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Sample records for composite leading edge

  1. UHTC Composites for Leading Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Stanley R.; Opila, Elizabeth J.

    2004-01-01

    Ultrahigh temperature ceramics (UHTC) have performed unreliably due to material flaws and attachment design. These deficiencies are brought tot he fore by the low fracture tougness and thermal shock resistance of UHTC. In addition, poor oxidation resistance is a limitation on UHTC applicability to reusable launch vehicles. We have been addressing these deficiencies for the past two years via a small task at GRC that is in the Airframe part of the Next Generation Launch Technology Program. Our focus is on UHTC composite (UHTCC) constructions and functional grading to address the mechanical issues and on composition modification to address the oxidation issue. Processing, mechanical property, and oxidation resutls will be reported.

  2. A Thermostructural Analysis of a Diboride Composite Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, Tom; Buesking, Kent; Kolodziej, Paul; Bull, Jeff

    1996-01-01

    In an effort to support the design of zirconium diboride composite leading edges for hypersonic vehicles, a finite element model (FEM) of a prototype leading edge was created and finite element analysis (FEA) was employed to assess its thermal and structural response to aerothermal boundary conditions. Unidirectional material properties for the structural components of the leading edge, a continuous fiber reinforced diboride composite, were computed with COSTAR. These properties agree well with those experimentally measured. To verify the analytical approach taken with COSMOS/M, an independent FEA of one of the leading edge assembly components was also done with COSTAR. Good agreement was obtained between the two codes. Both showed that a unidirectional lay-up had the best margin of safety for a simple loading case. Both located the maximum stress in the same region and ply. The magnitudes agreed within 4 percent. Trajectory based aerothermal heating was then applied to the leading edge assembly FEM created with COSMOS/M to determine steady state temperature response, displacement, stresses, and contact forces due to thermal expansion and thermal strains. Results show that the leading edge stagnation line temperature reached 4700 F. The maximum computed failure index for the laminated composite components peaks at 4.2, and is located at the bolt flange in layer 2 of the side bracket. The temperature gradient in the tip causes a compressive stress of 279 ksi along its width and substantial tensile stresses within its depth.

  3. Advanced leading edge thermal-structure concept. Direct bond reusable surface insulation to a composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, S. R.; Figueroa, H.; Coe, C. F.; Kuo, C. P.

    1984-01-01

    An advanced leading-edge concept was analyzed using the space shuttle leading edge system as a reference model. The comparison indicates that a direct-bond system utilizing a high temperature (2700 F) fibrous refractory composite insulation tile bonded to a high temperature (PI/graphite) composite structure can result in a weight savings of up to 800 lb. The concern that tile damage or loss during ascent would result in adverse entry aerodynamics if a leading edge tile system were used is addressed. It was found from experiment that missing tiles (as many as 22) on the leading edge would not significantly affect the basic force-and-moment aerodynamic coefficients. Additionally, this concept affords a degree of redundancy to a thermal protection system in that the base structure (being a composite material) ablates and neither melts nor burns through when subjected to entry heating in the event tiles are actually lost or damaged during ascent.

  4. Arc Jet Results on Candidate High Temperature Coatings for NASA's NGLT Refractory Composite Leading Edge Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlhorst, C. W.; Vaughn, W. L.; Lewis, R. K.; Milhoan, J. D.

    2004-01-01

    In 2000, arc jet testing was conducted on thirteen material systems for possible use on the nose leading edge of the Hyper-X program s X-43A Mach 10 vehicle. Six material systems survived 3, 130- second cycles. To support NASA s Next Generation Launch Technology Programs (NGLT) need for passive refractory composite leading edges with multiple reuse capability at temperatures up to 3600 F, these six materials were subjected to an expanded arc jet test program. This expanded arc jet test program included three phases. The purpose of the first phase was to generate emissivity data as a function of temperature. The purpose of the second phase was to determine if the material systems had any thermal cycling durability, and the third phase was to determine whether the materials could survive an arc jet test of one hour duration. Some of the coating systems were found to have very low emissivities, suggesting that they would not be good candidates for leading edges coating. Other coating systems survived both the second and third phases of the test program and showed potential for use as an oxidation protection coating for leading edges. This presentation summarizes the test program results.

  5. Space environmental effects on LDEF composites: A leading edge coated graphite epoxy panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Pete E.; Dursch, Harry W.; Hill, Sylvester G.

    1993-01-01

    The electronics module cover for the leading edge (Row D 9) experiment M0003-8 was fabricated from T300 graphite/934 epoxy unidirectional prepreg tape in a (O(sub 2), +/- 45, O(sub 2), +/- 45, 90, 0)(sub s) layup. This 11.75 in x 16.75 in panel was covered with thermal control coatings in three of the four quadrants with the fourth quadrant uncoated. The composite panel experienced different thermal cycling extremes in each quadrant due to the different optical properties of the coatings and bare composite. The panel also experienced ultraviolet (UV) and atomic oxygen (AO) attack as well as micrometeoroid and space debris impacts. An AO reactivity of 0.99 x 10(exp -24) cm(sup 3)/atom was calculated for the bare composite based on thickness loss. The white urethane thermal control coatings (A276 and BMS 1060) prevented AO attack of the composite substrate. However, the black urethane thermal control coating (Z306) was severely eroded by AO, allowing some AO attack of the composite substrate. An interesting banding pattern on the AO eroded bare composite surface was investigated and found to match the dimensions of the graphite fiber tow widths as prepregged. Also, erosion depths were greater in the darker bands. Five micrometeoroid/space debris impacts were cross sectioned to investigate possible structural damage as well as impact/AO interactions. Local crushing and delaminations were found to some extent in all of the impacts. No signs of coating undercutting were observed despite the extensive AO erosion patterns seen in the exposed composite material at the impact sites. An extensive microcrack study was performed on the panel along with modeling of the thermal environment to estimate temperature extremes and thermal shock. The white coated composite substrate displayed almost no microcracking while the black coated and bare composite showed extensive microcracking. Significant AO erosion was seen in many of the cracks in the bare composite.

  6. Sharpening the Leading Edge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassi, Laurie J.; Van Buren, Mark E.

    1999-01-01

    This condensed version of the American Society for Training and Development's annual state of the industry report highlights the practices that distinguish leading-edge firms from average organizations in how and to what degree they train. (JOW)

  7. Materials, Manufacturing, and Test Development of a Composite Fan Blade Leading Edge Subcomponent for Improved Impact Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Handschuh, Katherine; Sinnott, Matthew J.; Kohlman, Lee W.; Roberts, Gary D.; Martin, Richard E.; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Pereira, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Application of polymer matrix composite materials for jet engine fan blades is becoming attractive as an alternative to metallic blades; particularly for large engines where significant weight savings are recognized on moving to a composite structure. However, the weight benefit of the composite is offset by a reduction of aerodynamic efficiency resulting from a necessary increase in blade thickness; relative to the titanium blades. Blade dimensions are largely driven by resistance to damage on bird strike. Further development of the composite material is necessary to allow composite blade designs to approximate the dimensions of a metallic fan blade. The reduction in thickness over the state of the art composite blades is expected to translate into structural weight reduction, improved aerodynamic efficiency, and therefore reduced fuel consumption. This paper presents test article design, subcomponent blade leading edge fabrication, test method development, and initial results from ballistic impact of a gelatin projectile on the leading edge of composite fan blades. The simplified test article geometry was developed to realistically simulate a blade leading edge while decreasing fabrication complexity. Impact data is presented on baseline composite blades and toughened blades; where a considerable improvement to impact resistance was recorded.

  8. Materials, Manufacturing and Test Development of a Composite Fan Blade Leading Edge Subcomponent for Improved Impact Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Katherine M.; Miller, Sandi G.; Sinnott, Matthew J.; Kohlman, Lee W.; Roberts, Gary D.; Pereira, J. Michael; Ruggeri, Charles R.

    2014-01-01

    Application of polymer matrix composite materials for jet engine fan blades is becoming attractive as an alternative to metallic blades; particularly for large engines where significant weight savings are recognized on moving to a composite structure. However, the weight benefit of the composite of is offset by a reduction of aerodynamic efficiency resulting from a necessary increase in blade thickness; relative to the titanium blades. Blade dimensions are largely driven by resistance to damage on bird strike. Further development of the composite material is necessary to allow composite blade designs to approximate the dimensions of a metallic fan blade. The reduction in thickness over the state of the art composite blades is expected to translate into structural weight reduction, improved aerodynamic efficiency, and therefore reduced fuel consumption. This paper presents test article design, subcomponent blade leading edge fabrication, test method development, and initial results from ballistic impact of a gelatin projectile on the leading edge of composite fan blades. The simplified test article geometry was developed to realistically simulate a blade leading edge while decreasing fabrication complexity. Impact data is presented on baseline composite blades and toughened blades; where a considerable improvement to impact resistance was recorded.

  9. Advanced X-Ray Inspection of Reinforced Carbon Composite Materials on the Orbiter Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Jose M.; Berry, Robert F.; Osborn, Robin; Bueno, Clifford; Osterlitz, Mark; Mills, Richard; Morris, Philip; Phalen, Robert; McNab, Jim; Thibodeaux, Tahanie; Thompson, Kyle

    2004-01-01

    The post return-to-flight (RTF) inspection methodology for the Orbiter Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS) is currently being defined. Numerous NDT modalities and techniques are being explored to perform the flight-to-flight inspections of the reinforced carbon/carbon (RCC) composite material for impact damage, general loss of mass in the bulk layers, or other anomalous conditions that would pose risk to safe return upon re-entry. It is possible to have an impact upon ascent that is not visually observable on the surface, yet causes internal damage. Radiographic testing may be a useful NDT technique for such occurrences. The authors have performed radiographic tests on full-sized mock samples of LESS hardware with embedded image quality phantoms. Digitized radiographic film, computed radiography and flat panel digital real-time radiography was acquired using a GE Eresco 200 x-ray tube, and Se-75 and Yb-169 radioisotopes.

  10. Impact Behavior of Composite Fan Blade Leading Edge Subcomponent with Thermoplastic Polyurethane Interleave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Roberts, Gary D.; Kohlman, Lee W.; Heimann, Paula J.; Pereira, J. Michael; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Martin, Richard E.; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2015-01-01

    Impact damage tolerance and damage resistance is a critical metric for application of polymer matrix composites where failure caused by impact damage could compromise structural performance and safety. As a result, several materials and/or design approaches to improve impact damage tolerance have been investigated over the past several decades. Many composite toughening methodologies impart a trade-off between increased fracture toughness and compromised in-plane strength and modulus. In large part, mechanical tests to evaluate composite damage tolerance include static methods such as Mode I, Mode II, and mixed mode failures. However, ballistic impact damage resistance does not always correlate with static properties. The intent of this paper is to evaluate the influence of a thermoplastic polyurethane veil interleave on the static and dynamic performance of composite test articles. Static coupon tests included tension, compression, double cantilever beam, and end notch flexure. Measurement of the resistance to ballistic impact damage were made to evaluate the composites response to high speed impact. The interlayer material showed a decrease of in-plane performance with only a moderate improvement to Mode I and Mode II fracture toughness. However, significant benefit to impact damage tolerance was observed through ballistic tests.

  11. Icing tunnel tests of a composite porous leading edge for use with a liquid anti-ice system. [Lewis icing research tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlman, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    The efficacy of liquid ice protection systems which distribute a glycol-water solution onto leading edge surfaces through a porous skin was demonstrated in tests conducted in the NASA Lewis icing research tunnel using a composite porous leading edge panels. The data obtained were compared with the performance of previously tested stainless steel leading edge with the same geometry. Results show: (1) anti-ice protection of a composite leading edge is possible for all the simulated conditions tested; (2) the glycol flow rates required to achieve anti-ice protection were generally much higher than those required for a stainless steel panel; (3) the low reservoir pressures of the glycol during test runs indicates that more uniform distribution of glycol, and therefore lower glycol flow rates, can probably be achieved by decreasing the porosity of the panel; and (4) significant weight savings can be achieved in fluid ice protection systems with composite porous leading edges. The resistance of composite panels to abrasion and erosion must yet be determined before they can be incorporated in production systems.

  12. Leading Edge Cellular Decision Making

    E-print Network

    Collins, James J.

    Leading Edge Review Cellular Decision Making and Biological Noise: From Microbes to Mammals Ga´ bor.cell.2011.01.030 Cellular decision making is the process whereby cells assume different, functionally stressful environment. Here, we review several examples of cellular decision making from viruses, bacteria

  13. Leading Edge Reversing DNA Methylation

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Yi

    ). In mammals, new DNA methylation pattern is established by de novo DNA methyltransferases, DNMT3A and DNMT3B is faithfully maintained in daughter cells through the action of maintenance DNA methyltransferase DNMT1 and itsLeading Edge Review Reversing DNA Methylation: Mechanisms, Genomics, and Biological Functions Hao

  14. Leading Edge Slicing across Kingdoms

    E-print Network

    Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    intense intrinsic and extrinsic challenges to their survival. Animal and plant tissues wear out as partLeading Edge Review Slicing across Kingdoms: Regeneration in Plants and Animals Kenneth D. Birnbaum, but the question remains in both plants and animals whether regeneration invokes embryogenesis, generic patterning

  15. Leading Edge Cellular Strategies for

    E-print Network

    Dekker, Nynke

    Leading Edge Review Cellular Strategies for Regulating DNA Supercoiling: A Single.h.dekker@tudelft.nl DOI 10.1016/j.cell.2010.08.001 Entangling and twisting of cellular DNA (i.e., supercoiling performed with magnetic and optical tweezers. Ensemble tech- niques average the behavior of a large number

  16. Aerothermal/FEM Analysis of Hypersonic Sharp Leading Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolodziej, Paul; Bull, Jeffrey D.; Kowalski, Thomas R.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Advanced hypersonic vehicles, like wave riders, will have sharp leading edges to minimize drag. These designs require accurate finite element modeling (FEM) of the thermal-structural behavior of a diboride ceramic matrix composite sharp leading edge. By coupling the FEM solver to an engineering model of the aerothermodynamic heating environment the impact of non catalytic surfaces, rarefied flow effects, and multidimensional conduction on the performance envelopes of sharp leading edges can be examined.

  17. Moveable Leading Edge Device for a Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitt, Dale M. (Inventor); Eckstein, Nicholas Stephen (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method and apparatus for managing a flight control surface system. A leading edge section on a wing of an aircraft is extended into a deployed position. A deformable section connects the leading edge section to a trailing section. The deformable section changes from a deformed shape to an original shape when the leading edge section is moved into the deployed position. The leading edge section on the wing is moved from the deployed position to an undeployed position. The deformable section changes to the deformed shape inside of the wing.

  18. Imaging The Leading Edge Of A Weld

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed optical system integrated into plasma arc welding torch provides image of leading edge of weld pool and welding-arc-initiation point. Welding torch aligned better with joint. System includes coherent bundle of optical fibers and transparent cup.

  19. Leading-edge vortex lifts swifts.

    PubMed

    Videler, J J; Stamhuis, E J; Povel, G D E

    2004-12-10

    The current understanding of how birds fly must be revised, because birds use their hand-wings in an unconventional way to generate lift and drag. Physical models of a common swift wing in gliding posture with a 60 degrees sweep of the sharp hand-wing leading edge were tested in a water tunnel. Interactions with the flow were measured quantitatively with digital particle image velocimetry at Reynolds numbers realistic for the gliding flight of a swift between 3750 and 37,500. The results show that gliding swifts can generate stable leading-edge vortices at small (5 degrees to 10 degrees) angles of attack. We suggest that the flow around the arm-wings of most birds can remain conventionally attached, whereas the swept-back hand-wings generate lift with leading-edge vortices. PMID:15591209

  20. Wing Leading Edge Concepts for Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shmilovich, Arvin; Yadlin, Yoram; Pitera, David M.

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on the development of wing leading edge concepts for noise reduction during high-lift operations, without compromising landing stall speeds, stall characteristics or cruise performance. High-lift geometries, which can be obtained by conventional mechanical systems or morphing structures have been considered. A systematic aerodynamic analysis procedure was used to arrive at several promising configurations. The aerodynamic design of new wing leading edge shapes is obtained from a robust Computational Fluid Dynamics procedure. Acoustic benefits are qualitatively established through the evaluation of the computed flow fields.

  1. Leading Edge Phosphotyrosine Signaling: Evolving a New

    E-print Network

    Lim, Wendell

    Leading Edge Essay Phosphotyrosine Signaling: Evolving a New Cellular Communication System Wendell many cellular functions. Yet the three-part toolkit that regulates phosphotyrosine signaling--tyrosine kinases, phosphotyrosine phosphatases, and Src Homology 2 (SH2) domains--is a relatively new innovation

  2. The Leading Edge of Stem Cell Therapeutics

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    malignant cancer cells. Stem cells are the most primordial cells of the organism (the embryonic stem cellThe Leading Edge of Stem Cell Therapeutics Ilyas Singec,1 Rahul Jandial,1,2 Andrew Crain,1,3 Guido Nikkhah,4 and Evan Y. Snyder1 1 Stem Cell & Regeneration Program, Burnham Institute for Medical Research

  3. Leading Edge Timescales of Genetic and Epigenetic

    E-print Network

    Leading Edge Review Timescales of Genetic and Epigenetic Inheritance Oliver J. Rando1, * and Kevin and epigenetic switches increase the variabil- ity of specific phenotypes; error-prone DNA replicases produce contained a widely variable number of phage-resistant mutants (Luria and Delbru¨ ck, 1943). Hence

  4. Wing Leading Edge Joint Laminar Flow Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Aaron; Westphal, Russell V.; Zuniga, Fanny A.; Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Koga, Dennis J.

    1996-01-01

    An F-104G aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center has been equipped with a specially designed and instrumented test fixture to simulate surface imperfections of the type likely to be present near the leading edge on the wings of some laminar flow aircraft. The simulated imperfections consisted of five combinations of spanwise steps and gaps of various sizes. The unswept fixture yielded a pressure distribution similar to that of some laminar flow airfoils. The experiment was conducted at cruise conditions typical for business-jets and light transports: Mach numbers were in the range 0.5-0.8, and unit Reynolds numbers were 1.5-2.5 million per foot. Skin friction measurements indicated that laminar flow was often maintained for some distance downstream of the surface imperfections. Further work is needed to more precisely define transition location and to extend the experiments to swept-wing conditions and a broader range of imperfection geometries.

  5. Experimental investigation of leading-edge thrust at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, R. M.; Miller, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    Wings, designed for leading edge thrust at supersonic speeds, were investigated in the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at Mach numbers of 1.60, 1.80, 2.00, 2.16, and 2.36. Experimental data were obtained on a uncambered wing which had three interchangeable leading edges that varied from sharp to blunt. The leading edge thrust concept was evaluated. Results from the investigation showed that leading edge flow separation characteristics of all wings tested agree well with theoretical predictions. The experimental data showed that significant changes in wing leading edge bluntness did not affect the zero lift drag of the uncambered wings.

  6. Textbook Multigrid Efficiency for Leading Edge Stagnation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Mineck, Raymond E.

    2004-01-01

    A multigrid solver is defined as having textbook multigrid efficiency (TME) if the solutions to the governing system of equations are attained in a computational work which is a small (less than 10) multiple of the operation count in evaluating the discrete residuals. TME in solving the incompressible inviscid fluid equations is demonstrated for leading-edge stagnation flows. The contributions of this paper include (1) a special formulation of the boundary conditions near stagnation allowing convergence of the Newton iterations on coarse grids, (2) the boundary relaxation technique to facilitate relaxation and residual restriction near the boundaries, (3) a modified relaxation scheme to prevent initial error amplification, and (4) new general analysis techniques for multigrid solvers. Convergence of algebraic errors below the level of discretization errors is attained by a full multigrid (FMG) solver with one full approximation scheme (FAS) cycle per grid. Asymptotic convergence rates of the FAS cycles for the full system of flow equations are very fast, approaching those for scalar elliptic equations.

  7. Textbook Multigrid Efficiency for Leading Edge Stagnation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Mineck, Raymond E.

    2004-01-01

    A multigrid solver is defined as having textbook multigrid efficiency (TME) if the solutions to the governing system of equations are attained in a computational work which is a small (less than 10) multiple of the operation count in evaluating the discrete residuals. TME in solving the incompressible inviscid fluid equations is demonstrated for leading- edge stagnation flows. The contributions of this paper include (1) a special formulation of the boundary conditions near stagnation allowing convergence of the Newton iterations on coarse grids, (2) the boundary relaxation technique to facilitate relaxation and residual restriction near the boundaries, (3) a modified relaxation scheme to prevent initial error amplification, and (4) new general analysis techniques for multigrid solvers. Convergence of algebraic errors below the level of discretization errors is attained by a full multigrid (FMG) solver with one full approximation scheme (F.4S) cycle per grid. Asymptotic convergence rates of the F.4S cycles for the full system of flow equations are very fast, approaching those for scalar elliptic equations.

  8. Development of X-43A Mach 10 Leading Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlhorst, Craig W.; Glass, David E.; Bruce, Walter E., III; Lindell, Michael C.; Vaughn, Wallace L.; Dirling, R. B., Jr.; Hogenson, P. A.; Nichols, J. M.; Risner, N. W.; Thompson, D. R.

    2005-01-01

    The nose leading edge of the Hyper-X Mach 10 vehicle was orginally anticipated to reach temperatures near 4000 F at the leading-edge stagnation line. A SiC coated carbon/carbon (C/C) leading-edge material will not survive that extreme temperature for even a short duration single flight. To identify a suitable leading edge for the Mach 10 vehicle, arc-jet testing was performed on thirteen leading-edge segments fabricated from different material systems to evaluate their performance in a simulated flight environment. Hf, Zr, Si, and Ir based materials, in most cases as a coating on C/C, were included in the evaluation. Afterwards, MER, Tucson, AZ was selected as the supplier of the flight vehicle leading edges. The nose and the vertical and horizontal tail leading edges were fabricated out of a 3:1 biased high thermal conductivity C/C. The leading edges were coated with a three layer coating comprised of a SiC conversion of the top surface of the C/C, followed by a chemical vapor deposited layer of SiC, followed by a thin chemical vapor deposited layer of HfC. This paper will describe the fabrication of the Mach 10 C/C leading edges and the testing performed to validate performance.

  9. Laminar Flow Control Leading Edge Systems in Simulated Airline Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, R. D.; Maddalon, D. V.; Fisher, D. F.

    1988-01-01

    Achieving laminar flow on the wings of a commercial transport involves difficult problems associated with the wing leading edge. The NASA Leading Edge Flight Test Program has made major progress toward the solution of these problems. The effectiveness and practicality of candidate laminar flow leading edge systems were proven under representative airline service conditions. This was accomplished in a series of simulated airline service flights by modifying a JetStar aircraft with laminar flow leading edge systems and operating it out of three commercial airports in the United States. The aircraft was operated as an airliner would under actual air traffic conditions, in bad weather, and in insect infested environments.

  10. Leading-edge singularities in thin-airfoil theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    If the thin airfoil theory is applied to an airfoil having a rounded leading edge, a certain error will arise in the determination of the pressure distribution around the nose. It is shown that the evaluation of the drag of such a blunt nosed airfoil by the thin airfoil theory requires the addition of a leading edge force, analogous to the leading edge thrust of the lifting airfoil. The method of calculation is illustrated by application to: (1) The Joukowski airfoil in subsonic flow; and (2) the thin elliptic cone in supersonic flow. A general formula for the edge force is provided which is applicable to a variety of wing forms.

  11. Numerical study of delta wing leading edge blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, David; Tavella, Domingo; Roberts, Leonard

    1988-01-01

    Spanwise and tangential leading edge blowing as a means of controlling the position and strength of the leading edge vortices are studied by numerical solution of the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. The leading edge jet is simulated by defining a permeable boundary, corresponding to the jet slot, where suitable boundary conditions are implemented. Numerical results are shown to compare favorably with experimental measurements. It is found that the use of spanwise leading edge blowing at moderate angle of attack magnifies the size and strength of the leading edge vortices, and moves the vortex cores outboard and upward. The increase in lift primarily comes from the greater nonlinear vortex lift. However, spanwise blowing causes earlier vortex breakdown, thus decreasing the stall angle. The effects of tangential blowing at low to moderate angles of attack tend to reduce the pressure peaks associated with leading edge vortices and to increase the suction peak around the leading edge, so that the integrated value of the surface pressure remains about the same. Tangential leading edge blowing in post-stall conditions is shown to re-establish vortical flow and delay vortex bursting, thus increasing C sub L sub max and stall angle.

  12. Heat-Pipe-Cooled Leading Edges for Hypersonic Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.

    2006-01-01

    Heat pipes can be used to effectively cool wing leading edges of hypersonic vehicles. . Heat-pipe leading edge development. Design validation heat pipe testing confirmed design. Three heat pipes embedded and tested in C/C. Single J-tube heat pipe fabricated and testing initiated. HPCLE work is currently underway at several locations.

  13. Topology Optimization of Adaptive Compliant Aircraft Wing Leading Edge

    E-print Network

    Pellegrino, Sergio

    Topology Optimization of Adaptive Compliant Aircraft Wing Leading Edge M.J. Santer and S compliant aircraft wing rib from conception via optimization to fabrication of a demonstration model the adaptive leading edge of an aircraft wing rib, suggested by Kota and co-workers.2 In this concept, a change

  14. Vortex leading edge flap assembly for supersonic airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, Peter K. C. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A leading edge flap (16) for supersonic transport airplanes is disclosed. In its stowed position, the leading edge flap forms the lower surface of the wing leading edge up to the horizontal center of the leading edge radius. For low speed operation, the vortex leading edge flap moves forward and rotates down. The upward curve of the flap leading edge triggers flow separation on the flap and rotational flow on the upper surface of the flap (vortex). The rounded shape of the upper fixed leading edge provides the conditions for a controlled reattachment of the flow on the upper wing surface and therefore a stable vortex. The vortex generates lift and a nose-up pitching moment. This improves maximum lift at low speed, reduces attitude for a given lift coefficient and improves lift to drag ratio. The mechanism (27) to move the vortex flap consists of two spanwise supports (24) with two diverging straight tracks (64 and 68) each and a screw drive mechanism (62) in the center of the flap panel (29). The flap motion is essentially normal to the airloads and therefore requires only low actuation forces.

  15. Robust UHTC for Sharp Leading Edge Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Stanley R.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Opila, Elizabeth J.

    2003-01-01

    Ultrahigh temperature ceramics have performed unreliably due to material flaws and attachment design. These deficiencies are brought to the fore by the low fracture toughness and thermal shock resistance of UHTCs. If these deficiencies are overcome, we are still faced with poor oxidation resistance as a limitation on UHTC applicability to reusable launch vehicles. We have been addressing the deficiencies of UHTCs for the past year via a small task at GRC that is part of the 3rd Gen TPS effort. Our focus is on composite constructions and functional grading to address the mechanical issues and on composition modification to address the oxidation issue. The approaches and progress will be reported.

  16. Structural Health Monitoring Analysis for the Orbiter Wing Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yap, Keng C.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews Structural Health Monitoring Analysis for the Orbiter Wing Leading Edge. The Wing Leading Edge Impact Detection System (WLE IDS) and the Impact Analysis Process are also described to monitor WLE debris threats. The contents include: 1) Risk Management via SHM; 2) Hardware Overview; 3) Instrumentation; 4) Sensor Configuration; 5) Debris Hazard Monitoring; 6) Ascent Response Summary; 7) Response Signal; 8) Distribution of Flight Indications; 9) Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA); 10) Model Correlation; 11) Impact Tests; 12) Wing Leading Edge Modeling; 13) Ascent Debris PRA Results; and 14) MM/OD PRA Results.

  17. Timing discriminator using leading-edge extrapolation

    DOEpatents

    Gottschalk, Bernard (Palo Alto, CA)

    1983-01-01

    A discriminator circuit to recover timing information from slow-rising pulses by means of an output trailing edge, a fixed time after the starting corner of the input pulse, which is nearly independent of risetime and threshold setting. This apparatus comprises means for comparing pulses with a threshold voltage; a capacitor to be charged at a certain rate when the input signal is one-third threshold voltage, and at a lower rate when the input signal is two-thirds threshold voltage; current-generating means for charging the capacitor; means for comparing voltage capacitor with a bias voltage; a flip-flop to be set when the input pulse reaches threshold voltage and reset when capacitor voltage reaches the bias voltage; and a clamping means for discharging the capacitor when the input signal returns below one-third threshold voltage.

  18. Timing discriminator using leading-edge extrapolation

    DOEpatents

    Gottschalk, B.

    1981-07-30

    A discriminator circuit to recover timing information from slow-rising pulses by means of an output trailing edge, a fixed time after the starting corner of the input pulse, which is nearly independent of risetime and threshold setting is described. This apparatus comprises means for comparing pulses with a threshold voltage; a capacitor to be charged at a certain rate when the input signal is one-third threshold voltage, and at a lower rate when the input signal is two-thirds threshold voltage; current-generating means for charging the capacitor; means for comparing voltage capacitor with a bias voltage; a flip-flop to be set when the input pulse reaches threshold voltage and reset when capacitor voltage reaches the bias voltage; and a clamping means for discharging the capacitor when the input signal returns below one-third threshold voltage.

  19. Leading Edge Spinning the Web of Cell Fate

    E-print Network

    Corces, Victor G.

    Leading Edge Minireview Spinning the Web of Cell Fate Kevin Van Bortle1 and Victor G. Corces1,* 1 involved in spinning the web of cell fate. Chromatin at the Nuclear Lamina The nuclear lamina is a thin

  20. Shock Interaction Control for Scramjet Cowl Leading Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albertson, Cindy W.; Venkat, Venki, S.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to qualitatively determine the effectiveness of stagnation-region gas injection in protecting a scramjet cowl leading edge from the intense heating produced by Type III and Type IV shock interactions. The model consisted of a two-dimensional leading edge, representative of that of a scramjet cowl. Tests were conducted at a nominal freestream Mach number of 6. Gaseous nitrogen was supersonically injected through the leading-edge nozzles at various mass flux ratios and with the model pitched at angles of 0deg and -20deg relative to the freestream flow. Qualitative data, in the form of focusing and conventional schlieren images, were obtained of the shock interaction patterns. Results indicate that large shock displacements can be achieved and both the Type III and IV interactions can be altered such that the interaction does not impinge on the leading edge surface.

  1. Leading-edge receptivity for blunt-nose bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammerton, P. W.; Kerschen, E. J.

    1992-01-01

    Boundary-layer receptivity in the leading edge region for bodies with blunt leading edges is investigated in this research program. Receptivity theory provides the link between the unsteady disturbance environment in the freestream and the initial amplitudes of instability waves in the boundary layer. This is a critical problem which must be addressed in order to develop more accurate prediction methods for boundary-layer transition.

  2. Dynamic Stall Characteristics of Drooped Leading Edge Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankar, Lakshmi N.; Sahin, Mehmet; Gopal, Naveen

    2000-01-01

    Helicopters in high-speed forward flight usually experience large regions of dynamic stall over the retreating side of the rotor disk. The rapid variations in the lift and pitching moments associated with the stall process can result in vibratory loads, and can cause fatigue and failure of pitch links. In some instances, the large time lag between the aerodynamic forces and the blade motion can trigger stall flutter. A number of techniques for the alleviation of dynamic stall have been proposed and studied by researchers. Passive and active control techniques have both been explored. Passive techniques include the use of high solidity rotors that reduce the lift coefficients of individual blades, leading edge slots and leading edge slats. Active control techniques include steady and unsteady blowing, and dynamically deformable leading edge (DDLE) airfoils. Considerable amount of experimental and numerical data has been collected on the effectiveness of these concepts. One concept that has not received as much attention is the drooped-leading edge airfoil idea. It has been observed in wind tunnel studies and flight tests that drooped leading edge airfoils can have a milder dynamic stall, with a significantly milder load hysteresis. Drooped leading edge airfoils may not, however, be suitable at other conditions, e.g. in hover, or in transonic flow. Work needs to be done on the analysis and design of drooped leading edge airfoils for efficient operation in a variety of flight regimes (hover, dynamic stall, and transonic flow). One concept that is worthy of investigation is the dynamically drooping airfoil, where the leading edge shape is changed roughly once-per-rev to mitigate the dynamic stall.

  3. Task 4 supporting technology. Part 1: Detailed test plan for leading edge tile development. Leading edge material development and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogenson, P. A.; Staszak, Paul; Hinkle, Karrie

    1995-01-01

    This task develops two alternative candidate tile materials for leading edge applications: coated alumina enhanced thermal barrier (AETB) tile and silicone impregnated reusable ceramic ablator (SIRCA) tile. Upon reentry of the X-33/RLV space vehicle, the leading edges experience the highest heating rates and temperatures. The wing leading edge and nose cap experience peak temperatures in the range 2000 to 2700 F. Replacing reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) with tile-based thermal protection system (TPS) materials is the primary objective. Weight, complexity, coating impact damage, and repairability are among the problems that this tile technology development addresses. The following subtasks will be performed in this development effort: tile coating development; SIRCA tile development; robustness testing of tiles; tile repair development; tile operations/processing; tile leading edge configuration; and life cycle testing.

  4. AIRFOIL NOSE SHAPES DELAYING LEADING-EDGE SEPARATION

    E-print Network

    Stokes, Yvonne

    ) Subsonic edges in thin-wing and slender-body theory. NACA TM 3843. Werle, M.J. and Davis, R.T. (1972) Incom on the leading edge of a slender airfoil. Izv. Akad. Nauk SSSR Mech. Zhidk. Gaza, 1, 42-51. Tuck, E.O. (1991)A for a harmonic flow past a slender airfoil is constructed by matching the thin-airfoil solution and the so

  5. Section Characteristics of the NACA 0006 Airfoil with Leading-edge and Trailing-edge Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gambucci, Bruno J

    1956-01-01

    Lift and pitching-moment characteristics of an NACA 0006 airfoil are presented for various deflections of a 0.15-chord leading-edge flap and a 0.30-chord plain trailing-edge flap. Pressure-distribution data are presented in tabular form. The data were obtained at a Mach number of 0.15 and a Reynolds number of 4,500,000.

  6. Laminar flow control leading edge glove flight test article development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, W. E.; Mcnay, D. E.; Thelander, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    A laminar flow control (LFC) flight test article was designed and fabricated to fit into the right leading edge of a JetStar aircraft. The article was designed to attach to the front spar and fill in approx. 70 inches of the leading edge that are normally occupied by the large slipper fuel tank. The outer contour of the test article was constrained to align with an external fairing aft of the front spar which provided a surface pressure distribution over the test region representative of an LFC airfoil. LFC is achieved by applying suction through a finely perforated surface, which removes a small fraction of the boundary layer. The LFC test article has a retractable high lift shield to protect the laminar surface from contamination by airborne debris during takeoff and low altitude operation. The shield is designed to intercept insects and other particles that could otherwise impact the leading edge. Because the shield will intercept freezing rain and ice, a oozing glycol ice protection system is installed on the shield leading edge. In addition to the shield, a liquid freezing point depressant can be sprayed on the back of the shield.

  7. Leading Edge The Human Condition--A Molecular Approach

    E-print Network

    Pääbo, Svante

    Consortium, 2005). The explicit goal was to illuminate human-specific biology (e.g., Olson and Varki, 2003Leading Edge Review The Human Condition--A Molecular Approach Svante Pa¨ a¨ bo1,* 1Department humans originated and how they differ from, and interacted with, other now-extinct forms of human has so

  8. MODULATIONS IN THE LEADING EDGES OF MIDLATITUDE STORM TRACKS

    E-print Network

    Goodman, Roy

    MODULATIONS IN THE LEADING EDGES OF MIDLATITUDE STORM TRACKS R. H. GOODMAN, A. J. MAJDA, AND D. W. This work is based on research toward R.H. Goodman's Ph.D. at the Courant Institute. http of Mathematical Sciences, New Jersey Institute of Technology, University Heights, Newark, NJ 07102 (goodman

  9. Contact angle at the leading edge controls cell protrusion rate.

    PubMed

    Gabella, Chiara; Bertseva, Elena; Bottier, Céline; Piacentini, Niccolň; Bornert, Alicia; Jeney, Sylvia; Forró, László; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Verkhovsky, Alexander B

    2014-05-19

    Plasma membrane tension and the pressure generated by actin polymerization are two antagonistic forces believed to define the protrusion rate at the leading edge of migrating cells [1-5]. Quantitatively, resistance to actin protrusion is a product of membrane tension and mean local curvature (Laplace's law); thus, it depends on the local geometry of the membrane interface. However, the role of the geometry of the leading edge in protrusion control has not been yet investigated. Here, we manipulate both the cell shape and substrate topography in the model system of persistently migrating fish epidermal keratocytes. We find that the protrusion rate does not correlate with membrane tension, but, instead, strongly correlates with cell roundness, and that the leading edge of the cell exhibits pinning on substrate ridges-a phenomenon characteristic of spreading of liquid drops. These results indicate that the leading edge could be considered a triple interface between the substrate, membrane, and extracellular medium and that the contact angle between the membrane and the substrate determines the load on actin polymerization and, therefore, the protrusion rate. Our findings thus illuminate a novel relationship between the 3D shape of the cell and its dynamics, which may have implications for cell migration in 3D environments. PMID:24794299

  10. Leading Edge BRAIN Initiative and Human Brain Project

    E-print Network

    Raymond, Jennifer L.

    Leading Edge Voices BRAIN Initiative and Human Brain Project: Hopes and Reservations's Human Brain Project, there is an opportunity to accelerate fundamental brain sciences. The ambitions CNRS, Unit of Neuroscience, Information and Complexity As a member of the Human Brain Project (HBP), I

  11. Digitally Literate Teachers in Leading Edge Schools in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almas, Aslaug Grov; Krumsvik, Rune

    2007-01-01

    This paper highlights digitally literate, in-service teachers in leading edge schools in Norway and focuses on how they, in their professional development, adapt digital literacy. Today we find a consensus among policy-makers, researchers, teacher-educators and teachers that digital literacy must be given high priority and needs to be explored…

  12. Detail view of the leading and top edge of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of the leading and top edge of the vertical stabilizer of the Orbiter Discovery showing the thermal protection system components with the white Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation (AFRSI) blanket and the black High-temperature Reusable Surface Insulation (HRSI) tiles along the outer edges. The marks seen on the HRSI tiles are injection point marks and holes for the application of waterproofing material. This view was taken from a service platform in the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  13. The fish tail motion forms an attached leading edge vortex

    PubMed Central

    Borazjani, Iman; Daghooghi, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    The tail (caudal fin) is one of the most prominent characteristics of fishes, and the analysis of the flow pattern it creates is fundamental to understanding how its motion generates locomotor forces. A mechanism that is known to greatly enhance locomotor forces in insect and bird flight is the leading edge vortex (LEV) reattachment, i.e. a vortex (separation bubble) that stays attached at the leading edge of a wing. However, this mechanism has not been reported in fish-like swimming probably owing to the overemphasis on the trailing wake, and the fact that the flow does not separate along the body of undulating swimmers. We provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence of the vortex reattachment at the leading edge of the fish tail using three-dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations of self-propelled virtual swimmers with different tail shapes. We show that at Strouhal numbers (a measure of lateral velocity to the axial velocity) at which most fish swim in nature (approx. 0.25) an attached LEV is formed, whereas at a higher Strouhal number of approximately 0.6 the LEV does not reattach. We show that the evolution of the LEV drastically alters the pressure distribution on the tail and the force it generates. We also show that the tail's delta shape is not necessary for the LEV reattachment and fish-like kinematics is capable of stabilising the LEV. Our results suggest the need for a paradigm shift in fish-like swimming research to turn the focus from the trailing edge to the leading edge of the tail. PMID:23407826

  14. Closed Form Equations for the Preliminary Design of a Heat-Pipe-Cooled Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.

    1998-01-01

    A set of closed form equations for the preliminary evaluation and design of a heat-pipe-cooled leading edge is presented. The set of equations can provide a leading-edge designer with a quick evaluation of the feasibility of using heat-pipe cooling. The heat pipes can be embedded in a metallic or composite structure. The maximum heat flux, total integrated heat load, and thermal properties of the structure and heat-pipe container are required input. The heat-pipe operating temperature, maximum surface temperature, heat-pipe length, and heat pipe-spacing can be estimated. Results using the design equations compared well with those from a 3-D finite element analysis for both a large and small radius leading edge.

  15. Fabrication and Testing of a Leading-Edge-Shaped Heat Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Merrigan, Michael A.; Sena, J. Tom; Reid, Robert S.

    1998-01-01

    The development of a refractory-composite/heat-pipe-cooled leading edge has evolved from the design stage to the fabrication and testing of a full size, leading-edge-shaped heat pipe. The heat pipe had a 'D-shaped' cross section and was fabricated from arc cast Mo-4lRe. An artery was included in the wick. Several issues were resolved with the fabrication of the sharp leading edge radius heat pipe. The heat pipe was tested in a vacuum chamber at Los Alamos National Laboratory using induction heating and was started up from the frozen state several times. However, design temperatures and heat fluxes were not obtained due to premature failure of the heat pipe resulting from electrical discharge between the induction heating apparatus and the heat pipe. Though a testing anomaly caused premature failure of the heat pipe, successful startup and operation of the heat pipe was demonstrated.

  16. Turbine Airfoil With CMC Leading-Edge Concept Tested Under Simulated Gas Turbine Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. Craig; Hatton, Kenneth S.

    2000-01-01

    Silicon-based ceramics have been proposed as component materials for gas turbine engine hot-sections. When the Navy s Harrier fighter experienced engine (Pegasus F402) failure because of leading-edge durability problems on the second-stage high-pressure turbine vane, the Office of Naval Research came to the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field for test support in evaluating a concept for eliminating the vane-edge degradation. The High Pressure Burner Rig (HPBR) was selected for testing since it could provide temperature, pressure, velocity, and combustion gas compositions that closely simulate the engine environment. The study focused on equipping the stationary metal airfoil (Pegasus F402) with a ceramic matrix composite (CMC) leading-edge insert and evaluating the feasibility and benefits of such a configuration. The test exposed the component, with and without the CMC insert, to the harsh engine environment in an unloaded condition, with cooling to provide temperature relief to the metal blade underneath. The insert was made using an AlliedSignal Composites, Inc., enhanced HiNicalon (Nippon Carbon Co. LTD., Yokohama, Japan) fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composite (SiC/SiC CMC) material fabricated via chemical vapor infiltration. This insert was 45-mils thick and occupied a recessed area in the leading edge and shroud of the vane. It was designed to be free floating with an end cap design. The HPBR tests provided a comparative evaluation of the temperature response and leading-edge durability and included cycling the airfoils between simulated idle, lift, and cruise flight conditions. In addition, the airfoils were aircooled, uniquely instrumented, and exposed to the exact set of internal and external conditions, which included gas temperatures in excess of 1370 C (2500 F). In addition to documenting the temperature response of the metal vane for comparison with the CMC, a demonstration of improved leading-edge durability was a primary goal. First, the metal vane was tested for a total of 150 cycles. Both the leading edge and trailing edge of the blade exhibited fatigue cracking and burn-through similar to the failures experienced in service by the F402 engine. Next, an airfoil, fitted with the ceramic leading edge insert, was exposed for 200 cycles. The temperature response of those HPBR cycles indicated a reduced internal metal temperature, by as much as 600 F at the midspan location for the same surface temperature (2100 F). After testing, the composite insert appeared intact, with no signs of failure on either the vane s leading or trailing edge. Only a slight oxide scale, as would be expected, was noted on the insert. Overall, the CMC insert performed similarly to a thick thermal barrier coating. With a small air gap between the metal and the SiC/SiC leading edge, heat transfer from the CMC to the metal alloy was low, effectively lowering the temperatures. The insert's performance has proven that an uncooled CMC can be engineered and designed to withstand the thermal up-shock experienced during the severe lift conditions in the Pegasus engine. The design of the leading-edge insert, which minimized thermal stresses in the SiC/SiC CMC, showed that the CMC/metal assembly can be engineered to be a functioning component.

  17. Nondestructive Evaluation for the Space Shuttle's Wing Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madaras, Eric I.; Winfree, William P.; Prosser, William H.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Cramer, K. Elliot

    2005-01-01

    The loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia highlighted concerns about the integrity of the Shuttle's thermal protection system, which includes Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) on the leading edge. This led NASA to investigate nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods for certifying the integrity of the Shuttle's wing leading edge. That investigation was performed simultaneously with a large study conducted to understand the impact damage caused by errant debris. Among the many advanced NDE methods investigated for applicability to the RCC material, advanced digital radiography, high resolution computed tomography, thermography, ultrasound, acoustic emission and eddy current systems have demonstrated the maturity and success for application to the Shuttle RCC panels. For the purposes of evaluating the RCC panels while they are installed on the orbiters, thermographic detection incorporating principal component analysis (PCA) and eddy current array scanning systems demonstrated the ability to measure the RCC panels from one side only and to detect several flaw types of concern. These systems were field tested at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and at several locations where impact testing was being conducted. Another advanced method that NASA has been investigating is an automated acoustic based detection system. Such a system would be based in part on methods developed over the years for acoustic emission testing. Impact sensing has been demonstrated through numerous impact tests on both reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) leading edge materials as well as Shuttle tile materials on representative aluminum wing structures. A variety of impact materials and conditions have been evaluated including foam, ice, and ablator materials at ascent velocities as well as simulated hypervelocity micrometeoroid and orbital debris impacts. These tests have successfully demonstrated the capability to detect and localize impact events on Shuttle's wing structures. A first generation impact sensing system has been designed for the next Shuttle flight and is undergoing final evaluation for deployment on the Shuttle's first return to flight. This system will employ wireless accelerometer sensors that were qualified for other applications on previous Shuttle flights. These sensors will be deployed on the wing's leading edge to detect impacts on the RCC leading edge panels. The application of these methods will help to insure the continued integrity of the Shuttle wing's leading edge system as the Shuttle flights resume and until their retirement.

  18. Heat pipes for wing leading edges of hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boman, B. L.; Citrin, K. M.; Garner, E. C.; Stone, J. E.

    1990-01-01

    Wing leading edge heat pipes were conceptually designed for three types of vehicle: an entry research vehicle, aero-space plane, and advanced shuttle. A full scale, internally instrumented sodium/Hastelloy X heat pipe was successfully designed and fabricated for the advanced shuttle application. The 69.4 inch long heat pipe reduces peak leading edge temperatures from 3500 F to 1800 F. It is internally instrumented with thermocouples and pressure transducers to measure sodium vapor qualities. Large thermal gradients and consequently large thermal stresses, which have the potential of limiting heat pipe life, were predicted to occur during startup. A test stand and test plan were developed for subsequent testing of this heat pipe. Heat pipe manufacturing technology was advanced during this program, including the development of an innovative technique for wick installation.

  19. Probabilistic Structural Health Monitoring of the Orbiter Wing Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yap, Keng C.; Macias, Jesus; Kaouk, Mohamed; Gafka, Tammy L.; Kerr, Justin H.

    2011-01-01

    A structural health monitoring (SHM) system can contribute to the risk management of a structure operating under hazardous conditions. An example is the Wing Leading Edge Impact Detection System (WLEIDS) that monitors the debris hazards to the Space Shuttle Orbiter s Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels. Since Return-to-Flight (RTF) after the Columbia accident, WLEIDS was developed and subsequently deployed on board the Orbiter to detect ascent and on-orbit debris impacts, so as to support the assessment of wing leading edge structural integrity prior to Orbiter re-entry. As SHM is inherently an inverse problem, the analyses involved, including those performed for WLEIDS, tend to be associated with significant uncertainty. The use of probabilistic approaches to handle the uncertainty has resulted in the successful implementation of many development and application milestones.

  20. Leading edge flap system for aircraft control augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. M. (inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Traditional roll control systems such as ailerons, elevons or spoilers are least effective at high angles of attack due to boundary layer separation over the wing. This invention uses independently deployed leading edge flaps on the upper surfaces of vortex stabilized wings to shift the center of lift outboard. A rolling moment is created that is used to control roll in flight at high angles of attack. The effectiveness of the rolling moment increases linearly with angle of attack. No adverse yaw effects are induced. In an alternate mode of operation, both leading edge flaps are deployed together at cruise speeds to create a very effective airbrake without appreciable modification in pitching moment. Little trim change is required.

  1. Leading-edge vortex solutions with large total pressure losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Earll M.; Powell, Kenneth G.; Goodsell, Aga M.; Landahl, Marten T.

    1987-01-01

    Computations are presented for a Lambda = 75 deg delta wing in a supersonic freestream under two conditions which lead to leading-edge vortices. For one condition, analysis of the computed vortical flow reveals a closed streamline in the core. From varying computational parameters, it appears that this is due to truncation error of the convective derivatives. For the other condition, comparisons are made with wind-tunnel data, and good agreement is noted for pitot pressure distributions, flow angles on the symmetry plane, and the position of an embedded shock. Many of the aerodynamic parameters are shown to be insensitive to grid spacing.

  2. Computational aeroacoustic simulations of leading-edge slat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, K.; Zhang, X.; Nelson, P. A.

    2004-02-01

    High-lift devices on modern airliners are a major contributor to overall airframe noise. In this paper the aeroacoustics of leading-edge slat devices in a high-lift configuration are investigated computationally. A hierarchical methodology is used to enable the rapid evaluation of different slat configurations. The overall goal is to gain a deeper understanding of the noise generation and amplification mechanisms in and around the slat, and the effects of slat system geometry. In order to perform parametric studies of the aeroacoustics, a simplified 2-D model of the slat is used. The flow and aeroacoustics are computed using a compressible, unsteady, Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes code. A robust buffer zone boundary condition is used to prevent the reflection of outgoing acoustic waves from contaminating the long-time solution. A Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings solver is used to compute the far field acoustic field from the unsteady flow solution and determine the directivity. The spanwise correlation length used is derived from experimental data of this high-lift configuration. The effect of spanwise correlation length on the acoustic far field is examined. The aeroacoustics of the slat system are largely governed by the geometry, especially in terms of slat overlap. We perform a study of the effects of trailing edge thickness, horizontal and vertical overlap settings for the slat on near field wave propagation and far field directivity. The implications for low-noise leading edge slat design are discussed.

  3. Simulated big sagebrush regeneration supports predicted changes at the trailing and leading edges of distribution shifts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlaepfer, Daniel R.; Taylor, Kyle A.; Pennington, Victoria E.; Nelson, Kellen N.; Martin, Trace E.; Rottler, Caitlin M.; Lauenroth, William K.; Bradford, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Many semi-arid plant communities in western North America are dominated by big sagebrush. These ecosystems are being reduced in extent and quality due to economic development, invasive species, and climate change. These pervasive modifications have generated concern about the long-term viability of sagebrush habitat and sagebrush-obligate wildlife species (notably greater sage-grouse), highlighting the need for better understanding of the future big sagebrush distribution, particularly at the species' range margins. These leading and trailing edges of potential climate-driven sagebrush distribution shifts are likely to be areas most sensitive to climate change. We used a process-based regeneration model for big sagebrush, which simulates potential germination and seedling survival in response to climatic and edaphic conditions and tested expectations about current and future regeneration responses at trailing and leading edges that were previously identified using traditional species distribution models. Our results confirmed expectations of increased probability of regeneration at the leading edge and decreased probability of regeneration at the trailing edge below current levels. Our simulations indicated that soil water dynamics at the leading edge became more similar to the typical seasonal ecohydrological conditions observed within the current range of big sagebrush ecosystems. At the trailing edge, an increased winter and spring dryness represented a departure from conditions typically supportive of big sagebrush. Our results highlighted that minimum and maximum daily temperatures as well as soil water recharge and summer dry periods are important constraints for big sagebrush regeneration. Overall, our results confirmed previous predictions, i.e., we see consistent changes in areas identified as trailing and leading edges; however, we also identified potential local refugia within the trailing edge, mostly at sites at higher elevation. Decreasing regeneration probability at the trailing edge underscores the Schlaepfer et al. Future regeneration potential of big sagebrush potential futility of efforts to preserve and/or restore big sagebrush in these areas. Conversely, increasing regeneration probability at the leading edge suggest a growing potential for conflicts in management goals between maintaining existing grasslands by preventing sagebrush expansion versus accepting a shift in plant community composition to sagebrush dominance.

  4. An Aeroacoustic Study of a Leading Edge Slat Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendoza, J. M.; Brooks, T. F.; Humphreys, W. M., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Aeroacoustic evaluations of high-lift devices have been carried out in the Quiet Flow Facility of the NASA Langley Research Center. The present paper describes detailed flow and acoustic measurements that have been made in order to better understand the noise generated from airflow over a wing leading edge slat configuration, and to possibly predict and reduce this noise source. The acoustic database is obtained by a moveable Small Aperture Directional Array of microphones designed to electronically steer to different portions of models under study. The slat is shown to be a uniform distributed noise source. The data was processed such that spectra and directivity were determined with respect to a one-foot span of slat. The spectra are normalized in various fashions to demonstrate slat noise character. In order to equate portions of the spectra to different slat noise components, trailing edge noise predictions using measured slat boundary layer parameters as inputs are compared to the measured slat noise spectra.

  5. Flexible Plug Repair for Shuttle Wing Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, Charles J.; Sikora, Joseph; Smith, Russel; Rivers, H.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Fuller, Alan M.; Klacka, Robert; Reinders, Martin; Schwind, Francis; Sullivan, Brian; Lester, Dean

    2012-01-01

    In response to the Columbia Accident Investigation Board report, a plug repair kit has been developed to enable astronauts to repair the space shuttle's wing leading edge (WLE) during orbit. The plug repair kit consists of several 17.78- cm-diameter carbon/silicon carbide (C/SiC) cover plates of various curvatures that can be attached to the refractory carbon-carbon WLE panels using a TZM refractory metal attach mechanism. The attach mechanism is inserted through the damage in the WLE panel and, as it is tightened, the cover plate flexes to conform to the curvature of the WLE panel within 0.050 mm. An astronaut installs the repair during an extravehicular activity (EVA). After installing the plug repair, edge gaps are checked and the perimeter of the repair is sealed using a proprietary material, developed to fill cracks and small holes in the WLE.

  6. Thermostructural applications of heat pipes for cooling leading edges of high-speed aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, Charles J.; Glass, David E.

    1992-01-01

    Heat pipes have been considered for use on wing leading edge for over 20 years. Early concepts envisioned metal heat pipes cooling a metallic leading edge. Several superalloy/sodium heat pipes were fabricated and successfully tested for wing leading edge cooling. Results of radiant heat and aerothermal testing indicate the feasibility of using heat pipes to cool the stagnation region of shuttle-type space transportation systems. The test model withstood a total seven radiant heating tests, eight aerothermal tests, and twenty-seven supplemental radiant heating tests. Cold-wall heating rates ranged from 21 to 57 Btu/sq ft-s and maximum operating temperatures ranged from 1090 to 1520 F. Follow-on studies investigated the application of heat pipes to cool the stagnation regions of single-stage-to-orbit and advanced shuttle vehicles. Results of those studies indicate that a 'D-shaped' structural design can reduce the mass of the heat-pipe concept by over 44 percent compared to a circular heat-pipe geometry. Simple analytical models for heat-pipe startup from the frozen state (working fluid initially frozen) were adequate to approximate transient, startup, and steady-state heat-pipe performance. Improvement in analysis methods has resulted in the development of a finite-element analysis technique to predict heat-pipe startup from the frozen state. However, current requirements of light-weight design and reliability suggest that metallic heat pipes embedded in a refractory composite material should be used. This concept is the concept presently being evaluated for NASP. A refractory-composite/heat-pipe-cooled wing leading edge is currently being considered for the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP). This concept uses high-temperature refractory-metal/lithium heat pipes embedded within a refractory-composite structure and is significantly lighter than an actively cooled wing leading edge because it eliminates the need for active cooling during ascent and descent. Since the NASP vehicle uses cryogenic hydrogen to cool structural components and then burns this fuel in the combustor, hydrogen necessary for descent cooling only, when the vehicle is unpowered, is considered to be a weight penalty. Details of the design of the refractory-composite/heat-pipe-cooled wing leading edge are currently being investigated. Issues such as thermal contact resistance and thermal stress are also being investigated.

  7. Method Improvements in Thermal Analysis of Mach 10 Leading Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundsen, Ruth M.

    2001-01-01

    Several improvements have recently been made in the thermal analysis methods for leading edges of a hypersonic vehicle. The leading edges of this vehicle undergo exceptionally high heat loads that incorporate extreme spatial gradients as well as severe transients. Due to the varying flight conditions, complex geometry, and need for thermal loads at many points along the trajectory, full computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of the aeroheating; loads is not feasible. Thus, engineering methods must be used to determine the aeroheating on the vehicle surfaces, and that must be utilized in the thermal analysis. Over the last year, the thermal analysis of a hypersonic vehicle has been enhanced in several ways. Two different engineering codes are used to predict aeroheating loads: one over the curve near the stagnation point, and the other on flat surfaces downstream of the leading edge. These two are matched together at the intersection point using a method that allows closer approximation of CFD results. User-developed FORTRAN, which is part of the thermal solver PATRAN Thermal, is used to accomplish this. The customizable FORTRAN code also allows use of many different time- and space-dependent factors, interpolation of the heat load in time and space, and inclusion of both highly swept and unswept grid structures. This FORTRAN is available to other PATRAN users who may want to accomplish a similar objective in analysis. Flux, rather than convective coefficient, is used to define heat loads, which allows more accurate analysis as well as better application of margins. Improvements have also been made in more efficient utilization of imported CAD geometry, by creating faces on solids to facilitate load application.

  8. Laminar flow control leading edge systems in simulated airline service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, R. D.; Maddalon, D. V.; Fisher, D. F.

    1988-01-01

    The feasibility of two candidate leading-edge flow laminarization systems applicable to airline service was tested using representative airline operational conditions with respect to air traffic, weather, and airport insect infestation. One of the systems involved a perforated Ti alloy suction surface with about 1 million 0.0025-in. diameter holes drilled by electron beam, as well as a Krueger-type flap that offered protective shielding against insect impingement; the other supplied surface suction through a slotted Ti alloy skin with 27 spanwise slots on the upper and lower surface.

  9. Measurements of leading edge vortices in a supersonic stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanovic, Ivana Milija

    An experimental investigation of the leading edge vortices from a 75° sweptback, sharp edge delta wing has been carried out in a Mach 2.49 stream. Five-hole conical probe traverses were conducted vertically and horizontally through the primary vortices at the trailing edge and at one half chord downstream station for 7° and 12° angles of attack. The main objective was to determine the Mach number and pressure distributions in the primary vortex and to present comparisons of flow properties at different survey stations. In response to the continued interest in efficient supersonic flight vehicles, particularly in the missile arena, the motivation for this research has been to provide the quantitative details of supersonic leading edge vortices, the understanding of which up to now has been largely based on flow visualizations and presumed similarity to low speed flows. As a prerequisite to the measurement campaign, the employed five-hole conical probe was numerically calibrated using a three-dimensional Thin Layer Navier-Stokes solver in order to circumvent the traditional experimental approach vastly demanding on resources. The pressure readings at the probe orifices were computed for a range of Mach numbers and pitch angles, and subsequently verified in wind tunnel tests. The calibration phase also demonstrated the profound influence of the probe bluntness on the nearby static pressure ports, its relevance to the ultimate modeling strategy and the resulting calibration charts. Flow diagnostics of the leading edge vortices included both qualitative flow visualizations, as well as quantitative measurements. Shadowgraphs provided information regarding the trajectory and relative size of the generated vortices while assuring that no probe-induced vortex breakdown occurred. Surface oil patterns revealed the general spanwise locations of leeward vortices, and confirmed topological similarity to their low speed counterparts. The probe measurements revealed substantial Pitot, total and static pressure deficits in the vortex core. The magnitude of these deficits increase with increasing angle of attack for the same measurement plane and decrease with downstream distance from the model. Pressure deficits in the same survey station also grow spatially with the higher incidence angle. Very large swirl Mach numbers, at times reaching low supersonic values, were recorded and their distribution resembles that of the classical low speed Lamb-Oseen vortex. At the core edges, the presence of substantial radial flow directed towards the vortex center indicates the entrainment of the surrounding fluid. A decrease in the radial Mach number component confirms the change in vortex trajectory from a strong downward flow over the planform to a gradual return towards the free stream in the near-wake. The axial profiles follow the general trend exhibited in the total Mach number distribution thereby confirming the dominance of the streamwise flow. The axial Mach number profiles also demonstrated that the initially conical convection over the wing does not proceed in the wake as a uniform translation of the profiles found at the trailing edge. Most remarkably, contrary to its transonic and low speed counterparts, the axial Mach number profiles exhibit a strong wake-like behavior. Consistent with the shadowgraphs and other existing flow visualizations, measurements illustrated vortex shape adjustment in the near-wake. In the absence of the constraint from the wing surface, the primary vortices stretch in the vertical direction while convecting downstream where a more round shape is ultimately developed.

  10. The effect of leading edge tubercles on dynamic stall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrynuk, John

    The effect of the leading edge tubercles of humpback whales has been heavily studied for their static benefits. These studies have shown that tubercles inhibit flow separation, limit spanwise flow, and extend the operating angle of a wing beyond the static stall point while maintaining lift, all while having a comparatively low negative impact on drag. The current study extends the prior work to investigating the effect of tubercles on dynamic stall, a fundamental flow phenomenon that occurs when wings undergo dynamic pitching motions. Flow fields around the wing models tested were studied using Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) and Molecular Tagging Velocimetry (MTV).Resulting velocity fields show that the dynamics of the formation and separation of the leading edge vortex were fundamentally different between the straight wing and the tubercled wing. Tracking of the Dynamic Stall Vortex (DSV) and Shear Layer Vortices (SLVs), which may have a significant impact on the overall flow behavior, was done along with calculations of vortex circulation. Proximity to the wing surface and total circulation were used to evaluate potential dynamic lift increases provided by the tubercles. The effects of pitch rate on the formation process and benefits of the tubercles were also studied and were generally consistent with prior dynamic stall studies. However, tubercles were shown to affect the SLV formation and the circulation differently at higher pitch rates.

  11. Centrifugal pump performance drop due to leading edge cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. J.; Pan, Z. Y.; Zhang, D. Q.; Yuan, S. Q.

    2012-11-01

    This paper deals with the leading edge cavitation of the impeller of a single stage centrifugal pump. A centrifugal pump with and without inducer is investigated by numerical simulation. The simulation results of the pump with inducer were compared with experimental data under cavitating and non-cavitating situation. An acceptable agreement has been obtained for the overall performance. Cavitation phenomena are found in varied area near the impeller inlet at the condition in the impeller flow passage and induce unexpected head drop and blade load for the pump without inducer. Violent excitement of cavitation appears at conditions of low partial flow rate and low inlet pressure. As to that with inducer, through obvious cavitation occurs in the inducer passage, no violent cavitation is found in the impeller passage. The overall performance curves are also different between the two conditions.

  12. An embedded mesh procedure for leading-edge vortex flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Kenneth G.; Murman, Earll M.

    1989-01-01

    A cell-vertex scheme is outlined for solving the flow about a delta wing with M (sub infinity) is greater than 1. Embedded regions of mesh refinement allow solutions to be obtained which have much higher resolution than those achieved to date. Effects of mesh refinement and artificial viscosity on the solutions are studied, to determine at what point leading-edge vortex solutions are grid-converged. A macroscale and a microscale for the size of the vortex are defined, and it is shown that the macroscale (which includes the wing surface properties) is converged on a moderately refined grid, while the microscale is very sensitive to grid spacing. The level of numerical diffusion in the core of the vortex is found to be substantial. Comparisons with the experiment are made for two cases which have transonic cross-flow velocities.

  13. Managed aquifer recharge: rediscovering nature as a leading edge technology.

    PubMed

    Dillon, P; Toze, S; Page, D; Vanderzalm, J; Bekele, E; Sidhu, J; Rinck-Pfeiffer, S

    2010-01-01

    Use of Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) has rapidly increased in Australia, USA, and Europe in recent years as an efficient means of recycling stormwater or treated sewage effluent for non-potable and indirect potable reuse in urban and rural areas. Yet aquifers have been relied on knowingly for water storage and unwittingly for water treatment for millennia. Hence if 'leading edge' is defined as 'the foremost part of a trend; a vanguard', it would be misleading to claim managed aquifer recharge as a leading edge technology. However it has taken a significant investment in scientific research in recent years to demonstrate the effectiveness of aquifers as sustainable treatment systems to enable managed aquifer recharge to be recognised along side engineered treatment systems in water recycling. It is a 'cross-over' technology that is applicable to water and wastewater treatment and makes use of passive low energy processes to spectacularly reduce the energy requirements for water supply. It is robust within limits, has low cost, is suitable from village to city scale supplies, and offers as yet almost untapped opportunities for producing safe drinking water supplies where they do not yet exist. It will have an increasingly valued role in securing water supplies to sustain cities affected by climate change and population growth. However it is not a universal panacea and relies on the presence of suitable aquifers and sources of water together with effective governance to ensure human health and environment protection and water resources planning and management. This paper describes managed aquifer recharge, illustrates its use in Australia, outlining economics, guidelines and policies, and presents some of the knowledge about aquifer treatment processes that are revealing the latent value of aquifers as urban water infrastructure and provide a driver to improving our understanding of urban hydrogeology. PMID:21076220

  14. Rotational accelerations stabilize leading edge vortices on revolving fly wings.

    PubMed

    Lentink, David; Dickinson, Michael H

    2009-08-01

    The aerodynamic performance of hovering insects is largely explained by the presence of a stably attached leading edge vortex (LEV) on top of their wings. Although LEVs have been visualized on real, physically modeled, and simulated insects, the physical mechanisms responsible for their stability are poorly understood. To gain fundamental insight into LEV stability on flapping fly wings we expressed the Navier-Stokes equations in a rotating frame of reference attached to the wing's surface. Using these equations we show that LEV dynamics on flapping wings are governed by three terms: angular, centripetal and Coriolis acceleration. Our analysis for hovering conditions shows that angular acceleration is proportional to the inverse of dimensionless stroke amplitude, whereas Coriolis and centripetal acceleration are proportional to the inverse of the Rossby number. Using a dynamically scaled robot model of a flapping fruit fly wing to systematically vary these dimensionless numbers, we determined which of the three accelerations mediate LEV stability. Our force measurements and flow visualizations indicate that the LEV is stabilized by the ;quasi-steady' centripetal and Coriolis accelerations that are present at low Rossby number and result from the propeller-like sweep of the wing. In contrast, the unsteady angular acceleration that results from the back and forth motion of a flapping wing does not appear to play a role in the stable attachment of the LEV. Angular acceleration is, however, critical for LEV integrity as we found it can mediate LEV spiral bursting, a high Reynolds number effect. Our analysis and experiments further suggest that the mechanism responsible for LEV stability is not dependent on Reynolds number, at least over the range most relevant for insect flight (100leading edge) vortices could represent a convergent solution for the generation of high fluid forces over a quite large range in size. PMID:19648415

  15. Development of Advanced High Lift Leading Edge Technology for Laminar Flow Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bright, Michelle M.; Korntheuer, Andrea; Komadina, Steve; Lin, John C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the Advanced High Lift Leading Edge (AHLLE) task performed by Northrop Grumman Systems Corporation, Aerospace Systems (NGAS) for the NASA Subsonic Fixed Wing project in an effort to develop enabling high-lift technology for laminar flow wings. Based on a known laminar cruise airfoil that incorporated an NGAS-developed integrated slot design, this effort involved using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis and quality function deployment (QFD) analysis on several leading edge concepts, and subsequently down-selected to two blown leading-edge concepts for testing. A 7-foot-span AHLLE airfoil model was designed and fabricated at NGAS and then tested at the NGAS 7 x 10 Low Speed Wind Tunnel in Hawthorne, CA. The model configurations tested included: baseline, deflected trailing edge, blown deflected trailing edge, blown leading edge, morphed leading edge, and blown/morphed leading edge. A successful demonstration of high lift leading edge technology was achieved, and the target goals for improved lift were exceeded by 30% with a maximum section lift coefficient (Cl) of 5.2. Maximum incremental section lift coefficients ( Cl) of 3.5 and 3.1 were achieved for a blown drooped (morphed) leading edge concept and a non-drooped leading edge blowing concept, respectively. The most effective AHLLE design yielded an estimated 94% lift improvement over the conventional high lift Krueger flap configurations while providing laminar flow capability on the cruise configuration.

  16. Boundary element simulation of oscillating foil with leading-edge separation

    E-print Network

    Dong, Xiaoxia, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis, we develop a numerical model to account for the leading-edge separation for the boundary element simulation of the oscillating foil with potential flow assumption. Similar to the trailing-edge separation, ...

  17. Nondestructive Evaluation Tests Performed on Space Shuttle Leading- Edge Materials Subjected to Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Martin, Richard E.; Bodis, James R.

    2005-01-01

    In support of the space shuttle Return To Flight efforts at the NASA Glenn Research Center, a series of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) tests were performed on reinforced carbon/carbon (RCC) composite panels subjected to ballistic foam impact. The impact tests were conducted to refine and verify analytical models of an external tank foam strike on the space shuttle leading edge. The NDE tests were conducted to quantify the size and location of the resulting damage zone as well as to identify hidden damage.

  18. Leading edge vortex in a slow-flying passerine.

    PubMed

    Muijres, Florian T; Johansson, L Christoffer; Hedenström, Anders

    2012-08-23

    Most hovering animals, such as insects and hummingbirds, enhance lift by producing leading edge vortices (LEVs) and by using both the downstroke and upstroke for lift production. By contrast, most hovering passerine birds primarily use the downstroke to generate lift. To compensate for the nearly inactive upstroke, weight support during the downstroke needs to be relatively higher in passerines when compared with, e.g. hummingbirds. Here we show, by capturing the airflow around the wing of a freely flying pied flycatcher, that passerines may use LEVs during the downstroke to increase lift. The LEV contributes up to 49 per cent to weight support, which is three times higher than in hummingbirds, suggesting that avian hoverers compensate for the nearly inactive upstroke by generating stronger LEVs. Contrary to other animals, the LEV strength in the flycatcher is lowest near the wing tip, instead of highest. This is correlated with a spanwise reduction of the wing's angle-of-attack, partly owing to upward bending of primary feathers. We suggest that this helps to delay bursting and shedding of the particularly strong LEV in passerines. PMID:22417792

  19. Mechanisms of leading edge protrusion in interstitial migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Kerry; Lewalle, Alexandre; Fritzsche, Marco; Thorogate, Richard; Duke, Tom; Charras, Guillaume

    2013-12-01

    While the molecular and biophysical mechanisms underlying cell protrusion on two-dimensional substrates are well understood, our knowledge of the actin structures driving protrusion in three-dimensional environments is poor, despite relevance to inflammation, development and cancer. Here we report that, during chemotactic migration through microchannels with 5??m × 5??m cross-sections, HL60 neutrophil-like cells assemble an actin-rich slab filling the whole channel cross-section at their front. This leading edge comprises two distinct F-actin networks: an adherent network that polymerizes perpendicular to cell-wall interfaces and a ‘free’ network that grows from the free membrane at the cell front. Each network is polymerized by a distinct nucleator and, due to their geometrical arrangement, the networks interact mechanically. On the basis of our experimental data, we propose that, during interstitial migration, medial growth of the adherent network compresses the free network preventing its retrograde movement and enabling new polymerization to be converted into forward protrusion.

  20. Radiation Degradation of Polytetrafluoroethylene-Lead Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Sanat; Lawrence, Falix; Mallika, C.; Mudali, U. Kamachi

    2015-11-01

    Composites of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) with Pb (0-15 wt.%) were fabricated and irradiated up to 50 kGy in a 60Co-gamma chamber to evaluate the effect of Pb in improving the radiation tolerance of PTFE. Thermal and mechanical properties were measured for the irradiated and un-irradiated PTFE samples and its composites. The number average molecular weight of PTFE was estimated at different doses from the enthalpy of crystallization values obtained by Differential Scanning Calorimetry. Reduction in the percentage increase in the enthalpy of crystallization and melting of PTFE-15% Pb composite, during irradiation indicated the stabilizing effect of lead on PTFE. Surface morphology of PTFE and its composites revealed that the formation of micro-cracks and blisters in PTFE, owing to radiation damage was controlled by lead. Elongation at break values and SEM images of the irradiated composites indicated that 15% Pb offered better stability to PTFE than 10% Pb.

  1. Method and Apparatus for a Leading Edge Slat on a Wing of an Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitt, Dale M. (Inventor); Eckstein, Nicholas Stephen (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method and apparatus for managing a flight control surface system. A leading edge device is moved on a leading edge from an undeployed position to a deployed position. The leading edge device has an outer surface, an inner surface, and a deformable fairing attached to the leading edge device such that the deformable fairing covers at least a portion of the inner surface. The deformable fairing changes from a deformed shape to an original shape when the leading edge device is moved to the deployed position. The leading edge device is then moved from the deployed position to the undeployed position, wherein the deformable fairing changes from the original shape to the deformed shape.

  2. Trailing edges projected to move faster than leading edges for large pelagic fish habitats under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, L. M.; Hobday, A. J.; Possingham, H. P.; Richardson, A. J.

    2015-03-01

    There is mounting evidence to suggest that many species are shifting their ranges in concordance with the climate velocity of their preferred environmental conditions/habitat. While accelerated rates in species' range shifts have been noted in areas of intense warming, due to climate change, few studies have considered the influence that both spatial temperature gradients and rates of warming (i.e., the two components of climate velocity) could have on rates of movement in species habitats. We compared projected shifts in the core habitat of nine large pelagic fish species (five tuna, two billfish and two shark species) off the east coast of Australia at different spatial points (centre, leading and trailing edges of the core habitat), during different seasons (summer and winter), in the near-(2030) and long-term (2070), using independent species distribution models and habitat suitability models. Model projections incorporated depth integrated temperature data from 11 climate models with a focus on the IPCC SRES A2 general emission scenario. Projections showed a number of consistent patterns: southern (poleward) shifts in all species' core habitats; trailing edges shifted faster than leading edges; shifts were faster by 2070 than 2030; and there was little difference in shifts among species and between seasons. Averaging across all species and climate models, rates of habitat shifts for 2030 were 45-60 km decade-1 at the trailing edge, 40-45 km decade-1 at the centre, and 20-30 km decade-1 at the leading edge. Habitat shifts for 2070 were 60-70 km decade-1 at the trailing edge, 50-55 km decade-1 at the centre, and 30-40 km decade-1 at the leading edge. It is often assumed that the leading edge of a species range will shift faster than the trailing edge, but there are few projections or observations in large pelagic fish to validate this assumption. We found that projected shifts at the trailing edge were greater than at the centre and leading of core habitats in all large pelagic fish included in our study. Faster shifts at species trailing edges were due to weaker spatial gradients in temperature in the north than in the south of the study region, in conjunction with relatively constant rates of warming across latitudes. Rather than assuming that leading edges will always move faster, this study suggests that spatial gradients of temperature could be important in determining differences in shifts at different points in species core habitats.

  3. The Columbia River--on the Leading Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. E.

    2005-05-01

    On the leading edge of the North American plate, the Columbia River is the largest of the world's 40 or so rivers with drainage areas greater than 500,000 square kilometers to drain toward a convergent plate boundary. This unique setting results in a unique continental river basin; marked by episodic and cataclysmic geologic disturbance, but also famously fecund with perhaps 10 to 16 million salmon historically spawning in its waters each year. Now transformed by dams, transportation infrastructure, dikes and diversions, the Columbia River presents an expensive conundrum for management of its many values. Inclusion of river ecology and geomorphology in discussions of river management is generally limited to observations of the last 200 years-a time period of little natural disturbance and low sediment transport. However, consideration of longer timescales provides additional perspective of historical ecologic and geomorphic conditions. Only 230 km from its mouth, the Columbia River bisects the volcanic arc of the Cascade Range, forming the Columbia River Gorge. Cenozoic lava flows have blocked the river, forcing diversions and new canyon cutting. Holocene eruptions of Mount Mazama (Crater Lake), Mount Hood, Mount St. Helens, and Mount Rainier have shed immense quantities of sediment into the lower Columbia River, forming a large percentage of the Holocene sediment transported through the lower river. Quaternary landslides, perhaps triggered by great earthquakes, have descended from the 1000-m-high gorge walls, also blocking and diverting the river, one as recently as 550 years ago. These geologic disturbances, mostly outside the realm of historical observation and operating at timescales of 100s to 1000s of years in the gorge and elsewhere, have clearly affected basin geomorphology, riverine ecology, and past and present cultural utilization of river resources. The historic productivity of the river, however, hints at extraordinary resilience (and perhaps dependence) of the Columbia River system to such disturbances, many of which are similar to engineered disturbances of the last 200 years.

  4. A numerical model for the platelet heat-pipe-cooled leading edge of hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongpeng; Liu, Weiqiang

    2016-01-01

    A new design, the platelet heat-pipe-cooled leading edge, is discussed for the thermal management to prevent damage to hypersonic vehicle leading edge component. For calculating the steady state behavior of platelet heat-pipe-cooled leading edge, a numerical model based on the principles of evaporation, convection, and condensation of a working fluid is presented. And then its effectiveness is validated by comparing the wall and vapor temperature against experimental data for a conventional heat pipe. Further investigations indicate that alloy IN718, with sodium as the working fluid is a feasible combination for Mach 8 flight with a 15 mm leading edge radius.

  5. Modulation of leading edge vorticity and aerodynamic forces in flexible flapping wings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P

    2011-09-01

    In diverse biological flight systems, the leading edge vortex has been implicated as a flow feature of key importance in the generation of flight forces. Unlike fixed wings, flapping wings can translate at higher angles of attack without stalling because their leading edge vorticity is more stable than the corresponding fixed wing case. Hence, the leading edge vorticity has often been suggested as the primary determinant of the high forces generated by flapping wings. To test this hypothesis, it is necessary to modulate the size and strength of the leading edge vorticity independently of the gross kinematics while simultaneously monitoring the forces generated by the wing. In a recent study, we observed that forces generated by wings with flexible trailing margins showed a direct dependence on the flexural stiffness of the wing. Based on that study, we hypothesized that trailing edge flexion directly influences leading edge vorticity, and thereby the magnitude of aerodynamic forces on the flexible flapping wings. To test this hypothesis, we visualized the flows on wings of varying flexural stiffness using a custom 2D digital particle image velocimetry system, while simultaneously monitoring the magnitude of the aerodynamic forces. Our data show that as flexion decreases, the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity increases and enhances aerodynamic forces, thus confirming that the leading edge vortex is indeed a key feature for aerodynamic force generation in flapping flight. The data shown here thus support the hypothesis that camber influences instantaneous aerodynamic forces through modulation of the leading edge vorticity. PMID:21852729

  6. Preparation and Support of a Tap Test on the Leading Edge Surfaces of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohr, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reports on a Tap test for the leading edge surfaces of the Space Shuttle. A description of the Wing Leading Edge Impact Detection System (WLEIDS) flight system is given, and the rationale and approach for improving the WLEIDS system. The three phases of the strategy of the test project amd the results of the tests are reviewed.

  7. Decay to equilibrium of the filament end density along the leading edge of the lamellipodium

    E-print Network

    Schmeiser, Christian

    Decay to equilibrium of the filament end density along the leading edge of the lamellipodium for the dynamics of actin filament ends along the leading edge of the lamellipodium is analyzed. It contains-dimensional meshwork of protein filaments, created by polymerization of actin [6]. In steadily protruding lamellipodia

  8. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Relevance Strategic Designs: 6. Perspectives Charter School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high schools across the…

  9. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Relevance Strategic Designs: 4. Boston Arts Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high schools across the…

  10. A method for computing the leading-edge suction in a higher-order panel method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlers, F. E.; Manro, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental data show that the phenomenon of a separation induced leading edge vortex is influenced by the wing thickness and the shape of the leading edge. Both thickness and leading edge shape (rounded rather than point) delay the formation of a vortex. Existing computer programs used to predict the effect of a leading edge vortex do not include a procedure for determining whether or not a vortex actually exists. Studies under NASA Contract NAS1-15678 have shown that the vortex development can be predicted by using the relationship between the leading edge suction coefficient and the parabolic nose drag. The linear theory FLEXSTAB was used to calculate the leading edge suction coefficient. This report describes the development of a method for calculating leading edge suction using the capabilities of the higher order panel methods (exact boundary conditions). For a two dimensional case, numerical methods were developed using the double strength and downwash distribution along the chord. A Gaussian quadrature formula that directly incorporates the logarithmic singularity in the downwash distribution, at all panel edges, was found to be the best method.

  11. SIMS chemical analysis of extended impacts on the leading and trailing edges of LDEF experiment AO187-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amari, S.; Foote, J.; Swan, P.; Walker, R. M.; Zinner, E.; Lange, G.

    1993-01-01

    Numerous 'extended impacts' found in both leading and trailing edge capture cells were successfully analyzed for the chemical composition of projectile residues by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Most data were obtained from the trailing edge cells where 45 of 58 impacts were classified as 'probably natural' and the remainder as 'possibly man-made debris.' This is in striking contrast to leading edge cells where 9 of 11 impacts so far measured are definitely classified as orbital debris. Although all the leading edge cells had lost their plastic entrance foils during flight, the rate of foil failure was similar to that of the trailing edge cells, 10 percent of which were recovered intact. Ultraviolet embrittlement is suspected as the major cause of failure on both leading and trailing edges. The major impediment to the accurate determination of projectile chemistry is the fractionation of volatile and refractory elements in the hypervelocity impact and redeposition processes. This effect had been noted in a simulation experiment but is more pronounced in the LDEF capture cells, probably due to the higher average velocities of the space impacts. Surface contamination of the pure Ge surfaces with a substance rich in Si, but also containing Mg and Al, provides an additional problem for the accurate determination of impactor chemistry. The effect is variable, being much larger on surfaces that were exposed to space than in those cells that remained intact. Future work will concentrate on the analyses of more leading edge impacts and the development of new SIMS techniques for the measurement of elemental abundances in extended impacts.

  12. Dynamic Impact Tolerance of Shuttle RCC Leading Edge Panels using LS-DYNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin; Jackson, Karen E.; Lyle, Karen H.; Jones, Lisa E.; Hardy, Robin C.; Spellman, Regina L.; Carney, Kelly S.; Melis, Matthew E.; Stockwell, Alan E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a research program conducted to enable accurate prediction of the impact tolerance of the shuttle Orbiter leading-edge wing panels using 'physics-based- codes such as LS-DYNA, a nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic finite element code. The shuttle leading-edge panels are constructed of Reinforced-Carbon-Carbon (RCC) composite material, which issued because of its thermal properties to protect the shuttle during re-entry into the Earth's atmosphere. Accurate predictions of impact damage from insulating foam and other debris strikes that occur during launch required materials characterization of expected debris, including strain-rate effects. First, analytical models of individual foam and RCC materials were validated. Next, analytical models of individual foam cylinders impacting 6-in. x 6-in. RCC flat plates were developed and validated. LS-DYNA pre-test models of the RCC flat plate specimens established the impact velocity of the test for three damage levels: no-detectable damage, non-destructive evaluation (NDE) detectable damage, or visible damage such as a through crack or hole. Finally, the threshold of impact damage for RCC on representative Orbiter wing panels was predicted for both a small through crack and for NDE-detectable damage.

  13. Dynamics Impact Tolerance of Shuttle RCC Leading Edge Panels Using LS-DYNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Lyle, Karen H.; Jones, Lisa E.; Hardy, Robin C.; Spellman, Regina L.; Carney, Kelly S.; Melis, Matthew E.; Stockwell, Alan E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a research program conducted to enable accurate prediction of the impact tolerance of the shuttle Orbiter leading-edge wing panels using physics-based codes such as LS-DYNA, a nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic finite element code. The shuttle leading-edge panels are constructed of Reinforced-Carbon-Carbon (RCC) composite material, which is used because of its thermal properties to protect the shuttle during reentry into the Earth's atmosphere. Accurate predictions of impact damage from insulating foam and other debris strikes that occur during launch required materials characterization of expected debris, including strain-rate effects. First, analytical models of individual foam and RCC materials were validated. Next, analytical models of foam cylinders impacting 6- in. x 6-in. RCC flat plates were developed and validated. LS-DYNA pre-test models of the RCC flat plate specimens established the impact velocity of the test for three damage levels: no-detectable damage, non-destructive evaluation (NDE) detectable damage, or visible damage such as a through crack or hole. Finally, the threshold of impact damage for RCC on representative Orbiter wing panels was predicted for both a small through crack and for NDE-detectable damage.

  14. Study of supersonic wings employing the attainable leading-edge thrust concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical study was made of supersonic wing geometries at Mach 1.8, using the attainable leading-edge thrust concept. The attainable thrust method offers a powerful means to improve overall aerodynamic efficiency by identifying wing leading-edge geometries that promote attached flow and by defining a local angle-of-attack range over which attached flow may be obtained. The concept applies to flat and to cambered wings, which leads to the consideration of drooped-wing leading edges for attached flow at high lift coefficients.

  15. SIMS chemical analysis of extended impacts on the leading and trailing edges of LDEF experiment AO187-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amari, S.; Foote, J.; Simon, Charles G.; Swan, P.; Walker, R. M.; Zinner, E.; Jessberger, E. K.; Lange, G.; Stadermann, F.

    1992-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Experiment AO187-2 consisted of 237 capture cells, 120 on the leading edge and 117 on the trailing edge. Each cell was made of polished Ge plates covered with 2.5 micron thick mylar foil at 200 microns from the Ge. Although all leading edge cells and 105 trailing edge cells had lost their plastic covers during flight, optical and electron microscope examination revealed extended impacts in bare cells from either edge that apparently were produced by high velocity projectiles while the plastic foils were still in place. Detailed optical scanning yielded 53 extended impacts on 100 bare cells from the trailing edge that were selected for SIMS chemical analysis. Lateral multi-element ion probe profiles were obtained on 40 of these impacts. Material that can be attributed to the incoming projectiles was found in all analyzed extended compact features and most seem to be associated with cosmic dust particles. However, LDEF deposits are systematically enriched in the refractory elements Al, Ca, and Ti relative to Mg and Fe when compared to IDP's collected in the stratosphere and to chondritic compositions. These differences are most likely due to elemental fractionation effects during the high velocity impact but real differences between interplanetary particles captured on LDEF and stratospheric IDP's cannot be excluded. Recently we extended our studies to cells from the leading edge and the covered cells from the trailing edge. The 12 covered cells contain 20 extended impact candidates. Ion probe analysis of 3 yielded results similar to those obtained for impacts on the bare cells from the trailing edge. Optical scanning of the bare leading edge cell also reveals many extended impacts (42 on 22 cells scanned to date), demonstrating that the cover foils remained intact at least for some time. However, SIMS analysis showed elements that can reasonably be attributed to micrometeoroids in only 2 out of 11 impacts. Eight impacts have residues dominated by Al and one dominated by Ti, indicating a preponderance of orbital debris in leading edge impacts.

  16. Effects of leading and trailing edge flaps on the aerodynamics of airfoil/vortex interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, Ahmed A.; Sankar, L. N.; Tadghighi, H.

    1991-01-01

    A numerical procedure based on the unsteady 2D full potential equation is presently used to simulate the effects of leading-edge and trailing-edge flaps on the aerodynamics of airfoil-vortex interactions. Attention is given to unsteady flap-motion effects, which alleviate those interactions at sub- and supercritical onset flows. For subcritical interactions, the results obtained indicate that trailing-edge flaps can be used to alleviate the impulsive loads experienced by the airfoil; for supercritical interactions, a leading- rather than trailing-edge flap must be used to alleviate the interaction.

  17. Simulated airline service experience with laminar-flow control leading-edge systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, Dal V.; Fisher, David F.; Jennett, Lisa A.; Fischer, Michael C.

    1987-01-01

    The first JetStar leading edge flight test was made November 30, 1983. The JetStar was flown for more than 3 years. The titanium leading edge test articles today remain in virtually the same condition as they were in on that first flight. No degradation of laminar flow performance has occurred as a result of service. The JetStar simulated airline service flights have demonstrated that effective, practical leading edge systems are available for future commercial transports. Specific conclusions based on the results of the simulated airline service test program are summarized.

  18. Generation of instability waves at a leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.

    1982-01-01

    Two cases are considered. The first is concerned with mean flows of the Blasius type wherein the instabilities are represented by Tollmien-Schlichting waves. It is shown that the latter are generated fairly far downstream of the edge and are the result of a wave length reduction process that tunes the free stream disturbances to the Tollmien-Schlichting wave length. The other case is concerned with inflectional, uni-directional, transversely sheared mean flows. Such idealized flows provide a fairly good local representation to the nearly parallel flows in jets. They can support inviscid instabilities of the Kelvin-Helmholtz type. The various mathematically permissible mechanisms that can couple these instabilities to the upstream disturbances are discussed.

  19. Heat transfer characteristics of hypersonic waveriders with an emphasis on the leading edge effects. M.S. Thesis, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanmol, Denis O.; Anderson, John D., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The heat transfer characteristics in surface radiative equilibrium and the aerodynamic performance of blunted hypersonic waveriders are studied along two constant dynamic pressure trajectories for four different Mach numbers. The inviscid leading edge drag was found to be a small (4 to 8 percent) but not negligible fraction of the inviscid drag of the vehicle. Although the viscous drag at the leading edge can be neglected, the presence of the leading edge will influence the transition pattern of the upper and the lower surfaces and therefore affect the viscous drag of the entire vehicle. For an application similar to the National Aerospace Plane (NASP), the present study demonstrates that the waverider remains a valuable concept at high Mach numbers if a state-of-the-art active cooling device is used along the leading edge. At low Mach number (less than 5), the study shows the surface radiative cooling might be sufficient. In all cases, radiative cooling is sufficient for the upper and lower surfaces of the vehicle if ceramic composites are used as thermal protection.

  20. Composition of White Lead and Paints. 

    E-print Network

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1908-01-01

    be divided into. two classes: First, those ~~~hich are gen- erally recognized as standarcl paint materials; seconcl, those which are of dis- puted value or ~vl~ich can be considered only as adulterai~ts. The first class includes white lead, zinc oxide..., whereas, most other pigments do not ~~~crk well. It appears to enter into combination with linseed cil, and form a coating of great permanency. Zinc Oxide.-This is also called zinc white and '-Chinese white." It is some- n-hat variable in composition...

  1. Hydrodynamic effects of leading-edge tubercles on control surfaces and in flapping foil propulsion

    E-print Network

    Stanway, Michael Jordan

    2008-01-01

    This thesis investigates the hydrodynamic effects of biologically-inspired leading-edge tubercles. Two complementary studies examine the performance of three-dimensional hydrofoils based on the pectoral flippers of the ...

  2. User's manual for interfacing a leading edge, vortex rollup program with two linear panel methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desilva, B. M. E.; Medan, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    Sufficient instructions are provided for interfacing the Mangler-Smith, leading edge vortex rollup program with a vortex lattice (POTFAN) method and an advanced higher order, singularity linear analysis for computing the vortex effects for simple canard wing combinations.

  3. Computational simulation of flows about hypersonic geometries with sharp leading edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kevin D.; Dougherty, F. Carroll

    1990-01-01

    Hypersonic waverider design has become an important concern in the aerospace industry. As one part of an inverse design effort for waveriders, work has been done to apply existing Euler and Navier-Stokies flow solvers to hypersonic geometries with sharp leading edges. Previously, calculations were done on bodies with rounded leading edges or with conical solutions for the nose initial conditions. In this paper, solutions are computed about waveriders and conical shapes with sharp leading edges without resorting to either shortrcut. All solutions show attached shocks with fully supersonic flows at the nose and along the leading edges. Flows about several waverider shapes are shown, as well as a preliminary cone with inlet calculation to study the shock/inlet interaction.

  4. Metallic Concepts for Repair of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Space Shuttle Leading Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritzert, Frank; Nesbitt, James

    2007-01-01

    The Columbia accident has focused attention on the critical need for on-orbit repair concepts for wing leading edges in the event that potentially catastrophic damage is incurred during Space Shuttle Orbiter flight. The leading edge of the space shuttle wings consists of a series of eleven panels on each side of the orbiter. These panels are fabricated from reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) which is a light weight composite with attractive strength at very high temperatures. The damage that was responsible for the loss of the Colombia space shuttle was deemed due to formation of a large hole in one these RCC leading edge panels produced by the impact of a large piece of foam. However, even small cracks in the RCC are considered as potentially catastrophic because of the high temperature re-entry environment. After the Columbia accident, NASA has explored various means to perform on-orbit repairs in the event that damage is sustained in future shuttle flights. Although large areas of damage, such as that which doomed Columbia, are not anticipated to re-occur due to various improvements to the shuttle, especially the foam attachment, NASA has also explored various options for both small and large area repair. This paper reports one large area repair concept referred to as the "metallic over-wrap." Environmental conditions during re-entry of the orbiter impose extreme requirements on the RCC leading edges as well as on any repair concepts. These requirements include temperatures up to 3000 F (1650 C) for up to 15 minutes in the presence of an extremely oxidizing plasma environment. Figure 1 shows the temperature profile across one panel (#9) which is subject to the highest temperatures during re-entry. Although the RCC possesses adequate mechanical strength at these temperatures, it lacks oxidation resistance. Oxidation protection is afforded by converting the outer layers of the RCC to SiC by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). At high temperatures in an oxidizing environment, the SiC layer forms a protective SiO2 scale. However, CVD processing to form the SiC layer can result in the formation of small cracks in the outer surface. Hence, as a final fabrication step, a sodium silicate glass, known as "Type A," is applied as a sealant to fill any surface porosity and/or cracks in the coating and the outer portions of the RCC[1]. At relatively low temperatures, the Type A glass melts and flows into the cracks providing oxidation protection at the higher temperatures. In addition, the Type A coating, provides a "dark" coating with a high emissivity. This high emissivity allows the RCC to transfer heat by radiating outward to space as well as dispersing heat within the leading edge cavity. Lastly, the Type A possesses low catalycity which reduces surface temperatures by limiting oxygen recombination on the surface during re-entry.

  5. Design and fabrication of a high temperature leading edge heating array, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Progress during a Phase 1 program to design a high temperature heating array is reported for environmentally testing full-scale shuttle leading edges (30 inch span, 6 to 15 inch radius) at flight heating rates and pressures. Heat transfer analyses of the heating array, individual modules, and the shuttle leading edge were performed, which influenced the array design, and the design, fabrication, and testing of a prototype heater module.

  6. Space shuttle orbiter leading-edge flight performance compared to design goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, D. M.; Johnson, D. W.; Kelly, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Thermo-structural performance of the Space Shuttle orbiter Columbia's leading-edge structural subsystem for the first five (5) flights is compared with the design goals. Lessons learned from thse initial flights of the first reusable manned spacecraft are discussed in order to assess design maturity, deficiencies, and modifications required to rectify the design deficiencies. Flight data and post-flight inspections support the conclusion that the leading-edge structural subsystem hardware performance was outstanding for the initial five (5) flights.

  7. Extension of a vortex-lattice method to include the effects of leading-edge separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mook, D. T.; Maddox, S. A.

    1974-01-01

    Vortex-lattice methods have been used successfully to obtain the aerodynamic coefficients of lifting surfaces without leading-edge separation. It is shown how an existing vortex-lattice method can be modified to include the effects of leading-edge separation. The modified version is then used to calculate the aerodynamic loads on a highly swept delta wing. The results are compared with Peckham's (1958) experimental data.

  8. Formation of Leading-Edge Pinholes in the Space Shuttle Wings Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2000-01-01

    The space shuttle wing leading edge and nose cap are composed of a carbon/carbon composite that is protected by silicon carbide. The coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch leads to cracks in the silicon carbide. The outer coating of the silicon carbide is a sodium-silicate-based glass that becomes fluid at the shuttles high reentry temperatures and fills these cracks. Small pinholes roughly 0.1 mm in diameter have been observed on these materials after 12 or more flights. These pinholes have been investigated by researchers at the NASA Johnson Space Center, Rockwell International, the Boeing Company, Lockheed Martin Corporation, and the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field to determine the possible sources and the extent of damage. A typical pinhole is illustrated in the photomicrographs. These pinholes are found primarily on the wing leading edges and not on the nose cap, which is covered when the orbiter is on the launch pad. The pinholes are generally associated with a bead of zincrich glass. Examination of the orbiter and launch structure indicates that weathering paint on the launch structure leads to deposits of zinc-containing paint flakes on the wing leading edge. These may become embedded in the crevices of the wing leading edge and form the observed zinc-rich glass. Laboratory experiments indicate that zinc oxide reacts vigorously with the glass coating on the silicon carbide. Thus, it is likely that this is the reaction that leads to pinhole formation (Christensen, S.V.: Reinforced Carbon/Carbon Pin Hole Formation Through Zinc Oxide Attack. Rockwell International Internal Letter, RDW 96 057, May 1996). Cross-sectional examination of pinholes suggests that they are enlarged thermal expansion mismatch cracks. This is illustrated in the photomicrographs. A careful microstructural analysis indicates that the pinhole walls consist of layers of zinc-containing glass. Thus, pinholes are likely formed by zinc oxide particles lodging in crevices and forming a corrosive zinc-rich glass that enlarges existing cracks. Having established the likely source of the pinholes, we next needed to model the damage. Our concern was that if a pinhole went through the silicon carbide to the carbon/carbon substrate, oxygen would have a clear path to oxidize the carbon at high temperatures. This possibility was examined with studies in a laboratory furnace. An ultrasonic drill was used to make artificial pinholes in a sample of protected carbon/carbon. After exposure, the specimens were weighed and cross-sectioned to quantify the extent of oxidation below the pinhole. The results at higher temperatures showed good agreement with a simple diffusion-control model. This model is based on the two-step oxidation of carbon to carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. The fluxes are illustrated in the final figure. The model indicates a strong dependence on pinhole diameter. For smaller diameters and short times, the oxidation of carbon is very limited.

  9. Turbulent heat transfer and friction in a segmental channel that simulates leading-edge cooling channels of modern turbine blades 

    E-print Network

    Spence, Rodney Brian

    1995-01-01

    Experiments are conducted to study the effects of channel geometry and asymmetric heating on the heat transfer and friction characteristics of turbulent flows in leading edge cooling channels in stator blades of gas turbines. The leading edge...

  10. A mechanism of leading-edge protrusion in the absence of Arp2/3 complex

    PubMed Central

    Suraneni, Praveen; Fogelson, Ben; Rubinstein, Boris; Noguera, Philippe; Volkmann, Niels; Hanein, Dorit; Mogilner, Alex; Li, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Cells employ protrusive leading edges to navigate and promote their migration in diverse physiological environments. Classical models of leading-edge protrusion rely on a treadmilling dendritic actin network that undergoes continuous assembly nucleated by the Arp2/3 complex, forming ruffling lamellipodia. Recent work demonstrated, however, that, in the absence of the Arp2/3 complex, fibroblast cells adopt a leading edge with filopodia-like protrusions (FLPs) and maintain an ability to move, albeit with altered responses to different environmental signals. We show that formin-family actin nucleators are required for the extension of FLPs but are insufficient to produce a continuous leading edge in fibroblasts lacking Arp2/3 complex. Myosin II is concentrated in arc-like regions of the leading edge in between FLPs, and its activity is required for coordinated advancement of these regions with formin-generated FLPs. We propose that actomyosin contraction acting against membrane tension advances the web of arcs between FLPs. Predictions of this model are verified experimentally. The dependence of myosin II in leading-edge advancement helps explain the previously reported defect in directional movement in the Arpc3-null fibroblasts. We provide further evidence that this defect is cell autonomous during chemotaxis. PMID:25568333

  11. Hypersonic Engine Leading Edge Experiments in a High Heat Flux, Supersonic Flow Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, Herbert J.; Melis, Matthew E.

    1994-01-01

    A major concern in advancing the state-of-the-art technologies for hypersonic vehicles is the development of an aeropropulsion system capable of withstanding the sustained high thermal loads expected during hypersonic flight. Three aerothermal load related concerns are the boundary layer transition from laminar to turbulent flow, articulating panel seals in high temperature environments, and strut (or cowl) leading edges with shock-on-shock interactions. A multidisciplinary approach is required to address these technical concerns. A hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine heat source has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center as one element in a series of facilities at national laboratories designed to experimentally evaluate the heat transfer and structural response of the strut (or cowl) leading edge. A recent experimental program conducted in this facility is discussed and related to cooling technology capability. The specific objective of the experiment discussed is to evaluate the erosion and oxidation characteristics of a coating on a cowl leading edge (or strut leading edge) in a supersonic, high heat flux environment. Heat transfer analyses of a similar leading edge concept cooled with gaseous hydrogen is included to demonstrate the complexity of the problem resulting from plastic deformation of the structures. Macro-photographic data from a coated leading edge model show progressive degradation over several thermal cycles at aerothermal conditions representative of high Mach number flight.

  12. Analytical model and stability analysis of the leading edge spar of a passively morphing ornithopter wing.

    PubMed

    Wissa, Aimy; Calogero, Joseph; Wereley, Norman; Hubbard, James E; Frecker, Mary

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the stability analysis of the leading edge spar of a flapping wing unmanned air vehicle with a compliant spine inserted in it. The compliant spine is a mechanism that was designed to be flexible during the upstroke and stiff during the downstroke. Inserting a variable stiffness mechanism into the leading edge spar affects its structural stability. The model for the spar-spine system was formulated in terms of the well-known Mathieu's equation, in which the compliant spine was modeled as a torsional spring with a sinusoidal stiffness function. Experimental data was used to validate the model and results show agreement within 11%. The structural stability of the leading edge spar-spine system was determined analytically and graphically using a phase plane plot and Strutt diagrams. Lastly, a torsional viscous damper was added to the leading edge spar-spine model to investigate the effect of damping on stability. Results show that for the un-damped case, the leading edge spar-spine response was stable and bounded; however, there were areas of instability that appear for a range of spine upstroke and downstroke stiffnesses. Results also show that there exist a damping ratio between 0.2 and 0.5, for which the leading edge spar-spine system was stable for all values of spine upstroke and downstroke stiffnesses. PMID:26502210

  13. A mechanism of leading-edge protrusion in the absence of Arp2/3 complex.

    PubMed

    Suraneni, Praveen; Fogelson, Ben; Rubinstein, Boris; Noguera, Philippe; Volkmann, Niels; Hanein, Dorit; Mogilner, Alex; Li, Rong

    2015-03-01

    Cells employ protrusive leading edges to navigate and promote their migration in diverse physiological environments. Classical models of leading-edge protrusion rely on a treadmilling dendritic actin network that undergoes continuous assembly nucleated by the Arp2/3 complex, forming ruffling lamellipodia. Recent work demonstrated, however, that, in the absence of the Arp2/3 complex, fibroblast cells adopt a leading edge with filopodia-like protrusions (FLPs) and maintain an ability to move, albeit with altered responses to different environmental signals. We show that formin-family actin nucleators are required for the extension of FLPs but are insufficient to produce a continuous leading edge in fibroblasts lacking Arp2/3 complex. Myosin II is concentrated in arc-like regions of the leading edge in between FLPs, and its activity is required for coordinated advancement of these regions with formin-generated FLPs. We propose that actomyosin contraction acting against membrane tension advances the web of arcs between FLPs. Predictions of this model are verified experimentally. The dependence of myosin II in leading-edge advancement helps explain the previously reported defect in directional movement in the Arpc3-null fibroblasts. We provide further evidence that this defect is cell autonomous during chemotaxis. PMID:25568333

  14. Shuttle Wing Leading Edge Root Cause NDE Team Findings and Implementation of Quantitative Flash Infrared Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Eric R.

    2009-01-01

    Comparison metrics can be established to reliably and repeatedly establish the health of the joggle region of the Orbiter Wing Leading Edge reinforced carbon carbon (RCC) panels. Using these metrics can greatly reduced the man hours needed to perform, wing leading edge scanning for service induced damage. These time savings have allowed for more thorough inspections to be preformed in the necessary areas with out affecting orbiter flow schedule. Using specialized local inspections allows for a larger margin of safety by allowing for more complete characterizations of panel defects. The presence of the t-seal during thermographic inspection can have adverse masking affects on ability properly characterize defects that exist in the joggle region of the RCC panels. This masking affect dictates the final specialized inspection should be preformed with the t-seal removed. Removal of the t-seal and use of the higher magnification optics has lead to the most effective and repeatable inspection method for characterizing and tracking defects in the wing leading edge. Through this study some inadequacies in the main health monitoring system for the orbiter wing leading edge have been identified and corrected. The use of metrics and local specialized inspection have lead to a greatly increased reliability and repeatable inspection of the shuttle wing leading edge.

  15. A Boundary Element Simulation of Flapping Foils with Leading-Edge Separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiang; Dong, Xiaoxia

    2005-11-01

    We develop a three-dimensional numerical model based on potential-flow theory and boundary-integral formulations to investigate the dynamics of a flapping foil with vortex generation at both the trailing and the leading edges. The shedding at the trailing edge is denoted by a single shear layer originated from the sharp edge itself, while the vorticity generation near the leading edge is modeled as a group of shear layers, each of them starting from a prescribed separation line. With a boundary-element algorithm the problem is solved numerically. We find that without taking into account the effect of leading-edge separations, the predictions of the hydrodynamic forces and propulsion efficiency of a heaving-pitching foil match the experimental measurements only in the regime of small Strouhal number or small angle of attack, while the agreement between numerical results and experiments is significantly improved over a large range of kinematic parameters by including the leading-edge separation model.

  16. Evaluation of cloud detection instruments and performance of laminar-flow leading-edge test articles during NASA Leading-Edge Flight-Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Richard E.; Maddalon, Dal V.; Wagner, Richard D.; Fisher, David F.; Young, Ronald

    1989-01-01

    Summary evaluations of the performance of laminar-flow control (LFC) leading edge test articles on a NASA JetStar aircraft are presented. Statistics, presented for the test articles' performance in haze and cloud situations, as well as in clear air, show a significant effect of cloud particle concentrations on the extent of laminar flow. The cloud particle environment was monitored by two instruments, a cloud particle spectrometer (Knollenberg probe) and a charging patch. Both instruments are evaluated as diagnostic aids for avoiding laminar-flow detrimental particle concentrations in future LFC aircraft operations. The data base covers 19 flights in the simulated airline service phase of the NASA Leading-Edge Flight-Test (LEFT) Program.

  17. A role for actin arcs in the leading-edge advance of migrating cells.

    PubMed

    Burnette, Dylan T; Manley, Suliana; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Sougrat, Rachid; Davidson, Michael W; Kachar, Bechara; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2011-04-01

    Epithelial cell migration requires coordination of two actin modules at the leading edge: one in the lamellipodium and one in the lamella. How the two modules connect mechanistically to regulate directed edge motion is not understood. Using live-cell imaging and photoactivation approaches, we demonstrate that the actin network of the lamellipodium evolves spatio-temporally into the lamella. This occurs during the retraction phase of edge motion, when myosin II redistributes to the lamellipodial actin and condenses it into an actin arc parallel to the edge. The new actin arc moves rearward, slowing down at focal adhesions in the lamella. We propose that net edge extension occurs by nascent focal adhesions advancing the site at which new actin arcs slow down and form the base of the next protrusion event. The actin arc thereby serves as a structural element underlying the temporal and spatial connection between the lamellipodium and the lamella during directed cell motion. PMID:21423177

  18. The Influence of Clocking Angle of the Projectile on the Simulated Impact Response of a Shuttle Leading Edge Wing Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Lyle, Karen H.; Spellman, Regina L.

    2005-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted to determine the influence of clocking angle of a foam projectile impacting a space shuttle leading edge wing panel. Four simulations were performed using LS-DYNA. The leading edge panels are fabricated of multiple layers of reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) material. The RCC material was represented using Mat 58, which is a material property that can be used for laminated composite fabrics. Simulations were performed of a rectangular-shaped foam block, weighing 0.23-lb., impacting RCC Panel 9 on the top surface. The material properties of the foam were input using Mat 83. The impact velocity was 1,000 ft/s along the Orbiter X-axis. In two models, the foam impacted on a corner, in one model the foam impacted the panel initially on the 2-in.-long edge, and in the last model the foam impacted the panel on the 7-in.- long edge. The simulation results are presented as contour plots of first principal infinitesimal strain and time history plots of contact force and internal and kinetic energy of the foam and RCC panel.

  19. Extension of leading-edge-suction analogy to wings with separated flow around the side edges at subsonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    A method for determining the lift, drag, and pitching moment for wings which have separated flow at the leading and side edges with subsequently reattached flow downstream and inboard is presented. Limiting values of the contribution to lift of the side-edge reattached flow are determined for rectangular wings. The general behavior of this contribution is computed for rectangular, cropped-delta, cropped-diamond, and cropped-arrow wings. Comparisons of the results of the method and experiment indicate reasonably good correlation of the lift, drag, and pitching moment for a wide planform range. The agreement of the method with experiment was as good as, or better than, that obtained by other methods. The procedure is computerized and is available from COSMIC as NASA Langley computer program A0313.

  20. Modeling Creep-Induced Stress Relaxation at the Leading Edge of SiC/SiC Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Jerry; DiCarlo, James A.

    2007-01-01

    Anticipating the implementation of advanced SiC/SiC composites into internally cooled airfoil components within the turbine section of future aero-propulsion engines, the primary objective of this study was to develop physics-based analytical and finite-element modeling tools to predict the effects of composite creep and stress relaxation at the airfoil leading edges, which will generally experience large thermal gradients at high temperatures. A second objective was to examine how some advanced NASA-developed SiC/SiC systems coated with typical EBC materials would behave as leading edge materials in terms of long-term steady-state operating temperatures. Because of the complexities introduced by mechanical stresses inherent in internally cooled airfoils, a simple cylindrical thin-walled tube model subjected to thermal stresses only is employed for the leading edge, thereby obtaining a best-case scenario for the material behavior. In addition, the SiC/SiC composite materials are assumed to behave as isotropic materials with temperature-dependent viscoelastic creep behavior as measured in-plane on thin-walled panels. Key findings include: (1) without mechanical stresses and for typical airfoil geometries, as heat flux is increased through the leading edge, life-limiting tensile crack formation will occur first in the hoop direction on the inside wall of the leading edge; (2) thermal gradients through all current SiC/SiC systems should be kept below approx.300 F at high temperatures to avoid this cracking; (3) at temperatures near the maximum operating temperatures of advanced SiC/SiC systems, thermal stresses induced by the thermal gradients will beneficially relax with time due to creep; (4) although stress relaxation occurs, the maximum gradient should still not exceed 300oF because of residual tensile stress buildup on the airfoil outer wall during cool-down; and (5) without film cooling and mechanical stresses, the NASA-developed N26 SiC/SiC system with thru-thickness Sylramic-iBN fiber reinforcement and a typical EBC coating has the potential of offering a maximum long-term steady-state operating temperature of approx.3100 F at the surface of the EBC.

  1. The three-dimensional leading-edge vortex of a 'hovering' model hawkmoth

    PubMed Central

    Berg, C. van den; Ellington, C.P.

    1997-01-01

    Recent flow visualisation experiments with the hawkmoth, Manduca sexta, revealed small but clear leading-edge vortex and a pronounced three-dimensional flow. Details of this flow pattern were studied with a scaled-up, robotic insect ('the flapper') that accurately mimicked the wing movements of a hovering hawkmoth. Smoke released from the leading edge of the flapper wing confirmed the existence of a small, strong and stable leading-edge vortex, increasing in size from wingbase to wingtip. Between 25 and 75 per cent of the wing length, its diameter increased approximately from 10 to 50 per cent of the wing chord. The leading-edge vortex had a strong axial flow veolocity, which stabilized it and reduced its diamater. The vortex separated from the wing at approximately 75 per cent of the wing length and thus fed vorticity into a large, tangled tip vortex. If the circulation of the leading-edge vortex were fully used for lift generation, it could support up to two-thirds of the hawkmoth's weight during the downstroke. The growth of this circulation with time and spanwise position clearly identify dynamic stall as the unsteady aerodynamic mechanism responsible for high lift production by hovering hawkmoths and possibly also by many other insect species.

  2. Acoustic Receptivity of Mach 4.5 Boundary Layer with Leading- Edge Bluntness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, Mujeeb R.; Balakumar, Ponnampalam

    2007-01-01

    Boundary layer receptivity to two-dimensional slow and fast acoustic waves is investigated by solving Navier-Stokes equations for Mach 4.5 flow over a flat plate with a finite-thickness leading edge. Higher order spatial and temporal schemes are employed to obtain the solution whereby the flat-plate leading edge region is resolved by providing a sufficiently refined grid. The results show that the instability waves are generated in the leading edge region and that the boundary-layer is much more receptive to slow acoustic waves (by almost a factor of 20) as compared to the fast waves. Hence, this leading-edge receptivity mechanism is expected to be more relevant in the transition process for high Mach number flows where second mode instability is dominant. Computations are performed to investigate the effect of leading-edge thickness and it is found that bluntness tends to stabilize the boundary layer. Furthermore, the relative significance of fast acoustic waves is enhanced in the presence of bluntness. The effect of acoustic wave incidence angle is also studied and it is found that the receptivity of the boundary layer on the windward side (with respect to the acoustic forcing) decreases by more than a factor of 4 when the incidence angle is increased from 0 to 45 deg. However, the receptivity coefficient for the leeward side is found to vary relatively weakly with the incidence angle.

  3. Interplay between phosphoinositide lipids and calcium signals at the leading edge of chemotaxing ameboid cells?

    PubMed Central

    Falke, Joseph J.; Ziemba, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    The chemotactic migration of eukaryotic ameboid cells up concentration gradients is among the most advanced forms of cellular behavior. Chemotaxis is controlled by a complex network of signaling proteins bound to specific lipids on the cytoplasmic surface of the plasma membrane at the front of the cell, or the leading edge. The central lipid players in this leading edge signaling pathway include the phosphoinositides PI(4,5)P2 (PIP2) and PI(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3), both of which play multiple roles. The products of PI(4,5)P2 hydrolysis, diacylglycerol (DAG) and Ins(1,4,5)P3 (IP3), are also implicated as important players. Together, these leading edge phosphoinositides and their degradation products, in concert with a local Ca2+ signal, control the recruitment and activities of many peripheral membrane proteins that are crucial to the leading edge signaling network. The present critical review summarizes the current molecular understanding of chemotactic signaling at the leading edge, including newly discovered roles of phosphoinositide lipids and Ca2+, while highlighting key questions for future research. PMID:24451847

  4. Subsonic balance and pressure investigation of a 60 deg delta wing with leading edge devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tingas, S. A.; Rao, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    Low supersonic wave drag makes the thin highly swept delta wing the logical choice for use on aircraft designed for supersonic cruise. However, the high-lift maneuver capability of the aircraft is limited by severe induced-drag penalties attributed to loss of potential flow leading-edge suction. This drag increase may be alleviated through leading-edge flow control to recover lost aerodynamic thrust through either retention of attached leading-edge flow to higher angles of attack or exploitation of the increased suction potential of separation-induced vortex flow. A low-speed wind-tunnel investigation was undertaken to examine the high-lift devices such as fences, chordwise slots, pylon vortex generators, leading-edge vortex flaps, and sharp leading-edge extensions. The devices were tested individually and in combinations in an attempt to improve high-alpha drag performance with a minimum of low-alpha drag penalty. This report presents an analysis of the force, moment, and static pressure data obtained in angles of attack up to 23 deg, at Mach and Reynolds numbers of 0.16 and 3.85 x 10 to the 6th power per meter, respectively. The results indicate that all the devices produced drag and longitudinal/lateral stability improvements at high lift with, in most cases, minor drag penalties at low angles of attack.

  5. Active concentration of vorticity along the leading edge of a semi-circular wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, David; Collins, Jesse; Colonius, Tim

    2007-11-01

    Leading-edge vorticity concentration plays a key role in lift enhancement for insect flight, swept wings on aircraft, and in unsteady flows through the formation of the dynamic stall vortex. Using 16 spatially localized pulsed-blowing actuators, we are able to concentrate the vorticity at the leading edge of a wing with a semi-circular planform. The experiments are done in a wind tunnel with a model chord Reynolds number of 68,000. Peak vorticity values double those of the unforced case result in an 80 percent increase in lift on the wing relative to the unforced post-stall lift. The semi-circular wing obtains lift coefficients approximately 35 percent larger than a rectangular planform wing with a comparable aspect ratio. The sweep of the wing's leading edge is believed to establish a spanwise transport of vorticity, contributing to the stabilization of the leading edge vortex. Closed-loop control of the wing plunging motion in an unsteady flow stream is demonstrated by modulating the strength of the leading-edge vorticity via a proportional-derivative controller.

  6. A feasibility study of heat-pipe-cooled leading edges for hypersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverstein, C. C.

    1971-01-01

    A theoretical study of the use of heat pipe structures for cooling the leading edges of hypersonic cruise aircraft was carried out over a Mach number range of 6 to 12. Preliminary design studies showed that a heat pipe cooling structure with a 33-in. chordwise length could maintain the maximum temperature of a 65 deg sweepback wing with a 0.5-in. leading edge radius below 1600 F during cruise at Mach 8. A few relatively minor changes in the steady-state design of the structure were found necessary to insure satisfactory cooling during the climb to cruise speed and altitude. It was concluded that heat pipe cooling is an attractive, feasible technique for limiting leading edge temperatures of hypersonic cruise aircraft.

  7. Improved Method for Prediction of Attainable Wing Leading-Edge Thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Harry W.; McElroy, Marcus O.; Lessard, Wendy B.; McCullers, L. Arnold

    1996-01-01

    Prediction of the loss of wing leading-edge thrust and the accompanying increase in drag due to lift, when flow is not completely attached, presents a difficult but commonly encountered problem. A method (called the previous method) for the prediction of attainable leading-edge thrust and the resultant effect on airplane aerodynamic performance has been in use for more than a decade. Recently, the method has been revised to enhance its applicability to current airplane design and evaluation problems. The improved method (called the present method) provides for a greater range of airfoil shapes from very sharp to very blunt leading edges. It is also based on a wider range of Reynolds numbers than was available for the previous method. The present method, when employed in computer codes for aerodynamic analysis, generally results in improved correlation with experimental wing-body axial-force data and provides reasonable estimates of the measured drag.

  8. Effectiveness of leading-edge vortex flaps on 60 and 75 degree delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchman, J. F., III

    1981-01-01

    A series of wind tunnel tests were run on 60 and 75 deg sweep delta wings to examine the effectiveness of leading-edge vortex flaps. Tests results showed that leading-edge vortex flaps are effective in giving large increases in lift-to-drag ratio and decreases in drag over a wide range of angle of attack. Tests on inverted flaps on the 60 deg delta wing showed substantial increases in lift and drag and may indicate a possibility of using inverted flaps on delta wings in the landing portion of flight. The 60 deg data were compared with that for a 75 deg sweep delta wing confirming that leading-edge vortex flap effectiveness is stronger as sweep is increased. Pitching moment effects due to vortex flaps use were also examined.

  9. Fundamental aerodynamic characteristics of delta wings with leading-edge vortex flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, R. M.; Miller, D. S.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation of the aerodynamics of sharp leading-edge delta wings at supersonic speeds has been conducted. The supporting experimental data for this investigation were taken from published force, pressure, and flow-visualization data in which the Mach number normal to the wing leading edge is always less than 1.0. The individual upper- and lower-surface nonlinear characteristics for uncambered delta wings are determined and presented in three charts. The upper-surface data show that both the normal-force coefficient and minimum pressure coefficient increase nonlinearly with a decreasing slope with increasing angle of attack. The lower-surface normal-force coefficient was shown to be independent of Mach number and to increase nonlinearly, with an increasing slope, with increasing angle of attack. These charts are then used to define a wing-design space for sharp leading-edge delta wings.

  10. Influence of blade angle distribution along leading edge on cavitation performance of a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Tan, L.; Cao, S. L.; Wang, Y. C.; Meng, G.; Qu, W. S.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of blade angle distribution along leading edge on cavitation performance of centrifugal pumps is analysed in the present paper. Three sets of blade angle distribution along leading edge for three blade inlet angles are chosen to design nine centrifugal pump impellers. The RNG k-epsilon turbulence model and the Zwart-Gerber-Belamri cavitation model are employed to simulate the cavitation flows in centrifugal pumps with different impellers and the same volute. The numerical results are compared with the experimental data, and the comparison proves that the numerical simulation can accurately predict the cavitation performance of centrifugal pumps. On the basis of the numerical simulations, the pump head variations with pump inlet pressure, and the flow details in centrifugal pump are revealed to demonstrate the influence of blade angle distribution along leading edge on cavitation performances of centrifugal pumps.

  11. Test and Analysis Correlation of Form Impact onto Space Shuttle Wing Leading Edge RCC Panel 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Lyle, Karen H.; Gabrys, Jonathan; Melis, Matthew; Carney, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    Soon after the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) began their study of the space shuttle Columbia accident, "physics-based" analyses using LS-DYNA were applied to characterize the expected damage to the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) leading edge from high-speed foam impacts. Forensic evidence quickly led CAIB investigators to concentrate on the left wing leading edge RCC panels. This paper will concentrate on the test of the left-wing RCC panel 8 conducted at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) and the correlation with an LS-DYNA analysis. The successful correlation of the LS-DYNA model has resulted in the use of LS-DYNA as a predictive tool for characterizing the threshold of damage for impacts of various debris such as foam, ice, and ablators onto the RCC leading edge for shuttle return-to-flight.

  12. A flight test of laminar flow control leading-edge systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, M. C.; Wright, A. S., Jr.; Wagner, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    NASA's program for development of a laminar flow technology base for application to commercial transports has made significant progress since its inception in 1976. Current efforts are focused on development of practical reliable systems for the leading-edge region where the most difficult problems in applying laminar flow exist. Practical solutions to these problems will remove many concerns about the ultimate practicality of laminar flow. To address these issues, two contractors performed studies, conducted development tests, and designed and fabricated fully functional leading-edge test articles for installation on the NASA JetStar aircraft. Systems evaluation and performance testing will be conducted to thoroughly evaluate all system capabilities and characteristics. A simulated airline service flight test program will be performed to obtain the operational sensitivity, maintenance, and reliability data needed to establish that practical solutions exist for the difficult leading-edge area of a future commercial transport employing laminar flow control.

  13. Heat transfer and flowfield measurements in the leading edge region of a stator vane endwall

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, M.B.; Kohli, A.; Thole, K.A.

    1999-07-01

    The leading edge region of a first-stage stator vane experiences high heat transfer rates, especially near the endwall, making it very important to get a better understanding of the formation of the leading edge vortex. In order to improve numerical predictions of the complex endwall flow, benchmark quality experimental data are required. To this purpose, this study documents the endwall heat transfer and static pressure coefficient distribution of a modern stator vane for two different exit Reynolds numbers (Re{sub ex} {equals} 6 {times} 10 {sup 5} and 1.2 {times} 10{sup 6}). In addition, laser-doppler velocimeter measurements of all three components of the mean and fluctuating velocities are presented for a plane in the leading edge region. Results indicate that the endwall heat transfer, pressure distribution, and flowfield characteristics change with Reynolds number. The endwall pressure distribution show that lower pressure coefficients occur at higher Reynolds numbers due to secondary flows. The stronger secondary flows cause enhanced heat transfer near the trailing edge of the vane at the higher Reynolds number. On the other hand, the mean velocity, turbulent kinetic energy, and vorticity results indicate that leading edge vortex is stronger and more turbulent at the lower Reynolds number. The Reynolds number also has an effect on the location of the separation point, which moves closer to the stator vane at lower Reynolds numbers.

  14. An analytical design procedure for the determination of effective leading edge extensions on thick delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffari, F.; Chaturvedi, S. K.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical design procedure for leading edge extensions (LEE) was developed for thick delta wings. This LEE device is designed to be mounted to a wing along the pseudo-stagnation stream surface associated with the attached flow design lift coefficient of greater than zero. The intended purpose of this device is to improve the aerodynamic performance of high subsonic and low supersonic aircraft at incidences above that of attached flow design lift coefficient, by using a vortex system emanating along the leading edges of the device. The low pressure associated with these vortices would act on the LEE upper surface and the forward facing area at the wing leading edges, providing an additional lift and effective leading edge thrust recovery. The first application of this technique was to a thick, round edged, twisted and cambered wing of approximately triangular planform having a sweep of 58 deg and aspect ratio of 2.30. The panel aerodynamics and vortex lattice method with suction analogy computer codes were employed to determine the pseudo-stagnation stream surface and an optimized LEE planform shape.

  15. Interlaminar stress singularities at a straight free edge in composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A quasi three dimensional finite element analysis was used to analyze the edge stress problem in four-ply, composite laminates. Convergence studies were made to explore the existence of stress singularities near the free edge. The existence of stress singularities at the intersection of the interface and the free edge is confirmed.

  16. Summary of past experience in natural laminar flow and experimental program for resilient leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, B. H.

    1979-01-01

    The potential of natural laminar flow for significant drag reduction and improved efficiency for aircraft is assessed. Past experience with natural laminar flow as reported in published and unpublished data and personal observations of various researchers is summarized. Aspects discussed include surface contour, waviness, and smoothness requirements; noise and vibration effects on boundary layer transition, boundary layer stability criteria; flight experience with natural laminar flow and suction stabilized boundary layers; and propeller slipstream, rain, frost, ice and insect contamination effects on boundary layer transition. The resilient leading edge appears to be a very promising method to prevent leading edge insect contamination.

  17. Experimental study of delta wing leading-edge devices for drag reduction at high lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. D., Jr.; Rao, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    The drag reduction devices selected for evaluation were the fence, slot, pylon-type vortex generator, and sharp leading-edge extension. These devices were tested on a 60 degree flatplate delta (with blunt leading edges) in the Langley Research Center 7- by 10-foot high-speed tunnel at low speed and to angles of attack of 28 degrees. Balance and static pressure measurements were taken. The results indicate that all the devices had significant drag reduction capability and improved longitudinal stability while a slight loss of lift and increased cruise drag occurred.

  18. Chronophin coordinates cell leading edge dynamics by controlling active cofilin levels.

    PubMed

    Delorme-Walker, Violaine; Seo, Ji-Yeon; Gohla, Antje; Fowler, Bruce; Bohl, Ben; DerMardirossian, Céline

    2015-09-15

    Cofilin, a critical player of actin dynamics, is spatially and temporally regulated to control the direction and force of membrane extension required for cell locomotion. In carcinoma cells, although the signaling pathways regulating cofilin activity to control cell direction have been established, the molecular machinery required to generate the force of the protrusion remains unclear. We show that the cofilin phosphatase chronophin (CIN) spatiotemporally regulates cofilin activity at the cell edge to generate persistent membrane extension. We show that CIN translocates to the leading edge in a PI3-kinase-, Rac1-, and cofilin-dependent manner after EGF stimulation to activate cofilin, promotes actin free barbed end formation, accelerates actin turnover, and enhances membrane protrusion. In addition, we establish that CIN is crucial for the balance of protrusion/retraction events during cell migration. Thus, CIN coordinates the leading edge dynamics by controlling active cofilin levels to promote MTLn3 cell protrusion. PMID:26324884

  19. Leading Edge 216 Cell 135, October 17, 2008 2008 Elsevier Inc.

    E-print Network

    van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    Leading Edge Review 216 Cell 135, October 17, 2008 ©2008 Elsevier Inc. Introduction Life is a study is DNA. It is this molecule, usually present in just one or few copies per cell, that gives organ- isms involves the discrete and inherently random bio- chemical reactions involved in the production of m

  20. Nonreflection seismic and inversion of surface and guided waves 628 The Leading Edge June 2013

    E-print Network

    Snieder, Roel

    ) analyzed the ambient noise field in a volcanic region and found that Love waves with frequencies of about 0Nonreflection seismic and inversion of surface and guided waves 628 The Leading Edge June 2013 Nonreflection seismic and inversion of surface and guided waves Surface-wave interferometry on local scale

  1. Experimental Investigation of Dynamic Stall on an Airfoil with Leading Edge Tubercles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrynuk, John; Bohl, Douglas

    2013-11-01

    Humpback whales are unique in that their flippers have leading edge ``bumps'' or tubercles. Past work on airfoils modeled after whale flippers has centered on the static aerodynamic characteristics of these airfoils. In the current work, NACA 0012 airfoils modified with leading edge tubercles are investigated to determine the effect of the tubercles on the dynamic characteristics, specifically on dynamic stall vortex formation, of the airfoils. Molecular Tagging Velocimetry (MTV) is used to measure the flow field around the modified airfoils at nondimensional pitch rates of ? = 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4. The results show that the characteristics of the dynamics stall vortex are dependent on the location relative to the peak or valley of the leading edge bumps. These characteristics are also found to be different than those observed in dynamic stall on a smooth leading edge airfoil. In specific, the location of the dynamic stall vortex appears to form further aft on the airfoil for the tubercle case versus the smooth case. This work supported by NSF Grant # 0845882.

  2. 1340 The Leading Edge October 2008 SAGE celebrates 25 years of learning geophysics by

    E-print Network

    1340 The Leading Edge October 2008 SAGE celebrates 25 years of learning geophysics by doing that has helped to answer this question in the affirmative for 25 years is SAGE (Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience). SAGE continues to develop with new faculty, new collaborations, and additional ways

  3. Leading Edge Cell 127, December 29, 2006 2006 Elsevier Inc. 1309

    E-print Network

    Doebley, John

    Leading Edge Review Cell 127, December 29, 2006 ©2006 Elsevier Inc. 1309 Most members of our modern dominance (the robust growth of the central stem in comparison to the side stems), and a loss of natu- ral. The Domestication Process Most researchers believe that agriculture began as an attempt to modify the landscape

  4. Leading Edge Cell 128, March 9, 2007 2007 Elsevier Inc. 821

    E-print Network

    Sheen, Jen

    Leading Edge Previews Cell 128, March 9, 2007 ©2007 Elsevier Inc. 821 Distinguishing self from, 2006). Combin- ing state-of-the-art in vivo imaging and mutational analysis, Shen et al. (2006 compro- mised immunity mediated by multi- ple MLAs. The result suggests that HvWRKY1/2 are negative

  5. Design, analysis, and tests of a shuttle-type heat-pipe-cooled leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, C. J.; Masek, R. V.

    1979-01-01

    A one-half scale heat-pipe-cooled leading edge model was designed and fabricated to verify feasibility and performance of a full-scale Phase B shuttle orbiter design. Model performance was investigated experimentally by radiant heating and aerothermal tests and analytically by using a simple technique which predicts heat pipe start-up from the frozen state and also predicts transient and steady-state thermal behavior. Analytical results agree well with experimental results for start-up and steady-state heat pipe operation. The results indicate that variations in angle of attack and roll orientation had a negligible effect on heat pipe performance. The heat pipes effectively isothermalized the leading edge, and reduced peak temperatures to levels compatible with the use temperatures of superalloys. Results of these tests demonstrated the durability of the heat-pipe-cooled leading edge in withstanding earth-entry thermal and mechanical loads and indicate that the use of heat pipes in leading edge structures is a reliable concept for fully reusable hypersonic cruise and space transportation systems.

  6. Leading-edge tubercles delay stall on humpback whale ,,Megaptera novaeangliae... flippers

    E-print Network

    Fish, Frank

    Leading-edge tubercles delay stall on humpback whale ,,Megaptera novaeangliae... flippers D. S online 15 March 2004 The humpback whale Megaptera novaeangliae is exceptional among the baleen whales these banking and turning maneuvers, humpback whales utilize extremely mobile flippers. The humpback whale

  7. Practical, leading edge content World-class session leaders Unparalleled customer service EXECUTIVE PROGRAM

    E-print Network

    Fletcher, Robin

    Practical, leading edge content · World-class session leaders · Unparalleled customer service apply your learning to your own business situation. Executive-Level Customer Service The Program team the comfort and service of the IACC-certified Donald Gordon Conference Centre, and rest assured that your time

  8. A leading edge heating array and a flat surface heating array - operation, maintenance and repair manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A general description of the leading edge/flat surface heating array is presented along with its components, assembly instructions, installation instructions, operation procedures, maintenance instructions, repair procedures, schematics, spare parts lists, engineering drawings of the array, and functional acceptance test log sheets. The proper replacement of components, correct torque values, step-by-step maintenance instructions, and pretest checkouts are described.

  9. Project 2000-3 Leading Edge Enterprise: Insights into Employment and Training Practices. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Michael; Fischer, John

    Leading-edge firms (LEFs)--at the forefront of their industry in terms of growth or market share--may influence skill development through diffusion of technology, products, or practices and use of market power to set standards or change customer businesses. Study of LEFs can identify the type and mix of skills needed in the industry. LEFs are…

  10. The Leading Edge: A Career Development Workshop Series for Young Adults. Facilitator Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Career Development Foundation, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This booklet is designed to be used by facilitators of the Canadian Career Development Foundation's "The Leading Edge: A Career Development Workshop Series for Young Adults." The guide provides information, including objectives of the workshops and lists of required materials, needed in order to facilitate an introductory session as well as the…

  11. Leading-Edge Efforts To Improve Teaching and Learning: The Hesburgh Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, K. Patricia

    2001-01-01

    Uses 9 years of applications of award finalists for the Hesburgh Award for innovation in undergraduate teaching to examine leading-edge efforts to improve teaching and learning in 2- and 4-year colleges and universities. Describes efforts in three major categories: improving teaching, redesigning courses, and changing the learning environment of…

  12. Numerical simulations of high-speed flows about waveriders with sharp leading edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kevin D.; Dougherty, F. C.

    1992-01-01

    A procedure is developed for the numerical simulation of stagnation-free inviscid supersonic and hypersonic flows about waveriders with sharp leading edges. The numerical approach involves the development of a specialized grid generator (named HYGRID), an algebraic solution-adaptive grid scheme, and a modified flow solving method. A comparison of the results obtained for several waverider geometries with exact solutions, other numerical solutions, and experimental results demonstrated the ability of the new procedure to produce stagnation-free Euler solutions about sharp-edged configurations and to describe the physics of the flow in these regions.

  13. A theoretical investigation of the aerodynamics of low-aspect-ratio wings with partial leading-edge separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, S. C.; Lan, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    A numerical method is developed to predict distributed and total aerodynamic characteristics for low aspect-ratio wings with partial leading-edge separation. The flow is assumed to be steady and inviscid. The wing boundary condition is formulated by the quasi-vortex-lattice method. The leading-edge separated vortices are represented by discrete free vortex elements which are aligned with the local velocity vector at mid-points to satisfy the force free condition. The wake behind the trailing-edge is also force free. The flow tangency boundary condition is satisfied on the wing, including the leading- and trailing-edges. Comparison of the predicted results with complete leading-edge separation has shown reasonably good agreement. For cases with partial leading-edge separation, the lift is found to be highly nonlinear with angle of attack.

  14. The effect of wavy leading edges on aerofoil-gust interaction noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Alex S. H.; Haeri, Sina; Kim, Jae Wook

    2013-11-01

    High-order accurate numerical simulations are performed to investigate the effects of wavy leading edges (WLEs) on aerofoil-gust interaction (AGI) noise. The present study is based on periodic velocity disturbances predominantly in streamwise and vertical directions that are mainly responsible for the surface pressure fluctuation of an aerofoil. In general, the present results show that WLEs lead to reduced AGI noise. It is found that the ratio of the wavy leading-edge peak-to-peak amplitude (LEA) to the longitudinal wavelength of the incident gust (?g) is the most important factor for the reduction of AGI noise. It is observed that there exists a tendency that the reduction of AGI noise increases with LEA/?g and the noise reduction is significant for LEA/?g?0.3. The present results also suggest that any two different cases with the same LEA/?g lead to a strong similarity in their profiles of noise reduction relative to the straight leading-edge case. The wavelength of wavy leading edges (LEW), however, shows minor influence on the reduction of AGI noise under the present gust profiles used. Nevertheless, the present results show that a meaningful improvement in noise reduction may be achieved when 1.0?LEW/?g?1.5. In addition, it is found that the beneficial effects of WLEs are maintained for various flow incidence angles and aerofoil thicknesses. Also, the WLEs remain effective for gust profiles containing multiple frequency components. It is discovered in this paper that WLEs result in incoherent response time to the incident gust across the span, which results in a decreased level of surface pressure fluctuations, hence a reduced level of AGI noise.

  15. Zinc halogen battery electrolyte composition with lead additive

    DOEpatents

    Henriksen, Gary L. (Troy, MI)

    1981-01-01

    This disclosure relates to a zinc halogen battery electrolyte composition containing an additive providing improved zinc-on-zinc recyclability. The improved electrolyte composition involves the use of a lead additive to inhibit undesirable irregular plating and reduce nodular or dendritic growth on the electrode surface. The lead-containing electrolyte composition of the present invention appears to influence not only the morphology of the base plate zinc, but also the morphology of the zinc-on-zinc replate. In addition, such lead-containing electrolyte compositions appear to reduce hydrogen formation.

  16. Effects of leading and trailing edge flaps on the aerodynamics of airfoil/vortex interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, Ahmed A.; Sankar, L. N.; Tadghighi, H.

    1994-01-01

    A numerical procedure has been developed for predicting the two-dimensional parallel interaction between a free convecting vortex and a NACA 0012 airfoil having leading and trailing edge integral-type flaps. Special emphasis is placed on the unsteady flap motion effects which result in alleviating the interaction at subcritical and supercritical onset flows. The numerical procedure described here is based on the implicit finite-difference solutions to the unsteady two-dimensional full potential equation. Vortex-induced effects are computed using the Biot-Savart Law with allowance for a finite core radius. The vortex-induced velocities at the surface of the airfoil are incorporated into the potential flow model via the use of the velocity transpiration approach. Flap motion effects are also modeled using the transpiration approach. For subcritical interactions, our results indicate that trailing edge flaps can be used to alleviate the impulsive loads experienced by the airfoil. For supercritical interactions, our results demonstrate the necessity of using a leading edge flap, rather than a trailing edge flap, to alleviate the interaction. Results for various time-dependent flap motions and their effect on the predicted temporal sectional loads, differential pressures, and the free vortex trajectories are presented

  17. A numerical study of the unsteady leading edge separation bubble on an oscillating airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreskovsky, J. P.; Shamroth, S. J.; Briley, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary study of the unsteady viscous flow in the region of an airfoil leading edge was performed, in which the interaction between the viscous and inviscid flow fields is neglected. The solution method uses the finite difference form of the governing equations throughout the separated flow field and incorporates a transition model based on the integral turbulence kinetic energy equation. The validity of the numerical procedure is verified by making comparisons with analytical solutions to several test problems, including unsteady flow over a plate oscillating in its own plane. The method was then applied to the problem of unsteady viscous flow over a NACA 0012 airfoil oscillating sinusoidally in pitch. The flow field characteristics were in qualitative agreement with experimental results. The bubble moved forward on the airfoil and decreased in size as incidence was increased. Viscous flow in the leading edge region was found to be quasi-steady, while bubble height varied inversely with Reynolds number.

  18. A Reduced-Complexity Investigation of Blunt Leading-Edge Separation Motivated by UCAV Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.; Boelens, Okko J.

    2015-01-01

    A reduced complexity investigation for blunt-leading-edge vortical separation has been undertaken. The overall approach is to design the fundamental work in such a way so that it relates to the aerodynamics of a more complex Uninhabited Combat Air Vehicle (UCAV) concept known as SACCON. Some of the challenges associated with both the vehicle-class aerodynamics and the fundamental vortical flows are reviewed, and principles from a hierarchical complexity approach are used to relate flow fundamentals to system-level interests. The work is part of roughly 6-year research program on blunt-leading-edge separation pertinent to UCAVs, and was conducted under the NATO Science and Technology Organization, Applied Vehicle Technology panel.

  19. Leading-edge 'Vortex Flaps' for enhanced subsonic aerodynamics of slender wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    The 'Vortex Flap' is a novel concept aimed at reducing the lift-dependent drag due to leading-edge flow separation on highly swept, slender wings at high angles of attack. The suction effect of coiled vortices generated via controlled separation over leading-edge flap surfaces is utilized to produce an aerodynamic thrust component. This principle was verified through wind-tunnel experiments on 74-deg and 60-deg delta wings and a supersonic-cruise slender wing aircraft configuration. Adaptation of the vortex-flap for augmentation of roll-control on the 74-deg delta at high angles of attack also was demonstrated. Selected results are presented in this paper to indicate the potential of the vortex flap concept to enhance the low-speed performance, stability and control of slender wing aircraft.

  20. Effects of leading-edge flap oscillation on unsteady delta wing flow and rock control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Salman, Ahmed A.

    1991-01-01

    The isolated and interdisciplinary problems of unsteady fluid dynamics and rigid-body dynamics and control of delta wings with and without leading-edge flap oscillation are considered. For the fluid dynamics problem, the unsteady, compressible, thin-layer Navier-Stokes (NS) equations, which are written relative to a moving frame of reference, are solved along with the unsteady, linearized, Navier-displacement (ND) equations. The NS equations are solved for the flowfield using an implicit finite-volume scheme. The ND equations are solved for the grid deformation, if the leading-edge flaps oscillate, using an ADI scheme. For the dynamics and control problem, the Euler equation of rigid-body rolling motion for a wing and its flaps are solved interactively with the fluid dynamics equations for the wing-rock motion and subsequently for its control. A four-stage Runge-Kutta scheme is used to explicitly integrate the dynamics equation.

  1. Unsteady vortex-dominated flow around wings with oscillating leading-edge flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Salman, Ahmed A.

    1991-01-01

    Unsteady vortex-dominated flow around delta wings with oscillating leading-edge flaps represents an important classs of problems for supermaneuverability and flow control of advanced aircraft. The problem is solved using time accurate integration of the unsteady, compressible, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations in conjunction with the unsteady, linearized, Navier-displacement equations. Starting with an initial configuration of the wing and its flaps, the Navier-Stokes equations are solved on an initial structured grid for the steady flow. The forced oscillation of the flaps is then applied, and the problem is solved accurately in time. The Navier-displacement equations are solved for the grid deformation and the Navier-Stokes equations are solved for the flowfield. Symmetric and anti-symmetric flaps oscillations are presented to study the effect of the flaps oscillation on the leading-edge vortical flow.

  2. Wind-tunnel studies of advanced cargo aircraft concepts. [leading edge vortex flaps for drag reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. M.; Goglia, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    Accomplishments in vortex flap research are summarized. A singular feature of the vortex flap is that, throughout the range of angle of attack range, the flow type remains qualitatively unchanged. Accordingly, no large or sudden change in the aerodynamic characteristics, as happens when forcibly maintained attached flow suddenly reverts to separation, will occur with the vortex flap. Typical wind tunnel test data are presented which show the drag reduction potential of the vortex flap concept applied to a supersonic cruise airplane configuration. The new technology offers a means of aerodynamically augmenting roll-control effectiveness on slender wings at higher angles of attack by manipulating the vortex flow generated from leading edge separation. The proposed manipulator takes the form of a flap hinged at or close to the leading edge, normally retracted flush with the wing upper surface to conform to the airfoil shape.

  3. Cooling Strategies for Vane Leading Edges in a Syngas Environment Including Effects of Deposition and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, Forrest; Bons, Jeffrey

    2014-09-30

    The Department of Energy has goals to move land based gas turbine systems to alternate fuels including coal derived synthetic gas and hydrogen. Coal is the most abundant energy resource in the US and in the world and it is economically advantageous to develop power systems which can use coal. Integrated gasification combined cycles are (IGCC) expected to allow the clean use of coal derived fuels while improving the ability to capture and sequester carbon dioxide. These cycles will need to maintain or increase turbine entry temperatures to develop competitive efficiencies. The use of coal derived syngas introduces a range of potential contaminants into the hot section of the gas turbine including sulfur, iron, calcium, and various alkali metals. Depending on the effectiveness of the gas clean up processes, there exists significant likelihood that the remaining materials will become molten in the combustion process and potentially deposit on downstream turbine surfaces. Past evidence suggests that deposition will be a strong function of increasing temperature. Currently, even with the best gas cleanup processes a small level of particulate matter in the syngas is expected. Consequently, particulate deposition is expected to be an important consideration in the design of turbine components. The leading edge region of first stage vanes most often have higher deposition rates than other areas due to strong fluid acceleration and streamline curvature in the vicinity of the surface. This region remains one of the most difficult areas in a turbine nozzle to cool due to high inlet temperatures and only a small pressure ratio for cooling. The leading edge of a vane often has relatively high heat transfer coefficients and is often cooled using showerhead film cooling arrays. The throat of the first stage nozzle is another area where deposition potentially has a strongly adverse effect on turbine performance as this region meters the turbine inlet flow. Based on roughness levels found on in service vanes (Bons, et al., 2001, up to 300 microns) flow blockage in first stage turbine nozzles can easily reach 1 to 2 percent in conventional turbines. Deposition levels in syngas fueled gas turbines are expected to be even more problematic. The likelihood of significant deposition to the leading edge of vanes in a syngas environment indicates the need to examine this effect on the leading edge cooling problem. It is critical to understand the influence of leading edge geometry and turbulence on deposition rates for both internally and showerhead cooled leading edge regions. The expected level of deposition in a vane stagnation region not only significantly changes the heat transfer problem but also suggests that cooling arrays may clog. Addressing the cooling issue suggests a need to better understand stagnation region heat transfer with realistic roughness as well as the other variables affecting transport near the leading edge. Also, the question of whether leading edge regions can be cooled internally with modern cooling approaches should also be raised, thus avoiding the clogging issue. Addressing deposition in the pressure side throat region of the nozzle is another critical issue for this environment. Issues such as examining the protective effect of slot and full coverage discrete-hole film cooling on limiting deposition as well as the influence of roughness and turbulence on effectiveness should be raised. The objective of this present study is to address these technical challenges to help enable the development of high efficiency syngas tolerant gas turbine engines.

  4. Test and Analysis of a Hyper-X Carbon-Carbon Leading Edge Chine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Russell W.; Sikora, Joseph G.; Lindell, Michael C.

    2005-01-01

    During parts production for the X43A Mach 10 hypersonic vehicle nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of a leading edge chine detected on imbedded delamination near the lower surface of the part. An ultimate proof test was conducted to verify the ultimate strength of this leading edge chine part. The ultimate proof test setup used a pressure bladder design to impose a uniform distributed pressure field over the bi-planar surface of the chine test article. A detailed description of the chine test article and experimental test setup is presented. Analysis results from a linear status model of the test article are also presented and discussed. Post-test inspection of the specimen revealed no visible failures or areas of delamination.

  5. Leading Edge Flow Structure of a Dynamically Pitching NACA 0012 Airfoil 

    E-print Network

    Pruski, Brandon

    2012-11-27

    FLOW STRUCTURE OF A DYNAMICALLY PITCHING NACA 0012 AIRFOIL A Thesis by BRANDON JAMES PRUSKI Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved... by: Chair of Committee, Rodney Bowersox Committee Members, Helen Reed Simon North Head of Department, Rodney Bowersox December 2012 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering Copyright 2012 Brandon James Pruski ABSTRACT The leading edge ow...

  6. Visualization of leading edge vortices on a series of flat plate delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, Francis M.; Ng, T. Terry; Nelson, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of flow visualization data obtained as part of NASA Grant NAG2-258 is presented. During the course of this study, many still and high speed motion pictures were taken of the leading edge vortices on a series of flat plate delta wings at varying angles of attack. The purpose is to present a systematic collection of photographs showing the state of vortices as a function of the angle of attack for the four models tested.

  7. Effects of Nose Radius and Aerodynamic Loading on Leading Edge Receptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammerton, P. W.; Kerschen, E. J.

    1998-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the effects of airfoil thickness and mean aerodynamic loading on boundary-layer receptivity in the leading-edge region. The case of acoustic free-stream disturbances, incident on a thin cambered airfoil with a parabolic leading edge in a low Mach number flow, is considered. An asymptotic analysis based on large Reynolds number is developed, supplemented by numerical results. The airfoil thickness distribution enters the theory through a Strouhal number based on the nose radius of the airfoil, S = (omega)tau(sub n)/U, where omega is the frequency of the acoustic wave and U is the mean flow speed. The influence of mean aerodynamic loading enters through an effective angle-of-attack parameter ti, related to flow around the leading edge from the lower surface to the upper. The variation of the receptivity level is analyzed as a function of S, mu, and characteristics of the free-stream acoustic wave. For an unloaded leading edge, a finite nose radius dramatically reduces the receptivity level compared to that for a flat plate, the amplitude of the instability waves in the boundary layer being decreased by an order of magnitude when S = 0.3. Modest levels of aerodynamic loading are found to further decrease the receptivity level for the upper surface of the airfoil, while an increase in receptivity level occurs for the lower surface. For larger angles of attack close to the critical angle for boundary layer separation, a local rise in the receptivity level occurs for the upper surface, while for the lower surface the receptivity decreases. The effects of aerodynamic loading are more pronounced at larger values of S. Oblique acoustic waves produce much higher receptivity levels than acoustic waves propagating downstream parallel to the airfoil chord.

  8. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of the Slip-Side Joggle Regions of Wing-Leading-Edge Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan; Phillips, Dawn R.

    2011-01-01

    The Space Shuttle wing-leading edge consists of panels that are made of reinforced carbon-carbon. Coating spallation was observed near the slip-side region of the panels that experience extreme heating. To understand this phenomenon, a root-cause investigation was conducted. As part of that investigation, fracture mechanics analyses of the slip-side joggle regions of the hot panels were conducted. This paper presents an overview of the fracture mechanics analyses.

  9. Effect of leading-edge vortex flaps on aerodynamic performance of delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. S.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of leading-edge vortex flaps on the aerodynamic characteristics of highly swept-back wings is analytically investigated, using the free vortex sheet method. The method, based on a three-dimensional inviscid flow model, is an advanced panel type employing quadratic doublet distributions to represent the wing surface, rolled-up vortex sheet and wake and is capable of computing forces, moments and surface pressures.

  10. Leading edge vortex-flap experiments on a 74 deg delta wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    Exploratory wind tunnel tests are reported on a 74 deg. delta wing model. The potential of a vortex flap concept in reducing the subsonic lift dependent drag of highly swept, slender wings is examined. The suction effect of coiled vortices generated through controlled separation over leading edge flap surfaces to produce a thrust component is discussed. A series of vortex-flap configurations were investigated to explore the effect of some primary geometric variables.

  11. The lift of sharp-leading-edged delta wings with blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavella, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of the lift augmentation due to a thin jet of air issuing from a slot along the leading edge of a delta wing is presented. The problem is treated with an extension of the method of Brown and Michael, representing the separated flow on the lee side of the wing by a pair of concentrated vortices and corresponding feeding sheets. It is assumed that the jet is not affected by Coanda forces. The analysis produces qualitative agreement with experiments.

  12. Estimation of leading-edge thrust for supersonic wings of arbitrary planform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, H. W.; Mack, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    A numerical method for the estimation of leading edge thrust for supersonic wings of arbitrary planform was developed and was programmed as an extension to an existing high speed digital computer method for prediction of wing pressure distributions. The accuracy of the method was assessed by comparison with linearized theory results for a series of flat delta wings. Application of the method to wings of arbitrary planform, both flat and cambered, is illustrated in several examples.

  13. F-18 HARV smoke and tuft vortex flow visualization along leading edge extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Flow visualization smoke marks vortex flows along the leading edge extension on an F/A-18 flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in its High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) program. The aircraft is at a high angle of attack in this photo. The aircraft was modified with a thrust vectoring system to further investigate high angle of attack flying. The program was conducted jointly with NASA's Langley Research Center.

  14. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Core Academic Strategic Designs: 3. University Park Campus School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high schools across the…

  15. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Relevance Strategic Designs: 8. High Tech High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high schools across the…

  16. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Relevance Strategic Designs: 7. TechBoston Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high schools across the…

  17. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Core Academic Strategic Designs: 1. Academy of the Pacific Rim

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high schools across the…

  18. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Core Academic Strategic Designs: 2. Noble Street Charter High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high schools across the…

  19. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Relevance Strategic Designs: 5. Life Academy of Health and Bioscience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high schools across the…

  20. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Personalization Strategic Designs: 9. MetWest High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high schools across the…

  1. A Reynolds Number Study of Wing Leading-Edge Effects on a Supersonic Transport Model at Mach 0.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. Susan; Owens, Lewis R., Jr.; Chu, Julio

    1999-01-01

    A representative supersonic transport design was tested in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) in its original configuration with small-radius leading-edge flaps and also with modified large-radius inboard leading-edge flaps. Aerodynamic data were obtained over a range of Reynolds numbers at a Mach number of 0.3 and angles of attack up to 16 deg. Increasing the radius of the inboard leading-edge flap delayed nose-up pitching moment to a higher lift coefficient. Deflecting the large-radius leading-edge flap produced an overall decrease in lift coefficient and delayed nose-up pitching moment to even higher angles of attack as compared with the undeflected large- radius leading-edge flap. At angles of attack corresponding to the maximum untrimmed lift-to-drag ratio, lift and drag coefficients decreased while lift-to-drag ratio increased with increasing Reynolds number. At an angle of attack of 13.5 deg., the pitching-moment coefficient was nearly constant with increasing Reynolds number for both the small-radius leading-edge flap and the deflected large-radius leading-edge flap. However, the pitching moment coefficient increased with increasing Reynolds number for the undeflected large-radius leading-edge flap above a chord Reynolds number of about 35 x 10 (exp 6).

  2. LFC leading edge glove flight: Aircraft modification design, test article development and systems integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etchberger, F. R.

    1983-01-01

    Reduction of skin friction drag by suction of boundary layer air to maintain laminar flow has been known since Prandtl's published work in 1904. The dramatic increases in fuel costs and the potential for periods of limited fuel availability provided the impetus to explore technologies to reduce transport aircraft fuel consumption. NASA sponsored the Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) program in 1976 to develop technologies to improve fuel efficiency. This report documents the Lockheed-Georgia Company accomplishments in designing and fabricating a leading-edge flight test article incorporating boundary layer suction slots to be flown by NASA on their modified JetStar aircraft. Lockheed-Georgia Company performed as the integration contractor to design the JetStar aircraft modification to accept both a Lockheed and a McDonnell Douglas flight test article. McDonnell Douglas uses a porous skin concept. The report describes aerodynamic analyses, fabrication techniques, JetStar modifications, instrumentation requirements, and structural analyses and testing for the Lockheed test article. NASA will flight test the two LFC leading-edge test articles in a simulated commercial environment over a 6 to 8 month period in 1984. The objective of the flight test program is to evaluate the effectiveness of LFC leading-edge systems in reducing skin friction drag and consequently improving fuel efficiency.

  3. Controlled vortical flow on delta wings through unsteady leading edge blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. T.; Roberts, Leonard

    1990-01-01

    The vortical flow over a delta wing contributes an important part of the lift - the so called nonlinear lift. Controlling this vortical flow with its favorable influence would enhance aircraft maneuverability at high angle of attack. Several previous studies have shown that control of the vortical flow field is possible through the use of blowing jets. The present experimental research studies vortical flow control by applying a new blowing scheme to the rounded leading edge of a delta wing; this blowing scheme is called Tangential Leading Edge Blowing (TLEB). Vortical flow response both to steady blowing and to unsteady blowing is investigated. It is found that TLEB can redevelop stable, strong vortices even in the post-stall angle of attack regime. Analysis of the steady data shows that the effect of leading edge blowing can be interpreted as an effective change in angle of attack. The examination of the fundamental time scales for vortical flow re-organization after the application of blowing for different initial states of the flow field is studied. Different time scales for flow re-organization are shown to depend upon the effective angle of attack. A faster response time can be achieved at angles of attack beyond stall by a suitable choice of the initial blowing momentum strength. Consequently, TLEB shows the potential of controlling the vortical flow over a wide range of angles of attack; i.e., in both for pre-stall and post-stall conditions.

  4. Application of a flush airdata sensing system to a wing leading edge (LE-FADS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Moes, Timothy R.; Czerniejewski, Mark W.; Nichols, Douglas A.

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of locating a flush airdata sensing (FADS) system on a wing leading edge where the operation of the avionics or fire control radar system will not be hindered is investigated. The leading-edge FADS system (LE-FADS) was installed on an unswept symmetrical airfoil and a series of low-speed wind-tunnel tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of the system. As a result of the tests it is concluded that the aerodynamic models formulated for use on aircraft nosetips are directly applicable to wing leading edges and that the calibration process is similar. Furthermore, the agreement between the airdata calculations for angle of attack and total pressure from the LE-FADS and known wind-tunnel values suggest that wing-based flush airdata systems can be calibrated to a high degree of accuracy. Static wind-tunnel tests for angles of attack from -50 deg to 50 deg and dynamic pressures from 3.6 to 11.4 lb/sq ft were performed.

  5. Increased heat transfer to a cylindrical leading edge due to spanwise variations in the freestream velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, D. L.; Vanfossen, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    The present study numerically demonstrates how small spanwise variations in velocity upstream of a body can cause relatively large increases in the spanwise-averaged heat transfer to the leading edge. Vorticity introduced by spanwise variations, first decays as it drifts downstream, then amplifies in the stagnation region as a result of vortex stretching. This amplification can cause a periodic array of 3 D structures, similar to horseshoe vortices, to form. The numerical results indicate that, for the given wavelength, there is an amplitude threshold below which a structure does not form. A one-dimensional analysis, to predict the decay of vorticity in the absence of the body, in conjunction with the full numerical results indicated that the threshold is more accurately stated as minimum level of vorticity required in the leading edge region for a structure to form. It is possible, using the one-dimensional analysis, to compute an optimum wavelength in terms of the maximum vorticity reaching the leading edge region for given amplitude. A discussion is presented which relates experimentally observed trends to the trends of the present phenomena.

  6. Vorticity transport and the leading-edge vortex of a plunging airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslam Panah, Azar; Akkala, James M.; Buchholz, James H. J.

    2015-08-01

    The three-dimensional flow field was experimentally characterized for a nominally two-dimensional flat-plate airfoil plunging at large amplitude and reduced frequencies, using three-dimensional reconstructions of planar PIV data at a chord-based Reynolds number of 10,000. Time-resolved, instantaneous PIV measurements reveal that secondary vorticity, of opposite sign to the primary vortex, is intermittently entrained into the leading-edge vortex (LEV) throughout the downstroke, with the rate of entrainment increasing toward the end of the stroke when the leading-edge shear layer weakens. A planar vorticity transport analysis around the LEV indicated that, during the downstroke, the surface vorticity flux due to the pressure gradient is consistently about half that due to the leading-edge shear layer for all parameter values investigated, demonstrating that production and entrainment of secondary vorticity is an important mechanism regulating LEV strength. A small but non-negligible vorticity source was also attributed to spanwise flow toward the end of the downstroke. Aggregate vortex tilting is notably more significant for higher plunge frequencies, suggesting that the vortex core is more three-dimensional.

  7. Effect of leading-edge roughness on stability and transition of wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutz, Douglas; Freels, Justin; Hidore, John; White, Edward

    2011-11-01

    Over time, wind turbine blades erode due to impacts with sand and other debris. The resulting surface roughness degrades the blades' aerodynamic performance. Experimental studies conducted at the Texas A&M University Low-Speed Wind Tunnel examine roughness effects using a 2D NACA 63-418 airfoil with interchangeable leading edges of varying roughness at chord Reynolds numbers up to 3 . 0 ×106 . These data reveal decreased CL , max and increased CD , min as roughness increases. At very high roughness levels, even the lift curve slope is reduced. To better understand these findings and improve modeling of roughness effects, extensive boundary layer measurements including surface-mounted hotfilms and boundary-layer velocity profiles are used to assess how laminar-to-turbulent transition is promoted by roughness. As expected, roughness accelerates transition. Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) transition is observed only for a smooth leading edge while bypass transition is observed for the moderate and high roughness levels. Results are compared to N-factor transition predictions generated with software used by the wind industry. Predictions are successful for the smooth leading edge but even the low roughness level prevents correct transition prediction using TS-based methods. Support for this work by Vestas Technology Americas, Inc., is gratefully acknowledged as is the support of the wind-energy research group and the Low-Speed Wind Tunnel staff.

  8. Simulation of Flow Through Breach in Leading Edge at Mach 24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Alter, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    A baseline solution for CFD Point 1 (Mach 24) in the STS-107 accident investigation was modified to include effects of holes through the leading edge into a vented cavity. The simulations were generated relatively quickly and early in the investigation by making simplifications to the leading edge cavity geometry. These simplifications in the breach simulations enabled: 1) A very quick grid generation procedure; 2) High fidelity corroboration of jet physics with internal surface impingements ensuing from a breach through the leading edge, fully coupled to the external shock layer flow at flight conditions. These simulations provided early evidence that the flow through a 2 inch diameter (or larger) breach enters the cavity with significant retention of external flow directionality. A normal jet directed into the cavity was not an appropriate model for these conditions at CFD Point 1 (Mach 24). The breach diameters were of the same order or larger than the local, external boundary-layer thickness. High impingement heating and pressures on the downstream lip of the breach were computed. It is likely that hole shape would evolve as a slot cut in the direction of the external streamlines. In the case of the 6 inch diameter breach the boundary layer is fully ingested.

  9. The influence of leading-edge geometry on profile and secondary losses in turbine cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benner, Michael William

    This thesis presents detailed experimental results of the midspan and secondary flows from two large-scale, low-speed linear turbine cascades. The airfoils for the two cascades differ mainly in their leading-edge geometries. Detailed flow field measurements were made upstream and downstream of the cascades using three- and seven-hole pressure probes and static pressure distributions were measured on the airfoil surfaces. The data were supplemented with extensive surface oil flow visualization. Measurements were made at three different values of incidence: 0, +10 and +20 degrees. For the off-design profile losses, significant discrepancies were observed between the present measurements and the predictions from the most recent available correlation (Moustapha et al., 1990). Based on data from the present experiment and cases from the open literature, a revised off-design profile loss correlation has been developed that is significantly more successful than the existing correlations. The new correlation includes leading-edge wedge angle as an influential and additional correlating parameter. The results from the secondary flow measurements at the design incidence suggest that the leading-geometry has only a minor influence on the secondary losses, whereas, the loading on the forward part of the airfoil appears to be of primary importance. At off-design incidence, the most recent off-design secondary loss correlation (Moustapha et al., 1990) includes leading-edge diameter as an influential correlating parameter. The correlation predicts that the secondary losses for the airfoil with the larger leading-edge diameter are lower at off-design incidence; however, the opposite is observed experimentally. The loss results at high positive incidence have also highlighted some serious shortcomings with the conventional method of loss decomposition. An empirical prediction method for secondary losses has been developed to replace the conventional one. In addition to the experimental study, a computational investigation was conducted using a CFD code that is currently widely used in turbomachinery design. The objective was to determine the degree to which the code is capable of predicting off design profile losses. For cases at moderate values of incidence, the correct loss trend was predicted; however, the code did not predict the trailing-edge separation that occurred at high incidence.

  10. Composite polymer-glass edge cladding for laser disks

    DOEpatents

    Powell, Howard T. (Livermore, CA); Riley, Michael O. (San Ramon, CA); Wolfe, Charles R. (Palo Alto, CA); Lyon, Richard E. (Livermore, CA); Campbell, John H. (Livermore, CA); Jessop, Edward S. (Tracy, CA); Murray, James E. (Livermore, CA)

    1989-01-01

    Large neodymium glass laser disks for disk amplifiers such as those used in the Nova laser require an edge cladding which absorbs at 1 micrometer. This cladding prevents edge reflections from causing parasitic oscillations which would otherwise deplete the gain. Nova now utilizes volume-absorbing monolithic-glass claddings which are fused at high temperature to the disks. These perform quite well but are expensive to produce. Absorbing glass strips are adhesively bonded to the edges of polygonal disks using a bonding agent whose index of refraction matches that of both the laser and absorbing glass. Optical finishing occurs after the strips are attached. Laser disks constructed with such claddings have shown identical gain performance to the previous Nova disks and have been tested for hundreds of shots without significant degradation.

  11. Composite polymer: Glass edge cladding for laser disks

    DOEpatents

    Powell, H.T.; Wolfe, C.A.; Campbell, J.H.; Murray, J.E.; Riley, M.O.; Lyon, R.E.; Jessop, E.S.

    1987-11-02

    Large neodymium glass laser disks for disk amplifiers such as those used in the Nova laser require an edge cladding which absorbs at 1 micrometer. This cladding prevents edge reflections from causing parasitic oscillations which would otherwise deplete the gain. Nova now utilizes volume-absorbing monolithic-glass claddings which are fused at high temperature to the disks. These perform quite well but are expensive to produce. Absorbing glass strips are adhesively bonded to the edges of polygonal disks using a bonding agent whose index of refraction matches that of both the laser and absorbing glass. Optical finishing occurs after the strips are attached. Laser disks constructed with such claddings have shown identical gain performance to the previous Nova disks and have been tested for hundreds of shots without significant degradation. 18 figs.

  12. Flow visualization of vortices locked by spanwise blowing over wings featuring a unique leading and trailing-edge flap system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, G. E.; Campbell, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Flow visualization studies were conducted to qualitatively determine the effects of active generation and augmentation of vortex flow over wings by blowing a discrete jet in a spanwise direction in the channel formed by extension of upper surface leading- and trailing-edge flaps. Spanwise blowing from a reflection plane over a rectangular wing was found to generate and lock a dual corotating vortex system within the channel and, at sufficient blowing rates, cause the separated flow off the upper end of the leading-edge flap to reattach to the trailing-edge flap. Test parameters included wing angle of attack, jet momentum coefficient, leading- and trailing-edge flap deflection angle, and jet location above the wing surface. Effects due to removal of the leading- and trailing-edge flap were also investigated.

  13. A study of the vortical flow over a delta wing with a leading edge extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Heuy-Dong; Lee, Young-Ki; Kim, Tae-Ho; Sohn, Myoung-Hwan

    2003-11-01

    The present paper describes computational and experimental work on the vortex flow characteristics of a sharp-edged delta wing with a leading edge extension (LEX). Experiment was carried out using a low-speed wind tunnel that has a test section of 3.5 m(W)×2.45 m(H)×8.7 m(L). The angle of attack of the delta wing ranges from 10° to 30°. The free stream velocity is fixed at 20 m/s, which corresponds to Reynolds number of 0.88×106. Computations using the mass-averaged implicit 3D Navier-Stokes equations were applied to predict the complicated vortical flow over the delta wing. The governing equations were discretized in space using a fully implicit finite volume differencing formation. The standard k-? turbulent model was employed to close the governing equations. The present computations predicted the experimented flow field with a good accuracy.

  14. Hypersonic aerospace vehicle leading-edge cooling using heat-pipe, transpiration and film-cooling techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Modlin, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of cooling hypersonic-vehicle leading-edge structures exposed to severe aerodynamic surface heat fluxes was studied, using a combination of liquid-metal heat pipes and surface-mass-transfer cooling techniques. A generalized, transient, finite-difference-based hypersonic leading-edge cooling model was developed that incorporated these effects and was demonstrated on an assumed aerospace plane-type wing leading edge section and a SCRAMJET engine inlet leading-edge section. The hypersonic leading-edge cooling model was developed using an existing, experimentally verified heat-pipe model. Then the existing heat-pipe model was modified by adding both transpiration and film-cooling options as new surface boundary conditions. The models used to predict the leading-edge surface heat-transfer reduction effects of the transpiration and film cooling were modifications of more-generalized, empirically based models obtained from the literature. It is concluded that cooling leading-edge structures exposed to severe hypersonic-flight environments using a combination of liquid-metal heat pipe, surface transpiration, and film cooling methods appears feasible.

  15. An improved Woodward's panel method for calculating leading-edge and side-edge suction forces at subsonic and supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. E.; Mehrotra, S. C.

    1979-01-01

    Woodward's panel method for subsonic and supersonic flow was improved by employing control points determined by exactly matching two-dimensional pressure at a finite number of points. The results show great improvement in the predicted pressure distribution of a flapped airfoil. With the paneling scheme of cosine law in both chordwise and spanwise directions, the method is shown to accurately predict leading edge and side edge suction forces of various configurations in subsonic and supersonic flow.

  16. Subsonic balance and pressure investigation of a 60-deg delta wing with leading-edge devices (data report)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. M.; Tingas, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    The drag reduction potential of leading edge devices on a 60 degree delta wing at high lift was examined. Geometric variations of fences, chordwise slots, pylon type vortex generators, leading edge vortex flaps, and sharp leading edge extensions were tested individually and in specific combinations to improve high-alpha drag performance with a minimum of low-alpha drag penalty. The force, moment, and surface static pressure data for angles of attack up to 23 degrees, at Mach and Reynolds numbers of 0.16 and 3.85 x 10 to the 6th power per meter are documented.

  17. How differential deflection of the inboard and outboard leading-edge flaps affected the handling qua

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    How differential deflection of the inboard and outboard leading-edge flaps affected the handling qualities of this modified F/A-18A was evaluated during the first check flight in the Active Aeroelastic Wing program at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. The Active Aeroelastic Wing program at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center seeks to determine the advantages of twisting flexible wings for primary maneuvering roll control at transonic and supersonic speeds, with traditional control surfaces such as ailerons and leading-edge flaps used to aerodynamically induce the twist. From flight test and simulation data, the program intends to develop structural modeling techniques and tools to help design lighter, more flexible high aspect-ratio wings for future high-performance aircraft, which could translate to more economical operation or greater payload capability. AAW flight tests began in November, 2002 with checkout and parameter-identification flights. Based on data obtained during the first flight series, new flight control software will be developed and a second series of research flights will then evaluate the AAW concept in a real-world environment. The program uses wings that were modified to the flexibility of the original pre-production F-18 wing. Other modifications include a new actuator to operate the outboard leading edge flap over a greater range and rate, and a research flight control system to host the aeroelastic wing control laws. The Active Aeroelastic Wing Program is jointly funded and managed by the Air Force Research Laboratory and NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, with Boeing's Phantom Works as prime contractor for wing modifications and flight control software development. The F/A-18A aircraft was provided by the Naval Aviation Systems Test Team and modified for its research role by NASA Dryden technicians.

  18. Flexible Metallic Overwrap Concept Developed for On-Orbit Repair of Space Shuttle Orbiter Leading Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritzert, Frank J.; Nesbitt, James A.

    2005-01-01

    The Columbia accident has focused attention on the critical need for on-orbit repair concepts for leading edges in the event that damage is incurred during space shuttle orbiter flight. Damage that is considered as potentially catastrophic for orbiter leading edges ranges from simple cracks to holes as large as 16 in. in diameter. NASA is particularly interested in examining potential solutions for areas of larger damage since such a problem was identified as the cause for the Columbia disaster. One possible idea for the on-orbit repair of the reinforced carbon/carbon (RCC) leading edges is an overwrap concept that would use a metallic sheet flexible enough to conform to the contours of the orbiter and robust enough to protect any problem area from catastrophic failure during reentry. The simplified view of the application of a refractory metal sheet over a mockup of shuttle orbiter panel 9, which experiences the highest temperatures on the shuttle during reentry is shown. The metallic overwrap concept is attractive because of its versatility as well as the ease with which it can be included in an onboard repair kit. Reentry of the orbiter into Earth's atmosphere imposes extreme requirements on repair materials. Temperatures can exceed 1650 C for up to 15 min in the presence of an extremely oxidizing plasma environment. Several other factors are critical, including catalysity, emissivity, and vibrational and aerodynamic loads. Materials chosen for this application will need to be evaluated with respect to high-temperature capability, resistance to oxidation, strength, coefficient of thermal expansion, and thermal conductivity. The temperature profile across panel 9 during reentry as well as a schematic of the overwrap concept itself is shown.

  19. Carbon dioxide gas purification and analytical measurement for leading edge 193nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle Vogt, Sarah; Landoni, Cristian; Applegarth, Chuck; Browning, Matt; Succi, Marco; Pirola, Simona; Macchi, Giorgio

    2015-03-01

    The use of purified carbon dioxide (CO2) has become a reality for leading edge 193 nm immersion lithography scanners. Traditionally, both dry and immersion 193 nm lithographic processes have constantly purged the optics stack with ultrahigh purity compressed dry air (UHPCDA). CO2 has been utilized for a similar purpose as UHPCDA. Airborne molecular contamniation (AMC) purification technologies and analytical measurement methods have been extensively developed to support the Lithography Tool Manufacturers purity requirements. This paper covers the analytical tests and characterizations carried out to assess impurity removal from 3.0 N CO2 (beverage grade) for its final utilization in 193 nm and EUV scanners.

  20. Influence of a heated leading edge on boundary layer growth, stability, and transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landrum, D. B.; Macha, J. M.

    1987-06-01

    This paper presents the results of a combined theoretical and experimental study of the influence of a heated leading edge on the growth, stability, and transition of a two-dimensional boundary layer. The findings are directly applicable to aircraft wings and nacelles that use surface heating for anti-icing protection. The potential effects of the non-adiabatic condition are particularly important for laminar-flow sections where even small perturbations can result in significantly degraded aerodynamic performance. The results of the study give new insight to the fundamental coupling between streamwise pressure gradient and surface heat flux in laminar and transitional boundary layers.

  1. Influence of a heated leading edge on boundary layer growth, stability and transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landrum, D. B.; Macha, J. M.

    1987-04-01

    This paper presents the results of a combined theoretical and experimental study of the influence of a heated leading edge on the growth, stability, and transition of a two-dimensional boundary layer. The findings are directly applicable to aircraft wings and nacelles that use surface heating for anti-icing protection. The potential effects of the non-adiabatic condition are particularly important for laminar-flow sections where even small perturbations can result in significantly degraded aerodynamic performance. The results of the study give new insight to the fundamental coupling between streamwise pressure gradient and surface heat flux in laminar and transitional boundary layers.

  2. Initial development of an ablative leading edge for the space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daforno, G.; Rose, L.; Graham, J.; Roy, P.

    1974-01-01

    A state-of-the-art preliminary design for typical wing areas is developed. Seven medium-density ablators (with/without honeycomb, flown on Apollo, Prime, X15A2) are evaluated. The screening tests include: (1) leading-edge models sequentially subjected to ascent heating, cold soak, entry heating, post-entry pressure fluctuations, and touchdown shock, and (2) virgin/charred models subjected to bondline strains. Two honeycomb reinforced 30 pcf elastomeric ablators were selected. Roughness/recession degradation of low speed aerodynamics appears acceptable. The design, including attachments, substructure and joints, is presented.

  3. The Leading Edge 250: Oblique wing aircraft configuration project, volume 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Andre; Moore, Peri; Nguyen, Dan; Oganesyan, Petros; Palmer, Charles

    1988-01-01

    The design of a high speed transport aircraft using the oblique wing concept as a part of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft study is the Leading Edge 250 capable of travelling at Mach 4 with 250 passengers and has a 6,500 nautical mile range. Its innovation lies within its use of the unconventional oblique wing to provide efficient flight at any Mach number. Wave drag is kept to a minimum at high speed, while high lift is attained during critical takeoff and landing maneuvers by varying the sweep of the wing.

  4. Spanwise pressure distribution on delta wing with leading-edge vortex flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. S.

    1987-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of a highly swept planar delta wing employing conical leading edge flaps are numerically investigated, using a free vortex sheet method that is based on an advanced, three-dimensional inviscid flow panel method employing quadratic doublet distributions to represent the wing surface and the rolled-up vortex sheet and wake. Upward flap deflection shifts the negative pressure peak inboard of the basic wing and develops a significant suction pressure on the flap that then produces thrust component in the direction of flight; overall drag is thereby reduced.

  5. Cascade tests of serrated leading edge blading at high subsonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. G.

    1974-01-01

    Cascade tests of two-dimensional fan rotor blade rows were performed to investigate the effects of leading edge serration on acoustic and aerodynamic performance. The test configurations covered a range of serration tooth geometries. Tests were performed to investigate effects of inlet air angle and velocity on performance. Aerodynamic performance was determined by flow surveys at the mid-span of the blade exit. Acoustic performance was determined by wake turbulence surveys and sound measurements in the semireverberent exhaust chamber. Measured acoustic and aerodynamic performance was comparable and indicated that a serration length of about six percent blade chord yields minimum noise generation and minimum total pressure losses.

  6. An attached flow design of a noninterfering leading edge extension to a thick delta wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffari, F.; Lamar, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The analytical procedure presented for leading edge extension (LEE) determination, in keeping with such design criteria as noninterference at the wing design point, is applied to thick delta wings. The LEE device thus defined is to be mounted on a wing along a dividing stream surface that is associated with an attached flow design lift coefficient greater than zero. The delta wing in question is of twisted and cambered type. It is demonstrated that span reductions for the candidate LEEs has the most detrimental effect on overall aerodynamic efficiency, irrespective of area or shape.

  7. Estimation of attainable leading-edge thrust for wings at subsonic and supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, H. W.; Mack, R. J.; Barger, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The factors which place limits on the theoretical leading edge thrust are identified. An empirical method for the estimation of attainable thrust is presented. The method is based on the use of simple sweep theory to permit a two dimensional analysis, the use of theoretical airfoil programs to define thrust dependence on local geometric characteristics, and the examination of experimental two dimensional airfoil data to define limitations imposed by local Mach numbers and Reynolds numbers. Comparisons of theoretical and experimental aerodynamic characteristics for a series of wing body configurations are examined.

  8. Estimating Blade Section Airloads from Blade Leading-Edge Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanAken, Johannes M.

    2003-01-01

    The Tilt-Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM) test in the Duitse-Nederlandse Wind (DNW) Tunnel acquired blade pressure data for forward flight test conditions of a tiltrotor in helicopter mode. Chordwise pressure data at seven radial locations were integrated to obtain the blade section normal force. The present investigation evaluates the use of linear regression analysis and of neural networks in estimating the blade section normal force coefficient from a limited number of blade leading-edge pressure measurements and representative operating conditions. These network models are subsequently used to estimate the airloads at intermediate radial locations where only blade pressure measurements at the 3.5% chordwise stations are available.

  9. Dynamic Stall Measurements and Computations for a VR-12 Airfoil with a Variable Droop Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, P. B.; McAlister, K. W.; Chandrasekhara, M. S.; Geissler, W.

    2003-01-01

    High density-altitude operations of helicopters with advanced performance and maneuver capabilities have lead to fundamental research on active high-lift system concepts for rotor blades. The requirement for this type of system was to improve the sectional lift-to-drag ratio by alleviating dynamic stall on the retreating blade while simultaneously reducing the transonic drag rise of the advancing blade. Both measured and computational results showed that a Variable Droop Leading Edge (VDLE) airfoil is a viable concept for application to a rotor high-lift system. Results are presented for a series of 2D compressible dynamic stall wind tunnel tests with supporting CFD results for selected test cases. These measurements and computations show a dramatic decrease in the drag and pitching moment associated with severe dynamic stall when the VDLE concept is applied to the Boeing VR-12 airfoil. Test results also show an elimination of the negative pitch damping observed in the baseline moment hysteresis curves.

  10. Influence of Large Positive Dihedral on Heat Transfer to Leading Edges of Highly Swept Wings at Very High Mach Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Morton; Stainback, P. Calvin

    1959-01-01

    A geometric study has been made of some of the effects of dihedral on the heat transfer to swept delta wings. The results of this study show that the incorporation of large positive dihedral on highly swept wings can shift, even at moderately low angles of attack, the stagnation-line heat-transfer problem from the leading edges to the axis of symmetry (ridge line). An order-of-magnitude analysis (assuming laminar flow) indicates conditions for which it may be possible to reduce the heating at the ridge line (except in the vicinity of the wing apex) to a small fraction of the leading-edge heat transfer of a flat wing at the same lift. Furthermore, conditions are indicated where dihedral reduces the leading-edge heat transfer for angles of attack less than those required to shift the stagnation line from the leading edge to the ridge line.

  11. Effect of canard position and wing leading-edge flap deflection on wing buffet at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloss, B. B.; Henderson, W. P.; Huffman, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    A generalized wind-tunnel model, with canard and wing planform typical of highly maneuverable aircraft, was tested. The addition of a canard above the wing chord plane, for the configuration with leading-edge flaps undeflected, produced substantially higher total configuration lift coefficients before buffet onset than the configuration with the canard off and leading-edge flaps undeflected. The wing buffet intensity was substantially lower for the canard-wing configuration than the wing-alone configuration. The low-canard configuration generally displayed the poorest buffet characteristics. Deflecting the wing leading-edge flaps substantially improved the wing buffet characteristics for canard-off configurations. The addition of the high canard did not appear to substantially improve the wing buffet characteristics of the wing with leading-edge flaps deflected.

  12. Project Title: Genes, isotopes, and ecosystem biogeochemistry: dissecting methane flux at the leading edge of global change

    E-print Network

    Saleska, Scott

    Project Title: Genes, isotopes, and ecosystem biogeochemistry: dissecting methane flux at the leading edge of global change Applicant/Institution: Scott Saleska, University of Arizona Street, point of contact, and Biogeochemistry Research Coordinator University of Queensland, Gene Tyson

  13. The effects of leading edge and downstream film cooling on turbine vane heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hylton, L. D.; Nirmalan, V.; Sultanian, B. K.; Kaufman, R. M.

    1988-01-01

    The progress under contract NAS3-24619 toward the goal of establishing a relevant data base for use in improving the predictive design capabilities for external heat transfer to turbine vanes, including the effect of downstream film cooling with and without leading edge showerhead film cooling. Experimental measurements were made in a two-dimensional cascade previously used to obtain vane surface heat transfer distributions on nonfilm cooled airfoils under contract NAS3-22761 and leading edge showerhead film cooled airfoils under contract NAS3-23695. The principal independent parameters (Mach number, Reynolds number, turbulence, wall-to-gas temperature ratio, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio) were maintained over ranges consistent with actual engine conditions and the test matrix was structured to provide an assessment of the independent influence of parameters of interest, namely, exit Mach number, exit Reynolds number, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio. Data provide a data base for downstream film cooled turbine vanes and extends the data bases generated in the two previous studies. The vane external heat transfer obtained indicate that considerable cooling benefits can be achieved by utilizing downstream film cooling. The data obtained and presented illustrate the interaction of the variables and should provide the airfoil designer and computational analyst the information required to improve heat transfer design capabilities for film cooled turbine airfoils.

  14. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of the Slip-Side Joggle Regions of Wing-Leading Edge Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan; Phillips, Dawn R.

    2010-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter wing comprises of 22 leading edge panels on each side of the wing. These panels are part of the thermal protection system that protects the Orbiter wings from extreme heating that take place on the reentry in to the earth atmosphere. On some panels that experience extreme heating, liberation of silicon carbon (SiC) coating was observed on the slip side regions of the panels. Global structural and local fracture mechanics analyses were performed on these panels as a part of the root cause investigation of this coating liberation anomaly. The wing-leading-edge reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) panels, Panel 9, T-seal 10, and Panel 10, are shown in Figure 1 and the progression of the stress analysis models is presented in Figure 2. The global structural analyses showed minimal interaction between adjacent panels and the T-seal that bridges the gap between the panels. A bounding uniform temperature is applied to a representative panel and the resulting stress distribution is examined. For this loading condition, the interlaminar normal stresses showed negligible variation in the chord direction and increased values in the vicinity of the slip-side joggle shoulder. As such, a representative span wise slice on the panel can be taken and the cross section can be analyzed using plane strain analysis.

  15. Leading edge vortex dynamics on a pitching delta wing. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemay, Scott P.

    1988-01-01

    The leading edge flow structure was investigated on a 70 deg flat plate delta wing which was pitched about its 1/2 chord position, to increase understanding of the high angle of attack aerodynamics on an unsteady delta wing. The wing was sinusoidally pitched at reduced frequencies ranging from k being identical with 2pi fc/u = 0.05 to 0.30 at chord Reynolds numbers between 90,000 and 350,000, for angle of attack ranges of alpha = 29 to 39 deg and alpha = 0 to 45 deg. The wing was also impulsively pitched at an approximate rate of 0.7 rad/s. During these dynamic motions, visualization of the leading edge vorticies was obtained by entraining titanium tetrachloride into the flow at the model apex. The location of vortex breakdown was recorded using 16mm high speed motion picture photography. When the wing was sinusoidally pitched, a hysteresis was observed in the location of breakdown position. This hysteresis increased with reduced frequency. The velocity of breakdown propagation along the wing, and the phase lag between model motion and breakdown location were also determined. When the wing was impulsively pitched, several convective times were required for the vortex flow to reach a steady state. Detailed information was also obtained on the oscillation of breakdown position in both static and dynamic cases.

  16. Analytical impact models and experimental test validation for the Columbia shuttle wing leading edge panels.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang; Metzinger, Kurt Evan; Gwinn, Kenneth West; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Korellis, John S.

    2004-10-01

    This paper describes the analyses and the experimental mechanics program to support the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) investigation of the Shuttle Columbia accident. A synergism of the analysis and experimental effort is required to insure that the final analysis is valid - the experimental program provides both the material behavior and a basis for validation, while the analysis is required to insure the experimental effort provides behavior in the correct loading regime. Preliminary scoping calculations of foam impact onto the Shuttle Columbia's wing leading edge determined if enough energy was available to damage the leading edge panel. These analyses also determined the strain-rate regimes for various materials to provide the material test conditions. Experimental testing of the reinforced carbon-carbon wing panels then proceeded to provide the material behavior in a variety of configurations and strain-rates for flown or conditioned samples of the material. After determination of the important failure mechanisms of the material, validation experiments were designed to provide a basis of comparison for the analytical effort. Using this basis, the final analyses were used for test configuration, instrumentation location, and calibration definition in support of full-scale testing of the panels in June 2003. These tests subsequently confirmed the accident cause.

  17. Some Effects of Leading-Edge Sweep on Boundary-Layer Transition at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Gray T.

    1961-01-01

    The effects of crossflow and shock strength on transition of the laminar boundary layer behind a swept leading edge have been investigated analytically and with the aid of available experimental data. An approximate method of determining the crossflow Reynolds number on a leading edge of circular cross section at supersonic speeds is presented. The applicability of the critical crossflow criterion described by Owen and Randall for transition on swept wings in subsonic flow was examined for the case of supersonic flow over swept circular cylinders. A wide range of applicability of the subsonic critical values is indicated. The corresponding magnitude of crossflow velocity necessary to cause instability on the surface of a swept wing at supersonic speeds was also calculated and found to be small. The effects of shock strength on transition caused by Tollmien-Schlichting type of instability are discussed briefly. Changes in local Reynolds number, due to shock strength, were found analytically to have considerably more effect on transition caused by Tollmien-Schlichting instability than on transition caused by crossflow instability. Changes in the mechanism controlling transition from Tollmien-Schlichting instability to crossflow instability were found to be possible as a wing is swept back and to result in large reductions in the length of laminar flow.

  18. The Influence of Spanwise Flow on Leading-Edge Vortex Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Jaime; Kriegseis, Jochen; Rival, David

    2012-11-01

    It has been postulated that a spanwise component velocity through the core of a leading-edge vortex (LEV) can limit its growth and allow the LEV to remain attached to the wing. In the case of a delta wing, spanwise velocity is produced by wing sweep. However, in the case of flapping-wing flight, centripetal and Coriolis accelerations produce spanwise velocities which vary periodically. In order to understand the effect of various spanwise velocity profiles on LEV growth a simple analytical model for vortex growth has been developed. This model is based on the transport of vorticity-containing mass into the LEV through the leading-edge shear layer. By first neglecting spanwise effects, the model has been verified against a nominally two-dimensional plunging profile using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). With the addition of a spanwise transport of vorticity-containing mass, swept and flapping spanwise velocity profiles have been modeled and compared with three-dimensional, three-component velocity data collected using Particle Tracking Velocimetry.

  19. Analytical observations on the aerodynamics of a delta wing with leading edge flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, S.; Tavella, D.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of a leading edge flap on the aerodynamics of a low aspect ratio delta wing is studied analytically. The separated flow field about the wing is represented by a simple vortex model composed of a conical straight vortex sheet and a concentrated vortex. The analysis is carried out in the cross flow plane by mapping the wing trace, by means of the Schwarz-Christoffel transformation into the real axis of the transformed plane. Particular attention is given to the influence of the angle of attack and flap deflection angle on lift and drag forces. Both lift and drag decrease with flap deflection, while the lift-to-drag ratioe increases. A simple coordinate transformation is used to obtain a closed form expression for the lift-to-drag ratio as a function of flap deflection. The main effect of leading edge flap deflection is a partial suppression of the separated flow on the leeside of the wing. Qualitative comparison with experiments is presented, showing agreement in the general trends.

  20. Space Shuttle Orbiter Wing-Leading-Edge Panel Thermo-Mechanical Analysis for Entry Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2010-01-01

    Linear elastic, thermo-mechanical stress analyses of the Space Shuttle Orbiter wing-leading-edge panels is presented for entry heating conditions. The wing-leading-edge panels are made from reinforced carbon-carbon and serve as a part of the overall thermal protection system. Three-dimensional finite element models are described for three configurations: integrated configuration, an independent single-panel configuration, and a local lower-apex joggle segment. Entry temperature conditions are imposed and the through-the-thickness response is examined. From the integrated model, it was concluded that individual panels can be analyzed independently since minimal interaction between adjacent components occurred. From the independent single-panel model, it was concluded that increased through-the-thickness stress levels developed all along the chord of a panel s slip-side joggle region, and hence isolated local joggle sections will exhibit the same trend. From the local joggle models, it was concluded that two-dimensional plane-strain models can be used to study the influence of subsurface defects along the slip-side joggle region of these panels.

  1. Investigation of leading-edge flap performance on delta and double-delta wings at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covell, Peter F.; Wood, Richard M.; Miller, David S.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation of the aerodynamic performance of leading-edge flaps on three clipped delta and three clipped double-delta wing planforms with aspect ratios of 1.75, 2.11, and 2.50 was conducted in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at Mach numbers of 1.60, 1.90, and 2.16. A primary set of fullspan leading-edge flaps with similar root and tip chords were investigated on each wing, and several alternate flap planforms were investigated on the aspect-ratio-1.75 wings. All leading-edge flap geometries were effective in reducing the drag at lifting conditions over the range of wing aspect ratios and Mach numbers tested. Application of a primary flap resulted in better flap performance with the double-delta planform than with the delta planform. The primary flap geometry generally yielded better performance than the alternate flap geometries tested. Trim drag due to flap-induced pitching moments was found to reduce the leading-edge flap performance more for the delta planform than for the double-delta planform. Flow-visualization techniques showed that leading-edge flap deflection reduces crossflow shock-induced separation effects. Finally, it was found that modified linear theory consistently predicts only the effects of leading-edge flap deflection as related to pitching moment and lift trends.

  2. Interlaminar stress singularities at a straight free edge in composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A quasi-three-dimensional finite-element analysis was used to analyze the edge-stress problem in four-ply, composite laminates. The seven laminates that were considered belong to the laminate family where the outer ply angle is between 0 and 90 deg. Systematic convergence studies were made to explore the existence of stress singularities near the free edge. The present analysis appears to confirm the existence of stress singularities at the intersection of the interface and the free edge. The power of the stress singularity was the same for all seven laminates considered.

  3. A computer program for calculating aerodynamic characteristics of low aspect-ratio wings with partial leading-edge separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, S. C.; Lan, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    The necessary information for using a computer program to predict distributed and total aerodynamic characteristics for low aspect ratio wings with partial leading-edge separation is presented. The flow is assumed to be steady and inviscid. The wing boundary condition is formulated by the Quasi-Vortex-Lattice method. The leading edge separated vortices are represented by discrete free vortex elements which are aligned with the local velocity vector at midpoints to satisfy the force free condition. The wake behind the trailing edge is also force free. The flow tangency boundary condition is satisfied on the wing, including the leading and trailing edges. The program is restricted to delta wings with zero thickness and no camber. It is written in FORTRAN language and runs on CDC 6600 computer.

  4. Aerodynamic Forces and Loadings on Symmetrical Circular-Arc Airfoils with Plain Leading-Edge and Plain Trailing-Edge Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahill, Jones F; Underwood, William J; Nuber, Robert J; Cheesman, Gail A

    1953-01-01

    An investigation has been made in the Langley two-dimensional low-turbulence tunnel and in the Langley two-dimensional low-pressure tunnel of 6- and 10-percent-thick symmetrical circular-arc airfoil sections at low Mach numbers and several Reynolds numbers. The airfoils were equipped with 0.15-chord plain leading-edge flaps and 0.20-chord plan trailing-edge flaps. The section lift and pitching-moment characteristics were determined for both airfoils with the flaps deflected individually and in combination. The section drag characteristics were obtained for the 6-percent-thick airfoil with the flaps partly deflected as low-drag-control flaps and for airfoils with the flaps neutral. Surface pressures were measured on the 6-percent-thick airfoil section with the flaps deflected either individually or in appropriate combination to furnish flap load and hinge-moment data applicable to the structural design of the airfoil. A generalized method is developed that permits the determination of the chordwise pressure distribution over sharp-edge airfoils with plain leading-edge flaps and plain trailing-edge flaps of arbitrary size and deflection.

  5. ALES, the multi­mission Adaptive Leading Edge Sub­Waveform Retracker, design and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passaro, Marcello; Benveniste, Jérôme; Vignudelli, Stefano; Cipollini, Paolo; Quartly, Graham; Snaith, Helen

    Satellite altimetry has revolutionized our understanding of ocean dynamics thanks to high repetition rate and global coverage. Nevertheless, coastal data has been flagged as unreliable due to land and calm water interference in the altimeter and radiometer footprint and high frequency tidal and atmospheric forcing. Our study addresses the first issue, i.e. retracking, presenting ALES, the Adaptive Leading Edge Subwaveform Retracker. ALES is potentially applicable to all the pulse­limited altimetry altimetry missions and its aim is to retrack with the same precision both open ocean and coastal data with the same algorithm. ALES selects part of each returned echo and models it with a classic ‘open ocean’ Brown functional form, by means of least square estimation whose convergence is found through the Nelder­Mead nonlinear optimization technique. By avoiding echoes from bright targets along the trailing edge, it is capable of retrieving the majority of coastal waveform up to 2 to 3 Km from the coasts. By adapting the estimation window to the significant wave height, it aims at preserving the precision of the standard data both in open ocean and in the coastal strip. ALES is validated against tide gauges in the Adriatic Sea and in the Greater Agulhas System for three different missions: Envisat, Jason­1 and Jason­2. Considerations on noise and biases provide a further verification of the strategy.

  6. The Cutting Edge of High-Temperature Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA s Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program was formed in 1999 at Glenn Research Center to manage an important national propulsion program for the Space Agency. The UEET program s focus is on developing innovative technologies to enable intelligent, environmentally friendly, and clean-burning turbine engines capable of reducing harmful emissions while maintaining high performance and increasing reliability. Seven technology projects exist under the program, with each project working towards specific goals to provide new technology for propulsion. One of these projects, Materials and Structures for High Performance, is concentrating on developing and demonstrating advanced high-temperature materials to enable high-performance, high-efficiency, and environmentally compatible propulsion systems. Materials include ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor liners and turbine vanes, disk alloys, turbine airfoil material systems, high-temperature polymer matrix composites, and lightweight materials for static engine structures.

  7. Leading edge serrations which reduce the noise of low-speed rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, P. T.

    1973-01-01

    Acoustic effects of serrated brass strips attached near the leading edges of two different size rotors were investigated. The two bladed rotors were tested in hover. Rotor rotational speed, blade angle, serration shape, and serration position were varied. The serrations were more effective as noise suppressors at rotor tip speeds less than 135 m/sec (444 ft/sec) than at higher speeds. high frequency noise was reduced but the low frequency rotational noise was little affected. Noise reductions from 4 to 8 db overall sound pressure level and 3 to 17 db in the upper octave bands were achieved on the 1.52 m (5.0 ft) diameter rotor. Noise reductions up to 4 db overall sound pressure level were measured for the 2.59 m (8.5 ft) diameter rotor at some conditions.

  8. Multiple leading edge vortices of unexpected strength in freely flying hawkmoth

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, L. Christoffer; Engel, Sophia; Kelber, Almut; Heerenbrink, Marco Klein; Hedenström, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The Leading Edge Vortex (LEV) is a universal mechanism enhancing lift in flying organisms. LEVs, generally illustrated as a single vortex attached to the wing throughout the downstroke, have not been studied quantitatively in freely flying insects. Previous findings are either qualitative or from flappers and tethered insects. We measure the flow above the wing of freely flying hawkmoths and find multiple simultaneous LEVs of varying strength and structure along the wingspan. At the inner wing there is a single, attached LEV, while at mid wing there are multiple LEVs, and towards the wingtip flow separates. At mid wing the LEV circulation is ~40% higher than in the wake, implying that the circulation unrelated to the LEV may reduce lift. The strong and complex LEV suggests relatively high flight power in hawmoths. The variable LEV structure may result in variable force production, influencing flight control in the animals. PMID:24253180

  9. Application of finite element and remeshing technique to shock interference on a cylindrical leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, James R.; Thareja, Rajiv R.; Wieting, Allan R.; Morgan, Ken

    1988-01-01

    The problem of planar oblique shock impingement on a cylindrical leading edge in hypersonic flow is modeled using a Galerkin-Runge Kutta finite element method. The method utilizes a four stage Runge-Kutta time stepping scheme to solve the compressible Euler equations. Freestream Mach numbers of 6.5, 8.0 and 16.0 are studied. The computed surface pressure distributions consistently agree well with available experimental data. The peak pressure amplification ranges from 5.45 at M = 6.5 to approximately 17.0 at M = 16.0. Stagnation point heat transfer rate amplifications are calculated from the inviscid solution using the method of Fay and Riddell. The value and wall location of the peak pressure and heat transfer rate amplifications are extremely sensitive to the location of the impinging shock/bow shock intersection point.

  10. Application of superplastically formed and diffusion bonded aluminum to a laminar flow control leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyear, M. D.

    1987-01-01

    NASA sponsored the Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) program in 1976 to develop technologies to improve fuel efficiency. Laminar flow control was one such technology. Two approaches for achieving laminar flow were designed and manufactured under NASA sponsored programs: the perforated skin concept used at McDonnell Douglas and the slotted design used at Lockheed-Georgia. Both achieved laminar flow, with the slotted design to a lesser degree (JetStar flight test program). The latter design had several fabrication problems concerning springback and adhesive flow clogging the air flow passages. The Lockheed-Georgia Company accomplishments is documented in designing and fabricating a small section of a leading edge article addressing a simpler fabrication method to overcome the previous program's manufacturing problems, i.e., design and fabrication using advanced technologies such as diffusion bonding of aluminum, which has not been used on aerospace structures to date, and the superplastic forming of aluminum.

  11. An experimental study of pressures on 60 deg Delta wings with leading edge vortex flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchman, J. F., III; Terry, J. E.; Donatelli, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted in the Virginia Tech Stability Wind Tunnel to determine surface pressures over a 60 deg sweep delta wing with three vortex flap designs. Extensive pressure data was collected to provide a base data set for comparison with computational design codes and to allow a better understanding of the flow over vortex flaps. The results indicated that vortex flaps can be designed which will contain the leading edge vortex with no spillage onto the wing upper surface. However, the tests also showed that flaps designed without accounting for flap thickness will not be optimum and the result can be oversized flaps, early flap vortex reattachment and a second separation and vortex at the wing/flap hinge line.

  12. Development of a Transition Edge Sensor Gamma Ray Microcalorimeter with an Epoxy Coupled Bulk Lead Absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Damayanthi, R. M. T.; Iyomoto, N.; Takahashi, H.; Minamigawa, Y.; Nishimura, K.; Ohno, M.

    2009-12-16

    Transition edge sensor (TES)-based gamma ray detectors have been developed primarily for use up to energies of {approx}100 keV. However, there are many interesting applications at higher energies. We have started to develop a TES gamma-ray detector to apply to Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy analysis at 511 keV. Our detector is composed of a bulk lead absorber, which is coupled to a thin-film TES using a small amount of epoxy. The response of our first detector showed a very long decay tail of {approx}135 ms. To improve the device response time we have designed a new detector in which the response time is improved by a factor of five.

  13. Cavitation on a semicircular leading-edge plate and NACA0015 hydrofoil: Visualization and velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsova, A. Yu.; Markovich, D. M.; Pervunin, K. S.; Timoshevskii, M. V.; Hanjali?, K.

    2014-12-01

    Using high-speed visualization and particle image velocimetry (PIV), cavitating flows near a plane plate with a rounded leading edge and NACA0015 hydrofoil at angles of attack from 0° to 9° are studied. In the experiments, several known types of cavitation, as well as some differences, were detected with variation of the cavitation number. In particular, at small angles of attack (up to 3°), cavitation on the plate appears in the form of a streak array; on the hydrofoil, it appears in the form of individual bubbles. For the NACA0015 hydrofoil, isolated and intermittent streaks are divided and grow in regimes with developed cavitation; then, however, they merge in bubble clouds and form an extremely regular cellular structure. With an increase in the angle of attack to 9°, the structure of the cavitation cavity on the hydrofoil is changed by the streak structure, like in the case with the plate. In this work, it is shown that PIV permits one to measure the velocity in cavitating flows, in particular, within the gas-vapor phase. It was established from the analysis of distributions of the average flow velocity and moments of velocity fluctuations that the cavitation generation is caused by the development of the carrier fluid flow near the leading edge of the hydrofoil. Down the stream, however, the flow structure strongly depends on the cavitation regime, which is seen from the comparison of the distributions with the case of a single-phase flow. The presented measurements qualitatively verify general trends and show some quantitative distinctions for the two considered flowpast bodies.

  14. Insect Residue Contamination on Wing Leading Edge Surfaces: A Materials Investigation for Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzi, Tyler M.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Penner, Ronald K.; Smith, Joseph G.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2011-01-01

    Flight tests have shown that residue from insect strikes on aircraft wing leading edge surfaces may induce localized transition of laminar to turbulent flow. The highest density of insect populations have been observed between ground level and 153 m during light winds (2.6 -- 5.1 m/s), high humidity, and temperatures from 21 -- 29 C. At a critical residue height, dependent on the airfoil and Reynolds number, boundary layer transition from laminar to turbulent results in increased drag and fuel consumption. Although this represents a minimal increase in fuel burn for conventional transport aircraft, future aircraft designs will rely on maintaining laminar flow across a larger portion of wing surfaces to reduce fuel burn during cruise. Thus, insect residue adhesion mitigation is most critical during takeoff and initial climb to maintain laminar flow in fuel-efficient aircraft configurations. Several exterior treatments investigated to mitigate insect residue buildup (e.g., paper, scrapers, surfactants, flexible surfaces) have shown potential; however, implementation has proven to be impractical. Current research is focused on evaluation of wing leading edge surface coatings that may reduce insect residue adhesion. Initial work under NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation Program focused on evaluation of several commercially available products (commercial off-the-shelf, COTS), polymers, and substituted alkoxy silanes that were applied to aluminum (Al) substrates. Surface energies of these coatings were determined from contact angle data and were correlated to residual insect excrescence on coated aluminum substrates using a custom-built "bug gun." Quantification of insect excrescence surface coverage was evaluated by a series of digital photographic image processing techniques.

  15. An Attached Flow Design of a Noninterferring Leading Edge Extension to a Thick Delta Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Ghaffari, Farhad

    1985-01-01

    An analytical procedure for the determination of the shape of a Leading-Edge Extension (LEE) which satisfies design criteria, including especially noninterference at the wing design point, has been developed for thick delta wings. The LEE device best satisfying all criteria is designed to be mounted on a wing along a dividing stream surface associated with an attached flow design lift coefficient (C(sub L,d)) of greater than zero. This device is intended to improve the aerodynamic performance of transonic aircraft at C(sub L) greater than C(sub L,d) system emanating from the LEE leading edge. In order to quantify this process a twisted and cambered thick delta wing was chosen for the initial application of this design procedure. Appropriate computer codes representing potential and vortex flows were employed to determine the dividing stream surface at C(sub L,d) and an optimized LEE planform shape at C(sub L) greater than C(sub L,d), respectively. To aid in the LEE selection, the aerodynamic effectiveness of 36 planforms was investigated at C(sub L) greater than C(sub L,d). This study showed that reducing the span of the candidate LEEs has the most detrimental effect on overall aerodynamic efficiency, regardless of the shape or area. Furthermore, for a fixed area, constant-chord LEE candidates were relatively more efficient than those with sweep less than the wing. At C(sub L,d), the presence of the LEE planform best satisfying the design criteria was found to have no effect on the wing alone aerodynamic performance.

  16. Effect of leading- and trailing-edge flaps on clipped delta wings with and without wing camber at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Gloria; Wood, Richard M.; Covell, Peter F.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of thin, moderately swept fighter wings has been conducted to evaluate the effect of camber and twist on the effectiveness of leading- and trailing-edge flaps at supersonic speeds in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. The study geometry consisted of a generic fuselage with camber typical of advanced fighter designs without inlets, canopy, or vertical tail. The model was tested with two wing configurations an uncambered (flat) wing and a cambered and twisted wing. Each wing had an identical clipped delta planform with an inboard leading edge swept back 65 deg and an outboard leading edge swept back 50 deg. The trailing edge was swept forward 25 deg. The leading-edge flaps were deflected 4 deg to 15 deg, and the trailing-edge flaps were deflected from -30 deg to 10 deg. Longitudinal force and moment data were obtained at Mach numbers of 1.60, 1.80, 2.00, and 2.16 for an angle-of-attack range 4 deg to 20 deg at a Reynolds number of 2.16 x 10(exp 6) per foot and for an angle-of-attack range 4 deg to 20 deg at a Reynolds number of 2.0 x 10(exp 6) per foot. Vapor screen, tuft, and oil flow visualization data are also included.

  17. A Mesh Refinement Study on the Impact Response of a Shuttle Leading-Edge Panel Finite Element Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Lyle, Karen H.; Spellman, Regina L.

    2006-01-01

    A study was performed to examine the influence of varying mesh density on an LS-DYNA simulation of a rectangular-shaped foam projectile impacting the space shuttle leading edge Panel 6. The shuttle leading-edge panels are fabricated of reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) material. During the study, nine cases were executed with all possible combinations of coarse, baseline, and fine meshes of the foam and panel. For each simulation, the same material properties and impact conditions were specified and only the mesh density was varied. In the baseline model, the shell elements representing the RCC panel are approximately 0.2-in. on edge, whereas the foam elements are about 0.5-in. on edge. The element nominal edge-length for the baseline panel was halved to create a fine panel (0.1-in. edge length) mesh and doubled to create a coarse panel (0.4-in. edge length) mesh. In addition, the element nominal edge-length of the baseline foam projectile was halved (0.25-in. edge length) to create a fine foam mesh and doubled (1.0-in. edge length) to create a coarse foam mesh. The initial impact velocity of the foam was 775 ft/s. The simulations were executed in LS-DYNA for 6 ms of simulation time. Contour plots of resultant panel displacement and effective stress in the foam were compared at four discrete time intervals. Also, time-history responses of internal and kinetic energy of the panel, kinetic and hourglass energy of the foam, and resultant contact force were plotted to determine the influence of mesh density.

  18. A Three-Dimensional Solution of Flows over Wings with Leading-Edge Vortex Separation. Part 1: Engineering Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, G. W.; Weber, J. A.; Johnson, F. T.; Lu, P.; Rubbert, P. E.

    1975-01-01

    A method of predicting forces, moments, and detailed surface pressures on thin, sharp-edged wings with leading-edge vortex separation in incompressible flow is presented. The method employs an inviscid flow model in which the wing and the rolled-up vortex sheets are represented by piecewise, continuous quadratic doublet sheet distributions. The Kutta condition is imposed on all wing edges. Computed results are compared with experimental data and with the predictions of the leading-edge suction analogy for a selected number of wing planforms over a wide range of angle of attack. These comparisons show the method to be very promising, capable of producing not only force predictions, but also accurate predictions of detailed surface pressure distributions, loads, and moments.

  19. Pressure distributions from subsonic tests of an advanced laminar-flow-control wing with leading- and trailing-edge flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applin, Zachary T.; Gentry, Garl L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    An unswept, semispan wing model equipped with full-span leading- and trailing-edge flaps was tested in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel to determine the effect of high-lift components on the aerodynamics of an advanced laminar-flow-control (LFC) airfoil section. Chordwise pressure distributions near the midsemispan were measured for four configurations: cruise, trailing-edge flap only, and trailing-edge flap with a leading edge Kreuger flap of either 0.10 or 0.12 chord. Part 1 of this report presents a representative sample of the plotted pressure distribution data for each configuration tested. Part 2 (under separate cover) presents the entire set of plotted and tabulated pressure distribution data. The data are presented without analysis.

  20. Pressure distributions from subsonic tests of an advanced laminar-flow-control wing with leading- and trailing-edge flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applin, Zachary T.; Gentry, Garl L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    An unswept, semispan wing model equipped with full-span leading- and trailing-edge flaps was tested in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel to determine the effect of high-lift components on the aerodynamics of an advanced laminar-flow-control (LFC) airfoil section. Chordwise pressure distributions near the midsemispan were measured for four configurations: cruise, trailing-edge flap only, and trailing-edge flap with a leading-edge Krueger flap of either 0.10 or 0.12 chord. Part 1 of this report (under separate cover) presents a representative sample of the plotted pressure distribution data for each configuration tested. Part 2 presents the entire set of plotted and tabulated pressure distribution data. The data are presented without analysis.

  1. Australian atmospheric lead deposition reconstructed using lead concentrations and isotopic compositions of archival lichen and fungi.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liqin; Taylor, Mark Patrick; Handley, Heather K; Wu, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Lead concentrations and their isotopic compositions were measured in lichen genera Cladonia and Usnea and fungi genus Trametes from the Greater Sydney region (New South Wales, Australia) that had been collected and archived over the past 120 years. The median lead contents were elevated in lichens and fungi prior to the introduction of leaded petrol (Cladonia 12.5 mg/kg; Usnea 15.6 mg/kg; Trametes 1.85 mg/kg) corresponding to early industrial development. During the use of leaded petrol for automobiles in Australia from 1932 to 2002, total median lead concentrations rose: Cladonia 18.8 mg/kg; Usnea 21.5 mg/kg; Trametes 4.3 mg/kg. Following the cessation of leaded petrol use, median total lead concentrations decreased sharply in the 2000s: Cladonia 4.8 mg/kg; Usnea 1.7 mg/kg. The lichen and fungi isotopic compositions reveal a significant decrease in (206)Pb/(207)Pb values from the end of 19th century to the 1970s. The following decades were characterised by lower allowable levels of lead additive in fuel and the introduction of unleaded petrol in 1985. The environmental response to these regulatory changes was that lichen and fungi (206)Pb/(207)Pb values increased, particularly from 1995 onwards. Although the lead isotope ratios of lichens continued to increase in the 2000s they do not return to pre-leaded petrol values. This demonstrates that historic leaded petrol emissions, inter alia other sources, remain a persistent source of anthropogenic contamination in the Greater Sydney region. PMID:26608874

  2. Preservation of wing leading edge suction at the plane of symmetry as a factor in wing-fuselage design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larrabee, E. E.

    1975-01-01

    Most fuselage geometries cover a portion of the wing leading edge near the plane of symmetry, and it seems reasonable to expect that a large fraction of the leading edge suction which would be developed by the covered wing at high angles of attack is not developed on the fuselage. This is one of the reasons that the Oswald span efficiency factor for the wing body combination fails to approach the value predicted by lifting line theory for the isolated wing. Some traditional and recent literature on wing-body interference is discussed and high Reynolds number data on wing-body-nacelle drag are reviewed. An exposed central leading edge geometry has been developed for a sailplane configuration. Low Reynolds number tests have not validated the design concept.

  3. Leading edge boundary layer receptivitivy to oblique free stream acoustic waves on parabolic bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erturk, Ercan

    In this study, the effect of the incidence angle of free strewn acoustic waves on the leading edge boundary layer receptivity of a two dimensional laminar incompressible flow over parabolic bodies is investigated. For this, the full Navier-Stokes equations in parabolic coordinates in streamfunction and vorticity variables were solved numerically. For the receptivity problem a spatial approach is used. With this approach, the free stream flow variables are composed of a uniform flow with a superimposed perturbation fluctuations of small amplitude. Using Normal Mode form and linearization assuming that the perturbations are small, the unsteady governing equations are converted into two systems of equations; the steady nonlinear basic flow equations and the steady linear complex perturbation flow equations. For the solution of nonlinear basic flow equations, a new numerical technique is developed which provides very accurate solutions. The perturbation equations are solved using a direct linear solver (LINPACK subroutines). In the numerical calculations, the numerical domain extends downstream of Branch II predicted by the linear theory for Blasius flow, for the frequency of the free stream oscillations used in the problem. The numerical codes for the solution of both the basic flow and the perturbation flow equations are first tested extensively to validate the solutions. In order to determine the receptivity coefficient, KLE, three steps are followed. First the basic flow equations are solved. Second, using the basic flow solution, the perturbation equations are solved. Third, the Stokes wave solution is obtained and subtracted from the perturbation solution. Using this final solution, the receptivity coefficient is extrapolated to the leading edge. The results obtained are compared with the past numerical results of Haddad [17], where they were found to be in excellent quantitative agreement. Quantitative comparisons with the analytical results of Hammerton and Kerschen [20] could not be made because of differences between the semi-infinite geometry used here and the finite geometry used by them. However, we observed excellent qualitative comparisons which indicate that the essential physics were represented by our numerical approach.

  4. Method and System for Weakening Shock Wave Strength at Leading Edge Surfaces of Vehicle in Supersonic Atmospheric Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daso, Endwell O. (Inventor); Pritchett, Victor E., II (Inventor); Wang, Ten-See (Inventor); Farr, Rebecca Ann (Inventor); Auslender, Aaron Howard (Inventor); Blankson, Isaiah M. (Inventor); Plotkin, Kenneth J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method and system are provided to weaken shock wave strength at leading edge surfaces of a vehicle in atmospheric flight. One or more flight-related attribute sensed along a vehicle's outer mold line are used to control the injection of a non-heated, non-plasma-producing gas into a local external flowfield of the vehicle from at least one leading-edge surface location along the vehicle's outer mold line. Pressure and/or mass flow rate of the gas so-injected is adjusted in order to cause a Rankine-Hugoniot Jump Condition along the vehicle's outer mold line to be violated.

  5. Evaluation of leading- and trailing-edge flaps on flat and cambered delta wings at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Gloria; Wood, Richard M.; Collins, Robert E.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of leading- and trailing-edge flaps on a flat and cambered wing at superconic speeds. Results from the experimental tests showed that highly complex and three-dimensional flow can occur over the wings with leading- and/or trailing-edge flaps deflected. An analysis of the data also showed that flap effectiveness varies significantly between a cambered and flat wing of identical planform and flap geometry. Mach number effects are similar for both flat and cambered wings for all aerodynamic parameters.

  6. Mass loss of TEOS-coated RCC subjected to the environment at the shuttle wing leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, C. W.; Rummler, D. R.

    1981-01-01

    Coated, reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) is used for the leading edges of the Space Shuttle. The mass loss characteristics of RCC specimens coated with tetra-ethyl-ortho-silicate (TEOS) were determined for conditions which simulated the entry environment expected at the stagnation area of the wing leading edge. Maximum specimen temperature was 1632 K. Specimens were exposed for up to 100 missions. Stress levels up to 8.274 MPa caused an average increase in oxidation of 6 percent over unstressed specimens. Experimentally determined mass losses were compared with those predicted by an existing empirical analysis.

  7. Suppression of dynamic stall with a leading-edge slat on a VR-7 airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcalister, K. W.; Tung, C.

    1993-01-01

    The VR-7 airfoil was experimentally studied with and without a leading-edge slat at fixed angles of attack from 0 deg to 30 deg at Re = 200,000 and for unsteady pitching motions described by alpha equals alpha(sub m) + 10 deg(sin(wt)). The models were two dimensional, and the test was performed in a water tunnel at Ames Research Center. The unsteady conditions ranged over Re equals 100,000 to 250,000, k equals 0.001 to 0.2, and alpha(sub m) = 10 deg to 20 deg. Unsteady lift, drag, and pitching-moment measurements were obtained along with fluorescent-dye flow visualizations. The addition of the slat was found to delay the static-drag and static-moment stall by about 5 degrees and to eliminate completely the development of a dynamic-stall vortex during unsteady motions that reached angles as high as 25 degrees. In all of the unsteady cases studied, the slat caused a significant reduction in the force and moment hysteresis amplitudes. The reduced frequency was found to have the greatest effect on the results, whereas the Reynolds number had little effect on the behavior of either the basic or the slatted airfoil. The slat caused a slight drag penalty at low angles of attack, but generally increased the lift/drag ratio when averaged over the full cycle of oscillation.

  8. Mechanism of Water Droplet Breakup Near the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Sor, Suthyvann; Magarino, Adelaida, Garcia

    2012-01-01

    This work presents results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. The airfoil model was placed at the end of the rotating arm and a monosize droplet generator produced droplets that fell from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil. The interaction between the droplets and the airfoil was captured with high speed imaging and allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. Image processing software was used to measure the position of the droplet centroid, equivalent diameter, perimeter, area, and the major and minor axes of an ellipse superimposed over the deforming droplet. The horizontal and vertical displacement of each droplet against time was also measured, and the velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of the droplet to the beginning of breakup. Droplet deformation is defined and studied against main parameters. The high speed imaging allowed observation of the actual mechanism of breakup and identification of the sequence of configurations from the initiation of the breakup to the disintegration of the droplet. Results and comparisons are presented for droplets of diameters in the range of 500 to 1800 microns, and airfoil velocities of 70 and 90 m/sec.

  9. Drag Coefficient of Water Droplets Approaching the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Sor, Suthyvann; Magarino, Adelaida Garcia

    2013-01-01

    This work presents results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. An airfoil model was placed at the end of the rotating arm and a monosize droplet generator produced droplets that fell from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil. The interaction between the droplets and the airfoil was captured with high speed imaging and allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. Image processing software was used to measure the position of the droplet centroid, equivalent diameter, perimeter, area, and the major and minor axes of an ellipse superimposed over the deforming droplet. The horizontal and vertical displacement of each droplet against time was also measured, and the velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of the droplet to the beginning of breakup. Results are presented and discussed for drag coefficients of droplets with diameters in the range of 300 to 1800 micrometers, and airfoil velocities of 50, 70 and 90 meters/second. The effect of droplet oscillation on the drag coefficient is discussed.

  10. Effect of Impact Location on the Response of Shuttle Wing Leading Edge Panel 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyle, Karen H.; Spellman, Regina L.; Hardy, Robin C.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to compare the results of several simulations performed to determine the worst-case location for a foam impact on the Space Shuttle wing leading edge. The simulations were performed using the commercial non-linear transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA. These simulations represent the first in a series of parametric studies performed to support the selection of the worst-case impact scenario. Panel 9 was selected for this study to enable comparisons with previous simulations performed during the Columbia Accident Investigation. The projectile for this study is a 5.5-in cube of typical external tank foam weighing 0.23 lb. Seven locations spanning the panel surface were impacted with the foam cube. For each of these cases, the foam was traveling at 1000 ft/s directly aft, along the orbiter X-axis. Results compared from the parametric studies included strains, contact forces, and material energies for various simulations. The results show that the worst case impact location was on the top surface, near the apex.

  11. Mechanism of Water Droplet Breakup near the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Sor, Suthyvann; Magarino, Adelaida Garcia

    2012-01-01

    This work presents results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de T cnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. The airfoil model was placed at the end of the rotating arm and a monosize droplet generator produced droplets that fell from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil. The interaction between the droplets and the airfoil was captured with high speed imaging and allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. Image processing software was used to measure the position of the droplet centroid, equivalent diameter, perimeter, area, and the major and minor axes of an ellipse superimposed over the deforming droplet. The horizontal and vertical displacement of each droplet against time was also measured, and the velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of the droplet to the beginning of breakup. Droplet deformation is defined and studied against main parameters. The high speed imaging allowed observation of the actual mechanism of breakup and identification of the sequence of configurations from the initiation of the breakup to the disintegration of the droplet. Results and comparisons are presented for droplets of diameters in the range of 500 to 1800 micrometers, and airfoil velocities of 70 and 90 meters/second.

  12. Augmentation of fighter-aircraft performance by spanwise blowing over the wing leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seginer, A.; Salomon, M.

    1983-01-01

    Spanwise blowing over the wing and canard of a 1:35 model of a close-coupled-canard fighter-airplane configuration (similar to the Kfir-C2) was investigated experimentally in low-speed flow. Tests were conducted at airspeeds of 30 m/sec (Reynolds number of 1.8 x 10 to the 5th power based on mean aerodynamic chord) with angle-of-attack sweeps from -8 deg to 60 deg, and yaw-angle sweeps from -8 deg to 36 deg at fixed angles of attack 0 deg, 10 deg, 20 deg, 25 deg, 30 deg, and 35 deg. Significant improvement in lift-curve slope, maximum lift, drag polar and lateral/directional stability was found, enlarging the flight envelope beyond its previous low-speed/maximum-lift limit. In spite of the highly swept (60 deg) leading edge, the efficiency of the lift augmentation by blowing was relatively high and was found to increase with increasing blowing momentum on the close-coupled-canard configuration. Interesting possibilities of obtaining much higher efficiencies with swirling jets were indicated.

  13. A practical study of the aerodynamic impact of wind turbine blade leading edge erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudern, N.

    2014-06-01

    During operation wind turbine blades are exposed to a wide variety of atmospheric and environmental conditions; inspection reports for blades that have been operating for several years show varying degrees of leading edge erosion. It is important to be able to estimate the impact of different stages of erosion on wind turbine performance, but this is very difficult even with advanced CFD models. In this study, wind tunnel testing was used to evaluate a range of complex erosion stages. Erosion patterns were transferred to thin films that were applied to 18% thick commercial wind turbine aerofoils and full lift and drag polars were measured in a wind tunnel. Tests were conducted up to a Reynolds number of 2.20 × 106 scaling based on the local roughness Reynolds number was used in combination with different film thicknesses to simulate a variety of erosion depths. The results will be very useful for conducting cost/benefit analyses of different methods of blade protection and repair, as well as for defining the appropriate timescales for these processes.

  14. Thermostructural Evaluation of Joggle Region on the Shuttle Orbiter's Wing Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Sandra P.; Warren, Jerry E.

    2012-01-01

    An investigation was initiated to determine the cause of coating spallation occurring on the Shuttle Orbiter's wing leading edge panels in the slip-side joggle region. The coating spallation events were observed, post flight, on differing panels on different missions. As part of the investigation, the high re-entry heating occurring on the joggles was considered here as a possible cause. Thus, a thermostructural evaluation was conducted to determine the detailed state-of-stress in the joggle region during re-entry and the feasibility of a laboratory test on a local joggle specimen to replicate this state-of-stress. A detailed three-dimensional finite element model of a panel slip-side joggle region was developed. Parametric and sensitivity studies revealed significant stresses occur in the joggle during peak heating. A critical interlaminar normal stress concentration was predicted in the substrate at the coating interface and was confined to the curved joggle region. Specifically, the high interlaminar normal stress is identified to be the cause for the occurrence of failure in the form of local subsurface material separation occurring in the slip-side joggle. The predicted critical stresses are coincident with material separations that had been observed with microscopy in joggle specimens obtained from flight panels.

  15. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Wing-Leading-Edge Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Phillips, Dawn R.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan

    2010-01-01

    Fracture mechanics analyses of subsurface defects within the joggle regions of the Space Shuttle wing-leading-edge RCC panels are performed. A 2D plane strain idealized joggle finite element model is developed to study the fracture behavior of the panels for three distinct loading conditions - lift-off and ascent, on-orbit, and entry. For lift-off and ascent, an estimated bounding aerodynamic pressure load is used for the analyses, while for on-orbit and entry, thermo-mechanical analyses are performed using the extreme cold and hot temperatures experienced by the panels. In addition, a best estimate for the material stress-free temperature is used in the thermo-mechanical analyses. In the finite element models, the substrate and coating are modeled separately as two distinct materials. Subsurface defects are introduced at the coating-substrate interface and within the substrate. The objective of the fracture mechanics analyses is to evaluate the defect driving forces, which are characterized by the strain energy release rates, and determine if defects can become unstable for each of the loading conditions.

  16. Numerical Predictions of Sonic Boom Signatures for a Straight Line Segmented Leading Edge Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmiligui, Alaa A.; Wilcox, Floyd J.; Cliff, Susan; Thomas, Scott

    2012-01-01

    A sonic boom wind tunnel test was conducted on a straight-line segmented leading edge (SLSLE) model in the NASA Langley 4- by 4- Foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT). The purpose of the test was to determine whether accurate sonic boom measurements could be obtained while continuously moving the SLSLE model past a conical pressure probe. Sonic boom signatures were also obtained using the conventional move-pause data acquisition method for comparison. The continuous data acquisition approach allows for accurate signatures approximately 15 times faster than a move-pause technique. These successful results provide an incentive for future testing with greatly increased efficiency using the continuous model translation technique with the single probe to measure sonic boom signatures. Two widely used NASA codes, USM3D (Navier-Stokes) and CART3D-AERO (Euler, adjoint-based adaptive mesh), were used to compute off-body sonic boom pressure signatures of the SLSLE model at several different altitudes below the model at Mach 2.0. The computed pressure signatures compared well with wind tunnel data. The effect of the different altitude for signature extraction was evaluated by extrapolating the near field signatures to the ground and comparing pressure signatures and sonic boom loudness levels.

  17. Performance of laminar-flow leading-edge test articles in cloud encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Richard E.; Maddalon, Dal V.; Wagner, Richard D.

    1987-01-01

    An extensive data bank of concurrent measurements of laminar flow (LF), particle concentration, and aircraft charging state was gathered for the first time. From this data bank, 13 flights in the simulated airline service (SAS) portion were analyzed to date. A total of 6.86 hours of data at one-second resolution were analyzed. An extensive statistical analysis, for both leading-edge test articles, shows that there is a significant effect of cloud and haze particles on the extent of laminar flow obtained. Approximately 93 percent of data points simulating LFC flight were obtained in clear air conditions; approximately 7 percent were obtained in cloud and haze. These percentages are consistent with earlier USAF and NASA estimates and results. The Hall laminar flow loss criteria was verified qualitatively. Larger particles and higher particle concentrations have a more marked effect on LF than do small particles. A particle spectrometer of a charging patch are both acceptable as diagnostic indicators of the presence of particles detrimental to laminar flow.

  18. GMF promotes leading edge dynamics and collective cell migration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Poukkula, Minna; Hakala, Markku; Pentinmikko, Nalle; Sweeney, Meredith O.; Jansen, Silvia; Mattila, Jaakko; Hietakangas, Ville; Goode, Bruce L.; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Lamellipodia are dynamic actin-rich cellular extensions, which drive advancement of the leading edge during cell migration [1–3]. Lamellipodia undergo periodic extension/retraction cycles [4–8], but the molecular mechanisms underlying these dynamics and their role in cell migration have remained obscure. We show that gliamaturation factor (GMF), which is an Arp2/3 complex inhibitor and actin filament debranching factor [9, 10], regulates lamellipodial protrusion dynamics in living cells. In cultured S2R+ cells, GMF silencing resulted in an increase in the width of lamellipodial actin filament arrays. Importantly, live-imaging of mutant Drosophila egg chambers revealed that the dynamics of actin-rich protrusions in migrating border cells are diminished in the absence of GMF. Consequently, velocity of border cell clusters undergoing guided migration was reduced in GMF mutant flies. Furthermore, genetic studies demonstrated that GMF cooperates with the Drosophila homologue of Aip1 (flare) in promoting disassembly of Arp2/3-nucleated actin filament networks and driving border cell migration. These data suggest that GMF functions in vivo to promote the disassembly of Arp2/3-nucleated actin filament arrays, making an important contribution to cell migration within a three-dimensional tissue environment. PMID:25308079

  19. GMF promotes leading-edge dynamics and collective cell migration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Poukkula, Minna; Hakala, Markku; Pentinmikko, Nalle; Sweeney, Meredith O; Jansen, Silvia; Mattila, Jaakko; Hietakangas, Ville; Goode, Bruce L; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2014-11-01

    Lamellipodia are dynamic actin-rich cellular extensions that drive advancement of the leading edge during cell migration. Lamellipodia undergo periodic extension and retraction cycles, but the molecular mechanisms underlying these dynamics and their role in cell migration have remained obscure. We show that glia-maturation factor (GMF), which is an Arp2/3 complex inhibitor and actin filament debranching factor, regulates lamellipodial protrusion dynamics in living cells. In cultured S2R(+) cells, GMF silencing resulted in an increase in the width of lamellipodial actin filament arrays. Importantly, live-cell imaging of mutant Drosophila egg chambers revealed that the dynamics of actin-rich protrusions in migrating border cells is diminished in the absence of GMF. Consequently, velocity of border cell clusters undergoing guided migration was reduced in GMF mutant flies. Furthermore, genetic studies demonstrated that GMF cooperates with the Drosophila homolog of Aip1 (flare) in promoting disassembly of Arp2/3-nucleated actin filament networks and driving border cell migration. These data suggest that GMF functions in vivo to promote the disassembly of Arp2/3-nucleated actin filament arrays, making an important contribution to cell migration within a 3D tissue environment. PMID:25308079

  20. Augmentation of Fighter-Aircraft Performance by Spanwise Blowing over the Wing Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seginer, A.; Salomon, M.

    1983-01-01

    Spanwise blowing over the wing and canard of a 1:35 model of a close-coupled-canard fighter airplane configuration (similar to the Kfir-C2) was investigated experimentally in low-speed flow. Tests were conducted at airspeeds of 30 m/sec (Reynolds number of 1.8 x 10 to the 5th power based on mean aerodynamic chord) with angle-of-attack sweeps from -8 to 60 deg, and yaw-angle sweeps from -8 to 36 deg at fixed angles of attack 0, 10, 20, 25, 30, and 35 deg. Significant improvement in lift-curve slope, maximum lift, drag polar and lateral/directional stability was found, enlarging the flight envelope beyond its previous low-speed/maximum-lift limit. In spite of the highly swept (60 deg) leading edge, the efficiency of the lift augmentation by blowing was relatively high and was found to increase with increasing blowing momentum on the close-coupled-canard configuration. Interesting possibilities of obtaining much higher efficiencies with swirling jets were indicated.

  1. Turbulent Wing-Leading-Edge Correlation Assessment for the Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Rudolph A.; Vaughan, Matthew P.

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted in support of the Orbiter damage assessment activity that takes place for each Shuttle mission since STS-107 (STS - Space Transportation System). As part of the damage assessment activity, the state of boundary layer (laminar or turbulent) during reentry needs to be estimated in order to define the aerothermal environment on the Orbiter. Premature turbulence on the wing leading edge (WLE) is possible if a surface irregularity promotes early transition and the resulting turbulent wedge flow contaminates the WLE flow. The objective of this analysis is to develop a criterion to determine if and when the flow along the WLE experiences turbulent heating given an incoming turbulent boundary layer that contaminates the attachment line. The data to be analyzed were all obtained as part of the MH-13 Space Shuttle Orbiter Aerothermodynamic Test conducted on a 1.8%-scale Orbiter model at Calspan/University of Buffalo Research Center in the Large Energy National Shock Tunnels facility. A rational framework was used to develop a means to assess the state of the WLE flow on the Orbiter during reentry given a contaminated attachment-line flow. Evidence of turbulent flow on the WLE has been recently documented for a few STS missions during the Orbiter s flight history, albeit late in the reentry trajectory. The criterion developed herein will be compared to these flight results.

  2. Wing Leading Edge RCC Rapid Response Damage Prediction Tool (IMPACT2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Robert; Cottter, Paul; Michalopoulos, Constantine

    2013-01-01

    This rapid response computer program predicts Orbiter Wing Leading Edge (WLE) damage caused by ice or foam impact during a Space Shuttle launch (Program "IMPACT2"). The program was developed after the Columbia accident in order to assess quickly WLE damage due to ice, foam, or metal impact (if any) during a Shuttle launch. IMPACT2 simulates an impact event in a few minutes for foam impactors, and in seconds for ice and metal impactors. The damage criterion is derived from results obtained from one sophisticated commercial program, which requires hours to carry out simulations of the same impact events. The program was designed to run much faster than the commercial program with prediction of projectile threshold velocities within 10 to 15% of commercial-program values. The mathematical model involves coupling of Orbiter wing normal modes of vibration to nonlinear or linear springmass models. IMPACT2 solves nonlinear or linear impact problems using classical normal modes of vibration of a target, and nonlinear/ linear time-domain equations for the projectile. Impact loads and stresses developed in the target are computed as functions of time. This model is novel because of its speed of execution. A typical model of foam, or other projectile characterized by material nonlinearities, impacting an RCC panel is executed in minutes instead of hours needed by the commercial programs. Target damage due to impact can be assessed quickly, provided that target vibration modes and allowable stress are known.

  3. Development of Detectability Limits for On-Orbit Inspection of Space Shuttle Wing Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephan, Ryan A.; Johnson, David G.; Mastropietro, A. J.; Ancarrow, Walt C.

    2005-01-01

    At the conclusion of the Columbia Accident Investigation, one of the recommendations of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) was that NASA develop and implement an inspection plan for the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) system components of the Space Shuttle. To address these issues, a group of scientists and engineers at NASA Langley Research Center proposed the use of an IR camera to inspect the RCC. Any crack in an RCC panel changes the thermal resistance of the material in the direction perpendicular to the crack. The change in thermal resistance can be made visible by introducing a heat flow across the crack and using an IR camera to image the resulting surface temperature distribution. The temperature difference across the crack depends on the change in the thermal resistance, the length of the crack, the local thermal gradient, and the rate of radiation exchange with the environment. This paper describes how the authors derived the minimum thermal gradient detectability limits for a through crack in an RCC panel. This paper will also show, through the use of a transient, 3-dimensional, finite element model, that these minimum gradients naturally exist on-orbit. The results from the finite element model confirm that there are sufficient thermal gradient to detect a crack on 96% of the RCC leading edge.

  4. Reduction of Free Edge Peeling Stress of Laminated Composites Using Active Piezoelectric Layers

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bin; Kim, Heung Soo

    2014-01-01

    An analytical approach is proposed in the reduction of free edge peeling stresses of laminated composites using active piezoelectric layers. The approach is the extended Kantorovich method which is an iterative method. Multiterms of trial function are employed and governing equations are derived by taking the principle of complementary virtual work. The solutions are obtained by solving a generalized eigenvalue problem. By this approach, the stresses automatically satisfy not only the traction-free boundary conditions, but also the free edge boundary conditions. Through the iteration processes, the free edge stresses converge very quickly. It is found that the peeling stresses generated by mechanical loadings are significantly reduced by applying a proper electric field to the piezoelectric actuators. PMID:25025088

  5. Free edge strain concentrations in real composite laminates Experimental-theoretical correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.; Post, D.; Buczek, M. B.; Czarnek, R.

    1985-01-01

    The magnitude of the maximum shear strain at the free edge of axially loaded theta (2)/theta(2)(s) and (+ or - theta(2) (s) composite laminates was investigated experimentally and numerically to ascertain the actual value of strain concentration in resin matrix laminates and to determine the accuracy of finite element results. Experimental results using moire interferometry show large, but finite, shear strain concentrations at the free edge of graphite-epoxy and graphite-polyimide laminates. Comparison of the experimental results with those obtained using several different finite element representations showed that a four node isoparametric finite element provided the best and most trouble free numerical results. The results indicate that the ratio of maximum shear strain at the free edge to applied axial strain varies with fiber orientation and does not exceed nine for the most critical angle which is 15 deg.

  6. Free edge strain concentrations in real composite laminates: Experimental-theoretical correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.; Post, D.; Buczek, M. B.; Czarnek, R.

    1984-01-01

    The magnitude of the maximum shear strain at the free edge of axially loaded theta (2)/-theta(2)(s) and (+ or - theta(2) (s) composite laminates was investigated experimentally and numerically to ascertain the actual value of strain concentration in resin matrix laminates and to determine the accuracy of finite element results. Experimental results using moire interferometry show large, but finite, shear strain concentrations at the free edge of graphite-epoxy and graphite-polyimide laminates. Comparison of the experimental results with those obtained using several different finite element representations showed that a four node isoparametric finite element provided the best and most trouble free numerical results. The results indicate that the ratio of maxium shear strain at the free edge to applied axial strain varies with fiber orientation and does not exceed nine for the most critical angle which is 15 deg.

  7. HTS current lead using a composite heat pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, M.A.; Prenger, F.C.; Hill, D.D.; Daney, D.E.; Woloshun, K.A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper discusses the design and fabrication of HTS current leads being built by Los Alamos to supply power to a demonstration HTS coil which will operate in a vacuum cooled by a cryocooler. Because vapor cooling is not an option for this application the leads must be entirely conductively cooled. In the design of HTS current leads for this type of application, it is desirable to intercept part of the heat load at an intermediate temperature. This thermal intercept or connection must be electrically insulating but thermally conductive, two mutually exclusive properties of most candidate solid materials. To achieve this end we incorporate a composite nitrogen heat pipe, constructed of conducting and non-conducting materials, to provide efficient thermal communication and simultaneously, electrical isolation between the lead and the intermediate temperature heat sink. Another important feature of the current lead design is the use of high Jc thick film superconductors deposited on a non-conducting substrate to reduce the conductive heat leak through the lower portion of the lead. Two flexible electrical conductors are incorporated to accommodate handling, assembly and the dissimilar expansion coefficients of the various materials.

  8. Subsonic Investigation of a Leading-Edge Boundary Layer Control Suction System on a High-Speed Civil Transport Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Bryan A.; Applin, Zachary T.; Kemmerly, Guy T.; Coe, Paul L., Jr.; Owens, D. Bruce; Gile, Brenda E.; Parikh, Pradip G.; Smith, Don

    1999-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of a leading edge boundary layer control system was conducted on a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. Data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.08 to 0.27, with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 1.79 x 10(exp 6) to 5.76 x 10(exp 6). Variations in the amount of suction, as well as the size and location of the suction area, were tested with outboard leading edge flaps deflected 0 and 30 deg and trailing-edge flaps deflected 0 and 20 deg. The longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic data are presented without analysis. A complete tabulated data listing is also presented herein.

  9. Effects of leading-edge devices on the low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a highly-swept arrow-wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, S. J.; Nicks, O. W.; Imbrie, P. K.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Texas A&M University 7 by 10 foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel to provide a direct comparison of the effect of several leading edge devices on the aerodynamic performance of a highly swept wing configuration. Analysis of the data indicates that for the configuration with undeflected leading edges, vortex separation first occurs on the outboard wing panel for angles of attack of approximately 2, and wing apex vorticies become apparent for alpha or = 4 deg. However, the occurrence of the leading edge vortex flow may be postponed with leading edge devices. Of the devices considered, the most promising were a simple leading edge deflection of 30 deg and a leading edge slat system. The trailing edge flap effectiveness was found to be essentially the same for the configuration employing either of these more promising leading edge devices. Analysis of the lateral directional data showed that for all of the concepts considered, deflecting leading edge downward in an attempt to postpone leading edge vortex flows, has the favorable effect of reducing the effective dihedral.

  10. A n n i v e r s a r y T L E 702 The Leading Edge June 2012

    E-print Network

    v e r s a r y T L E SAGE at 30 As you receive this issue of The Leading Edge the Summer ofAppliedGeophysicalExperience(SAGE)willbestarting our 30th field season. SAGE is a unique educational program that combines teaching and research as a partnership between universities, industry, government agencies and professional societies. SAGE includes

  11. Design fabrication, testing, and delivery of shuttle heat pipe leading edge test modules. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The construction of two test modules is presented for a feasibility demonstration of a concept for reusable space shuttle wing leading edge surfaces. In this leading edge concept high temperature heat pipes were incorporated into the structure to cool the stagnation region, allowing the use of super-alloys in place of refractory metal, ablator protected, or carbon-carbon structures. The program included the analysis and design of the heat pipes, their integration into the test module structure, heat pipe development testing, construction of the test modules and a facility adapter, and formulation of recommended testing conditions. The results of the heat pipe and leading edge module thermal analyses indicate the test modules will meet the design goal; reducing the leading edge temperature at the stagnation line from 1315 C (2400 F) to less than 1010 C (1850 F). The development tests demonstrated that the module assembly could be brazed with active heat pipes, as was borne out by the subsequent successful brazing of both modules with active heat pipes loaded with sodium.

  12. "Partners in Science": A Model Cooperative Program Introducing High School Teachers and Students to Leading-Edge Pharmaceutical Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woska, Joseph R., Jr.; Collins, Danielle M.; Canney, Brian J.; Arcario, Erin L.; Reilly, Patricia L.

    2005-01-01

    "Partners in Science" is a cooperative program between Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and area high schools in the community surrounding our Connecticut campus. It is a two-phase program that introduces high school students and teachers to the world of drug discovery and leading-edge pharmaceutical research. Phase 1 involves a series…

  13. Turbulent Vortex-Flow Simulation Over a 65 deg Sharp and Blunt Leading-Edge Delta Wing at Subsonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffari, Farhad

    2005-01-01

    Turbulent thin-layer, Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solutions, based on a multi-block structured grid, are presented for a 65 deg delta wing having either a sharp leading edge (SLE) or blunt leading edge (BLE) geometry. The primary objective of the study is to assess the prediction capability of the method for simulating the leading-edge flow separation and the ensuing vortex flow characteristics. Computational results are obtained for two angles of attack of approximately 13 and 20 deg, at free-stream Mach number of 0.40 and Reynolds number of 6 million based on the wing mean aerodynamic chord. The effects of two turbulence models of Baldwin-Lomax with Degani-Schiff (BL/DS) and the Spalart-Allmaras (SA) on the numerical results are also discussed. The computations also explore the effects of two numerical flux-splitting schemes, i.e., flux difference splitting (fds) and flux vector splitting (fvs), on the solution development and convergence characteristics. The resulting trends in solution sensitivity to grid resolution for the selected leading-edge geometries, angles of attack, turbulence models and flux splitting schemes are also presented. The validity of the numerical results is evaluated against a unique set of experimental wind-tunnel data that was obtained in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  14. An evaluation of leading-edge flap performance on delta and double-delta wings at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covell, P. F.; Miller, D. S.; Wood, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of leading-edge flaps on three delta double-delta wing planforms having aspect ratios of 1.75, 2.11, and 2.50, have been investigated experimentally. The wings were mounted on a generic fuselage without an inlet canopy, or a vertical tail. The Mach numbers of the flow over the wings were 1.60, 1.90 and 2.16. A primary set of full-span leading-edge flaps with similar root and tip chords were tested on each wing, and several alternate flap planforms were tested on the aspect ratio 1.75 wings. It is found that all leading edge geometries were effective in reducing drag lifting over the range of wing aspect ratios and Mach numbers tested. Greater flap performance was obtained when primary flaps were applied to the delta planform. In general, the primary flap geometry yielded better performance than the alternative geometries tested. Flow visualization techniques were found to be useful for identifying the beneficial effects of leading-edge flap deflection on flow separation as well as fuselage interference effects. Black and white photographs of the delta and double-delta planforms are provided.

  15. Heat transfer and material temperature conditions in the leading edge area of impingement-cooled turbine vanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, H. P.; Pfaff, K.; Hennecke, D. K.

    The resultant effects on the cooling effectiveness at the leading edge area of an impingement-cooled turbine vane by varying certain geometrical parameters is described with reference to local internal heat transfer coefficients determined from experiment and temperature calculations. The local heat transfer on the cooling-air side is determined experimentally with the aid of the analogy between heat- and mass transfer. The impingement cooling is provided from an inserted sheet-metal containing a single row of holes. The Reynolds Number and several of the cooling geometry parameters were varied. The results demonstrate the high local resolution of the method of measurement, which allows improved analytical treatment of the leading-edge cooling configuration. These experiments also point to the necessity of not always performing model tests under idealized conditions. This becomes very clear in the case of the tests performed on an application-oriented impingement-cooling configuration like that often encountered in engine manufacture. In conclusion, as an example, temperature calculations are employed to demonstrate the effect on the cooling effectiveness of varying the distances between insert and inner surface of the leading edge. It shows how the effectiveness of the leading edge cooling can be increased by simple geometrical measures, which results in a considerable improvement in service life.

  16. Thermal Edge-Effects Model for Automated Tape Placement of Thermoplastic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costen, Robert C.

    2000-01-01

    Two-dimensional thermal models for automated tape placement (ATP) of thermoplastic composites neglect the diffusive heat transport that occurs between the newly placed tape and the cool substrate beside it. Such lateral transport can cool the tape edges prematurely and weaken the bond. The three-dimensional, steady state, thermal transport equation is solved by the Green's function method for a tape of finite width being placed on an infinitely wide substrate. The isotherm for the glass transition temperature on the weld interface is used to determine the distance inward from the tape edge that is prematurely cooled, called the cooling incursion Delta a. For the Langley ATP robot, Delta a = 0.4 mm for a unidirectional lay-up of PEEK/carbon fiber composite, and Delta a = 1.2 mm for an isotropic lay-up. A formula for Delta a is developed and applied to a wide range of operating conditions. A surprise finding is that Delta a need not decrease as the Peclet number Pe becomes very large, where Pe is the dimensionless ratio of inertial to diffusive heat transport. Conformable rollers that increase the consolidation length would also increase Delta a, unless other changes are made, such as proportionally increasing the material speed. To compensate for premature edge cooling, the thermal input could be extended past the tape edges by the amount Delta a. This method should help achieve uniform weld strength and crystallinity across the width of the tape.

  17. Penetration of carbon-fabric-reinforced composites by edge cracks during thermal aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Kamvouris, John E.

    1994-01-01

    Thermo-oxidative stability (TOS) test results are significantly influenced by the formation and growth or presence of interlaminar and interlaminar cracks in the cut edges of all carbon-fiber-crosslinked high-temperature polymer matrix composites(exp 1-5) (i.e., unidirectional, crossplied, angle-plied, and fabric composites). The thermo-oxidative degradation of these composites is heavily dependent on the surface area that is exposed to the harmful environment and on the surface-to-volume ratio of the structure under study. Since the growth of cracks and voids on the composite surfaces significantly increases the exposed surface areas, it is imperative that the interaction between the aging process and the formation of new surface area as the aging time progresses be understood.

  18. The Influence of Mesh Density on the Impact Response of a Shuttle Leading-Edge Panel Finite Element Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Lyle, Karen H.; Spellman, Regina L.

    2004-01-01

    A study was performed to examine the influence of varying mesh density on an LS-DYNA simulation of a rectangular-shaped foam projectile impacting the space shuttle leading edge Panel 6. The shuttle leading-edge panels are fabricated of reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) material. During the study, nine cases were executed with all possible combinations of coarse, baseline, and fine meshes of the foam and panel. For each simulation, the same material properties and impact conditions were specified and only the mesh density was varied. In the baseline model, the shell elements representing the RCC panel are approximately 0.2-in. on edge, whereas the foam elements are about 0.5-in. on edge. The element nominal edge-length for the baseline panel was halved to create a fine panel (0.1-in. edge length) mesh and doubled to create a coarse panel (0.4-in. edge length) mesh. In addition, the element nominal edge-length of the baseline foam projectile was halved (0.25-in. edge length) to create a fine foam mesh and doubled (1.0- in. edge length) to create a coarse foam mesh. The initial impact velocity of the foam was 775 ft/s. The simulations were executed in LS-DYNA version 960 for 6 ms of simulation time. Contour plots of resultant panel displacement and effective stress in the foam were compared at five discrete time intervals. Also, time-history responses of internal and kinetic energy of the panel, kinetic and hourglass energy of the foam, and resultant contact force were plotted to determine the influence of mesh density. As a final comparison, the model with a fine panel and fine foam mesh was executed with slightly different material properties for the RCC. For this model, the average degraded properties of the RCC were replaced with the maximum degraded properties. Similar comparisons of panel and foam responses were made for the average and maximum degraded models.

  19. Subsonic longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a vectored-engine-over-wing configuration having spanwise leading-edge vortex enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, J. K.; Fox, C. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A configuration which integrates a close coupled canard wing combination, spanwise blowing for enhancement of the wing leading edge vortex, an engine-over-wing concept, and a wing trailing edge coanda-effect flap is studied. The data on the configuration are presented in tabular from without discussion. The investigation was conducted in the Langley 7- by 10-foot high speed tunnel at a Mach number of 0.166 through an angle-of-attack range from -2 to 22 deg. Rectangular main engine nozzles of aspect ratio 4, 6, and 8 were tested over a momentum coefficient range from 1.0 to 1.8.

  20. EPDM composite membranes modified with cerium doped lead zirconate titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaharescu, T.; Dumitru, A.; Lungulescu, M. E.; Velciu, G.

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed on ?-irradiated ethylene-propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM) loaded with lead zirconate titanate. The inorganic phase has a perovskite structure with general formula Pb(Zr0.65-xCexTi0.35)O3. The three composites with different Ce dopant concentrations revealed the stabilization activity of filler against oxidation proved by chemiluminescence investigation in respect to pristine polymer. The presence of cerium low concentrations in the solid lead zirconate titanate nanoparticles causes significant slowing of oxidation rate during radiation exposure. The improvement in the stabilization feature of filler is correlated with the existence of traps, whose interaction with free radicals assumes medium energy due to their convenient depth.

  1. Measurement of Fuel Concentration Profile at Leading Edge of Lifted Flame with Acetone Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Mitsutomo; Sekine, Kazushi; Hashimoto, Kouta; Saiki, Atsushi; Takahashi, Hidemi; Masuya, Goro

    This is a study of the leading-edge characteristics of a methane-air triple flame. Few experiment results are available for physical examination of such characteristics, so further experimental investigations are strongly needed to understand the stability mechanism in a mixture with a steep concentration gradient. To this end, we measured concentration profiles at the leading edge of a flame using acetone laser-induced fluorescence (acetone LIF). The results demonstrated that the lifted height of the flame changed when acetone was added to the mixture and correlated well with increased C2 radical behind the flame edge. However, the OH radical luminous intensity, measured with a spectroscope, did not change with addition of acetone. Moreover, the burning velocity obtained by the Bunsen-burner method remained constant when acetone was added to the mixture. Therefore, acetone had little influence on burning intensity. Acetone LIF can thus be employed to measure the local concentration gradient at the leading edge of a flame. The acetone LIF signals could be corrected to consider the thermal effect by using silicone oil vanishing-plane data. From the corrected acetone LIF data, the width between the lean and rich flammability limits (flammability limit width) in the flow upstream of the flame with a steep concentration gradient was clearly observed and could be quantitatively compared with the recent numerical results.

  2. KNN–NTK composite lead-free piezoelectric ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, T. Kozuka, H.; Kitamura, K.; Yamada, H.; Kurahashi, T.; Yamazaki, M.; Ohbayashi, K.

    2014-10-21

    A (K,Na)NbO?-based lead-free piezoelectric ceramic was successfully densified. It exhibited an enhanced electromechanical coupling factor of k?=0.52, a piezoelectric constant d??=252 pC/N, and a frequency constant N?=3170 Hz m because of the incorporation of an elaborate secondary phase composed primarily of KTiNbO?. The ceramic's nominal composition was 0.92K?.??Na?.??Ca?.??Li?.??Nb?.??O?–0.047K?.??Ti?.??Nb?.??O?–0.023BaZrO? –0.0017Co?O?–0.002Fe?O?–0.005ZnO, abbreviated herein as KNN–NTK composite. The KNN–NTK ceramic exhibited a dense microstructure with few microvoids which significantly degraded its piezoelectric properties. Elemental maps recorded using transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (TEM–EDS) revealed regions of high concentrations of Co and Zn inside the NTK phase. In addition, X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed that a small portion of the NTK phase was converted into K?(Ti,Nb,Co,Zn)?O?? or CoZnTiO? by a possible reaction between Co and Zn solutes and the NTK phase during a programmed sintering schedule. TEM studies also clarified a distortion around the KNN/NTK interfaces. Such an NTK phase filled voids between KNN particles, resulting in an improved chemical stability of the KNN ceramic. The manufacturing process was subsequently scaled to 100 kg per batch for granulated ceramic powder using a spray-drying technique. The properties of the KNN–NTK composite ceramic produced using the scaled-up method were confirmed to be identical to those of the ceramic prepared by conventional solid-state reaction sintering. Consequently, slight changes in the NTK phase composition and the distortion around the KNN/NTK interfaces affected the KNN–NTK composite ceramic's piezoelectric characteristics.

  3. A New Method for Measuring Edge Tensions and Stability of Lipid Bilayers: Effect of Membrane Composition

    PubMed Central

    Portet, Thomas; Dimova, Rumiana

    2010-01-01

    We report a novel and facile method for measuring edge tensions of lipid membranes. The approach is based on electroporation of giant unilamellar vesicles and analysis of the pore closure dynamics. We applied this method to evaluate the edge tension in membranes with four different compositions: egg phosphatidylcholine (eggPC), dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), and mixtures of DOPC with cholesterol and dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine. Our data confirm previous results for eggPC and DOPC. The addition of 17 mol % cholesterol to the DOPC membrane causes an increase in the membrane edge tension. On the contrary, when the same fraction of dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine is added to the membrane, a decrease in the edge tension is observed, which is an unexpected result considering the inverted-cone shape geometry of the molecule. It is presumed that interlipid hydrogen bonding is the origin of this behavior. Furthermore, cholesterol was found to lower the lysis tension of DOPC bilayers. This behavior differs from that observed on bilayers made of stearoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine, suggesting that cholesterol influences the membrane mechanical stability in a lipid-specific manner. PMID:21081074

  4. Coordinated RhoA signaling at the leading edge and uropod is required for T cell transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Heasman, Sarah J; Carlin, Leo M; Cox, Susan; Ng, Tony; Ridley, Anne J

    2010-08-23

    Transendothelial migration (TEM) is a tightly regulated process whereby leukocytes migrate from the vasculature into tissues. Rho guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) are implicated in TEM, but the contributions of individual Rho family members are not known. In this study, we use an RNA interference screen to identify which Rho GTPases affect T cell TEM and demonstrate that RhoA is critical for this process. RhoA depletion leads to loss of migratory polarity; cells lack both leading edge and uropod structures and, instead, have stable narrow protrusions with delocalized protrusions and contractions. By imaging a RhoA activity biosensor in transmigrating T cells, we find that RhoA is locally and dynamically activated at the leading edge, where its activation precedes both extension and retraction events, and in the uropod, where it is associated with ROCK-mediated contraction. The Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) GEF-H1 contributes to uropod contraction but does not affect the leading edge. Our data indicate that RhoA activity is dynamically regulated at the front and back of T cells to coordinate TEM. PMID:20733052

  5. Calculation of the 3-D viscous flow at the endwall leading edge region of an axial annular turbine cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walitt, L.

    1984-01-01

    A three-dimensional viscous computer code (VANS/MD) was employed to calculate the turbulent flow field at the end wall leading edge region of a 20 inch axial annular turbine cascade. The initial boundary layer roll-up and formation of the end wall vortices were computed at the vane leading edge. The calculated flow field was found to be periodic with a frequency of approximately 1600 Hz. The calculated size of the separation region for the hub endwall vortex compared favorably with measured endwall oil traces. In an effort to determine the effects of the turbulence model on the calculated unsteadiness, a laminar calculation was made. The periodic nature of the calculated flow field persisted with the frequency essentially unchanged.

  6. KNN-NTK composite lead-free piezoelectric ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, T.; Kozuka, H.; Kitamura, K.; Yamada, H.; Kurahashi, T.; Yamazaki, M.; Ohbayashi, K.

    2014-10-01

    A (K,Na)NbO3-based lead-free piezoelectric ceramic was successfully densified. It exhibited an enhanced electromechanical coupling factor of kp = 0.52, a piezoelectric constant d33 = 252 pC/N, and a frequency constant Np = 3170 Hz m because of the incorporation of an elaborate secondary phase composed primarily of KTiNbO5. The ceramic's nominal composition was 0.92K0.42Na0.44Ca0.04Li0.02Nb0.85O3-0.047K0.85Ti0.85Nb1.15O5-0.023BaZrO3-0.0017Co3O4-0.002Fe2O3-0.005ZnO, abbreviated herein as KNN-NTK composite. The KNN-NTK ceramic exhibited a dense microstructure with few microvoids which significantly degraded its piezoelectric properties. Elemental maps recorded using transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (TEM-EDS) revealed regions of high concentrations of Co and Zn inside the NTK phase. In addition, X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed that a small portion of the NTK phase was converted into K2(Ti,Nb,Co,Zn)6O13 or CoZnTiO4 by a possible reaction between Co and Zn solutes and the NTK phase during a programmed sintering schedule. TEM studies also clarified a distortion around the KNN/NTK interfaces. Such an NTK phase filled voids between KNN particles, resulting in an improved chemical stability of the KNN ceramic. The manufacturing process was subsequently scaled to 100 kg per batch for granulated ceramic powder using a spray-drying technique. The properties of the KNN-NTK composite ceramic produced using the scaled-up method were confirmed to be identical to those of the ceramic prepared by conventional solid-state reaction sintering. Consequently, slight changes in the NTK phase composition and the distortion around the KNN/NTK interfaces affected the KNN-NTK composite ceramic's piezoelectric characteristics.

  7. Novel lead-graphene and lead-graphite metallic composite materials for possible applications as positive electrode grid in lead-acid battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yolshina, L. A.; Yolshina, V. A.; Yolshin, A. N.; Plaksin, S. V.

    2015-03-01

    Novel lead-graphene and lead-graphite metallic composites which melt at temperature of the melting point of lead were investigated as possible positive current collectors for lead acid batteries in sulfuric acid solution. Scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, difference scanning calorimetry, cyclic voltammetry and prolonged corrosion tests were employed to characterize the effect of the newly proposed lead-carbon metallic composites on the structure and electrochemical properties of positive grid material. Both lead-graphene and lead-graphite metallic composite materials show the similar electrochemical characteristics to metallic lead in the voltage range where the positive electrodes of lead acid batteries operate. It has been shown that carbon both as graphene and graphite does not participate in the electrochemical process but improve corrosion and electrochemical characteristics of both metallic composite materials. No products of interaction of lead with sulfuric acid were formed on the surface of graphene and graphite so as it was not found additional peaks of carbon discharge on voltammograms which could be attributed to the carbon. Graphene inclusions in lead prevent formation of leady oxide nanocrystals which deteriorate discharge characteristics of positive electrode of LAB. Both lead-graphene alloy and lead-graphite metallic composite proved excellent electrochemical and corrosion behavior and can be used as positive grids in lead acid batteries of new generation.

  8. A Unit-Problem Investigation of Blunt Leading-Edge Separation Motivated by AVT-161 SACCON Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.; Boelens, Okko J.

    2011-01-01

    A research effort has been initiated to examine in more detail some of the challenging flow fields discovered from analysis of the SACCON configuration aerodynamics. This particular effort is oriented toward a diamond wing investigation specifically designed to isolate blunt leading-edge separation phenomena relevant to the SACCON investigations of the present workshop. The approach taken to design this new effort is reviewed along with the current status of the program.

  9. Investigation of Porous Gas-Heated Leading-Edge Section for Icing Protection of a Delta Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowden, Dean T.

    1955-01-01

    A tip section of a delta wing having an NACA 0004-65 airfoil section and a 600 leading-edge sweepback was equipped with a porous leading-edge section through which hot gas was 'bled for anti-icing. Heating rates for anti-icing were determined for a wide range of icing conditions. The effects of gas flow through the porous leading-edge section on airfoil pressure distribution and drag in dry air were investigated. The drag increase caused by an ice formation on the unheated airfoil was measured for several icing conditions. Experimental porous surface- to free-stream convective heat-transfer coefficients were obtained in dry air and compared with theory. Adequate icing protection was obtained at all icing conditions investigated. Savings in total gas-flow rate up to 42 percent may be obtained with no loss in anti-icing effectiveness by sealing half the upper-surface porous area. Gas flow through the leading-edge section had no appreciable effect on airfoil pressure distribution. The airfoil section drag increased slightly (5-percent average) with gas flow through the porous surface. A heavy glaze-ice formation produced after 10 minutes of icing caused an increase in section drag coefficient of 240 percent. Experimental convective heat-transfer coefficients obtained with hot-gas flow through the porous area in dry air and turbulent flow were 20 to 30 percent lower than the theoretical values for a solid surface under similar conditions. The transition region from laminar to turbulent flow moved forward as the ratio of gas velocity through the porous surface to air-stream velocity was increased.

  10. Icing tunnel tests of a glycol-exuding porous leading edge ice protection system on a general aviation airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlman, D. L.; Schweikhard, W. G.; Evanich, P.

    1981-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the Icing Research Tunnel at the NASA Lewis Research Center to determine the characteristics of an ice protection system that distributes a glycol solution onto the leading edge of an airfoil through a porous surface material. Minimum fluid flow rates required to achieve anti-icing (no ice formation) were determined for various flight conditions and angles of attack. The ability of the system to remove ice formed on the airfoil before system activation was also investigated.

  11. A TOF-PET Detector based on Quadrant-Sharing PMTs and Optimized Leading-edge Timing Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yingjie; Liu, Junhui; Li, Daowu; Zhang, Tianbao; Zhang, Zhiming; Cao, Xingzhong; Wang, Baoyi; Wei, Long

    2013-06-01

    A time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF-PET) detector was developed based on a 6×9 LYSO array and four single channel photomultipliers (Hamamatsu R9800). Leading-edge timing circuit with optimized parameter was used instead of the constant fraction discriminator. The results showed that all 54 elements in the flood histogram could be identified clearly. The average coincidence resolving time was 402 ps FWHM.

  12. Flight test operations using an F-106B research airplane modified with a wing leading-edge vortex flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, Daniel J.; Brown, Philip W.; Hallissy, James B.

    1992-01-01

    Flight tests of an F-106B aircraft equipped with a leading-edge vortex flap, which represented the culmination of a research effort to examine the effectiveness of the flap, were conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center. The purpose of the flight tests was to establish a data base on the use of a wing leading-edge vortex flap as a means to validate the design and analysis methods associated with the development of such a vortical flow-control concept. The overall experiment included: refinements of the design codes for vortex flaps; numerous wind tunnel entries to aid in verifying design codes and determining basic aerodynamic characteristics; design and fabrication of the flaps, structural modifications to the wing tip and leading edges of the test aircraft; development and installation of an aircraft research instrumentation system, including wing and flap surface pressure measurements and selected structural loads measurements; ground-based simulation to assess flying qualities; and finally, flight testing. This paper reviews the operational aspects associated with the flight experiment, which includes a description of modifications to the research airplane, the overall flight test procedures, and problems encountered. Selected research results are also presented to illustrate the accomplishments of the research effort.

  13. Model for adhesion clutch explains biphasic relationship between actin flow and traction at the cell leading edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Erin M.; Stricker, Jonathan; Gardel, Margaret; Mogilner, Alex

    2015-05-01

    Cell motility relies on the continuous reorganization of a dynamic actin-myosin-adhesion network at the leading edge of the cell, in order to generate protrusion at the leading edge and traction between the cell and its external environment. We analyze experimentally measured spatial distributions of actin flow, traction force, myosin density, and adhesion density in control and pharmacologically perturbed epithelial cells in order to develop a mechanical model of the actin-adhesion-myosin self-organization at the leading edge. A model in which the F-actin network is treated as a viscous gel, and adhesion clutch engagement is strengthened by myosin but weakened by actin flow, can explain the measured molecular distributions and correctly predict the spatial distributions of the actin flow and traction stress. We test the model by comparing its predictions with measurements of the actin flow and traction stress in cells with fast and slow actin polymerization rates. The model predicts how the location of the lamellipodium-lamellum boundary depends on the actin viscosity and adhesion strength. The model further predicts that the location of the lamellipodium-lamellum boundary is not very sensitive to the level of myosin contraction.

  14. Low-Speed Aerodynamic Data for an 0.18-Scale Model of an F-16XL with Various Leading-Edge Modifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, Daniel E.

    1999-01-01

    Using the F-16XL as a test-bed, two strategies for improving the low-speed flying characteristics that had minimal impact on high-speed performance were evaluated. In addition to the basic F-16XL configuration several modifications to the baseline configuration were tested in the Langley 30- X 60-Foot Tunnel: 1) the notched area at the wing leading edge and fuselage juncture was removed resulting in a continuous 70 deg leading-edge sweep on the inboard portion of the wing; 2) an integral attached-flow leading-edge flap concept was added to the continuous leading edge; and 3) a deployable vortex flap concept was added to the continuous leading edge. The purpose of this report is simply to document the test configurations, test conditions, and data obtained in this investigation for future reference and analysis. No analysis is presented herein and the data only appear in tabulated format.

  15. Boundary-layer effects in composite laminates: Free-edge stress singularities, part 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanag, S. S.; Choi, I.

    1981-01-01

    A rigorous mathematical model was obtained for the boundary-layer free-edge stress singularity in angleplied and crossplied fiber composite laminates. The solution was obtained using a method consisting of complex-variable stress function potentials and eigenfunction expansions. The required order of the boundary-layer stress singularity is determined by solving the transcendental characteristic equation obtained from the homogeneous solution of the partial differential equations. Numerical results obtained show that the boundary-layer stress singularity depends only upon material elastic constants and fiber orientation of the adjacent plies. For angleplied and crossplied laminates the order of the singularity is weak in general.

  16. Development of composite materials for non-leaded glove for use in radiological hand protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodoo-Amoo, David Nii Amoo

    Lead is a hazardous material and US congress has mandated the rapid reduction of all hazardous waste generation as a matter of national policy. With the large amount of plutonium handling in numerous projects including the development of MOX fuel, power source etc., hand glove protection for the emitted alpha-beta- and low energy photons is an important issue. Leaded gloves are the prime shields used for radiological hand protection. US Department of Energy laboratories require a substitute material for the lead oxide in the gloves, as a way to reduced mixed waste. To solve this problem, a new blend of non-hazardous materials that have the same radiological properties, approximately the same cost of production, and lastly not potentially fall under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulation, to replace the lead oxide currently used in the gloves had been investigated. The investigations have produced alternative materials using calculations (deterministic and Monte Carlo, MCNP) and experiments. The selection of the constituent compounds for the new composite materials, were based on the k-absorption edge energy of the main constituent element(s) in the compound. The formulations of these composites were fashioned on the principle of blending neoprene rubber formulation with several constituent compounds. Calculations based on the Lambert-Beer attenuation law together with the mass attenuation coefficient values from the XCOM cross section database program were used to determine the transmission fractions of these proposed composite materials. Selected composite materials that compared favorably with the leaded-neoprene were fabricated. These fabricated composite materials were tested with attenuation experiments and the results were in excellent agreement with the calculations using the Lambert-Beer law. For the purpose of benchmarking the result of the calculations, Monte Carlo calculations were also made. The success of this research would mean that this new composite material could also replace the lead aprons currently in use, as shields against radiation like x-ray in most hospitals. Based on computational and experimental results, the recommended compositions of the composite materials for the glove are: (i) Erbium III Oxide (Er2O3)---40% and 40 Tungsten Boride (WB) blend with 20% Neoprene formulation, or with the reduced Er2O3, (ii) Erbium III Oxide (Er2O 3)---5% and 75% Tungsten Boride (WB) blend with 20% Neoprene formulation. (iii) Tungsten III Oxide (WO3)---80% blended with 20% Neoprene formulation. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) results show that, several heavy metals used in these new materials that would leach out were below the US EPA limit or are not on the list of regulated heavy metals. However, on the original gloves Lead leached out at a concentration of 5.2 mL/L, slightly above the regulatory limit.

  17. Asian anthropogenic lead contamination in the North Pacific Ocean as evidenced by stable lead isotopic compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurbrick, Cheryl M.

    This dissertation work determined the changing scope of lead (Pb) contamination in the North Pacific Ocean since the phase-out of leaded gasoline in most of the world. Chapters 1 and 2 consisted of validating our method for determining Pb concentrations and isotopic compositions in seawater. Chapter 3 established a baseline of Pb isotopic compositions (PbICs) in the western and central North Pacific in 2002. This was an ideal time to establish such a baseline because China had recently (mid-2000) ceased their use of leaded gasoline and simultaneously began consuming increasingly large amounts of coal, known to have relatively high Pb concentrations. We found subsurface waters were contaminated with Asian industrial Pb, predominantly Chinese coal emissions. In contrast, the abyssal waters were a mix of Asian industrial Pb and background (i.e., natural) Pb. Chapter 4 revisited the western and central North Pacific in 2009 -- 2011 to determine what, if any, changes had occurred in this short time period. We found that Pb in subsurface and abyssal waters of the western North Pacific were similar to Chinese aerosols. Such a large change in the PbICs of abyssal water in 9 years was unanticipated and attributed to the relatively large flux of particle-bound Pb from the euphotic zone to the deep ocean, which was in isotopic equilibrium with the reservoir of dissolved Pb. In contrast, the central North Pacific abyssal water PbICs were similar to values previously reported because of the relatively lower particulate export. Based on comparisons to baseline PbIC data, we determined that abyssal waters in the western and central North Pacific would be isotopically indistinguishable from surface waters in the next three decades. Sources of Pb to coastal California waters were reevaluated in Chapter 5. Prior studies had found that surface waters of the California Current System (CCS) were isotopically consistent with both Asian industrial Pb and US leaded gasoline, still in use at that point in time. In 2010 and 2011, we found that surface and subsurface waters of the CCS were isotopically similar to Asian industrial emissions. However, remobilized US gasoline Pb from sediments in the San Francisco Bay, California, were accumulating in the "mud belt" on the continental shelf and changing the isotopic composition of overlying waters. During periods of intense upwelling, this historic Pb was brought to the surface of the water. However, the much larger quantity of Pb from Asian industrial emissions made the isotopic composition of Pb from historic US gasoline unidentifiable in off-shore waters. A secondary research focus of this dissertation was to improve my own teaching abilities. Chapter 6 explored the intersection of system thinking and aquatic toxicology in undergraduate education. Among a wealth of information, I found that group concept mapping was no more useful to student learning than the same activity done individually. This was due to poor implementation of team learning strategies by me and inadequate time for students to adjust to non-traditional instruction methodologies.

  18. Convergence of strain energy release rate components for edge-delaminated composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Crews, J. H., Jr.; Aminpour, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    Strain energy release rates for edge delaminated composite laminates were obtained using quasi 3 dimensional finite element analysis. The problem of edge delamination at the -35/90 interfaces of an 8-ply composite laminate subjected to uniform axial strain was studied. The individual components of the strain energy release rates did not show convergence as the delamination tip elements were made smaller. In contrast, the total strain energy release rate converged and remained unchanged as the delamination tip elements were made smaller and agreed with that calculated using a classical laminated plate theory. The studies of the near field solutions for a delamination at an interface between two dissimilar isotropic or orthotropic plates showed that the imaginary part of the singularity is the cause of the nonconvergent behavior of the individual components. To evaluate the accuracy of the results, an 8-ply laminate with the delamination modeled in a thin resin layer, that exists between the -35 and 90 plies, was analyzed. Because the delamination exists in a homogeneous isotropic material, the oscillatory component of the singularity vanishes.

  19. Effect of laminate edge conditions on the formation of microvoids in composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. P.; Altan, M. C.

    2015-05-01

    Manufacturing defects such as microvoids are common in thermoset composite components and are known to negatively affect their strength. The resin pressure developed in and the resin flow out from the laminates during cure have been reported to be the primary factors influencing the final void content of a composite component. In this work, the effect of laminate edge conditions during the cure process on the formation of microvoids was experimentally investigated. This was achieved by fabricating eight-ply laminates from TenCate® BT250/7781 prepreg in a hot-press at a constant cure pressure of 170 kPa while limiting the laminate perimeter available for resin flow by 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100%. The individual plies of these five laminates were conditioned at 99% relative humidity before curing to maximize the moisture present in the lay-up before fabrication. The presence of moisture in the lay-ups was expected to promote void formation and allow the effect of restricting flow at the edges of a laminate to be better identified. The restriction of resin outflow was found to cause the average characteristic void diameter to decrease by 17% and void content to rise by 33%. This phenomenon was identified to be a result of the outflow restriction increasing the number of voids trapped within the laminate and indicates that for laminates cured at low pressures resin outflow is the dominant mechanism for void reduction.

  20. Lift augmentation on a delta wing via leading edge fences and the Gurney flap. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchholz, Mark D.

    1992-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted on two devices for the purpose of lift augmentation on a 60 deg delta wing at low speed. Lift, drag, pitching moment, and surface pressures were measured. Detailed flow visualization was also obtained. Both the leading edge fence and the Gurney flap are shown to increase lift. The fences and flap shift the lift curve as much as 5 deg and 10 deg, respectively. The fences aid in trapping vortices on the upper surface, thereby increasing suction. The Gurney flap improves circulation at the trailing edge. The individual influences of both devices are roughly additive, creating high lift gain. However, the lower lift to drag ratio and the precipitation of vortex burst caused by the fences, and the nose down pitching moment created by the flap are also significant factors.

  1. Experimental study of flow separation control on a low- Re airfoil using leading-edge protuberance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M. M.; Wang, G. F.; Xu, J. Z.

    2014-04-01

    An experimental study of flow separation control on a low- Re c airfoil was presently investigated using a newly developed leading-edge protuberance method, motivated by the improvement in the hydrodynamics of the giant humpback whale through its pectoral flippers. Deploying this method, the control effectiveness of the airfoil aerodynamics was fully evaluated using a three-component force balance, leading to an effectively impaired stall phenomenon and great improvement in the performances within the wide post-stall angle range (22°-80°). To understand the flow physics behind, the vorticity field, velocity field and boundary layer flow field over the airfoil suction side were examined using a particle image velocimetry and an oil-flow surface visualization system. It was found that the leading-edge protuberance method, more like low-profile vortex generator, effectively modified the flow pattern of the airfoil boundary layer through the chordwise and spanwise evolutions of the interacting streamwise vortices generated by protuberances, where the separation of the turbulent boundary layer dominated within the stall region and the rather strong attachment of the laminar boundary layer still existed within the post-stall region. The characteristics to manipulate the flow separation mode of the original airfoil indicated the possibility to further optimize the control performance by reasonably designing the layout of the protuberances.

  2. Thermal/structural analyses of several hydrogen-cooled leading-edge concepts for hypersonic flight vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, Herbert J.; Melis, Matthew E.; Mockler, Theodore T.; Tong, Mike

    1990-01-01

    The aerodynamic heating at high flight Mach numbers, when shock interference heating is included, can be extremely high and can exceed the capability of most conventional metallic and potential ceramic materials available. Numerical analyses of the heat transfer and thermal stresses are performed on three actively cooled leading-edge geometries (models) made of three different materials to address the issue of survivability in a hostile environment. These analyses show a mixture of results from one configuration to the next. Results for each configuration are presented and discussed. Combinations of enhanced internal film coefficients and high material thermal conductivity of copper and tungsten are predicted to maintain the maximum wall temperature for each concept within acceptable operating limits. The exception is the TD nickel material which is predicted to melt for most cases. The wide range of internal impingement film coefficients (based on correlations) for these conditions can lead to a significant uncertainty in expected leading-edge wall temperatures. The equivalent plastic strain, inherent in each configuration which results from the high thermal gradients, indicates a need for further cyclic analysis to determine component life.

  3. Analysis of the effects on life of leading-edge holes in an airfoil subjected to arbitrary spanwise and chordwise temperature distributions. [structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of temperature gradients, cooling-hole rim and bulk metal temperatures, and mechanical stress were investigated by using a finite-element structural analysis of a symmetrical airfoil with and without leading-edge holes. The results indicate that leading-edge film cooling is beneficial when large chordwise temperature gradients exist and if the cooling-hole rim temperatures are above the bulk metal temperature. The effects of film cooling at other locations on the airfoil were not considered, and the relative merits of convection or film cooling at the leading edge, in terms of allowable turbine inlet temperature or coolant flow requirements, were not evaluated.

  4. Effects of Wing Leading Edge Penetration with Venting and Exhaust Flow from Wheel Well at Mach 24 in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2003-01-01

    A baseline solution for CFD Point 1 (Mach 24) in the STS-107 accident investigation was modified to include effects of: (1) holes through the leading edge into a vented cavity; and (2) a scarfed, conical nozzle directed toward the centerline of the vehicle from the forward, inboard corner of the landing gear door. The simulations were generated relatively quickly and early in the investigation because simplifications were made to the leading edge cavity geometry and an existing utility to merge scarfed nozzle grid domains with structured baseline external domains was implemented. These simplifications in the breach simulations enabled: (1) a very quick grid generation procedure; and (2) high fidelity corroboration of jet physics with internal surface impingements ensuing from a breach through the leading edge, fully coupled to the external shock layer flow at flight conditions. These simulations provided early evidence that the flow through a two-inch diameter (or larger) breach enters the cavity with significant retention of external flow directionality. A normal jet directed into the cavity was not an appropriate model for these conditions at CFD Point 1 (Mach 24). The breach diameters were of the same order or larger than the local, external boundary-layer thickness. High impingement heating and pressures on the downstream lip of the breach were computed. It is likely that hole shape would evolve as a slot cut in the direction of the external streamlines. In the case of the six-inch diameter breach the boundary layer is fully ingested. The intent of externally directed jet simulations in the second scenario was to approximately model aerodynamic effects of a relatively large internal wing pressure, fueled by combusting aluminum, which deforms the corner of the landing gear door and directs a jet across the windside surface. These jet interactions, in and of themselves, were not sufficiently large to explain observed aerodynamic behavior.

  5. Effects of Mach Number, Leading-Edge Bluntness, and Sweep on Boundary-Layer Transition on a Flat Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jillie, Don W.; Hopkins, Edward J.

    1961-01-01

    The effects of leading-edge bluntness and sweep on boundary-layer transition on flat plate models were investigated at Mach numbers of 2.00, 2.50, 3.00, and 4.00. The effect of sweep on transition was also determined on a flat plate model equipped with an elliptical nose at a Mach number of 0.27. Models used for the supersonic investigation had leading-edge radii varying from 0.0005 to 0.040 inch. The free-stream unit Reynolds number was held constant at 15 million per foot for the supersonic tests and the angle of attack was 0 deg. Surface flow conditions were determined by visual observation and recorded photographically. The sublimation technique was used to indicate transition, and the fluorescent-oil technique was used to indicate flow separation. Measured Mach number and sweep effects on transition are compared with those predicted from shock-loss considerations as described in NACA Rep. 1312. For the models with the blunter leading edges, the transition Reynolds number (based on free-stream flow conditions) was approximately doubled by an increase in Mach number from 2.50 to 4.00; and nearly the same result was predicted from shock-loss considerations. At all super- sonic Mach numbers, increases in sweep reduced the transition Reynolds number and the amount of reduction increased with increases in bluntness. The shock-loss method considerably underestimated- the sweep effects, possibly because of the existence of crossflow instability associated with swept wings. At a Mach number of 0.27, no reduction in the transition Reynolds number with sweep was measured (as would be expected with no shock loss) until the sweep angle was attained where crossflow instability appeared.

  6. Temperate forest fragments maintain aboveground carbon stocks out to the forest edge despite changes in community composition.

    PubMed

    Ziter, Carly; Bennett, Elena M; Gonzalez, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Edge effects are among the primary mechanisms by which forest fragmentation can influence the link between biodiversity and ecosystem processes, but relatively few studies have quantified these mechanisms in temperate regions. Carbon storage is an important ecosystem function altered by edge effects, with implications for climate change mitigation. Two opposing hypotheses suggest that aboveground carbon (AGC) stocks at the forest edge will (a) decrease due to increased tree mortality and compositional shifts towards smaller, lower wood density species (e.g., as seen in tropical systems) or, less often, (b) increase due to light/temperature-induced increases in diversity and productivity. We used field-based measurements, allometry, and mixed models to investigate the effects of proximity to the forest edge on AGC stocks, species richness, and community composition in 24 forest fragments in southern Quebec. We also asked whether fragment size or connectivity with surrounding forests altered these edge effects. AGC stocks remained constant across a 100 m edge-to-interior gradient in all fragment types, despite changes in tree community composition and stem density consistent with expectations of forest edge effects. We attribute this constancy primarily to compensatory effects of small trees at the forest edge; however, it is due in some cases to the retention of large trees at forest edges, likely a result of forest management. Our results suggest important differences between temperate and tropical fragments with respect to mechanisms linking biodiversity and AGC dynamics. Small temperate forest fragments may be valuable in conservation efforts based on maintaining biodiversity and multiple ecosystem services. PMID:25185776

  7. A Survey of Factors Affecting Blunt Leading-Edge Separation for Swept and Semi-Slender Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.

    2010-01-01

    A survey is presented of factors affecting blunt leading-edge separation for swept and semi-slender wings. This class of separation often results in the onset and progression of separation-induced vortical flow over a slender or semi-slender wing. The term semi-slender is used to distinguish wings with moderate sweeps and aspect ratios from the more traditional highly-swept, low-aspect-ratio slender wing. Emphasis is divided between a selection of results obtained through literature survey a section of results from some recent research projects primarily being coordinated through NATO s Research and Technology Organization (RTO). An aircraft context to these studies is included.

  8. An efficient way to more power 344 metres of leading edge

    E-print Network

    Firestone, Jeremy

    National Laboratory in Denmark, Vestas engineers worked on optimising the relationship between the overall VMP-Top controller with converter Service crane OptiSpeed® generator Composite disc coupling Yaw gears,000 kW Operational data: 50 Hz 1,000 V Gearbox Type: Two planetary an

  9. Landscape composition, patch size, and distance to edges: interactions affecting duck reproductive success

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horn, D.J.; Phillips, M.L.; Koford, R.R.; Clark, W.R.; Sovada, M.A.; Greenwood, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    Prairies and other North American grasslands, although highly fragmented, provide breeding habitat for a diverse array of species, including species of tremendous economic and ecological importance. Conservation and management of these species requires some understanding of how reproductive success is affected by edge effects, patch size, and characteristics of the landscape. We examined how differences in the percentage of grassland in the landscape influenced the relationships between the success of nests of upland-nesting ducks and (1) field size and (2) distance to nearest field and wetland edges. We collected data on study areas composed of 15DS20% grassland and areas composed of 45DS55% grassland in central North Dakota, USA during the 1996 and 1997 nesting seasons. Daily survival rates (DSRs) of duck nests were greater in study areas with 45DS55% grassland than with 15DS20% grassland. Within study areas, we detected a curvilinear relationship between DSR and field size: DSRs were highest in small and large fields and lowest in moderately sized fields. In study areas with 15DS20% grassland, there was no relationship between probability of hatching and distance to nearest field edge, whereas in study areas with 45DS55% grassland, there was a positive relationship between these two variables. Results of this study support the conclusion that both landscape composition and configuration affect reproductive success of ground-nesting birds. We are prompted to question conservation strategies that favor clustering moderately sized patches of nesting habitat within agricultural landscapes because our results show that such patches would have low nest success, most likely caused by predation. Understanding the pattern of nest success, and the predatorDSprey mechanisms that produce the pattern, will enable design of patch configurations that are most conducive to meeting conservation goals.

  10. Studies Conducted of Sodium Carbonate Contaminant Found on the Wing Leading Edge and the Nose Cap of the Space Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Palou, Jaime J.

    2003-01-01

    In early 2001, three of the space shuttle orbiters were found to have a sodium carbonate contaminant on the wing leading edge and nose cap. These parts are made of a reinforced carbon/carbon material protected by silicon carbide (SiC) and a glass coating. The glass coating is known as Type A and is primarily sodium silicate with particles of SiC. NASA Glenn Research Center's Environmental Durability Branch was asked to determine the chemistry of this deposit formation and assess any possible detrimental effects. At low temperatures, the reverse reaction is favorable. Previous studies of the corrosion of glass show that carbon dioxide in the presence of water does form sodium carbonate on sodium silicate glass (ref. 1). It is quite likely that a similar scenario exists for the orbiter wing leading edge. All three orbiters that formed sodium carbonate were exposed to rain. This formation of sodium carbonate was duplicated in the laboratory. The Type A glass, which coats the wing leading edge and nose cap, was made in a freestanding form and exposed to water in two separate experiments. In one set of experiments, the coating was placed in a petri dish filled with water. As the water evaporated, sodium carbonate formed. In another case, water was slowly dripped on the coating and sodium carbonate formed. The sodium carbonate was detected by chemical analysis and, in some cases, xray diffraction showed a hydrated sodium carbonate. The next step was to examine possible detrimental effects of this sodium carbonate. There are three likely scenarios for the sodium carbonate deposit: (1) it may be removed with a simple rinse, (2) it may remain and flow back into the Type A glass after heating during reentry, or (3) it may remain and flow onto unprotected SiC and/or other parts after heating during reentry. The effect of case 1 is to remove the Na2O constituent from the Type A glass, thus decreasing its effectiveness as a sealant. Even so, overall, it is probably the best approach and was used by the NASA Kennedy Space Center when the deposits were first observed. The effect of case 2 is minimal and would actually restore the the Type A glass to its composition before carbonate formation. However, the problem with allowing the carbonate to remain leads to the third scenario, the deposit flowing onto other parts. A series of tests were conducted on unprotected SiC, and minimal effects were found in the short-term, but other ceramic and metal parts could be damaged by the molten sodium carbonate and would require close monitoring.

  11. AMELIA CESTOL Test: Acoustic Characteristics of Circulation Control Wing with Leading- and Trailing-Edge Slot Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, William C.; Burnside, Nathan J.

    2013-01-01

    The AMELIA Cruise-Efficient Short Take-off and Landing (CESTOL) configuration concept was developed to meet future requirements of reduced field length, noise, and fuel burn by researchers at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo and Georgia Tech Research Institute under sponsorship by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program (FAP), Subsonic Fixed Wing Project. The novel configuration includes leading- and trailing-edge circulation control wing (CCW), over-wing podded turbine propulsion simulation (TPS). Extensive aerodynamic measurements of forces, surfaces pressures, and wing surface skin friction measurements were recently measured over a wide range of test conditions in the Arnold Engineering Development Center(AEDC) National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) 40- by 80-Ft Wind Tunnel. Acoustic measurements of the model were also acquired for each configuration with 7 fixed microphones on a line under the left wing, and with a 48-element, 40-inch diameter phased microphone array under the right wing. This presentation will discuss acoustic characteristics of the CCW system for a variety of tunnel speeds (0 to 120 kts), model configurations (leading edge(LE) and/or trailing-edge(TE) slot blowing, and orientations (incidence and yaw) based on acoustic measurements acquired concurrently with the aerodynamic measurements. The flow coefficient, Cmu= mVSLOT/qSW varied from 0 to 0.88 at 40 kts, and from 0 to 0.15 at 120 kts. Here m is the slot mass flow rate, VSLOT is the slot exit velocity, q is dynamic pressure, and SW is wing surface area. Directivities at selected 1/3 octave bands will be compared with comparable measurements of a 2-D wing at GTRI, as will as microphone array near-field measurements of the right wing at maximum flow rate. The presentation will include discussion of acoustic sensor calibrations as well as characterization of the wind tunnel background noise environment.

  12. Application of digital particle image velocimetry to insect aerodynamics: measurement of the leading-edge vortex and near wake of a Hawkmoth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomphrey, Richard J.; Lawson, Nicholas J.; Taylor, Graham K.; Thomas, Adrian L. R.

    2006-04-01

    Some insects use leading-edge vortices to generate high lift forces, as has been inferred from qualitative smoke visualisations of the flow around their wings. Here we present the first Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) data and quantitative analysis of an insect’s leading-edge vortex and near wake at two flight speeds. This allows us to describe objectively 2D slices through the flow field of a tethered Tobacco Hawkmoth ( Manduca sexta). The near-field vortex wake appears to braodly resemble elliptical vortex loops. The presence of a leading-edge vortex towards the end of the downstroke is found to coincide with peak upward force production measured by a six-component force-moment balance. The topology of Manduca’s leading-edge vortex differs from that previously described because late in the downstroke, the structure extends continuously from wingtip across the thorax to the other wingtip.

  13. A leading edge heating array and a flat surface heating array: Final design. [for testing the thermal protection system of the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A heating array is described for testing full-scale sections of the leading edge and lower fuselage surfaces of the shuttle. The heating array was designed to provide a tool for development and acceptance testing of leading edge segments and large flat sections of the main body thermal protection system. The array was designed using a variable length module concept to meet test requirements using interchangeable components from one test configuration in another configuration. Heat generating modules and heat absorbing modules were employed to achieve the thermal gradient around the leading edge. A support was developed to hold the modules to form an envelope around a variety of leading edges; to supply coolant to each module; the support structure and to hold the modules in the flat surface heater configuration. An optical pyrometer system mounted within the array was designed to monitor specimen surface temperatures without altering the test article's surface.

  14. DENND2B activates Rab13 at the leading edge of migrating cells and promotes metastatic behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ioannou, Maria S.; Bell, Emily S.; Girard, Martine; Chaineau, Mathilde; Hamlin, Jason N.R.; Daubaras, Mark; Monast, Anie; Park, Morag; Hodgson, Louis

    2015-01-01

    The small guanosine triphosphatase Rab13 functions in exocytic vesicle trafficking in epithelial cells. Alterations in Rab13 activity have been observed in human cancers, yet the mechanism of Rab13 activation and its role in cancer progression remain unclear. In this paper, we identify the DENN domain protein DENND2B as the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rab13 and develop a novel Förster resonance energy transfer–based Rab biosensor to reveal activation of Rab13 by DENND2B at the leading edge of migrating cells. DENND2B interacts with the Rab13 effector MICAL-L2 at the cell periphery, and this interaction is required for the dynamic remodeling of the cell’s leading edge. Disruption of Rab13-mediated trafficking dramatically limits the invasive behavior of epithelial cells in vitro and the growth and migration of highly invasive cancer cells in vivo. Thus, blocking Rab13 activation by DENND2B may provide a novel target to limit the spread of epithelial cancers. PMID:25713415

  15. Design and longitudinal dynamic stability analysis of a slender delta kite for high altitudes using leading edge suction analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madduri, Bharath

    In this thesis, the longitudinal dynamic stability modes, namely Phugoid and Short-period of delta kite with single tether are examined, for different aspect ratios (A) and flow conditions. The equations of motion, of kite are solved in polar-inertial wind frame and the tether is approximated by straight line elements. The vortex lift and induced drag due to leading edge vortices are calculated using Polhamus leading edge suction analogy. The Polhamus proportionality constants (Kp, Kv) are used to estimate the overall coefficient of lift and drag (C L, CD) and are computed using Multhopp lifting surface theory. The values of total coefficient of lift and drag (CL, CD) are examined for a wide variety of aspect ratio of delta kite and are validated by comparing with the experimental data. Linear stability analysis is performed for the chosen design variables to ensure the nominal design has stable longitudinal dynamics. A plot of the root locus of the system matrix for longitudinal dynamics as a function of geometry and flight conditions, provided an intuitive understanding of the flight modes of the kite, with respect to design parameters of interest.

  16. The Influence of Projectile Trajectory Angle on the Simulated Impact Response of a Shuttle Leading Edge Wing Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spellman, Regina L.; Jones, Lisa E.; Lyle, Karen H.; Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2005-01-01

    In support of recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board, a team has been studying the effect of debris impacting the reinforced carbon-carbon panels of the shuttle leading edge. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of varying parameters of the debris trajectory on the damage tolerance. Impacts at the upper and lower surface and the apex of the leading edge were examined. For each location, trajectory variances included both the alpha and beta directions. The results of the analysis indicated in all cases the beta sweep decreased the amount of damage to the panel. The increases in alpha resulted in a significant increase in damage to the RCC panel. In particular, for the lower surface, where the alpha can increase by 10 degrees, there was a nearly 40% increase in the impulse. As a result, it is recommended that for future analyses, a 10 degree offset in alpha from the nominal trajectory is included for impacts on the lower surface. It is also recommended to assume a straight aft, or zero beta, trajectory for a more conservative analysis.

  17. Young Children of Immigrants: The Leading Edge of America's Future. Brief No. 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortuny, Karina; Hernandez, Donald J.; Chaudry, Ajay

    2010-01-01

    Children of immigrants have nearly doubled as a share of pre-K to 3rd grade students since 1990. The share of children under age 8 with immigrant parents stood at 24 percent in 2008, up from 13 percent in 1990. Young children of immigrants account for more than 30 percent of children in seven states, with California leading the nation at 50…

  18. Application of an aerodynamic analysis method including attainable thrust estimates to low speed leading-edge flap design for supersonic cruise vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, H. W.

    1982-01-01

    A study of low speed leading-edge flap design for supersonic cruise vehicle was conducted. Wings with flaps were analyzed with the aid of a newly developed subsonic wing program which provides estimates of attainable leading-edge thrust. Results indicate that the thrust actually attainable can have a significant influence on the design and that the resultant flaps can be smaller and simpler than those resulting from more conventional approaches.

  19. Boundary-layer effects in composite laminates. I - Free-edge stress singularities. II - Free-edge stress solutions and basic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. S.; Choi, I.

    1982-01-01

    The fundamental nature of the boundary-layer effect in fiber-reinforced composite laminates is formulated in terms of the theory of anisotropic elasticity. The basic structure of the boundary-layer field solution is obtained by using Lekhnitskii's stress potentials (1963). The boundary-layer stress field is found to be singular at composite laminate edges, and the exact order or strength of the boundary layer stress singularity is determined using an eigenfunction expansion method. A complete solution to the boundary-layer problem is then derived, and the convergence and accuracy of the solution are analyzed, comparing results with existing approximate numerical solutions. The solution method is demonstrated for a symmetric graphite-epoxy composite.

  20. Effects of wing-leading-edge modifications on a full-scale, low-wing general aviation airplane: Wind-tunnel investigation of high-angle-of-attack aerodynamic characteristics. [conducted in Langley 30- by 60-foot tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, W. A., Jr.; Satran, D. R.; Johnson, J. L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Wing-leading-edge modifications included leading-edge droop and slat configurations having full-span, partial-span, or segmented arrangements. Other devices included wing-chord extensions, fences, and leading-edge stall strips. Good correlation was apparent between the results of wind-tunnel data and the results of flight tests, on the basis of autorotational stability criterion, for a wide range of wing-leading-edge modifications.

  1. Space Shuttle Orbiter - Leading edge structural design/analysis and material allowables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. W.; Curry, D. M.; Kelly, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC), a structural composite whose development was targeted for the high temperature reentry environments of reusable space vehicles, has successfully demonstrated that capability on the Space Shuttle Orbiter. Unique mechanical properties, particularly at elevated temperatures up to 3000 F, make this material ideally suited for the 'hot' regions of multimission space vehicles. Design allowable characterization testing, full-scale development and qualification testing, and structural analysis techniques will be presented herein that briefly chart the history of the RCC material from infancy to eventual multimission certification for the Orbiter. Included are discussions pertaining to the development of the design allowable data base, manipulation of the test data into usable forms, and the analytical verification process.

  2. General Method for Determination of the Surface Composition in Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts from the L Edge X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Tiapin; Childers, David; Gomez, Carolina; Karim, Ayman M.; Schweitzer, Neil; Kropf, Arthur; Wang, Hui; Bolin, Trudy B.; Hu, Yongfeng; Kovarik, Libor; Meyer, Randall; Miller, Jeffrey T.

    2012-10-08

    Bimetallic PtPd on silica nano-particle catalysts have been synthesized and their average structure determined by Pt L3 and Pd K-edge extended X-ray absorption finestructure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The bimetallic structure is confirmed from elemental line scans by STEM for the individual 1-2 nm sized particles. A general method is described to determine the surface composition in bimetallic nanoparticles even when both metals adsorb, for example, CO. By measuring the change in the L3 X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra with and without CO in bimetallic particles and comparing these changes to those in monometallic particles of known size the fraction of surface atoms can be determined. The turnover rates (TOR) and neopentane hydrogenolysis and isomerization selectivities based on the surface composition suggest that the catalytic and spectroscopic properties are different from those in monometallic nano-particle catalysts. At the same neo-pentane conversion, the isomerization selectivity is higher for the PtPd catalyst while the TOR is lower than that of both Pt and Pd. As with the catalytic performance, the infrared spectra of adsorbed CO are not a linear combination of the spectra on monometallic catalysts. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the Pt-CO adsorption enthalpy increases while the Pd-CO bond energy decreases. The ability to determine the surface composition allows for a better understanding of the spectroscopic and catalytic properties of bimetallic nanoparticle catalysts.

  3. Equations and charts for the rapid estimation of hinge-moment and effectiveness parameters for trailing-edge controls having leading and trailing edges swept ahead of the Mach lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goin, Kennith L

    1951-01-01

    Existing conical-flow solutions have been used to calculate the hinge-moments and effectiveness parameters of trailing-edge controls having leading and trailing edges swept ahead of the Mach lines and having streamwise root and tip chords. Equations and detailed charts are presented for the rapid estimation of these parameters. Also included is an approximate method by which these parameters may be corrected for airfoil-section thickness.

  4. Use of Truncated Flapped Airfoils for Impingement and Icing Tests of Full-Scale Leading-Edge Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonGlahn, Uwe H.

    1956-01-01

    In an effort to increase the operational range of existing small icing tunnels, the use of truncated airfoil sections has been suggested. With truncated airfoils, large-scale or even full-scale wing-icing-protection systems could be evaluated. Therefore, experimental studies were conducted in the NACA Lewis laboratory icing 'tunnel with an NACA 651-212 airfoil section to determine the effect of truncating the airfoil chord on velocity distribution and impingement characteristics. A 6-foot-chord airfoil was cut successively at the 50- and 30-percent-chord stations to produce the truncated airfoil sections, which were equipped with trailing-edge flaps that were used to alter the flow field about the truncated sections. The study was conducted at geometric angles of attack of 00 and 40, an airspeed of about 156 knots, and volume-median droplet sizes of 11.5 and 18.6 microns. A dye-tracer technique was used in the impingement studies. With the trailing-edge flap on the truncated airfoil deflected so that the local velocity distribution in the impingement region was substantially the same as that for the full-chord airfoil, the local impingement rates and the limits of impingement for the truncated and full-chord airfoils were the same. In general, truncating the airfoils with flaps undeflected resulted in a subs'tantially altered velocity distribution and local impingement rates compared with those of the full-chord airfoil. The use of flapped truncated airfoils may permit impingement and icing studies to be conducted with full-scale leading-edge sections, ranging in size from tip to root sections.

  5. X-ray absorption near edge structure spectrometry study of nickel and lead speciation in coals and coal combustion products

    SciTech Connect

    Pushan Shah; Vladimir Strezov; Peter F. Nelson

    2009-03-15

    The fate and environmental impacts of trace elements from coal fired power stations are a significant concern because of the large quantities of coal used as an energy source. The ultimate environmental fate and health impact of some of these trace elements is dependent on their various forms and oxidation states. Nickel and lead are two of the trace elements classified as 'priority pollutants' by the National Pollutant Inventory (NPI) in Australia. This study attempts to understand speciation of nickel and lead in coal and coal combustion products from five coal fired power stations in Australia where bituminous rank coals are utilized. Non-destructive X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure Spectrometry (XANES) was used to determine speciation of these metals. Semiquantitative speciation of nickel and lead was calculated using a linear combination fit of XANES spectra obtained for selected pure reference compounds. In all fly ash samples, 28-80% of nickel was present as nickel in NiSO{sub 4} form, which is a more toxic and more bioavailable form of nickel. Less toxic NiO was detected in fly ash samples in the range of 0-15%. Speciation of lead revealed that 65-70% is present as PbS in the feed coals. In all fly ash samples analyzed, lead comprised different proportions of PbCl{sub 2}, PbO, and PbSO{sub 4}. PbCl{sub 2} and PbSO{sub 4} contents varied between 30-70% and 30-60%, respectively. Chemical reactions resulting in nickel and lead transformation that are likely to have occurred in the post-combustion environment are discussed. 22 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Air forces and moments on triangular and related wings with subsonic leading edges oscillating in supersonic potential flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Charles E; Berman, Julian N

    1952-01-01

    This analysis treats the air forces and moments in supersonic potential flow on oscillating triangular wings and a series of sweptback and arrow wings with subsonic leading edges and supersonic trailing edges. For the wings undergoing sinusoidal torsional oscillations simultaneously with vertical translations, the linearized velocity potential is derived in the form of a power series in terms of a frequency parameter. This method can be useful for treatment of similar problems for other plan forms and for wings undergoing other sinusoidal motions. For triangular wings, as many terms of such a series expansion as may be derived can be determined; however, the terms after the first few become very cumbersome. Closed expressions that include the reduced frequency to the fifth power, an order which is sufficient for a large class of practical application, are given for the velocity potential and for the components of chordwise section force and moment coefficients. These wings are found to exhibit the possibility of undamped torsional oscillations for certain ranges of Mach number and locations of the axis of rotation. The ranges of these parameters are delineated for triangular wings.

  7. AMELIA CESTOL Test: Acoustic Characteristics of Circulation Control Wing with Leading-and Trailing-Edge Slot Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Clifton; Burnside, Nathan J.

    2013-01-01

    Aeroacoustic measurements of the 11 % scale full-span AMELIA CESTOL model with leading- and trailing-edge slot blowing circulation control (CCW) wing were obtained during a recent test in the Arnold Engineering Development Center 40- by 80-Ft. Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center, Sound levels and spectra were acquired with seven in-flow microphones and a 48-element phased microphone array for a variety of vehicle configurations, CCW slot flow rates, and forward speeds, Corrections to the measurements and processing are in progress, however the data from selected configurations presented in this report confirm good measurement quality and dynamic range over the test conditions, Array beamform maps at 40 kts tunnel speed show that the trailing edge flap source is dominant for most frequencies at flap angles of 0deg and 60deg, The overall sound level for the 60deg flap was similar to the 0deg flap for most slot blowing rates forward of 90deg incidence, but was louder by up to 6 dB for downstream angles, At 100 kts, the in-flow microphone levels were louder than the sensor self-noise for the higher blowing rates, while passive and active background noise suppression methods for the microphone array revealed source levels as much as 20 dB lower than observed with the in-flow microphones,

  8. An improved panel method for the solution of three-dimensional leading-edge vortex flows. Volume 1: Theory document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, F. T.; Lu, P.; Tinoco, E. N.

    1980-01-01

    An improved panel method for the solution of three dimensional flow and wing and wing-body combinations with leading edge vortex separation is presented. The method employs a three dimensional inviscid flow model in which the configuration, the rolled-up vortex sheets, and the wake are represented by quadratic doublet distributions. The strength of the singularity distribution as well as shape and position of the vortex spirals are computed in an iterative fashion starting with an assumed initial sheet geometry. The method calculates forces and moments as well as detail surface pressure distributions. Improvements include the implementation of improved panel numerics for the purpose of elimination the highly nonlinear effects of ring vortices around double panel edges, and the development of a least squares procedure for damping vortex sheet geometry update instabilities. A complete description of the method is included. A variety of cases generated by the computer program implementing the method are presented which verify the mathematical assumptions of the method and which compare computed results with experimental data to verify the underlying physical assumptions made by the method.

  9. Wind-tunnel tests on model wing with Fowler flap and specially developed leading-edge slot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weick, Fred E; Platt, Robert C

    1933-01-01

    An investigation was made in the NACA 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel to find the increase in maximum lift coefficient which could be obtained by providing a model wing with both a Fowler trailing-edge extension flap and a Handley Page type leading-edge slot. A conventional Handley page slot proportioned to operate on the plain wing without a flap gave but a slight increase with the flap; so a special form of slot was developed to work more effectively with the flap. With the best combined arrangement the maximum lift coefficient based on the original area was increased from 3.17, for the Fowler wing, to 3.62. The minimum drag coefficient with both devices retracted was increased in approximately the same proportion. Tests were also made with the special-type slot on the plain wing without the flap. The special slot, used either with or without the Fowler flap, gave definitely higher values of the maximum lift coefficient than the slots of conventional form, with an increase of the same order in the minimum drag coefficient.

  10. Icing tunnel tests of a glycol-exuding porous leading edge ice protection system on a general aviation airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlman, D. L.; Schweikhard, W. G.; Albright, A. E.; Evanich, P.

    1981-01-01

    A glycol-exuding porous leading edge ice protection system was tested. Results show that the system is very effective in preventing ice accretion (anti-ice mode) or removing ice from an airfoil. Minimum glycol flow rates required for anti-icing are a function of velocity, liquid water content in the air, ambient temperature, and droplet size. Large ice caps were removed in only a few minutes using anti-ice flow rates. It was found that the shed time is a function of the type of ice, size of the ice cap, angle of attack, and glycol flow rate. Wake survey measurements show that there is no significant drag penalty for the installation or operation of the system tested.

  11. Test-Analysis Correlation for Space Shuttle External Tank Foam Impacting RCC Wing Leading Edge Component Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyle, Karen H.

    2008-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Columbia Accident Investigation Board recommended that NASA develop, validate, and maintain a modeling tool capable of predicting the damage threshold for debris impacts on the Space Shuttle Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) wing leading edge and nosecap assembly. The results presented in this paper are one part of a multi-level approach that supported the development of the predictive tool used to recertify the shuttle for flight following the Columbia Accident. The assessment of predictive capability was largely based on test analysis comparisons for simpler component structures. This paper provides comparisons of finite element simulations with test data for external tank foam debris impacts onto 6-in. square RCC flat panels. Both quantitative displacement and qualitative damage assessment correlations are provided. The comparisons show good agreement and provided the Space Shuttle Program with confidence in the predictive tool.

  12. Sensitivity of F-106B Leading-Edge-Vortex Images to Flight and Vapor-Screen Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Johnson, Thomas D., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A flight test was undertaken at NASA Langley Research Center with vapor-screen and image-enhancement techniques to obtain qualitative and quantitative information about near-field vortex flows above the wings of fighter aircraft. In particular, the effects of Reynolds and Mach numbers on the vortex system over an angle-of-attack range were sought. The relevance of these flows stems from their present and future use at many points in the flight envelope, especially during transonic maneuvers. The aircraft used in this flight program was the F-106B because it was available and had sufficient wing sweep (60 deg) to generate a significant leading-edge vortex system. The sensitivity of the visual results to vapor screen hardware and to onset flow changes is discussed.

  13. Comparison of Theoretical and Experimental Unsteady Aerodynamics of Linear Oscillating Cascade With Supersonic Leading-Edge Locus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, John K.; Erwin, Dan

    2004-01-01

    An experimental influence coefficient technique was used to obtain unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficients and, consequently, unsteady pressures for a cascade of symmetric airfoils oscillating in pitch about mid-chord. Stagger angles of 0 deg and 10 deg were investigated for a cascade with a gap-to-chord ratio of 0.417 operating at an axial Mach number of 1.9, resulting in a supersonic leading-edge locus. Reduced frequencies ranged from 0.056 to 0.2. The influence coefficients obtained determine the unsteady pressures for any interblade phase angle. The unsteady pressures were compared with those predicted by several algorithms for interblade phase angles of 0 deg and 180 deg.

  14. CFD Analysis of the Aerodynamics of a Business-Jet Airfoil with Leading-Edge Ice Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, X.; Zhu, B.; Shih, T. I.-P.; Addy, H. E.; Choo, Y. K.

    2004-01-01

    For rime ice - where the ice buildup has only rough and jagged surfaces but no protruding horns - this study shows two dimensional CFD analysis based on the one-equation Spalart-Almaras (S-A) turbulence model to predict accurately the lift, drag, and pressure coefficients up to near the stall angle. For glaze ice - where the ice buildup has two or more protruding horns near the airfoil's leading edge - CFD predictions were much less satisfactory because of the large separated region produced by the horns even at zero angle of attack. This CFD study, based on the WIND and the Fluent codes, assesses the following turbulence models by comparing predictions with available experimental data: S-A, standard k-epsilon, shear-stress transport, v(exp 2)-f, and differential Reynolds stress.

  15. Turbine vane gas film cooling with injection in the leading edge region from a single row of spanwise angled holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecuyer, M. R.; Hanus, G. J.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental study of gas film cooling was conducted on a 3X size model turbine vane. Injection in the leading edge region was from a single row of holes angled in a spanwise direction. Measurements of the local heat flux downstream from the row of coolant holes, both with and without film coolant flow, were used to determine the film cooling performance presented in terms of the Stanton number ratio. Results for a range of coolant blowing ratio, M = 0 to 2.0, indicate a reduction in heat flux of up to 15 to 30 percent at a point 10 to 11 hole diameters downstream from injection. An optimum coolant blowing ratio corresponds to a coolant-to-freestream velocity ratio in the range of 0.5. The shallow injection angle resulted in superior cooling performance for injection closest to stagnation, while the effect of injection angle was insignificant for injection further from stagnation.

  16. Experimental methods of the study of vortex structures excited by point injection at the leading edge of the oblique wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolkachev, S. N.; Gorev, V. N.; Zharkova, G. M.; Kovrizhina, V. N.

    2015-06-01

    The paper presents the results of application of thermoanemometry on a curved surface and the liquid crystal thermography (LCT) to study the stability of the flow at the leading edge of an oblique wing. Quantitative results of the distribution of the velocity perturbation in the boundary layer near the attachment line were obtained with the help of thermoanemometry. A decrease of boundary-layer stability because of modification of its structure by stationary vortex is found. The method of LCT allowed to expand the study area to 70° on both sides of the attachment line, to get pictures of disturbed flow visualization for multiple modes of injection, and to show the influence of the injection velocity on the size and trajectory of stationary disturbances induced by air jet. Visualization results are consistent with the thermoanemometry.

  17. Predictive process simulation of cryogenic implants for leading edge transistor design

    SciTech Connect

    Gossmann, Hans-Joachim; Zographos, Nikolas; Park, Hugh; Colombeau, Benjamin; Parrill, Thomas; Khasgiwale, Niranjan; Borges, Ricardo; Gull, Ronald; Erokhin, Yuri

    2012-11-06

    Two cryogenic implant TCAD-modules have been developed: (i) A continuum-based compact model targeted towards a TCAD production environment calibrated against an extensive data-set for all common dopants. Ion-specific calibration parameters related to damage generation and dynamic annealing were used and resulted in excellent fits to the calibration data-set. (ii) A Kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) model including the full time dependence of ion-exposure that a particular spot on the wafer experiences, as well as the resulting temperature vs. time profile of this spot. It was calibrated by adjusting damage generation and dynamic annealing parameters. The kMC simulations clearly demonstrate the importance of the time-structure of the beam for the amorphization process: Assuming an average dose-rate does not capture all of the physics and may lead to incorrect conclusions. The model enables optimization of the amorphization process through tool parameters such as scan speed or beam height.

  18. An experimental analysis of critical factors involved in the breakdown process of leading edge vortex flows. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visser, Kenneth D.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental crosswire measurements of the flowfield above a 70 and 75 degree flat plate delta wing were performed at a Reynolds number of 250,000. Survey grids were taken normal to the platform at a series of chordwise locations for angles of attack of 20 and 30 degrees. Axial and azimuthal vorticity distributions were derived from the velocity fields. The dependence of circulation on distance from the vortex core as well as on chordwise location was examined. The effects of nondimensionalization in comparison with other experimental data was made. The circulation distribution scales with the local semispan and grows approximately linearly in the chordwise direction. For regions of the flow outside of the vortex subcore, the circulation at any chordwise station was observed to vary logarithmically with distance from the vortex axis. The circulation was also found to increase linearly with angle of incidence at a given chordwise station. A reduction in the local circulation about the vortex axis occurred at breakdown. The spanwise distribution of axial vorticity was severely altered through the breakdown region and the spanwise distribution of axial vorticity present appeared to reach a maximum immediately preceding breakdown. The local concentration of axial vorticity about the vortex axis was reduced while the magnitude of the azimuthal vorticity decreased throughout the breakdown zone. The axial vorticity components with a negative sense, found in the secondary vortex, remained unaffected by changes in wing sweep or angle of attack, in direct contrast to the positive components. The inclusion of the local wing geometry into a previously derived correlation parameter indicated that the circulation of growing leading edge vortex flows were similar at corresponding radii from the vortex axis. It was concluded that the flow over a delta wing, upstream of the breakdown regions and away from the apex and trailing edge regions, is conical. In addition, the dominating factors leading to the onset of breakdown are felt to be the local circulation of the vortex and the accompanying pressure field.

  19. Rate and topography of peptidoglycan synthesis during cell division in Escherichia coli: Concept of a leading edge

    SciTech Connect

    Wientjes, F.B.; Nanninga, N. )

    1989-06-01

    The rate at which the peptidoglycan of Escherichia coli is synthesized during the division cycle was studied with two methods. One method involved synchronization of E. coli MC4100 lysA cultures by centrifugal elutriation and subsequent pulse-labeling of the synchronously growing cultures with (meso-{sup 3}H)diaminopimelic acid (({sup 3}H)Dap). The second method was autoradiography of cells pulse-labeled with ({sup 3}H)Dap. It was found that the peptidoglycan is synthesized at a more or less exponentially increasing rate during the division cycle with a slight acceleration in this rate as the cells start to constrict. Apparently, polar cap formation requires synthesis of extra surface components, presumably to accommodate for a change in the surface-to-volume ratio. Furthermore, it was found that the pool size of Dap was constant during the division cycle. Close analysis of the topography of ({sup 3}H)Dap incorporation at the constriction site revealed that constriction proceeded by synthesis of peptidoglycan at the leading edge of the invaginating cell envelope. During constriction, no reallocation of incorporation occurred, i.e., the incorporation at the leading edge remained high throughout the process of constriction. Impairment of penicillin-binding protein 3 by mutation or by the specific {beta}-lactam antibiotic furazlocillin did not affect ({sup 3}H)Dap incorporation during initiation of constriction. However, the incorporation at the constriction site was inhibited in later stages of the constriction process. It is concluded that during division at least two peptidoglycan-synthesizing systems are operating sequentially.

  20. Particle Image Velocimetry Near the Leading Edge of a Sikorsky SSC-A09 Wing During Dynamic Stall 

    E-print Network

    Vannelli, Rachel Renee

    2012-02-14

    edge region and the first indications of separation are observed at 18 degree angle of attack. The edge of the boundary layer has been characterized for alpha = 18 degrees. The roles of the Reynolds stresses and vorticity are examined....

  1. Lead content and isotopic composition in submound and recent soils of the Volga Upland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pampura, T. V.; Probst, A.; Ladonin, D. V.; Demkin, V. A.

    2013-11-01

    Literature data on the historical reconstructions of the atmospheric lead deposition in Europe and the isotopic composition of the ores that are potential sources of the anthropogenic lead in the atmospheric deposition in the lower Volga steppes during different time periods have been compiled. The effect of the increasing anthropogenic lead deposition recorded since the Bronze Age on the level of soil contamination has been investigated. For the first time paleosol buried under a burial mound of the Bronze Age has been used as a reference point to assess of the current contamination level. The contents and isotopic compositions of the mobile and total lead have been determined in submound paleosols of different ages and their recent remote and roadside analogues. An increase in the content and fraction of the mobile lead and a shift of its isotopic composition toward less radiogenic values (typical for lead from the recent anthropogenic sources) has been revealed when going from a Bronze-Age paleosol to a recent soil. In the Bronze-Age soil, the isotopic composition of the mobile lead is inherited from the parent rock to a greater extent than in the modern soils, where the lead is enriched with the less radiogenic component. The effect of the anthropogenic component is traced in the analysis of the mobile lead, but it is barely visible for the total lead. An exception is provided by the recent roadside soils characterized by increased contents and the significantly less radiogenic isotopic composition of the mobile and total lead.

  2. Influence of leading-edge geometry on profile losses in turbines at off-design incidence: Experimental results and an improved correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Benner, M.W.; Sjolander, S.A.; Moustapha, S.H.

    1997-04-01

    The most recent correlations for turbine profile losses at off-design incidence include the leading-edge diameter as the only aspect of the leading-edge geometry that influences the losses. Cascade measurements are presented for two turbine blades that differ primarily in their leading-edge geometries. The incidence was varied over a range of {+-}20 deg and the results show significant discrepancies between the observed profile losses and those predicted by the available correlations. Using data from the present experiments, as well as cases from the literature for which sufficient geometric data are given, a revised correlation has been developed. The new correlation is a function of both the leading-edge diameter and the wedge angle, and it is significantly more successful than the existing correlations. It is argued that the off-design loss behavior of the blade is influenced by the magnitude of the discontinuity in curvature at the points where the leading-edge circle meets the rest of the blade profile. The wedge angle appears to be an approximate and convenient measure of the discontinuity in curvature at these blend points.

  3. Experimental Surface Pressure Data Obtained on 65 deg Delta Wing Across Reynolds Number and Mach Number Ranges. Volume 2; Small-Radius Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Julio; Luckring, James M.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental wind tunnel test of a 65 deg. delta wing model with interchangeable leading edges was conducted in the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF). The objective was to investigate the effects of Reynolds and Mach numbers on slender-wing leading-edge vortex flows with four values of wing leading-edge bluntness. Experimentally obtained pressure data are presented without analysis in tabulated and graphical formats across a Reynolds number range of 6 x 10(exp 6) to 84 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 0.85 and across a Mach number range of 0.4 to 0.9 at Reynolds numbers of 6 x 10(exp 6) and 60 x 10(exp 6). Normal-force and pitching-moment coefficient plots for these Reynolds number and Mach number ranges are also presented.

  4. Experimental Surface Pressure Data Obtained on 65 deg Delta Wing Across Reynolds Number and Mach Number Ranges. Vol. 4: Large-radius leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Julio; Luckring, James M.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental wind tunnel test of a 65 deg delta wing model with interchangeable leading edges was conducted in the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF). The objective was to investigate the effects of Reynolds and Mach numbers on slender-wing leading-edge vortex flows with four values of wing leading-edge bluntness. Experimentally obtained pressure data are presented without analysis in tabulated and graphical formats across a Reynolds number range of 6 x 10(exp 6) to 120 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 0.85 and across a Mach number range of 0.4 to 0.9 at Reynolds numbers of 6 x 10(exp 6) and 60 x 10(exp 6). Normal-force and pitching-moment coefficient plots for these Reynolds number and Mach number ranges are also presented.

  5. Experimental Surface Pressure Data Obtained on 65 deg Delta Wing Across Reynolds Number and Mach Number Ranges. Vol. 3: Medium-radius leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Julio; Luckring, James M.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental wind tunnel test of a 65 deg delta wing model with interchangeable leading edges was conducted in the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF). The objective was to investigate the effects of Reynolds and Mach numbers on slender-wing leading-edge vortex flows with four values of wing leading-edge bluntness. Experimentally obtained pressure data are presented without analysis in tabulated and graphical formats across a Reynolds number range of 6 x 10(exp 6) to 120 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 0.85 and across a Mach number range of 0.4 to 0.9 at Reynolds numbers of 6 x 10(exp 6), 60 x 10(exp 6), and 120 x 10(exp 6). Normal-force and pitching-moment coefficient plots for these Reynolds number and Mach number ranges are also presented.

  6. First results from core-edge parallel composition in the FACETS project.

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, J. R.; Candy, J.; Cohen, R. H.; Krasheninnikov, S.; McCune, D. C.; Estep, D. J.; Larson, J.; Malony, A. D.; Pankin, A.; Worley, P. H.; Carlsson, J. A.; Hakim, A. H.; Hamill, P.; Kruger, S.; Miah, M.; Muzsala, S.; Pletzer, A.; Shasharina, S.; Wade-Stein, D.; Wang, N.; Balay, S.; McInnes, L.; Zhang, H.; Casper, T.; Diachin, L.

    2008-01-01

    FACETS (Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations), now in its second year, has achieved its first coupled core-edge transport simulations. In the process, a number of accompanying accomplishments were achieved. These include a new parallel core component, a new wall component, improvements in edge and source components, and the framework for coupling all of this together. These accomplishments were a result of an interdisciplinary collaboration among computational physics, computer scientists, and applied mathematicians on the team.

  7. First results from core-edge parallel composition in the FACETS project

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, John R.; Candy, Jeff; Cohen, Ronald H.; Krasheninnikov, Sergei; McCune, Douglas; Estep, Donald J; Larson, Jay; Malony, Allen; Pankin, A.; Worley, Patrick H; Carlsson, Johann; Hakim, A H; Hamill, P; Kruger, Scott; Miah, Mahmood; Muzsala, S; Pletzer, Alexander; Shasharina, Svetlana; Wade-Stein, D; Wang, N; Balay, Satish; McInnes, Lois; Zhang, Hong; Casper, T. A.; Diachin, Lori; Epperly, Thomas; Rognlien, T. D.; Fahey, Mark R; Cobb, John W; Morris, A; Shende, Sameer; Hammett, Greg; Indireshkumar, K; Stotler, D.; Pigarov, A

    2008-01-01

    FACETS (Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations), now in its second year, has achieved its first coupled core-edge transport simulations. In the process, a number of accompanying accomplishments were achieved. These include a new parallel core component, a new wall component, improvements in edge and source components, and the framework for coupling all of this together. These accomplishments were a result of an interdisciplinary collaboration among computational physics, computer scientists, and applied mathematicians on the team.

  8. Subsonic Investigation of Leading-Edge Flaps Designed for Vortex- and Attached-Flow on a High-Speed Civil Transport Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Bryan A.; Kemmerly, Guy T.; Kjerstad, Kevin J.; Lessard, Victor R.

    1999-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of two separate leading-edge flaps, designed for vortex and attached-flow, respectively, were conducted on a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. Data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.12 to 0.27, with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 2.50 x 10 (sup 6) to 5.50 x 10 (sup 6). Variations of the leading-edge flap deflection angle were tested with outboard leading-edge flaps deflected 0 deg. and 26.4 deg. Trailing-edge flaps were deflected 0 deg., 10 deg., 12.9 deg., and 20 deg. The longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic data are presented without analysis. A complete tabulated data listing is also presented herein. The data associated with each deflected leading-edge flap indicate L/D improvements over the undeflected configuration. These improvements may be instrumental in providing the necessary lift augmentation required by an actual HSCT during the climb-out and landing phases of the flight envelope. However, further tests will have to be done to assess their full potential.

  9. Leading Edge Book Review

    E-print Network

    Monteiro, Antónia

    to offspring with different morphologies and behaviors as a result of epigenetic changes to the offspring. Most- generational effects through inheri- tance of epigenetic modifications. These chapters should be required, such as diabetes, hypertension, and cancer, are also discussed. It is argued that early envi- ronmental influences

  10. Leading Edge `Fore Brain

    E-print Network

    Luo, Liqun

    .08.024 By combining gene expression profiling with image registration, Tomer et al. (2010) find that the mushroom body propose that the mushroom body and cortex evolved from the same structure in the common ancestor dumerilii (an annelid) called the mushroom body that shares the same ``molecular fingerprint

  11. Leading Edge Book Review

    E-print Network

    Coller, Jeff

    . Their discovery of the lac operon and elucidation of its regulatory circuitry were profoundly influential, the most important work of the time was the analysis by Jacob and Monod of lactose metabolism in bacteria

  12. Leading Edge Book Review

    E-print Network

    Richards, Robert J.

    : the German biologist Ernst Haeckel. A towering figure in the intellectual and scientific circles of the late)? In his lucidly written biography, The Tragic Sense of Life: Ernst Haeckel and the Struggle over 19th and early 20th century, Haeckel's name has been relegated to the shadows of modern thought

  13. Leading Edge Yoshiki Sasai

    E-print Network

    De Robertis, Eddy M.

    biologists. Known as the ``Brain- maker,'' he developed methods to guide human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into forming brain cortex, eyes, and other organs in tissue culture. Yoshiki was a man of rectitude for generations. A man of strong physique, Yoshiki was recruited to play the sport he loved, Amer- ican football

  14. Turbine Vane External Heat Transfer. Volume 1: Analytical and Experimental Evaluation of Surface Heat Transfer Distributions with Leading Edge Showerhead Film Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, E. R.; Wilson, M. D.; Hylton, L. D.; Kaufman, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in predictive design capabilities for external heat transfer to turbine vanes was summarized. A two dimensional linear cascade (previously used to obtain vane surface heat transfer distributions on nonfilm cooled airfoils) was used to examine the effect of leading edge shower head film cooling on downstream heat transfer. The data were used to develop and evaluate analytical models. Modifications to the two dimensional boundary layer model are described. The results were used to formulate and test an effective viscosity model capable of predicting heat transfer phenomena downstream of the leading edge film cooling array on both the suction and pressure surfaces, with and without mass injection.

  15. Aeroelastic loads prediction for an arrow wing. Task 3: Evaluation of the Boeing three-dimensional leading-edge vortex code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manro, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    Two separated flow computer programs and a semiempirical method for incorporating the experimentally measured separated flow effects into a linear aeroelastic analysis were evaluated. The three dimensional leading edge vortex (LEV) code is evaluated. This code is an improved panel method for three dimensional inviscid flow over a wing with leading edge vortex separation. The governing equations are the linear flow differential equation with nonlinear boundary conditions. The solution is iterative; the position as well as the strength of the vortex is determined. Cases for both full and partial span vortices were executed. The predicted pressures are good and adequately reflect changes in configuration.

  16. Effects of wing leading-edge deflection on the low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a low-aspect-ratio highly swept arrow-wing configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, P. L., Jr.; Weston, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    Wing leading-edge deflection effects on the low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a low-aspect-ratio highly swept arrow-wing configuration were determined. Static force tests were conducted in a V/STOL tunnel at a Reynolds number of about 2.5 x 1 million for an angle-of-attack range from -10 deg to 17 deg and an angle-of-sideslip range from -5 deg to 5 deg. Limited flow visualization studies were also conducted in order to provide a qualitative assessment of leading-edge upwash characteristics.

  17. Borosilicate and lead silicate glass matrix composites containing pyrochlore phases for nuclear waste encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccaccini, A. R.; Bernardo, E.; Blain, L.; Boccaccini, D. N.

    2004-05-01

    Glass matrix composites intended for the immobilisation of plutonium bearing nuclear legacy waste have been manufactured. Two different matrices, a soda borosilicate glass and a lead silicate glass, are proposed for encapsulating lanthanum and gadolinium zirconates having pyrochlore crystalline structure. The fabrication of the composites involves powder mixing followed by cold pressing and pressureless sintering or hot-pressing at relatively low temperatures (<620 °C). The hot-pressing route is found to be the most convenient, since it leads to relatively high densification even with substantial loading of pyrochlore phase (40 vol.%). The absence of microcracks, due to the close matching of thermal expansion coefficients of the composite constituents, together with the strong pyrochlore particle/glass matrix interfacial bonding, suggests that the composites have good mechanical properties. The innovative introduction of gadolinium zirconate in a lead silicate matrix represents an attractive approach, since the composites reach reasonably high densities both by pressureless sintering and hot-pressing.

  18. Experimental Observations on the Deformation and Breakup of Water Droplets Near the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Feo, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. An airfoil model placed at the end of the rotating arm was moved at speeds of 50 to 90 m/sec. A monosize droplet generator was employed to produce droplets that were allowed to fall from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil at a given location. High speed imaging was employed to observe the interaction between the droplets and the airfoil. The high speed imaging allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. A tracking software program was used to measure from the high speed movies the horizontal and vertical displacement of the droplet against time. The velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of a given droplet from beginning of deformation to breakup and/or hitting the airfoil. Results are presented for droplets with a diameter of 490 micrometers at airfoil speeds of 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90 m/sec

  19. Leading edge vortices in lesser long-nosed bats occurring at slow but not fast flight speeds.

    PubMed

    Muijres, Florian T; Christoffer Johansson, L; Winter, York; Hedenström, Anders

    2014-06-01

    Slow and hovering animal flight creates high demands on the lift production of animal wings. Steady state aerodynamics is unable to explain the forces required and the most commonly used mechanism to enhance the lift production is a leading edge vortex (LEV). Although LEVs increase the lift, they come at the cost of high drag. Here we determine the flow above the wing of lesser long-nosed bats at slow and cruising speed using particle image velocimetry (PIV). We find that a prominent LEV is present during the downstroke at slow speed, but not at cruising speed. Comparison with previously published LEV data from a robotic flapper inspired by lesser long-nosed bats suggests that bats should be able to generate LEVs at cruising speeds, but that they avoid doing so, probably to increase flight efficiency. In addition, at slow flight speeds we find LEVs of opposite spin at the inner and outer wing during the upstroke, potentially providing a control challenge to the animal. We also note that the LEV stays attached to the wing throughout the downstoke and does not show the complex structures found in insects. This suggests that bats are able to control the development of the LEV and potential control mechanisms are discussed. PMID:24855067

  20. Prediction of leading-edge transition and relaminarization phenomena on a subsonic multi-element high-lift system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandam, C. P.

    1993-01-01

    Boundary-layer transition and relaminarization may have a critical effect on the flow development about multi-element high-lift systems of subsonic transport jets with swept wings. The purpose of the research is to study these transition phenomena in the leading-edge region of the various elements of a high-lift system. The flow phenomena studied include transition to the attachment-line flow, relaminarization, and crossflow instability, and transition. The calculations are based on pressure distributions measured in flight on the NASA Transport Systems Research Vehicle (Boeing 737-100) at a wing station where the flow approximated infinite swept wing conditions. The results indicate that significant regions of laminar flow can exist on all flap elements in flight. In future flight experiments (planned for January-February, 1994) the extent of these regions, the transition mechanisms and the effect of laminar flow on the high-lift characteristics of the multi-element system will be further explored.

  1. A numerical investigation of new film cooling hole configuration at the leading edge of asymmetrical turbine blade: part A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benabed, Mustapha

    2013-04-01

    The focus of the first part of this numerical study is to investigate the effects of two new configurations: (1) slot with cylindrical end and (2) slot with median cylindrical hole, generated by the combination between two film cooling configurations: cylindrical hole and uniform slot. Computational results are presented for a row of coolant injection holes on each side of an asymmetrical turbine blade model near the leading edge. For each configuration, three values of the radius are taken: R = 0.4, R = 0.8 and R = 1.2. The six cases simulations, thus obtained, are conducted for the same density ratio of 1.0 and the same inlet plenum pressure. A new parameter, Rc, is defined to measure the rate of blade coverage by the film cooling. Results show that, at the pressure side; for the two new configurations, the six studied cases exceed the case baseline in cooling effectiveness term with the best result obtained for R = 0.8 (case 2). For the suction side, only configurations with R = 0.4 (cases 1 and 4) provide an increase of film effectiveness compared to the case baseline. The following configuration: Cases 1 or 4 at the suction side and case 2 at the pressure side, gets the best thermal protection because of their higher coverage and strong cooling effectiveness.

  2. The Vercors and Chartreuse Massifs at the leading edge of the alpine thrust belt: Tetonic history and petroleum assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Deville, E.; Mascle, A.; Philippe, Y.

    1995-08-01

    The Vercors and Chartreuse Massifs are located at the leading edge of the Western Alps Thrust Belt. They developed in late Miocene-Pliocene times above a major decollement hosted in late Triassic evaporites and/or Liassic marls. The uplift of both massifs led to the oblique and partial inversion of the previous Mesozoic margin of the Southeastern Basin, the thickest onshore sedimentary basin in France. Both massifs are unexplored. The regional geology of eastern France and the results of ten wells located in the near foreland suggest that source rocks are present in late Paleozoic and late Liassic strata, and that fractured sandstones and/or limestones of Triassic/Jurassic age could act as reservoirs. A nonexclusive seismic survey has been shot in 1991 by CGG allowing the first well constrained balanced sections to be drawn across both massifs. They have been used inturn to model the forward kinematics of thrust propagation, and the source rock maturation history, using the {open_quotes}Thrustpack{close_quotes} software developed by IFP and partners.

  3. A leading-edge hardware family for diagnostics applications and low-level RF in CERN's ELENA ring

    E-print Network

    Angoletta, M E; Jaussi, M; Leiononen, P; Levens, T E; Molendijk, J C; Sanchez-Quesada, J; Simonin, J

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) Ring is a new synchrotron that will be commissioned in 2016 to further decelerate the antiprotons transferred from the CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator (AD). The requirements for the acquisition and treatment of signals for longitudinal diagnostics are very demanding, owing to the revolution frequency swing as well as to the digital signal processing required. The requirements for the Low-Level Radio-Frequency (LLRF) system are very demanding as well, especially in terms of revolution frequency swing, dynamic range and low noise required by the cavity voltage control and digital signal processing to be performed. Both sets of requirements will be satisfied by using a leading-edge hardware family, developed to cover the LLRF needs of all synchrotrons in the Meyrin site; it will be first deployed in 2014 in the CERN’s PSB and in the medical machine MedAustron. This paper gives an overview of the main building blocks of the hardware family and of th...

  4. Endocytic membrane turnover at the leading edge is driven by a transient interaction between Cdc42 and GRAF1.

    PubMed

    Francis, Monika K; Holst, Mikkel R; Vidal-Quadras, Maite; Henriksson, Sara; Santarella-Mellwig, Rachel; Sandblad, Linda; Lundmark, Richard

    2015-11-15

    Changes in cell morphology require coordination of plasma membrane turnover and cytoskeleton dynamics, processes that are regulated by Rho GTPases. Here, we describe how a direct interaction between the Rho GTPase Cdc42 and the GTPase-activating protein (GAP) GRAF1 (also known as ARHGAP26), facilitates rapid cell surface turnover at the leading edge. Both Cdc42 and GRAF1 were required for fluid-phase uptake and regulated the generation of transient GRAF1-coated endocytic carriers, which were distinct from clathrin-coated vesicles. GRAF1 was found to transiently assemble at discrete Cdc42-enriched punctae at the plasma membrane, resulting in a corresponding decrease in the microdomain association of Cdc42. However, Cdc42 captured in its active state was, through a GAP-domain-mediated interaction, localised together with GRAF1 on accumulated internal structures derived from the cell surface. Correlative fluorescence and electron tomography microscopy revealed that these structures were clusters of small membrane carriers with defective endosomal processing. We conclude that a transient interaction between Cdc42 and GRAF1 drives endocytic turnover and controls the transition essential for endosomal maturation of plasma membrane internalised by this mechanism. PMID:26446261

  5. Stress and strain field singularities, micro-cracks, and their role in failure initiation at the composite laminate free-edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dustin, Joshua S.

    A state-of-the-art multi-scale analysis was performed to predict failure initiation at the free-edge of an angle-ply laminate using the Strain Invariant Failure Theory (SIFT), and multiple improvements to this analysis methodology were proposed and implemented. Application of this analysis and theory led to the conclusion that point-wise failure criteria which ignore the singular stress and strain fields from a homogenized analysis and the presence of free-edge damage in the form of micro-cracking, may do so at the expense of failure prediction capability. The main contributions of this work then are made in the study of the laminate free-edge singularity and in the effects of micro-cracking at the composite laminate free-edge. Study of both classical elasticity and finite element solutions of the laminate free-edge stress field based upon the assumption of homogenized lamina properties reveal that the order of the free-edge singularity is sufficiently small such that the domain of dominance of this term away from the laminate free-edge is much smaller than the relevant dimensions of the microstructure. In comparison to a crack-tip field, these free-edge singularities generate stress and strain fields which are half as intense as those at the crack-tip, leading to the conclusion that existing flaws at the free-edge in the form of micro-cracks would be more prone to the initiation of free-edge failure than the existence of a singularity in the free-edge elasticity solutions. A methodical experiment was performed on a family of [±25°/90°] s laminates made of IM7/8552 carbon/epoxy composite, to both characterize micro-cracks present at the laminate free-edge and to study their behavior under the application of a uniform extensional load. The majority of these micro-cracks were of length on the order of a few fiber diameters, though larger micro-cracks as long as 100 fiber diameters were observed in thicker laminates. A strong correlation between the application of vacuum during cure and the presence of micro-cracks was observed. The majority of micro-cracks were located along ply interfaces, even along the interfaces of plies with identical orientation, further implicating processing methods and conditions in the formation of these micro-cracks and suggesting that a region of interphase is present between composite plies. No micro-cracks of length smaller than approximately 36 fiber diameters (180 µm) grew or interacted with the free-edge delamination or damage at ultimate laminate failure, and the median length of micro-cracks which did grow was approximately 50 fiber diameters (250 µm). While the internal depth of these free-edge cracks was unknown, the results of these experiments then suggests a critical free-edge crack-length in the [±25°/90°]s family of laminates of approximately 50 fiber diameters (250 µm, or 1.5 lamina thicknesses). A multi-scale analysis of free-edge micro-cracks using traditional displacement based finite element submodeling and XFEM was used to explain the experimental observation that micro-cracks did not grow unless they were of sufficient length. Analysis of the stress-intensity factors along the micro-crack front revealed that penny shaped micro-cracks in the 90° plies of the [±25°/90°] s family of laminates of length two fiber diameters or longer are under mode I dominated loading conditions when oriented parallel or perpendicular to the laminate loading direction. The maximum observed KI along the crack-front of these modeled micro-cracks was no larger than 26% of the ultimate KIC of the matrix material, under the application of a uniform temperature change (?T=-150°C) and uniform extension equal to the experimentally measured ultimate failure strain of the laminate. This indicates that insufficient energy is supplied to these small micro-cracks to facilitate crack growth, confirming what was experimentally observed. A method for estimating a critical micro-crack length based upon the results of the fracture mechanics analysis was developed, and predictions for this critical

  6. AERO2S - SUBSONIC AERODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF WINGS WITH LEADING- AND TRAILING-EDGE FLAPS IN COMBINATION WITH CANARD OR HORIZONTAL TAIL SURFACES (CDC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    This code was developed to aid design engineers in the selection and evaluation of aerodynamically efficient wing-canard and wing-horizontal-tail configurations that may employ simple hinged-flap systems. Rapid estimates of the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of conceptual airplane lifting surface arrangements are provided. The method is particularly well suited to configurations which, because of high speed flight requirements, must employ thin wings with highly swept leading edges. The code is applicable to wings with either sharp or rounded leading edges. The code provides theoretical pressure distributions over the wing, the canard or horizontal tail, and the deflected flap surfaces as well as estimates of the wing lift, drag, and pitching moments which account for attainable leading edge thrust and leading edge separation vortex forces. The wing planform information is specified by a series of leading edge and trailing edge breakpoints for a right hand wing panel. Up to 21 pairs of coordinates may be used to describe both the leading edge and the trailing edge. The code has been written to accommodate 2000 right hand panel elements, but can easily be modified to accommodate a larger or smaller number of elements depending on the capacity of the target computer platform. The code provides solutions for wing surfaces composed of all possible combinations of leading edge and trailing edge flap settings provided by the original deflection multipliers and by the flap deflection multipliers. Up to 25 pairs of leading edge and trailing edge flap deflection schedules may thus be treated simultaneously. The code also provides for an improved accounting of hinge-line singularities in determination of wing forces and moments. To determine lifting surface perturbation velocity distributions, the code provides for a maximum of 70 iterations. The program is constructed so that successive runs may be made with a given code entry. To make additional runs, it is necessary only to add an identification record and the namelist data that are to be changed from the previous run. This code was originally developed in 1989 in FORTRAN V on a CDC 6000 computer system, and was later ported to an MS-DOS environment. Both versions are available from COSMIC. There are only a few differences between the PC version (LAR-14458) and CDC version (LAR-14178) of AERO2S distributed by COSMIC. The CDC version has one main source code file while the PC version has two files which are easier to edit and compile on a PC. The PC version does not require a FORTRAN compiler which supports NAMELIST because a special INPUT subroutine has been added. The CDC version includes two MODIFY decks which can be used to improve the code and prevent the possibility of some infrequently occurring errors while PC-version users will have to make these code changes manually. The PC version includes an executable which was generated with the Ryan McFarland/FORTRAN compiler and requires 253K RAM and an 80x87 math co-processor. Using this executable, the sample case requires about four hours to execute on an 8MHz AT-class microcomputer with a co-processor. The source code conforms to the FORTRAN 77 standard except that it uses variables longer than six characters. With two minor modifications, the PC version should be portable to any computer with a FORTRAN compiler and sufficient memory. The CDC version of AERO2S is available in CDC NOS Internal format on a 9-track 1600 BPI magnetic tape. The PC version is available on a set of two 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskettes. IBM AT is a registered trademark of International Business Machines. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation. CDC is a registered trademark of Control Data Corporation. NOS is a trademark of Control Data Corporation.

  7. AERO2S - SUBSONIC AERODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF WINGS WITH LEADING- AND TRAILING-EDGE FLAPS IN COMBINATION WITH CANARD OR HORIZONTAL TAIL SURFACES (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, H. W.

    1994-01-01

    This code was developed to aid design engineers in the selection and evaluation of aerodynamically efficient wing-canard and wing-horizontal-tail configurations that may employ simple hinged-flap systems. Rapid estimates of the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of conceptual airplane lifting surface arrangements are provided. The method is particularly well suited to configurations which, because of high speed flight requirements, must employ thin wings with highly swept leading edges. The code is applicable to wings with either sharp or rounded leading edges. The code provides theoretical pressure distributions over the wing, the canard or horizontal tail, and the deflected flap surfaces as well as estimates of the wing lift, drag, and pitching moments which account for attainable leading edge thrust and leading edge separation vortex forces. The wing planform information is specified by a series of leading edge and trailing edge breakpoints for a right hand wing panel. Up to 21 pairs of coordinates may be used to describe both the leading edge and the trailing edge. The code has been written to accommodate 2000 right hand panel elements, but can easily be modified to accommodate a larger or smaller number of elements depending on the capacity of the target computer platform. The code provides solutions for wing surfaces composed of all possible combinations of leading edge and trailing edge flap settings provided by the original deflection multipliers and by the flap deflection multipliers. Up to 25 pairs of leading edge and trailing edge flap deflection schedules may thus be treated simultaneously. The code also provides for an improved accounting of hinge-line singularities in determination of wing forces and moments. To determine lifting surface perturbation velocity distributions, the code provides for a maximum of 70 iterations. The program is constructed so that successive runs may be made with a given code entry. To make additional runs, it is necessary only to add an identification record and the namelist data that are to be changed from the previous run. This code was originally developed in 1989 in FORTRAN V on a CDC 6000 computer system, and was later ported to an MS-DOS environment. Both versions are available from COSMIC. There are only a few differences between the PC version (LAR-14458) and CDC version (LAR-14178) of AERO2S distributed by COSMIC. The CDC version has one main source code file while the PC version has two files which are easier to edit and compile on a PC. The PC version does not require a FORTRAN compiler which supports NAMELIST because a special INPUT subroutine has been added. The CDC version includes two MODIFY decks which can be used to improve the code and prevent the possibility of some infrequently occurring errors while PC-version users will have to make these code changes manually. The PC version includes an executable which was generated with the Ryan McFarland/FORTRAN compiler and requires 253K RAM and an 80x87 math co-processor. Using this executable, the sample case requires about four hours to execute on an 8MHz AT-class microcomputer with a co-processor. The source code conforms to the FORTRAN 77 standard except that it uses variables longer than six characters. With two minor modifications, the PC version should be portable to any computer with a FORTRAN compiler and sufficient memory. The CDC version of AERO2S is available in CDC NOS Internal format on a 9-track 1600 BPI magnetic tape. The PC version is available on a set of two 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskettes. IBM AT is a registered trademark of International Business Machines. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation. CDC is a registered trademark of Control Data Corporation. NOS is a trademark of Control Data Corporation.

  8. Low-Speed Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Blowing Boundary-Layer Control on Leading- and Trailing-Edge Flaps of a Large-Scale, Low-Aspect-Ratio, 45 Swept-wing Airplane Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Ralph L.

    1959-01-01

    Blowing boundary-layer control was applied to the leading- and trailing-edge flaps of a 45 deg sweptback-wing complete model in a full-scale low-speed wind-tunnel study. The principal purpose of the study was to determine the effects of leading-edge flap deflection and boundary-layer control on maximum lift and longitudinal stability. Leading-edge flap deflection alone was sufficient to maintain static longitudinal stability without trailing-edge flaps. However, leading-edge flap blowing was required to maintain longitudinal stability by delaying leading-edge flow separation when trailing-edge flaps were deflected either with or without blowing. Partial-span leading-edge flaps deflected 60 deg with moderate blowing gave the major increase in maximum lift, although higher deflection and additional blowing gave some further increase. Inboard of 0.4 semispan leading-edge flap deflection could be reduced to 40 deg and/or blowing could be omitted with only small loss in maximum lift. Trailing-edge flap lift increments were increased by boundary-layer control for deflections greater than 45 deg. Maximum lift was not increased with deflected trailing-edge flaps with blowing.

  9. Experimental study of pressure and heating rate on a swept cylindrical leading edge resulting from swept shock wave interference. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Christopher E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of cylindrical leading edge sweep on surface pressure and heat transfer rate for swept shock wave interference were investigated. Experimental tests were conducted in the Calspan 48-inch Hypersonic Shock Tunnel at a nominal Mach number of 8, nominal unit Reynolds number of 1.5 x 10 to the 6th power per foot, leading edge and incident shock generator sweep angles of 0, 15, and 30 deg, and incident shock generator angle-of-attack fixed at 12.5 deg. Detailed surface pressure and heat transfer rate on the cylindircal leading edge of a swept shock wave interference model were measured at the region of the maximum surface pressure and heat transfer rate. Results show that pressure and heat transfer rate on the cylindrical leading edge of the shock wave interference model were reduced as the sweep was increased over the range of tested parameters. Peak surface pressure and heat transfer rate on the cylinder were about 10 and 30 times the undisturbed flow stagnation point value, respectively, for the 0 deg sweep test. A comparison of the 15 and 30 deg swept results with the 0 deg swept results showed that peak pressure was reduced about 13 percent and 44 percent, respectively, and peak heat transfer rate was reduced about 7 percent and 27 percent, respectively.

  10. An improved panel method for the solution of three-dimensional leading edge vortex flows Volume 2: User's guide and programmer's document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinoco, E. N.; Lu, P.; Johnson, F. T.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program developed for solving the subsonic, three dimensional flow over wing-body configurations with leading edge vortex separation is presented. Instructions are given for the proper set up and input of a problem into the computer code. Program input formats and output are described, as well as the overlay structure of the program. The program is written in FORTRAN.

  11. A method of predicting flow rates required to achieve anti-icing performance with a porous leading edge ice protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlman, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    A proposed method of analytically predicting the minimum fluid flow rate required to provide anti-ice protection with a porous leading edge system on a wing under a given set of flight conditions is presented. Results of the proposed method are compared with the actual results of an icing test of a real wing section in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel.

  12. A method of predicting flow rates required to achieve anti-icing performance with a porous leading edge ice protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlman, D. L.; Albright, A. E.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical method was developed for predicting minimum flow rates required to provide anti-ice protection with a porous leading edge fluid ice protection system. The predicted flow rates compare with an average error of less than 10 percent to six experimentally determined flow rates from tests in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel on a general aviation wing section.

  13. Lift, Drag, and Pitching Moment of an Aspect-Ratio-2 Triangular Wing with Leading-Edge Flaps Designed to Simulate Conical Camber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menees, Gene P.

    1958-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effectiveness of leading-edge flaps in reducing the drag at lifting conditions of a triangular wing of aspect ratio 2.0. The flaps, deflected to simulate conically cambered wings having a wide range of design lift coefficients, were tested over a Mach number range of 0.70 to 2.22 through an angle-of-attack variation from -6 deg to +18 deg at a constant Reynolds number of 3.68 million based on the wing mean aerodynamic chord. A symmetrical wing of the same plan form and aspect ratio was also tested to provide a basis for comparison. The experimental results showed that with the flaps in the undeflected position, a small amount of fixed leading-edge droop incorporated over the outboard 5 percent of the wing semispan was as effective at high subsonic speeds as conical camber in improving the maximum lift-drag ratio above that of the symmetrical wing. At supersonic speeds, the penalty in minimum drag above that of the symmetrical wing was less than that incurred by conical camber. Deflecting the leading-edge flaps about the hinge line through 80 percent of the wing semispan resulted in further improvements of the drag characteristics at lift coefficients above 0.20 throughout the Mach number range investigated. The lift and pitching-moment characteristics were not significantly affected by the leading-edge flaps.

  14. Lead-free precussion primer mixes based on metastable interstitial composite (MIC) technology

    DOEpatents

    Dixon, George P. (Alexandria, VA); Martin, Joe A. (Espanola, NM); Thompson, Don (Ridgecrest, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A lead-free percussion primer composition and a percussion cup containing e composition. The lead-free percussion primer composition is comprised of a mixture of about 45 wt % aluminum powder having an outer coating of aluminum oxide and molybdenum trioxide powder or a mixture of about 50 wt % aluminum powder having an outer coating of aluminum oxide and polytetrafluoroethylene powder. The aluminum powder, molybdenum trioxide powder and polytetrafluoroethylene powder has a particle size of 0.1 .mu.m or less, more preferably a particle size of from about 200-500 angstroms.

  15. Compatibility of SiC and SiC Composites with Molten Lead

    SciTech Connect

    H Tunison

    2006-03-07

    The choice of structural material candidates to contain Lead at 1000 C are limited in number. Silicon carbide composites comprise one choice of possible containment materials. Short term screening studies (120 hours) were undertaken to study the behavior of Silicon Carbide, Silicon Nitride, elemental Silicon and various Silicon Carbide fiber composites focusing mainly on melt infiltrated composites. Isothermal experiments at 1000 C utilized graphite fixtures to contain the Lead and material specimens under a low oxygen partial pressure environment. The corrosion weight loss values (grams/cm{sup 2} Hr) obtained for each of the pure materials showed SiC (monolithic CVD or Hexoloy) to have the best materials compatibility with Lead at this temperature. Increased weight loss values were observed for pure Silicon Nitride and elemental Silicon. For the SiC fiber composite samples those prepared using a SiC matrix material performed better than Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} as a matrix material. Composites prepared using a silicon melt infiltration process showed larger corrosion weight loss values due to the solubility of silicon in lead at these temperatures. When excess silicon was removed from these composite samples the corrosion performance for these material improved. These screening studies were used to guide future long term exposure (both isothermal and non-isothermal) experiments and Silicon Carbide composite fabrication work.

  16. The importance of leading edge vortices under simplified flapping flight conditions at the size scale of birds.

    PubMed

    Hubel, Tatjana Y; Tropea, Cameron

    2010-06-01

    Over the last decade, interest in animal flight has grown, in part due to the possible use of flapping propulsion for micro air vehicles. The importance of unsteady lift-enhancing mechanisms in insect flight has been recognized, but unsteady effects were generally thought to be absent for the flapping flight of larger animals. Only recently has the existence of LEVs (leading edge vortices) in small vertebrates such as swifts, small bats and hummingbirds been confirmed. To study the relevance of unsteady effects at the scale of large birds [reduced frequency k between 0.05 and 0.3, k=(pifc)/U(infinity); f is wingbeat frequency, U(infinity) is free-stream velocity, and c is the average wing chord], and the consequences of the lack of kinematic and morphological refinements, we have designed a simplified goose-sized flapping model for wind tunnel testing. The 2-D flow patterns along the wing span were quantitatively visualized using particle image velocimetry (PIV), and a three-component balance was used to measure the forces generated by the wings. The flow visualization on the wing showed the appearance of LEVs, which is typically associated with a delayed stall effect, and the transition into flow separation. Also, the influence of the delayed stall and flow separation was clearly visible in measurements of instantaneous net force over the wingbeat cycle. Here, we show that, even at reduced frequencies as low as those of large bird flight, unsteady effects are present and non-negligible and have to be addressed by kinematic and morphological adaptations. PMID:20472780

  17. Prediction of STS-107 Hypervelocity Flow Fields about the Shuttle Orbiter with Various Wing Leading Edge Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulsonetti, Maria V.; Thompson, Richard A.; Alter, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    Computations were performed for damaged configurations of the Shuttle Orbiter in support of the STS-107 Columbia accident investigation. Two configurations with missing wing leading-edge reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) panels were evaluated at conditions just prior to the peak heating trajectory point. The initial configuration modeled the Orbiter with an approximate missing RCC panel 6 to determine whether this damage could result in anomalous temperatures measured during the STS-107 reentry. This missing RCC panel 6 computation was found to produce heating augmentation factors of 5 times the nominal heating rates on the side fuselage with lesser heat increases on the front of the OMS pod. This is consistent with the thermocouple and resistance temperature detector sensors from the STS-107 re-entry which observed off nominal high early in the re-entry trajectory. A second damaged configuration modeled the Orbiter with missing RCC panel 9 and included ingestion of the flow into the outboard RCC channel. This computation lowered the level (only 2 times nominal) and moved the location of the heating augmentation on the leeside fuselage relative to the missing RCC panel 6 configuration. The lesser heating augmentation for missing RCC panel 9 was confined near the wing fuselage juncture. Near nominal heating was predicted on the remainder of the side fuselage with some lower than nominal heating on the front surface of the OMS pod. These results for missing RCC panel 9 are consistent with data from the STS-107 re-entry where the heating augmentation was observed to move off the side fuselage and OMS pod sensors at later times in the trajectory. As this solution requires supersonic mass ingestion into the RCC channel, it is probably not an appropriate model prior to penetration of the flow through the spar into the wing structure. It may, however, be representative of the conditions at later times and could account for the movement of the heating signature on the side fuselage.

  18. The effect of aspect ratio on the leading-edge vortex over an insect-like flapping wing.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Nathan; Knowles, Kevin; Bomphrey, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    Insect wing shapes are diverse and a renowned source of inspiration for the new generation of autonomous flapping vehicles, yet the aerodynamic consequences of varying geometry is not well understood. One of the most defining and aerodynamically significant measures of wing shape is the aspect ratio, defined as the ratio of wing length (R) to mean wing chord (c). We investigated the impact of aspect ratio, AR, on the induced flow field around a flapping wing using a robotic device. Rigid rectangular wings ranging from AR = 1.5 to 7.5 were flapped with insect-like kinematics in air with a constant Reynolds number (Re) of 1400, and a dimensionless stroke amplitude of 6.5c (number of chords traversed by the wingtip). Pseudo-volumetric, ensemble-averaged, flow fields around the wings were captured using particle image velocimetry at 11 instances throughout simulated downstrokes. Results confirmed the presence of a high-lift, separated flow field with a leading-edge vortex (LEV), and revealed that the conical, primary LEV grows in size and strength with increasing AR. In each case, the LEV had an arch-shaped axis with its outboard end originating from a focus-sink singularity on the wing surface near the tip. LEV detachment was observed for AR > 1.5 around mid-stroke at ~70% span, and initiated sooner over higher aspect ratio wings. At AR > 3 the larger, stronger vortex persisted under the wing surface well into the next half-stroke leading to a reduction in lift. Circulatory lift attributable to the LEV increased with AR up to AR = 6. Higher aspect ratios generated proportionally less lift distally because of LEV breakdown, and also less lift closer to the wing root due to the previous LEV's continuing presence under the wing. In nature, insect wings go no higher than AR ~ 5, likely in part due to architectural and physiological constraints but also because of the reducing aerodynamic benefits of high AR wings. PMID:26451802

  19. Lead isotopic compositions of common arsenical pesticides used in New England

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayuso, Robert; Foley, Nora; Robinson, Gilpin, Jr.; Wandless, Gregory; Dillingham, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    The three most important arsenical pesticides and herbicides that were extensively used on apple, blueberry, and potato crops in New England from mid-1800s to recent times are lead arsenate, calcium arsenate, and sodium arsenate. Lead arsenate was probably the most heavily used of the arsenical pesticides until it was banned in 1988. Other metal-arsenic pesticides were also used but in lesser amounts. A recent report identified areas in New England where arsenical pesticides were used extensively (Robinson and Ayuso, 2004). On the basis of factor analysis of metal concentrations in stream sediment samples, a positive correlation with pesticide use was shown in regions having stream sediment sample populations that contained concentrations of high arsenic and lead. Lead isotope compositions of stream sediments from areas with heavy use of the pesticides could not be entirely explained by lead originating from rock sulfides and their weathering products. An industrial lead contribution (mostly from atmospheric deposition of lead) was suggested in general to explain the lead isotopic distributions of the stream sediments that could not be accounted for by the natural lead in the environment. We concluded that when agricultural land previously contaminated with arsenical pesticides is urbanized, pesticide residues in the soils and stream sediments could be released into the groundwater. No lead isotopic data characterizing the compositions of pesticides were available for comparison. We have determined the lead isotopic compositions of commonly used pesticides in New England, such as lead arsenate, sodium metaarsenite, and calcium arsenate, in order to assist in future isotopic comparisons and to better establish anthropogenic sources of Pb and As. New data are also presented for copper acetoarsenite (or Paris green), methyl arsonic acid and methane arsonic acid, as well as for arsanilic acid, all of which are used as feed additives to promote swine and poultry growth. The new data characterize these anthropogenic sources. The data show that the arsenical pesticides have similar compositions: 208Pb/207Pb = 2.3839-2.4721, 206Pb/207Pb = 1.1035-1.2010, and 206Pb/204Pb = 17.070-18.759 and, more importantly, that the pesticides overlap the composition of the stream sediments that represent the areas with the most extensive agricultural use. Copper acetoarsenite (Paris green), arsenic oxide, methyl arsonic acid, methane arsonic acid, and arsanilic acid were also analyzed and have lead isotope compositions that range widely. An important source of arsenic and metals to most of the stream sediment samples in New England appears to be weathering products from rocks and industrial lead, but the extensive use of arsenical pesticides and herbicides up to about the 1960s can also be a significant anthropogenic source in agricultural regions.

  20. Automated Screening of Microtubule Growth Dynamics Identifies MARK2 as a Regulator of Leading Edge Microtubules Downstream of Rac1 in Migrating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Yukako; Applegate, Kathryn; Davidson, Michael W.; Danuser, Gaudenz; Waterman, Clare M.

    2012-01-01

    Polarized microtubule (MT) growth in the leading edge is critical to directed cell migration, and is mediated by Rac1 GTPase. To find downstream targets of Rac1 that affect MT assembly dynamics, we performed an RNAi screen of 23 MT binding and regulatory factors and identified RNAi treatments that suppressed changes in MT dynamics induced by constitutively activated Rac1. By analyzing fluorescent EB3 dynamics with automated tracking, we found that RNAi treatments targeting p150glued, APC2, spastin, EB1, Op18, or MARK2 blocked Rac1-mediated MT growth in lamellipodia. MARK2 was the only protein whose RNAi targeting additionally suppressed Rac1 effects on MT orientation in lamellipodia, and thus became the focus of further study. We show that GFP-MARK2 rescued effects of MARK2 depletion on MT growth lifetime and orientation, and GFP-MARK2 localized in lamellipodia in a Rac1-activity-dependent manner. In a wound-edge motility assay, MARK2-depleted cells failed to polarize their centrosomes or exhibit oriented MT growth in the leading edge, and displayed defects in directional cell migration. Thus, automated image analysis of MT assembly dynamics identified MARK2 as a target regulated downstream of Rac1 that promotes oriented MT growth in the leading edge to mediate directed cell migration. PMID:22848487

  1. Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Large-Scale Unswept Wing-Body-Tail Configuration with Blowing Applied Over the Flap and Wind Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLemore, H. Clyde; Peterson, John B., Jr.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley full-scale tunnel to determine the effects of a blowing boundary-layer-control lift-augmentation system on the aerodynamic characteristics of a large-scale model of a fighter-type airplane. The wing was unswept at the 70-percent- chord station, had an aspect ratio of 2.86, a taper ratio of 0.40, and 4-percent-thick biconvex airfoil sections parallel to the plane of symmetry. The tests were conducted over a range of angles of attack from approximately -4 deg to 23 deg for a Reynolds number of approximately 5.2 x 10(exp 6) which corresponds to a Mach number of 0.08. Blowing rates were normally restricted to values just sufficient to control air-flow separation. The results of this investigation showed that wing leading-edge blowing in combination with large values of wing leading-edge-flap deflection was a very effective leading-edge flow-control device for wings having highly loaded trailing-edge flaps. With leading-edge blowing there was no hysteresis of the lift, drag, and pitching-moment characteristics upon recovery from stall. End plates were found to improve the lift and drag characteristics of the test configuration in the moderate angle-of-attack range, and blockage to one-quarter of the blowing-slot area was not detrimental to the aerodynamic characteristics. Blowing boundary-layer control resulted in a considerably reduced landing speed and reduced landing and take-off distances. The ailerons were very effective lateral-control devices when used with blowing flaps.

  2. Suppression of Chemotaxis by SSeCKS via Scaffolding of Phosphoinositol Phosphates and the Recruitment of the Cdc42 GEF, Frabin, to the Leading Edge

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Hyun-Kyung; Guo, Li-wu; Su, Bing; Gao, Lingqiu; Gelman, Irwin H.

    2014-01-01

    Chemotaxis is controlled by interactions between receptors, Rho-family GTPases, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases, and cytoskeleton remodeling proteins. We investigated how the metastasis suppressor, SSeCKS, attenuates chemotaxis. Chemotaxis activity inversely correlated with SSeCKS levels in mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF), DU145 and MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. SSeCKS loss induced chemotactic velocity and linear directionality, correlating with replacement of leading edge lamellipodia with fascin-enriched filopodia-like extensions, the formation of thickened longitudinal F-actin stress fibers reaching to filopodial tips, relative enrichments at the leading edge of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)P3 (PIP3), Akt, PKC-?, Cdc42-GTP and active Src (SrcpoY416), and a loss of Rac1. Leading edge lamellipodia and chemotaxis inhibition in SSeCKS-null MEF could be restored by full-length SSeCKS or SSeCKS deleted of its Src-binding domain (?Src), but not by SSeCKS deleted of its three MARCKS (myristylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate) polybasic domains (?PBD), which bind PIP2 and PIP3. The enrichment of activated Cdc42 in SSeCKS-null leading edge filopodia correlated with recruitment of the Cdc42-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor, Frabin, likely recruited via multiple PIP2/3-binding domains. Frabin knockdown in SSeCKS-null MEF restores leading edge lamellipodia and chemotaxis inhibition. However, SSeCKS failed to co-immunoprecipitate with Rac1, Cdc42 or Frabin. Consistent with the notion that chemotaxis is controlled by SSeCKS-PIP (vs. -Src) scaffolding activity, constitutively-active phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase could override the ability of the Src inhibitor, SKI-606, to suppress chemotaxis and filopodial enrichment of Frabin in SSeCKS-null MEF. Our data suggest a role for SSeCKS in controlling Rac1 vs. Cdc42-induced cellular dynamics at the leading chemotactic edge through the scaffolding of phospholipids and signal mediators, and through the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton controlling directional movement. PMID:25356636

  3. Regional variations in the lead isotopic composition of galena from southern Korea with implications for the discrimination of lead provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Youn-Joong; Cheong, Chang-sik; Shin, Dongbok; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Jo, Hui Je; Gautam, Mukesh Kumar; Lee, Insung

    2012-11-01

    This study presents a comprehensive database (n = 215) of lead isotopes in galena from the southern Korean peninsula using new and published data. Of the 69 metal mines examined, predominantly skarn- and hydrothermal-type Pb-Zn-Au-Ag-Cu deposits were observed and were associated with Mesozoic magmatic activities. Galena samples from each geotectonic unit showed discrete lead isotopic signatures. The Gyeongsang basin samples were characteristically unradiogenic and had restricted variations in lead isotopic composition (206Pb/204Pb = 18.16-18.59, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.48-15.64, 208Pb/204Pb = 37.87-38.77). Their 208Pb/204Pb range indicated an involvement of source materials less thorogenic than the associated granites. The galena samples from Cambro-Ordovician carbonate rocks of the northeastern Yeongnam massif and eastern Taebaeksan basin had the most radiogenic 206Pb/204Pb (19.28 ± 0.14) and 207Pb/204Pb (15.833 ± 0.027) ratios. Their lead isotopic trend indicated a combined contribution of ore lead from granitic magmas, Precambrian basements, and overlain host rocks. Less radiogenic galena samples from the middle to southwestern parts of the Yeongnam massif and Okcheon belt showed limited lead isotopic variations (206Pb/204Pb = 18.332 ± 0.065, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.693 ± 0.012, 208Pb/204Pb = 38.93 ± 0.07 on average), probably resulted from mixing with a common crustal basement. The differences in lead isotopes between the radiogenic and unradiogenic groups from the Yeongnam massif and Okcheon belt may reflect the spatial dissimilarity of involved crustal rocks. The old crust appears to have significantly contributed ore lead to galenas from the western Gyeonggi massif, but the geochronological meaning of their steep 207Pb/204Pb-206Pb/204Pb trend is not clear. The comprehensive database constructed by the present study suggests that lead province in the southern Korean peninsula may be subdivided into four discrete zones. Linear discriminant analysis showed that more than 90% of the compiled data were correctly reclassified within their a priori zones. Such discrimination may be useful for a wide range of applications, including mineral exploration, archaeological correlation, and environmental characterization.

  4. Characterization of noise amplifiers with global singular modes: the case of the leading-edge flat-plate boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipp, Denis; Marquet, Olivier

    2013-09-01

    This article deals with the linear dynamics of a transitional boundary layer subject to two-dimensional Tollmien-Schlichting instabilities. We consider a flat plate including the leading edge, characterized by a Reynolds number based on the length of the plate equal to Re = 6 × 105, inducing a displacement thickness-based Reynolds number of 1,332 at the end of the plate. The global linearized Navier-Stokes equations only display stable eigenvalues, and the associated eigen-vectors are known to poorly represent the dynamics of such open flows. Therefore, we resort to an input-output approach by considering the singular value decomposition of the global resolvent. We then obtain a series of singular values, an associated orthonormal basis representing the forcing (the so-called optimal forcings) as well as an orthonormal basis representing the response (the so-called optimal responses). The objective of this paper is to analyze these spatial structures and to closely relate their spatial downstream evolution to the Orr and Tollmien-Schlichting mechanisms. Analysis of the spatio-frequential diagrams shows that the optimal forcings and responses are respectively localized, for all frequencies, near the upstream neutral point (branch I) and the downstream neutral point (branch II). It is also shown that the spatial growth of the dominant optimal response favorably compares with the e N method in regions where the dominant optimal forcing is small. Moreover, thanks to an energetic input-output approach, it is shown that this spatial growth is solely due to intrinsic amplifying mechanisms related to the Orr and Tollmien-Schlichting mechanisms, while the spatial growth due to the externally supplied power by the dominant optimal forcing is negligible even in regions where the dominant optimal forcing is strong. The energetic input-output approach also yields a general method to assess the strength of the instability in amplifier flows. It is based on a ratio comparing two quantities of same physical dimension, the mean-fluctuating kinetic energy flux of the dominant optimal response across some boundary and the supplied mean external power by the dominant optimal forcing. For the present boundary-layer flow, we have computed this amplification parameter for each frequency and discussed the results with respect to the Orr and Tollmien-Schlichting mechanisms.

  5. Numerical and experimental study on the ability of dynamic roughness to alter the development of a leading edge vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Christopher D.

    Dynamic stall is an unsteady aerodynamic phenomenon garnering much research interest because it occurs in a variety of applications. For example, dynamic stall is known to occur on helicopter rotor blades, wind turbines, high maneuvering military aircraft, and flapping wings. Dynamic stall occurs when an aerodynamic lifting device, such as an airfoil, wing, or turbomachine blade, undergoes a rapid pitching motion. It also occurs on lifting devices that are impulsively started at high angles of attack. Dynamic stall can "delay" aerodynamic stall to angles of attack that are significantly beyond the static stall angle of attack. During dynamic stall a large leading edge vortex (LEV) is formed, which creates greater fluid acceleration over the wing or airfoil, thus sustaining lift. As this vortex is shed downstream stall eventually occurs and there is an abrupt increase in drag and a large shift in pitching moment. Research has been performed to better understand the mechanisms occurring during dynamic stall in an effort to find ways to best take advantage of the increased lift associated with dynamic stall, but avoid the downfalls that occur once stall is initiated. Few attempts have been made to alter the LEV, and these attempts have used methods associated with laminar boundary layer separation control. Although these methods have shown promise, they suffer from the drawback that they exhaust more energy than is gained by flow control, while also only being effective at certain flight regimes. The research described herein documents the first study on the ability of dynamic roughness to alter the LEV encountered on a rapidly pitching airfoil. Both numerical and experimental studies were performed, including two-dimensional and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations as well as stereo and planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments. Evidence for the ability of small scale dynamic roughness to alter the development of the LEV was found in both the computational simulations and experiments. This research is the first of its kind to show both computationally and experimentally that dynamic roughness is a viable flow control method for both steady and unsteady aerodynamics.

  6. Edge Effects on Forest Composition and Structure Lab 5, 5.16.07

    E-print Network

    Wallin, David O.

    of edge and interior plots within a second growth big leaf maple-Douglas fir stand on Blanchard Mountain by greater tree diameter and favored an overstory of Douglas fir and an understory of sword fern. We discuss in the basal areas of Douglas fir trees. Other tree species evaluated did not show a significant difference

  7. Lead

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Lead Epidemiology Surveillance Program (ABLES) Lead in the environment Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Healthy Homes ...

  8. Formulas for the Supersonic Loading, Lift, and Drag of Flat Swept-Back Wings with Leading Edges Behind the Mach Line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Doris

    1951-01-01

    The method of superposition of linearized conical flows has been applied to the calculation of the aerodynamic properties, in supersonic flight, of thin flat, swept-back wings at an angle of attack. The wings are assumed to have rectilinear plan forms, with tips parallel to the stream, and to taper in the conventional sense. The investigation covers the moderately supersonic speed range where the Mach lines from the leading-edge apex lie ahead of the wing. The trailing edge may lie ahead of or behind the Mach lines from its apex. The case in which the Mach cone from one tip intersects the other tip is not treated. Formulas are obtained for the load distribution, the total lift, and the drag due to lift. For the cases in which the trailing edge is outside the Mach cone from its apex the formulas are complete. For wings with both leading and trailing edges behind their respective Mach lines, a degree of approximation is necessary. Charts of some of the functions derived are included to facilitate computing, and several examples are worked out in outline.

  9. Synthesis and thermoelectric properties of compositional-modulated lead telluride-bismuth telluride nanowire heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Fang, Haiyu; Feng, Tianli; Yang, Haoran; Ruan, Xiulin; Wu, Yue

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate the rational solution-phase synthesis of compositional modulated telluride nanowire heterostructures containing lead telluride (PbTe) and bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3). By tuning the ratio between PbTe and Bi2Te3 through adjusting the amount of critical reactants and precursors during the synthesis, the influence of composition on the thermoelectric properties of the nanowire heterostructures has been investigated in hot pressed nanocomposite pellets. Measurements of the thermoelectric properties show strongly reduced thermal conductivity that leads to an enhanced thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) of 1.2 at 620 K. PMID:23586462

  10. Effect of dielectrophoretic structuring on piezoelectric and pyroelectric properties of lead titanate-epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanbareh, H.; van der Zwaag, S.; Groen, W. A.

    2014-10-01

    Functional granular composites of lead titanate particles in an epoxy matrix prepared by dielectrophoresis show enhanced dielectric, piezoelectric and pyroelectric properties compared to 0-3 composites for different ceramic volume content from 10% to 50%. Two structuring parameters, the interparticle distance and the percentage of 1-3 connectivity are used based on the Bowen model and the mixed connectivity model respectively. The degree of structuring calculated according to both models correlate well with the increase in piezoelectric and pyroelectric sensitivities of the composites. Higher sensitivity of the electroactive properties are observed at higher ceramic volume fractions. The effect of electrical conductivity of the matrix on the pyroelectric responsivity of the composites has been demonstrated to be a key parameter in governing the pyroelectric properties of the composites.

  11. An instability at the edge of a tissue of collectively migrating cells can lead to finger formation during wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, J.; Basan, M.; Levine, H.

    2014-06-01

    In wound healing assays, a monolayer of epithelial cells is allowed to migrate onto empty surface area. When the motile cells close the artificial wound, the edge of the tissue does usually not move uniformly but characteristic fingerlike protrusions are observed. We model the collectively moving cells as a system of self-propelled particles using the Toner-Tu equations for an active fluid. A linear stability analysis of perturbations at the tissue edge reveals an instability in the disordered nonmoving state. The instability is purely due to spontaneous motility and velocity alignment between cells. It can account for finger formation in wound healing experiments.

  12. Isotopic composition of lead and strontium from Ascension and Gough Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gast, P.W.; Tilton, G.R.; Hedge, C.

    1964-01-01

    Isotopic composition of lead and strontium has been determined in a series of rock samples from two islands on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Both inter-and intra-island variations exist in the abundance of radiogenic isotopes of both elements. Lead from basalt of Ascension Island has a Pb206-Pb 204 ratio of 19.5, while the corresponding ratio at Gough Island is only 18.4. The Pb208-Pb204 ratios from the two islands do not differ. Conversely, strontium from basalt of Ascension Island is less radiogenic than that from Gough Island basalts. The trachytes of both islands have lead and strontium that is more radiogenic than that found in the basalts. The inter-island differences indicate the existence of regional variations in the uranium-lead and rubidium-strontium ratios of the upper mantle source of these rocks and show that isotope compositions are a means for investigating chemical heterogeneities in the mantle.

  13. Static force tests of a sharp leading edge delta-wing model at ambient and cryogenic temperatures with a description of the apparatus employed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.; Davenport, E. E.

    1976-01-01

    A sharp leading edge delta-wing model was tested through an angle-of-attack range at Mach numbers of 0.75, 0.80, and 0.85 at both ambient and cryogenic temperatures in the Langley 1/3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel. Total pressure was varied with total temperature in order to hold test Reynolds number constant at a given Mach number. Agreement between the aerodynamic data obtained at ambient and cryogenic temperatures indicates that flows with leading-edge vortex effects are duplicated properly at cryogenic temperatures. The test results demonstrate that accurate aerodynamic data can be obtained by using conventional force-testing techniques if suitable measures are taken to minimize temperature gradients across the balance and to keep the balance at ambient (warm) temperatures during cryogenic operation of the tunnel.

  14. Effects of wing leading-edge flap deflections on subsonic longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a wing-fuselage configuration with a 44 deg swept wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of wing leading-edge flap deflections on the subsonic longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a wing-fuselage configuration with a 44 deg swept wing. The tests were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.40 to 0.85, corresponding to Reynolds numbers (based on wing mean geometric chord) of 2.37 x 1,000,000 to 4.59 x 1,000,000 and at angles of attack from -3 deg to 22 deg. The configurations under study included a wing-fuselage configuration and a wing-fuselage-strake configuration. Each configuration had multisegmented, constant-chord leading-edge flaps which could be deflected independently or in various combinations.

  15. Applicability of linearized-theory attached-flow methods to design and analysis of flap systems at low speeds for thin swept wings with sharp leading edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Harry W.; Darden, Christine M.

    1987-01-01

    Low-speed experimental force and data on a series of thin swept wings with sharp leading edges and leading and trailing-edge flaps are compared with predictions made using a linearized-theory method which includes estimates of vortex forces. These comparisons were made to assess the effectiveness of linearized-theory methods for use in the design and analysis of flap systems in subsonic flow. Results demonstrate that linearized-theory, attached-flow methods (with approximate representation of vortex forces) can form the basis of a rational system for flap design and analysis. Even attached-flow methods that do not take vortex forces into account can be used for the selection of optimized flap-system geometry, but design-point performance levels tend to be underestimated unless vortex forces are included. Illustrative examples of the use of these methods in the design of efficient low-speed flap systems are included.

  16. Heat transfer in leading and trailing edge cooling channels of the gas turbine blade under high rotation numbers 

    E-print Network

    Liu, Yao-Hsien

    2009-05-15

    at the highest rotation number of 0.58. Heat transfer coefficients are also experimentally measured in a wedge-shaped cooling channel (Dh =2.22cm, Ac=7.62cm2) to model an internal cooling passage near the trailing edge of a gas turbine blade where the coolant...

  17. Reef structure drives parrotfish species composition on shelf edge reefs in La Parguera, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzadik, Orian E.; Appeldoorn, Richard S.

    2013-02-01

    Shelf edge reefs that exist in coral reef ecosystems provide essential habitats for a large variety of fish and other marine organisms. Marine herbivores act as differential algal grazers that advocate coral reef colonization. In the Caribbean basin parrotfishes make up a large contingency of such herbivores and act as important ecological ichthyofauna. By investigating parrotfish relationship with habitat, this study aims to aid in future predictive mapping techniques that will outline parrotfish distributions via benthic quantification. Parrotfish communities were evaluated on the shelf edge reef off of La Parguera, Puerto Rico. Parrotfish abundances were found to positively correlate with high values of overall reef structure. High values of coral cover and of rugosity were strong indicators of most parrotfish species. The lone exception, Scarus taeniopterus, negatively correlated with these factors and positively correlated with algal cover. Indications exist that Scarus taeniopterus and Scarus iseri are sympatric species and can be found in abundance at opposite locations.

  18. Assessment of the Radiation Attenuation Properties of Several Lead Free Composites by Monte Carlo Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Kazempour, M.; Saeedimoghadam, M.; Shekoohi Shooli, F.; Shokrpour, N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In diagnostic radiology lead apron, are usually used to protect patients and radiology staff against ionizing radiation. Lead apron is a desirable shield due to high absorption and effective attenuation of x-ray photons in the diagnostic radiology range. Objective: Although lead aprons have good radiation protection properties, in recent years, researchers have been looking for alternative materials to be used instead of lead apron because of some problems derived from lead-content of aprons. Because of its lead-content, these radiation protection garments are so heavy and uncomfortable for the staff to wear, particularly in long-time uses. In addition, lead is a toxic element and its disposal is associated with environmental and human-health hazards. Method: In this study, several new combinations of lead free materials ((W-Si), (W-Sn-Ba-EPVC ), (W-Sn-Cd-EPVC)) have been investigated in the energy range of diagnostic radiology in two geometries: narrow and broad beam. Geometries of the radiation attenuation characteristics of these materials was assessed in 40, 60, 90 and 120 kVp and the results compared with those of some lead-containing materials ((Pb-Si), (Pb-EPVC)). Results: Lead shields still provide better protection in low energies (below 40 kVp). Combination of W-Sn-Cd-EPVC has shown the best radiation attenuation features in 60 and 90 kVp and the composition of (W-Sn-Ba-EPVC) represents the best attenuation in 120 kVp, even better than previously mentioned lead- containing composites. Conclusion: Lead free shields are completely effective for protection against X-ray energies in the range of 60 to 120 kVp. PMID:26157732

  19. Effects of a modified leading edge on noise and boundary-layer transition in a rod-wall sound shield at Mach 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creel, T. R., Jr.; Holley, B. B.; Beckwith, I. E.

    1981-05-01

    A version of a rod wall sound shield was tested in the Mach 5 pilot quiet tunnel over a range of unit Reynolds numbers from 10 to 35 million per meter. The model was modified by inclining the leading edge plates to produce an initial 2 deg expansion to ascertain the sensitivity of boundary layer transition to leading edge disturbances. Rod surface pitot pressures, mean free stream pitot pressures, and static pressures on the rods and plenum walls were measured. Hot-wire measurements were also made in the model and nozzle free stream at a unit Reynolds number of 15 million per meter. The surface pitot pressures indicated that transition was much farther forward than for the previous tests due to the leading edge modification and minor fabrication flaws in the model. Early boundary layer transition on the rods was confirmed by hot-wire measurements which showed much higher noise levels in the free stream shield flow when compared with results from previous tests. Mean pitot pressure surveys within the shielded region inside the model indicated that there was an overexpansion and recompression that would limit the streamwise length of undisturbed flow to about 13 cm along the centerline.

  20. Transonic Investigation of Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Swept-Wing Fighter-Airplane Model with Leading-Edge Droop in Combination with Outboard Chord-Extensions and Notches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, Charles F.; Norton, Harry T., Jr.

    1961-01-01

    An investigation of the effects of several wing leading-edge modifications on the aerodynamic characteristics of a 45 degree swept-wing fighter-airplane model has been conducted in the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel at low and high lifting conditions at Mach numbers from 0.85 to 1.03. The investigation included the determination of the effect on longitudinal stability and performance characteristics of wing leading-edge and chord-extension droops of 60 and 20 degrees chord-extension overhangs of 0.075c and 0.15c (where c inboard end of the 0.075c chord-extension to depths of 0.075c and 0.l25c, and indention of the model fuselage to conform partially to the supersonic area rule for a Mach number of 1.20. Lift, drag, and pitching-moment data were obtained for configurations with the tail on and off. Comparisons of data obtained from the present model with data from a configuration with leading-edge slats are included. Generally, the model wing modifications provided only slight improvements of the airplane longitudinal stability characteristics, but did substantially reduce the airplane drag coefficients at moderate and high lifting conditions.

  1. Compression-Loaded Composite Panels With Elastic Edge Restraints and Initial Prestress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Riddick, Jaret C.; Thornburgh, Robert P.

    2005-01-01

    A parametric study of the effects of test-fixture-induced initial prestress and elastic edge restraints on the prebuckling and buckling responses of a compression-loaded, quasi-isotropic curved panel is presented. The numerical results were obtained by using a geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis code with high-fidelity models. The results presented show that a wide range of prebuckling and buckling behavior can be obtained by varying parameters that represent circumferential loaded-edge restraint and rotational unloaded-edge restraint provided by a test fixture and that represent the mismatch in specimen and test-fixture radii of curvature. For a certain range of parameters, the panels exhibit substantial nonlinear prebuckling deformations that yield buckling loads nearly twice the corresponding buckling load predicted by a traditional linear bifurcation buckling analysis for shallow curved panels. In contrast, the results show another range of parameters exist for which the nonlinear prebuckling deformations either do not exist or are relatively benign, and the panels exhibit buckling loads that are nearly equal to the corresponding linear bifurcation buckling load. Overall, the results should be of particular interest to scientists, engineers, and designers involved in simulating flight-hardware boundary conditions in structural verification and certification tests, involved in validating structural analysis tools, and interested in tailoring buckling performance.

  2. Assembly and testing of a composite heat pipe thermal intercept for HTS current leads

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, M.A.; Daney, D.E.; Prenger, F.C.; Hill, D.D.; Williams, P.M.; Boenig, H.J.

    1995-09-01

    We are building high temperature superconducting (HTS) current leads for a demonstration HTS-high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) system cooled by a cryocooler. The current leads are entirely conductively cooled. A composite nitrogen heat pipe provides efficient thermal communication, and simultaneously electrical isolation, between the lead and an intermediate temperature heat sink. Data on the thermal and electrical performance of the heat pipe thermal intercept are presented. The electrical isolation of the heat pipe was measured as a function of applied voltage with and without a thermal load across the heat pipe. The results show the electrical isolation with evaporation, condensation and internal circulation taking place in the heat pipe.

  3. The isotopic composition of silver and lead in two iron meteorites - Cape York and Grant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. H.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    Anomalies in silver isotope composition in the metal phases of the Cape York (IIIA) and Grant (IIIB) iron meteorites are studied together with the lead isotopic composition of both the metal and sulfide phases of Cape York. Following extensive surface cleaning, the Ag-107/Ag-109 ratio in the metal phases of the meteorites is found to be in excess of the terrestrial ratio, and of that found in the sulfide phases. A definite correlation between the Ag-107/Ag-109 and Pd-108/Ag-109 ratios is observed for these meteorites, indicating the in situ decay of Pd-107 and supporting the widespread presence of Pd in the early universe. Lead, determined after cleaning and with chemical separations using low blank levels, is found to exist in variable proportions in the metal and sulfide phases. The sulfides appear to be dominated by radiogenic modern lead, which may be explained by terrestrial contamination or by late metamorphism in the meteorite parent body.

  4. Board-Level Solder Joint Reliability of Edge- and Corner-Bonded Lead-Free Chip Scale Package Assemblies Subjected to Thermal Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hongbin; Tian, Cuihua; Ueda, Toshitsugu

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we present the results of thermal cycling test for edge- and corner-bonded lead-free chip scale packages (CSPs), which was carried out on the basis of the IPC-9701 test standard. Six materials were used in this study: four edge-bond adhesives and two corner-bond adhesives. These adhesives were compared with CSPs with full capillary flow underfill (FCFU) and without adhesives. The thermal cycling test results show that corner-bond adhesive has comparable solder joint reliability performance with CSP without adhesive, and is better than edge-bond adhesive, followed by CSPs with FCFU. In addition, the adhesives with a low coefficient of thermal expansion, a high glass transition temperature and a intermediate storage modulus yielded good performance. Results of detailed failure analysis indicate that the dominant failure mode is solder bulk fatigue cracking near package and/or printed circuit board (PCB) pads, and that the location of critical solder joints change from die edges to package corners with the introduction of adhesives.

  5. Residual thermal and moisture influences on the free-edge delamination of laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armanios, Erian A.; Mahler, Mary A.

    1988-01-01

    A simple delamination analysis method is developed. It is based on a shear-type deformation theory and includes hygrothermal effects. The method is applied to mixed-mode edge delamination specimens made of T300/5208 graphite/epoxy. It is found that residual thermal influences were alleviated when moisture stresses were included. Thermal effects on the interlaminar shear stress and total energy release rate were totally alleviated for the same specific moisture content. Moreover, this value of moisture content was not significantly affected by the stacking sequence for the laminates considered.

  6. Piezoelectric and pyroelectric properties of lead titanate-polyethylene oxide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanbareh, H.; van der Zwaag, S.; Groen, W. A.

    2014-11-01

    Polymer-ceramic composites with pyroelectric sensitivity are presented as promising candidates for infrared detection. Selection of the appropriate ceramic filler and the polymer matrix is one of the key parameters in the development of optimized materials for specific applications. In this work lead-titanate (PT) ceramic is incorporated into a flexible polymer matrix, polyethylene oxide (PEO) with relatively high electrical conductivity to develop sensitive and at the same time flexible composites. PT particles are dispersed in PEO at varying volume fractions, and composite materials cast in the form of films for the measurements. The dielectric, piezoelectric and pyroelectric properties are measured. From these data the piezoelectric voltage coefficients as well as pyroelctric figures of merit of the composite films have been determined and values were compared with that of PT-epoxy composites in order to determine the effect of electrical conductivity of the polymer matrix on the poling efficiency and the final properties. It is found that, in general, both the piezoelectric and the pyroelectric figures of merit increase with concentration of PT; however, it is at the expense of mechanical flexibility of the material. Moreover PT-PEO composites show superior pyroelectric sensitivity compared to PT-Epoxy composites. Improving the electrical conductivity of the polymer phase enhances the poling process significantly.

  7. Wind tunnel investigation of effects of variations in Reynolds number and leading-edge treatment on the aerodynamic characteristics of an externally blown jet-flap configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parlett, L. P.; Smith, C. C., Jr.; Megrail, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in a full-scale tunnel to determine the effects of variations in Reynolds number and leading-edge treatment on the aerodynamic characteristics of an externally blown jet-flap transport configuration. The model had a double-slotted trailing-edge flap and was powered by four high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Tests were performed by using each of three leading-edge devices (a 30-percent-chord flap and 15- and 25-percent-chord slats) at Reynolds numbers from 0.47 x one million to 1.36 x one million thrust coefficients up to 3.5. The use of a 25-percent-chord slat was found to be more effective than a 15-percent-chord slat or a 30-percent-chord flap in extending the stall angle of attack and in minimizing the loss of lift after the stall. The large slat was also effective in reducing the rolling moments that occurred when the engine-out wing stalled first.

  8. A low speed wind tunnel investigation of Reynolds number effects on a 60-deg swept wing configuration with leading and trailing edge flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Dhanvada M.; Hoffler, Keith D.

    1988-01-01

    A low-speed wind tunnel test was performed to investigate Reynolds number effects on the aerodynamic characteristics of a supersonic cruise wing concept model with a 60-deg swept wing incorporating leading-edge and trailing-edge flap deflections. The Reynolds number ranged from 0.3 to 1.6 x 10 to the 6th, and corresponding Mach numbers from .05 to 0.3. The objective was to define a threshold Reynolds number above which the flap aerodynamics basically remained unchanged, and also to generate a data base useful for validating theoretical predictions for the Reynolds number effects on flap performance. This report documents the test procedures used and the basic data acquired in the investigation.

  9. Piezoelectric and pyroelectric properties of conductive polyethylene oxide-lead titanate composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanbareh, H.; van der Zwaag, S.; Groen, W. A.

    2015-04-01

    Polymer-ceramic composites with pyroelectric sensitivity are presented as promising candidates for sensing applications. Selection of the appropriate ceramic filler and the polymer matrix is one of the key parameters in the development of optimized materials for specific applications. In this work lead-titanate (PT) ceramic particulate is incorporated into a polymer matrix, polyethylene oxide (PEO) with a relatively high electrical conductivity to develop sensitive and at the same time flexible composites. PT particles are dispersed in PEO at varying volume fractions, and composite materials are cast in the form of films to measure their dielectric, piezoelectric and pyroelectric properties. From these data the piezoelectric voltage coefficients as well as pyroelctric figures of merit of the composite films have been determined. In order to determine the effect of electrical conductivity of the polymer matrix on the poling efficiency and the final properties, a poling study has been performed. Improving the electrical conductivity of the polymer phase enhances the poling process significantly. It is found that both the piezoelectric and the pyroelectric figures of merit increase with concentration of PT. PT-PEO composites show superior pyroelectric sensitivity compared to other composites with less conductive polymer matrices.

  10. A comparison of finite-difference and finite-element methods for calculating free edge stresses in composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauld, N. R., Jr.; Goree, J. G.; Tzeng, L.-S.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that edge delamination is a serious failure mechanism for laminated composite materials. Various numerical methods have been utilized in attempts to calculate the interlaminar stress components which precede delamination in a laminate. There are, however, discrepancies regarding the results provided by different methods, taking into account a finite-difference procedure, a perturbation procedure, and finite element approaches. The present investigation has the objective to assess the capacity of a finite difference method to predict the character and magnitude of the interlaminar stress distributions near an interface corner. A second purpose of the investigation is to determine if predictions by finite element method in-plane, interlaminar stress components near an interface corner represent actual laminate behavior.

  11. Evaluation of the Edge Crack Torsion (ECT) Test for Mode 3 Interlaminar Fracture Toughness of Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian; Lee, Edward W.; OBrien, T. Kevin; Lee, Shaw Ming

    1996-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation was carried out on G40-800/R6376 graphite epoxy laminates to evaluate the Edge Crack Torsion (ECT) test as a candidate for a standard Mode 3 interlaminar fracture toughness test for laminated composites. The ECT test consists of a (90/(+/- 45)(sub 3)/(+/- 45)(sub 3)/90))(sub s) laminate with a delamination introduced by a non-adhesive film at the mid-plane along one edge and loaded in a special fixture to create torsion along the length of the laminate. Dye penetrate enhanced X-radiograph of failed specimens revealed that the delamination initiated at the middle of the specimen length and propagated in a self similar manner along the laminate mid-plane. A three-dimensional finite element analysis was performed that indicated that a pure Mode 3 delamination exists at the middle of specimen length away from both ends. At the ends near the loading point a small Mode 2 component exists. However, the magnitude of this Mode 2 strain energy release rate at the loading point is small compared to the magnitude of Mode 3 component in the mid-section of the specimen. Hence, the ECT test yielded the desired Mode 3 delamination. The Mode 3 fracture toughness was obtained from a compliance calibration method and was in good agreement with the finite element results. Mode 2 End-Notched Flexure (ENF) tests and Mode 1 Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) tests were also performed for the same composite material. The Mode 1 fracture toughness was much smaller than both the Mode 2 and Mode 3 fracture toughness. The Mode 2 fracture toughness was found to be 75% of the Mode 3 fracture toughness.

  12. Effects of Canard Planform and Wing-Leading-Edge Modification on Low-Speed Longitudinal Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Canard Airplane Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Bernard, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted at low subsonic speeds to study the effects of canard planform and wing-leading-edge modification on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a general research canard airplane configuration. The basic wing of the model had a trapezoidal planform, an aspect ratio of 3.0, a taper ratio of 0.143, and an unswept 80-percent-chord line. Modifications to the wing included addition of full-span and partial-span leading-edge chord-extensions. Two canard planforms were employed in the study; one was a 60 deg sweptback delta planform and the other was a trapezoidal planform similar to that of the basic wing. Modifications to these canards included addition of a full-span leading-edge chord-extension to the trapezoidal planform and a fence to the delta planform. For the basic-wing-trapezoidal-canard configuration, rather abrupt increases in stability occurred at about 12 deg angle of attack. A slight pitch-up tendency occurred for the delta-canard configuration at approximately 8 deg angle of attack. A comparison of the longitudinal control effectiveness for the basic-wing-trapezoidal-canard combination and for the basic-wing-delta-canard combination indicates higher values of control effectiveness at law angles of attack for the trapezoidal canard. The control effectiveness for the delta-canard configuration, however, is seen to hold up for higher canard deflections and to higher angles of attack. Use of a full-span chord-extension deflected approximately 30 deg on the trapezoidal canard greatly improved the control characteristics of this configuration and enabled a sizeable increase in trim lift to be realized.

  13. Surface-Pressure and Flow-Visualization Data at Mach Number of 1.60 for Three 65 deg Delta Wings Varying in Leading-Edge Radius and Camber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillin, S. Naomi; Bryd, James E.; Parmar, Devendra S.; Bezos-OConnor, Gaudy M.; Forrest, Dana K.; Bowen, Susan

    1996-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the effect of leading-edge radius, camber, Reynolds number, and boundary-layer state on the incipient separation of a delta wing at supersonic speeds was conducted at the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at Mach number of 1.60 over a free-stream Reynolds number range of 1 x 106 to 5 x 106 ft-1. The three delta wing models examined had a 65 deg swept leading edge and varied in cross-sectional shape: a sharp wedge, a 20:1 ellipse, and a 20:1 ellipse with a -9.750 circular camber imposed across the span. The wings were tested with and without transition grit applied. Surface-pressure coefficient data and flow-visualization data indicated that by rounding the wing leading edge or cambering the wing in the spanwise direction, the onset of leading-edge separation on a delta wing can be raised to a higher angle of attack than that observed on a sharp-edged delta wing. The data also showed that the onset of leading-edge separation can be raised to a higher angle of attack by forcing boundary-layer transition to occur closer to the wing leading edge by the application of grit or the increase in free-stream Reynolds number.

  14. In-flight leading-edge vortex flow-field survey measurements on a F-18 aircraft at high angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richwine, David M.; Fisher, David F.

    1991-01-01

    A rotating rake with 16 hemispherical-tipped five-hole probes was used to obtain flow-field measurements of the leading-edge-extension (LEX) vortex of the F-18 aircraft. The measurements were carried out under 1-g flight conditions at quasi-stabilized angles of attack of 10-52 deg and at Reynolds numbers based on a mean aerodynamic cord up to 16 x 10 to the 6th. Correlations with surface pressure, flow visualization, and computational fluid dynamics results are presented for angles of attack of 19 and 30 deg.

  15. Generation of high-voltage pulses with a subnanosecond leading edge in an open discharge. I. design and experimental data on switching characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokhan, P. A.; Gugin, P. P.; Zakrevskii, D. E.; Lavrukhin, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    A new type of switch based on a photoelectron open discharge is studied. The switch can generate high-voltage pulses with a subnanosecond leading edge. The coaxial and planar designs of the switch are studied. The feasibility of switching currents reaching several tens of kiloamperes with a switching time of less than 0.4 ns at a voltage of up to 20 kV, a pulse repetition rate of up to 100 kHz, and an efficiency of no less than 0.9 is demonstrated.

  16. Composite uranium carbide targets at TRIUMF: Development and characterization with SEM, XRD, XRF and L-edge densitometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Peter; Bricault, Pierre; Dombsky, Marik; Erdmann, Nicole; Hanemaayer, Vicky; Wong, John; Lützenkirchen, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    The production of radioactive ion beams (RIB) from spallation targets by irradiation with a continuous 500 MeV proton beam, has been routine at TRIUMF for several years. Based on the experience with composite refractory carbide targets a procedure for the fabrication of UC2/C targets was developed. It includes the preparation of UC2 by carbothermal reduction of UO2, the slip-casting of fine-grained UC2/C slurry on graphite foil under inert gas atmosphere and the cutting of composite target discs which are stacked up to a lamellar structure. The thermal properties of such an arrangement are adequate to withstand the high power deposition of an intense, continuous proton beam and also beneficial for the fast release of short-lived radioactive isotopes. Molecular structure, particle size and the impact of sintering of the target discs were investigated via XRD and SEM. Thickness and mass distribution were measured with position-sensitive LIII-edge densitometry. The results confirm that the properties of the UC2/C target material are well suited for RIB production at TRIUMF while there is still room for improvement with regard to uniformity of mass distribution in target disc thickness.

  17. Composite materials with metal oxide attached to lead chalcogenide nanocrystal quantum dots with linkers

    DOEpatents

    Fuke, Nobuhiro; Koposov, Alexey Y; Sykora, Milan; Hoch, Laura

    2014-12-16

    Composite materials useful for devices such as photoelectrochemical solar cells include a substrate, a metal oxide film on the substrate, nanocrystalline quantum dots (NQDs) of lead sulfide, lead selenide, and lead telluride, and linkers that attach the NQDs to the metal oxide film. Suitable linkers preserve the 1s absorption peak of the NQDs. A suitable linker has a general structure A-B-C where A is a chemical group adapted for binding to a MO.sub.x and C is a chemical group adapted for binding to a NQD and B is a divalent, rigid, or semi-rigid organic spacer moiety. Other linkers that preserve the 1s absorption peak may also be used.

  18. Electrochemical Evaluation of Lead Base Composite Anodes Fabricated by Accumulative Roll Bonding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbasi, Maryam; Keshavarz Alamdari, Eskandar

    2015-04-01

    Accumulative roll bonding is used for the first time in lead systems to fabricate advanced lead base composite anodes. For this purpose, Ag as the most common and effective additive, Co as the best metallic immiscible substitution for Ag, and MnO2 as the ceramic and electrocatalytic agent have been used as additives to produce anodes. The accumulative roll bonding processed sheets have been fabricated under determined conditions. The electrochemical properties of the prepared samples are investigated by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy, Cyclic Voltammetry, Polarization tests, electrowinning tests, and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The results indicate that the ARB-processed composite lead sheets can be perfectly used as novel developed anodes. The advantages include 5.51 times increase of current density, in the Pb-pct0.5Ag 9-pass sample compared to pure lead anode, decreased charge transfer resistance from 56.31 (? cm2) in pure lead anode to 17.5 (? cm2) in the Pb-pct2MnO2 8-pass sample (72 pct lower), and decreased oxygen evolution potential from 1.95 (V/SHE) in pure lead anode to 1.77 (V/SHE) in the Pb-pct2MnO2 8-pass sample (0.18 (V/SHE) lower). Electrowinning tests results reveal Pb-2 pctMnO2 8-pass showed best anodic performance withsignificant lower compared corrosion rate (75 pct), product and electrolyte contamination, slime formation, energy consumption and higher Zn deposit and energy conservation (to 294 kWh/t-Zn). Finest Zn deposit morphology (effective reduced grain size corresponding to smoothness and compaction) has been supplied by Pb-2 pctMnO2 8-pass sample resulted from enhanced growth rate of Zn in lack of Pb contaminations that could act as suitable nucleation sites.

  19. Direct In Vivo Manipulation and Imaging of Calcium Transients in Neutrophils Identify a Critical Role for Leading-Edge Calcium Flux.

    PubMed

    Beerman, Rebecca W; Matty, Molly A; Au, Gina G; Looger, Loren L; Choudhury, Kingshuk Roy; Keller, Philipp J; Tobin, David M

    2015-12-15

    Calcium signaling has long been associated with key events of immunity, including chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and activation. However, imaging and manipulation of calcium flux in motile immune cells in live animals remain challenging. Using light-sheet microscopy for in vivo calcium imaging in zebrafish, we observe characteristic patterns of calcium flux triggered by distinct events, including phagocytosis of pathogenic bacteria and migration of neutrophils toward inflammatory stimuli. In contrast to findings from ex vivo studies, we observe enriched calcium influx at the leading edge of migrating neutrophils. To directly manipulate calcium dynamics in vivo, we have developed transgenic lines with cell-specific expression of the mammalian TRPV1 channel, enabling ligand-gated, reversible, and spatiotemporal control of calcium influx. We find that controlled calcium influx can function to help define the neutrophil's leading edge. Cell-specific TRPV1 expression may have broad utility for precise control of calcium dynamics in other immune cell types and organisms. PMID:26673320

  20. Analysis of a Circular Composite Disk Subjected to Edge Rotations and Hydrostatic Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, Stanley T.

    2004-01-01

    The structural analysis results for a graphite/epoxy quasi-isotropic circular plate subjected to a forced rotation at the boundary and pressure is presented. The analysis is to support a specialized material characterization test for composite cryogenic tanks. Finite element models were used to ensure panel integrity and determine the pressure necessary to achieve a predetermined equal biaxial strain value. The displacement results due to the forced rotation at the boundary led to a detailed study of the bending stiffness matrix [D]. The variation of the bending stiffness terms as a function of angular position is presented graphically, as well as, an illustrative technique of considering the laminate as an I-beam.

  1. Design, fabrication, testing, and delivery of shuttle heat pipe leading edge test modules. Volume 2: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Development in the design of leading heat pipes for the space shuttle are reported. The analysis, design, and integration of the heat pipes into the module structure are described along with the recommended tests. Results indicate the design goals were meet.

  2. Lubricating Properties of Lead-Monoxide-Base Coatings of Various Compositions at Temperatures to 1250 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1959-01-01

    A number of ceramic coatings of different compositions containing lead monoxide (PbO) were studied to determine their relative merits as dry-film lubricants. Lead monoxide is known to be an effective solid lubricant at elevated temperatures, and this oxide was the main component in all compositions studied. Friction and wear properties were determined at temperatures from 750 to 1250 F, at a sliding velocity of 430 feet per minute, and at a normal load of 1 kilogram. In all of the coatings, PbO was the component primarily responsible for the lubricating properties. Oxides other than PbO had an indirect effect on lubrication by influencing such properties as adhesion, hardness, vitrifying or glaze-forming tendency, melting or softening point, and chemical stability of the coatings. Notable among these oxides were magnetite (Fe3O4.), which had generally a beneficial influence on ceramic- to-metal adhesion, and silica (SiO2), which inhibited the oxidation of PbO and enhanced the tendency for glaze formation on the sliding surfaces. Several of the compositions studied provided protection against metal-to-metal adhesive wear, galling, or seizure at test temperatures from 750 to 1250 F. Coating friction coefficients ranged from 0.20 to 0.37 at 75 F but were around 0.08 to 0.20 at temperatures of 1250 F.

  3. Lead isotopic compositions in the EPICA Dome C ice core and Southern Hemisphere Potential Source Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallelonga, P.; Gabrielli, P.; Balliana, E.; Wegner, A.; Delmonte, B.; Turetta, C.; Burton, G.; Vanhaecke, F.; Rosman, K. J. R.; Hong, S.; Boutron, C. F.; Cescon, P.; Barbante, C.

    2010-01-01

    A record of Pb isotopic compositions and Pb and Ba concentrations are presented for the EPICA Dome C ice core covering the past 220 ky, indicating the characteristics of dust and volcanic Pb deposition in central East Antarctica. Lead isotopic compositions are also reported in a suite of soil and loess samples from the Southern Hemisphere (Australia, Southern Africa, Southern South America, New Zealand, Antarctica) in order to evaluate the provenance of dust present in Antarctic ice. Lead isotopic compositions in Dome C ice support the contention that Southern South America was an important source of dust in Antarctica during the last two glacial maxima, and furthermore suggest occasional dust contributions from local Antarctic sources. The isotopic signature of Pb in Antarctic ice is altered by the presence of volcanic Pb, inhibiting the evaluation of glacial-interglacial changes in dust sources and the evaluation of Australia as a source of dust to Antarctica. Consequently, an accurate evaluation of the predominant source(s) of Antarctic dust can only be obtained from glacial maxima, when dust-Pb concentrations were greatest. These data confirm that volcanic Pb is present throughout Antarctica and is emitted in a physical phase that is free from Ba, while dust Pb is transported within a matrix containing Ba and other crustal elements.

  4. Metabolism of Antarctic micronektonic crustacea across a summer ice-edge bloom: respiration, composition, and enzymatic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Joseph; Kawall, Helena; Geiger, Stephen P.; Torres, Joseph J.

    2004-08-01

    The Antarctic marginal ice zone is an important oceanic front separating the pack-ice and open-water environments. During summer, the retreating pack ice creates a meltwater lens in the euphotic zone, allowing primary producers and microheterotrophs to flourish in a discrete bloom just seaward of the retreating ice edge that lasts about 60 days. The purpose of the present study was to see if the ice-edge bloom had a discernible effect on the metabolism and physiological condition of Antarctic micronekton similar to that observed in zooplankton species. We also wished to assess the importance of the summer season to species' life cycles. Two major data sets were collected on 25 species in the following taxonomic groups: amphipods, cephalopods, decapods, euphausiids, isopods, mysids, ostracods, and polychaetes. The first data set described the metabolic rates of individuals in areas of the marginal ice zone with widely different levels of chlorophyll biomass to investigate the effect of the ice-edge bloom on metabolism. Additionally, summer metabolic rates were compared with data from other seasons. The second data set detailed the levels of protein, water, ash, RNA and DNA, and the activities of metabolic enzymes (citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase) to examine the efficacy of biochemical indices as predictive tools for metabolism. Results suggested that the mobility of the micronektonic species eliminated most direct effects of the bloom on metabolism. Individuals captured in very different productivity regimes showed few significant differences in the metabolic indicators listed above. Isolated cases of changes in body composition and enzyme activity, however, implied that longer-term effects of the bloom may be exhibited. Seasonal increases in metabolism from winter to summer were observed in the euphausiids Euphausia superba, E. triacantha, and Thysanoessa macrura and the amphipod Vibilia stebbingi. It was concluded that the seasonal shifts were indicative of a "type 2" or compromise overwintering strategy whereby metabolism drops without an accompanying dormant state. Protein content and MDH activity were found to be the best predictors of respiration rate, while nucleic acid measures only correlated with respiration in immature specimens.

  5. Effect of compositional variations in the lead lanthanum zirconate stannate titanate system on electrical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Markowski, K.; Park, S.E.; Yoshikawa, Shoko; Cross, L.E.

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of compositional modifications on the electrical properties of lead lanthanum zirconate stannate titanate (PLZST) ceramics, as well as to examine their electrically induced phase-change behavior. Variations in the Ti:Sn ratio were evaluated. Increased Ti{sup 4+} content produced the following: decreased switching field, related to an increased antiferroelectric-ferroelectric (AFE-FE) transition temperature; constant hysteresis ({Delta}E) correlated with a constant temperature of the maximum dielectric constant (T{sub max}); a sharper dielectric-constant maximum peak; and increased room-temperature dielectric constant (K). Variations in the Zr:Sn ratio also were evaluated. Increased Zr{sup 4+} content produced the following: increased hysteresis with increased T{sub max}, decreased maximum dielectric constant, and decreased switching field with increased AFE-FE transition temperature (T{sub AFE-FE}). From these results, with respect to compositional modifications, the AFE-FE switching field (E{sub AFE-FE}) and {Delta}E were observed to be dependent strongly on T{sub AFE-FE} and T{sub max}, respectively. Negligible change existed in the strain achievable at the switching field, which remained constant for all compositions at {approximately}0.16%. The significance of this research was the ability demonstrated to tailor the properties of phase-change materials through compositional modifications.

  6. Development of porous clay-based composites for the sorption of lead from water.

    PubMed

    Ake, C L; Mayura, K; Huebner, H; Bratton, G R; Phillips, T D

    2001-07-20

    Lead contamination of water is a major health hazard, as illustrated by the fact that exposure to this metal has been associated with death and disease in humans, birds, and animals. The present research was aimed at the development of a porous, solid-phase sorbent that can be used in the remediation of lead-contaminated water. A suitable sorbent was identified by screening various clays and other materials for their ability to effectively bind lead. The clay was adhered to a solid support using an aqueous solution of carboxymethyl cellulose. The binary composite was then tested for its ability to bind lead from solution, while providing void volume, increased surface area, and considerably enhanced hydraulic conductivity. The results suggested that a combination of sodium montmorillonite clay and carbon exhibited enhanced sorption of lead compared to carbon alone, and also supported the potential application of various combinations of sorbent materials. This value-added combination of clay, solid support, and adhesive will allow for the construction of column filtration systems that are multifunctional and capable of purifying large volumes of contaminated water. PMID:11482800

  7. Investigation of the Effects of Leading-edge Chord-extensions and Fences in Combination with Leading-edge Flaps on the Aerodynamic Characteristics at Mach Numbers from 0.40 to 0.93 of a 45 Degree Sweptback Wing of Aspect Ratio 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spreeman, Kenneth P; Alford, William J , Jr

    1954-01-01

    This investigation was made to determine the effects of 6 degree full-spoan and 3 degree partial-span leading-edge flaps in combination with chord-extensions or fences on the aerodynamic characteristics of a wing-fuselage configuration with a 45 degree sweptback wing of aspect ratio 4, taper ratio 0.3, and NACA 65A006 airfoil sections. The investigation was made in the Langley high-speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel over a Mach number range of 0.40 to 0.93 and an angle-of-attack range of about -2 degrees to 24 degrees. Lift, drag, and pitching-moment data were obtained for all configurations. From overall considerations of stability and performance it appears that with the model of this investigation the 6 degree full-span leading-edge flaps in combination with the chord-extension over the outboard 35 percent of the span, with or without leading-edge camber, would be the most desirable configuration.

  8. Reaction of YBa2Cu3O(7-beta) with Gold, Silver, Bismuth and Lead: Substitution Chemistry and Composite Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Gaier, James R.

    1993-01-01

    The reaction of YBa2Cu3O(7-beta) with Au, Ag, Bi, and Ph ions or metal is described. Three types of materials were produced: a well-defined series of homogeneous superconductors was obtained for Au ion substitution with little effect on T(sub c); attempted Ag and Bi ion substitution resulted in multi-phase samples with slightly enhanced T(sub c); finally, attempts to produce superconducting metal/superconducting ceramic composites with Pb and Bi powders resulted in multi-phase samples with drastically diminished superconducting properties. For Au- substituted superconductors, YBa2(Cu(l-x)Au(x))3O(7-beta), a substitution series (x = 0 - 0.1) has been synthesized. For x = 0.1 there was no change in the a and b lattice parameters (a = 3.826 A and b = 3.889 A) but a 0.06 A c axis expansion to 11.75 A was observed. The valence of Cu and Au in YBa2Au(0.3)Cu(2.7)O(7-beta) was investigated using X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES). X-ray studies indicate that Au goes into the Cu(l) site and Cu K edge XANES shows that this has little effect on the oxidation state of the remaining copper. A small effect on T(sub c) is observed (T(sub c) = 89 K for x = 0.10). Ag and Bi addition results in a rise in T(sub c) and a decrease in (delta)T(sub c) at low levels (x = 0.10 Ag, T(sub c) = 94 K and (delta)T(sub c) = 0.5 K; x = 0.02 Bi, T(sub c) = 94 K and (delta)T(sub c) = 1K) relative to typical values for YBa2Cu3O(7-beta) (T(sub c) = 91 K, (delta)T(sub c) = 2 K). Attempts at fabrication of Pb- and Pb(1-x)Bi(x)-superconductor composites are described. Cold pressing followed by low temperature (200 C) sintering resulted in a composite which excluded flux below 90 K but did not show zero electrical resistance until the metal (alloy) superconducting transition. X-ray diffraction showed the presence of pervoskite and metal. Processing at moderate (450 C) or high (950 C) temperatures resulted in oxygen-depleted pervoskite and/or metal oxides. These materials displayed greatly degraded superconducting properties. Processing at 800 C resulted in high T(sub c) only for composites containing greater than 90% weight fraction ceramic. Reaction of metal with YBa2Cu3O(7-beta) formed superconducting lead/bismuth-based oxides and other binary oxides.

  9. Composite lead for conducting an electrical current between 75--80K and 4. 5K temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Negm, Y.; Zimmerman, G.O.; Powers, R.E. Jr.; McConeghy, R.J.; Kaplan, A.

    1994-12-27

    A composite lead is provided which electrically links and conducts a current between about 75-80K and liquid helium temperature of about 4.5K. The composite lead may be employed singly or in multiples concurrently to provide conduction of electrical current from normal conductors and semi-conductors at room temperature to superconductors operating at 4.5K. In addition, a variety of organizational arrangements and assemblies are provided by which the mechanical strength and electrical reliability of the composite lead is maintained. 12 figures.

  10. Composite lead for conducting an electrical current between 75-80K and 4.5K temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Negm, Yehia (Braintree, MA); Zimmerman, George O. (South Hamilton, MA); Powers, Jr., Robert E. (East Boston, MA); McConeghy, Randy J. (Waxahachie, TX); Kaplan, Alvaro (Brookline, MA)

    1994-12-27

    A composite lead is provided which electrically links and conducts a current between about 75-80K. and liquid helium temperature of about 4.5K. The composite lead may be employed singly or in multiples concurrently to provide conduction of electrical current from normal conductors and semi-conductors at room temperature to superconductors operating at 4.5K. In addition, a variety of organizationl arrangements and assemblies are provided by which the mechanical strength and electrical reliability of the composite lead is maintained.

  11. The tumour-suppressor Scribble dictates cell polarity during directed epithelial migration: regulation of Rho GTPase recruitment to the leading edge.

    PubMed

    Dow, L E; Kauffman, J S; Caddy, J; Zarbalis, K; Peterson, A S; Jane, S M; Russell, S M; Humbert, P O

    2007-04-01

    Altered expression of human Scribble is associated with invasive epithelial cancers, however, its role in tumour development remains unclear. Mutations in Drosophila Scribble result in loss of polarity, overproliferation and 3D-tumourous overgrowth of epithelial cells. Using complementation studies in Drosophila we recently demonstrated that expression of human Scribble can also regulate polarity and restrict tissue overgrowth. Here, we have undertaken a detailed study of human Scribble function in the polarized mammary cell line, MCF10A. We show that although Scribble does not seem to be required for apical-basal polarity or proliferation control in MCF10A cells, Scribble is essential for the control of polarity associated with directed epithelial cell migration. Scribble-depleted MCF10A cells show defective in vitro wound closure and chemotactic movement. The cells at the wound edge fail to polarize, show reduced lamellipodia formation and impaired recruitment of Cdc42 and Rac1 to the leading edge. Furthermore, we show that this function is relevant in vivo as Scribble mutant mice show defective epidermal wound healing. This data identifies an essential role for mammalian Scribble in the regulation of the polarity specifically involved in directed epithelial migration. PMID:17043654

  12. Surface Composition of Europa's Icy Bright Plains and Dark Linea: Leading side versus trailing side comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, J. H.; Dalton, J. B.; Kamp, L. W.

    2011-10-01

    We compare linear mixture modeling solutions yielding surface composition and water ice grain size information for three widely-spaced locations on Europa. Low-noise Galileo Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) observations are employed for this analysis. Model solutions indicate that the surface compositions for locations on the orbital leading hemisphere are dominated by fine-grained water ice. Ice abundance ranges from 65%-82% with grain sizes ranging from ~50-?m to ~75-?m. These locations exhibit extremely low abundances of hydrated sulfuric acid and minor amounts of hydrated salts. A location on the orbital trailing side is characterized by a high abundance (>40%) of hydrated sulfuric acid, with lesser amounts of hydrated salts. Large-grained (100-?m to ~250-?m) water ice is present in this trailing hemisphere location. Higher abundances of hydrated salts and distinctive water ice grain size distributions are seen in association with dark materials in all three locations. Our results help distinguish between exogenic and endogenic influences on Europa's present-day surface composition.

  13. Lead isotope studies of the Guerrero composite terrane, west-central Mexico: implications for ore genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potra, Adriana; Macfarlane, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    New thermal ionization mass spectrometry and multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry Pb isotope analyses of three Cenozoic ores from the La Verde porphyry copper deposit located in the Zihuatanejo-Huetamo subterrane of the Guerrero composite terrane are presented and the metal sources are evaluated. Lead isotope ratios of 3 Cenozoic ores from the El Malacate and La Esmeralda porphyry copper deposits located in the Zihuatanejo-Huetamo subterrane and of 14 ores from the Zimapan and La Negra skarn deposits from the adjoining Sierra Madre terrane are also presented to look for systematic differences in the lead isotope trends and ore metal sources among the proposed exotic tectonostratigraphic terranes of southern Mexico. Comparison among the isotopic signatures of ores from the Sierra Madre terrane and distinct subterranes of the Guerrero terrane supports the idea that there is no direct correlation between the distinct suspect terranes of Mexico and the isotopic signatures of the associated Cenozoic ores. Rather, these Pb isotope patterns are interpreted to reflect increasing crustal contribution to mantle-derived magmas as the arc advanced eastward onto a progressively thicker continental crust. The lead isotope trend observed in Cenozoic ores is not recognized in the ores from Mesozoic volcanogenic massive sulfide and sedimentary exhalative deposits. The Mesozoic ores formed prior to the amalgamation of the Guerrero composite terrane to the continental margin, which took place during the Late Cretaceous, in intraoceanic island arc and intracontinental marginal basin settings, while the Tertiary deposits formed after this event in a continental arc setting. Lead isotope ratios of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic ores appear to reflect these differences in tectonic setting of ore formation. Most Pb isotope values of ores from the La Verde deposit (206Pb/204Pb = 18.674-18.719) are less radiogenic than those of the host igneous rocks, but plot within the field defined by the Huetamo Sequence, suggesting that these ores may also contain metals from the sedimentary rocks. The Pb isotope ratios of ore samples from the Zimapan deposit (206Pb/204Pb = 18.771-18.848) are substantially higher than the whole-rock Pb isotope compositions of the basement rocks. The similarity of ore Pb to igneous rock Pb in the Zimapan district (206Pb/204Pb = 18.800-18.968) may indicate that the proximal source of ore metals in the hydrothermal system was the igneous activity.

  14. Quasi-Static 3-Point Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Bend Test and Analysis for Shuttle Orbiter Wing Leading Edge Impact Damage Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Sotiris, Kellas

    2006-01-01

    Static 3-point bend tests of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) were conducted to failure to provide data for additional validation of an LS-DYNA RCC model suitable for predicting the threshold of impact damage to shuttle orbiter wing leading edges. LS-DYNA predictions correlated well with the average RCC failure load, and were good in matching the load vs. deflection. However, correlating the detectable damage using NDE methods with the cumulative damage parameter in LS-DYNA material model 58 was not readily achievable. The difficulty of finding internal RCC damage with NDE and the high sensitivity of the mat58 damage parameter to the load near failure made the task very challenging. In addition, damage mechanisms for RCC due to dynamic impact of debris such as foam and ice and damage mechanisms due to a static loading were, as expected, not equivalent.

  15. Effects of Horizontal-Control Planform and Wing-Leading-Edge Modification on Low-Speed Longitudinal Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Canard Airplane Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Bernard, Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation at low subsonic speeds has been conducted in the Langley 300-MPH 7- by 10-foot tunnel. The basic wing had a trapezoidal planform, an aspect ratio of 3.0., a taper ratio of 0.143, and an unswept 80-percent-chord line. Modifications to the basic wing included deflectable full-span and partial-span leading-edge chord-extensions. A trapezoidal horizontal control similar in planform to the basic wing and a 60 deg sweptback delta horizontal control were tested in conjunction with the wing. The total planform area of each horizontal control was 16 percent of the total basic-wing area. Modifications to these horizontal controls included addition of a full-span chord-extension to the trapezoidal planform and a fence to the delta planform.

  16. Low-Speed Investigation of Upper-Surface Leading-Edge Blowing on a High-Speed Civil Transport Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.; Laflin, Brenda E. Gile; Kemmerly, Guy T.; Campbell, Bryan A.

    1999-01-01

    The paper identifies speed, agility, human interface, generation of sensitivity information, task decomposition, and data transmission (including storage) as important attributes for a computer environment to have in order to support engineering design effectively. It is argued that when examined in terms of these attributes the presently available environment can be shown to be inadequate. A radical improvement is needed, and it may be achieved by combining new methods that have recently emerged from multidisciplinary design optimisation (MDO) with massively parallel processing computer technology. The caveat is that, for successful use of that technology in engineering computing, new paradigms for computing will have to be developed - specifically, innovative algorithms that are intrinsically parallel so that their performance scales up linearly with the number of processors. It may be speculated that the idea of simulating a complex behaviour by interaction of a large number of very simple models may be an inspiration for the above algorithms; the cellular automata are an example. Because of the long lead time needed to develop and mature new paradigms, development should begin now, even though the widespread availability of massively parallel processing is still a few years away.

  17. Actin Filaments at the Leading Edge of Cancer Cells Are Characterized by a High Mobile Fraction and Turnover Regulation by Profilin I

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Gisela; Syriani, Emilio; Morales, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Cellular motility is the basis for cancer cell invasion and metastasis. In the case of breast cancer, the most common type of cancer among women, metastasis represents the most devastating stage of the disease. The central role of cellular motility in cancer development emphasizes the importance of understanding the specific mechanisms involved in this process. In this context, tumor development and metastasis would be the consequence of a loss or defect of the mechanisms that control cytoskeletal remodeling. Profilin I belongs to a family of small actin binding proteins that are thought to assist in actin filament elongation at the leading edge of migrating cells. Traditionally, Profilin I has been considered to be an essential control element for actin polymerization and cell migration. Expression of Profilin I is down-regulated in breast and various other cancer cells. In MDA-MB-231 cells, a breast cancer cell line, further inhibition of Profilin I expression promotes hypermotility and metastatic spread, a finding that contrasts with the proposed role of Profilin in enhancing polymerization. In this report, we have taken advantage of the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) of GFP-actin to quantify and compare actin dynamics at the leading edge level in both cancer and non-cancer cell models. Our results suggest that (i) a high level of actin dynamics (i.e., a large mobile fraction of actin filaments and a fast turnover) is a common characteristic of some cancer cells; (ii) actin polymerization shows a high degree of independence from the presence of extracellular growth factors; and (iii) our results also corroborate the role of Profilin I in regulating actin polymerization, as raising the intracellular levels of Profilin I decreased the mobile fraction ratio of actin filaments and slowed their polymerization rate; furthermore, increased Profilin levels also led to reduced individual cell velocity and directionality. PMID:24465723

  18. Basanite-nephelinite suite from early Kilauea: Carbonated melts of phlogopite-garnet peridotite at Hawaii's leading magmatic edge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sisson, T.W.; Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Coombs, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    A basanite-nephelinite glass suite from early submarine Kilauea defines a continuous compositional array marked by increasing concentrations of incompatible components with decreasing SiO2, MgO, and Al2O3. Like peripheral and post-shield strongly alkalic Hawaiian localities (Clague et al. in J Volcanol Geotherm Res 151:279-307, 2006; Dixon et al. in J Pet 38:911-939, 1997), the early Kilauea basanite-nephelinite glasses are interpreted as olivine fractionation products from primary magnesian alkalic liquids. For early Kilauea, these were saturated with a garnet-phlogopite-sulfide peridotite assemblage, with elevated dissolved CO2 contents responsible for the liquids' distinctly low-SiO2 concentrations. Reconstructed primitive liquids for early Kilauea and other Hawaiian strongly alkalic localities are similar to experimental 3 GPa low-degree melts of moderately carbonated garnet lherzolite, and estimated parent magma temperatures of 1,350-1,400??C (olivine-liquid geothermometry) match the ambient upper mantle geotherm shortly beneath the base of the lithosphere. The ???3 GPa source regions were too hot for stable crystalline carbonate and may have consisted of ambient upper mantle peridotite containing interstitial carbonate-silicate or carbonatitic liquid, possibly (Dixon et al. in Geochem Geophys Geosyst 9(9):Q09005, 2008), although not necessarily, from the Hawaiian mantle plume. Carbonate-enriched domains were particularly susceptible to further melting upon modest decompression during upward lithospheric flexure beneath the advancing Hawaiian Arch, or by conductive heating or upward drag by the Hawaiian mantle plume. The early Kilauea basanite-nephelinite suite has a HIMU-influenced isotopic character unlike other Hawaiian magmas (Shimizu et al. in EOS Tran Amer Geophys Union 82(47): abstr V12B-0962, 2001; Shimizu et al. in Geochim Cosmochim Acta 66(15A):710, 2002) but consistent with oceanic carbonatite involvement (Hoernle et al. in Contrib Mineral Petrol 142:520-542, 2002). It may represent the melting products of a fertile domain in the ambient upper mantle impinged upon and perturbed by the sustained plume source that feeds later shield-stage magmatism. ?? US Government 2009.

  19. Lead concentration and isotopic composition in five peridotite inclusions of probable mantle origin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zartman, R.E.; Tera, F.

    1973-01-01

    The lead content of five whole-rock peridotite inclusions (four lherzolites and one harzburgite) in alkali basalt ranges from 82 to 570 ppb (parts per billion). Approximately 30-60 ppb of this amount can be accounted for by analyzed major silicate minerals (olivine ??? 10 ppb; enstatite 5-28 ppb; chrome diopside ???400 ppb). Through a series of acid leaching experiments, the remainder of the lead is shown to be quite labile and to reside in either glassy or microcrystalline veinlets or accessory mineral phases, such as apatite and mica. The lead isotopic composition of the peridotites (206Pb/204Pb = 18.01-18.90; 207Pb/204Pb = 15.52-15.61; 208Pb/204Pb = 37.80-38.86) lies within the range of values defined by many modern volcanic rocks and, in particular, is essentially coextensive with the abyssal tholeiite field. In all but one instance, isotopic differences were found between the peridotite and its host alkali basalt. Two of the peridotites clearly demonstrated internal isotopic heterogeneity between leachable and residual fractions that could not simply be due to contamination by the host basalt. However, there is no evidence that these ultramafic rocks form some layer in the mantle with isotopic characteristics fundamentally different from those of the magma sources of volcanic rocks. ?? 1973.

  20. The design of a functionally graded composite for service in high temperature lead and lead-bismuth cooled nuclear reactors

    E-print Network

    Short, Michael Philip

    2010-01-01

    A material that resists lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) attack and retains its strength at 700°C would be an enabling technology for LBE-cooled reactors. No single alloy currently exists that can economically meet the required ...

  1. Lack of Association between Membrane-Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase Expression and Clinically Relevant Molecular or Morphologic Tumor Characteristics at the Leading Edge of Invasive Colorectal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Annette; Kraft, Klaus; Wardelmann, Eva; Steinestel, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of death from cancer in the western world, but tumor biology and clinical course show great interindividual variation. Molecular and morphologic tumor characteristics, such as KRAS/BRAF mutation status, mismatch repair (MMR) protein expression, tumor growth pattern, and tumor cell budding, have been shown to be of key therapeutic and/or prognostic relevance in CRC. Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is a membrane-anchored zinc-binding endopeptidase that is expressed at the leading edge of various invasive carcinomas and promotes tumor cell invasion through degradation of the extracellular matrix. The aim of this study was to investigate possible associations between MT1-MMP expression and molecular tumor characteristics as well as morphologic features of tumor aggressiveness in a consecutive series of 79 CRC tissue samples. However, although MT1-MMP was expressed in 41/79 samples (52%), there was no significant association between MT1-MMP expression and KRAS/BRAF mutation status, MMR protein expression, presence of lymphovascular invasion, tumor growth pattern, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, or tumor cell budding in our sample cohort (P > 0.05). Thus, we conclude that although MT1-MMP may play a role in CRC invasion, it is not of key relevance to the current models of CRC invasion and aggressiveness. PMID:26106602

  2. Lack of Association between Membrane-Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase Expression and Clinically Relevant Molecular or Morphologic Tumor Characteristics at the Leading Edge of Invasive Colorectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, Annette; Kraft, Klaus; Wardelmann, Eva; Steinestel, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of death from cancer in the western world, but tumor biology and clinical course show great interindividual variation. Molecular and morphologic tumor characteristics, such as KRAS/BRAF mutation status, mismatch repair (MMR) protein expression, tumor growth pattern, and tumor cell budding, have been shown to be of key therapeutic and/or prognostic relevance in CRC. Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is a membrane-anchored zinc-binding endopeptidase that is expressed at the leading edge of various invasive carcinomas and promotes tumor cell invasion through degradation of the extracellular matrix. The aim of this study was to investigate possible associations between MT1-MMP expression and molecular tumor characteristics as well as morphologic features of tumor aggressiveness in a consecutive series of 79 CRC tissue samples. However, although MT1-MMP was expressed in 41/79 samples (52%), there was no significant association between MT1-MMP expression and KRAS/BRAF mutation status, MMR protein expression, presence of lymphovascular invasion, tumor growth pattern, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, or tumor cell budding in our sample cohort (P > 0.05). Thus, we conclude that although MT1-MMP may play a role in CRC invasion, it is not of key relevance to the current models of CRC invasion and aggressiveness. PMID:26106602

  3. Microstructure Characterization Of Lead-Free Solders Depending On Alloy Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Iuliana; Mueller, Maik; Wolter, Klaus-Juergen

    2010-11-01

    Fatigue and crack nucleation in solder joints is basically associated with changes in the microstructure. Therefore the microstructure evolution of SnAgCu solder joints during solidification and subsequent application is an important subject for reliability investigations and physics of failure analysis. The scope of this study is a systematic overview of the as-cast microstructures in small sized lead-free SnAgCu solder spheres after solidification. A total of 32 alloy compositions have been investigated with varying Ag content from 0 to 5 wt.% and varying Cu content from 0 to 1.2 wt.%. The solder spheres had a diameter of approx. 270 ?m and were all manufactured under the similar conditions. Subsequent cross-sectioning was carried out in order to analyze the microstructure by optical and electron microscopy as well as Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy. The results allow a comprehensive overview of the dependence of the as-cast microstructure on the solder composition. It is shown that strong changes in microstructure can be caused by small changes in solder composition. In addition, a solidification phenomenon known as cyclic twinning has been found in the samples. Three different microstructures related to that phenomenon will be presented and detailed characterizations of these structures are given in this study. These microstructures differ in their appearance by solidification morphology, phase distribution as well as grain structure and can be described as follows: 1. large dentritic areas of different grain orientations which are characterized by approx. 60° twin boundaries; 2. areas of small ?-Sn cells with approx. 60° twin relation and larger intermetallic precipitates; 3. large grains consisting of a ?-Sn matrix with very fine intermetallic precipitates and high angle grain boundaries between adjacent grains.

  4. Lead Toxicity to the Performance, Viability, And Community Composition of Activated Sludge Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, L; Zhi, W; Liu, YS; Karyala, S; Vikesland, PJ; Chen, X; Zhang, HS

    2015-01-20

    Lead (Pb) is a prominent toxic metal in natural and engineered systems. Current knowledge on Pb toxicity to the activated sludge has been limited to short-term (<= 24 h) toxicity. The effect of extended Pb exposure on process performance, bacterial viability, and community compositions remains unknown. We quantified the 24-h and 7-day Pb toxicity to chemical oxygen demand (COD) and NH3-N removal, bacterial viability, and community compositions using lab-scale experiments. Our results showed that 7-day toxicity was significantly higher than the short-term 24-h toxicity. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were more susceptible than the heterotrophs to Pb toxicity. The specific oxygen uptake rate responded quickly to Pb addition and could serve as a rapid indicator for detecting Pb pollutions. Microbial viability decreased linearly with the amount of added Pb at extended exposure. The bacterial community diversity was markedly reduced with elevated Pb concentrations. Surface analysis suggested that the adsorbed form of Pb could have contributed to its toxicity along with the dissolved form. Our study provides for the first time a systematic investigation of the effect of extended exposure of Pb on the performance and microbiology of aerobic treatment processes, and it indicates that long-term Pb toxicity has been underappreciated by previous studies.

  5. Thermo-Active Behavior of Ethylene-Vinyl Acetate | Multiwall Carbon Nanotube Composites Examined by in Situ near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine-Structure Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    NEXAFS spectroscopy was used to investigate the temperature dependence of thermally active ethylene-vinyl acetate | multiwall carbon nanotube (EVA|MWCNT) films. The data shows systematic variations of intensities with increasing temperature. Molecular orbital assignment of interplaying intensities identified the 1s ? ?*C=C and 1s ? ?*C=O transitions as the main actors during temperature variation. Furthermore, enhanced near-edge interplay was observed in prestrained composites. Because macroscopic observations confirmed enhanced thermal-mechanical actuation in prestrained composites, our findings suggest that the interplay of C=C and C=O ? orbitals may be instrumental to actuation. PMID:24803975

  6. Nonlinear absorption of laser radiation by zinc and lead phthalocyanines and zinc porphyrin in a nanoporous-glass/polymer composite

    SciTech Connect

    Dolotov, S M; Koldunov, L M; Koldunov, M F; Petukhov, A V; Sizyukhin, A V

    2012-01-31

    We have studied the nonlinear absorption of nanosecond 532-nm laser pulses by zinc phthalocyanine (PcZn), lead phthalocyanine (PcPb) and zinc porphyrin (PrZn) incorporated into a nanoporous-glass/polymer composite and determined the basic nonlinear absorption characteristics of these compounds in the composite host. The composite is shown to be suitable for designing nonlinear optical elements activated with organic compounds. The correlation between the characteristics of the three compounds in the composite host and liquid solvents is analysed.

  7. The Use of Pristine and Intercalated Graphite Fiber Composites as Buss Bars in Lead-Acid Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opaluch, Amanda M.

    2004-01-01

    This study was conducted as a part of the Firefly Energy Space Act Agreement project to investigate the possible use of composite materials in lead acid batteries. Specifically, it examined the use of intercalated graphite composites as buss bars. Currently, buss bars of these batteries are made of lead, a material that is problematic for several reasons. Over time, the lead is subject to both corrosion at the positive plate and sulfation at the negative plate, resulting in decreased battery life. In addition, the weight and size of the lead buss bars make for a heavy and cumbersome battery that is undesirable. Functionality and practicality of lead buss bars is adequate at best; consequently, investigation of more efficient composite materials would be advantageous. Practically speaking, graphite composites have a low density that is nearly one fourth that of its lead counterpart. A battery made of less dense materials would be more attractive to the consumer and the producer because it would be light and convenient. More importantly, low weight would be especially beneficial because it would result in greater overall power density of the battery. In addition to power density, use of graphite composite materials can also increase the life of the battery. From a functional standpoint, corrosion and sulfation at the positive and negative plates are major obstacles when considering how to extend battery life. Neither of these reactions are a factor when graphite composites replace lead parts because graphite is chemically non-reactive with the electrolyte within the battery. Without the problem of corrosion or sulfation, battery life expectancy can be almost doubled. The replacement of lead battery parts with composite materials is also more environmentally favorable because of easy disposal of organic materials. For this study, both pristine and bromine intercalated single-ply graphite fiber composites were created. The composites were fabricated in such a way as to facilitate their use in a 3" x 1/2" buss bar test cell. The prime objective of this investigation was to examine the effectiveness of a variety of graphite composite materials to act as buss bars and carry the current to and from the positive and negative battery plates. This energy transfer can be maximized by use of materials with high conductivity to minimize the buss resistance. Electrical conductivity of composites was measured using both a contactless eddy current probe and a four point measurement. In addition, the stability of these materials at battery-use conditions was characterized.

  8. Experimental Surface Pressure Data Obtained on 65 deg Delta Wing Across Reynolds Number and Mach Number Ranges. Volume 1; Sharp Leading Edge; [conducted in the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Julio; Luckring, James M.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental wind tunnel test of a 65 deg delta wing model with interchangeable leading edges was conducted in the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF). The objective was to investigate the effects of Reynolds and Mach numbers on slender-wing leading-edge vortex flows with four values of wing leading-edge bluntness. Experimentally obtained pressure data are presented without analysis in tabulated and graphical formats across a Reynolds number range of 6 x 10(exp 6) to 36 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 0.85 and across a Mach number range of 0.4 to 0.9 at a Reynolds number of 6 x 10(exp 6). Normal-force and pitching-moment coefficient plots for these Reynolds number and Mach number ranges are also presented.

  9. Lithospheric structure at the leading edge of the North American craton: Imaging the Shield-Cordillera transition in western Canada by teleseismic Rayleigh-wave analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, X.; Eaton, D. W.

    2013-12-01

    The tectonics of southwestern Canada is characterized by a transition from the Mesozoic-Cenozoic Cordilleran orogen to the Archean-Proterozoic craton, making this region an excellent natural laboratory to study episodic growth of continents. Here, we explore regional lithospheric structure using fundamental Rayleigh waves recorded by broadband seismometers from CNSN and various temporary networks (ATSN, CRANE, USArray) from 2006 to the present. Using a two-station cross-correlation technique, we extract phase velocities at periods ranging from 20 s to more than 200 s. Phase velocities for the region west of the deformation front are significantly lower than those of the region to the east, especially at periods of 30-200 s, reflecting strong lateral variations in lithosphere structure due to thermal and compositional differences. Our analysis is particularly focused on characterizing the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) across the transition, and identifying small-scale convection associated with the edge of the craton. Detailed 3-D lithospheric structural models developed in the near feature will shed more new lights on the transition from backarc to craton lithosphere and their geodynamical interactions.

  10. Leading Edge Network Medicine Strikes

    E-print Network

    ,* and Rune Linding2,* 1Biotech Research and Innovation Center (BRIC), University of Copenhagen, DK-2200: janine.erler@bric.ku.dk (J.T.E.), linding@cbs.dtu.dk (R.L.) DOI 10.1016/j.cell.2012.04.014 Drug

  11. Leading Edge Evolutionary Biology Select

    E-print Network

    Kocher, Thomas D.

    potential of that species. Finally, pathogens that change the sex ratio of a species can be detected et al. (2009) report that an allelic variant of a pigmentation gene poses just such a conflict of the females have an unusual pigment pattern, called orange-blotch (OB), which helps them to blend

  12. Leading Edge In This Issue

    E-print Network

    Rohs, Remo

    strategies are needed to maximize efficacy and minimize resistance in cancer therapies that target tumor and safety of aPlGF suggest that aPlGF may provide a new approach for cancer treatment. Surface Proteins Go in increased insulin sensitivity and resistance to diabetes and obesity even when mice are fed a high-fat diet

  13. Leading Edge Geroscience: Linking Aging

    E-print Network

    Morimoto, Richard

    approaches. Given that the elderly population is dramatically increasing and that aging is the greatest risk factor for a majority of chronic diseases driving both morbidity and mortality, it is critical to expand to address the major diseases driving morbidity and mortality. Interro- gating and developing therapeutics

  14. Leading Edge Synthetic Biology Looks

    E-print Network

    Collins, James J.

    -defined gene circuits in filter paper by freeze-drying. Doing so renders the operation of gene circuits less- free systems must follow strict protocols such as proper freeze-thaw, temperature regulation

  15. Leading Edge Behind the Movement

    E-print Network

    Economou, Tassos

    exploration of the surface of the Red Planet, Earth-bound scientists debate whether alien life can be recog. The biochemistry of life may be moot, but one phenomenon is linked to it so tightly as to not be debatable

  16. Leading Edge Chemoaffinity Revisited: Dscams,

    E-print Network

    Zipursky, Lawrebce

    of experiments, Roger Sperry (Sperry, 1943, 1944, 1963) cut the optic nerves of amphibia (newts, toads, and frogs with their original synaptic targets in the brain, not the targets that would now make functional sense. Sperry went in Sperry, 1963). Langley and Sperry drew similar conclusions. Langley (1895) reasoned that there must

  17. Leading Edge Sending Mixed Messages

    E-print Network

    Lim, Wendell

    population growth, the authors establish in vitro cultures of CD4+ T cells with a wide range of starting are the signals that could encode such information? CD4+ T cells secrete, sense, and consume the cytokine inter population does not expand indefinitely (until all resources are depleted) remains an open question

  18. Leading Edge Mechanisms and Functions

    E-print Network

    Mekalanos, John

    localization. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) are transmembrane proteins found. A second class of PRRs resides in intracellular compartments and includes the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR), the AIM2-like receptor (ALR), and the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat-containing (NLR

  19. Leading Edge In This Issue

    E-print Network

    Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    (DISC1) gene is mutated in a familial form of schizophrenia and depression and has been shown to play a role in brain development. Mao et al. now find that DISC1 directly interacts with and inhibits caused by DISC1 deficiency. In the adult mouse brain, loss of DISC1 specifically in the dentate gyrus

  20. Leading Edge Certification for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Rowland

    2012-01-01

    For leaders of schools in the 21st century, it seems there is a never-ending demand on what they need to be doing. Just when they thought they had a handle on traditional testing and ways to improve student achievement, along comes the Common Core Standards, which change the game in many ways. The Common Core will require students to have an…

  1. The isotopic composition of uranium and lead in Allende inclusions and meteoritic phosphates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. H.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    The isotopic compositions of uranium and lead in Ca-Al-rich inclusions from the Allende chondrite and in whitlockite from the St. Severin chondrite and the Angra dos Reis achondrite are reported. Isoptopic analysis of acid soluble fractions of the Allende inclusions and the meteoritic whitlockite, which show isotopic anomalies in other elements, reveals U-235/U-238 ratios from 1/137.6 to 1/138.3, within 20 per mil of normal terrestrial U abundances. The Pb isotopic compositions of five coarse-grained Allende inclusions give a mean Pb-207/Pb-206 model age of 4.559 + or - 0.015 AE, in agreement with the U results. Pb isotope ratios of two fine-grained inclusions and a coarse-grained inclusion with strong mass fractionation and some nonlinear isotopic anomalies indicate that the U-Pb systems of these inclusions have evolved differently from the rest of Allende. Th/U abundance ratios in the Allende inclusions and meteoritic phosphate are found to range from 3.8 to 96, presumably indicating an optimal case for Cm/U fractionation, although the normal U concentrations do not support claims of abundant live Cm-247 or Cm-247/U-238 fractionation at the time of meteorite formation, in contrast to previous results. A limiting Cm-247/U-235 ratio of 0.004 at the time of meteorite formation is calculated which implies that the last major r process contribution at the protosolar nebula was approximately 100 million years prior to Al-26 formation and injection.

  2. Asymmetric formation of coated pits on dorsal and ventral surfaces at the leading edges of motile cells and on protrusions of immobile cells

    PubMed Central

    Kural, Comert; Akatay, Ahmet Ata; Gaudin, Raphaël; Chen, Bi-Chang; Legant, Wesley R.; Betzig, Eric; Kirchhausen, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Clathrin/AP2-coated vesicles are the principal endocytic carriers originating at the plasma membrane. In the experiments reported here, we used spinning-disk confocal and lattice light-sheet microscopy to study the assembly dynamics of coated pits on the dorsal and ventral membranes of migrating U373 glioblastoma cells stably expressing AP2 tagged with enhanced green fluorescence (AP2-EGFP) and on lateral protrusions from immobile SUM159 breast carcinoma cells, gene-edited to express AP2-EGFP. On U373 cells, coated pits initiated on the dorsal membrane at the front of the lamellipodium and at the approximate boundary between the lamellipodium and lamella and continued to grow as they were swept back toward the cell body; coated pits were absent from the corresponding ventral membrane. We observed a similar dorsal/ventral asymmetry on membrane protrusions from SUM159 cells. Stationary coated pits formed and budded on the remainder of the dorsal and ventral surfaces of both types of cells. These observations support a previously proposed model that invokes net membrane deposition at the leading edge due to an imbalance between the endocytic and exocytic membrane flow at the front of a migrating cell. PMID:25851602

  3. In-flight leading-edge extension vortex flow-field survey measurements on a F-18 aircraft at high angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richwine, David M.; Fisher, David F.

    1992-01-01

    Flow-field measurements on the leading-edge extension (LEX) of the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) were obtained using a rotating rake with 16 hemispherical-tipped five-hole probes. Detailed pressure, velocity, and flow direction data were obtained through the LEX vortex core. Data were gathered during 1-g quasi-stabilized flight conditions at angles of attack alpha from 10 degrees to 52 degrees and at Reynolds numbers based on mean aerodynamic cord up to 16 x 10(exp 6). Normalized dynamic pressures and crossflow velocities clearly showed the primary vortex above the LEX and formation of a secondary vortex at higher angles of attack. The vortex was characterized by a ring of high dynamic pressure surrounding a region of low dynamic pressure at the vortex core center. The vortex core, subcore diameter, and vertical location of the core above the LEX increased with angle of attack. Minimum values for static pressure were obtained in the vortex subcore and decreased nearly linearly with increasing angle of attack until vortex breakdown. Rake-measured static pressures were consistent with previously documented surface pressures and showed good agreement with flow visualization flight test results. Comparison of the LEX vortex flight test data to computational solutions at alpha approximately equals 19 degrees and 30 degrees showed fair correlation.

  4. Leading-Edge Votex-System Details Obtained on F-106B Aircraft Using a Rotating Vapor Screen and Surface Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Brandon, Jay; Stacy, Kathryn; Johnson, Thomas D., Jr.; Severance, Kurt; Childers, Brooks A.

    1993-01-01

    A flight research program to study the flow structure and separated-flow origins over an F-106B aircraft wing is described. The flight parameters presented include Mach numbers from 0.26 to 0.81, angles of attack from 8.5 deg to 22.5 deg, Reynolds numbers from 22.6 x 10(exp 6) to 57.3 x 10(exp 6) and load factors from 0.9 to 3.9 times the acceleration due to gravity. Techniques for vapor screens, image enhancement, photogrammetry, and computer graphics are integrated to analyze vortex-flow systems. Emphasis is placed on the development and application of the techniques. The spatial location of vortex cores and their tracks over the wing are derived from the analysis. Multiple vortices are observed and are likely attributed to small surface distortions in the wing leading-edge region. A major thrust is to correlate locations of reattachment lines obtained from the off-surface (vapor-screen) observations with those obtained from on-surface oil-flow patterns and pressure-port data. Applying vapor-screen image data to approximate reattachment lines is experimental, but depending on the angle of attack, the agreement with oil-flow results is generally good. Although surface pressure-port data are limited, the vapor-screen data indicate reattachment point occurrences consistent with the available data.

  5. An axisymmetric analog two-layer convective heating procedure with application to the evaluation of Space Shuttle Orbiter wing leading edge and windward surface heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, K. C.

    1994-01-01

    A numerical procedure for predicting the convective heating rate of hypersonic reentry vehicles is described. The procedure, which is based on the axisymmetric analog, consists of obtaining the three-dimensional inviscid flowfield solution; then the surface streamlines and metrics are calculated using the inviscid velocity components on the surface; finally, an axisymmetric boundary layer code or approximate convective heating equations are used to evaluate heating rates. This approach yields heating predictions to general three-dimensional body shapes. The procedure has been applied to the prediction of the wing leading edge heating to the Space Shuttle Orbiter. The numerical results are compared with the results of heat transfer testing (OH66) of an 0.025 scale model of the Space Shuttle Orbiter configuration in the Calspan Hypersonic Shock Tunnel (HST) at Mach 10 and angles of attack of 30 and 40 degrees. Comparisons with STS-5 flight data at Mach 9.15 and angle of attack of 37.4 degrees and STS-2 flight data at Mach 12.86 and angle of attack of 39.7 degrees are also given.

  6. Wind tunnel investigation of aerodynamic and tail buffet characteristics of leading-edge extension modifications to the F/A-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Gautam H.

    1991-01-01

    The impact of leading-edge extension (LEX) modifications on aerodynamic and vertical tail buffet characteristics of a 16-percent scale F/A-18 model has been investigated in the NASA Langley 30-foot by 60-foot tunnel. Modifications under consideration include variations in LEX chord and span, addition of upper surface fences, and removal of the LEX. Both buffeting and high-angle-of-attack aerodynamics are found to be strongly dependent upon the LEX geometry, which directly influences the strength, position, and breakdown characteristics of the vortex flow field. Concepts aimed at influencing the development of vortical flow field are considered to have much greater potential in design application than those geared toward altering already established flow fields. It is recommended that configuration effects on structural and aerodynamic characteristics be evaluated in parallel, so that trade-off studies can be conducted to ensure adequate structural fatigue life and desired high-angle-of-attack stability and control characteristics in the design of future high performance aircraft.

  7. Electromigration and thermomigration studies in composite high lead and eutectic tin-lead flip chip solder joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Annie Tzuyu

    The effect of thermomigration and the combination effect of thermomigration and electromigration have been studied in composite SnPb flip chip solder joints. Because Al line on the silicon chip side is the major heat source exerted on flip chip solder joint, temperature gradient across the joint is induced when a long Al line is stressed with high current density. Under a estimated temperature gradient of 1000°C/cm, Sn-rich and Pb-rich phase separation is found to occur. Experimental results have shown that Sn-rich phase accumulates at the hot side and Pb-rich phase accumulates at the cold side after thermomigration. When solder bumps are current high current density, thermomigration was found to accompany electromigration. Not only Pb-rich phase migrated toward the anode side and Sn-rich phase migrated toward the cathode side due to electromigration, Sn-rich phase was found to migrate along the top of solder joint due to thermomigration. It was found that as void propagates along the top of the solder joint, current crowding region shifts with the tip of the void. This created a local hot spot and thus a lateral temperature gradient was induced for thermomigration to occur. To isolate the thermal effect from the current effect, ac stressing at 60 Hz was also utilized. Interestingly, ac seems to have an effect other than thermal effect due to the difference in microstructure evolution between pure thermomigration and ac case after stressing. Further investigation at different frequency is needed to fully understand the effect of ac. Furthermore, analysis was performed to explain the phenomena of phase separation and phase reversal in the solder joint considering a constraint volume within underfill. Both Kirkendall effect and back stress were considered. Finally, detail morphological change after thermomigration and electromigration were investigated. Grain refinement was found to occur at a certain stressing condition. Production of entropy and morphological instability were utilized to explain the phenomenon.

  8. Effects of Wing Leading-Edge Camber and Tip Modifications on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Convair F-102 Airplane at Transonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tempelmeyer, Kenneth E.; Osborne, Robert S.

    1954-01-01

    The effects of several wing leading-edge camber and deflected-tip modifications on the force and moment characteristics of a 1/20-scale model of the Convair F-102 airplane have been determined at Mach numbers from 0.60 t o 1.14 for angles of attack up to 14 deg. in the Langley 8-foot transonic tunnel. The effects of elevator deflections from 0 deg. to -10 deg. were also obtained for a configuration incorporating favorable leading- edge and tip modifications. Leading-edge modifications which had a small amount of constant-chord camber obtained by vertically adjusting the thickness distribution over the forward (3.9 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord) portion of the wing were ineffective in reducing the drag at lifting conditions at transonic speeds. Leading edges with relatively large cambers designed to support nearly elliptical span load distributions at lift coefficients of 0.15 and 0.22 near a Mach number of 1.0 produced substantial reductions in drag at most lift coefficients.

  9. Detection of Subsurface Material Separation in Shuttle Orbiter Slip-Side Joggle Region of the Wing Leading Edge using Infrared Imaging Data from Arc Jet Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Walker, Sandra P.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine whether infrared imaging (IR) surface temperature data obtained during arc-jet tests of Space Shuttle Orbiter s reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) wing leading edge panel slip-side joggle region could be used to detect presence of subsurface material separation, and if so, to determine when separation occurs during the simulated entry profile. Recent thermostructural studies have indicated thermally induced interlaminar normal stress concentrations at the substrate/coating interface in the curved joggle region can result in local subsurface material separation, with the separation predicted to occur during approach to peak heating during reentry. The present study was an attempt to determine experimentally when subsurface material separations occur. A simplified thermal model of a flat RCC panel with subsurface material separation was developed and used to infer general surface temperature trends due to the presence of subsurface material separation. IR data from previously conducted arc-jet tests on three test specimens were analyzed: one without subsurface material separation either pre or post test, one with pre test separation, and one with separation developing during test. The simplified thermal model trend predictions along with comparison of experimental IR data of the three test specimens were used to successfully infer material separation from the arc-jet test data. Furthermore, for the test specimen that had developed subsurface material separation during the arc-jet tests, the initiation of separation appeared to occur during the ramp up to the peak heating condition, where test specimen temperature went from 2500 to 2800 F.

  10. Breeding on the leading edge of a northward range expansion: differences in morphology and the stress response in the arctic Gambel's white-crowned sparrow.

    PubMed

    Krause, Jesse S; Chmura, Helen E; Pérez, Jonathan H; Quach, Lisa N; Asmus, Ashley; Word, Karen R; McGuigan, Michaela A; Sweet, Shannan K; Meddle, Simone L; Gough, Laura; Boelman, Natalie; Wingfield, John C

    2016-01-01

    Individuals at the forefront of a range shift are likely to exhibit phenotypic traits that distinguish them from the population breeding within the historic range. Recent studies have examined morphological, physiological and behavioral phenotypes of individuals at the edge of their range. Several studies have found differences in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity in response to acute restraint stress in individuals at the range limits. HPA axis activation leads to elevations in glucocorticoids that regulate physiology and behavior. Here we compare the hormonal profiles and morphometrics from Gambel's white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii) breeding at the northern limit of the population's range to those birds breeding within the historic population range. Birds breeding at the northern limit experienced a harsher environment with colder temperatures; however, we found no differences in arthropod prey biomass between the northern limit and more southern (historic) sites. Males at the northern limit had higher body condition scores (mass corrected for body size) compared to individuals within the historic range, but no differences were found in beak and tarsus lengths, wing chord, muscle profile or fat stores. In males during the pre-parental stage, before breeding commenced, HPA axis activity was elevated in birds at the northern limit of the range, but no differences were found during the parental or molt stages. Females showed no differences in HPA axis activity during the parental stage. This study suggests that "pioneering" individuals at the limits of their breeding range exhibit physiology and morphology that are distinct from individuals within the historic range. PMID:26423267

  11. Concentrations, isotopic compositions, and sources of lead in the surface waters of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, R.; Zurbrick, C. M.; Flegal, A. R., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Lead concentrations and isotopic compositions were measured in surface and subsurface waters across the Eastern Tropical South Pacific as part of the 2013 US GEOTRACES Zonal Transect from Peru to Tahiti. Surface waters were collected throughout the transect, and subsurface waters were collected to a depth of 1,000 m at 36 vertical profile stations. Aliquots of some of those samples, as well as samples from greater depths, were used in intercalibrations with Ed Boyle's group, which focused on lead fluxes from hydrothermal vents and at the benthic boundary layer. In contrast, our group focused on aeolian lead fluxes to surface waters from natural and industrial sources. Preliminary data indicate that lead concentrations in those South Pacific surface waters are low compared to the more contaminated North Pacific. Moreover, complementary lead isotopic compositions indicate distinguishing between natural and industrial lead fluxes in the South Pacific will be more difficult now that the use of gasoline with lead alkyls from Australia have been eliminated.

  12. IMPACT OF PH AND LEAD COMPOSITION ON METAL LEACHED FROM BRASS COUPONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water sampling and monitoring requirements under the Lead and Copper Rule specify one liter samples taken at the consumers tap following at least 6 hours of stagnation. robable direct sources of lead in the one liter water volume are lead/tin solder and brass fixtures. rass range...

  13. Effects of Elastic Edge Restraints and Initial Prestress on the Buckling Response of Compression-Loaded Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Riddick, Jaret C.; Thornburgh, Robert P.

    2004-01-01

    A parametric study of the effects of test-fixture-induced initial prestress and elastic edge restraints on the prebuckling and buckling responses of a compression-loaded, quasi-isotropic curved panel is presented. The numerical results were obtained by using a geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis code with high-fidelity models. The results presented show that a wide range of prebuckling and buckling behavior can be obtained by varying parameters that represent circumferential loaded-edge restraint and rotational unloaded-edge restraint provided by a test fixture and that represent the mismatch in specimen and test-fixture radii of curvature. For a certain range of parameters, the panels exhibit substantial nonlinear prebuckling deformations that yield buckling loads nearly twice the corresponding buckling load predicted by a traditional linear bifurcation buckling analysis for shallow curved panels. In contrast, the results show another range of parameters exist for which the nonlinear prebuckling deformations either do not exist or are relatively benign, and the panels exhibit buckling loads that are nearly equal to the corresponding linear bifurcation buckling load. Overall, the results should also be of particular interest to scientists, engineers, and designers involved in simulating flight-hardware boundary conditions in structural verification and certification tests, involved in validating structural analysis tools, and interested in tailoring buckling performance.

  14. The lead susceptibility of fuels and its dependence on the chemical composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widmaier, O

    1940-01-01

    The fact that by the use of tetraethyl lead a number of otherwise unsuitable fuels could be made to meet engine requirements was not sufficiently appreciated. While use of tetraethyl lead is limited, the addition of special leaded fuels that increase the octane number is a requirement for many fuels. In this connection, the extent to which the action of tetraethyl lead through the addition of knock-resistant hydrocarbons to the base gasoline is influenced, is quite important. To the elucidation of this problem and of the storage stability of leaded fuels, the present report is dedicated.

  15. Tailoring of unipolar strain in lead-free piezoelectrics using the ceramic/ceramic composite approach

    SciTech Connect

    Khansur, Neamul H.; Daniels, John E.; Groh, Claudia; Jo, Wook; Webber, Kyle G.; Reinhard, Christina; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2014-03-28

    The electric-field-induced strain response mechanism in a polycrystalline ceramic/ceramic composite of relaxor and ferroelectric materials has been studied using in situ high-energy x-ray diffraction. The addition of ferroelectric phase material in the relaxor matrix has produced a system where a small volume fraction behaves independently of the bulk under an applied electric field. Inter- and intra-grain models of the strain mechanism in the composite material consistent with the diffraction data have been proposed. The results show that such ceramic/ceramic composite microstructure has the potential for tailoring properties of future piezoelectric materials over a wider range than is possible in uniform compositions.

  16. High-strain actuation of lead-free perovskites : compositional effects, phenomenology and mechanism

    E-print Network

    Soukhojak, Andrey N. (Andrey Nestorovich), 1972-

    2002-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to map the compositional dependence of electromechanical behavior and ferroelectric phase stability in the barium, zirconium-codoped sodium bismuth titanate (BNBZT) system for barium ...

  17. Performance and use of composite-substrate-based bipolar lead/acid batteries for pulsed-power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saakes, Michel; Schellevis, Dion; van Trier, Dieter; Wollersheim, Maurice

    A new type of composite substrate is proposed for constructing fast discharge bipolar lead/acid batteries.This newly developed substrate, used for constructing 4 V bipolar lead/acid batteries, displays no corrosion and a very low catalytic effectfor both hydrogen and oxygen evolution. The specific resistance is 1.2 ? cm while the areal resistance is 0.04 ? cm 2. The activelayers are formed by the Planté formation method, both in situ and ex situ. For pulsed-power applications, where energy is quickly transferredto an inductor, a model calculation is given for deriving the required ratio of the specific power and the specific energy.

  18. New leading/trailing edge modulation strategies for two-stage AC/DC PFC adapters to reduce DC-link capacitor ripple current 

    E-print Network

    Sun, Jing

    2007-09-17

    PFC stage and trailing edge modulation for the second DC/DC converter stage can significantly reduce the ripple current and ripple voltage of the DC-link capacitor. Thus, a smaller DC-link capacitance can be used, lowering the cost and size of the AC...

  19. Understanding and manipulating plant lipid composition: Metabolic engineering leads the way

    PubMed Central

    Napier, Johnathan A; Haslam, Richard P; Beaudoin, Frederic; Cahoon, Edgar B

    2014-01-01

    The manipulation of plant seed oil composition so as to deliver enhanced fatty acid compositions suitable for feed or fuel has long been a goal of metabolic engineers. Recent advances in our understanding of the flux of acyl-changes through different key metabolic pools such as phosphatidylcholine and diacylglycerol have allowed for more targeted interventions. When combined in iterative fashion with further lipidomic analyses, significant breakthroughs in our capacity to generate plants with novel oils have been achieved. Collectively these studies, working at the interface between metabolic engineering and synthetic biology, demonstrate the positive fundamental and applied outcomes derived from such research. PMID:24809765

  20. Isotopic composition of lead in oceanic basalt and its implication to mantle evolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tatsumoto, M.

    1978-01-01

    New data are given in this report for (1) Pb isotopic compositions and U, Th, and Pb concentrations of basalts from the island of Hawaii; (2) redetermined Pb isotopic compositions of some abyssal tholeiites; and (3) U, Th, and Pb concentrations of altered and fresh abyssal basalts, and basalt genesis and mantle evolution are discussed. The Th U ratios of abyssal and Japanese tholeiites are distinctly lower than those of tholeiites and alkali basalts from other areas. It is thought that these low values reflect a part of the mantle depleted in large ionic lithophile elements. Thus a mantle evolution model is presented, in which Th U ratios of the depleted zone in the mantle have decreased to ???2, and U Pb ratios have increased, showing an apparent ???1.5-b.y. isochron trend in the 207Pb/204Pb vs. 206Pb/204Pb plot. The Pb isotopic compositions of basalts from the island of Hawaii are distinct for each of the five volcanoes, and within each volcano, Pb's of tholeiites and alkali basalts are similar. An interaction between partially melted material (hot plume?) of the asthenosphere and the lithosphere is suggested to explain the trend in the Pb isotopic compositions of Hawaiian basalts. ?? 1978.

  1. Asymptotic expressions for turbulent burning velocity at the leading edge of a premixed flame brush and their validation by published measurement data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaeseo; Lee, Gwang G.; Huh, Kang Y.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents validation of new analytical expressions for the turbulent burning velocity, ST, based on asymptotic behavior at the leading edge (LE) in turbulent premixed combustion. Reaction and density variation are assumed to be negligible at the LE to avoid the cold boundary difficulty in the statistically steady state. Good agreement is shown for the slopes, dST/du', with respect to Lc/?f at low turbulence, with both normalized by those of the reference cases. ?f is the inverse of the maximum gradient of reaction progress variable through an unstretched laminar flame, and Lc is the characteristic length scale given as burner diameter or measured integral length scale. Comparison is made for thirty-five datasets involving different fuels, equivalence ratios, H2 fractions in fuel, pressures, and integral length scales from eight references [R. C. Aldredge et al., "Premixed-flame propagation in turbulent Taylor-Couette flow," Combust. Flame 115, 395 (1998); M. Lawes et al., "The turbulent burning velocity of iso-octane/air mixtures," Combust. Flame 159, 1949 (2012); H. Kido et al., "Influence of local flame displacement velocity on turbulent burning velocity," Proc. Combust. Inst. 29, 1855 (2002); J. Wang et al., "Correlation of turbulent burning velocity for syngas/air mixtures at high pressure up to 1.0 MPa," Exp. Therm. Fluid Sci. 50, 90 (2013); H. Kobayashi et al., "Experimental study on general correlation of turbulent burning velocity at high pressure," Proc. Combust. Inst. 27, 941 (1998); C. W. Chiu et al., "High-pressure hydrogen/carbon monoxide syngas turbulent burning velocities measured at constant turbulent Reynolds numbers," Int. J. Hydrogen Energy 37, 10935 (2012); P. Venkateswaran et al., "Pressure and fuel effects on turbulent consumption speeds of H2/CO blends," Proc. Combust. Inst. 34, 1527 (2013); M. Fairweather et al., "Turbulent burning rates of methane and methane-hydrogen mixtures," Combust. Flame 156, 780 (2009)]. The turbulent burning velocity is shown to increase as the flamelet thickness, ?f, decreases at a high pressure, for an equivalence ratio slightly rich or close to stoichiometric and for mixture of a high H2 fraction. Two constants involved are C to scale turbulent diffusivity as a product of turbulent intensity and characteristic length scale and Cs to relate ?f with the mean effective Lm. L m = (D m u / SL u 0) is the scale of exponential decay at the LE of an unstretched laminar flame. The combined constant, KC/Cs, is adjusted to match measured turbulent burning velocities at low turbulence in each of the eight different experimental setups. All measured S T / SL u 0 values follow the line, KDtu/Dmu + 1, at low turbulent intensities and show bending below the line due to positive mean curvature and broadened flamelet thickness at high turbulent intensities. Further work is required to determine the constants, Cs and K, and the factor, (L m / Lm * - L m (? ? n) f), that is responsible for bending in different conditions of laminar flamelet and incoming turbulence.

  2. Application of the method of equivalent edge currents to composite scattering from the cone-cylinder above a dielectric rough sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li-Xin; Wang, Rui; Wu, Zhen-Sen

    2010-04-01

    Compared with scattering from a rough surface only, composite scattering from a target above a rough surface has become so practical that it is a subject of great interest. At present, this problem has been solved by some numerical methods which will produce an enormous calculation amount. In order to overcome this shortcoming, the reciprocity theorem (RT) and the method of equivalent edge currents (MEC) are used in this paper. Due to the advantage of RT, the difficulty in computing the secondary scattered fields is reduced. Simultaneously, MEC, a high-frequency method with edge diffraction considered, is used to calculate the scattered field from the cone-cylinder target with a high accuracy and efficiency. The backscattered field and the polarization currents of the rough sea surface are evaluated by the Kirchhoff approximation (KA) method and physical optics (PO) method, respectively. The effects of the backscattering radar cross section (RCS) and the Doppler spectrum on the size of the target and the windspeed of the sea surface for different incident angles are analysed in detail.

  3. Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Studies of Electrospun Poly(dimethylsiloxane)/Poly (methyl methacrylate)/Multiwall Carbon Nanotube Composites

    PubMed Central

    Winter, A. Douglas; Larios, Eduardo; Alamgir, Faisal M.; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel; Campo, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the near conduction band edge structure of electrospun mats of MWCNT-PDMS-PMMA by near edge X-Ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Effects of adding nanofillers of different sizes were addressed. Despite observed morphological variations and inhomogeneous carbon nanotube distribution, spun mats appeared homogeneous under NEXAFS analysis. Spectra revealed differences in emissions from glancing and normal spectra; which may evidence phase separation within the bulk of the micron-size fibers. Further, dichroic ratios show polymer chains did not align, even in the presence of nanofillers. Addition of nanofillers affected emissions in the C-H, C=O and C-C regimes, suggesting their involvement in interfacial matrix-carbon nanotube bonding. Spectral differences at glancing angles between pristine and composite mats suggest that geometric conformational configurations are taking place between polymeric chains and carbon nanotubes. These differences appear to be carbon nanotube-dimension dependent, and are promoted upon room temperature mixing and shear flow during electrospinning. CH-? bonding between polymer chains and graphitic walls, as well as H-bonds between impurities in the as-grown CNTs and polymer pendant groups are proposed bonding mechanisms promoting matrix conformation. PMID:24308286

  4. Alternative Processing Method Leads to Stronger Sapphire-Reinforced Alumina Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.

    1997-01-01

    The development of advanced engines for aerospace applications depends on the availability of strong, tough materials that can withstand increasingly higher temperatures under oxidizing conditions. The need for such materials led to the study of an oxide-based composite composed of an alumina matrix reinforced with zirconia-coated sapphire fibers. Because the nonbrittle behavior of this system depends on the interface and its ability to prevent fiber-to-matrix bonding and reduce interfacial shear stress, the microstructure of the zirconia must be carefully controlled during both coating application and composite processing. When it was both porous and unstabilized, zirconia (which does not react easily with alumina) was found to be the most effective material tested in reducing interfacial shear strength between the fiber and matrix.

  5. Flight Investigation of the Low-Speed Characteristics of a 45 deg Swept-Wing Fighter-Type Airplane with Blowing Boundary-Layer Control Applied to the Leading- and Trailing-Edge Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quigley, Hervey C.; Anderson, Seth B.; Innis, Robert C.

    1960-01-01

    A flight investigation has been conducted to study how pilots use the high lift available with blowing-type boundary-layer control applied to the leading- and trailing-edge flaps of a 45 deg. swept-wing airplane. The study includes documentation of the low-speed handling qualities as well as the pilots' evaluations of the landing-approach characteristics. All the pilots who flew the airplane considered it more comfortable to fly at low speeds than any other F-100 configuration they had flown. The major improvements noted were the reduced stall speed, the improved longitudinal stability at high lift, and the reduction in low-speed buffet. The study has shown the minimum comfortable landing-approach speeds are between 120.5 and 126.5 knots compared to 134 for the airplane with a slatted leading edge and the same trailing-edge flap. The limiting factors in the pilots' choices of landing-approach speeds were the limits of ability to control flight-path angle, lack of visibility, trim change with thrust, low static directional stability, and sluggish longitudinal control. Several of these factors were found to be associated with the high angles of attack, between 13 deg. and 15 deg., required for the low approach speeds. The angle of attack for maximum lift coefficient was 28 deg.

  6. Isotopic composition of epiphytic lichens as a tracer of the sources of atmospheric lead emissions in southern Quebec, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Carignan, J.; Gariepy, C.

    1995-11-01

    Lead isotopic data are reported for epiphytic lichens, vegetation samples, and lacustrine sediments collected in the boreal forest of Quebec between 47{degrees} and 55{degrees}N, and along the St. Lawrence Valley between 45{degrees} to 48{degrees}N. Lichens located up to 500 km north of Noranda (48{degrees}N) record a significant input is not apparent beyond 53{degrees}N where only the isotopic signal typical of Canadian aerosols is recorded. Lichens along the St. Lawrence Valley show evidences for a dominant input from U.S. sources. The lead isotopic composition of lichens allow quantitative monitoring of the sources of atmospheric Pb. However, their slow metabolism and their unknown age detract from recording the Pb signal on short and precise timescales. Spruce needles have isotopic compositions undistinguishable from that of lichens; this reflects integration of the atmospheric Pb signal over a comparable time span, a result confirmed by the lead isotopic record in lacustrine sediments. Vegetation samples such as spruce bark, spruce wood, and decidous tree leaves are more radiogenic than lichens from the same site. This may reflect mixing of radiogenic Pb metabolized from soil solutions through the root system with atmospheric Pb. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Low-speed investigation of effects of wing leading- and trailing-edge flap deflections and canard incidence on a fighter configuration equipped with a forward-swept wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gainer, T. G.; Mann, M. J.; Huffman, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    An advanced fighter configuration with a forward-swept wing of aspect ratio 3.28 is tested in the Langley 7 by 10 Foot High Speed Tunnel at a Mach number of 0.3. The wing has 29.5 degrees of forward sweep of the quarter chord line and is equipped with 15 percent chord leading edge and 30 percent chord trailing edge flaps. The canard is sweptback 45 degrees. Tests were made through a range of angle of attack from about -2 degrees to 22 degrees. Deflecting the flaps significantly improves the lift drag characteristics at the higher angles of attack. The canard is able to trim the configurations with different flap deflections over most of the range of angle of attack. The penalty in maximum lift coefficient due to trimming is about 0.10.

  8. Alloy composition and temperature dependence of the fundamental absorption edge in CuGaxIn1 - xSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lárez, C.; Bellabarba, C.; Rincón, C.

    1994-09-01

    We have proposed a semi-empirical expression for the alloy composition and temperature dependence of the fundamental energy gap in the CuGaxIn1-xSe2 alloy system. A good agreement between theoretical predictions and available experimental data is found. It seems that such semi-empirical expressions are of considerable importance for the analysis of results on new ternary and quaternary compounds and its alloys for which detailed studies based on a more fundamental analysis are not available.

  9. Lead isotopic compositions and paleohydrology of caldera-related epithermal veins, Lake City, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    The Uncompahgre caldera, and the Lake City caldera nested within it, each have fossil hydrothermal systems and associated mineral deposits that formed during multiple episodes of mineralization during Oligocene and Miocene time. New lead isotopic analyses for 51 ore samples, mainly galena, combined with previously obtained data for ore minerals and rocks, suggest likely lead source rocks and fluid-migration paths. Hydrothermal flow in the Uncompahgre caldera was predominantly west to east down the topographic slope. Hydrothermal circulation in the Lake City caldera was controlled by local topography and post-caldera intrusions and was isolated from flow in the Uncompahgre caldera and Eureka graben. As in the rest of the San Juan Mountains, lead originally came from a predominantly ~1450 Ma source. Enough variation in 207Pb/204Pb was produced by orogenic events at ca. 1450 Ma, ca. 1760 Ma, and earlier to explain most of the 207Pb/204Pb variation present day in tertiary volcanic rocks and hydrothermal veins. -from Author

  10. Isotopic compositions of bismuth, lead, thallium, and mercury from mini r-processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, D.; Liffman, K.

    1986-01-01

    The yields of stable isotopes of Bi, Pb, Tl and Hg as well as yields of Pb-205 are calculated with a parametrized model for 'mini r-processing' in the Ne, O, C-rich zones of explosive burning in massive stars. The Pb isotopic compositions stand out by their comparatively low Pb-207 yields and by the fact that this r-process variant yields Pb-204 quite abundantly. The average Pb-205/Pb-204 yield ratio of 6.1 is the same order of magnitude as yield ratios deduced for s-processing. The Hg from this mini r-process looks like normal solar-system mercury, but with Hg-196 missing and the light s-isotopes A = 198, 199, 200 and 201 depleted (especially the odd-A species).

  11. Spatial and temporal variation in isotopic composition of atmospheric lead in Norwegian moss

    SciTech Connect

    Rosman, K.J.R.; Ly, C.; Steinnes, E.

    1998-09-01

    Earlier studies using moss as a biomonitor of pollution have shown that long-range transport is a major source of pollution in Norway. Until now, the origin of these pollutants has been inferred from concentration measurements of various elements in moss and the climatology at each sampling site. Lead isotopes provide an opportunity to identify the sources and to quantify the contribution of each. This preliminary study reports measurements of lead isotopes in moss from selected sites along the full extent of Norway that reveal significant spatial and temporal variations. There are significant north-south trends that differ at coastal and inland sites and differ between sampling periods (1974--1994). These variations reflect the changing contributions from the different source regions as the regulation of pollution from automobiles and industry takes effect. Identifiable sources are the U.K. and possibly France, which is noticeable at coastal sites; western Europe at the southern end; and eastern Europe and Russia influencing the inland and northernmost sites.

  12. Room temperature nonlinear magnetoelectric effect in lead-free and Nb-doped AlFeO{sub 3} compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Cótica, Luiz F.; Santos, Guilherme M.; Santos, Ivair A.; Freitas, Valdirlei F.; Coelho, Adelino A.; Pal, Madhuparna; Guo, Ruyan; Bhalla, Amar S.; Garcia, Ducinei; Eiras, José A.

    2015-02-14

    It is still a challenging problem to obtain technologically useful materials displaying strong magnetoelectric coupling at room temperature. In the search for new effects and materials to achieve this kind of coupling, a nonlinear magnetoelectric effect was proposed in the magnetically disordered relaxor ferroelectric materials. In this context, the aluminum iron oxide (AlFeO{sub 3}), a room temperature ferroelectric relaxor and magnetic spin glass compound, emerges as an attractive lead-free magnetoelectric material along with nonlinear magnetoelectric effects. In this work, static, dynamic, and temperature dependent ferroic and magnetoelectric properties in lead-free AlFeO{sub 3} and 2 at.?% Nb-doped AlFeO{sub 3} multiferroic magnetoelectric compositions are studied. Pyroelectric and magnetic measurements show changes in ferroelectric and magnetic states close to each other (?200?K). The magnetoelectric coefficient behavior as a function of H{sub bias} suggests a room temperature nonlinear magnetoelectric coupling in both single-phase and Nb-doped AlFeO{sub 3}-based ceramic compositions.

  13. Ballistic parameters of .177 (4.5 mm) caliber plastic-sleeved composite projectiles compared to conventional lead pellets.

    PubMed

    Frank, Matthias; Schönekeß, Holger; Jäger, Frank; Herbst, Jörg; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Nguyen, Thanh Tien; Bockholdt, Britta

    2013-11-01

    The capability of conventional air gun lead pellets (diabolo pellets) to cause severe injuries or fatalities even at low kinetic energy levels is well documented in medical literature. Modern composite hunting pellets, usually a metal core (made of steel, lead, zinc, or a zinc and aluminum alloy) encased in a plastic sleeve, are of special forensic and traumatological interest. These projectiles are advertised by the manufacturers to discharge at higher velocities than conventional air gun pellets, thus generating very high tissue-penetrating capabilities. Lack of experimental data on these uncommon air gun projectiles induced this work. Ballistic parameters of 12 different caliber .177 (4.5 mm) composite pellets, discharged from two spring-piston air guns (Weihrauch HW 35, Webley CUB) and three pneumatic air guns (Walther LGR, Walther LG400, Walther LP300), were investigated using a ballistic speed measurement system and compared to a conventional diabolo pellet (RWS Meisterkugel) as reference projectile. Although overall results were inconsistent, for some projectile-weapon combinations (particularly spring-piston air guns), a significant change of the kinetic energy (-53 up to +48 %) to the reference projectile was observed. The data provided in this work may serve as a basis for forensic investigation as well as traumatological diagnosis and treatment of injuries caused by these uncommon projectiles. PMID:23989221

  14. Rotary balance data for a typical single-engine general aviation design for an angle-of-attack range of 8 degrees to 35 degrees, 3. Effect of wing leading-edge modifications, model A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bihrle, W., Jr.; Mulcay, W.

    1979-01-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics obtained in a rotational flow environment utilizing a rotary balance located in the Langley spin tunnel are presented in plotted form for a 1/5 scale, single-engine, low-wing, general aviation airplane model. The configurations tested included the basic airplane, sixteen wing leading-edge modifications and lateral-directional control settings. Data are presented for all configurations without analysis for an angle of attack range of 8 deg to 35 deg and clockwise and counter-clockwise rotations covering an Omega b/2v range from 0 to 0.85. Also, data are presented above 35 deg of attack for some configurations.

  15. Laser-based surface preparation of composite laminates leads to improved electrodes for electrical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almuhammadi, Khaled; Selvakumaran, Lakshmi; Alfano, Marco; Yang, Yang; Bera, Tushar Kanti; Lubineau, Gilles

    2015-12-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a low-cost, fast and effective structural health monitoring technique that can be used on carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP). Electrodes are a key component of any EIT system and as such they should feature low resistivity as well as high robustness and reproducibility. Surface preparation is required prior to bonding of electrodes. Currently this task is mostly carried out by traditional sanding. However this is a time consuming procedure which can also induce damage to surface fibers and lead to spurious electrode properties. Here we propose an alternative processing technique based on the use of pulsed laser irradiation. The processing parameters that result in selective removal of the electrically insulating resin with minimum surface fiber damage are identified. A quantitative analysis of the electrical contact resistance is presented and the results are compared with those obtained using sanding.

  16. Plasma edge spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behringer, K.

    1992-06-01

    Atomic physics models for the interpretation of plasma edge spectroscopic measurements are discussed. Spectroscopy of the plasma edge, mainly in the visible range, provides information on hydrogen and impurity influxes, on impurity production measurements and on particle confinement. Some basic processes determining the population of excited levels are presented leading to the corona excitation balance and to collisional radiative models. These were discussed for the special case of helium. A first application of plasma edge spectroscopy is the investigation of atom and ion particle flux densities at the boundary of tokamaks or stellarators. Results are shown for oxygen, carbon and chromium in JET. Molecular particle fluxes, like H2, D2 and CH4 are then focused upon. The interpretation of the shape and intensity of molecular band emission is explained, and results are presented with respect to chemical carbon production. The mechanisms of impurity screening at the plasma edge are investigated and respective measurements are shown.

  17. Stable lead isotope compositions in selected coals from around the world and implications for present day aerosol source tracing

    SciTech Connect

    M. Diaz-Somoano; M.E. Kylander; M.A. Lopez-Anton; I. Suarez-Ruiz; M.R. Martinez-Tarazona; M. Ferrat; B. Kober; D.J. Weiss

    2009-02-15

    The phasing out of leaded gasoline in many countries around the world at the end of the last millennium has resulted in a complex mixture of lead sources in the atmosphere. Recent studies suggest that coal combustion has become an important source of Pb in aerosols in urban and remote areas. Lead concentration and isotopic composition is reported for 59 coal samples representing major coal deposits worldwide in an attempt to characterize this potential source. The average concentration in these coals is 35 {mu}g Pb g{sup -1}, with the highest values in coals from Spain and Peru and the lowest in coals from Australia and North America. The {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb isotope ratios range between 1.15 and 1.24, with less radiogenic Pb in coals from Europe and Asia compared to South and North America. Comparing the Pb isotopic signatures of coals from this and previous studies with those published for Northern and Southern Hemisphere aerosols, we hypothesize that coal combustion might now be an important Pb source in China, the eastern U.S., and to some extent, in Europe but not as yet in other regions including South Africa, South America, and western U.S. This supports the notion that 'old Pb pollution' from leaded gasoline reemitted into the atmosphere or long-range transport (i.e., from China to the western U.S.) is important. Comparing the isotope ratios of the coals, the age of the deposits, and Pb isotope evolution models for the major geochemical reservoirs suggests that the lead isotope ratios (PbIC) in coals is strongly influenced by the depositional coal forming environment. 47 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Phosphorus K-edge XANES Spectroscopy of Mineral Standards

    SciTech Connect

    E Ingall; J Brandes; J Diaz; M de Jonge; D Paterson; I McNulty; C Elliott; P Northrup

    2011-12-31

    Phosphorus K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was performed on phosphate mineral specimens including (a) twelve specimens from the apatite group covering a range of compositional variation and crystallinity; (b) six non-apatite calcium-rich phosphate minerals; (c) 15 aluminium-rich phosphate minerals; (d) ten phosphate minerals rich in either reduced iron or manganese; (e) four phosphate minerals rich in either oxidized iron or manganese; (f) eight phosphate minerals rich in either magnesium, copper, lead, zinc or rare-earth elements; and (g) four uranium phosphate minerals. The identity of all minerals examined in this study was independently confirmed using X-ray powder diffraction. Minerals were distinguished using XANES spectra with a combination of pre-edge features, edge position, peak shapes and post-edge features. Shared spectral features were observed in minerals with compositions dominated by the same specific cation. Analyses of apatite-group minerals indicate that XANES spectral patterns are not strongly affected by variations in composition and crystallinity typical of natural mineral specimens.

  19. An experimental investigation of lead zirconate titanate--epoxy-multi-walled carbon nanotube bulk and flexible thick film composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sankha

    Piezoelectric sensors and actuators are needed for a wide range of applications from physiological measurement to industrial monitoring systems. Sensors that can be easily integrated with the host, while maintaining high sensitivity and reliability over a wide range of frequencies are not readily feasible and economical with homogenous piezoelectric materials. It is well known that two-phase piezoelectric-epoxy composites offer several benefits over their single phase counterparts, as the properties of the constituent phases combine to improve the range of applicability. However, the piezoelectric properties of these materials suffer from the electrically insulating properties of the epoxy matrix. The electrical properties of the matrix may be enhanced by including electrically conducting inclusions however, less is known about the mechanisms that drive the changes in these properties. Hence, this experimental investigation of sensor materials builds on the previous work in two-phase piezoelectric composites, where the aims are to understand the roles that specific fabrication parameters and inclusion composition play in determining the piezoelectric and dielectric performance the aforementioned composites. The materials under investigation will be comprised of Lead Zirconate Titanate, Epofix Cold-Setting Embedding Resin and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, i.e. the piezoelectric, epoxy and electrical inclusions respectively. Our work suggests that inclusion of MWCNTs enhances the piezoelectric and dielectric properties with increasing volume fraction below the percolation threshold. This work seeks to understand how the processing parameters: poling temperature, poling type and particle distribution influence the contact resistance, space charge double layer at the piezoelectric and conductor interfaces and electric field intensity at the piezoelectric boundary, which all ultimately dictate the piezoelectric and dielectric performance of the composite materials. Conventional solid oxide mixing, spin coating and deposition techniques will be used to fabricate the bulk and thick films. The piezoelectric and dielectric performance will be determined from the measurement of the piezoelectric strain coefficients, d33 and d31, dielectric constant, impedance and dielectric spectrum, dielectric loss tangent, and capacitance. These measurements will be correlated with inclusion size, shape, distribution, and surface morphology observations obtained from the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM).

  20. Lead pollution in subtropical ecosystems on the SE Gulf of California Coast: a study of concentrations and isotopic composition.

    PubMed

    Soto-Jiménez, Martin F; Páez-Osuna, Federico; Scelfo, Genine; Hibdon, Sharon; Franks, Rob; Aggarawl, Jugdeep; Flegal, A Russell

    2008-10-01

    Lead pollution was investigated in environmental matrices and biological indicators collected from two typical subtropical coastal ecosystems in the southeast Gulf of California, Mexico. Lead concentrations and isotopic compositions ((206)Pb/(207)Pb and (208)Pb/(207)Pb) were measured using high resolution inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS) and thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), respectively. Lead in surface estuary sediments (10.0-34.2microgg(-1)) and particulate Pb (25.0-128.7microgg(-1), >98% of total Pb) in the water column were significantly higher than levels in natural bedrock soils (15.1+/-8.3microgg(-1)) and river runoff (1.9+/-1.4microgg(-1)). Aquatic plants had Pb concentrations between 2.5 and 7.2microgg(-1), while those in macroalgae ranged from 3 to 5microgg(-1). The ranges of mean Pb concentrations in the aquatic animals studied (ranges in microgg(-1)) were as follows: zooplankton 32+/-3, mussels 2.3-3.9, oysters 1.9-7.9, snail 2.0-7.7, barnacles 0.1-18.5, fish 1.4-8.9, crab 6.3-40.2 and polychaetae 8.5-16.7. Pb values in 20-40% of oyster and fish samples and in all samples of crab exceeded acceptable levels for a food source for human consumption. Pb isotope ratios (206)Pb/(207)Pb, (208)Pb/(207)Pb in biota ranged from 1.188 to 1.206 and 2.448 to 2.470, respectively. A plot of (206)Pb/(207)Pb versus (208)Pb/(207)Pb for the environmental and biological samples collected from two study areas indicates that they contain lead from ores mined in Mexico and used in the past to produce leaded gasoline in use until 1997, natural Pb weathered from the Sierra Madre Occidental mother rock, and the later influence of inputs from a more radiogenic source related to industrial activity in the United States. Statistical software IsoSource results revealed that the Pb contained in environmental matrices and biomonitors is mostly derived from gasoline (20-90%) and US emissions (10-40%). PMID:18789522