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Sample records for composite resin cement

  1. Color stability of composite resin cements.

    PubMed

    Smith, Darrell S; Vandewalle, Kraig S; Whisler, Gerry

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to determine the difference in color stability of resin cements after one year of storage in water. Three commercial resin cements (Nexus 3, Calibra, Variolink 2) were evaluated under three different curing conditions (photo-, dual-, and self-cure) over three storage time periods (3, 6, and 12 months). A plastic mold was used to prepare cylindrical specimens of each of the three resin cements. For the phototcured specimens, only the base component of the resin cement was cured. For the dual- and self-cure specimens, the base and catalyst of the cements were mixed according to the manufacturer's instructions, syringed into the mold, and either photocured as before (dual-cure) or allowed to chemically set (self-cure). The total amount of color change (delta E) was calculated using a spectrophotometer after 24 hours (baseline) and after 3, 6, and 12 months of storage in distilled water. Data were analyzed using a repeated measures ANOVA and a Tukey test. After one year of storage, Nexus 3 demonstated the lowest color change values (delta E) under all curing conditions, although it was not significantly different from Variolink 2 when photocured or Calibra when self-cured. New resin cements without a traditional benzoyl peroxide/amine redox initiator system, such as Nexus 3, could be more color-stable over time. PMID:22313825

  2. Hydroxyapatite composite resin cement augmentation of pedicle screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Turner, Alexander W L; Gillies, R Mark; Svehla, Martin J; Saito, Masanobu; Walsh, William R

    2003-01-01

    Pedicle screw stability is poor in osteopenic vertebrae attributable, in part, to low screw-bone interface strength. The current authors examined cement augmentation using a low curing temperature hydroxyapatite and bis-phenol-A glycidol methacrylate-based composite resin. This cement may stiffen the screw-bone interface and reduce the harmful effects associated with polymethylmethacrylate regarding temperature and toxic monomer. Thirty-five lumbar vertebrae from human cadavers were instrumented with pedicle screws, with one pedicle previously injected with cement and the other as the control. Caudocephalad toggling of +/- 1 mm for 1600 cycles was applied to the pedicle screws, and the resulting forces supported by the implant-bone interface were captured by a load cell. A curve was constructed from the peak caudal load for each cycle and three mechanical measures parameterized this curve: (1) initial load; (2) rate of load decay during the first 400 cycles; and (3) final load. The initial load increased by 16% as a result of cement augmentation, the final load increased by 65%, and the rate of load decay decreased by 59%. Cement augmentation of pedicle screws increased the stiffness and stability of the screw-bone interface. PMID:12579026

  3. Strengthening of Porcelain Provided by Resin Cements and Flowable Composites.

    PubMed

    Spazzin, A O; Guarda, G B; Oliveira-Ogliari, A; Leal, F B; Correr-Sobrinho, L; Moraes, R R

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of mechanical properties of resin-based luting agents on the strength of resin-coated porcelain. The luting agents tested were two flowable resin composites (Filtek Z350 Flow and Tetric-N Flow), a light-cured resin cement (Variolink Veneer [VV]), and a dual-cured resin cement (Variolink II) in either light-cured (base paste) or dual-cured (base + catalyst pastes [VD]) mode. Flexural strength (σf) and modulus of elasticity (Ef) of the luting agents were measured in three-point bending mode (n=5). Porcelain discs (Vita VM7) were tested either untreated (control) or acid etched, silanized, and coated with the luting agents. Biaxial flexural strength (σbf) of the porcelain discs was tested using a ball-on-ring setup (n=30). The σbf of the resin-coated specimens was calculated at z-axial positions for multilayer specimens in the ball-on-ring test: position z = 0 (ceramic surface at the bonded interface) and position z = -t2 (luting agent surface above ring). The σf and Ef data were subjected to analysis of variance and the Student-Newman-Keuls test (α=0.05). A Weibull analysis was performed for σbf data. Weibull modulus (m) and characteristic strength (σ0) were calculated. Linear regression analyses investigated the relationship between mechanical properties of the luting agents and the strengthening of porcelain. VD had higher and VV had lower mechanical strength than the other materials. At z = 0, all resin-coated groups had higher σbf than the control group. No significant differences between the luting agents were observed for σbf and σ0. At z = -t2, VD had the highest σbf and σ0, whereas VV had the poorest results. No significant differences in m were observed across groups. A linear increase in flexural strength of the porcelain was associated with increased σf and Ef of the luting agents at position z = -t2. In conclusion, resin coating and use of luting agents with better physical properties generally improved the

  4. Do resin cements influence the cuspal deflection of teeth restored with composite resin inlays?

    PubMed

    da Rosa, Helen C V; Marcondes, Maurem L; de Souza, Niélli C; Weber, João B B; Spohr, Ana M

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different resin cements on the cuspal deflection of endodontically treated teeth restored with composite resin inlays. Sixty upper premolars were randomly divided into five groups (n=12): 1 - sound teeth; 2 - cavity; 3 - Rely X ARC; 4 - RelyX Unicem; 5 - SeT. The teeth from groups 2, 3, 4 and 5 received a MOD preparation and endodontic treatment. Impressions were made with vinyl polysiloxane and poured using type IV die stone in groups 3, 4 and 5. Inlays with composite resin were built over each cast and luted with the resin cements. A 200 N load was applied on the occlusal surface, and cuspal deflection was measured using a micrometer. After 24 h, cuspal deflection was measured again using a 300 N load. The Student t-test showed that there was no statistically significant difference between the 200 N and 300 N occlusal loads only for the sound teeth group (p = 0.389) and the RelyX ARC group (p = 0.188). ANOVA and Tukey'test showed that the sound teeth had the lowest mean cuspal deflection, differing statistically from the other groups (p<0.05). The highest cuspal deflections were obtained in the SeT group and the cavity group, with no statistical difference between them. Intermediate values were obtained in RelyX ARC group and RelyX Unicem group, which differed statistically. The self-adhesive resin cements RelyX Unicem and SeT showed less capacity to maintain the stiffness of the tooth/restoration complex than the conventional resin cement RelyX ARC. PMID:25950160

  5. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to composite submitted to different surface pretreatments

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Victor Hugo; Griza, Sandro; de Moraes, Rafael Ratto

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Extensively destroyed teeth are commonly restored with composite resin before cavity preparation for indirect restorations. The longevity of the restoration can be related to the proper bonding of the resin cement to the composite. This study aimed to evaluate the microshear bond strength of two self-adhesive resin cements to composite resin. Materials and Methods Composite discs were subject to one of six different surface pretreatments: none (control), 35% phosphoric acid etching for 30 seconds (PA), application of silane (silane), PA + silane, PA + adhesive, or PA + silane + adhesive (n = 6). A silicone mold containing a cylindrical orifice (1 mm2 diameter) was placed over the composite resin. RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE) or BisCem (Bisco Inc.) self-adhesive resin cement was inserted into the orifices and light-cured. Self-adhesive cement cylinders were submitted to shear loading. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05). Results Independent of the cement used, the PA + Silane + Adhesive group showed higher microshear bond strength than those of the PA and PA + Silane groups. There was no difference among the other treatments. Unicem presented higher bond strength than BisCem for all experimental conditions. Conclusions Pretreatments of the composite resin surface might have an effect on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to this substrate. PMID:24516824

  6. Effect of indirect composite treatment microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Escribano, Nuria; Baracco, Bruno; Romero, Martin; Ceballos, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background No specific indications about the pre-treatment of indirect composite restorations is provided by the manufacturers of most self-adhesive resin cements. The potential effect of silane treatment to the bond strength of the complete tooth/indirect restoration complex is not available.The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of composite overlays to dentin using several self-adhesive resin cements and a total-etch one. Material and Methods Composite overlays were fabricated and bonding surfaces were airborne-particle abraded and randomly assigned to two different surface treatments: no treatment or silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer) followed by an adhesive (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). Composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, Speedcem, Maxcem Elite or Smartcem2, and the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into sticks 1 mm thick and stressed in tension until failure. Two-way ANOVA and SNK tests were applied at α=0.05. Results Bond strength values were significantly influenced by the resin cement used (p<0.001). However, composite surface treatment and the interaction between the resin cement applied and surface treatment did not significantly affect dentin bond strength (p>0.05). All self-adhesive resin cements showed lower bond strength values than the total-etch RelyX ARC. Among self-adhesive resin cements, RelyX Unicem and G-Cem attained statistically higher bond strength values. Smartcem2 and Maxcem Elite exhibited 80-90% of pre-test failures. Conclusions The silane and adhesive application after indirect resin composite sandblasting did not improve the bond strength of dentin-composite overlay complex. Selection of the resin cement seems to be a more relevant factor when bonding indirect composites to dentin than its surface treatment. Key words

  7. Composite resin vs resin cement for luting of indirect restorations: comparison of solubility and shrinkage behavior.

    PubMed

    Bortolotto, Tissiana; Guillarme, Davy; Gutemberg, Daniel; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; Krejci, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate relationship between shrinkage development and early solubility of two commonly used luting materials, a self-adhesive cement (GCem chemical and light cured) and composite resin (Tetric). Linear displacement, shrinkage forces and leaching of UDMA from specimens immersed in 75% ethanol/25% water were measured. The least amount of linear shrinkage (33.0±2.9 µm) and polymerization force (4.1±0.3 kg) was observed in Tetric. UDMA leaching (% µg/mL) was the following: chemically cured GCem (4.2±0.2)>light cured GCem (1.5±0.1)>Tetric (0.1). Shrinkage development in the early stages of polymerization was much slower in the self-cured specimens in respect to light cured ones. With the chemically cured self-adhesive cement, incomplete materials' setting during the initial stages after polymerization favored monomer leaching from the cements' mass. PMID:24088842

  8. Evaluation of the flexural strength of dual-cure composite resin cements.

    PubMed

    Duymus, Zeynep Yesil; Yanikoğlu, Nuran Dinckal; Alkurt, Murat

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate of flexural strength of some adhesive resin cements. Three dual-cure composite resin cements (Nexus 3; Variolink II, Panavia F) were prepared. The manufacturer's mixing directions for the cements were followed. Adhesive resin cement was mixed, placed in the rectangular portion of the mold. Fifteen specimens were prepared for each cements. The cements were light-activated with light lamp for 40 s on both and top and bottom surfaces. The each cement specimens were divided into three groups according to time of storage and stored in distilled water for 24 h, 15, and 30 days. Total 45 specimens were stored at 37°C (98.6 0F) in distilled water for 24 h, 15, and 30 days prior to tests. The flexural strength was tested wıth a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min (0.02 in.) The maximum load was recorded as MPa. The results were analyzed by Analysis of Variance and Duncan test. The Panavia F resin cements content Bisphenol A was showed the highest flexural strength (80.80 MPa) (11.71 ksi) for 24 h. The lowest flexural strength was observed in Nexus 3 (51.00 MPa) (7.39 ksi). It was found significant interaction of material and time (p < 0.05). The types of cement and time of storage was statistically significant on the flexural strengths (p < 0.001). PMID:23359518

  9. A medicated polycarboxylate cement to prevent complications in composite resin therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Y.; Shintani, H.; Yamaki, M. )

    1990-01-01

    Preparative treatment is the preferred method to protect the dentin and pulp from complications in composite resin therapy. This study investigated the in vivo effects of the polycarboxylate cement containing zinc fluoride and tannic acid in composite resin restorations. Scanning electron micrographs established that the composite resin failed to contact the axial wall. The gaps varied from 10 to 60 microns. However, this polycarboxylate cement was shown to provide excellent adaptation to dentin when used as a base and its chemical adhesion allowed it to make close contact with the unetched dentin. The newly developed electron probe x-ray microanalyzer revealed that the in vivo penetration of fluoride and zinc occurred through the dentinal tubules. When this polycarboxylate cement was used, the orifices of dentinal tubules were partially occluded, possibly with the smear layer fixed by tannic acid. In addition, by releasing the components, this polycarboxylate cement adds acid resistance to dentin and increases the resistance of dentin collagen to proteolytic enzymes. As such this polycarboxylate cement offers advantages as a base to composite resin therapy.

  10. Influence of post and resin cement on stress distribution of maxillary central incisors restored with direct resin composite.

    PubMed

    Spazzin, A O; Galafassi, D; de Meira-Júnior, A D; Braz, R; Garbin, C A

    2009-01-01

    The current study evaluated the influence of two endodontic post systems and the elastic modulus and film thickness of resin cement on stress distribution in a maxillary central incisor (MCI) restored with direct resin composite using finite element analysis (FEA). A three-dimensional model of an MCI with a coronary fracture and supporting structures was performed. A static chewing pressure of 2.16 N/mm2 was applied to two areas on the palatal surface of the composite restoration. Zirconia ceramic (ZC) and glass fiber (GF) posts were considered. The stress distribution was analyzed in the post, dentin and cement layer when ZC and GF posts were fixed to the root canals using resin cements of different elastic moduli (7.0 and 18.6 GPa) and different layer thicknesses (70 and 200 microm). The different post materials presented a significant influence on stress distribution with lesser stress concentration when using the GF post. The higher elastic modulus cement created higher stress levels within itself. The cement thicknesses did not present significant changes. PMID:19363979

  11. Effects of mechanical properties of adhesive resin cements on stress distribution in fiber-reinforced composite adhesive fixed partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Daiichiro; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Vallittu, Pekka K; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Using finite element analysis (FEA), this study investigated the effects of the mechanical properties of adhesive resin cements on stress distributions in fiber-reinforced resin composite (FRC) adhesive fixed partial dentures (AFPDs). Two adhesive resin cements were compared: Super-Bond C&B and Panavia Fluoro Cement. The AFPD consisted of a pontic to replace a maxillary right lateral incisor and retainers on a maxillary central incisor and canine. FRC framework was made of isotropic, continuous, unidirectional E-glass fibers. Maximum principal stresses were calculated using finite element method (FEM). Test results revealed that differences in the mechanical properties of adhesive resin cements led to different stress distributions at the cement interfaces between AFPD and abutment teeth. Clinical implication of these findings suggested that the safety and longevity of an AFPD depended on choosing an adhesive resin cement with the appropriate mechanical properties. PMID:22447051

  12. Evaluation of tensile retention of Y-TZP crowns cemented on resin composite cores: effect of the cement and Y-TZP surface conditioning.

    PubMed

    Rippe, M P; Amaral, R; Oliveira, F S; Cesar, P F; Scotti, R; Valandro, L F; Bottino, M A

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of the cement type (adhesive resin, self-adhesive, glass ionomer, and zinc phosphate) on the retention of crowns made of yttria-stabilized polycrystalline tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP). Therefore, 108 freshly extracted molars were embedded in acrylic resin, perpendicular to their long axis, and prepared for full crowns: the crown preparations were removed and reconstructed using composite resin plus fiber posts with dimensions identical to the prepared dentin. The preparations were impressed using addition silicone, and Y-TZP copings were produced, which presented a special setup for the tensile testing. Cementation was performed with two adhesive resin cements (Multilink Automix, Ivoclar-Vivadent; RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA), one self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100, 3M ESPE), one glass ionomer based cement (RelyX Luting, 3M ESPE), and one zinc phosphate cement (Cimento de Zinco, SS White, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). For the resin cement groups, the inner surfaces of the crowns were subjected to three surface treatments: cleaning with isopropyl alcohol, tribochemical silica coating, or application of a thin low-fusing glass porcelain layer plus silanization. After 24 hours, all groups were subjected to thermocycling (6000 cycles) and included in a special device for tensile testing in a universal testing machine to test the retention of the infrastructure. After testing, the failure modes of all samples were analyzed under a stereomicroscope. The Kruskal-Wallis test showed that the surface treatment and cement type (α=0.05) affected the tensile retention results. The Multilink cement presented the highest tensile retention values, but that result was not statistically different from RelyX ARC. The surface treatment was statistically relevant only for the Multilink cement. The cement choice was shown to be more important than the crown surface treatment for cementation of a Y-TZP crown to a composite resin substrate. PMID

  13. Bond strength of selected composite resin-cements to zirconium-oxide ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Fons-Font, Antonio; Amigó-Borrás, Vicente; Granell-Ruiz, María; Busquets-Mataix, David; Panadero, Rubén A.; Solá-Ruiz, Maria F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strengths of zirconium-oxide (zirconia) ceramic and a selection of different composite resin cements. Study Design: 130 Lava TM cylinders were fabricated. The cylinders were sandblasted with 80 µm aluminium oxide or silica coated with CoJet Sand. Silane, and bonding agent and/or Clearfil Ceramic Primer were applied. One hundred thirty composite cement cylinders, comprising two dual-polymerizing (Variolink II and Panavia F) and two autopolymerizing (Rely X and Multilink) resins were bonded to the ceramic samples. A shear test was conducted, followed by an optical microscopy study to identify the location and type of failure, an electron microscopy study (SEM and TEM) and statistical analysis using the Kruskal-Wallis test for more than two independent samples and Mann-Whitney for two independent samples. Given the large number of combinations, Bonferroni correction was applied (α=0.001). Results: Dual-polymerizing cements provided better adhesion values (11.7 MPa) than the autopolymerizing (7.47 MPa) (p-value M-W<0.001). The worst techniques were Lava TM + sandblasting + Silane + Rely X; Lava TM + sandblasting + Silane + Multilink and Lava TM + CoJet + silane + Multilink. Adhesive failure (separation of cement and ceramic) was produced at a lesser force than cohesive failure (fracture of cement) (p-value M-W<0.001). Electron microscopy confirmed that the surface treatments modified the zirconium-oxide ceramic, creating a more rough and retentive surface, thus providing an improved micromechanical interlocking between the cement and the ceramic. Key words:Shear bond strength, silica coating, surface treatment, zirconia ceramics, phosphate monomer. PMID:22926485

  14. Cutting effectiveness of diamond points on commercial core composite resins and cements.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, H; Taira, M; Yamaki, M

    1996-06-01

    In dental clinics, composite resin and cement cores are routinely cut and polished during abutment tooth preparation. To identify their characteristics during cutting, weight-load cutting tests were performed on eight commercial core composites and two cements, using diamond points driven by an air-turbine handpiece. It became evident that the cutting effectiveness of the diamond points on nine workpieces exceeded that on natural tooth dentine, while that on one composite containing Si3,N4 filler was analogous to that on dentine. With continued use, the cutting effectiveness of the diamond point on all workpieces gradually declined. SEM observations revealed that diamond particles of the diamond point wore out with repeated use. It is clinically advised to select the core material with material characteristics during cutting and mechanical strength similar to those of dentin. PMID:8809696

  15. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    PubMed Central

    TÜRKMEN, Cafer; DURKAN, Meral; CİMİLLİ, Hale; ÖKSÜZ, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. Material and Methods Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group): direct composite resin restoration (Alert) with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive), Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia) luted with a resin cement (Cement-It) combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond), Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively) onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. Results The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7) showed better results compared to the other groups (p<0.05). Group 4 showed the weakest bond strength (p>0.05). The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. Conclusion The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces. PMID:21710095

  16. Direct Tensile Strength and Characteristics of Dentin Restored with All-Ceramic, Resin-Composite, and Cast Metal Prostheses Cemented with Resin Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Piemjai, Morakot; Nakabayashi, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    A dentin-cement-prosthesis complex restored with either all-porcelain, cured resin-composite, or cast base metal alloy and cemented with either of the different resin cements was trimmed into a mini-dumbbell shape for tensile testing. The fractured surfaces and characterization of the dentin-cement interface of bonded specimens were investigated using a Scanning Electron Microscope. A significantly higher tensile strength of all-porcelain (12.5 ± 2.2 MPa) than that of cast metal (9.2 ± 3.5 MPa) restorations was revealed with cohesive failure in the cement and failure at the prosthesis-cement interface in Super-Bond C&B group. No significant difference in tensile strength was found among the types of restorations using the other three cements with adhesive failure on the dentin side and cohesive failure in the cured resin. SEM micrographs demonstrated the consistent hybridized dentin in Super-Bond C&B specimens that could resist degradation when immersed in hydrochloric acid followed by NaOCl solutions whereas a detached and degraded interfacial layer was found for the other cements. The results suggest that when complete hybridization of resin into dentin occurs tensile strength at the dentin-cement is higher than at the cement-prosthesis interfaces. The impermeable hybridized dentin can protect the underlying dentin and pulp from acid demineralization, even if detachment of the prosthesis has occurred. PMID:26539520

  17. Direct Tensile Strength and Characteristics of Dentin Restored with All-Ceramic, Resin-Composite, and Cast Metal Prostheses Cemented with Resin Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Piemjai, Morakot; Nakabayashi, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    A dentin-cement-prosthesis complex restored with either all-porcelain, cured resin-composite, or cast base metal alloy and cemented with either of the different resin cements was trimmed into a mini-dumbbell shape for tensile testing. The fractured surfaces and characterization of the dentin-cement interface of bonded specimens were investigated using a Scanning Electron Microscope. A significantly higher tensile strength of all-porcelain (12.5 ± 2.2 MPa) than that of cast metal (9.2 ± 3.5 MPa) restorations was revealed with cohesive failure in the cement and failure at the prosthesis-cement interface in Super-Bond C&B group. No significant difference in tensile strength was found among the types of restorations using the other three cements with adhesive failure on the dentin side and cohesive failure in the cured resin. SEM micrographs demonstrated the consistent hybridized dentin in Super-Bond C&B specimens that could resist degradation when immersed in hydrochloric acid followed by NaOCl solutions whereas a detached and degraded interfacial layer was found for the other cements. The results suggest that when complete hybridization of resin into dentin occurs tensile strength at the dentin-cement is higher than at the cement-prosthesis interfaces. The impermeable hybridized dentin can protect the underlying dentin and pulp from acid demineralization, even if detachment of the prosthesis has occurred. PMID:26539520

  18. Curing time effect on the fraction of {sup 137}Cs from cement-ion exchange resins-bentonite clay composition

    SciTech Connect

    Plecas, Ilija; Dimovic, Slavko

    2007-07-01

    To assess the safety of disposal of radioactive waste material in cement, curing conditions and time of leaching radionuclides {sup 137}Cs have been studied. Leaching tests in cement-ion exchange resins-bentonite matrix, were carried out in accordance with a method recommended by IAEA. Curing conditions and curing time prior to commencing the leaching test are critically important in leach studies since the extent of hydration of the cement materials determines how much hydration product develops and whether it is available to block the pore network, thereby reducing leaching. Incremental leaching rates R{sub n}(cm/d) of {sup 137}Cs from cement ion exchange resins-bentonite matrix after 180 days were measured. The results presented in this paper are examples of results obtained in a 20-year concrete testing project which will influence the design of the engineer trenches system for future central Serbian radioactive waste storing center. (authors)

  19. Effect of Bonding Application Time on Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Glass Ionomer Cement

    PubMed Central

    Panahandeh, Narges; Torabzadeh, Hassan; Ghassemi, Amir; Mahdian, Mina; Akbarzadeh Bagheban, Alireza; Moayyedi, Seddigheh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This experimental study evaluated the effect of bonding application time on the microshear bond strength of composite resin to different types of glass ionomer cements (GICs). Materials and Methods: One-hundred and sixty specimens (two conventional and two resin-modified GICs) were prepared and divided into 16 groups. The surface of all specimens was prepared using two different bonding systems (Frog and Stea) at three different times. After setting, the composite resin (Z100) was placed over the GICs. The specimens were then stored in distilled water for 24 hours (37°C) and exposed to microshear stresses at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The results were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (P<0.05). Results: In conventional GICs, bond strength was affected by the type of bonding system at different times, and bond strength was significantly higher in the Fuji II group compared to Riva Self Cure group. In the Riva Self Cure group, bond strength was significantly affected by time; whereas, the type of bonding system failed to exert a significant effect on bond strength. There was no significant correlation between the type of bonding system and the two brands of resin-modified GICs. Bond strength was not affected by the type of bonding agent; however, among the two brands of resin-modified GICs, Fuji II LC yielded a significantly stronger bond. Conclusion: It appears that the type of bonding agent does not affect the microshear bond strength, and the bonding application time affects the microshear bond strength in Riva Self Cure GICs. PMID:27507998

  20. Temporary zinc oxide-eugenol cement: eugenol quantity in dentin and bond strength of resin composite.

    PubMed

    Koch, Tamara; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Malinovskii, Vladimir; Flury, Simon; Häner, Robert; Lussi, Adrian

    2013-08-01

    Uptake of eugenol from eugenol-containing temporary materials may reduce the adhesion of subsequent resin-based restorations. This study investigated the effect of duration of exposure to zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) cement on the quantity of eugenol retained in dentin and on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of the resin composite. The ZOE cement (IRM Caps) was applied onto the dentin of human molars (21 per group) for 1, 7, or 28 d. One half of each molar was used to determine the quantity of eugenol (by spectrofluorimetry) and the other half was used for μTBS testing. The ZOE-exposed dentin was treated with either OptiBond FL using phosphoric acid (H₃PO₄) or with Gluma Classic using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) conditioning. One group without conditioning (for eugenol quantity) and two groups not exposed to ZOE (for eugenol quantity and μTBS testing) served as controls. The quantity of eugenol ranged between 0.33 and 2.9 nmol mg⁻¹ of dentin (median values). No effect of the duration of exposure to ZOE was found. Conditioning with H₃PO₄ or EDTA significantly reduced the quantity of eugenol in dentin. Nevertheless, for OptiBond FL, exposure to ZOE significantly decreased the μTBS, regardless of the duration of exposure. For Gluma Classic, the μTBS decreased after exposure to ZOE for 7 and 28 d. OptiBond FL yielded a significantly higher μTBS than did Gluma Classic. Thus, ZOE should be avoided in cavities later to be restored with resin-based materials. PMID:23841789

  1. Colour matching of composite resin cements with their corresponding try-in pastes.

    PubMed

    Kampouropoulos, D; Gaintantzopoulou, M; Papazoglou, E; Kakaboura, A

    2014-06-01

    Two shades of four resin cements (Calibra, Clearfil Esthetic, Insure, Variolink II), in light- and dual-curing modes, were tested for colour matching with their corresponding try-in pastes, immediately after photopolymerization and after 24-hour dry and dark storage. Colour measurements were performed for 0.8 mm-thick specimens through a 0.8mm-thick ceramic plate. For each resin cement, colour differences (deltaE) were calculated between the two curing modes, and between the corresponding try-in paste, at baseline and after 24h. deltaE>0 values were detected between all resin cements and their try-in pastes, which were brand/shade/curing mode depended. The try-in pastes of the Variolink II system demonstrated the best colour matching (deltaE<2). Try-in pastes of Calibra and Insure, at both curing modes, did not match at an acceptable value, the shade of their corresponding resin cements (deltaE>3.3). Calibra presented the highest colour differences. deltaE values of the Clearfil Esthetic system immediately after photo-activation ranged between 2 and 3 units. A ceramic restoration may fail aesthetically as a result of not acceptable colour match (deltaE>3.3) between the shade of certain resin cements and their relevant try-in pastes. PMID:25134367

  2. Push-out bond strengths of fiber-reinforced composite posts with various resin cements according to the root level

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hoon-Sang; Noh, Young-Sin; Lee, Yoon; Min, Kyung-San

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to determine whether the push-out bond strengths between the radicular dentin and fiber reinforced-composite (FRC) posts with various resin cements decreased or not, according to the coronal, middle or apical level of the root. MATERIALS AND METHODS FRC posts were cemented with one of five resin cement groups (RelyX Unicem: Uni, Contax with activator & LuxaCore-Dual: LuA, Contax & LuxaCore-Dual: Lu, Panavia F 2.0: PA, Super-Bond C&B: SB) into extracted human mandibular premolars. The roots were sliced into discs at the coronal, middle and apical levels. Push-out bond strength tests were performed with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min, and the failure aspect was analyzed. RESULTS There were no significant differences (P>.05) in the bond strengths of the different resin cements at the coronal level, but there were significant differences in the bond strengths at the middle and apical levels (P<.05). Only the Uni and LuA cements did not show any significant decrease in their bond strengths at all the root levels (P>.05); all other groups had a significant decrease in bond strength at the middle or apical level (P<.05). The failure aspect was dominantly cohesive at the coronal level of all resin cements (P<.05), whereas it was dominantly adhesive at the apical level. CONCLUSION All resin cement groups showed decreases in bond strengths at the middle or apical level except LuA and Uni. PMID:24049569

  3. Restoration of Strip Crown with a Resin-Bonded Composite Cement in Early Childhood Caries

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Mi-ae; Kim, Ah-hyeon; Shim, Youn-soo; An, So-youn

    2013-01-01

    Background. Early childhood caries is a widely prevalent disease throughout the world. It is necessary to treat this condition in early childhood; however, child behavior management may be particularly challenging during treatment. To overcome this challenge, we used Carigel to remove caries and RelyX Unicem resin cement for strip crown restoration. It not only has the desired aesthetic effect but is also more effective for primary teeth, which are used for a shorter period than permanent teeth are. Case Presentation. We report a case of three pediatric patients with early childhood caries, in whom caries was removed by using Carigel to avoid the risk of pulpal exposure associated with high-speed handpieces. Subsequently, aesthetic restoration was performed using strip crown with RelyX Unicem self-adhesive resin cement. Conclusion. RelyX Unicem has the following advantages: (1) not requiring have any special skills for the dentist for performing the procedure, (2) decreased occurrence of bubbles during injection of the cement, and (3) overall short duration of the procedure. Thus, it is appropriate for the treatment of pediatric patients whose behavior is difficult to manage. However, further studies are required in order to establish the use of RelyX Unicem as a stable restorative material in early childhood caries. PMID:24490090

  4. Transmission of composite polymerization contraction force through a flowable composite and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Espinosa, Juan Carlos; Pereira, Rosana Aparecida; Cavalcanti, Ana Paula; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the individual contraction force during polymerization of a composite resin (Z-250), a flowable composite (Filtek Flow, FF) and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitrebond, VB), and the transmission of Z-250 composite resin polymerization contraction force through different thicknesses of FF and VB. The experiment setup consisted of two identical parallel steel plates connected to a universal testing machine. One was fixed to a transversal base and the other to the equipment's cross head. The evaluated materials were inserted into a 1-mm space between the steel plates or between the inferior steel plate and a previously polymerized layer of an intermediate material (either FF or VB) adhered to the upper steel plate. The composite resin was light-cured with a halogen lamp with light intensity of 500 mW/cm(2) for 60 s. A force/time graph was obtained for each sample for up to 120 s. Seven groups of 10 specimens each were evaluated: G1: Z-250; G2: FF; G3: VB; G4: Z-250 through a 0.5-mm layer of FF; G5: Z-250 through a 1-mm layer of FF; G6: Z-250 through a 0.5-mm of VB; G7: Z-250 through a 1-mm layer of VB. They were averaged and compared using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test at a = 0.05. The obtained contraction forces were: G1: 6.3N + 0.2N; G2: 9.8 + 0.2N; G3: 1.8 + 0.2N; G4: 6.8N + 0.2N; G5: 6.9N + 0.3N; G6: 4.0N + 0.4N and G7: 2.8N + 0.4N. The use of VB as an intermediate layer promoted a significant decrease in polymerization contraction force values of the restorative system, regardless of material thickness. The use of FF as an intermediate layer promoted an increase in polymerization contraction force values with both material thicknesses. PMID:19089187

  5. Microtensile strength of resin cement bond to indirect composite treated by different output powers of Er:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Garshasbzadeh, Nazanin Zeinab; Mirzaie, Mansoreh; Yassini, Esmaeil; Shahabi, Sima; Benedicenti, Stefano; Angiero, Francesca; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2016-04-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effect of different output powers of Er:YAG laser on microtensile bonding strength of indirect composite to resin cements.36 indirect composite blocks (GC Gradia DA2, Japan) size 15 × 10 × 10 mm(3) were constructed, and divided into 12 groups, as follows:G1: control group (no treatment); Groups G2 to G6: treated with Er:YAG laser (2,940 nm) in noncontact mode, frequency 20 Hz, pulse duration 470 µs, with output power ranging from 2W to 6W; Groups G7 sandblasting, Groups 8 to G12: as Groups G2 to G 6 with preparatory sandblasting. One specimen from each group was analyzed by SEM; each specimen was fixed to a specialized metal jig using cyanoacrylate (Mitreapel, Beta Kimya San. Ve TIC, Iran) and debonded under tension with a universal testing machine (Zwick, Germany) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm min(-1). Sandblasting and laser can improve bond strength above an energy level of 150 mJ. SEM evaluation of laser-treated specimens showed irregularities and deep undercuts. T test analysis showed no significant difference between sandblasted and non-sandblasted group, with laser output power of 0, 100, or 150 mJ (P = 0.666, P = 0.875, and P =  .069); in the specimens irradiated with energy output of 200, 250, or 300 mJ, sandblasted specimens showed higher bond strength than non-sandblasted ones. The results demonstrate that, in composite resin irradiated with laser at energy output of 200-300 mJ, sandblasting might be a suitable procedure to enhance bond strength of resin cement. PMID:26873266

  6. Analytical method to estimate resin cement diffusion into dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira Ferraz, Larissa Cristina; Ubaldini, Adriana Lemos Mori; de Oliveira, Bruna Medeiros Bertol; Neto, Antonio Medina; Sato, Fracielle; Baesso, Mauro Luciano; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2016-05-01

    This study analyzed the diffusion of two resin luting agents (resin cements) into dentin, with the aim of presenting an analytical method for estimating the thickness of the diffusion zone. Class V cavities were prepared in the buccal and lingual surfaces of molars (n=9). Indirect composite inlays were luted into the cavities with either a self-adhesive or a self-etch resin cement. The teeth were sectioned bucco-lingually and the cement-dentin interface was analyzed by using micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS) and scanning electron microscopy. Evolution of peak intensities of the Raman bands, collected from the functional groups corresponding to the resin monomer (C–O–C, 1113 cm-1) present in the cements, and the mineral content (P–O, 961 cm-1) in dentin were sigmoid shaped functions. A Boltzmann function (BF) was then fitted to the peaks encountered at 1113 cm-1 to estimate the resin cement diffusion into dentin. The BF identified a resin cement-dentin diffusion zone of 1.8±0.4 μm for the self-adhesive cement and 2.5±0.3 μm for the self-etch cement. This analysis allowed the authors to estimate the diffusion of the resin cements into the dentin. Fitting the MRS data to the BF contributed to and is relevant for future studies of the adhesive interface.

  7. Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes in hydraulic cement

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Kalb, P.; Fuhrmann, M.; Colombo, P.

    1982-01-01

    Work has been conducted to investigate the solidification of ion exchange resin wastes with portland cements. These efforts have been directed toward the development of acceptable formulations for the solidification of ion exchange resin wastes and the characterization of the resultant waste forms. This paper describes formulation development work and defines acceptable formulations in terms of ternary phase compositional diagrams. The effects of cement type, resin type, resin loading, waste/cement ratio and water/cement ratio are described. The leachability of unsolidified and solidified resin waste forms and its relationship to full-scale waste form behavior is discussed. Gamma irradiation was found to improve waste form integrity, apparently as a result of increased resin crosslinking. Modifications to improve waste form integrity are described. 3 tables.

  8. Effect of air polishing on the fluoride release of (resin-modified) glass ionomer cements and of a polyacid-modified composite resin.

    PubMed

    Jost-Brinkmann, P G

    1998-06-01

    Eight different conventional and resin-modified glass ionomers as well as a polyacid-modified composite were air polished and their fluoride release was determined in comparison to untreated controls. The air polishing was done with two different devices at medium and maximum setting for powder and water. Ninety discs of 1.5 mm thickness and 7.0 mm diameter were produced from each cement. These discs were stored in 5 ml deionized water at 37 degrees C. After 1 day and 1, 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks, the specimens were transferred into new vials with fresh deionized water. From the 4th week onward, the specimens (except for the untreated controls) were air polished on half of their upper and lower surfaces for 2 s each before being put into a new vial. After 20 weeks the fluoride released during the previous 4 weeks was determined with a fluoride ion-sensitive electrode. With the exception of Ketac-Cem, all cements released significantly more fluoride ions after air polishing, irrespective of the devices' settings. The differences in the amount of fluoride released among the investigated materials were greater than the changes in fluoride release patterns caused by air polishing. Air polishing increased the fluoride release by 20-60% in most of the materials investigated. PMID:15490782

  9. Try-in Pastes Versus Resin Cements: A Color Comparison.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Edenize Cristina; Vaz, Maysa Magalhães; Rodrigues Gonçalves de Oliveira, Maria Beatriz; Takano, Alfa Emília; de Carvalho Cardoso, Paula; de Torres, Érica Miranda; Gonzaga Lopes, Lawrence

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to compare the color of ceramic veneer restorations using different shades of try-in pastes and resin cement. Researchers found no differences between try-in pastes and resin cements after cementation. PMID:27213935

  10. Effects of air abrasion with alumina or glass beads on surface characteristics of CAD/CAM composite materials and the bond strength of resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Nobuaki, ARAO; Keiichi, YOSHIDA; Takashi, SAWASE

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The study aimed to evaluate effects of air abrasion with alumina or glass beads on bond strengths of resin cements to CAD/CAM composite materials. Material and Methods CAD/CAM composite block materials [Cerasmart (CS) and Block HC (BHC)] were pretreated as follows: (a) no treatment (None), (b) application of a ceramic primer (CP), (c) alumina-blasting at 0.2 MPa (AB), (d) AB followed by CP (AB+CP), and (e) glass-beads blasting at 0.4 MPa (GBB) followed by CP (GBB+CP). The composite specimens were bonded to resin composite disks using resin cements [G-CEM Cerasmart (GCCS) and ResiCem (RC)]. The bond strengths after 24 h (TC 0) and after thermal cycling (TC 10,000 at 4–60°C) were measured by shear tests. Three-way ANOVA and the Tukey compromise post hoc tests were used to analyze statistically significant differences between groups (α=0.05). Results For both CAD/CAM composite materials, the None group exhibited a significant decrease in bond strength after TC 10,000 (p<0.05). AB showed significantly higher bond strength after TC 10,000 than the None group, while CP did not (p<0.05). GBB exhibited smaller surface defects than did AB; however, their surface roughnesses were not significantly different (p>0.05). The AB+CP group showed a significantly higher bond strength after TC 10,000 than did the AB group for RC (p<0.05), but not for GCCS. The GBB+CP group showed the highest bond strength for both thermal cyclings (p<0.05). Conclusions Air abrasion with glass beads was more effective in increasing bond durability between the resin cements and CAD/CAM composite materials than was using an alumina powder and a CP. PMID:26814465

  11. Effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Tae-Bong; Lee, Joo-Hee; Ahn, Kang-Min; Kim, Tae-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement. MATERIALS AND METHODS The specimens were prepared to evaluate the bond strength of epoxy resin-based fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post) to dual-curing resin cement (RelyX U200). The specimens were divided into four groups (n=18) according to different surface treatments: group 1, no treatment; group 2, silanization; group 3, silanization after hydrogen peroxide etching; group 4, silanization with warm drying at 80℃ after hydrogen peroxide etching. After storage of the specimens in distilled water at 37℃ for 24 hours, the shear bond strength (in MPa) between the fiber post and resin cement was measured using a universal testing machine. The fractured surface of the fiber post was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post-hoc analysis with Tukey's HSD test (α=0.05). RESULTS Silanization of the fiber post (Group 2) significantly increased the bond strength in comparison with the non treated control (Group 1) (P<.05). Heat drying after silanization also significantly increased the bond strength (Group 3 and 4) (P<.05). However, no effect was determined for hydrogen peroxide etching before applying silane agent (Group 2 and 3) (P>.05). CONCLUSION Fiber post silanization and subsequent heat treatment (80℃) with warm air blower can be beneficial in clinical post cementation. However, hydrogen peroxide etching prior to silanization was not effective in this study. PMID:27141252

  12. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to three different liners: TheraCal LC, Biodentine, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using universal adhesive: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Deepa, Velagala L; Dhamaraju, Bhargavi; Bollu, Indira Priyadharsini; Balaji, Tandri S

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To compare and evaluate the bonding ability of resin composite (RC) to three different liners: TheraCal LC™ (TLC), a novel resin-modified (RM) calcium silicate cement, Biodentine™ (BD), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) using an universal silane-containing adhesive and characterizing their failure modes. Materials and Methods: Thirty extracted intact human molars with occlusal cavity (6-mm diameter and 2-mm height) were mounted in acrylic blocks and divided into three groups of 10 samples each based on the liner used as Group A (TLC), Group B (BD), and Group C (RMGIC). Composite post of 3 mm diameter and 3 mm height was then bonded to each sample using universal adhesive. Shear bond strength (SBS) analysis was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc test using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20. Results: No significant difference was observed between group A and group C (P = 0.573) while group B showed the least bond strength values with a highly significant difference (P = 0.000). The modes of failure were predominantly cohesive in Groups A and B (TLC and BD) while RMGIC showed mixed and adhesive failures. Conclusions: Hence, this present study concludes that the bond strength of composite resin to TLC and RMGIC was similar and significantly higher than that of BD following application of universal adhesive. PMID:27099425

  13. Resin cementation of zirconia ceramics with different bonding agents

    PubMed Central

    Tanış, Merve Çakırbay; Akay, Canan; Karakış, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sandblasting and different chemical bonding agents on shear bond strength of zirconia and conventional resin cement. In this study, 35 zirconia specimens were treated as follows: Group I: control; Group II: sandblasting; Group III: sandblasting + Monobond S; Group IV: sandblasting + Monobond Plus; Group V: sandblasting + Z-Prime Plus. The specimens in each group were bonded with conventional composite resin cement Variolink II. After cementation, specimens were stored in distilled water (at 37 °C) for 24 h and shear test was performed. The highest shear bond strength values were observed in Groups IV and V. The lowest shear bond strength values were observed in Group I. Using 10-methacryloyloxy-decyl dihydrogenphosphate monomer-containing priming agents, e.g. Monobond Plus and Z-PRIME Plus, combined with sandblasting can be an effective method for resin bonding of zirconia restorations. PMID:26019653

  14. Evaluation of shear bond strength of two resin-based composites and glass ionomer cement to pure tricalcium silicate-based cement (Biodentine®)

    PubMed Central

    CANTEKİN, Kenan; AVCİ, Serap

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Tricalcium silicate is the major constituent phase in mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). It is thus postulated that pure tricalcium silicate can replace the Portland cement component of MTA. The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strength of methacrylate-based (MB) composites, silorane-based (SB) composites, and glass ionomer cement (GIC) to Biodentine® and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Material and Methods Acrylic blocks (n=90, 2 mm high, 5 mm diameter central hole) were prepared. In 45 of the samples, the holes were fully filled with Biodentine® and in the other 45 samples, the holes were fully filled with MTA. The Biodentine® and the MTA samples were randomly divided into 3 subgroups of 15 specimens each: Group-1: MB composite; Group-2: SB composite; and Group-3: GIC. For the shear bond strength (SBS) test, each block was secured in a universal testing machine. Results The highest (17.7±6.2 MPa) and the lowest (5.8±3.2 MPa) bond strength values were recorded for the MB composite-Biodentine® and the GIC-MTA, respectively. Although the MB composite showed significantly higher bond strength to Biodentine (17.7±6.2) than it did to MTA (8.9±5.7) (p<0.001), the SB composite (SB and MTA=7.4±3.3; SB and Biodentine®=8.0±3,6) and GIC (GIC and MTA=5.8±3.2; GIC and Biodentine=6.7±2.6) showed similar bond strength performance with MTA compared with Biodentine (p=0.73 and p=0.38, respectively). Conclusions The new pure tricalcium-based pulp capping, repair, and endodontic material showed higher shear bond scores compared to MTA when used with the MB composite. PMID:25141202

  15. Incombustible resin composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akima, T.

    1982-01-01

    Incombustible resin compositions composed of aromatic compounds were obtained through (1) combustion polymer material and (2) bisphenol A or halogenated bisphenol A and bisphenol A diglycidl ether or halogenated bisphenol A diglycidyl ether. The aromatic compound is an adduct of bifunctional phenols and bifunctional epoxy resins.

  16. Solubility and sorption of resin-based luting cements.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, L A; Kerby, R E; McMillen, K; Clelland, N

    2000-01-01

    This study compared the seven-day water sorption, water solubility and lactic acid solubility of three composite cements and three resin-modified glass-ionomer cements. Disc-shaped specimens measuring 15 mm x 0.5 mm were prepared according to each manufacturer's specifications and desiccated to a constant mass. Specimens were then placed in distilled water at 37 degrees C for seven days. Acid solubility was performed in 0.01 M lactic acid. The weight changes of the specimens after immersion in distilled water or 0.01 M lactic acid were measured using an electronic analytical balance. A one-way ANOVA followed by the Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch (REGW) multiple range test was performed on all data. Significant differences (p < 0.05) were found among several cements tested for each of the properties investigated. Due to their hydrophilic nature, all resin-modified glass-ionomer cements showed significantly higher water sorption compared to composite cements. PMID:11203853

  17. Color agreement between nanofluorapatite ceramic discs associated with try-in pastes and with resin cements.

    PubMed

    Rigoni, Paulo; Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho do; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro color agreement between nanofluorapatite ceramic discs (e.max Ceram / Ivoclar Vivadent / A2) associated with try-in pastes and those bonded with resin cements (Vitique / DMG/ try-in shade A2½ and cement shade A2½, Variolink II / Ivoclar Vivadent / try-in shade A1 and cement shade A1, and Choice 2 / Bisco / try-in shade A2 and cement shade A2), and to evaluate the shade stability of the discs bonded with resin cements. The shades of composite resin discs (Lliss / FGM / A2) and nanofluorapatite ceramic discs with try-in pastes or cements were evaluated according to the Vita Classical shade guide by a digital spectrophotometer (Micro EspectroShade, MHT) immediately after placing the try-in pastes or resin cements between composite resin discs and ceramic discs. Other evaluations were performed at 2, 5, and 6 day intervals after cementation with the resin cements. All ceramic discs that received try-in pastes presented an A2 shade. There was no statistical difference in the shade of the ceramic specimens fixed with different cements at the different intervals, as evaluated by the Friedman test (p > 0.05). Two try-in pastes presented shade compatibility with those recommended by the manufacturers. There was no similarity of shades between the ceramic discs with try-in pastes and those with the respective resin cements. Shade stability was observed in ceramic discs with resin cements within the intervals evaluated. PMID:23184164

  18. The effect of CO2 laser irradiation plus fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to glass ionomer cement or composite resin restorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, S. R.; Moraes, M.; Hanashiro, F. S.; Youssef, M. N.; Brugnera Junior, A.; Nobre-dos-Santos, M.; de Souza-Zaroni, W. C.

    2016-02-01

    Although the cariostatic effects of CO2 laser on the root surface have been shown, there is scarce information regarding its effects on root secondary caries. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of the association of CO2 laser and a fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to composite-resin or glass-ionomer-cement restorations. Dental blocks of human roots were divided into two groups: composite resin (CR) or glass ionomer cement (GIC). Subsequently, the blocks were divided into four subgroups (n  =  10): C, non-fluoride dentifrice; FD, fluoride dentifrice; L, CO2 laser with an energy density of 6.0 J cm-2  +  non-fluoride dentifrice; and L  +  FD, CO2 laser  +  fluoride dentifrice. The blocks were subjected to pH cycling to simulate a high cariogenic challenge. Dental demineralization around the restorations was quantified by microhardness analysis. The results were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey-Kramer test (p  ⩽  0.05). As for mineral loss, it can be observed that all the groups that were treated with a fluoride dentifrice and laser, used alone or not, were statistically similar and superior to the RC-C group. It was concluded that CO2 laser irradiation and a fluoride dentifrice used alone or combined with each other are efficient surface treatments for preventing secondary root caries, regardless of the restorative material used.

  19. Fiber reinforced composite resin systems.

    PubMed

    Giordano, R

    2000-01-01

    The Targis/Vectris and Sculpture/FibreKor systems were devised to create a translucent maximally reinforced resin framework for fabrication of crowns, bridges, inlays, and onlays. These materials are esthetic, have translucency similar to castable glass-ceramics such as OPC and Empress, and have fits that are reported to be acceptable in clinical and laboratory trials. These restorations rely on proper bonding to the remaining tooth structure; therefore, careful attention to detail must be paid to this part of the procedure. Cementation procedures should involve silane treatment of the cleaned abraded internal restoration surface, application of bonding agent to the restoration as well as the etched/primed tooth, and finally use of a composite resin. Each manufacturer has a recommended system which has been tested for success with its resin system. These fiber reinforced resins are somewhat different than classical composites, so not all cementation systems will necessarily work with them. Polishing of the restoration can be accomplished using diamond or alumina impregnated rubber wheels followed by diamond paste. The glass fibers can pose a health risk. They are small enough to be inhaled and deposited in the lungs, resulting in a silicosis-type problem. Therefore, if fibers are exposed and ground on, it is extremely important to wear a mask. Also, the fibers can be a skin irritant, so gloves also should be worn. If the fibers become exposed intraorally, they can cause gingival inflammation and may attract plaque. The fibers should be covered with additional composite resin. If this cannot be accomplished, the restoration should be replaced. The bulk of these restorations are formed using a particulate filled resin, similar in structure to conventional composite resins. Therefore, concerns as to wear resistance, color stability, excessive expansion/contraction, and sensitivity remain until these materials are proven in long-term clinical trials. They do hold the

  20. Biocompatibility of composite resins

    PubMed Central

    Mousavinasab, Sayed Mostafa

    2011-01-01

    Dental materials that are used in dentistry should be harmless to oral tissues, so they should not contain any leachable toxic and diffusible substances that can cause some side effects. Reports about probable biologic hazards, in relation to dental resins, have increased interest to this topic in dentists. The present paper reviews the articles published about biocompatibility of resin-restorative materials specially resin composites and monomers which are mainly based on Bis-GMA and concerns about their degradation and substances which may be segregated into oral cavity. PMID:23372592

  1. Composite resin in medicine and dentistry.

    PubMed

    Stein, Pamela S; Sullivan, Jennifer; Haubenreich, James E; Osborne, Paul B

    2005-01-01

    Composite resin has been used for nearly 50 years as a restorative material in dentistry. Use of this material has recently increased as a result of consumer demands for esthetic restorations, coupled with the public's concern with mercury-containing dental amalgam. Composite is now used in over 95% of all anterior teeth direct restorations and in 50% of all posterior teeth direct restorations. Carbon fiber reinforced composites have been developed for use as dental implants. In medicine, fiber-reinforced composites have been used in orthopedics as implants, osseous screws, and bearing surfaces. In addition, hydroxyapatite composite resin has become a promising alternative to acrylic cement in stabilizing fractures and cancellous screw fixation in elderly and osteoporotic patients. The use of composite resin in dentistry and medicine will be the focus of this review, with particular attention paid to its physical properties, chemical composition, clinical applications, and biocompatibility. PMID:16393132

  2. Retention of gold alloy crowns cemented with traditional and resin cements.

    PubMed

    Pinzón, Lilliam M; Frey, Gary N; Winkler, Mark M; Tate, William H; Burgess, John O; Powers, John M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure in vitro retention of cast gold crowns cemented with traditional and resin cements. Forty-eight human molars were prepared on a lathe to produce complete crown preparations with a consistent taper and split into six groups, eight crowns in each group. Crowns were cast in a high-gold alloy and then cemented. After 24 hours, the retention force (N) was recorded and mean values were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and the Fisher post-hoc least significant difference (PLSD) multiple comparisons test (a = .05). Failure sites were examined under 3100 magnification and recorded. Mean values (SD) for each group in increasing order of retention force were: Harvard Cement: 43 N (27), TempoCem: 59 N (16), PermaCem Dual: 130 N (42), RelyX Luting Cement: 279 N (26), Contax and PermaCem Dual: 286 N (38), and TempoCem with Contax and PermaCem Dual: 340 N (14). The Fisher PLSD interval (P = .05) for comparing cements was 29 N. Zinc-phosphate cement and provisional resin cements had the lowest retention forces. Resin cement with a bonding agent and the hybrid-ionomer cement had similar retention forces. Resin cement with a bonding agent applied after use of a provisional resin cement had a significantly higher retention force than the other cements tested. PMID:19639070

  3. Long-term clinical evaluation of fracture and pulp injury following glass-ionomer cement or composite resin applied as a base filling in teeth restored with amalgam.

    PubMed

    De C Luz, M A; Ciaramicoli-Rodrigues, M T; Garone Netto, N; De Lima, A C

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this research was to analyse the long-term clinical behaviour of two dental materials applied as filling under silver amalgam restorations: glass-ionomer cement (GIC) and composite resin with adhesive system (CR). In this study, 117 posterior teeth (29 premolars and 88 molars) were selected with carious lesions which resulted in great loss of dentin and cusps with unsupported enamel. After caries removal, cavities were prepared and totally filled with GIC or with CR. In a following visit, new cavities were prepared, leaving the employed filling material as a base and support for the enamel, which were then restored with silver amalgam. Restorations were evaluated periodically after 6 months and up to 5 years. Both fracture and pulpal involvement rates were low. Although differences could be observed in the behaviour of the materials, statistical survival estimation showed that the performances of GIC and CR as filling material were similar. There was a significant association both between kind of tooth (molar or premolar) and long-term survival of the restorations; and between degree of unsupported enamel and the same long-term survival. Our results confirmed that the technique in which GIC or CR are used as filling under silver amalgam restorations is clinically acceptable. PMID:11422695

  4. Effect of a CO2 Laser on the Inhibition of Root Surface Caries Adjacent to Restorations of Glass Ionomer Cement or Composite Resin: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, L. C.; Araújo, F. C.; Zancopé, B. R.; Hanashiro, F. S.; Nobre-dos-Santos, M.; Youssef, M. N.; Souza-Zaroni, W. C.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of CO2 laser irradiation on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to glass ionomer cement (GIC) or composite resin (CR) restorations. 40 dental blocks were divided into 4 groups: G1 (negative control): cavity preparation + adhesive restoration with CR; G2: (positive control) cavity preparation + GIC restoration; G3: equal to group 1 + CO2 laser with 6 J/cm2; G4: equal to group 2 + CO2 laser. The blocks were submitted to thermal and pH cycling. Dental demineralization around restorations was quantified using microhardness analyses and Light-Induced Fluorescence (QLF). The groups showed no significant differences in mineral loss at depths between 20 μm and 40 μm. At 60 μm, G2 and G3 ≠ G1, but G4 = G1, G2 and G3. At 80 μm, G4 ≠ G1, and at 100 μm, G4 = G2 = G1. At 140 and 220 μm, G2, G3, and G4 = G1. The averages obtained using QFL in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 0.637, 0.162, 0.095, and 0.048, respectively. QLF and microhardness analyses showed that CO2 laser irradiation reduced mineral loss around the CR restorations but that it did not increase the anticariogenic effect of GIC restorations. PMID:26347900

  5. Indirect resin composites

    PubMed Central

    Nandini, Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Aesthetic dentistry continues to evolve through innovations in bonding agents, restorative materials, and conservative preparation techniques. The use of direct composite restoration in posterior teeth is limited to relatively small cavities due to polymerization stresses. Indirect composites offer an esthetic alternative to ceramics for posterior teeth. This review article focuses on the material aspect of the newer generation of composites. This review was based on a PubMed database search which we limited to peer-reviewed articles in English that were published between 1990 and 2010 in dental journals. The key words used were ‘indirect resin composites,’ composite inlays,’ and ‘fiber-reinforced composites.’ PMID:21217945

  6. Effects of different surface treatments on bond strength between resin cements and zirconia ceramics.

    PubMed

    Erdem, A; Akar, G C; Erdem, A; Kose, T

    2014-01-01

    This study compares the bond strength of resin cement and yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) ceramic with different surface conditioning methods. Two hundred presintered Y-TZP ceramic specimens were prepared, sintered (4 × 4 × 4 mm), and randomly assigned to four equal groups as control (C, no conditioning); airborne particle abraded (APA, air abrasion with 11 μm Al2O3); tribochemical silica coating/silane coupling system (TSC, Rocatec, air abrasion with 110 μm Al2O3, 30 μm silica-coated Al2O3 and silane); and laser (L, Er:YAG laser irradiation treated at a power setting of 200 mJ). After specimen preparation, composite resin cylinders were prepared and cemented with resin cements (Clearfil Esthetic, Panavia F 2.0, Rely X-U100, Super Bond C&B, and Multilink Automix) on the ceramic surfaces and kept in an incubator at 37°C for 60 days. All specimens were tested for shear bond strength with a universal testing machine, and fractured surfaces were evaluated by environmental scanning electron microscopy. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests (α=0.05). The bond strengths for C and L groups were not significantly different according to adhesive resin cement. APA and TSC resulted in increased bond strength for Panavia F 2.0 and Rely X-U100 resin cements. Additionally, TSC presented higher bond strength with Multilink Automix. Adhesive fracture between the ceramic and resin cement was the most common failure. Complete cohesive fracture at the ceramic or composite cylinders was not observed. Regardless of the adhesive resin cement used, laser treatment did not improve resin bond strength. PMID:24299447

  7. Recycled rubber in cement composites

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavan, D.; Tratt, K.; Wool, R.P.

    1994-12-31

    Disposal of 200 million waste tires in the US each year has become a major problem. An environmentally sound innovative technology of recycling rubber in cement matrix was examined. Using silane coupling agent the rubber was bonded to the hydrating cement making a lighter composite, which absorbed more energy than ordinary Portland cement. The bonding information was obtained by peel strength analysis. SEM was used to understand the mode of fracture in pure cement paste, cement bonded rubber composite and rubber filled cement paste. It was found that cracks propagate through the rubber particle in rubber bonded cement composite while in unbonded rubber cement mix, the cracks propagate around the interface. The density and shrinkage measurements are also discussed.

  8. Cement waste-form development for ion-exchange resins at the Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Veazey, G.W.; Ames, R.L.

    1997-03-01

    This report describes the development of a cement waste form to stabilize ion-exchange resins at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). These resins have an elevated potential for ignition due to inadequate wetness and contact with nitrates. The work focused on the preparation and performance evaluation of several Portland cement/resin formulations. The performance standards were chosen to address Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and Environmental Protection Agency Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements, compatibility with Rocky Flats equipment, and throughput efficiency. The work was performed with surrogate gel-type Dowex cation- and anion-exchange resins chosen to be representative of the resin inventory at RFETS. Work was initiated with nonactinide resins to establish formulation ranges that would meet performance standards. Results were then verified and refined with actinide-containing resins. The final recommended formulation that passed all performance standards was determined to be a cement/water/resin (C/W/R) wt % ratio of 63/27/10 at a pH of 9 to 12. The recommendations include the acceptable compositional ranges for each component of the C/W/R ratio. Also included in this report are a recommended procedure, an equipment list, and observations/suggestions for implementation at RFETS. In addition, information is included that explains why denitration of the resin is unnecessary for stabilizing its ignitability potential.

  9. Effect of resin cement, aging process and root level on the bond strength of the resin-fiber posts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almuhim, Khalid Salman

    Background. Little is known about the long-term clinical bonding effectiveness of the Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts cemented with self-etch adhesive systems. Bond stability and longevity of the cemented post are adversely affected by physical and chemical factors over time, such as expansion and contraction stresses caused by thermal changes and occlusal load. This clinical condition can be simulated in vitro by thermocyclic loading; and bonding effectiveness can be evaluated by applying the micropush out test. Therefore, more in vitro studies are needed to evaluate the bond strength of the fiber posts cemented with different resin cement systems after simulating the artificial aging induced by thermocycling. The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of two different resin cement systems (total etch, and self-etch resin cement system) used for cementation of fiber reinforced composite posts in three different aging periods using thermocycling. Methods. Following IRB approval, sixty freshly extracted bicuspid single rooted natural teeth were endodontically treated, and the post-spaces were prepared to receive a fiber-post cemented with either a total etch resin cement (Rely-X Ultimate) or with a self-etch resin cement (Rely-X Unicem). No thermocycling, 20,000 and 40,000 cycles was used to age the specimens. Teeth were randomly allocated into six different groups: G1 - Control: Rely-X Ultimate cement with no thermocycling. G2: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 20,000 thermocycling. G3: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 40,000 thermocycling. G4: Rely-X Unicem cement. G5: Rely-X Unicem cement. G6: Rely-X Unicem cement. Microtensile bond strength determined using a micropush out test on a universal testing machine (MTS). Additionally, the failure mode of each specimen was observed under a stereomicroscope (Olympus) at 40x magnification. Finally, one representative sample was randomly selected from each of the five failure modes for scanning

  10. Statistical failure analysis of adhesive resin cement bonded dental ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaou; Katsube, Noriko; Seghi, Robert R; Rokhlin, Stanislav I.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this work is to quantitatively examine the effect of adhesive resin cement on the probability of crack initiation from the internal surface of ceramic dental restorations. The possible crack bridging mechanism and residual stress effect of the resin cement on the ceramic surface are examined. Based on the fracture-mechanics-based failure probability model, we predict the failure probability of glass-ceramic disks bonded to simulated dentin subjected to indentation loads. The theoretical predictions match experimental data suggesting that both resin bridging and shrinkage plays an important role and need to be considered for accurate prognostics to occur. PMID:18670583

  11. Comparative Evaluation of Bond Strength of Dual-Cured Resin Cements: An In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, R Veena; Poluri, Ramya Krishna; Nagaraj, Hema; Siddaruju, Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Background: To compare the microtensile bond strength of resin cements to enamel and dentin and to determine the type of bond failure using stereomicroscope. Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro study 40 teeth were embedded in acrylic resin and divided into two main groups i.e., Group A for enamel and Group B for dentin. Each group is again subdivided into four subgroups, which are as follows; Subgroup 1 for Calibra resin cement, Subgroup 2 for Paracem, Subgroup 3 for Variolink II and Subgroup 4 for Rely X ARC. These resin cements were applied on enamel and dentin according to manufacturer’s instructions followed by incremental build-up of composite resin on the top of resin cements. Each tooth was sectioned perpendicular to the resin-substrate interface with a slow speed diamond saw under water cooling yielding sections of approximately 1 mm2. On an average, three sections from each tooth were used for testing. The beams obtained after sectioning were stressed to failure under tension in a custom made stainless steel forceps held in a universal testing machine (Lloyd) at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Results were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance, independent t-test, and Tukey’s HSD post-hoc test. Results: Cements bonded to enamel substrates showed higher mean bond strength compared to dentin, which is statistically significant. Rely X ARC showed highest mean bond strength to both the substrates. Conclusion: There was a significant difference between the bond strength to enamel and dentin and, Rely X ARC resin cement showed higher bond strength compared with the other groups. PMID:26225104

  12. Resin content in cement liquids of resin-modified glass ionomers.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, K; Fujishima, A; Suzuki, M; Inoue, M; Sasa, R; Miyazaki, T

    1999-09-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analyses were conducted on four kinds of resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI) cement liquids, LC, LC II, LC III (hereinafter referred to as LCs) and VM, using HPLC and laser Raman spectroscopic methods. HPLC revealed that among the RMGI liquids LCs contain 31-32% HEMA (2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate), and VM contains 18% of the same. The composition of RMGI cement liquids varied significantly between manufacturers. In Raman spectroscopic analyses, the spectra of liquids of various ratios of polyacrylic acid and HEMA were measured, and calculations were made on the peak intensity ratios of C=C stretch vibration to C=O stretch vibration, common in both HEMA and polyacrylic acid. The composition ratio of polycarboxylic acid to HEMA of commercial glass ionomer cements was assessed by the regression curve generated by a combination of peak intensity ratios and composition ratios. In addition, Raman spectroscopy was able to identity the differences in form of the methacryloyloxy group. PMID:10786135

  13. Surface Hardness of Resin Cement Polymerized under Different Ceramic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Kesrak, Pimmada; Leevailoj, Chalermpol

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the surface hardness of two light-cured resin cements polymerized under different ceramic discs. Methods. 40 experimental groups of 2 light-cured resin cement specimens (Variolink Veneer and NX3) were prepared and polymerized under 5 different ceramic discs (IPS e.max Press HT, LT, MO, HO, and Cercon) of 4 thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mm), Those directly activated of both resin cements were used as control. After light activation and 37°C storage in an incubator, Knoop hardness measurements were obtained at the bottom. The data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA, t-test, and one-way ANOVA. Results. The KHN of NX3 was of significantly higher than that of Variolink Veneer (P < 0.05). The KHN of resin cement polymerized under different ceramic types and thicknesses was significant difference (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Resin cements polymerized under different ceramic materials and thicknesses showed statistically significant differences in KHN. PMID:22548062

  14. Evaluation of TEGDMA leaching from four resin cements by HPLC

    PubMed Central

    Altintas, Subutay Han; Usumez, Aslihan

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the elution of TEGDMA from dual cured resin cements, used for bonding of ceramic restoration by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Methods: Forty freshly extracted caries and restoration free molar teeth used in this study. Standardized Class I preparations were prepared in all teeth. Ceramic inlays were cemented with one of the dual cured resin cements (Variolink II, Rely X ARC, Rely X Unicem and Resilute). After cementation, specimens were stored in 75% ethanol solution. HPLC was used to analyze the amounts of TEGDMA in different time intervals. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests were used to evaluate the results (P<.05). Results: The amount of TEGDMA eluted from Resilute was the highest and the amount of TEG-DMA eluted from Rely X Unicem was the lowest (P<.05). The total amount of monomers was the highest after 21 days (P<.05). Conclusion: In the case of resin cements, elution of TEGDMA was the highest in Resilute and lowest in Rely X Unicem. The amount of TEGDMA eluted from resin cements was influenced by the time. PMID:22904653

  15. Dental repair material: a resin-modified glass-ionomer bioactive ionic resin-based composite.

    PubMed

    Croll, Theodore P; Berg, Joel H; Donly, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    This report documents treatment and repair of three carious teeth that were restored with a new dental repair material that features the characteristics of both resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative cement (RMGI) and resin-based composite (RBC). The restorative products presented are reported by the manufacturer to be the first bioactive dental materials with an ionic resin matrix, a shock-absorbing resin component, and bioactive fillers that mimic the physical and chemical properties of natural teeth. The restorative material and base/liner, which feature three hardening mechanisms, could prove to be a notable advancement in the adhesive dentistry restorative materials continuum. PMID:25822408

  16. Resin/graphite fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.; Jones, R. J.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    High temperature resin matrices suitable for use in advanced graphite fiber composites for jet engine applications were evaluated. A series of planned, sequential screening experiments with resin systems in composite form were performed to reduce the number of candidates to a single A-type polyimide resin that repetitively produced void-free, high strength and modulus composites acceptable for use in the 550 F range for 1000 hours. An optimized processing procedure was established for this system. Extensive mechanical property studies characterized this single system, at room temperature, 500 F, 550 F and 600 F, for various exposure times.

  17. Occupational contact allergy to unsaturated polyester resin cements.

    PubMed

    Tarvainen, K; Jolanki, R; Estlander, T

    1993-04-01

    6 men contracted occupational allergic contact dermatitis from unsaturated polyester (UP) cements. 4 of the men were employed in car repair painting and the remaining 2 in mold manufacturing. The exposure time to UP cements ranged from 6 to 32 years before onset of skin symptoms. All patients had eczema on their hands; in addition, 4 had skin symptoms on airborne areas, i.e., wrists, neck and face. All 6 patients developed allergic reactions when patch tested with UP resin at 0.5-10% in petrolatum (pet.). None of the tested patients reacted to auxiliary or cross-linking chemicals of the cements. Diethylene glycol maleate (DGM) was purified and identified from the UP resin of a cement. 1 patient reacting to UP resin was also patch test positive to DGM and he produced an allergic reaction to DGM down to a concentration of 0.0032% pet. DGM was found in both uncured and cured UP resin. None of the patients could continue their work with UP cements after their sensitization. PMID:8508632

  18. Effect of filler size on wear resistance of resin cement.

    PubMed

    Shinkai, K; Suzuki, S; Katoh, Y

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of filler size on the wear of resin cements. Materials tested included four experimental dual-cure resin cements (Kuraray) consisting of different-sized filler particles. A rectangular box cavity was prepared on the flattened occlusal surface of extracted human molars. Ceramic inlays for the cavities were fabricated using the Cerec 2 system. The Cerec inlays were cemented with the respective cements and adhesive systems according to the manufacturer's directions. The restored surface was finished by wet-grinding with an 800-grit silicon carbide paper. Six specimens were prepared for each resin cement. Half of the specimens were subjected to a three-body wear test for 200,000 cycles, and the others were subjected to a toothbrush abrasion test for 30,000 cycles. The worn surface of each restoration was scanned by a profilometer (Surfcom 475 A) at eight different points for each restoration. The wear value was determined by measuring the vertical gap depth on the profilometric tracings. The data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Scheffe's test. The results showed that, with increase of filler size, the wear value decreased in the toothbrush test and increased in the three-body wear test. The cement with 0.04-microm filler exhibited the lowest wear value among the materials in the three-body wear test, and the same wear value as the cement with 0.97-microm filler in the toothbrush test. Based upon the results of this study, it is concluded that the wear of resin cements was affected by the filler size as well as the mode of wear test. PMID:14530920

  19. Solidification of microbiologically treated ion-exchange resins using Portland cement-based systems

    SciTech Connect

    Voima Oy, I.

    1993-12-31

    Pretreated inactive ion exchange resins from the Loviisa nuclear power plant (NPP) were first reduced to one tenth of the original volume through microbiological treatment. During the process, the granular ion exchange resins were decomposed to result in dregs, which were solidified with two types of Portland cements. The objective of the present experiments was to investigate whether commercial cements are suitable solidification agents for this kind of waste. A total of ten mixtures were pretested for their rheological and setting properties. On the basis of the pretest results, four additional mixtures were chosen and tested for the spread value, density, air content, setting time and bleeding of the fresh waste product and for the dimensional stability and compressive strength of the hardened waste product. The cementing systems incorporated in the tests were ASTM type V Portland cement and ASTm type P Portland Composite cements. The dregs used in the tests were taken from a Pilot-Plant experiment at the Loviisa NPP and contained 2 wt-% solids. The test results were promising in showing that microbiological dregs can very easily be soldified with Portland cements to form a high-quality waste product. Thus, the microbiological treatment of spent ion exchange resins will drastically decrease the amount of solidified waste to be disposed of at the Loviisa NPP.

  20. Bonding of self-adhesive resin cements to enamel using different surface treatments: bond strength and etching pattern evaluations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jie; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2010-08-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strengths and etching patterns of seven self-adhesive resin cements to human enamel specimens which were subjected to one of the following surface treatments: (1) Polishing with #600 polishing paper; (2) Phosphoric acid; (3) G-Bond one-step adhesive; or (4) Phosphoric acid and G-Bond. After surface treatment, the human incisor specimens were bonded to a resin composite using a self-adhesive resin cement [Maxcem (MA), RelyX Unicem (UN), Breeze (BR), BisCem (BI), seT (SE), Clearfil SA Luting (CL)] or a conventional resin cement [ResiCem (RE)]. Representative morphology formed with self-adhesive resin cements showed areas of etched enamel intermingled with areas of featureless enamel. In conclusion, etching efficacy influenced the bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive resin cements to unground enamel, and that a combined use of phosphoric acid and G-Bond for pretreatment of human enamel surfaces improved the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements. PMID:20668359

  1. Effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of zirconia to three resin cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadjoo, Nisa

    Statement of problem: There are no standard guidelines for material selection to obtain acceptable bonding to high-strength zirconium oxide ceramic. Studies suggest resin cements in combination with MDP-containing primer is a reasonable choice, however, the other cements cannot be rejected and need further investigation. Objective: The purpose of this in vitro study was the evaluation of the shear bond strength of three composite resin cements to zirconia ceramic after using different surface conditioning methods. Materials and methods: One hundred and twenty sintered Y-TZP ceramic (IPS e.max ZirCAD) squares (8 x 8 x 4 mm) were embedded in acrylic molds, then divided into three groups (n=40) based on the type of cement used. Within each group, the specimens were divided into four subgroups (n=10) and treated as follows: (1) Air abrasion with 50microm aluminum oxide (Al2O 3) particles (ALO); (2) Air abrasion + Scotchbond Universal adhesive (SBU); (3) Air abrasion + Monobond Plus (MBP); (4) Air abrasion + Z-Prime Plus (ZPP). Composite cylinders were used as carriers to bond to conditioned ceramic using (1) RelyX Ultimate adhesive resin cement (RX); (2) Panavia SA self-adhesive resin cement (PSA); (3) Calibra esthetic cement (CAL). The bonded specimens were submerged in distilled water and subjected to 24-hour incubation period at 37°C. All specimens were stressed in shear at a constant crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA. The bond strength values (MPa), means and standard deviations were calculated and data were analyzed using analysis of variance with Fisher's PLSD multiple comparison test at the 0.05 level of significance. The nature of failure was recorded. Results: The two-way ANOVA showed Panavia SA to have the highest strength at 44.3 +/- 16.9 MPa (p<0.05). The combination of Scotchbond Universal surface treatment with Panavia SA cement showed statistically higher bond strength (p=0.0054). The highest bond

  2. Effect of Coloring–by-Dipping on Microtensile Bond Strength of Zirconia to Resin Cement

    PubMed Central

    Mahshid, Minoo; Berijani, Naeem; Sadr, Seyed Jalil; Homayoon, Sepide Sorour

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Studies on the effect of coloring procedures on the bond strength of zirconia to resin cement are lacking in the literature. This study evaluated the effect of dipping of zirconia ceramic in different liquid color shades on the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of zirconia ceramic to resin cement. Materials and Methods: This in vitro study was conducted on 100 microbar specimens divided into five groups of B2, C1, D4, A3 and control (not colored). To prepare the microbars, 20 white zirconia ceramic blocks, measuring 5×11×11 mm, were dipped in A3, B2, C1 or D4 liquid color shades for 10 seconds (five blocks for each color shade) and five blocks were not colored as controls. All the zirconia blocks were sintered in a sintering furnace. Composite blocks of similar dimensions were fabricated and bonded to zirconia ceramic blocks using Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. Zirconia-cement-composite blocks were sectioned into microbars measuring 1×1×10 mm. The MTBS of microbars was measured by a testing machine. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. All tests were carried out at 0.05 level of significance. Results: Statistically significant differences were found among the groups in MTBS (P<0.001). The D4 group had the highest MTBS value (39.16 ± 6.52 MPa). Conclusion: Dipping affected the MTBS of zirconia ceramic to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement; however, a similar pattern of change was not seen due to the different liquid color shades. PMID:26884775

  3. Effects of coronal substrates and water storage on the microhardness of a resin cement used for luting ceramic crowns

    PubMed Central

    de MENDONÇA, Luana Menezes; PEGORARO, Luiz Fernando; LANZA, Marcos Daniel Septímio; PEGORARO, Thiago Amadei; de CARVALHO, Ricardo Marins

    2014-01-01

    Composite resin and metallic posts are the materials most employed for reconstruction of teeth presenting partial or total destruction of crowns. Resin-based cements have been widely used for cementation of ceramic crowns. The success of cementation depends on the achievement of adequate cement curing. Objectives To evaluate the microhardness of Variolink® II (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein), used for cementing ceramic crowns onto three different coronal substrate preparations (dentin, metal, and composite resin), after 7 days and 3 months of water storage. The evaluation was performed along the cement line in the cervical, medium and occlusal thirds on the buccal and lingual aspects, and on the occlusal surface. Material and Methods Thirty molars were distributed in three groups (N=10) according to the type of coronal substrate: Group D- the prepared surfaces were kept in dentin; Groups M (metal) and R (resin)- the crowns were sectioned at the level of the cementoenamel junction and restored with metallic cast posts or resin build-up cores, respectively. The crowns were fabricated in ceramic IPS e.max® Press (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein) and luted with Variolink II. After 7 days of water storage, 5 specimens of each group were sectioned in buccolingual direction for microhardness measurements. The other specimens (N=5) were kept stored in deionized water at 37ºC for three months, followed by sectioning and microhardness measurements. Results Data were first analyzed by three-way ANOVA that did not reveal significant differences between thirds and occlusal surface (p=0.231). Two-way ANOVA showed significant effect of substrates (p<0.001) and the Tukey test revealed that microhardness was significantly lower when crowns were cemented on resin cores and tested after 7 days of water storage (p=0.007). Conclusion The type of material employed for coronal reconstruction of preparations for prosthetic purposes may influence the cement properties

  4. Retention of overdenture posts cemented with self-adhesive resin cements.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Mohamed Ezzat; El-Mowafy, Omar; Fenton, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of two self-adhesive resin cements on the retention of overdenture anchor posts after 30 days of aging in water. Forty caries-free human canines were randomly assigned to four test groups. Uni-Anchor posts were cemented to specimens in groups A and B with Breeze and Maxcem self-adhesive resin cements, respectively. In groups C and D, Fuji glass-ionomer cement and Fleck's zinc phosphate cement were used, respectively. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 30 days. Each specimen was loaded in tension in an Instron universal testing machine. The maximum force required to dislodge each post was recorded. Means and standard deviations (SDs) were calculated and data were statistically analyzed with analysis of variance (ANOVA). Means and SDs were 706.5 +/- 204.6 N for Breeze, 585.1 +/- 213.5 N for Maxcem, 449.2 +/- 181.1 N for Fuji, and 330.4 +/- 120.6 N for Fleck's. ANOVA revealed significant differences among the means (P < .0003). Adhesive failure was observed with all groups except group A, in which eight specimens underwent a cohesive fracture of the dentin. Breeze cement (group A) resulted in the highest retention force and most frequent cohesive failure and thus would be expected to clinically perform in a superior manner. PMID:19548412

  5. Resin impregnation process for producing a resin-fiber composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Raymond J. (Inventor); Moore, William E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Process for vacuum impregnation of a dry fiber reinforcement with a curable resin to produce a resin-fiber composite, by drawing a vacuum to permit flow of curable liquid resin into and through a fiber reinforcement to impregnate same and curing the resin-impregnated fiber reinforcement at a sufficient temperature and pressure to effect final curing. Both vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are applied to the dry fiber reinforcement prior to application of heat and prior to any resin flow to compact the dry fiber reinforcement, and produce a resin-fiber composite of reduced weight, thickness and resin content, and improved mechanical properties. Preferably both a vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are also applied during final curing.

  6. DESENSITIZING BIOACTIVE AGENTS IMPROVES BOND STRENGTH OF INDIRECT RESIN-CEMENTED RESTORATIONS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    PubMed Central

    Pires-De-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri; de Marco, Fabíola Fiorezi; Casemiro, Luciana Assirati; Panzeri, Heitor

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of indirect composite restorations cemented with a resin-based cement associated with etch-and-rinse and self-etching primer adhesive systems to dentin treated or not with a bioactive material. Materials and Method: Twenty bovine incisor crowns had the buccal enamel removed and the dentin ground flat. The teeth were assigned to 4 groups (n=5): Group I: acid etching + Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply); Group II: application of a bioactive glass (Biosilicato®)+ acid etching + Prime & Bond NT; Group III: One-up Bond F (J Morita); Group IV: Biosilicato® + One-up Bond F. Indirect composite resin (Artglass, Kulzer) cylinders (6x10mm) were fabricated and cemented to the teeth with a dualcure resin-based cement (Enforce, Dentsply). After cementation, the specimens were stored in artificial saliva at 37oC for 30 days and thereafter tested in tensile strength in a universal testing machine (EMIC) with 50 kgf load cell at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Failure modes were assessed under scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (95% level of confidence). Results: Groups I, II and III had statistically similar results (p>0.05). Group IV had statistically significant higher bond strength means (p<0.05) than the other groups. The analysis of the debonded surfaces showed a predominance of adhesive failure mode for Group III and mixed failure mode for the other groups. Conclusion: The use of desensitizing agent did not affect negatively the bonding of the indirect composite restorations to dentin, independently of the tested adhesive systems. PMID:19089114

  7. Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Noble and Base Metal Alloys with Different Surface Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Raeisosadat, Farkhondeh; Ghavam, Maryam; Hasani Tabatabaei, Masoomeh; Arami, Sakineh; Sedaghati, Maedeh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The bond strength of resin cements to metal alloys depends on the type of the metal, conditioning methods and the adhesive resins used. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of resin cements to base and noble metal alloys after sand blasting or application of silano-pen. Materials and Method: Cylinders of light cured Z 250 composite were cemented to “Degubond 4” (Au Pd) and “Verabond” (Ni Cr) alloys by either RelyX Unicem or Panavia F2, after sandblasting or treating the alloys with Silano-Pen. The shear bond strengths were evaluated. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and t tests at a significance level of P<0.05. Results: When the alloys were treated by Silano-Pen, RelyX Unicem showed a higher bond strength for Degubond 4 (P=0.021) and Verabond (P< 0.001). No significant difference was observed in the bond strength of Panavia F2 to the alloys after either of surface treatments, Degubond 4 (P=0.291) and Verabond (P=0.899). Panavia F2 showed a higher bond strength to sandblasted Verabond compared to RelyX Unicem (P=0.003). The bond strength of RelyX Unicem was significantly higher to Silano-Pen treated Verabond (P=0.011). The bond strength of the cements to sandblasted Degubond 4 showed no significant difference (P=0.59). RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated Degubond 4 (P=0.035). Conclusion: The bond strength of resin cements to Verabond alloy was significantly higher than Degubond 4. RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated alloys. Surface treatments of the alloys did not affect the bond strength of Panavia F2. PMID:25628687

  8. Influence of chlorhexidine on dentin adhesive interface micromorphology and nanoleakage expression of resin cements.

    PubMed

    Stape, Thiago Henrique Scarabello; Menezes, Murilo De Sousa; Barreto, Bruno De Castro Ferreira; Naves, Lucas Zago; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Quagliatto, Paulo Sérgio; Martins, Luís Roberto Marcondes

    2013-08-01

    This study focused on adhesive interface morphologic characterization and nanoleakage expression of resin cements bonded to human dentin pretreated with 1% chlorhexidine (CHX). Thirty-two non-carious human third molars were ground flat to expose superficial dentin. Resin composite blocks were luted to the exposed dentin using one conventional (RelyX ARC) and one self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100), with/without CHX pretreatment. Four groups (n = 8) were obtained: control groups (ARC and U100); experimental groups (ARC/CHX and U100/CHX) were pretreated with 1% CHX prior to the luting process. After storage in water for 24 h, the bonded teeth were sectioned into 0.9 × 0.9 mm(2) sticks producing a minimum of 12 sticks per tooth. Four sticks from each tooth were prepared for hybrid layer evaluation by scanning electron microscope analysis. The remaining sticks were immersed in silver nitrate for 24 h for either nanoleakage evaluation along the bonded interfaces or after rupture. Nanoleakage samples were carbon coated and examined using backscattered electron mode. Well-established hybrid layers were observed in the groups luted with RelyX ARC. Nanoleakage evaluation revealed increase nanoleakage in groups treated with CHX for both resin cements. Group U100/CHX exhibited the most pronouncing nanoleakage expression along with porous zones adjacent to the CHX pretreated dentin. The results suggest a possible incompatibility between CHX and RelyX U100 that raises the concern that the use of CHX with self-adhesive cements may adversely affect resin-dentin bond. PMID:23737406

  9. Cytotoxicity evaluation of five different dual-cured resin cements used for fiber posts cementation

    PubMed Central

    Dioguardi, M; Perrone, D; Troiano, G; Laino, L; Ardito, F; Lauritano, F; Cicciù, M; Muzio, L Lo

    2015-01-01

    Custom-cast posts and cores are usually used to treat endodontically treated teeth. However, several researches have underlined how these devices may be a much higher elastic modulus than the supporting dentine and the difference in the modulus could lead to stress concentrating in the cement lute, leading to failure. The role of the cement seems to play a fundamental role in order to transfer the strength during the chewing phases. Aim of this research is to record the rate of cytotoxicity of five different dual-cured resin cements used for fiber posts cementation. We tested the cytotoxicity of this five materials on MG63 osteoblast-like cells through two different methods: MTT ([3-4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide succinate) assay which tests for mitochondrial enzyme activity6 and xCELLigence® system. PMID:26309592

  10. Cytotoxicity evaluation of five different dual-cured resin cements used for fiber posts cementation.

    PubMed

    Dioguardi, M; Perrone, D; Troiano, G; Laino, L; Ardito, F; Lauritano, F; Cicciù, M; Muzio, L Lo

    2015-01-01

    Custom-cast posts and cores are usually used to treat endodontically treated teeth. However, several researches have underlined how these devices may be a much higher elastic modulus than the supporting dentine and the difference in the modulus could lead to stress concentrating in the cement lute, leading to failure. The role of the cement seems to play a fundamental role in order to transfer the strength during the chewing phases. Aim of this research is to record the rate of cytotoxicity of five different dual-cured resin cements used for fiber posts cementation. We tested the cytotoxicity of this five materials on MG63 osteoblast-like cells through two different methods: MTT ([3-4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide succinate) assay which tests for mitochondrial enzyme activity(6) and xCELLigence® system. PMID:26309592

  11. Retention strength of tin plated gold inlays bonded with two resin cements.

    PubMed

    Eakle, W S; Giblin, J M

    2000-01-01

    Research has shown bonding of restorations to tooth structure to enhance retention of the restoration to increase the fracture resistance of the tooth, and to reduce microleakage. Resin cements have superior physical properties to traditional cements such as zinc phosphate. The purpose of this study was to compare the retention of gold inlays luted with two resin cements to that of those luted with zinc phosphate cement. PMID:11199614

  12. Simulated Wear of Self-Adhesive Resin Cements.

    PubMed

    Takamizawa, T; Barkmeier, W W; Latta, M A; Berry, T P; Tsujimoto, A; Miyazaki, M

    2016-01-01

    One of the primary areas of concern with luting agents is marginal gap erosion and attrition. The purpose of this laboratory study was to evaluate bulk and marginal slit (gap) generalized wear of self-adhesive resin cements. Three self-adhesive resin cements were used in this study: G-CEM LinkAce (LA), Maxcem Elite (ME), and RelyX Unicem2 Automix (RU). A custom stainless-steel fixture with a cavity 4.5 mm in diameter and 4 mm deep was used for simulated generalized (bulk) wear. For simulated marginal gap wear, a two-piece stainless-steel custom fixture was designed with a slit (gap) 300 μm wide and 3 mm in length. For both wear models, 20 specimens each for each of the three adhesive cements were made for both light-cure and chemical-cure techniques. The cured cements were polished with a series of carbide papers to a 4000-grit surface and subjected to 100,000 cycles using the slit (gap) wear model and 400,000 cycles for generalized (bulk) wear in a Leinfelder-Suzuki (Alabama machine) wear simulator (maximum load of 78.5 N). Flat-ended stainless-steel antagonists were used in a water slurry of poly(methylmethacrylate) beads for simulation of generalized contact-free area wear with both wear models. Before and after the wear challenges, the specimens were profiled with a Proscan 2100 noncontact profilometer, and wear (volume loss [VL] and mean facet depth [FD]) was determined using AnSur 3D software. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc tests were used for data analysis for the two wear models. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine polished surfaces of the resin cements and the worn surfaces after the wear challenges. The two-way ANOVA of VL using the generalized (bulk) wear model showed a significant effect among the three resin cement materials for the factor of resin cement (p<0.001) and the interaction of the cement and cure method (p<0.001), but not for the cure method (p=0.465). The two-way ANOVA for FD also found a

  13. Cement compositions for cementing wells allowing pressure gas channeling in the cemented annulus to be controlled

    SciTech Connect

    Porcevaux, P. A.; Piot, B. M.; Vercaemer, C. J.

    1985-08-27

    The invention relates to cement compositions for cementing wells, which allow pressure gas-channeling to be effectively controlled up to more than about 485 F. The cement composition contains a styrene-butadiene latex and a stabilizer. The film of latex interrupts gas-channeling after an extremely brief path.

  14. Relined fiberglass post: an ex vivo study of the resin cement thickness and dentin-resin interface.

    PubMed

    Souza, Niélli Caetano de; Marcondes, Maurem Leitão; Breda, Ricardo Vaz; Weber, João Batista Blessmann; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the thickness of resin cements in the root thirds when using conventional fiberglass posts (CP) and relined fiberglass posts (RP) in weakened roots and to evaluate the morphological characteristics of the dentin-resin interface. Forty human maxillary anterior teeth had the crown sectioned below the cemento-enamel junction. The canals were endodontically treated and weakened with diamond burs. Teeth were divided into four groups (n = 10): Group 1 - CP + RelyX ARC; Group 2 - CP + RelyX U200; Group 3 - RP + RelyX ARC; and Group 4 - RP + RelyX U200. Prior to luting, 0.1% Fluorescein and 0.1% Rhodamine B dyes were added to an adhesive and resin cement, respectively. Slices were obtained from the apical, middle, and cervical thirds of the root. Confocal laser scanning microscopy images were recorded in four areas (buccal, lingual, mesial, distal) of each third. In each area, four equidistant measures of the resin cement were made and the mean value was calculated. The interface morphology was observed. The data were submitted to three-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The interaction between fiberglass posts, resin cement, and root thirds was significant (p < 0.0001). The resin cement thicknesses were significantly lower for RP in comparison with CP, except in the apical third. There was no significant difference between the resin cements for RP. There was formation of resin cement tags and adhesive tags along the root for RP. RP favored the formation of thin and uniform resin cement films and resin tags in weakened roots. PMID:27556553

  15. The Comparison of Sorption and Solubility Behavior of Four Different Resin Luting Cements in Different Storage Media

    PubMed Central

    Giti, Rashin; Vojdani, Mahroo; Abduo, Jaafar; Bagheri, Rafat

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Structural integrity and dimensional stability are the key factors that determine the clinical success and durability of luting cements in the oral cavity. Sorption and solubility of self-adhesive resin luting cements in food-simulating solutions has not been studied sufficiently. Purpose This study aimed to compare the sorption and solubility of 2 conventional and 2 self-adhesive resin-based luting cements immersed in four different storage media. Materials and Method A total of 32 disc-shaped specimens were prepared from each of four resin luting cements; seT (SDI), Panavia F (Kuraray), Clearfil SA Cement (Kuraray), and Choice 2 (Bisco). Eight specimens of each material were immersed in all tested solutions including n-heptane 97%, distilled water, apple juice, or Listerine mouth wash. Sorption and solubility were measured by weighing the specimens before and after immersion and desiccation. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 18, using two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD test with p≤ 0.05 set as the level of significance. Results There was a statistically significant interaction between the materials and solutions. The effect of media on the sorption and solubility was material-dependent. While seT showed the highest values of the sorption in almost all solutions, Choice 2 showed the least values of sorption and solubility. Immersion in apple juice caused more sorption than other solutions (p≤ 0.05). Conclusion The sorption and solubility behavior of the studied cements were significantly affected by their composition and the storage media. The more hydrophobic materials with higher filler content like Choice 2 resin cement showed the least sorption and solubility. Due to their lower sorption and solubility, these types of resin-based luting cements are recommended to be used clinically. PMID:27284553

  16. Resin/graphite fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Techniques were developed that provided thermo-oxidatively stable A-type polyimide/graphite fiber composites using the approach of in situ polymerization of monomeric reactants directly on reinforcing fibers, rather than employing separately prepared prepolymer varnish. This was accomplished by simply mixing methylene dianiline and two ester-acids and applying this solution to the fibers for subsequent molding. Five different formulated molecular weight resins were examined, and an optimized die molding procedure established for the 1500 formulated molecular weight system. Extensive ultrasonic inspection of composites was successfully utilized as a technique for monitoring laminate quality. Composite mechanical property studies were conducted with this polyimide resin at room temperature and after various time exposures in a thermo-oxidative environment at 561 K (550 F), 589 K (600 F) and 617 K (650 F). It was determined that such composites have a long term life in the temperature range of 561 K to 589 K. The final phase involved the fabrication and evaluation of a series of demonstration airfoil specimens.

  17. Immobilization of caesium-loaded ion exchange resins in zeolite-cement blends

    SciTech Connect

    Bagosi, S.; Csetenyi, L.J.

    1999-04-01

    In several countries, low-level radioactive waste immobilization strategies are based on cementitious materials. Water leaching of caesium (Cs)-loaded cemented ion exchange resin and the mechanism of Cs immobilization were studied in the cement-resin-zeolite (mainly clinoptilolite) system. Present work focuses on the reduction of significant Cs leaching (in terms of the total Cs adsorbed on the resin) by blending natural untreated and chemically treated zeolites to the cement. Addition of natural zeolites decreased Cs release by up to 70--75% (of the quantity originally bonded in the resin) in the course of a 3-year leaching period.

  18. Bond strength of resin cement to CO2 and Er:YAG laser-treated zirconia ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Kasraei, Shahin; Heidari, Bijan; Vafaee, Fariborz

    2014-01-01

    Objectives It is difficult to achieve adhesion between resin cement and zirconia ceramics using routine surface preparation methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of CO2 and Er:YAG laser treatment on the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramics. Materials and Methods In this in-vitro study 45 zirconia disks (6 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) were assigned to 3 groups (n = 15). In control group (CNT) no laser treatment was used. In groups COL and EYL, CO2 and Er:YAG lasers were used for pretreatment of zirconia surface, respectively. Composite resin disks were cemented on zirconia disk using dual-curing resin cement. Shear bond strength tests were performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min after 24 hr distilled water storage. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's HSD tests. Results The means and standard deviations of shear bond strength values in the EYL, COL and CNT groups were 8.65 ± 1.75, 12.12 ± 3.02, and 5.97 ± 1.14 MPa, respectively. Data showed that application of CO2 and Er:YAG lasers resulted in a significant higher shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramics (p < 0.0001). The highest bond strength was recorded in the COL group (p < 0.0001). In the CNT group all the failures were adhesive. However, in the laser groups, 80% of the failures were of the adhesive type. Conclusions Pretreatment of zirconia ceramic via CO2 and Er:YAG laser improves the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic, with higher bond strength values in the CO2 laser treated samples. PMID:25383349

  19. Do conventional glass ionomer cements release more fluoride than resin-modified glass ionomer cements?

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Maria Fernanda Costa; Martinho, Roberto Luiz de Menezes; Guedes-Neto, Manoel Valcácio; Rebelo, Maria Augusta Bessa; Pontes, Danielson Guedes

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride release of conventional glass ionomer cements (GICs) and resin-modified GICs. Materials and Methods The cements were grouped as follows: G1 (Vidrion R, SS White), G2 (Vitro Fil, DFL), G3 (Vitro Molar, DFL), G4 (Bioglass R, Biodinâmica), and G5 (Ketac Fil, 3M ESPE), as conventional GICs, and G6 (Vitremer, 3M ESPE), G7 (Vitro Fil LC, DFL), and G8 (Resiglass, Biodinâmica) as resin-modified GICs. Six specimens (8.60 mm in diameter; 1.65 mm in thickness) of each material were prepared using a stainless steel mold. The specimens were immersed in a demineralizing solution (pH 4.3) for 6 hr and a remineralizing solution (pH 7.0) for 18 hr a day. The fluoride ions were measured for 15 days. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test with 5% significance were applied. Results The highest amounts of fluoride release were found during the first 24 hr for all cements, decreasing abruptly on day 2, and reaching gradually decreasing levels on day 7. Based on these results, the decreasing scale of fluoride release was as follows: G2 > G3 > G8 = G4 = G7 > G6 = G1 > G5 (p < 0.05). Conclusions There were wide variations among the materials in terms of the cumulative amount of fluoride ion released, and the amount of fluoride release could not be attributed to the category of cement, that is, conventional GICs or resin-modified GICs. PMID:26295024

  20. Mechanical Properties and Sliding-impact Wear Resistance of Self-adhesive Resin Cements.

    PubMed

    Furuichi, T; Takamizawa, T; Tsujimoto, A; Miyazaki, M; Barkmeier, W W; Latta, M A

    2016-01-01

    The present study determined the mechanical properties and impact-sliding wear characteristics of self-adhesive resin cements. Five self-adhesive resin cements were used: G-CEM LinkAce, BeautiCem SA, Maxcem Elite, Clearfil SA Automix, and RelyX Unicem 2. Clearfil Esthetic Cement was employed as a control material. Six specimens for each resin cement were used to determine flexural strength, elastic modulus, and resilience according to ISO specification #4049. Ten specimens for each resin cement were used to determine the wear characteristics using an impact-sliding wear testing apparatus. Wear was generated using a stainless-steel ball bearing mounted inside a collet assembly. The maximum facet depth and volume loss were determined using a noncontact profilometer in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Data were evaluated using analysis of variance followed by the Tukey honestly significantly different test (α=0.05). The flexural strength of the resin cements ranged from 68.4 to 144.2 MPa; the elastic modulus ranged from 4.4 to 10.6 GPa; and the resilience ranged from 4.5 to 12.0 MJ/m(3). The results for the maximum facet depth ranged from 25.2 to 235.9 μm, and volume loss ranged from 0.0107 to 0.5258 mm(3). The flexural properties and wear resistance were found to vary depending upon the self-adhesive resin cement tested. The self-adhesive cements tended to have lower mechanical properties than the conventional resin cement. All self-adhesive resin cements, apart from G-CEM LinkAce, demonstrated significantly poorer wear resistance than did the conventional resin cement. PMID:26918929

  1. Resin/graphite fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Processing techniques were developed for the fabrication of both polyphenylquinoxaline and polyimide composites by the in situ polymerization of monomeric reactants directly on the graphite reinforcing fibers, rather than using previously prepared prepolymer varnishes. Void-free polyphenylquinoxaline composites were fabricated and evaluated for room and elevated flexure and shear properties. The technology of the polyimide system was advanced to the point where the material is ready for commercial exploitation. A reproducible processing cycle free of operator judgment factors was developed for fabrication of void-free composites exhibiting excellent mechanical properties and a long time isothermal life in the range of 288 C to 316 C. The effects of monomer reactant stoichiometry and process modification on resin flow were investigated. Demonstration of the utility and quality of this polyimide system was provided through the successful fabrication and evaluation of four complex high tip speed fan blades.

  2. Bending rigidity of composite resin coating clasps.

    PubMed

    Ikebe, K; Kibi, M; Ono, T; Nokubi, T

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the bending profiles of composite resin coating cast clasps. The cobalt-chromium alloy cast clasps were made using tapered wax pattern. Silane coupling method (Silicoater MD, Kulzer Co.) was used to attach composite resin to metal surface. The breakage and the bending rigidity of composite resin coating clasps were evaluated. Results were as follows: 1) After the repeated bending test to the tips of clasp arm at 10,000 times in 0.25 mm deflection, neither crack on composite resin surface nor separation at resin/metal interface was observed in any specimen. 2) There was no significant difference in the bending rigidity of clasp arms between before and after composite resin coating. From these results, it was demonstrated that the composite resin coating cast clasp was available in clinical cases and coating with composite resin had little influence on the bending rigidity of clasp arms. Therefore, it was suggested that our clasp designing and fabricating system to control the bending rigidity of clasp arms could be applied to composite resin coating clasps. PMID:8935086

  3. Shear bond strength of resin cement to an acid etched and a laser irradiated ceramic surface

    PubMed Central

    Motro, Pelin Fatma Karagoz; Yurdaguven, Haktan

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effects of hydrofluoric acid etching and Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on the shear bond strength of resin cement to lithium disilicate ceramic. MATERIALS AND METHODS Fifty-five ceramic blocks (5 mm × 5 mm × 2 mm) were fabricated and embedded in acrylic resin. Their surfaces were finished with 1000-grit silicon carbide paper. The blocks were assigned to five groups: 1) 9.5% hydrofluoric-acid etching for 60 s; 2-4), 1.5-, 2.5-, and 6-W Er,Cr:YSGG laser applications for 60 seconds, respectively; and 5) no treatment (control). One specimen from each group was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Ceramic primer (Rely X ceramic primer) and adhesive (Adper Single Bond) were applied to the ceramic surfaces, followed by resin cement to bond the composite cylinders, and light curing. Bonded specimens were stored in distilled water at 37℃ for 24 hours. Shear bond strengths were determined by a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests (α=0.05). RESULTS Adhesion was significantly stronger in Group 2 (3.88 ± 1.94 MPa) and Group 3 (3.65 ± 1.87 MPa) than in Control group (1.95 ± 1.06 MPa), in which bonding values were lowest (P<.01). No significant difference was observed between Group 4 (3.59 ± 1.19 MPa) and Control group. Shear bond strength was highest in Group 1 (8.42 ± 1.86 MPa; P<.01). CONCLUSION Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation at 1.5 and 2.5 W increased shear bond strengths between ceramic and resin cement compared with untreated ceramic surfaces. Irradiation at 6 W may not be an efficient ceramic surface treatment technique. PMID:23755333

  4. Influence of the interposition of ceramic spacers on the degree of conversion and the hardness of resin cements.

    PubMed

    Calgaro, Patricia Angélica Milani; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Correr, Gisele Maria; Ornaghi, Bárbara Pick; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated: I) the effect of photo-activation through ceramics on the degree of conversion (DC) and on the Knoop hardness (KHN) of light- and dual-cured resin cements; and II) two different protocols for obtaining the spectra of uncured materials, to determine the DC of a dual-cured resin cement. Thin films of cements were photo-activated through ceramics [feldspathic porcelain (FP); lithium disilicate glass-ceramics of low translucency (e.max-LT), medium opacity (e.max-MO) and high translucency (e.max-HT); glass-infiltrated alumina composite (IC) and polycrystalline zirconia (ZR)] with thicknesses of 1.5 and 2.0 mm. DC was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Two protocols were used to obtain the spectra of the uncured materials: I) base and catalyst pastes were mixed, and II) thin films of base and catalyst pastes were obtained separately, and an average was obtained. KHN assessment was performed with cylindrical specimens. The results were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α= 0.05). The light-cured cement showed higher DC (61.9%) than the dual-cured cement (55.7%). The DC varied as follows: FP (65.4%), e.max-HT (65.1%), e.max-LT (61.8%), e.max-MO (60.9%), ZR (54.8%), and IC (44.9%). The light-cured cement showed lower KHN (22.0) than the dual-cured (25.6) cement. The cements cured under 1.5 mm spacers showed higher KHN (26.2) than when polymerized under 2.0 mm ceramics (21.3). Regarding the two protocols, there were significant differences only in three groups. Thus, both methods can be considered appropriate. The physical and mechanical properties of resin cements may be affected by the thickness and microstructure of the ceramic material interposed during photo-activation. PMID:24036978

  5. Foam, Foam-resin composite and method of making a foam-resin composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cranston, John A. (Inventor); MacArthur, Doug E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a foam, a foam-resin composite and a method of making foam-resin composites. The foam set forth in this invention comprises a urethane modified polyisocyanurate derived from an aromatic amino polyol and a polyether polyol. In addition to the polyisocyanurate foam, the composite of this invention further contains a resin layer, wherein the resin may be epoxy, bismaleimide, or phenolic resin. Such resins generally require cure or post-cure temperatures of at least 350.degree. F.

  6. Microtensile bond strength of indirect resin composite to resin-coated dentin: interaction between diamond bur roughness and coating material.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Oishi, Takumi; Sugawara, Toyotarou; Hirai, Yoshito

    2009-02-01

    This aim of this study was to determine the effect of type of bur and resin-coating material on microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of indirect composite to dentin. Dentin surfaces were first ground with two types of diamond bur and resin-coated using UniFil Bond (UB) or Adper Single Bond (SB), and then bonded to a resin composite disc for indirect restoration with adhesive resin cement. After storage for 24 hr in distilled water at 37 degrees C, microTBS was measured (crosshead speed 1 mm/min). When UB was applied to dentin prepared using the regular-grit diamond bur, microTBS was significantly lower than that in dentin prepared using the superfine-grit bur. In contrast, no significant difference was found between regular-grit and superfine-grit bur with SB. However, more than half of the superfine-grit specimens failed before microTBS testing. These results indicate that selection of bur type is important in improving the bond strength of adhesive resin cement between indirect resin composite and resin-coated dentin. PMID:19622875

  7. The influence of polymerization shrinkage of resin cements on bonding to metal.

    PubMed

    Verzijden, C W; Feilzer, A J; Creugers, N H; Davidson, C L

    1992-02-01

    During the setting of a resin composite cement (RCC) used as an adhesive between a resin-bonded bridge and tooth structure, the adhesion may be disrupted by the development of shrinkage stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the shrinkage stress of three different RCCs on their adhesive and cohesive qualities when bonded to metal surfaces in a rigid set-up. Two opposing parallel NiCr discs (Wiron 77) were mounted in a tensilometer at a mutual distance of 200 microns and cemented with Panavia Ex, Clearfil F2, or Microfill Pontic C. The alloy surfaces were treated by either electrolytic etching, sand-blasting, silane-coating, or tin-plating. During setting, the discs were kept at their original mutual distance to simulate the extreme clinical situation of "complete" rigidity, where the casting and the tooth cannot move toward each other. The developing shrinkage stress was recorded continuously. During setting, the adhesive strength of the RCCs to silane-coated surfaces was always higher than their early cohesive strength. Electrolytically-etched surfaces as well as sand-blasted surfaces showed, in almost all cases, adhesive failure. The tin-plated samples showed mainly adhesive failure at the metal/resin interface. The highest bond strength values were found for silane-coated surfaces in combination with Clearfil F2. PMID:1556300

  8. Effect of dentin pretreatment and curing mode on the microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Youm, Seung-Hyun; Jung, Kyoung-Hwa; Son, Sung-Ae; Kwon, Yong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim was to evaluate the effect of curing mode and different dentin surface pretreatment on microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of self-adhesive resin cements. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-six extracted human permanent molars were sectioned horizontally exposing flat dentin surface. The teeth were divided into 12 groups (3 teeth/group) according to the dentin surface pretreatment methods (control, 18% EDTA, 10% Polyacrylic acid) and curing mode (self-curing vs. light-curing) of cement. After pretreatment, composite resin blocks were cemented with the following: (a) G-CEM LinkAce; (b) RelyX U200, followed by either self-curing or light-curing. After storage, the teeth were sectioned and µTBS test was performed using a microtensile testing machine. The data was statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA, Student T-test and Scheffe's post-hoc test at P<.05 level. RESULTS For G-CEM LinkAce cement groups, polyacrylic acid pretreatment showed the highest µTBS in the self-cured group. In the light-cured group, no significant improvements were observed according to the dentin surface pretreatment. There were no significant differences between curing modes. Both dentin surface pretreatment methods helped to increase the µTBS of RelyX U200 resin cement significantly and degree of pretreatment effect was similar. No significant differences were found regarding curing modes except control groups. In the comparisons of two self-adhesive resin cements, all groups within the same pretreatment and curing mode were significantly different excluding self-cured control groups. CONCLUSION Selecting RelyX U200 used in this study and application of dentin surface pretreatment with EDTA and polyacrylic acid might be recommended to enhance the bond strength of cement to dentin. PMID:26330979

  9. Release and toxicity of dental resin composite

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saurabh K.; Saxena, Payal; Pant, Vandana A.; Pant, Aditya B.

    2012-01-01

    Dental resin composite that are tooth-colored materials have been considered as possible substitutes to mercury-containing silver amalgam filling. Despite the fact that dental resin composites have improved their physico-chemical properties, the concern for its intrinsic toxicity remains high. Some components of restorative composite resins are released in the oral environment initially during polymerization reaction and later due to degradation of the material. In vitro and in vivo studies have clearly identified that these components of restorative composite resins are toxic. But there is a large gap between the results published by research laboratories and clinical reports. The objective of this manuscript was to review the literature on release phenomenon as well as in vitro and in vivo toxicity of dental resin composite. Interpretation made from the recent data was also outlined. PMID:23293458

  10. Resistance to bond degradation between dual-cure resin cements and pre-treated sintered CAD-CAM dental ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Raquel; Monticelli, Francesca; Osorio, Estrella; Toledano, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the bond stability of resin cements when luted to glass-reinforced alumina and zirconia CAD/CAM dental ceramics. Study design: Eighteen glass-infiltrated alumina and eighteen densely sintered zirconia blocks were randomly conditioned as follows: Group 1: No treatment; Group 2: Sandblasting (125 µm Al2O3-particles); and Group 3: Silica-coating (50 µm silica-modified Al2O3-particles). Composite samples were randomly bonded to the pre-treated ceramic surfaces using different resin cements: Subgroup 1: Clearfil Esthetic Cement (CEC); Subgroup 2: RelyX Unicem (RXU); and Subgroup 3: Calibra (CAL). After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into 1 ± 0.1 mm2 sticks. One-half of the beams were tested for microtensile bond strength (MTBS). The remaining one-half was immersed in 10 % NaOCl aqueous solution (NaOClaq) for 5 h before testing. The fracture pattern and morphology of the debonded surfaces were assessed with a field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM). A multiple ANOVA was conducted to analyze the contributions of ceramic composition, surface treatment, resin cement type, and chemical challenging to MTBS. The Tukey test was run for multiple comparisons (p < 0.05). Results: After 24 h, CEC luted to pre-treated zirconia achieved the highest MTBS. Using RXU, alumina and zirconia registered comparable MTBS. CAL failed prematurely, except when luted to sandblasted zirconia. After NaOClaq storage, CEC significantly lowered MTBS when luted to zirconia or alumina. RXU decreased MTBS only when bonded to silica-coated alumina. CAL recorded 100 % of pre-testing failures. Micromorphological alterations were evident after NaOClaq immersion. Conclusions: Resin-ceramic interfacial longevity depended on cement selection rather than on surface pre-treatments. The MDP-containing and the self-adhesive resin cements were both suitable for luting CAD/CAM ceramics. Despite both cements being prone to degradation, RXU luted to zirconia or untreated or

  11. High elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites for dental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yijun

    2007-12-01

    Dental restorations account for more than $3 billion dollars a year on the market. Among them, all-ceramic dental crowns draw more and more attention and their popularity has risen because of their superior aesthetics and biocompatibility. However, their relatively high failure rate and labor-intensive fabrication procedure still limit their application. In this thesis, a new family of high elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites and their mechanical properties are studied. Materials with higher elastic modulus, such as alumina and diamond, are used to replace the routine filler material, silica, in dental resin composites to achieve the desired properties. This class of composites is developed to serve (1) as a high stiffness support to all-ceramic crowns and (2) as a means of joining independently fabricated crown core and veneer layers. Most of the work focuses on nano-sized Al2O3 (average particle size 47 nm) reinforcement in a polymeric matrix with 50:50 Bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA): triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) monomers. Surfactants, silanizing agents and primers are examined to obtain higher filler levels and enhance the bonding between filler and matrix. Silane agents work best. The elastic modulus of a 57.5 vol% alumina/resin composite is 31.5 GPa compared to current commercial resin composites with elastic modulus <15 GPa. Chemical additives can also effectively raise the hardness to as much as 1.34 GPa. Besides>alumina, diamond/resin composites are studied. An elastic modulus of about 45 GPa is obtained for a 57 vol% diamond/resin composite. Our results indicate that with a generally monodispersed nano-sized high modulus filler, relatively high elastic modulus resin-based composite cements are possible. Time-dependent behavior of our resin composites is also investigated. This is valuable for understanding the behavior of our material and possible fatigue testing in the future. Our results indicate that with

  12. SEM and elemental analysis of composite resins

    SciTech Connect

    Hosoda, H.; Yamada, T.; Inokoshi, S. )

    1990-12-01

    Twenty-four chemically cured, 21 light-cured anterior, three light-cured anterior/posterior, and 18 light-cured posterior composite resins were examined using scanning electron microscopy, and the elemental composition of their filler particles was analyzed with an energy dispersive electron probe microanalyzer. According to the results obtained, the composite resins were divided into five groups (traditional, microfilled type, submicrofilled type, hybrid type, and semihybrid), with two additional hypothetical categories (microfilled and hybrid). Characteristics of each type were described with clinical indications for selective guidance of respective composite resins for clinical use.

  13. Resin selection criteria for tough composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    Resin selection criteria are derived using a structured methodology consisting of an upward integrated mechanistic theory and its inverse (top-down structured theory). These criteria are expressed in a "criteria selection space" which are used to identify resin bulk properties for improved composite "toughness". The resin selection criteria correlate with a variety of experimental data including laminate strength, elevated temperature effects and impact resistance.

  14. An assessment of fracture resistance of three composite resin core build-up materials on three prefabricated non-metallic posts, cemented in endodontically treated teeth: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Bhupinder; Pujari, Prashant

    2015-01-01

    Endodontically treated teeth with excessive loss of tooth structure would require to be restored with post and core to enhance the strength and durability of the tooth and to achieve retention for the restoration. The non-metallic posts have a superior aesthetic quality. Various core build-up materials can be used to build-up cores on the posts placed in endodontically treated teeth. These materials would show variation in their bonding with the non-metallic posts thus affecting the strength and resistance to fracture of the remaining tooth structure. Aims. The aim of the study was to assess the fracture resistance of three composite resin core build-up materials on three prefabricated non-metallic posts, cemented in extracted endodontically treated teeth. Material and Methods. Forty-five freshly extracted maxillary central incisors of approximately of the same size and shape were selected for the study. They were divided randomly into 3 groups of 15 each, depending on the types of non-metallic posts used. Each group was further divided into 3 groups (A, B and C) of 5 samples each depending on three core build-up material used. Student’s unpaired ‘t’ test was also used to analyse and compare each group with the other groups individually, and decide whether their comparisons were statistically significant. Results. Luxacore showed the highest fracture resistance among the three core build-up materials with all the three posts systems. Ti-core had intermediate values of fracture resistance and Lumiglass had the least values of fracture resistance. PMID:25755926

  15. Effect of CO2 and Nd:YAG Lasers on Shear Bond Strength of Resin Cement to Zirconia Ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Kasraei, Shahin; Yarmohamadi, Ebrahim; Shabani, Amanj

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Because of poor bond between resin cement and zirconia ceramics, laser surface treatments have been suggested to improve adhesion. The present study evaluated the effect of CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers on the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin cement to zirconia ceramic. Materials and Methods: Ninety zirconia disks (6×2 mm) were randomly divided into six groups of 15. In the control group, no surface treatment was used. In the test groups, laser surface treatment was accomplished using CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers, respectively (groups two and three). Composite resin disks (3×2 mm) were fabricated and cemented to zirconia disks with self-etch resin cement and stored in distilled water for 24 hours. In the test groups four-six, the samples were prepared as in groups one-three and then thermocycled and stored in distilled water for six months. The SBS tests were performed (strain rate of 0.5 mm/min). The fracture modes were observed via stereomicroscopy. Data were analyzed with one and two-way ANOVA, independent t and Tukey’s tests. Results: The SBS values of Nd:YAG group (18.95±3.46MPa) was significantly higher than that of the CO2 group (14.00±1.96MPa), but lower than that of controls (23.35±3.12MPa). After thermocycling and six months of water storage, the SBS of the untreated group (1.80±1.23 MPa) was significantly lower than that of the laser groups. In groups stored for 24 hours, 60% of the failures were adhesive; however, after thermocycling and six months of water storage, 100% of failures were adhesive. Conclusion: Bonding durability of resin cement to zirconia improved with CO2 and Nd:YAG laser surface treatment of zirconia ceramic. PMID:27148380

  16. Study of deformation of resin cements used in fixing of root posts through fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido, C. A.; Franco, A. P. G. O.; Karam, L. Z.; Kalinowski, H. J.; Gomes, O. M. M.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the polymerization shrinkage "in situ" in resin cements inside the root canal during the fixation of glass fiber posts. For cementation teeth were randomly divided into 2 groups according to the resin cement used: Group1 - resin cement dual Relyx ARC (3M/ESPE), and Group 2 - resin cement dual Relyx U200 (3M/ESPE). Before inserting the resin cement into the root canal, two Bragg grating sensors were recorded and pasted in the region without contact with the canal, one at the apical and other at the coronal thirds of the post. The sensors measured the deformation of the resin cements in coronal and apical root thirds to obtain the values in micro-strain (μɛ).

  17. Effect of surface preparation on bond strength of resin luting cements to dentin.

    PubMed

    Peerzada, Farrahnaz; Yiu, Cynthia Kar Yung; Hiraishi, Noriko; Tay, Franklin Russell; King, Nigel Martyn

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effects of using two different burs for dentin surface preparation on the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of three resin luting cements. Flat, deep dentin surfaces from 45 extracted human third molars were divided into three groups (n = 15) according to bur type: (i) diamond bur and (ii) tungsten carbide bur. The controls were abraded with #600-grit SiC paper. Both burs operated in a high-speed handpiece under water-cooling. Composite blocks were luted onto the dentin using one of three cements: RelyX ARC (ARC, 3M ESPE), Panavia F2.0 (PF, Kuraray) and RelyX Unicem (UN, 3M ESPE) following the manufacturers' instructions. For ARC, the dentin surface was treated with 32% phosphoric acid. The bonded specimens were stored at 37 degrees C for 24 hours and sectioned into 0.9 x 0.9 mm beams for microTBS testing. The data were analyzed using the two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests. Representative fractured beams from each group were prepared for fractographic analysis under SEM. Two-way ANOVA revealed that the effects of "dentin surface preparation" and "luting cement" were statistically significant (p < 0.001); however, the interaction of these two factors was not significant (p > 0.05). ARC showed no significant difference in microTBS among the three differently prepared dentin surfaces. The microTBS of PF and UN was significantly lower when bonding to dentin prepared with a diamond bur (p < 0.05), compared to the control. For Panavia F2.0, higher bond strengths were achieved on the dentin surface prepared with a tungsten carbide bur. Proper bur selection is essential to optimizing the dentin adhesion of self-etch resin luting cements. PMID:21180001

  18. Class II Resin Composites: Restorative Options.

    PubMed

    Patel, Minesh; Mehta, Shamir B; Banerji, Subir

    2015-10-01

    Tooth-coloured, resin composite restorations are amongst the most frequently prescribed forms of dental restoration to manage defects in posterior teeth. The attainment of a desirable outcome when placing posterior resin composite restorations requires the clinician to have a good understanding of the benefits (as well as the limitations) posed by this material, together with a sound knowledge of placement technique. Numerous protocols and materials have evolved to assist the dental operator with this type of demanding posterior restoration. With the use of case examples, four techniques available are reported here. CPD/Clinical Relevance: This article explores varying techniques for the restoration of Class II cavities using resin composite. PMID:26685471

  19. Submargination of a resin luting cement--a clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Chan, D C; Titus, H W

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this case report was to examine the marginal integrity of an indirect inlay and an onlay luted with resin luting cement over a four year period. A technique to seal the occlusal margins of the inlay restoration was reported. Over time, the occlusal margins of the inlay were noticeably submarginated due to wear degradation of the resin inlay cement. The onlay margins were less affected by wear. Clinical techniques to overcome submargination problems were discussed. PMID:9518821

  20. Correlation between clinical performance and degree of conversion of resin cements: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    DE SOUZA, Grace; BRAGA, Roberto Ruggiero; CESAR, Paulo Francisco; LOPES, Guilherme Carpena

    2015-01-01

    Resin-based cements have been frequently employed in clinical practice to lute indirect restorations. However, there are numerous factors that may compromise the clinical performance of those cements. The aim of this literature review is to present and discuss some of the clinical factors that may affect the performance of current resin-based luting systems. Resin cements may have three different curing mechanisms: chemical curing, photo curing or a combination of both. Chemically cured systems are recommended to be used under opaque or thick restorations, due to the reduced access of the light. Photo-cured cements are mainly indicated for translucent veneers, due to the possibility of light transmission through the restoration. Dual-cured are more versatile systems and, theoretically, can be used in either situation, since the presence of both curing mechanisms might guarantee a high degree of conversion (DC) under every condition. However, it has been demonstrated that clinical procedures and characteristics of the materials may have many different implications in the DC of currently available resin cements, affecting their mechanical properties, bond strength to the substrate and the esthetic results of the restoration. Factors such as curing mechanism, choice of adhesive system, indirect restorative material and light-curing device may affect the degree of conversion of the cement and, therefore, have an effect on the clinical performance of resin-based cements. Specific measures are to be taken to ensure a higher DC of the luting system to be used. PMID:26398507

  1. Color changes in resin cement polymerized with different curing lights under indirect restorations

    PubMed Central

    Bayindir, Funda; Ilday, Nurcan Ozakar; Bayindir, Yusuf Ziya; Karataş, Ozcan; Gurpinar, Aysel

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of different interface materials and curing units on color changes in a resin cement material. Materials and Methods: Three interface materials and different curing systems, quartz-tungsten-halogen and polywave and monowave light-emitting diode (LED) light curing units, were studied at two-time intervals. Polystyrene strip was used as a control group. All measurements were made on a white background for standard color measurement. According to the CIE L*a*b* color space, the baseline color values of each specimen were measured. Differences between the measurements were calculated as ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's tests (α = 0.05) with SPSS 20.0 software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). ANOVA revealed significance for interface materials and curing units and time for ΔE (P < 0.05). Results: Interaction between polymerizing units, material and time was not significant (P > 0.05). Monowave LED exhibited significantly higher color changes than the other units ([P < 0.05] [ΔE 2.94 ± 0.44]). QTH promoted composite specimens significantly less color change ([P < 0.05] [ΔE 0.87 ± 0.41]). Conclusion: This study concluded that color of resin cement used in the adhesion of indirect restorations was affected by curing device light and indirect restoration material type. PMID:26957793

  2. Effect of sandblasting, silica coating, and laser treatment on the microtensile bond strength of a dental zirconia ceramic to resin cements.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodi, Nasrin; Hooshmand, Tabassom; Heidari, Solmaz; Khoshro, Kimia

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of laser irradiation as well as other surface treatment methods on the microtensile bond strength of a dental zirconia ceramic to the two types of resin cements. Zirconia ceramic blocks (ICE Zirkon) were sintered according to the manufacturer's instructions and duplicated in resin composites. The ceramic specimens were divided into four groups according to the following surface treatments: no surface treatment (control), sandblasting with alumina, silica coating plus silanization, and Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The specimens were divided equally and then bonded with Panavia F2.0 (self-etching resin cement) and Clearfil SA Luting (self-adhesive resin cement) to the composite blocks. The bonded ceramic-composite blocks were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 72 h, cut to prepare bar-shaped specimens with a bonding area of approximately 1 mm(2), and thermocycled for 3000 cycles between 5 and 55 °C, and the microtensile bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test. The results showed that the self-adhesive resin cement used in this study did not improve the microtensile bond strength when the zirconia surface was sandblasted by alumina. The use of the Nd:YAG laser did not enhance the bond strength between the zirconia and both types of resin cements. In addition, silica coating of the zirconia surfaces plus silane application significantly improved the bond strength regardless of the type of resin cement utilized. PMID:26690357

  3. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to tooth structure

    PubMed Central

    Hattar, Susan; Hatamleh, Muhanad M.; Sawair, Faleh; Al-Rabab’ah, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the strength of the bond between newly introduced self-adhesive resin cements and tooth structures (i.e., enamel and dentin). Methods Three self-adhesive cements (SmartCem2, RelyX Unicem, seT SDI) were tested. Cylindrical-shaped cement specimens (diameter, 3 mm; height, 3 mm) were bonded to enamel and dentin. Test specimens were incubated at 37 °C for 24 h. The shear bond strength (SBS) was tested in a Zwick Roll testing machine. Results were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and t-test. Statistically significant differences were defined at the α = 0.05 level. Bond failures were categorized as adhesive, cohesive, or mixed. Results The SBS values ranged from 3.76 to 6.81 MPa for cements bonded to enamel and from 4.48 to 5.94 MPa for cements bonded to dentin (p > 0.05 between surfaces). There were no statistically significant differences between the SBS values to enamel versus dentin for any given cement type. All cements exhibited adhesive failure at the resin/tooth interface. Conclusions Regardless of their clinical simplicity, the self-adhesive resin cements examined in this study exhibit limited bond performance to tooth structures; therefore, these cements must be used with caution. PMID:26082572

  4. Modelling of the interaction between chemical and mechanical behaviour of ion exchange resins incorporated into a cement-based matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neji, M.; Bary, B.; Burlion, N.; Le Bescop, P.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we present a predictive model, based on experimental data, to determine the macroscopic mechanical behavior of a material made up of ion exchange resins solidified into a CEM III cement paste. Some observations have shown that in some cases, a significant macroscopic expansion of this composite material may be expected, due to internal pressures generated in the resin. To build the model, we made the choice to break down the problem in two scale's studies. The first deals with the mechanical behavior of the different heterogeneities of the composite, i.e. the resin and the cement paste. The second upscales the information from the heterogeneities to the Representative Elementary Volume (REV) of the composite. The heterogeneities effects are taken into account in the REV by applying a homogenization method derived from the Eshelby theory combined with an interaction coefficient drawn from the poroelasticity theory. At the first scale, from the second thermodynamic law, a formulation is developed to estimate the resin microscopic swelling. The model response is illustrated on a simple example showing the impact of the calculated internal pressure, on the macroscopic strain.

  5. The Bond Strength of Resin Bonded Bridge Retainers to Abutments of Differing Proportions of Enamel and Composite.

    PubMed

    Durey, Kathryn; Nattress, Brian

    2015-03-01

    Four groups of specimens were constructed using bovine enamel and composite resin. After a period of ageing, the specimens were roughened and acid etched before they were cemented to air abraded base metal alloy beams with a universal resin cement. After further ageing, tensile peel testing was carried out using a Universal Testing Machine. The force required to produce failure increased as the amount of composite resin on the bonding surface of the abutment increased. This difference reached statistical significance (p < 0.5) when the abutments contained > 50% composite. The mode of failure was mixed on the majority of retainers. Within the limitations of the study, findings suggest that RBB retainers can be cemented to abutments restored with composite resin without a reduction in bond strength. PMID:26415336

  6. Effect of blastfurnace slag addition to Portland cement for cationic exchange resins encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafond, E.; Cau Dit Coumes, C.; Gauffinet, S.; Chartier, D.; Le Bescop, P.; Stefan, L.; Nonat, A.

    2013-07-01

    In the nuclear industry, cement-based materials are extensively used to encapsulate spent ion exchange resins (IERs) before their final disposal in a repository. It is well known that the cement has to be carefully selected to prevent any deleterious expansion of the solidified waste form, but the reasons for this possible expansion are not clearly established. This work aims at filling the gap. The swelling pressure of IERs is first investigated as a function of ions exchange and ionic strength. It is shown that pressures of a few tenths of MPa can be produced by decreases in the ionic strength of the bulk solution, or by ion exchanges (2Na+ instead of Ca2+, Na+ instead of K+). Then, the chemical evolution of cationic resins initially in the Na+ form is characterized in CEM I (Portland cement) and CEM III (Portland cement + blastfurnace slag) cements at early age and an explanation is proposed for the better stability of CEM III material.

  7. Comparison of Flexural Strength of Resin Cements After Storing in Different Media and Bleaching Agents.

    PubMed

    Geramipanah, Farideh; Rezaei, Susan Mir Mohammad; Jafary, Maryam; Sadighpour, Leyla

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of different storage media and bleaching treatments on the flexural strength of two resin cements (Panavia and BisCem). One hundred rectangular-shaped specimens were prepared with two resin cements and were stored in five media types (n = 10): distilled water (DW), lactic acid (LA), sodium hydroxide (NH), in-office bleaching (OB) and home bleaching (HB). There was significant interaction between the solutions and cements (p < 0.05). The lowest three-point flexural strength was found in sodium hydroxide for both cements (p < 0.05). Both cements exhibited significant increase in flexural strength following home and in-office bleaching (except Panavia in OB) (p < 0.05) compared with immersion in distilled water. Panavia recorded significantly higher flexural strength compared with BisCem in all media (p < 0.002), with the exception of in-office bleaching. PMID:26373198

  8. Resin composite repair: Quantitative microleakage evaluation of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces with different surface treatments

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Cigdem; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak; Arhun, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effect of different adhesive systems and surface treatments on the integrity of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces after partial removal of preexisting resin composites using quantitative image analysis for microleakage testing protocol. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 human molar teeth were restored with either of the resin composites (Filtek Z250/GrandioSO) occlusally. The teeth were thermocycled (1000×). Mesial and distal 1/3 parts of the restorations were removed out leaving only middle part. One side of the cavity was finished with course diamond bur and the other was air-abraded with 50 μm Al2O3. They were randomly divided into four groups (n = 10) to receive: Group 1: Adper Single Bond 2; Group 2: All Bond 3; Group 3: ClearfilSE; Group 4: BeautiBond, before being repaired with the same resin composite (Filtek Z250). The specimens were re-thermocycled (1000×), sealed with nail varnish, stained with 0.5% basic fuchsin, sectioned mesiodistally and photographed digitally. The extent of dye penetration was measured by image analysis software (ImageJ) for both bur-finished and air-abraded surfaces at resin-tooth and resin-resin interfaces. The data were analyzed statistically. Results: BeautiBond exhibited the most microleakage at every site. Irrespective of adhesive and initial composite type, air-abrasion showed less microleakage except for BeautiBond. The type of initial repaired restorative material did not affect the microleakage. BeautiBond adhesive may not be preferred in resin composite repair in terms of microleakage prevention. Conclusions: Surface treatment with air-abrasion produced the lowest microleakage scores, independent of the adhesive systems and the pre-existing resin composite type. Pre-existing composite type does not affect the microleakage issue. All-in-one adhesive resin (BeautiBond) may not be preferred in resin composite repair in terms of microleakage prevention. PMID:25713491

  9. Reinforcing of Cement Composites by Estabragh Fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merati, A. A.

    2014-04-01

    The influence of Estabragh fibres has been studied to improve the performance characteristics of the reinforced cement composites. The concrete shrinkage was evaluated by counting the number of cracks and measuring the width of cracks on the surface of concrete specimens. Although, the Estabragh fibres lose their strength in an alkali environment of cement composites, but, the ability of Estabragh fibres to bridge on the micro cracks in the concrete matrix causes to decrease the width of the cracks on the surface of the concrete samples in comparison with the plain concrete. However, considering the mechanical properties of specimens such as bending strength and impact resistance, the specimens with 0.25 % of Estabragh fibre performed better in all respects compared to the physical and mechanical properties of reinforced cement composite of concrete. Consequently, by adding 0.25 % of Estabragh fibres to the cement composite of concrete, a remarkable improvement in physical and mechanical properties of fibre-containing cement composite is achieved.

  10. Temperature rise during polymerization of different cavity liners and composite resins

    PubMed Central

    Karatas, Ozcan; Turel, Verda; Bayindir, Yusuf Ziya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the thermal insulating properties of different light curing cavity liners and composite resins during light emitting diode (LED) curing. Materials and Methods: Sixty-four dentin discs, 1 mm thick and 8 mm in diameter, were prepared. Specimens were divided into four groups. Calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH]2), resin-modified glass ionomer cement, flowable composite and adhesive systems were applied to dentin discs according to the manufacturers’ instructions. The rise in temperature during polymerization with a LED curing unit (LCU) was measured using a K-type thermocouple connected to a data logger. Subsequently, all specimens were randomly divided into one of two groups. A silorane-based composite resin and a methacrylate-based composite resin were applied to the specimens. Temperature rise during polymerization of composite resins with LCU were then measured again. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey analyses. Results: There were significant differences in temperature rise among the liners, adhesives, and composite resins (P < 0.05). Silorane-based composite resin exhibited significantly greater temperature rises than methacrylate-based resin (P < 0.05). The smallest temperature rises were observed in Ca(OH)2 specimens. Conclusion: Thermal insulating properties of different restorative materials are important factors in pulp health. Bonding agents alone are not sufficient to protect pulp from thermal stimuli throughout curing. PMID:26751112

  11. PMR Resin Compositions For High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes experiments to identify polymer matrix resins suitable for making graphite-fiber laminates used at 700 degree F (371 degree C) in such applications as aircraft engines to achieve higher thrust-to-weight ratios. Two particular high-molecular-weight formulations of PMR (polymerization of monomer reactants) resins most promising. PMR compositions of higher FMW exhibit enhanced thermo-oxidative stability. Formation of high-quality laminates with these compositions requires use of curing pressures higher than those suitable for compositions of lower FMW.

  12. An evaluation of commercial and experimental resin-modified glass-ionomer cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanchanavasita, Widchaya

    Glass-ionomer cement (GIG) has become widely accepted as a restorative material due to its bonding ability and sustained release of fluoride. The cement is, however, sensitive to moisture imbalance and lacks toughness. Recently, resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (RMGIC) have been introduced. These materials contain monomeric species, such as 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) in addition to the components of the conventional glass-ionomer cements. Disadvantages of RMGICs include a relatively high contraction and exotherm on polymerisation. HEMA is known to be cytotoxic, leading to problems of biocompatibility, and polyHEMA swells on exposure to water, leading to dimensional instability of the cements. Addressing these problems is important in the development of the RMGICs. Using alternative monomers to replace or reduce the amount of HEMA used in the current RMGIC formulations would be appropriate. This study was divided into two parts. Initially certain properties such as water sorption, micro-hardness, flexural strength and polymerisation exotherm of commercially available RMGICs were evaluated. Long-term storage of RMGICs in aqueous solutions resulted in their high water uptakes and solubilities and large volumetric expansions. However, the surface hardness and strengths of the restorative grade RMGICs were not affected on storage in distilled water. When the materials were immersed in artificial saliva, significantly higher water uptake were obtained; the equilibrium water uptake were not reached after 20 months. As a consequence, plastic behaviour and reduced surface hardness were observed. The RMGICs also produced high exotherm during polymerisation. The second part of the study investigated the use of an experimental resin as an alternative to HEMA. The experimental resin has the advantage of low toxicity to the pulp and relatively low polymerisation shrinkage. This study compared the polymerisations of the resin and HEMA, and of mixtures of these two

  13. Solidification of radioactive waste resins using cement mixed with organic material

    SciTech Connect

    Laili, Zalina; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Wahab, Mohd Abdul

    2015-04-29

    Solidification of radioactive waste resins using cement mixed with organic material i.e. biochar is described in this paper. Different percentage of biochar (0%, 5%, 8%, 11%, 14% and 18%) was investigated in this study. The characteristics such as compressive strength and leaching behavior were examined in order to evaluate the performance of solidified radioactive waste resins. The results showed that the amount of biochar affect the compressive strength of the solidified resins. Based on the data obtained for the leaching experiments performed, only one formulation showed the leached of Cs-134 from the solidified radioactive waste resins.

  14. Solidification of radioactive waste resins using cement mixed with organic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laili, Zalina; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Wahab, Mohd Abdul

    2015-04-01

    Solidification of radioactive waste resins using cement mixed with organic material i.e. biochar is described in this paper. Different percentage of biochar (0%, 5%, 8%, 11%, 14% and 18%) was investigated in this study. The characteristics such as compressive strength and leaching behavior were examined in order to evaluate the performance of solidified radioactive waste resins. The results showed that the amount of biochar affect the compressive strength of the solidified resins. Based on the data obtained for the leaching experiments performed, only one formulation showed the leached of Cs-134 from the solidified radioactive waste resins.

  15. Comparison of Microleakage and Thickness of Resin Cement in Ceramic Inlays with Various Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Alaghemand, Homayoun; Abolghasemzadeh, Faezeh; Pakdel, Farzaneh; Judi Chelan, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Microleakage is still one of the major problems of composite-based restorations.This study compared the microleakage and thickness of resin cement in ceramic inlays with various temperatures. Materials and methods. Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual aspects of thirty human molars with occlusal margins in enamel and gingival margins in dentin (3 mm wide, 5 mm long and 2 mm deep). Laboratory-made inlays (LMI) were used for buccal cavities, and CAD/CAM inlays (CMI) were used for lingual cavities. All the cavities were divided into six groups (n=10): 1) LMI at -5°C; 2) LMI at 50°C; 3) LMI at room temperature (25°C); 4) CMI at -5°C; 5) CMI at 50°C; 6) CMI at room temperature (25°C). Inlays were bonded to cavities in a pulp pressure- and temperature-simulating device. After thermocycling and dye penetration, the teeth were divided into two mesiodistal halves. Amount of dye penetration and film thickness were measured under a stereomicroscope and analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon and Spearman's correlation tests ( = 0.05). Results. There were no statistically significant differences in leakage between different inlay temperatures (P > 0.05). The mean cement thickness in laboratory-made inlays (gingival margin, 83.7 ± 11 and occlusal margin, 84.7 ± 19) was greater than that in CAD/CAM inlays (gingival margin, 69 ± 16 and occlusal margin, 84.7 ± 16). No correlation was found be-tween cement thickness and microleakage either in enamel or dentin for any of the ceramic systems. Conclusion. Differences in inlay temperature had no effect on microleakage. CAD/CAM inlays had lower cement thickness than laboratory-made inlays, but this was not related to their microleakage. PMID:25024839

  16. Resin Characterization in Cured Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.; Chang, A.

    1985-01-01

    Molecular-level characterization of polymeric matrix resin in cured graphite-reinforced composite materials now determined through analysis of diffuse reflectance (DR) with Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Improved analytical method based on diffuse reflectance. DR/ FTIR technique successfully applied to analysis of several different composites and adhesives impossible to analyze by conventional methods.

  17. Microleakage in MOD resin composite with three dentin bonding agents.

    PubMed

    Eakle, W S; Nakamoto, D K

    1989-11-01

    The extent of microleakage under MOD composites was studied when an aluminum oxalate dentin bonding agent (Tenure), a phosphonated resin bonding agent (Bondlite), and a glass-ionomer cement (Ketac Silver) were used. Three groups of 10 extracted molars were prepared with MOD cavities; one box ended on enamel, the other on cementum. In Group 1, Bondlite was applied to dentin and etched enamel before the sample was restored with a light-cured hybrid composite. In Group 2, a 2-mm increment of Ketac Silver was placed in each box before Bondlite and composite. In Group 3, Tenure was applied to dentin before being restored. Teeth were thermal-cycled, stained in silver nitrate, sectioned, and scored for microleakage. Microleakage along the gingival floor was significantly less at enamel margins than at cementum margins in all three groups. All groups showed severe marginal microleakage on cementum. PMID:2700971

  18. Shear bond strength of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic and nano resin ceramics blocks cemented with three different generations of resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Ab-Ghani, Zuryati; Jaafar, Wahyuni; Foo, Siew Fon; Ariffin, Zaihan; Mohamad, Dasmawati

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the shear bond strength between the dentin substrate and computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic ceramic and nano resin ceramics blocks cemented with resin cement. Materials and Methods: Sixty cuboidal blocks (5 mm × 5 mm × 5 mm) were fabricated in equal numbers from feldspathic ceramic CEREC® Blocs PC and nano resin ceramic Lava™ Ultimate, and randomly divided into six groups (n = 10). Each block was cemented to the dentin of 60 extracted human premolar using Variolink® II/Syntac Classic (multi-steps etch-and-rinse adhesive bonding), NX3 Nexus® (two-steps etch-and-rinse adhesive bonding) and RelyX™ U200 self-adhesive cement. All specimens were thermocycled, and shear bond strength testing was done using the universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA. Results: Combination of CEREC® Blocs PC and Variolink® II showed the highest mean shear bond strength (8.71 Mpa), while the lowest of 2.06 Mpa were observed in Lava™ Ultimate and RelyX™ U200. There was no significant difference in the mean shear bond strength between different blocks. Conclusion: Variolink® II cement using multi-steps etch-and-rinse adhesive bonding provided a higher shear bond strength than the self-adhesive cement RelyX U200. The shear bond strength was not affected by the type of blocks used. PMID:26430296

  19. The resin-bonded cast post core: technical preparation and cementation protocols.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, M; Vichi, A; Colt, S G; Mason, P N

    1997-03-01

    Post and core restorations have been widely utilized in the reconstruction of endodontically treated teeth. This study compares the traditional cast post core with the bonded type, and reviews the restoration of devitalized teeth without imposing frictional forces within the root canal walls. Clinical and laboratory aspects are discussed, with emphasis on the cementing procedure. Several resin cements are evaluated and compared to traditional zinc oxide phosphate cement techniques; microleakage test results are presented. The learning objective of this article is to outline the clinical indications, advantages, disadvantages, and the clinical techniques employed for resin-bonded cast post core restoration. A case of an endodontically treated maxillary left central incisor following a direct trauma is used to illustrate the procedure of resin-bonded post core placement. Biocompatibility of the cast post core is confirmed by a radiograph 2 years postoperatively. PMID:12698529

  20. High temperature expanding cement composition and use

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Erik B.; Eilers, Louis H.

    1982-01-01

    A hydratable cement composition useful for preparing a pectolite-containing expanding cement at temperatures above about 150.degree. C. comprising a water soluble sodium salt of a weak acid, a 0.1 molar aqueous solution of which salt has a pH of between about 7.5 and about 11.5, a calcium source, and a silicon source, where the atomic ratio of sodium to calcium to silicon ranges from about 0.3:0.6:1 to about 0.03:1:1; aqueous slurries prepared therefrom and the use of such slurries for plugging subterranean cavities at a temperature of at least about 150.degree. C. The invention composition is useful for preparing a pectolite-containing expansive cement having about 0.2 to about 2 percent expansion, by volume, when cured at at least 150.degree. C.

  1. Durability of pulp fiber-cement composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Benjamin J.

    Wood pulp fibers are a unique reinforcing material as they are non-hazardous, renewable, and readily available at relatively low cost compared to other commercially available fibers. Today, pulp fiber-cement composites can be found in products such as extruded non-pressure pipes and non-structural building materials, mainly thin-sheet products. Although natural fibers have been used historically to reinforce various building materials, little scientific effort has been devoted to the examination of natural fibers to reinforce engineering materials until recently. The need for this type of fundamental research has been emphasized by widespread awareness of moisture-related failures of some engineered materials; these failures have led to the filing of national- and state-level class action lawsuits against several manufacturers. Thus, if pulp fiber-cement composites are to be used for exterior structural applications, the effects of cyclical wet/dry (rain/heat) exposure on performance must be known. Pulp fiber-cement composites have been tested in flexure to examine the progression of strength and toughness degradation. Based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), a three-part model describing the mechanisms of progressive degradation has been proposed: (1) initial fiber-cement/fiber interlayer debonding, (2) reprecipitation of crystalline and amorphous ettringite within the void space at the former fiber-cement interface, and (3) fiber embrittlement due to reprecipitation of calcium hydroxide filling the spaces within the fiber cell wall structure. Finally, as a means to mitigate kraft pulp fiber-cement composite degradation, the effects of partial portland cement replacement with various supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) has been investigated for their effect on mitigating kraft pulp fiber-cement composite mechanical property degradation (i.e., strength and toughness

  2. Etching conditions for resin-modified glass ionomer cement for orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Valente, Rudolfo M; De Rijk, Waldemar G; Drummond, James L; Evans, Carla A

    2002-05-01

    This study reports the tensile bond strength of orthodontic eyelets (RMO, Inc, Denver, Colo) bonded to human extracted teeth with a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) (Fuji Ortho LC, GC America, Alsip, Ill) and various acid etchants (Etch-37 and All-Etch, Bisco, Schaumburg, Ill; Ultra Etch, 3M Unitek, St Paul, Minn) for enamel preparation before bonding. The enamel etch conditions were as follows: 37% phosphoric acid with silica; 37% phosphoric acid, silica-free; 10% phosphoric acid, silica-free; 10% polyacrylic acid; and unetched enamel. Bond strength was measured by pulling in tension on the eyelet with a 0.018-in steel wire perpendicular to the enamel surface with a testing machine (Instron model 1125, Canton, Mass) at a speed of 2 mm/min. A light-cured resin cement (Transbond XT, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) applied to enamel etched with 37% phosphoric acid containing silica served as a control. Each group included 30 specimens. The Weibull distribution (m) was used for statistical analysis with a 90% CI. The different etchants used with RMGIC did not affect tensile bond strength. The resin cement group had the highest tensile strength. Significantly lower bond strengths were observed when glass ionomer cement was used to bond orthodontic attachments to nonetched teeth. However, unlike resin cement, RMGIC can bond effectively to etched teeth in a moist environment without an additional bonding agent. PMID:12045770

  3. Evaluation of polymerization shrinkage of resin cements through in vitro and in situ experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, A. P. G. O.; Karam, L. Z.; Pulido, C. A.; Gomes, O. M. M.; Kalinowski, H. J.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the behavior of two types of resin cements , conventional dual and dual self adhesive, through in vitro and in situ experiments. For the in vitro assay were selected two resin cements that were handled and dispensed over a mylar strip supported by a glass plate. The Bragg grating sensors were positioned and another portion of cement. was placed, covered by another mylar strip. For the in situ experiment 16 single-rooted teeth were selected who were divided into 2 groups: group 1 - conventional dual resin cement Relyx ARC and group 2 - dual self adhesive resin cement Relyx U200 ( 3M/ESPE ). The teeth were treated and prepared to receive the intracanal posts. Two Bragg grating sensors were recorded and introduced into the root canal at different apical and coronal positions. The results showed that the in vitro experiment presented similar values of polymerization shrinkage that the in situ experiment made in cervical position; whereas Relyx ARC resulted lower values compared to Relyx U200; and cervical position showed higher shrinkage than the apical.

  4. Development of resins for composites by resin transfer molding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Edmund P.; Puckett, Paul M.; Maynard, Shawn J.

    1991-01-01

    Designed to cover a wide range of resin technology and to meet the near-term and long-term needs of the aircraft industry, this research has three objectives: to produce resin transfer molding (RES) resins with improved processability, to produce prepreg systems with high toughness and service temperature, and to produce new resin systems. Progress on reaching the objectives is reported.

  5. Water transport into epoxy resins and composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, H.S.

    1987-01-01

    The processing-property relationships were established for the epoxy system of tetraglycidyl 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDDM) cured with diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS). The TGDDM-DDS epoxy system was selected for analysis as the ensuing polymer matrix is most common in high-performance fiber-reinforced epoxy composites. Experiments on water transport in epoxy resins with varying compositions were performed and a relaxation-coupled transport behavior was observed in these epoxy resins. By post-curing vitrified epoxy resins, the additional free volume usually measured in them was removed and maximum water uptake was reduced. Since epoxy resins were in a quasi-equilibrium glassy state after the post-cure, Fick's law with a constant diffusion coefficient could adequately describe the water sorption behavior. A network formation model based on the branching theory was developed, taking into account the difference in reactivities of primary and secondary amines and the etherification reaction. Using this network formation model, water uptake in post-cured epoxy resins was found to be proportional to tertiary amine concentration.

  6. Fiber reinforced thermoplastic resin matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert J. (Inventor); Chang, Glenn E. C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Polyimide polymer composites having a combination of enhanced thermal and mechanical properties even when subjected to service temperatures as high as 700.degree. F. are described. They comprise (a) from 10 to 50 parts by weight of a thermoplastic polyimide resin prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane and (b) from 90 to 50 parts by weight of continuous reinforcing fibers, the total of (a) and (b) being 100 parts by weight. Composites based on polyimide resin formed from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane and pyromellitic dianhydride and continuous carbon fibers retained at least about 50% of their room temperature shear strength after exposure to 700.degree. F. for a period of 16 hours in flowing air. Preferably, the thermoplastic polyimide resin is formed in situ in the composite material by thermal imidization of a corresponding amide-acid polymer prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane. It is also preferred to initially size the continuous reinforcing fibers with up to about one percent by weight of an amide-acid polymer prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane. In this way imidization at a suitable elevated temperature results in the in-situ formation of a substantially homogeneous thermoplastic matrix of the polyimide resin tightly and intimately bonded to the continuous fibers. The resultant composites tend to have optimum thermo-mechanical properties.

  7. Long Term Water Storage Deteriorates Bonding of Composite Resin to Alumina and Zirconia Short Communication

    PubMed Central

    Heikkinen, T.T.; Matinlinna, J.P; Vallittu, P.K.; Lassila, L.V.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of long term water storage and ageing on the bond strength of resin composite cement to yttria-stabilized zirconium dioxide (zirconia) and dialuminium trioxide (alumina). Substrate specimens of alumina and zirconia were air particle abraded with dialuminium trioxide before priming and application of composite resin. Priming was made with gamma metharyloxy-trimethoxysilane or acryloxypropyl-trimethoxysilane monomer after which the intermediate dimethacrylate resin was applied and photopolymerized. This was followed by curing particulate composite resin cement (Relyx ARC) to the substrate as a resin stub. The ageing methods of the specimens (n=6) were: (1) they stored four years in 37±1ºC distilled water, (2) thermocycled 8000 times between 55±1ºC and 5±1ºC, (3) stored first in water for four years and then thermocycled. Specimens which were stored dry, were used as controls. Bonding of composite resin was measured by shear-bond strength test set-up. Both thermocycling and long-term water storage decreased significantly shear bond strength values compared to the control group (from the level of 20 MPa to 5 MPa) regardless of the used primer or the type of the substrate. Combination of four years water storage and thermocyling reduced the bond strength even more, to the level of two to three megapascals. In can be concluded that water storage and thermocycling itselves, and especially combination of water storage and thermocycling can cause considerable reduction in the bond strength of composite resin cement to alumina and zirconia. PMID:24167535

  8. Composite fabrication via resin transfer molding technology

    SciTech Connect

    Jamison, G.M.; Domeier, L.A.

    1996-04-01

    The IMPReS (Integrated Modeling and Processing of Resin-based Structures) Program was funded in FY95 to consolidate, evaluate and enhance Sandia`s capabilities in the design and fabrication of composite structures. A key driver of this and related programs was the need for more agile product development processes and for model based design and fabrication tools across all of Sandia`s material technologies. A team of polymer, composite and modeling personnel was assembled to benchmark Sandia`s existing expertise in this area relative to industrial and academic programs and to initiate the tasks required to meet Sandia`s future needs. RTM (Resin Transfer Molding) was selected as the focus composite fabrication technology due to its versatility and growing use in industry. Modeling efforts focused on the prediction of composite mechanical properties and failure/damage mechanisms and also on the uncured resin flow processes typical of RTM. Appropriate molds and test composites were fabricated and model validation studies begun. This report summarizes and archives the modeling and fabrication studies carried out under IMPReS and evaluates the status of composite technology within Sandia. It should provide a complete and convenient baseline for future composite technology efforts within Sandia.

  9. Bonding All-Ceramic Restorations with Two Resins Cement Techniques: A Clinical Report of Three-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; de Almeida, Erika Oliveira; Junior, Amilcar Chagas Freitas; Martini, Ana Paula

    2011-01-01

    Ceramics have been widely used for esthetic and functional improvements. The resin cement is the material of choice for bonding ceramics to dental substrate and it can also dictate the final esthetic appearance and strength of the restoration. The correct use of the wide spectrum of resin luting agents available depends on the dental tooth substrate. This article presents three-year clinical results of a 41 years old female patient B.H.C complaining about her unattractive smile. Two all-ceramic crowns and two laminates veneers were placed in the maxillary incisors and cemented with a self-adhesive resin luting cement and conventional resin luting cement, respectively. After a three-year follow-up, the restorations and cement/teeth interface were clinically perfect with no chipping, fractures or discoloration. Proper use of different resin luting cements shows clinical appropriate behavior after a three-year follow-up. Self-adhesive resin luting cement may be used for cementing all-ceramic crowns with high predictability of success, mainly if there is a large dentin surface available for bonding and no enamel at the finish line. Otherwise, conventional resin luting agent should be used for achieving an adequate bonding strength to enamel. PMID:21912505

  10. Influence of the feldspathic ceramic thickness and shade on the microhardness of dual resin cement.

    PubMed

    Soares, Carlos José; da Silva, Natéricia Rezende; Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the microhardness of a dual resin cement under the influence of thickness and shade of a feldspathic ceramic. Ninety-five bovine incisors were selected; the crowns, with the roots removed, were embedded in a polystyrene resin and were randomly divided into 19 groups (n=5). On the buccal surface, a standardized cavity, 4.0 mm in diameter and 1.0 mm in depth, was prepared. Ceramic restorations (Noritake Ex 3) were manufactured with 4.0 mm diameter and 1, 2 and 4-mm thicknesses at shades A1, A2, A3, A3.5 and A4. A dual resin cement (Rely X-ARC) was inserted into the prepared cavity. A mylar strip was positioned over the prepared cavity, and light curing was performed for 40 seconds following the protocols: controls-without insertion of the restoration at distances of 0.0, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mm. The remaining groups had the restorations positioned between the resin cement and light source during polymerization. The Vickers hardness test was performed on the cement layer with 50 g of load application for 30 seconds, with 5 indentations for each sample. Two-way ANOVA (5 x 3) and Tukey test (alpha = 0.05) were used to compare the results. The chemical curing of the dual resin cement was not sufficient to compensate for the energy attenuation promoted by the interposition of A3.5 and A4 ceramic material with 4-mm of thickness. The thickness had a greater influence on the cement microhardness than the ceramic restoration shade. PMID:16802648

  11. Corrosion of steel drums containing cemented ion-exchange resins as intermediate level nuclear waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffó, G. S.; Farina, S. B.; Schulz, F. M.

    2013-07-01

    Exhausted ion-exchange resins used in nuclear reactors are immobilized by cementation before being stored. They are contained in steel drums that may undergo internal corrosion depending on the presence of certain contaminants. The objective of this work is to evaluate the corrosion susceptibility of steel drums in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins with different aggressive species. The corrosion potential and the corrosion rate of the steel, and the electrical resistivity of the matrix were monitored for 900 days. Results show that the cementation of ion-exchange resins seems not to pose special risks regarding the corrosion of the steel drums. The corrosion rate of the steel in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins in the absence of contaminants or in the presence of 2.3 wt.% sulphate content remains low (less than 0.1 μm/year) during the whole period of the study (900 days). The presence of chloride ions increases the corrosion rate of the steel at the beginning of the exposure but, after 1 year, the corrosion rate drops abruptly reaching a value close to 0.1 μm/year. This is probably due to the lack of water to sustain the corrosion process. When applying the results obtained in the present work to estimate the corrosion depth of the steel drums containing the cemented radioactive waste after a period of 300 years, it is found that in the most unfavourable case (high chloride contamination), the corrosion penetration will be considerably lower than the thickness of the wall of the steel drums. Cementation of ion-exchange resins does not seem to pose special risks regarding the corrosion of the steel drums that contained them; even in the case the matrix is highly contaminated with chloride ions.

  12. Bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic with different surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Usumez, Aslıhan; Hamdemirci, Nermin; Koroglu, Bilge Yuksel; Simsek, Irfan; Parlar, Ozge; Sari, Tugrul

    2013-01-01

    Zirconia-based ceramics offer strong restorations in dentistry, but the adhesive bond strength of resin cements to such ceramics is not optimal. This study evaluated the influence of surface treatments on the bond strength of resin cement to yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP) ceramic. Seventy-five plates of Y-TZP ceramic were randomly assigned to five groups (n = 15) according to the surface treatments [airborne particle abrasion, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser irradiation (Fidelis Plus 3, Fotona; 2 W, 200 mJ, 10 Hz, with two different pulse durations 180 or 320 μs), glaze applied, and then 9.5 % hydrofluoric acid gel conditioned, control]. One specimen from each group was randomly selected, and specimens were evaluated with x-ray diffraction and SEM analysis. The resin cement (Clearfil Esthetic Cement, Kuraray) was adhered onto the zirconia surfaces with its corresponding adhesive components. Shear bond strength of each sample was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Bond strengths were analyzed through one-way ANOVA/Tukey tests. Surface treatments significantly modified the topography of the Y-TZP ceramic. The Nd:YAG laser-irradiated specimens resulted in both increased surface roughness and bond strength of the resin cement. The highest surface roughness and bond strength values were achieved with short pulse duration. Nd:YAG laser irradiation increased both surface roughness of Y-TZP surfaces and bond strength of resin cement to the zirconia surface. PMID:22718473

  13. Ceramic whisker reinforcement of dental resin composites.

    PubMed

    Xu, H H; Martin, T A; Antonucci, J M; Eichmiller, F C

    1999-02-01

    Resin composites currently available are not suitable for use as large stress-bearing posterior restorations involving cusps due to their tendencies toward excessive fracture and wear. The glass fillers in composites provide only limited reinforcement because of the brittleness and low strength of glass. The aim of the present study was to reinforce dental resins with ceramic single-crystalline whiskers of elongated shapes that possess extremely high strength. A novel method was developed that consisted of fusing silicate glass particles onto the surfaces of individual whiskers for a two-fold benefit: (1) to facilitate silanization regardless of whisker composition; and (2) to enhance whisker retention in the matrix by providing rougher whisker surfaces. Silicon nitride whiskers, with an average diameter of 0.4 microm and length of 5 microm, were coated by the fusion of silica particles 0.04 microm in size to the whisker surface at temperatures ranging from 650 degrees C to 1000 degrees C. The coated whiskers were silanized and manually blended with resins by spatulation. Flexural, fracture toughness, and indentation tests were carried out for evaluation of the properties of the whisker-reinforced composites in comparison with conventional composites. A two-fold increase in strength and toughness was achieved in the whisker-reinforced composite, together with a substantially enhanced resistance to contact damage and microcracking. The highest flexural strength (195+/-8 MPa) and fracture toughness (2.1+/-0.3 MPa x m(1/2)) occurred in a composite reinforced with a whisker-silica mixture at whisker:silica mass ratio of 2:1 fused at 800 degrees C. To conclude, the strength, toughness, and contact damage resistance of dental resin composites can be substantially improved by reinforcement with fillers of ceramic whiskers fused with silica glass particles. PMID:10029470

  14. Processable polyimide adhesive and matrix composite resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Progar, Donald J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A high temperature polyimide composition prepared by reacting 4,4'-isophthaloyldiphthalic anhydride with metaphenylenediamine is employed to prepare matrix resins, adhesives, films, coatings, moldings, and laminates, especially those showing enhanced flow with retention of mechanical and adhesive properties. It can be used in the aerospace industry, for example, in joining metals to metals or metals to composite structures. One area of application is in the manufacture of lighter and stronger aircraft and spacecraft structures.

  15. Resin transfer molding of textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falcone, Anthony; Dursch, Harry; Nelson, Karl; Avery, William

    1993-01-01

    The design and manufacture of textile composite panels, tubes, and angle sections that were provided to NASA for testing and evaluation are documented. The textile preform designs and requirements were established by NASA in collaboration with Boeing and several vendors of textile reinforcements. The following four types of preform architectures were used: stitched uniweave, 2D-braids, 3D-braids, and interlock weaves. The preforms consisted primarily of Hercules AS4 carbon fiber; Shell RSL-1895 resin was introduced using a resin transfer molding process. All the finished parts were inspected using ultrasonics.

  16. Effect of Different Thicknesses of Pressable Ceramic Veneers on Polymerization of Light-cured and Dual-cured Resin Cements

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seok-Hwan; Lopez, Arnaldo; Berzins, David W.; Prasad, Soni; Ahn, Kwang Woo

    2015-01-01

    Aim This study evaluated the effects of ceramic veneer thicknesses on the polymerization of two different resin cements. Materials and Methods A total of 80 ceramic veneer discs were fabricated by using a pressable ceramic material (e.max Press; Ivoclar Vivadent) from a Low Translucency (LT) ingot (A1 shade). These discs were divided into light-cured (LC; NX3 Nexus LC; Kerr) and dual-cured (DC; NX3 Nexus DC; Kerr) and each group was further divided into 4 subgroups, based on ceramic disc thickness (0.3 mm, 0.6 mm, 0.9 mm, and 1.2 mm). The values of Vickers microhardness (MH) and degree of conversion (DOC) were obtained for each specimen after a 24-hour storage period. Association between ceramic thickness, resin cement type, and light intensity readings (mW/cm2) with respect to microhardness and degree of conversion was statistically evaluated by using ANOVA. Results For the DOC values, there was no significant difference observed among the LC resin cement subgroups, except in the 1.2 mm subgroup; only the DOC value (14.0 ± 7.4%) of 1.2 mm DC resin cement had significantly difference from that value (28.9 ± 7.5%) of 1.2 mm LC resin cement (P<.05). For the MH values between LC and DC resin cement groups, there was statistically significant difference (P<.05); overall, the MH values of LC resin cement groups demonstrated higher values than DC resin cement groups. On the other hands, among the DC resin cement subgroups, the MH values of 1.2 mm DC subgroup was significantly lower than the 0.3 mm and 0.6 mm subgroups (P<.05). However, among the LC subgroups, there was no statistically significant difference among them (P >.05). Conclusion The degree of conversion and hardness of the resin cement was unaffected with veneering thicknesses between 0.3 and 0.9 mm. However, the DC resin cement group resulted in a significantly lower DOC and MH values for the 1.2 mm subgroup. Clinical Significance While clinically adequate polymerization of LC resin cement can be achieved

  17. Influence of alloy microstructure on the microshear bond strength of basic alloys to a resin luting cement.

    PubMed

    Bauer, José; Costa, José Ferreira; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Souza, Douglas Nesadal de; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of microstructure and composition of basic alloys on their microshear bond strength (µSBS) to resin luting cement. The alloys used were: Supreme Cast-V (SC), Tilite Star (TS), Wiron 99 (W9), VeraBond II (VBII), VeraBond (VB), Remanium (RM) and IPS d.SIGN 30 (IPS). Five wax patterns (13 mm in diameter and 4mm height) were invested, and cast in a centrifugal casting machine for each basic alloy. The specimens were embedded in resin, polished with a SiC paper and sandblasted. After cleaning the metal surfaces, six tygon tubes (0.5 mm height and 0.75 mm in diameter) were placed on each alloy surface, the resin cement (Panavia F) was inserted, and the excess was removed before light-curing. After storage (24 h/37°C), the specimens were subjected to µSBS testing (0.5 mm/min). The data were subjected to a one-way repeated measures analysis of variance and Turkey's test (α=0.05). After polishing, their microstructures were revealed with specific conditioners. The highest µSBS (mean/standard deviation in MPa) were observed in the alloys with dendritic structure, eutectic formation or precipitation: VB (30.6/1.7), TS (29.8/0.9), SC (30.6/1.7), with the exception of IPS (31.1/0.9) which showed high µSBS but no eutectic formation. The W9 (28.1/1.5), VBII (25.9/2.0) and RM (25.9/0.9) showed the lowest µSBS and no eutectic formation. It seems that alloys with eutectic formation provide the highest µSBS values when bonded to a light-cured resin luting cement. PMID:23306223

  18. Tensile bond strength of gold and porcelain inlays to extracted teeth using three cements.

    PubMed

    Michelini, F S; Belser, U C; Scherrer, S S; De Rijk, W G

    1995-01-01

    This in vitro study compared the tensile bond strength of gold and porcelain inlays to extracted molars in standardized cavities. Three cements were used: zinc phosphate, glass-ionomer, and a resin composite cement. The gold inlays were cemented using zinc phosphate or glass-ionomer cement, and the porcelain inlays were luted using resin composite or glass-ionomer cement. Surface treatments included, for gold inlays, either no treatment (zinc phosphate cement) or airborne particle abraded and tinplated (glass-ionomer cement); and for porcelain inlays, either no treatment (glass-ionomer cement) or etched and silane-treated (resin composite cement). Statistical analysis was performed using the Weibull distribution. Results showed no significant differences between gold inlays cemented using zinc phosphate or glass-ionomer cements and porcelain inlays luted using glass-ionomer cements. The bonded porcelain inlays (resin composite cement) showed tensile bond strengths two to three times higher than those obtained for cemented gold inlays. PMID:7575974

  19. Effect of Self-adhesive Resin Cement and Tribochemical Treatment on Bond Strength to Zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jie; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the interactive effects of different self-adhesive resin cements and tribochemical treatment on bond strength to zirconia. Methodology The following self-adhesive resin cements for bonding two zirconia blocks were evaluated: Maxcem (MA), Smartcem (SM), Rely X Unicem Aplicap (UN), Breeze (BR), Biscem (BI), Set (SE), and Clearfil SA luting (CL). The specimens were grouped according to conditioning as follows: Group 1, polishing with 600 grit polishing paper; Group 2, silica coating with 110 µm Al2O3 particles which modified with silica; and, Group 3, tribochemical treatment - silica coating + silanization. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours before testing shear bond strength. Results Silica coating and tribochemical treatment significantly increased the bond strength of the MA, UN, BR, BI, SE and CL to zirconia compared to #600 polishing. For both #600 polished and silica coating treatments, MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cement CL had the highest bond strengths to zirconia. Conclusion Applying silica coating and tribochemical treatment improved the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to zirconia, especially for CL. PMID:20690416

  20. Radiopacity of different resin-based and conventional luting cements compared to human and bovine teeth.

    PubMed

    Pekkan, Gürel; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2012-02-01

    This study evaluated the radiopacity of different resin-based luting materials and compared the results to human and bovine dental hard tissues. Disc specimens (N=130, n=10 per group) (diameter: 6 mm, thickness: 1 mm) were prepared from 10 resin-based and 3 conventional luting cements. Human canine dentin (n=10), bovine enamel (n=10), bovine dentin (n=10) and Aluminium (Al) step wedge were used as references. The optical density values of each material were measured from radiographic images using a transmission densitometer. Al step wedge thickness and optical density values were plotted and equivalent Al thickness values were determined for radiopacity measurements of each material. The radiopacity values of conventional cements and two resin luting materials (Rely X Unicem and Variolink II), were significantly higher than that of bovine enamel that could be preferred for restorations cemented on enamel. Since all examined resin-based luting materials showed radiopacity values equivalent to or greater than that of human and bovine dentin, they could be considered suitable for the restorations cemented on dentin. PMID:22277608

  1. Novel fabrication method for zirconia restorations: bonding strength of machinable ceramic to zirconia with resin cements.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Soichi; Terui, Yuichi; Higuchi, Daisuke; Goto, Daisuke; Hotta, Yasuhiro; Manabe, Atsufumi; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    A novel method was developed to fabricate all-ceramic restorations which comprised CAD/CAM-fabricated machinable ceramic bonded to CAD/CAM-fabricated zirconia framework using resin cement. The feasibility of this fabrication method was assessed in this study by investigating the bonding strength of a machinable ceramic to zirconia. A machinable ceramic was bonded to a zirconia plate using three kinds of resin cements: ResiCem (RE), Panavia (PA), and Multilink (ML). Conventional porcelain-fused-to-zirconia specimens were also prepared to serve as control. Shear bond strength test (SBT) and Schwickerath crack initiation test (SCT) were carried out. SBT revealed that PA (40.42 MPa) yielded a significantly higher bonding strength than RE (28.01 MPa) and ML (18.89 MPa). SCT revealed that the bonding strengths of test groups using resin cement were significantly higher than those of Control. Notably, the bonding strengths of RE and ML were above 25 MPa even after 10,000 times of thermal cycling -adequately meeting the ISO 9693 standard for metal-ceramic restorations. These results affirmed the feasibility of the novel fabrication method, in that a CAD/CAM-fabricated machinable ceramic is bonded to a CAD/CAM-fabricated zirconia framework using a resin cement. PMID:21597207

  2. Effects of Different Surface Treatment Methods and MDP Monomer on Resin Cementation of Zirconia Ceramics an In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Tanış, Merve Çakırbay; Akçaboy, Cihan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Resin cements are generally preferred for cementation of zirconia ceramics. Resin bonding of zirconia ceramics cannot be done with the same methods of traditional ceramics because zirconia is a silica-free material. In recent years, many methods have been reported in the literature to provide the resin bonding of zirconia ceramics. The purpose of this in vitro study is to evaluate effects of different surface treatments and 10-metacryloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) monomer on shear bond strength between zirconia and resin cement. Methods: 120 zirconia specimens were treated as follows: Group I: sandblasting, group II: sandblasting + tribochemical silica coating + silane, group III: sandblasting + Nd:YAG (neodymium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet) laser. One specimen from each group was evaluated under scanning electron microscope (SEM). Specimens in each group were bonded either with conventional resin cement Variolink II or with a MDP containing resin cement Panavia F2.0. Subgroups of bonded specimens were stored in distilled water (37°C) for 24 hours or 14 days. Following water storage shear bond strength test was performed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min in a universal test machine. Then statistical analyses were performed. Results: Highest shear bond strength values were observed in group II. No significant difference between group I and III was found when Panavia F2.0 resin cement was used. When Variolink II resin cement was used group III showed significantly higher bond strength than group I. In group I, Panavia F2.0 resin cement showed statistically higher shear bond strength than Variolink II resin cement. In group II no significant difference was found between resin cements. No significant difference was found between specimens stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 hours and 14 days. In group I surface irregularities with sharp edges and grooves were observed. In group II less roughened surface was observed with silica particles. In group

  3. Tensile Bond Strength of Self Adhesive Resin Cement After Various Surface Treatment of Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Sekhri, Sahil; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In self adhesive resin cements adhesion is achieved to dental surface without surface pre-treatment, and requires only single step application. This makes the luting procedure less technique-sensitive and decreases postoperative sensitivity. Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate bond strength of self adhesive resin after surface treatment of enamel for bonding base metal alloy. Materials and Methods On the labial surface of 64 central incisor rectangular base metal block of dimension 6 mm length, 5mm width and 1 mm height was cemented with RelyX U200 and Maxcem Elite self adhesive cements with and without surface treatment of enamel. Surface treatment of enamel was application of etchant, one step bonding agent and both. Tensile bond strength of specimen was measured with universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Results Least tensile bond strength (MPa) was in control group i.e. 1.33 (0.32) & 1.59 (0.299), Highest bond strength observed when enamel treated with both etchant and bonding agent i.e. 2.72 (0.43) & 2.97 (0.19) for Relyx U200 and Elite cement. When alone etchant and bonding agent were applied alone bond strength is 2.19 (0.18) & 2.24 (0.47) for Relyx U200, and 2.38 (0.27) 2.49 (0.16) for Max-cem elite. Mean bond strength was higher in case of Max-cem Elite as compared to RelyX U200 resin cement, although differences were non–significant (p > 0.05). Conclusion Surface treatment of enamel increases the bond strength of self adhesive resin cement. PMID:26894165

  4. In vitro comparative bond strength of contemporary self-adhesive resin cements to zirconium oxide ceramic with and without air-particle abrasion.

    PubMed

    Blatz, Markus B; Phark, Jin-Ho; Ozer, Fusun; Mante, Francis K; Saleh, Najeed; Bergler, Michael; Sadan, Avishai

    2010-04-01

    This study compared shear bond strengths of six self-adhesive resin cements to zirconium oxide ceramic with and without air-particle abrasion. One hundred twenty zirconia samples were air-abraded (group SB; n = 60) or left untreated (group NO). Composite cylinders were bonded to the zirconia samples with either BisCem (BC), Maxcem (MC), G-Cem (GC), RelyX Unicem Clicker (RUC), RelyX Unicem Applicator (RUA), or Clearfil SA Cement (CSA). Shear bond strength was tested after thermocycling, and data were analyzed with analysis of variance and Holm-Sidak pairwise comparisons. Without abrasion, RUA (8.0 MPa), GC (7.9 MPa), and CSA (7.6 MPa) revealed significantly higher bond strengths than the other cements. Air-particle abrasion increased bond strengths for all test cements (p < 0.001). GC (22.4 MPa) and CSA (18.4 MPa) revealed the highest bond strengths in group SB. Bond strengths of self-adhesive resin cements to zirconia were increased by air-particle abrasion. Cements containing adhesive monomers (MDP/4-META) were superior to other compositions. PMID:19415350

  5. Effects of curing mode of resin cements on the bond strength of a titanium post: An intraradicular study

    PubMed Central

    Reza, Fazal; Lim, Siau Peng

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To compare push-out bond strength between self-cured and dual-cured resin cement using a titanium post. Background: Dual-cured resin cements have been found to be less polymerized in the absence of light; thus the bond strength of cements would be compromised due to the absence of light with a metallic post. Materials and Methods: Ten extracted teeth were prepared for cement titanium PARAPOST, of five specimens each, with Panavia F [dual-cured (PF)] and Rely×Luting 2 [self-cured resin-modified glass ionomer luting cement (RL)]; the push-out bond strength (PBS) at three different levels of the sectioned roots was measured. The failure modes were observed and the significance of the differences in bond strength of the two types of cement at each level and at different levels of the same type was analyzed with non-parametric tests. Results: The push-out bond strength of the RL group was greater at all the three levels; with significant differences at the coronal and middle levels (P<0.05). No significant differences in PBS at different levels of the same group were observed. Cement material around the post was obvious in the PF group. The failure mode was mostly adhesive between the post and resin cement in the RL group. Conclusion: Bond strength was greater with self-cured, resin-modified glass ionomer luting cement, using titanium post. PMID:22557808

  6. Leach studies on cement-solidified ion exchange resins from decontamination processes at operating nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect

    McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W.; Morcos, N.

    1992-08-01

    The effects of varying pH and leachant compositions on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents were determined for cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small scale waste-form specimens were collected during waste solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station. The collected specimens were leach tested, and their compressive strength was measured in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s ``Technical Position on Waste Form`` (Revision 1), from the Low-Level Waste Management Branch. Leachates from these studies were analyzed for radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to assess the leachability of these waste form constituents. Leachants used for the study were deionized water, simulated seawater, and groundwater compositions similar to those found at Barnwell, South Carolina and Hanford, Washington. Results of this study indicate that initial leachant pH does not affect leachate pH or releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms. However, differences in leachant composition and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. In addition, results from this study indicate that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents observed for forms that disintegrated were similar to those for forms that maintained their general physical integrity.

  7. Leach studies on cement-solidified ion exchange resins from decontamination processes at operating nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect

    McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W.; Morcos, N.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of varying pH and leachant compositions on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents were determined for cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small scale waste-form specimens were collected during waste solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station. The collected specimens were leach tested, and their compressive strength was measured in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Technical Position on Waste Form'' (Revision 1), from the Low-Level Waste Management Branch. Leachates from these studies were analyzed for radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to assess the leachability of these waste form constituents. Leachants used for the study were deionized water, simulated seawater, and groundwater compositions similar to those found at Barnwell, South Carolina and Hanford, Washington. Results of this study indicate that initial leachant pH does not affect leachate pH or releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms. However, differences in leachant composition and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. In addition, results from this study indicate that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents observed for forms that disintegrated were similar to those for forms that maintained their general physical integrity.

  8. Adhesive Cementation of Indirect Composite Inlays and Onlays: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    D'Arcangelo, Camillo; Vanini, Lorenzo; Casinelli, Matteo; Frascaria, Massimo; De Angelis, Francesco; Vadini, Mirco; D'Amario, Maurizio

    2015-09-01

    The authors conducted a literature review focused on materials and techniques used in adhesive cementation for indirect composite resin restorations. It was based on English language sources and involved a search of online databases in Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Scopus using related topic keywords in different combinations; it was supplemented by a traditional search of peer-reviewed journals and cross-referenced with the articles accessed. The purpose of most research on adhesive systems has been to learn more about increased bond strength and simplified application methods. Adherent surface treatments before cementation are necessary to obtain high survival and success rates of indirect composite resin. Each step of the clinical and laboratory procedures can have an impact on longevity and the esthetic results of indirect restorations. Cementation seems to be the most critical step, and its long-term success relies on adherence to the clinical protocols. The authors concluded that in terms of survival rate and esthetic long-term outcomes, indirect composite resin techniques have proven to be clinically acceptable. However, the correct management of adhesive cementation protocols requires knowledge of adhesive principles and adherence to the clinical protocol in order to obtain durable bonding between tooth structure and restorative materials. PMID:26355440

  9. Synthesis and toughness properties of resins and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, N. J.

    1984-01-01

    Tensile and shear moduli of four ACEE (Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program) resins are presented along with ACEE composite material modulus predictions based on micromechanics. Compressive strength and fracture toughness of the resins and composites were discussed. In addition, several resin synthesis techniques are reviewed.

  10. Factors affecting on bond strength of glass fiber post cemented with different resin cements to root canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavijo, V. R. G.; Bandéca, M. C.; Calixto, L. R.; Nadalin, M. R.; Saade, E. G.; Oliveira-Junior, O. B.; Andrade, M. F.

    2009-09-01

    Luting materials provides the retention of endodontic post. However, the failures of endodontic posts predominantly occurred are the losses of retention. Thus, the alternating use to remove the smear layer, open the dentine tubules, and/or etch the inter-tubular dentine can be provided by EDTA. This study was performed to evaluate effect of EDTA on bond strength of glass fiber post cemented with different resin cements to root canal. Fifty bovine incisors were selected and the crowns were removed to obtain a remaining 14-mm-height root. The roots were randomly distributed into five groups: GI: RelyX™ ARC/LED; GII: RelyX™ U100/LED; GIII EDTA/RelyX™ U100/LED; GIV: Multilink™; and GV: EDTA/Multlink™. After endodontic treatment, the post space was prepared with the drills designated for the quartz-coated-carbon-fiber post Aestheti-Post®. Before application of resin cements, root canals were irrigated with 17% EDTA (GIII and GV) during 1 min, rinsed with distilled water and dried using paper points. The light-cured materials were light-activated with UltraLume LED 5 (Ultradent, South Jordan, Utah) with power density of 1315 mW/cm2. Specimens were perpendicularly sectioned into approximately 1 mm thick sections and the stubs were performed on Universal Testing Machine. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey’s post-hoc tests showed significant statistical different between RelyX™ ARC (GI) and RelyX™ U100 independent of the pre-treatment (GII to GIII) ( P < 0.05). The Multlink™ showed between RelyX™ ARC and RelyX™ U100 (GI to GIII; GII to GV) ( P < 0.05). The ANOVA showed significant statistical similar ( P > 0.05) to all resin cements between the Cervical to Apical regions (GI to GV). The use of 17% EDTA showed no difference significant between the resin cements evaluated (GII to GIII; GIV to GV). Within the limitations of the current study, it can be concluded that the use of EDTA did not provide efficiency on bond strength. The RelyX™ ARC

  11. Standard tests for toughened resin composites, revised edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Several toughened resin systems are evaluated to achieve commonality for certain kinds of tests used to characterize toughened resin composites. Specifications for five tests were standardized; these test standards are described.

  12. Adhesion of conventional and simplified resin-based luting cements to superficial and deep dentin.

    PubMed

    Özcan, Mutlu; Mese, Ayse

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated the bond strengths of conventional (chemically and dual-polymerized) and simplified resin-based luting cements with their corresponding adhesives to superficial dentin (SD) and deep dentin (DD). Recently extracted third molars (N = 70, n = 10 per group) were obtained and prepared for testing procedures. After using their corresponding etchants, primers, and/or adhesive systems, the conventional and simplified cements (Variolink II [group A, conventional], Bifix QM [group B, conventional], Panavia F2.0 [group C, conventional], Multilink Automix [group D, simplified], Superbond C&B [group E, conventional], Clearfil Esthetic Cement [group F, simplified], Ketac-Fil [group G, conventional]) were adhered incrementally onto the dentin surfaces using polyethylene molds (inner diameter 3.5 mm, height 5 mm) and polymerized accordingly. Resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) acted as the control material. Shear bond strengths (1 mm/min) were determined after 500 times of thermocycling. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used to analyze the data (α = 0.05). Bond strength (MPa) results were significantly affected by the cement types and their corresponding adhesive systems (p ≤ 0.05). The shear bond strengths (MPa ± SD) for groups A-G were 14.6 ± 3.8, 18.9 ± 3.9, 5.5 ± 4.5, 3.1 ± 3.6, 1.1 ± 2.5, 15.5 ± 2.6, 7 ± 4.3 and 7.1 ± 5.8, 15.1 ± 7.8, 8.4 ± 7.3, 7.5 ± 7.3, 4.9 ± 5.1, 12.5 ± 2.1, 6 ± 2.6 for SD and DD, respectively. The level of dentin depth did not decrease the bond strength significantly (p > 0.05) for all cements, except for Variolink II (p < 0.05). On the SD, bond strength of resin cements with "etch-and-rinse" adhesive systems (Variolink II, Bifix QM, Super-Bond C&B) showed similar results being higher than those of the simplified ones. Simplified cements and RMGIC as control material showed inferior adhesion to superficial and deep dentin compared to conventional resin cements tested. PMID:21833482

  13. Influence of Resin Cements on the Tension Force of Cast Frameworks Made by the Technique of Framework Cemented on Prepared Abutments.

    PubMed

    Perroni, Ana Paula; Gomes, Érica Alves; Bielemann, Amália Machado; Baseggio, Bruna; Federizzi, Leonardo; Spazzin, Aloísio Oro; dos Santos, Mateus Bertolini Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the tension force of cast frameworks made by the technique of framework cemented on prepared abutments using two different resin cements. Forty multi-unit abutment analogs were individually fixed with chemically cured acrylic resin inside PVC cylinders using a parallelometer. Brass cylindrical abutments were tightened to the multi-unit abutments to be used as spacers and then castable UCLA abutments were positioned above. These abutments were cast with Ni-Cr and then divided into 4 groups (n=10): cemented with RelyX U100(r); cemented with RelyX U100(r) and simulation of acrylic resin polymerization process; cemented with Multilink(r); and cemented with Multilink(r) and simulation of acrylic resin polymerization process. Abutments were cemented according to manufacturers' instructions. In a universal testing machine, tensile strength was applied in the direction of the long axis of the abutments at 1 mm/min crosshead speed until displacement of the luted abutments was obtained. The values of maximum tensile force (N) required for the displacement of the luted abutments were tabulated and analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA with a 95% confidence level. No statistically significant difference was found among the groups (p>0.05). There was an increase in mean tension force when the specimens were subjected to the simulation of acrylic resin polymerization process, but the results did not differ statistically. Both resin cements presented positive results as regards the retention of luted abutments on their respective multi-unit abutments. Both materials may be indicated for the technique of framework cemented on prepared abutments when professionals pursuit better adaptation of implant-supported frameworks. PMID:26312978

  14. The effect of amine-free initiator system and the polymerization type on color stability of resin cements.

    PubMed

    Ural, Çağrı; Duran, İbrahim; Tatar, Numan; Öztürk, Özgür; Kaya, İsmail; Kavut, İdris

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the short-term (4 weeks) color stability of light-cure and dual-cure resin cements. Sixty disk-shaped test specimens of adhesive resin cement (10 × 1 mm) were prepared. One feldspathic porcelain test specimen (12 × 14 × 0.8 mm) was prepared from a prefabricated ceramic block. The feldspathic sample was placed on the resin cement disk and all the measurements were performed without cementation. Specific color coordinate differences (ΔL, Δa, and Δb), and the total color differences (ΔE) were calculated after immersion in distilled water for different periods. Data were compared using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) (α = 0.05). The test results revealed that different chemical structures and curing modes affected the ΔE values (P < 0.05). The highest ΔE values were obtained for RelyX Unicem dual-cure cement (2.14 ± 0.40), and the lowest for NX3 light-cure cement (0.78 ± 0.34). Third generation adhesive resin cement free of tertiary amines and benzoyl peroxide showed relatively slight color change in both test groups (light-cure and dual-cure resin cement). (J Oral Sci 58, 157-161, 2016). PMID:27349535

  15. Effect of curing mode on the hardness of dual-cured composite resin core build-up materials.

    PubMed

    Arrais, César Augusto Galvão; Kasaz, Aline de Cerqueira; Albino, Luís Gustavo Barrote; Rodrigues, José Augusto; Reis, Andre Figueiredo

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the Knoop Hardness (KHN) values of two dual-cured composite resin core build-up materials and one resin cement exposed to different curing conditions. Two dual-cured core build-up composite resins (LuxaCore-Dual, DMG; and FluoroCore2, Dentsply Caulk), and one dual-cured resin cement (Rely X ARC, 3M ESPE) were used in the present study. The composite materials were placed into a cylindrical matrix (2 mm in height and 3 mm in diameter), and the specimens thus produced were either light-activated for 40 s (Optilux 501, Demetron Kerr) or were allowed to self-cure for 10 min in the dark (n = 5). All specimens were then stored in humidity at 37 degrees C for 24 h in the dark and were subjected to KHN analysis. The results were submitted to 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test at a pre-set alpha of 5%. All the light-activated groups exhibited higher KHN values than the self-cured ones (p = 0.00001), regardless of product. Among the self-cured groups, both composite resin core build-up materials showed higher KHN values than the dual-cured resin cement (p = 0.00001). LuxaCore-Dual exhibited higher KHN values than FluoroCore2 (p = 0.00001) when they were allowed to self-cure, while no significant differences in KHN values were observed among the light-activated products. The results suggest that dual-cured composite resin core build-up materials may be more reliable than dual-cured resin cements when curing light is not available. PMID:20658046

  16. Evaluation of shear bond strength between dual cure resin cement and zirconia ceramic after thermocycling treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Jin; Kang, Cheol-Kyun; Oh, Ju-Won

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was performed to evaluate shear bond strength (SBS) between three dual-cured resin cements and silica coated zirconia, before and after thermocycling treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixty specimens were cut in 15 × 2.75 mm discs using zirconia. After air blasting of 50 µm alumina, samples were prepared by tribochemical silica coating with Rocatec™ plus. The specimens were divided into three groups according to the dual-cure resin cement used: (1) Calibra silane+Calibra®, (2) Monobond S+Multilink® N and (3) ESPN sil+RelyX™ Unicem Clicker. After the resin cement was bonded to the zirconia using a Teflon mold, photopolymerization was carried out. Only 10 specimens in each group were thermocycled 6,000 times. Depending on thermocycling treatment, each group was divided into two subgroups (n=10) and SBS was measured by applying force at the speed of 1 mm/min using a universal testing machine. To find out the differences in SBS according to the types of cements and thermocycling using the SPSS, two-way ANOVA was conducted and post-hoc analysis was performed by Turkey's test. RESULTS In non-thermal aged groups, SBS of Multilink group (M1) was higher than that of Calibra (C1) and Unicem (U1) group (P<.05). Moreover, even after thermocycling treatment, SBS of Multilink group (M2) was higher than the other groups (C2 and U2). All three cements showed lower SBS after the thermocycling than before the treatments. But Multilink and Unicem had a significant difference (P<.05). CONCLUSION In this experiment, Multilink showed the highest SBS before and after thermocycling. Also, bond strengths of all three cements decreased after thermocycling. PMID:25722830

  17. Film Thickness and Flow Properties of Resin-Based Cements at Different Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, R

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem: For a luting agent to allow complete seating of prosthetic restorations, it must obtain an appropriate flow rate maintaining a minimum film thickness. The performance of recently introduced luting agents in this regard has not been evaluated. Purpose: To measure and compare the film thickness and flow properties of seven resin-containing luting cements at different temperatures (37°C, 25°C and10°C). Material and Methods: Specimens were prepared from five resin luting cements; seT (SDI), Panavia F (Kuraray), Varioloink II (Ivoclar), Maxcem (Kerr), Nexus2 (Kerr) and two resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cements (RM-GICs); GC Fuji Plus (GC Corporation), and RelyX Luting 2 (3 M/ESPE). The film thickness and flow rate of each cement (n=15) was determined using the test described in ISO at three different temperatures. Results: There was a linear correlation between film thickness and flow rate for most of the materials. Cooling increased fluidity of almost all materials while the effect of temperature on film thickness was material dependent. At 37°C, all products revealed a film thickness of less than 25µm except for GC Fuji Plus. At 25°C, all cements produced a film thickness of less than 27 µm except for seT. At 10°C, apart from seT and Rely X Luting 2, the remaining cements showed a film thickness smaller than 20 µm. Conclusion: Cooling increased fluidity of almost all materials, however. the film thickness did not exceed 35 µm in either condition, in spite of the lowest film thickness being demonstrated at the lowest temperature. PMID:24724120

  18. Performance Properties of Graphite Reinforced Composites with Advanced Resin Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.

    1980-01-01

    This article looks at the effect of different resin matrices on thermal and mechanical properties of graphite composites, and relates the thermal and flammability properties to the anaerobic char yield of the resins. The processing parameters of graphite composites utilizing graphite fabric and epoxy or other advanced resins as matrices are presented. Thermoset resin matrices studied were: aminecured polyfunctional glycidyl aminetype epoxy (baseline), phenolicnovolac resin based on condensation of dihydroxymethyl-xylene and phenol cured with hexamine, two types of polydismaleimide resins, phenolic resin, and benzyl resin. The thermoplastic matrices studied were polyethersulfone and polyphenylenesulfone. Properties evaluated in the study included anaerobic char yield, limiting oxygen index, smoke evolution, moisture absorption, and mechanical properties at elevated temperatures including tensile, compressive, and short-beam shear strengths. Generally, it was determined that graphite composites with the highest char yield exhibited optimum fire-resistant properties.

  19. Influence of glass particle size of resin cements on bonding to glass ceramic: SEM and bond strength evaluation.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Fernanda; Moraes, Rafael R; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Boscato, Noéli

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of the filler particle size (micron or submicron) of experimental resin cements on the microtensile bond strength to a glass-ceramic pretreated with hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching or alumina airborne-particle abrasion (AA). Cements were obtained from a Bis-GMA/TEGDMA mixture filled with 60 mass% micron-sized (1 ± 0.2 µm) or submicron-sized (180 ± 30 µm) Ba-Si-Al glass particles. Ceramic blocks (PM9; VITA) were treated with 10% HFA for 60 s or AA for 15 s. Silane and adhesive were applied. Ceramic blocks were bonded to resin composite blocks (Z250; 3M ESPE) using one of the cements. Bonded specimens were sectioned into beams (n = 20/group) and subjected to microtensile bond strength tests. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' tests (5%). Failure modes were classified under magnification. Morphologies of the treated ceramic surfaces and bonded interfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The HFA-submicron group had lower bond strengths than the other groups. All AA-submicron specimens debonded prematurely. Mixed failures were predominant for HFA groups, whereas interfacial failures predominated for AA groups. SEM revealed a honeycomb-like aspect in the HFA-treated ceramic, whereas the AA-treated groups showed an irregular retentive pattern. Continuity of cement infiltration along the bonded interface was more uniform for HFA-treated compared to AA-treated specimens. Cracks toward the bulk of the ceramic were observed in AA-treated specimens. Particle size significantly influenced the ceramic bond strength, whereas surface treatment had a minor effect. PMID:24610793

  20. Creep on a composite resin in water.

    PubMed

    Hirano, S; Hirasawa, T

    1989-06-01

    The compressive creep test of a composite resin (0-3.5 kg/mm2 stress levels) was conducted in water for 500 h. Linear regressions were obtained between the creep strains and the compressive stress levels at various hours. It is possible to predict the creep strain of the composite from the regression when it reaches water absorbed equilibrium after 500 h. The stress of the hygroscopic expansion was calculated from the linear regressions. The maximum stress due to the hygroscopic examination of the composite was 0.74 kg/mm2 at equilibrium of the water absorbed of the composite. The linear regressions at several compressive stress levels were obtained within 30-50 hr in the strain-log time diagrams. PMID:2638964

  1. Dental composite resins: measuring the polymerization shrinkage using optical fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottevaere, H.; Tabak, M.; Chah, K.; Mégret, P.; Thienpont, H.

    2012-04-01

    Polymerization shrinkage of dental composite materials is recognized as one of the main reasons for the development of marginal leakage between a tooth and filling material. As an alternative to conventional measurement methods, we propose optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) based sensors to perform real-time strain and shrinkage measurements during the curing process of dental resin cements. We introduce a fully automated set-up to measure the Bragg wavelength shift of the FBG strain sensors and to accurately monitor the linear strain and shrinkage of dental resins during curing. Three different dental resin materials were studied in this work: matrix-filled BisGMA-based resins, glass ionomers and organic modified ceramics.

  2. Effects of light curing method and resin composite composition on composite adaptation to the cavity wall.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Takako; Morigami, Makoto; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of the light curing method and resin composite composition on marginal sealing and resin composite adaptation to the cavity wall. Cylindrical cavities were prepared on the buccal or lingual cervical regions. The teeth were restored using Clearfil Liner Bond 2V adhesive system and filled with Clearfil Photo Bright or Palfique Estelite resin composite. The resins were cured using the conventional or slow-start light curing method. After thermal cycling, the specimens were subjected to a dye penetration test. The slow-start curing method showed better resin composite adaptation to the cavity wall for both composites. Furthermore, the slow-start curing method resulted in significantly improved dentin marginal sealing compared with the conventional method for Clearfil Photo Bright. The light-cured resin composite, which exhibited increased contrast ratios duringpolymerization, seems to suggest high compensation for polymerization contraction stress when using the slow-start curing method. PMID:24988883

  3. Effect of flexural strength of orthodontic resin cement on bond strength of metal brackets to enamel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun

    2011-04-01

    Three types of experimental resin cements with different curing systems, dual, light, and chemical, were designed. The relationship between the flexural strengths of the three experimental and five commercial (Beauty Ortho Bond, Transbond™ XT, Light Cure Bond, Kurasper® F, and Super Bond) orthodontic resin cements on the tensile bond strength (TBS) and shear bond strength (SBS) of metal brackets to enamel was determined. Seven specimen bars of each resin were prepared for measuring the flexural strengths of the resins. Bonded specimens of each resin were prepared, seven for measuring TBS and seven SBS for after bonding of a metal bracket to a maxillary central human labial anterior tooth using experimental and commercial resin cements. The results were analysed by one-way analysis of variance and Scheffé's multiple comparison tests. The level of statistical significance was set at 0.05. Increases in the flexural strength of the resin cements were related to increases in the TBS and SBS of the metal bracket. While the light-curing cements exhibited a strong linear correlation between flexural strengths and TBS or SBS, the dual- and chemical-curing cements exhibited a different flexural strength effect on both TBS and SBS. This was a result of the adhesive layer under the metal bracket, which could be chemically cured, in contrast to the light-curing cement. To control setting time and to obtain higher initial TBS and SBS by polymerizing the resin cement under the bracket, a dual-curing system, that combines both light- and chemical-curing systems, is essential. PMID:20937669

  4. A Comparative Evaluation of the Effect of Resin based Sealers on Retention of Crown Cemented with Three Types of Cement – An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sumeet; Patel, J.R.; Sethuraman, Rajesh; Singh, Sarbjeet; Wazir, Nikhil Dev; Singh, Harvinder

    2014-01-01

    Aim: In an effort to control postoperative sensitivity, dentin sealers are being applied following crown preparations, with little knowledge of how crown retention might be affected. A previous study demonstrated no adverse effect when using a gluteraldehyde-based sealer, and existing studies have shown conflicting results for resin-based products. This study determined the retention of the casting cemented with three types of cement, with and without use of resin sealers and it determined the mode of failure. Materials and Methods: Extracted human molars (n=60) were prepared with a flat occlusal, 20-degree taper, and 4-mm axial length. The axial surface area of each preparation was determined and specimens were distributed equally among groups (n=10). A single-bottle adhesive system (one step single bottle adhesive system) was used to seal dentin, following tooth preparation. Sealers were not used on the control specimens. The test castings were prepared by using Ni-Cr alloy for each specimen and they were cemented with a seating force of 20 Kg by using either Zinc Phosphate (Harvard Cement), Glass Ionomer (GC luting and lining cement,GC America Inc.) and modified-resin cement (RelyXTMLuting2). Specimens were thermocycled for one month and were then removed along the path of insertion by using a Universal Testing Machine at 0.5 mm/min. A single-factor ANOVA was used with a p value of .05. The nature of failure was recorded and the data was analyzed by using Chi-square test. Results: Mean dislodgement stress for Zinc phosphate (Group A) was 24.55±1.0 KgF and that for zinc phosphate with sealer (Group D) was 14.65±0.8 KgF. For glass ionomer (Group B) without sealer, the mean value was 32.0±1.0 KgF and mean value for glass ionomer with sealer (Group E) was 37.90±1.0 KgF. The mean value for modified resin cement (Group C) was 44.3±1.0KgF and that for modified resins with sealer (Group F) was 57.2±1.2 KgF. The tooth failed before casting dislodgement in 8 to 10

  5. [Comparative studies on fissure sealing: composite versus Cermet cement].

    PubMed

    Hickel, R; Voss, A

    1989-06-01

    Fifty two molars sealed with either composite or Cermet cement were compared. The composite sealant was applied after enamel etching using a rubber dam. Before sealing with Cermet cement the enamel was only cleaned with pumice powder and sodium hypochlorie and the material was applied without enamel etching. After an average follow-up of 1.6 years composite sealants proved to be significantly more reliable. Cermet cement sealings showed defects more frequently. PMID:2517111

  6. Effect of etch-and-rinse and self-etching adhesive systems on hardness uniformity of resin cements after glass fiber post cementation

    PubMed Central

    Grande da Cruz, Fernanda Zander; Grande, Christiana Zander; Roderjan, Douglas Augusto; Galvão Arrais, César Augusto; Bührer Samra, Adriana Postiglione; Calixto, Abraham Lincoln

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of etch-and-rinse and self-etching adhesive systems on Vickers hardness (VHN) uniformity of dual-cured resin cements after fiber post cementation. Methods: Fifty glass fiber posts were cemented into bovine roots using the following cementing systems: Prime&Bond 2.1 Dual Cure and Enforce with light-activation (PBDC-LCEN); Prime&Bond 2.1 and Enforce with light-activation (PB-CLEN); Prime&Bond 2.1 Dual Cure and Enforce without light exposure (PBDC-SCEN); ED Primer and Panavia 21 (ED-SCPN); and Clearfil SE Bond and Panavia 21 (CF-SCPN). The roots were stored in distilled water for 72 h and transversely sectioned into thirds (coronal, medium, and apical). The VHN values of the resin cement layers were measured close to the post and to the dentin wall on the transversely sectioned flat surfaces. The results were analyzed by three-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey’s post-hoc test (pre-set alpha of 5%). Results: Most resin cements presented higher VHN values near the post than near the dentin wall. The ED-SCPN group showed the highest VHN values regardless of the root third, while the self-cured group PBDC-SCEN exhibited the lowest values. The resin cements from the light-activated groups PBDC-LCEN and PB-LCEN showed lower VHN values at the apical third than at the coronal third. The VHN values were not influenced by the root third in self-cured groups PBDC-SCEN, ED-SCPN, and ED-SCPN. Conclusion: Depending on the product, bonding agents might promote changes in hardness uniformity of resin cements after post cementation. PMID:22904652

  7. Effect of femtosecond laser beam angle on bond strength of zirconia-resin cement.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Yusuf Z; Kepceoglu, Abdullah; Yavuz, Tevfik; Aslan, Muhammed A; Demirtag, Zulfikar; Kılıc, Hamdi S; Usumez, Aslihan

    2015-11-01

    Yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) ceramic is widely used as an all-ceramic core material because of its enhanced mechanical and aesthetic properties. The bond strength of Y-TZP restorations affects long-term success; hence, surface treatment is required on ceramic boundaries. This study evaluated the effect of different laser beam angles on Y-TZP-resin cement shear bond strength (SBS). Forty plates of Y-TZP ceramics were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 10). A femtosecond amplifier laser pulse was applied on Y-TZP surface with different incidence angles (90°, 75°, 60°, 45°). The resin cement was adhered onto the zirconia surfaces. The SBS of each sample was measured using universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The SBS was analyzed through one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA)/Tukey tests. The results showed that the degree of laser beam angle affects the SBS of resin cement to Y-TZP. The laser beam was applied to a surface with a 45° angle which resulted in significantly higher SBS (18.2 ± 1.43 MPa) than other groups (at 90° angulation (10.79 ± 1.8 MPa), at 75° (13.48 ± 1.2 MPa) and at 60° (15.85 ± 0.81 MPa); p < 0.001). This study shows that decreasing of the angle between the ceramic surface and the laser beam increased the SBS between the resin cement and the ceramic material, as well as the orifice. PMID:25958172

  8. Effects of Mechanical and Chemical Pretreatments of Zirconia or Fiber Posts on Resin Cement Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Zhou, Hui; Wei, Wei; Wang, Chen; Sun, Ying Chun; Gao, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The bonding strength between resin cement and posts is important for post and core restorations. An important method of improving the bonding strength is the use of various surface pretreatments of the post. In this study, the surfaces of zirconia (fiber) posts were treated by mechanical and/or chemical methods such as sandblasting and silanization. The bonding strength between the zirconia (fiber) post and the resin cement was measured by a push-out method after thermocycling based on the adhesion to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. The zirconia and fiber posts exhibited different bonding strengths after sandblasting and/or silanization because of the different strengths and chemical structures. The zirconia post showed a high bonding strength of up to 17.1 MPa after a combined treatment of sandblasting and silanization because of the rough surface and covalent bonds at the interface. This effect was also enhanced by using 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane for the formation of a flexible layer at the interface. In contrast, a high bonding strength of 13.9 MPa was obtained for the fiber post treated by silane agents because the sandblasting treatment resulted in damage to the fiber post, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the improvement in the bonding strength between the post and the resin cement could be controlled by different chemical and/or mechanical treatments. Enhanced bonding strength depended on covalent bonding and the surface roughness. A zirconia post with high bonding strength could potentially be used for the restoration of teeth in the future. PMID:26066349

  9. High performance mixed bisimide resins and composites based thereon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. A.; ations.

    1986-01-01

    Mixtures of bismaleimide/biscitraconirnide resins produces materials which have better handling, processing or mechanical and thermal properties, particularly in graphite composites, than materials made with the individual resins. The mechanical strength of cured graphite composites prepared from a 1:1 copolymer of such bisimide resins is excellent at both ambient and elevated temperatures. The copolymer mixture provides improved composites which are lighter than metals and replace metals in many aerospace applications.

  10. Mini fiberglass post for composite resin restorations: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Luís Fernando Dos Santos Alves; Martins, Adriana Vieira; Albuquerque, Rodrigo de Castro; Silveira, Rodrigo Richard; Silva, Nelson Renato França Alves; Moreira, Allysson Nogueira

    2016-06-01

    Threaded metal pins have been used to create additional retention for large composite resin restorations. However, their dark appearance may compromise esthetic outcome. The use of small fiberglass posts has been advocated as an alternative. This clinical report describes a mini fiberglass post (MFP) used to provide additional retention in a fractured anterior tooth that received a composite resin restoration. The MFP represents a promising option for creating additional retention for large composite resin restorations. PMID:26724848

  11. Crack Formation in Cement-Based Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprince, A.; Pakrastinsh, L.; Vatin, N.

    2016-04-01

    The cracking properties in cement-based composites widely influences mechanical behavior of construction structures. The challenge of present investigation is to evaluate the crack propagation near the crack tip. During experiments the tension strength and crack mouth opening displacement of several types of concrete compositions was determined. For each composition the Compact Tension (CT) specimens were prepared with dimensions 150×150×12 mm. Specimens were subjected to a tensile load. Deformations and crack mouth opening displacement were measured with extensometers. Cracks initiation and propagation were analyzed using a digital image analysis technique. The formation and propagation of the tensile cracks was traced on the surface of the specimens using a high resolution digital camera with 60 mm focal length. Images were captured during testing with a time interval of one second. The obtained experimental curve shows the stages of crack development.

  12. Do Resin Cements Alter Action Potentials of Isolated Rat Sciatic Nerve?

    PubMed Central

    Ertan, Ahmet Atila; Beriat, Nilufer Celebi; Onur, Mehmet Ali; Tan, Gamze; Cehreli, Murat Cavit

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the effects dual-cure resin cements on nerve conduction. Methods: Panavia F, RelyX ARC, and Variolink II polymerized either by light-emitting diode (LED) or quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) were used in the study (n=10). The conductance of sciatic nerves of 50 rats were measured before and after contact with the specimens for 1 h. Results: The time-dependent change in nerve conductance and the comparison of LED versus QTH showed that differences between groups are significant (P<.05). For both polymerization techniques, pair-wise comparisons of resin cements showed that the nerve conductance between groups is different (P<.05). RelyX ARC elicited irreversible inhibition of compound action potentials (more than 50% change) and Panavia F and Variolink II polymerized by LED and QTH did not alter nerve conduction beyond physiologic limits. Conclusions: Resin cements may alter nerve conductance and even lead to neurotoxic effects. PMID:21494389

  13. Bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive and conventional-type adhesive resin cements to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Part 2: Effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Asuka; Matsumoto, Mariko; Higashi, Mami; Miura, Jiro; Minamino, Takuya; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Takeshige, Fumio; Mine, Atsushi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning on resin cement bonding to CAD/CAM resin blocks. One of two resin cements, PANAVIA V5 (PV5) or PANAVIA SA CEMENT HANDMIX (PSA), were bonded to one of 24 CAD/CAM blocks (KATANA AVENCIA BLOCK). Each cement group was divided into four subgroups: no cleaning (Ctl), ultrasonic cleaning (Uc), acid cleaning (Ac) and Uc+Ac. Micro-tensile bond strengths (µTBSs) were measured immediately and 1, 3, and 6 months after water storage. Block surfaces after each treatment were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant effect for the parameters 'surface treatment' (p<0.001, F=40), 'resin cement' (p<0.001, F=696) and 'water aging' (p<0.001, F=71). The PV5 group exhibited higher µTBS values than the PSA group. Although cleaning after sandblasting was effective in removing residual alumina particles, it did not affect the long-term bonding durability with non-contaminated CAD/CAM resin blocks. PMID:26830822

  14. Influence of the bracket on bonding and physical behavior of orthodontic resin cements.

    PubMed

    Bolaños-Carmona, Victoria; Zein, Bilal; Menéndez-Núñez, Mario; Sánchez-Sánchez, Purificación; Ceballos-García, Laura; González-López, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the influence of the type of bracket, on bond strength, microhardness and conversion degree (CD) of four resin orthodontic cements. Micro-tensile bond strength (µTBS) test between the bracket base and the cement was carried out on glass-hour-shaped specimens (n=20). Vickers Hardness Number (VHN) and micro-Raman spectra were recorded in situ under the bracket base. Weibull distribution, ANOVA and non-parametric test were applied for data analysis (p<0.05). The highest values of ή as well as the β Weibull parameter were obtained for metallic brackets with Transbond™ plastic brackets with the self-curing cement showing the worst performance. The CD was from 80% to 62.5%. PMID:26235709

  15. Microtensile bond strength of a newly developed resin cement to dentin.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Shimpei; Fu, Jiale; Saikaew, Pipop; Chowdhury, Afm Almas; Fukuzawa, Naoyuki; Kadowaki, Yoshitaka; Kakuda, Shinichi; Hoshika, Shuhei; Nakaoki, Yasuko; Ikeda, Takatsumi; Tanaka, Toru; Sano, Hidehiko

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of a newly developed resin cement, ECD-89 (ECD, Tokuyama Dental, Tokyo, Japan) to dentin and to observe the interfacial micromorphology by comparing with two commercial resin cements, Multilink Automix (MA, Ivoclar Vivadent AG, Schaan, Liechtenstein) and Panavia F2.0 (PF, Kuraray Noritake Dental, Tokyo, Japan). Flat dentin surfaces of human third molars were exposed using #600 SiC. After application of primer and cement to the dentin surface, each cement was applied and cured with light (light condition) or without light (dark condition). The teeth were sectioned to obtain beams (1 mm×1 mm) after 24 h of water storage. The mean bond strengths and SDs (MPa) were: ECD: 68.6±14.9, MA: 39.2±18.9, PF: 39.4±18.5 and ECD: 54.5±22.4, MA: 36.7±15.6, PF: 13.4±4.46 when cured in light and dark condition, respectively. In both conditions, ECD-89 showed statistically higher µTBS than the others. PMID:25748460

  16. Light transmittance of zirconia as a function of thickness and microhardness of resin cements under different thicknesses of zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Egilmez, Ferhan; Ergun, Gulfem; Kaya, Bekir M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to compare microhardness of resin cements under different thicknesses of zirconia and the light transmittance of zirconia as a function of thickness. Study design: A total of 126 disc-shaped specimens (2 mm in height and 5 mm in diameter) were prepared from dual-cured resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Panavia F and Clearfil SA cement). Photoactivation was performed by using quartz tungsten halogen and light emitting diode light curing units under different thicknesses of zirconia. Then the specimens (n=7/per group) were stored in dry conditions in total dark at 37°C for 24 h. The Vicker’s hardness test was performed on the resin cement layer with a microhardness tester. Statistical significance was determined using multifactorial analysis of variance (ANOVA) (alpha=.05). Light transmittance of different thicknesses of zirconia (0.3, 0.5 and 0.8 mm) was measured using a hand-held radiometer (Demetron, Kerr). Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA test (alpha=.05). Results: ANOVA revealed that resin cement and light curing unit had significant effects on microhardness (p < 0.001). Additionally, greater zirconia thickness resulted in lower transmittance. There was no correlation between the amount of light transmitted and microhardness of dual-cured resin cements (r = 0.073, p = 0.295). Conclusion: Although different zirconia thicknesses might result in insufficient light transmission, dual-cured resin cements under zirconia restorations could have adequate microhardness. Key words:Zirconia, microhardness, light transmittance, resin cement. PMID:23385497

  17. Nanoindentation Study of Resin Impregnated Sandstone and Early-Age Cement Paste Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Fonteyn, M. T. J.; Hughes, J.; Pearce, C.

    Nanoindentation testing requires well prepared samples with a good surface finish. Achieving a good surface finish is difficult for heterogeneous materials, particularly those with weak and fragile structures/phases, which are easily damaged or lost during preparation. The loss of weak structures can be drastically reduced by impregnating the sample with a resin before cutting and polishing. This technique is commonly used in SEM microscopy but has not been used for nanoindentation-testing before. This paper reports an investigation to extract micro-mechanical properties of different phases in resin impregnated sandstone and 1-day hydrated cement samples. The results appeared to show that it is feasible to use resin impregnated specimens for nanoindentation study of both materials.

  18. Swelling behavior of ion exchange resins incorporated in tri-calcium silicate cement matrix: I. Chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neji, M.; Bary, B.; Le Bescop, P.; Burlion, N.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the first part of a theoretical and experimental work aiming at modeling the chemo-mechanical behavior of composites made up of ion exchange resins (IER) solidified in a tri-calcium silicate cement paste (C3S). Because of ion exchange processes, the volume change of the IER may cause internal pressures leading to the degradation of the material. In this study, a predictive modeling is developed for describing the chemical behavior of such material. It is based on thermodynamic equilibria to determine the evolution of the ion exchange processes, and the potential precipitation of portlandite in the composite. In parallel, a phenomenological study has been set up to understand chemical phenomena related to the swelling mechanisms. The model created has been finally implemented in a finite elements software; the simulation of a laboratory test has been performed and the results compared to experimental data.

  19. Characterization of Composite Fan Case Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvoracek, Charlene M.

    2004-01-01

    The majority of commercial turbine engines that power today s aircraft use a large fan driven by the engine core to generate thrust which dramatically increases the engine s efficiency. However, if one of these fan blades fails during flight, it becomes high energy shrapnel, potentially impacting the engine or puncturing the aircraft itself and thus risking the lives of passengers. To solve this problem, the fan case must be capable of containing a fan blade should it break off during flight. Currently, all commercial fan cases are made of either just a thick metal barrier or a thinner metal wall surrounded by Kevlar-an ultra strong fiber that elastically catches the blade. My summer 2004 project was to characterize the resins for a composite fan case that will be lighter and more efficient than the current metal. The composite fan case is created by braiding carbon fibers and injecting a polymer resin into the braid. The resin holds the fibers together, so at first using the strongest polymer appears to logically lead to the strongest fan case. Unfortunately, the stronger polymers are too viscous when melted. This makes the manufacturing process more difficult because the polymer does not flow as freely through the braid, and the final product is less dense. With all of this in mind, it is important to remember that the strength of the polymer is still imperative; the case must still contain blades with high impact energy. The research identified which polymer had the right balance of properties, including ease of fabrication, toughness, and ability to transfer the load to the carbon fibers. Resin deformation was studied to better understand the composite response during high speed impact. My role in this research was the testing of polymers using dynamic mechanical analysis and tensile, compression, and torsion testing. Dynamic mechanical analysis examines the response of materials under cyclic loading. Two techniques were used for dynamic mechanical analysis

  20. [Bond strength of etched enamel to direct composite resins, to indirect composite resins and to etched and silanized porcelain].

    PubMed

    Prévost, A P; Desautels, P

    1990-07-01

    The adhesion to enamel of composite resin inlays are not documented as much as porcelain inlays and direct composite resins. This study evaluates the adhesion of a light cured composite resin (P-50) used in an indirect technique and secondarily polymerized by heat. No significant differences were found between adhesion of P-50 used with an indirect technique and adhesion of porcelain (Mirage). P-50 used with the direct technique yield adhesion values significantly lower than the indirect techniques. PMID:2204471

  1. Priming the tooth surface with chlorhexidine and antibacterial activity of resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Monika; Singh, Yashpal; Garg, Rishabh; Pandey, Anita

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of priming the tooth surface with 2% chlorhexidine gluconate on antibacterial activity of resin cement. METHODS: Ten patients in whom a single missing tooth was present on both the right and left side in the upper or lower arch were selected. Two fixed partial dentures (FPDs) in each patient on the right and left side were planned. Each FPD was assigned either to the control or test group. In the control group, FPD was luted with resin cement and in the test group, the tooth surface was primed with 2% chlorhexidine gluconate before luting with resin cement. Bacteriological samples were collected at base line level, as the patient came to the outpatient department before the start of any treatment, 5 wk prior to cementation of FPD and at 13 wk (8 wk after final cementation). Microbiological processing of all samples was done and the results were statistically analyzed. RESULTS: In the test group, a predominance of aerobic/facultative gram positive cocci rod was seen which indicates a healthy periodontal site, whereas in the control group, a predominance of anaerobic gram negative rods was present which indicates an unhealthy periodontal condition. This is evident by the fact that the anaerobic bacteria percentage in the control sample is 57% and 15% in the test sample after 13 wk, whereas the aerobic/facultative bacteria percentage is 43% in the control sample and 85% in the test sample after 13 wk. The percentage of gram negative bacteria in the control sample is 61% and in the test sample is 20% after 13 wk, whereas the percentage of gram positive bacteria in the control sample is 39% and in the test sample is 80% after 13 wk. The shift from anaerobic gram negative bacteria to aerobic gram positive bacteria is clearly seen from the control to test sample after 13 wk. CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrated that priming the tooth surface with 2% chlorhexidine gluconate may enhance antibacterial activity of the resin cement. PMID

  2. In-vitro study of resin-modified glass ionomer cements for cementation of orthodontic bands. Isolation, surplus removal and humidity as factors influencing the bond strength between enamel, cement and metal.

    PubMed

    Liebmann, S M; Jost-Brinkmann, P G

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate different light-cured and chemically cured resin-modified glass ionomer cements used for the cementation of orthodontic bands and to analyze various factors influencing the adhesive strength between enamel, cement and stainless steel. Four resin-modified glass ionomers (Fuji Ortho LC/GC, Fuji Duet/GC, Unitek Multi-Cure Glass Ionomer Orthodontic Band Cement/3M Unitek, Vitremer/3M) and 1 compomer (Band-Lok/Reliance) were examined. Flattened and polished bovine teeth embedded in polyurethane resin were used as enamel specimens. Before cementation, 50% of the specimens were moistened with the aerosol of an inhalation device, while the rest were dried with compressed air. Stainless steel cylinders (CrNi 18 10) were perpendicularly bonded onto the polished enamel using a custom-made cementation device and immediately topped with a pressure of 0.25 MPa. The cement was isolated with either Ketac Glaze/ESPE, Fuji Coat/GC, Cacao Butter/GC, Dryfoil/Jalenko or Final Varnish/VOCO, or was left uncoated. Eight minutes after the beginning of mixing, either the surplus cement was removed with a scalpel or surplus removal was simulated with ultrasound. After 24 hours storage in a water bath at 37 degrees C and 1,000 thermocycles the shear bond strength was determined. Significant differences with respect to the shear bond strength were found among the following cements, ranking from highest to lowest: Fuji Duet, Unitek cement > Fuji Ortho LC > Vitremer > Band-Lok. The application of a barrier coating significantly increased the shear bond strength of all cements except Fuji Ortho LC. The light-cured resin Ketac Glaze proved to be the most effective barrier coating. A dry enamel surface increased the bond strength of all investigated cements except Unitek cement. The use of ultrasound led to no significant reduction in shear bond strength in comparison with surplus removal with a scalpel. PMID:10546417

  3. Effect of resin monomer composition on toothbrush wear resistance.

    PubMed

    Kawai, K; Iwami, Y; Ebisu, S

    1998-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the toothbrush abrasion resistance of seven different experimental resins which were made by changing the composition of resin monomers. The experimental resins were made by mixing four kinds of dental resin monomers (Bis-GMA, UDMA, TMPT and TEGDMA), camphorquinone (1 wt%), dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (2 wt%) and 2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-cresol (0.05 wt%). The resin specimens were stored in air for 2 weeks, and then put on a toothbrush abrasion testing machine. After 100000 strokes, the wear loss of each specimen was determined by weight change during the wear test. TMPT-TEGDMA resin showed the most wear resistance, while Bis-GMA- and UDMA-based resins showed increased wear resistance with an increased content of TEGDMA. Also, a inverse relationship between the microhardness number and the amount of wear of the respective resins was confirmed. PMID:9610853

  4. Conventional dual-cure versus self-adhesive resin cements in dentin bond integrity

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Renata Andreza Talaveira; COUTINHO, Margareth; CARDOZO, Pedro Igor; da SILVA, Larissa Alves; ZORZATTO, José Roberto

    2011-01-01

    During post preparation, the root canal is exposed to the oral cavity, and endodontic treatment may fail because of coronal leakage, bacterial infection and sealing inability of the luting cement. Objective this study quantified the interfacial continuity produced with conventional dual-cure and self-adhesive resin cements in the cervical (C), medium (M) and apical (A) thirds of the root. Material and methods Forty single-rooted human teeth were restored using Reforpost # 01 conical glass-fiber posts and different materials (N=10 per group): group AC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + AllCem; group ARC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + RelyX ARC; group U100=RelyX U100; and group MXC=Maxcem Elite. After being kept in 100% humidity at 37ºC for 72 hours, the samples were sectioned parallel to their longitudinal axis and positive epoxy resin replicas were made. The scanning electron micrographs of each third section of the teeth were combined using Image Analyst software and measured with AutoCAD-2002. We obtained percentage values of the interfacial continuity. Results Interfacial continuity was similar in the apical, medium and cervical thirds of the roots within the groups (Friedman test, p>0.05). Comparison of the different cements in a same root third showed that interfacial continuity was lower in MXC (C=45.5%; M=48.5%; A=47.3%) than in AC (C=85.9%, M=81.8% and A=76.0%), ARC (C=83.8%, M=82.4% and A=75.0%) and U100 (C=84.1%, M=82.4% and A=77.3%) (Kruskal-Wallis test, p<0.05). Conclusions Allcem, Rely X ARC and U100 provide the best cementation; cementation was similar among root portions; in practical terms, U100 is the best resin because it combines good cementation and easy application and none of the cements provides complete interfacial continuity. PMID:21710099

  5. Recycling of ladle slag in cement composites: Environmental impacts.

    PubMed

    Serjun, Vesna Zalar; Mladenovič, Ana; Mirtič, Breda; Meden, Anton; Ščančar, Janez; Milačič, Radmila

    2015-09-01

    In the present work compact and ground cement composites in which 30% of cement by mass was replaced by ladle slag were investigated for their chemical and physico-mechanical properties. To evaluate long-term environmental impacts, leachability test based on diffusion, which combined both, diffusion and dissolution of contaminants, was performed in water and saline water. Total element concentrations and Cr(VI) were determined in leachates over a time period of 180days. At the end of the experiment, the mineralogical composition and the physico-mechanical stability of cement composites was also assessed. The results revealed that Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were immobilized by the hydration products formed in the cement composites with the addition of ladle slag. Cr(VI) content originating from the cement was also appreciably reduced by Fe(II) from minerals present in the added ladle slag, which thus had significant positive environmental effects. Among metals, only Mo and Ba were leached in elevated concentrations, but solely in ground cement composites with the addition of ladle slag. Lower V concentrations were observed in leachates of ground than compact composite. It was demonstrated that the presence of ladle slag in cement composites can even contribute to improved mortar resistance. The investigated ladle slag can be successfully implemented in cement composites as supplementary cementitious material. PMID:26008145

  6. Deproteinized dentin: a favorable substrate to self-bonding resin cements?

    PubMed

    Barbosa De Souza, Fábio; Sinclér Delfino, Carina; Lacalle Turbino, Míriam; Braz, Rodivan

    2011-08-01

    The adhesive performance on deproteinized dentin of different self-adhesive resin cements was evaluated through microtensile bond strength (μTBS) analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Occlusal dentin of human molars were distributed into different groups, according to the categories: adhesive cementation with two-step bonding systems-control Groups (Adper Single Bond 2 + RelyX ARC/3M ESPE; One Step Plus + Duolink/Bisco; Excite + Variolink I/Ivoclar Vivadent) and self-adhesive cementation-experimental groups (Rely X Unicem/3M ESPE; Biscem/Bisco; MultiLink Sprint/Ivoclar Vivadent). Each group was subdivided according to the dentin approach to: α, maintenance of collagen fibers and β, deproteinization. The mean values were obtained, and submitted to ANOVA and Tukey test. Statistical differences were obtained to the RelyX Unicem groups (α = 13.59 MPa; β = 30.19 MPa). All the BIS Group specimens failed before the mechanical tests. Dentinal deproteinization provided an improved bond performance for the self-adhesive cement Rely X Unicem, and had no negative effect on the other cementing systems studied. PMID:21648064

  7. Comparing the effect of a resin based sealer on crown retention for three types of cements: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pankaj; Thummar, Mansukh; Shah, Dipti; Pitti, Varun

    2013-09-01

    To determine the effect of resin based sealer on retention of casting cemented with three different luting agents. 55 extracted molar teeth were prepared with a flat occlusal surface, 20° taper and 4 mm axial height. The axial surface of each specimen was determined. The specimen were then distributed into five groups based on decreasing surface area, so each cementation group contained 11 specimens with similar mean axial surface area. A two-step, single bottle universal adhesive system (One-Step-Resinomer, Bisco) was used to seal dentin after the tooth preparation. Sealer was not used on the control specimens except for the modified-resin cement (Resinomer, Bisco) specimens that required use of adhesive with cementation. Using ceramometal (Wirobond(®), BEGO), a casting was produced for each specimen and cemented with either zinc phosphate (Harvard), glass ionomer (Vivaglass) or modified resin cement (Resinomer) with single bottle adhesive. All the castings were cemented with a force of 20 kg. Castings were thermal cycled at 5 and 55 °C for 2,500 cycles and were then removed along the path of insertion using a universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min. A single-factor ANOVA was used with a = 0.05. The nature of failure was also recorded. The mean stress removal for non sealed zinc phosphate, sealed zinc phosphate, non sealed glass ionomer, sealed glass ionomer and modified resin cement was found to be 3.56, 1.92, 2.40, 4.26, 6.95 MPa respectively. Zinc phosphate cement remained principally on the castings when the tooth surface was treated with the sealer and was found on both the tooth and the casting when the sealer was not used. Fracture of root before dislodgement was seen in 9 of 11 specimens with modified resin cement. Resin sealer decreases the retention of the castings when used with zinc phosphate and increases it when used with glass ionomer cement. The highest mean dislodgement force was measured with modified resin cement. PMID:24431752

  8. Surface roughness of orthodontic band cements with different compositions

    PubMed Central

    van de SANDE, Françoise Hélène; da SILVA, Adriana Fernandes; MICHELON, Douver; PIVA, Evandro; CENCI, Maximiliano Sérgio; DEMARCO, Flávio Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The present study evaluated comparatively the surface roughness of four orthodontic band cements after storage in various solutions. Material and Methods eight standardized cylinders were made from 4 materials: zinc phosphate cement (ZP), compomer (C), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) and resin cement (RC). Specimens were stored for 24 h in deionized water and immersed in saline (pH 7.0) or 0.1 M lactic acid solution (pH 4.0) for 15 days. Surface roughness readings were taken with a profilometer (Surfcorder SE1200) before and after the storage period. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (comparison among cements and storage solutions) or paired t-test (comparison before and after the storage period) at 5% significance level. Results The values for average surface roughness were statistically different (p<0.001) among cements at both baseline and after storage. The roughness values of cements in a decreasing order were ZP>RMGIC>C>R (p<0.001). After 15 days, immersion in lactic acid solution resulted in the highest surface roughness for all cements (p<0.05), except for the RC group (p>0.05). Compared to the current threshold (0.2 µm) related to biofilm accumulation, both RC and C remained below the threshold, even after acidic challenge by immersion in lactic acid solution. Conclusions Storage time and immersion in lactic acid solution increased the surface roughness of the majority of the tested cements. RC presented the smoothest surface and it was not influenced by storage conditions. PMID:21625737

  9. Dual and self-curing potential of self-adhesive resin cements as thin films.

    PubMed

    Moraes, R R; Boscato, N; Jardim, P S; Schneider, L F J

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the dual- and self-curing potential of self-adhesive resin cements (SARCs) as thin, clinically-relevant cement films was investigated. The SARCs tested were: BisCem (BSC; Bisco), Maxcem Elite (MXE; Kerr), RelyX Unicem clicker (UNI; 3M ESPE), seT capsule (SET; SDI), and SmartCem 2 (SC2; Dentsply Caulk). The conventional cement RelyX ARC (3M ESPE) was tested as a reference. The degree of conversion (DC) as a function of time was evaluated by real-time Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with an attenuated total reflectance (ATR) device. The cements were either photoactivated for 40 seconds (dual-cure mode) or not photoactivated (self-cure mode). The cement film thickness was 50 ± 10 μm. The DC (%) was evaluated 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 minutes after placing the cement on the ATR cell. Data for DC as a function of time were analyzed by two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). DC values at 30 minutes for the self- and dual-cure modes were submitted to one-way ANOVA. Post hoc comparisons were performed using the Student-Newman-Keuls test (p<0.05). The rate and the extent of conversion were lower for the SARCs compared with the conventional cement. Means ± standard deviations (SD) for the dual-cure mode at 30 minutes were: 75 ± 5 (ARC)a, 73 ± 8 (SET)a, 61 ± 4 (MXE)b, 51 ± 9 (BSC)c, 51 ± 4 (UNI)c, and 48 ± 3 (SC2)c, while in the self-cure mode means and SD were 62 ± 6 (ARC)a, 54 ± 3 (MXE)b, 40 ± 6 (SC2)c, 35 ± 2 (UNI)c, 35 ± 3 (SET)c, and 11 ± 3 (BSC)d. The DC for the dual-cure mode was generally higher than the self-cure, irrespective of the time. Discrepancies in DC between the dual- and self-cure modes from 11% to 79% were observed. In conclusion, SARCs may present slower rate of polymerization and lower final DC than conventional resin cements, in either the dual- or self-cure mode. PMID:21864125

  10. Bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive and conventional-type adhesive resin cements to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Part 1: Effects of sandblasting and silanization.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Mami; Matsumoto, Mariko; Kawaguchi, Asuka; Miura, Jiro; Minamino, Takuya; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Takeshige, Fumio; Mine, Atsushi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the effect of sandblasting and silanization on resin cement bond strengths to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Twenty four blocks (KATANA AVENCIA BLOCK) were divided into two resin cement groups (PANAVIA V5 [PV5] and PANAVIA SA CEMENT HANDMIX [PSA]), and further divided into four subgroups representing different surface treatment methods: no treatment (Ctl), silanization (Si), sandblasting (Sb), and Sb+Si. After resin application, microtensile bond strengths (μTBSs) were measured immediately, 1, 3 and 6 months after water storage. In addition, surfaces resulting from each of the treatment methods were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Three-way analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant effect for the parameters 'surface treatment' (p<0.001, F=370), 'resin cement' (p<0.001, F=103, PSA

  11. Advanced thermoset resins for fire-resistant composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal and flammability properties of some thermoset polymers and composites are described. The processing and evaluation of composites fabricated from currently used resins and advanced fire-resistant resins are also described. Laboratory test methodology used to qualify candidate composite materials includes thermochemical characterization of the polymeric compounds and evaluation of the glass reinforced composites for flammability and smoke evolution. The use of these test methods will be discussed in comparing advanced laminating resins and composites consisting of modified epoxies, phenolics and bismaleimide, with conventional baseline materials consisting of epoxy.

  12. Intra-radicular dentin treatments and retention of fiber posts with self-adhesive resin cements.

    PubMed

    Faria-e-Silva, André Luis; Menezes, Murilo de Sousa; Silva, Fernanda Pereira; Reis, Giselle Rodrigues dos; Moraes, Rafael Ratto de

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of treating intraradicular dentin with irrigating solutions on the retention of glass-fiber posts luted with self-adhesive resin cement. Bovine incisors were endodontically treated, and 9-mm-deep postholes were prepared. Before inserting the cement, the root canals were irrigated with various solutions: 11.5% polyacrylic acid for 30 s, 17% EDTA for 60 s, or 5% NaOCl for 60 s, respectively. Irrigation with distilled water was used in the control group. After all specimens had been rinsed with distilled water, the excess moisture was removed and the posts were luted using either BisCem (Bisco) or RelyX Unicem clicker (3M ESPE). Seven days after luting, the specimens were sectioned transversally into 1-mm-thick slices, which were submitted to push-out testing on a mechanical testing machine. Bond strength data (n = 6 per group) were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' test (α = 0.05). For Unicem, EDTA showed lower bond strength than the other solutions, which had similar results. For BisCem, EDTA showed higher bond strength than the other treatments, while application of NaOCl yielded higher bond strength than polyacrylic acid whereas the control group had intermediate results. In conclusion, irrigating root canals before insertion of self-adhesive resin cements, especially EDTA, might interfere with retention of the fiber posts. PMID:23306622

  13. Composites with improved fiber-resin interfacial adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cizmecioglu, Muzaffer (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The adhesion of fiber reinforcement such as high modulus graphite to a matrix resin such as polycarbonate is greatly enhanced by applying a very thin layer, suitably from 50 Angstroms to below 1000 Angstroms, to the surface of the fiber such as by immersing the fiber in a dilute solution of the matrix resin in a volatile solvent followed by draining to remove excess solution and air drying to remove the solvent. The thin layer wets the fiber surface. The very dilute solution of matrix resin is able to impregnate multifilament fibers and the solution evenly flows onto the surface of the fibers. A thin uniform layer is formed on the surface of the fiber after removal of the solvent. The matrix resin coated fiber is completely wetted by the matrix resin during formation of the composite. Increased adhesion of the resin to the fibers is observed at fracture. At least 65 percent of the surface of the graphite fiber is covered with polycarbonate resin at fracture whereas uncoated fibers have very little matrix resin adhering to their surfaces at fracture and epoxy sized graphite fibers exhibit only slightly higher coverage with matrix resin at fracture. Flexural modulus of the composite containing matrix resin coated fibers is increased by 50 percent and flexural strength by 37 percent as compared to composites made with unsized fibers.

  14. Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Methacrylate- and Silorane-based Composite Resin Bonded to Resin-Modified Glass-ionomer Containing Micro- and Nano-hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Moradian, Marzie; Motamedi, Mehran

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The adhesion of resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI) to composite resin has a very important role in the durability of sandwich restorations. Hydroxyapatite is an excellent candidate as a filler material for improving the mechanical properties of glass ionomer cement. Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the effect of adding micro- and nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) powder to RMGI on the shear bond strength (SBS) of nanofilled and silorane-based composite resins bonded to RMGI containing micro- and nano-HA. Materials and Method Sixty cylindrical acrylic blocks containing a hole of 5.5×2.5 mm (diameter × height) were prepared and randomly divided into 6 groups as Group 1 with RMGI (Fuji II LC) plus Adper Single Bond/Z350 composite resin (5.5×3.5 mm diameter × height); Group 2 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of micro-HA plus Adper Single Bond/Z350 composite resin; Group3 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of nano-HA plus Adper Single Bond/Z350 composite resin; Group 4 with RMGI plus P90 System Adhesive/P90 Filtek composite resin (5.5×3.5 mm diameter × height); Group 5 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of micro-HA plus P90 System Adhesive/P90Filtek composite resin; and Group 6 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of nano-HA plus P90 System Adhesive/P90 Filtek composite resin. The specimens were stored in water (37° C, 1 week) and subjected to 1000 thermal cycles (5°C/55°C). SBS test was performed by using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (p< 0.05). Results There were significant differences between groups 1 and 4 (RMGI groups, p= 0.025), and groups 3 and 6 (RMGI+ nano-HA groups, p= 0.012). However, among Z350 and P90 specimens, no statistically significant difference was detected in the SBS values (p= 0.19, p= 0.083, respectively). Conclusion RMGI containing HA can improve the bond strength to methacrylate-based in comparison to silorane-based composite resins. Meanwhile, RMGI

  15. Tissue response of apatite-filled resin cement and titanium-reinforced apatite dental implants in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ogiso, M; Tabata, T; Nakabayashi, N; Yamashita, Y; Borgese, D

    1993-01-01

    Abutment and root portion divided two-piece dental implants were designed to modify the one-piece dense hydroxyapatite (D-HAP) implant. The initial placement of the root portion endosseously ensured an aseptic environment and physical stability for the implant during the bone healing period. The outer D-HAP shell of the root portion was fortified by an inner titanium cylinder and cemented with an adhesive resin cement containing 4-methacryloyoxyethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META) and reinforced by fine apatite filler. Upon attaining integration of the bone and implant, the abutment was screwed and fixed into the screw hole of the root portion. The tissue response of both the apatite-filled resin cement and root portion of the two-piece implant was studied by animal canine experiments. Light and electron microscopic examination of specimens taken from experimental animal tissue showed bone contacted directly not only the exposed apatite filler at the surface of the apatite-filled resin cement, but also the resin portion. These findings of direct bone contact suggested that the tissue response of apatite-filled resin cement was approximately similar to the usual D-HAP. Because most of the surface of the outer D-HAP shell of the root portion came in contact with bone, it prevented the deposition of contamination on the D-HAP surface during the manufacturing procedures of the root portion. PMID:10148567

  16. Swelling behavior of ion exchange resins incorporated in tri-calcium silicate cement matrix: II. Mechanical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neji, M.; Bary, B.; Le Bescop, P.; Burlion, N.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the second part of a study aiming at modelling the mechanical behavior of composites made up of ion exchange resins (IER) solidified in a tri-calcium silicate cement paste (C3S). Such composites may be subjected to internal pressures due to ion exchange processes between ionic species which are in IER and interstitial solution of the cement paste. The reactive transport model developed in the companion paper is coupled in this study to a multi-scale approach describing the mechanical behavior of the material. It is based on an analogy with thermomechanics for taking in account the IER internal pressures, and on Eshelby-based homogenization techniques to estimate both mechanical and coupling parameters. A laboratory test has been set up to measure the macroscopic strain caused by the swelling phenomenon. The model has been finally implemented in a finite elements software. The simulation of the laboratory tests has been performed and the results have been analyzed and compared to experimental data.

  17. In-vitro evaluation of an experimental method for bonding of orthodontic brackets with self-adhesive resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Ramazanzadeh, Barat Ali; Merati, Mohsen; Shafaee, Hooman; Dogon, Leon; Sohrabi, Keyvan

    2013-01-01

    Background Self-adhesive resin cements do not require the surface treatment of teeth and are said to release fluoride, which makes them suitable candidates for bonding of orthodontic brackets. The objectives of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of self-adhesive resin cements on etched on non-etched surfaces in vitro and to assess their fluoride release features. Materials and Methods Four fluoride-releasing dual-cure self-adhesive resin cements were investigated. For SBS experiment, 135 freshly extracted human maxillary premolars were used and divided into nine groups of 15 teeth. In the control group, brackets were cemented by Transbond XT (3M Unitek, USA), in four groups self-adhesive resin cements were used without acid-etching and in four groups self-adhesive cements were applied on acid-etched surfaces and the brackets were then deboned in shear with a testing machine. Adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were also calculated. For fluoride release investigation, 6 discs were prepared for each self-adhesive cement. Transbond XT and Fuji Ortho LC (GC, Japan) served as negative and positive control groups, respectively. The fluoride release of each disc into 5 ml of deionized water was measured at days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 28, and 56 using a fluoride ion-selective electrode connected to an ion analyzer. To prevent cumulative measurements, the storage solutions were changed daily. Results The SBS of brackets cemented with Transbond XT were significantly higher compared to self-adhesives applied on non-etched surfaces (P<0.001). However, when the self-adhesive resin cements were used with enamel etching, no significant differences was found in the SBS compared to Transbond XT, except for Breeze. The comparisons of the ARI scores indicated that bracket failure modes were significantly different between the etched and non-etched groups. All self-adhesive cements released clinically sufficient amounts of fluoride for an extended period of time

  18. Comparison of the flexural strength of two dual cure adhesive resin cements under oral simulated conditions: an in-vitro study.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, P; Nair, A; Regish, K M; Viswambaran, M; Kumar, M

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the flexural strength of the newly developed self-adhesive dual cure resin cement and compare it with conventional resin cement under oral simulated conditions. A conventional resin cement (Calibra) and self adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100) were selected and 40 specimens of each cement were fabricated for the study. Half of these specimens were polymerized directly whereas the other half were polymerized through 2 mm of porcelain disc. Specimens were tested after 24hrs and after 30 days immersion in artificial saliva. A three point bending test was performed using universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Overall RelyX U100 showed higher mean flexural strength compared to Calibra (141.55 MPa, 119.46MPa, respectively). When the specimens of both the cements were light cured through 2 mm porcelain disc, their flexural strength decreased significantly. The mean flexural strength of both self adhesive and conventional dual cure adhesive resin cements was increased significantly after storage in artificial saliva for 30 days at 37 degreeC. Among the two dual cure resin cements, the self adhesive dual cure cement (RelyX U100) showed increased overall mean flexural strength as compared to conventional resin cement (Calibra) under all the curing and storage protocols. PMID:23888528

  19. 3D micro-CT analysis of void formations and push-out bonding strength of resin cements used for fiber post cementation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To investigate the void parameters within the resin cements used for fiber post cementation by micro-CT (µCT) and regional push-out bonding strength. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty-one, single and round shaped roots were enlarged with a low-speed drill following by endodontic treatment. The roots were divided into three groups (n=7) and fiber posts were cemented with Maxcem Elite, Multilink N and Superbond C&B resin cements. Specimens were scanned using µCT scanner at resolution of 13.7 µm. The number, area, and volume of voids between dentin and post were evaluated. A method of analysis based on the post segmentation was used, and coronal, middle and apical thirds considered separately. After the µCT analysis, roots were embedded in epoxy resin and sectioned into 2 mm thick slices (63 sections in total). Push-out testing was performed with universal testing device at 0.5 mm/min cross-head speed. Data were analyzed with Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U tests (α=.05). RESULTS Overall, significant differences between the resin cements and the post level were observed in the void number, area, and volume (P<.05). Super-Bond C&B showed the most void formation (44.86 ± 22.71). Multilink N showed the least void surface (3.51 ± 2.24 mm2) and volume (0.01 ± 0.01 mm3). Regional push-out bond strength of the cements was not different (P>.05). CONCLUSION µCT proved to be a powerful non-destructive 3D analysis tool for visualizing the void parameters. Multilink N had the lowest void parameters. When efficiency of all cements was evaluated, direct relationship between the post region and push-out bonding strength was not observed. PMID:27141253

  20. Assessment of Natural Radioactivity Levels of Cements and Cement Composites in the Slovak Republic

    PubMed Central

    Eštoková, Adriana; Palaščáková, Lenka

    2013-01-01

    The radionuclide activities of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K and radiological parameters (radium equivalent activity, gamma and alpha indices, the absorbed gamma dose rate and external and internal hazard indices) of cements and cement composites commonly used in the Slovak Republic have been studied in this paper. The cement samples of 8 types of cements from Slovak cement plants and five types of composites made from cement type CEM I were analyzed in the experiment. The radionuclide activities in the cements ranged from 8.58–19.1 Bq·kg−1, 9.78–26.3 Bq·kg−1 and 156.5–489.4 Bq·kg−1 for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K, respectively. The radiological parameters in cement samples were calculated as follows: mean radium equivalent activity Raeq = 67.87 Bq·kg−1, gamma index Iγ = 0.256, alpha index Iα = 0.067, the absorbed gamma dose rate D = 60.76 nGy·h−1, external hazard index Hex = 0.182 and internal hazard index Hin was 0.218. The radionuclide activity in composites ranged from 6.84–10.8 Bq·kg−1 for 226Ra, 13.1–20.5 Bq·kg−1 for 232Th and 250.4–494.4 Bq·kg−1 for 40K. The calculated radiological parameters of cements were lower than calculated radiological parameters of cement composites. PMID:24351739

  1. The effect of dentin desensitizers and Nd:YAG laser pre-treatment on microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Tuncer, Duygu; Yuzugullu, Bulem; Celik, Cigdem

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study is to evaluate if pre-treatment with desensitizers have a negative effect on microtensile bond strength before cementing a restoration using recently introduced self-adhesive resin cement to dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-five human molars' occlusal surfaces were ground to expose dentin; and were randomly grouped as (n=5); 1) Gluma-(Glutaraldehyde/HEMA) 2) Aqua-Prep F-(Fluoride), 3) Bisblock-(Oxalate), 4) Cervitec Plus-(Clorhexidine), 5) Smart protect-(Triclosan), 6) Nd:YAG laser, 7) No treatment (control). After applying the selected agent, RelyX U200 self-adhesive resin cement was used to bond composite resin blocks to dentin. All groups were subjected to thermocycling for 1000 cycles between 5-55℃. Each bonded specimen was sectioned to microbars (6 mm × 1 mm × 1 mm) (n=20). Specimens were submitted to microtensile bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Levene's test, Kruskal-Wallis One-way Analysis of Variance, and Conover's nonparametric statistical analysis were used (P<.05). RESULTS Gluma, Smart Protect and Nd:YAG laser treatments showed comparable microtensile bond strengths compared with the control group (P>.05). The microtensile bond strengths of Aqua-Prep F, and Cervitec Plus were similar to each other but significantly lower than the control group (P<.05). Bisblock showed the lowest microtensile bond strength among all groups (P<.001). Most groups showed adhesive failure. CONCLUSION Within the limitation of this study, it is not recommended to use Aqua-prep F, Cervitec Plus and Bisblock on dentin when used with a self-adhesive resin cement due to the decrease they cause in bond strength. Beside, pre-treatment of dentin with Gluma, Smart protect, and Nd:YAG laser do not have a negative effect. PMID:24843392

  2. Formulation Study on Immobilization of Spent Ion Exchange Resins in Polymer Cements

    SciTech Connect

    Lili Xia; Meiqiong Lin; Bao Liangjin

    2006-07-01

    Applying normal design and correlative computer software, a new matrix material and an excellent waste formulation were developed. Based on the theory calculations and normal design in this paper, using polymer complex cement as immobilization matrix that mixed with simulating spent ion exchange resin a new waste formulation was carried out. The characterization of solidified waste had been done after 28 days curing. The results conformed to the treatment of the waste about the requests of the national standard [GB14569-93-1]. Leach index of the solidified waste was excellent. An optimized formulation was recommended. (authors)

  3. Influence of resin cement shade on the color and translucency of ceramic veneers

    PubMed Central

    HERNANDES, Daiana Kelly Lopes; ARRAIS, Cesar Augusto Galvão; de LIMA, Erick; CESAR, Paulo Francisco; RODRIGUES, José Augusto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective This in vitro study evaluated the effect of two different shades of resin cement (RC- A1 and A3) layer on color change, translucency parameter (TP), and chroma of low (LT) and high (HT) translucent reinforced lithium disilicate ceramic laminates. Material and Methods One dual-cured RC (Variolink II, A1- and A3-shade, Ivoclar Vivadent) was applied to 1-mm thick ceramic discs to create thin RC films (100 µm thick) under the ceramics. The RC was exposed to light from a LED curing unit. Color change (ΔE) of ceramic discs was measured according to CIEL*a*b* system with a standard illuminant D65 in reflectance mode in a spectrophotometer, operating in the light range of 360-740 nm, equipped with an integrating sphere. The color difference between black (B) and white (W) background readings was used for TP analysis, while chroma was calculated by the formula C* ab=(a*2+b*2)½. ΔE of 3.3 was set as the threshold of clinically unacceptable. The results were evaluated by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. Results HT ceramics showed higher ΔE and higher TP than LT ceramics. A3-shade RC promoted higher ΔE than A1-shade cement, regardless of the ceramic translucency. No significant difference in TP was noted between ceramic discs with A1- and those with A3-shade cement. Ceramic with underlying RC showed lower TP than discs without RC. HT ceramics showed lower chroma than LT ceramics, regardless of the resin cement shade. The presence of A3-shade RC resulted in higher chroma than the presence of A1-shade RC. Conclusions Darker underlying RC layer promoted more pronounced changes in ceramic translucency, chroma, and shade of high translucent ceramic veneers. These differences may not be clinically differentiable. PMID:27556211

  4. Bonding of Resin Cement to Zirconia with High Pressure Primer Coating

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-jie; Jiao, Kai; Liu, Yan; Zhou, Wei; Shen, Li-juan; Fang, Ming; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xiang; Tay, Franklin R.; Chen, Ji-hua

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effect of air-drying pressure during ceramic primer coating on zirconia/resin bonding and the surface characteristics of the primed zirconia. Methods Two ceramic primers (Clearfil Ceramic Primer, CCP, Kuraray Medical Inc. and Z-Prime Plus, ZPP, Bisco Inc.) were applied on the surface of air-abraded zirconia (Katana zirconia, Noritake) and dried at 4 different air pressures (0.1–0.4 MPa). The primed zirconia ceramic specimens were bonded with a resin-based luting agent (SA Luting Cement, Kuraray). Micro-shear bond strengths of the bonded specimens were tested after 3 days of water storage or 5,000× thermocycling (n = 12). Failure modes of the fractured specimens were examined with scanning electron miscopy. The effects of air pressure on the thickness of the primer layers and the surface roughness (Sa) of primed zirconia were evaluated using spectroscopic ellipsometry (n = 6), optical profilometry and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) (n = 6), respectively. Results Clearfil Ceramic Primer air-dried at 0.3 and 0.4 MPa, yielding significantly higher µSBS than gentle air-drying subgroups (p<0.05). Compared to vigorous drying conditions, Z-Prime Plus air-dried at 0.2 MPa exhibited significantly higher µSBS (p<0.05). Increasing air-drying pressure reduced the film thickness for both primers. Profilometry measurements and ESEM showed rougher surfaces in the high pressure subgroups of CCP and intermediate pressure subgroup of ZPP. Conclusion Air-drying pressure influences resin/zirconia bond strength and durability significantly. Higher air-drying pressure (0.3-0.4 MPa) for CCP and intermediate pressure (0.2 MPa) for ZPP are recommended to produce strong, durable bonds between resin cement and zirconia ceramics. PMID:24992678

  5. In vitro evaluation of the bonding durability of self-adhesive resin cement to titanium using highly accelerated life test.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jie; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bonding durability of three self-adhesive resin cements to titanium using the Highly Accelerated Life Test (HALT). The following self-adhesive resin cements were used to bond pairs of titanium blocks together according to manufacturers' instructions: RelyX Unicem, Breeze, and Clearfil SA Luting. After storage in water at 37°C for 24 h, bonded specimens (n=15) immersed in 37°C water were subjected to cyclic shear load testing regimes of 20, 30, or 40 kg using a fatigue testing machine. Cyclic loading continued until failure occurred, and the number of cycles taken to reach failure was recorded. The bonding durability of a self-adhesive resin cement to titanium was largely influenced by the weight of impact load. HALT showed that Clearfil SA Luting, which contained MDP monomer, yielded the highest median bonding lifetime to titanium. PMID:22123007

  6. Effect of different grades of gum rosins and hydrogenated resins on the solubility, disintegration, and dimensional alterations of Grossman cement.

    PubMed

    Sousa-Neto, M D; Guimarães, L F; Saquy, P C; Pécora, J D

    1999-07-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of the addition of different grades of gum rosins and hydrogenated resins to Grossman cement on dimensional stability, solubility and disintegration. pH and conductivity, which may affect these properties, were also determined. The experiments were performed according to Specification 57 of the American Dental Association for root canal cements using Grossman cements containing three gum rosins (grades X, WW, and WG) and two hydrogenated resins (Staybelite and Staybelite ester 10). The results showed that the solubility, disintegration, and dimensional stability of Grossman cement containing Staybelite and Staybelite ester 10 were inferior to the values considered acceptable by the American Dental Association Specification 57. PMID:10687510

  7. Evaluation of the shear bond strength of resin cement to Y-TZP ceramic after different surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yoo-Jin; Shin, Yooseok; Yi, Young-Ah; Kim, Jaehoon; Lee, In-Bog; Cho, Byeong-Hoon; Son, Ho-Hyun; Seo, Deog-Gyu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various surface treatments on the shear bond strength of Y-TZP (Yttria-Tetragonal Zirconia Polycrystal) ceramics with zirconia primer and two different resin cements both containing 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP). Zirconia blocks (LAVA, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN) were polished and assigned to five groups according to the surface treatment: (1) no further treatment (control); (2) airborne abrasion with Al2 O3 particles; (3) Z-PRIME Plus (Bisco, Schaumburg, IL) applied on polished zirconia; (4) Z-PRIME Plus applied on zirconia after airborne abrasion; and (5) tribochemical silica-coating performed with the CoJet system (3M ESPE) followed by application of ESPE®-Sil (3M ESPE). Each group was further divided into one of two resin cements: Panavia F2.0 (Kuraray, Kurashiki, Okayama, Japan) and Clearfil SA Luting (Kuraray). Resin cement placed inside a gel-cap was polymerized on the zirconia surface. Shear bond strength was tested with a universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min. One-way analysis of variance and paired t-test were done. (p < 0.05), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were taken. Zirconia primer applied after airborne abrasion significantly increased the shear bond strength resulting in the highest value for both resin cements. Control groups for both cements showed the weakest value for shear bond strength. No significant differences were found between the shear bond strengths of the individual resin cements applied to zirconia surfaces treated the same way. In conclusion, the combined surface treatment of airborne abrasion followed by a zirconia primer is recommended for zirconia bonding with Panavia F2.0 and Clearfil SA Luting cements. PMID:24676632

  8. Antibacterial activity of resin adhesives, glass ionomer and resin-modified glass ionomer cements and a compomer in contact with dentin caries samples.

    PubMed

    Herrera, M; Castillo, A; Bravo, M; Liébana, J; Carrión, P

    2000-01-01

    A total of 103 clinical samples of carious dentin were used to study the antibacterial action of different dental resin adhesive materials (Gluma 2000, Syntac, Prisma Universal Bond 3, Scotchbond Multi-Purpose and Prime&Bond 2.0) glass ionomer cements (Ketac-Cem, Ketac-Bond, Ketac-Silver, Ketac-Fil) resin-modified glass ionomer cements (Fuji II LC, Vitremer and Vitrebond) and a compomer (Dyract). The agar plate diffusion method was used for the microbial cultures and a chlorhexidine control. The growth of the caries-producing microorganisms was effectively inhibited by the Vitremer and Vitrebond cements, and to a lesser extent by the Scotchbond Multi-Purpose adhesive system. Overall, there were statistically significant differences in the antibacterial activity of the products tested. PMID:11203829

  9. The measurement of polymerization shrinkage of composite resins with ESPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhang; Yang, Guo Biao

    2008-09-01

    In the current study, we used the method of electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) to measure polymerization shrinkage of composite resins. Standardized cavities were prepared and placed into the ESPI apparatus before the cavities were filled with composites (n=2) .The ESPI apparatus was constructed to measure the out-of-plane displacement of the resins surface during the polymerization. Experiments demonstrated that the ESPI technique was a viable method to measure the deformation of composite resins. It was responsive and sensitive to dimensional changes. We found that cavity shape, size and C- factor influenced the date of resins shrinkage. And the tooth deformation in response to polymerization of resins was measured by the ESPI too. We concluded that ESPI was a feasible method for assessing resins deformation induced by its polymerization shrinkage when it was bonded in tooth cavities. And the results were greatly influenced by the dimensions of cavities , or interface adhesive and so on. It could also measure the tooth deformation induced by shrinkage of bonded composite resins. We found that resins polymerization shrinkage date may overestimate shrinkage-induced tooth deformation.

  10. Method and solvent composition for regenerating an ion exchange resin

    DOEpatents

    Even, William R.; Irvin, David J.; Irvin, Jennifer A.; Tarver, Edward E.; Brown, Gilbert M.; Wang, James C. F.

    2002-01-01

    A method and composition for removing perchlorate from a highly selective ion exchange resin is disclosed. The disclosed approach comprises treating the resin in a solution of super critical or liquid carbon dioxide and one or more quaternary ammonium chloride surfactant compounds.

  11. Immediate and delayed photoactivation of self-adhesive resin cements and retention of glass-fiber posts.

    PubMed

    Faria-e-Silva, André Luis; Peixoto, Aline Carvalho; Borges, Marcela Gonçalves; Menezes, Murilo de Sousa; Moraes, Rafael Ratto de

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of immediate and delayed photoactivation of self-adhesive resin cements (SARCs) on the retention of glass-fiber posts luted into root canals. Bovine incisors were endodontically treated, and post holes of 9 mm in depth were prepared. Fiber posts were luted using one of two SARCs, BisCem (Bisco Inc., Schaumburg, USA) or RelyX Unicem clicker (3M ESPE, Saint Paul, USA), or a regular (etch-and-rinse) resin cement (AllCem; FGM, Joinvile, Brazil). Photoactivation was performed immediately, or at 5 or 10 min after cementation. Root/post specimens were transversely sectioned 7 days after luting into 1-mm-thick slices, which were submitted to push-out testing in a mechanical testing machine. Bond strength data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' method (α = 0.05). Immediate photoactivation resulted in the highest bond strength for Unicem. BisCem demonstrated higher bond strength values when photoactivated after a 10-min delay. Immediate photoactivation yielded the lowest bond strengths for AllCem, although no differences in bond strength were observed between photoactivation delayed by 5 and 10 min. In conclusion, the moment of resin cement photoactivation may affect the intraradicular retention of fiber posts, depending upon the resin cement used for luting. PMID:25006624

  12. Comparative study of the radiopacity of resin cements used in aesthetic dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Monterde-Hernández, Manuel; Cabanillas-Casabella, Cristina; Pallares-Sabater, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to compare the radiopacity of 6 modern resin cements with that of human enamel and dentine using the Digora digital radiography system, to verify whether they meet the requirements of ANSI/ADA specification no. 27/1993 and the ISO 4049/2000 standard and assess whether their radiopacity is influenced by the thickness of the cement employed. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three 3-thickness samples (0.5, 1 and 1.5 mm) were fabricated for each material. The individual cement samples were radiographed on the CCD sensor next to the aluminium wedge and the tooth samples. Five radiographs were made of each sample and therefore five readings of radiographic density were taken for each thickness of the materials. The radiopacity was measured in pixels using Digora 2.6 software. The calibration curve obtained from the mean values of each step of the wedge made it possible to obtain the equivalent in mm of aluminium for each mm of the luting material. RESULTS With the exception of Variolink Veneer Medium Value 0, all the cements studied were more radiopaque than enamel and dentin (P<.05) and complied with the ISO and ANSI/ADA requirements (P<.001). The radiopacity of all the cements examined depended on their thickness: the thicker the material, the greater its radiopacity. CONCLUSION All materials except Variolink Veneer Medium Value 0 yielded radiopacity values that complied with the recommendations of the ISO and ANSI/ADA. Variolink Veneer Medium Value 0 showed less radiopacity than enamel and dentin. PMID:27350854

  13. Characterization and Process Development of Cyanate Ester Resin and Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, B.J.

    1998-03-01

    Cyanate ester (or polycyanate) resins offer advantages as composite matrices because of their high thermal stability, low outgassing, low water absorption and radiation resistance. This report describes the results of a processing study to develop high-strength hoop-wound composite by the wet-filament winding method using Toray T1000G carbon fiber and YLA RS-14A polycyanate resin as the constituent materials. Process trials, tests and analyses were conducted in order to gain insight into factors that can affect final properties of the cured cyanate ester resin and its composites. The study shows that the cyanate ester resin has a broad process envelope but that an inert-atmosphere cure is essential for obtaining optimum resin and composite properties. Minimizing moisture exposure prior to cure is also crucial as it affects the T{sub g} of the resin and composite. Recommendations for reducing moisture contact with the resin during wet-winding are presented. High fiber volume fraction ({approximately}80%) composites wound and cured with these methods yielded excellent hoop tensile strengths (660 to 670 ksi average with individual rings failing above 700 ksi), which are believed to be the highest recorded strengths for this class of materials. The measured transverse properties were also exceptional for these high fiber fraction composites. Based on the available data, this cyanate ester resin system and its composites are recommended for space and vacuum applications only. Further testing is required before these materials can be recommended for long term use at elevated temperatures in an ambient air environment. The results of all analyses and tests performed as part of this study are presented as well as baseline process for fabricating thick, stage-cured composites. The manufacture of a 1 in. thick composite cylinder made with this process is also described.

  14. Surface pH of resin-modified glass polyalkenoate (ionomer) cements.

    PubMed

    Woolford, M J; Chadwick, R G

    1992-12-01

    The recently developed group of materials known as light-activated, or resin-modified, glass polyalkenoate (ionomer) cements have been produced in response to clinical demands for a command set cavity base material. This study monitored the surface pH of three commercially available resin-modified glass ionomer cements over a 60-min period following either mixing alone or mixing followed by a 30-s exposure to a curing lamp. The results indicate that each material behaves in a unique manner. For all materials and conditions the pH reached after a 60-min period was significantly (P < 0.001) higher than the initial value. Light curing the materials significantly increased (P < 0.01) the surface pH of two of the materials (Baseline VLC and Vitrebond) as compared to the same materials in the uncured state. In the case of XR-Ionomer, however, no significant (P > 0.05) effect of light curing upon the surface pH was apparent. The precise clinical consequences of a low surface pH are unclear but may be an aetiological factor in postoperative pulpal sensitivity. It is therefore recommended that a sublining of a proprietary calcium hydroxide lining material should be placed routinely beneath these materials and every effort made to ensure effective light curing. PMID:1452877

  15. Perfluorotriethylene glycol dimethacrylate modified composite resins for improved dental restoratives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guigui

    The studies described in this dissertation focus on improvement of water resistance and durability of current dental composite resins. The physical, thermal and mechanical properties of the diluent fluorinated monomer, perfluorotriethylene glycol methacrylate (FTEGDMA), FTEGDMA-containing neat resin and its formulated composite resins were evaluated and compared with the conventional visible light-cured (VLC) dental composite resins. Further, the biocompatibility of this monomer and its cured resins were investigated and compared with their conventional counterparts. The results showed that the FTEGDMA-containing neat resin and its composite systems showed more water resistance and longer durability, compared to the conventional Bisphenol A glycol dimethacrylate/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (BisGMA/TEGDMA) system. The preliminary in vitro biocompatibility test showed that FTEGDMA favored cell growth, compared to the conventional dental resins. The first study investigated basic physical properties of the diluent FTEGDMA monomer. The results showed that the FTEGDMA exhibited lower viscosity, lower refractive index, and a smaller contact angle, which were all beneficial to lowering the water sorption and increasing hydrophobicity. The second study evaluated some physical, thermal, and mechanical properties of the FTEGDMA based neat resins, including polymerization shrinkage, contact angle, water sorption, glass-transitions, dynamic modulus, thermal expansion, compressive strength, and diametral tensile strength. The results showed that the FTEGDMA diluent exhibited significant less water sorption and lower polymerization shrinkage and the BisEMA also contributed towards reducing water sorption. The third study investigated the effects of the FTEGDMA on the mechanical properties of the composite resins including flexural strength (FS), diametral tensile strength (DTS) and wear resistance (WR). In addition, the fracture surface topography of the tested materials

  16. Low fluid leakoff cementing compositions and filtration control additive for cement

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, G.T.

    1993-07-20

    A cementing composition is described, for cementing oil or gas wells penetrating subterranean formations, capable of forming a fluid slurry when mixed with water comprising: dry hydraulic cement; and a filtration control additive of from about 0.2 to 5.0 percent by weight, based upon dry hydraulic cement, of finely ground peanut hulls, wherein 10 percent or more of the finely ground peanut hulls is in the particle size range of less than 20 standard sieve mesh and greater than 500 standard sieve mesh. In a process for cementing a casing in an oil or gas well penetrating a subterranean formation wherein a cement slurry, formed by mixing water and hydraulic cement, is pumped down the well to flow upwardly between the casing and the subterranean formation, the improvement is described comprising: utilizing as a filtration control additive of from about 0.2 to 5.0 percent by weight, based upon dry hydraulic cement, of finely ground peanut hulls, and utilizing finely ground peanut hulls wherein 10 percent or more of the finely ground peanut hulls is in the particle size range of less than 20 standard sieve mesh and greater than 500 standard sieve mesh.

  17. In vitro evaluation of the film thickness of self-etching resin cements.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Lozada, Julio; Urquía-Morales, María Del Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the film thickness of selfetching resin cement. The following materials were used: Group1, Relyx U100 (3M /ESPE); Group 2, BisCem (Bisco); Group 3, Max Cem (Kerr); Group 4, Set (SDI) and Group 5, Relyx ARC (3M/ESPE) as control. Two 5.4 x 76.2 x 1 mm glass slides were marked in the center to identify the area where the material would be placed. A volume of 0.05 ml was used for each specimen material. After 1, 3 and 6 minutes, a 50 N load was applied for one minute. The thickness of each specimen was then measured using a digital micrometer to the nearest 1 μm; (Digimatic, Mitutoyo Corporation, Japan.). Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Bonferroni's multiple comparison tests. No significant difference was found between the materials tested (p = 0.0921) or material/time interaction (p = 0.0864), but there were differences in the time factor (p = 0.0001). At one minute, the thinnest film was Relyx ARC (control) (14 μm), followed by Relyx U100 (17 μm), and Maxcem and SeT (19 μm). At 3 minutes, Group 5 (control) was also the thinnest film (19 μm), followed by Group 1 (21 μm), Group 3 (25 μm), Group 2 (29 μm), and Group 4 (31 μm). At 6 minutes, Group 4 was the thinnest (34 μm), followed by Group 1 (38 μm), Group 5 (40 μm), Group 2 (41 μm) and Group 3 (42 μm). The film thickness of resin cements was influenced by time and polymerization reaction. The film thickness of self-etching cements was low. PMID:25560694

  18. In-depth polymerization of a self-adhesive dual-cured resin cement.

    PubMed

    Puppin-Rontani, R M; Dinelli, R G; de Paula, A B; Fucio, S B P; Ambrosano, G M B; Pascon, F M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess Knoop hardness at different depths of a dual-cured self-adhesive resin cement through different thicknesses of Empress Esthetic® ceramic.Flattened bovine dentin was embedded in resin. The cement was inserted into a rubber mold (0.8 x 5 mm) that was placed between two polyvinyl chloride plastic films and placed over the flat dentin and light cured by Elipar Trilight-QTH (800 mW/cm2) or Ultra-Lumelight-emitting diode (LED 5; 1585 mW/cm2) over ceramic disks 1.4 or 2 mm thick. The specimens(n=6) were stored for 24 hours before Knoop hardness (KHN) was measured. The data were submitted to analysis of variance in a factorial split-plot design and Tukey's test (a=0.05).There was significant interaction among the study factors. In the groups cured by the QTHunit, an increase in ceramic thickness resulted in reduced cement hardness values at all depths, with the highest values always being found in the center (1.4 mm, 58.1; 2 mm, 50.1)and the lowest values at the bottom (1.4 mm,23.8; 2 mm, 20.2). When using the LED unit, the hardness values diminished with increased ceramic thickness only on the top (1.4 mm,51.5; 2 mm, 42.3). In the group with the 1.4-mm-thick disk, the LED curing unit resulted in similar values on the top (51.5) and center(51.9) and lower values on the bottom (24.2).However, when the cement was light cured through the 2-mm disk, the highest hardness value was obtained in the center (51.8), followed by the top (42.3) and bottom (19.9),results similar to those obtained with the QTH curing unit (center > top > bottom). The hardness values of the studied cement at different depths were dependent on the ceramic thickness but not on the light curing units used. PMID:22166106

  19. Optical fiber sensors and their application in monitoring stress build-up in dental resin cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottevaere, H.; Tabak, M.; Fernandez Fernandez, A.; Berghmans, F.; Thienpont, H.

    2005-09-01

    The field of optical fiber sensing is highly diverse and this diversity is perceived as a great advantage over more conventional sensors in that an optical sensor can be tailored to measure any of a myriad of physical parameters. In this paper we present a niche application for optical fiber sensors in the domain of biophotonics, namely the monitoring of stress build-up during the curing process of dental resin cements. We discuss the origin of this stress build-up and the problems it can cause when treating patients. Optical fiber sensors aim at excelling in two kind of applications: firstly to perform quality control on batch produced dental cements and measure their total material shrinkage, secondly to monitor the hardening of the cement during in-vivo measurements resulting in the dynamic measurement of the shrinkage and to control the stress in a facing based restoration. We therefore investigated two types of optical fiber sensors as alternatives to conventional measurement techniques; namely polarimetric optical fiber sensors and fiber Bragg gratings written in polarization maintaining fibers. After discussing the results obtained with both optical fiber sensors, we will conclude with a critical assessment of the suitability of the two proposed sensing configurations for multi-parameter stress monitoring.

  20. A novel antibacterial resin composite for improved dental restoratives.

    PubMed

    Weng, Yiming; Howard, Leah; Guo, Xia; Chong, Voon Joe; Gregory, Richard L; Xie, Dong

    2012-06-01

    A novel furanone-containing antibacterial resin composite has been prepared and evaluated. compressive strength (CS) and Streptococcus mutans viability were used to evaluate the mechanical strength and antibacterial activity of the composites. The modified resin composites showed a significant antibacterial activity without substantially decreasing the mechanical strengths. With 5-30 % addition of the furanone derivative, the composite kept its original CS unchanged but showed a significant antibacterial activity with a 16-68 % reduction in the S. mutans viability. Further, the antibacterial function of the new composite was not affected by human saliva. The aging study indicates that the composite may have a long-lasting antibacterial function. Within the limitations of this study, it appears that the experimental antibacterial resin composite may potentially be developed into a clinically attractive dental restorative due to its high mechanical strength and antibacterial function. PMID:22466818

  1. Effectiveness of Flowable Resin Composite in Reducing Microleakage – An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Lokhande, Niket A; Padmai, Amit S; Rathore, Vishnu Pratap Singh; Shingane, Shrikant; Jayashankar, D N; Sharma, Usha

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to evaluate the microleakage, when flowable composite is used as a restorative material and a liner. Materials and Methods: Forty, non-carious, extracted human premolar teeth were used and they were divided into five groups according to the type of composite material used. Group I: Hybrid composite was inserted and cured for 40 s. Group II: Flowable resin composite which was cured for 40 s. Group III: A thin layer of flowable composite was used to line the axial wall of cavity, over that hybrid composite was inserted and cured for 40 s. Group IV: A thin layer of flowable composite was lined on the axial wall of cavity; over that a packable composite was inserted and cured for 40 s. Group V: Group V was a control group. These cavities were not etched and bonded. They were restored with resin modified glass ionomer cement. After thermocycling and dye immersion, each tooth sectioned longitudinally. Each restoration was observed under a binocular stereomicroscope with magnifying loop of ×12 for microleakage. Results: The results of the study indicate that there was minimum leakage at the enamel margin of all groups. In every group, the leakage at the dentin margin was more than that at the enamel margin. The difference was statistically significant in hybrid and flowable composite (P values are 0.29 and 0.289, respectively). Conclusion: Similar leakage values were shown by Groups I and II, indicating that flowable and hybrid composites performed equally well in terms of microleakage. The use of flowable composite as a liner under hybrid and packable composite have shown a trend toward less leakage compared to hybrid and flowable composite alone. How to cite the article: Lokhande NA, Padmai AS, Rathore VP, Shingane S, Jayashankar DN, Sharma U. Effectiveness of flowable resin composite in reducing microleakage – An in vitro Study. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):111-4. PMID:25083045

  2. Effect of root canal rinsing protocol on dentin bond strength of two resin cements using three different method of test

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Sheikhi, Mohammadreza; Soleimani, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    Background Different studies have used different tests to evaluate bond strength of resin cements to root dentin. In this in vitrostudy, three different tests were used to evaluate the bond strength of two resin cements to root dentin using two root dentin irrigation protocols. Material and Methods Ninety-six intact single-rooted teeth were selected for this study. Forty-eight teeth, with a root length of 15mm, were randomly divided into two groups and irrigated with normal saline or 2.5% sodium hypochlorite solutions during root canal preparation, respectively. For each 12 specimens from each group, fiber post #1 was bonded using an etch-and-rinse (Duo-Link) and a self-adhesive (BisCem) resin cement, respectively. After incubation, two specimens were prepared for the push-out test from the middle thirds of the roots. In another 24 teeth, after two 1.5-mm sections were prepared from the middle thirds of the prepared roots, sections of the post were bonded in two subgroups with each of the cements mentioned above and the samples were prepared for the pull-out test. For shear test, the crowns of 48 teeth were cut away, the dentin surfaces were prepared, the two irrigation solutions were used, and the resin cements were bonded. Data collected from the three tests were evaluated by ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey and Weibull tests (α=0.05). Results There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values between the three bond strength tests (P<0.001). Rinsing protocol and cement type resulted in similar variations in the mean bond strength in all tests (P>0.05). Conclusions Under the limitations of the present study, the method of the test used had an effect on the recorded bond strength between the resin cement and root dentin. Cement type and irrigation protocol resulted in similar variations with all the tests. Push-out and shear tests exhibited more coherent results. Key words:Bond strength, endodontically treated tooth, fiber post, resin cement, sodium

  3. Composition and method for making polyimide resin-reinforced fabric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A composition for making polyimide resin reinforced fibers or fabric is discussed. The composition includes a polyfunctional ester, a polyfunctional amine, and an end capping agent. The composition is impregnated into fibers or fabric and heated to form prepreg material. The tack retention characteristics of this prepreg material are improved by incorporating into the composition a liquid olefinic material compatible with the other ingredients of the composition. The prepreg material is heated at a higher temperature to effect formation of the polyimide resin and the monomeric additive is incorporated in the polyimide polymer structure.

  4. [Application of composite resin inlays to deciduous molars--a clinical observation of the resin onlay].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Iyori, H; Kanomi, R; Yao, K; Hieda, T

    1990-01-01

    Although composite resin has been used as an aesthetic restorative material, wear and fracture of the resin of fracture of the tooth structure are likely to occur when the size of the dental cavities are large. In addition to the lack of the aesthetic value, clinical results of prefabricated metal crown revealed several problems which were caused by the wear of the metal and the ill-adaptation of the cervical margin. In the present study, 50 devitalized deciduous molars were treated with composite resin onlays which were designed to cover the entire occlusal surface of the deciduous molar, and the clinical results were evaluated for a 6 month period. Additionally, for the purpose of simplification of the laboratory process for making resin onlays, ready-made occlusal shells were fabricated. The variety of the prepared shell size consisted of 7 sizes for the first deciduous molar, 9 sizes for the upper second deciduous molar and 10 sizes for the lower deciduous molar. The following results were obtained. 1) A partial resin fracture at the peripheral area of the mesio-buccal cuspid was found in five cases out of 50. 2) A glossy appearance on the surface of the onlay which was created by coated unfilled resin disappeared after 6 months of observation. 3) In relation to the resin onlay, when the antagonistic tooth was restored with prefabricated metal crowns, holes were made by attrition on all the crowns within a 3-4 month period.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2133972

  5. Adhesion of 10-MDP containing resin cements to dentin with and without the etch-and-rinse technique

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Deniz; Tuncelli, Betul; Özcan, Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study evaluated the adhesion of 10-MDP containing self-etch and self-adhesive resin cements to dentin with and without the use of etch-and-rinse technique. MATERIALS AND METHODS Human third molars (N=180) were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=30 per group). Conventional (Panavia F2.0, Kuraray-PAN) and self-adhesive resin cements (Clearfil SA, Kuraray-CSA) were bonded to dentin surfaces either after application of 3-step etch-and-rinse (35% H3PO4 + ED Primer) or two-step self-etch adhesive resin (Clearfil SE Bond). Specimens were subjected to shear bond strength test using the universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min). The failure types were analyzed using a stereomicroscope and quality of hybrid layer was observed under a scanning electron microscope. The data (MPa) were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α=.05). RESULTS Overall, PAN adhesive cement showed significantly higher mean bond strength (12.5 ± 2.3 - 14.1 ± 2.4 MPa) than CSA cement (9.3 ± 1.4 - 13.9 ± 1.9 MPa) (P<.001). Adhesive failures were more frequent in CSA cement groups when used in conjunction with two-step self-adhesive (68%) or no adhesive at all (66%). Hybrid layer quality was inferior in CSA compared to PAN cement in all conditions. CONCLUSION In clinical situations where bonding to dentin substrate is crucial, both conventional and self-adhesive resin cements based on 10-MDP can benefit from etch-and-rinse technique to achieve better quality of adhesion in the early clinical period. PMID:24049562

  6. Thermal expansion characteristics of light-cured dental resins and resin composites.

    PubMed

    Sideridou, Irini; Achilias, Dimitris S; Kyrikou, Eleni

    2004-07-01

    The thermal expansion characteristics of dental resins prepared by light-curing of Bis-GMA, TEGDMA, UDMA, Bis-EMA(4) or PCDMA dimethacrylate monomers and of commercial light-cured resin composites (Z-100 MP, Filtek Z-250, Sculpt-It and Alert), the organic matrix resin of which is based on different combinations of the above monomers, were studied by thermomechanical analysis (TMA). This study showed the existence of a glass transition temperature at around 35-47 degrees C for the resins and 40-45 degrees C for the composites; then the coefficient of linear thermal expansion (CLTE) was calculated at the temperature intervals 0-60 degrees C, 0-T(g) and T(g)-60 degrees C. The CLTE values of Bis-GMA, TEGDMA and UDMA resins are similar and lower than those of Bis-EMA (4) and PCDMA resins. The CLTE values of the composites indicated that the major factor that affects the CLTE of a composite is the filler content, but it also seems to be affected by the chemical structure of the matrix resin. TMA on water-saturated samples showed that water desorption takes place during the measurement and that the residual water acts as a plasticizer decreasing the T(g) and increasing the CLTE values. Furthermore, TMA on post-heated samples for 1, 3 or 6h showed, only for the resins, an initial decrease of CLTE and increase of the T(g) after 1h that was not significantly changed after 6h of heating. PMID:14967543

  7. Relationship between abrasive wear and microstructure of composite resins.

    PubMed

    Draughn, R A; Harrison, A

    1978-08-01

    The in vitro abrasion resistance of seven commercial composite resin restorative materials has been measured. Analysis of the composite microstructures shows that abrasion rates are dependent upon the size, hardness, and volume fraction of particles in the material. The most abrasion-resistant composites contain a high volume fraction of large, hard particles. PMID:278840

  8. Matrix resin effects in composite delamination - Mode I fracture aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunston, Donald L.; Moulton, Richard J.; Johnston, Norman J.; Bascom, Willard D.

    1987-01-01

    A number of thermoset, toughened thermoset, and thermoplastic resin matrix systems were characterized for Mode I critical strain energy release rates, and their composites were tested for interlaminar critical strain energy release rates using the double cantilever beam method. A clear correlation is found between the two sets of data. With brittle resins, the interlaminar critical strain energy release rates are somewhat larger than the neat resin values due to a full transfer of the neat resin toughness to the composite and toughening mechanisms associated with crack growth. With tougher matrices, the higher critical strain energy release rates are only partially transferred to the composites, presumably because the fibers restrict the crack-tip deformation zones.

  9. Novel bioactive composite bone cements based on the beta-tricalcium phosphate-monocalcium phosphate monohydrate composite cement system.

    PubMed

    Huan, Zhiguang; Chang, Jiang

    2009-05-01

    Bioactive composite bone cements were obtained by incorporation of tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5, C3S) into a brushite bone cement composed of beta-tricalcium phosphate [beta-Ca3(PO4)2, beta-TCP] and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate [Ca(H2PO4)2.H2O, MCPM], and the properties of the new cements were studied and compared with pure brushite cement. The results indicated that the injectability, setting time and short- and long-term mechanical strength of the material are higher than those of pure brushite cement, and the compressive strength of the TCP/MCPM/C3S composite paste increased with increasing aging time. Moreover, the TCP/MCPM/C3S specimens showed significantly improved in vitro bioactivity in simulated body fluid and similar degradability in phosphate-buffered saline as compared with brushite cement. Additionally, the reacted TCP/MCPM/C3S paste possesses the ability to stimulate osteoblast proliferation and promote osteoblastic differentiation of the bone marrow stromal cells. The results indicated that the TCP/MCPM/C3S cements may be used as a bioactive material for bone regeneration, and might have significant clinical advantage over the traditional beta-TCP/MCPM brushite cement. PMID:18996779

  10. Influence of temporary cement remnant and surface cleaning method on bond strength to dentin of a composite luting system.

    PubMed

    Kanakuri, Katsuhito; Kawamoto, Yoshikazu; Matsumura, Hideo

    2005-03-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate the influence of polycarboxylate temporary cement remaining on the dentin surface on the bond strength of a composite luting system. An acrylic resin plate was luted to bovine dentin with a polycarboxylate temporary cement (HY-Bond Temporary Cement Hard, HYB). The temporary cement was not used for the control groups. After removing the temporary cement with an excavator, dentin specimens were divided into five groups; 1) no subsequent treatment, 2) cleaning with a rotational brush (RTB), 3) cleaning with a rotational brush and non-fluoridated flour of pumice, 4) sweeping with an air scaler, and 5) treated with a sonic toothbrush. A silane-treated ceramic disk (IPS Empress) was bonded to each dentin specimen with a composite luting system (Panavia F). Shear testing results showed that the RTB groups exhibited the highest bond strength regardless of the use of temporary cement (P < 0.05). The use of a rotational brush with water coolant is recommended to achieve ideal bond strength between the Panavia F luting system and dentin to which HYB temporary cement was primarily applied. PMID:15881223

  11. Effect of pH on the release of radionuclides and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resins collected from operating nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect

    McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W. )

    1991-06-01

    Data are presented on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small-scale waste--form specimens collected during solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station were leach-tested and subjected to compressive strength testing in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Technical Position on Waste Form'' (Revision 1). Samples of untreated resin waste collected from each solidification vessel before the solidification process were analyzed for concentrations of radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to determine the quantities of these chemicals in the waste-form specimens. The chelating agents included oxalic, citric, and picolinic acids. In order to determine the effect of leachant chemical composition and pH on the stability and leachability of the waste forms, waste-form specimens were leached in various leachants. Results of this study indicate that differences in pH do not affect releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms, but that differences in leachant chemistry and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. Also, this study indicates that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents are similar for waste- form specimens that decomposed and those that retained their general physical form. 36 refs., 60 figs., 28 tabs.

  12. Si-based thin film coating on Y-TZP: Influence of deposition parameters on adhesion of resin cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queiroz, José Renato Cavalcanti; Nogueira Junior, Lafayette; Massi, Marcos; Silva, Alecssandro de Moura; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Sobrinho, Argemiro Soares da Silva; Özcan, Mutlu

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated the influence of deposition parameters for Si-based thin films using magnetron sputtering for coating zirconia and subsequent adhesion of resin cement. Zirconia ceramic blocks were randomly divided into 8 groups and specimens were either ground finished and polished or conditioned using air-abrasion with alumina particles coated with silica. In the remaining groups, the polished specimens were coated with Si-based film coating with argon/oxygen magnetron discharge at 8:1 or 20:1 flux. In one group, Si-based film coating was performed on air-abraded surfaces. After application of bonding agent, resin cement was bonded. Profilometry, goniometry, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy analysis were performed on the conditioned zirconia surfaces. Adhesion of resin cement to zirconia was tested using shear bond test and debonded surfaces were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy. Si-based film coating applied on air-abraded rough zirconia surfaces increased the adhesion of the resin cement (22.78 ± 5.2 MPa) compared to those of other methods (0-14.62 MPa) (p = 0.05). Mixed type of failures were more frequent in Si film coated groups on either polished or air-abraded groups. Si-based thin films increased wettability compared to the control group but did not change the roughness, considering the parameters evaluated. Deposition parameters of Si-based thin film and after application of air-abrasion influenced the initial adhesion of resin cement to zirconia.

  13. The role of resin cement on bond strength of glass-fiber posts luted into root canals: a systematic review and meta-analysis of in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Sarkis-Onofre, R; Skupien, J A; Cenci, M S; Moraes, R R; Pereira-Cenci, T

    2014-01-01

    Because there are several ways to cement glass-fiber posts (GFPs) into root canals, there is no consensus on the best strategy to achieve high bond strengths. A systematic review was conducted to determine if there is difference in bond strength to dentin between regular and self-adhesive resin cements and to verify the influence of several variables on the retention of GFPs. This report followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. In vitro studies that investigated the bond strength of GFPs luted with self-adhesive and regular resin cements were selected. Searches were carried out in the PubMed and Scopus databases. No publication year or language limit was used, and the last search was done in October 2012. A global comparison was performed between self-adhesive and regular resin cements. Two subgroup analyses were performed: 1) Self-adhesive × Regular resin cement + Etch-and-rinse adhesive and 2) Self-adhesive × Regular resin cement + Self-etch adhesive. The analyses were carried out using fixed-effect and random-effects models. The results showed heterogeneity in all comparisons, and higher bond strength to dentin was identified for self-adhesive cements. Although the articles included in this meta-analysis showed high heterogeneity and high risk of bias, the in vitro literature seems to suggest that use of self-adhesive resin cement could improve the retention of GFPs into root canals. PMID:23937401

  14. Nanoleakage for Self-Adhesive Resin Cements used in Bonding CAD/CAD Ceramic Material to Dentin

    PubMed Central

    El-Badrawy, Wafa; Hafez, Randa Mohamed; El Naga, Abeer Ibrahim Abo; Ahmed, Doaa Ragai

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To determine nanoleakage of CAD/CAM ceramic blocks bonded to dentin with self-adhesive resin cement. Methods: Eighteen sound extracted human molars were sterilized and sectioned into 3 mm-thick dentin sections. Trilux Cerec Vitablocks (Vita) were also sectioned into 3 mm sections, surface-treated using 5% hydrofluoric acid-etchant, and then coated with silane primer (Vita). Trilux and dentin sections were cemented together by means of three resin cements: Rely-X Unicem (3M/ESPE), BisCem (Bisco), and Calibra (Dentsply), according to manufacturers’ recommendations. Calibra was used in conjunction with Prime/Bond-NT adhesive (Dentsply), while the other two are self-adhesive. The bonded specimens were stored for 24h in distilled water at 37°C. Specimens were vertically sectioned into 1 mm-thick slabs, yielding up to six per specimen. Two central slabs were randomly chosen from each specimen making up the cement groups (n=12). Each group was subdivided into two subgroups (n=6), a control and a thermocycled subgroup (5–55°C) for 500 cycles. Slabs were coated with nail polish up to 1 mm from the interface, immersed in a 50% silver nitrate solution for 24h, and tested for nanoleakage using Quanta Environmental SEM and EDAX. Data were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc tests. Results: Rely-X Unicem and Calibra groups demonstrated no significant difference in the percentage of silver penetration, while the BisCem group revealed a significantly higher percentage (P≤.05). Thermocycling (500 cycles) did not have a statistically significant effect on the percentage of silver penetration (P>.05). Conclusions: One self-adhesive-resin cement demonstrated a similar sealing ability when compared with a standard resin cement. Thermo-cycling did not significantly increase dye penetration under the test conditions. PMID:21769269

  15. Long-term deterioration of composite resin and amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Smales, R J

    1991-01-01

    Previous long-term longitudinal studies of two different methods of placing an auto-cured conventional anterior composite resin, and of a low- and a high-copper amalgam alloy, had shown similar restoration survivals despite the different resin treatment methods used or the types of amalgam alloy placed. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess several clinical factors or characteristics of these restorations that were believed to affect the survival of the restorative materials. The 950 composite resin and the 1042 amalgam restorations examined were placed by many operators in numerous patients attending a dental hospital. The composite resin restorations were placed using unetched- and etched-enamel-bonding treatment methods, and the amalgam restorations were polished after insertion. Clinical ratings supplemented by color transparencies were used for the assessment of four factors for the resin, and four factors for the amalgam restoration. Significant deterioration differences were found for several of the clinical factors assessed for both the two different composite resin treatment methods, and for the two different amalgam alloys, which were not directly related to the restoration survivals. PMID:1840079

  16. Characterization and Process Development of Cyanate Ester Resin Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, B.J.

    1999-05-23

    Cyanate ester resins offer advantages as composite matrices because of their high thermal stability, low outgassing, low water absorption, and radiation resistance. This paper describes the results of a processing study to develop a high-strength hoop-wound composite by the wet-filament winding method using Toray TI 000G carbon fiber and YLA RS- 14A cyanate ester resin as the constituent materials. The study shows that the cyanate ester resin has a broad process envelope but that an inert-atmosphere cure is essential for obtaining optimum resin and composite properties. Minimizing moisture exposure prior to and during cure is also crucial as it affects the glass transition temperature of the resin and composite. Composite cylinders wound and cured with these methods yielded excellent ring tensile strengths both at room and elevated temperature. A summary of the measured mechanical and thermal property data for these composites is presented. Potential applications for these materials include flywheeI energy storage systems for space and satellite structures.

  17. Effect of surface pretreatments on resin composite bonding to PEEK.

    PubMed

    Silthampitag, Patcharawan; Chaijareenont, Pisaisit; Tattakorn, Kittipong; Banjongprasert, Chaiyasit; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Arksornnukit, Mansuang

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of surface pretreatments on resin composite bonding to polyetheretherketone (PEEK). Four groups of surface pretreatment (no pretreatment, etched with 98% sulfuric acid, etched with piranha solution and sandblasting with 50 µm alumina) were performed on PEEK. Surface roughness, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis were examined. Shear bond strength (SBS) and interface characteristics were also evaluated after the specimens were bonded with resin materials. Two-way ANOVA analysis revealed significance on two main effects and interactions. Tukey's multiple comparisons test showed that the SBS of resin composite on PEEK were the highest in the group etched with 98% sulfuric acid and bonded with Heliobond(®) (p<0.05). All pretreatments produced similar spectra of FTIR patterns. SEM demonstrated porosities and pitting from chemical etching, which suggested a significant influence on the adhesion between PEEK and resin materials. PMID:27477234

  18. Degradation, Fatigue, and Failure of Resin Dental Composite Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, J.L.

    2008-11-03

    The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle- or fiber-filler-containing indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on the effects of degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed-mode loading on flexure strength and fracture toughness. Several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading, and 3D tomography with multi-axial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and/or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection); after that time period, failure most often results from secondary decay.

  19. Degradation, fatigue and failure of resin dental composite materials

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, James L.

    2008-01-01

    The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle or fiber filler containing, indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed mode loading on the flexure strength and fracture toughness. Next several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading and then an examination of 3D tomography using multiaxial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection) and after that time period from secondary decay. PMID:18650540

  20. High piezoelectric properties of cement piezoelectric composites containing kaolin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Huang Hsing; Yang, Ruei-Hao; Cheng, Yu-Chieh

    2015-04-01

    To obtain high piezoelectric properties, PZT/cement composites with kaolin were fabricated and polarized by 1.5kV/mm electric field for 40 min, where lead zirconate titanate (PZT) inclusion with 50% by volume was used. After the polarization, piezoelectric properties of the composite were measured daily till 100 days. Results indicated that relative dielectric constant (ɛr) and piezoelectric strain constant (d33) increase with aging day, and approach to asymptotic values after 70 days. Temperature treatment to the composite is a dominate factor to enhance piezoelectric properties. The d33 and ɛr values of PZT/cement composites treated at the ambient temperature (23℃) were 57pC/N and 275 at the 70th aging day respectively, and then reached 106pC/N and 455 in turn with 150℃ treatment. The composite contains 4% kaolin having the highest value of d33=111pC/N and ɛr=500 at 90 days because the porosity is the less than the others. Cement piezoelectric composites containing kaolin own the higher d33 and ɛr value, compared with the other reported composites with 50% PZT. The porosity, the electromechanical coupling factor and impedance-frequency spectra of the cement piezoelectric composites were also discussed.

  1. Electrical properties of epoxy resin based nano-composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Aytug, Tolga; Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan; More, Karren Leslie; Li, Jing; Goyal, Amit

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the electrical properties of composite materials prepared as nano and sub-micro scale metal-oxide particles embedded in a commercial resin. The filler particles are barium titanate and calcium copper titanate. The physical and structural characteristics of constituents and the fabricated composites are reported. The electrical characterization of the composite samples are performed with the time- and frequency-domain dielectric spectroscopy techniques. The electrical breakdown strength of samples with nano and sub-micron size particles have better electrical insulation properties than the unfilled resin.

  2. Advanced composites: Environmental effects on selected resin matrix materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welhart, E. K.

    1976-01-01

    The effects that expected space flight environment has upon the mechanical properties of epoxy and polyimide matrix composites were analyzed. Environmental phenomena covered water immersion, high temperature aging, humidity, lightning strike, galvanic action, electromagnetic interference, thermal shock, rain and sand erosion, and thermal/vacuum outgassing. The technology state-of-the-art for graphite and boron reinforced epoxy and polyimide matrix materials is summarized to determine the relative merit of using composites in the space shuttle program. Resin matrix composites generally are affected to some degree by natural environmental phenomena with polyimide resin matrix materials less affected than epoxies.

  3. Resin char oxidation retardant for composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, K. J.; Gluyas, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Boron powder stabilizes char, so burned substances are shiny, smooth, and free of loose graphite fibers. Resin weight loss of laminates during burning in air is identical for the first three minutes for unfilled and boron-filled samples, then boron samples stabilize.

  4. Development of a ceramic primer with higher bond durability for resin cement.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui

    2010-07-01

    To increase the bond durability of resin to the CAD/CAM ceramic surface, two types of two-bottle type ceramic primers, consisting of Primer A1 or A2 and Primer B, were designed. Primer A1 was prepared by dissolving 25, 50, or 100 mg of gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane in 1 mL of ethanol. Primer A2 was prepared by dissolving 50 mg of mixed silanes, consisting of 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane to gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane, in 1 mL of ethanol. Mole fractions of 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane to gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane were 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 mol%. Primer B was prepared after dissolving 0.01, 0.05 or 0.1 mol L(-1) hydrochloric acid in ethanol by 50 vol%. Ceramic surface was silanated with a mixture of Primers A1 and B or Primers A2 and B for 1 min, and then air-dried. Commercial GC ceramic primer and Porcelain Liner M were utilized. Thereafter, dual-curing type resin cement was bonded to silanated ceramic surface through visible-light irradiation. Shear bond strength of resin to the ceramic surface was measured, before and after thermo-cycling. Addition of 0.01 or 0.05 mol L(-1) hydrochloric acid to the gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane allowed for significant increases in the bond strength. However, thermo-cycling resulted in significant decreases of approximately 5 MPa in the bond strength. Conversely, when the mixed silane, where 30 mol% of 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane dissolved in gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane, was utilized with 0.05 mol L(-1) hydrochloric acid, the reduction in the bond strength decreased to approximately 2 MPa. The designed ceramic primers exhibited higher ceramic bond durability than commercial ceramic primers. PMID:20136699

  5. An Investigation on Load Bearing Capacities of Cement and Resin Grouted Rock Bolts Installed in Weak Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyoncu Erguler, Guzide; Abiddin Erguler, Zeynal

    2015-04-01

    Rock bolts have been considered one of indispensable support method to improve load bearing capacity of many underground engineering projects, and thus, various types of them have been developed until now for different purposes. Although mechanically anchored rock bolts can be successfully installed to prevent structurally controlled instabilities in hard rocks, in comparison with cement and resin grouted rock bolts, these types of anchors are not so effective in weak rocks characterized by relatively low mechanical properties. In order to investigate the applicability and to measure relative performance of cement and resin grouted rock bolts into weak and heavily jointed rock mass, a research program mainly consisting of pull-out tests was performed in a metal mine in Turkey. The rock materials excavated in this underground mining were described as basalt, tuff, ore dominated volcanic rocks and dacite. To achieve more representative results for rock materials found in this mining and openings excavated in varied dimensions, the pull-out tests were conducted on rock bolts used in many different locations where more convergences were measured and deformation dependent instability was expected to cause greater engineering problems. It is well known that the capacity of rock bolts depends on the length, diameter and density of the bolt pattern, and so considering the thickness of plastic zone in the studied openings, the length and diameter of rock bolts were taken as 2.4 m. and 25 mm., respectively. The spacing between rows changed between 70 and 180 cm. In this study, totally twenty five pull-out tests were performed to have a general understanding about axial load bearing capacity and support reaction curves of cement and resin grouted rock bolts. When pull load-displacement curves belongs to cement and resin grouted rock bolts were compared with each other, it was determined that cement grouted rock bolts carry more load ranging between 115.6 kN and 127.5 kN with

  6. Fracture resistance of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing-generated composite resin-based molar crowns.

    PubMed

    Harada, Akio; Nakamura, Keisuke; Kanno, Taro; Inagaki, Ryoichi; Örtengren, Ulf; Niwano, Yoshimi; Sasaki, Keiichi; Egusa, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether different fabrication processes, such as the computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system or the manual build-up technique, affect the fracture resistance of composite resin-based crowns. Lava Ultimate (LU), Estenia C&B (EC&B), and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic IPS e.max press (EMP) were used. Four types of molar crowns were fabricated: CAD/CAM-generated composite resin-based crowns (LU crowns); manually built-up monolayer composite resin-based crowns (EC&B-monolayer crowns); manually built-up layered composite resin-based crowns (EC&B-layered crowns); and EMP crowns. Each type of crown was cemented to dies and the fracture resistance was tested. EC&B-layered crowns showed significantly lower fracture resistance compared with LU and EMP crowns, although there was no significant difference in flexural strength or fracture toughness between LU and EC&B materials. Micro-computed tomography and fractographic analysis showed that decreased strength probably resulted from internal voids in the EC&B-layered crowns introduced by the layering process. There was no significant difference in fracture resistance among LU, EC&B-monolayer, and EMP crowns. Both types of composite resin-based crowns showed fracture loads of >2000 N, which is higher than the molar bite force. Therefore, CAD/CAM-generated crowns, without internal defects, may be applied to molar regions with sufficient fracture resistance. PMID:25683749

  7. Novel tricalcium silicate/monocalcium phosphate monohydrate composite bone cement.

    PubMed

    Huan, Zhiguang; Chang, Jiang

    2007-08-01

    In this paper, we obtained a novel bone cement composed of tricalcium silicate (Ca(3)SiO(5); C(3)S) and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM). The weight ratio of MCPM in the cement is 0, 10, 20, and 30%. The initial setting time was dramatically reduced from 90 min to 30 min as the content of MCPM reached 20%. The workable paste with a liquid/powder (L/P) ratio of 0.8 mL/g could be injected for 2-20 min (nozzle diameter 2.0 mm). The pH variation of the composite cement in simulated body environment was obviously lowered. The compressive strength of the composite cement after setting for 4-28 days was slightly lower than that of the tricalcium silicate paste. The in vitro bioactivity was investigated by soaking in simulated body fluid for 7 days. The result showed that the novel bone cement had good bioactivity and could degrade in tris-(hydroxymethyl)-aminomethane-hydrochloric-acid (Tris-HCl) solution. Our result indicated that the Ca(3)SiO(5)/MCPM paste had good hydraulic properties, bioactivity, and degradability. The novel bone cement could be a potential candidate as bone substitute. PMID:17238165

  8. Influence of Photoinitiator and Light-Curing Source on Bond Strength of Experimental Resin Cements to Dentin.

    PubMed

    Segreto, Dario Raimundo; Naufel, Fabiana Scarparo; Brandt, William Cunha; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the bond strength (BS) of experimental resin cements formulated with different photoinitiators when activated by two kinds of light-curing units (LCUs) through a ceramic material. Seven resin blends with different camphorquinone (CQ) and/or phenylpropanedione (PPD) concentrations (weight) were prepared: C5: 0.5% CQ; C8: 0.8% CQ; P5: 0.5% PPD; P8: 0.8% PPD; C1P4: 0.1% CQ and 0.4% PPD; C4P1: 0.4% CQ and 0.1% PPD; C4P4: 0.4% CQ and 0.4% PPD. Two LCUs were used: one quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH - 850 mW/cm²) and one light-emitting diode (LED - 1300 mW/cm²). The microtensile bond strength of each blend was assessed. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The BS values did not exhibit significant differences for LCUs, regardless of the photoinitiator type. Three cements showed significant differences: P5 and C5 had higher BS with QTH, and C4P1 with LED. For QTH, P5 showed the highest and C1P4 the lowest BS. For the LED, C4P1 showed the highest BS of all the cements. The results indicated that PPD was a viable alternative in the formulation of photocured resin cements, reducing or eliminating CQ that is yellowish without impairing the bond strength. Furthermore, both LED and QTH were effective in curing resin cements that contain PPD or CQ. PMID:27007352

  9. Influence of light curing unit and ceramic thickness on temperature rise during resin cement photo-activation.

    PubMed

    Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Consani, Simonides; Mastrofrancisco, Sarina; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different ceramic thickness on heat generation during resin cement photo-activation by QTH (quartz-tungsten-halogen), LED (light emitting diode), and PAC (plasma arc-curing) LCUs (light curing units). The resin cement used was Rely X ARC (3M-ESPE), and the ceramic was IPS Empress Esthetic (Ivoclar-Vivadent), of which 0.7-, 1.4- and 2.0-mm thick disks, 0.8 mm in diameter were made. Temperature increase was recorded with a type-K thermocouple connected to a digital thermometer (Iopetherm 46). An acrylic resin base was built to guide the thermocouple and support the 1.0-mm thick dentin disk. A 0.1-mm thick black adhesive paper matrix with a perforation 6 mm in diameter was placed on the dentin to contain the resin cement and support the ceramic disks of different thicknesses. Three LCUs were used: QTH, LED and PAC. Nine groups were formed (n=10) according to the interaction: 3 ceramic thicknesses, 1 resin cement and 3 photo-activation methods. Temperature increase data were submitted to Tukey's test (5%). For all ceramic thicknesses, a statistically significant difference in temperature increase was observed among the LCUs, with the highest mean value for the QTH LCU (p<0.05). For all the LCUs, a thickness of 0.7 mm produced the highest temperatures (1.4 and 2.0mm, p<0.05). There was no difference in temperature values between the latter two thicknesses (p>0.05). The interaction of higher energy density with smaller ceramic thickness showed higher temperature increase values. PMID:19420877

  10. Cariogenic bacteria degrade dental resin composites and adhesives.

    PubMed

    Bourbia, M; Ma, D; Cvitkovitch, D G; Santerre, J P; Finer, Y

    2013-11-01

    A major reason for dental resin composite restoration replacement is related to secondary caries promoted by acid production from bacteria including Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). We hypothesized that S. mutans has esterase activities that degrade dental resin composites and adhesives. Standardized specimens of resin composite (Z250), total-etch (Scotchbond Multipurpose, SB), and self-etch (Easybond, EB) adhesives were incubated with S. mutans UA159 or uninoculated culture medium (control) for up to 30 days. Quantification of the BisGMA-derived biodegradation by-product, bishydroxy-propoxy-phenyl-propane (BisHPPP), was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Surface analysis of the specimens was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). S. mutans was shown to have esterase activities in levels comparable with those found in human saliva. A trend of increasing BisHPPP release throughout the incubation period was observed for all materials and was more elevated in the presence of bacteria vs. control medium for EB and Z250, but not for SB (p < .05). SEM confirmed the increased degradation of all materials with S. mutans UA159 vs. control. S. mutans has esterase activities at levels that degrade resin composites and adhesives; degree of degradation was dependent on the material's chemical formulation. This finding suggests that the resin-dentin interface could be compromised by oral bacteria that contribute to the progression of secondary caries. PMID:24026951

  11. Resin-composite blocks for dental CAD/CAM applications.

    PubMed

    Ruse, N D; Sadoun, M J

    2014-12-01

    Advances in digital impression technology and manufacturing processes have led to a dramatic paradigm shift in dentistry and to the widespread use of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) in the fabrication of indirect dental restorations. Research and development in materials suitable for CAD/CAM applications are currently the most active field in dental materials. Two classes of materials are used in the production of CAD/CAM restorations: glass-ceramics/ceramics and resin composites. While glass-ceramics/ceramics have overall superior mechanical and esthetic properties, resin-composite materials may offer significant advantages related to their machinability and intra-oral reparability. This review summarizes recent developments in resin-composite materials for CAD/CAM applications, focusing on both commercial and experimental materials. PMID:25344335

  12. Shrinkage Stresses Generated during Resin-Composite Applications: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Luis Felipe J.; Cavalcante, Larissa Maria; Silikas, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Many developments have been made in the field of resin composites for dental applications. However, the manifestation of shrinkage due to the polymerization process continues to be a major problem. The material's shrinkage, associated with dynamic development of elastic modulus, creates stresses within the material and its interface with the tooth structure. As a consequence, marginal failure and subsequent secondary caries, marginal staining, restoration displacement, tooth fracture, and/or post-operative sensitivity are clinical drawbacks of resin-composite applications. The aim of the current paper is to present an overview about the shrinkage stresses created during resin-composite applications, consequences, and advances. The paper is based on results of many researches that are available in the literature. PMID:20948573

  13. Resin-composite Blocks for Dental CAD/CAM Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ruse, N.D.; Sadoun, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in digital impression technology and manufacturing processes have led to a dramatic paradigm shift in dentistry and to the widespread use of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) in the fabrication of indirect dental restorations. Research and development in materials suitable for CAD/CAM applications are currently the most active field in dental materials. Two classes of materials are used in the production of CAD/CAM restorations: glass-ceramics/ceramics and resin composites. While glass-ceramics/ceramics have overall superior mechanical and esthetic properties, resin-composite materials may offer significant advantages related to their machinability and intra-oral reparability. This review summarizes recent developments in resin-composite materials for CAD/CAM applications, focusing on both commercial and experimental materials. PMID:25344335

  14. The effect of resin shades on microhardness, polymerization shrinkage, and color change of dental composite resins.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Tae-Sung; Kang, Ho-Seung; Kim, Sung-Ki; Kim, Shin; Kim, Hyung-Il; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2009-07-01

    The present study sought to evaluate the effect of resin shades on the degree of the polymerization. To this end, response variables affected by the degree of polymerization were examined in this study - namely, microhardness, polymerization shrinkage, and color change. Two commercial composite resins of four different shades were employed in this study: shades A3, A3.5, B3, and C3 of Z250 (Z2) and shades A3, A3.5, B3, and B4 of Solitaire 2 (S2). After light curing, the reflectance/absorbance, microhardness, polymerization shrinkage, and color change of the specimens were measured. On reflectance and absorbance, Z2 and S2 showed similar distribution curves regardless of the resin shade, with shade A3.5 of Z2 and shade A3 of S2 exhibiting the lowest/highest distributions. Similarly for attenuation coefficient and microhardness, the lowest/highest values were exhibited by shade A3.5 of Z2 and shade A3 of S2. On polymerization shrinkage, no statistically significant differences were observed among the different shades of Z2. Similarly for color change, Z2 specimens exhibited only a slight (DeltaE*=0.5-0.9) color change after immersion in distilled water for 10 days, except for shades A3 and A3.5. Taken together, results of the present study suggested that the degree of polymerization of the tested composite resins was minimally affected by resin shade. PMID:19721281

  15. Push-out bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin using glass ionomer and resin modified glass ionomer cements

    PubMed Central

    PEREIRA, Jefferson Ricardo; da ROSA, Ricardo Abreu; SÓ, Marcus Vinícius Reis; AFONSO, Daniele; KUGA, Milton Carlos; HONÓRIO, Heitor Marques; do VALLE, Accácio Lins; VIDOTTI, Hugo Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts to root dentin after cementation with glass ionomer (GICs) and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs). Material and Methods Fifty human maxillary canines were transversally sectioned at 15 mm from the apex. Canals were prepared with a step back technique until the application of a #55 K-file and filled. Post spaces were prepared and specimens were divided into five groups according to the cement used for post cementation: Luting & Lining Cement; Fuji II LC Improved; RelyX Luting; Ketac Cem; and Ionoseal. After cementation of the glass fiber posts, all roots were stored at 100% humidity until testing. For push-out test, 1-mm thick slices were produced. The push-out test was performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute and the values (MPa) were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Levene's tests and by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test at a significance level of 5%. Results Fiber posts cemented using Luting & Lining Cement, Fuji II LC Improved, and Ketac Cem presented the highest bond strength to root dentin, followed by RelyX Luting. Ionoseal presented the lowest bond strength values (P>0.05). The post level did not influence the bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin (P=0.148). The major cause of failure was cohesive at the cement for all GICs and RMGICs. Conclusions Except for Ionoseal, all cements provided satisfactory bond strength values. PMID:25004052

  16. Effect of Surface Treatment on Shear Bond Strength between Resin Cement and Ce-TZP/Al2O3

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Eun; Kim, Jee-Hwan; Shim, June-Sung; Roh, Byoung-Duck

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Although several studies evaluating the mechanical properties of Ce-TZP/Al2O3 have been published, to date, no study has been published investigating the bonding protocol between Ce-TZP/Al2O3 and resin cement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength to air-abraded Ce-TZP/Al2O3 when primers and two different cement types were used. Materials and Methods. Two types of zirconia (Y-TZP and Ce-TZP/Al2O3) specimens were further divided into four subgroups according to primer application and the cement used. Shear bond strength was measured after water storage for 3 days or 5,000 times thermocycling for artificial aging. Results. The Y-TZP block showed significantly higher shear bond strength than the Ce-TZP/Al2O3 block generally. Primer application promoted high bond strength and less effect on bond strength reduction after thermocycling, regardless of the type of cement, zirconia block, or aging time. Conclusions. Depending on the type of the primer or resin cement used after air-abrasion, different wettability of the zirconia surface can be observed. Application of primer affected the values of shear bond strength after the thermocycling procedure. In the case of using the same bonding protocol, Y-TZP could obtain significantly higher bond strength compared with Ce-TZP/Al2O3. PMID:27382569

  17. Effect of Ingested Liquids on Color Change of Composite Resins

    PubMed Central

    Malek Afzali, Beheshteh; Ghasemi, Amir; Mirani, Asrin; Akbarzade Baghban, Alireza; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Color change of composite restorations is well known to dentists. However, the effect of commonly consumed drinks on discoloration of composite resins has yet to be determined. This study sought to assess the color change of a nanofilled (Premise) and a flowable composite resin (Premise flowable) following simulated consumption of tea, cola, iron drops and multivitamin syrup. Materials and Methods: Forty disk-shaped specimens (7 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick) were fabricated from each composite resin. The baseline color values were measured according to the CIE L*a*b* system using digital imaging. The specimens of each restorative material were randomly divided into five groups (eight each) according to the storage media namely tea, cola, iron drops, multivitamin syrup or distilled water (control). The specimens were immersed in staining solutions for three hours daily over a 40-day test period. Following this, the color change values (ΔE*) were calculated. For statistical analyses, the color differences were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (P< 0.05). Results: There was no significant difference in ΔE* values between the two types of composite resins (P>0.05). In both composite materials, the difference among the solutions was not significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: Under the tested experimental conditions, both restorative materials were susceptible to discoloration by all four staining solutions. The color change values were not related to the solution or the type of material used. PMID:27123017

  18. Durability of Cement Composites Reinforced with Sisal Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jianqiang

    This dissertation focuses mainly on investigating the aging mechanisms and degradation kinetics of sisal fiber, as well as the approaches to mitigate its degradation in the matrix of cement composites. In contrast to previous works reported in the literature, a novel approach is proposed in this study to directly determine the fiber's degradation rate by separately studying the composition changes, mechanical and physical properties of the embedded sisal fibers. Cement hydration is presented to be a crucial factor in understanding fiber degradation behavior. The degradation mechanisms of natural fiber consist of mineralization of cell walls, alkali hydrolysis of lignin and hemicellulose, as well as the cellulose decomposition which includes stripping of cellulose microfibrils and alkaline hydrolysis of amorphous regions in cellulose chains. Two mineralization mechanisms, CH-mineralization and self-mineralization, are proposed. The degradation kinetics of sisal fiber in the cement matrix are also analyzed and a model to predict the degradation rate of cellulose for natural fiber embedded in cement is outlined. The results indicate that the time needed to completely degrade the cellulose in the matrix with cement replacement by 30wt.% metakaolin is 13 times longer than that in pure cement. A novel and scientific method is presented to determine accelerated aging conditions, and to evaluating sisal fiber's degradation rate and durability of natural fiber-reinforced cement composites. Among the static aggressive environments, the most effective approach for accelerating the degradation of natural fiber in cement composites is to soak the samples or change the humidity at 70 °C and higher temperature. However, the dynamic wetting and drying cycling treatment has a more accelerating effect on the alkali hydrolysis of fiber's amorphous components evidenced by the highest crystallinity indices, minimum content of holocellulose, and lowest tensile strength. Based on the

  19. Thio-urethanes improve properties of dual-cured composite cements.

    PubMed

    Bacchi, A; Dobson, A; Ferracane, J L; Consani, R; Pfeifer, C S

    2014-12-01

    This study aims at modifying dual-cure composite cements by adding thio-urethane oligomers to improve mechanical properties, especially fracture toughness, and reduce polymerization stress. Thiol-functionalized oligomers were synthesized by combining 1,3-bis(1-isocyanato-1-methylethyl)benzene with trimethylol-tris-3-mercaptopropionate, at 1:2 isocyanate:thiol. Oligomer was added at 0, 10 or 20 wt% to BisGMA-UDMA-TEGDMA (5:3:2, with 25 wt% silanated inorganic fillers) or to one commercial composite cement (Relyx Ultimate, 3M Espe). Near-IR was used to measure methacrylate conversion after photoactivation (700 mW/cm(2) × 60s) and after 72 h. Flexural strength and modulus, toughness, and fracture toughness were evaluated in three-point bending. Polymerization stress was measured with the Bioman. The microtensile bond strength of an indirect composite and a glass ceramic to dentin was also evaluated. Results were analyzed with analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). For BisGMA-UDMA-TEGDMA cements, conversion values were not affected by the addition of thio-urethanes. Flexural strength/modulus increased significantly for both oligomer concentrations, with a 3-fold increase in toughness at 20 wt%. Fracture toughness increased over 2-fold for the thio-urethane modified groups. Contraction stress was reduced by 40% to 50% with the addition of thio-urethanes. The addition of thio-urethane to the commercial cement led to similar flexural strength, toughness, and conversion at 72h compared to the control. Flexural modulus decreased for the 20 wt% group, due to the dilution of the overall filler volume, which also led to decreased stress. However, fracture toughness increased by up to 50%. The microtensile bond strength increased for the experimental composite cement with 20 wt% thio-urethane bonding for both an indirect composite and a glass ceramic. Novel dual-cured composite cements containing thio-urethanes showed increased toughness, fracture toughness and

  20. Thio-urethanes Improve Properties of Dual-cured Composite Cements

    PubMed Central

    Bacchi, A.; Dobson, A.; Ferracane, J.L.; Consani, R.; Pfeifer, C.S.

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at modifying dual-cure composite cements by adding thio-urethane oligomers to improve mechanical properties, especially fracture toughness, and reduce polymerization stress. Thiol-functionalized oligomers were synthesized by combining 1,3-bis(1-isocyanato-1-methylethyl)benzene with trimethylol-tris-3-mercaptopropionate, at 1:2 isocyanate:thiol. Oligomer was added at 0, 10 or 20 wt% to BisGMA-UDMA-TEGDMA (5:3:2, with 25 wt% silanated inorganic fillers) or to one commercial composite cement (Relyx Ultimate, 3M Espe). Near-IR was used to measure methacrylate conversion after photoactivation (700 mW/cm2 × 60s) and after 72 h. Flexural strength and modulus, toughness, and fracture toughness were evaluated in three-point bending. Polymerization stress was measured with the Bioman. The microtensile bond strength of an indirect composite and a glass ceramic to dentin was also evaluated. Results were analyzed with analysis of variance and Tukey’s test (α = 0.05). For BisGMA-UDMA-TEGDMA cements, conversion values were not affected by the addition of thio-urethanes. Flexural strength/modulus increased significantly for both oligomer concentrations, with a 3-fold increase in toughness at 20 wt%. Fracture toughness increased over 2-fold for the thio-urethane modified groups. Contraction stress was reduced by 40% to 50% with the addition of thio-urethanes. The addition of thio-urethane to the commercial cement led to similar flexural strength, toughness, and conversion at 72h compared to the control. Flexural modulus decreased for the 20 wt% group, due to the dilution of the overall filler volume, which also led to decreased stress. However, fracture toughness increased by up to 50%. The microtensile bond strength increased for the experimental composite cement with 20 wt% thio-urethane bonding for both an indirect composite and a glass ceramic. Novel dual-cured composite cements containing thio-urethanes showed increased toughness, fracture toughness and

  1. Microshear bond strength of composite resins to enamel and porcelain substrates utilizing unfilled versus filled resins

    PubMed Central

    Najafi-Abrandabadi, Ahmad; Najafi-Abrandabadi, Siamak; Ghasemi, Amir; Kotick, Philip G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Failures such as marginal discoloration and composite chipping are still the problems of tooth-colored restorations on the substrate of enamel and porcelain, which some of these problems are consequently as a result of failures in the bonding layer. Using filled resin has been recently introduced to increase the bond strength of this layer. The aim of this study was to compare the microshear bond strength (μ-SBS) of composite resins to enamel incubated in periods of 24 h and 9 months and porcelain with unfilled resin and flowable composites (filled resin). Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, two groups of 75 enamel samples with different storage times (24 h and 9 months) and a group of 75 porcelain samples were used. They were divided into 5 experimental groups of 15 samples in each. Composite cylinders in tygon tubes were bonded on the surface of acid-etched enamel and pretreated porcelain. Wave, Wave MV, Wave HV, Grandioflow and Margin Bond were used as bonding agents. The μ-SBS was measured at the speed of 1.0 mm/min. The bond strengths were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test followed by Tukey test. P < 0.05 was selected as the level of statistical significance in this study. Results: The results showed that for enamel (24 h), the μ-SBS of the Wave MV and Wave HV groups were significantly lower than the Margin Bond group. Tukey test indicated the absence of a significant difference between the μ-SBS of the Wave group and the Margin Bond group. However, the μ-SBS of the Grandioflow group was significantly higher than the one for the Margin Bond as a bonding agent. In enamel (9 months), there was a significant difference between the Grandioflow and Margin Bond groups. Regarding bonding to the porcelain the one-way ANOVA test did not show a significant difference among the groups. Conclusion: This study revealed that flowable composites (filled resins) can be used instead of unfilled resins in bonding composite

  2. Comparative analysis of polymerization shrinkage of different resin composites.

    PubMed

    Barretto, Iana Coutinho; Pontes, Luana Farias; Carneiro, Karina Kato; Araujo, Jesuina Lamartine Nogueira; Ballester, Rafael Yague; Silva, Cecy Martins

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to compare the shrinkage of 3 resin composites after polymerization, using different curing modes and 2 methods of analysis, with 45 samples in each group. To evaluate free linear shrinkage, specimens were prepared in Teflon molds (8 mm diameter x 2 mm thick) with 1 of 2 methacrylate-based resins or a silorane-based resin. To evaluate wall-to-wall shrinkage, cavities (1.5 mm thick x 3 mm diameter) were prepared in 45 healthy bovine incisors and then restored. In both tests, the same curing lights were used: conventional quartz-tungsten-halogen, a conventional light-emitting diode (LED), and an exponential LED. Gaps were measured microscopically, and the gap percentage was calculated. The results were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Curing modes differed significantly in the free linear shrinkage test group, while resin composites did not. In the wall-to-wall shrinkage group, there were significant differences between the resin composites. PMID:25734285

  3. Preparation of Calcium Phosphate Cement and Polymethyl Methacrylate for Biological Composite Bone Cements

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Zhang, Kairui; Zhang, Sheng; Fan, Jiping; Guo, Xinhui; Dong, Weiqiang; Wang, Shengnan; Chen, Yirong; Yu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Background We studied the biological safety, biomechanics, and tissue compatibility of calcium phosphate cement and Polymethyl Methacrylate composite bone cement mixed in different ratios. Material/Methods CPC and PMMA were mixed in different ratios (3: 1, 2: 1, 1: 1, 1: 2, 1: 5, 1: 10, 1: 15, and 1: 20). PMMA solvent is a general solvent containing a dissolved preparation of the composite bone cement specific to a given specimen to determine biological safety, biomechanics, and tissue compatibility. Results The CPC/PMMA (33%) group, CPC/PMMA (50%) group, CPC/PMMA (67%) group, and CPC/PMMA (75%) group were more in line with the composite bone cement without cytotoxicity requirements. The compressive strength of the CPC/PMMA (67%) group and CPC/PMMA (75%) group was 20Mpa–30Mpa, while that of the CPC/PMMA (4.8%) group, CPC/PMMA (6.25%) group, CPC/PMMA (9.1%) group, CPC/PMMA (16.7%) group, CPC/PMMA (33%) group, and CPC/PMMA (50%) group was 40Mpa–70Mpa. Curing time was longer in the CPC group (more than 11 min) and shorter in the PMMA group (less than 2 min). The results of weight loss rate showed that there were no significant differences between the CPC/PMMA group (4.8%, 6.25%, 9.1%, 16.7%, 33%) and PMMA control group (p>0.05). With the decrease of CPC content, the rate of weight loss gradually decreased. Conclusions The CPC/PMMA (50%) group, CPC/PMMA (67%) group, and CPC/PMMA (75%) group provide greater variability and selectivity for the composite bone cement in obtaining better application. PMID:25904398

  4. Evaluating resin-enamel bonds by microshear and microtensile bond strength tests: effects of composite resin

    PubMed Central

    de ANDRADE, Andrea Mello; MOURA, Sandra Kiss; REIS, Alessandra; LOGUERCIO, Alessandro Dourado; GARCIA, Eugenio Jose; GRANDE, Rosa Helena Miranda

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of resin composite (Filtek Z250 and Filtek Flow Z350) and adhesive system [(Solobond Plus, Futurabond NR (VOCO) and Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE)] on the microtensile (µTBS) and microshear bond strength (µSBS) tests on enamel, and to correlate the bond strength means between them. Material and methods Thirty-six extracted human molars were sectioned to obtain two tooth halves: one for µTBS and the other one for µSBS. Adhesive systems and resin composites were applied to the enamel ground surfaces and light-cured. After storage (37ºC/24 h) specimens were stressed (0.5 mm/ min). Fracture modes were analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Results The correlation between tests was estimated with Pearson's product-moment correlation statistics (α =0.05). For both tests only the main factor resin composite was statistically significant (p<0.05). The correlation test detected a positive (r=0.91) and significant (p=0.01) correlation between the tests. Conclusions The results were more influenced by the resin type than by the adhesives. Both microbond tests seem to be positive and linearly correlated and can therefore lead to similar conclusions. PMID:21308290

  5. Porosity prediction of calcium phosphate cements based on chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Öhman, Caroline; Unosson, Johanna; Carlsson, Elin; Ginebra, Maria Pau; Persson, Cecilia; Engqvist, Håkan

    2015-07-01

    The porosity of calcium phosphate cements has an impact on several important parameters, such as strength, resorbability and bioactivity. A model to predict the porosity for biomedical cements would hence be a useful tool. At the moment such a model only exists for Portland cements. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a first porosity prediction model for calcium phosphate cements. On the basis of chemical reaction, molar weight and density of components, a volume-based model was developed and validated using calcium phosphate cement as model material. 60 mol% β-tricalcium phosphate and 40 mol% monocalcium phosphate monohydrate were mixed with deionized water, at different liquid-to-powder ratios. Samples were set for 24 h at 37°C and 100% relative humidity. Thereafter, samples were dried either under vacuum at room temperature for 24 h or in air at 37 °C for 7 days. Porosity and phase composition were determined. It was found that the two drying protocols led to the formation of brushite and monetite, respectively. The model was found to predict well the experimental values and also data reported in the literature for apatite cements, as deduced from the small absolute average residual errors (<2.0%). In conclusion, a theoretical model for porosity prediction was developed and validated for brushite, monetite and apatite cements. The model gives a good estimate of the final porosity and has the potential to be used as a porosity prediction tool in the biomedical cement field. PMID:26169187

  6. Influence of preheating the bonding agent of a conventional three-step adhesive system and the light activated resin cement on dentin bond strength

    PubMed Central

    Holanda, Daniel Brandão Vilela; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; do Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; Flório, Flávia Martão; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2013-01-01

    Aims: to evaluate the influence of preheating the bonding agent (Scotchbond Multipurpose Adhesive/3M ESPE) and the light-activated resin cement (RelyX Venner/3M ESPE) on dentin microtensile bond strength. Materials and Methods: The exposed flat dentin surface of 40 human third molars were randomly distributed into four groups for cementation (SR Adoro/Ivoclar Vivadent) (n = 10): G1-bond and resin cement, both at room temperature (22°C), G2-bond preheated to 58°C and cement at room temperature (22°C), G3-bond at room temperature (22°C) and the cement preheated to 58°C, G4-bond preheated to 58°C and cement preheated to 58°C. Sticks of dentin/block set measuring approximately 1 mm2 were obtained and used for the microtensile bond strength test. All sticks had their failure mode classified. Statistical analysis used: Factorial analysis of variance was applied, 2 × 2 (bond × cement) (P < 0.05). Results: Preheating the bonding agent (P = 0.8411) or the cement (P = 0.7155), yielded no significant difference. The interaction bond × cement was not significant (P = 0.9389). Conclusions: Preheating the bond and/or the light-activated resin cement did not influence dentin bond strength or fracture failure mode. PMID:24347889

  7. Photocurable bioactive bone cement based on hydroxyethyl methacrylate-poly(acrylic/maleic) acid resin and mesoporous sol gel-derived bioactive glass.

    PubMed

    Hesaraki, S

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports on strong and bioactive bone cement based on ternary bioactive SiO2-CaO-P2O5 glass particles and a photocurable resin comprising hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and poly(acrylic/maleic) acid. The as-cured composite represented a compressive strength of about 95 MPa but it weakened during soaking in simulated body fluid, SBF, qua its compressive strength reached to about 20 MPa after immersing for 30 days. Biodegradability of the composite was confirmed by reducing its initial weight (~32%) as well as decreasing the molecular weight of early cured resin during the soaking procedure. The composite exhibited in vitro calcium phosphate precipitation in the form of nanosized carbonated hydroxyapatite, which indicates its bone bonding ability. Proliferation of calvarium-derived newborn rat osteoblasts seeded on top of the composite was observed during incubation at 37 °C, meanwhile, an adequate cell supporting ability was found. Consequently, it seems that the produced composite is an appropriate alternative for bone defect injuries, because of its good cell responses, high compressive strength and ongoing biodegradability, though more in vivo experiments are essential to confirm this assumption. PMID:27040248

  8. Phenylethynyl Containing Polyarylene Ethers/Polyimides Resin Infiltration of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, DeRome O.

    1998-01-01

    The following tasks were performed at NCA&TSU during the second year in performance of the grant. LaRC-LV-1 13 resin was synthesized at NCA&TSU. In order to perform the synthesis, glassware and needed apparatus were purchased with grant funds along with the appropriate monomers. It was found that the LaRC-LV-1 13 resin was easily synthesized by the NMP solvent/toluene imminization/distilled water precipitation process. However, in use this resin exhibited a bubbling/foaming behavior during cure that was detrimental leading to the production of composite panels having a high void content. Composite panels were fabricated using compression molding and resin transfer molding (RTM) techniques. Initial fiber volume determinations were computed at NCA&TSU along with NASA-Langley measured c-scans on the panels produced. The initial results indicated a unsatisfactory level of approximately 20% by volume of voids. Testing of uniaxial coupons in compression to failure also agreed with these results. The uniaxial coupons delaminated as the major mode of failure indicative of an unacceptably low level of resin and to much void content in the final composites produced. In discussions with Dr. Brian Jensen, it was suggested the void fraction needs to be reduced to at least 2% by volume for a useful composite. The panels produced used both resin synthesized at NASA-Langley and NCA&TSU. In reviewing our progress over the past year, it was noted that the resin as formulated by the current synthesis process bubbled at elevated temperature. This was especially observed in neat resin slugs cured at the recommended one, four and eight hour cure temperatures. Pressurized cures where then performed with pressures up to 200 psi and simultaneously the lowest eight hour cure temperatures. Although this procedure reduced the amount of bubbles to some extent in the neat resin slugs it did not completely eliminate them. The cure reaction appears to be very energetic even at the lowest

  9. Effects of resin formulation and nanofiller surface treatment on the properties of experimental hybrid resin composite.

    PubMed

    Musanje, Lawrence; Ferracane, Jack L

    2004-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects of nanofiller surface treatment and resin viscosity on the early and long-term properties of experimental hybrid composites. Three resin formulations (low, medium and high viscosity) were prepared by varying the ratio of TEGDMA:UDMA:bis-GMA (47:33:16 wt%; 30:33:33 wt%; 12:33:51 wt%). Composites contained 71.3 wt% silanated strontium glass (1-3 microm) and 12.6 wt% of either silanated or unsilanated silica (OX-50; 0.04 microm). Specimens (n=10) for flexural strength, flexural modulus, fracture toughness and Knoop hardness were tested after 24 h, 1 and 6 months exposure to water at 37 degrees C. Degree of conversion (DC) was determined 24 h after photoinitiation using FTIR. Resin viscosity only had a marginal influence on the mechanical response of composites but it can be adjusted to achieve a balance between DC and mechanical properties. Adding non-bonded nanofiller to hybrid composites had no systematic effect on DC. Non-bonded nanofillers had no significant effect on the long-term properties of hybrid composites. PMID:15046897

  10. Strengthening composite resin restorations with ceramic whisker reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Xu, H H; Schumacher, G E; Eichmiller, F C; Antonucci, J M

    2000-01-01

    Due to their tendency to fracture, current composite formulations are unsuitable for use in large stress-bearing direct posterior restorations that involve cusps. This study investigated the use of single-crystalline ceramic whiskers for the reinforcement of composite resins. The whisker-reinforced composite materials exhibited physical characteristics (i.e., flexural strength, work-of-fracture, and elastic modulus) that were significantly greater (P < 0.05; Student's t test) than those of traditional composite formulations. The experimental materials also had a surface smoothness that was essentially comparable to hybrid composite control specimens. PMID:11404884

  11. Estimation of cesium-137 release from waste/cement composites using data from small-scale specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Dayal, R.; Arora, H.; Morcos, N.

    1983-07-01

    A study has been performed, correlating the leachability of Cs-137 from small-scale to large-scale waste/cement composites. In the study, simulants of two contrasting waste types were considered: cation-exchange resin and boric acid wastes incorporated in Portland Type cements. Test specimens were right cylinders of dimensions varying from 5 x 5 to 55 x 55 (diameter x height, cm). Using leach data representing diffusion-controlled release, effective diffusivities of approx. 2 x 10/sup -8/ cm/sup 2//s have been calculated for Cs-137 in both waste/cement matrices. A comparison of the observed and predicted cesium release values indicated that leach data derived from testing of small-scale specimens can be extrapolated, using a planar semi-infinite medium approximation, to estimate leachability of a full-scale specimen.

  12. Effect of eugenol-based root canal sealers on retention of prefabricated metal posts luted with resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ali, Khalil

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the effect of two different eugenol-based root canal sealers on the retention of prefabricated metal posts luted with adhesive resin cement. Materials and methods Thirty prefabricated ParaPosts randomly divided among three groups of 10 each were luted into extracted single-rooted teeth with adhesive resin cement. Two of the groups had been obturated with Gutta–Percha and one of two eugenol-based root canal sealers (Endofil and Tubli-Seal), respectively. The third group was not obturated and served as the control. The forces required for dislodgment of posts from their prepared post spaces were recorded using a universal testing machine. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s multiple range test was used to determine the mean differences. Results Endofil and Tubli-Seal groups demonstrated significantly reduced retention compared to the unobturated (control) group (P < 0.05). Conclusion Eugenol-based sealers significantly reduced the retention of prefabricated posts luted with adhesive resin cement. PMID:23960462

  13. Resin transfer molding for advanced composite primary aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markus, Alan; Palmer, Ray

    1991-01-01

    Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) has been identified by Douglas Aircraft Company (DAC) and industry to be one of the promising processes being developed today which can break the cost barrier of implementing composite primary structures into a commercial aircraft production environment. The RTM process developments and scale-up plans Douglas Aircrart will be conducting under the NASA ACT contract are discussed.

  14. Comparison of bond strength of three adhesives: composite resin, hybrid GIC, and glass-filled GIC.

    PubMed

    Rix, D; Foley, T F; Mamandras, A

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare 3 orthodontic adhesives in the areas of shear-peel bond strength, location of adhesive failure, and extent of enamel cracking before bonding and after debonding of orthodontic brackets. The adhesives included a composite resin control (Transbond XT; 3M/Unitek, St Paul, Minn), a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji Ortho LC; GC America Corp, Alsip, Ill), and a polyacid-modified composite resin under dry and saliva-contaminated conditions (Assure; Reliance Orthodontic Products Inc, Itasca, Ill). Metal brackets were bonded to the buccal surfaces of 160 (4 groups of 40) human premolars. The bonded teeth were stored in deionized water at 37 degrees C for 30 days and thermocycled for 24 hours before debonding with a Universal Instron (Instron Corp, Canton, Mass) testing machine. The extent of cracking in the buccal surfaces was evaluated under 16x magnification before bonding and after debonding. Although the bond strength of the composite resin control (20.19 MPa) was significantly greater (P <.05) than that of the adhesives in the other groups, clinically acceptable shear-peel bond strengths were found for all adhesives (Fuji Ortho LC = 13.57 MPa, Assure-dry = 10.74 MPa, Assure-wet = 10.99 MPa). The bond strength for the Assure adhesive was not significantly affected by saliva contamination. The sample of extracted premolars used in this study displayed a greater frequency of buccal surface enamel cracking (46.7%) than that reported in the literature for in vivo premolars (7.8%-10.2%), which was possibly due to the extraction process. The frequency of enamel cracking in a subset of this sample (n = 34) increased from 46.4% at prebonding to 62.4% at postdebonding as a result of the forces of debonding. PMID:11174538

  15. Push-out bond strength of quartz fibre posts to root canal dentin using total-etch and self-adhesive resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Navimipour, Elmira J.; Shakerifar, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Several adhesive systems are available for cementation of fibre posts into the root canal. The aim of the present study was to investigate the push-out bond strengths of quartz fibre posts to root dentin with the use of different total-etch and self-adhesive resin cements. Study Design: Ninety single-rooted human premolars were endodontically treated and standardized post-spaces were prepared. Fibre posts were cemented with different luting agents: total-etch (Nexus NX3, Duo-Link, and RelyX ARC) and self-adhesive resin cements (Maxcem Elite, BisCem, and RelyX Unicem). Three post/dentin sections (coronal, middle and apical) were obtained from each specimen, and push-out bond strength test was performed in each section at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data was analyzed with two-factor and one-way analysis of variance and a post-hoc Tukey test at a significance level of p < 0.05. Results: Cement type, canal region, and their interaction significantly influenced bond strength. Significantly higher bond strength values were observed in the apical region of self-adhesive cements. Only Duo-Link and RelyX ARC cements resulted in homogeneous bond strengths. Conclusions: Cementation of quartz fibre posts using self-adhesive cements provided higher push-out bond strengths especially in the apical region, while total-etch cements resulted in more uniform bond strengths in different regions of the root canal. Key words: Push-out bond strength; quartz fibre post; total-etch resin cement; self-adhesive resin cement. PMID:22143695

  16. Effect of Eu-citrate complex composition on its cementation

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, V.M.; Kornilov, A.S.; Yadovin, A.A.

    1995-03-01

    The dependence of Eu cementation by sodium amalgam in a semicountercurrent regime from citrate solutions on the Eu complex composition is studied. The purity of the {sup 153}Gd product from radioactive Eu can be increased during cementation by introducing correcting solutions of citric acid and stable Eu. The selected conditions are verified by processing irradiated targets. The content of radioactive Eu in the {sup 153}Gd product is reduced from 0.01 to 0.0005% with respect to {gamma}-activity.

  17. A Confocal Microscopic Evaluation of the Dehydration Effect on Conventional, Resin Reinforced Powder/Liquid and Paste to Paste Glass Ionomer Luting Cements

    PubMed Central

    George, Liza; Kandaswamy, D

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dehydration of resin-modified glass ionomer powder/liquid system, resin-modified glass ionomer paste/paste luting cements in three different quantities and to compare them with a conventional glass ionomer luting cement using confocal laser scanning microscope. Materials and Methods: A conventional glass ionomer (Group I), a resin modified powder/liquid system (Group II), and a resin-modified paste/paste system (Group III) were selected for the study. In Group III, there were three subgroups based on the quantity of material dispensed. 50 premolar teeth were selected and randomly divided among the groups with 10 samples in each. The teeth were ground flat to expose a flat occlusal dentin. A device was made to standardize the thickness of cement placed on the teeth. The teeth were stored in distilled water for 24 h and then longitudinally sectioned to examine the tooth dentin interface under a confocal microscope. The specimens were allowed to dehydrate under the microscope for different time intervals. The width of the crack after dehydration near the dentinal interface was measured at definite intervals in all the groups and analyzed statistically using Student’s t-test. Results: Conventional glass ionomer cement showed the maximum width of the crack followed by resin modified paste/paste system during the dehydration period. Resin modified powder/liquid system did not show cohesive failure. Conclusions: Conventional glass ionomer luting cement is more susceptible to cohesive failure when subjected to dehydration compared to resin-modified glass ionomer paste/paste luting cement. Among the luting cements, resin-modified glass ionomer powder/liquid system showed the best results when subjected to dehydration. PMID:26464535

  18. Correlations of norbornenyl crosslinked polyimide resin structures with resin thermo-oxidative stability, resin glass transition temperature and composite initial mechanical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, William B.

    1988-01-01

    PMR (polymerization of monomeric reactants) methodology was used to prepare 70 different polyimide oligomeric resins and 30 different unidirectional graphite fiber/polyimide composites. Monomeric composition as well as chain length between sites of crosslinks were varied to examine their effects on resin thermo-oxidative stability and glass transition temperature (Tg) of the cured/postcured resins. A linear correlation of decreasing 316 C resin weight loss/surface area versus (1) decreasing aliphatic content, or (2) increasing benzylic/aliphatic content stoichiometry ratio over a wide range of resin compositions was observed. An almost linear correlation of Tg versus molecular distance between the crosslinks was also observed. An attempt was made to correlate Tg with initial composite mechanical properties (flexural strength and interlaminar shear strength). However, the scatter in mechanical strength data prevented obtaining a clear correlation. Instead, only a range of composite mechanical properties was obtained at 25, 288, and 316 C. Perhaps more importantly, what did become apparent during the correlation study was (1) the PMR methodology could be used to prepare composites from resins containing a wide variety of monomer modifications, (2) that these composites almost invariably provided satisfactory initial mechanical properties as long as the resins formulated exhibited satisfactory processing flow, and (3) that PMR resins exhibited predictable rates of 316 C weight loss/surface area based on their benzylic/aliphatic stoichiometery ratio.

  19. Additives for cement compositions based on modified peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopanitsa, Natalya; Sarkisov, Yurij; Gorshkova, Aleksandra; Demyanenko, Olga

    2016-01-01

    High quality competitive dry building mixes require modifying additives for various purposes to be included in their composition. There is insufficient amount of quality additives having stable properties for controlling the properties of cement compositions produced in Russia. Using of foreign modifying additives leads to significant increasing of the final cost of the product. The cost of imported modifiers in the composition of the dry building mixes can be up to 90% of the material cost, depending on the composition complexity. Thus, the problem of import substitution becomes relevant, especially in recent years, due to difficult economic situation. The article discusses the possibility of using local raw materials as a basis for obtaining dry building mixtures components. The properties of organo-mineral additives for cement compositions based on thermally modified peat raw materials are studied. Studies of the structure and composition of the additives are carried out by physicochemical research methods: electron microscopy and X-ray analysis. Results of experimental research showed that the peat additives contribute to improving of cement-sand mortar strength and hydrophysical properties.

  20. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites: A comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  1. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites - A comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  2. Process Optimization of Bismaleimide (BMI) Resin Infused Carbon Fiber Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrlich, Joshua W.; Tate, LaNetra C.; Cox, Sarah B.; Taylor, Brian J.; Wright, M. Clara; Faughnan, Patrick D.; Batterson, Lawrence M.; Caraccio, Anne J.; Sampson, Jeffery W.

    2013-01-01

    Engineers today are presented with the opportunity to design and build the next generation of space vehicles out of the lightest, strongest, and most durable materials available. Composites offer excellent structural characteristics and outstanding reliability in many forms that will be utilized in future aerospace applications including the Commercial Crew and Cargo Program and the Orion space capsule. NASA's Composites for Exploration (CoEx) project researches the various methods of manufacturing composite materials of different fiber characteristics while using proven infusion methods of different resin compositions. Development and testing on these different material combinations will provide engineers the opportunity to produce optimal material compounds for multidisciplinary applications. Through the CoEx project, engineers pursue the opportunity to research and develop repair patch procedures for damaged spacecraft. Working in conjunction with Raptor Resins Inc., NASA engineers are utilizing high flow liquid infusion molding practices to manufacture high-temperature composite parts comprised of intermediate modulus 7 (IM7) carbon fiber material. IM7 is a continuous, high-tensile strength composite with outstanding structural qualities such as high shear strength, tensile strength and modulus as well as excellent corrosion, creep, and fatigue resistance. IM7 carbon fiber, combined with existing thermoset and thermoplastic resin systems, can provide improvements in material strength reinforcement and deformation-resistant properties for high-temperature applications. Void analysis of the different layups of the IM7 material discovered the largest total void composition within the [ +45 , 90 , 90 , -45 ] composite panel. Tensile and compressional testing proved the highest mechanical strength was found in the [0 4] layup. This paper further investigates the infusion procedure of a low-cost/high-performance BMI resin into an IM7 carbon fiber material and the

  3. Composition for producing polyurethane resin at ambient temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kamatani, Y.; Nishino, K.; Tanaka, M.; Yamazaki, K.

    1984-06-26

    Disclosed is a composition for polyurethane resins which is ordinarily of two-package type and curable at ambient temperature and which comprises an isocyanate component having oxadiazinetrione ring as a curing agent and a polyol component, having in the molecule, at least one of a tertiary amino group, a quaternary ammonium group and a salt-formed carboxyl group as a main component. The composition has excellent curability and provides cured products excellent in adhesiveness and physical properties.

  4. Effects of adding silica particles on certain properties of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement

    PubMed Central

    Felemban, Nayef H.; Ebrahim, Mohamed I.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of incorporation of silica particles with different concentrations on some properties of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC): Microleakage, compressive strength, tensile strength, water sorption, and solubility. Materials and Methods: Silica particle was incorporated into RMGIC powder to study its effects, one type of RMGIC (Type II visible light-cured) and three concentrations of silica particles (0.06, 0.08, and 0.1% weight) were used. One hundred and twenty specimens were fabricated for measuring microleakage, compressive strength, tensile strength, water sorption, and solubility. Statistical Analysis: One-way analysis of variance and Tukey's tests were used for measuring significance between means where P ≤ 0.05. Results: RMGIC specimens without any additives showed significantly highest microleakage and lowest compressive and tensile strengths. Conclusion: Silica particles added to RMGIC have the potential as a reliable restorative material with increased compressive strength, tensile strength, and water sorption but decreased microleakage and water solubility. PMID:27095901

  5. Fluid loss control additives for oil well cementing compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Crema, S.C.; Kucera, C.H.; Konrad, G.; Hartmann, H.

    1993-07-20

    A cementing composition is described useful in cementing oil, gas and water wells comprising: (a) water; (b) hydraulic cement; and (c) a fluid loss additive in an amount effective to reduce fluid loss, to below 100 cc/30 min said fluid loss additive comprised of a blend of (i) a copolymer of acrylamide and vinyl imidazole, in a weight percent ratio of from about 95:5 to 5:95, acryamide to vinyl imidazole said copolymer having a molecular weight range of from about 10,000 to 3,000,000, and (ii) a copolymer of vinyl pyrrolidone and sodium salt of sulfonate in a weight percent ratio of 80:20 to 20:80; the ratio of copolymer (i) to copolymer (ii) being in the range of 20:80 to 80:20.

  6. Infiltration/cure modeling of resin transfer molded composite materials using advanced fiber architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loos, Alfred C.; Weideman, Mark H.; Long, Edward R., Jr.; Kranbuehl, David E.; Kinsley, Philip J.; Hart, Sean M.

    1991-01-01

    A model was developed which can be used to simulate infiltration and cure of textile composites by resin transfer molding. Fabric preforms were resin infiltrated and cured using model generated optimized one-step infiltration/cure protocols. Frequency dependent electromagnetic sensing (FDEMS) was used to monitor in situ resin infiltration and cure during processing. FDEMS measurements of infiltration time, resin viscosity, and resin degree of cure agreed well with values predicted by the simulation model. Textile composites fabricated using a one-step infiltration/cure procedure were uniformly resin impregnated and void free. Fiber volume fraction measurements by the resin digestion method compared well with values predicted using the model.

  7. Effect of antioxidants on push-out bond strength of hydrogen peroxide treated glass fiber posts bonded with two types of resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Mazaheri, Hamid; Tarighi, Pardis; Samimi, Pouran

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) surface treatment of fiber posts has been reported to increase bond strength of fiber posts to resin cements. However, residual oxygen radicals might jeopardize the bonding procedure. This study examined the effect of three antioxidant agents on the bond strength of fiber posts to conventional and self-adhesive resin cements. Materials and Methods Post spaces were prepared in forty human maxillary second premolars. Posts were divided into five groups of 8 each: G1 (control), no pre-treatment; G2, 10% H2O2 pre-treatment; G3, G4 and G5. After H2O2 application, Hesperidin (HES), Sodium Ascorbate (SA) or Rosmarinic acid (RA) was applied on each group respectively. In each group four posts were cemented with Duo-Link conventional resin cement and the others with self-adhesive BisCem cement. Push-out test was performed and data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and tukey's post-hoc test (α = 0.05). Results There was a statistically significant interaction between the cement type and post surface treatment on push-out bond strength of fiber posts (p < 0.001, F = 16). Also it was shown that different posts' surface treatments significantly affect the push-out bond strength of fiber posts (p = 0.001). H2O2 treated posts (G2) and control posts (G1) cemented with Duo-link showed the highest (15.96 ± 5.07MPa) and lowest bond strengths (6.79 ± 3.94) respectively. Conclusions It was concluded that H2O2 surface treatment might enhance the bond strength of fiber posts cemented with conventional resin cements. The effect of antioxidants as post's surface treatment agents depends on the characteristics of resin cements used for bonding procedure. PMID:25383350

  8. Effect of different light curing methods on mechanical and physical properties of resin-cements polymerized through ceramic discs

    PubMed Central

    CEKIC-NAGAS, Isil; ERGUN, Gulfem

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the polimerization ability of three different light-curing units (quartz tungsten halogen, light-emitting diodes and plasma arc) and their exposure modes (high-intensity and soft-start) by determination of microhardness, water sorption and solubility, and diametral tensile strength of 5 dual-curing resin cements. Material and methods A total of 720 disc-shaped samples (1 mm height and 5 mm diameter) were prepared from different dual-curing resin cements (Duolink, Nexus, Bifix-QM, Panavia F and RelyX Unicem). Photoactivation was performed by using quartz tungsten halogen (high-power and soft-up modes), light-emitting diode (standard and exponential modes) and plasma arc (normal and ramp-curing modes) curing units through ceramic discs. Then the samples (n=8/per group) were stored dry in the dark at 37ºC for 24 h. The Vickers hardness test was performed on the resin cement layer with a microhardness tester (Shimadzu HMV). For sorption and solubility tests; the samples were stored in a desiccator at 37ºC and weighed to a constant mass. The samples were weighed both before and after being immersed in deionized water for different periods of time (24 h and 7 days) and being desiccated. The diametral tensile strength of the samples was tested in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed statistically by nonparametric Kruskal Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests at 5% significance level. Results Resin cement and light-curing unit had significant effects (p<0.05) on microhardness, diametral tensile strength, water solubility and sorption. However, no significant differences (p>0.05) were obtained with different modes of LCUs. Conclusion The study indicates that polymerization of resin cements with different light-curing units may result in various polymer structures, and consequently different mechanical and physical properties. PMID:21710093

  9. The reparability of contemporary composite resins

    PubMed Central

    Spyrou, Maria; Koliniotou-Koumpia, Eugenia; Kouros, Pantelis; Koulaouzidou, Elisabeth; Dionysopoulos, Pavlos

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to investigate the way that various surface treatments could influence the bond strength of the repair of methacrylate (MC) and silorane (SIL) composites. Materials and Methods: A total of 160 MC and SIL cylindrical specimens were polymerized and aged in artificial saliva solution for 7 days. Depending on the following surface treatment (diamond bur or air abrasion), and the conditioning procedure (orthophosphoric acid or sodium hypochlorite), 16 groups were formed and repaired either with MC, either with SIL composite. Repaired specimens were subjected to an additional aging procedure in artificial saliva for 7 days, followed by thermo-cycling and then stressed in shear at a rate of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Failure patterns were analyzed using stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscopy. Results: MC composite showed statistically significant higher bond strength both as a base or repair material than SIL (P < 0.001). Statistically significant differences were not observed, when grinding and conditioning procedures was compared. Pretest failures were observed when aged MC-based composite was repaired with SIL-based. Conclusions: Type of composite seems to be the main factor influencing the bond strength of the repair. MC-based composite showed better repairability than SIL composite. Optimum repair conditions should include knowledge of the composite's composition. PMID:25202216

  10. The effect of composition on mechanical properties of brushite cements.

    PubMed

    Engstrand, Johanna; Persson, Cecilia; Engqvist, Håkan

    2014-01-01

    Due to a fast setting reaction, good biological properties, and easily available starting materials, there has been extensive research within the field of brushite cements as bone replacing material. However, the fast setting of brushite cement gives them intrinsically low mechanical properties due to the poor crystal compaction during setting. To improve this, many additives such as citric acid, pyrophosphates, and glycolic acid have been added to the cement paste to retard the crystal growth. Furthermore, the incorporation of a filler material could improve the mechanical properties when used in the correct amounts. In this study, the effect of the addition of the two retardants, disodium dihydrogen pyrophosphate and citric acid, together with the addition of β-TCP filler particles, on the mechanical properties of a brushite cement was investigated. The results showed that the addition of low amounts of a filler (up to 10%) can have large effects on the mechanical properties. Furthermore, the addition of citric acid to the liquid phase makes it possible to use lower liquid-to-powder ratios (L/P), which strongly affects the strength of the cements. The maximal compressive strength (41.8MPa) was found for a composition with a molar ratio of 45:55 between monocalcium phosphate monohydrate and beta-tricalcium phosphate, an L/P of 0.25ml/g and a citric acid concentration of 0.5M in the liquid phase. PMID:24064324

  11. Creep of experimental short fiber-reinforced composite resin.

    PubMed

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Kaleem, Muhammad; Shinya, Akikazu; Vallittu, Pekka K; Satterthwaite, Julian D; Watts, David C; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the reinforcing effect of short E-glass fiber fillers oriented in different directions on composite resin under static and dynamic loading. Experimental short fiber-reinforced composite resin (FC) was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers, 22.5 wt% of resin, and 55 wt% of silane-treated silica fillers. Three groups of specimens (n=5) were tested: FC with isotropic fiber orientation, FC with anisotropic fiber orientation, and particulate-filled composite resin (PFC) as a control. Time-dependent creep and recovery were recorded. ANOVA revealed that after secondary curing in a vacuum oven and after storage in dry condition for 30 days, FC with isotropic fiber orientation (1.73%) exhibited significantly lower static creep value (p<0.05) than PFC (2.54%). For the different curing methods and storage conditions evaluated in this study, FC achieved acceptable static and dynamic creep values when compared to PFC. PMID:23037835

  12. Effect of thermocycling on the bond strength of composite resin to bur and laser treated composite resin.

    PubMed

    Özel Bektas, Özden; Eren, Digdem; Herguner Siso, Seyda; Akin, Gulsah E

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of two different surface treatments (Er:YAG laser and bur) and three different numbers of thermal cycling (no aging, 1,000, 5,000, and 10,000 cycles) on the micro-shear bond strength of repaired composite resin. Ninety-six composite blocks (4 mm × 4 mm × 1 mm) obtained with a micromatrix hybrid composite were prepared. The composite blocks were then randomly divided into four groups (n = 24), according to the thermal cycling procedure: (1) stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h (control group), (2) 1,000 cycles, (3) 5,000 cycles, and (4) 10,000 cycles. After aging, the blocks were further subdivided into two subgroups (n = 12), according to surface treatment. Bur and laser-treated composite surfaces were treated with an etch&rinse adhesive system. In addition, a microhybrid composite resin was bonded to the surfaces via polyethylene tubing. Specimens were subjected to micro-shear bond strength test by a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0 and 5 mm/min. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey tests (α = 0.05) for micro-shear bond strengths. After conducting a bond strength test, it was found that the laser and bur-treated specimens had similar results. Aging with 10,000 thermocycles significantly affected the repair bond strength of composite resins. PMID:21833556

  13. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE SHRINKAGE STRESS OF COMPOSITE RESINS

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Rosana Aparecida; de Araujo, Paulo Amarante; Castañeda-Espinosa, Juan Carlos; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the shrinkage stress of composite resins by three methods. In the first method, composites were inserted between two stainless steel plates. One of the plates was connected to a 20 kgf load cell of a universal testing machine (EMIC-DL-500). In the second method, disk-shaped cavities were prepared in 2-mm-thick Teflon molds and filled with the different composites. Gaps between the composites and molds formed after polymerization were evaluated microscopically. In the third method, the wall-to-wall shrinkage stress of the resins that were placed in bovine dentin cavities was evaluated. The gaps were measured microscopically. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The obtained contraction forces were: Grandio = 12.18 ± 0.428N; Filtek Z 250 = 11.80 ± 0.760N; Filtek Supreme = 11.80 ± 0.707 N; and Admira = 11.89 ± 0.647 N. The gaps obtained between composites and Teflon molds were: Filtek Z 250 = 0.51 ± 0.0357%; Filtek Supreme = 0.36 ± 0.0438%; Admira = 0.25 ± 0.0346% and Grandio = 0.16 ± 0.008%. The gaps obtained in wall-to-wall contraction were: Filtek Z 250 = 11.33 ± 2.160 μm; Filtek Supreme = 10.66 ± 1.211μm; Admira = 11.16 ± 2.041 μm and Grandio = 10.50 ± 1.224 μm. There were no significant differences among the composite resins obtained with the first (shrinkage stress generated during polymerization) and third method (wall-to-wall shrinkage). The composite resins obtained with the second method (Teflon method) differed significantly regarding gap formation. PMID:19089286

  14. Development of new addition-type composite resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kray, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The most promising of a number of new addition type polyimides and polyaromatic melamine (NCNS) resins for use in high performance composite materials. Three different cure temperature ranges were of interest: 530-560 K (500-550 F), 475-530 K (400-500 F), and 450 K (350 F). Examined were a wide variety of polyimide precursors terminated with 5 norbornene groups and addition polymerized at 560 K similar to PMR-15 and LARC-160 polyimides. In addition, a number of lower curing cinnamal end capped polyimides and a bismaleimide were investigated but were not found promising. A group of NCNS resins were investigated and some were found to be superior to current epoxy resins in moisture resistance, oxidative aging and flame and smoke properties.

  15. Electrical properties of epoxy resin based nano-composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; James, D. Randy; Ellis, Alvin R.; Parans Paranthaman, M.; Aytug, Tolga; Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan; More, Karren L.; Li, Jing; Goyal, Amit

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the electrical properties of composite materials prepared as nano- and sub-micron-scale metal-oxide particles embedded in a commercial resin. The filler particles are barium titanate and calcium copper titanate. The physical and structural characteristics of the constituents and the fabricated composites are reported. Electrical characterization of the composite samples is performed using time- and frequency-domain dielectric spectroscopy techniques. The electrical breakdown strength of samples with nano- and sub-micron-sized particles have better electrical insulation properties than the unfilled resin. The start-up funding for the research was provided by the US Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, and follow-on funding was continued by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the US Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 (D06-100).

  16. Acoustic Emissions in Borosilicate and epoxy resin composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatica, N.; Guerra, S.; Vargas, Y.; Gaete, L.; Galleguillos, E.; Ruzzante, J.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a research looking for to extend the acoustic emission (AE) technique from the evaluation of stress state of rock samples to know its composition is presented. For this purpose the rock samples were simulated by a composite made of a resin and borosilicate spheres. The epoxy resin playing the role of country rock and Borosilicate spheres represent the coarse grain. These samples were undergone to uniaxial compression test and the AE signals were recorded and studied looking for the identification of each material characteristic spectrum. The spectral analysis of these recorded signals shown that it is possible to identify the characteristic spectra of each material from the full spectra of composite.

  17. Does the light source affect the repairability of composite resins?

    PubMed

    Karaman, Emel; Gönülol, Nihan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of the light source on the microshear bond strength of different composite resins repaired with the same substrate. Thirty cylindrical specimens of each composite resin--Filtek Silorane, Filtek Z550 (3M ESPE), Gradia Direct Anterior (GC), and Aelite Posterior (BISCO)--were prepared and light-cured with a QTH light curing unit (LCU). The specimens were aged by thermal cycling and divided into three subgroups according to the light source used--QTH, LED, or PAC (n = 10). They were repaired with the same substrate and a Clearfil Repair Kit (Kuraray). The specimens were light-cured and aged for 1 week in distilled water at 37 °C. The microshear bond strength and failure modes were assessed. There was no significant difference in the microshear bond strength values among the composite resins, except for the Filtek Silorane group that showed significantly lower bond strength values when polymerized with the PAC unit compared to the QTH or LED unit. In conclusion, previously placed dimethacrylate-based composites can be repaired with different light sources; however, if the composite to be repaired is silorane-based, then using a QTH or LED device may be the best option. PMID:25098825

  18. Fluid loss agents for oil well cementing composition

    SciTech Connect

    Savoly, A.; Villa, J.L.; Garvey, C.M.; Resnick, A.L.

    1987-06-23

    This patent describes a method of cementing a conduit in a borehole penetrating an earthen formation by introducing a cementing composition into the space. The cementing composition comprises: water; hydraulic cement; a water dispersible fluid loss additive comprised of a terpolymer of (1) from about 10 to about 75 weight percent of an acid selected from the group consisting of 2-acrylamido-2 methylpropane sulfonic acid, sodium vinyl sulfonate and vinyl benzene sulfonate; (2) from about 10 to 76 weight percent of a nonionic monomer selected from the group consisting of acrylamide, N,N-dimethylacrylamide, N-vinyl pyrrolidone, N-vinyl acetamide and dimethylamino ethyl methacrylate; and (3) from about 1 to 60 weight percent of an unsaturated polybasic acid selected from the group consisting of itaconic acid, maleic acid, fumaric acid, citraconic acid, mesaconic acid, glutaconic acid, aconitic acid, dimethylmuconic acid and 1-butene 2,3,4-tricarboxylic acid, the polymer having an average molecular weight of between about 200,000 and about 1,000,000 being in its free acid or partially or completely neutralized form and being at least water dispersible.

  19. A long term study of fluoride release from metal-containing conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Williams, J A; Billington, R W; Pearson, G J

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine long term release of fluoride from a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) (Fuji II LC (FLC)) compared with that from two conventional acid-base setting cements (HiDense (HD) and KetacSilver (KS)) marketed for similar restorative purposes. Fluoride release from discs of cement immersed in water or artificial saliva was measured for 2.7 years using an ion selective electrode technique. The RMGIC was affected by water if immersed immediately after setting. This is similar to conventional acid-base cements and the experimental method was designed to allow for this. Over the 2.7-year period, the RMGIC and HD released similar amounts of fluoride into both water and artificial saliva. In water, the RMGIC released the most fluoride, while in artificial saliva the highest release was from HD. KS released the least amount of fluoride in both immersing liquids. In artificial saliva, release was reduced to 17-25% of that found in water, with the RMGIC showing the greatest reduction. Both acid-base cured cements showed changes in colour over the 2.7-year span, while the colour of the RMGIC was stable. It was concluded that the RMGIC released equivalent or greater amounts of fluoride than the two acid-base cure glass-ionomers over a period of 2.7 years. PMID:11298908

  20. Luting of CAD/CAM ceramic inlays: direct composite versus dual-cure luting cement.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Bonroy, Kim; Elsen, Caroline; Lührs, Anne-Katrin; Suyama, Yuji; Peumans, Marleen; Van Meerbeek, Bart; De Munck, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate bonding effectiveness in direct restorations. A two-step self-etch adhesive and a light-cure resin composite was compared with luting with a conventional dual-cure resin cement and a two-step etch and rinse adhesive. Class-I box-type cavities were prepared. Identical ceramic inlays were designed and fabricated with a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) device. The inlays were seated with Clearfil SE Bond/Clearfil AP-X (Kuraray Medical) or ExciTE F DSC/Variolink II (Ivoclar Vivadent), each by two operators (five teeth per group). The inlays were stored in water for one week at 37°C, whereafter micro-tensile bond strength testing was conducted. The micro-tensile bond strength of the direct composite was significantly higher than that from conventional luting, and was independent of the operator (P<0.0001). Pre-testing failures were only observed with the conventional method. High-power light-curing of a direct composite may be a viable alternative to luting lithium disilicate glass-ceramic CAD/CAM restorations. PMID:26407114

  1. Effect of eugenol-containing temporary cements on bond strength of composite to dentin.

    PubMed

    Ganss, C; Jung, M

    1998-01-01

    The effect of temporary materials on shear bond strength of composite to dentin was investigated. Sixty previously impacted (caries-free) human third molars were embedded and sectioned horizontally at the pulp chamber and at the half of the crown. The samples were covered with ZOE, Temp Bond (eugenol-containing), Fermit, (temporary resin material, used without cementing) and Provicol, (eugenol-free, calcium hydroxide-containing). All specimens were stored in saline for 10 days. After mechanical cleaning the dentin was pretreated with a dentin bonding agent (Syntac), and the composite columns were applied. Debonding was performed using a Zwick Universal Testing Machine (cross-head speed 1.5 mm/min). The mode of failure was noted using a light microscope, and the thickness of the dentin at the composite/dentin interface was measured. The median shear bond strength values for the treated and control samples were: ZOE 7.46 MPa, Temp Bond 10.22 MPa, Fermit 6.49 MPa, Provicol 8.43 MPa, and control 10.06 MPa. No two groups were significantly different at the 0.05 level (one-way ANOVA and Scheffé test). In all groups the predominant mode of failure was adhesive and there was a slight tendency towards lower shear bond strength values at lower values for the thickness of the dentin. Under the conditions described the use of eugenol-containing temporary cements had no adverse effect on shear bond strength of a dual-curing composite luting cement to dentin. PMID:9573789

  2. Criteria for selecting resin matrices for improved composite strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Hanson, M. P.; Serafini, T. T.

    1973-01-01

    Criteria are presented which can be used a priori to select matrices to yield composites with improved unidirectional strength. The criteria evolved from an investigation including both theoretical and experimental efforts. Composite micromechanics were used in conjunction with suitable experiments and reference data to identify those matrix properties which influence composite strength properties. Composites of graphite fibers and low, intermediate and high-modulus resins were investigated. It was found that the area under the matrix stress/strain diagram limited to one percent strain is a good index for an a priori assessment of the matrix contribution to composite strength. The corresponding initial modulus is a useful parameter in translating matrix properties to composite properties. Matrix properties such as ultimate strength, ultimate elongation, toughness, and fracture toughness are misleading in translating matrix properties to composite strength.

  3. Boron/aluminum graphite/resin advanced fiber composite hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    Fabrication feasibility and potential of an adhesively bonded metal and resin matrix fiber-composite hybrid are determined as an advanced material for aerospace and other structural applications. The results show that using this hybrid concept makes possible a composite design which, when compared with nonhybrid composites, has greater transverse strength, transverse stiffness, and impact resistance with only a small penalty on density and longitudinal properties. The results also show that laminate theory is suitable for predicting the structural response of such hybrids. The sequence of fracture modes indicates that these types of hybrids can be readily designed to meet fail-safe requirements.

  4. Use of coir pith particles in composites with Portland cement.

    PubMed

    Brasileiro, Gisela Azevedo Menezes; Vieira, Jhonatas Augusto Rocha; Barreto, Ledjane Silva

    2013-12-15

    Brazil is the fourth largest world's producer of coconut (Cocos nucifera L.). Coconut crops generate several wastes, including, coir pith. Coir pith and short fibers are the byproducts of extracting the long fibers and account for approximately 70% of the mature coconut husk. The main use of coir pith is as an agricultural substrate. Due to its shape and small size (0.075-1.2 mm), this material can be considered as a particulate material. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of coir pith as an aggregate in cementitious composites and to evaluate the effect of the presence of sand in the performance of these composites. Some composites were produced exclusively with coir pith particles and other composites with coir pith partially substituting the natural sand. The cementitious composites developed were tested for their physical and mechanical properties and characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to evaluate the effect of coir pith particles addition in cement paste and sand-cement-mortar. The statistical significance of the results was evaluated by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test followed by multiple comparisons of the means by Tukey's test that showed that the composites with coir pith particles, with or without natural sand, had similar mechanical results, i.e., means were not statistically different at 5% significance level. There was a reduction in bulk density and an improved post-cracking behavior in the composites with coir pith particles compared to conventional mortar and to cement paste. These composites can be used for the production of lightweight, nonstructural building materials, according to the values of compressive strength (3.97-4.35 MPa) and low bulk density (0.99-1.26 g/cm(3)). PMID:24184526

  5. Effects of ceramic component on cephalexin release from bioactive bone cement consisting of Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin and bioactive glass ceramics.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, M; Fujita, H; Nakamura, T; Kokubo, T

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of amount of ceramic cement powder on drug release from bioactive bone cement. The associated bone-bonding strength was also investigated. The bioactive bone cement under investigation consisted of bisphenol-alpha-glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA), triethylene-glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) resin and a combination of apatite- and wollastonite-containing glass-ceramic (A-W GC) powder. A-W GC powder (50%, 70% and 80% w/w) containing 5% cephalexin (CEX) powder hardened within 5 min after mixing with Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin. The compressive strength of the cement with or without drug increased with increasing the amount of ceramic powder. The compressive strength of the 80% ceramic cement without the incorporation of cephalexin was 194 MPa. This compressive strength was about 3 times higher than that for polymethylmethacrylate cement. After the cement was implanted in the proximal metaphysis of the tibiae of male rabbits, the failure load for the cement was found to increase with increasing of the amount of ceramic powder. This finding suggested that the cement formed a bonding with bone. In vitro CEX release from bioactive bone cement pellets in a simulated body fluid at pH 7.25 and 37 degrees C continued for more than 2 weeks. Drug release profile followed the Higuchi equation initially, but not at later stages. The drug release rate increased with increasing amount of ceramic powder in the mixture. Since the pore volume of the cement increased with increasing of amount of ceramic powder, the drug diffused in the pores between the ceramics particle and polymer matrix. As hydroxyapatite precipitated on the cement surface, the drug release rate decreased, as observed at the later release stage. These results suggest that varying the amount of ceramic powder in the cement system could control the drug release rate from bioactive bone cement. PMID:11281575

  6. Resin infusion of layered metal/composite hybrid and resulting metal/composite hybrid laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Grimsley, Brian W. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method of fabricating a metal/composite hybrid laminate is provided. One or more layered arrangements are stacked on a solid base to form a layered structure. Each layered arrangement is defined by a fibrous material and a perforated metal sheet. A resin in its liquid state is introduced along a portion of the layered structure while a differential pressure is applied across the laminate structure until the resin permeates the fibrous material of each layered arrangement and fills perforations in each perforated metal sheet. The resin is cured thereby yielding a metal/composite hybrid laminate.

  7. Do blood contamination and haemostatic agents affect microtensile bond strength of dual cured resin cement to dentin?

    PubMed Central

    KİLİC, Kerem; ARSLAN, Soley; DEMETOGLU, Goknil Alkan; ZARARSIZ, Gokmen; KESİM, Bulent

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of blood contamination and haemostatic agents such as Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the microtensile bond strength between dual cured resin cement-dentin interface. Material and Methods: Twelve pressed lithium disilicate glass ceramics were luted to flat occlusal dentin surfaces with Panavia F under the following conditions: Control Group: no contamination, Group Blood: blood contamination, Group ABS: ABS contamination Group H2O2: H2O2 contamination. The specimens were sectioned to the beams and microtensile testing was carried out. Failure modes were classified under stereomicroscope. Two specimens were randomly selected from each group, and SEM analyses were performed. Results: There were significant differences in microtensile bond strengths (µTBS) between the control and blood-contaminated groups (p<0.05), whereas there were no significant differences found between the control and the other groups (p>0.05). Conclusions: Contamination by blood of dentin surface prior to bonding reduced the bond strength between resin cement and the dentin. Ankaferd Blood Stoper and H2O2 could be used safely as blood stopping agents during cementation of all-ceramics to dentin to prevent bond failure due to blood contamination. PMID:23559118

  8. Atraumatic Restoration of Vertical Food Impaction with an Open Contact Using Flowable Composite Resin Aided by Cerclage Wire under Tension

    PubMed Central

    Ying Cao, Chris; Xu, Qiang-Jian; Xu, Xiao-Hua; Yin, Jia-Li

    2016-01-01

    To date, treating vertical food impaction with open contact effectively, especially with an atraumatic therapy, remains a challenge. In this study, we developed a simple, atraumatic, and economic therapeutic measure to treat vertical food impaction. The scientific rationale of our therapeutic technique is to restore an intact and firm proximal contact with proper location and form relationships to prevent forceful interproximal wedging of food, which in turn protects interdental papilla. We performed the procedure using flowable composite resin or composite resin cement with the aid of a cerclage wire under tension to rebuild the contact area. The reported method is especially useful for some challenging clinical cases, such as food impaction after crown and inlay on onlay restoration, and some conventional treatment methods, such as contouring the marginal ridge and developmental grooves, are ineffective. PMID:27579217

  9. Atraumatic Restoration of Vertical Food Impaction with an Open Contact Using Flowable Composite Resin Aided by Cerclage Wire under Tension.

    PubMed

    Li, Quan-Li; Ying Cao, Chris; Xu, Qiang-Jian; Xu, Xiao-Hua; Yin, Jia-Li

    2016-01-01

    To date, treating vertical food impaction with open contact effectively, especially with an atraumatic therapy, remains a challenge. In this study, we developed a simple, atraumatic, and economic therapeutic measure to treat vertical food impaction. The scientific rationale of our therapeutic technique is to restore an intact and firm proximal contact with proper location and form relationships to prevent forceful interproximal wedging of food, which in turn protects interdental papilla. We performed the procedure using flowable composite resin or composite resin cement with the aid of a cerclage wire under tension to rebuild the contact area. The reported method is especially useful for some challenging clinical cases, such as food impaction after crown and inlay on onlay restoration, and some conventional treatment methods, such as contouring the marginal ridge and developmental grooves, are ineffective. PMID:27579217

  10. NON-POLLUTING COMPOSITES REPAIR AND REMANUFACTURING FOR MILITARY APPLICATIONS: CO-INJECTION RESIN TRANSFER MOLDING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) processes have been proven to be cost-effective manufacturing techniques for large composite structures. However, their use has been limited to single resin systems. A large variety of composite structures requires multiple resins to...

  11. Piezoelectric and bonding properties of a cement-based composite for dental application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Liu, Jinsong; Zhu, Jianguo; Ye, Yongmei; Li, Xiang; Chen, Zhiqing

    2008-11-01

    A cement-based piezoelectric composite was introduced as real-time health monitoring systems to dentin. Lithium sodium potassium niobate and zinc polycarboxylate cement were mixed and made piezoelectric under different poling conditions. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope confirmed the component and microstructure of the cement. The bonding force of the composites was compared to that of pure cement by analysis of variance. The optimum poling method was determined and the influencing factors of piezoelectric coefficient were discussed.

  12. Margin designs and fracture resistance of incisal resin composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Tan, D E; Tjan, A H

    1992-02-01

    This study measured the resistance to fracture of Class IV resin composite restorations prepared with either butt joints, bevels, or chamfer margins. Seventy extracted intact, non-carious maxillary central incisors, of approximately the same size, were collected and randomly divided into the following seven groups: 90 degrees butt joint (control)), 1 and 2 mm 45 degrees bevels, 1 and 2 mm 60 degrees bevels, and 1 and 2 mm chamfer margins. The teeth were restored with a hybrid resin composite and tested in an Instron Universal testing machine in a compressive mode at 45 degrees to the long axis. Statistical analysis indicated that there were no significant differences between the control group and any of the 1 mm bevel or chamfer margins and that the 2 mm bevel and chamfer margins yielded the highest fracture resistance. PMID:1524737

  13. Replacement of Anterior Composite Resin Restorations Using Conservative Ceramics for Occlusal and Periodontal Rehabilitation: An 18-Month Clinical Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Prochnow, Rayane Alexandra; Costacurta, Adriana Osten; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Correr, Gisele Maria

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes a patient with discolored and fractured composite resin restorations on the anterior teeth in whom substitution was indicated. After wax-up and mock-up, the composite was removed and replaced with minimally invasive ceramic laminates. An established and predictable protocol was performed using resin cement. Minimally invasive ceramic restorations are increasingly being used to replace composite restorations. This treatment improves the occlusal and periodontal aspects during the planning and restorative phases, such as anterior guides, and laterality can be restored easily with ceramic laminates. In addition, the surface smoothness and contour of ceramic restorations do not affect the health of the surrounding periodontal tissues. Here we present the outcome after 18 months of clinical follow-up in a patient in whom composite resin restorations in the anterior teeth were replaced with minimally invasive ceramic laminates. PMID:27555970

  14. Replacement of Anterior Composite Resin Restorations Using Conservative Ceramics for Occlusal and Periodontal Rehabilitation: An 18-Month Clinical Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Prochnow, Rayane Alexandra; Costacurta, Adriana Osten; Correr, Gisele Maria

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes a patient with discolored and fractured composite resin restorations on the anterior teeth in whom substitution was indicated. After wax-up and mock-up, the composite was removed and replaced with minimally invasive ceramic laminates. An established and predictable protocol was performed using resin cement. Minimally invasive ceramic restorations are increasingly being used to replace composite restorations. This treatment improves the occlusal and periodontal aspects during the planning and restorative phases, such as anterior guides, and laterality can be restored easily with ceramic laminates. In addition, the surface smoothness and contour of ceramic restorations do not affect the health of the surrounding periodontal tissues. Here we present the outcome after 18 months of clinical follow-up in a patient in whom composite resin restorations in the anterior teeth were replaced with minimally invasive ceramic laminates. PMID:27555970

  15. High temperature resistant composites from bismaleimide resin.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J.; Rosser, R. W.; Parker, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    It is shown that bismaleimide/woven fiberglass composites molded at moderate pressures (100 psi) yield void-free laminates of good integrity. The strength of the laminates at room temperature compares favorably with epoxy/glass laminates; at 260 C, the laminates are far superior in oxidative aging to epoxy and silicon laminates. The synthesis, processing, and fabrication of a bismaleide polymer are discussed.

  16. EFFECTS OF POLISHING PROCEDURES ON COLOR STABILITY OF COMPOSITE RESINS

    PubMed Central

    Güler, Ahmet Umut; Güler, Eda; Yücel, Ali Çagin; ERTA§, Ertan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different polishing methods on color stability of posterior, universal and nanohybrid composite resin restorative materials upon exposure to a staining agent. Twenty-five specimens were prepared for each of 5 different composite resins (Filtek Z250, Filtek P60, Quadrant LC, Grandio and Filtek Supreme). Specimens were divided into 5 groups and different polishing procedures, including polishing discs (Pd), polishing discs then diamond polishing paste (PdP), polishing discs then a liquid polishing system (Biscover) (PdB), and combinations of these (PdPB) were used. Unpolished specimens served as the control (C). The specimens were stored for 48 h in a coffee solution. The color of all specimens was measured before and after exposure with a colorimeter, and total color change ∆E*) were calculated. The data were analyzed with a two-way ANOVA and the means were compared by Tukey HSD test (α=0.05). The lowest color difference was observed in the groups PdP and C, while the highest color difference was observed in PdPB, and PdB. When comparing the five different restorative materials, no significant difference was observed between FiltekP60 and FiltekZ250, and these materials demonstrated significantly less color change than Quadrant LC and the nanohybrid materials (Grandio, Filtek Supreme). The posterior (Filtek P60) and universal (Filtek Z250) composite resin restorative materials, which do not contain tetraethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA), were found to be less stainable than the nanohybrid (Grandio, Filtek Supreme) and universal (Quadrant LC) composite resins, which contain TEGDMA. The use of diamond polishing paste after polishing with polishing discs significantly decreased staining when compared to the groups that used polishing discs alone, for all restorative materials tested. The highest color change values were obtained for the specimens that were polished with the Biscover liquid polish system

  17. Microleakage in class V gingiva-shaded composite resin restorations

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Claudio; Chiesa, Marco; Dagna, Alberto; Colombo, Marco; Scribante, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Summary The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microleakage in Class V cavities restored with a new gingiva-shaded microhybrid composite resin and with a conventional microhybrid composite resin using three different dentin bonding systems (DBS). Class V cavities were prepared in sixty freshly extracted human teeth with the incisal margin in enamel and the apical margin in dentin/cementum. Restored specimens, after thermocycling, were placed in 2% methylene blue solution for 24 hours. Longitudinal sections were obtained and studied with a stereomicroscope for assessment of the microleakage according to degree of dye penetration (scale 0–3). Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis test and with Mann-Whitney U-test. In this study there was no leakage in enamel: all the cavities showed no dye penetration at the incisal margins (located in enamel). None of the DBS used eliminated microleakage in apical margins (located in dentin or cementum): three-step total-etch and single-step self-etch were more effective in reducing microleakage in dentin margins when compared with two-step total-etch. This in vitro study concluded that microleakage in Class V cavities restored with the composite resins tested is similar. PMID:22783451

  18. Repair bond strength of restorative resin composite applied to fiber-reinforced composite substrate.

    PubMed

    Tezvergil, Arzu; Lassila, Lippo V J; Yli-Urpo, Antti; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2004-02-01

    Delamination or fracture of composite veneers can occur as a result of improper design of the fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) framework. This in vitro study tested the repair bond strength of restorative composite to aged FRC. The substrate was multiphase polymer matrix FRC (everStick) aged by boiling for 8 h and storing at 37 degrees C in water for 6 weeks. The aged substrate surfaces were wet-ground flat with 1200-grit silicon carbide paper and subjected randomly to 5 different surface treatments: 1) An adhesion primer (Composite Activator) and resin (CA), 2) Silane (EspeSil) and resin (SIL-MP), 3) Silane, adhesive primer, and resin (Clearfil Repair) (CF), 4) Air particle-abrading (CoJet), silane, and resin (CJ-SIL-MP), 5) Resin (Scotchbond Multipurpose Resin) only as control (MP). Restorative composite resin (Z250) was added to the substrate in 2 mm layer increments and light-cured. Subsequently, every surface treatment group was divided into 2 subgroups of 12 specimens each. The specimens were either 48 h water-stored or thermocycled (6000 x 5-55 degrees C). The shear bond strengths of composite resin to FRC were measured at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. The data were analyzed by ANOVA for factors 'treatment type' and 'storage condition'; Tukey's post-hoc tests and Weibull analysis were performed. ANOVA showed a significant difference as a function of surface treatment (P<0.05) and storage condition (P<0.05). The CJ-SIL-MP group showed highest bond strength and Weibull modulus after thermocycling. Repair of multiphase polymer matrix FRC may show reliable bond strength when silane treatment is used along with air-particle abrading. PMID:15124783

  19. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of a Novel Resin-Based Pulp Capping Material Containing the Quaternary Ammonium Salt MAE-DB and Portland Cement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongchen; Zhou, Wei; Ban, Jinghao; Wei, Jingjing; Liu, Yan; Gao, Jing; Chen, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    Background Vital pulp preservation in the treatment of deep caries is challenging due to bacterial infection. The objectives of this study were to synthesize a novel, light-cured composite material containing bioactive calcium-silicate (Portland cement, PC) and the antimicrobial quaternary ammonium salt monomer 2-methacryloxylethyl dodecyl methyl ammonium bromide (MAE-DB) and to evaluate its effects on Streptococcus mutans growth in vitro. Methods The experimental material was prepared from a 2∶1 ratio of PC mixed with a resin of 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate, bisphenol glycerolate dimethacrylate, and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (4∶3∶1) containing 5 wt% MAE-DB. Cured resin containing 5% MAE-DB without PC served as the positive control material, and resin without MAE-DB or PC served as the negative control material. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium hydroxide (Dycal) served as commercial controls. S. mutans biofilm formation on material surfaces and growth in the culture medium were tested according to colony-forming units (CFUs) and metabolic activity after 24 h incubation over freshly prepared samples or samples aged in water for 6 months. Biofilm formation was also assessed by Live/Dead staining and scanning electron microscopy. Results S. mutans biofilm formation on the experimental material was significantly inhibited, with CFU counts, metabolic activity, viability staining, and morphology similar to those of biofilms on the positive control material. None of the materials affected bacterial growth in solution. Contact-inhibition of biofilm formation was retained by the aged experimental material. Significant biofilm formation was observed on MTA and Dycal. Conclusion The synthesized material containing HEMA-BisGMA-TEGDMA resin with MAE-DB as the antimicrobial agent and PC to support mineralized tissue formation inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation even after aging in water for 6 months, but had no inhibitory effect on bacteria in solution

  20. Stabilization of geothermal residues by encapsulation in polymer concrete and portland cement mortar composites

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, R.P.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1987-11-01

    Presented are the results from the preliminary phase of a laboratory test program conducted to identify and evaluate materials for converting hazardous geothermal residues to a non-hazardous and potentially usable form. Laboratory test results indicate that geothermal residues can be effectively incorporated, as a fine aggregate, into polymer concrete (PC) and portland cement mortar (PCM) composites. PC composites made using an emulsifiable polyester resin and a methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based monomer system exhibited compressive strengths varying between 3700 and 16,500 psi (25.5 and 113.8 MPa), depending upon the type of binder used and the moisture content of the residue. Waste extraction tests (WET) performed on ground samples of the composites indicate elemental levels of leachable heavy metals are below specified soluble threshold limit concentrations (STLC), thereby allowing the composites to be classified as non-hazardous. PCM composites exhibited compressive strengths varying between 2875 and 5530 psi (19.8 and 38.1 MPa), depending upon the type, amount and moisture content of the residue. WET analysis indicates that all but one of the PCM composites evaluated can be classified as non-hazardous. 8 tabs.

  1. Degree of conversion of two dual-cured resin cements light-irradiated through zirconia ceramic disks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kim, Young-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic study was to measure the degree of conversion (DC) of dual-cured resin cements light-irradiated through zirconia ceramic disks with different thicknesses using various light-curing methods. MATERIALS AND METHODS Zirconia ceramic disks (KT12) with three different thicknesses (1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 mm) were prepared. The light transmittance of the disks was measured using ultraviolet visible near-infrared spectroscopy. Four different light-curing protocols were used by combining two curing light modes (Elipar TriLight (standard mode) and bluephase G2 (high power mode)) with light-exposure times of 40 and 120 seconds. The DCs of the two dual-cured resin cements (Duo-Link and Panavia F2.0) light-irradiated through the disks was analyzed at three time intervals (3, 7, and 10 minutes) by FTIR spectroscopy. The data was analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA (α=.05).Two-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test were used to analyze the 10 minute DC results. RESULTS The 1.0 mm thick disk exhibited low light transmittance (<25%), and the transmittance decreased considerably with increasing disk thickness. All groups exhibited significantly higher 10 minute DC values than the 3 or 7 minute values (P<.05), but some exceptions were observed in Duo-Link. Two-way ANOVA revealed that the influence of the zirconia disk thickness on the 10 minute DC was dependent on the light-curing methods (P<.001). This finding was still valid even at 4.0 mm thickness, where substantial light attenuation took place. CONCLUSION The curing of the dual-cured resin cements was affected significantly by the light-curing technique, even though the additional chemical polymerization mechanism worked effectively. PMID:24353887

  2. Scanning electron microscopic study of teeth restored with fiber posts and composite resin: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Sridhara, K. S.; Mankar, Sunil; Jayshankar, C. M.; Vinaya, K.

    2014-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to compare and evaluate the thickness of resin dentin interface zones (RDIZ) obtained by luting carbon fiber post to intra-radicular dentin, either with All-Bond 2 bonding agent and C and B composite cement or Panavia F dentin-bonding system and Panavia F resin cement. Materials and Methods: Twenty single rooted mandibular premolars of similar sizes were prepared for the carbon fiber post after biomechanical preparation and obturation. They were divided into two groups, Group 1 and 2 of 10 samples each. Carbon fiber posts used for Group 1 samples were luted using All-Bond 2 and C and B cement. For Group 2 carbon fiber posts were luted using Panavia F dentin-bonding system and Panavia F resin cement. All the 20 samples were sectioned longitudinally and marked at three points on the length of the tooth from the dentin-core interface to the apex at 2 mm, 5 mm, and 8 mm to get coronal, middle, and apical areas, respectively. The formation and thickness (width) of the RDIZ at the marked areas was evaluated by scanning electron microscope using ×1000 magnification. The results were statistical analyzed. Results: Irrespective of the adhesive systems used all specimens showed a RDIZ formation. Microscopic examination of Group 1 showed significantly higher percentage of RDIZ (P < 0.05) than Group 2. RDIZ morphology was easily detectable at coronal and middle areas of all specimens. Conclusion: All-Bond 2 showed denser and wider RDIZ compared with the Panavia F. PMID:25210390

  3. Biocompatibility of a restorative resin-modified glass ionomer cement applied in very deep cavities prepared in human teeth.

    PubMed

    Soares, Diana Gabriela; Basso, Fernanda Gonçalves; Scheffel, Débora Lopes Sales; Giro, Elisa Maria Aparecida; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto; Hebling, Josimeri

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated whether a restorative resin-modified glass ionomer cement, Vitremer (VM), would be biocompatible with pulp tissue when used as a liner in very deep cavities prepared in young human permanent teeth. Two dental cements in current use as liner materials, Vitrebond (VB) and Dycal (DY), were compared to VM. Class V cavities were prepared in 36 sound premolars that were scheduled for extraction, and the cavity floor was lined with the restorative cement (VM) or a liner/base control cement (VB or DY). For VM specimens, the cavity floor was pretreated with a primer (polyacrylic acid plus 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate). Teeth were extracted after 7 or 30 days and processed for microscopic evaluation. In the VM group, inward diffusion of dental material components through dentinal tubules, associated with disruption of the odontoblastic layer, moderate to intense inflammatory response, and resorption of inner dentin, was observed in 2 teeth at 7 days. These histologic features were observed in 1 tooth at 30 days. In the VB group, mild inflammatory reactions and tissue disorganization observed at 7 days were resolved at 30 days. No pulpal damage occurred in the DY specimens. Of the materials tested, only Vitremer was not considered biocompatible, because it caused persistent pulpal damage when applied in very deep cavities (remaining dentin thickness less than 0.3 mm). PMID:27367631

  4. The Effect of Surface Roughness on Repair Bond Strength of Light-Curing Composite Resin to Polymer Composite Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Kallio, Timo T.; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Lassila, Lippo V.J.; Vallittu, Pekka K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to analyze the shear bond strength of a new composite resin to polymer-based composite substrates using various surface roughnesses and two kinds of polymer matrices. Materials and methods: Particulate filler composite resin with cross-linked polymer matrix and fiber-reinforced composite with semi-interpenetrating polymer matrix were used as bonding substrates after being ground to different roughnesses. Substrates were aged in water for one week before bonding to new resin composites. Twelve specimens in the substrate groups were ground with grinding papers of four grits; 320, 800, 1200 and 2400. Results: Corresponding values of surface roughness (Ra) varied from 0.09 to 0.40 for the particulate filler composite resin and 0.07 to 0.96 for the fiber-reinforced composite resin. Characteristic shear bond strength between the new resin and particulate filler composite resin was highest (27.8 MPa) with the roughest surface (Weibull modulus: 2.085). Fiber-reinforced composite showed the highest bond strength (20.8 MPa) with the smoothest surface (Weibull modulus: 4.713). Conclusions: We concluded that surface roughness did not increase the bonding of new resin to the substrate of IPN based fiber-reinforced composite, whereas the roughness contributed to bonding the new resin to the particulate filler composite resin with a cross-linked polymer matrix. PMID:24167536

  5. An effect of immediate dentin sealing on the shear bond strength of resin cement to porcelain restoration

    PubMed Central

    Cho, In-Ho

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to determine differences in shear bond strength to human dentin using immediate dentin sealing (IDS) technique compared to delayed dentin sealing (DDS). MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty extracted human molars were divided into 4 groups with 10 teeth each. The control group was light-cured after application of dentin bonding agent (Excite® DSC) and cemented with Variolink® II resin cement. IDS/SE (immediate dentin sealing, Clearfil™ SE Bond) and IDS/SB (immediate dentin sealing, AdapterTM Single Bond 2) were light-cured after application of dentin bonding agent (Clearfil™ SE Bond and Adapter™ Sing Bond 2, respectively), whereas DDS specimens were not treated with any dentin bonding agent. Specimens were cemented with Variolink® II resin cement. Dentin bonding agent (Excite® DSC) was left unpolymerized until the application of porcelain restoration. Shear strength was measured using a universal testing machine at a speed of 5 mm/min and evaluated of fracture using an optical microscope. RESULTS The mean shear bond strengths of control group and IDS/SE group were not statistically different from another at 14.86 and 11.18 MPa. Bond strength of IDS/SE group had a significantly higher mean than DDS group (3.14 MPa) (P < .05). There were no significance in the mean shear bond strength between IDS/SB (4.11 MPa) and DDS group. Evaluation of failure patterns indicates that most failures in the control group and IDS/SE groups were mixed, whereas failures in the DDS were interfacial. CONCLUSION When preparing teeth for indirect ceramic restoration, IDS with Clearfil™ SE Bond results in improved shear bond strength compared with DDS. PMID:21165186

  6. The effect of resin cements and primer on retentive force of zirconia copings bonded to zirconia abutments with insufficient retention

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Mi; Yoon, Ji-Young; Lee, Myung-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of resin cements and primer on the retentive force of zirconia copings bonded to zirconia abutments with insufficient retention. MATERIALS AND METHODS Zirconia blocks (Lava, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) were obtained and forty sets of zirconia abutments and copings were fabricated using CAD/CAM technology. They were grouped into 4 categories as follows, depending on the types of resin cements used, and whether the primer is applied or not:Panavia F2.0 (P), Panavia F2.0 using Primer (PRIME Plus, Bisco Inc, Schaumburg, IL, USA) (PZ), Superbond C&B (S), and Superbond C&B using Primer (SZ). For each of the groups, the cementation was conducted. The specimens were kept in sterilized water (37℃) for 24 hours. Retentive forces were tested and measured, and a statistical analysis was carried out. The nature of failure was recorded. RESULTS The means and standard deviations of retentive force in Newton for each group were 265.15 ± 35.04 N (P), 318.21 ± 22.24 N (PZ), 445.13 ± 78.54 N (S) and 508.21 ± 79.48 N (SZ). Superbond C&B groups (S & SZ) showed significantly higher retentive force than Panavia F2.0 groups (P & PZ). In Panavia F2.0 groups, the use of primer was found to contribute to the increase of retentive force. On the other hand, in Superbond C&B groups, the use of primer did not influence the retention forces. Adhesive failure was observed in all groups. CONCLUSION This study suggests that cementation of the zirconia abutments and zirconia copings with Superbond C&B have a higher retentive force than Panavia F2.0. When using Panavia F2.0, the use of primer increases the retentive force. PMID:23755347

  7. Probing the microstructure and water phases in composite cement blends

    SciTech Connect

    Gorce, Jean-Philippe . E-mail: j.gorce@sheffield.ac.uk; Milestone, Neil B.

    2007-03-15

    {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry has been used in combination with the more conventional techniques of mercury intrusion porosimetry, freeze-drying and thermogravimetric analysis to investigate the evolution of the microstructure and the distribution of water phases in two composite cement blends hydrating over a one year period. These two blends are composed of high substitution of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) with Blast Furnace Slag (BFS) at level of 75 wt.% (3:1 blend) and 90 wt.% (9:1 blend). After one year, the 3:1 blend microstructure is characterised by poorly interconnected gel pores filled with about 35 vol.% of water while less than 4 vol.% of water is trapped in remaining capillary pores. The 9:1 blend microstructure is characterised by a network of larger gel and capillary pores filled with about 21 and 22 vol.% of water respectively. Further hydration is ruled out for this blend.

  8. Double Vacuum Bag Process for Resin Matrix Composite Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Tan-Hung (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A double vacuum bag molding assembly with improved void management and laminate net shape control which provides a double vacuum enviromnent for use in fabricating composites from prepregs containing air and/or volatiles such as reactive resin matrix composites or composites from solvent containing prepregs with non-reactive resins matrices. By using two vacuum environments during the curing process, a vacuum can be drawn during a B-stage of a two-step cycle without placing the composite under significant relative pressure. During the final cure stage, a significant pressure can be applied by releasing the vacuum in one of the two environments. Inner and outer bags are useful for creating the two vacuum environments with a perforated tool intermediate the two. The composite is placed intermediate a tool plate and a caul plate in the first environment with the inner bag and tool plate defining the first environment. The second environment is characterized by the outer bag which is placed over the inner bag and the tool plate.

  9. Electron Beam Cured Epoxy Resin Composites for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dorsey, George F.; Havens, Stephen J.; Lopata, Vincent J.; Meador, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    Electron beam curing of Polymer Matrix Composites (PMC's) is a nonthermal, nonautoclave curing process that has been demonstrated to be a cost effective and advantageous alternative to conventional thermal curing. Advantages of electron beam curing include: reduced manufacturing costs; significantly reduced curing times; improvements in part quality and performance; reduced environmental and health concerns; and improvement in material handling. In 1994 a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners, was established to advance the electron beam curing of PMC technology. Over the last several years a significant amount of effort within the CRADA has been devoted to the development and optimization of resin systems and PMCs that match the performance of thermal cured composites. This highly successful materials development effort has resulted in a board family of high performance, electron beam curable cationic epoxy resin systems possessing a wide range of excellent processing and property profiles. Hundreds of resin systems, both toughened and untoughened, offering unlimited formulation and processing flexibility have been developed and evaluated in the CRADA program.

  10. Dual resin bonded joints in polyetheretherketone (PEEK) matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenak, Steve; Radford, Donald W.; Dean, Michael W.

    1993-04-01

    The paper describes applications of the dual resin (miscible polymer) bonding technique (Smiley, 1989) developed as an alternative to traditional bonding approaches to joining thermoplastic matrix composite subassemblies into structures. In the experiments, the performance of joint geometries, such as those that could be used to assemble large truss structures in space, are investigated using truss joint models consisting of woven carbon fiber/PEEK tubes of about 1 mm wall thickness. Specific process conditions and hand-held hardware used to apply heat and pressure were chosen to simulate a field asembly technique. Results are presented on tube/cruciform double lap shear tests, pinned-pinned tube compression tests, and single lap shear bond tests of joints obtained using the dual resin bonding technique.

  11. Adhesive and composite evaluation of acetylene-terminated phenylquinoxaline resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    A series of acetylene-terminated phenylquinoxaline (ATPQ) oligomers of various molecular weights were prepared and subsequently chain extended by the thermally induced reaction of the ethynyl groups. The processability and thermal properties of these oligomers and their cured resins were compared with that of a relatively high molecular weight linear polyphenylquinoxaline (PPQ) with the same chemical backbone. The ATPQ oligomers exhibited significantly better processability than the linear PPQ but the PPQ displayed substantially better thermooxidative stability. Adhesive (Ti/Ti) and composite (graphite filament reinforcement) work was performed to evaluate the potential of these materials for structural applications. The PPQ exhibited better retention of adhesive and laminate properties than the ATPQ resins at 260 C after aging for 500 hr at 260 C in circulating air.

  12. Properties of lightweight cement-based composites containing waste polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Záleská, Martina; Pavlíková, Milena; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-07-01

    Improvement of buildings thermal stability represents an increasingly important trend of the construction industry. This work aims to study the possible use of two types of waste polypropylene (PP) for the development of lightweight cement-based composites with enhanced thermal insulation function. Crushed PP waste originating from the PP tubes production is used for the partial replacement of silica sand by 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 mass%, whereas a reference mixture without plastic waste is studied as well. First, basic physical and thermal properties of granular PP random copolymer (PPR) and glass fiber reinforced PP (PPGF) aggregate are studied. For the developed composite mixtures, basic physical, mechanical, heat transport and storage properties are accessed. The obtained results show that the composites with incorporated PP aggregate exhibit an improved thermal insulation properties and acceptable mechanical resistivity. This new composite materials with enhanced thermal insulation function are found to be promising materials for buildings subsoil or floor structures.

  13. Evaluation of the Bond Strength of Resin Cements Used to Lute Ceramics on Laser-Etched Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Duzdar, Lale; Oksuz, Mustafa; Tanboga, Ilknur

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of two different adhesive resin cements used to lute ceramics on laser-etched dentin. Background data: Erbium, chromium: yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser irradiation has been claimed to improve the adhesive properties of dentin, but results to date have been controversial, and its compatibility with existing adhesive resin cements has not been conclusively determined. Materials and methods: Two adhesive cements, one “etch-and-rinse” [Variolink II (V)] and one “self-etch” [Clearfil Esthetic Cement (C)] luting cement, were used to lute ceramic blocks (Vita Celay Blanks, Vita) onto dentin surfaces. In total, 80 dentin specimens were distributed randomly into eight experimental groups according to the dentin surface-etching technique used Er,Cr:YSGG laser and Er:YAG laser: (1) 37% orthophosphoric acid+V (control group), (2) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+V, (3) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+acid+V, (4) Er:YAG laser+V, (5) Er:YAG laser+acid+V, (6) C, (7) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+C, and (8) Er:YAG laser+C. Following these applications, the ceramic discs were bonded to prepared surfaces and were shear loaded in a universal testing machine until fracture. SBS was recorded for each group in MPa. Shear test values were evaluated statistically using the Mann–Whitney U test. Results: No statistically significant differences were evident between the control group and the other groups (p>0.05). The Er,Cr:YSGG laser+A+V group demonstrated significantly higher SBS than did the Er,Cr:YSGG laser+V group (p=0.034). The Er,Cr:YSGG laser+C and Er:YAG laser+C groups demonstrated significantly lower SBS than did the C group (p<0.05). Conclusions: Dentin surfaces prepared with lasers may provide comparable ceramic bond strengths, depending upon the adhesive cement used. PMID:24992276

  14. Effect of Light Intensity on the Degree of Conversion of Dual-cured Resin Cement at Different Depths with the use of Translucent Fiber Posts

    PubMed Central

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Mohammadi, Narmin; Saati Khosroshahi, Elmira

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of different light intensities on the degree of conversion (DC) of dual-cured resin cement at different depths of translucent fiber posts. Materials and Methods: Thirty translucent fiber posts were randomly assigned into three (n=10) groups. They were cemented in the simulated canal spaces using Duo-Link dual-cured resin cement. The cement was light-cured under 600, 800 and 1100 mW/cm2 light intensities for 40 seconds. DC of the resin cement was calculated at cervical, middle and apical thirds using the spectra of FT-Raman spectrometer. Data were analyzed by repeated measurement ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc tests (α=0.05). Results: In all the groups, the least DC was obtained at the apical region. There were no significant differences in the DC with different light intensities between the cervical and middle regions (p>0.05). However, in the apical region, the DC in both 800 and 1100 mw/cm2 was similar (p>0.05), but greater with 600 mW/cm2 light intensity (p=0.02 and p<0.001, respectively). Conclusion: In comparison with the light intensity of 600 mW/cm2, the light intensity of 800 mW/cm2 significantly increased the DC of dual-cured resin cement in the apical region. However, DC was not significantly different between 800 and 1100 mw/cm2 light intensities. If the resin cement, especially in the apical areas is not sufficiently cured, microleakage might increase and post retention might be jeopardized. In comparison with 600 mW/cm2 light intensity, 800 mW/cm2 significantly increases DC at the apical third that might be clinically beneficial. PMID:25628659

  15. Shear Bond Strength of a Resin Cement to Different Alloys Subjected to Various Surface Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Tabari, Kasra; Jaberi Ansari, Zahra; Torabzadeh, Hassan; Kharrazi fard, Mohammad Javad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Micromechanical retention of resin cements to alloys is an important factor affecting the longevity of metal base restorations. This study aimed to compare the bond strength and etching pattern of a newly introduced experimental etchant gel namely Nano Met Etch with those of conventional surface treatment techniques for nickel-chrome (Ni-Cr) and high noble alloys. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 discs (8×10×15 mm) were cast with Ni-Cr (n=20), high noble BegoStar (n=50) and gold coin alloys (n=50). Their Surfaces were ground with abrasive papers. Ni-Cr specimens received sandblasting and etching. High noble alloy specimens (BegoStar and gold coin) received sandblasting, sandblasting-alloy primer, etching, etch-alloy primer and alloy primer alone. Cylindrical specimens of Panavia were bonded to surfaces using Tygon tubes. Specimens were subjected to micro-shear bond strength testing after storing at 37°C for 24 hours. Results: In gold coin group, the highest bond strength was achieved after sandblasting (25.82±1.37MPa, P<0.001) and etching+alloy primer (26.60 ± 5.47 MPa, P<0.01). The lowest bond strength belonged to sandblasting+alloy primer (17.79±2.96MPa, P<0.01). In BegoStar group, the highest bond strength was obtained in the sandblasted group (38.40±3.29MPa, P<0.001) while the lowest bond strength was detected in the sandblast+ alloy primer group (15.38±2.92MPa, P<0.001). For the Ni-Cr alloy, bond strength in the etched group (20.79±2.01MPa) was higher than that in the sandblasted group (18.25±1.82MPa) (P<0.01). Conclusions: For the Ni-Cr alloy, etching was more efficient than sandblasting but for the high noble alloys, higher Au content increased the efficacy of etching. PMID:27536326

  16. Filament winding S-glass/polyimide resin composite processing studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Jones, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The work performed in selecting a TRW A-type polyimide resin that would be suitable for fabrication of filament wound reinforced plastic structures is described. Several different formulations were evaluated after which the P105AC formulation was selected as the most promising. Procedures then were developed for preparing P105AC/S-glass roving prepreg and for fabricating filament wound structural composites. Composites were fabricated and then tested in order to obtain tensile and shear strength information. Small, closed-end cylindrical pressure vessels then were fabricated using a stainless steel liner and end fittings with a P105AC/S-glass polar wound overwrap. These pressure vessels were cured in an air circulating oven without augmented pressure. It is concluded that the P105AC resin system is suitable for filament winding; that low void content, high strength composites are obtained by the filament winding process; and that augmented pressure is not required to effect the fabrication of filament wound P105AC composites.

  17. Thermal stability relationships between PMR-15 resin and its composites

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, K.J.; Jayne, D.; Leonhardt, T.A.; Bors, D.

    1993-10-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the relationship between the thermo-oxidative stability of PMR-15 matrix resin and the stability of graphite-fiber-reinforced composites that contain this resin as the matrix material. Three areas were investigated. The first was the effect of fiber/matrix interfacial bond strength on the isothermal aging weight loss of composites. By using type-A graphite fibers produced by Hercules, it was possible to study composites reinforced with fibers that were processed to receive different surface treatments. One of the fibers was untreated, a second fiber was treated by oxidation to enhance fiber/matrix bonding, and the third type of fiber was coated with an epoxy sizing. These treatments produced three significantly different interfacial bond strengths. The epoxy sizing on the third fiber was quickly oxidized from the bare fiber surfaces at 288, 316, and 343 C. The weight loss due to the removal of the sizing was constant at 1.5 percent. This initial weight loss was not observed in thermo-oxidative stability studies of composites. The PMR-15 matrix satisfactorily protected the reinforcemnt at all three temperatures.

  18. Thermal stability relationships between PMR-15 resin and its composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Jayne, Douglas; Leonhardt, Todd A.; Bors, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the relationship between the thermo-oxidative stability of PMR-15 matrix resin and the stability of graphite-fiber-reinforced composites that contain this resin as the matrix material. Three areas were investigated. The first was the effect of fiber/matrix interfacial bond strength on the isothermal aging weight loss of composites. By using type-A graphite fibers produced by Hercules, it was possible to study composites reinforced with fibers that were processed to receive different surface treatments. One of the fibers was untreated, a second fiber was treated by oxidation to enhance fiber/matrix bonding, and the third type of fiber was coated with an epoxy sizing. These treatments produced three significantly different interfacial bond strengths. The epoxy sizing on the third fiber was quickly oxidized from the bare fiber surfaces at 288, 316, and 343 C. The weight loss due to the removal of the sizing was constant at 1.5 percent. This initial weight loss was not observed in thermo-oxidative stability studies of composites. The PMR-15 matrix satisfactorily protected the reinforcemnt at all three temperatures.

  19. Morphological properties of surface-treated carbon nanotubes in cement-based composites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baomin; Han, Yu; Zhang, Tingting

    2012-11-01

    The morphological properties of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) reinforced Portland cement composites were investigated. MWCNTs with addition of up to 0.15 wt% of cement were incorporated to Portland cement with a water to cement ratio of 0.35. The porosity and pore size distribution of the composites were measured by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), and the results indicate that the cement doped with MWCNTs obtained lower porosity and concentrated pore size distribution. The microstructure was analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). It is shown that MWCNTs act as bridges and networks across cracks and voids. PMID:23421224

  20. 21 CFR 888.3490 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non... § 888.3490 Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis is a...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3490 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non... § 888.3490 Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis is a...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3500 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi... § 888.3500 Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3490 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non... § 888.3490 Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis is a...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3500 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi... § 888.3500 Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3500 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi... § 888.3500 Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3500 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi... § 888.3500 Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3490 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non... § 888.3490 Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis is a...

  8. Monkey pulpal responses to conventional and adhesive luting cements.

    PubMed

    Inokoshi, S; Fujitani, M; Otsuki, M; Sonoda, H; Kitasako, Y; Shimada, Y; Tagami, J

    1998-01-01

    Monkey pulpal responses to metal inlays luted with a combination of an adhesive resin and luting composite and conventional dental cements were histopathologically evaluated. Initial pulpal responses caused by re-exposure of the cut dentin surfaces and luting procedure under hydraulic pressure subsided at 90 days after final cementation. There was no significant difference among pulpal reactions to conventional dental cements and a combination of an adhesive resin and luting composite. The adhesive resin coating of freshly cut dentinal walls/floors immediately after cavity preparation seems to provide protection for the dentin and pulp in indirect restorations requiring temporary sealing. PMID:9610329

  9. The erosion kinetics of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cements in acidic buffer solutions.

    PubMed

    Hazar-Yoruc, Binnaz; Bavbek, Andac Barkin; Özcan, Mutlu

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the erosion kinetics of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cements in acidic buffer solutions as a function of time. Disc shaped specimens were prepared from conventional (Ketac-Cem: KTC) and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (Fuji Plus: FP) and immersed in three acidic buffer solutions (0.01 M) namely, acetic acid/sodium acetate (AA(B)), lactic acid/sodium lactate (LA(B)) and citric acid/sodium citrate (CA(B)) with a constant pH of 4.1 and stored for 1, 8, 24, 48, 80, 120 and 168 h. F concentration was determined using ion-specific electrode. Si, Ca and Al concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Ca, Al, Si and F solubility rates in both FP and KTC were the highest in CA(B) solution. The erosion rates of both FP and KTC in all buffer solutions increased as a function of immersion time. The amount of F eluted from FP was more than that of KTC. The total amount of elements released from FP was less than KTC in all solutions. PMID:23207217

  10. The use of EAF dust in cement composites: assessment of environmental impact.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Tina; Milacic, Radmila; Murko, Simona; Vahcic, Mitja; Mladenovic, Ana; Suput, Jerneja Strupi; Scancar, Janez

    2009-07-15

    Electric arc filter dust (EAF dust) is a waste by-product which occurs in the production of steel. Instead of being disposed of, it can be used in cement composites for civil engineering, and for balances in washing machines. To estimate the environmental impact of the use of EAF dust in cement composites leachability tests based on diffusion were performed using water and salt water as leaching agents. Compact and ground cement composites, and cement composites with addition of 1.5% of EAF dust by mass were studied. The concentrations of total Cr and Cr(VI) were determined in leachates over a time period of 175 days. At the end of the experiment the concentrations of some other metals were also determined in leachates. The results indicated that Cr in leachates was present almost solely in its hexavalent form. No leaching of Cr(VI) was observed in aqueous leachates from compact cement composites and compact cement composites to which different quantities of EAF dust have been added. In ground cement composites and in ground cement composites with addition of EAF dust, Cr(VI) was leached with water in very low concentrations up to 5 microg L(-1). Cr(VI) concentrations were higher in salt water leachates. In compact and ground cement composites with addition of EAF dust Cr(VI) concentrations were 40 and 100 microg L(-1), respectively. It was experimentally found that addition of EAF dust had almost no influence on leaching of Cr(VI) from cement composites. Leaching of Cr(VI) originated primarily from cement. Leaching of other metals from composites investigated did not represent an environmental burden. From the physico-mechanical and environmental aspects EAF dust can be used as a component in cement mixtures. PMID:19097693

  11. Characterization of a new composite PMMA-HA/Brushite bone cement for spinal augmentation.

    PubMed

    Aghyarian, Shant; Rodriguez, Lucas C; Chari, Jonathan; Bentley, Elizabeth; Kosmopoulos, Victor; Lieberman, Isador H; Rodrigues, Danieli C

    2014-11-01

    Calcium phosphate fillers have been shown to increase cement osteoconductivity, but have caused drawbacks in cement properties. Hydroxyapatite and Brushite were introduced in an acrylic two-solution cement at varying concentrations. Novel composite bone cements were developed and characterized using rheology, injectability, and mechanical tests. It was hypothesized that the ample swelling time allowed by the premixed two-solution cement would enable thorough dispersion of the additives in the solutions, resulting in no detrimental effects after polymerization. The addition of Hydroxyapatite and Brushite both caused an increase in cement viscosity; however, these cements exhibited high shear-thinning, which facilitated injection. In gel point studies, the composite cements showed no detectable change in gel point time compared to an all-acrylic control cement. Hydroxyapatite and Brushite composite cements were observed to have high mechanical strengths even at high loads of calcium phosphate fillers. These cements showed an average compressive strength of 85 MPa and flexural strength of 65 MPa. A calcium phosphate-containing cement exhibiting a combination of high viscosity, pseudoplasticity and high mechanical strength can provide the essential bioactivity factor for osseointegration without sacrificing load-bearing capability. PMID:25085810

  12. Acrylic resin guide for locating the abutment screw access channel of cement-retained implant prostheses.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ayman; Maroulakos, Georgios; Garaicoa, Jorge

    2016-05-01

    Abutment screw loosening represents a common and challenging technical complication of cement-retained implant prostheses. This article describes the fabrication of a simple and accurate poly(methyl methacrylate) guide for identifying the location and angulation of the abutment screw access channel of a cement-retained implant prosthesis with a loosened abutment screw. PMID:26794698

  13. Heat treatment of pre-hydrolyzed silane increases adhesion of phosphate monomer-based resin cement to glass ceramic.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Rodrigo Furtado; Cotes, Caroline; Kimpara, Estevão Tomomitsu; Leite, Fabíola Pessoa Pereira; Özcan, Mutlu

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different forms of heat treatment on a pre-hydrolyzed silane to improve the adhesion of phosphate monomer-based (MDP) resin cement to glass ceramic. Resin and feldspathic ceramic blocks (n=48, n=6 for bond test, n=2 for microscopy) were randomly divided into 6 groups and subject to surface treatments: G1: Hydrofluoric acid (HF) 9.6% for 20 s + Silane + MDP resin cement (Panavia F); G2: HF 9.6% for 20 s + Silane + Heat Treatment (oven) + Panavia F; G3: Silane + Heat Treatment (oven) + Panavia F; G4: HF 9.6% for 20 s + Silane + Heat Treatment (hot air) + Panavia F; G5: Silane + Heat Treatment (hot air) + Panavia F; G6: Silane + Panavia F. Microtensile bond strength (MTBS) test was performed using a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). After debonding, the substrate and adherent surfaces were analyzed using stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM) to categorize the failure types. Data were analyzed statistically using two-way test ANOVA and Tukey's test (=0.05). Heat treatment of the silane containing MDP, with prior etching with HF (G2: 13.15 ± 0.89a; G4: 12.58 ± 1.03a) presented significantly higher bond strength values than the control group (G1: 9.16 ± 0.64b). The groups without prior etching (G3: 10.47 ± 0.70b; G5: 9.47 ± 0.32b) showed statistically similar bond strength values between them and the control group (G1). The silane application without prior etching and heat treatment resulted in the lowest mean bond strength (G6: 8.05 ± 0.37c). SEM analysis showed predominantly adhesive failures and EDS analysis showed common elements of spectra (Si, Na, Al, K, O, C) characterizing the microstructure of the glass-ceramic studied. Heat treatment of the pre-hydrolyzed silane containing MDP in an oven at 100 °C for 2 min or with hot air application at 50 ± 5 ºC for 1 min, was effective in increasing the bond strength values between the ceramic and resin cement containing MDP. PMID:25672383

  14. Dielectric properties of epoxy resin fly ash composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattanaik, A.; Bhuyan, S. K.; Samal, S. K.; Behera, A.; Mishra, S. C.

    2016-02-01

    Epoxy resin is widely used as an insulating material in high voltage applications. Ceramic fillers are always added to the polymer matrix to enhance its mechanical properties. But at the same time, filler materials decreases the electrical properties. So while making the fly ash epoxy composite, it is obvious to detect the effect of fly ash reinforcement on the dielectric nature of the material. In the present research work, fly ash is added to four different weight percentages compositions and post-curing has been done in the atmospheric condition, normal oven and micro oven. Tests were carried out on the developed polymer composite to measure its dielectric permittivity and tan delta value in a frequency range of 1 Hz - 1 MHz. The space charge behaviours were also observed by using the pulse electroacoustic (PEA) technique. The dielectric strength and losses are compared for different conditions.

  15. Two-body wear resistance of some indirect composite resins.

    PubMed

    Savabi, Omid; Nejatidanesh, Farahnaz; Shabanian, Mitra; Anbari, Zahra

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate two-body wear of five indirect composites and compare them with enamel. Signum, belleGlass HP, SR Adoro, Dialog, GC Gradia and enamel were formed into cylinders (n = 10). Two-body abrasive wear rates were determined using a porcelain disk and a pin on disk apparatus. The height and weight loss of the specimens were measured by stereomicroscope and digital scale. The data were subjected to analysis of variance and Tukey HSD tests to determine significant differences (alpha = 0.05). GC Gradia showed significantly less wear resistance than the other materials. Enamel was more resistant than any of the tested composites. Within the limitations of this study it can be concluded that the type of resin, filler size and method of polymerization could have affect the two-body abrasion resistance of indirect composites. PMID:21780731

  16. Boron/aluminum-graphite/resin advanced fiber composite hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the fabrication feasibility and to assess the potential of adhesively-bonded metal and resin matrix fiber composite hybrids as an advanced material, for aerospace and other structural applications. The results of fabrication studies and of evaluation of physical and mechanical properties show that using this hybrid concept it is possible to design a composite which, when compared to nonhybrid composites, has improved transverse strength, transverse stiffness, and impact resistance with only a small penalty on density and longitudinal properties. The results also show that laminate theory is suitable for perdicting the structural response of such hybrids. The sequence of fracture modes indicates that these types of hybrids can be readily designed to meet fail-safe requirements.

  17. Boron/aluminum-graphite/resin advanced fiber composite hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the fabrication feasibility and to assess the potential of adhesively-bonded metal and resin matrix fiber composite hybrids as an advanced material, for aerospace and other structural applications. The results of fabrication studies and of evaluation of physical and mechanical properties show that using this hybrid concept it is possible to design a composite which, when compared to nonhybrid composites, has improved transverse strength, transverse stiffness, and impact resistance with only a small penalty on density and longitudinal properties. The results also show that laminate theory is suitable for predicting the structural response of such hybrids. The sequence of fracture modes indicates that these types of hybrids can be readily designed to meet fail-safe requirements.

  18. Development and characterization of soy-based epoxy resins and pultruded FRP composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiang

    This dissertation focuses on the development, manufacture and characterization of novel soy-based epoxy FRP composites. Use of alternative epoxy resin systems derived from a renewable resource holds potential for low cost raw materials for the polymer and composite industries. Epoxidized Allyl Soyate (EAS) and Epoxidized Methyl Soyate (EMS) were developed from soybean oil with two chemical modification procedures: transesterification and epoxidation. This research investigates the curing characteristics and thermal and mechanical properties of the neat soyate resin systems. The derived soyate resins have higher reactivity and superior performance compared to commercially available epoxidized soybean oil. An efficient two-step curing method was developed in order to utilize these soyate resins to their full potential. The epoxy co-resin systems with varied soyate resin content were successfully used to fabricate composite material through pultrusion. The pultrusion resin systems with 30 wt% soyate resins yielded improved, or comparable mechanical properties with neat commercial resins. A finite element analysis of the heat transfer and curing process was performed to study the processing characterization on glass/epoxy composite pultrusion. This model can be used to establish baseline process variables and will benefit subsequent optimization. This research demonstrates that soy-based resins, especially EAS, show considerable promise as an epoxy resin supplement for use in polymer and composite structural applications. The new products derived from soybean oil can provide competitive performance, low cost and environmental advantages.

  19. Retrograde root filling with dentin-bonded modified resin composite.

    PubMed

    Rud, J; Rud, V; Munksgaard, E C

    1996-09-01

    A retrograde root-end cover with a special resin composite (Retroplast) combined with the dentin bonding agent Gluma (Bayer AG) has been used since 1984 by the authors. Its content of silver, added to promote radiopacity, has been found to lower the working time and storage stability of the composite and might cause discolorations. Since 1990, silver has therefore been replaced with ytterbium trifluoride, which eliminates these side effects. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical results obtained with these two resin composites and to evaluate the healing results after several years in function. Apical fillings (351) with the modified Retroplast showed the following radiographic healing pattern 1 yr after surgery: 80% complete healing, 2% scar tissue, 12% uncertain healing, and 6% failure. No significant difference in this healing pattern was found, compared with that obtained with the silver-containing Retroplast. Cases with ytterbium trifluoride classified as scar tissue and uncertain healing at 1 yr when examined at 2 to 4 yr postoperatively showed 89% complete healing. 0% scar tissue, 1% uncertain healing, and 9% failure. This result is significantly different from that obtained 1 yr after surgery. Based on calculations, it was predicted that with time 90% will become complete healing, whereas 10% will become failure. PMID:9198430

  20. Design, fabrication, and properties of 2-2 connectivity cement/polymer based piezoelectric composites with varied piezoelectric phase distribution

    PubMed Central

    Dongyu, Xu; Xin, Cheng; Banerjee, Sourav; Shifeng, Huang

    2014-01-01

    The laminated 2-2 connectivity cement/polymer based piezoelectric composites with varied piezoelectric phase distribution were fabricated by employing Lead Zirconium Titanate ceramic as active phase, and mixture of cement powder, epoxy resin, and hardener as matrix phase with a mass proportion of 4:4:1. The dielectric, piezoelectric, and electromechanical coupling properties of the composites were studied. The composites with large total volume fraction of piezoelectric phase have large piezoelectric strain constant and relative permittivity, and the piezoelectric and dielectric properties of the composites are independent of the dimensional variations of the piezoelectric ceramic layer. The composites with small total volume fraction of piezoelectric phase have large piezoelectric voltage constant, but also large dielectric loss. The composite with gradually increased dimension of piezoelectric ceramic layer has the smallest dielectric loss, and that with the gradually increased dimension of matrix layer has the largest piezoelectric voltage constant. The novel piezoelectric composites show potential applications in fabricating ultrasonic transducers with varied surface vibration amplitude of the transducer. PMID:25565725

  1. Design, fabrication, and properties of 2-2 connectivity cement/polymer based piezoelectric composites with varied piezoelectric phase distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Dongyu, Xu; Xin, Cheng; Shifeng, Huang; Banerjee, Sourav

    2014-12-28

    The laminated 2-2 connectivity cement/polymer based piezoelectric composites with varied piezoelectric phase distribution were fabricated by employing Lead Zirconium Titanate ceramic as active phase, and mixture of cement powder, epoxy resin, and hardener as matrix phase with a mass proportion of 4:4:1. The dielectric, piezoelectric, and electromechanical coupling properties of the composites were studied. The composites with large total volume fraction of piezoelectric phase have large piezoelectric strain constant and relative permittivity, and the piezoelectric and dielectric properties of the composites are independent of the dimensional variations of the piezoelectric ceramic layer. The composites with small total volume fraction of piezoelectric phase have large piezoelectric voltage constant, but also large dielectric loss. The composite with gradually increased dimension of piezoelectric ceramic layer has the smallest dielectric loss, and that with the gradually increased dimension of matrix layer has the largest piezoelectric voltage constant. The novel piezoelectric composites show potential applications in fabricating ultrasonic transducers with varied surface vibration amplitude of the transducer.

  2. Sealing capacity of a resin-modified glass-ionomer and resin composite placed in vivo in Class 5 restorations.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, M; Davidson, C L

    1996-01-01

    A 2% methylene blue dye was used to assess the leakage resistance of class 5 resin-modified glass-ionomer and resin composite restorations placed in 17 adults. The teeth were extracted 75 to 90 days after placement of the restorations and immersed for 24 hours in the dye solution. Within 7 days after extraction the teeth were sectioned inciso-apically through the center of the restoration and inspected under a stereomicroscope at X20 to determine the depth of dye penetration. No significant differences between the resin-modified glass-ionomer and resin composite restorations at the incisal or cervical margins were found. Although no more than 30% of the restorations of either group exhibited microleakage, neither of the restorative systems was able to completely prevent leakage at either incisal or cervical margins. PMID:8957921

  3. Possibility of Using Wood Pulp in the Preparation of Cement Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidalova, Lucia; Stevulova, Nadezda; Geffert, Anton

    2014-06-01

    Sustainable building materials are based on the use of renewable materials instead of non-renewable. Large group of renewable materials composes of plant fibres having high tensile strength are used as fillers into building material with reinforcement function of composite. This study aimed to establish the mechanical and physical properties of cement composites with organic fillers, such as wood pulp. Wood pulp cellulose is very interesting material as reinforcement in cement which contributes to a reduction of pollutants. Varying the producing technology (wood pulp and cement ratio in mixture) it is possible to obtain composites with density from 940 to 1260 kgm-3 and with compressive strength from 1.02 to 5.44 MPa after 28 days of hardening. Based on the experimental results, cement composites with using unbleached wood pulp reach higher values than composites based on bleached wood pulp. Volume ratio of unbleached wood pulp in composites influences water absorbability of cement composites

  4. Effect of Resin Cement Porosity on Retention of Glass-Fiber Posts to Root Dentin: An Experimental and Finite Element Analysis.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Natércia Rezende; Aguiar, Grazielle Crystine Rodrigues; Rodrigues, Monise de Paula; Bicalho, Aline Aredes; Soares, Priscilla Barbosa Ferreira; Veríssimo, Crisnicaw; Soares, Carlos José

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of porosity of self-adhesive resin on the stress distribution, post retention and failure mode of fiber post cemented to human root dentin. Ten human central upper incisors with circular root canal were selected. They were sectioned with 15 mm and were endodontically filled. The roots were scanned using micro-CT after post space preparation for root filling remaining evaluation. Fiber posts were cemented using self-adhesive resin cement (Rely X U200, 3M-ESPE). Two 1-mm-thick slices from the cervical, medium and apical thirds were scanned for resin cement bubbles volume measurements and submitted to a push-out test (PBS). Three operators using stereomicroscopy and confocal laser microscopy classified the failure mode. Stress distributions during the push-out test were analyzed using 3D finite element analysis. PBS values (MPa) were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests and the failure modes using the Kappa coefficient to assess inter-operator agreement. Chi-square test was used to determine significant differences between the methods ( = 0.05). Push-out bond strength was significantly affected by the bubbles presence in all root depth (p<0.05). The stress concentration was higher when the bubbles were present. Adhesive dentin/resin cement interface failure was the most frequent type of failure. Confocal microscopy was better than stereomicroscopy for failure analysis. Bubbles generated during resin cement insertion into the root canal negatively affect the stress distribution and the bond strength. The use of confocal microscopy is recommended for failure analysis. PMID:26963208

  5. Flowable Resin Composites: A Systematic Review and Clinical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Jean C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about flowable composite materials. Most literature mentions conventional composite materials at large, giving minimal emphasis to flowables in particular. This paper briefly gives an in depth insight to the multiple facets of this versatile material. Aim To exclusively review the most salient features of flowable composite materials in comparison to conventional composites and to give clinicians a detailed understanding of the advantages, drawbacks, indications and contraindications based on composition and physical/mechanical properties. Methodology Data Sources: A thorough literature search from the year 1996 up to January 2015 was done on PubMed Central, The Cochrane Library, Science Direct, Wiley Online Library, and Google Scholar. Grey literature (pending patents, technical reports etc.) was also screened. The search terms used were “dental flowable resin composites”. Search Strategy After omitting the duplicates/repetitions, a total of 491 full text articles were assessed. As including all articles were out of the scope of this paper. Only relevant articles that fulfilled the reviewer’s objectives {mentioning indications, contraindications, applications, assessment of physical/mechanical/biological properties (in vitro/ in vivo /ex vivo)} were considered. A total of 92 full text articles were selected. Conclusion Flowable composites exhibit a variable composition and consequently variable mechanical/ physical properties. Clinicians must be aware of this aspect to make a proper material selection based on specific properties and indications of each material relevant to a particular clinical situation. PMID:26266238

  6. Evaluation of a new fiber-reinforced resin composite.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, S; Saimi, Y; Ono, T

    2006-01-01

    Efficacy of the usage of an experimental fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) on mechanical properties of an indirect composite was investigated by means of three-point bending and Charpy impact tests. Bond strength between the FRC and the indirect composite was also evaluated by tensile testing. The FRC consisted of a matrix resin with 25% silanized milled glass fiber (11-microm diameter, 150-microm length) and 5% colloidal silica. The values of strain of proportional limit, total strain, and fracture energy of the FRC during the bending test (1.2%, 10.4%, and 41.6 x 10(-3) J) were significantly higher than those of the indirect composite (0.1%, 2.5%, and 11.9 x 10(-3) J). The impact strengths of the 1-mm specimens with FRC ranged from 15.2 to 15.9 kJ/m(2), and were significantly higher than that of the control (3.1 kJ/m(2)). The 2-mm specimens showed significant difference from the control when the FRC thickness was equal or greater than 0.5 mm. The bond strength after the thermocycling was 15.2 MPa, and all of the specimens exhibited cohesive fracture inside the indirect composite. Based upon the results, it was concluded that the FRC tested in this study improved toughness and impact resistance of the indirect composite. The interfacial bonding between the FRC and the indirect composite was strong enough to prevent delamination. PMID:16161120

  7. Ceramic inserts do not generally improve resin composite margins.

    PubMed

    Strobel, W O; Petschelt, A; Kemmoona, M; Frankenberger, R

    2005-08-01

    summary Ceramic inserts are reported to possibly reduce polymerization shrinkage for posterior resin composite fillings. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the effect of different insert systems before and after thermomechanical loading. Sixty sound human third molars received occlusomesial Class II cavities, 40 with proximal margins 2 mm above and 20 with proximal margins 1 mm below the cementum-enamel junction. The specimens were randomly assigned to one of the six experimental groups (n = 10). The enamel-bordered cavities were restored with Syntac classic and Tetric Ceram (ST), Syntac classic, Tetric Ceram and beta-quartz inserts (TB), Syntac classic, Tetric Ceram and Cerana inserts (TC), Syntac classic, Tetric flow and SonicSys approx inserts (TS). The dentin-limited cavities were filled with Syntac classic and Tetic Ceram (DT), Syntac classic, Tetric flow and SonicSys approx inserts (DS). Before and after thermomechanical loading (100 000 x 50 N, 2500 x 5 degrees C/55 degrees C), replicas were made and both interfaces tooth/composite and insert/composite were examined under a scanning electron microscope at 200x. The Cerana and SonicSys insert groups showed significantly less gaps in enamel (P < 0.05). With beta-quartz inserts, no reduction of gaps was found (P > 0.05). Marginal integrity in dentine-bordered specimens could not be improved with SonicSys inserts (P > 0.05). The bonding performance insert/composite was promising for all IPS Empress inserts (Cerana, SonicSys enamel) but worse for beta-quartz inserts. Regarding gap formation between resin composite and tooth, Cerana and SonicSys inserts significantly reduced gaps. The use of SonicSys inserts in deep proximal cavities cannot be recommended. PMID:16011640

  8. Rubber-Toughening of Dimethacrylate Dental Composite Resin

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Valerie A.; Cardenas, H. Lee; Rawls, H. Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Dimethacrylate dental composite resins exhibit inherently low toughness. Toughening of these materials may reduce the incidence of marginal and bulk fracture of composite restorations. Objective: To determine if dimethacrylate dental restorative materials can be rubber-toughened, and if so, to identify a possible mechanism. Methods: A filler composed of aggregates of polybutadiene/silica as well as irregularly-shaped silica slabs was produced by mixing silica with polybutadiene in dichloromethane. The dried filler was subsequently ground and sieved to <25μm. Polybutadiene/silica ratios were varied from 0:1 (control) to 0.5:1. EDAX analysis verified the composition of the complex filler. Filler was added to a bis-GMA/bis-EMA/TEGDMA resin system and fractured in 3-point bend test mode at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. In addition, 1 bar was fractured at a crosshead speed of 0.001mm/min in order to identify a possible mechanism for toughening. Results: In specimens fractured at 1mm/min, flexural modulus is increased or maintained and flexural strength and energy to break increase as the amount of polybutadiene in the aggregates increases. Cavitation of high-rubber-containing aggregates is demonstrated. In the one specimen fractured at 0.001mm/min, a marked increase in size of high-rubber-containing aggregates along with severe shear damage in the surrounding matrix is shown, suggesting that cavitation with subsequent absorption of energy during shear yielding is the likely mechanism behind the increase in energy to break in bars fractured at 1mm/min. Significance: These results indicate that dimethacrylate dental composite materials can be rubber toughened, which may potentially reduce marginal and bulk fractures of composite restorations, and consequently extend their service lifetime. PMID:20583305

  9. Effect of an Extra Hydrophobic Resin Layer on Repair Shear Bond Strength of a Silorane-Based Composite Resin

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Bahari, Mahmoud; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Rahbani Nobar, Behnam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Composite repair is a minimally invasive and conservative approach. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an additional hydrophobic resin layer on the repair shear bond strength of a silorane-based composite repaired with silorane or methacrylate-based composite. Materials and Methods: Sixty bar-shaped composite blocks were fabricated and stored in saline for 72 hours. The surface of the samples were roughened by diamond burs and etched with phosphoric acid; then, they were randomly divided into three groups according to the repairing process: Group 1: Silorane composite-silorane bonding agent-silorane composite; group 2: Silorane composite-silorane bonding agent-hydrophobic resin-silorane composite, and group 3: Silorane composite-silorane bonding agent-hydrophobic resin methacrylate-based composite. Repairing composite blocks measured 2.5×2.5×5mm. After repairing, the samples were stored in saline for 24 hours and thermocycled for 1500 cycles. The repair bond strength was measured at a strain rate of 1mm/min. Twenty additional cylindrical composite blocks (diameter: 2.5mm, height: 6mm) were also fabricated for measuring the cohesive strength of silorane-based composite. The data were analyzed using One-way ANOVA and the post hoc Tukey’s test (α=0.05). Results: Cohesive bond strength of silorane composite was significantly higher than the repair bond strengths in other groups (P<0.001). The repair bond strength of group 3 was significantly higher than that of group 1 (P=0.001). Conclusion: Application of an additional hydrophobic resin layer for repair of silorane-based composite with a methacrylate-based composite enhanced the repair shear bond strength. PMID:27559348

  10. Radiopacity evaluation of contemporary resin composites by digitization of images

    PubMed Central

    Ermis, R. Banu; Yildirim, Derya; Yildiz, Gul; Gormez, Ozlem

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of different composite resins and compare the values to those of human enamel and dentine. Materials and Methods: Five specimens of each material with thicknesses of 2 mm were prepared and radiographed alongside aluminum step wedge and human enamel and dentin. Three occlusal radiographs for each material were taken and digitized using a desktop scanner. Mean gray values of the test materials were measured using Image J software. Then a conversion was performed according to establish the radiopacity of the test materials, in millimeters of equivalent Al. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Duncan multiple range tests (P < 0.05). Results: The radiopacity values varied among the restorative materials (P < 0.05). The radiopacity values of the materials tested were, in decreasing order: Enamel Plus HRI > Z250 > Filtek Ultimate ≥ Z550 > Nexcomp ≥ Nanoceram Bright > enamel ≥ Estelite Sigma Quick > Clearfil Majesty Esthetic ≥ Reflexions XLS ≥ Aelite LS Posterior ≥ dentin ≥ 2 mm Al. Conclusion: All resin composite materials investigated in this study presented different radiopacity values. However, all materials had radiopacity values greater than dentin and had sufficient radiopacity to meet International Organization for Standardization 4049 standard. PMID:25202214

  11. Evaluation of the resin cement thicknesses and push-out bond strengths of circular and oval fiber posts in oval-shapes canals

    PubMed Central

    Er, Özgür; Kılıç, Kerem; Kılınç, Halil İbrahim; Sağsen, Burak

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the push-out bond strength varies between oval and circular fiber posts, and to examine the effect on the resin cement thicknesses around the posts. MATERIALS AND METHODS Eighteen mandibular premolar roots were separated into two groups for oval and circular fiber posts systems. Post spaces were prepared and fiber posts were luted to the post spaces. Roots were cut horizontally to produce 1-mm-thick specimens. Resin cement thicknesses were determined with a metallographic optical microscope and push-out tests were done. RESULTS No significant differences were observed in terms of push-out bond strength between the oval and circular fiber posts (P>.05) The resin cement thicknesses of the oval posts were greater than those of the circular posts group in the coronal, middle and apical specimens (P<.05). CONCLUSION In the light of these results, it can be stated that resin cement thickness does not affect the push-out bond strength. PMID:25722832

  12. Effects of surface treatments, thermocycling, and cyclic loading on the bond strength of a resin cement bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

    PubMed

    Guarda, G B; Correr, A B; Gonçalves, L S; Costa, A R; Borges, G A; Sinhoreti, M A C; Correr-Sobrinho, L

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives : The aim of this present study was to investigate the effect of two surface treatments, fatigue and thermocycling, on the microtensile bond strength of a newly introduced lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent) and a dual-cured resin cement. Methods : A total of 18 ceramic blocks (10 mm long × 7 mm wide × 3.0 mm thick) were fabricated and divided into six groups (n=3): groups 1, 2, and 3-air particle abraded for five seconds with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles; groups 4, 5, and 6-acid etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 seconds. A silane coupling agent was applied onto all specimens and allowed to dry for five seconds, and the ceramic blocks were bonded to a block of composite Tetric N-Ceram (Ivoclar Vivadent) with RelyX ARC (3M ESPE) resin cement and placed under a 500-g static load for two minutes. The cement excess was removed with a disposable microbrush, and four periods of light activation for 40 seconds each were performed at right angles using an LED curing unit (UltraLume LED 5, Ultradent) with a final 40 second light exposure from the top surface. All of the specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. Groups 2 and 5 were submitted to 3,000 thermal cycles between 5°C and 55°C, and groups 3 and 6 were submitted to a fatigue test of 100,000 cycles at 2 Hz. Specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the bonding area to obtain beams with a cross-sectional area of 1 mm(2) (30 beams per group) and submitted to a microtensile bond strength test in a testing machine (EZ Test) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test (p≤0.05). Results : The microtensile bond strength values (MPa) were 26.9 ± 6.9, 22.2 ± 7.8, and 21.2 ± 9.1 for groups 1-3 and 35.0 ± 9.6, 24.3 ± 8.9, and 23.9 ± 6.3 for groups 4-6. For the control group, fatigue testing and thermocycling produced a predominance of adhesive failures. Fatigue and

  13. Cytotoxicity of Resin Composites Containing Bioactive Glass Fillers

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Satin; Gwinner, Fernanda; Mitchell, John C; Pfeifer, Carmem; Ferracane, Jack L

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the in vitro cytotoxicity of dental composites containing bioactive glass fillers. Methods Dental composites (50:50 Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin: 72.5wt% filler, 67.5%Sr-glass and 5% OX50) containing different concentrations (0, 5, 10 and 15 wt %) of two sol-gel bioactive glasses, BAG65 (65 mole% SiO2, 31 mole% CaO, 4 mole% P2O5) and BAG62 (3 mole% F added) were evaluated for cytotoxicity using Alamar Blue assay. First, composite extracts were obtained from 7 day incubations of composite in cell culture medium at 37° C. Undifferentiated pulp cells (OD-21) were exposed to dilutions of the original extracts for 3, 5, and 7 days. Then freshly cured composite disks were incubated with OD-21 cells (n=5) for 2 days. Subsequently, fresh composite disks were incubated in culture medium at 37°C for 7 days, and then the extracted disks were incubated with OD-21 cells for 2 days. Finally, fresh composites disks were light cured for 3, 5, and 20 seconds and incubated with OD-21 cells (n=5) for 1, 3, 5, and 7 days. To verify that the three different curing modes produced different levels of degree of conversion (DC), the DC of each composite was determined by FTIR. Groups (n=5) were compared with ANOVA/Tukey’s (α≤0.05). Results Extracts from all composites significantly reduced cell viability until a dilution of 1:8 or lower, where the extract became equal to the control. All freshly-cured composites showed significantly reduced cell viability at two days. However, no reduction in cell viability was observed for any composite that had been previously soaked in media before exposure to the cells. Composites with reduced DC (3 s vs. 20 s cure), as verified by FTIR, showed significantly reduced cell viability. Significance The results show that the composites, independent of composition, had equivalent potency in terms of reducing the viability of the cells in culture. Soaking the composites for 7 days before exposing them to the cells suggested that the

  14. Performance of resin transfer molded multiaxial warp knit composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. Benson; Hasko, Gregory H.

    1993-01-01

    Composite materials that are subjected to complex loads have traditionally been fabricated with multidirectionally oriented prepreg tape materials. Some of the problems associated with this type of construction include low delamination resistance, poor out-of-plane strength, and labor intensive fabrication processes. Textile reinforced composites with through-the-thickness reinforcement have the potential to solve some of these problems. Recently, a relatively new class of noncrimp fabrics designated as multiaxial warp knits have been developed to minimize some of the high cost and damage tolerance concerns. Multiple stacks of warp knit fabrics can be knitted or stitched together to reduce layup labor cost. The through-the-thickness reinforcement can provide significant improvements in damage tolerance and out-of-plane strength. Multilayer knitted/stitched preforms, in conjunction with resin transfer molding (RTM), offer potential for significant cost savings in fabrication of primary aircraft structures. The objectives of this investigation were to conduct RTM processing studies and to characterize the mechanical behavior of composites reinforced with three multiaxial warp knit fabrics. The three fabrics investigated were produced by Hexcel and Milliken in the United States, and Saerbeck in Germany. Two resin systems, British Petroleum E9O5L and 3M PR 500, were characterized for RTM processing. The performance of Hexcel and Milliken quasi-isotropic knitted fabrics are compared to conventional prepreg tape laminates. The performance of the Saerbeck fabric is compared to uniweave wing skin layups being investigated by Douglas Aircraft Company in the NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) program. Tests conducted include tension, open hole tension, compression, open hole compression, and compression after impact. The effects of fabric defects, such as misaligned fibers and gaps between tows, on material performance are also discussed. Estimated material and labor

  15. Moisture effects on the high-temperature strength of fiber-reinforced resin composites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertz, J.

    1972-01-01

    Under NAS 8-27435, the Convair Aerospace Division of General Dynamics and their subcontractor, Hercules Incorporated, have conducted studies on the effects of moisture on the properties of fiber-reinforced resin composites and on the epoxy resins presently used in advanced composites. Data are presented on the resins and composites subjected to varying time/temperature/humidity or time/temperature/water-boil exposures. The effects of moisture on matrix, reinforcement, and fiber/resin interface are discussed and supported by experimental test data.

  16. Advanced resin systems and 3D textile preforms for low cost composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukla, J. G.; Bayha, T. D.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced resin systems and 3D textile preforms are being evaluated at Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company (LASC) under NASA's Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program. This work is aimed towards the development of low-cost, damage-tolerant composite fuselage structures. Resin systems for resin transfer molding and powder epoxy towpreg materials are being evaluated for processability, performance and cost. Three developmental epoxy resin systems for resin transfer molding (RTM) and three resin systems for powder towpregging are being investigated. Various 3D textile preform architectures using advanced weaving and braiding processes are also being evaluated. Trials are being conducted with powdered towpreg, in 2D weaving and 3D braiding processes for their textile processability and their potential for fabrication in 'net shape' fuselage structures. The progress in advanced resin screening and textile preform development is reviewed here.

  17. Mechanical evaluation of five flowable resin composites by the dynamic micro-indentation method

    PubMed Central

    Hirayama, Satoshi; Iwai, Hirotoshi

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of the strength of brittle materials, such as resin composites, is extremely difficult. Micro-indentation hardness testing is a convenient way of investigating the mechanical properties of a small volume of material. In this study, the mechanical properties of five commercially available flowable resin composites were investigated by the dynamic micro-indentation method. Additionally, the effects of inorganic-filler content on the dynamic hardness and elastic modulus of flowable composites obtained by this method were investigated. The weight percentages of the inorganic fillers in the resin composites were determined by the ashing technique. The results indicate that the mechanical properties of flowable composites are affected by not only the filler content but also the properties of the resin matrix. In conclusion, the dynamic micro-indentation method is a useful technique for determining the mechanical behavior of dental resin composites as brittle material. PMID:25342983

  18. Effect of surfactants on pressure-sensitivity of CNT filled cement mortar composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Baoguo; Yu, Xun

    2014-11-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (NaDDBS) were used as surfactants to disperse multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) in cement mortar and fabricate pressure-sensitive carbon nanotubes filled cement mortar composites. The pressure-sensitivity of cement mortar composites with different concentrations of MWNT and different surfactants was explored under repeated loading and impulsive loading, respectively. Experimental results indicate that the response of the electrical resistance of composites with NaDDBS to external force is more stable and sensitive than that of composites with SDS. Therefore, NaDDBS has higher efficiency than SDS for the dispersion of MWNT in cement mortar, and it is an effective surfactant for fabricating MWNT filled cement mortar composites with superior pressure-sensitivity.

  19. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen profiles on the bond strength of repaired composite resin

    PubMed Central

    Mossa, Hossam; ElKhatat, Essam; Hassan, Ahmed M.; Baroudi, Kusai; Beshr, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study was performed to evaluate the bond strength of repaired three types of composite resins under various hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) profiles with various session numbers. Materials and Methods: Sixty specimens of three types of composite resin (nanofilled composite, nanohybrid composite and microfilled composite) each type of composite was divided into four group according to various profiles of HBO treatment (control, 2bar, 3 bar and 5 bar). Then, the specimens were repaired; thermocycled, the tensile bond strength were measured. Then the data were analyzed by One-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test (α = 0.05). Results: The highest bond strength was obtained for the repaired nanofilled composite resin specimens while; the lowest bond strength was obtained for the repaired microfilled composite resin specimens. The highest tensile bond strength was recorded for the specimens who treated with the highest pressure of HBO. Conclusion: The bond strength of repaired nanofilled composite resins is better than the other types of composite resin. The highest pressure of HBO, the highest bond strength of repaired composite resins. PMID:27195232

  20. Process Optimization of Bismaleimide (BMI) Resin Infused Carbon Fiber Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrlich, Joshua W.; Tate, LaNetra C.; Cox, Sarah B.; Taylor, Brian J.; Wright, M. Clara; Caraccio, Anne J.; Sampson, Jeffery W.

    2013-01-01

    Bismaleimide (BMI) resins are an attractive new addition to world-wide composite applications. This type of thermosetting polyimide provides several unique characteristics such as excellent physical property retention at elevated temperatures and in wet environments, constant electrical properties over a vast array of temperature settings, and nonflammability properties as well. This makes BMI a popular choice in advance composites and electronics applications [I]. Bismaleimide-2 (BMI-2) resin was used to infuse intermediate modulus 7 (IM7) based carbon fiber. Two panel configurations consisting of 4 plies with [+45deg, 90deg]2 and [0deg]4 orientations were fabricated. For tensile testing, a [90deg]4 configuration was tested by rotating the [0deg]4 configirration to lie orthogonal with the load direction of the test fixture. Curing of the BMI-2/IM7 system utilized an optimal infusion process which focused on the integration of the manufacturer-recommended ramp rates,. hold times, and cure temperatures. Completion of the cure cycle for the BMI-2/IM7 composite yielded a product with multiple surface voids determined through visual and metallographic observation. Although the curing cycle was the same for the three panellayups, the surface voids that remained within the material post-cure were different in abundance, shape, and size. For tensile testing, the [0deg]4 layup had a 19.9% and 21.7% greater average tensile strain performance compared to the [90deg]4 and [+45deg, 90deg, 90deg,-45degg] layups, respectively, at failure. For tensile stress performance, the [0deg]4 layup had a 5.8% and 34.0% greater average performance% than the [90deg]4 and [+45deg, 90deg, 90deg,-45deg] layups.

  1. Injection repair of carbon fiber/bismaleimide composite panels with bisphenol E cyanate ester resin

    SciTech Connect

    Thunga, Mahendra; Bauer, Amy; Obusek, Kristine; Meilunas, Ray; Akinc, Mufit; Kessler, Michael R

    2014-08-01

    Resin injection of bisphenol E cyanate ester, a low viscosity resin that cures into a high temperature thermoset polymer, is investigated as a reliable repair method to restore strength and stiffness in delaminated carbon fiber/bismaleimide composites used in aircraft panels. The influence of temperature on the viscosity of the uncured resin was measured to optimize the injection conditions for high resin infiltration into the delaminations. The repair efficiency of the resin was evaluated by varying the panel thickness and the method by which the delamination damage was created in the composite specimens. Ultrasonic scanning (C-scan), flash thermography images, and cross-section analysis of repaired panels revealed excellent resin infiltration into the damaged region. Evaluation of mechanical repair efficiency using both bending stiffness and in-plain compressive strength of the composite panels as the repair metrics showed values exceeding 100%.

  2. Optimization of fly ash as sand replacement materials (SRM) in cement composites containing coconut fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadzri, N. I. M.; Jamaludin, S. B.; Mazlee, M. N.; Jamal, Z. A. Z.

    2016-07-01

    The need of utilizing industrial and agricultural wastes is very important to maintain sustainability. These wastes are often incorporated with cement composites to improve performances in term of physical and mechanical properties. This study presents the results of the investigation of the response of cement composites containing coconut fiber as reinforcement and fly ash use as substitution of sand at different hardening days. Hardening periods of time (7, 14 and 28 days) were selected to study the properties of cement composites. Optimization result showed that 20 wt. % of fly ash (FA) is a suitable material for sand replacement (SRM). Meanwhile 14 days of hardening period gave highest compressive strength (70.12 MPa) from the cement composite containing 9 wt. % of coconut fiber and fly ash. This strength was comparable with the cement without coconut fiber (74.19 MPa) after 28 days of curing.

  3. Impact properties of rubber-modified epoxy resin-graphite-fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J.; Nir, Z.

    1984-01-01

    To improve the impact resistance of graphite-fiber composites, a commercial and an experimental epoxy resin were modified with liquid reactive rubber and a brominated epoxy resin. The commercial epoxy was a tetrafunctional resin, and the experimental epoxy was a trifunctional resin. The reactive rubber was a carboxyl-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer. The rubber content was varied from 0 to 25 percent (wt). The brominated epoxy resin was used at Br levels of 4, 19, and 35 percent of the resin. Composites were prepared with woven graphite cloth reinforcement. The composites were evaluated by using flexural strength in the dry state and an elevated temperature after saturation with water. The impact properties were determined by measuring shear strength after falling-ball impact and instrumented impact. The rubber-modified, trifunctional resin exhibited better properties, when tested in hot-wet conditions in a heated oven at 366 K (after boiling the material for 2 h in demineralized water), than the tetrafunctional resin. Improved impact resistance was observed with the addition of the reactive rubber to the epoxy resin. Further improvement was observed with the addition of the brominated epoxy resin.

  4. Survey of inorganic polymers. [for composite matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerber, A. H.; Mcinerney, E. F.

    1979-01-01

    A literature search was carried out in order to identify inorganic, metallo-organic, and hybrid inorganic-organic polymers that could serve as potential matrix resins for advanced composites. The five most promising candidates were critically reviewed and recommendations were made for the achievement of their potential in terms of performance and cost. These generic polymer classes comprise: (1) Poly(arylsil sesquioxanes); (2) Poly(silyl arylene siloxanes); (3) Poly(silarylenes); (4) Poly(silicon-linked ferrocenes); and (5) Poly(organo phosphazenes). No single candidate currently possesses the necessary combination of physicomechanical properties, thermal stability, processability, and favorable economics. The first three classes exhibit the best thermal performance. On the other hand, poly (organo phosphazenes), the most extensively studied polymer class, exhibit the best combination of structure-property control, processability, and favorable economics.

  5. Physical properties of fixed prosthodontic, resin composite luting agents.

    PubMed

    White, S N; Yu, Z

    1993-01-01

    This study determined and compared physical properties of six fixed prosthodontic resin composite luting agents and one control. Inorganic filler content, compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, film thickness, and Knoop hardness were determined. The amounts of filler and the physical properties varied widely among materials. One material, which contained a minimal amount of filler, underwent so much plastic deformation that its strengths could not be measured. All other materials demonstrated high strengths. The materials with the least filler demonstrated the least resistance to indentation. The material with the lowest film thickness had not set at the time of measurement, 10 minutes after mixing. Most materials had unacceptable film thicknesses. Only one material demonstrated acceptable physical properties throughout the study. PMID:8240650

  6. Properties of a glass-ionomer/resin-composite hybrid material.

    PubMed

    Mathis, R S; Ferracane, J L

    1989-09-01

    A small percentage of the liquid resin used in commercial dental composites was added to the liquid used in a commercial glass-ionomer restorative in order to produce a fluoride-containing hybrid restorative-type material that would adhere to dentin while being stronger, less brittle, and less sensitive to desiccation in the oral cavity than glass ionomer. Compressive strength, yield strength, elastic modulus, fracture toughness, and tensile strength were analyzed for this hybrid, light-cured material. In addition, the solubility in water, adhesion to dentin, and surface roughness were also examined in vitro. The results suggest that the early (one-hour) mechanical properties of the hybrid material exceed those of glass ionomer. In addition, the brittleness and solubility of the material are less than those of commercial glass ionomer, while adhesion to dentin is unaffected. Most importantly, surface crazing, a documented problem with some glass ionomers when they become desiccated, is alleviated with this hybrid formulation. PMID:2638281

  7. The nonlinear viscoelastic response of resin matrix composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, C.; Cardon, A. H.; Brinson, H. F.

    1984-01-01

    Possible treatments of the nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of materials are reviewed. A thermodynamic based approach, developed by Schapery, is discussed and used to interpret the nonlinear viscoelastic response of a graphite epoxy laminate, T300/934. Test data to verify the analysis for Fiberite 934 neat resin as well as transverse and shear properties of the unidirectional T300/934 composited are presented. Long time creep characteristics as a function of stress level and temperature are generated. Favorable comparisons between the traditional, graphical, and the current analytical approaches are shown. A free energy based rupture criterion is proposed as a way to estimate the life that remains in a structure at any time.

  8. The influence of surface standardization of lithium disilicate glass ceramic on bond strength to a dual resin cement.

    PubMed

    Brum, R; Mazur, R; Almeida, J; Borges, G; Caldas, D

    2011-01-01

    In vitro studies to assess bond strength between resins and ceramics have used surfaces that have been ground flat to ensure standardization; however, in patients, ceramic surfaces are irregular. The effect of a polished and unpolished ceramic on bond strength needs to be investigated. Sixty ceramic specimens (20×5×2 mm) were made and divided into two groups. One group was ground with 220- to 2000-grit wet silicon carbide paper and polished with 3-, 1-, and ¼-μm diamond paste; the other group was neither ground nor polished. Each group was divided into three subgroups: treated polished controls (PC) and untreated unpolished controls (UPC), polished (PE) and unpolished specimens (UPE) etched with hydrofluoric acid, and polished (PS) and unpolished specimens (UPS) sandblasted with alumina. Resin cement cylinders were built over each specimen. Shear bond strength was measured, and the fractured site was analyzed. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc tests were performed. PE (44.47 ± 5.91 MPa) and UPE (39.70 ± 5.46 MPa) had the highest mean bond strength. PS (31.05 ± 8.81 MPa), UPC (29.11 ± 8.11 MPa), and UPS (26.41 ± 7.31 MPa) were statistically similar, and PC (24.96 ± 8.17 MPa) was the lowest. Hydrofluoric acid provides the highest bond strength regardless of whether the surface is polished or not. PMID:21819200

  9. Boswellia gum resin/chitosan polymer composites: Controlled delivery vehicles for aceclofenac.

    PubMed

    Jana, Sougata; Laha, Bibek; Maiti, Sabyasachi

    2015-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of Boswellia gum resin on the properties of glutaraldehyde (GA) crosslinked chitosan polymer composites and their potential as oral delivery vehicles for a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, aceclofenac. The incorporation of resinous material caused a significant improvement in drug entrapment efficiency (∼40%) of the polymer composites. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis confirmed the formation of chitosan-gum resin composites and did not show any evidence of drug-polymer chemical interaction. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) suggested the formation of particulate polymer composites up to chitosan:gum resin mass ratio of 1:3. Only 8-17% drug was released into HCl solution (pH 1.2) in 2h. The drug release rate of polymer composites was faster in phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.8). The composites released ∼60-68% drug load in 7h. In same duration, the drug release rate suddenly boosted up to 92% as the concentration of gum resin in the composites was raised to 80%. The drug release mechanism deviated from non-Fickian to case-II type with increasing resin concentration in the composites. Hence, GA-treated Boswellia resin-chitosan composites could be considered as alternative vehicles for oral delivery of aceclofenac. PMID:25825076

  10. New restoration and direct pulp capping systems using adhesive composite resin.

    PubMed

    Kashiwada, T; Takagi, M

    1991-12-01

    There have been many arguments on the irritating mechanisms of the composite resin on the dental pulp. While the direct irritative effect of the resin has been preferred, some authors considered that the marginal microleakage and the resulting bacterial infection play a more important role in inducing the complicating pulp irritation. We developed a new filling technique, called the direct inlay restoration method, which could prevent the marginal leakage associated with the polymerization shrinkage of the adhesive composite resin. In this study, we tried to apply our method clinically. None of the 440 cases which were filled with the adhesive composite resin and 60 cases out of 64 cases in which the pulps were directly capped with the adhesive composite resin developed any signs and symptoms of pulp irritation. The other 4 cases developed signs of pulp irritation. Two of those 4 cases were pulpectomized due to spontaneous pain and the other 2 cases turned out to be well after re-restoration. With the informed consent of the patients, the direct pulp capping using the adhesive composite resin was experimentally performed on 6 caries-free 3rd molars and the histopathological examination of these capped molars revealed that neither significant degenerative nor inflammatory changes were brought about in the dental pulp. These clinical and histopathological observation suggest that the dental pulp irritation after resin filling is not induced by the composite resin itself. PMID:1764760

  11. Effects of Surface Treatments on the Bond Strength Between Resin Cement and a New Zirconia-reinforced Lithium Silicate Ceramic.

    PubMed

    Sato, T P; Anami, L C; Melo, R M; Valandro, L F; Bottino, M A

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of surface treatments on the bond strength between the new zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate ceramic (ZLS) and resin cement. VITA Suprinity blocks were crystallized according to the manufacturer's instructions and randomly assigned to six groups (N=36; n=6), according to the surface treatment to be performed and aging conditions: HF20, 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 seconds, baseline (control); HF20tc, 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 seconds, aging; HF40, 10% hydrofluoric acid for 40 seconds, baseline; HF40tc, 10% hydrofluoric acid for 40 seconds, aging; CJ, CoJet sandblasting (25 seconds, 2.5 bar, 15-mm distance), baseline; and CJtc, CoJet sandblasting (25 seconds, 2.5 bar, 15-mm distance), aging. All specimens were silanized (Monobond S) and cemented with Panavia F to newly polymerized Z250 resin blocks. After specimens were immersed for 24 hours in distilled water at 37° C, 1-mm(2) cross-section microbars were obtained by means of a cutting machine under constant cooling. Baseline groups were immediately tested, whereas "tc" groups were used to analyze the effect of aging on bond strength (10,000 thermal cycles, 5/55°C, 30-second bath). The microtensile bond strength test was performed with a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min), and bond strength (MPa) was calculated when the load-to-failure (N) was divided by the adhesive area (mm(2)). We also evaluated the surface roughness (Sa, average roughness; Str, texture aspect ratio; Sdr, developed interfacial area ratio) and the contact angle resulting from the treatments. Data were statistically analyzed by one- or two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (all α=5%). The failure mode of each specimen was evaluated by stereomicroscopy, and representative specimens were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The microtensile bond strength was affected by the surface conditioning (p<0.0001), storage condition (p<0.0001), and the interaction between them (p=0.0012). The

  12. Cytotoxicity evaluation of luting resin cements on bovine dental pulp-derived cells (bDPCs) by real-time cell analysis.

    PubMed

    Arslan Malkoç, Meral; Demir, Necla; Şengün, Abdulkadir; Bozkurt, Şerife Buket; Hakki, Sema Sezen

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the cytotoxicity of resin cements on dental pulp-derived cells (bDPCs), Bifix QM (BQM), Choice 2(C2), RelyX U200(RU200), Maxcem Elite(ME), and Multilink Automix(MA) were tested. The materials were incubated in DMEM for 72 h. A real-time cell analyzer was used to evaluate cell survival. The statistical analyses used were one-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer tests. BQM, RU200, and ME demonstrated a significant decrease in the bDPCs' index at 24 and 72 h (p≤0.001). These materials were found to be the most toxic resin cements, as compared to the control and other tested materials (C2 and MA). However, C2 and MA showed a better survival rate, compared to BQM, RU200, and ME, and had lower cell index than the control group. The cytotoxic effects of resin cements on pulpa should be evaluated during the selection of proper cements. PMID:25736260

  13. Evaluation of light transmission through different esthetic posts and its influence on the degree of polymerization of a dual cure resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Taneja, Sonali; Kumari, Manju; Gupta, Anupama

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To measure the light transmission through different esthetic posts and to evaluate the degree of polymerization of dual cure resin cement cured through these posts. Materials and Methods: The posts were divided into two experimental groups i.e. Group A (D.T. Light post); Group B (D.T. White post) and control i.e. Group C (metal post), each group having 10 samples. Posts of each group were illuminated with curing light and photographs were taken keeping the parameters standardized to evaluate the intensity of light transmission at different levels. The degree of polymerization of dual cure resin cement was evaluated using Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. The data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis. Results: D.T. Light post showed highest light transmission and degree of polymerization. The light intensity decreased from cervical to apical for both esthetic post but the decrease from middle to apical third was insignificant for D.T. White post group. No light transmission was detected in metal post but the degree of polymerization decreased significantly from cervical to middle third. Conclusion: Cementation of fibre post with superior light transmitting ability using dual cured resin cement resulted in increased degree of polymerization. PMID:23349573

  14. Assessing microleakage at the junction between amalgam and composite resin: a new method in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, F; Hey, J H; Ambrose, E R

    1991-01-01

    A new dye-diffusion test method was utilized to evaluate the microleakage between amalgam and composite resin. An amalgam cylinder was made to which a base of composite was added. The effects of several factors upon the microleakage were investigated. The test results indicated less microleakage when bonding agent was applied directly to the roughened amalgam prior to placement of composite resin. The most microleakage was found when roughened amalgam surface was acid-etched before placement of bonding agent and composite resin. PMID:1784538

  15. The effects of tooth preparation cleansing protocols on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin luting cement to contaminated dentin.

    PubMed

    Chaiyabutr, Yada; Kois, John C

    2008-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of a self-adhesive luting cement after using four different techniques to remove surface contamination on dentin. Extracted human molars were flattened to expose the dentin surface and prepared for full crown preparation. Acrylic temporary crowns were fabricated and placed using temporary cement. The specimens were stored at room temperature with 100% relative humidity for seven days. Following removal of the temporary crowns, the specimens were randomly divided into four groups, and excess provisional cement was removed with (1) a hand instrument (excavator), (2) prophy with a mixture of flour pumice and water (3) aluminous oxide abrasion with a particle size of 27 microm at 40 psi and (4) aluminous oxide abrasion with a particle size of 50 microm at 40 psi. The microstructure morphology of the tooth surface was evaluated and residual materials were detected using SEM and EDS analysis of randomly selected specimens. The ceramics were treated with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid-etch and silanized to the prepared dentin prior to cementing with self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem, 3M ESPE). The shear bond strength was determined at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The results were analyzed with one-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey's test. Particle abrasion treatment of dentin with an aluminous oxide particle provided the highest values of bond strength, while hand instrument excavation was the lowest (p < 0.05). Aluminous oxide particle size did not significantly influence the bond strength at 40 psi. The use of low pressure and small particle abrasion treated dentin as a mechanical cleansing protocol prior to definitive cementation increased the bond strength of self-adhesive resin-luting cement to dentin following eugenol-containing temporary cement. PMID:18833862

  16. Evaluation of micro-shear bond strength of resin modified glass-ionomer to composite resins using various bonding systems

    PubMed Central

    Kasraie, Shahin; Shokripour, Mohadese; Safari, Mahin

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to compare the micro-shear bond strength between composite and resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI) by different adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: A total of 16 discs of RMGI with a diameter of 15 mm and a thickness of 2 mm were randomly divided into four groups (n = 4). Four cylinders of composite resin (z250) were bonded to the RMGI discs with Single Bond, Clearfil SE Bond and Clearfil S3 Bond in Groups 1-3, respectively. The fourth group was the control. Samples were tested by a mechanical testing machine with a strain rate of 0.5 mm/min. Failure mode was assessed under a stereo-microscope. Results: The means of micro-shear bond strength values for Groups 1-4 were 14.45, 23.49, 16.23 and 5.46 MPa, respectively. Using a bonding agent significantly increased micro-shear bond strength (P = 0.0001). Conclusion: Micro-shear bond strength of RMGI to composite increased significantly with the use of adhesive resin. The bond strength of RMGI to composite resin could vary depending upon the type of adhesive system used. PMID:24347892

  17. Effects of aging on repair bond strengths of a polyacid-modified composite resin.

    PubMed

    Yap, A U; Sau, C W; Lye, K W

    1999-01-01

    The effect of age of a poly-acid-modified composite resin on repair bond strength after different methods of surface conditioning was studied. Surface conditioning methods included the following: maleic acid with resin application; polyacrylic acid with resin application; sand-blasting with resin application. Shear bond testing between the aged and new material was carried out with an Instron Universal Testing Machine. Although repair bonds strengths after all surface conditioning methods were significantly higher than the control group at 1 week, no statistically significant differences in bond strengths were noted after aging the material for 6 months. After all aging periods, surface conditioning with sand-blasting and resin application resulted in the highest repair bond for poly-acid-modified composite resins. Specimens with cohesive failure in the material gave significantly higher repair bond strengths than specimens with adhesive failure at the repaired interface. PMID:10823087

  18. An in vitro Comparative Evaluation of Micro Tensile Bond Strength of Two metal bonding Resin Cements bonded to Cobalt Chromium alloy

    PubMed Central

    Musani, Smita; Musani, Iqbal; Dugal, Ramandeep; Habbu, Nitin; Madanshetty, Pallavi; Virani, Danish

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the micro tensile bond strength of two metal bonding resin cements to sandblasted cobalt chromium alloy. Materials & Methods: Eight, Cobalt chromium alloy blocks of dimensions 10x5x5 mm were cast, finished and polished. One of the faces of each alloy block measuring 5x5mm was sandblasted with 50 μm grit alumina particles. The alloy blocks were then cleaned in an ultrasonic cleaner for 1 min and then air dried with an air stream. The Sandblasted surfaces of the two alloy blocks were bonded together with 2 different metal bonding resin systems (Panavia F Kuraray and DTK Kleber – Bredent). The samples were divided into 2 groups (n=4). Group 1- Two Co-Cr blocks were luted with Panavia cement. Group 2- Two Co-Cr blocks were luted with DTK Kleber-Bredent cement. The bonded samples were cut with a diamond saw to prepare Microtensile bars of approximately 1mm x 1mm x 6mm. Thirty bars from each group were randomly separated into 2 subgroups (n=15) and left for 3hrs (baseline) as per manufacturer's instructions while the other group was aged for 24hrs in 370C water, prior to loading to failure under tension at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Failure modes were determined by means of stereomicroscopy (sm). Statistical analysis was performed through one way – ANOVA. Results: Significant variation in micro-tensile bond strength was observed between the two metal bonding resin systems. Conclusion: DTK showed higher mean bond strength values than Panavia F cement both at baseline and after aging. How to cite this article: Musani S, Musani I, Dugal R, Habbu N, Madanshetty P, Virani D. An in vitro Comparative Evaluation of Micro Tensile Bond Strength of Two metal bonding Resin Cements bonded to Cobalt Chromium alloy. J Int Oral Health 2013;5(5):73-8. PMID:24324308

  19. Evaluation of pH, ultimate tensile strength, and micro-shear bond strength of two self-adhesive resin cements.

    PubMed

    Costa, Luciana Artioli; Carneiro, Karina Kato; Tanaka, Auro; Lima, Darlon Martins; Bauer, José

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the pH, ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and micro-shear bond strength (µSBS) of two self-adhesive resin cements to enamel and dentin. Sound bovine incisors (n = 10) and two self-adhesive resin cements (i.e., RelyX U-100 and seT PP) were used. The pH of the resin cements was measured using a pH-indicator paper (n = 3). Specimens for UTS were obtained from an hourglass-shaped mold. For µSBS, cylinders with internal diameter of 0.75 mm and height of 0.5 mm were bonded to the flat enamel and dentin surfaces. Bonded cylinders were tested in the shear mode using a loop wire. The fracture mode was also evaluated. The cement seT PP showed a low pH; U-100 showed significantly higher UTS (49.9 ± 2.0) than seT PP (40.0 ± 2.1) (p < 0.05) and high µSBS to enamel (10.7 ± 3.7). The lowest µSBS was found for seT PP to dentin (0.7 ± 0.6); seT PP to enamel (4.8 ± 1.7), and for U-100 to dentin (7.2 ± 1.9), showing an intermediate µSBS value (p < 0.05). Adhesive failure was the most frequently observed failure mode. The resin cement that presented the lowest pH and UTS also presented the lowest micro-shear bond strength to enamel and dentin. PMID:25337932

  20. Effect of Resin Cement Pre-heating on the Push-out Bond Strength of Fiber Post to Root Canal Dentin.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Nooroloyouni, Ahmad; Pornaghi Azar, Fatemeh; Sajjadi Oskoee, Jafar; Pirzadeh Ashraf, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Various factors influence the interfacial bond between the fiber posts and root canal dentin. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of pre-warming of resin cement on the push-out bond strength of fiber posts to various segments of root canal dentin. Materials and methods . In this in vitro study, 40 single-rooted human premolars were decoronated and underwent root canal treatment along with post space preparation. The samples were randomly divided into two groups: In group 1, Panavia F 2.0 cement was used at room temperature; in group 2, the same cement was warmed to 55‒60°C before mixing. After fiber posts were placed and cemented in the root canals, 3 dentin/post sections (coronal, middle and apical) with a thickness of 3 mm were prepared. A universal testing machine was used to measure push-out bond strength in MPa. Data was analyzed using two-factor ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test at α=0.05. Results. The mean value of push-out bond strength was high at room temperature, and the differences in the means of push-out bond strength values between the resin cement temperatures and between different root segments in each temperature were significant (P<0.05). Conclusion. Pre-warming of Panavia F 2.0 resin cement up to 55-60°C reduced push-out bond strength to root canal dentin. In addition, in each temperature group bond strengths decreased from coronal to apical segments. PMID:26889360

  1. Effect of Resin Cement Pre-heating on the Push-out Bond Strength of Fiber Post to Root Canal Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Nooroloyouni, Ahmad; Pornaghi Azar, Fatemeh; Sajjadi Oskoee, Jafar; Pirzadeh Ashraf, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Various factors influence the interfacial bond between the fiber posts and root canal dentin. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of pre-warming of resin cement on the push-out bond strength of fiber posts to various segments of root canal dentin. Materials and methods. In this in vitro study, 40 single-rooted human premolars were decoronated and underwent root canal treatment along with post space preparation. The samples were randomly divided into two groups: In group 1, Panavia F 2.0 cement was used at room temperature; in group 2, the same cement was warmed to 55‒60°C before mixing. After fiber posts were placed and cemented in the root canals, 3 dentin/post sections (coronal, middle and apical) with a thickness of 3 mm were prepared. A universal testing machine was used to measure push-out bond strength in MPa. Data was analyzed using two-factor ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test at α=0.05. Results. The mean value of push-out bond strength was high at room temperature, and the differences in the means of push-out bond strength values between the resin cement temperatures and between different root segments in each temperature were significant (P<0.05). Conclusion. Pre-warming of Panavia F 2.0 resin cement up to 55-60°C reduced push-out bond strength to root canal dentin. In addition, in each temperature group bond strengths decreased from coronal to apical segments. PMID:26889360

  2. A comparative evaluation of the retention of metallic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement under different enamel preparations: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Padmaja; Valiathan, Ashima; Arora, Ankit; Agarwal, Sachin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: For orthodontists, the ideal bonding material should be less moisture-sensitive and should release fluoride, thereby reducing unfavorable iatrogenic decalcification. Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cements (RMGICs), due to their ability to bond in the presence of saliva and blood can be a very good bonding agent for orthodontic attachments especially in the areas of mouth, which are difficult to access. Moreover, their fluoride releasing property makes them an ideal bonding agent for patients with poor oral hygiene. However, their immediate bond strength is said to be too low to immediately ligate the initial wire, which could increase the total number of appointments. The effect of sandblasting and the use of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCL) on the immediate bond failure of RMGIC clinically have not been reported in the literature until the date. This investigation intended to assess the effect of sandblasting (of the bracket base and enamel) and NaOCL on the rate of bond failure (with immediate ligation at 30 min) of Fuji Ortho LC and its comparison with that of conventional light cured composite resin over a period of 1 year. Materials and Methods: 400 sample teeth were further divided into 4 groups of 100 each and bonded as follows: (1) Group 1: Normal metallic brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (2) Group 2: Sandblasted bracket base and enamel surface, brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (3) Group 3: Deproteinized enamel surface using sodium hypochlorite and brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (4) Group 4: Normal metallic bracket bonded with Transbond XT after etching enamel with 37% phosphoric acid. This group served as control group. Results and Conclusion: Results showed that sandblasting the bracket base and enamel, can significantly reduce the bond failure rate of RMGIC. PMID:24014999

  3. Evaluating Resin-Dentin Bond by Microtensile Bond Strength Test: Effects of Various Resin Composites and Placement Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Moosavi, Horieh; Maleknejad, Fatemeh; Forghani, Maryam; Afshari, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This in vitro study evaluated the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of a methacrylate-based compared to a silorane-based resin composite in Class I cavity using different placement techniques. Materials and Methods: Class I cavities with dimension of (4 mm long, 4 mm wide, 3 mm deep) were prepared in extracted sound human molars. The teeth were randomly divided into six groups. The first three groups were filled with Filtek P90 using three methods of insertion; bulk, incremental and snow-plow, and the remaining three groups were filled with Clearfil AP-X using the same three placement techniques. After 24 hours of storage in water at 37°C, the specimens were thermocycled to 1000 cycles. Specimens were prepared for MTBS testing by creating bonded beams obtained from the pulpal floor. Statistical analysis used: Statistical analyses of data were performed by two-way ANOVA/Tukey (α=.05). Results: The experiment showed significant differences between the two resin composites with regard to filling techniques (P<0.05). The MTBS was significantly higher in each of Filtek P90 subgroup compared to Clearfil AP-X ones (P<0.05). With respect to filling technique in both resin composites, bulk insertion showed the significantly lowest MTBS (P<0.05), while no significant difference was found between the outcome of incremental and snow-plow techniques (P>0.05). Conclusion: Silorane-based resin composite as opposed to methacrylate based resin composite and layering placements in contrast to bulk filling method had higher microtensile bond strength. PMID:26966466

  4. Polyethyleneimine nanoparticles incorporated into resin composite cause cell death and trigger biofilm stress in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Beyth, Nurit; Yudovin-Farber, Ira; Perez-Davidi, Michael; Domb, Abraham J.; Weiss, Ervin I.

    2010-01-01

    Incorporation of cross-linked quaternary ammonium polyethylenimine (QPEI) nanoparticles in dental resin composite has a long-lasting and wide antimicrobial effect with no measured impact on biocompatibility in vitro. We hypothesized that QPEI nanoparticles incorporated into a resin composite have a potent antibacterial effect in vivo and that this stress condition triggers a suicide module in the bacterial biofilm. Ten volunteers wore a removable acrylic appliance, in which two control resin composite specimens and two resin composite specimens incorporating 1% wt/wt QPEI nanoparticles were inserted to allow the buildup of intraoral biofilms. After 4 h, the specimens were removed and tested for bacterial vitality and biofilm thickness, using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The vitality rate in specimens incorporating QPEI was reduced by > 50% (p < 0.00001), whereas biofilm thickness was increased (p < 0.05). The ability of the biofilm supernatant to restore bacterial death was tested in vitro. The in vitro tests showed a 70% decrease in viable bacteria (p < 0.05). Biofilm morphological differences were also observed in the scanning electron microscope micrographs of the resin composite versus the resin composite incorporating QPEI. These results strongly suggest that QPEI nanoparticles incorporated at a low concentration in resin composite exert a significant in vivo antibiofilm activity and exhibit a potent broad spectrum antibacterial activity against salivary bacteria. PMID:21131569

  5. Analysis of marginal adaptation and sealing to enamel and dentin of four self-adhesive resin cements.

    PubMed

    Aschenbrenner, Carina Maria; Lang, Reinhold; Handel, Gerhard; Behr, Michael

    2012-02-01

    This in vitro study compared the marginal adaptation of all-ceramic MOD-inlays luted to human molars with four self-adhesive resin cements. Thirty-two human third molars were randomly assigned to four test groups (n = 8 per group). MOD cavities were prepared with approximal finishing lines in dentin and enamel. All-ceramic Empress 2 inlays were luted with four self-adhesive cements (Clearfil SA, iCEM, Bifix SE, seT). Oral stress was simulated by 90 day storage in water as well as by thermal and mechanical loading (TCML, 1.2 × 10(6) × 50 N, 6,000 × 5°/55°, 1.6 Hz). The marginal fit was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and dye penetration. Data were analyzed with the ANOVA/Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The SEM investigation of the gingival cement margins (cement-tooth interface) showed values of perfect margin [percent] (means ± SD) after simulated aging between 84 ± 9% and 95 ± 5% for enamel and 80 ± 9% and 92 ± 3% for dentin. In enamel, seT showed significantly higher marginal integrity than iCEM after water storage and TCML (post hoc; p = 0.011). Furthermore, the marginal adaptation of iCEM in enamel deteriorated by simulated aging (p = 0.014, ANOVA). Mean values of dye penetration (percentage of dye entry into dentin) at the investigated restorations margins ranged between 3% and 8% for enamel and 12% and 22% for dentin. Clearfil SA, iCEM, and seT showed lower dye penetration in enamel than in dentin (Clearfil SA: p = 0.013, iCEM: p = 0.044, seT: p = 0.003). The results suggest that the four self-adhesive luting agents investigated seem to successfully bond to dentin-restricted as well as to enamel-restricted cavities, predicting good clinical performance. PMID:21327799

  6. Effects of modeling liquid/resin and polishing on the color change of resin composite.

    PubMed

    Sedrez-Porto, José Augusto; Münchow, Eliseu Aldrighi; Brondani, Lucas Pradebon; Cenci, Maximiliano Sergio; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Modeling liquids/resins have been used to build up resin composite (RC) restorations, although there is a lack of information regarding their effects on the color stability of the latter. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of the presence of modeling liquid between layers of RC and the finishing/polishing state of the material on color change in specimens exposed to red wine staining over time. Specimens were prepared by placing four increments (±0.5 mm thick) of RC (Filtek™ Z350 XT, 3M ESPE) into molds; half of which were prepared by applying modeling liquid (Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose™ Adhesive, SBMP, 3M ESPE) between the layers of RC, whereas the other half were prepared without SBMP (control). Light-activation was performed after application of the final RC layer using a light-emitting diode (Radii, SDI) curing unit with an irradiance of 900 mW/cm2 for 20 s. Each group was divided according to the surface finishing protocol (n = 7): nothing (non-polished) or polishing with Sof-Lex™/diamond paste (polished). Initial colors of the specimens were evaluated with a digital spectrophotometer and the CIEL*a*b* color system. The specimens were stored in wine (37°C) for 12 months, and the color measurements were reassessed after 4, 6, and 12 months of storage. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed at the end. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 5%). The presence of SBMP resulted in lower overall color change of the RC as compared with the control. The non-polished specimens exhibited a significantly higher color change than the polished specimens. SEM images corroborated the previous findings. In summary, the use of modeling liquid between layers of RC shows potential for application to reduce or delay the staining process of RC over time. Moreover, polishing is essential to provide increased color stability of the RC restoration. PMID:27556554

  7. Creep and creep-recovery of a thermoplastic resin and composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, Clem

    1988-01-01

    The database on advanced thermoplastic composites, which is currently available to industry, contains little data on the creep and viscoelastic behavior. This behavior is nevertheless considered important, particularly for extended-service reliability in structural applications. The creep deformation of a specific thermoplastic resin and composite is reviewed. The problem to relate the data obtained on the resin to the data obtained on the composite is discussed.

  8. [Influence of retainer design on fixation strength of resin-bonded glass fiber reinforced composite fixed cantilever dentures].

    PubMed

    Petrikas, O A; Voroshilin, Iu G; Petrikas, I V

    2013-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) fixed partial dentures (FPD) have become an accepted part of the restorative dentist's armamentarium. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of retainer design on the strength of two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass FRC-FPDs. Four retainer designs were tested: a dual wing, a dual wing + horizontal groove, a dual wing + occlusal rest and a step-box. Of each design on 7 human mandibular molars, FRC-FPDs of a premolar size were produced. The FRC framework was made of resin Revolution (Kerr) impregnated glass fibers (GlasSpan, GlasSpan) and veneered with hybrid resin composite (Charisma, Kulzer). Revolution (Kerr) was used as resin luting cement. FRC-FPDs were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine. T (Student's)-test was used to evaluate the data. The four designs were analyzed with finite element analysis (FEA) to reveal the stress distribution within the tooth/restoration complex. Significantly lower fracture strengths were observed with inlay-retained FPDs (step-box: 172±11 N) compared to wing-retained FPDs (p<0.05) (a dual wing + horizontal groove 222±9 N). The highest fracture strengths were observed with dual wing + occlusal rest FPDs: 250±10 N compared to inlay-retained FPDs (p<0.001) and wing-retained FPDs (p<0.001). FEA showed more favorable stress distributions within the tooth/restoration complex for dual wing retainers+ occlusal rest FPDs. There was stress concentration around connectors and retainers near connectors. A dual-wing retainer with occlusal rest is the optimal design for replacement of a single premolar by means of a two-unit cantilever FRC-FPDs. PMID:23715455

  9. Wear of feldspathic ceramic, nano-filled composite resin and acrylic resin artificial teeth when opposed to different antagonists.

    PubMed

    Ghazal, Muhamad; Hedderich, Jürgen; Kern, Matthias

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the wear of denture teeth and their antagonists produced by two-body and three-body wear tests. Three types of denture teeth, namely feldspathic ceramic (FC), nano-filled composite resin (NCR), and experimental acrylic resin teeth (AR), were tested. For each type two groups of eight upper premolars each were prepared. The first group was tested against cusps from the same material and the second group was tested against human enamel cusps. Each group was loaded with a total of 200,000 chewing cycles (two-body wear 100,000 cycles and three-body wear 100,000 cycles). Wear was analyzed by measuring the maximum depth and volume loss of the denture teeth using a laser scanner and by measuring the vertical loss of the antagonists using an optical macroscope. Statistically, there was no significant difference between the following combinations: FC-FC and NCR-NCR regarding the vertical and volume loss; and FC-enamel and NCR-enamel regarding the total vertical substance loss. The combinations AR-AR and AR-enamel showed higher wear values than the other combinations. For complete dentures, composite resin and ceramic teeth showed similar vertical and volume loss, whereas composite resin teeth seemed to be more suitable for partial dentures opposing natural teeth in terms of wear of teeth and antagonists. PMID:19049531

  10. Interlaminar shear properties of graphite fiber, high-performance resin composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needles, H. L.; Kourtides, D. A.; Fish, R. H.; Varma, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    Short beam testing was used to determine the shear properties of laminates consisting of T-300 and Celion 3000 and 6000 graphite fibers, in epoxy, hot melt and solvent bismaleimide, polyimide and polystyrylpyridine (PSP). Epoxy, composites showed the highest interlaminar shear strength, with values for all other resins being substantially lower. The dependence of interlaminar shear properties on the fiber-resin interfacial bond and on resin wetting characteristics and mechanical properties is investigated, and it is determined that the lower shear strength of the tested composites, by comparison with epoxy resin matrix composites, is due to their correspondingly lower interfacial bond strengths. An investigation of the effect of the wettability of carbon fiber tow on shear strength shows wetting variations among resins that are too small to account for the large shear strength property differences observed.

  11. Optical characterization of one dental composite resin using bovine enamel as reinforcing filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribioli, J. T.; Jacomassi, D.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Pratavieira, S.; Bagnato, V. S.; Kurachi, C.

    2012-01-01

    The use of composite resins for restorative procedure in anterior and posterior cavities is highly common in Dentistry due to its mechanical and aesthetic properties that are compatible with the remaining dental structure. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the optical characterization of one dental composite resin using bovine enamel as reinforcing filler. The same organic matrix of the commercially available resins was used for this experimental resin. The reinforcing filler was obtained after the gridding of bovine enamel fragments and a superficial treatment was performed to allow the adhesion of the filler particles with the organic matrix. Different optical images as fluorescence and reflectance were performed to compare the experimental composite with the human teeth. The present experimental resin shows similar optical properties compared with human teeth.

  12. Jute fiber composites from coal, super clean coal, and petroleum vacuum residue-modified phenolic resin

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmaruzzaman, M.; Sharma, D.K.

    2005-07-01

    Jute fiber composites were prepared with novolac and coal, phenolated-oxidized super clean coal (POS), petroleum vacuum residue (XVR)-modified phenol-formaldehyde (novolac) resin. Five different type of resins, i.e., coal, POS, and XVR-modified resins were used by replacing (10% to 50%) with coal, POS, and XVR. The composites thus prepared have been characterized by tensile strength, hardness, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier-transfer infrared (FT-IR), water absorption, steam absorption, and thickness swelling studies. Twenty percent POS-modified novolac composites showed almost the same tensile strength as that of pure novolac composites. After 30% POS incorporation, the tensile strength decreased to 25.84MPa from 33.96MPa in the case of pure novolac resin composites. However, after 50% POS incorporation, the percent retention of tensile strength was appreciable, i.e., 50.80% retention of tensile strength to that of pure novolac jute composites. The tensile strength of coal and XVR-rnodified composites showed a trend similar to that shown by POS-modified novolac resin composites. However, composites prepared from coal and XVR-modified resin with 50% phenol replacement showed 25.4% and 42% tensile strength retention, respectively, compared to that of pure novolac jute composites. It was found that the hardness of the modified composites slightly decreased with an increase in coal, POS, and XVR incorporation in the resin. The XVR-modified composites showed comparatively lower steam absorption than did coal or POS-modified composites. The thermal stability of the POS-modified composites was the highest among the composites studied. The detailed results obtained are being reported.

  13. Marginal leakage of class II glass ionomer-composite resin restorations: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Hirschfeld, Z; Frenkel, A; Zyskind, D; Fuks, A

    1992-02-01

    This in vitro study assessed the sealing properties of two metal-reinforced glass ionomer cements, used as "extended bases" in glass ionomer-composite resin restorations. Two class II cavities were prepared in the proximal surfaces of 30 molars. The gingival margin of one was prepared in enamel and the other in cementum/dentin. Fifteen teeth (30 cavities) were restored with Ketac Silver material used as an extended base (group A). In the remaining 15 teeth (30 cavities), the extended base was in Miracle Mix material (group B). All occlusal surfaces were restored with Estilux Posterior Material. The restored teeth were thermocycled, immersed in fuchsin, washed in water, embedded, sectioned, and examined under a dissecting microscope. All restorations with margins in cementum/dentin of group A (Ketac Silver) leaked. No microleakage occurred in 12 of the 30 restorations with margins in cementum/dentin of group B (Miracle Mix). In addition, severe microleakage was present in 24 teeth of group A, as opposed to three in group B. It was concluded that the sealing properties of Miracle Mix material are superior to those of Ketac Silver material, in vitro. PMID:1538319

  14. Evaluation of cuspal deflection in premolar teeth restored with low shrinkable resin composite (in vitro study)

    PubMed Central

    Labib, Labib Mohamed; Nabih, Sameh Mahmoud; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated cuspal deflection in premolar teeth restored with low shrinkable resin composite. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 human premolars were used for cuspal deflection evaluation in this study. Each group was divided into four equal groups according to the type of resin composite and the adhesive used as follows: group A: Using low shrinkable resin composite (silorane) with its adhesive system; group B: Using low shrinkable composite (silorane) with G-bond; group C: Using Filtek Z350 composite with G-bond; and group D: Using Filtek Z350 composite with AdheSE. Cusp deflection was detected using Universal measuring microscope and laser horizontal metroscope. Results: This study was done to investigate the effect of polymerization shrinkage stresses of two resin composite materials (Filtek Z350 and Filtek P90) on cuspal deflection of mesio-occluso-distal restoration. For this study, the extracted non-carious maxillary second premolars were selected. Forty teeth that showed no more than 5% variation in their dimensions were used. A significant increase in cuspal deflection of cavities restored with the methacrylate-based (Filtek Z350) compared with the silorane (P90) resin-based composites was obtained. Conclusion: The change in the organic matrix or materials formulation of the resin composite using silorane has a positive effect on controlling the cusp deflection. PMID:26759800

  15. Changes in scattering and absorption during curing of denta-resin composites: silorane and nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Mar Pérez, Maria; Ghinea, Razvan; Ionescu, Ana-Maria; de la Cruz Cardona, Juan

    2011-05-01

    Photocured polymers are widely used in dental applications. The optical properties of the dental composites change during curing; the appearance of the composites also changes. Recently, a new silorane-based composite resin and dental nanocomposite have been introduced. However, research regarding the effect of the silorane monomers or the size filler on appearance after curing of the resin composite is limited. This work aims to examine the optical properties of silorane-based composite and nanocomposite, in terms of scattering and absorption during curing. Six dimethacrylate-based dental resin composite (five universal and one nanocomposite) and one silorane-based dental resin composite (all shades A2 and T) were studied. The curing irradiance was 1100mW/cm2. The spectral reflectance of 1mm thick composite samples against white and black backgrounds were measured both before and after curing, and were converted to scattering and absorption coefficients using the Kubelka-Munk Theory. Both for pre and post-curing dental resin composites, the Albedo coefficient (K/S) shows that absorption prevails over the scattering for short wavelengths while for medium and large wavelengths, the scattering becomes more important, except for the T shade of the nanocomposite. After curing, the scattering and absorption values decreased for both types of materials. Changes in the absorption coefficient values should be caused by changes in the camphorquinone (CQ) absorption, whereas the scattering changes found should be directly attributable to index of refraction changes of the resin during curing.

  16. [Surface modification and microstructure of single-walled carbon nanotubes for dental composite resin].

    PubMed

    Xia, Yang; Zhang, Feimin; Xu, Li'na; Gu, Ning

    2006-12-01

    In order to improve its dispersion condition in dental composite resin and enhance its interaction with the matrix, single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWNTs) were refluxed and oxidized, then treated by APTE. Their outer surface were coated by nano-SiO2 particles using sol-gel process, then further treated by organosilanes ATES. IR and TEM were used to analyze modification results. TEM pictures showed nano-particles were on the surface of SWNTs; IR showed characteristic adsorbing bands of SiO2. Composite resin specimen with modified SWNTs was prepared and examined by TEM. SWNTs were detected in composite resin matrix among other inorganic fillers. PMID:17228726

  17. Shear bond strength of composite resin to amalgam: an experiment in vitro using different bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, F; Hey, J H; Ambrose, E R

    1991-01-01

    The shear bond strength between amalgam and composite resin with and without the use of adhesive systems was evaluated. It was found that the application of Cover-Up II or Prisma Universal Bond prior to placement of composite resin enhanced the shear bond strength between amalgam and composite resin more than five times; and a shear strength of 4.34 and 4.30 MPa was measured respectively. Acid-etching of the roughened amalgam surface prior to application of Prisma Universal Bond decreased the bond strength by nearly 45%. PMID:1784535

  18. Hydrolyzable polyester resins, varnishes and coating compositions containing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamori, Naoki; Yokoi, Junji; Yoshikawa, Motoyoshi

    1984-01-01

    Preparation of hydrolyzable polyester resin comprising reacting polycarboxylic acid and polyhydric alcohol components, which is characterized by using, as at least part of said polyhydric alcohol component, a metallic salt of hydroxy carboxylic acid of the formula defined and effecting the polycondensation at a temperature which is no more than the decomposition temperature of said metallic salt. The polyester resins are useful as resinous vehicle of varnishes and antifouling paints.

  19. Thermal Expansion and Swelling of Cured Epoxy Resin Used in Graphite/Epoxy Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal expansion and swelling of resin material as influenced by variations in temperature during moisture absorption is discussed. Comparison measurements using composites constructed of graphite fibers and each of two epoxy resin matrices are included. Polymer theory relative to these findings is discussed and modifications are proposed.

  20. Differences in interfacial bond strengths of graphite fiber-epoxy resin composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needles, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of epoxy-size and degree of cure on the interfacial bonding of an epoxy-amine-graphite fiber composite system is examined. The role of the fiber-resin interface in determining the overall mechanical properties of composites is poorly understood. A good interfacial adhesive bond is required to achieve maximum stress transfer to the fibers in composites, but at the same time some form of energy absorbing interfacial interaction is needed to achieve high fracture toughening. The incompatibility of these two processes makes it important to understand the nature and basic factors involved at the fiber-resin interface as stress is applied. The mechanical properties including interlaminar shear values for graphite fiber-resin composites are low compared to glass and boron-resin composites. These differences have been attributed to poor fiber-matrix adhesion. Graphite fibers are commonly subjected to post-treatments including application of organic sizing in order to improve their compatibility with the resin matrix and to protect the fiber tow from damage during processing and lay-up. In such processes, sized graphite fiber tow is impregnated with epoxy resin and then layed-up i nto the appropriate configuration. Following an extended ambient temperature cure, the graphite-resin composite structure is cured at elevated temperature using a programmed temperature sequence to cure and then cool the product.

  1. Localized and generalized simulated wear of resin composites.

    PubMed

    Barkmeier, W W; Takamizawa, T; Erickson, R L; Tsujimoto, A; Latta, M; Miyazaki, M

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to examine the wear of resin composite materials using both a localized and generalized wear simulation model. Twenty specimens each of seven resin composites (Esthet•X HD [HD], Filtek Supreme Ultra [SU], Herculite Ultra [HU], SonicFill [SF], Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill [TB], Venus Diamond [VD], and Z100 Restorative [Z]) were subjected to a wear challenge of 400,000 cycles for both localized and generalized wear in a Leinfelder-Suzuki wear simulator (Alabama machine). The materials were placed in custom cylinder-shaped stainless steel fixtures. A stainless steel ball bearing (r=2.387 mm) was used as the antagonist for localized wear, and a stainless steel, cylindrical antagonist with a flat tip was used for generalized wear. A water slurry of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) beads was used as the abrasive media. A noncontact profilometer (Proscan 2100) with Proscan software was used to digitize the surface contours of the pretest and posttest specimens. AnSur 3D software was used for wear assessment. For localized testing, maximum facet depth (μm) and volume loss (mm(3)) were used to compare the materials. The mean depth of the facet surface (μm) and volume loss (mm(3)) were used for comparison of the generalized wear specimens. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc test were used for data analysis of volume loss for both localized and generalized wear, maximum facet depth for localized wear, and mean depth of the facet for generalized wear. The results for localized wear simulation were as follows [mean (standard deviation)]: maximum facet depth (μm)--Z, 59.5 (14.7); HU, 99.3 (16.3); SU, 102.8 (13.8); HD, 110.2 (13.3); VD, 114.0 (10.3); TB, 125.5 (12.1); SF, 195.9 (16.9); volume loss (mm(3))--Z, 0.013 (0.002); SU, 0.026 (0.006); HU, 0.043 (0.008); VD, 0.057 (0.009); HD, 0.058 (0.014); TB, 0.061 (0.010); SF, 0.135 (0.024). Generalized wear simulation results were as follows: mean depth of facet (μm)--Z, 9.3 (3

  2. Bond strength of resin composite to differently conditioned amalgam.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, P K; Huysmans, M-C; Kalk, W; Vahlberg, T

    2006-01-01

    Bulk fracture of teeth, where a part of the amalgam restoration and/or the cusp is fractured, is a common clinical problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the shear bond strength of a hybrid resin composite to fresh amalgam. Amalgams (N=84) were condensed into acrylic and randomly assigned to one of the following treatments (N=6): (1) Alloy primer + opaquer, (2) Air-particle abrasion (50 micro m Al(2)O(3)) + alloy primer + opaquer, (3) Silica coating (30 micro m SiO(x)) + silanization + opaquer, (4) Opaquer + pre-impregnated continuous bidirectional E-glass fibre sheets, (5) Silica coating + silanization + fibre sheets, (6) Silica coating + silanization + opaquer + fibre sheet application. Non-conditioned amalgam surfaces were considered as control group (7). The mean surface roughness depth (R(Z)) was measured from the control group and air-abraded amalgam surfaces. The resin composite was bonded to the conditioned amalgam specimens using polyethylene molds. All specimens were tested under dry and thermocycled (6.000, 5-55 degrees C, 30 s) conditions. The shear bond strength of resin composite to amalgam substrates was measured in a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Surface roughness values for the non-conditioned control group (R(Z) approximately 0.14 micro m) and for air-particle abraded surfaces with either Al(2)O(3) or SiO(x) (R(Z) approximately 0.19 micro m and R(Z) approximately 0.16 micro m, respectively) did not show significant differences (p=0.23) (One-way ANOVA). In dry conditions, silica coating and silanization followed by fibre sheet application exhibited significantly higher results (14.8+/-5.6 MPa) than those of the groups conditioned with alloy primer (2.2+/-0.7 MPa) (p<0.001), air-particle abrasion+alloy primer (4.4+/-2.0 MPa, p<0.001), silica coating+silanization alone (6.2+/-0.8 MPa, p=0.009) or non-conditioned group (1.4+/-0.6, p<0.001). Silica coating and silanization followed

  3. Monitoring cure of composite resins using frequency dependent electromagnetic sensing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranbuehl, D. E.; Hoff, M. S.; Loos, A. C.; Freeman, W. T., Jr.; Eichinger, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    A nondestructive in situ measurement technique has been developed for monitoring and measuring the cure processing properties of composite resins. Frequency dependent electromagnetic sensors (FDEMS) were used to directly measure resin viscosity during cure. The effects of the cure cycle and resin aging on the viscosity during cure were investigated using the sensor. Viscosity measurements obtained using the sensor are compared with the viscosities calculated by the Loos-Springer cure process model. Good overall agreement was obtained except for the aged resin samples.

  4. Mechanical properties of magnesium ammonium phosphate cements and their zeolite composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Subhan, W.; Chawla, N.

    1993-04-01

    Phosphate-bonded cements have been proposed as candidates for solidification and stabilization of mixed wastes. Magnesium ammonium phosphate (MAP) has been investigated as a candidate material. Detailed physical and mechanical properties of MAP cement are reported. It is synthesized by the route of reaction of calcined MgO and ammonium phosphate solution. Samples are made by setting the cement at room temperature and slight pressure. The porosity is reduced to {approximately}11% by impregnation of ammonium phosphate solution. Detailed mechanical properties such as flexural strength, fracture toughness and compression strength are reported and fracture mechanical analyses supported with scanning electron microscopy are provided. Properties of composites of these cements with zeolites, which may be used for containment of radioactive as well as chemical waste are studied. We demonstrate that the strengths of these composites compare well with portland cement even after 50% loading of zeolites. Fracture mechanical implications of such loadings are given.

  5. DGEBF epoxy blends for use in the resin impregnation of extremely large composite parts

    SciTech Connect

    Madhukar, M. S.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2015-01-16

    Large superconducting electromagnets used in fusion reactors utilize a large amount of glass/epoxy composite for electrical insulation and mechanical and thermal strengths. Moreover, the manufacture of these magnets involves wrapping each superconducting cable bundle with dry glass cloth followed by the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding of the entire magnet. Due to their enormous size (more than 100 tons), it requires more than 40 h for resin impregnation and the subsequent pressure cycles to ensure complete impregnation and removal of any trapped air pockets. Diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F epoxy resin cross-linked with methyltetrahydrophthalic anhydride with an accelerator has been shown to be a good candidate for use in composite parts requiring long impregnation cycles. Viscosity, gel time, and glass transition temperature of four resin-blends of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F resin system were monitored as a function of time and temperature with an objective to find the blend that provides a working window longer than 40h at low viscosity without lowering its glass transition temperature. A resin-blend in the weight ratios of resin:hardener:accelerator=100:82:0.125 is shown to provide more than 60h at low resin viscosity while maintaining the same glass transition temperature as obtained with previously used resin-blends, based on the results.

  6. DGEBF epoxy blends for use in the resin impregnation of extremely large composite parts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Madhukar, M. S.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2015-01-16

    Large superconducting electromagnets used in fusion reactors utilize a large amount of glass/epoxy composite for electrical insulation and mechanical and thermal strengths. Moreover, the manufacture of these magnets involves wrapping each superconducting cable bundle with dry glass cloth followed by the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding of the entire magnet. Due to their enormous size (more than 100 tons), it requires more than 40 h for resin impregnation and the subsequent pressure cycles to ensure complete impregnation and removal of any trapped air pockets. Diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F epoxy resin cross-linked with methyltetrahydrophthalic anhydride with an accelerator has been shownmore » to be a good candidate for use in composite parts requiring long impregnation cycles. Viscosity, gel time, and glass transition temperature of four resin-blends of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F resin system were monitored as a function of time and temperature with an objective to find the blend that provides a working window longer than 40h at low viscosity without lowering its glass transition temperature. A resin-blend in the weight ratios of resin:hardener:accelerator=100:82:0.125 is shown to provide more than 60h at low resin viscosity while maintaining the same glass transition temperature as obtained with previously used resin-blends, based on the results.« less

  7. Thio-urethane oligomers improve the properties of light-cured resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Bacchi, Ataís; Consani, Rafael L.; Martim, Gedalias C.; Pfeifer, Carmem S.

    2015-01-01

    Thio-urethanes were synthesized by combining 1,6-Hexanediol-diissocyante (aliphatic) with pentaerythritol tetra-3-mercaptopropionate (PETMP) or 1,3-bis(1-isocyanato-1-methylethyl)benzene (aromatic) with trimethylol-tris-3-mercaptopropionate (TMP), at 1:2 isocyanate:thiol, leaving pendant thiols. Oligomers were added at 10–30 phr to BisGMA-UDMA-TEGDMA (5:3:2, BUT). 25wt% silanated inorganic fillers were added. Commercial cement (Relyx Veneer, 3M-ESPE) was also evaluated with 10–20 phr of aromatic oligomer. Near-IR was used to follow methacrylate conversion (DC) and rate of polymerization (Rpmax). Mechanical properties were evaluated in three-point bending (ISO 4049) for flexural strength/modulus (FS/FM, and toughness), and notched specimens (ASTM Standard E399-90) for fracture toughness (KIC). Polymerization stress (PS) was measured on the Bioman. Volumetric shrinkage (VS, %) was measured with the bonded disk technique. Results were analyzed with ANOVA/Tukey’s test (α=5%). In general terms, for BUT cements, conversion and mechanical properties in flexure increased for selected groups with the addition of thio-urethane oligomers. The aromatic versions resulted in greater FS/FM than aliphatic. Fracture toughness increased by twofold in the experimental groups (from 1.17±0.36 to around 3.23±0.22 MPa.m1/2). Rpmax decreased with the addition of thio-urethanes, though the vitrification point was not statistically different from the control. VS and PS decreased with both oligomers. For the commercial cement, 20 phr of oligomer increased DC, vitrification, reduced Rpmax and also significantly increased KIC, and reduced PS and FM. Thio-urethane oligomers were shown to favorably modify conventional dimethacrylate networks. Significant reductions in polymerization stress were achieved at the same time conversion and fracture toughness increased. PMID:25740124

  8. Kinetic behavior of a vinyl-ester resin within a thick-sectioned composite

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, D.J.; Beris, A.N.; Dhurjati, P.S.

    1996-12-31

    The experimental fabrication of thick-sectioned parts by the resin transfer molding (RTM) process has uncovered many important issues. The low thermal conductivity of the composite and the highly exothermic nature of typical RTM resins results in large internal thermal gradients. At the lower processing temperatures required to produce quality parts, the kinetic behavior of the vinyl-ester resin system being studied is significantly different. The cure of the resin was found to not reach full conversion at temperatures lower than 120{degrees}C. The activation energy of the resin at the lower temperatures was found to be 20% less than previously reported values. Another result of lower processing temperatures was a substantial increase in cure time due to inhibitors within the resin system. A preliminary analysis of the inhibitor deactivation kinetics was performed.

  9. Influence of endodontic sealer composition and time of fiber post cementation on sealer adhesiveness to bovine root dentin.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Ricardo Abreu da; Barreto, Mirela Sangoi; Moraes, Rafael do Amaral; Broch, Juliana; Bier, Carlos Alexandre Souza; Só, Marcus Vinícius Reis; Kaizer, Osvaldo Bazzan; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the influence of the type of endodontic sealer (salicylate resin-based sealer vs. two endodontic sealers) and the time of fiber post cementation after root filling on the post adhesion to bovine root dentin. Sixty bovine roots were assigned to six groups (n=10), considering an experimental design with two factors (factorial 3x2): endodontic sealer factor in three levels [epoxy resin-based sealer (AH Plus), eugenol-based sealer (Endofill), and salicylate resin-based sealer plus mineral trioxide aggregate - MTA (MTA Fillapex)] and time for post cementation factor in two levels (immediate post cementation or 15 days after root canal filling). After post cementation, 2-mm-thick slices were produced and submitted to push-out test. The failure modes were analyzed under a 40× stereomicroscope and scored as: adhesive at cement/dentin interface; adhesive at cement/post interface; cement cohesive; post cohesive; dentin cohesive; or mixed. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests (α=0.05). When the fiber posts were cemented immediately after the root canal filling, the bond strengths were similar, independent of the endodontic sealer type. However, after 15 days, the epoxy resin-based sealer presented higher bond strength than the other sealers (p<0.05). Comparison between each sealer in different experimental times did not reveal any differences. The main failure type was adhesive at dentin/cement interface (89.4%). The time elapsed between the root canal filling and post cementation has no influence on post/root dentin adhesion. On the contrary, the type of endodontic sealer can influence the adhesion between fiber posts and root dentin. PMID:23969913

  10. Composite restorations: influence of flowable and self-curing resin composite linings on microleakage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Peutzfeldt, Anne; Asmussen, Erik

    2002-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the microleakage at enamel (occlusal) and dentin (gingival) margins of MOD resin composite restorations made with different incremental insertion techniques. MOD cavities were prepared on 60 extracted human molars with the proximal margins placed 1 mm below the cemento-enamel junction. All teeth were acid-etched and treated with One-Step adhesive, then restored with a hybrid resin composite (Renew) with and without a flowable composite (AEliteflo) or a self-curing composite (Bisfil 2B) as the first increment in the proximal boxes. The time of placement of the second increment in relation to curing of the first increment was also varied. After polishing, the teeth were soaked in 0.5% basic fuchsin for 24 hours, sectioned and evaluated for dye penetration. None of the restorative techniques prevented microleakage at the enamel and dentin margins. However, microleakage at dentin margins were significantly reduced by the use of a flowable composite as the first increment in the proximal boxes. Time of placement in relation to curing had no influence on microleakage. Microleakage was lower at enamel margins than at dentin margins; however, besides microleakage at the enamel-restoration interface, 37 of the 60 restored teeth (62%) displayed at least one white line in enamel adjacent to the composite restoration. PMID:12413221

  11. Shear Bond Strength of MDP-Containing Self-Adhesive Resin Cement and Y-TZP Ceramics: Effect of Phosphate Monomer-Containing Primers

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jin-Soo; Yi, Young-Ah; Lee, Yoon; Seo, Deog-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of different phosphate monomer-containing primers on the shear bond strength between yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) ceramics and MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cement. Materials and Methods. Y-TZP ceramic surfaces were ground flat with #600-grit SiC paper and divided into six groups (n = 10). They were treated as follows: untreated (control), Metal/Zirconia Primer, Z-PRIME Plus, air abrasion, Metal/Zirconia Primer with air abrasion, and Z-PRIME Plus with air abrasion. MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cement was applied to the surface-treated Y-TZP specimens. After thermocycling, a shear bond strength test was performed. The surfaces of the Y-TZP specimens were analyzed under a scanning electron microscope. The bond strength values were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and the Student–Newman–Keuls multiple comparison test (P < 0.05). Results. The Z-PRIME Plus treatment combined with air abrasion produced the highest bond strength, followed by Z-PRIME Plus application, Metal/Zirconia Primer combined with air abrasion, air abrasion alone, and, lastly, Metal/Zirconia Primer application. The control group yielded the lowest results (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The application of MDP-containing primer resulted in increased bond strength between Y-TZP ceramics and MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cements. PMID:26539485

  12. Microwave heated resin injector for advanced composite production.

    PubMed

    Stanculovic, Sebastijan; Feher, Lambert

    2008-01-01

    A novel microwave (MW) injector at 2.45 GHz for resin infiltration has been developed at the Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology (IHM), Research Center Karlsruhe (FZK), Germany. Resin injection is an essential step in the production of carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) for aerospace applications. A compact, low-cost and automated MW injector provides an efficient and safe energy transfer from the MW source to the resin and supports an appropriate electromagnetic field structure for homogeneous infiltration. The system provides temperature monitoring and an automatized MW power switching, which ensures a fast response of the MW system to rapid changes in the temperature for high flow rates of the resin. In low power measurements with a vector network analyzer, the geometry of the injector cavity has been adjusted to provide an efficient system. The MW injector has been tested for specific resin systems infiltrations. PMID:19227063

  13. Properties of microfilled composite resins as influenced by filler content.

    PubMed

    St Germain, H; Swartz, M L; Phillips, R W; Moore, B K; Roberts, T A

    1985-02-01

    Two series of composite resins were prepared with a light-cured urethane dimethacrylate matrix to which varying amounts of two types of silanated silica particles were added. One series contained volume fractions ranging from 15.8 to 28.8% silica particles of 20 nm in diameter (Type I filler) and the other series volume fractions of from 24 to 49.4% of an agglomerated silica particle of 40 nm in diameter (Type II filler). Tests were conducted to determine the effect of filler level on: depth of cure as determined by hardness measurements; color stability in both UV light and water; water sorption with time; hardness; compressive strength; strain behavior in slow compression; and resistance to toothbrush abrasion and wear by hydroxyapatite. Analysis of the data obtained for these two microfilled series indicate that increased filler levels result in trends for increased depth of cure, color stability, hardness, compressive strength, and stiffness, while water sorption and resistance to both toothbrush abrasion and wear by hydroxyapatite were reduced. These trends were more pronounced for the Type II filler series than for the Type I filler series. However, there was a greater differential in filler levels within the Type II series than within the Type I series. PMID:2982935

  14. Effect of radiotherapy on the hardness and surface roughness of two composite resins.

    PubMed

    Viero, Flavio Luiz; Boscolo, Frab Norberto; Demarco, Flavio Fernando; Faot, Fernanda

    2011-01-01

    The knowledge about the potential adverse effects of radiotherapy compared to dental composites is a useful information for the clinician's decision regarding adoption of repairs or replacement of dental restorations during oral cancer treatment. This study evaluated the effects of irradiation on microhardness and surface roughness of a microfilled and a packable composite resin. The microfilled composite resin demonstrated significantly lower microhardness and a smoother surface compared to the packable composite resin (p < 0.05). Although irradiation significantly reduced the microhardness for both composite resins (P < 0.05), increasing the x-ray doses did not cause an additional significant decrease in surface hardness (P > 0.05). Meanwhile, irradiation did not produce a significantly rougher surface (P > 0.05), but specimens submitted to abrasion exhibited a significant increase in surface roughness for both composite resins (P < 0.05). It was concluded that while irradiation can adversely affect the hardness of tested composite resins, it does not interfere with surface roughness. PMID:21903557

  15. Polyimide Composites Properties of RTM370 Fabricated by Vacuum Assisted Resins Transfer Molding (VARTM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Criss, Jim M.; Mintz, Eric A.

    2011-01-01

    RTM370 imide resin based on 2,3,3 ,4 -biphenyl dianhydride ( a-BPDA), 3,4 -oxydianinline (3,4 -ODA) with 4-phenylethynylphthalic (PEPA) endcap has shown to exhibit high Tg (370 C) and low melt viscosity (10-30 poise) at 280 C with a pot-life of 1-2 h. Previously, RTM370 resin has been fabricated into composites with T650-35 carbon fabrics by resin transfer molding (RTM) successfully. RTM370 composites exhibit excellent mechanical properties up to 327 C (620 F), and outstanding property retention after aging at 288 C (550 F) for 1000 hrs. In this presentation, RTM 370 composites will be fabricated by vacuum assisted resins transfer molding (VARTM), using vacuum bags without mold. The mechanical properties of RTM370 composites fabricated by VARTM will be compared to those of RTM370 made by RTM.

  16. Composite Properties of RTM370 Polyimide Fabricated by Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Criss, James M.; Mintz, Eric A.; Shonkwiler, Brian; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2011-01-01

    RTM370 imide resin based on 2,3,3?,4?-biphenyl dianhydride (a-BPDA), 3,4'-oxydianinline (3,4'-ODA) with the 4-phenylethynylphthalic (PEPA) endcap has been shown to exhibit a high cured T(sub g) (370 C) and low melt viscosity (10-30 poise) at 280 C with a pot-life of 1-2 h. Previously, RTM370 resin has been successfully fabricated into composites reinforced with T650-35 carbon fabrics by resin transfer molding (RTM). RTM370 composites exhibit excellent mechanical properties up to 327?C (620?F), and outstanding property retention after aging at 288?C (550?F) for 1000 h. In this work, RTM370 composites were fabricated by vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM), using vacuum bags on a steel plate. The mechanical properties of RTM370 composites fabricated by VARTM are compared to those prepared by RTM.

  17. Wear of dental resin composites: insights into underlying processes and assessment methods--a review.

    PubMed

    Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; De Moraes Purquerio, Benedito; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2003-05-15

    Given the increased aesthetic demands of patients, along with improvements in the formulation of resin composites, the ability of these materials to bond to tooth structures, and concerns about dental amalgam fillings, the applicability of resin composites in dentistry has become increasingly widespread. As resistance to wear represents an important factor in determining the clinical success of resin composite restoratives, the aim of this article was to define what constitutes wear; the major underlying phenomena involved in this process-adhesion, abrasion, fatigue, and corrosion-being described. Discussions were also focused on factors that contribute both to the magnitude and minimization of resin composite wear. Finally, insights were included on both in vivo and laboratory studies used to determine wear resistance. PMID:12687721

  18. Mechanical properties, volumetric shrinkage and depth of cure of short fiber-reinforced resin composite.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties, volumetric shrinkage and depth of cure of a short fiber-reinforced resin composite (SFRC) were investigated in this study and compared to both a bulk fill resin composite (BFRC) and conventional glass/ceramic-filled resin composite (CGRC). Fracture toughness, flexural properties, volumetric shrinkage and depth of cure of the SFRC, BFRC and CGRC were measured. SFRC had significantly higher fracture toughness than BFRCs and CGRCs. The flexural properties of SFRC were comparable with BFRCs and CGRCs. SFRC showed significantly lower volumetric shrinkage than the other tested resin composites. The depth of cure of the SFRC was similar to BFRCs and higher than CGRCs. The data from this laboratory investigation suggests that SFRC exhibits improvements in fracture toughness, volumetric shrinkage and depth of cure when compared with CGRC, but depth of cure of SFRC was similar to BFRC. PMID:27251997

  19. A 3-year randomized clinical trial evaluating two different bonded posterior restorations: Amalgam versus resin composite

    PubMed Central

    Kemaloglu, Hande; Pamir, Tijen; Tezel, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the performance and postoperative sensitivity of a posterior resin composite with that of bonded amalgam in 40 (n = 20) large sized cavities and to evaluate whether resin composite could be an alternative for bonded amalgam. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial. Twenty patients in need of at least two posterior restorations were recruited. Authors randomly assigned one half of the restorations to receive bonded amalgam and the other half to composite restorations. Forty bonded amalgams (n = 20) and composites (n = 20) were evaluated for their performance on modified-US Public Health Service criteria and postoperative sensitivity using visual analogue scale (VAS) for 36-months. Results: Success rate of this study was 100%. First clinical alterations were rated as Bravo after 1 year in marginal discoloration, marginal adaptation, anatomical form, and surface roughness for both amalgam and composite. At the 3rd year, overall “Bravo” rated restorations were 12 for bonded amalgam and 13 for resin composites. There were no significant differences among the VAS scores of composites and bonded amalgams for all periods (P > 0.05) except for the comparisons at the 3rd year evaluation (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Within the limitation of this study, both resin composite and bonded amalgam were clinically acceptable. Postoperative sensitivity results tend to decrease more in composite restorations rather than amalgams. Therefore, it was concluded that posterior resin composite can be used even in large sized cavities. PMID:27011734

  20. Effect of resin thickness, and curing time on the micro-hardness of bulk-fill resin composites

    PubMed Central

    Nagi, Shaymaa M.; Moharam, Lamiaa M.; Zaazou, Mohamed H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bulk-fill resin composite has been introduced, their manufacturers claimed that they can be applied in bulks of 4mm, without necessitating a prolonged curing time, or a light curing unit with increased irradiance. Thus this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of resin thickness, and curing time on the micro-hardness of two bulk -fill resin composites; Tetric Evo-Ceram [TE], and X-trafil [XF]. Material and Methods 120 cylindrical specimens were prepared, and divided into 24 groups (n=5/group), representing the two bulk-fill resin composites, three different material thicknesses (2, 3 and 4 mm) and the four curing times used in the study (10, 20, 40, and 60 seconds). The specimens were light-cured from the top surface only. Specimens were stored in light proof containers in complete darkness at 37°C for 24 hours. Micro-hardness test was conducted on both top and bottom surfaces using Vickers micro-hardness tester with 500 g load and a dwell time of 15 seconds. Data were statistically analyzed by Four-way ANOVA of Variance. The significance level was set at P ≤ 0.05. Pearson Correlation used to determine significant correlations between mean micro-hardness (top) and (bottom) surfaces. Results Four way-ANOVA shows that different tested materials produce a statistically significant effect on mean micro-hardness (VHN) at p≤0.001, while thickness, curing time, and surface revealed statistically non significant effect on mean micro-hardness (VHN) at p≥0.05. [XF] (92.01±3.15 VHN) showed statistically significant higher mean micro-hardness than [TE] (54.13±4.96 VHN). Pearson Correlation revealed that there was a significant direct correlation between micro-hardness (bottom) and mean micro-hardness (top) (mm), r = 0.985, p (2-tailed) ≤0.001. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, the bulk-fill resin composites used in this study can be placed and cured properly in the 4 mm bulk. Key words:Bulk-fill resin composite, micro

  1. Fingerprint test data report: FM 5064J (Kaiser) lots No. 1 (K) - No. 4 (K). [resin matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Quality control tests are presented for resin matrix and carbon-carbon composites. Tests performed are filler test, resin test, prepregs test, and fabric test. The test results are presented in chart form.

  2. Achieving optimal aesthetics for direct and indirect restorations with microhybrid composite resins.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Wynn H

    2005-04-01

    In aesthetic dentistry, material science has played a key role in the development of natural-appearing restorations. Despite the progress, there have been challenges in achieving a harmonious integration of direct and indirect posterior restorations. Although porcelain restorations provide natural aesthetics, ceramics cannot be applied via direct techniques. Consequently, composite resins are valuable alternatives for conservative posterior restorations. In addition, because of their differing physical and optical properties, optimal aesthetic blending with porcelain and resin cannot be routinely achieved. This article explores the potential of composite resins as a direct and indirect restorative option in achieving the most favorable natural blend in the posterior region. PMID:15974036

  3. Cuspal Displacement Induced by Bulk Fill Resin Composite Polymerization: Biomechanical Evaluation Using Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, João; Alves, Sofia; Nogueira, Rogério

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization shrinkage is a major concern to the clinical success of direct composite resin restorations. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of polymerization shrinkage strain of two resin composites on cuspal movement based on the use of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. Twenty standardized Class II cavities prepared in upper third molars were allocated into two groups (n = 10). Restorations involved the bulk fill placement of conventional microhybrid resin composite (Esthet•X® HD, Dentsply DeTrey) (Group 1) or flowable “low-shrinkage” resin composite (SDR™, Dentsply DeTrey) (Group 2). Two FBG sensors were used per restoration for real-time measurement of cuspal linear deformation and temperature variation. Group comparisons were determined using ANCOVA (α = 0.05) considering temperature as the covariate. A statistically significant correlation between cuspal deflection, time, and material was observed (p < 0.01). Cuspal deflection reached 8.8 μm (0.23%) and 7.8 μm (0.20%) in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. When used with bulk fill technique, flowable resin composite SDR™ induced significantly less cuspal deflection than the conventional resin composite Esthet•X® HD (p = 0.015) and presented a smoother curve slope during the polymerization. FBG sensors appear to be a valid tool for accurate real-time monitoring of cuspal deformation. PMID:27190517

  4. Cuspal Displacement Induced by Bulk Fill Resin Composite Polymerization: Biomechanical Evaluation Using Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors.

    PubMed

    Vinagre, Alexandra; Ramos, João; Alves, Sofia; Messias, Ana; Alberto, Nélia; Nogueira, Rogério

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization shrinkage is a major concern to the clinical success of direct composite resin restorations. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of polymerization shrinkage strain of two resin composites on cuspal movement based on the use of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. Twenty standardized Class II cavities prepared in upper third molars were allocated into two groups (n = 10). Restorations involved the bulk fill placement of conventional microhybrid resin composite (Esthet•X® HD, Dentsply DeTrey) (Group 1) or flowable "low-shrinkage" resin composite (SDR™, Dentsply DeTrey) (Group 2). Two FBG sensors were used per restoration for real-time measurement of cuspal linear deformation and temperature variation. Group comparisons were determined using ANCOVA (α = 0.05) considering temperature as the covariate. A statistically significant correlation between cuspal deflection, time, and material was observed (p < 0.01). Cuspal deflection reached 8.8 μm (0.23%) and 7.8 μm (0.20%) in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. When used with bulk fill technique, flowable resin composite SDR™ induced significantly less cuspal deflection than the conventional resin composite Esthet•X® HD (p = 0.015) and presented a smoother curve slope during the polymerization. FBG sensors appear to be a valid tool for accurate real-time monitoring of cuspal deformation. PMID:27190517

  5. Surface roughness and bond strength between Y-TZP and self-adhesive resin cement after air particle abrasion protocols.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Rafael Santiago de; Campos, Fernanda; Sarmento, Hugo Ramalho; Alves, Maria Luiza Lima; Dal Piva, Amanda Maria de Oliveira; Gondim, Laísa Daniel; Souza, Rodrigo Othávio Assunção

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different air particle abrasion (APA) protocols-with variations in particle types, duration of application, and the distance between the device tip and the ceramic-on the surface roughness (SR) of zirconia-based ceramic (yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal [Y-TZP]) and the shear bond strength (SBS) between Y-TZP and resin cement. In total, 135 sintered Y-TZP blocks were polished and divided into 9 groups according to 3 factors: particle (alumina vs alumina coated with silica), duration (5 vs 10 seconds), and distance (contact vs 10 mm away). All 3 factors significantly influenced the SR values between the experimental groups and the control group. For SBS, only the particle type was a statistically significant factor. Results showed that air particle abrasion with silica-coated alumina resulted in higher SBS, even though the SR values associated with those groups were not the highest. PMID:27599282

  6. One year comparative clinical evaluation of EQUIA with resin-modified glass ionomer and a nanohybrid composite in noncarious cervical lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vaid, Deepa Sunil; Shah, Nimisha Chinmay; Bilgi, Priyanka Shripad

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Comparative evaluation of EQUIA with a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC; GC Gold Label glass ionomer light cured universal restorative cement) and a nanohybrid composite (Tetric N-Ceram) in noncarious cervical lesions (NCCLs). Background: To establish the most suitable material for the restoration of NCCLs. Settings and Design: In vivo study. Materials and Methods: Eighty-seven NCCLs were randomly restored with EQUIA, a RMGIC, and a nanohybrid composite. Clinical evaluation of the restorations was done following the Unites States Public Health criteria by a single-blinded investigator. Data were formulated, and statistical analysis was done by Chi-square test. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square test. Results: No significant difference was found between EQUIA, RMGIC, and nanohybrid composite at 1-month, at 6 months, and at 1-year (P > 0.05). Conclusions: EQUIA, resin-modified glass ionomer, and nanohybrid composite performed equally at 1-month, 6 months, and 1-year follow-up periods. PMID:26752837

  7. Non-retarding fluid loss additives for well cementing compositions

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, L.F.; McElfresh, P.M.; Reese, D.W.

    1986-07-29

    A method is described of cementing a well bore, comprising the steps of: mixing together a hydraulic cement, water in an amount to produce a pumpable slurry, and a non-retarding fluid loss additive which comprises a copolymer of N-vinylpyrrolidone monomer and a second anionic monomer selected from the group consisting of acrylic acid and methacrylic acid the monomer ratio of the N-vinylpyrrolidone monomer to the anionic monomer being in the range from about 85:15 to 95:5, and the copolymer having a molecular weight in the range from about 200,000 to 400,000; pumping the cement slurry to the desired location in the well bore; and allowing the cement slurry to harden to a solid mass.

  8. Clinical comparison between a modified light-curing denture base resin and a conventional composite resin for orthodontic bonding.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Lucia; Cacciafesta, Vittorio; Melsen, Birte

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this in vivo study was to evaluate and compare the bond failure rate of a modified visible light-cured denture base resin (Triad VLC Provisional Material; Dentsply International Inc., York, PA) with that of a conventional visible light-cured composite resin (Transbond XT; 3M/Unitek, Monrovia, CA) for the bonding of orthodontic brackets. Both adhesives were used in each patient following a split-mouth design. Thirty-five consecutive patients with fixed appliances were included in the study, and the performance of 655 stainless steel brackets was evaluated: 325 brackets were bonded with the modified Triad VLC resin and 330 were bonded with Transbond XT resin. The incidence and site of bond failures were recorded over a period of 12 months. The overall failure rate of Triad VLC (4.3%) was not significantly different (p>0.05) from that of Transbond XT (3.6%). No significant differences in the failure rates of upper and lower arches within each material or between the two materials were found (p>0.05). Transbond XT showed a significantly higher failure rate (p<0.05) in the anterior (4.8%) than in the posterior teeth (1.6%). The present findings demonstrate that Triad VLC could be used as an alternative bonding material for direct bonding of orthodontic brackets. PMID:12887574

  9. Apparatus and method for measuring the expansion properties of a cement composition

    DOEpatents

    Spangle, Lloyd B.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus is disclosed which is useful for measuring the expansion properties of semi-solid materials which expand to a solid phase, upon curing, such as cement compositions. The apparatus includes a sleeve, preferably cylindrical, which has a vertical slit on one side, to allow the sleeve to expand. Mounted on the outside of the sleeve are several sets of pins, consisting of two pins each. The two pins in each set are located on opposite sides of the slit. In the test procedure, the sleeve is filled with wet cement, which is then cured to a solid. As the cement cures it causes the sleeve to expand. The actual expansion of the sleeve represents an expansion factor for the cement. This factor is calculated by measuring the distance across the pins of each set, when the sleeve is empty, and again after the cured cement expands the sleeve.

  10. Rubber dam isolation--key to success in diastema closure technique with direct composite resin.

    PubMed

    Barros de Campos, Paulo Ricardo; Maia, Rodrigo Rocha; Rodrigues de Menezes, Livia; Barbosa, Isabel Ferreira; Carneiro da Cunha, Amanda; da Silveira Pereira, Gisele Damiana

    2015-01-01

    The use of direct composite resin for diastema closure has technique advantages, including that the restorative procedure can be carried out in one appointment at a reasonable cost and without the removal of sound tooth structure. The use of a rubber dam for closing diastemas with composite resin is of paramount importance as it prevents moisture contamination and ensures increased gingival retraction compared to other techniques. This provides better access to the cervical area of the tooth, facilitating proper placement of resin to recreate the natural anatomical contours and contact point. Thus, there is a more natural adaptation of the restoration to the gingival tissue, avoiding a space between the papilla and the restored tooth. To illustrate the advantages of this technique, two diastema closure cases are presented using direct composite resin with rubber dam isolation. PMID:26794052

  11. Novel matrix resins for composites for aircraft primary structures, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Edmund P.; Puckett, P. M.; Maynard, S.; Bishop, M. T.; Bruza, K. J.; Godschalx, J. P.; Mullins, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the contract is the development of matrix resins with improved processability and properties for composites for primarily aircraft structures. To this end, several resins/systems were identified for subsonic and supersonic applications. For subsonic aircraft, a series of epoxy resins suitable for RTM and powder prepreg was shown to give composites with about 40 ksi compressive strength after impact (CAI) and 200 F/wet mechanical performance. For supersonic applications, a thermoplastic toughened cyanate prepreg system has demonstrated excellent resistance to heat aging at 360 F for 4000 hours, 40 ksi CAI and useful mechanical properties at greater than or equal to 310 F. An AB-BCB-maleimide resin was identified as a leading candidate for the HSCT. Composite panels fabricated by RTM show CAI of approximately 50 ksi, 350 F/wet performance and excellent retention of mechanical properties after aging at 400 F for 4000 hours.

  12. Effects of air-polishing powders on color stability of composite resins

    PubMed Central

    GÜLER, Ahmet Umut; DURAN, Ibrahim; YÜCEL, Ali Çagin; ÖZKAN, Pelin

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different air-polishing powders on the color stability of different types of composite resin restorative materials. Material and methods Thirty cylindrical specimens (15×2 mm) were prepared for each of 7 composite resin restorative materials. All specimens were polished with a series of aluminum oxide polishing discs (Sof-Lex). The prepared specimens of each composite resin were randomly divided into 3 groups of 10 specimens each, for control (Group-C) and two air-powder applications (Group-CP: Cavitron Prophy-Jet; Group-PS: Sirona ProSmile prophylaxis powder). A standard air-polishing unit (ProSmile Handly) was used. All specimens were air-powdered for 10 s at 4-bar pressure. The distance of the spray nosel from the specimens was approximately 10 mm and angulation of the nosel was 90º. Specimens were stored in 100 mL of coffee (Nescafe Classic) for 24 h at 37ºC. Color measurement of all specimens was recorded before and after exposure to staining agent with a colorimeter (Minolta CR-300). Color differences (∆E*) between the 2 color measurements (baseline and after 24 h storage) were calculated. The data were analyzed with a 2-way ANOVA test, and mean values were compared by the Tukey HSD test (p≤0.05). Results According to the 2-way ANOVA results, composite resin restorative materials, air-polishing powders, and their interaction were statistically significant (p<0.05) For Aelite Aesthetic Enemal, Filtek Z250, Grandio, CeramX Mono, and Quixfil composite resin restorative materials, no significant difference was observed between Group-PS and Group-CP (p>.05) and these groups demonstrated the highest ∆E* values. For Filtek Silorane and IntenS, the highest ∆E* values were observed in Group-PS. The lowest ∆E* values for all composite resin groups were observed in Group-C. When comparing the 7 composite resin restorative materials, Aelite Aesthetic Enemal demonstrated significantly less

  13. Effects of Particle Size on the Piezoelectric Properties of 0-3 PZT/Cement Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zongjin; Gonga, Hongyu

    2008-02-01

    0-3 PZT/cement composites are kinds of new piezoelectric materials which are expected to find application in civil engineering for their high piezoelectric properties and good compatibility with concrete structures. In this study, the effect of particle size on the piezoelectric and dielectric properties of cement based 0-3 piezoelectric composites was investigated. The piezoelectric composites were prepared by mixing and pressing the white cement and PZT powder with different average particle size ranging from 3 μm to 482 μm. It was found that the piezoelectric strain factor (d33), dielectric constant (ɛr), and electromechanical coupling coefficient (Kt) increased with the increase of the PZT particle size. However, the composites with larger PZT particles had higher dielectric loss (tanδ) than the composites with smaller particles.

  14. Bonding performance and interfacial characteristics of short fiber-reinforced resin composite in comparison with other composite restoratives.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) and surface free-energy (SFE) of short fiber-reinforced resin composite (SFRC), using different adhesive systems, in comparison with other composite restoratives. The resin composites used were everX Posterior (EP), Clearfil AP-X (CA), and Filtek Supreme Ultra Universal Restorative (FS). The adhesive systems used were Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SM), Clearfil SE Bond (CS), and G-Premio Bond (GB). Resin composite was bonded to dentin, and SBS was determined after 24 h of storage in distilled water and after 10,000 thermal cycles (TCs). The SFEs of the resin composites and the adhesives were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids. The SFE values and SFE characteristics were not influenced by the type of resin composite, but were influenced by the type of adhesive system. The results of this study suggest that the bonding performance and interfacial characteristics of SFRC are the same as for other composite restoratives, but that these parameters are affected by the type of adhesive system. The bonding performance of SFRC was enhanced by thermal cycling in a manner similar to that for other composite restoratives. PMID:26954878

  15. Effect of ultraviolet light irradiation on bond strength of fiber post: Evaluation of surface characteristic and bonded area of fiber post with resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Reza, Fazal; Ibrahim, Nur Sukainah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Fiber post is cemented to a root canal to restore coronal tooth structure. This research aims to evaluate the effect of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on bond strength of fiber post with resin cement. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 of the two types of fiber posts, namely, FRC Prostec (FRC) and Fiber KOR (KOR), were used for the experiment. UV irradiation was applied on top of the fiber post surface for 0, 15, 20, and 30 min. The irradiated surface of the fiber posts (n = 5) were immediately bonded with resin cement (Rely X U200) after UV irradiation. Shear bond strength (SBS) MPa was measured, and the dislodged area of post surfaces was examined with scanning electron microscopes. Changes in surface roughness (Ra) of the FRC group after UV irradiation were observed (n = 3) using atomic force microscopy. Data of SBS were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance, followed by multiple comparisons (P < 0.05). Results: SBS was significantly higher for 20 min of UV irradiation of the FRC group while significantly higher SBS was observed with 15 min of UV irradiation of the KOR group. Resin cement was more evident (cohesive failure) on the dislodged post surface of the UV treated groups compared with the control. The surface roughness of the FRC post was Ra = 175.1 nm and Ra = 929.2 nm for the control and the 20 min group, respectively. Conclusions: Higher surface roughness of the UV irradiated group indicated formation of mechanical retention on the fiber post surface. Evidence of cohesive failure was observed which indicated higher SBS of fiber post with the UV irradiated group. PMID:25713488

  16. Fabrication and Mechanical Characterization of Water-Soluble Resin-Coated Natural Fiber Green Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manabe, Ken-Ichi; Hayakawa, Tomoyuki

    In this study, water-soluble biodegradable resin was introduced as a coating agent to improve the interfacial strength and then to fabricate a high-performance green composite with polylactic acid (PLA) and hemp yarn. Dip coating was carried out for hemp yarn and the green composites were fabricated by hot processing. The coated green composite achieves a high tensile strength of 117 MPa even though the fiber volume fraction is less than 30%. Interfacial shear strength (IFSS) was measured by a single fiber pull-out test, and the effect of water-soluble resin on the tensile properties of the composites was evaluated. As a result, when using coated natural bundles, the IFSS value is smaller than when using noncoated natural bundles. On the basis of observations of the fractured surface of composites and initial yarns using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), the effect of the impregnation of water-soluble resin into the natural bundles on the tensile strength is discussed in detail. It is found that water-soluble resin is effective in improving the mechanical properties of the composite, although the interfacial strength between PLA and water-soluble resin was decreased, and as a result, the tensile strength of green composites increases by almost 20%.

  17. Push-Out Bond Strength of Restorations with Bulk-Fill, Flow, and Conventional Resin Composites

    PubMed Central

    Caixeta, Rodrigo Vieira; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Kaneshima, Edmilson Nobumitu; Barbosa, Aline Silvestre; Picolotto, Cassiana Pedrotti; Lima, Ana Eliza de Souza; Gonini Júnior, Alcides; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strengths of composite restorations made with different filler amounts and resin composites that were photoactivated using a light-emitting diode (LED). Thirty bovine incisors were selected, and a conical cavity was prepared in the facial surface of each tooth. All preparations were etched with Scotchbond Etching Gel, the Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus adhesive system was applied followed by photoactivation, and the cavities were filled with a single increment of Filtek Z350 XT, Filtek Z350 XT Flow, or bulk-fill X-tra fil resin composite (n = 10) followed by photoactivation. A push-out test to determine bond strength was conducted using a universal testing machine. Data (MPa) were submitted to Student's t-test at a 5% significance level. After the test, the fractured specimens were examined using an optical microscope under magnification (10x). Although all three composites demonstrated a high prevalence of adhesive failures, the bond strength values of the different resin composites photoactivated by LED showed that the X-tra fil resin composite had a lower bond strength than the Filtek Z350 XT and Filtek Z350 XT Flow resin composites. PMID:26457322

  18. Improved method and composition for immobilization of waste in cement-based material

    DOEpatents

    Tallent, O.K.; Dodson, K.E.; McDaniel, E.W.

    1987-10-01

    A composition and method for fixation or immobilization of aqueous hazardous waste material in cement-based materials (grout) is disclosed. The amount of drainable water in the cured grout is reduced by the addition of an ionic aluminum compound to either the waste material or the mixture of waste material and dry-solid cement- based material. This reduction in drainable water in the cured grout obviates the need for large, expensive amounts of gelling clays in grout materials and also results in improved consistency and properties of these cement-based waste disposal materials.

  19. Cement-based piezoelectric ceramic composites for sensor applications in civil engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Biqin

    The objectives of this thesis are to develop and apply a new smart composite for the sensing and actuation application of civil engineering. Piezoelectric ceramic powder is incorporated into cement-based composite to achieve the sensing and actuation capability. The research investigates microstructure, polarization and aging, material properties and performance of cement-based piezoelectric ceramic composites both theoretically and experimentally. A hydrogen bonding is found at the interface of piezoelectric ceramic powder and cement phase by IR (Infrared Ray), XPS (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy) and SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy). It largely affects the material properties of composites. A simple first order model is introduced to explain the poling mechanism of composites and the dependency of polarization is discussed using electromechanical coupling coefficient kt. The mechanisms acting on the aging effect is explored in detail. Dielectrical, piezoelectric and mechanical properties of the cement-based piezoelectric ceramic composites are studied by experiment and theoretical calculation based on modified cube model (n=1) with chemical bonding . A complex circuit model is proposed to explain the unique feature of impedance spectra and the instinct of high-loss of cement-based piezoelectric ceramic composite. The sensing ability of cement-based piezoelectric ceramic composite has been evaluated by using step wave, sine wave, and random wave. It shows that the output of the composite can reflects the nature and characteristics of mechanical input. The work in this thesis opens a new direction for the current actuation/sensing technology in civil engineering. The materials and techniques, developed in this work, have a great potential in application of health monitoring of buildings and infrastructures.

  20. Repair bond strength of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials

    PubMed Central

    El-Deeb, Heba A.; Ghalab, Radwa M.; Elsayed Akah, Mai M.; Mobarak, Enas H.

    2015-01-01

    The reparability of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials using a light-cured one following one week or three months storage, prior to repair was evaluated. Two different dual-cured resin composites; Cosmecore™ DC automix and Clearfil™ DC automix core buildup materials and a light-cured nanofilled resin composite; Filtek™ Z350 XT were used. Substrate specimens were prepared (n = 12/each substrate material) and stored in artificial saliva at 37 °C either for one week or three months. Afterward, all specimens were ground flat, etched using Scotchbond™ phosphoric acid etchant and received Single Bond Universal adhesive system according to the manufacturers’ instructions. The light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT) was used as a repair material buildup. To determine the cohesive strength of each solid substrate material, additional specimens from each core material (n = 12) were prepared and stored for the same periods. Five sticks (0.8 ± 0.01 mm2) were obtained from each specimen (30 sticks/group) for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. Modes of failure were also determined. Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant effect for the core materials but not for the storage periods or their interaction. After one week, dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials (Cosmecore™ DC and Clearfil™ DC) achieved significantly higher repair μTBS than the light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT). However, Clearfil™ DC revealed the highest value, then Cosmecore™ DC and Filtek™ Z350 XT, following storage for 3-month. Repair strength values recovered 64–86% of the cohesive strengths of solid substrate materials. The predominant mode of failure was the mixed type. Dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials revealed acceptable repair bond strength values even after 3-month storage. PMID:26966567

  1. Whisker-reinforced bioactive composites containing calcium phosphate cement fillers: effects of filler ratio and surface treatments on mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Xu, H H; Quinn, J B

    2001-11-01

    Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) sets to form microporous solid hydroxyapatite with excellent osteoconductivity, but its brittleness and low strength prohibit use in stress-bearing locations. The aim of this study was to incorporate prehardened CPC particles and ceramic whiskers in a resin matrix to improve the strength and fracture resistance, and to investigate the effects of key microstructural variables on composite mechanical properties. Two types of whiskers were used: silicon nitride, and silicon carbide. The whiskers were surface-treated by fusing with silica and by silanization. The CPC particle fillers were either silanized or not silanized. Seven mass ratios of whisker-silica/CPC were mixed: 0:1 (no whisker-silica), 1:5, 1:2, 1:1, 2:1, 5:1, and 1:0 (no CPC). Each powder was blended with a bisphenol-a-glycidyl methacrylate-based resin to harden in 2 x 2 x 25 mm molds by two-part chemical curing. The specimens were tested in three-point flexure to measure strength, work-of-fracture (toughness), and elastic modulus. Two-way analysis of variance was used to analyze the data, and scanning electron microscopy was used to examine specimen fracture surfaces. The whisker-silica/CPC ratio had significant effects on composite properties (p < 0.001). When this ratio was increased from 0:1 to 1:0, the strength was increased by about three times, work-of-fracture by five times, and modulus by two times. Whisker surface treatments and CPC filler silanization also had significant effects (p < 0.001) on composite properties. Scanning electron microscopy revealed rough fracture surfaces for the whisker composites with steps and whisker pullout. Resin remnants were observed on the surfaces of the pulled-out whiskers, indicating strong whisker-matrix bonding. In conclusion, incorporating highly osteoconductive CPC fillers and ceramic whiskers yielded composites with substantially improved mechanical properties compared with composites filled with CPC particles without

  2. Mechanical, thermal, and interfacial properties of green composites with ramie fiber and soy resins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Tae; Netravali, Anil N

    2010-05-12

    Fully biodegradable, green composites were fabricated with ramie fibers and modified soy flour (MSF) resin. Defatted soy flour (SF) was modified by a lab-scale filtration system to improve its mechanical, interfacial, and thermal properties through increasing the protein content. The protein content of SF was increased from 53.1 to 67.5% by filtering out soluble sugars using a microfiber-based filter. Tensile stress and Young's modulus of MSF resins were 35.5 and 1411.7 MPa, respectively, which were significantly higher than those (12.7 and 379.3 MPa) of SF resins. Interfacial shear strength of single ramie fibers with MSF resins ranged from 8.8 to 15.2 MPa, which were about 40-50% higher than those obtained with SF resins. Tensile stress and Young's modulus of ramie fiber-reinforced composites were 88.0 MPa and 2.94 GPa with SF resin and 103.8 MPa and 3.15 GPa with MSF resin. PMID:20405944

  3. Preparation and degradation study of photocurable oligolactide-HA composite: a potential resin for stereolithography application.

    PubMed

    Tanodekaew, Siriporn; Channasanon, Somruethai; Uppanan, Paweena

    2014-04-01

    The merging of stereolithography (SLA) technology to the medical field certainly benefits the manufacturing of parts, especially those patient-specific for the clinical use. This technique, however, has hardly been exploited medically due to a limited number of biodegradable resins for SLA processing. To extend application of SLA in the biomedical field, photocurable oligolactide resins were developed and examined for biodegradation and biocompatibility. The degradation was studied by monitoring the changes in weight loss, and thermal and mechanical properties of the photocured specimens in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at 37°C. The results demonstrated that a resin composition played an important role in degradation, and the retarded degradation rate was observed for the highly crosslinked resin containing hydroxyapatite (HA). The less cytotoxic sample was also obtained from the resin with higher content of HA. These findings suggest the possible use of the developed photocurable oligolactide resins in SLA manufacturing of biodegradable implants, where their degradation behaviors can be designed by varying the resin composition. PMID:24136655

  4. A new resin technology: a glaze/composite sealant that cures without forming an oxygen-inhibited layer.

    PubMed

    Suh, Byoung I

    2003-08-01

    Until now, intraoral composite resin sealants cured with an oxygen-inhibited layer. In addition, resin glazes used for temporaries and processed appliances could not be used intraorally. This article describes the strategies behind the development of a new resin product that can be used intra- and extraorally as a sealant/glaze without forming an oxygen-inhibited layer after curing. PMID:14692216

  5. Pullout behavior of steel fibers from cement-based composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shannag, M.J.; Brincker, R.; Hansen, W.

    1997-06-01

    A comprehensive experimental program on pullout tests of steel fibers from cement based matrices is described. A specially designed single fiber pullout apparatus was used to provide a quantitative determination of interfacial properties that are relevant to toughening brittle materials through fiber reinforcement. The parameters investigated included a specially designed high strength cement based matrix called Densified Small Particles system (DSP), a conventional mortar matrix, fiber embedment length, and the fiber volume fraction. The mediums from which the fiber was pulled included a control mortar mix without fibers, a mortar mix with 3, and 6 percent fibers by volume. The results indicate that: (1) the dense DSP matrix has significantly improved interfacial properties as compared to the conventional mortar matrix. (2) Increasing the fiber embedment length and the fiber volume fraction in the cement matrix increase the peak pullout load and the pullout work. (3) The major bond mechanism in both systems is frictional sliding.

  6. The effect of red and white wine on color changes of nanofilled and nanohybrid resin composites

    PubMed Central

    Tanthanuch, Saijai; Peerasukprasert, Thanwalee; Chanmanee, Nilobon; Chaisomboonphun, Parnchanok; Rodklai, Apisara

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study investigated the effect of red and white wine on color changes of nanofilled and nanohybrid resin composite. Materials and Methods Sixty specimens of each resin composite were prepared. Baseline data color values were recorded using a spectrophotometer. Three groups of discs (n = 20) were then alternately immersed in red, white wine, and deionized water (as a control) for twenty five minutes and artificial saliva for five minutes for four cycles. Specimens were then stored in artificial saliva for twenty two hours. This process was repeated for five days following immersion in artificial saliva for two days. Subsequently, the process was repeated again. Data were analyzed by two-way repeated ANOVA, one-way ANOVA, and Tukey's HSD. Results Red wine caused significantly higher color change (ΔE* > 3.3) than did white wine and deionized water (p < 0.05). Nanohybrid resin composites had significantly more color changes than nanofilled resin composite (p < 0.05). Conclusions The effect of red and white wine on the color changes of resin composite restorative materials depended upon the physical and chemical composition of the restorative materials and the types of wine. PMID:27200281

  7. Characterization of composite materials based on cement-ceramic powder blended binder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulovaná, Tereza; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-06-01

    Characterization of newly developed composite mortars with incorporated ceramic powder coming from precise brick cutting as partial Portland cement replacement up to 40 mass% is presented in the paper. Fine ceramic powder belongs to the pozzolanic materials. Utilization of pozzolanic materials is accompanied by lower request on energy needed for Portland clinker production which generally results in lower production costs of blended binder and lower CO2 emission. In this paper, the ceramic powder is used in cement based mortar composition in amount of 8, 16, 24, 32, and 40 mass% of cement. Chemical composition of ceramic powder is analyzed by X-Ray Fluorescence and X-Ray Diffraction. The particle size distribution of ceramics is accessed on laser diffraction principle. For 28 days cured mortar samples, basic physical and mechanical properties are experimentally determined. The obtained results demonstrate that ceramic powder has potential to replace a part of Portland cement in composition of cement based composites and to reduce negative environmental impact of their production.

  8. Single-crystalline ceramic whisker-reinforced carboxylic acid-resin composites with fluoride release.

    PubMed

    Xu, H H; Eichmiller, F C; Antonucci, J M; Flaim, G M

    2000-01-01

    Currently available glass-ionomer, resin-modified glass-ionomer, and compomer materials have relatively low strength and toughness and, therefore, are inadequate for use in large stress-bearing posterior restorations. In the present study, ceramic single-crystalline whiskers were mixed with fluorosilicate glass particles and used as fillers to reinforce experimental carboxylic acid-resin composites. The carboxylic acid was a monofunctional methacryloxyethyl phthalate (MEP). Five mass fractions of whisker/(whisker + fluorosilicate glass), and corresponding resin (resin + MEP), were evaluated. Four control materials were also tested for comparison: a glass ionomer, a resin-modified glass ionomer, a compomer, and a hybrid composite resin. Flexural specimens were fabricated to measure the flexural strength, elastic modulus, and work-of-fracture (an indication of toughness). Fluoride release was measured by using a fluoride ion selective electrode. The properties of whisker composites depended on the whisker/(whisker + fluorosilicate glass) mass fraction. At a mass fraction of 0.8, the whisker composite had a flexural strength in MPa (mean +/- sd; n = 6) of 150 +/- 16, significantly higher than that of a glass ionomer (15 +/- 7) or a compomer control (89 +/- 18) (Tukey's multiple comparison test; family confidence coefficient = 0.95). Depending on the ratio of whisker:fluorosilicate glass, the whisker composites had a cumulative fluoride release up to 60% of that of a traditional glass ionomer. To conclude, combining ceramic whiskers and fluorosilicate glass in a carboxylic acid-resin matrix can result in fluoride-releasing composites with significantly improved mechanical properties. PMID:11203805

  9. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. 888.3100 Section 888.3100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3100 Ankle joint metal/composite...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint... ankle joint. The device limits translation and rotation: in one or more planes via the geometry of...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint... ankle joint. The device limits translation and rotation: in one or more planes via the geometry of...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint... ankle joint. The device limits translation and rotation: in one or more planes via the geometry of...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint... ankle joint. The device limits translation and rotation: in one or more planes via the geometry of...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3340 - Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal... hip joint. The device limits translation and rotation in one or more planes via the geometry of...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3340 - Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal... hip joint. The device limits translation and rotation in one or more planes via the geometry of...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3340 - Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal... hip joint. The device limits translation and rotation in one or more planes via the geometry of...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3340 - Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal... hip joint. The device limits translation and rotation in one or more planes via the geometry of...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3340 - Hip joint metal/co