21, a component of the archaeal RNase P holoenzyme, and interactions with its RPP29 protein partner.

    PubMed

    Amero, Carlos D; Boomershine, William P; Xu, Yiren; Foster, Mark

    2008-11-11

    RNase P is the ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein metalloenzyme responsible for cleaving the 5'-leader sequence of precursor tRNAs during their maturation. While the RNA subunit is catalytically active on its own at high monovalent and divalent ion concentrations, four protein subunits are associated with archaeal RNase P activity in vivo: RPP21, RPP29, RPP30, and POP5. These proteins have been shown to function in pairs: RPP21-RPP29 and POP5-RPP30. We have determined the solution structure of RPP21 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus ( Pfu) using conventional and paramagnetic NMR techniques. Pfu RPP21 in solution consists of an unstructured N-terminus, two alpha-helices, a zinc binding motif, and an unstructured C-terminus. Moreover, we have used chemical shift perturbations to characterize the interaction of RPP21 with RPP29. The data show that the primary contact with RPP29 is localized to the two helices of RPP21. This information represents a fundamental step toward understanding structure-function relationships of the archaeal RNase P holoenzyme. PMID:18922021

  3. Solution Structure of Pfu RPP21, a Component of the Archaeal RNase P Holoenzyme, and Interactions with its RPP29 Protein Partner

    PubMed Central

    Amero, Carlos D; Boomershine, William P; Xu, Yiren; Foster, Mark

    2009-01-01

    RNase P is the ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein metalloenzyme responsible for cleaving the 5′-leader sequence of precursor tRNAs during their maturation. While the RNA subunit is catalytically active on its own at high monovalent and divalent ion concentration, four proteins subunits are associated with archaeal RNase P activity in vivo: RPP21, RPP29, RPP30 and POP5. These proteins have been shown to function in pairs: RPP21-RPP29 and POP5-RPP30. We have determined the solution structure of RPP21 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) using conventional and paramagnetic NMR techniques. Pfu RPP21 in solution consists of an unstructured N-terminus, two alpha helices, a zinc binding motif, and an unstructured C-terminus. Moreover, we have used chemical shift perturbations to characterize the interaction of RPP21 with Pfu RPP29. The data show that the primary contact with RPP29 is localized to the two helices of RPP21. This information represents a fundamental step towards understanding structure-function relationships of the archaeal RNase P holoenzyme. PMID:18922021

  4. The in-situ decontamination of sand and gravel aquifers by chemically enhanced solubilization of multiple-component DNAPLS with surfactant solutions. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    Laboratory, numerical simulation, and field studies have been conducted to assess the potential use of micellar-surfactant solutions to solubilize chlorinated solvents contaminating sand and gravel aquifers. Laboratory studies were conducted at the State University of New York at Buffalo (SUNY) while numerical simulation and field work were undertaken by INTERA Inc. in collaboration with Martin Marietta Energy Systems Inc. at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Kentucky. Ninety-nine surfactants were screened for their ability to solubilize trichloroethene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CTET). Ten of these were capable of solubilizing TCE to concentrations greater than 15,000 mg/L, compared to its aqueous solubility of 1,100 mg/L. Four surfactants were identified as good solubilizers of all three chlorinated solvents. Of these, a secondary alcohol ethoxylate was the first choice for in situ testing because of its excellent solubilizing ability and its low propensity to sorb. However, this surfactant did not meet the Commonwealth of Kentucky`s acceptance criteria. Consequently, it was decided to use a surfactant approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration as a food-grade additive. As a 1% micellar-surfactant solution, this sorbitan monooleate has a solubilization capacity of 16,000 mg TCE/L, but has a higher propensity to sorb to clays than has the alcohol ethoxylate.

  5. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Integrability Aspects and Soliton Solutions for a System Describing Ultrashort Pulse Propagation in an Inhomogeneous Multi-Component Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Rui; Tian, Bo; Lü, Xing; Zhang, Hai-Qiang; Xu, Tao

    2010-09-01

    For the propagation of the ultrashort pulses in an inhomogeneous multi-component nonlinear medium, a system of coupled equations is analytically studied in this paper. Painlevé analysis shows that this system admits the Painlevé property under some constraints. By means of the Ablowitz-Kaup-Newell-Segur procedure, the Lax pair of this system is derived, and the Darboux transformation (DT) is constructed with the help of the obtained Lax pair. With symbolic computation, the soliton solutions are obtained by virtue of the DT algorithm. Figures are plotted to illustrate the dynamical features of the soliton solutions. Characteristics of the solitons propagating in an inhomogeneous multi-component nonlinear medium are discussed: (i) Propagation of one soliton and two-peak soliton; (ii) Elastic interactions of the parabolic two solitons; (iii) Overlap phenomenon between two solitons; (iv) Collision of two head-on solitons and two head-on two-peak solitons; (v) Two different types of interactions of the three solitons; (vi) Decomposition phenomenon of one soliton into two solitons. The results might be useful in the study on the ultrashort-pulse propagation in the inhomogeneous multi-component nonlinear media.

  6. Small organic solutes in sticky droplets from orb webs of the spider Zygiella atrica (Araneae; Araneidae): β-alaninamide is a novel and abundant component.

    PubMed

    Townley, Mark A; Pu, Qinglin; Zercher, Charles K; Neefus, Christopher D; Tillinghast, Edward K

    2012-10-01

    In northeastern North America, Zygiella atrica often build their orb webs near the ocean. We analyzed individual field-built Z. atrica webs to determine if organic low-molecular-mass solutes (LMM) in their sticky droplets showed any unusual features not previously seen in orb webs of other species living in less salty environments. While two of the three most abundant organic LMM (putrescine (butane-1,4-diamine) and GABamide (4-aminobutanamide)) are already well-known from webs of inland spiders, the third major LMM, β-alaninamide (3-aminopropanamide), a homolog of GABamide, has not been detected in sticky droplets from any other araneoid spiders (27 species). It remains to be established, however, whether or not use of β-alaninamide is related to proximity to saltwater. We observed variability in organic LMM composition in Z. atrica webs that appeared to be influenced more by an undetermined factor associated with different collecting locations and/or collection dates than by different genders or instars. Shifts in composition when adult females were transferred from the field to the laboratory were also observed. Structural similarities and inverse correlations among β-alaninamide, GABamide, and N-acetylputrescine suggest that they may form a series of LMM fulfilling essentially the same, as yet unknown, role in the webs of those species in which they occur. PMID:23081916

  7. Investigation on the coprecipitation of transuranium elements from alkaline solutions by the method of appearing reagents. Study of the effects of waste components on decontamination from Np(IV) and Pu(IV)

    SciTech Connect

    Bessonov, A.A.; Budantseva, N.A.; Gelis, A.V.; Nikonov, M.V.; Shilov, V.P.

    1997-09-01

    The third stage of the study on the homogeneous coprecipitation of neptunium and plutonium from alkaline high-level radioactive waste solutions by the Method of Appearing Reagents has been completed. Alkaline radioactive wastes exist at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. The recent studies investigated the effects of neptunium chemical reductants, plutonium(IV) concentration, and the presence of bulk tank waste solution components on the decontamination from tetravalent neptunium and plutonium achieved by homogeneous coprecipitation. Data on neptunium reduction to its tetravalent state in alkaline solution of different NaOH concentrations are given. Eleven reductants were tested to find those most suited to remove neptunium, through chemical reduction, from alkaline solution by homogeneous coprecipitation. Hydrazine, VOSO{sub 4}, and Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 4} were found to be the most effective reductants. The rates of reduction with these reductants were comparable with the kinetics of carrier formation. Solution decontamination factors of about 400 were attained for 10{sup -6}M neptunium. Coprecipitation of plutonium(IV) with carriers obtained as products of thermal hydrolysis, redox transformations, and catalytic decomposition of [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sup 3+}, [Fe(CN){sub 5}NO]{sup 2-}, Cr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, KMnO{sub 4}, and Li{sub 4}UO{sub 2}(O{sub 2}){sub 3} was studied and results are described. Under optimum conditions, a 100-fold decrease of plutonium concentration was possible with each of these reagents.

  8. Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 2.0: Wind Turbine Reliability and Maintainability Enhancement through System-wide Structure Health Monitoring and Modifications to Rotating Components

    SciTech Connect

    Janet M Twomey, PhD

    2010-04-30

    EXECUTIVE SUMARRY An evaluation of nondestructive structural health monitoring methods was completed with over 132 documents, 37 specifically about wind turbines, summarized into a technology matrix. This matrix lists the technology, what can be monitored with this technology, and gives a short summary of the key aspects of the technology and its application. Passive and active acoustic emission equipment from Physical Acoustics Corp. and Acellent Technologies have been evaluated and selected for use in experimental state loading and fatigue tests of composite wind turbine blade materials. Acoustic Emission (AE) and Active Ultrasonic Testing (AUT), were applied to composite coupons with both simulated and actual damage. The results found that, while composites are more complicated in nature, compared to metallic structures, an artificial neural network analysis could still be used to determine damage. For the AE system, the failure mode could be determined (i.e. fiber breakage, delamination, etc.). The Acellent system has been evaluated to work well with composite materials. A test-rig for reliability testing of the rotating components was constructed. The research on the types of bearings used in the wind turbines indicated that in most of the designs, the main bearings utilized to support the shaft are cylindrical roller bearings. The accelerated degradation testing of a population of bearings was performed. Vibration and acoustic emission data was collected and analyzed in order to identify a representative degradation signal for each bearing to identify the initiation of the degradation process in the bearings. Afterwards, the RMS of the vibration signal from degradation initiation up to the end of the useful life of the bearing was selected to predict the remaining useful life of the bearing. This step included fitting Autoregressive Moving Average (ARMA) models to the degradation signals and approximating the probability distribution function (PDF) of

  9. Single and multi-component adsorptive removal of bisphenol A and 2,4-dichlorophenol from aqueous solutions with transition metal modified inorganic-organic pillared clay composites: Effect of pH and presence of humic acid.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Martínez, Krisiam; Reddy, Pratap; Cabrera-Lafaurie, Wilman A; Román, Félix R; Hernández-Maldonado, Arturo J

    2016-07-15

    Pillared clay based composites containing transition metals and a surfactant, namely MAlOr-NaBt (Bt=bentonite; Or=surfactant; M=Ni(2+), Cu(2+)or Co(2+)), were prepared to study selectivity and capacity toward single and multiple-component adsorption of bisphenol A (BPA) and 2,4-diclorophenol (DCP) from water. Tests were also performed to account for the presence of natural organic matter in the form of humic acid (HA). Equilibrium adsorption capacities for single components increased as follows: NaBtcomponent fixed-bed tests, however, revealed competition between the adsorbates, with the exception of the CuAlOr-NaBt beds. Inclusion of HA, surprisingly, enhanced the phenols adsorption capacity. Preliminary regeneration tests suggested that the adsorbent capacity can be recovered via thermal treatment or by washing with alkaline solutions. The former strategy, however, requires surfactant replenishment. More complex schemes would be needed to deal with absorbed HA. PMID:27037481

  10. Adsorption of thorium(IV) from simulated radioactive solutions using a novel electrospun PVA/TiO2/ZnO nanofiber adsorbent functionalized with mercapto groups: Study in single and multi-component systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour, Dariush; Keshtkar, Ali Reza; Moosavian, Mohammad Ali

    2016-03-01

    The novel polyvinyl alcohol/titanium oxide/zinc oxide (PVA/TiO2/ZnO) nanofiber adsorbent functionalized with 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (TMPTMS) was prepared by electrospinning method and its potential was investigated for the adsorption of thorium from single and multi-metal aqueous solutions. The prepared adsorbent was characterized by FTIR, SEM and BET analysis. The influences of different operational parameters such as pH, ionic strength, equilibrium time, initial concentration and temperature were studied in batch mode. Investigation of ionic strength effect showed that the addition of NaNO3 to metal solution has a slight effect on the thorium adsorption, whereas pH value has a serious effect on the thorium adsorption at pH values lower than 4. The double-exponential model described the adsorption of Th(IV) ions much better than other kinetic models within both the single and multi-component systems. Among various isotherm models used, the equilibrium data of Th(IV) conformed the Langmuir isotherm in the single system, while those were best fitted by Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm in multi-component system. Thermodynamic parameters such as ΔH°, ΔS°, and ΔG° indicated that the nature of adsorption process was spontaneous, endothermic and thermodynamically favored. The inhibitory effect of other metal ions on the adsorption capacity of Th(IV) was in order of Al(III) > Cu(II) > Cd(II) > Ni(II) > U(VI) > Fe(II).

  11. Multi-response optimization using Taguchi design and principle component analysis for removing binary mixture of alizarin red and alizarin yellow from aqueous solution by nano γ-alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolgharnein, Javad; Asanjrani, Neda; Bagtash, Maryam; Azimi, Gholamhasan

    The nanostructure of γ-alumina was used as an effective adsorbent for simultaneous removing of a mixture of alizarin red and alizarin yellow from aqueous solutions. The Taguchi design and principle component analysis were applied to explore effective parameters for achieving a higher adsorption capacity and removal percentage of the binary mixture containing alizarin red and alizarin yellow. Seven factors including temperature, contact time, initial pH value, the shaker rate, the sorbent dose, and initial concentrations of alizarin red and alizarin yellow in three levels were considered through the Taguchi technique. A L27 orthogonal array was used to determine the signal-to-noise ratio. Then, the removal percentage (R%) and adsorption capacity (q) of the above-mentioned dyes were transformed into an accurate S/N ratio. The Taguchi method indicates that the solution pH has the most contribution in controlling the removal percentage of alizarin red and alizarin yellow. Under optimal condition, the maximum removal percentages of 99% and 78.5%, and the capacity uptake of 54.4 and 39.0 mg g-1 were obtained for both alizarin red and alizarin yellow, respectively. Isotherm modeling and kinetic investigations showed that Langmuir, modified Langmuir, and pseudo-second-order models describe both the adsorption equilibrium and kinetic behavior well. The Fourier transform infrared analysis also firmly confirmed the involving active sites of nano γ-alumina in the adsorption process.

  12. Component-specific modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for the second year effort of a 3-year program to develop methodology for component specific modeling of aircraft engine hot section components (turbine blades, turbine vanes, and burner liners). These accomplishments include: (1) engine thermodynamic and mission models; (2) geometry model generators; (3) remeshing; (4) specialty 3-D inelastic stuctural analysis; (5) computationally efficient solvers, (6) adaptive solution strategies; (7) engine performance parameters/component response variables decomposition and synthesis; (8) integrated software architecture and development, and (9) validation cases for software developed.

  13. Component-specific modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschbein, M. S.

    1982-01-01

    The ability to accurately structurally analyze engine components to assure that they can survive for their designed lifetime in an increasingly harsh environment is discussed. Under the HOST (HOt Section Technology) program, advanced component-specific modeling methods, with built-in analysis capability, will be developed separately for burner liners, turbine blades and vanes. These modeling methods will make maximum use of, but will not rely solely on, existing analysis methods and techniques, to analyze the three identified components. Nor will the complete structural analysis of a component necessarily be performed as a single analysis. The approach to be taken will develop complete software analysis packages with internal, component-specific, self-adaptive solution strategies. Each package will contain a set of modeling and analysis tools. The selection and order of specific methods and techniques within the set to be applied will depend on the specific-component, the current thermo-mechanical loading, and the current state of the component. All modeling and analysis decisions will be made internally based on developed decision criteria within the solution strategies; minimal user intervention will be required.

  14. Brain components

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The brain is composed of more than a thousand billion neurons. Specific groups of them, working in concert, provide ... of information. The 3 major components of the brain are the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem. The ...

  15. Component-specific modeling. [jet engine hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Maffeo, R. J.; Tipton, M. T.; Weber, G.

    1992-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for a 3 year program to develop methodology for component-specific modeling of aircraft hot section components (turbine blades, turbine vanes, and burner liners). These accomplishments include: (1) engine thermodynamic and mission models, (2) geometry model generators, (3) remeshing, (4) specialty three-dimensional inelastic structural analysis, (5) computationally efficient solvers, (6) adaptive solution strategies, (7) engine performance parameters/component response variables decomposition and synthesis, (8) integrated software architecture and development, and (9) validation cases for software developed.

  16. Component separations.

    PubMed

    Heller, Lior; McNichols, Colton H; Ramirez, Oscar M

    2012-02-01

    Component separation is a technique used to provide adequate coverage for midline abdominal wall defects such as a large ventral hernia. This surgical technique is based on subcutaneous lateral dissection, fasciotomy lateral to the rectus abdominis muscle, and dissection on the plane between external and internal oblique muscles with medial advancement of the block that includes the rectus muscle and its fascia. This release allows for medial advancement of the fascia and closure of up to 20-cm wide defects in the midline area. Since its original description, components separation technique underwent multiple modifications with the ultimate goal to decrease the morbidity associated with the traditional procedure. The extensive subcutaneous lateral dissection had been associated with ischemia of the midline skin edges, wound dehiscence, infection, and seroma. Although the current trend is to proceed with minimally invasive component separation and to reinforce the fascia with mesh, the basic principles of the techniques as described by Ramirez et al in 1990 have not changed over the years. Surgeons who deal with the management of abdominal wall defects are highly encouraged to include this technique in their collection of treatment options. PMID:23372455

  17. Hyperfrequency components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-09-01

    The document has a collection of 19 papers (11 on technologies, 8 on applications) by 26 authors and coauthors. Technological topics include: evolution from conventional HEMT's double heterojunction and planar types of pseudomorphic HEMT's; MMIC R&D and production aspects for very-low-noise, low-power, and very-low-noise, high-power applications; hyperfrequency CAD tools; parametric measurements of hyperfrequency components on plug-in cards for design and in-process testing uses; design of Class B power amplifiers and millimetric-wave, bigrid-transistor mixers, exemplifying combined use of three major types of physical simulation in electrical modeling of microwave components; FET's for power amplification at up to 110 GHz; production, characterization, and nonlinear applications of resonant tunnel diodes. Applications topics include: development of active modules for major European programs; tubes versus solid-state components in hyperfrequency applications; status and potentialities of national and international cooperative R&D on MMIC's and CAD of hyperfrequency circuitry; attainable performance levels in multifunction MMIC applications; state of the art relative of MESFET power amplifiers (Bands S, C, X, Ku); creating a hyperfrequency functions library, of parametrizable reference cells or macrocells; and design of a single-stage, low-noise, band-W amplifier toward development of a three-stage amplifier.

  18. Bacterial contamination of blood components.

    PubMed

    Seghatchian, J

    2001-10-01

    Despite considerable advances in the safety of blood components, transfusion associated bacterial infection (TABI) remains an unresolved problem. As yet there are no perfect preventative, screening and/or detection methodologies for eliminating contaminated units. Until a practical, rapid, cost-effective and logistically acceptable test becomes available, we should be satisfied with the choice of various limited solutions that at least partially improve the bacterial safety of blood components. It is also necessary to establish standardised guidelines and agreed upon systematic procedures for the recognition and reporting of the laboratory and clinical evaluation of adverse reactions in recipients of contaminated blood components. PMID:11761277

  19. Inkjet deposited circuit components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidoki, S. M.; Nouri, J.; Heidari, A. A.

    2010-05-01

    All-printed electronics as a means of achieving ultra-low-cost electronic circuits has attracted great interest in recent years. Inkjet printing is one of the most promising techniques by which the circuit components can be ultimately drawn (i.e. printed) onto the substrate in one step. Here, the inkjet printing technique was used to chemically deposit silver nanoparticles (10-200 nm) simply by ejection of silver nitrate and reducing solutions onto different substrates such as paper, PET plastic film and textile fabrics. The silver patterns were tested for their functionality to work as circuit components like conductor, resistor, capacitor and inductor. Different levels of conductivity were achieved simply by changing the printing sequence, inks ratio and concentration. The highest level of conductivity achieved by an office thermal inkjet printer (300 dpi) was 5.54 × 105 S m-1 on paper. Inkjet deposited capacitors could exhibit a capacitance of more than 1.5 nF (parallel plate 45 × 45 mm2) and induction coils displayed an inductance of around 400 µH (planar coil 10 cm in diameter). Comparison of electronic performance of inkjet deposited components to the performance of conventionally etched items makes the technique highly promising for fabricating different printed electronic devices.

  20. Solution-Assisted Optical Contacting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaddock, Daniel; Abramovici, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    A modified version of a conventional optical-contact procedure has been found to facilitate alignment of optical components. The optical-contact procedure (called simply optical contacting in the art) is a standard means of bonding two highly polished and cleaned glass optical components without using epoxies or other adhesives. In its unmodified form, the procedure does not involve the use of any foreign substances at all: components to be optically contacted are dry. The main disadvantage of conventional optical contacting is that it is difficult or impossible to adjust the alignment of the components once they have become bonded. In the modified version of the procedure, a drop of an alcohol-based optical cleaning solution (isopropyl alcohol or similar) is placed at the interface between two components immediately before putting the components together. The solution forms a weak bond that gradually strengthens during a time interval of the order of tens of seconds as the alcohol evaporates. While the solution is present, the components can be slid, without loss of contact, to perform fine adjustments of their relative positions. After about a minute, most of the alcohol has evaporated and the optical components are rigidly attached to each other. If necessary, more solution can be added to enable resumption or repetition of the adjustment until the components are aligned to the required precision.

  1. Prognostics for Microgrid Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, Abhinav

    2012-01-01

    Prognostics is the science of predicting future performance and potential failures based on targeted condition monitoring. Moving away from the traditional reliability centric view, prognostics aims at detecting and quantifying the time to impending failures. This advance warning provides the opportunity to take actions that can preserve uptime, reduce cost of damage, or extend the life of the component. The talk will focus on the concepts and basics of prognostics from the viewpoint of condition-based systems health management. Differences with other techniques used in systems health management and philosophies of prognostics used in other domains will be shown. Examples relevant to micro grid systems and subsystems will be used to illustrate various types of prediction scenarios and the resources it take to set up a desired prognostic system. Specifically, the implementation results for power storage and power semiconductor components will demonstrate specific solution approaches of prognostics. The role of constituent elements of prognostics, such as model, prediction algorithms, failure threshold, run-to-failure data, requirements and specifications, and post-prognostic reasoning will be explained. A discussion on performance evaluation and performance metrics will conclude the technical discussion followed by general comments on open research problems and challenges in prognostics.

  2. Thermodynamics of rock forming crystalline solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, S. K.

    1971-01-01

    Analysis of phase diagrams and cation distributions within crystalline solutions as means of obtaining thermodynamic data on rock forming crystalline solutions is discussed along with some aspects of partitioning of elements in coexisting phases. Crystalline solutions, components in a silicate mineral, and chemical potentials of these components were defined. Examples were given for calculating thermodynamic mixing functions in the CaW04-SrW04, olivine-chloride solution, and orthopyroxene systems.

  3. Big Ideas and Small Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Roy

    2004-01-01

    Small solutions solve discrete, well-bounded problems and can be pieces of larger solutions. They can move things forward by mixing and matching available components in new and previously unimagined ways. A number of innovations, which at first glance are completely unrelated, can come together and create important synergics. This article…

  4. Electromarking solution

    DOEpatents

    Bullock, Jonathan S.; Harper, William L.; Peck, Charles G.

    1976-06-22

    This invention is directed to an aqueous halogen-free electromarking solution which possesses the capacity for marking a broad spectrum of metals and alloys selected from different classes. The aqueous solution comprises basically the nitrate salt of an amphoteric metal, a chelating agent, and a corrosion-inhibiting agent.

  5. Decontamination solution development studies

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.P.; Fetrow, L.K.; Kjarmo, H.E.; Pool, K.H.

    1993-09-01

    This study was conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the Hanford Grout Technology Program (HGTP). The objective of this study was to identify decontamination solutions capable of removing radioactive contaminants and grout from the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) process equipment and to determine the impact of these solutions on equipment components and disposal options. The reference grout used in this study was prepared with simulated double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) and a dry blend consisting of 40 wt % limestone flour, 28 wt % blast furnace slag, 28 wt % fly ash, and 4 wt % type I/II Portland cement.

  6. Driven one-component plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzato, Felipe B.; Pakter, Renato; Levin, Yan

    2009-08-15

    A statistical theory is presented that allows the calculation of the stationary state achieved by a driven one-component plasma after a process of collisionless relaxation. The stationary Vlasov equation with appropriate boundary conditions is reduced to an ordinary differential equation, which is then solved numerically. The solution is then compared with the molecular-dynamics simulation. A perfect agreement is found between the theory and the simulations. The full current-voltage phase diagram is constructed.

  7. Kirkwood-Buff integrals for ideal solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploetz, Elizabeth A.; Bentenitis, Nikolaos; Smith, Paul E.

    2010-04-01

    The Kirkwood-Buff (KB) theory of solutions is a rigorous theory of solution mixtures which relates the molecular distributions between the solution components to the thermodynamic properties of the mixture. Ideal solutions represent a useful reference for understanding the properties of real solutions. Here, we derive expressions for the KB integrals, the central components of KB theory, in ideal solutions of any number of components corresponding to the three main concentration scales. The results are illustrated by use of molecular dynamics simulations for two binary solutions mixtures, benzene with toluene, and methanethiol with dimethylsulfide, which closely approach ideal behavior, and a binary mixture of benzene and methanol which is nonideal. Simulations of a quaternary mixture containing benzene, toluene, methanethiol, and dimethylsulfide suggest this system displays ideal behavior and that ideal behavior is not limited to mixtures containing a small number of components.

  8. Cold worked ferritic alloys and components

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to liquid metal fast breeder reactor and steam generator precipitation hardening fully ferritic alloy components which have a microstructure substantially free of the primary precipitation hardening phase while having cells or arrays of dislocations of varying population densities. It also relates to the process by which these components are produced, which entails solution treating the alloy followed by a final cold working step. In this condition, the first significant precipitation hardening of the component occurs during high temperature use.

  9. Fabrication of plastic microfluidic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter M.; Matson, Dean W.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Hammerstrom, D. J.

    1998-09-01

    Plastic components have many advantages, including ease of fabrication, low cost, chemical inertness, lightweight, and disposability. We report on the fabrication of three plastics-based microfluidic components: a motherboard, a dialysis unit, and a metal sensor. Microchannels, headers, and interconnects were produced in thin sheets (>=50 microns) of polyimide, PMMA, polyethylene, and polycarbonate using a direct-write excimer laser micromachining system. Machined sheets were laminated by thermal and adhesive bonding to form leak-tight microfluidic components. The microfluidic motherboard borrowed the `functionality on a chip' concept from the electronics industry and was the heart of a complex microfluidic analytical device. The motherboard platform was designed to be tightly integrated and self-contained (i.e., liquid flows are all confined within machined microchannels), reducing the need for tubing with fluid distribution and connectivity. This concept greatly facilitated system integration and miniaturization. As fabricated, the motherboard consisted of three fluid reservoirs connected to micropumps by microchannels. The fluids could either be pumped independently or mixed in microchannels prior to being directed to exterior analytical components via outlet ports. The microdialysis device was intended to separate electrolytic solutes from low volume samples prior to mass spectrometric analysis. The device consisted of a dialysis membrane laminated between opposed serpentine microchannels containing the sample fluid and a buffer solution. The laminated metal sensor consisted of fluid reservoirs, micro-flow channels, micropumps, mixing channels, reaction channels, and detector circuitry.

  10. Comparison of non-ideal solution theories for multi-solute solutions in cryobiology and tabulation of required coefficients.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Michal W; McGann, Locksley E; Nychka, John A; Elliott, Janet A W

    2014-10-01

    Thermodynamic solution theories allow the prediction of chemical potentials in solutions of known composition. In cryobiology, such models are a critical component of many mathematical models that are used to simulate the biophysical processes occurring in cells and tissues during cryopreservation. A number of solution theories, both thermodynamically ideal and non-ideal, have been proposed for use with cryobiological solutions. In this work, we have evaluated two non-ideal solution theories for predicting water chemical potential (i.e. osmolality) in multi-solute solutions relevant to cryobiology: the Elliott et al. form of the multi-solute osmotic virial equation, and the Kleinhans and Mazur freezing point summation model. These two solution theories require fitting to only single-solute data, although they can make predictions in multi-solute solutions. The predictions of these non-ideal solution theories were compared to predictions made using ideal dilute assumptions and to available literature multi-solute experimental osmometric data. A single, consistent set of literature single-solute solution data was used to fit for the required solute-specific coefficients for each of the non-ideal models. Our results indicate that the two non-ideal solution theories have similar overall performance, and both give more accurate predictions than ideal models. These results can be used to select between the non-ideal models for a specific multi-solute solution, and the updated coefficients provided in this work can be used to make the desired predictions. PMID:25158101

  11. Polymer solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczyk, Gerhard Erich; Miller, Kevin Michael

    2011-07-26

    There is provided a method of making a polymer solution comprising polymerizing one or more monomer in a solvent, wherein said monomer comprises one or more ethylenically unsaturated monomer that is a multi-functional Michael donor, and wherein said solvent comprises 40% or more by weight, based on the weight of said solvent, one or more multi-functional Michael donor.

  12. Sound Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkman, Neal

    2007-01-01

    Poor classroom acoustics are impairing students' hearing and their ability to learn. However, technology has come up with a solution: tools that focus voices in a way that minimizes intrusive ambient noise and gets to the intended receiver--not merely amplifying the sound, but also clarifying and directing it. One provider of classroom audio…

  13. Robotic component preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Dokos, J.R.

    1986-04-01

    This report provides information on the preparation of robotic components. Component preparation includes pretinning or solder dipping, preforming, and pretrimming of component leads. Since about 70% of all components are axial-leaded resistor-type components, it was decided to begin with them and then later develop capabilities to handle other types. The first workcell is the first phase of an overall system to pretin, preform, and pretrim all components and to feed them to an automatic insertion system. Before use of the robot, a Unimation PUMA Modal 260, pretinning and preforming was done by first hand with a shield and vented booth.

  14. Colligative properties of simple solutions.

    PubMed

    Andrews, F C

    1976-11-01

    Vapor pressure lowering, osmotic pressure, boiling point elevation, and freezing point depression are all related quantitatively to the decrease in micro(1)(soln) upon the addition of solute in forming a solution. In any equilibrium system, regardless of whether it is in a gravitational field or whether it contains walls, semipermeable membranes, phase transitions, or solutes, all equilibria are maintained locally, in the small region of the equilibrium, by the equality of micro(1)(soln). If there are several subsystems in a gravitational field, at any fixed height, microi will have the same value in each subsystem into which substance i can get, and microi + M(i)gh is constant throughout the entire system. In a solution, there is no mechanism by which solvent and solute molecules could sustain different pressures. Both the solvent and solute are always under identical pressures in a region of solution, namely, the pressure of the solution in that region. Since nature does not know which component we call the solvent and which the solute, equations should be symmetric in the two (acknowledging that the nonvolatile component, if any, is commonly chosen to be solute). Simple molecular pictures illustrate what is happening to cause pressure (positive or negative) in liquids, vapor pressure of liquids, and the various colligative properties of solutions. The only effect of solute involved in these properties is that it dilutes the solvent, with the resulting increase in S and decrease in micro(1)(soln). Water can be driven passively up a tree to enormous heights by the difference between its chemical potential in the roots and the ambient air. There is nothing mysterious about the molecular bases for any of these phenomena. Biologists can use the well-understood pictures of these phenomena with confidence to study what is happening in the complicated living systems they consider. PMID:17818408

  15. Compatible solutes

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Recently we reported a role for compatible solute uptake in mediating bile tolerance and increased gastrointestinal persistence in the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes.1 Herein, we review the evolution in our understanding of how these low molecular weight molecules contribute to growth and survival of the pathogen both inside and outside the body, and how this stress survival mechanism may ultimately be used to target and kill the pathogen. PMID:21326913

  16. Software component quality evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clough, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes a software inspection process that can be used to evaluate the quality of software components. Quality criteria, process application, independent testing of the process and proposed associated tool support are covered. Early results indicate that this technique is well suited for assessing software component quality in a standardized fashion. With automated machine assistance to facilitate both the evaluation and selection of software components, such a technique should promote effective reuse of software components.

  17. Reactor component automatic grapple

    SciTech Connect

    Greenaway, P.R.

    1982-12-07

    A grapple for handling nuclear reactor components in a medium such as liquid sodium which, upon proper seating and alignment of the grapple with the component as sensed by a mechanical logic integral to the grapple, automatically seizes the component. The mechanical logic system also precludes seizure in the absence of proper seating and alignment.

  18. Reactor component automatic grapple

    DOEpatents

    Greenaway, Paul R.

    1982-01-01

    A grapple for handling nuclear reactor components in a medium such as liquid sodium which, upon proper seating and alignment of the grapple with the component as sensed by a mechanical logic integral to the grapple, automatically seizes the component. The mechanical logic system also precludes seizure in the absence of proper seating and alignment.

  19. Solution Leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Tiejun; Zhu, Deqing; Pan, Jian; He, Zhen

    2014-06-01

    Recovery of alumina from magnetic separation tailings of red mud has been investigated by Na2CO3 solution leaching. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results show that most of the alumina is present as 12CaO·7Al2O3 and CaO·Al2O3 in the magnetic separation tailings. The shrinking core model was employed to describe the leaching kinetics. The results show that the calculated activation energy of 8.31 kJ/mol is characteristic for an internal diffusion-controlled process. The kinetic equation can be used to describe the leaching process. The effects of Na2CO3 concentration, liquid-to-solid ratio, and particle size on recovery of Al2O3 were examined.

  20. Inorganic Components of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wexler, Anthony Stein

    The inorganic components comprise 15% to 50% of the mass of atmospheric aerosols. For about the past 10 years the mass of these components was predicted assuming thermodynamic equilibrium between the volatile aerosol -phase inorganic species NH_4NO _3 and NH_4Cl and their gas-phase counterparts NH_3, HNO_3, and HCl. In this thesis I examine this assumption and prove that (1) the time scales for equilibration between the gas and aerosol phases are often too long for equilibrium to hold, and (2) even when equilibrium holds, transport considerations often govern the size distribution of these aerosol components. Water can comprise a significant portion of atmospheric aerosols under conditions of high relative humidity, whereas under conditions of sufficiently low relative humidity atmospheric aerosols tend to be dry. The deliquescence point is the relative humidity where the aerosol goes from a solid dry phase to an aqueous or mixed solid-aqueous phase. In this thesis I derive the temperature dependence of the deliquescence point and prove that in multicomponent solutions the deliquescence point is lower than for corresponding single component solutions. These theories of the transport, thermodynamic, and deliquescent properties of atmospheric aerosols are integrated into an aerosol inorganics model, AIM. The predictions of AIM compare well to fundamental thermodynamic measurements. Comparison of the prediction of AIM to those of other aerosol equilibrium models shows substantial disagreement in the predicted water content at lower relative humidities. The disagreement is due the improved treatment in AIM of the deliquescence properties of multicomponent solutions. In the summer and fall of 1987 the California Air Resources Board conducted the Southern California Air Quality Study, SCAQS, during which atmospheric aerosols were measured in Los Angeles. The size and composition of the aerosol and the concentrations of their gas phase counterparts were measured. When the

  1. Cvode component user guidelines.

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Jaideep; Allan, Benjamin A.; Smith, Kylene J.

    2003-05-01

    This report describes the wrapping of cvode, a serial library of BDF-based solvers for stiff ODE systems, into a CCA component. It also gives examples of how one loads In the Cvode Component into the CCA framework, (Sandia's dccafe) as well as how the interface to the component (called CvodePort) is used. The report concludes with some timing results whereby we empirically show that componentization results in a maximum 2% performance degradation on a single CPU. The component can be obtained from Jaideep Ray (jairav@ca.sandia.gov, 925-294-3638)

  2. Generalized Structured Component Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Takane, Yoshio

    2004-01-01

    We propose an alternative method to partial least squares for path analysis with components, called generalized structured component analysis. The proposed method replaces factors by exact linear combinations of observed variables. It employs a well-defined least squares criterion to estimate model parameters. As a result, the proposed method…

  3. Design of Critical Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2001-01-01

    Critical component design is based on minimizing product failures that results in loss of life. Potential catastrophic failures are reduced to secondary failures where components removed for cause or operating time in the system. Issues of liability and cost of component removal become of paramount importance. Deterministic design with factors of safety and probabilistic design address but lack the essential characteristics for the design of critical components. In deterministic design and fabrication there are heuristic rules and safety factors developed over time for large sets of structural/material components. These factors did not come without cost. Many designs failed and many rules (codes) have standing committees to oversee their proper usage and enforcement. In probabilistic design, not only are failures a given, the failures are calculated; an element of risk is assumed based on empirical failure data for large classes of component operations. Failure of a class of components can be predicted, yet one can not predict when a specific component will fail. The analogy is to the life insurance industry where very careful statistics are book-kept on classes of individuals. For a specific class, life span can be predicted within statistical limits, yet life-span of a specific element of that class can not be predicted.

  4. The Elusive Third Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.

    2004-01-01

    The historical development of techniques for measuring three velocity components using laser velocimetry is presented. The techniques are described and their relative merits presented. Many of the approaches currently in use based on the fringe laser velocimeter have yielded inaccurate measurements of turbulence intensity in the on-axis component. A possible explanation for these inaccuracies is presented along with simulation results.

  5. IRRIGATION SYSTEM COMPONENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The common components of a irrigation system are defined in terms of the diversion, delivery, distribution and drainage subsystems. Irrigation systems can be defined on at least three different levels: project, farm and field. Each level will have the same basic set of components regardless of sca...

  6. Life's Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Simon Conway

    2003-09-01

    Life's Solution builds a persuasive case for the predictability of evolutionary outcomes. The case rests on a remarkable compilation of examples of convergent evolution, in which two or more lineages have independently evolved similar structures and functions. The examples range from the aerodynamics of hovering moths and hummingbirds to the use of silk by spiders and some insects to capture prey. Going against the grain of Darwinian orthodoxy, this book is a must read for anyone grappling with the meaning of evolution and our place in the Universe. Simon Conway Morris is the Ad Hominen Professor in the Earth Science Department at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of St. John's College and the Royal Society. His research focuses on the study of constraints on evolution, and the historical processes that lead to the emergence of complexity, especially with respect to the construction of the major animal body parts in the Cambrian explosion. Previous books include The Crucible of Creation (Getty Center for Education in the Arts, 1999) and co-author of Solnhofen (Cambridge, 1990). Hb ISBN (2003) 0-521-82704-3

  7. Life's Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Simon Conway

    2004-11-01

    Life's Solution builds a persuasive case for the predictability of evolutionary outcomes. The case rests on a remarkable compilation of examples of convergent evolution, in which two or more lineages have independently evolved similar structures and functions. The examples range from the aerodynamics of hovering moths and hummingbirds to the use of silk by spiders and some insects to capture prey. Going against the grain of Darwinian orthodoxy, this book is a must read for anyone grappling with the meaning of evolution and our place in the Universe. Simon Conway Morris is the Ad Hominen Professor in the Earth Science Department at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of St. John's College and the Royal Society. His research focuses on the study of constraints on evolution, and the historical processes that lead to the emergence of complexity, especially with respect to the construction of the major animal body parts in the Cambrian explosion. Previous books include The Crucible of Creation (Getty Center for Education in the Arts, 1999) and co-author of Solnhofen (Cambridge, 1990). Hb ISBN (2003) 0-521-82704-3

  8. Alloy solution hardening with solute pairs

    DOEpatents

    Mitchell, John W.

    1976-08-24

    Solution hardened alloys are formed by using at least two solutes which form associated solute pairs in the solvent metal lattice. Copper containing equal atomic percentages of aluminum and palladium is an example.

  9. Bocca: A Development Environment for HPC Components

    SciTech Connect

    Elwasif, Wael R; Norris, Boyana; Benjamin, Allan A.; Armstrong, Robert C.

    2007-01-01

    In high-performance scientific software development, the emphasis is often on short time to first solution. Even when the development of new components mostly reuses existing components or libraries and only small amounts of new code must be created, dealing with the component glue code and software build processes to obtain complete applications is still tedious and error-prone. Component-based soft ware meant to reduce complexity at the application level increases complexity with the attendant glue code. To address these needs, we introduce Bocca, the first tool to enable application developers to perform rapid component prototyping while maintaining robust software-engineering practices suitable to HPC environments. Bocca provides project management and a comprehensive build environment for creating and managing applications composed of Common Component Architecture components. Of critical importance for HPC applications, Bocca is designed to operate in a language-agnostic way, simultaneously handling components written in any of the languages commonly used in scientific applications: C, C++, Fortran, Fortran77, Python, and Java. Bocca automates the tasks related to the component glue code, freeing the user to focus on the scientific aspects of the application. Bocca embraces the philosophy pioneered by Ruby Rails for web applications: Start with something that works and evolve it to the user's purpose.

  10. GCS component development cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Jose A.; Macias, Rosa; Molgo, Jordi; Guerra, Dailos; Pi, Marti

    2012-09-01

    The GTC1 is an optical-infrared 10-meter segmented mirror telescope at the ORM observatory in Canary Islands (Spain). First light was at 13/07/2007 and since them it is in the operation phase. The GTC control system (GCS) is a distributed object & component oriented system based on RT-CORBA8 and it is responsible for the management and operation of the telescope, including its instrumentation. GCS has used the Rational Unified process (RUP9) in its development. RUP is an iterative software development process framework. After analysing (use cases) and designing (UML10) any of GCS subsystems, an initial component description of its interface is obtained and from that information a component specification is written. In order to improve the code productivity, GCS has adopted the code generation to transform this component specification into the skeleton of component classes based on a software framework, called Device Component Framework. Using the GCS development tools, based on javadoc and gcc, in only one step, the component is generated, compiled and deployed to be tested for the first time through our GUI inspector. The main advantages of this approach are the following: It reduces the learning curve of new developers and the development error rate, allows a systematic use of design patterns in the development and software reuse, speeds up the deliverables of the software product and massively increase the timescale, design consistency and design quality, and eliminates the future refactoring process required for the code.

  11. Discriminant Incoherent Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Georgakis, Christos; Panagakis, Yannis; Pantic, Maja

    2016-05-01

    Face images convey rich information which can be perceived as a superposition of low-complexity components associated with attributes, such as facial identity, expressions, and activation of facial action units (AUs). For instance, low-rank components characterizing neutral facial images are associated with identity, while sparse components capturing non-rigid deformations occurring in certain face regions reveal expressions and AU activations. In this paper, the discriminant incoherent component analysis (DICA) is proposed in order to extract low-complexity components, corresponding to facial attributes, which are mutually incoherent among different classes (e.g., identity, expression, and AU activation) from training data, even in the presence of gross sparse errors. To this end, a suitable optimization problem, involving the minimization of nuclear-and l1 -norm, is solved. Having found an ensemble of class-specific incoherent components by the DICA, an unseen (test) image is expressed as a group-sparse linear combination of these components, where the non-zero coefficients reveal the class(es) of the respective facial attribute(s) that it belongs to. The performance of the DICA is experimentally assessed on both synthetic and real-world data. Emphasis is placed on face analysis tasks, namely, joint face and expression recognition, face recognition under varying percentages of training data corruption, subject-independent expression recognition, and AU detection by conducting experiments on four data sets. The proposed method outperforms all the methods that are compared with all the tasks and experimental settings. PMID:27008268

  12. Scientific Software Component Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S.; Dykman, N.; Kumfert, G.; Smolinski, B.

    2000-02-16

    We are developing new software component technology for high-performance parallel scientific computing to address issues of complexity, re-use, and interoperability for laboratory software. Component technology enables cross-project code re-use, reduces software development costs, and provides additional simulation capabilities for massively parallel laboratory application codes. The success of our approach will be measured by its impact on DOE mathematical and scientific software efforts. Thus, we are collaborating closely with library developers and application scientists in the Common Component Architecture forum, the Equation Solver Interface forum, and other DOE mathematical software groups to gather requirements, write and adopt a variety of design specifications, and develop demonstration projects to validate our approach. Numerical simulation is essential to the science mission at the laboratory. However, it is becoming increasingly difficult to manage the complexity of modern simulation software. Computational scientists develop complex, three-dimensional, massively parallel, full-physics simulations that require the integration of diverse software packages written by outside development teams. Currently, the integration of a new software package, such as a new linear solver library, can require several months of effort. Current industry component technologies such as CORBA, JavaBeans, and COM have all been used successfully in the business domain to reduce software development costs and increase software quality. However, these existing industry component infrastructures will not scale to support massively parallel applications in science and engineering. In particular, they do not address issues related to high-performance parallel computing on ASCI-class machines, such as fast in-process connections between components, language interoperability for scientific languages such as Fortran, parallel data redistribution between components, and massively

  13. EXAFS and principal component analysis : a new shell game.

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, S.

    1998-10-28

    The use of principal component (factor) analysis in the analysis EXAFS spectra is described. The components derived from EXAFS spectra share mathematical properties with the original spectra. As a result, the abstract components can be analyzed using standard EXAFS methodology to yield the bond distances and other coordination parameters. The number of components that must be analyzed is usually less than the number of original spectra. The method is demonstrated using a series of spectra from aqueous solutions of uranyl ions.

  14. Ceramic component for electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, David D.

    1979-01-01

    A ceramic component suitable for preparing MHD generator electrodes consists of HfO.sub.2 and sufficient Tb.sub.4 O.sub.7 to stabilize at least 60 volume percent of the HfO.sub.2 into the cubic structure. The ceramic component may also contain a small amount of PrO.sub.2, Yb.sub.2 O.sub.3 or a mixture of both to improve stability and electronic conductivity of the electrode. The component is highly resistant to corrosion by molten potassium seed and molten coal slag in the MHD fluid and exhibits both ionic and electronic conductivity.

  15. Rapid analysis of acid in etching and pickling solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tumbina, V.P.; Chinokalov, V.Ya.

    1995-02-01

    A computational method for determining sulfuric and hydrochloric acids in two-component etching solutions has been proposed. The method makes use of linear relationships, assuming that the sum of free and bound acid in solution remains constant.

  16. Structural materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    High density structural (blocking) materials composed of a polyimide filled with glass microballoons. Structural components such as panels which have integral edgings and/or other parts made of the high density materials.

  17. Structural materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    High density structural (blocking) materials composed of a polyimide filled with glass microballoons and methods for making such materials. Structural components such as panels which have integral edgings and/or other parts made of the high density materials.

  18. Component Fixturing Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kling, Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An end-configuration of components to be moved or positioned is first obtained. This end-configuration determines the relative positioning and orientation of the components with respect to each other when in a final, desired configuration. A folding pattern is then obtained that is formed by interior vertices defining corresponding tessellation facets. The folding pattern can be induced to transition from a first folded configuration to a second folded configuration. When in the second folded configuration mounting facets, which are a subset of the tessellation facets, are arranged by the geometry of the folding pattern into positions and orientations with respect to each other that correspond to the end-configuration of the components. A foldable structure is then obtained that folds in accordance with the folding pattern, and the components are affixed to their respective mounting facets.

  19. Structural materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    High density structural (blocking) materials composed of a polyimide filled with glass microballoons. Structural components such as panels which have integral edgings and/or other parts made of the high density materials.

  20. Develop a Model Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ensey, Tyler S.

    2013-01-01

    During my internship at NASA, I was a model developer for Ground Support Equipment (GSE). The purpose of a model developer is to develop and unit test model component libraries (fluid, electrical, gas, etc.). The models are designed to simulate software for GSE (Ground Special Power, Crew Access Arm, Cryo, Fire and Leak Detection System, Environmental Control System (ECS), etc. .) before they are implemented into hardware. These models support verifying local control and remote software for End-Item Software Under Test (SUT). The model simulates the physical behavior (function, state, limits and 110) of each end-item and it's dependencies as defined in the Subsystem Interface Table, Software Requirements & Design Specification (SRDS), Ground Integrated Schematic (GIS), and System Mechanical Schematic.(SMS). The software of each specific model component is simulated through MATLAB's Simulink program. The intensiv model development life cycle is a.s follows: Identify source documents; identify model scope; update schedule; preliminary design review; develop model requirements; update model.. scope; update schedule; detailed design review; create/modify library component; implement library components reference; implement subsystem components; develop a test script; run the test script; develop users guide; send model out for peer review; the model is sent out for verifictionlvalidation; if there is empirical data, a validation data package is generated; if there is not empirical data, a verification package is generated; the test results are then reviewed; and finally, the user. requests accreditation, and a statement of accreditation is prepared. Once each component model is reviewed and approved, they are intertwined together into one integrated model. This integrated model is then tested itself, through a test script and autotest, so that it can be concluded that all models work conjointly, for a single purpose. The component I was assigned, specifically, was a

  1. Component fragility research program

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, N.C.; Mochizuki, G.L.; Holman, G.S.; Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1989-11-01

    To demonstrate how high-level'' qualification test data can be used to estimate the ultimate seismic capacity of nuclear power plant equipment, we assessed in detail various electrical components tested by the Pacific Gas Electric Company for its Diablo Canyon plant. As part of our Phase I Component Fragility Research Program, we evaluated seismic fragility for five Diablo Canyon components: medium-voltage (4kV) switchgear; safeguard relay board; emergency light battery pack; potential transformer; and station battery and racks. This report discusses our Phase II fragility evaluation of a single Westinghouse Type W motor control center column, a fan cooler motor controller, and three local starters at the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant. These components were seismically qualified by means of biaxial random motion tests on a shaker table, and the test response spectra formed the basis for the estimate of the seismic capacity of the components. The seismic capacity of each component is referenced to the zero period acceleration (ZPA) and, in our Phase II study only, to the average spectral acceleration (ASA) of the motion at its base. For the motor control center, the seismic capacity was compared to the capacity of a Westinghouse Five-Star MCC subjected to actual fragility tests by LLNL during the Phase I Component Fragility Research Program, and to generic capacities developed by the Brookhaven National Laboratory for motor control center. Except for the medium-voltage switchgear, all of the components considered in both our Phase I and Phase II evaluations were qualified in their standard commercial configurations or with only relatively minor modifications such as top bracing of cabinets. 8 refs., 67 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Inelastic behavior of structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, N.; Khozeimeh, K.; Toridis, T. G.

    1980-01-01

    A more accurate procedure was developed for the determination of the inelastic behavior of structural components. The actual stress-strain curve for the mathematical of the structure was utilized to generate the force-deformation relationships for the structural elements, rather than using simplified models such as elastic-plastic, bilinear and trilinear approximations. relationships were generated for beam elements with various types of cross sections. In the generational of these curves, stress or load reversals, kinematic hardening and hysteretic behavior were taken into account. Intersections between loading and unloading branches were determined through an iterative process. Using the inelastic properties obtained, the plastic static response of some simple structural systems composed of beam elements was computed. Results were compared with known solutions, indicating a considerable improvement over response predictions obtained by means of simplified approximations used in previous investigations.

  3. NASTRAN component-mode synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guyan, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Procedure for dynamic substructuring analysis technique is generally as follows: calculation of component modes; selection of component normal modes, calculation of component generalized matrices, assembly of system matrices, and computation of normal modes; and retrieval of component response.

  4. Double well isomerization rate constants in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Anthony G.; Hynes, James T.

    1985-02-01

    The rate constant k for a double well isomerization in solution is calculated over the entire friction range. The importance of frequency-dependent friction for both the vibrational energy transfer (VET) and barrier passage components of k is described. Rapid suppression of the VET transfer component with increasing degrees of freedom is discussed.

  5. IT Infrastructure Components for Biobanking

    PubMed Central

    Prokosch, H.U.; Beck, A.; Ganslandt, T.; Hummel, M.; Kiehntopf, M.; Sax, U.; Ückert, F.; Semler, S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Within translational research projects in the recent years large biobanks have been established, mostly supported by homegrown, proprietary software solutions. No general requirements for biobanking IT infrastructures have been published yet. This paper presents an exemplary biobanking IT architecture, a requirements specification for a biorepository management tool and exemplary illustrations of three major types of requirements. Methods We have pursued a comprehensive literature review for biobanking IT solutions and established an interdisciplinary expert panel for creating the requirements specification. The exemplary illustrations were derived from a requirements analysis within two university hospitals. Results The requirements specification comprises a catalog with more than 130 detailed requirements grouped into 3 major categories and 20 subcategories. Special attention is given to multitenancy capabilities in order to support the project-specific definition of varying research and bio-banking contexts, the definition of workflows to track sample processing, sample transportation and sample storage and the automated integration of preanalytic handling and storage robots. Conclusion IT support for biobanking projects can be based on a federated architectural framework comprising primary data sources for clinical annotations, a pseudonymization service, a clinical data warehouse with a flexible and user-friendly query interface and a biorepository management system. Flexibility and scalability of all such components are vital since large medical facilities such as university hospitals will have to support biobanking for varying monocentric and multicentric research scenarios and multiple medical clients. PMID:23616851

  6. Encyclopedia of Software Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Lloyd V. (Inventor); Beckman, Brian C. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Intelligent browsing through a collection of reusable software components is facilitated with a computer having a video monitor and a user input interface such as a keyboard or a mouse for transmitting user selections, by presenting a picture of encyclopedia volumes with respective visible labels referring to types of software, in accordance with a metaphor in which each volume includes a page having a list of general topics under the software type of the volume and pages having lists of software components for each one of the generic topics, altering the picture to open one of the volumes in response to an initial user selection specifying the one volume to display on the monitor a picture of the page thereof having the list of general topics and altering the picture to display the page thereof having a list of software components under one of the general topics in response to a next user selection specifying the one general topic, and then presenting a picture of a set of different informative plates depicting different types of information about one of the software components in response to a further user selection specifying the one component.

  7. Scientific Component Technology Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S; Bosl, B; Dahlgren, T; Kumfert, G; Smith, S

    2003-02-07

    The laboratory has invested a significant amount of resources towards the development of high-performance scientific simulation software, including numerical libraries, visualization, steering, software frameworks, and physics packages. Unfortunately, because this software was not designed for interoperability and re-use, it is often difficult to share these sophisticated software packages among applications due to differences in implementation language, programming style, or calling interfaces. This LDRD Strategic Initiative investigated and developed software component technology for high-performance parallel scientific computing to address problems of complexity, re-use, and interoperability for laboratory software. Component technology is an extension of scripting and object-oriented software development techniques that specifically focuses on the needs of software interoperability. Component approaches based on CORBA, COM, and Java technologies are widely used in industry; however, they do not support massively parallel applications in science and engineering. Our research focused on the unique requirements of scientific computing on ASCI-class machines, such as fast in-process connections among components, language interoperability for scientific languages, and data distribution support for massively parallel SPMD components.

  8. Encyclopedia of software components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanwarren, Lloyd (Inventor); Beckman, Brian C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Intelligent browsing through a collection of reusable software components is facilitated with a computer having a video monitor and a user input interface such as a keyboard or a mouse for transmitting user selections, by presenting a picture of encyclopedia volumes with respective visible labels referring to types of software, in accordance with a metaphor in which each volume includes a page having a list of general topics under the software type of the volume and pages having lists of software components for each one of the generic topics, altering the picture to open one of the volumes in response to an initial user selection specifying the one volume to display on the monitor a picture of the page thereof having the list of general topics and altering the picture to display the page thereof having a list of software components under one of the general topics in response to a next user selection specifying the one general topic, and then presenting a picture of a set of different informative plates depicting different types of information about one of the software components in response to a further user selection specifying the one component.

  9. A Design for Standards-based Knowledge Components.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Thor A.; Merrill, M. David

    2000-01-01

    Describes ongoing work in designing modular software components based on open standards and a specific instructional design theoryuinstructional transaction theory. Focuses on applied technological solutions to overcome identified limitations of current authoring environments, including proprietary architectures, instructional design theory…

  10. Behavioral components of impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Christoph; Voss, Andreas; Schmitz, Florian; Nuszbaum, Mandy; Tüscher, Oliver; Lieb, Klaus; Klauer, Karl Christoph

    2014-04-01

    Acting in accord with long-term goals requires control of interfering impulses, the success of which depends on several different processes. Using a structural-equation modeling approach, we investigated 5 behavioral components of impulsivity: the control of stimulus interference, proactive interference, and response interference, as well as decisional and motivational impulsivity. Results support the existence of 5 correlated but separable components of impulsive behavior. The present study is the 1st to demonstrate the separability of stimulus and response interference. It also supports the notion that control of response-related interference is not a unitary construct: Response-selection demands were separable from those of withholding or stopping. Relations between behavioral impulsivity components and self-report measures of impulsivity were largely absent. We conclude that as the construct of impulsivity has been extended to describe an increasingly diverse set of phenomena and processes, it has become too broad to be helpful in guiding future research. PMID:23957282

  11. Component-specific modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    A series of interdisciplinary modeling and analysis techniques that were specialized to address three specific hot section components are presented. These techniques will incorporate data as well as theoretical methods from many diverse areas including cycle and performance analysis, heat transfer analysis, linear and nonlinear stress analysis, and mission analysis. Building on the proven techniques already available in these fields, the new methods developed will be integrated into computer codes to provide an accurate, and unified approach to analyzing combustor burner liners, hollow air cooled turbine blades, and air cooled turbine vanes. For these components, the methods developed will predict temperature, deformation, stress and strain histories throughout a complete flight mission.

  12. Components in the Pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Gorton, Ian; Wynne, Adam S.; Liu, Yan; Yin, Jian

    2011-02-24

    Scientists commonly describe their data processing systems metaphorically as software pipelines. These pipelines input one or more data sources and apply a sequence of processing steps to transform the data and create useful results. While conceptually simple, pipelines often adopt complex topologies and must meet stringent quality of service requirements that place stress on the software infrastructure used to construct the pipeline. In this paper we describe the MeDICi Integration Framework, which is a component-based framework for constructing complex software pipelines. The framework supports composing pipelines from distributed heterogeneous software components and provides mechanisms for controlling qualities of service to meet demanding performance, reliability and communication requirements.

  13. Blood Component Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kelton, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Human blood has been transfused for about 60-70 years. Over this time, the practice of blood transfusion has changed dramatically. One major change is the separation of blood into its various components. As a result, the patient can receive only the blood component in which he is deficient. In this way, the risk of side effects—particularly hepatitis—is lessened. This article briefly reviews the various blood products, the indications for their use, and some associated risks. These products include oxygen-carrying products, plasma products, blood products used to correct hemostatic defects, and immune globulin. PMID:21279096

  14. Ceramic component for electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, David D.; Bates, J. Lambert

    1980-01-01

    A ceramic component suitable for preparing MHD generator electrodes having the compositional formula: Y.sub.x (Mg.sub.y Cr.sub.z).sub.w Al.sub.(1-w) O.sub.3 where x=0.9 to 1.05, y=0.02 to 0.2, z=0.8 to 1.05 and w=1.0 to 0.5. The component is resistant to the formation of hydration products in an MHD environment, has good electrical conductivity and exhibits a lower electrochemical corrosion rate than do comparable compositions of lanthanum chromite.

  15. Laser Beam Welding of Nitride Steel Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Hongping; Yin, Guobin; Shulkin, Boris

    Laser beam welding is a joining technique that has many advantages over conventional GMAW welding, such as low heat input, short cycle time as well as good cosmetic welds. Laser beam welding has been widely used for welding powertrain components in automotive industry. When welding nitride steel components, however, laser beam welding faces a great challenge. The difficulty lies in the fact that the nitride layer in the joint releases the nitrogen into the weld pool, resulting in a porous weld. This research presents an industrial ready solution to prevent the nitrogen from forming gas bubbles in the weld.

  16. Informed Test Component Weighting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Lawrence M.

    2001-01-01

    Identifies and evaluates alternative methods for weighting tests. Presents formulas for composite reliability and validity as a function of component weights and suggests a rational process that identifies and considers trade-offs in determining weights. Discusses drawbacks to implicit weighting and explicit weighting and the difficulty of…

  17. Revisiting Wilson's Moral Components.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straughan, Roger

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the reasons why educational researchers and teachers never embraced the ideas of John Wilson as they related to his components of morality in moral education. States that through this examination, the strengths and weaknesses of Wilson's approach can be appraised. (CMK)

  18. Molecular Models Candy Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, William F.

    2007-01-01

    An explanation of various principles of chemistry in a paper by Fanny Ennever by the use of candy is described. The paper explains components of sucrose and the invert sugar that results from the hydrolysis of sucrose and will help students in determining whether the products are indeed hydrates of carbon.

  19. Revealing Optical Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Optical Vector Analyzer (OVA) 1550 significantly reduces the time and cost of testing sophisticated optical components. The technology grew from the research Luna Technologies' Dr. Mark Froggatt conducted on optical fiber strain measurement while working at Langley Research Center. Dr. Froggatt originally developed the technology for non- destructive evaluation testing at Langley. The new technique can provide 10,000 independent strain measurements while adding less than 10 grams to the weight of the vehicle. The OVA is capable of complete linear characterization of single-mode optical components used in high- bit-rate applications. The device can test most components over their full range in less than 30 seconds, compared to the more than 20 minutes required by other testing methods. The dramatically shortened measurement time results in increased efficiency in final acceptance tests of optical devices, and the comprehensive data produced by the instrument adds considerable value for component consumers. The device eliminates manufacturing bottlenecks, while reducing labor costs and wasted materials during production.

  20. Liquid rocket valve components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A monograph on valves for use with liquid rocket propellant engines is presented. The configurations of the various types of valves are described and illustrated. Design criteria and recommended practices for the various valves are explained. Tables of data are included to show the chief features of valve components in use on operational vehicles.

  1. Developing a Model Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, Christina M.

    2013-01-01

    The Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) Simulation Computer Software Configuration Item (CSCI) is responsible for providing simulations to support test and verification of SCCS hardware and software. The Universal Coolant Transporter System (UCTS) was a Space Shuttle Orbiter support piece of the Ground Servicing Equipment (GSE). The initial purpose of the UCTS was to provide two support services to the Space Shuttle Orbiter immediately after landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The UCTS is designed with the capability of servicing future space vehicles; including all Space Station Requirements necessary for the MPLM Modules. The Simulation uses GSE Models to stand in for the actual systems to support testing of SCCS systems during their development. As an intern at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), my assignment was to develop a model component for the UCTS. I was given a fluid component (dryer) to model in Simulink. I completed training for UNIX and Simulink. The dryer is a Catch All replaceable core type filter-dryer. The filter-dryer provides maximum protection for the thermostatic expansion valve and solenoid valve from dirt that may be in the system. The filter-dryer also protects the valves from freezing up. I researched fluid dynamics to understand the function of my component. The filter-dryer was modeled by determining affects it has on the pressure and velocity of the system. I used Bernoulli's Equation to calculate the pressure and velocity differential through the dryer. I created my filter-dryer model in Simulink and wrote the test script to test the component. I completed component testing and captured test data. The finalized model was sent for peer review for any improvements. I participated in Simulation meetings and was involved in the subsystem design process and team collaborations. I gained valuable work experience and insight into a career path as an engineer.

  2. Developing a Model Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, Christina M.

    2013-01-01

    The Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) Simulation Computer Software Configuration Item (CSCI) is,. responsible for providing simulations to support test and verification of SCCS hardware and software. The Universal Coolant Transporter System (UCTS) is a Space Shuttle Orbiter support piece of the Ground Servicing Equipment (GSE). The purpose of the UCTS is to provide two support services to the Space Shuttle Orbiter immediately after landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The Simulation uses GSE Models to stand in for the actual systems to support testing of SCCS systems s:luring their development. As an intern at KSC, my assignment was to develop a model component for the UCTS. I was given a fluid component (drier) to model in Matlab. The drier was a Catch All replaceable core type filter-drier. The filter-drier provides maximum protection for the thermostatic expansion valve and solenoid valve from dirt that may be in the system. The filter-drier also protects the valves from freezing up. I researched fluid dynamics to understand the function of my component. I completed training for UNIX and Simulink to help aid in my assignment. The filter-drier was modeled by determining affects it has on the pressure, velocity and temperature of the system. I used Bernoulli's Equation to calculate the pressure and velocity differential through the dryer. I created my model filter-drier in Simulink and wrote the test script to test the component. I completed component testing and captured test data. The finalized model was sent for peer review for any improvements.

  3. Demonstration of FRET in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Sunil; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Chib, Rahul; Fudala, Rafal; Baxi, Aatmun; Borejdo, Julian; Synak, Anna; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2016-03-01

    We measured the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from Uranin (U) donor to Rhodamine 101 (R101) acceptor in propylene glycol. Steady-state fluorescence measurements show a significant difference between mixed and unmixed fluorophore solutions. In the solution with mixed fluorophores, fluorescence intensity of the U donor decreases and intensity of R101 fluorescence increases. This is visualized as a color change from green to orange. Fluorescence anisotropy of the mixture solution increases in the donor emission wavelength region and decreases in the acceptor emission wavelengths; which is consistent with FRET occurrence. Time-resolved (lifetime) measurements show a decrease of the U lifetime in the presence of R101 acceptor. In the intensity decay of R101 acceptor appears a negative component indicating excited state process. All these measurements prove the presence of FRET in U/R101 mixture fluorescence.

  4. Multidimensional Scaling versus Components Analysis of Test Intercorrelations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, Mark L.

    1985-01-01

    Considers the relationship between coordinate estimates in components analysis and multidimensional scaling. Reports three small Monte Carlo studies comparing nonmetric scaling solutions to components analysis. Results are related to other methodological issues surrounding research on the general ability factor, response tendencies in…

  5. Thermodynamics of Dilute Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jancso, Gabor; Fenby, David V.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses principles and definitions related to the thermodynamics of dilute solutions. Topics considered include dilute solution, Gibbs-Duhem equation, reference systems (pure gases and gaseous mixtures, liquid mixtures, dilute solutions), real dilute solutions (focusing on solute and solvent), terminology, standard states, and reference systems.…

  6. Component-specific modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A series of interdisciplinary modeling and analysis techniques that were specialized to address three specific hot section components are presented. These techniques will incorporate data as well as theoretical methods from many diverse areas including cycle and performance analysis, heat transfer analysis, linear and nonlinear stress analysis, and mission analysis. Building on the proven techniques already available in these fields, the new methods developed will be integrated into computer codes to provide an accurate, efficient and unified approach to analyzing combustor burner liners, hollow air-cooled turbine blades and air-cooled turbine vanes. For these components, the methods developed will predict temperature, deformation, stress and strain histories throughout a complete flight mission.

  7. Bacterial Cell Wall Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsberg, Cynthia; Brown, Stephanie; Walker, Suzanne

    Bacterial cell-surface polysaccharides cells are surrounded by a variety of cell-surface structures that allow them to thrive in extreme environments. Components of the cell envelope and extracellular matrix are responsible for providing the cells with structural support, mediating intercellular communication, allowing the cells to move or to adhere to surfaces, protecting the cells from attack by antibiotics or the immune system, and facilitating the uptake of nutrients. Some of the most important cell wall components are polysaccharide structures. This review discusses the occurrence, structure, function, and biosynthesis of the most prevalent bacterial cell surface polysaccharides: peptidoglycan, lipopolysaccharide, arabinogalactan, and lipoarabinomannan, and capsular and extracellular polysaccharides. The roles of these polysaccharides in medicine, both as drug targets and as therapeutic agents, are also described.

  8. Diffusion bonding aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, G. A.; Broughton, T.

    1988-10-01

    The use of diffusion bonding processes at Rolls-Royce for the manufacture of titanium-alloy aircraft engine components and structures is described. A liquid-phase diffusion bonding process called activated diffusion bonding has been developed for the manufacture of the hollow titanium wide chord fan blade. In addition, solid-state diffusion bonding is being used in the manufacture of hollow vane/blade airfoil constructions mainly in conjunction with superplastic forming and hot forming techniques.

  9. Components for solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A requirement for the direct technological utilization of solar energy is a device for capturing and absorbing the available sunlight. These devices are commonly termed collectors. Because of the highly variable nature of sunlight, a facility for storing the collected energy is often essential. A device for direct conversion of light into electricity, which depends for operation on incident sunlight, is the photovoltaic cell. These components for solar energy systems are considered.

  10. Component for thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Purdy, David L.

    1977-01-01

    In a thermoelectric generator, a component comprises a ceramic insulator, having over limited areas thereof, each area corresponding to a terminal end of thermoelectric wires, a coating of a first metal which adheres to the insulator, and an electrical thermoelectric junction including a second metal which wets said first metal and adheres to said terminal ends but does not wet said insulator, and a cloth composed of electrically insulating threads interlaced with thermoelectric wires.

  11. MEA Component Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Frisk, J. W.; Hicks, M.T.; Atanasoski, R. T.; Boand, W. M.; Schmoeckel, A. K.; Kurkowski, M. J.

    2004-11-01

    Membrane electrode assembly (MEA) lifetime of greater than 40,000 hours remains a goal of the fuel cell industry. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of MEA degradation. Specifically, the relationship between component physical property changes and MEA performance decay has not been established. We report preliminary data relating changes in gas diffusion layer (GDL) physical properties to fuel cell performance decay.

  12. Solid state lighting component

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Thomas; Keller, Bernd; Ibbetson, James; Tarsa, Eric; Negley, Gerald

    2010-10-26

    An LED component comprising an array of LED chips mounted on a planar surface of a submount with the LED chips capable of emitting light in response to an electrical signal. The LED chips comprise respective groups emitting at different colors of light, with each of the groups interconnected in a series circuit. A lens is included over the LED chips. Other embodiments can comprise thermal spreading structures included integral to the submount and arranged to dissipate heat from the LED chips.

  13. Solid state lighting component

    DOEpatents

    Keller, Bernd; Ibbetson, James; Tarsa, Eric; Negley, Gerald; Yuan, Thomas

    2012-07-10

    An LED component comprising an array of LED chips mounted on a planar surface of a submount with the LED chips capable of emitting light in response to an electrical signal. The LED chips comprise respective groups emitting at different colors of light, with each of the groups interconnected in a series circuit. A lens is included over the LED chips. Other embodiments can comprise thermal spreading structures included integral to the submount and arranged to dissipate heat from the LED chips.

  14. Injection molded component

    SciTech Connect

    James, Allister W; Arrell, Douglas J

    2014-09-30

    An intermediate component includes a first wall member, a leachable material layer, and a precursor wall member. The first wall member has an outer surface and first connecting structure. The leachable material layer is provided on the first wall member outer surface. The precursor wall member is formed adjacent to the leachable material layer from a metal powder mixed with a binder material, and includes second connecting structure.

  15. Chondrites and Their Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, E. R. D.; Krot, A. N.

    Chondrites are extraordinary mixtures of materials with diverse origins that formed around other stars, in the solar nebula, and in their parent asteroids. Most chondrites were so severely altered by aqueous fluids, thermal metamorphism, and impacts that the original characteristics of their components have been largely erased. But a few pristine chondrites have preserved an exquisite mineralogical, chemical, isotopic, and chronological record of the first few million years of solar system history. The properties of diverse types of carbonaceous, ordinary, and enstatite chondrites focusing on the most pristine samples are reviewed to establish the chemical, isotopic, and mineralogical properties and origins of their components and to elucidate the asteroidal processes that modified them. Refractory inclusions - amoeboid olivine aggregates and Ca-Al-rich inclusions - were the first solids to form in the solar nebula near to the protosun. Chondrules and associated metallic Fe-Ni grains were still forming several million years later when the earliest planetesimals, which melted due to heat from 26Al decay, were colliding. In the least-altered chondrites, matrix material, which coats chondrules and other components, is largely composed of micrometer-sized silicates and amorphous materials, which formed at high temperatures, plus small amounts (up to 200 ppm) of presolar oxides and silicates.

  16. Artificial polarization components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cescato, L.; Gluch, Ekkehard; Stork, Wilhelm; Streibl, Norbert

    1990-07-01

    High frequency surface relief structures are optically anisotropic and show interesting polarisation properties 1 . These properties can be used to produce polarizations components such as wave plates polarizers. polarizing beamsplitters etc. Our experimental results show that even gratings with relatively low spatial frequency ( periods A ) exhibit a strong phase retardation and can be used as quarter-wave plates. k INTRODUC11ON The artificial birefringence exhibited by ultrahigh frequency gratings of dielectric materials can be used to produce various polarization components2 . Such components have applications in integrated optics as well as in free space optics. In order to produce the high spatial frequencies complex processes such as electron-beam lithography and reactive ion etching are needed. We show in this paper that sinusoidal holographic gratings in photoresist exhibit also a strong phase ret even at relatively long periods. L EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENTS To obtain the phase retardation of a lower frequency ( period A ) grating a simple setup as used by Enger and 2 can be applied. In our case however there are three measurements necessary to obtain the phase retardation because transmission of the two perpendicularly polarized beams is different from each other. I GRATING PRODUCTION grating 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 period (pmj 0. 74 0. 74 0. 61 0. 54 0. 46 0. 32 0. 54 0. 54 0. 54 ne (sec) 60

  17. Surface mount component jig

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1990-08-07

    A device for bending and trimming the pins of a dual-inline-package component and the like for surface mounting rather than through mounting to a circuit board comprises, in a first part, in pin cutter astride a holder having a recess for holding the component, a first spring therebetween, and, in a second part, two flat members pivotally interconnected by a hinge and urged to an upward peaked position from a downward peaked position by a second spring. As a downward force is applied to the pin cutter it urges the holder downward, assisted by the first spring and a pair of ridges riding on shoulders of the holder, to carry the component against the upward peaked flat members which guide the pins outwardly. As the holder continues downwardly, the flat members pivot to the downward peaked position bending the pins upwardly against the sides of the holder. When the downward movement is met with sufficient resistance, the ridges of the pin cutter ride over the holder's shoulders to continue downward to cut any excess length of pin.

  18. Energetic component treatability study

    SciTech Connect

    Gildea, P.D.; Brandon, S.L.; Brown, B.G.

    1997-11-01

    The effectiveness of three environmentally sound processes for small energetic component disposal was examined experimentally in this study. The three destruction methods, batch reactor supercritical water oxidation, sodium hydroxide base hydrolysis and calcium carbonate cookoff were selected based on their potential for producing a clean solid residue and minimum release of toxic gases after component detonation. The explosive hazard was destroyed by all three processes. Batch supercritical water oxidation destroyed both the energetics and organics. Further development is desired to optimize process parameters. Sodium hydroxide base hydrolysis and calcium carbonate cookoff results indicated the potential for scrubbing gaseous detonation products. Further study and testing are needed to quantify the effectiveness of these later two processes for full-scale munition destruction. The preliminary experiments completed in this study have demonstrated the promise of these three processes as environmentally sound technologies for energetic component destruction. Continuation of these experimental programs is strongly recommended to optimize batch supercritical water oxidation processing, and to fully develop the sodium hydroxide base hydrolysis and calcium carbonate cookoff technologies.

  19. The Component-Based Application for GAMESS

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Fang

    2007-01-01

    GAMESS, a quantum chetnistry program for electronic structure calculations, has been freely shared by high-performance application scientists for over twenty years. It provides a rich set of functionalities and can be run on a variety of parallel platforms through a distributed data interface. While a chemistry computation is sophisticated and hard to develop, the resource sharing among different chemistry packages will accelerate the development of new computations and encourage the cooperation of scientists from universities and laboratories. Common Component Architecture (CCA) offers an enviromnent that allows scientific packages to dynamically interact with each other through components, which enable dynamic coupling of GAMESS with other chetnistry packages, such as MPQC and NWChem. Conceptually, a cotnputation can be constructed with "plug-and-play" components from scientific packages and require more than componentizing functions/subroutines of interest, especially for large-scale scientific packages with a long development history. In this research, we present our efforts to construct cotnponents for GAMESS that conform to the CCA specification. The goal is to enable the fine-grained interoperability between three quantum chemistry programs, GAMESS, MPQC and NWChem, via components. We focus on one of the three packages, GAMESS; delineate the structure of GAMESS computations, followed by our approaches to its component development. Then we use GAMESS as the driver to interoperate integral components from the other tw"o packages, arid show the solutions for interoperability problems along with preliminary results. To justify the versatility of the design, the Tuning and Analysis Utility (TAU) components have been coupled with GAMESS and its components, so that the performance of GAMESS and its components may be analyzed for a wide range of systetn parameters.

  20. Solubility of uranium in alkaline salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.; Edwards, T.B.

    1994-03-29

    The solubility of uranium in alkaline salt solutions was investigated to screen for significant factors and interactions among the major salt components and temperature. The components included in the study were the sodium salts of hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, sulfate, and carbonate. General findings from the study included: (1) uranium solubilities are very low (1-20 mg/L) for all solution compositions at hydroxide concentrations from 0.1 to 17 molar (2) carbonate, sulfate, and aluminate are not effective complexants for uranium at high hydroxide concentration, (3) uranium solubility decreases with increasing temperature for most alkaline salt solutions, and (4) uranium solubility increases with changes in solution chemistry that reflect aging of high level waste (increase in nitrite and carbonate concentrations, decrease in nitrate and hydroxide concentrations). A predictive model for the concentration of uranium as a function of component concentrations and temperature was fitted to the data. All of the solution components and temperature were found to be significant. There is a significant lack of fit for the model, which suggests that the dependence on the uranium solubility over the wide range of solution compositions is non-linear and/or that there are other uncontrolled parameters which are important to the uranium solubility.

  1. Impedance of accelerator components

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, J.N.

    1996-05-01

    As demands for high luminosity and low emittance particle beams increase, an understanding of the electromagnetic interaction of these beams with their vacuum chamber environment becomes more important in order to maintain the quality of the beam. This interaction is described in terms of the wake field in time domain, and the beam impedance in frequency domain. These concepts are introduced, and related quantities such as the loss factor are presented. The broadband Q = 1 resonator impedance model is discussed. Perturbation and coaxial wire methods of measurement of real components are reviewed.

  2. Lifing of Engine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The successful development of advanced aerospace engines depends greatly on the capabilities of high performance materials and structures. Advanced materials, such as nickel based single crystal alloys, metal foam, advanced copper alloys, and ceramics matrix composites, have been engineered to provide higher engine temperature and stress capabilities. Thermal barrier coatings have been developed to improve component durability and fuel efficiency, by reducing the substrate hot wall metal temperature and protecting against oxidation and blanching. However, these coatings are prone to oxidation and delamination failures. In order to implement the use of these materials in advanced engines, it is necessary to understand and model the evolution of damage of the metal substrate as well as the coating under actual engine conditions. The models and the understanding of material behavior are utilized in the development of a life prediction methodology for hot section components. The research activities were focused on determining the stress and strain fields in an engine environment under combined thermo-mechanical loads to develop life prediction methodologies consistent with the observed damage formation of the coating and the substrates.

  3. Advanced Power Electronics Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper will give a description and status of the Advanced Power Electronics Materials and Components Technology program being conducted by the NASA Glenn Research Center for future aerospace power applications. The focus of this research program is on the following: 1) New and/or significantly improved dielectric materials for the development of power capacitors with increased volumetric efficiency, energy density, and operating temperature. Materials being investigated include nanocrystalline and composite ceramic dielectrics and diamond-like carbon films; 2) New and/or significantly improved high frequency, high temperature, low loss soft magnetic materials for the development of transformers/inductors with increased power/energy density, electrical efficiency, and operating temperature. Materials being investigated include nanocrystalline and nanocomposite soft magnetic materials; 3) Packaged high temperature, high power density, high voltage, and low loss SiC diodes and switches. Development of high quality 4H- and 6H- SiC atomically smooth substrates to significantly improve device performance is a major emphasis of the SiC materials program; 4) Demonstration of high temperature (> 200 C) circuits using the components developed above.

  4. Interactions between photodegradation components

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The interactions of p-cresol photocatalytic degradation components were studied by response surface methodology. The study was designed by central composite design using the irradiation time, pH, the amount of photocatalyst and the p-cresol concentration as variables. The design was performed to obtain photodegradation % as actual responses. The actual responses were fitted with linear, two factor interactions, cubic and quadratic model to select an appropriate model. The selected model was validated by analysis of variance which provided evidences such as high F-value (845.09), very low P-value (<.0.0001), non-significant lack of fit, the coefficient of R-squared (R2 = 0.999), adjusted R-squared (Radj2 = 0.998), predicted R-squared (Rpred2 = 0.994) and the adequate precision (95.94). Results From the validated model demonstrated that the component had interaction with irradiation time under 180 min of the time while the interaction with pH was above pH 9. Moreover, photocatalyst and p-cresol had interaction at minimal amount of photocatalyst (< 0.8 g/L) and 100 mg/L p-cresol. Conclusion These variables are interdependent and should be simultaneously considered during the photodegradation process, which is one of the advantages of the response surface methodology over the traditional laboratory method. PMID:22967885

  5. Laser generating metallic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Marc A.; Shannon, G. J.; Steen, William M.

    1997-04-01

    Recent developments in rapid prototyping have led to the concept of laser generating, the first additive manufacturing technology. This paper presents an innovative process of depositing multi-layer tracks, by fusing successive powder tracks, to generate three dimensional components, thereby offering an alternative to casting for small metal component manufacture. A coaxial nozzle assembly has been designed and manufactured enabling consistent omni-directional multi-layer deposition. In conjunction with this the software route from a CAD drawing to machine code generation has been established. The part is manufactured on a six axes machining center incorporating a 1.8 kW carbon-dioxide laser, providing an integrated opto-mechanical workstation. The part build-up program is controlled by a P150 host computer, linked directly to the DNC machining center. The direct manufacturing route is shown, including initial examples of simple objects (primitives -- cube, cylinder, cone) leading to more complex turbine blade generation, incorporating build-up techniques and the associated mechanical properties.

  6. Finite element (MARC) solution technologies for viscoplastic analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, V. K.; Thompson, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    A need for development of realistic constitutive models for structural components operating at high temperatures, accompanied by appropriate solution technologies for stress/life analyses of these components is studied. Viscoplastic models provide a better description of inelastic behavior of materials, but their mathematical structure is very complex. The highly nonlinear and stiff nature of the constitutive equations makes analytical solutions difficult. Therefore, suitable solution, finite element or other numerical, technologies must be developed to make these models adaptable for better and rational designs of components. NASA-Lewis has developed several solution technologies and successfully applied them to the solution of a number of uniaxial and multiaxial problems. Some of these solution technologies are described along with the models and representative results. The solution technologies developed and presented encompass a wide range of models, such as, isotropic, anisotropic, metal matrix composites, and single crystal models.

  7. Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes

    DOEpatents

    Morman, J.A.; Wei, T.Y.C.; Reifman, J.

    1999-07-27

    A process management expert system where following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced. 5 figs.

  8. Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes

    DOEpatents

    Morman, James A.; Wei, Thomas Y. C.; Reifman, Jaques

    1999-01-01

    A process management expert system where following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced.

  9. [Donation of blood components].

    PubMed

    Ladrón Llorente, Yolanda; Rández Alvero, Mónica; Carrascosa Ridruejo, Ana Isabel; Bregua García, Judith; Blanco Sotés, Carmelo; Calavia Lacarra, Jesús

    2004-06-01

    The donation of blood by means of aphaeresis by means of a cellular separator is a procedure through which one obtains blood components in the most efficient manner, yielding the best quality in the final product although this procedure requires special characteristics on behalf of the donor and consequently has a higher cost. The authors have analyzed the characteristics of 81 donors who used this procedure and who voluntarily came to our blood bank over a 17 month period from January 2002 until May 2003; 287 such procedures were carried out. The quality of the product obtained, as a benefit for the possible receptor, compensates the greater dedication by the donor and the high cost of this technique. PMID:15315098

  10. Economic components of grief.

    PubMed

    Corden, Anne; Hirst, Michael

    2013-09-01

    This article investigates the nature, context, and impact of economic stressors associated with loss, drawing on a mixed-methods study of changes in financial circumstances and economic roles following death of a life partner. Findings show how economic changes, and the practicalities of dealing with such transitions, shaped individual responses to the death. Perceived decline in financial wellbeing was associated with increased risk of poor psychological health following bereavement. The findings underline the theoretical importance of financial risk factors for anticipating the duration, pattern, and timing of bereavement outcomes. A challenge for service providers and professionals is how to bring understanding of economic components within emotional and practical support for people preparing for death and those who are bereaved. PMID:24521030

  11. Component failure data handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Gentillon, C.D.

    1991-04-01

    This report presents generic component failure rates that are used in reliability and risk studies of commercial nuclear power plants. The rates are computed using plant-specific data from published probabilistic risk assessments supplemented by selected other sources. Each data source is described. For rates with four or more separate estimates among the sources, plots show the data that are combined. The method for combining data from different sources is presented. The resulting aggregated rates are listed with upper bounds that reflect the variability observed in each rate across the nuclear power plant industry. Thus, the rates are generic. Both per hour and per demand rates are included. They may be used for screening in risk assessments or for forming distributions to be updated with plant-specific data.

  12. Hyaluronan: A Matrix Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rügheimer, Louise

    2008-09-01

    The glucosaminoglycan hyaluronan is a key component of the extracellular matrix. It is a large, negatively charged molecule that can act as an ion exchange reservoir for positive ions. Hyaluronan is involved in renomedullary water handling through its water-binding capacity. In the renal medulla, the main source for hyaluronan production is the renomedullary interstitial cells. Hyaluronan synthases are found in the inner part of the plasma membrane and polymerize hyaluronan chains which are extruded into the extracellular space. Hyaluronidases are a family of enzymes involved in the degradation of hyaluronan. They have a wide range of properties, including differences in size, inhibitor sensitivities, catalytic mechanisms, substrate specificities and pH optima.

  13. The Single Component Superinsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getmanets, V. F.; Goncharenko, L. G.; Mikhalchenko, R. S.; Pershin, N. P.; Stears, H.

    Many up-to-date space and ground-based applications require a superinsulation characterized by low outgassing rate, minimal emission of particles and extremely low heat conductivity. All these qualities are featured by a single- component superinsulation blankets composed of metallized film-screens provided with small "dimples" and perforations of very specific size. Our team has optimized and produced material such as this as a result of a great number of multiple successful laboratory tests. We have characterized and documented all of the relevant parameters of such a superinsulation. We have also developed, manufactured and tested a machine intended for large- scale industrial production of "dimpled" and perforated superinsulation. Within this report are presented results of tests for the new superinsulation as related to cryovessels. Resultant data shows that this superinsulation type is the best appropriate one for outer space and terrestrial applications where maximum contamination concerns are present. Several US organizations are presently performing independent evaluation of our material.

  14. Sprayed skin turbine component

    DOEpatents

    Allen, David B

    2013-06-04

    Fabricating a turbine component (50) by casting a core structure (30), forming an array of pits (24) in an outer surface (32) of the core structure, depositing a transient liquid phase (TLP) material (40) on the outer surface of the core structure, the TLP containing a melting-point depressant, depositing a skin (42) on the outer surface of the core structure over the TLP material, and heating the assembly, thus forming both a diffusion bond and a mechanical interlock between the skin and the core structure. The heating diffuses the melting-point depressant away from the interface. Subsurface cooling channels (35) may be formed by forming grooves (34) in the outer surface of the core structure, filling the grooves with a fugitive filler (36), depositing and bonding the skin (42), then removing the fugitive material.

  15. Optical communication components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldada, Louay

    2004-03-01

    We review and contrast key technologies developed to address the optical components market for communication applications. We first review the component requirements from a network perspective. We then look at different material systems, compare their properties, and describe the functions achieved to date in each of them. The material systems reviewed include silica fiber, silica on silicon, silicon on insulator, silicon oxynitride, sol-gels, polymers, thin-film dielectrics, lithium niobate, indium phosphide, gallium arsenide, magneto-optic materials, and birefringent crystals. We then describe the most commonly used classes of optical device technology and present their pros and cons as well as the functions achieved to date in each of them. The technologies reviewed include passive, actuation, and active technologies. The passive technologies described include fused fibers, dispersion-compensating fiber, beam steering, Bragg gratings, diffraction gratings, holographic elements, thin-film filters, photonic crystals, microrings, and birefringent elements. The actuation technologies include thermo-optics, electro-optics, acousto-optics, magneto-optics, electroabsorption, liquid crystals, total internal reflection technologies, and mechanical actuation. The active technologies include heterostructures, quantum wells, rare-earth doping, dye doping, Raman amplification, and semiconductor amplification. We also investigate the use of different material systems and device technologies to achieve building-block functions, including lasers, amplifiers, detectors, modulators, polarization controllers, couplers, filters, switches, attenuators, isolators, circulators, wavelength converters, chromatic dispersion compensators, and polarization mode dispersion compensators. Some of the technologies presented are well established in the industry and in some cases have reached the commodity stage, others have recently become ready for commercial introduction, while some others

  16. Communities of solutions in single solution clusters of a random K -satisfiability formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haijun; Ma, Hui

    2009-12-01

    The solution space of a K -satisfiability (K-SAT) formula is a collection of solution clusters, each of which contains all the solutions that are mutually reachable through a sequence of single-spin flips. Knowledge of the statistical property of solution clusters is valuable for a complete understanding of the solution space structure and the computational complexity of the random K-SAT problem. This paper explores single solution clusters of random 3- and 4-SAT formulas through unbiased and biased random-walk processes and the replica-symmetric cavity method of statistical physics. We find that the giant connected component of the solution space has already formed many different communities when the constraint density of the formula is still lower than the solution space clustering transition point. Solutions of the same community are more similar with each other and more densely connected with each other than with the other solutions. The entropy density of a solution community is calculated using belief propagation and is found to be different for different communities of the same cluster. When the constraint density is beyond the clustering transition point, the same behavior is observed for the solution clusters reached by several stochastic search algorithms. Taking together, the results of this work suggest a refined picture on the evolution of the solution space structure of the random K-SAT problem; they may also be helpful for designing heuristic algorithms.

  17. Communities of solutions in single solution clusters of a random K-satisfiability formula.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haijun; Ma, Hui

    2009-12-01

    The solution space of a K-satisfiability (K-SAT) formula is a collection of solution clusters, each of which contains all the solutions that are mutually reachable through a sequence of single-spin flips. Knowledge of the statistical property of solution clusters is valuable for a complete understanding of the solution space structure and the computational complexity of the random K-SAT problem. This paper explores single solution clusters of random 3- and 4-SAT formulas through unbiased and biased random-walk processes and the replica-symmetric cavity method of statistical physics. We find that the giant connected component of the solution space has already formed many different communities when the constraint density of the formula is still lower than the solution space clustering transition point. Solutions of the same community are more similar with each other and more densely connected with each other than with the other solutions. The entropy density of a solution community is calculated using belief propagation and is found to be different for different communities of the same cluster. When the constraint density is beyond the clustering transition point, the same behavior is observed for the solution clusters reached by several stochastic search algorithms. Taking together, the results of this work suggest a refined picture on the evolution of the solution space structure of the random K-SAT problem; they may also be helpful for designing heuristic algorithms. PMID:20365232

  18. Similarity solutions for phase-change problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canright, D.; Davis, S. H.

    1989-01-01

    A modification of Ivantsov's (1947) similarity solutions is proposed which can describe phase-change processes which are limited by diffusion. The method has application to systems that have n-components and possess cross-diffusion and Soret and Dufour effects, along with convection driven by density discontinuities at the two-phase interface. Local thermal equilibrium is assumed at the interface. It is shown that analytic solutions are possible when the material properties are constant.

  19. Properties of alkali-halide salt solutions about polarizable nanoparticle solutes for different ion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynveen, Aaron; Bresme, Fernando

    2010-10-01

    We investigate the distributions of various salts about large hydrophobic polarizable solutes in aqueous electrolyte solutions. The solutes are modeled as nanometer-sized cylindrical objects, a scale relevant to biomolecules and nanomaterials, and particularly high aspect ratio nanoparticles. Interactions, including image charge forces arising from the finite polarizability of the solute, between explicit solvent/ions and the solute are computed explicitly using a molecular dynamics simulation methodology we have recently introduced. Comparisons are made between several salt species and different models of the force fields for each ionic component of the salt. We find evidence that both small cations, Li+, and large anions, I-, adsorb at hydrophobic interfaces. Our results indicate that the ion structure about the solute is strongly dependent on the force field investigated, suggesting that ion selectivity is quite sensitive to the respective parameters defining the ion's size and binding energy as well as to the polarizability of the solute.

  20. CO component estimation based on the independent component analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Kaji, Ryohei; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Takeuchi, Tsutomu T.; Fukui, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    Fast Independent Component Analysis (FastICA) is a component separation algorithm based on the levels of non-Gaussianity. Here we apply FastICA to the component separation problem of the microwave background, including carbon monoxide (CO) line emissions that are found to contaminate the PLANCK High Frequency Instrument (HFI) data. Specifically, we prepare 100 GHz, 143 GHz, and 217 GHz mock microwave sky maps, which include galactic thermal dust, NANTEN CO line, and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) emissions, and then estimate the independent components based on the kurtosis. We find that FastICA can successfully estimate the CO component as the first independent component in our deflection algorithm because its distribution has the largest degree of non-Gaussianity among the components. Thus, FastICA can be a promising technique to extract CO-like components without prior assumptions about their distributions and frequency dependences.

  1. Three components of 'Taurids'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koseki, Masahiro

    2012-08-01

    Observations and the estimated activity profile both show the 'Taurids' are not a single entity but consist of three showers. It is necessary to study ecliptic streams such as 'Taurids' very carefully, because they are located near the ANT area, where sporadic or minor activities continue the whole year round. Nevertheless, photographic and CCD observations show a clear dip in the activity against the background and further analysis permits the discrimination of three components at the following solar longitudes and with the following radiants and geocentric velocities: SE activity (36.5 deg, +98 deg) Vgeo 28.6, mean solar longitude 202.6 deg SF activity (53.0 deg, +139 deg) Vgeo 27.0, mean solar longitude 223.4 deg Northern activity (55.5 deg, +213 deg) Vgeo 28.7, mean solar longitude 226.3 deg Observations might suggest other weaker activities exist but they are buried in the background activity. It is said that the 'Taurid' activity interval may extend from September to December, but the observations and analysis presented here argue against a single stream and in favor of a mixture of three independent streams and sporadic activities.

  2. Initial Ada components evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moebes, Travis

    1989-01-01

    The SAIC has the responsibility for independent test and validation of the SSE. They have been using a mathematical functions library package implemented in Ada to test the SSE IV and V process. The library package consists of elementary mathematical functions and is both machine and accuracy independent. The SSE Ada components evaluation includes code complexity metrics based on Halstead's software science metrics and McCabe's measure of cyclomatic complexity. Halstead's metrics are based on the number of operators and operands on a logical unit of code and are compiled from the number of distinct operators, distinct operands, and total number of occurrences of operators and operands. These metrics give an indication of the physical size of a program in terms of operators and operands and are used diagnostically to point to potential problems. McCabe's Cyclomatic Complexity Metrics (CCM) are compiled from flow charts transformed to equivalent directed graphs. The CCM is a measure of the total number of linearly independent paths through the code's control structure. These metrics were computed for the Ada mathematical functions library using Software Automated Verification and Validation (SAVVAS), the SSE IV and V tool. A table with selected results was shown, indicating that most of these routines are of good quality. Thresholds for the Halstead measures indicate poor quality if the length metric exceeds 260 or difficulty is greater than 190. The McCabe CCM indicated a high quality of software products.

  3. Filter Component Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.; Diaz, E.S.; Smeltzer, E.E.

    1996-12-31

    Advanced particulate filtration systems are currently being developed at Westinghouse for use in both coal-fired Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) systems. To date, Westinghouse has demonstrated 5855 hours of successful operation of first generation monolithic filter elements in PFBC applications when ash bridging or process thermal transient excursions are avoided. Alternate advanced monolithic and second generation fiber reinforced, filament wound and vacuum infiltrated filters are also being developed which are considered to have enhanced high temperature creep resistance, improved fracture toughness, or enhanced thermal shock characteristics, respectively. Mechanical and component fabrication improvements, as well as degradation mechanisms for each filter element have been identified by Westinghouse during exposure to simulated PFBC operating conditions and alkali-containing steam/air environments. Additional effort is currently being focused on determining the stability of the advanced monolithic high temperature creep resistant clay bonded silicon carbide (SiC) materials, alumina/mullite, and chemically vapor infiltrated (CVI) SiC materials during operation in the Westinghouse Advanced Particulate Filtration (W-APF) system at Foster Wheeler`s pressurized circulating fluidized-bed combustion (PCFBC) test facility in Karhula, Finland. Select advanced filter materials are being defined for additional long-term exposure in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) gas streams. The results of these efforts are summarized in this paper. 6 refs., 7 figs., 11 tabs.

  4. Performance Engineering Technology for Scientific Component Software

    SciTech Connect

    Malony, Allen D.

    2007-05-08

    Large-scale, complex scientific applications are beginning to benefit from the use of component software design methodology and technology for software development. Integral to the success of component-based applications is the ability to achieve high-performing code solutions through the use of performance engineering tools for both intra-component and inter-component analysis and optimization. Our work on this project aimed to develop performance engineering technology for scientific component software in association with the DOE CCTTSS SciDAC project (active during the contract period) and the broader Common Component Architecture (CCA) community. Our specific implementation objectives were to extend the TAU performance system and Program Database Toolkit (PDT) to support performance instrumentation, measurement, and analysis of CCA components and frameworks, and to develop performance measurement and monitoring infrastructure that could be integrated in CCA applications. These objectives have been met in the completion of all project milestones and in the transfer of the technology into the continuing CCA activities as part of the DOE TASCS SciDAC2 effort. In addition to these achievements, over the past three years, we have been an active member of the CCA Forum, attending all meetings and serving in several working groups, such as the CCA Toolkit working group, the CQoS working group, and the Tutorial working group. We have contributed significantly to CCA tutorials since SC'04, hosted two CCA meetings, participated in the annual ACTS workshops, and were co-authors on the recent CCA journal paper [24]. There are four main areas where our project has delivered results: component performance instrumentation and measurement, component performance modeling and optimization, performance database and data mining, and online performance monitoring. This final report outlines the achievements in these areas for the entire project period. The submitted progress

  5. Euclid Data Handling Design Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogiatto, Roberto; Tramutola, Antonio; Maddaleno, Corrado; Maiorano, Elena; Colombo, Cyril

    2014-08-01

    Euclid is the next medium-class mission of ESA's Science Programme, to be launched by 2020. The objective of Euclid is to investigate dark energy and dark matter, essential but mysterious components of today's standard model of cosmology. The complete survey will comprise hundreds of thousands of images and several tens of Petabytes of data. The significant amount of scientific data to be stored on-board and transmitted to Ground, imposes some challenging spacecraft requirements leading to innovative design solutions for the data handling and on-board communications. After the mission presentation, the paper provides an overview of the Spacecraft avionics architecture and deepens the Euclid data handling design concept.

  6. Materials Data on NaCe5S8 (SG:82) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Notch Signaling Components

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Yan; Wu, Tao; Li, Qing; Wang, Min-Cong; Jing, Li; Ruan, Zhi-Ping; Yao, Yu; Nan, Ke-Jun; Guo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a lethal and aggressive malignancy. Currently, the identities of prognostic and predictive makers of NSCLC have not been fully established. Dysregulated Notch signaling has been implicated in many human malignancies, including NSCLC. However, the prognostic value of measuring Notch signaling and the utility of developing Notch-targeted therapies in NSCLC remain inconclusive. The present study investigated the association of individual Notch receptor and ligand levels with lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) prognosis using the Kaplan-Meier plotte database. This online database encompasses 2437 lung cancer samples. Hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. The results showed that higher Notch1, Notch2, JAG1, and DLL1 mRNA expression predicted better overall survival (OS) in lung ADC, but showed no significance in SCC patients. Elevated Notch3, JAG2, and DLL3 mRNA expression was associated with poor OS of ADC patients, but not in SCC patients. There was no association between Notch4 and OS in either lung ADC or SCC patients. In conclusion, the set of Notch1, Notch2, JAG1, DLL1 and that of Notch3, JAG2, DLL3 played opposing prognostic roles in lung ADC patients. Neither set of Notch receptors and ligands was indicative of lung SCC prognosis. Notch signaling could serve as promising marker to predict outcomes in lung ADC patients. The distinct features of lung cancer subtypes and Notch components should be considered when developing future Notch-targeted therapies. PMID:27196489

  8. GOATS - Orbitology Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haber, Benjamin M.; Green, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    The GOATS Orbitology Component software was developed to specifically address the concerns presented by orbit analysis tools that are often written as stand-alone applications. These applications do not easily interface with standard JPL first-principles analysis tools, and have a steep learning curve due to their complicated nature. This toolset is written as a series of MATLAB functions, allowing seamless integration into existing JPL optical systems engineering modeling and analysis modules. The functions are completely open, and allow for advanced users to delve into and modify the underlying physics being modeled. Additionally, this software module fills an analysis gap, allowing for quick, high-level mission analysis trades without the need for detailed and complicated orbit analysis using commercial stand-alone tools. This software consists of a series of MATLAB functions to provide for geometric orbit-related analysis. This includes propagation of orbits to varying levels of generalization. In the simplest case, geosynchronous orbits can be modeled by specifying a subset of three orbit elements. The next case is a circular orbit, which can be specified by a subset of four orbit elements. The most general case is an arbitrary elliptical orbit specified by all six orbit elements. These orbits are all solved geometrically, under the basic problem of an object in circular (or elliptical) orbit around a rotating spheroid. The orbit functions output time series ground tracks, which serve as the basis for more detailed orbit analysis. This software module also includes functions to track the positions of the Sun, Moon, and arbitrary celestial bodies specified by right ascension and declination. Also included are functions to calculate line-of-sight geometries to ground-based targets, angular rotations and decompositions, and other line-of-site calculations. The toolset allows for the rapid execution of orbit trade studies at the level of detail required for the

  9. Definition of Contravariant Velocity Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-moa; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we have reviewed the basics of tensor analysis in an attempt to clarify some misconceptions regarding contravariant and covariant vector components as used in fluid dynamics. We have indicated that contravariant components are components of a given vector expressed as a unique combination of the covariant base vector system and, vice versa, that the covariant components are components of a vector expressed with the contravariant base vector system. Mathematically, expressing a vector with a combination of base vector is a decomposition process for a specific base vector system. Hence, the contravariant velocity components are decomposed components of velocity vector along the directions of coordinate lines, with respect to the covariant base vector system. However, the contravariant (and covariant) components are not physical quantities. Their magnitudes and dimensions are controlled by their corresponding covariant (and contravariant) base vectors.

  10. Cooling system for electronic components

    DOEpatents

    Anderl, William James; Colgan, Evan George; Gerken, James Dorance; Marroquin, Christopher Michael; Tian, Shurong

    2016-05-17

    Embodiments of the present invention provide for non interruptive fluid cooling of an electronic enclosure. One or more electronic component packages may be removable from a circuit card having a fluid flow system. When installed, the electronic component packages are coincident to and in a thermal relationship with the fluid flow system. If a particular electronic component package becomes non-functional, it may be removed from the electronic enclosure without affecting either the fluid flow system or other neighboring electronic component packages.

  11. Cooling system for electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Anderl, William James; Colgan, Evan George; Gerken, James Dorance; Marroquin, Christopher Michael; Tian, Shurong

    2015-12-15

    Embodiments of the present invention provide for non interruptive fluid cooling of an electronic enclosure. One or more electronic component packages may be removable from a circuit card having a fluid flow system. When installed, the electronic component packages are coincident to and in a thermal relationship with the fluid flow system. If a particular electronic component package becomes non-functional, it may be removed from the electronic enclosure without affecting either the fluid flow system or other neighboring electronic component packages.

  12. Contact Lens Solution Toxicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Contact Lens Solution Toxicity Information for adults A A A This image shows a reaction to contact lens solution. The prominent blood vessels and redness ...

  13. Spectroscopic studies of solutes in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Chai, Bing-hua; Zheng, Jian-ming; Zhao, Qing; Pollack, Gerald H

    2008-03-20

    Absorption and fluorescence characteristics of aqueous solutions of salts, sugars, and amino acids were studied using UV-vis spectroscopy and spectrofluorometry. Motivation stemmed from unanticipated absorption spectral and fluorescence features of the "exclusion zone" seen adjacent to various hydrophilic surfaces. Those features implied a structure distinct from that of bulk water (Adv. Colloid Interface Sci. 2006, 127, 19). Absorption peaks at approximately 270 nm similar to those observed in the exclusion zone were seen in solutions of the following substances: salts, Nafion 117 solution/film, l-lysine, d-alanine, d-glucose and sucrose. To determine the fate of the absorbed energy, we studied the fluorescence properties of these solutions. The salts showed fluorescence emission around 480-490 nm under different excitation wavelengths. The fluorescence intensity of LiCl was higher than NaCl, which was in turn higher than KCl-the same ordering as the absorption intensities. Fluorescence of Nafion 117 solution/film, l-lysine, d-alanine, d-glucose and sucrose were observed as well, with multiple excitation wavelengths. Hence, at least some of the absorbed energy is released as fluorescence. The results show features closely similar to those observed in the exclusion zone, implying that the aqueous region around the solutes resembles the aqueous zone adjacent to hydrophilic surfaces. Both may be more extensively ordered than previously thought. PMID:18298105

  14. Evolving Systems and Adaptive Key Component Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Balas, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new framework called Evolving Systems to describe the self-assembly, or autonomous assembly, of actively controlled dynamical subsystems into an Evolved System with a higher purpose. An introduction to Evolving Systems and exploration of the essential topics of the control and stability properties of Evolving Systems is provided. This chapter defines a framework for Evolving Systems, develops theory and control solutions for fundamental characteristics of Evolving Systems, and provides illustrative examples of Evolving Systems and their control with adaptive key component controllers.

  15. The electromagnetic spike solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nungesser, Ernesto; Lim, Woei Chet

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to use the existing relation between polarized electromagnetic Gowdy spacetimes and vacuum Gowdy spacetimes to find explicit solutions for electromagnetic spikes by a procedure which has been developed by one of the authors for gravitational spikes. We present new inhomogeneous solutions which we call the EME and MEM electromagnetic spike solutions.

  16. Thermodynamics of feldspathoid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sack, Richard O.; Ghiorso, Mark S.

    We have developed models for the thermody-namic properties of nephelines, kalsilites, and leucites in the simple system NaAlSiO4-KAlSiO4-Ca0.5AlSiO4-SiO2-H2O that are consistent with all known constraints on subsolidus equilibria and thermodynamic properties, and have integrated them into the existing MELTS software package. The model for nepheline is formulated for the simplifying assumptions that (1) a molecular mixing-type approximation describes changes in the configurational entropy associated with the coupled exchange substitutions □Si?NaAl and □Ca? Na2 and that (2) Na+ and K+ display long-range non-convergent ordering between a large cation and the three small cation sites in the Na4Al4Si4O16 formula unit. Notable features of the model include the prediction that the mineral tetrakalsilite (``panunzite'', sensu stricto) results from anti-ordering of Na and K between the large cation and the three small cation sites in the nepheline structure at high temperatures, an average dT/dP slope of about 55°/kbar for the reaction over the temperature and pressure ranges 800-1050 °C and 500-5000 bars, roughly symmetric (i.e. quadratic) solution behavior of the K-Na substitution along joins between fully ordered components in nepheline, and large positive Gibbs energies for the nepheline reciprocal reactions and and for the leucite reciprocal reaction

  17. Advanced integrated solution for MEMS design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liateni, Karim; Moulinier, David; Affour, Bachar; Boutamine, H.; Karam, Jean Michel; Veychard, D.; Courtois, Bernard; Cao, Ariel D.

    1999-03-01

    This paper presents a fully integrated solution for the development of Micro Electro Mechanical Systems which covers component libraries, design tools and designs methodologies which are used in conjunction with conventional design automation tools. This solutio enables system houses in wireless and optical communications and consumers electronics markets to reduce their internal development costs and significantly accelerate their product development cycles.

  18. Deuterium incorporation in biomass cell wall components by NMR analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Foston, Marcus B; McGaughey, Joseph; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Evans, Barbara R; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2012-01-01

    A commercially available deuterated kale sample was analyzed for deuterium incorporation by ionic liquid solution 2H and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). This protocol was found to effectively measure the percent deuterium incorporation at 33%, comparable to the 31% value determined by combustion. The solution NMR technique also suggested by a qualitative analysis that deuterium is preferentially incorporated into the carbohydrate components of the kale sample.

  19. Multi-component generalization of the Camassa-Holm equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Baoqiang; Qiao, Zhijun

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a multi-component system of the Camassa-Holm equation, denoted by CH(N , H), with 2 N components and an arbitrary smooth function H. This system is shown to admit Lax pair and infinitely many conservation laws. We particularly study the case N = 2 and derive the bi-Hamiltonian structures and peaked soliton (peakon) solutions for some examples.

  20. Joint Procrustes Analysis for Simultaneous Nonsingular Transformation of Component Score and Loading Matrices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adachi, Kohei

    2009-01-01

    In component analysis solutions, post-multiplying a component score matrix by a nonsingular matrix can be compensated by applying its inverse to the corresponding loading matrix. To eliminate this indeterminacy on nonsingular transformation, we propose Joint Procrustes Analysis (JPA) in which component score and loading matrices are simultaneously…

  1. The Analysis of Multitrait-Multimethod Matrices via Constrained Components Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiers, Henk A. L.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    An approach to the analysis of multitrait-multimethod matrices is proposed in which improper solutions are ruled out and convergence is guaranteed. The approach, based on constrained variants of components analysis, provides component scores that can relate components to external variables. It is illustrated through simulated and empirical data.…

  2. Multi-component assembly casting

    SciTech Connect

    James, Allister W.

    2015-10-13

    Multi-component vane segment and method for forming the same. Assembly includes: positioning a pre-formed airfoil component (12) and a preformed shroud heat resistant material (18) in a mold, wherein the airfoil component (12) and the shroud heat resistant material (18) each comprises an interlocking feature (24); preheating the mold; introducing molten structural material (46) into the mold; and solidifying the molten structural material such that it interlocks the pre-formed airfoil component (12) with respect to the preformed shroud heat resistant material (18) and is effective to provide structural support for the shroud heat resistant material (18). Surfaces between the airfoil component (12) and the structural material (46), between the airfoil component (12) and the shroud heat resistant material (18), and between the shroud heat resistant material (18) and the structural material (46) are free of metallurgical bonds.

  3. Magnetic Levitators With Superconductive Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgin, Benjamin P.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic noncontact levitators that include superconductive components provide vibration-damping suspension for cryogenic instruments, according to proposal. Because superconductive components attached to levitated cryogenic instruments, no additional coolant liquid or refrigeration power needed. Also because vibration-damping components of levitators located outside cold chambers, in ambient environment, not necessary to waste coolant liquid or refrigeration power on dissipation of vibrational energy. At least three levitating magnets and three superconductors necessary for stable levitation.

  4. EP component identification and measurement by principal components analysis.

    PubMed

    Chapman, R M; McCrary, J W

    1995-04-01

    Between the acquisition of Evoked Potential (EP) data and their interpretation lies a major problem: What to measure? An approach to this kind of problem is outlined here in terms of Principal Components Analysis (PCA). An important second theme is that experimental manipulation is important to functional interpretation. It would be desirable to have a system of EP measurement with the following characteristics: (1) represent the data in a concise, parsimonous way; (2) determine EP components from the data without assuming in advance any particular waveforms for the components; (3) extract components which are independent of each other; (4) measure the amounts (contributions) of various components in observed EPs; (5) use measures that have greater reliability than measures at any single time point or peak; and (6) identify and measure components that overlap in time. PCA has these desirable characteristics. Simulations are illustrated. PCA's beauty also has some warts that are discussed. In addition to discussing the usual two-mode model of PCA, an extension of PCA to a three-mode model is described that provides separate parameters for (1) waveforms over time, (2) coefficients for spatial distribution, and (3) scores telling the amount of each component in each EP. PCA is compared with more traditional approaches. Some biophysical considerations are briefly discussed. Choices to be made in applying PCA are considered. Other issues include misallocation of variance, overlapping components, validation, and latency changes. PMID:7626278

  5. Component separation in abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Rawstorne, Edward; Smart, Christopher J; Fallis, Simon A; Suggett, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Component separation is established for complex hernia repairs. This case presents early component separation and release of the anterior and posterior sheath to facilitate closure of the abdominal wall following emergency laparotomy, reinforcing the repair with a biological mesh. On Day 11 following an emergency laparotomy for penetrating trauma, this patient underwent component separation and release of the anterior and posterior sheath. An intra-abdominal biological mesh was secured, and the fascia and skin closed successfully. Primary abdominal closure can be achieved in patients with penetrating abdominal trauma with the use of component separation and insertion of intra-abdominal biological mesh, where standard closure is not possible. PMID:24876334

  6. Methods of component mode synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, R. R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A generalized substructure coupling, or component mode synthesis, procedure is described. Specific methods, applications, and such special topics as damping and experimental verification are surveyed.

  7. Solution deposition assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Roussillon, Yann; Scholz, Jeremy H; Shelton, Addison; Green, Geoff T; Utthachoo, Piyaphant

    2014-01-21

    Methods and devices are provided for improved deposition systems. In one embodiment of the present invention, a deposition system is provided for use with a solution and a substrate. The system comprises of a solution deposition apparatus; at least one heating chamber, at least one assembly for holding a solution over the substrate; and a substrate curling apparatus for curling at least one edge of the substrate to define a zone capable of containing a volume of the solution over the substrate. In another embodiment of the present invention, a deposition system for use with a substrate, the system comprising a solution deposition apparatus; at heating chamber; and at least assembly for holding solution over the substrate to allow for a depth of at least about 0.5 microns to 10 mm.

  8. A multigrid method for N-component nucleation.

    PubMed

    van Putten, Dennis S; Glazenborg, Simon P; Hagmeijer, Rob; Venner, Cornelis H

    2011-07-01

    A multigrid algorithm has been developed enabling more efficient solution of the cluster size distribution for N-component nucleation from the Becker-Döring equations. The theoretical derivation is valid for an arbitrary number of condensing components, making the simulation of many-component nucleating systems feasible. A steady state ternary nucleation problem is defined to demonstrate its efficiency. The results are used as a validation for existing nucleation theories. The non-steady state ternary problem provides useful insight into the initial stages of the nucleation process. We observe that for the ideal mixture the main nucleation flux bypasses the saddle point. PMID:21744895

  9. Transport of Solar Wind Fluctuations: A Two-Component Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oughton, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Smith, C. W.; Breech, B.; Isenberg, P. A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new model for the transport of solar wind fluctuations which treats them as two interacting incompressible components: quasi-two-dimensional turbulence and a wave-like piece. Quantities solved for include the energy, cross helicity, and characteristic transverse length scale of each component, plus the proton temperature. The development of the model is outlined and numerical solutions are compared with spacecraft observations. Compared to previous single-component models, this new model incorporates a more physically realistic treatment of fluctuations induced by pickup ions and yields improved agreement with observed values of the correlation length, while maintaining good observational accord with the energy, cross helicity, and temperature.

  10. Spacecraft redesign to reduce microphonic response of a VCO component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strain, J. C.; Mittal, S.

    1988-01-01

    Reaction wheel vibration was found to induce out of specification sidebands on the carrier frequencies of some spacecraft components containing mechanical voltage control oscillators (VCOs). Concurrent investigations were performed to redesign the VCOs to reduce their response to the wheel vibration, and to design a reaction wheel isolation system to reduce the vibration input to the affected components. Component level tests indicated that both efforts provided viable solutions. The redesigned VCO will be incorporated into future spacecraft in the series, while affected spacecraft already in production will be retrofitted with the reaction wheel isolation system.

  11. Topical diclofenac solution.

    PubMed

    Moen, Marit D

    2009-01-01

    Topical diclofenac solution (Pennsaid) is a liquid formulation containing the NSAID diclofenac sodium (1.5% w/w). The solution base contains 45% w/w dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to enhance the absorption of diclofenac through the skin. Topical diclofenac solution is applied directly to the knee for treatment of symptoms associated with osteoarthritis of the knee. In well designed 4- to 12-week trials in patients with primary osteoarthritis of the knee, topical diclofenac solution (40 drops four times daily) was significantly more effective than placebo or vehicle control (carrier solution without diclofenac) for improving Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis Index pain and physical function, and improving patient global assessment (PGA) and/or patient overall health assessment scores from baseline to the final assessments. Topical diclofenac solution (50 drops three times daily) was as effective as oral diclofenac 150 mg/day for improving WOMAC pain and physical function and PGA scores in a 12-week double-blind study in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Topical diclofenac solution was generally well tolerated. The most common treatment-emergent adverse event experienced by topical diclofenac solution recipients was dry skin at the application site. Gastrointestinal adverse events and abnormal laboratory parameters were less common with topical diclofenac solution than with oral diclofenac. PMID:19943711

  12. Mixed oxide solid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Magno, Scott; Wang, Ruiping; Derouane, Eric

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is a mixed oxide solid solution containing a tetravalent and a pentavalent cation that can be used as a support for a metal combustion catalyst. The invention is furthermore a combustion catalyst containing the mixed oxide solid solution and a method of making the mixed oxide solid solution. The tetravalent cation is zirconium(+4), hafnium(+4) or thorium(+4). In one embodiment, the pentavalent cation is tantalum(+5), niobium(+5) or bismuth(+5). Mixed oxide solid solutions of the present invention exhibit enhanced thermal stability, maintaining relatively high surface areas at high temperatures in the presence of water vapor.

  13. Wormholes in Wyman's solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formiga, J. B.; Almeida, T. S.

    2014-10-01

    The most general solution of the Einstein field equations coupled with a massless scalar field is known as Wyman's solution. This solution is also present in the Brans-Dicke theory and, due to its importance, it has been studied in detail by many authors. However, this solutions has not been studied from the perspective of a possible wormhole. In this paper, we perform a detailed analysis of this issue. It turns out that there is a wormhole. Although we prove that the so-called throat cannot be traversed by human beings, it can be traversed by particles and bodies that can last long enough.

  14. Lightweight Steel Solutions for Automotive Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hong Woo; Kim, Gyosung; Park, Sung Ho

    2010-06-15

    Recently, improvement in fuel efficiency and safety has become the biggest issue in worldwide automotive industry. Although the regulation of environment and safety has been tightened up more and more, the majority of vehicle bodies are still manufactured from stamped steel components. This means that the optimized steel solutions enable to demonstrate its ability to reduce body weight with high crashworthiness performance instead of expensive light weight materials such as Al, Mg and composites. To provide the innovative steel solutions for automotive industry, POSCO has developed AHSS and its application technologies, which is directly connected to EVI activities. EVI is a technical cooperation program with customer covering all stages of new car project from design to mass production. Integrated light weight solutions through new forming technologies such as TWB, hydroforming and HPF are continuously developed and provided for EVI activities. This paper will discuss the detailed status of these technologies especially light weight steel solutions based on innovative technologies.

  15. Lightweight Steel Solutions for Automotive Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hong Woo; Kim, Gyosung; Park, Sung Ho

    2010-06-01

    Recently, improvement in fuel efficiency and safety has become the biggest issue in worldwide automotive industry. Although the regulation of environment and safety has been tightened up more and more, the majority of vehicle bodies are still manufactured from stamped steel components. This means that the optimized steel solutions enable to demonstrate its ability to reduce body weight with high crashworthiness performance instead of expensive light weight materials such as Al, Mg and composites. To provide the innovative steel solutions for automotive industry, POSCO has developed AHSS and its application technologies, which is directly connected to EVI activities. EVI is a technical cooperation program with customer covering all stages of new car project from design to mass production. Integrated light weight solutions through new forming technologies such as TWB, hydroforming and HPF are continuously developed and provided for EVI activities. This paper will discuss the detailed status of these technologies especially light weight steel solutions based on innovative technologies.

  16. Mechanical cutting of irradiated reactor internal components

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael G.

    2008-01-15

    Mechanical cutting methods to volume reduce and package reactor internal components are now a viable solution for stakeholders challenged with the retirement of first generation nuclear facilities. The recent completion of the removal of the Reactor Vessel Internals (RVI) from within the Sacramento Municipal Utility District's (SMUD) Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Plant demonstrates that unlike previous methods, inclusive of plasma arc and abrasive water-jet cutting, mechanical cutting minimizes exposure to workers, costly water cleanup, and excessive secondary waste generation. Reactor internal components were segmented, packaged, and removed from the reactor building for shipment or storage, allowing the reactor cavity to be drained and follow-on reactor segmentation activities to proceed in the dry state. Area exposure rates at the work positions during the segmentation process were generally 1 mR per hr. Radiological exposure documented for the underwater segmentation processes totaled 13 person rem. The reactor internals weighing 343,000 pounds were segmented into over 200 pieces for maximum shipping package efficiency and produced 5,600 lb of stainless steel chips and shavings which were packaged in void spaces of existing disposal containers, therefore creating no additional disposal volume. Because no secondary waste was driven into suspension in the reactor cavity water, the water was free released after one pass through a charcoal bed and ion exchange filter system. Mechanical cutting techniques are capable of underwater segmentation of highly radioactive components on a large scale. This method minimized radiological exposure and costly water cleanup while creating no secondary waste.

  17. Topological objects in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y. M.; Khim, Hyojoong; Zhang, Pengming

    2005-12-15

    We study the topological objects in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates. We compare two competing theories of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates, the popular Gross-Pitaevskii theory, and the recently proposed gauge theory of two-component Bose-Einstein condensate which has an induced vorticity interaction. We show that two theories produce very similar topological objects, in spite of the obvious differences in dynamics. Furthermore we show that the gauge theory of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates, with the U(1) gauge symmetry, is remarkably similar to the Skyrme theory. Just like the Skyrme theory this theory admits the non-Abelian vortex, the helical vortex, and the vorticity knot. We construct the lightest knot solution in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates numerically, and discuss how the knot can be constructed in the spin-(1/2) condensate of {sup 87}Rb atoms.

  18. A Mixture Rasch Model with Item Response Time Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, J. Patrick

    2010-01-01

    An examinee faced with a test item will engage in solution behavior or rapid-guessing behavior. These qualitatively different test-taking behaviors bias parameter estimates for item response models that do not control for such behavior. A mixture Rasch model with item response time components was proposed and evaluated through application to real…

  19. RTI Essential Components Integrity Worksheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Response to Intervention, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Response to Intervention (RTI) Essential Components Integrity Rubric and the RTI Essential Components Integrity Worksheet are for use by individuals responsible for monitoring the school-level fidelity of Response to Intervention (RTI) implementation. They may also be used by schools for self-appraisal; however, they were not designed for…

  20. RTI Essential Components Integrity Rubric

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Response to Intervention, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Response to Intervention (RTI) Essential Components Integrity Rubric is for use by individuals who are responsible for monitoring school-level fidelity of RTI implementation. The rubric is aligned with "Essential Components of RTI: A Closer Look at Response to Intervention" (National Center on Response to Intervention, 2010). Subjects covered…

  1. Nonnutrient Components of Fish Diets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Though the various dietary nutrients are the primary concerns of nutritionists when formulating feeds for intensively cultured tilapia, the inclusion of dietary components that do not have nutritional value can have profound effects on the performance of fish fed these diets. These components may be...

  2. Heat treating of manufactured components

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B.

    2012-05-22

    An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material is disclosed. The system typically includes an insulating vessel placed within a microwave applicator chamber. A moderating material is positioned inside the insulating vessel so that a substantial portion of the exterior surface of each component for heat treating is in contact with the moderating material.

  3. Nickel-hydrogen component development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charleston, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Light weight energy storage systems for future space missions are investigated. One of the systems being studied is the nickel hydrogen battery. This battery is designed to achieve longer life, improve performance, and higher energy densities for space applications. The nickel hydrogen component development is discussed. Test data from polarization measurements of the hydrogen electrode component is presented.

  4. Components of Successful Magnet Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Faye B.

    This paper identifies and discusses components of successful magnet programs. It is based on a review of existing research literature and information gathered directly from school districts. First, the paper discusses separately the following elements, which are considered "core components": (1) leadership; (2) organizational structure; (3)…

  5. Regularized Generalized Structured Component Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun

    2009-01-01

    Generalized structured component analysis (GSCA) has been proposed as a component-based approach to structural equation modeling. In practice, GSCA may suffer from multi-collinearity, i.e., high correlations among exogenous variables. GSCA has yet no remedy for this problem. Thus, a regularized extension of GSCA is proposed that integrates a ridge…

  6. Multi-Velocity Component LDV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A laser doppler velocimeter uses frequency shifting of a laser beam to provide signal information for each velocity component. A composite electrical signal generated by a light detector is digitized and a processor produces a discrete Fourier transform based on the digitized electrical signal. The transform includes two peak frequencies corresponding to the two velocity components.

  7. Semantic Annotation of Computational Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, Peter; Mehrotra, Piyush

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology to specify machine-processable semantic descriptions of computational components to enable them to be shared and reused. A particular focus of this scheme is to enable automatic compositon of such components into simple work-flows.

  8. Development of hermetic, fiberoptic components

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, D.P.; Beckman, T.M.; Ewick, D.W.

    1990-04-30

    The fabrication of hermetic, fiberoptic components using a variety of novel processing techniques has been demonstrated. These processing techniques are based on standard sealing technologies and include the sealing of optical ``pin`` feedthrough components and the sealing of lengths of optical fibers. Various types of optical fibers including typical, plastic-buffered fibers and metal-coated fibers, have been hermetically sealed into components. Background research has disclosed that the temperatures necessary for seal formation do not degrade the properties of the optical fibers. A series of pyrotechnic test components has been fabricated using one of the newly developed processing techniques, and the firing characteristics of these ``full- up`` components have been determined. 7 refs., 21 figs.

  9. Multi-Component Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2008-11-01

    We explore multi-component dark matter models where the dark sector consists of multiple stable states with different mass scales, and dark forces coupling these states further enrich the dynamics. The multi-component nature of the dark matter naturally arises in supersymmetric models, where both R parity and an additional symmetry, such as a Z{sub 2}, is preserved. We focus on a particular model where the heavier component of dark matter carries lepton number and annihilates mostly to leptons. The heavier component, which is essentially a sterile neutrino, naturally explains the PAMELA, ATIC and synchrotron signals, without an excess in antiprotons which typically mars other models of weak scale dark matter. The lighter component, which may have a mass from a GeV to a TeV, may explain the DAMA signal, and may be visible in low threshold runs of CDMS and XENON, which search for light dark matter.

  10. Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes

    SciTech Connect

    Morman, James A.; Wei, Thomas Y.C.; Reifman, Jaques

    1997-12-01

    A process management expert system for a nuclear, chemical or other process is effective following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. The search process is based upon mass, momentum and energy conservation principles so that qualitative thermal-hydraulic fundamental principles are satisfied for new system configurations. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced.

  11. 21 CFR 522.1610 - Oleate sodium solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Oleate sodium solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of sterile aqueous solution contains 50 milligrams of sodium oleate. (b) Sponsor. See No. 037990 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of use—(1) It is used in horses to stimulate infiltration of cellular blood components that...

  12. Cromolyn Sodium Nasal Solution

    MedlinePlus

    Cromolyn comes as a solution to use with a special nasal applicator. It usually is inhaled three to six times a day to prevent allergy ... first time, read the instructions provided with the solution. Ask your doctor, pharmacist, or respiratory therapist to ...

  13. A high resolution upwind scheme for multi-component flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igra, D.; Takayama, K.

    2002-04-01

    Conservative schemes usually produce non-physical oscillations in multi-component flow solutions. Many methods were proposed to avoid these oscillations. Some of these correction schemes could fix these oscillations in the pressure profile at discontinuities, but the density profile still remained diffused between the two components. In the case of gas-liquid interfaces, density diffusion is not acceptable. In this paper, the interfacial correction scheme proposed by Cocchi et al. was modified to be used in conjunction with the level-set approach. After each time step two grid points that bound the interface are recalculated by using an exact Riemann solver so that pressure oscillations and the density diffusion at discontinuities were eliminated. The scheme presented here can be applied to any type of conservation law solver. Some examples solved by this scheme and their results are compared with the exact solution when available. Good agreement is obtained between the present results and the exact solutions. Copyright

  14. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, J.C.

    1984-03-13

    A process is claimed for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 vol % of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  15. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, James C.

    1986-01-01

    Process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 volume percent of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  16. Electrostatic twisted modes in multi-component dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayub, M. K.; Ali, S.; Ikram, M.

    2016-01-01

    Various electrostatic twisted modes are re-investigated with finite orbital angular momentum in an unmagnetized collisionless multi-component dusty plasma, consisting of positive/negative charged dust particles, ions, and electrons. For this purpose, hydrodynamical equations are employed to obtain paraxial equations in terms of density perturbations, while assuming the Gaussian and Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam solutions. Specifically, approximated solutions for potential problem are studied by using the paraxial approximation and expressed the electric field components in terms of LG functions. The energy fluxes associated with these modes are computed and corresponding expressions for orbital angular momenta are derived. Numerical analyses reveal that radial/angular mode numbers as well as dust number density and dust charging states strongly modify the LG potential profiles attributed to different electrostatic modes. Our results are important for understanding particle transport and energy transfer due to wave excitations in multi-component dusty plasmas.

  17. The Location GNSS Modules for the Components of Proteus System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzostowski, K.; Darakchiev, R.; Foks-Ryznar, A.; Sitek, P.

    2012-01-01

    The Proteus system - the Integrated Mobile System for Counterterrorism and Rescue Operations is a complex innovative project. To assure the best possible localization of mobile components of the system, many different Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) modules were taken into account. In order to chose the best solution many types of tests were done. Full results and conclusions are presented in this paper. The idea of measurements was to test modules in GPS Standard Positioning Service (SPS) with EGNOS system specification according to certain algorithms. The tests had to answer the question: what type of GNSS modules should be used on different components with respect to specific usage of Proteus system. The second goal of tests was to check the solution quality of integrated GNSS/INS (Inertial Navigation System) and its possible usage in some Proteus system components.

  18. ISOLATION OF AMYLOSE FROM STARCH SOLUTIONS BY PHASE SEPARATION*

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventionally, fractionation of the two components of starches, amylopectin and amylose had been achieved by aqueous dispersion or aqueous leaching of granules, and selective retrogradation or alcohol precipitation of one component from starch dispersion. Recently, we found that starch solutions s...

  19. Pantaloon Hernia: Obstructed Indirect Component and Direct Component with Cryptorchidism.

    PubMed

    Kariappa, Mohan Kumar; Harihar, Vivek; Kothudum, Ashwini Rajareddy; Hiremath, Vivekanand Kedarlingayya

    2016-01-01

    Cryptorchidism is a condition in which one or both testes have not passed down into the scrotal sac. It is categorized as true undescended testis in which testes are present in the normal path of descent, and as ectopic testis, in which testes are present at abnormal site. Common complications of cryptorchidism are testicular torsion, subfertility, inguinal hernia, and testicular cancer. Here we present a rare case of pantaloon hernia of obstructed indirect component and direct component with cryptorchidism. PMID:27579208

  20. Pantaloon Hernia: Obstructed Indirect Component and Direct Component with Cryptorchidism

    PubMed Central

    Kariappa, Mohan Kumar; Hiremath, Vivekanand Kedarlingayya

    2016-01-01

    Cryptorchidism is a condition in which one or both testes have not passed down into the scrotal sac. It is categorized as true undescended testis in which testes are present in the normal path of descent, and as ectopic testis, in which testes are present at abnormal site. Common complications of cryptorchidism are testicular torsion, subfertility, inguinal hernia, and testicular cancer. Here we present a rare case of pantaloon hernia of obstructed indirect component and direct component with cryptorchidism. PMID:27579208

  1. Dynamic leaching test of personal computer components.

    PubMed

    Li, Yadong; Richardson, Jay B; Niu, Xiaojun; Jackson, Ollie J; Laster, Jeremy D; Walker, Aaron K

    2009-11-15

    A dynamic leaching test (DLT) was developed and used to evaluate the leaching of toxic substances for electronic waste in the environment. The major components in personal computers (PCs) including motherboards, hard disc drives, floppy disc drives, and compact disc drives were tested. The tests lasted for 2 years for motherboards and 1.5 year for the disc drives. The extraction fluids for the standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) were used as the DLT leaching solutions. A total of 18 elements including Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ni, Pd, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, and Zn were analyzed in the DLT leachates. Only Al, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn were commonly found in the DLT leachates of the PC components. Their leaching levels were much higher in TCLP extraction fluid than in SPLP extraction fluid. The toxic heavy metal Pb was found to continuously leach out of the components over the entire test periods. The cumulative amounts of Pb leached out of the motherboards in TCLP extraction fluid reached 2.0 g per motherboard over the 2-year test period, and that in SPLP extraction fluid were 75-90% less. The leaching rates or levels of Pb were largely affected by the content of galvanized steel in the PC components. The higher was the steel content, the lower the Pb leaching rate would be. The findings suggest that the obsolete PCs disposed of in landfills or discarded in the environment continuously release Pb for years when subjected to landfill leachate or rains. PMID:19616380

  2. Apparatus for remotely handling components

    DOEpatents

    Szkrybalo, Gregory A.; Griffin, Donald L.

    1994-01-01

    The inventive apparatus for remotely handling bar-like components which define a longitudinal direction includes a gripper mechanism for gripping the component including first and second gripper members longitudinally fixedly spaced from each other and oriented parallel to each other in planes transverse to the longitudinal direction. Each gripper member includes a jaw having at least one V-groove with opposing surfaces intersecting at a base and extending radially relative to the longitudinal direction for receiving the component in an open end between the opposing surfaces. The V-grooves on the jaw plate of the first and second gripper members are aligned in the longitudinal direction to support the component in the first and second gripper members. A jaw is rotatably mounted on and a part of each of the first and second gripper members for selectively assuming a retracted mode in which the open end of the V-groove is unobstructed and active mode in which the jaw spans the open end of the V-groove in the first and second gripper members. The jaw has a locking surface for contacting the component in the active mode to secure the component between the locking surface of the jaw and the opposing surfaces of the V-groove. The locking surface has a plurality of stepped portions, each defining a progressively decreasing radial distance between the base of the V-groove and the stepped portion opposing the base to accommodate varying sizes of components.

  3. Vacuum Brazing of Accelerator Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajvir; Pant, K. K.; Lal, Shankar; Yadav, D. P.; Garg, S. R.; Raghuvanshi, V. K.; Mundra, G.

    2012-11-01

    Commonly used materials for accelerator components are those which are vacuum compatible and thermally conductive. Stainless steel, aluminum and copper are common among them. Stainless steel is a poor heat conductor and not very common in use where good thermal conductivity is required. Aluminum and copper and their alloys meet the above requirements and are frequently used for the above purpose. The accelerator components made of aluminum and its alloys using welding process have become a common practice now a days. It is mandatory to use copper and its other grades in RF devices required for accelerators. Beam line and Front End components of the accelerators are fabricated from stainless steel and OFHC copper. Fabrication of components made of copper using welding process is very difficult and in most of the cases it is impossible. Fabrication and joining in such cases is possible using brazing process especially under vacuum and inert gas atmosphere. Several accelerator components have been vacuum brazed for Indus projects at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore using vacuum brazing facility available at RRCAT, Indore. This paper presents details regarding development of the above mentioned high value and strategic components/assemblies. It will include basics required for vacuum brazing, details of vacuum brazing facility, joint design, fixturing of the jobs, selection of filler alloys, optimization of brazing parameters so as to obtain high quality brazed joints, brief description of vacuum brazed accelerator components etc.

  4. Component Fragility Research Program: Phase 1 component prioritization

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, G.S.; Chou, C.K.

    1987-06-01

    Current probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods for nuclear power plants utilize seismic ''fragilities'' - probabilities of failure conditioned on the severity of seismic input motion - that are based largely on limited test data and on engineering judgment. Under the NRC Component Fragility Research Program (CFRP), the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed and demonstrated procedures for using test data to derive probabilistic fragility descriptions for mechanical and electrical components. As part of its CFRP activities, LLNL systematically identified and categorized components influencing plant safety in order to identify ''candidate'' components for future NRC testing. Plant systems relevant to safety were first identified; within each system components were then ranked according to their importance to overall system function and their anticipated seismic capacity. Highest priority for future testing was assigned to those ''very important'' components having ''low'' seismic capacity. This report describes the LLNL prioritization effort, which also included application of ''high-level'' qualification data as an alternate means of developing probabilistic fragility descriptions for PRA applications.

  5. Composite components on commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. B.

    1980-01-01

    The paper considers the use of composite components in commercial aircraft. NASA has been active in sponsoring flight service programs with advanced composites for the last 10 years, with 2.5 million total composite component hours accumulated since 1970 on commercial transports and helicopters with no significant degradation in residual strength of composite components. Design, inspection, and maintenance procedures have been developed; a major NASA/US industry technology program has been developed to reduce fuel consumption of commercial transport aircraft through the use of advanced composites.

  6. Ceramic component for MHD electrode

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, David D.; Bates, Junior L.

    1981-01-01

    A ceramic component which exhibits electrical conductivity down to near room temperatures has the formula: Hf.sub.x In.sub.y A.sub.z O.sub.2 where x=0.1 to 0.4, y=0.3 to 0.6, z=0.1 to 0.4 and A is a lanthanide rare earth or yttrium. The component is suitable for use in the fabrication of MHD electrodes or as the current leadout portion of a composite electrode with other ceramic components.

  7. Ceramic components for MHD electrode

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, D.D.

    A ceramic component which exhibits electrical conductivity down to near room temperatures has the formula: Hf/sub x/In/sub y/A/sub z/O/sub 2/ where x = 0.1 to 0.4, y = 0.3 to 0.6, z = 0.1 to 0.4 and A is a lanthanide rare earth or yttrium. The component is suitable for use in the fabrication of MHD electrodes or as the current leadout portion of a composite electrode with other ceramic components.

  8. Analysis of Enterprise Workflow Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cui-E.; Wang, Shulin; Chen, Ying; Meng, Yang; Ma, Hua

    Since the 90’s, workflow technology has been widely applied in various industries, such as office automation(OA), manufacturing, telecommunications services, banking, securities, insurance and other financial services, research institutes and education services, and so on, to improve business process automation and integration capabilities. In this paper, based on Workflow theory, the author proposed a set of policy-based workflow approach in order to support dynamic workflow patterns. Through the expansion of the functions of Shark, it implemented a Workflow engine component-OAShark which can support retrieval / rollback function. The related classes were programmed. The technology was applied to the OA system of an enterprise project. The realization of the enterprise workflow solutions greatly improved the efficiency of the office automation.

  9. Singlet exciton fission in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Brian J.; Musser, Andrew J.; Beljonne, David; Friend, Richard H.

    2013-12-01

    Singlet exciton fission, the spin-conserving process that produces two triplet excited states from one photoexcited singlet state, is a means to circumvent the Shockley-Queisser limit in single-junction solar cells. Although the process through which singlet fission occurs is not well characterized, some local order is thought to be necessary for intermolecular coupling. Here, we report a triplet yield of 200% and triplet formation rates approaching the diffusion limit in solutions of bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl (TIPS)) pentacene. We observe a transient bound excimer intermediate, formed by the collision of one photoexcited and one ground-state TIPS-pentacene molecule. The intermediate breaks up when the two triplets separate to each TIPS-pentacene molecule. This efficient system is a model for future singlet-fission materials and for disordered device components that produce cascades of excited states from sunlight.

  10. Singlet exciton fission in solution.

    PubMed

    Walker, Brian J; Musser, Andrew J; Beljonne, David; Friend, Richard H

    2013-12-01

    Singlet exciton fission, the spin-conserving process that produces two triplet excited states from one photoexcited singlet state, is a means to circumvent the Shockley-Queisser limit in single-junction solar cells. Although the process through which singlet fission occurs is not well characterized, some local order is thought to be necessary for intermolecular coupling. Here, we report a triplet yield of 200% and triplet formation rates approaching the diffusion limit in solutions of bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl (TIPS)) pentacene. We observe a transient bound excimer intermediate, formed by the collision of one photoexcited and one ground-state TIPS-pentacene molecule. The intermediate breaks up when the two triplets separate to each TIPS-pentacene molecule. This efficient system is a model for future singlet-fission materials and for disordered device components that produce cascades of excited states from sunlight. PMID:24256865

  11. Electronic structure of CeO studied by a four-component relativistic configuration interaction method.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Hiroko; Tatewaki, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Shigeyoshi

    2013-06-14

    We studied the ground and excited states of CeO using the restricted active space CI method in the energy range below 25,000 cm(-1). Energy levels are computed to within errors of 2700 cm(-1). Electron correlation effects arising from the ionic core composed of Ce5s, 5p, 4f(*), 5d(*), and O2s, 2p spinors play crucial role to CeO spectra, as well as correlation effects of electrons distributed in the valence Ce 4f, 5d, 6s, and 6p spinors. Here, 4f(*) and 5d(*) denote spinors expanded to describe electron polarization between Ce and O. A bonding mechanism is proposed for CeO. As the two separate atoms in their ground states, Ce(4f(1)5d(1)6s(2))(1)G4 and O(2s(2)2p(4))(3)P2, approach each other, a CeO(2+) core is formed by two-electron transfer from Ce5d, 6s to O2p. Inside this ellipsoidal ion, a valence bond between Ce5p and O2s and an ionic bond between O2p and Ce5p are formed with back-donation through Ce 4f(*) and 5d(*). PMID:23781798

  12. Conduction heat transfer solutions

    SciTech Connect

    VanSant, J.H.

    1980-03-01

    This text is a collection of solutions to a variety of heat conduction problems found in numerous publications, such as textbooks, handbooks, journals, reports, etc. Its purpose is to assemble these solutions into one source that can facilitate the search for a particular problem solution. Generally, it is intended to be a handbook on the subject of heat conduction. This material is useful for engineers, scientists, technologists, and designers of all disciplines, particularly those who design thermal systems or estimate temperatures and heat transfer rates in structures. More than 500 problem solutions and relevant data are tabulated for easy retrieval. There are twelve sections of solutions which correspond with the class of problems found in each. Geometry, state, boundary conditions, and other categories are used to classify the problems. A case number is assigned to each problem for cross-referencing, and also for future reference. Each problem is concisely described by geometry and condition statements, and many times a descriptive sketch is also included. At least one source reference is given so that the user can review the methods used to derive the solutions. Problem solutions are given in the form of equations, graphs, and tables of data, all of which are also identified by problem case numbers and source references.

  13. Exact cosmological solutions of models with an interacting dark sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavan, A. B.; Ferreira, Elisa G. M.; Micheletti, Sandro M. R.; de Souza, J. C. C.; Abdalla, E.

    2012-11-01

    In this work we extend the first order formalism for cosmological models that present an interaction between a fermionic and a scalar field. Cosmological exact solutions describing universes filled with interacting dark energy and dark matter have been obtained. Viable cosmological solutions with an early period of decelerated expansion followed by late acceleration have been found, notably one which presents a dark matter component dominating in the past and a dark energy component dominating in the future. In another one, the dark energy alone is the responsible for both periods, similar to a Chaplygin gas case. Exclusively accelerating solutions have also been obtained.

  14. Electronic Components Subsystems and Equipment: a Compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Developments in electronic components, subsystems, and equipment are summarized. Topics discussed include integrated circuit components and techniques, circuit components and techniques, and cables and connectors.

  15. Chemistry of soil solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Elprince, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate students and researchers, this book serves as an introduction to the field of soil chemistry and associated fields such as aquatic chemistry, geochemistry, environmental chemistry, oceanography, and public health. The volume includes discussions on the structure of adsorbed water, adsorption of inorganics, solubility, redox, solute transport, chemical modeling, and sampling and monitoring the soil solution. Important papers on these topics together with editor's comments place each of the carefully chosen papers in the proper context. Because the chemistry of soil solutions requires the knowledge of many aspects of science, introductory information is provided for each topic to cover its history of development, present knowledge, and future prospects.

  16. Three-component homeostasis control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jin; Hong, Hyunsuk; Jo, Junghyo

    2014-03-01

    Two reciprocal components seem to be sufficient to maintain a control variable constant. However, pancreatic islets adapt three components to control glucose homeostasis. They are α (secreting glucagon), β (insulin), and δ (somatostatin) cells. Glucagon and insulin are the reciprocal hormones for increasing and decreasing blood glucose levels, while the role of somatostatin is unknown. However, it has been known how each hormone affects other cell types. Based on the pulsatile hormone secretion and the cellular interactions, this system can be described as coupled oscillators. In particular, we used the Landau-Stuart model to consider both amplitudes and phases of hormone oscillations. We found that the presence of the third component, δ cell, was effective to resist under glucose perturbations, and to quickly return to the normal glucose level once perturbed. Our analysis suggested that three components are necessary for advanced homeostasis control.

  17. Airframe noise component interaction studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M. R.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1979-01-01

    Acoustic wind tunnel tests were conducted to examine the noise-generating processes of an airframe during approach flight. The airframe model was a two-dimensional wing section, to which highlift leading and trailing edge devices and landing gear could be added. Far field conventional microphones were utilized to determine component spectrum levels. An acoustic mirror directional microphone was utilized to examine noise source distributions on airframe components extended separately and in combination. Measured quantities are compared with predictions inferred from aircraft flyover data. Aeroacoustic mechanisms for each airframe component are identified. Component interaction effects on total radiated noise generally were small (within about 2 dB). However, some interactions significantly redistributed the local noise source strengths by changing local flow velocities and turbulence levels. Possibilities for noise reduction exist if trailing edge flaps could be modified to decrease their noise radiation caused by incident turbulent flow.

  18. Solitary solutions including spatially localized chaos and their interactions in two-dimensional Kolmogorov flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiruta, Yoshiki; Toh, Sadayoshi

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional Kolmogorov flow in wide periodic boxes is numerically investigated. It is shown that the total flow rate in the direction perpendicular to the force controls the characteristics of the flow, especially the existence of spatially localized solitary solutions such as traveling waves, periodic solutions, and chaotic solutions, which can behave as elementary components of the flow. We propose a procedure to construct approximate solutions consisting of solitary solutions. It is confirmed by direct numerical simulations that these solutions are stable and represent interactions between elementary components such as collisions, coexistence, and collapse of chaos.

  19. Definition of Contravariant Velocity Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Mao; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This is an old issue in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). What is the so-called contravariant velocity or contravariant velocity component? In the article, we review the basics of tensor analysis and give the contravariant velocity component a rigorous explanation. For a given coordinate system, there exist two uniquely determined sets of base vector systems - one is the covariant and another is the contravariant base vector system. The two base vector systems are reciprocal. The so-called contravariant velocity component is really the contravariant component of a velocity vector for a time-independent coordinate system, or the contravariant component of a relative velocity between fluid and coordinates, for a time-dependent coordinate system. The contravariant velocity components are not physical quantities of the velocity vector. Their magnitudes, dimensions, and associated directions are controlled by their corresponding covariant base vectors. Several 2-D (two-dimensional) linear examples and 2-D mass-conservation equation are used to illustrate the details of expressing a vector with respect to the covariant and contravariant base vector systems, respectively.

  20. Analyzing growth components in trees.

    PubMed

    Guédon, Yann; Caraglio, Yves; Heuret, Patrick; Lebarbier, Emilie; Meredieu, Céline

    2007-10-01

    Observed growth, as given, for instance, by the length of successive annual shoots along the main axis of a plant, is mainly the result of two components: an ontogenetic component and an environmental component. An open question is whether the ontogenetic component along an axis at the growth unit or annual shoot scale takes the form of a trend or of a succession of phases. Various methods of analysis ranging from exploratory analysis (symmetric smoothing filters, sample autocorrelation functions) to statistical modeling (multiple change-point models, hidden semi-Markov chains and hidden hybrid model combining Markovian and semi-Markovian states) are applied to extract and characterize both the ontogenetic and environmental components using contrasted examples. This led us in particular to favor the hypothesis of an ontogenetic component structured as a succession of stationary phases and to highlight phase changes of high magnitude in unexpected situations (for instance, when growth globally decreases). These results shed light in a new way on botanical concepts such as "phase change" and "morphogenetic gradient". PMID:17631316

  1. Isospinning baby Skyrmion solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battye, Richard A.; Haberichter, Mareike

    2013-12-01

    We perform full two-dimensional (2D) numerical relaxations of isospinning soliton solutions in the baby Skyrme model in which the global O(3) symmetry is broken by the 2D analogue of the pion mass term in the Skyrme model. In our calculations we explicitly allow the isospinning solitons to deform and to break the symmetries of the static configurations. We find that stable isospinning baby Skyrme solutions can be constructed numerically for all angular frequencies ω≤min⁡(μ,1), where μ is the mass parameter of the model. Stable, rotationally symmetric baby Skyrmion solutions for higher angular velocities are simply an artefact of the hedgehog approximation. Isospinning multisoliton solutions of topological charge B turn out to be unstable to break up into their B charge-1 constituents at some critical breakup frequency value. Furthermore, we find that for μ sufficiently large the rotational symmetry of charge-2 baby Skyrmions becomes broken at a critical angular frequency ω.

  2. The Conductivity of Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayner-Canham, Geoff

    1993-01-01

    Presents historical background and modern explanations for the popular demonstration of showing conductivity of solutions through the insertion of a light-bulb conductivity tester into deionized water and water with salt in it. (PR)

  3. Turbulent solutions of equations of fluid motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    Some turbulent solutions of the unaveraged Navier-Stokes equations (equations of fluid motion) are reviewed. Those equations are solved numerically in order to study the nonlinear physics of incompressible turbulent flow. The three components of the mean-square velocity fluctuations are initially equal for the conditions chosen. The resulting solutions show characteristics of turbulence, such as the linear and nonlinear excitation of small-scale fluctuations. For the stronger fluctuations the initially nonrandom flow develops into an apparently random turbulence. The cases considered include turbulence that is statistically homogeneous or inhomogeneous and isotropic or anisotropic. A statistically steady-state turbulence is obtained by using a spatially periodic body force. Various turbulence processes, including the transfer of energy between eddy sizes and between directional components and the production, dissipation, and spatial diffusion of turbulence, are considered. It is concluded that the physical processes occurring in turbulence can be profitably studied numerically.

  4. Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Caliò, Renato; Rongala, Udaya Bhaskar; Camboni, Domenico; Milazzo, Mario; Stefanini, Cesare; de Petris, Gianluca; Oddo, Calogero Maria

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the state of the art in piezoelectric energy harvesting. It presents the basics of piezoelectricity and discusses materials choice. The work places emphasis on material operating modes and device configurations, from resonant to non-resonant devices and also to rotational solutions. The reviewed literature is compared based on power density and bandwidth. Lastly, the question of power conversion is addressed by reviewing various circuit solutions. PMID:24618725

  5. Reflectance of aqueous solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Querry, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    The optical properties and optical constants of water and aqueous solutions were studied to develop an accurate tabulation of graphical representations of the optical constants through a broad spectrum. Manuscripts of articles are presented concerning extinction coefficients, relative specular reflectance, and temperature effect on the water spectrum. Graphs of absolute reflectance, phase shifts, index of refraction, and extinction coefficients for water, heavy water and aqueous solutions are included.

  6. Conduction heat transfer solutions

    SciTech Connect

    VanSant, J.H.

    1983-08-01

    This text is a collection of solutions to a variety of heat conduction problems found in numerous publications, such as textbooks, handbooks, journals, reports, etc. Its purpose is to assemble these solutions into one source that can facilitate the search for a particular problem solution. Generally, it is intended to be a handbook on the subject of heat conduction. There are twelve sections of solutions which correspond with the class of problems found in each. Geometry, state, boundary conditions, and other categories are used to classify the problems. Each problem is concisely described by geometry and condition statements, and many times a descriptive sketch is also included. The introduction presents a synopsis on the theory, differential equations, and boundary conditions for conduction heat transfer. Some discussion is given on the use and interpretation of solutions. Supplementary data such as mathematical functions, convection correlations, and thermal properties are included for aiding the user in computing numerical values from the solutions. 155 figs., 92 refs., 9 tabs.

  7. Heat capacity of alkanolamine aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, L.F.; Li, M.H.

    1999-12-01

    Heat capacities of monoethanoloamine, diglycolamine, diethanolamine, di-w propanolamine, triethanolamine, N-methyldiethanolamine, 2-amino-2-methyl-l-propanol, and 2-piperidineethanol aqueous solutions were measured from 30 to 80 C with a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The mole fractions of alkanolamines studied are 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8. Heat capacities of N-methyldiethanolamine aqueous solutions have been measured to verify the validity of C{sub p} measurements for alkanolamine aqueous solutions. The estimated uncertainty of the measured heat capacities is {plus{underscore}minus}3%, including the effect of up to 5% impurities in a substance. An excess molar heat capacity expression using the Redlich-Kister equation for the composition dependence is used to represent the measured C{sub p} of alkanolamine aqueous solutions. For a total of 374 data points, the calculation results for eight alkanolamine solutions give the overall average absolute deviations of 11.9% and 0.29% for the excess molar heat capacity and the heat capacity, respectively. The heat capacities presented in this study are, in general, of sufficient accuracy for most engineering-design calculations. Solutions of alkanolamines are industrially important mixtures used in the natural gas industry, oil refineries, petroleum chemical plants, and synthetic ammonia plants for the removal of acidic components such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S from gas streams.

  8. Study of palladium plating components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Palladium deposits were prepared by electrolysis for evaluation as catalytic materials. Electrolysis was carried out in acidic solutions consisting of either 1.0 M in NaCl and 0.01 M PdCl2 or 1.0 M NaCl and 0.04 M PdCl2. It was during the preparation of the palladium deposits that unexpected observations were made that led to the request for analytical services. The analyses did not, nor were they intended to, answer all of the questions. They did, however, shed light on the nature and magnitude of some of the contaminants in the solutions and in the palladium electrodes, as well as characterize the forms of the palladium deposits. Results of analyses are grouped into solution, deposit, and electrode categories for comparison purposes.

  9. The effects of friction on component dynamic response

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, B.J.; Flanders, H.E. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Friction is often used to components and piping from moving relative to building anchorages and other components. It is common analytical practice to address frictional constraints by either neglecting them and allowing unrestrained motion or by fixing them and not allowing any motion. An evaluation of the dynamic response of a component with frictional constraint is presented. Simplified component models with both fixed and fractionally constrained boundary conditions are analyzed with sinusoidal harmonic and recorded earthquake time history input excitations. The harmonic forcing results are compared with closed form solutions to establish accuracy of the methods and to relate frictional energy dissipation to equivalent viscous damping. The results of the earthquake excitations are compared and related to the overall system response. 2 refs.

  10. The effects of friction on component dynamic response

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, B.J.; Flanders, H.E. Jr.

    1992-05-01

    Friction is often used to components and piping from moving relative to building anchorages and other components. It is common analytical practice to address frictional constraints by either neglecting them and allowing unrestrained motion or by fixing them and not allowing any motion. An evaluation of the dynamic response of a component with frictional constraint is presented. Simplified component models with both fixed and fractionally constrained boundary conditions are analyzed with sinusoidal harmonic and recorded earthquake time history input excitations. The harmonic forcing results are compared with closed form solutions to establish accuracy of the methods and to relate frictional energy dissipation to equivalent viscous damping. The results of the earthquake excitations are compared and related to the overall system response. 2 refs.

  11. Cold-standby redundancy allocation problem with degrading components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Xiong, Junlin; Xie, Min

    2015-11-01

    Components in cold-standby state are usually assumed to be as good as new when they are activated. However, even in a standby environment, the components will suffer from performance degradation. This article presents a study of a redundancy allocation problem (RAP) for cold-standby systems with degrading components. The objective of the RAP is to determine an optimal design configuration of components to maximize system reliability subject to system resource constraints (e.g. cost, weight). As in most cases, it is not possible to obtain a closed-form expression for this problem, and hence, an approximated objective function is presented. A genetic algorithm with dual mutation is developed to solve such a constrained optimization problem. Finally, a numerical example is given to illustrate the proposed solution methodology.

  12. TX Cancri - Which component is hotter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. E.; Biermann, P.

    1976-01-01

    The question is considered of whether the W-type light curves of TX Cnc result from a slightly higher temperature for the low-mass component or from a relatively strong classical gravity-darkening law. Photometric parameters for this W UMa binary area derived using light curves from four epochs exhibiting dissimilar behavior. The analysis is performed for up to five colors, and solutions are obtained by two different approaches in which the temperature difference between the components is treated as a free parameter or is determined by the surface gravitational field. The results of the second approach show that the polar effective temperature of the low-mass star is about 30 K cooler than that of the high-mass star, while the results of the first approach show the low-mass star to be 125 to 175 K hotter. Preference is given to the second approach because gravity darkening provides a simple and adequate explanation of the light curves. Epoch-to-epoch changes in the gravity-darkening and albedo parameters are taken as suggesting differences in the degree of thermal contact over a time scale of a few years.

  13. Optical access: networks and components (overview)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mynbaev, Djafar K.

    2004-09-01

    The exponential gtowth of traffic delivered to an individual customer both for business and personal needs puts tremendous pressure on the telecommunications networks. Because the development of the long-haul and metro networks has advanced rapidly and their capacity much eceeds demand, tremendous pressure now falls in the local networks to provide customers with access to the global telecom infrastructure. Building a broadband access network enabling fast delivery of high-volume traffic is the current task of network operators. A brief review of broadband access networks brings us to the conclusion that only wired optical networks can serve as an immediate and future solution to the "last-mile" problem. After discussin goptical access network classification, we focus mainly on passive optical networks (PON) because PON is a major technology today. From the network standpoint, we discuss the principle of PON operation, architectures, topologies, protocols and standards, design issues, and network management and services. We also discuss the main problems with PON and the use of WDM technology. From the hardware standpoint, we consider both active and passive components. We analyze the structure and elements of these components, including their technical characteristics.

  14. Anodizing of High Electrically Stressed Components

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, P.; Henderson, D. J.; Good, D. E.; Hogge, K.; Mitton, C. V.; Molina, I.; Naffziger, C.; Codova, S. R.; Ormond, E. U.

    2013-06-01

    Anodizing creates an aluminum oxide coating that penetrates into the surface as well as builds above the surface of aluminum creating a very hard ceramic-type coating with good dielectric properties. Over time and use, the electrical carrying components (or spools in this case) experience electrical breakdown, yielding undesirable x-ray dosages or failure. The spool is located in the high vacuum region of a rod pinch diode section of an x-ray producing machine. Machine operators have recorded decreases in x-ray dosages over numerous shots using the reusable spool component, and re-anodizing the interior surface of the spool does not provide the expected improvement. A machine operation subject matter expert coated the anodized surface with diffusion pump oil to eliminate electrical breakdown as a temporary fix. It is known that an anodized surface is very porous, and it is because of this porosity that the surface may trap air that becomes a catalyst for electrical breakdown. In this paper we present a solution of mitigating electrical breakdown by oiling. We will also present results of surface anodizing improvements achieved by surface finish preparation and surface sealing. We conclude that oiling the anodized surface and using anodized hot dip sealing processes will have similar results.

  15. Perceptual quantization of chromatic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadane, Abdelhakim; Bedat, Laurent; Barba, Dominique

    1998-07-01

    In order to achieve a color image coding based on the human visual system features, we have been interested by the design of a perceptually based quantizer. The cardinal directions Ach, Cr1 and Cr2, designed by Krauskopf from habituation experiments and validated in our lab from spatial masking experiments, have been used to characterize color images. The achromatic component, already considered in previous study, will not be considered here. The same methodology has been applied to the two chromatic components to specify the decision thresholds and the reconstruction levels which ensure that the degradations induced will be lower than their visibility thresholds. Two observers have been used for each of the two components. From the values obtained for Cr1 component one should notice that the decision thresholds and reconstruction levels follow a linear law even at higher levels. However, for Cr2 component the values seem following a monotonous increasing function. To determine if these behaviors are frequency dependent, further experiments have been conducted with stimulus frequencies varying from 1cy/deg to 4cy/deg. The measured values show no significant variations. Finally, instead of sinusoidal stimuli, filtered textures have been used to take into account the spatio-frequential combination. The same laws (linear for Cr1 and monotonous increasing for Cr2) have been observed even if a variation in the quantization intervals is reported.

  16. Subsystems component definitions summary program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, A. Don; Thomas, Carolyn C.; Simonsen, Lisa C.; Hall, John B., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A computer program, the Subsystems Component Definitions Summary (SUBCOMDEF), was developed to provide a quick and efficient means of summarizing large quantities of subsystems component data in terms of weight, volume, resupply, and power. The program was validated using Space Station Freedom Program Definition Requirements Document data for the internal and external thermal control subsystem. Once all component descriptions, unit weights and volumes, resupply, and power data are input, the user may obtain a summary report of user-specified portions of the subsystem or of the entire subsystem as a whole. Any combination or all of the parameters of wet and dry weight, wet and dry volume, resupply weight and volume, and power may be displayed. The user may vary the resupply period according to individual mission requirements, as well as the number of hours per day power consuming components operate. Uses of this program are not limited only to subsystem component summaries. Any applications that require quick, efficient, and accurate weight, volume, resupply, or power summaries would be well suited to take advantage of SUBCOMDEF's capabilities.

  17. Failure Analysis of Ceramic Components

    SciTech Connect

    B.W. Morris

    2000-06-29

    Ceramics are being considered for a wide range of structural applications due to their low density and their ability to retain strength at high temperatures. The inherent brittleness of monolithic ceramics requires a departure from the deterministic design philosophy utilized to analyze metallic structural components. The design program ''Ceramic Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life'' (CARES/LIFE) developed by NASA Lewis Research Center uses a probabilistic approach to predict the reliability of monolithic components under operational loading. The objective of this study was to develop an understanding of the theories used by CARES/LIFE to predict the reliability of ceramic components and to assess the ability of CARES/LIFE to accurately predict the fast fracture behavior of monolithic ceramic components. A finite element analysis was performed to determine the temperature and stress distribution of a silicon carbide O-ring under diametral compression. The results of the finite element analysis were supplied as input into CARES/LIFE to determine the fast fracture reliability of the O-ring. Statistical material strength parameters were calculated from four-point flexure bar test data. The predicted reliability showed excellent correlation with O-ring compression test data indicating that the CARES/LIFE program can be used to predict the reliability of ceramic components subjected to complicated stress states using material properties determined from simple uniaxial tensile tests.

  18. REdiii: a pipeline for automated structure solution

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Markus-Frederik; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput crystallographic approaches require integrated software solutions to minimize the need for manual effort. REdiii is a system that allows fully automated crystallographic structure solution by integrating existing crystallographic software into an adaptive and partly autonomous workflow engine. The program can be initiated after collecting the first frame of diffraction data and is able to perform processing, molecular-replacement phasing, chain tracing, ligand fitting and refinement without further user intervention. Preset values for each software component allow efficient progress with high-quality data and known parameters. The adaptive workflow engine can determine whether some parameters require modifications and choose alternative software strategies in case the preconfigured solution is inadequate. This integrated pipeline is targeted at providing a comprehensive and efficient approach to screening for ligand-bound co-crystal structures while minimizing repetitiveness and allowing a high-throughput scientific discovery process. PMID:25945571

  19. REdiii: a pipeline for automated structure solution.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Markus Frederik; Schiffer, Celia A

    2015-05-01

    High-throughput crystallographic approaches require integrated software solutions to minimize the need for manual effort. REdiii is a system that allows fully automated crystallographic structure solution by integrating existing crystallographic software into an adaptive and partly autonomous workflow engine. The program can be initiated after collecting the first frame of diffraction data and is able to perform processing, molecular-replacement phasing, chain tracing, ligand fitting and refinement without further user intervention. Preset values for each software component allow efficient progress with high-quality data and known parameters. The adaptive workflow engine can determine whether some parameters require modifications and choose alternative software strategies in case the preconfigured solution is inadequate. This integrated pipeline is targeted at providing a comprehensive and efficient approach to screening for ligand-bound co-crystal structures while minimizing repetitiveness and allowing a high-throughput scientific discovery process. PMID:25945571

  20. Towards Prognostics for Electronics Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Bhaskar; Celaya, Jose R.; Wysocki, Philip F.; Goebel, Kai F.

    2013-01-01

    Electronics components have an increasingly critical role in avionics systems and in the development of future aircraft systems. Prognostics of such components is becoming a very important research field as a result of the need to provide aircraft systems with system level health management information. This paper focuses on a prognostics application for electronics components within avionics systems, and in particular its application to an Isolated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT). This application utilizes the remaining useful life prediction, accomplished by employing the particle filter framework, leveraging data from accelerated aging tests on IGBTs. These tests induced thermal-electrical overstresses by applying thermal cycling to the IGBT devices. In-situ state monitoring, including measurements of steady-state voltages and currents, electrical transients, and thermal transients are recorded and used as potential precursors of failure.

  1. Automated cleaning of electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Drotning, W.; Meirans, L.; Wapman, W.; Hwang, Y.; Koenig, L.; Petterson, B.

    1994-07-01

    Environmental and operator safety concerns are leading to the elimination of trichloroethylene and chlorofluorocarbon solvents in cleaning processes that remove rosin flux, organic and inorganic contamination, and particulates from electronic components. Present processes depend heavily on these solvents for manual spray cleaning of small components and subassemblies. Use of alternative solvent systems can lead to longer processing times and reduced quality. Automated spray cleaning can improve the quality of the cleaning process, thus enabling the productive use of environmentally conscious materials, while minimizing personnel exposure to hazardous materials. We describe the development of a prototype robotic system for cleaning electronic components in a spray cleaning workcell. An important feature of the prototype system is the capability to generate the robot paths and motions automatically from the CAD models of the part to be cleaned, and to embed cleaning process knowledge into the automatically programmed operations.

  2. Efinaconazole 10% Solution

    PubMed Central

    Reece, Barry; Smith, Kathleen; Miller, Terri

    2013-01-01

    Background: Onychomycosis is a chronic condition that often requires long-term management to eradicate the causative fungus, allow a healthy nail to grow, and prevent relapse. As a successful outcome depends highly on patient adherence with treatment, a low risk of periungual skin irritation with topical medication is clinically relevant. Objectives: To study the potential for efinaconazole 10% solution and its corresponding vehicle to induce delayed contact skin sensitization and evaluate its skin irritation potential. Methods: Efinaconazole 10% solution and its vehicle were studied in 239 healthy volunteers for the potential to induce contact skin sensitization. This included a series of induction, challenge, and re-challenge phases. An additional 21-day cumulative irritation study was undertaken in 35 healthy volunteers to compare three concentrations of efinaconazole (1%, 5%, and 10%), vehicle, and positive/negative controls. Results: There was no evidence of induced contact sensitization under occlusive, semi-occlusive, and open (open rub-in) applications of efinaconazole 10% solution. Efinaconazole 1%, 5%, and 10% solutions have mean cumulative irritancy indices of 1.12, 1.26, and 1.18, respectively, where a range of >0 to ≤1 is classified as “mildly irritating.” Results were comparable to vehicle (1.04). Conclusion: Efinaconazole 10% solution did not cause contact sensitization and induced only minimal skin irritation in the studies completed. PMID:23556032

  3. Independent Component Analysis of Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manduchi, Roberto; Portilla, Javier

    2000-01-01

    A common method for texture representation is to use the marginal probability densities over the outputs of a set of multi-orientation, multi-scale filters as a description of the texture. We propose a technique, based on Independent Components Analysis, for choosing the set of filters that yield the most informative marginals, meaning that the product over the marginals most closely approximates the joint probability density function of the filter outputs. The algorithm is implemented using a steerable filter space. Experiments involving both texture classification and synthesis show that compared to Principal Components Analysis, ICA provides superior performance for modeling of natural and synthetic textures.

  4. Space storable propulsion components development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagler, R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The current development status of components to control the flow of propellants (liquid fluorine and hydrazine) in a demonstration space storable propulsion system is discussed. The criteria which determined the designs for the pressure regulator, explosive-actuated valves, propellant shutoff valve, latching solenoid-actuated valve and propellant filter are presented. The test philosophy that was followed during component development is outlined. The results from compatibility demonstrations for reusable connectors, flange seals, and CRES/Ti-6Al4V transition tubes and the evaluations of processes for welding (hand-held TIG, automated TIG, and EB), cleaning for fluorine service, and decontamination after fluorine exposure are described.

  5. [Allergy to bone cement components].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Schuh, A; Eben, R; Thomsen, M

    2008-02-01

    Intolerance reactions to endoprostheses may lead to allergological diagnostics, which focus mainly on metal allergy. However, bone cement may also contain potential allergens, e.g. acrylates and additives such as benzoyl peroxide (BPO), N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine, hydroquinone, and antibiotics (particularly gentamicin). In the Munich implant allergy clinic, we found that 28 of 113 patients (24.8%) with cemented prostheses had contact allergies to bone cement components, mostly to gentamicin (16.8%) and BPO (8.0%). The clinical significance of test results cannot always be shown, but we still recommend including bone cement components in the allergological diagnostics of suspected hypersensitivity reactions to arthroplasty. PMID:18227996

  6. The NACA Three Component Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, H J E

    1922-01-01

    A new instrument known as the NACA three component accelerometer is described in this note. This instrument was designed by the technical staff of the NACA for recording accelerations along three mutually perpendicular axes, and is of the same type as the NACA single component accelerometer with the addition of two springs and a few minor improvements such as a pump for filling the dash-pots and a convenient method for aligning the springs. This note includes a few records as well as photographs of the instrument itself.

  7. Transducer for downhole drilling components

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R; Fox, Joe R

    2006-05-30

    A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. The transmission element may include an annular housing forming a trough, an electrical conductor disposed within the trough, and an MCEI material disposed between the annular housing and the electrical conductor.

  8. Relational conceptual change in solution chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebenezer, Jazlin V.; Gaskell, P. James

    This study explores changes to students' conceptions about solution chemistry in the context of instruction based on collaboration between a researcher and an experienced teacher attempting to implement strategies from the literature on conceptual change. Conceptual change for students and teachers is viewed not just as a process of replacement of old concepts but also as a process of learning to relate ideas to appropriate contexts. The process of instruction and collaboration was influenced by institutional limits on time, the press to cover the curriculum, and the teacher's prior beliefs and practices. The study uses phenomenography to conceptualize students' understandings of solubility. Six categories of description were constructed: (a) physical transformation from solid to liquid; (b) chemical transformation of solute; (c) density of solute; (d) amount of space available in solution; (e) properties of solute; and (f) size of solute. After instruction students showed evidence of two additional ways of talking about solubility: (a) chemical structure of components; and (b) solution equilibrium. The new language, however, did not necessarily replace initial ideas about what happens in particular instances of solution chemistry. A careful analysis of the students' conceptions of solubility revealed important factors influencing the nature of student learning in this area of chemistry. These factors include: (a) ambiguities of chemical theories about dissolving: (b) explanations of the observable; and (c) students' chemical language. It is argued, in conclusion, that the goals for instruction are to assist students to appreciate contexts where everyday conceptions of chemical phenomenon are appropriate and contexts where particular conceptions from the community of chemists are more appropriate.

  9. Resolution of Adsorption and Partition Components of Organic Compounds on Black Carbons.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Cary T; Cheng, Jianzhong; Hung, Wei-Nung; Chen, Baoliang; Lin, Tsair-Fuh

    2015-08-01

    Black carbons (BCs) may sequester non-ionic organic compounds by adsorption and/or partition to varying extents. Up to now, no experimental method has been developed to accurately resolve the combined adsorption and partition capacity of a compound on a BC. In this study, a unique "adsorptive displacement method" is introduced to reliably resolve the adsorption and partition components for a solute-BC system. It estimates the solute adsorption on a BC by the use of an adsorptive displacer to displace the adsorbed target solute into the solution phase. The method is validated by tests with uses of activated carbon as the model carbonaceous adsorbent, soil organic matter as the model carbonaceous partition phase, o-xylene and 1,2,3-trichlorobenzene as the reference solutes, and p-nitrophenol as the adsorptive displacer. Thereafter, the adsorption-partition resolution was completed for the two solutes on selected model BCs: four biochars and two National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) standard soots (SRM-2975 and SRM-1650b). The adsorption and partition components resolved for selected solutes with given BCs and their dependences upon solute properties enable one to cross-check the sorption data of other solutes on the same BCs. The resolved components also provide a theoretical basis for exploring the potential modes and extents of different solute uptakes by given BCs in natural systems. PMID:26114972

  10. Method for separating disparate components in a fluid stream

    DOEpatents

    Meikrantz, David H.

    1990-01-01

    The invention provides a method of separating a mixed component waste stream in a centrifugal separator. The mixed component waste stream is introduced into the separator and is centrifugally separated within a spinning rotor. A dual vortex separation occurs due to the phase density differences, with the phases exiting the rotor distinct from one another. In a preferred embodiment, aqueous solutions of organics can be separated with up to 100% efficiency. The relatively more dense water phase is centrifugally separated through a radially outer aperture in the separator, while the relatively less dense organic phase is separated through a radially inner aperture.

  11. Stability and error estimation for Component Adaptive Grid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliger, Joseph; Zhu, Xiaolei

    1994-01-01

    Component adaptive grid (CAG) methods for solving hyperbolic partial differential equations (PDE's) are discussed in this paper. Applying recent stability results for a class of numerical methods on uniform grids. The convergence of these methods for linear problems on component adaptive grids is established here. Furthermore, the computational error can be estimated on CAG's using the stability results. Using these estimates, the error can be controlled on CAG's. Thus, the solution can be computed efficiently on CAG's within a given error tolerance. Computational results for time dependent linear problems in one and two space dimensions are presented.

  12. Plutonium in Concentrated Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Sue B.; Delegard, Calvin H.

    2002-08-01

    Complex, high ionic strength media are used throughout the plutonium cycle, from its processing and purification in nitric acid, to waste storage and processing in alkaline solutions of concentrated electrolytes, to geologic disposal in brines. Plutonium oxidation/reduction, stability, radiolysis, solution and solid phase chemistry have been studied in such systems. In some cases, predictive models for describing Pu chemistry under such non-ideal conditions have been developed, which are usually based on empirical databases describing specific ion interactions. In Chapter 11, Non-Ideal Systems, studies on the behavior of Pu in various complex media and available model descriptions are reviewed.

  13. Dimensionally continued wormhole solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X. School of Science, East China University of Science Technology, Shanghai 200237 )

    1994-09-15

    In this paper we consider wormhole solutions for the action of special Lovelock gravity'' recently discussed by Banados, Teitelboim, and Zanelli. This action is, in odd dimensions, the Chern-Simons form for the anti--de Sitter group and, in even dimensions, the Euler density constructed with the Lorentz part of the anti--de Sitter curvature tensor. We present a systematic study of classical wormhole solutions in the special Lovelock theory with various matter content, including a perfect fluid energy-momentum tensor, axionic field, and conformal scalar field.

  14. Fissile solution measurement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Crane, T.W.; Collinsworth, P.R.

    1984-06-11

    An apparatus for determining the content of a fissile material within a solution by detecting delayed fission neutrons emitted by the fissile material after it is temporarily irradiated by a neutron source. The apparatus comprises a container holding the solution and having a portion defining a neutron source cavity centrally disposed within the container. The neutron source cavity temporarily receives the neutron source. The container has portions defining a plurality of neutron detector ports that form an annular pattern and surround the neutron source cavity. A plurality of neutron detectors count delayed fission neutrons emitted by the fissile material. Each neutron detector is located in a separate one of the neutron detector ports.

  15. MCFC component development at ANL.

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, I.

    1998-09-15

    Argonne National Laboratory is developing advanced cathode and electrolyte components for the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). Working in support of the MCFC developers, the goal of this effort is to extend the life of the MCFC cell and to improve its performance.

  16. Carcinogenicity of hair dye components.

    PubMed

    Van Duuren, B L

    1980-03-01

    The available animal carcinogenicity data on hair dye components was reviewed. From this review it became clear that certain hair dye components, some of which are still in hair dye formulations now on the market, are animal carcinogens. The compounds of concern that are still in use are: 3-amino-4-methoxyaniline, 2-nitro-4-aminoaniline and 3-nitro-4-hydroxyaniline. Certain azo dyes formerly used, and related compounds still in use, contain the benzidine moiety. Two of these compounds, Direct Blue 6 and Direct Black 38, have been shown to be metabolized in animals to the human carcinogen benzidine. Furthermore, skin absorption studies carried out with radiolabeled hair dye components applied to animal or human skin have conclusively shown that these compounds are systemically absorbed and excreted. Known cocarcinogens such as catechol and pyrogallol, which enhance benzo(a)pyrene carcinogenicity on mouse skin, are used as hair dye components. It is not known whether such compounds will enhance the carcinogenicity of substituted aniline hair dye chemicals. The available epidemiologic data are not sufficient to link hair dye use with an increased incidence in human cancer. PMID:6993608

  17. Complement component 3 (C3)

    MedlinePlus

    C3 and C4 are the most commonly measured complement components. A complement test may be used to monitor people with an ... normal levels of the complement proteins C3 and C4 . Complement activity varies throughout the body. For example, ...

  18. New component in protein fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Longworth, J W

    1980-01-01

    Tryptophyl residues in proteins absorb at longer wavelengths than tyrosyl residues and thus the tryptophyl fluorescence can be selectively excited. In addition, tryptophyl residues have a fluorescence maximum at much longer wavelengths than tyrosyl residues and are the predominant source of fluorescence at the long wavelength region. The contribution of tyrosyl fluorescence to protein fluorescence can be determined by exploiting these spectral properties. The tyrosyl fluorescence of native human serum albumin is different than the fluorescence of N-acetyl-L-tyrosinamide. The spectral maximum is at longer wavelength and the spectral width is greater. This is caused by a second component with a maximum at 345 nm. The excitation spectrum of the 345 nm component is similar to the excitation spectrum of the normal 304 nm tyrosyl component. The 345 nm is largely absent from denatured serum albumin. An excited singlet state protolysis from the buried tyrosyl residues explains the appearance of the 345 nm component. A possible acceptor base is an amino group of buried lysyl residue.

  19. Large Component Removal/Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, D. M.

    2002-02-27

    This paper describes the removal and disposal of the large components from Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant. The large components discussed include the three steam generators, pressurizer, and reactor pressure vessel. Two separate Exemption Requests, which included radiological characterizations, shielding evaluations, structural evaluations and transportation plans, were prepared and issued to the DOT for approval to ship these components; the first was for the three steam generators and one pressurizer, the second was for the reactor pressure vessel. Both Exemption Requests were submitted to the DOT in November 1999. The DOT approved the Exemption Requests in May and July of 2000, respectively. The steam generators and pressurizer have been removed from Maine Yankee and shipped to the processing facility. They were removed from Maine Yankee's Containment Building, loaded onto specially designed skid assemblies, transported onto two separate barges, tied down to the barges, th en shipped 2750 miles to Memphis, Tennessee for processing. The Reactor Pressure Vessel Removal Project is currently under way and scheduled to be completed by Fall of 2002. The planning, preparation and removal of these large components has required extensive efforts in planning and implementation on the part of all parties involved.

  20. Spacecraft communications terminal breadboard components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The C-band translator, transmitter, and attenuator are described for the spacecraft communication terminal breadboard components. The block diagram is also included for the C-band receiver. The system performance data and the mechanical properties of the system are briefly considered.

  1. Placement of the acetabular component.

    PubMed

    Beverland, D E; O'Neill, C K J; Rutherford, M; Molloy, D; Hill, J C

    2016-01-01

    Ideal placement of the acetabular component remains elusive both in terms of defining and achieving a target. Our aim is to help restore original anatomy by using the transverse acetabular ligament (TAL) to control the height, depth and version of the component. In the normal hip the TAL and labrum extend beyond the equator of the femoral head and therefore, if the definitive acetabular component is positioned such that it is cradled by and just deep to the plane of the TAL and labrum and is no more than 4mm larger than the original femoral head, the centre of the hip should be restored. If the face of the component is positioned parallel to the TAL and psoas groove the patient specific version should be restored. We still use the TAL for controlling version in the dysplastic hip because we believe that the TAL and labrum compensate for any underlying bony abnormality. The TAL should not be used as an aid to inclination. Worldwide, > 75% of surgeons operate with the patient in the lateral decubitus position and we have shown that errors in post-operative radiographic inclination (RI) of > 50° are generally caused by errors in patient positioning. Consequently, great care needs to be taken when positioning the patient. We also recommend 35° of apparent operative inclination (AOI) during surgery, as opposed to the traditional 45°. PMID:26733639

  2. Sterility of packaged implant components.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Philip

    2005-01-01

    Several implant components in their original glass vial and peel-back packages were subjected to sterility testing to determine whether the contents remained sterile after the expiration date marked on the package had passed. The results from a university microbiology laboratory showed that the contents remained sterile for 6 to 11 years after the expiration dates. PMID:15973959

  3. Component Processes in Task Switching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meiran, Nachshon; Chorev, Ziv; Sapir, Ayelet

    2000-01-01

    Studied task switching in 4 experiments involving 111 Israeli undergraduates. Results show the preparation for a task switch is not a by-product of general preparation by phasic alertness or predicting target onset and establish reconfiguration as a separate preparatory process. Suggests that there are at least three components of task switching…

  4. Factor Analysis via Components Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentler, Peter M.; de Leeuw, Jan

    2011-01-01

    When the factor analysis model holds, component loadings are linear combinations of factor loadings, and vice versa. This interrelation permits us to define new optimization criteria and estimation methods for exploratory factor analysis. Although this article is primarily conceptual in nature, an illustrative example and a small simulation show…

  5. Modeling fabrication of nuclear components: An integrative approach

    SciTech Connect

    Hench, K.W.

    1996-08-01

    Reduction of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the general downsizing of the nuclear weapons complex has presented challenges for Los Alamos. One is to design an optimized fabrication facility to manufacture nuclear weapon primary components in an environment of intense regulation and shrinking budgets. This dissertation presents an integrative two-stage approach to modeling the casting operation for fabrication of nuclear weapon primary components. The first stage optimizes personnel radiation exposure for the casting operation layout by modeling the operation as a facility layout problem formulated as a quadratic assignment problem. The solution procedure uses an evolutionary heuristic technique. The best solutions to the layout problem are used as input to the second stage - a simulation model that assesses the impact of competing layouts on operational performance. The focus of the simulation model is to determine the layout that minimizes personnel radiation exposures and nuclear material movement, and maximizes the utilization of capacity for finished units.

  6. School Solutions for Cyberbullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Susan

    2009-01-01

    This article offers solutions and steps to prevent cyberbullying. Schools can improve their ability to handle cyberbullying by educating staff members, students, and parents and by implementing rules and procedures for how to handle possible incidents. Among the steps is to include a section about cyberbullying and expectations in the student…

  7. Cells and Hypotonic Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bery, Julia

    1985-01-01

    Describes a demonstration designed to help students better understand the response of plant and animal cells to hypotonic solutions. The demonstration uses a balloon inside a flexible, thin-walled cardboard box. Air going in corresponds to water entering by osmosis, and, like real cells, if stretched enough, the balloon will burst. (DH)

  8. Maintenance Crisis vs Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggard, Susie

    Industrial maintenance in Northeast Georgia is facing an acute crisis. Contributing factors are economic development that is depleting the work force, aging of the population, downsizing of the military, and lack of technical school graduates. Solutions to the crisis fall into three categories: short-term, mid-term, and long-term. For short-term…

  9. Correct Problems, Desperate Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donohue, William A.

    1996-01-01

    Argues that the social problems confronting America have been bombarded with ill-conceived and unsuccessful social policy largely driven by fear. Explains that parental licensing is a draconian and unworkable solution. Vouchers for indigent youth to attend Catholic schools, developing after-school and summer programs, and reforming welfare are…

  10. An Inexpensive Solution Calorimeter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavanagh, Emma; Mindel, Sam; Robertson, Giles; Hughes, D. E. Peter

    2008-01-01

    We describe the construction of a simple solution calorimeter, using a miniature bead thermistor as a temperature-sensing element. This has a response time of a few seconds and made it possible to carry out a thermometric reaction in under a minute, which led to minimal heat losses. Small temperature changes of 1 K associated with enthalpies of…

  11. Service-based Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Lynda; Winston, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Describes the Solutions model used at Shelley High School in Idaho which gives students the opportunity to gain practical experience while tackling community problems. This approach is built on the three fundamentals of an integrated curriculum, a problem-solving focus, and service-based learning. Sample problems include increasing certain trout…

  12. Knowledge Retrieval Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Kamran

    1998-01-01

    Excalibur RetrievalWare offers true knowledge retrieval solutions. Its fundamental technologies, Adaptive Pattern Recognition Processing and Semantic Networks, have capabilities for knowledge discovery and knowledge management of full-text, structured and visual information. The software delivers a combination of accuracy, extensibility,…

  13. Solubility of pllutonium in alkaline salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.; Edwards, T.B.

    1993-02-26

    Plutonium solubility data from several studies have been evaluated. For each data set, a predictive model has been developed where appropriate. In addition, a statistical model and corresponding prediction intervals for plutonium solubility as a quadratic function of the hydroxide concentration have been developed. Because of the wide range of solution compositions, the solubility of plutonium can vary by as much as three orders of magnitude for any given hydroxide concentration and still remain within the prediction interval. Any nuclear safety assessments that depend on the maximum amount of plutonium dissolved in alkaline salt solutions should use concentrations at least as great as the upper prediction limits developed in this study. To increase the confidence in the prediction model, it is recommended that additional solubility tests be conducted at low hydroxide concentrations and with all of the other solution components involved. To validate the model for application to actual waste solutions, it is recommended that the plutonium solubilities in actual waste solutions be determined and compared to the values predicted by the quadratic model.

  14. [Mycelial wastes of penicillin fermentation as glue components].

    PubMed

    Kadimaliev, D A; Revin, V V; Vatolin, A K; Groshev, V M; Bychkov, M V

    2002-01-01

    A new trend in the rational use of micelial wastes after antibiotics fermentation was elaborated. The modification of P. chrysogenum micelium by means of acid and alkaline solutions allows to use it as bone glue component. As a result physico-mechanical characteristics of the mixture increase, while the ratio cost-price decreases. The obtained glue composition can be used in the production of glue paper tape, for paper and wood glue. PMID:12728627

  15. IDENTIFICATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF INORGANIC COMPONENTS IN WATER: WHAT TO MEASURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical forms of inorganic components in water are widely varied and range from simple aquo complexes in solution to complicated silicate minerals in suspension. A variety of techniques are used to determine the total quantities of components in a particular aqueous environm...

  16. Component Modeling Approach Software Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-08-23

    The Component Modeling Approach Software Tool (CMAST) establishes a set of performance libraries of approved components (frames, glass, and spacer) which can be accessed for configuring fenestration products for a project, and btaining a U-factor, Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC), and Visible Transmittance (VT) rating for those products, which can then be reflected in a CMA Label Certificate for code compliance. CMAST is web-based as well as client-based. The completed CMA program and software toolmore » will be useful in several ways for a vast array of stakeholders in the industry: Generating performance ratings for bidding projects Ascertaining credible and accurate performance data Obtaining third party certification of overall product performance for code compliance« less

  17. Component characterization and development 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jacqueline D.

    1993-09-01

    The effort entitled, 'Component Characterization and Development II' was established in the Rome Lab Photonics Center Analog & Lightwave Photonics Branch as part of the overall in-house program plan to advanced the state-of-the-art in optics and electrooptics. The objective of the effort is to specify, acquire, and/or develop components for Air Force Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence (C3I) applications. The source of prototype devices was designated to include academia, industry, and government organizations. Actual performance data was measured for both electro-optic and fiber-optic based devices that were of interest to communications, spatial laser control, and optical beamforming applications. Additionally, several novel approaches to device fabrication were investigated through a BAA contract with Syracuse University.

  18. Processing of Activated Core Components

    SciTech Connect

    Friske, A.; Gestermann, G.; Finkbeiner, R.

    2003-02-26

    Used activated components from the core of a NPP like control elements, water channels from a BWR, and others like in-core measurement devices need to be processed into waste forms suitable for interim storage, and for the final waste repository. Processing of the activated materials can be undertaken by underwater cutting and packaging or by cutting and high-pressure compaction in a hot cell. A hot cell is available in Germany as a joint investment between GNS and the Karlsruhe Research Center at the latter's site. Special transport equipment is available to transport the components ''as-is'' to the hot cell. Newly designed underwater processing equipment has been designed, constructed, and operated for the special application of NPP decommissioning. This equipment integrates an underwater cutting device with an 80 ton force underwater in-drum compactor.

  19. Nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Glenn J.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint. Small gaps limit horizontal displacement of components during a seismic occurrence and therefore reduce dynamic loadings on the free lower end. The reactor vessel and reactor guard vessel use thicker section roll-forged rings welded between the vessel straight shell sections and the bottom hemispherical head sections. The inside of the reactor guard vessel ring forging contains local vertical dovetail slots and upper ledge pockets to mount and retain field fitted and installed blocks. As an option, the horizontal displacement of the reactor vessel core support cone can be limited by including shop fitted/installed local blocks in opposing alignment with the reactor vessel forged ring. Beams embedded in the wall of the reactor building protrude into apertures in the thermal insulation shell adjacent the reactor guard vessel ring and have motion limit blocks attached thereto to provide to a predetermined clearance between the blocks and reactor guard vessel ring.

  20. Composite components on commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. B.

    1980-01-01

    Commercial aircraft manufacturers are making production commitments to composite structure for future aircraft and modifications to current production aircraft. Flight service programs with advanced composites sponsored by NASA during the past 10 years are described. Approximately 2.5 million total composite component flight hours have been accumulated since 1970 on both commercial transports and helicopters. Design concepts with significant mass savings were developed, appropriate inspection and maintenance procedures were established, and satisfactory service was achieved for the various composite components. A major NASA/U.S. industry technology program to reduce fuel consumption of commercial transport aircraft through the use of advanced composites was undertaken. Ground and flight environmental effects on the composite materials used in the flight service programs supplement the flight service evaluation.

  1. [Inulin: a valuable nutritional component].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Anna; Klimowicz, Adam; Bielecka-Grzela, Stanisława; Piechota, Magda

    2012-01-01

    Inulin, a natural oligomer of fructose, is classified as a food component. It can be found in some plants and vegetables, i.e. chicory, Jerusalem artichoke, elecampane, and dandelion. Following ingestion, inulin reaches the lower part of the gastrointestinal tract where it is fermented increasing the bifidobacterial population of the colon. The growth of bifidobacteria regulates cholesterol concentration and absorption of minerals. Inulin added to food may prevent the spread of civilization diseases, like diabetes and obesity. PMID:23547397

  2. NAT: perspectives for cellular components.

    PubMed

    Barbara, J A

    1999-12-01

    The introduction of routine testing to detect viral genomes in donated blood was originally driven by requirements for plasma fractionation in relation to exclusion of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA. Nevertheless, it was obvious from the outset that a dual standard for fractionated products and individual blood components would be untenable. In many countries therefore, planning for introduction of nucleic acid testing (NAT) of blood incorporated progression to release of HCV RNA tested components. HCV was singled out because of its long seronegative 'window period', relatively high prevalence and incidence in blood donors, rapid burst time and high genome copy number during seroconversion. The latter properties made HCV particularly suitable for detection in pools of samples. If HCV RNA testing is required for release of labile components such as platelets, rapid provision of NAT results is vital because of short shelf life of platelets and the problems of delays when resolving the infectious unit in a reactive pool. For NAT release of labile components smaller sample pool sizes allow faster resolution of RNA positive units. Smaller pools involve high test throughput, the likely need for more testing laboratories and ensuing increased costs. Single sample testing is the ultimate extrapolation of reducing sample pool size. With reduced pool sizes or single sample testing, the option of testing for other viruses (e.g. HIV or HBV) singly or in multiplex also arises. The cost-benefit and incremental yield of such strategies in the light of 'combo' assays for HIV Ag/Ab and the recently described HCV Ag assay will require careful and objective assessment, together with re-appraisal of anti-HBc screening for detection of HBV infected donors at the "tail-end" of carriage. PMID:10686060

  3. Quasar redshifts: the intrinsic component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Peter M.

    2016-09-01

    The large observed redshift of quasars has suggested large cosmological distances and a corresponding enormous energy output to explain the brightness or luminosity as seen at earth. Alternative or complementary sources of redshift have not been identified by the astronomical community. This study examines one possible source of additional redshift: an intrinsic component based on the plasma characteristics of high temperature and high electron density which are believed to be present.

  4. Kernel Near Principal Component Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    MARTIN, SHAWN B.

    2002-07-01

    We propose a novel algorithm based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA). First, we present an interesting approximation of PCA using Gram-Schmidt orthonormalization. Next, we combine our approximation with the kernel functions from Support Vector Machines (SVMs) to provide a nonlinear generalization of PCA. After benchmarking our algorithm in the linear case, we explore its use in both the linear and nonlinear cases. We include applications to face data analysis, handwritten digit recognition, and fluid flow.

  5. Advanced micromoulding of optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Hans-Dieter; Ehrfeld, Wolfgang; Paatzsch, Thomas; Smaglinski, Ingo; Weber, Lutz

    1999-09-01

    There is a growing need for micro-optical components in the field of tele- and datacom applications. Such components have to be very precise and should be available in reasonable numbers. Microtechnology provides manufacturing techniques that fulfill both requirements. Using micro electro discharge machining, laser micromachining, ultra precision milling and deep lithography with subsequent electroforming methods, complex tools for the replication of highly precise plastic parts have been manufactured. In many cases a combination of methods enumerated above gives a tool which shows both functionality and cost-efficiency. As examples we present the realization of integrated-optical components with passive fiber-waveguide coupling used as components in optical networks and as velocity sensors for two-phase flows, like liquids containing small gas bubbles or particles. In the first case multimode 4 X 4 star couplers have been manufactured in a pilot series that show excess loss values below 3 dB and a uniformity better than 3 dB at 830 nm. This performance becomes possible by using a compression molding process. By stamping the microstructured mold into a semifinished PMMA plate exact replication of the molds as well as very low surface roughness of the waveguide side walls could be observed. In the second case the waveguide channels of the flow sensors show dimensions of between 20 micrometer and 100 micrometer and an aspect ratio of about 20. These structures have been replicated by injection molding of PMMA using variotherm process treatment with a cycle time of about 2 - 3 min.

  6. Analytic solutions of an unclassified artifact /

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, Bruce C.

    2012-03-01

    This report provides the technical detail for analytic solutions for the inner and outer profiles of the unclassified CMM Test Artifact (LANL Part Number 157Y-700373, 5/03/2001) in terms of radius and polar angle. Furthermore, analytic solutions are derived for the legacy Sheffield measurement hardware, also in terms of radius and polar angle, using part coordinates, i.e., relative to the analytic profile solutions obtained. The purpose of this work is to determine the exact solution for the “cosine correction” term inherent to measurement with the Sheffield hardware. The cosine correction is required in order to interpret the actual measurements taken by the hardware in terms of an actual part definition, or “knot-point spline definition,” that typically accompanies a component drawing. Specifically, there are two portions of the problem: first an analytic solution must be obtained for any point on the part, e.g., given the radii and the straight lines that define the part, it is required to find an exact solution for the inner and outer profile for any arbitrary polar angle. Next, the problem of the inspection of this part must be solved, i.e., given an arbitrary sphere (representing the inspection hardware) that comes in contact with the part (inner and outer profiles) at any arbitrary polar angle, it is required to determine the exact location of that intersection. This is trivial for the case of concentric circles. In the present case, however, the spherical portion of the profiles is offset from the defined center of the part, making the analysis nontrivial. Here, a simultaneous solution of the part profiles and the sphere was obtained.

  7. A simple closed-form solution for assessing concentration uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros, F. P. J.; Fiori, Aldo; Bellin, Alberto

    2011-12-01

    We propose closed-form approximate solutions for the moments of a nonreactive tracer that can be used in applications, such as risk analysis. This is in line with the tenet that analytical solutions provide useful information, with minimum cost, during initial site characterization efforts and can serve as a preliminary screening tool when used with prior knowledge. We show that with the help of a few assumptions, the first-order solutions of the concentration moments proposed by Fiori and Dagan (2000) can be further simplified to assume a form similar to well-known deterministic solutions, therefore facilitating their use in applications. A highly anisotropic formation is assumed, and we neglect the transverse components of the two-particle correlation trajectory. The proposed solution compares well with the work of Fiori and Dagan while presenting the same simplicity of use of existing solutions for homogeneous porous media.

  8. Automated cleaning of electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Drotning, W.

    1994-03-01

    Environmental and operator safety concerns are leading to the elimination of trichloroethylene (TCE) and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) solvents in electronic component cleaning processes that remove rosin flux, organic and inorganic contamination, and particulates. Present processes depend heavily on these solvents for manual spray cleaning of small components and subassemblies. Use of alternative solvent systems can lead to longer processing times and reduced quality. Automated spray cleaning can improve the quality of the cleaning process, thus enabling the productive use of environmentally conscious materials, while minimizing personnel exposure to hazardous materials. In addition, the use of robotic and automated systems can reduce the manual handling of parts that necessitates additional cleaning. We describe the development of a prototype robotic system for cleaning electronic components in a spray cleaning workcell. An important feature of the prototype system is the capability to generate the robot paths and motions automatically from the CAD models of the part to be cleaned, and to embed cleaning process knowledge into the automatically programmed operations.

  9. Diamond turning microstructure optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wenda

    2009-05-01

    Microstructure optical components in the form of Fresnel, TIR, microgroove, micro lens array provide a lot design freedom for high compact optical systems. It is a key factor which enables the cutting edge technology for telecommunication, surveillance and high-definition display system. Therefore, the demand of manufacturing such element is rapidly increasing. These elements usually contain high precision, tiny structure and complex form, which have posed many new challenges for tooling, programming as well as ultra-precision machining. To cope with the fast development of the technology and meet the increasing demand of the market, we have developed our own manufacturing process to fabricate microstructure optical components by way of Diamond tuning, Shaping, Raster cutting, Slow Slide Servo (SSS), Diamond milling and Post polishing. This paper is to focus on how we employed these methods to produce complex prototype of microstructure optical components and precision mold inserts which either contains aspheric lens array or freeform V grooves. The high quality finish of these surfaces meets application requirements. Measurement results are presented. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods are compared and discussed in the paper.

  10. Component-Based Visualization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    A software system has been developed that gives engineers and operations personnel with no "formal" programming expertise, but who are familiar with the Microsoft Windows operating system, the ability to create visualization displays to monitor the health and performance of aircraft/spacecraft. This software system is currently supporting the X38 V201 spacecraft component/system testing and is intended to give users the ability to create, test, deploy, and certify their subsystem displays in a fraction of the time that it would take to do so using previous software and programming methods. Within the visualization system there are three major components: the developer, the deployer, and the widget set. The developer is a blank canvas with widget menu items that give users the ability to easily create displays. The deployer is an application that allows for the deployment of the displays created using the developer application. The deployer has additional functionality that the developer does not have, such as printing of displays, screen captures to files, windowing of displays, and also serves as the interface into the documentation archive and help system. The third major component is the widget set. The widgets are the visual representation of the items that will make up the display (i.e., meters, dials, buttons, numerical indicators, string indicators, and the like). This software was developed using Visual C++ and uses COTS (commercial off-the-shelf) software where possible.

  11. Design for pressure regulating components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichmann, H.

    1973-01-01

    The design development for Pressure Regulating Components included a regulator component trade-off study with analog computer performance verification to arrive at a final optimized regulator configuration for the Space Storable Propulsion Module, under development for a Jupiter Orbiter mission. This application requires the pressure regulator to be capable of long-term fluorine exposure. In addition, individual but basically identical (for purposes of commonality) units are required for separate oxidizer and fuel pressurization. The need for dual units requires improvement in the regulation accuracy over present designs. An advanced regulator concept was prepared featuring redundant bellows, all metallic/ceramic construction, friction-free guidance of moving parts, gas damping, and the elimination of coil springs normally used for reference forces. The activities included testing of actual size seat/poppet components to determine actual discharge coefficients and flow forces. The resulting data was inserted into the computer model of the regulator. Computer simulation of the propulsion module performance over two mission profiles indicated satisfactory minimization of propellant residual requirements imposed by regulator performance uncertainties.

  12. Dismantling Anger Control Training for Children: A Randomized Pilot Study of Social Problem-Solving Versus Social Skills Training Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sukhodolsky, Denis G.; Golub, Arthur; Stone, Erin C.; Orban, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Two components of multimodal anger control training were compared in a randomized study. The first component, social problem-solving training, utilized the techniques of cognitive restructuring, attribution retraining, and solution generation that targeted social-cognitive deficits implicated in anger and aggression. The second component, social…

  13. A flow simulation study of protein solution under magnetic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Hidehiko; Hirota, Noriyuki; Matsumoto, Shinji; Wada, Hitoshi

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a superconducting magnet system generating magnetic forces able to compensate gravity and suppress convection of diamagnetic protein solution from which protein crystals precipitate. A simulation model has been proposed to elucidate the motion of protein solutions and search for the optimal conditions of the crystal formation process. This model incorporates general, non-uniform magnetic forces as external forces, while the previous models involve only simple, uniform magnetic forces. The simulation results indicate that the vertical component can suppress the convection of protein solution, while the horizontal component induces minimal convection. We, therefore, need to take into account the both components when considering the formation of protein crystals under magnetic forces.

  14. The sustainability solutions agenda.

    PubMed

    Sarewitz, Daniel; Clapp, Richard; Crumbley, Cathy; Kriebel, David; Tickner, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Progress toward a more sustainable society is usually described in a "knowledge-first" framework, where science characterizes a problem in terms of its causes and mechanisms as a basis for subsequent action. Here we present a different approach-A Sustainability Solutions Agenda (SSA)-which seeks from the outset to identify the possible pathways to solutions. SSA focuses on uncovering paths to sustainability by improving current technological practice, and applying existing knowledge to identify and evaluate technological alternatives. SSA allows people and organizations to transition toward greater sustainability without sacrificing essential technological functions, and therefore does not threaten the interests that depend on those functions. Whereas knowledge-first approaches view scientific information as sufficient to convince people to take the right actions, even if those actions are perceived as against their immediate interests, SSA allows values to evolve toward greater attention to sustainability as a result of the positive experience of solving a problem. PMID:22776577

  15. Solution of Nonlinear Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, L. R.

    1960-01-01

    The problem of solving systems of nonlinear equations has been relatively neglected in the mathematical literature, especially in the textbooks, in comparison to the corresponding linear problem. Moreover, treatments that have an appearance of generality fail to discuss the nature of the solutions and the possible pitfalls of the methods suggested. Probably it is unrealistic to expect that a unified and comprehensive treatment of the subject will evolve, owing to the great variety of situations possible, especially in the applied field where some requirement of human or mechanical efficiency is always present. Therefore we attempt here simply to pose the problem and to describe and partially appraise the methods of solution currently in favor.

  16. Software Solutions for ICME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, G. J.; Engstrom, A.; Bernhardt, R.; Prahl, U.; Adam, L.; Seyfarth, J.; Apel, M.; de Saracibar, C. Agelet; Korzhavyi, P.; Ågren, J.; Patzak, B.

    2016-01-01

    The Integrated Computational Materials Engineering expert group (ICMEg), a coordination activity of the European Commission, aims at developing a global and open standard for information exchange between the heterogeneous varieties of numerous simulation tools. The ICMEg consortium coordinates respective developments by a strategy of networking stakeholders in the first International Workshop on Software Solutions for ICME, compiling identified and relevant software tools into the Handbook of Software Solutions for ICME, discussing strategies for interoperability between different software tools during a second (planned) international workshop, and eventually proposing a scheme for standardized information exchange in a future book or document. The present article summarizes these respective actions to provide the ICME community with some additional insights and resources from which to help move this field forward.

  17. Using an architectural approach to integrate heterogeneous, distributed software components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, John R.; Purtilo, James M.

    1995-01-01

    Many computer programs cannot be easily integrated because their components are distributed and heterogeneous, i.e., they are implemented in diverse programming languages, use different data representation formats, or their runtime environments are incompatible. In many cases, programs are integrated by modifying their components or interposing mechanisms that handle communication and conversion tasks. For example, remote procedure call (RPC) helps integrate heterogeneous, distributed programs. When configuring such programs, however, mechanisms like RPC must be used explicitly by software developers in order to integrate collections of diverse components. Each collection may require a unique integration solution. This paper describes improvements to the concepts of software packaging and some of our experiences in constructing complex software systems from a wide variety of components in different execution environments. Software packaging is a process that automatically determines how to integrate a diverse collection of computer programs based on the types of components involved and the capabilities of available translators and adapters in an environment. Software packaging provides a context that relates such mechanisms to software integration processes and reduces the cost of configuring applications whose components are distributed or implemented in different programming languages. Our software packaging tool subsumes traditional integration tools like UNIX make by providing a rule-based approach to software integration that is independent of execution environments.

  18. Amine-phenyl multi-component gradient stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Dewoolkar, Veeren C; Kannan, Balamurali; Ashraf, Kayesh M; Higgins, Daniel A; Collinson, Maryanne M

    2015-09-01

    Continuous multi-component gradients in amine and phenyl groups were fabricated using controlled rate infusion (CRI). Solutions prepared from either 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTEOS) or phenyltrimethoxysilane (PTMOS) were infused, in a sequential fashion, at a controlled rate into an empty graduated cylinder housing a vertically aligned thin layer chromatography (TLC) plate. The hydrolyzed precursors reacted with an abundance of silanol (SiOH) groups on the TLC plates, covalently attaching the functionalized silane to its surface. The extent of modification by phenyl and amine was determined by the kinetics of each reaction and the exposure time at each point along the TLC plate. The local concentrations of phenyl and amine were measured using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The profile of the multi-component gradients strongly depended on the order of infusion, the direction of the gradient and the presence of available surface silanol groups. A slightly higher amount of phenyl can be deposited on the TLC plate by first modifying its surface with amine groups as they serve as a catalyst, enhancing condensation. Separation of water- and fat-soluble vitamins and the control of retention factors were demonstrated on the multi-component gradient TLC plates. Uniformly modified and single-component TLC plates gave different separations compared to the multi-component gradient plates. The retention factors of the individual vitamins depended on the order of surface modification, the spotting end, and whether the multi-component gradients align or oppose each other. PMID:26255112

  19. A fluorimeter for solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fletcher, Mary H.; Warner, E. Ray

    1953-01-01

    description of and complete drawings for the construction of a fluorimeter for the measurement of fluorescence of solutions are given. The instrument is sturdy and versatile. It may be used with various phototubes and measuring devices. It is constructed so that phototubes and filters may be changed readily. Sensitivity is controlled easily over a wide range by limiting the size of either the ultraviolet or fluorescent light beam with standard apertures.

  20. Stabilization of polyaniline solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.

    1993-12-01

    Adding hindered amine light stabilizers (HALS) to N-methyl- pyrrolidinone (NMP) solutions of polyaniline delays gelation. It is hypothesized that HALS act in some manner other than as traditional antioxidants in preventing gelation; the secondary amine functional group appears to play a critical role, perhaps by disrupting the physical crystallization network that may contribute to gelation. Pyrrolidine, a secondary amine, or ammonia is an effective cosolvent with NMP in dissolving PAn-EB (emeraldine base). 6 refs, 4 figs.

  1. Laser ultrasonic multi-component imaging

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Thomas K.; Telschow, Kenneth

    2011-01-25

    Techniques for ultrasonic determination of the interfacial relationship of multi-component systems are discussed. In implementations, a laser energy source may be used to excite a multi-component system including a first component and a second component at least in partial contact with the first component. Vibrations resulting from the excitation may be detected for correlation with a resonance pattern indicating if discontinuity exists at the interface of the first and second components.

  2. A Goal Seeking Strategy for Constructing Systems from Alternative Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentine, Mark E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology to efficiently construct feasible systems then modify feasible systems to meet successive goals by selecting from alternative components, a problem recognized to be n-p complete. The methodology provides a means to catalog and model alternative components. A presented system modeling Structure is robust enough to model a wide variety of systems and provides a means to compare and evaluate alternative systems. These models act as input to a methodology for selecting alternative components to construct feasible systems and modify feasible systems to meet design goals and objectives. The presented algorithm's ability to find a restricted solution, as defined by a unique set of requirements, is demonstrated against an exhaustive search of a sample of proposed shuttle modifications. The utility of the algorithm is demonstrated by comparing results from the algorithm with results from three NASA shuttle evolution studies using their value systems and assumptions.

  3. Sensor modules for structural health monitoring and reliability of components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroening, Michael; Berthold, Axel; Meyendorf, Norbert

    2005-05-01

    Safety and availability of ageing infrastructures require periodic or continuous monitoring of the structure"s integrity. Innovative design criteria for new infrastructure components may allow material and energy conservation if components are continuously monitored by using advanced sensor systems. This concept for recurring Structural Health Monitoring will replace a significant part of conventional NDE by new maintenance concepts. The goal consists in sensor networks based on advanced principles of testing technology with integrated signal/data processing and data communication. NDE modeling is required for the quantification of measurement results. Finally, a decision on the integrity of the structure based on sensor results requires detailed knowledge about material behavior and modeling capacity for materials and components. IZFP has developed sensor concepts for complex solutions applicable to Structural Health Monitoring for different applications. These applications include railroad inspection, aircraft inspection, inspection of wind energy systems, power electric switches and micro gas valves. Basic concepts and applications of sensor networks will be presented.

  4. Structural Analysis Methods Development for Turbine Hot Section Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    The structural analysis technologies and activities of the NASA Lewis Research Center's gas turbine engine Hot Section Technology (HOST) program are summarized. The technologies synergistically developed and validated include: time-varying thermal/mechanical load models; component-specific automated geometric modeling and solution strategy capabilities; advanced inelastic analysis methods; inelastic constitutive models; high-temperature experimental techniques and experiments; and nonlinear structural analysis codes. Features of the program that incorporate the new technologies and their application to hot section component analysis and design are described. Improved and, in some cases, first-time 3-D nonlinear structural analyses of hot section components of isotropic and anisotropic nickel-base superalloys are presented.

  5. Component Control System for a Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser-Chanpong, Nathan (Inventor); Spain, Ivan (Inventor); Dawson, Andrew D. (Inventor); Bluethmann, William J. (Inventor); Lee, Chunhao J. (Inventor); Vitale, Robert L. (Inventor); Guo, Raymond (Inventor); Waligora, Thomas M. (Inventor); Akinyode, Akinjide Akinniyi (Inventor); Reed, Ryan M. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A vehicle includes a chassis, a modular component, and a central operating system. The modular component is supported by the chassis. The central operating system includes a component control system, a primary master controller, and a secondary master controller. The component control system is configured for controlling the modular component. The primary and secondary master controllers are in operative communication with the component control system. The primary and secondary master controllers are configured to simultaneously transmit commands to the component control system. The component control system is configured to accept commands from the secondary master controller only when a fault occurs in the primary master controller.

  6. Computer analysis of vibrational spectra of aqueous ethanol solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burikov, S. A.; Dolenko, T. A.; Kurchatov, I. S.; Patsaeva, S. V.; Starokurov, Yu. V.

    2012-09-01

    Results of decomposition of vibrational spectra for aqueous ethanol solutions into components in the region of hydroxyl group stretching vibrations are presented. The infrared light absorption and Raman scattering spectra are investigated for alcohol concentrations in the solution changing from 0 to 90 mass %. Methods of higher derivatives and genetic algorithms together with the simplex method are used to investigate the OH stretching vibrational band contour. Independent methods of spectral structure resolution demonstrate good agreement in the number of the major spectral components as well as in the dependences of the peak wavenumbers, band widths, and amplitudes of spectral components on the ethanol concentration in water. The observed changes in the shape of the spectral contour for OH stretching vibration and, therefore, its components are explained in terms of the hydrogen bonding in non-electrolyte/water mixtures.

  7. Hydrocarbon components in carbonaceous meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissin, Y. V.

    2003-05-01

    Currently, the presence of free n-alkanes and isoprenoid alkanes in carbonaceous meteorites is usually explained either by microbial contamination during the period between the meteorite fall and collection or by contamination from the environment of analytical laboratories and museums. The goal of this research was to repeat analysis of hydrocarbon components in meteorites and to investigate possible meteorite contamination routes discussed in the literature. Experimental analysis of free organic constituents in five carbonaceous meteorites by infrared spectroscopy (IR) and gas chromatographic (GC) methods confirmed the presence of extractable aliphatic components, n-alkanes in the C 15H 32-C 27H 56 range and isoprenoid alkanes (phytane, pristane, and norpristane), in some of these meteorites. The contents of these compounds vary depending on the source. Insoluble organic components of two meteorites (meteorite kerogens) were isolated, and their composition was analyzed by IR and cracking/GC methods. Comparison with the data on several terrestrial contamination sources proposed in the literature shows that the presence of free saturated hydrocarbons in meteorites and the composition of the meteorite kerogen could not be explained either by microbial contamination or by contamination from the laboratory environment. The types of the hydrocarbons in meteorites resemble those typical of ancient terrestrial deposits of organic-rich sediments, except for the absence of lighter hydrocarbons, which apparently slowly evaporated in space, and multi-ring naphthenic compounds of the biologic origin, steranes, terpanes, etc. The prevailing current explanation for the presence of free linear saturated hydrocarbons in carbonaceous meteorites, apart from contamination, is the abiotic route from hydrogen and carbon monoxide. However, the data on the structure of meteorite kerogens require a search for different routes that initially produce complex polymeric structures containing

  8. Non-traditional solution routes to ferroelectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, T.J.; Buchheit, C.D.; Al-Shareef, H.N.

    1997-04-01

    Non-traditional precursor solutions for production of ferroelectric thin films have been developed for PXZT (X = L, N, S), SBT, and PMN systems. For PXZT and SBT, pyridine is a key solvent, wherein, it both solubilizes and reduces the reactivity of the individual components of the solution. Further control of the final films has been obtained using novel tailor-made precursors to dictate their properties.

  9. Parallel Assembly of LIGA Components

    SciTech Connect

    Christenson, T.R.; Feddema, J.T.

    1999-03-04

    In this paper, a prototype robotic workcell for the parallel assembly of LIGA components is described. A Cartesian robot is used to press 386 and 485 micron diameter pins into a LIGA substrate and then place a 3-inch diameter wafer with LIGA gears onto the pins. Upward and downward looking microscopes are used to locate holes in the LIGA substrate, pins to be pressed in the holes, and gears to be placed on the pins. This vision system can locate parts within 3 microns, while the Cartesian manipulator can place the parts within 0.4 microns.

  10. TFTR CAMAC systems and components

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, W.A.; Bergin, W.; Sichta, P.

    1987-08-01

    Princeton's tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) utilizes Computer Automated Measurement and Control (CAMAC) to provide instrumentation for real and quasi real time control, monitoring, and data acquisition systems. This paper describes and discusses the complement of CAMAC hardware systems and components that comprise the interface for tokamak control and measurement instrumentation, and communication with the central instrumentation control and data acquisition (CICADA) system. It also discusses CAMAC reliability and calibration, types of modules used, a summary of data acquisition and control points, and various diagnostic maintenance tools used to support and troubleshoot typical CAMAC systems on TFTR.

  11. Rotor component displacement measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Mercer, Gary D.; Li, Ming C.; Baum, Charles R.

    2003-05-27

    A measuring system for measuring axial displacement of a tube relative to an axially stationary component in a rotating rotor assembly includes at least one displacement sensor adapted to be located normal to a longitudinal axis of the tube; an insulated cable system adapted for passage through the rotor assembly; a rotatable proximitor module located axially beyond the rotor assembly to which the cables are connected; and a telemetry system operatively connected to the proximitor module for sampling signals from the proximitor module and forwarding data to a ground station.

  12. Damping filter method for obtaining spatially localized solutions.

    PubMed

    Teramura, Toshiki; Toh, Sadayoshi

    2014-05-01

    Spatially localized structures are key components of turbulence and other spatiotemporally chaotic systems. From a dynamical systems viewpoint, it is desirable to obtain corresponding exact solutions, though their existence is not guaranteed. A damping filter method is introduced to obtain variously localized solutions and adapted in two typical cases. This method introduces a spatially selective damping effect to make a good guess at the exact solution, and we can obtain an exact solution through a continuation with the damping amplitude. The first target is a steady solution to the Swift-Hohenberg equation, which is a representative of bistable systems in which localized solutions coexist and a model for spanwise-localized cases. Not only solutions belonging to the well-known snaking branches but also those belonging to isolated branches known as "isolas" are found with continuation paths between them in phase space extended with the damping amplitude. This indicates that this spatially selective excitation mechanism has an advantage in searching spatially localized solutions. The second target is a spatially localized traveling-wave solution to the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, which is a model for streamwise-localized cases. Since the spatially selective damping effect breaks Galilean and translational invariances, the propagation velocity cannot be determined uniquely while the damping is active, and a singularity arises when these invariances are recovered. We demonstrate that this singularity can be avoided by imposing a simple condition, and a localized traveling-wave solution is obtained with a specific propagation speed. PMID:25353864

  13. Critical hysteresis for n-component magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, Ravá Da; Kardar, Mehran

    1999-02-01

    Earlier work on dynamical critical phenomena in the context of magnetic hysteresis for uniaxial (scalar) spins is extended to the case of a multicomponent (vector) field. From symmetry arguments and a perturbative renormalization-group approach (in the path-integral formalism), it is found that the generic behavior at long time and length scales is described by the scalar fixed point (reached for a given value of the magnetic field and of the quenched disorder), with the corresponding Ising-like exponents. By tuning an additional parameter, however, a fully rotationally invariant fixed point can be reached, at which all components become critical simultaneously, with O(n)-like exponents. Furthermore, the possibility of a spontaneous nonequilibrium transverse ordering, controlled by a distinct fixed point, is unveiled and the associated exponents calculated. In addition to these central results, a didactic ``derivation'' of the equations of motion for the spin field are given, the scalar model is revisited and treated in a more direct fashion, and some issues pertaining to time dependences and the problem of multiple solutions within the path-integral formalism are clarified.

  14. Mixed waste chemical compatibility with packaging components

    SciTech Connect

    Nigrey, P.J.; Conroy, M.; Blalock, L.B.

    1994-05-01

    In this paper, a chemical compatibility testing program for packaging of mixed wastes at will be described. We will discuss the choice of four y-radiation doses, four time durations, four temperatures and four waste solutions to simulate the hazardous waste components of mixed wastes for testing materials compatibility of polymers. The selected simulant wastes are (1) an aqueous alkaline mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite; (2) a chlorinated hydrocarbon mixture; (3) a simulant liquid scintillation fluid; and (4) a mixture of ketones. A selection of 10 polymers with anticipated high resistance to one or more of these types of environments are proposed for testing as potential liner or seal materials. These polymers are butadiene acrylonitrile copolymer, cross-linked polyethylene, epichlorhyarin, ethylene-propylene rubber, fluorocarbon, glass-filled tetrafluoroethylene, high-density poly-ethylene, isobutylene-isoprene copolymer, polypropylene, and styrene-butadiene rubber. We will describe the elements of the testing plan along with a metric for establishing time resistance of the packaging materials to radiation and chemicals.

  15. Bioactive Components in Fish Venoms

    PubMed Central

    Ziegman, Rebekah; Alewood, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Animal venoms are widely recognized excellent resources for the discovery of novel drug leads and physiological tools. Most are comprised of a large number of components, of which the enzymes, small peptides, and proteins are studied for their important bioactivities. However, in spite of there being over 2000 venomous fish species, piscine venoms have been relatively underrepresented in the literature thus far. Most studies have explored whole or partially fractioned venom, revealing broad pharmacology, which includes cardiovascular, neuromuscular, cytotoxic, inflammatory, and nociceptive activities. Several large proteinaceous toxins, such as stonustoxin, verrucotoxin, and Sp-CTx, have been isolated from scorpaenoid fish. These form pores in cell membranes, resulting in cell death and creating a cascade of reactions that result in many, but not all, of the physiological symptoms observed from envenomation. Additionally, Natterins, a novel family of toxins possessing kininogenase activity have been found in toadfish venom. A variety of smaller protein toxins, as well as a small number of peptides, enzymes, and non-proteinaceous molecules have also been isolated from a range of fish venoms, but most remain poorly characterized. Many other bioactive fish venom components remain to be discovered and investigated. These represent an untapped treasure of potentially useful molecules. PMID:25941767

  16. Structural Studies of Ciliary Components

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Naoko; Taschner, Michael; Engel, Benjamin D.; Lorentzen, Esben

    2012-01-01

    Cilia are organelles found on most eukaryotic cells, where they serve important functions in motility, sensory reception, and signaling. Recent advances in electron tomography have facilitated a number of ultrastructural studies of ciliary components that have significantly improved our knowledge of cilium architecture. These studies have produced nanometer‐resolution structures of axonemal dynein complexes, microtubule doublets and triplets, basal bodies, radial spokes, and nexin complexes. In addition to these electron tomography studies, several recently published crystal structures provide insights into the architecture and mechanism of dynein as well as the centriolar protein SAS-6, important for establishing the 9-fold symmetry of centrioles. Ciliary assembly requires intraflagellar transport (IFT), a process that moves macromolecules between the tip of the cilium and the cell body. IFT relies on a large 20-subunit protein complex that is thought to mediate the contacts between ciliary motor and cargo proteins. Structural investigations of IFT complexes are starting to emerge, including the first three‐dimensional models of IFT material in situ, revealing how IFT particles organize into larger train-like arrays, and the high-resolution structure of the IFT25/27 subcomplex. In this review, we cover recent advances in the structural and mechanistic understanding of ciliary components and IFT complexes. PMID:22683354

  17. Skylab Components in Launch Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    This cutaway drawing illustrates major Skylab components in launch configuration on top of the Saturn V. In an early effort to extend the use of Apollo for further applications, NASA established the Apollo Applications Program (AAP) in August of 1965. The AAP was to include long duration Earth orbital missions during which astronauts would carry out scientific, technological, and engineering experiments in space by utilizing modified Saturn launch vehicles and the Apollo spacecraft. Established in 1970, the Skylab Program was the forerurner of the AAP. The goals of the Skylab were to enrich our scientific knowledge of the Earth, the Sun, the stars, and cosmic space; to study the effects of weightlessness on living organisms, including man; to study the effects of the processing and manufacturing of materials utilizing the absence of gravity; and to conduct Earth resource observations. The Skylab also conducted 19 selected experiments submitted by high school students. Skylab's 3 different 3-man crews spent up to 84 days in Earth orbit. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) had responsibility for developing and integrating most of the major components of the Skylab: the Orbital Workshop (OWS), Airlock Module (AM), Multiple Docking Adapter (MDA), Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM), Payload Shroud (PS), and most of the experiments. MSFC was also responsible for providing the Saturn IB launch vehicles for three Apollo spacecraft and crews and a Saturn V launch vehicle for the Skylab.

  18. Bioactive components in fish venoms.

    PubMed

    Ziegman, Rebekah; Alewood, Paul

    2015-05-01

    Animal venoms are widely recognized excellent resources for the discovery of novel drug leads and physiological tools. Most are comprised of a large number of components, of which the enzymes, small peptides, and proteins are studied for their important bioactivities. However, in spite of there being over 2000 venomous fish species, piscine venoms have been relatively underrepresented in the literature thus far. Most studies have explored whole or partially fractioned venom, revealing broad pharmacology, which includes cardiovascular, neuromuscular, cytotoxic, inflammatory, and nociceptive activities. Several large proteinaceous toxins, such as stonustoxin, verrucotoxin, and Sp-CTx, have been isolated from scorpaenoid fish. These form pores in cell membranes, resulting in cell death and creating a cascade of reactions that result in many, but not all, of the physiological symptoms observed from envenomation. Additionally, Natterins, a novel family of toxins possessing kininogenase activity have been found in toadfish venom. A variety of smaller protein toxins, as well as a small number of peptides, enzymes, and non-proteinaceous molecules have also been isolated from a range of fish venoms, but most remain poorly characterized. Many other bioactive fish venom components remain to be discovered and investigated. These represent an untapped treasure of potentially useful molecules. PMID:25941767

  19. Three-component gyrotropic metamaterial

    SciTech Connect

    Tralle, Igor Ziȩba, Paweł; Paśko, Wioletta

    2014-06-21

    All of the proposed ever since designs of metamaterials are characterized by ever-increasing sophistication of fabrication methods. Here, a comparatively simple recipe for the fabrication of a metamaterial, which is both gyrotropic and of the simultaneously negative permittivity and permeability, is proposed. The idea is to make a mixture of three ingredients, where one of them would be responsible for the negativity of μ, while the other two would be responsible for the negativity of ε. The first component of the mixture is the “swarm” of single-domain ferromagnetic nano-particles, immersed in a mixture of other two, silver and mercury cadmium telluride. By carrying out the computer simulations, the domains of gyromagnetic metamaterial exist, relative to all parameters characterizing the model, that is, the temperature, external magnetic field, parameters of nano-particles, and the fraction of cadmium in Hg{sub 1−x}Cd{sub x}Te-compound as well as relative concentrations of the mixture components are established.

  20. GMES Space Component: Programme overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschbacher, J.; Milagro-Perez, M. P.

    2012-04-01

    The European Union (EU) and the European Space Agency (ESA) have developed the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) programme as Europe's answer to the vital need for joined-up data about our climate, environment and security. Through a unique combination of satellite, atmospheric and Earth-based monitoring systems, the initiative will provide new insight into the state of the land, sea and air, providing policymakers, scientists, businesses and the public with accurate and timely information. GMES capabilities include monitoring and forecasting of climatic change, flood risks, soil and coastal erosion, crop and fish resources, air pollution, greenhouse gases, iceberg distribution and snow cover, among others. To accomplish this, GMES has been divided into three main components: Space, In-situ and Services. The Space Component, led by ESA, comprises five types of new satellites called Sentinels that are being developed by ESA specifically to meet the needs of GMES, the first of which to be launched in 2013. These missions carry a range of technologies, such as radar and multi-spectral imaging instruments for land, ocean and atmospheric monitoring. In addition, access to data from the so-called Contributing Missions guarantees that European space infrastructure is fully used for GMES. An integrated Ground Segment ensures access to Sentinels and Contributing Missions data. The in-situ component, under the coordination of the European Environment Agency (EEA), is composed of atmospheric and Earth based monitoring systems, and based on established networks and programmes at European and international levels. The European Commission is in charge of implementing the services component of GMES and of leading GMES overall. GMES services, fed with data from the Space and In-situ components, will provide essential information in five main domains, atmosphere, ocean and land monitoring as well as emergency response and security. Climate change has been added

  1. Rapid Regional Centroid Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, S.; Zhan, Z.; Luo, Y.; Ni, S.; Chen, Y.; Helmberger, D. V.

    2009-12-01

    The 2008 Wells Nevada Earthquake was recorded by 164 broadband USArray stations within a distance of 550km (5 degrees) with all azimuths uniformly sampled. To establish the source parameters, we applied the Cut and Paste (CAP) code to all the stations to obtain a mechanism (strike/dip/rake=35/41/-85) at a depth of 9km and Mw=5.9. Surface wave shifts range from -8s to 8s which are in good agreement with ambient seismic noise (ASN) predictions. Here we use this data set to test the accuracy of the number of stations needed to obtain adequate solutions (position of the compressional and tension axis) for mechanism. The stations were chosen at random where combinations of Pnl and surface waves were used to establish mechanism and depth. If the event is bracketed by two stations, we obtain an accurate magnitude with good solutions about 80% of the trials. Complete solutions from four stations or Pnl from 10 stations prove reliable in nearly all situations. We also explore the use of this dataset in locating the event using a combination of surface wave travel times and/or the full waveform inversion (CAPloc) that uses the CAP shifts to refine locations. If the mechanism is known (fixed) only a few stations is needed to locate an event to within 5km if date is available at less than 150km. In contrast, surface wave travel times (calibrated to within one second) produce amazing accurate locations with only 6 stations reasonably distributed. It appears this approach is easily automated as suggested by Scrivner and Helmberger (1995) who discussed travel times of Pnl and surface waves and the evolving of source accuracy as the various phases arrive.

  2. Radiographic solution contamination.

    PubMed

    Hardman, P K; Tilmon, M F; Taylor, T S

    1987-06-01

    Contamination of processor solutions adversely affects the image quality of radiographic films. The purpose of this study was to determine the amount of developer or fixer contaminant that was necessary to produce a significant densitometric change in the base plus fog, speed, or contrast optical density readings for panoramic film. Significant differences in base plus fog (after 16 mL of fixer contaminant was added to developer), speed index (after 4 mL), and contrast index (after 8 mL) were observed in comparison with control values. PMID:3473399

  3. Shuttle Wastewater Solution Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adam, Niklas; Pham, Chau

    2011-01-01

    During the 31st shuttle mission to the International Space Station, STS-129, there was a clogging event in the shuttle wastewater tank. A routine wastewater dump was performed during the mission and before the dump was completed, degraded flow was observed. In order to complete the wastewater dump, flow had to be rerouted around the dump filter. As a result, a basic chemical and microbial investigation was performed to understand the shuttle wastewater system and perform mitigation tasks to prevent another blockage. Testing continued on the remaining shuttle flights wastewater and wastewater tank cleaning solutions. The results of the analyses and the effect of the mitigation steps are detailed in this paper.

  4. Mydriatic solution for outpatient indirect ophthalmoscopy.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, S H; Pelham, V; Giovanoni, R; Regan, C D

    1980-09-01

    A mydriatic used for outpatient indirect ophthalmoscopy should produce prompt, maximal, transient mydrasis after a single instillation. Cycloplegia or systemic side effects should be minimal. A solution of tropicamide with phenylephrine hydrochloride seems to achieve this most effectively. In a general retina clinic population, the percentage of pupils dilated, the degree of dilation, and the resistence of the dilation to intense illumination were used to evaluate various concentrations of the drugs. Eight-tenths percent tropicamide with 5% phenylephrine adequately dilated 98.8% of the eyes, among which 25% had dark irides and 9% were receiving miotic therapy. Reduction of the concentration of either component produced less adequate mydriasis; an increase of the tropicamide concentration resulted in a saturated solution with drug precipitate forming on storage and a less adequate dilation. With the optimal combination, 1 drop adequately dilates the general population; 2 drops appear on more effective than 1. PMID:7425917

  5. Turbulent drag reduction in nonionic surfactant solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamano, Shinji; Itoh, Motoyuki; Kato, Katsuo; Yokota, Kazuhiko

    2010-05-01

    There are only a few studies on the drag-reducing effect of nonionic surfactant solutions which are nontoxic and biodegradable, while many investigations of cationic surfactant solutions have been performed so far. First, the drag-reducing effects of a nonionic surfactant (AROMOX), which mainly consisted of oleyldimethylamineoxide, was investigated by measuring the pressure drop in the pipe flow at solvent Reynolds numbers Re between 1000 and 60 000. Second, we investigated the drag-reducing effect of a nonionic surfactant on the turbulent boundary layer at momentum-thickness Reynolds numbers Reθ from 443 to 814 using two-component laser-Doppler velocimetry and particle image velocimetry systems. At the temperature of nonionic surfactant solutions, T =25 °C, the maximum drag reduction ratio for AROMOX 500 ppm was about 50%, in the boundary layer flow, although the drag reduction ratio was larger than 60% in pipe flow. Turbulence statistics and structures for AROMOX 500 ppm showed the behavior of typical drag-reducing flow such as suppression of turbulence and modification of near-wall vortices, but they were different from those of drag-reducing cationic surfactant solutions, in which bilayered structures of the fluctuating velocity vectors were observed in high activity.

  6. Solutions for transients in arbitrarily branching cables

    PubMed Central

    Major, Guy; Evans, Jonathan D.; Jack, J. Julian B.

    1993-01-01

    Analytical solutions are derived for arbitrarily branching passive neurone models with a soma and somatic shunt, for synaptic inputs and somatic voltage commands, for both perfect and imperfect somatic voltage clamp. The solutions are infinite exponential series. Perfect clamp decouples different dendritic trees at the soma: each exponential component exists only in one tree; its time constant is independent of stimulating and recording position within the tree; its amplitude is the product of a factor constant over that entire tree and factors dependent on stimulating and recording positions. Imperfect clamp to zero is mathematically equivalent to voltage recording with a shunt. As the series resistance increases, different dendritic trees become more strongly coupled. A number of interesting response symmetries are evident. The solutions reveal parameter dependencies, including an insensitivity of the early parts of the responses to specific membrane resistivity and somatic shunt, and an approximately linear dependence of the slower time constants on series resistance, for small series resistances. The solutions are illustrated using a “cartoon” representation of a CA1 pyramidal cell and a two-cylinder + soma model. PMID:8369449

  7. Generating Problems from Problems and Solutions from Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arcavi, Abraham; Resnick, Zippora

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a geometrical solution to a problem that is usually solved geometrically as an example of how alternative solutions may enrich the teaching and learning of mathematics. (Contains 11 figures.)

  8. Shock absorbing mount for electrical components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, R. F., Jr.; Mayne, R. C. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A shock mount for installing electrical components on circuit boards is described. The shock absorber is made of viscoelastic material which interconnects the electrical components. With this system, shocks imposed on one component of the circuit are not transmitted to other components. A diagram of a typical circuit is provided.

  9. Dirac solutions for quaternionic potentials

    SciTech Connect

    De Leo, Stefano Giardino, Sergio

    2014-02-15

    The Dirac equation is solved for quaternionic potentials, i V{sub 0} + j W{sub 0} (V{sub 0}∈R , W{sub 0}∈C). The study shows two different solutions. The first one contains particle and anti-particle solutions and leads to the diffusion, tunneling, and Klein energy zones. The standard solution is recovered taking the complex limit of this solution. The second solution, which does not have a complex counterpart, can be seen as a V{sub 0}-antiparticle or |W{sub 0}|-particle solution.

  10. Solutions Remediate Contaminated Groundwater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    During the Apollo Program, NASA workers used chlorinated solvents to clean rocket engine components at launch sites. These solvents, known as dense non-aqueous phase liquids, had contaminated launch facilities to the point of near-irreparability. Dr. Jacqueline Quinn and Dr. Kathleen Brooks Loftin of Kennedy Space Center partnered with researchers from the University of Central Florida's chemistry and engineering programs to develop technology capable of remediating the area without great cost or further environmental damage. They called the new invention Emulsified Zero-Valent Iron (EZVI). The groundwater remediation compound is cleaning up polluted areas all around the world and is, to date, NASA's most licensed technology.

  11. Heavy Water Components Test Reactor Decommissioning - Major Component Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

    2010-05-05

    The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility (Figure 1) was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR facility is on high, well-drained ground, about 30 meters above the water table. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. It was not a defense-related facility like the materials production reactors at SRS. The reactor was moderated with heavy water and was rated at 50 megawatts thermal power. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In 1965, fuel assemblies were removed, systems that contained heavy water were drained, fluid piping systems were drained, deenergized and disconnected and the spent fuel basin was drained and dried. The doors of the reactor facility were shut and it wasn't until 10 years later that decommissioning plans were considered and ultimately postponed due to budget constraints. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR again. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. The $1.6 billion allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to SRS for site clean up at SRS has opened the doors to the HWCTR again - this time for final decommissioning. During the lifetime of HWCTR, 36 different fuel assemblies were tested in the facility. Ten of these

  12. Review of solution-processed oxide thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Si Joon; Yoon, Seokhyun; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2014-02-01

    In this review, we summarize solution-processed oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) researches based on our fulfillments. We describe the fundamental studies of precursor composition effects at the beginning in order to figure out the role of each component in oxide semiconductors, and then present low temperature process for the adoption of flexible devices. Moreover, channel engineering for high performance and reliability of solution-processed oxide TFTs and various coating methods: spin-coating, inkjet printing, and gravure printing are also presented. The last topic of this review is an overview of multi-functional solution-processed oxide TFTs for various applications such as photodetector, biosensor, and memory.

  13. Analysis of Periodical Solutions in the Duffing-Holmes Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Alexey, Dubrovskiy

    2010-09-30

    In recent works there were found some periodical solutions in the Duffing-Holmes's system using a weak dissipative component. In the current work the existence of them in the conservative system will be illustrated. There will be proposed an approach to localize, to stabilize and to track periodic solutions in the domain of system parameters. As well it will be shown that the complexification of the topological structure of the conservative and dissipative systems is based on the same mechanism of bifurcations of periodical solutions. The bifurcation diagram will be presented, where the cascade of bifurcations obeys the universal theory of Fegenbaum-Sharkovskii-Magnitskii.

  14. Method for vacuum pressing electrochemical cell components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Craig C. (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Assembling electrochemical cell components using a bonding agent comprising aligning components of the electrochemical cell, applying a bonding agent between the components to bond the components together, placing the components within a container that is essentially a pliable bag, and drawing a vacuum within the bag, wherein the bag conforms to the shape of the components from the pressure outside the bag, thereby holding the components securely in place. The vacuum is passively maintained until the adhesive has cured and the components are securely bonded. The bonding agent used to bond the components of the electrochemical cell may be distributed to the bonding surface from distribution channels in the components. To prevent contamination with bonding agent, some areas may be treated to produce regions of preferred adhesive distribution and protected regions. Treatments may include polishing, etching, coating and providing protective grooves between the bonding surfaces and the protected regions.

  15. The Paperless Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    REI Systems, Inc. developed a software solution that uses the Internet to eliminate the paperwork typically required to document and manage complex business processes. The data management solution, called Electronic Handbooks (EHBs), is presently used for the entire SBIR program processes at NASA. The EHB-based system is ideal for programs and projects whose users are geographically distributed and are involved in complex management processes and procedures. EHBs provide flexible access control and increased communications while maintaining security for systems of all sizes. Through Internet Protocol- based access, user authentication and user-based access restrictions, role-based access control, and encryption/decryption, EHBs provide the level of security required for confidential data transfer. EHBs contain electronic forms and menus, which can be used in real time to execute the described processes. EHBs use standard word processors that generate ASCII HTML code to set up electronic forms that are viewed within a web browser. EHBs require no end-user software distribution, significantly reducing operating costs. Each interactive handbook simulates a hard-copy version containing chapters with descriptions of participants' roles in the online process.

  16. Solute-Filled Syringe For Formulating Intravenous Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Jim; Bindokas, AL; Dudar, Tom; Finley, Mike; Scharf, Mike

    1993-01-01

    Prefilled syringe contains premeasured amount of solute in powder or concentrate form used to deliver solute to sterile interior of large-volume parenteral (LVP) bag. Predetermined amount of sterile water also added to LVP bag through sterilizing filter, and mixed with contents of syringe, yielding sterile intravenous solution of specified concentration.

  17. Parallel supercomputing with commodity components

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, M.S.; Goda, M.P.; Becker, D.J.

    1997-09-01

    We have implemented a parallel computer architecture based entirely upon commodity personal computer components. Using 16 Intel Pentium Pro microprocessors and switched fast ethernet as a communication fabric, we have obtained sustained performance on scientific applications in excess of one Gigaflop. During one production astrophysics treecode simulation, we performed 1.2 x 10{sup 15} floating point operations (1.2 Petaflops) over a three week period, with one phase of that simulation running continuously for two weeks without interruption. We report on a variety of disk, memory and network benchmarks. We also present results from the NAS parallel benchmark suite, which indicate that this architecture is competitive with current commercial architectures. In addition, we describe some software written to support efficient message passing, as well as a Linux device driver interface to the Pentium hardware performance monitoring registers.

  18. The magnet components database system

    SciTech Connect

    Baggett, M.J. ); Leedy, R.; Saltmarsh, C.; Tompkins, J.C. )

    1990-01-01

    The philosophy, structure, and usage MagCom, the SSC magnet components database, are described. The database has been implemented in Sybase (a powerful relational database management system) on a UNIX-based workstation at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL); magnet project collaborators can access the database via network connections. The database was designed to contain the specifications and measured values of important properties for major materials, plus configuration information (specifying which individual items were used in each cable, coil, and magnet) and the test results on completed magnets. These data will facilitate the tracking and control of the production process as well as the correlation of magnet performance with the properties of its constituents. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  19. Two-component auroral electrojet

    SciTech Connect

    Kamide, Y.

    1982-10-01

    By using the AL index for one year as well as some of the IMS meridian chain records, the longitudinal center of the substorm westward electrojet is examined. Although on the average AL is most often dominated by stations located near 0300 MLT, the westward electrojet during the expansion and maximum phase of substorms tends to be centered in the premidnight to early morning sector, and, during the recovery phase, it is most intense in morning hours. It is suggested that the substorm-associated westward electrojet consists of two components which have different characteristic times; one produced mainly by Hall condutivity enhancements which dominate in the midnight sector and the other one by southward electric fields in the morning sector.

  20. Parallel supercomputing with commodity components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, M. S.; Goda, M. P.; Becker, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    We have implemented a parallel computer architecture based entirely upon commodity personal computer components. Using 16 Intel Pentium Pro microprocessors and switched fast ethernet as a communication fabric, we have obtained sustained performance on scientific applications in excess of one Gigaflop. During one production astrophysics treecode simulation, we performed 1.2 x 10(sup 15) floating point operations (1.2 Petaflops) over a three week period, with one phase of that simulation running continuously for two weeks without interruption. We report on a variety of disk, memory and network benchmarks. We also present results from the NAS parallel benchmark suite, which indicate that this architecture is competitive with current commercial architectures. In addition, we describe some software written to support efficient message passing, as well as a Linux device driver interface to the Pentium hardware performance monitoring registers.

  1. Training of component reading skills.

    PubMed

    Fiedorowicz, C A

    1986-01-01

    Fifteen reading-disabled boys, classified according to reading subskill deficits, formed three subgroups: Oral Reading, Associative, and Sequential. On the rationale that training procedures emphasizing accuracy and speed of response to letters, syllables, and words would improve reading skills, the children were trained daily for two and one-half months. Two schedules of testing and training allowed for an untrained control group and a follow-up group. The results indicated that the computer-assisted training procedures were not only effective in improving component reading skills, but in addition there was a transfer of training to achievement measures of reading word recognition. This study lends support to the hypothesis that training according to subgroup classification, using training procedures which incorporate an application of the automaticity theory and a combination of task-analytic and process-oriented models, is an effective training approach for reading-disabled children. PMID:24243467

  2. NEXT Thruster Component Verification Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinero, Luis R.; Sovey, James S.

    2007-01-01

    Component testing is a critical part of thruster life validation activities under NASA s Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) project testing. The high voltage propellant isolators were selected for design verification testing. Even though they are based on a heritage design, design changes were made because the isolators will be operated under different environmental conditions including temperature, voltage, and pressure. The life test of two NEXT isolators was therefore initiated and has accumulated more than 10,000 hr of operation. Measurements to date indicate only a negligibly small increase in leakage current. The cathode heaters were also selected for verification testing. The technology to fabricate these heaters, developed for the International Space Station plasma contactor hollow cathode assembly, was transferred to Aerojet for the fabrication of the NEXT prototype model ion thrusters. Testing the contractor-fabricated heaters is necessary to validate fabrication processes for high reliability heaters. This paper documents the status of the propellant isolator and cathode heater tests.

  3. Electroslag component casting. [Nickel aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    This project is directed toward the development of electroslag-casting (ESC) technology for use in coal conversion components such as valve bodies, pump housings, and pipe fittings. The aim is also to develop a sufficient data base to permit electroslag casting to become an ASME Code-accepted process. It is also intended to transfer the ESC process technology to private industry. A total of 32 electroslag castings of 2.25Cr-1Mo, 9Cr-1Mo, type 316, and nickel aluminide were procured from four facilities for evaluation (Table 1). The most complex castings procured during this program were the valve bodies shown in Figure 2. The castings were subjected to various heat treatments (Table 2), checked for chemical composition uniformity from top to bottom, and subjected to macrostructural evaluation and mechanical properties testing. Results are discussed. 10 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Fast Steerable Principal Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhizhen; Shkolnisky, Yoel; Singer, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy nowadays often requires the analysis of hundreds of thousands of 2-D images as large as a few hundred pixels in each direction. Here, we introduce an algorithm that efficiently and accurately performs principal component analysis (PCA) for a large set of 2-D images, and, for each image, the set of its uniform rotations in the plane and their reflections. For a dataset consisting of n images of size L × L pixels, the computational complexity of our algorithm is O(nL3 + L4), while existing algorithms take O(nL4). The new algorithm computes the expansion coefficients of the images in a Fourier–Bessel basis efficiently using the nonuniform fast Fourier transform. We compare the accuracy and efficiency of the new algorithm with traditional PCA and existing algorithms for steerable PCA. PMID:27570801

  5. Implementation of the block-Krylov boundary flexibility method of component synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, Kelly S.; Abdallah, Ayman A.; Hucklebridge, Arthur A.

    1993-01-01

    A method of dynamic substructuring is presented which utilizes a set of static Ritz vectors as a replacement for normal eigenvectors in component mode synthesis. This set of Ritz vectors is generated in a recurrence relationship, which has the form of a block-Krylov subspace. The initial seed to the recurrence algorithm is based on the boundary flexibility vectors of the component. This algorithm is not load-dependent, is applicable to both fixed and free-interface boundary components, and results in a general component model appropriate for any type of dynamic analysis. This methodology was implemented in the MSC/NASTRAN normal modes solution sequence using DMAP. The accuracy is found to be comparable to that of component synthesis based upon normal modes. The block-Krylov recurrence algorithm is a series of static solutions and so requires significantly less computation than solving the normal eigenspace problem.

  6. Implementation of the block-Krylov boundary flexibility method of component synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carney, Kelly S.; Abdallah, Ayman A.; Hucklebridge, Arthur A.

    1993-05-01

    A method of dynamic substructuring is presented which utilizes a set of static Ritz vectors as a replacement for normal eigenvectors in component mode synthesis. This set of Ritz vectors is generated in a recurrence relationship, which has the form of a block-Krylov subspace. The initial seed to the recurrence algorithm is based on the boundary flexibility vectors of the component. This algorithm is not load-dependent, is applicable to both fixed and free-interface boundary components, and results in a general component model appropriate for any type of dynamic analysis. This methodology was implemented in the MSC/NASTRAN normal modes solution sequence using DMAP. The accuracy is found to be comparable to that of component synthesis based upon normal modes. The block-Krylov recurrence algorithm is a series of static solutions and so requires significantly less computation than solving the normal eigenspace problem.

  7. A One Chip Hardened Solution for High Speed SpaceWire System Implementations. Session: Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Joseph R.; Berger, Richard W.; Rakow, Glenn P.

    2007-01-01

    An Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) that implements the SpaceWire protocol has been developed in a radiation hardened 0.25 micron CMOS technology. This effort began in March 2003 as a joint development between the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and BAE Systems. The BAE Systems SpaceWire ASIC is comprised entirely of reusable core elements, many of which are already flight-proven. It incorporates a router with 4 SpaceWire ports and two local ports, dual PC1 bus interfaces, a microcontroller, 32KB of internal memory, and a memory controller for additional external memory use. The SpaceWire cores are also reused in other ASICs under development. The SpaceWire ASIC is planned for use on the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES)-R, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) and other missions. Engineering and flight parts have been delivered to programs and users. This paper reviews the SpaceWire protocol and those elements of it that have been built into the current and next SpaceWire reusable cores and features within the core that go beyond the current standard and can be enabled or disabled by the user. The adaptation of SpaceWire to BAE Systems' On Chip Bus (OCB) for compatibility with the other reusable cores will be reviewed and highlighted. Optional configurations within user systems and test boards will be shown. The physical implementation of the design will be described and test results from the hardware will be discussed. Application of this ASIC and other ASICs containing the SpaceWire cores and embedded microcontroller to Plug and Play and reconfigurable implementations will be described. Finally, the BAE Systems roadmap for SpaceWire developments will be updated, including some products already in design as well as longer term plans.

  8. Valence Electronic Structure of Aqueous Solutions: Insights from Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Robert; Winter, Bernd; Bradforth, Stephen E.

    2016-05-01

    The valence orbital electron binding energies of water and of embedded solutes are crucial quantities for understanding chemical reactions taking place in aqueous solution, including oxidation/reduction, transition-metal coordination, and radiation chemistry. Their experimental determination based on liquid-photoelectron spectroscopy using soft X-rays is described, and we provide an overview of valence photoelectron spectroscopy studies reported to date. We discuss principal experimental aspects and several theoretical approaches to compute the measured binding energies of the least tightly bound molecular orbitals. Solutes studied are presented chronologically, from simple electrolytes, via transition-metal ion solutions and several organic and inorganic molecules, to biologically relevant molecules, including aqueous nucleotides and their components. In addition to the lowest vertical ionization energies, the measured valence photoelectron spectra also provide information on adiabatic ionization energies and reorganization energies for the oxidation (ionization) half-reaction. For solutes with low solubility, resonantly enhanced ionization provides a promising alternative pathway.

  9. Valence Electronic Structure of Aqueous Solutions: Insights from Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Robert; Winter, Bernd; Bradforth, Stephen E

    2016-05-27

    The valence orbital electron binding energies of water and of embedded solutes are crucial quantities for understanding chemical reactions taking place in aqueous solution, including oxidation/reduction, transition-metal coordination, and radiation chemistry. Their experimental determination based on liquid-photoelectron spectroscopy using soft X-rays is described, and we provide an overview of valence photoelectron spectroscopy studies reported to date. We discuss principal experimental aspects and several theoretical approaches to compute the measured binding energies of the least tightly bound molecular orbitals. Solutes studied are presented chronologically, from simple electrolytes, via transition-metal ion solutions and several organic and inorganic molecules, to biologically relevant molecules, including aqueous nucleotides and their components. In addition to the lowest vertical ionization energies, the measured valence photoelectron spectra also provide information on adiabatic ionization energies and reorganization energies for the oxidation (ionization) half-reaction. For solutes with low solubility, resonantly enhanced ionization provides a promising alternative pathway. PMID:27023757

  10. Modeling Activity: Ions to Hydrophobics in Crowded Biological Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettitt, Montgomery

    2006-03-01

    Nonideal solutions play a role in many aspects of chemistry. As concentrations increase, concentration itself becomes a less useful quantity to understand equilibria. Industrial and medicinal chemistry often fail due to the difference between concentration and activity. An understanding of the impact of the crowded conditions in the cytoplasm on its biomolecules is of clear importance to biochemical, medical and pharmaceutical science. Work on the use of small biochemical compounds to crowd protein solutions indicates that a quantitative description of their non-ideal behavior is possible and straightforward. Here, we will show what the structural origin of this non-ideal solution behavior is from expression derived from a semi grand ensemble approach. We discuss the consequences of these findings regarding protein folding stability and solvation in crowded solutions through a structural analysis of the m-value or the change in free energy difference of a macromolecule in solution with respect to the concentration of a third component.

  11. Multi-component joint analysis of surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Moro, Giancarlo; Moura, Rui Miguel Marques; Moustafa, Sayed S. R.

    2015-08-01

    Propagation of surface waves can occur with complex energy distribution amongst the various modes. It is shown that even simple VS (shear-wave velocity) profiles can generate velocity spectra that, because of a complex mode excitation, can be quite difficult to interpret in terms of modal dispersion curves. In some cases, Rayleigh waves show relevant differences depending on the considered component (radial or vertical) and the kind of source (vertical impact or explosive). Contrary to several simplistic assumptions often proposed, it is shown, both via synthetic and field datasets, that the fundamental mode of Rayleigh waves can be almost completely absent. This sort of evidence demonstrates the importance of a multi-component analysis capable of providing the necessary elements to properly interpret the data and adequately constrain the subsurface model. It is purposely shown, also through the sole use of horizontal geophones, how it can be possible to efficiently and quickly acquire both Love and Rayleigh (radial-component) waves. The presented field dataset reports a case where Rayleigh waves (both their vertical and radial components) appear largely dominated by higher modes with little or no evidence of the fundamental mode. The joint inversion of the radial and vertical components of Rayleigh waves jointly with Love waves is performed by adopting a multi-objective inversion scheme based on the computation of synthetic seismograms for the three considered components and the minimization of the whole velocity spectra misfits (Full Velocity Spectra - FVS - inversion). Such a FVS multi-component joint inversion can better handle complex velocity spectra thus providing a more robust subsurface model not affected by erroneous velocity spectra interpretations and non-uniqueness of the solution.

  12. Mutation Testing for Effective Verification of Digital Components of Physical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushik, N. G.; Evtushenko, N. V.; Torgaev, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    Digital components of modern physical systems are often designed applying circuitry solutions based on the field programmable gate array technology (FPGA). Such (embedded) digital components should be carefully tested. In this paper, an approach for the verification of digital physical system components based on mutation testing is proposed. The reference description of the behavior of a digital component in the hardware description language (HDL) is mutated by introducing into it the most probable errors and, unlike mutants in high-level programming languages, the corresponding test case is effectively derived based on a comparison of special scalable representations of the specification and the constructed mutant using various logic synthesis and verification systems.

  13. 2010 Water & Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Dor Ben-Amotz

    2010-08-13

    Water covers more than two thirds of the surface of the Earth and about the same fraction of water forms the total mass of a human body. Since the early days of our civilization water has also been in the focus of technological developments, starting from converting it to wine to more modern achievements. The meeting will focus on recent advances in experimental, theoretical, and computational understanding of the behavior of the most important and fascinating liquid in a variety of situations and applications. The emphasis will be less on water properties per se than on water as a medium in which fundamental dynamic and reactive processes take place. In the following sessions, speakers will discuss the latest breakthroughs in unraveling these processes at the molecular level: Water in Solutions; Water in Motion I and II; Water in Biology I and II; Water in the Environment I and II; Water in Confined Geometries and Water in Discussion (keynote lecture and poster winners presentations).

  14. Immersion lithography bevel solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedeschi, Len; Tamada, Osamu; Sanada, Masakazu; Yasuda, Shuichi; Asai, Masaya

    2008-03-01

    The introduction of Immersion lithography, combined with the desire to maximize the number of potential yielding devices per wafer, has brought wafer edge engineering to the forefront for advanced semiconductor manufactures. Bevel cleanliness, the position accuracy of the lithography films, and quality of the EBR cut has become more critical. In this paper, the effectiveness of wafer track based solutions to enable state-of-art bevel schemes is explored. This includes an integrated bevel cleaner and new bevel rinse nozzles. The bevel rinse nozzles are used in the coating process to ensure a precise, clean film edge on or near the bevel. The bevel cleaner is used immediately before the wafer is loaded into the scanner after the coating process. The bevel cleaner shows promise in driving down defectivity levels, specifically printing particles, while not damaging films on the bevel.

  15. Naturally selecting solutions

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Timmy; Sleator, Roy D; Walsh, Paul

    2013-01-01

    For decades, computer scientists have looked to nature for biologically inspired solutions to computational problems; ranging from robotic control to scheduling optimization. Paradoxically, as we move deeper into the post-genomics era, the reverse is occurring, as biologists and bioinformaticians look to computational techniques, to solve a variety of biological problems. One of the most common biologically inspired techniques are genetic algorithms (GAs), which take the Darwinian concept of natural selection as the driving force behind systems for solving real world problems, including those in the bioinformatics domain. Herein, we provide an overview of genetic algorithms and survey some of the most recent applications of this approach to bioinformatics based problems. PMID:23222169

  16. Internet Business Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Cogent Software, Inc. was formed in January 1995 by David Atkinson and Irene Woerner, both former employees of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Several other Cogent employees also worked at JPL. Atkinson headed JPL's Information Systems Technology section and Woerner lead the Advanced User Interfaces Group. Cogent's mission is to help companies organize and manage their online content by developing advanced software for the next generation of online directories and information catalogs. The company offers a complete range of Internet solutions, including Internet access, Web site design, local and wide-area networks, and custom software for online commerce applications. Cogent also offers DesignSphere Online, an electronic community for the communications arts industry. Customers range from small offices to manufacturers with thousands of employees, including Chemi-Con, one of the largest manufacturers of capacitors in the world.

  17. Surprising high hydrophobicity of polymer networks from hydrophilic components.

    PubMed

    Attanasio, Agnese; Bayer, Ilker S; Ruffilli, Roberta; Ayadi, Farouk; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2013-06-26

    We report a simple and inexpensive method of fabricating highly hydrophobic novel materials based on interpenetrating networks of polyamide and poly(ethyl cyanoacrylate) hydrophilic components. The process is a single-step solution casting from a common solvent, formic acid, of polyamide and ethyl cyanoacrylate monomers. After casting and subsequent solvent evaporation, the in situ polymerization of ethyl cyanoacrylate monomer forms polyamide-poly(ethyl cyanoacrylate) interpenetrating network films. The interpenetrating networks demonstrate remarkable waterproof properties allowing wettability control by modulating the concentration of the components. In contrast, pure polyamide and poly(ethyl cyanoacrylate) films obtained from formic acid solutions are highly hygroscopic and hydrophilic, respectively. The polymerization of ethyl cyanoacrylate in the presence of polyamide promotes molecular interactions between the components, which reduce the available hydrophilic moieties and render the final material hydrophobic. The wettability, morphology, and thermo-physical properties of the polymeric coatings were characterized. The materials developed in this work take advantage of the properties of both polymers in a single blend and above all, due to their hydrophobic nature and minimal water uptake, can extend the application range of the individual polymers where water repellency is required. PMID:23713478

  18. Bioregenerative system components for microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nevill, Gale E., Jr.; Hessel, Michael I., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the class was to design, fabricate, and test prototype designs that were independent, yet applicable to a Closed Loop Life Support System. The three prototypes chosen were in the areas of agar plant growth, regnerative filtration, and microgravity food preparation. The plant growth group designed a prototype agar medium growth system that incorporates nutrient solution replenishment and post-harvest refurbishment. In addition, the unit emphasizes material containment and minimization of open interfaces. The second project was a filter used in microgravity that has the capability to clean itself. The filters are perforated plates which slide through a duct and are cleaned outside of the flow with a vacuum system. The air in the duct is prevented from flowing outside of the duct by a network of sliding seals. The food preparation group developed a device which dispenses and mixes ingredients and then cooks the mixture in microgravity. The dry ingredients are dispensed from a canister by a ratchet-operated piston. The wet ingredients are dispensed from plastic bags through tubing attached to a syringe. Once inside the mixing chamber, the ingredients are mixed using a collapsible whisk and then pushed into the cooking device.

  19. Increase of both Order and Disorder in the First Hydration Shell with Increasing Solute Polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godec, Aljaž; Smith, Jeremy C.; Merzel, Franci

    2011-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of a small model solute in an aqueous solution are used to examine the effects of solute polarity on hydration structure. A judicious definition of the orientational order parameter leads to reinterpretation of the conventional picture of hydration. As the solute varies from hydrophobic to hydrophilic the ordered first shell water simultaneously fractionates into a more highly ordered and a more disordered component. The hydrogen-bond network rearranges such that the more ordered component relaxes to configurations of optimal intermolecular angles, the other fraction being released from the network.

  20. Modifications in structure and interaction of nanoparticle-protein-surfactant complexes in electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehan, Sumit; Kumar, S.; Aswal, V. K.; Schweins, R.

    2016-05-01

    SANS experiments of three-component system of anionic silica nanoparticles, anionic BSA protein and anionic SDS surfactants have been carried out without and with electrolyte in aqueous solution. In both the cases, the interaction of surfactant with protein results in formation of bead-necklace structure of protein-surfactant complexes in solution. These protein-surfactant complexes interact very differently with nanoparticles in absence and presence of electrolyte. In absence of electrolyte, nanoparticles remain in dispersed phase in solution, whereas with the addition of electrolyte the nanoparticles fractal aggregates are formed. SANS describes the phase behavior to be governed by competition of electrostatic and depletion interactions among the components solution.

  1. Knop's Solution Is Not What It Seems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses Knob's solution, which was considered the ideal plant growth solution in 1865, and recommends eliminating Knob's solution from active teaching. Describes solution culture basics including nutrient solutions, containers and aeration, and plants and light. (Contains 12 references.) (YDS)

  2. Electric vehicle drive train components

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, F.

    1994-12-31

    Power Control Systems has developed a family of electric vehicle drive systems that range from 65 horsepower through 300 horse power. These propulsion systems support vehicle applications ranging from light cars and pickups to buses and trucks weighing as much as 40,000 lbs (18,400 kg). These robust systems are designed specifically for automotive applications including safety, electromagnetic emissions, and environment ruggedness. Dolphin Drive Systems are very flexible. Their inverter controllers are programmable and can be provided as stand alone components matched to customer specified motors. A selection of pre-calibrated systems including motor and inverter/controller can be provided. Accessory tools are also available for customer self programming. Dolphin Drive Systems provide precision control of AC induction motors providing excellent torque-speed performance usually eliminating the need for multistage transmissions. In addition, they are very efficient over a wide speed/torque range. This provides for excellent power management over a variety of continuous speed and stop and go applications.

  3. Molecular Components of Catalytic Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Park, Jeong Y.

    2008-07-02

    Selectivity, that is, to produce one molecule out of many other thermodynamically feasible product molecules, is the key concept to develop 'clean manufacturing' processes that do not produce byproducts (green chemistry). Small differences in potential energy barriers for elementary reaction steps control which reaction channel is more likely to yield the desired product molecule (selectivity), instead of the overall activation energy for the reaction that controls turnover rates (activity). Recent studies have demonstrated the atomic- or molecular-level tailoring of parameters such as the surface structures of active sites that give rise to nanoparticle size and shape dependence of turnover rates and reaction selectivities. Here, we highlight seven molecular components that influence reaction selectivities. These include: surface structure, adsorbate-induced restructuring, adsorbate mobility, reaction intermediates, surface composition, charge transport, and oxidation states for model metal single crystal and colloid nanoparticle catalysts. We show examples of their functioning and describe in-situ instruments that permit us to investigate their roles in surface reactions.

  4. Airframe noise component interaction studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M. R.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1979-01-01

    Acoustic wind tunnel tests were conducted of a two-dimensional wing section with removable high-lift leading and trailing edge devices and a removeable two-wheel landing gear with open cavity. An array of far field conventional microphones and an acoustic mirror directional microphone were utilized to determine far field spectrum levels and noise source distribution. Data were obtained for the wing with components deployed separately and in various combinations. The basic wing model had 0.305 m (1.00 ft) chord, which is roughly 1/10 scale for a one-hundred passenger transport airplane. Most of the data were obtained at 70.7 and 100 m/sec (232 and 328 ft/sec) airspeeds, which bracket the range of practical approach speeds for such aircraft. Data were obtained at frequence to 40 kHz so that, when scaled to s typical full-airframe, the frequency region which strongly influences preceived noise level would be included.

  5. High temperature two component explosive

    DOEpatents

    Mars, James E.; Poole, Donald R.; Schmidt, Eckart W.; Wang, Charles

    1981-01-01

    A two component, high temperature, thermally stable explosive composition comprises a liquid or low melting oxidizer and a liquid or low melting organic fuel. The oxidizer and fuel in admixture are incapable of substantial spontaneous exothermic reaction at temperatures on the order of 475.degree. K. At temperatures on the order of 475.degree. K., the oxidizer and fuel in admixture have an activation energy of at least about 40 kcal/mol. As a result of the high activation energy, the preferred explosive compositions are nondetonable as solids at ambient temperature, and become detonable only when heated beyond the melting point. Preferable oxidizers are selected from alkali or alkaline earth metal nitrates, nitrites, perchlorates, and/or mixtures thereof. Preferred fuels are organic compounds having polar hydrophilic groups. The most preferred fuels are guanidinium nitrate, acetamide and mixtures of the two. Most preferred oxidizers are eutectic mixtures of lithium nitrate, potassium nitrate and sodium nitrate, of sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate, and of potassium nitrate, calcium nitrate and sodium nitrate.

  6. Automated assembly of VECSEL components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, C.; Pyschny, N.; Haag, S.; Mueller, T.

    2013-02-01

    Due to the architectural advantage of an external cavity architecture that enables the integration of additional elements into the cavity (e.g. for mode control, frequency conversion, wavelength tuning or passive mode-locking) VECSELs are a rapidly developing laser technology. Nevertheless they often have to compete with direct (edge) emitting laser diodes which can have significant cost advantages thanks to their rather simple structure and production processes. One way to compensate the economical disadvantages of VECSELs is to optimize each component in terms of quality and costs and to apply more efficient (batch) production processes. In this context, the paper presents recent process developments for the automated assembly of VECSELs using a new type of desktop assembly station with an ultra-precise micromanipulator. The core concept is to create a dedicated process development environment from which implemented processes can be transferred fluently to production equipment. By now two types of processes have been put into operation on the desktop assembly station: 1.) passive alignment of the pump optics implementing a camera-based alignment process, where the pump spot geometry and position on the semiconductor chip is analyzed and evaluated; 2.) active alignment of the end mirror based on output power measurements and optimization algorithms. In addition to the core concept and corresponding hardware and software developments, detailed results of both processes are presented explaining measurement setups as well as alignment strategies and results.

  7. Bioactive Egg Components and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a normal acute response of the immune system to pathogens and tissue injury. However, chronic inflammation is known to play a significant role in the pathophysiology of numerous chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cancer. Thus, the impact of dietary factors on inflammation may provide key insight into mitigating chronic disease risk. Eggs are recognized as a functional food that contain a variety of bioactive compounds that can influence pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Interestingly, the effects of egg consumption on inflammation varies across different populations, including those that are classified as healthy, overweight, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetic. The following review will discuss the pro- and anti-inflammatory properties of egg components, with a focus on egg phospholipids, cholesterol, the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, and bioactive proteins. The effects of egg consumption of inflammation across human populations will additionally be presented. Together, these findings have implications for population-specific dietary recommendations and chronic disease risk. PMID:26389951

  8. Precision fiducialization of transport components

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, G.E.; Bressler, V.E.; Cobb, J.K.; Jensen, D.R.; Ruland, R.E.; Walz, H.V.; Williams, S.H.

    1992-03-01

    The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) is a transport line designed to test both concept and advanced technology for application to future linear colliders. It is currently under construction at SLAC in the central beam line. Most of the quadrupoles of the FFTB have ab initio alignment tolerances of less than 30 microns, if the planned for beam based alignment tuning procedure is to converge. For such placement tolerances to have any meaning requires that the coordinates of the effective centers, seen by the beam particles, be tansferred to tooling (that can be reached by mechanical or optical alignment methods) located on the outside of the components to comparable or better values. We have constructed an apparatus that simultaneously locates to micron tolerances, the effective magnetic center of fussing lenses, as well as the electrical center of beam position monitors (BPM) imbedded therein, and once located, for transferring these coordinates to specially mounted tooling frames that supported the external retroreflectors used in a laser tracker based alignment of the beam line. Details of construction as well as experimental results from the method are presented.

  9. Rebound: A Framework for Automated Component Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penix, John; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The REBOUND adaptation framework organizes a collection of adaptation tactics in a way that they can be selected based on the components available for adaptation. Adaptation tactics are specified formally in terms of the relationship between the component to be adapted and the resulting adapted component. The tactic specifications are used as matching conditions for specification-based component retrieval, creating a 'retrieval for adaptation' scenario. The results of specification matching are used to guide component adaptation. Several examples illustrate how the framework guides component and tactic selection and how basic tactics are composed to form more powerful tactics.

  10. Principal Component Analysis for Enhancement of Infrared Spectra Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, Ricky Lance

    contaminants in an aircraft cabin. In addition, experimental data sets are analyzed for a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) aqueous solution mixture to determine H2O2 concentrations at various levels that could be produced during use of a vapor phase hydrogen peroxide (VPHP) decontamination system. After the PCA application to two and three component systems, the analysis technique is further expanded to include the monitoring of potential bleed air contaminants from engine oil combustion. Simulation data sets created from database spectra were utilized to predict gas components and concentrations in unknown engine oil samples at high temperatures as well as time-evolved gases from the heating of engine oils.

  11. Various Boussinesq solitary wave solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.T.

    1995-12-31

    The generalized Boussinesq (gB) equations have been used to model nonlinear wave evolution over variable topography and wave interactions with structures. Like the KdV equation, the gB equations support a solitary wave solution which propagates without changing shape, and this solitary wave is often used as a primary test case for numerical studies of nonlinear waves using either the gB or other model equations. Nine different approximate solutions of the generalized Boussinesq equations are presented with simple closed form expressions for the wave elevation and wave speed. Each approximates the free propagation of a single solitary wave, and eight of these solutions are newly obtained. The author compares these solutions with the well known KdV solution, Rayleigh`s solution, Laitone`s higher order solution, and ``exact`` numerical integration of the gB equations. Existing experimental data on solitary wave shape and wave speed are compared with these models.

  12. Explosive components facility certification tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dorrell, L.; Johnson, D.

    1995-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has recently completed construction of a new Explosive Components Facility (ECF) that will be used for the research and development of advanced explosives technology. The ECF includes nine indoor firing pads for detonating explosives and monitoring the detonations. Department of Energy requirements for certification of this facility include detonation of explosive levels up to 125 percent of the rated firing pad capacity with no visual structural degradation resulting from the explosion. The Explosives Projects and Diagnostics Department at Sandia decided to expand this certification process to include vibration and acoustic monitoring at various locations throughout the building during these explosive events. This information could then be used to help determine the best locations for noise and vibration sensitive equipment (e.g. scanning electron microscopes) used for analysis throughout the building. This facility has many unique isolation features built into the explosive chamber and laboratory areas of the building that allow normal operation of other building activities during explosive tests. This paper discusses the design of this facility and the various types of explosive testing performed by the Explosives Projects and Diagnostics Department at Sandia. However, the primary focus of the paper is directed at the vibration and acoustic data acquired during the certification process. This includes the vibration test setup and data acquisition parameters, as well as analysis methods used for generating peak acceleration levels and spectral information. Concerns over instrumentation issues such as the choice of transducers (appropriate ranges, resonant frequencies, etc.) and measurements with long cable lengths (500 feet) are also discussed.

  13. Integrated computational and conceptual solutions for complex environmental information management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rückemann, Claus-Peter

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the recent results of the integration of computational and conceptual solutions for the complex case of environmental information management. The solution for the major goal of creating and developing long-term multi-disciplinary knowledge resources and conceptual and computational support was achieved by implementing and integrating key components. The key components are long-term knowledge resources providing required structures for universal knowledge creation, documentation, and preservation, universal multi-disciplinary and multi-lingual conceptual knowledge and classification, especially, references to Universal Decimal Classification (UDC), sustainable workflows for environmental information management, and computational support for dynamical use, processing, and advanced scientific computing with Integrated Information and Computing System (IICS) components and High End Computing (HEC) resources.

  14. 42 CFR 84.251 - Required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Required components. (a) Each vinyl chloride respirator described in § 84.250 shall, where its design...) Breathing tube. (b) The components of each vinyl chloride respirator shall meet the minimum...

  15. 42 CFR 84.251 - Required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Required components. (a) Each vinyl chloride respirator described in § 84.250 shall, where its design...) Breathing tube. (b) The components of each vinyl chloride respirator shall meet the minimum...

  16. 42 CFR 84.251 - Required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Required components. (a) Each vinyl chloride respirator described in § 84.250 shall, where its design...) Breathing tube. (b) The components of each vinyl chloride respirator shall meet the minimum...

  17. 42 CFR 84.251 - Required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Required components. (a) Each vinyl chloride respirator described in § 84.250 shall, where its design...) Breathing tube. (b) The components of each vinyl chloride respirator shall meet the minimum...

  18. 42 CFR 84.251 - Required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Required components. (a) Each vinyl chloride respirator described in § 84.250 shall, where its design...) Breathing tube. (b) The components of each vinyl chloride respirator shall meet the minimum...

  19. Nonlinear principal component analysis of climate data

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, J.; Sengupta, S.

    1995-06-01

    This paper presents the details of the nonlinear principal component analysis of climate data. Topic discussed include: connection with principal component analysis; network architecture; analysis of the standard routine (PRINC); and results.

  20. Additive Manufacturing of Aerospace Propulsion Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.; Grady, Joseph E.; Carter, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will provide an overview of ongoing activities on additive manufacturing of aerospace propulsion components, which included rocket propulsion and gas turbine engines. Future opportunities on additive manufacturing of hybrid electric propulsion components will be discussed.

  1. Attitude Control Propulsion Components, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Attitude control propulsion components are described, including hydrazine thrusters, hydrazine thruster and cold gas jet valves, and pressure and temperature transducers. Component-ordered data are presented in tabular form; the manufacturer and specific space program are included.

  2. Battery components employing a silicate binder

    DOEpatents

    Delnick, Frank M.; Reinhardt, Frederick W.; Odinek, Judy G.

    2011-05-24

    A battery component structure employing inorganic-silicate binders. In some embodiments, casting or coating of components may be performed using aqueous slurries of silicates and electrode materials or separator materials.

  3. Plutonium solution analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    A fully automated analyzer has been developed for plutonium solutions. It was assembled from several commercially available modules, is based upon segmented flow analysis, and exhibits precision about an order of magnitude better than commercial units (0.5%-O.05% RSD). The system was designed to accept unmeasured, untreated liquid samples in the concentration range 40-240 g/L and produce a report with sample identification, sample concentrations, and an abundance of statistics. Optional hydraulics can accommodate samples in the concentration range 0.4-4.0 g/L. Operating at a typical rate of 30 to 40 samples per hour, it consumes only 0.074 mL of each sample and standard, and generates waste at the rate of about 1.5 mL per minute. No radioactive material passes through its multichannel peristaltic pump (which remains outside the glovebox, uncontaminated) but rather is handled by a 6-port, 2-position chromatography-type loop valve. An accompanying computer is programmed in QuickBASIC 4.5 to provide both instrument control and data reduction. The program is truly user-friendly and communication between operator and instrument is via computer screen displays and keyboard. Two important issues which have been addressed are waste minimization and operator safety (the analyzer can run in the absence of an operator, once its autosampler has been loaded).

  4. Simple de Sitter Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, Eva; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2008-01-07

    We present a framework for de Sitter model building in type IIA string theory, illustrated with specific examples. We find metastable dS minima of the potential for moduli obtained from a compactification on a product of two Nil three-manifolds (which have negative scalar curvature) combined with orientifolds, branes, fractional Chern-Simons forms, and fluxes. As a discrete quantum number is taken large, the curvature, field strengths, inverse volume, and four dimensional string coupling become parametrically small, and the de Sitter Hubble scale can be tuned parametrically smaller than the scales of the moduli, KK, and winding mode masses. A subtle point in the construction is that although the curvature remains consistently weak, the circle fibers of the nilmanifolds become very small in this limit (though this is avoided in illustrative solutions at modest values of the parameters). In the simplest version of the construction, the heaviest moduli masses are parametrically of the same order as the lightest KK and winding masses. However, we provide a method for separating these marginally overlapping scales, and more generally the underlying supersymmetry of the model protects against large corrections to the low-energy moduli potential.

  5. Wetting in electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Ibagon, Ingrid; Bier, Markus; Dietrich, S

    2013-06-01

    Wetting of a charged substrate by an electrolyte solution is investigated by means of classical density functional theory applied to a lattice model. Within the present model the pure, i.e., salt-free solvent, for which all interactions are of the nearest-neighbor type only, exhibits a second-order wetting transition for all strengths of the substrate-particle and the particle-particle interactions for which the wetting transition temperature is nonzero. The influences of the substrate charge density and of the ionic strength on the wetting transition temperature and on the order of the wetting transition are studied. If the substrate is neutral, the addition of salt to the solvent changes neither the order nor the transition temperature of the wetting transition of the system. If the surface charge is nonzero, upon adding salt this continuous wetting transition changes to first-order within the wide range of substrate surface charge densities and ionic strengths studied here. As the substrate surface charge density is increased, at fixed ionic strength, the wetting transition temperature decreases and the prewetting line associated with the first-order wetting transition becomes longer. This decrease of the wetting transition temperature upon increasing the surface charge density becomes more pronounced by decreasing the ionic strength. PMID:23758391

  6. Solutions for Hot Situations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    From the company that brought the world an integral heating and cooling food service system after originally developing it for NASA's Apollo Program, comes yet another orbital offshoot: a product that can be as thin as paper and as strong as steel. Nextel Ceramic Textiles and Composites from 3M Company offer space-age protection and innovative solutions for hot situations, ranging from NASA to NASCAR. With superior thermal protection, Nextel fabrics, tape, and sleevings outperform other high temperature textiles such as aramids, carbon, glass, and quartz, permitting engineers and manufacturers to handle applications up to 2,500 F (1,371 C). The stiffness and strength of Nextel Continuous Ceramic Fibers make them a great match for improving the rigidity of aluminum in metal matrix composites. Moreover, the fibers demonstrate low shrinkage at operating temperatures, which allow for the manufacturing of a dimensionally stable product. These novel fibers also offer excellent chemical resistance, low thermal conductivity, thermal shock resistance, low porosity, and unique electrical properties.

  7. Fabrication of ion source components by electroforming

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, D.E.; Sluss, F.

    1983-01-01

    Several components of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)/Magnetic Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) ion source have been fabricated utilizing an electroforming process. A procedure has been developed for enclosing coolant passages in copper components by electrodepositing a thick (greater than or equal to 0.75-mm) layer of copper (electroforming) over the top of grooves machined into the copper component base. Details of the procedure to fabricate acceleration grids and other ion source components are presented.

  8. Experimental Structural Studies of Solutes in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, Ingmar

    2007-11-29

    The principles of experimental methods to study the structure and the hydrogen bonding of hydrated solutes in aqueous solution are presented, and whether theoretical simulations can produce comparable information as the experimental ones is discussed. Two structure methods, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and large angle X-ray scattering (LAXS), and one method to study the hydrogen bonding in hydrated species in aqueous solution, double difference infrared spectroscopy of HDO, are presented.

  9. A Smart pH-Responsive Three Components Luminescent Hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Li, Yibao; Liu, Wei; Cheng, Linxiu; Huang, Ping; Peng, Yu; Wu, Yongquan; Li, Xun; Li, Xiaokang; Fan, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report a novel three-component luminescent hydrogel, which is composed of amino acid derivatives (N,N'-di valine-3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic acid, NVPD), riboflavin (RF), and melamine (MM). The three-component hydrogel is attributed to multiple hydrogen bonds and the strong π-π stacking interaction between these molecules. Based on the strong hydrogen bonding of the gelator, when the reversible process between the gel and the solution take places it changes the pH of the system from 6.1 to 10.6. In addition, green fluorescence could be the emissive of the hydrogel under 498 nm and the conversion process of the aggregation state repeated reversibly by altering the value of ambient pH. This pH-responsive luminescent gel may display potential for use in nano pH sensors. PMID:27626452

  10. Multi-component transparent conducting oxides: progress in materials modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Aron; Da Silva, Juarez L. F.; Wei, Su-Huai

    2011-08-01

    Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) play an essential role in modern optoelectronic devices through their combination of electrical conductivity and optical transparency. We review recent progress in our understanding of multi-component TCOs formed from solid solutions of ZnO, In2O3, Ga2O3 and Al2O3, with a particular emphasis on the contributions of materials modelling, primarily based on density functional theory. In particular, we highlight three major results from our work: (i) the fundamental principles governing the crystal structures of multi-component oxide structures including (In2O3)(ZnO)n and (In2O3)m(Ga2O3)l(ZnO)n; (ii) the relationship between elemental composition and optical and electrical behaviour, including valence band alignments; (iii) the high performance of amorphous oxide semiconductors. On the basis of these advances, the challenge of the rational design of novel electroceramic materials is discussed.

  11. mm-wave component tradeoffs for tactical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seashore, C. R.; Singh, D. R.

    1982-06-01

    Future warfare scenarios include land and sea attacks occurring during weather conditions which will place defensive air support at a maximum disadvantage. In adverse weather, tactical air strike effectiveness can be severely reduced when the visual meteorological range falls below 2000 meters. Continuing research and development of the millimeter wavelength region, 30 to 300 GHz, is being carried out for new nonelectrooptical air-to-surface guidance solutions. The selection of this wavelength region is partly related to comparatively low propagation losses in selected atmospheric windows. Reasonable resolution can be obtained from small diameter apertures, and tactical targets have significant radar cross sections at millimeter-wave frequencies. Attention is given to tactical systems, component requirements, and integrated circuit technology. It is found that a new generation of components is needed in order to meet system requirements and satisfy the key factors of low cost and producibility.

  12. Component failures at pressurized water reactors. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Reisinger, M.F.

    1980-10-01

    Objectives of this study were to identify those systems having major impact on safety and availability (i.e. to identify those systems and components whose failures have historically caused the greatest number of challenges to the reactor protective systems and which have resulted in greatest loss of electric generation time). These problems were identified for engineering solutions and recommendations made for areas and programs where research and development should be concentrated. The program was conducted in three major phases: Data Analysis, Engineering Evaluation, Cost Benefit Analysis.

  13. Analysis of the transient behavior of rubbing components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quezdou, M. B.; Mullen, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    Finite element equations are developed for studying deformations and temperatures resulting from frictional heating in sliding system. The formulation is done for linear steady state motion in two dimensions. The equations include the effect of the velocity on the moving components. This gives spurious oscillations in their solutions by Galerkin finite element methods. A method called streamline upwind scheme is used to try to deal with this deficiency. The finite element program is then used to investigate the friction of heating in gas path seal.

  14. The Coordination of Components for Educational Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education and Science, London (England).

    The coordination of the building components of educational facilities is discussed. The resulting components will be used for a wide range of building types in addition to schools and the recommendation should therefore be seen as part of a widespread move toward establishing a national British 'pool' of dimensionally related components. The two…

  15. Manufacturing complex silica aerogel target components

    SciTech Connect

    Defriend Obrey, Kimberly Ann; Day, Robert D; Espinoza, Brent F; Hatch, Doug; Patterson, Brian M; Feng, Shihai

    2008-01-01

    Aerogel is a material used in numerous components in High Energy Density Physics targets. In the past these components were molded into the proper shapes. Artifacts left in the parts from the molding process, such as contour irregularities from shrinkage and density gradients caused by the skin, have caused LANL to pursue machining as a way to make the components.

  16. 42 CFR 93.209 - Funding component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Funding component. 93.209 Section 93.209 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH... MISCONDUCT Definitions § 93.209 Funding component. Funding component means any organizational unit of the...

  17. 42 CFR 93.209 - Funding component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Funding component. 93.209 Section 93.209 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH... MISCONDUCT Definitions § 93.209 Funding component. Funding component means any organizational unit of the...

  18. 42 CFR 93.209 - Funding component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Funding component. 93.209 Section 93.209 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH... MISCONDUCT Definitions § 93.209 Funding component. Funding component means any organizational unit of the...

  19. 42 CFR 93.209 - Funding component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Funding component. 93.209 Section 93.209 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH... MISCONDUCT Definitions § 93.209 Funding component. Funding component means any organizational unit of the...

  20. 42 CFR 93.209 - Funding component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Funding component. 93.209 Section 93.209 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH... MISCONDUCT Definitions § 93.209 Funding component. Funding component means any organizational unit of the...

  1. 6 CFR 7.11 - Components' responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... INFORMATION Administration § 7.11 Components' responsibilities. Each DHS component shall appoint a security... security information; (b) Report violations of the provisions of this regulation to the Chief Security... component acquire adequate security education and training, as required by the DHS classified...

  2. Concentration Dependence of Solution Shear Viscosity and Solute Mass Diffusivity in Crystal Growth from Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izmailov, Alexander F.; Myerson, Allan S.

    1995-01-01

    The physical properties of a supersaturated binary solution such as its density rho, shear viscosity eta, and solute mass diffusivity D are dependent on the solute concentration c: rho = rho(c), eta = eta(c), and D = D(c). The diffusion boundary layer equations related to crystal growth from solution are derived for the case of natural convection with a solution density, a shear viscosity, and a solute diffusivity that are all depen- dent on solute concentration. The solution of these equations has demonstrated the following. (1) At the vicinity of the saturation concentration c(sub s) the solution shear viscosity eta depends on rho as eta(sub s) = eta(rho(sub s))varies as square root of rho(c(sub s)). This theoretically derived result has been verified in experiments with several aqueous solutions of inorganic and organic salts. (2) The maximum solute mass transfer towards the growing crystal surface can be achieved for values of c where the ratio of d ln(D(c)/dc) to d ln(eta(c)/dc) is a maximum.

  3. Solution structure of RNase P RNA

    PubMed Central

    Kazantsev, Alexei V.; Rambo, Robert P.; Karimpour, Sina; SantaLucia, John; Tainer, John A.; Pace, Norman R.

    2011-01-01

    The ribonucleoprotein enzyme ribonuclease P (RNase P) processes tRNAs by cleavage of precursor-tRNAs. RNase P is a ribozyme: The RNA component catalyzes tRNA maturation in vitro without proteins. Remarkable features of RNase P include multiple turnovers in vivo and ability to process diverse substrates. Structures of the bacterial RNase P, including full-length RNAs and a ternary complex with substrate, have been determined by X-ray crystallography. However, crystal structures of free RNA are significantly different from the ternary complex, and the solution structure of the RNA is unknown. Here, we report solution structures of three phylogenetically distinct bacterial RNase P RNAs from Escherichia coli, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and Bacillus stearothermophilus, determined using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) analysis. A combination of homology modeling, normal mode analysis, and molecular dynamics was used to refine the structural models against the empirical data of these RNAs in solution under the high ionic strength required for catalytic activity. PMID:21531920

  4. Process for decomposing nitrates in aqueous solution

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Paul A.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is a process for decomposing ammonium nitrate and/or selected metal nitrates in an aqueous solution at an elevated temperature and pressure. Where the compound to be decomposed is a metal nitrate (e.g., a nuclear-fuel metal nitrate), a hydroxylated organic reducing agent therefor is provided in the solution. In accordance with the invention, an effective proportion of both nitromethane and nitric acid is incorporated in the solution to accelerate decomposition of the ammonium nitrate and/or selected metal nitrate. As a result, decomposition can be effected at significantly lower temperatures and pressures, permitting the use of system components composed of off-the-shelf materials, such as stainless steel, rather than more costly materials of construction. Preferably, the process is conducted on a continuous basis. Fluid can be automatically vented from the reaction zone as required to maintain the operating temperature at a moderate value--e.g., at a value in the range of from about 130.degree.-200.degree. C.

  5. Cellulose-Based Membranes for Solutes Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anokhina, T. S.; Yushkin, A. A.; Volkov, V. V.; Antonov, S. V.; Volkov, A. V.

    This work was focused on investigation of industrial cellophane film as a membrane material for solvent nanofiltration. The effect of conditioning of cellophane membranes by stepwise changing of composition of ethanol-water binary mixtures (from ethanol to water and from water to ethanol) was studied. It was shown that such treatment leads to an increase of ethanol permeability more than two orders of magnitude over initial untreated film samples. Treated cellophane membranes possess the ethanol permeability coefficient comparable with the values for highly permeability glassy polymers. Investigation of cellophane swelling in water ethanol solutions allowed to conclude that during the treatment formation of porous in the film takes place due to increase of inter chain distances. Observed high ethanol permeability connected with the fact that formed porous structure remains after the replacement of water with ethanol. Also it was shown that rejection coefficients of a number of dyes (MW 350) were in good agreement with the degree of hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity and ability of the solvent to form hydrogen bonding with the solute molecules. It was demonstrated that cellulose-based membranes can be complimentary for other type of the membranes in fractionation of multi-components solutions.

  6. Bi-Component Droplet Combustion in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Benjamin D.

    2004-01-01

    This research deals with reduced-gravity combustion of bi-component droplets initially in the mm size range or larger. The primary objectives of the research are to study the effects of droplet internal flows, thermal and solutal Marangoni stresses, and species volatility differences on liquid species transport and overall combustion phenomena (e.g., gas-phase unsteadiness, burning rates, sooting, radiation, and extinction). The research program utilizes a reduced gravity environment so that buoyancy effects are rendered negligible. Use of large droplets also facilitates visualization of droplet internal flows, which is important for this research. In the experiments, droplets composed of low- and high-volatility species are burned. The low-volatility components are initially present in small amounts. As combustion of a droplet proceeds, the liquid surface mass fraction of the low-volatility component will increase with time, resulting in a sudden and temporary decrease in droplet burning rates as the droplet rapidly heats to temperatures close to the boiling point of the low-volatility component. This decrease in burning rates causes a sudden and temporary contraction of the flame. The decrease in burning rates and the flame contraction can be observed experimentally. Measurements of burning rates as well as the onset time for flame contraction allow effective liquid-phase species diffusivities to be calculated, e.g., using asymptotic theory. It is planned that droplet internal flows will be visualized in flight and ground-based experiments. In this way, effective liquid species diffusivities can be related to droplet internal flow characteristics. This program is a continuation of extensive ground-based experimental and theoretical research on bi-component droplet combustion that has been ongoing for several years. The focal point of this program is a flight experiment (Bi-Component Droplet Combustion Experiment, BCDCE). This flight experiment is under

  7. On non-singular solutions in multidimensional cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikov, V. N.

    2009-05-18

    Exact solutions with an exponential behaviour of the scale factors are considered in a multidimensional cosmological model describing the dynamics of n+1 Ricci-flat factor spaces M{sub i} in the presence of a one-component perfect fluid. The pressures in all spaces are proportional to the density: p{sub i} = w{sub i}{rho}, i = 0,...,n. Solutions with accelerated expansion of our 3-space M{sub 0} and a small enough variation of the gravitational constant G are found.A family of generalized non-singular S-brane solutions with orthogonal intersection rules and n Ricci-flat factor spaces in the theory with several scalar fields, antisymmetric forms and multiple scalar potential is considered. The solution possess exponential behaviour of scale factors. These solutions contain a sub-family of solutions with accelerated expansion of certain factor spaces. Some examples of solutions with exponential dependence of one scale factor and constant scale factors of ''internal'' spaces (e.g. Freund-Rubin type solutions) are also considered.

  8. Liquid-phase and vapor-phase dehydration of organic/water solutions

    DOEpatents

    Huang, Yu; Ly, Jennifer; Aldajani, Tiem; Baker, Richard W.

    2011-08-23

    Processes for dehydrating an organic/water solution by pervaporation or vapor separation using fluorinated membranes. The processes are particularly useful for treating mixtures containing light organic components, such as ethanol, isopropanol or acetic acid.

  9. Low-power photonic components for optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Po; Liao, Shirong; Liang, Hong; Feng, Ning-Ning; Qian, Wei; Shafiiha, Roshanak; Feng, Dazeng; Li, Guoliang; Zheng, Xuezhe; Cunningham, John E.; Krishnamoorthy, Ashok V.; Asghari, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    Silicon-based optical interconnects are expected to provide high bandwidth and low power consumption solutions for chip-level communication applications, due to their electronics integration capability, proven manufacturing record and attractive price volume curve. In order to compete with electrical interconnects, the energy requirement is projected to be sub-pJ per bit for an optical link in chip to chip communication. Such low energies pose significant challenges for the optical components used in these applications. In this paper, we review several low power photonic components developed at Kotura for DARPA's Ultraperformance Nanophotonic Intrachip Communications (UNIC) project. These components include high speed silicon microring modulators, wavelength (de)multiplexers using silicon cascaded microrings, low power electro-optic silicon switches, low loss silicon routing waveguides, and low capacitance germanium photodetectors. Our microring modulators demonstrate an energy consumption of { 10 fJ per bit with a drive voltage of 1 V. Silicon routing waveguides have a propagation loss of < 0.3 dB/cm, enabling a propagation length of a few tens of centimeters. The germanium photodetectors can have a low device capacitance of a few fF, a high responsivity up to 1.1 A/W and a high speed of >30 GHz. These components are potentially sufficient to construct a full optical link with an energy consumption of less than 1 pJ per bit.

  10. Properties of scintillator solutes

    SciTech Connect

    Fluornoy, J.M.

    1998-06-01

    This special report summarizes measurements of the spectroscopic and other properties of the solutes that were used in the preparation of several new liquid scintillators developed at EG and G/Energy Measurements/Santa Barbara Operations (the precursor to Bechtel Nevada/Special Technologies Laboratory) on the radiation-to-light converter program. The data on the individual compounds are presented in a form similar to that used by Prof. Isadore Berlman in his classic handbook of fluorescence spectra. The temporal properties and relative efficiencies of the new scintillators are presented in Table 1, and the efficiencies as a function of wavelength are presented graphically in Figure 1. In addition, there is a descriptive glossary of the abbreviations used herein. Figure 2 illustrates the basic structures of some of the compounds and of the four solvents reported in this summary. The emission spectra generally exhibit more structure than the absorption spectra, with the result that the peak emission wavelength for a given compound may lie several nm away from the wavelength, {lambda}{sub avg}, at the geometric center of the emission spectrum. Therefore, the author has chosen to list absorption peaks, {lambda}{sub max}, and emission {lambda}{sub avg} values in Figures 3--30, as being most illustrative of the differences between the compounds. The compounds, BHTP, BTPB, ADBT, and DPTPB were all developed on this program. P-terphenyl, PBD, and TPB are commercially available blue emitters. C-480 and the other longer-wavelength emitters are laser dyes available commercially from Exciton Corporation. 1 ref., 30 figs.

  11. Method of using infrared radiation for assembling a first component with a second component

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Whitson, Barry G.; Blue, Craig A.

    1999-01-01

    A method of assembling a first component for assembly with a second component involves a heating device which includes an enclosure having a cavity for inserting a first component. An array of infrared energy generators is disposed within the enclosure. At least a portion of the first component is inserted into the cavity, exposed to infrared energy and thereby heated to a temperature wherein the portion of the first component is sufficiently softened and/or expanded for assembly with a second component.

  12. Iodine addition using triiodide solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutz, Jeffrey A.; Muckle, Susan V.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    The study develops: a triiodide solution for use in preparing ground service equipment (GSE) water for Shuttle support, an iodine dissolution method that is reliable and requires minimal time and effort to prepare, and an iodine dissolution agent with a minimal concentration of sodium salt. Sodium iodide and hydriodic acid were both found to dissolve iodine to attain the desired GSE iodine concentrations of 7.5 +/- 2.5 mg/L and 25 +/- 5 mg/L. The 1.75:1 and 2:1 sodium iodide solutions produced higher iodine recoveries than the 1.2:1 hydriodic acid solution. A two-hour preparation time is required for the three sodium iodide solutions. The 1.2:1 hydriodic acid solution can be prepared in less than 5 min. Two sodium iodide stock solutions (2.5:1 and 2:1) were found to dissolve iodine without undergoing precipitation.

  13. Component Technology for Laser Plasma Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Bosl, W J; Smith, S G; Dahlgren, T; Epperley, T; Kohn, S; Kumfert, G

    2002-06-17

    This paper will discuss the application of high performance component software technology developed for a complex physics simulation development effort. The primary tool used to build software components is called Babel and is used to create language-independent libraries for high performance computers. Components were constructed from legacy code and wrapped with a thin Python layer to enable run-time scripting. Low-level components in Fortran, C++, and Python were composed directly as Babel components and invoked interactively from a parallel Python script.

  14. Mixing state of bi-component mixtures under aggregation with a product kernel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Díaz, J. M.; Gómez-García, G. J.

    2010-05-01

    We analyze the aggregation of a two-component system with a product kernel, to determine its evolution in time during a progressive mixing. The evolution is governed by the Smoluchowski equation, yielding gelation from a certain time. In the past, equilibrium (or asymptotic) solutions have been used to study mixing of bi-component mixtures for non-gelling kernels. In this letter we show that asymptotic solutions are invalid to describe the mixing behavior for the product kernel case (even before gelation). Besides, an equilibrium concentration is not reached. On the contrary, particles with any composition exist all time.

  15. HGMF of 10-L solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Larkin, K.A.

    1994-08-14

    This test plan describes the activities associated with the High Gradient Magnetic Filtration (HGMF) of plutonium-bearing solutions (10-L). The 10-L solutions were received from Argonne National Laboratories in 1972, are highly acidic, and are considered unstable. The purpose of the testing is to show that HGMF is an applicable method of removing plutonium precipitates from solution. The plutonium then can be stored safely in a solid form.

  16. Cylindrical solutions in mimetic gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, Davood; Myrzakulov, Kairat; Myrzakulov, Ratbay; Raza, Muhammad

    2016-06-01

    This paper is devoted to investigate cylindrical solutions in mimetic gravity. The explicit forms of the metric of this theory, namely mimetic-Kasner (say) have been obtained. In this study we have noticed that the Kasner's family of exact solutions needs to be reconsidered under this type of modified gravity. A no-go theorem is proposed for the exact solutions in the presence of a cosmological constant.

  17. Cylindrical solutions in braneworld gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Khoeini-Moghaddam, S.; Nouri-Zonoz, M.

    2005-09-15

    In this article we investigate exact cylindrically symmetric solutions to the modified Einstein field equations in the braneworld gravity scenarios. It is shown that for the special choice of the equation of state 2U+P=0 for the dark energy and dark pressure, the solutions found could be considered formally as solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations in 4-D general relativity.

  18. Solute diffusion in liquid metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N.

    1973-01-01

    A gas model of diffusion in liquid metals is presented. In this model, ions of liquid metals are assumed to behave like the molecules in a dense gas. Diffusion coefficient of solute is discussed with reference to its mass, ionic size, and pair potential. The model is applied to the case of solute diffusion in liquid silver. An attempt was made to predict diffusion coefficients of solutes with reasonable accuracy.

  19. Expandable Metal Liner For Downhole Components

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe R.

    2004-10-05

    A liner for an annular downhole component is comprised of an expandable metal tube having indentations along its surface. The indentations are formed in the wall of the tube either by drawing the tube through a die, by hydroforming, by stamping, or roll forming and may extend axially, radially, or spirally along its wall. The indentations accommodate radial and axial expansion of the tube within the downhole component. The tube is inserted into the annular component and deformed to match an inside surface of the component. The tube may be expanded using a hydroforming process or by drawing a mandrel through the tube. The tube may be expanded in such a manner so as to place it in compression against the inside wall of the component. The tube is useful for improving component hydraulics, shielding components from contamination, inhibiting corrosion, and preventing wear to the downhole component during use. It may also be useful for positioning conduit and insulated conductors within the component. An insulating material may be disposed between the tube and the component in order to prevent galvanic corrosion of the downhole component.

  20. Micromotion of cemented and uncemented femoral components.

    PubMed

    Burke, D W; O'Connor, D O; Zalenski, E B; Jasty, M; Harris, W H

    1991-01-01

    We evaluated the initial stability of cemented and uncemented femoral components within the femoral canals of cadaver femurs during simulated single limb stance and stair climbing. Both types were very stable in simulated single limb stance (maximum micromotion of 42 microns for cemented and 30 microns for uncemented components). However, in simulated stair climbing, the cemented components were much more stable than the uncemented components (76 microns as against 280 microns). There was also greater variation in the stability of uncemented components in simulated stair climbing, with two of the seven components moving 200 microns or more. Future implant designs should aim to improve the initial stability of cementless femoral components under torsional loads; this should improve the chances of bony ingrowth. PMID:1991771

  1. Optical components damage parameters database system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yizheng; Li, Xinglan; Jin, Yuquan; Xie, Dongmei; Tang, Dingyong

    2012-10-01

    Optical component is the key to large-scale laser device developed by one of its load capacity is directly related to the device output capacity indicators, load capacity depends on many factors. Through the optical components will damage parameters database load capacity factors of various digital, information technology, for the load capacity of optical components to provide a scientific basis for data support; use of business processes and model-driven approach, the establishment of component damage parameter information model and database systems, system application results that meet the injury test optical components business processes and data management requirements of damage parameters, component parameters of flexible, configurable system is simple, easy to use, improve the efficiency of the optical component damage test.

  2. Extraordinary vacuum black string solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyeong-Chan; Lee, Jungjai

    2008-01-15

    In addition to the boosted static solution there are two other classes of stationary stringlike solutions of the vacuum Einstein equation in (4+1) dimensions. Each class is characterized by three parameters of mass, tension, and momentum flow along the fifth coordinate. We analyze the metric properties of one of the two classes, which was previously assumed to be naked singular, and show that the solution spectrum contains black string and wormhole in addition to the known naked singularity as the momentum flow to mass ratio increases. Interestingly, there does not exist new zero momentum solution in these cases.

  3. Amine treatment of polysaccharide solution

    SciTech Connect

    Shay, L. K.; Reiter, S. E.

    1984-11-27

    A thermostable, viscous xanthan polysaccharide solution prepared by the process of heating a xanthan polysaccharide solution in the presence of at least one C/sub 1/ to C/sub 10/ alkyl or C/sub 3/ to C/sub 10/ cycloalkyl substituted primary or secondary mono- or diamine having an upper limit of a total of 15 carbon atoms under conditions sufficient to form a thermostable, viscous xanthan polysaccharide solution. The thermostable, viscous xanthan polysaccharide solution may be used as a mobility buffer in a process for the enhanced recovery of oil.

  4. Water activity in supersaturated aqueous solutions of organic solutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Han-Soo; Arnold, Stephen; Myerson, Allan S.

    1995-04-01

    Measurements of water activity in supersaturated aqueous organic solutions of glycine, alanine, succinic acid and itaconic acid were made far into the metastable zone by levitating micron-sized droplets electrodynamically in a spherical void electrodynamic levitator trap (SVELT) with a water vapor reservoir. The concentration dependent behavior of the activity was examined in relationship to the molecular interactions for solutions.

  5. High conductivity electrolyte solutions and rechargeable cells incorporating such solutions

    DOEpatents

    Angell, Charles Austen; Zhang, Sheng-Shui; Xu, Kang

    1998-01-01

    This invention relates generally to electrolyte solvents for use in liquid or rubbery polymer electrolyte solutions as are used, for example, in electrochemical devices. More specifically, this invention relates to sulfonyl/phospho-compound electrolyte solvents and sulfonyl/phospho-compound electrolyte solutions incorporating such solvents.

  6. High conductivity electrolyte solutions and rechargeable cells incorporating such solutions

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C.A.; Zhang, S.S.; Xu, K.

    1998-10-20

    This invention relates generally to electrolyte solvents for use in liquid or rubbery polymer electrolyte solutions as are used, for example, in electrochemical devices. More specifically, this invention relates to sulfonyl/phospho-compound electrolyte solvents and sulfonyl/phospho-compound electrolyte solutions incorporating such solvents. 9 figs.

  7. Extending the geometric deformation: New black hole solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovalle, Jorge

    2016-03-01

    By using the extension of the Minimal Geometric Deformation approach, recently developed to investigate the exterior spacetime of a self-gravitating system in the Braneworld, we identified a master solution for the deformation undergone by the radial metric component when time deformations are produced by bulk gravitons. A specific form for the temporal deformation is used to generate a new exterior solution with a tidal charge Q. The main feature of this solution is the presence of higher-order terms in the tidal charge, thus generalizing the well known tidally charged solution. The horizon of the black hole lies inside the Schwarzschild radius, h < rs = 2ℳ, indicating that extra-dimensional effects weaken the gravitational field.

  8. Simplified process for preparation of schizophyllan solutions for biomaterial applications.

    PubMed

    Sutivisedsak, Nongnuch; Leathers, Timothy D; Biresaw, Girma; Nunnally, Melinda S; Bischoff, Kenneth M

    2016-04-01

    Schizophyllan is a biopolymer commercially produced for pharmaceutical and cosmetics uses. However, schizophyllan also has potential biomaterial applications. Schizophyllan is conventionally produced from glucose and recovered by diafiltration and ultrafiltration to produce a highly purified product. Here we demonstrate a simplified process for preparation of schizophyllan solutions for biomaterial applications. Schizophyllan was produced in 1.5-L bioreactors from distiller's dried grains with solubles (DDGS), an abundant coproduct of dry grind fuel ethanol production. Downstream processing eliminated filtration and concentration steps, providing solutions containing 4.2 ± 0.3 g schizophyllan/L. Solutions contained high-molecular-weight schizophyllan and exhibited viscosity properties similar to those of commercial schizophyllan. Schizophyllan solutions showed promise as a component of biolubricants in friction and wear tests and by dynamic surface and interfacial tension measurements. PMID:25830418

  9. Electrodeposition of cobalt-chromium alloy from trivalent chromium solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Dasarathy, H.; Riley, C.; Coble, H.D. . Dept. of Chemistry and Materials Science)

    1994-07-01

    Cobalt-chromium alloy was deposited from plating solutions containing cobalt(II) chloride and chromium(III) chloride at 3.5 pH. The deposits were obtained using both single and mixed complex solutions. Deposit morphology showed significant dependence on the complexing agent(s) used. Partitioning of the two components in the deposit as determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy depended on plating parameters such as concentration ratio of the two salts in the solution, complexing agent, type of current (both dc and pulsed current were studied), and current density. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra collected from as-deposited alloy revealed the presence of both oxides and metals. X-ray diffraction spectra for the alloy deposit indicated solid solution formation.

  10. A Mathematical Model of Solute Coupled Water Transport in Toad Intestine Incorporating Recirculation of the Actively Transported Solute

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model of an absorbing leaky epithelium is developed for analysis of solute coupled water transport. The non-charged driving solute diffuses into cells and is pumped from cells into the lateral intercellular space (lis). All membranes contain water channels with the solute passing those of tight junction and interspace basement membrane by convection-diffusion. With solute permeability of paracellular pathway large relative to paracellular water flow, the paracellular flux ratio of the solute (influx/outflux) is small (2–4) in agreement with experiments. The virtual solute concentration of fluid emerging from lis is then significantly larger than the concentration in lis. Thus, in absence of external driving forces the model generates isotonic transport provided a component of the solute flux emerging downstream lis is taken up by cells through the serosal membrane and pumped back into lis, i.e., the solute would have to be recirculated. With input variables from toad intestine (Nedergaard, S., E.H. Larsen, and H.H. Ussing, J. Membr. Biol. 168:241–251), computations predict that 60–80% of the pumped flux stems from serosal bath in agreement with the experimental estimate of the recirculation flux. Robust solutions are obtained with realistic concentrations and pressures of lis, and with the following features. Rate of fluid absorption is governed by the solute permeability of mucosal membrane. Maximum fluid flow is governed by density of pumps on lis-membranes. Energetic efficiency increases with hydraulic conductance of the pathway carrying water from mucosal solution into lis. Uphill water transport is accomplished, but with high hydraulic conductance of cell membranes strength of transport is obscured by water flow through cells. Anomalous solvent drag occurs when back flux of water through cells exceeds inward water flux between cells. Molecules moving along the paracellular pathway are driven by a translateral flow of water, i.e., the model

  11. Influence of membrane-solvent-solute interactions on solute permeation in model membranes.

    PubMed

    Dias, Monica; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E

    2007-05-01

    The interaction of the components of topical formulations with the skin is an important consideration for effective drug delivery and efficacy. The relative importance of solubility parameters and other solvent properties on membrane diffusion processes has not been fully elucidated in the literature. In this paper, the effect of different vehicles on the permeation of caffeine, salicylic acid and benzoic acid through silicone membranes was evaluated. Polydimethylsiloxane membranes were used as model membranes for comparing the release characteristics of saturated solutions of model permeants because of their homogeneity and uniformity. Log P (octanol-water partition coefficient) and solubility parameter values were calculated for the compounds under study. In vitro diffusion studies indicated that the permeation profiles of all solutes showed a similar pattern. The permeation rates of benzoic acid and salicylic acid through silicone membrane from saturated solutions were higher than those for caffeine reflecting the more lipophilic nature of these compounds in comparison with caffeine. Solvent uptake studies confirmed that the vehicles that were highly sorbed by the membrane altered its properties and hence the flux. Vehicles that were not sorbed by the membrane showed similar steady-state fluxes for the model drugs. This suggests that the diffusion process is mainly influenced by the interactions between the vehicles and the membrane. Solubility parameter alone cannot explain the interactions between the membrane and the vehicles in all cases. Rather, it is likely that membrane flux reflects a combination of different solvent and solute characteristics, such as size, shape and charge distribution. PMID:17204382

  12. Aquifer washing by micellar solutions: 1. Optimization of alcohol-surfactant-solvent solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Richard; Gélinas, Pierre J.; Desnoyers, Jacques E.

    1998-03-01

    pore volume of the washing solution recovered in the sand column effluent, the DNAPL is in a water-in-oil microemulsion lighter than the excess aqueous phase (Winsor Type II system), which indicates that part of the DNAPL was mobilized. In the next pore volumes, DNAPL is dissolved in a oil-in-water microemulsion phase and is mobilized in an excess oil phase lighter than the microemulsion (Winsor Type I system). The main drawback of this oil extraction process is the high concentration of ingredients necessary for DNAPL dissolution, which makes the process expensive. Because mobilization of oil seems to occur at the washing solution front, an injection strategy must be developed if there is no impermeable limit at the aquifer base. DNAPL recovery in the field could be less than observed in sand columns because of a smaller sweep efficiency related to field sand heterogeneities. The role of each component in the extraction processes in sand column as well as the Winsor system type have to be better defined for modeling purposes. Injection strategies must be developed to recover ingredients of the washing solution that can remain in the soil at the end of the washing process.

  13. Formation of hydroxyapatite in various aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturgeon, Jacqueline Lee

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp), Ca10(PO4)6(OH) 2, is important in the field of biomaterials as it is the mineral component of bones and teeth. Biological apatites do not maintain an exact composition and are usually calcium-deficient, represented as Ca(10- x)(HPO 4)x(PO4)(6-x)(OH)(2-x), where x ranges from 0 to 1, with various ion substitutions. Formation of calcium-deficient hydroxyapatites (CDHAp) from solid calcium phosphate precursor materials was performed at physiologic temperature (37°C) in a variety of aqueous solutions. Two cement systems were utilized in these experiments: tetralcium phosphate (TetCP) with dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA) and beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP). The kinetics, solution chemistry, phase evolution, and microstructure of the developed apatites were analyzed as appropriate. Reaction of beta-TCP in ammonium fluoride solutions formed HAp substituted with fluoride and calculated to be deficient in calcium. A new ratio of TetCP to DCPA was used with solutions of sodium bicarbonate to form a calcium-deficient carbonate hydroxyapatite. The capacity for sodium dihydrogen phosphate to buffer pH increases and enhance reaction kinetics in this system was also explored. Formation of a highly crystalline CDHAp was achieved by hydrolyzing beta-TCP in water for extended time periods. Lattice parameters were among the features characterized for this apatite. The hydrolysis of beta-TCP in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and simulated body fluids (SBF) was also investigated; use of SBF was found to completely inhibit formation of HAp in this system while reaction in PBS was slow in comparison to water. The effects of filler materials on the mechanical properties of a calcium phosphate cement were examined using the TetCP/DCPA system. Dense aggregates were not found to decrease compressive strength in comparison to the cement alone. The use of aggregates was found to improve the compressive strength of cement formed using NaHCO3 solution as a

  14. Biochemical component identification by plasmonic improved whispering gallery mode optical resonance based sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saetchnikov, Vladimir A.; Tcherniavskaia, Elina A.; Saetchnikov, Anton V.; Schweiger, Gustav; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Experimental data on detection and identification of variety of biochemical agents, such as proteins, microelements, antibiotic of different generation etc. in both single and multi component solutions under varied in wide range concentration analyzed on the light scattering parameters of whispering gallery mode optical resonance based sensor are represented. Multiplexing on parameters and components has been realized using developed fluidic sensor cell with fixed in adhesive layer dielectric microspheres and data processing. Biochemical component identification has been performed by developed network analysis techniques. Developed approach is demonstrated to be applicable both for single agent and for multi component biochemical analysis. Novel technique based on optical resonance on microring structures, plasmon resonance and identification tools has been developed. To improve a sensitivity of microring structures microspheres fixed by adhesive had been treated previously by gold nanoparticle solution. Another technique used thin film gold layers deposited on the substrate below adhesive. Both biomolecule and nanoparticle injections caused considerable changes of optical resonance spectra. Plasmonic gold layers under optimized thickness also improve parameters of optical resonance spectra. Biochemical component identification has been also performed by developed network analysis techniques both for single and for multi component solution. So advantages of plasmon enhancing optical microcavity resonance with multiparameter identification tools is used for development of a new platform for ultra sensitive label-free biomedical sensor.

  15. Design for robustness of unique, multi-component engineering systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Kenneth A.

    2007-12-01

    design concept. These allele values are unitless themselves, but map to both configuration descriptions and attribute values. The Value Distance and Component Distance are metrics that measure the relative differences between two design concepts using the allele values, and all differences in a population of design concepts are calculated relative to a reference design, called the "base design". The base design is the top-ranked member of the population in weighted terms of robustness and performance. Robustness is determined based on the change in multi-objective performance as Value Distance and Component Distance (and thus differences in design) increases. It is assessed as acceptable if differences in design configurations up to specified tolerances result in performance changes that remain within a specified performance range. The design configuration difference tolerances and performance range together define the designer's risk management preferences for the final design concepts. Additionally, a complementary visualization capability was developed, called the "Design Solution Topography". This concept allows the visualization of a population of design concepts, and is a 3-axis plot where each point represents an entire design concept. The axes are the Value Distance, Component Distance and Performance Objective. The key benefit of the Design Solution Topography is that it allows the designer to visually identify and interpret the overall robustness of the current population of design concepts for a particular performance objective. In a multi-objective problem, each performance objective has its own Design Solution Topography view. These new concepts are implemented in an evolutionary computation-based conceptual designing method called the "Design for Robustness Method" that produces robust design concepts. The design procedures associated with this method enable designers to evaluate and ensure robustness in selected designs that also perform within a desired

  16. pyIAST: Ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) Python package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Cory M.; Smit, Berend; Haranczyk, Maciej

    2016-03-01

    Ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) is a widely-used thermodynamic framework to readily predict mixed-gas adsorption isotherms from a set of pure-component adsorption isotherms. We present an open-source, user-friendly Python package, pyIAST, to perform IAST calculations for an arbitrary number of components. pyIAST supports several common analytical models to characterize the pure-component isotherms from experimental or simulated data. Alternatively, pyIAST can use numerical quadrature to compute the spreading pressure for IAST calculations by interpolating the pure-component isotherm data. pyIAST can also perform reverse IAST calculations, where one seeks the required gas phase composition to yield a desired adsorbed phase composition.

  17. Calculating Probabilistic Distance to Solution in a Complex Problem Solving Domain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sudol, Leigh Ann; Rivers, Kelly; Harris, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    In complex problem solving domains, correct solutions are often comprised of a combination of individual components. Students usually go through several attempts, each attempt reflecting an individual solution state that can be observed during practice. Classic metrics to measure student performance over time rely on counting the number of…

  18. Organic Nanofibers Embedding Stimuli-Responsive Threaded Molecular Components

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    While most of the studies on molecular machines have been performed in solution, interfacing these supramolecular systems with solid-state nanostructures and materials is very important in view of their utilization in sensing components working by chemical and photonic actuation. Host polymeric materials, and particularly polymer nanofibers, enable the manipulation of the functional molecules constituting molecular machines and provide a way to induce and control the supramolecular organization. Here, we present electrospun nanocomposites embedding a self-assembling rotaxane-type system that is responsive to both optical (UV–vis light) and chemical (acid/base) stimuli. The system includes a molecular axle comprised of a dibenzylammonium recognition site and two azobenzene end groups and a dibenzo[24]crown-8 molecular ring. The dethreading and rethreading of the molecular components in nanofibers induced by exposure to base and acid vapors, as well as the photoisomerization of the azobenzene end groups, occur in a similar manner to what observed in solution. Importantly, however, the nanoscale mechanical function following external chemical stimuli induces a measurable variation of the macroscopic mechanical properties of nanofibers aligned in arrays, whose Young’s modulus is significantly enhanced upon dethreading of the axles from the rings. These composite nanosystems show therefore great potential for application in chemical sensors, photonic actuators, and environmentally responsive materials. PMID:25264943

  19. Marangoni instability of bi-component droplet gasification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharon, I.; Shaw, B. D.

    1996-07-01

    Simplified analyses using a linear stability approach are developed to predict influences of thermal and solutal Marangoni effects on hydrodynamic stability of bi-component droplets evaporating in a spherically-symmetrical manner in hot environments. It is predicted that with zeotropic mixtures and for ∂σ/∂T<0 and ∂σ/∂y<0 (where σ is surface tension, T temperature, and y the surface mass fraction of the more volatile droplet component), the thermal and solutal Marangoni effects oppose each other in that the thermal effect is stabilizing and the concentration effect is destabilizing. The model is applied to alkane/alkane and alcohol/water mixture droplets. The alkane mixture droplets were predicted to be hydrodynamically stable. For alcohol/water mixtures, the results suggest that critical radii for marginal stability exist; when a droplet is initially pure methanol which subsequently absorbs water from the ambient, the critical radius is predicted to depend upon the relative humidity of the environment.

  20. SIFT - A Component-Based Integration Architecture for Enterprise Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman, David A.; Almquist, Justin P.; Gorton, Ian; Wynne, Adam S.; Chatterton, Jack

    2007-02-01

    Architectures and technologies for enterprise application integration are relatively mature, resulting in a range of standards-based and proprietary middleware technologies. In the domain of complex analytical applications, integration architectures are not so well understood. Analytical applications such as those used in scientific discovery, emergency response, financial and intelligence analysis exert unique demands on their underlying architecture. These demands make existing integration middleware inappropriate for use in enterprise analytics environments. In this paper we describe SIFT (Scalable Information Fusion and Triage), a platform designed for integrating the various components that comprise enterprise analytics applications. SIFT exploits a common pattern for composing analytical components, and extends an existing messaging platform with dynamic configuration mechanisms and scaling capabilities. We demonstrate the use of SIFT to create a decision support platform for quality control based on large volumes of incoming delivery data. The strengths of the SIFT solution are discussed, and we conclude by describing where further work is required to create a complete solution applicable to a wide range of analytical application domains.