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Sample records for composite system reinforced

  1. Fiber reinforced composite resin systems.

    PubMed

    Giordano, R

    2000-01-01

    The Targis/Vectris and Sculpture/FibreKor systems were devised to create a translucent maximally reinforced resin framework for fabrication of crowns, bridges, inlays, and onlays. These materials are esthetic, have translucency similar to castable glass-ceramics such as OPC and Empress, and have fits that are reported to be acceptable in clinical and laboratory trials. These restorations rely on proper bonding to the remaining tooth structure; therefore, careful attention to detail must be paid to this part of the procedure. Cementation procedures should involve silane treatment of the cleaned abraded internal restoration surface, application of bonding agent to the restoration as well as the etched/primed tooth, and finally use of a composite resin. Each manufacturer has a recommended system which has been tested for success with its resin system. These fiber reinforced resins are somewhat different than classical composites, so not all cementation systems will necessarily work with them. Polishing of the restoration can be accomplished using diamond or alumina impregnated rubber wheels followed by diamond paste. The glass fibers can pose a health risk. They are small enough to be inhaled and deposited in the lungs, resulting in a silicosis-type problem. Therefore, if fibers are exposed and ground on, it is extremely important to wear a mask. Also, the fibers can be a skin irritant, so gloves also should be worn. If the fibers become exposed intraorally, they can cause gingival inflammation and may attract plaque. The fibers should be covered with additional composite resin. If this cannot be accomplished, the restoration should be replaced. The bulk of these restorations are formed using a particulate filled resin, similar in structure to conventional composite resins. Therefore, concerns as to wear resistance, color stability, excessive expansion/contraction, and sensitivity remain until these materials are proven in long-term clinical trials. They do hold the

  2. Constitutive Modeling of Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Composite Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Harik, Vasyl M.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, a technique has been proposed for developing constitutive models for polymer composite systems reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Since the polymer molecules are on the same size scale as the nanotubes, the interaction at the polymer/nanotube interface is highly dependent on the local molecular structure and bonding. At these small length scales, the lattice structures of the nanotube and polymer chains cannot be considered continuous, and the bulk mechanical properties of the SWNT/polymer composites can no longer be determined through traditional micromechanical approaches that are formulated using continuum mechanics. It is proposed herein that the nanotube, the local polymer near the nanotube, and the nanotube/polymer interface can be modeled as an effective continuum fiber using an equivalent-continuum modeling method. The effective fiber retains the local molecular structure and bonding information and serves as a means for incorporating micromechanical analyses for the prediction of bulk mechanical properties of SWNT/polymer composites with various nanotube sizes and orientations. As an example, the proposed approach is used for the constitutive modeling of two SWNT/polyethylene composite systems, one with continuous and aligned SWNT and the other with discontinuous and randomly aligned nanotubes.

  3. Constitutive Modeling of Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Composite Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Harik, Vasyl M.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a technique has been proposed for developing constitutive models for polymer composite systems reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Since the polymer molecules are on the same size scale as the nanotubes, the interaction at the polymer/nanotube interface is highly dependent on the local molecular structure and bonding. At these small length scales, the lattice structures of the nanotube and polymer chains cannot be considered continuous, and the bulk mechanical properties of the SWNT/polymer composites can no longer be determined through traditional micromechanical approaches that are formulated using continuum mechanics. It is proposed herein that the nanotube, the local polymer near the nanotube, and the nanotube/polymer interface can be modeled as an effective continuum fiber using an equivalent-continuum modeling method. The effective fiber retains the local molecular structure and bonding information and serves as a means for incorporating micromechanical analyses for the prediction of bulk mechanical properties of SWNT/polymer composites with various nanotube sizes and orientations. As an example, the proposed approach is used for the constitutive modeling of two SWNT/polyethylene composite systems, one with continuous and aligned SWNT and the other with discontinuous and randomly aligned nanotubes.

  4. Quasicrystalline particulate reinforced aluminum composite

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.E.; Biner, S.B.; Sordelet, D.J.; Unal, O.

    1997-07-01

    Particulate reinforced aluminum and aluminum alloy composites are rapidly emerging as new commercial materials for aerospace, automotive, electronic packaging and other high performance applications. However, their low processing ductility and difficulty in recyclability have been the key concern. In this study, two composite systems having the same aluminum alloy matrix, one reinforced with quasicrystals and the other reinforced with the conventional SiC reinforcements were produced with identical processing routes. Their processing characteristics and tensile mechanical properties were compared.

  5. Composite Intersection Reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misciagna, David T. (Inventor); Fuhrer, Jessica J. (Inventor); Funk, Robert S. (Inventor); Tolotta, William S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An assembly and method for manufacturing a composite reinforcement for unitizing a structure are provided. According to one embodiment, the assembly includes a base having a plurality of pins extending outwardly therefrom to define a structure about which a composite fiber is wound to define a composite reinforcement preform. The assembly also includes a plurality of mandrels positioned adjacent to the base and at least a portion of the composite reinforcement preform, and a cap that is positioned over at least a portion of the plurality of mandrels. The cap is configured to engage each of the mandrels to support the mandrels and the composite reinforcement preform during a curing process to form the composite reinforcement.

  6. Composite intersection reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misciagna, David T. (Inventor); Fuhrer, Jessica J. (Inventor); Funk, Robert S. (Inventor); Tolotta, William S. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An assembly and method for manufacturing a composite reinforcement for unitizing a structure are provided. According to one embodiment, the assembly includes a base having a plurality of pins extending outwardly therefrom to define a structure about which a composite fiber is wound to define a composite reinforcement preform. The assembly also includes a plurality of mandrels positioned adjacent to the base and at least a portion of the composite reinforcement preform, and a cap that is positioned over at least a portion of the plurality of mandrels. The cap is configured to engage each of the mandrels to support the mandrels and the composite reinforcement preform during a curing process to form the composite reinforcement.

  7. Fiber reinforced PMR polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.; Winters, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    Commercially obtained PMR-15 polyimide prepregs with S-glass and graphite fiber reinforcements were evaluated along with in-house prepared glass and graphite cloth PMR 2 materials. A novel autoclave approach was conceived and used to demonstrate that both the PMR systems respond to 1.4 MPa (200 psi) autoclave pressures to produce void free composites equivalent to die molded laminates. Isothermal gravimetric analysis and subsequent mechanical property tests indicated that the PMR 2 system was significantly superior in thermo-oxidative stability, and that S-glass reinforcements may contribute to the accelerated degradation of composites at 316 C (600 F) when compared to graphite fiber reinforced composites. Fully reversed bending fatigue experiments were conducted with a type of fixture unused for organic matrix composites. These studies indicated that the graphite fiber composites were clearly superior in fatigue resistance to the glass fiber reinforced material and that PMR matrix composite systems yield performance of the same order as composite materials employing other families of matrices.

  8. Design and analysis of a novel latch system implementing fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara Arreola, Francisco Javier

    The use of fiber-reinforced composite materials have increased in the last four decades in high technology applications due to their exceptional mechanical properties and low weight. In the automotive industry carbon fiber have become popular exclusively in luxury cars because of its high cost. However, Carbon-glass hybrid composites offer an effective alternative to designers to implement fiber-reinforced composites into several conventional applications without a considerable price increase maintaining most of their mechanical properties. A door latch system is a complex mechanism that is under high loading conditions during car accidents such as side impacts and rollovers. Therefore, the Department of Transportation in The United States developed a series of tests that every door latch system comply in order to be installed in a vehicle. The implementation of fiber-reinforced composite materials in a door latch system was studied by analyzing the material behavior during the FMVSS No. 206 transverse test using computational efforts and experimental testing. Firstly, a computational model of the current forkbolt and detent structure was developed. Several efforts were conducted in order to create an effective and time efficient model. Two simplified models were implemented with two different contact interaction approaches. 9 composite materials were studied in forkbolt and 5 in detent including woven carbon fiber, unidirectional carbon fiber, woven carbon-glass fiber hybrid composites and unidirectional carbon-glass fiber hybrid composites. The computational model results showed that woven fiber-reinforced composite materials were stiffer than the unidirectional fiber-reinforced composite materials. For instance, a forkbolt made of woven carbon fibers was 20% stiffer than a forkbolt made of unidirectional fibers symmetrically stacked in 0° and 90° alternating directions. Furthermore, Hybrid composite materials behaved as expected in forkbolt noticing a decline

  9. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D.; Ripley, Edward B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  10. Analysis of pultrusion processing for long fiber reinforced thermoplastic composite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tso, W.; Hou, T. H.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Pultrusion is one of the composite processing technology, commonly recognized as a simple and cost-effective means for the manufacturing of fiber-reinforced, resin matrix composite parts with different regular geometries. Previously, because the majority of the pultruded composite parts were made of thermosetting resin matrix, emphasis of the analysis on the process has been on the conservation of energy from various sources, such as heat conduction and the curing kinetics of the resin system. Analysis on the flow aspect of the process was almost absent in the literature for thermosetting process. With the increasing uses of thermoplastic materials, it is desirable to obtain the detailed velocity and pressure profiles inside the pultrusion die. Using a modified Darcy's law for flow through porous media, closed form analytical solutions for the velocity and pressure distributions inside the pultrusion die are obtained for the first time. This enables us to estimate the magnitude of viscous dissipation and it's effects on the pultruded parts. Pulling forces refined in the pultrusion processing are also analyzed. The analytical model derived in this study can be used to advance our knowledge and control of the pultrusion process for fiber reinforced thermoplastic composite parts.

  11. Micromechanics for particulate reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Mital, Subodh K.

    1996-01-01

    A set of micromechanics equations for the analysis of particulate reinforced composites is developed using the mechanics of materials approach. Simplified equations are used to compute homogenized or equivalent thermal and mechanical properties of particulate reinforced composites in terms of the properties of the constituent materials. The microstress equations are also presented here to decompose the applied stresses on the overall composite to the microstresses in the constituent materials. The properties of a 'generic' particulate composite as well as those of a particle reinforced metal matrix composite are predicted and compared with other theories as well as some experimental data. The micromechanics predictions are in excellent agreement with the measured values.

  12. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.; Prewo, K. M.; Thompson, E. R.

    1978-01-01

    A composite that can be used at temperatures up to 875 K with mechanical properties equal or superior to graphite fiber reinforced epoxy composites is presented. The composite system consist of graphite fiber, uniaxially or biaxially, reinforced borosilicate glass. The mechanical and thermal properties of such a graphite fiber reinforced glass composite are described, and the system is shown to offer promise as a high performance structural material. Specific properties that were measured were: a modified borosilicate glass uniaxially reinforced by Hercules HMS graphite fiber has a three-point flexural strength of 1030 MPa, a four-point flexural strength of 964 MPa, an elastic modulus of 199 GPa and a failure strain of 0.0052. The preparation and properties of similar composites with Hercules HTS, Celanese DG-102, Thornel 300 and Thornel Pitch graphite fibers are also described.

  13. Fiber-Reinforced Composite Foam

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A two-phase method for making fiber-reinforced compositions was developed to achieve uniform fiber dispersion in a composite matrix. The first phase involved mixing together water, fibers, and a portion of a fiber dispersant to form a viscous composition. The high viscosity imparted by the dispersa...

  14. Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Composites for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yuhe; Liao, Susan; Li, Jiajia

    2014-01-01

    This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matrix composites, and CNTs reinforced ceramic matrix composites), their mechanical properties, cell experiments in vitro, and biocompatibility tests in vivo. PMID:24707488

  15. A three-dimensional computational model for unidirectional fiber and woven textile-reinforced composite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlockton, Michael Andre

    1998-12-01

    Models for the behavior of unidirectional fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites with weak interfaces and 3D woven textile composites are presented as an assemblage of coarse 3D effective medium elements and 1D spring elements. The models are used to simulate the stochastic failure process leading to ultimate stress and the transition to post peak extension. Monte Carlo methods assign fracture nuclei strengths to the 1D spring elements which fail with increasing load. Interface mechanics mechanism are incorporated to transfer load from failed elements to remaining intact elements. For unidirectional CMCs the model predicts the peak stress sustained is comparable to the value expected from global load sharing for a wide range of values of interface shear and constituent elastic properties due to sparse damage in the composite at ultimate load and low stress concentrations. Toughness is predicted from simple pullout laws. For 3D woven textile composites the ultimate strength and toughness are determined by lockup of undulations at the interface of inplane reinforcements. The strength of the lockup is modulated by the presence of through thickness reinforcements which survive after the inplane reinforcements fail.

  16. Analysis of Graphite-Reinforced Cementitious Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. E.

    2002-01-01

    Strategically embedding graphite meshes in a compliant cementitious matrix produces a composite material with relatively high tension and compressive properties as compared to steel-reinforced structures fabricated from a standard concrete mix. Although these composite systems are somewhat similar, the methods used to analyze steel-reinforced composites often fail to characterize the behavior of their more advanced graphite-reinforced counterparts. This Technical Memorandum describes some of the analytical methods being developed to determine the deflections and stresses in graphite-reinforced cementitious composites. It is initially demonstrated that the standard transform section method fails to provide accurate results when the elastic moduli ratio exceeds 20. An alternate approach is formulated by using the rule of mixtures to determine a set of effective material properties for the composite. Tensile tests are conducted on composite samples to verify this approach. When the effective material properties are used to characterize the deflections of composite beams subjected to pure bending, an excellent agreement is obtained. Laminated composite plate theory is investigated as a means for analyzing even more complex composites, consisting of multiple graphite layers oriented in different directions. In this case, composite beams are analyzed using the laminated composite plate theory with material properties established from tensile tests. Then, finite element modeling is used to verify the results. Considering the complexity of the samples, a very good agreement is obtained.

  17. Alumina-Reinforced Zirconia Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2003-01-01

    Alumina-reinforced zirconia composites, used as electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells, were fabricated by hot pressing 10 mol percent yttria-stabilized zirconia (10-YSZ) reinforced with two different forms of alumina particulates and platelets each containing 0 to 30 mol percent alumina. Major mechanical and physical properties of both particulate and platelet composites including flexure strength, fracture toughness, slow crack growth, elastic modulus, density, Vickers microhardness, thermal conductivity, and microstructures were determined as a function of alumina content either at 25 C or at both 25 and 1000 C. Flexure strength and fracture toughness at 1000 C were maximized with 30 particulate and 30 mol percent platelet composites, respectively, while resistance to slow crack growth at 1000 C in air was greater for 30 mol percent platelet composite than for 30 mol percent particulate composites.

  18. Sapphire reinforced alumina matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Setlock, John A.

    1994-01-01

    Unidirectionally reinforced A1203 matrix composites have been fabricated by hot pressing. Approximately 30 volume % of either coated or uncoated sapphire fiber was used as reinforcement. Unstabilized ZrO2 was applied as the fiber coating. Composite mechanical behavior was analyzed both after fabrication and after additional heat treatment. The results of composite tensile tests were correlated with fiber-matrix interfacial shear strengths determined from fiber push-out tests. Substantially higher strength and greater fiber pull-out were observed for the coated fiber composites for all processing conditions studied. The coated fiber composites retained up to 95% and 87% of their as-fabricated strength when heat treated at 14000C for 8 or 24 hours, respectively. Electron microscopy analysis of the fracture surfaces revealed extensive fiber pull-out both before and after heat treatment.

  19. Stiffness and strength of fiber reinforced polymer composite bridge deck systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Aixi

    This research investigates two principal characteristics that are of primary importance in Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) bridge deck applications: STIFFNESS and STRENGTH. The research was undertaken by investigating the stiffness and strength characteristics of the multi-cellular FRP bridge deck systems consisting of pultruded FRP shapes. A systematic analysis procedure was developed for the stiffness analysis of multi-cellular FRP deck systems. This procedure uses the Method of Elastic Equivalence to model the cellular deck as an equivalent orthotropic plate. The procedure provides a practical method to predict the equivalent orthotropic plate properties of cellular FRP decks. Analytical solutions for the bending analysis of single span decks were developed using classical laminated plate theory. The analysis procedures can be extended to analyze continuous FRP decks. It can also be further developed using higher order plate theories. Several failure modes of the cellular FRP deck systems were recorded and analyzed through laboratory and field tests and Finite Element Analysis (FEA). Two schemes of loading patches were used in the laboratory test: a steel patch made according to the ASSHTO's bridge testing specifications; and a tire patch made from a real truck tire reinforced with silicon rubber. The tire patch was specially designed to simulate service loading conditions by modifying real contact loading from a tire. Our research shows that the effects of the stiffness and contact conditions of loading patches are significant in the stiffness and strength testing of FRP decks. Due to the localization of load, a simulated tire patch yields larger deflection than the steel patch under the same loading level. The tire patch produces significantly different failure compared to the steel patch: a local bending mode with less damage for the tire patch; and a local punching-shear mode for the steel patch. A deck failure function method is proposed for predicting the

  20. New environmental barrier coating system on carbon-fiber reinforced silicon carbide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latzel, S.; Vaßen, R.; Stöver, D.

    2005-06-01

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites (C/SiC) are promising materials for high-temperature, light weight structural components. However, a protective coating and environmental barrier coating (EBC) are necessary to prevent the oxidation of the carbon and the reaction of the formed silica scale with water vapor. Current EBC systems use multiple layers, each serving unique requirements. However, any mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) creates internal stresses and might lead to crack formation. In this case, oxygen and water vapor penetrate through the EBC, reducing the lifetime of the component. Mullite (Al6Si2O13) is used in many known EBC systems on silicon-based ceramics either as an EBC itself or as a bondcoat. Due to its low CTE and its sufficient thermal cycling behavior, mullite was chosen in this investigation as a first layer. As mullite suffers loss of SiO2 when exposed to water vapor at high temperatures, an additional protective top coat is needed to complete the EBC system. Different oxides were evaluated to serve as top coat, especially high-temperature oxides with low coefficients of thermal expansion (LCTE). An EBC containing mullite as bondcoat and the LCTE oxide La2Hf2O7 as a top coat is proposed. Both layers were applied via atmospheric plasma spraying. In this paper, results of the influence of processing conditions on the microstructure of single mullite and LCTE oxide layers as well as mullite/LCTE oxide systems are presented. Special emphasis was directed toward the crystallinity of the mullite layer and, in the top layer, toward low porosity and reduced crack density.

  1. [A metal-free single sitting fibre-reinforced composite bridge for tooth replacement using the EOS-System].

    PubMed

    Belvedere, P C

    1990-06-01

    This paper intends to introduce a technique for a one sitting fixed resin bridge with excellent aesthetics and longevity. Techniques using denture teeth or a crown portion of the patient's own teeth have already been presented by many authors. But they all have been unpredictable and their longevity could not be assured. The addition of resin fibre filament to create a flexible reinforcement at the pontic-abutment interface gives added strength to the acid etch bond between pontic and abutment. Reinforcing systems such as metal wires, woven screen, metal bars with retentive holes, glass fibres, silk and resin fibres have been used with varying results. The original composite reinforced bridge using resin fibres was done by the author with Kevlar 49 in February of 1981, replacing both upper central incisors using only the lateral incisors on a 22 year-old female. This four-unit-bridge is still in function (end of 1989) and has never been replaced or repaired. Since then improvements have been made and the following technique has evolved. 360 fibre reinforced "Belvedere bridges" have been placed to date with a success rate of 98%. One of the improvements is the use of another fibre, which has extremely high tensile strength: it is a polyethylene fibre, colourless and six times stronger than steel. PMID:2120805

  2. Graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Bacon, J. F.; Dicus, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composite system is described. Although this composite is not yet a mature material, it possesses low density, attractive mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, and good environmental stability. Properties are reported for a borosilicate glass matrix unidirectionally reinforced with 60 volume percent HMS graphite fiber. The flexural strength and fatigue characteristics at room and elevated temperature, resistance to thermal cycling and continuous high temperature oxidation, and thermal expansion characteristics of the composite are reported. The properties of this new composite are compared to those of advanced resin and metal matrix composites showing that graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites are attractive for aerospace applications.

  3. Microstructural characterization of fiber-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Summerscales, J.

    1998-12-31

    In the past 50 years, great progress has been made in developing artificial fiber-reinforced composite materials, generally using filaments with microscopic diameters. An array of reinforcement forms can be used in commercial applications--with the microstructure being a critical factor in realizing the required properties in a material. This book comprehensively examines the application of advanced microstructural characterization techniques to fiber-reinforced composites. Its contents include: (1) flexible textile composite microstructure; (2) 3-D confocal microscopy of glass fiber-reinforced composites; (3) geometric modeling of yarn and fiber assemblies; (4) characterization of yarn shape in woven fabric composites; (5) quantitative microstructural analysis for continuous fiber composites; (6) electron microscopy of polymer composites; (7) micromechanics of reinforcement using laser raman spectroscopy; and (8) acoustic microscopy of ceramic fiber composites.

  4. Stress relaxation in discontinuously reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, N.; Arsenault, R.J.

    1995-05-01

    It has been observed that in discontinuously-reinforced Al{sub 2}0{sub 3}/NiAl composites that as the reinforcement size increases the average density of dislocations generated from the relaxation of the thermal stresses increases, and the corresponding thermal residual stresses slightly decrease. Similar changes result when the reinforcement morphology changes from spheres to short fibers to continuous filaments. The changes of dislocation density and thermal residual stresses with respect to particle size are in contrast to those observed in the SiC/Al counterpart A previously developed simple model used to explain the SiC/Al data, which was based on prismatic dislocation punching, suggested that the density of the misfit dislocations decreases when the reinforcement size increases. In this investigation, a simple model is proposed to explain the anomaly in the development of thermal residual stresses and the generation of misfit dislocations as a function of the particle size and shape in Al{sub 2}0{sub 3}/NiAl composites. As a result of a lack of sufficient independent-slip-systems in low symmetry materials such as NiAl, plastic relaxation of the thermal stresses is severely constrained as compared to fcc Al. As such, plastic relaxation requires collaborative slips in an aggregate of grains. This only occurs when the length scale of the varying misfit thermal stress field is much larger than the average grain size. That is, the mechanism of plastic relaxation becomes operative when the reinforcement size increases.

  5. Reinforced rubber composition containing ground coal

    SciTech Connect

    Sperley, R.J.

    1984-10-16

    A reinforced rubber composition is provided comprising a mixture of (a) a sulfur vulcanizable rubber and (b) ground coal having an average mesh size of 25 or more and which produces an aqueous slurry with a pH of less than 7.0, and wherein a metallic reinforcing member is embedded in the rubber mixture of (a) and (b).

  6. Microtensile bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite with semi-interpenetrating polymer matrix to dentin using various bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2008-11-01

    This study investigated the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) to dentin using various adhesive systems. Forty eight (n = 8/group) human molars were flattened to expose dentin. A layer of preimpregnated unidirectional FRC (everStick) was applied on the dentin surface after treatment with either a single-step self-etching adhesive, two-step self-etching system, or a conventional three-step adhesive system. For the control, particulate filler composite (PFC) (Filtek Z250) layering without FRC was used. After 24-hour water storage at 37 degrees C, the specimens were sectioned, further water-stored at 37 degrees C for 30 days and then tested. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test, and reliability was analyzed with Weibull distribution. microTBS values differed significantly according to the adhesive material used (p < 0.05). Single-step self-etching adhesive showed the lowest bond reliability and microTBS values with both FRC and PFC, whereas conventional three-step and two-step self-etching systems showed higher bond reliability and microTBS with both materials. PMID:19241691

  7. Aluminum-Alloy-Matrix/Alumina-Reinforcement Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashalikar, Uday; Rozenoyer, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Isotropic composites of aluminum-alloy matrices reinforced with particulate alumina have been developed as lightweight, high-specific-strength, less-expensive alternatives to nickel-base and ferrous superalloys. These composites feature a specific gravity of about 3.45 grams per cubic centimeter and specific strengths of about 200 MPa/(grams per cubic centimeter). The room-temperature tensile strength is 100 ksi (689 MPa) and stiffness is 30 Msi (206 GPa). At 500 F (260 C), these composites have shown 80 percent retention in strength and 95 percent retention in stiffness. These materials also have excellent fatigue tolerance and tribological properties. They can be fabricated in net (or nearly net) sizes and shapes to make housings, pistons, valves, and ducts in turbomachinery, and to make structural components of such diverse systems as diesel engines, automotive brake systems, and power-generation, mining, and oil-drilling equipment. Separately, incorporation of these metal matrix composites within aluminum gravity castings for localized reinforcement has been demonstrated. A composite part of this type can be fabricated in a pressure infiltration casting process. The process begins with the placement of a mold with alumina particulate preform of net or nearly net size and shape in a crucible in a vacuum furnace. A charge of the alloy is placed in the crucible with the preform. The interior of the furnace is evacuated, then the furnace heaters are turned on to heat the alloy above its liquidus temperature. Next, the interior of the furnace is filled with argon gas at a pressure about 900 psi (approximately equal to 6.2 MPa) to force the molten alloy to infiltrate the preform. Once infiltrated, the entire contents of the crucible can be allowed to cool in place, and the composite part recovered from the mold.

  8. Boron Nitride Nanotubes-Reinforced Glass Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam; Hurst, Janet B.; Choi, Sung R.

    2005-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes of significant lengths were synthesized by reaction of boron with nitrogen. Barium calcium aluminosilicate glass composites reinforced with 4 weight percent of BN nanotubes were fabricated by hot pressing. Ambient-temperature flexure strength and fracture toughness of the glass-BN nanotube composites were determined. The strength and fracture toughness of the composite were higher by as much as 90 and 35 percent, respectively, than those of the unreinforced glass. Microscopic examination of the composite fracture surfaces showed pullout of the BN nanotubes. The preliminary results on the processing and improvement in mechanical properties of BN nanotube reinforced glass matrix composites are being reported here for the first time.

  9. Validation of Framework Code Approach to a Life Prediction System for Fiber Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gravett, Phillip

    1997-01-01

    The grant was conducted by the MMC Life Prediction Cooperative, an industry/government collaborative team, Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAI) acted as the prime contractor on behalf of the Cooperative for this grant effort. See Figure I for the organization and responsibilities of team members. The technical effort was conducted during the period August 7, 1995 to June 30, 1996 in cooperation with Erwin Zaretsky, the LERC Program Monitor. Phil Gravett of Pratt & Whitney was the principal technical investigator. Table I documents all meeting-related coordination memos during this period. The effort under this grant was closely coordinated with an existing USAF sponsored program focused on putting into practice a life prediction system for turbine engine components made of metal matrix composites (MMC). The overall architecture of the NMC life prediction system was defined in the USAF sponsored program (prior to this grant). The efforts of this grant were focussed on implementing and tailoring of the life prediction system, the framework code within it and the damage modules within it to meet the specific requirements of the Cooperative. T'he tailoring of the life prediction system provides the basis for pervasive and continued use of this capability by the industry/government cooperative. The outputs of this grant are: 1. Definition of the framework code to analysis modules interfaces, 2. Definition of the interface between the materials database and the finite element model, and 3. Definition of the integration of the framework code into an FEM design tool.

  10. An Analysis of the Macroscopic Tensile Behavior of a Nonlinear Nylon Reinforced Elastomeric Composite System Using MAC/GMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assaad, Mahmoud; Arnold, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    A special class of composite laminates composed of soft rubbery matrices and stiff reinforcements made of steel wires or synthetic fibers is examined, where each constituent behaves in a nonlinear fashion even in the small strain domain. Composite laminates made of piles stacked at alternating small orientation angles with respect to the applied axial strain are primarily dominated by the nonlinear behavior of the reinforcing fibers. However; composites with large ply orientations or those perpendicular to the loading axis, will approximate the behavior of the matrix phase and respond in even a more complex fashion for arbitrarily stacked piles. The geometric nonlinearity due to small cord rotations during loading was deemed here to have a second order effect and consequently dropped from any consideration. The user subroutine USRMAT within the Micromechanics Analysis Code with the Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC), was utilized to introduce the constituent material nonlinear behavior. Stress-strain behavior at the macro level was experimentally generated for single and multi ply composites comprised of continuous Nylon-66 reinforcements embedded in a carbon black loaded rubbery matrix. Comparisons between the predicted macro composite behavior and experimental results are excellent when material nonlinearity is included in the analysis. In this paper, a brief review of GMC is provided, along with a description of the nonlinear behavior of the constituents and associated constituent constitutive relations, and the improved macro (or composite) behavior predictions are documented and illustrated.

  11. Reinforcement of metals with advanced filamentary composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.; Davis, J. G.; Dexter, H. B.

    1974-01-01

    This paper reviews some recent applications of the concept of reinforcing metal structures with advanced filamentary composites, and presents some results of an experimental investigation of the tensile behavior of aluminum and titanium reinforced with unidirectional boron/epoxy. Results are given for tubular and flat specimens, bonded at either room temperature or elevated temperature. The composite reinforced metals showed increased stiffness over the all-metal counterpart, as predicted by the rule of mixtures, and the results were independent of specimen geometry. The tensile strength of the born/epoxy reinforced metals is shown to be a function of the geometry of the test specimen and the method of bonding the composite to the metal.

  12. Evaluation of capillary reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahill, J. E.; Halase, J. F.; South, W. K.; Stoffer, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    Anti-icing of the inlet of jet engines is generally performed with high pressure heated air that is directed forward from the compressor through a series of pipes to various manifolds located near the structures to be anti-iced. From these manifolds, the air is directed to all flowpath surfaces that may be susceptible to ice formation. There the anti-icing function may be performed by either heat conduction or film heating. Unfortunately, the prospect of utilizing lighweight, high strength composites for inlet structures of jet engines has been frustrated by the low transverse thermal conductivity of such materials. It was the objective of this program to develop an advanced materials and design concept for anti-icing composite structures. The concept that was evaluated used capillary glass tubes embedded on the surface of a composite structure with heated air ducted through the tubes. An analytical computer program was developed to predict the anti-icing performance of such tubes and a test program was conducted to demonstrate actual performance of this system. Test data and analytical code results were in excellent agreement. Both indicate feasibility of using capillary tubes for surface heating as a means for composite engine structures to combat ice accumulation.

  13. Continuous fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. A.; Brindley, P. K.; Froes, F. H.

    1991-01-01

    An account is given of the fabrication techniques, microstructural characteristics, and mechanical behavior of a lightweight, high service temperature SiC-reinforced alpha-2 Ti-14Al-21Nb intermetallic-matrix composite. Fabrication techniques under investigation to improve the low-temperature ductility and environmental resistance of this material system, while reducing manufacturing costs to competitive levels, encompass powder-cloth processing, foil-fiber-foil processing, and thermal-spray processing. Attention is given to composite microstructure problems associated with fiber distribution and fiber-matrix interfaces, as well as with mismatches of thermal-expansion coefficient; major improvements are noted to be required in tensile properties, thermal cycling effects, mechanical damage, creep, and environmental effects.

  14. Assessment of microcapsule—catalyst particles healing system in high performance fibre reinforced polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolimowski, P. A.; Wass, D. F.; Bond, I. P.

    2016-08-01

    Autonomous self-healing in carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) is demonstrated using epoxy resin filled microcapsules and a solid-state catalyst. Microcapsules filled with oligomeric epoxy resin (20–450 μm) and particles of Sc(OTf)3 are embedded in an interleave region of a unidirectional CFRP laminate and tested under mode I loading. Double cantilever beam (DCB) test specimens containing variable concentrations of microcapsules and catalyst were prepared, tested and compared to those healed by manual injection with corresponding healing resin formulation. The healing efficiency was evaluated by comparing the maximum peak load recorded on load–displacement curves for pristine and healed specimens. A 44% maximum recovery was observed for specimens containing 10 wt% of solid phase catalyst and 11 wt% of epoxy microcapsules. However, a significant (80%) decrease in initial strain energy release rate (G IC) was observed for specimens with the embedded healing chemistries.

  15. 3-D textile reinforcements in composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Miravete, A.

    1999-11-01

    Laminated composite materials have been used in structural applications since the 1960s. However, their high cost and inability to accommodate fibers in the laminate`s thickness direction greatly reduce their damage tolerance and impact resistance. The second generation of materials--3-D textile reinforced composites--offers significant cost reduction, and by incorporating reinforcement in the thickness direction, dramatically increases damage tolerance and impact resistance. However, methods for predicting mechanical properties of 3-D textile reinforced composite materials tend to be more complex. These materials also have disadvantages--particularly in regard to crimps in the yarns--that require more research. Textile preforms, micro- and macromechanical modeling, manufacturing processes, and characterization all need further development. As researchers overcome these problems, this new generation of composites will emerge as a highly competitive family of materials. This book provides a state-of-the-art account of this promising technology. In it, top experts describe the manufacturing processes, highlight the advantages, identify the main applications, analyze methods for predicting mechanical properties, and detail various reinforcement strategies, including grid structure, knitted fabric composites, and the braiding technique. Armed with the information in this book, readers will be prepared to better exploit the advantages of 3-D textile reinforced composites, overcome its disadvantages, and contribute to the further development of the technology.

  16. Ceramic whisker reinforcement of dental resin composites.

    PubMed

    Xu, H H; Martin, T A; Antonucci, J M; Eichmiller, F C

    1999-02-01

    Resin composites currently available are not suitable for use as large stress-bearing posterior restorations involving cusps due to their tendencies toward excessive fracture and wear. The glass fillers in composites provide only limited reinforcement because of the brittleness and low strength of glass. The aim of the present study was to reinforce dental resins with ceramic single-crystalline whiskers of elongated shapes that possess extremely high strength. A novel method was developed that consisted of fusing silicate glass particles onto the surfaces of individual whiskers for a two-fold benefit: (1) to facilitate silanization regardless of whisker composition; and (2) to enhance whisker retention in the matrix by providing rougher whisker surfaces. Silicon nitride whiskers, with an average diameter of 0.4 microm and length of 5 microm, were coated by the fusion of silica particles 0.04 microm in size to the whisker surface at temperatures ranging from 650 degrees C to 1000 degrees C. The coated whiskers were silanized and manually blended with resins by spatulation. Flexural, fracture toughness, and indentation tests were carried out for evaluation of the properties of the whisker-reinforced composites in comparison with conventional composites. A two-fold increase in strength and toughness was achieved in the whisker-reinforced composite, together with a substantially enhanced resistance to contact damage and microcracking. The highest flexural strength (195+/-8 MPa) and fracture toughness (2.1+/-0.3 MPa x m(1/2)) occurred in a composite reinforced with a whisker-silica mixture at whisker:silica mass ratio of 2:1 fused at 800 degrees C. To conclude, the strength, toughness, and contact damage resistance of dental resin composites can be substantially improved by reinforcement with fillers of ceramic whiskers fused with silica glass particles. PMID:10029470

  17. Understanding the interdiffusion behavior and determining the long term stability of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium-base matrix composite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, John K.

    1990-01-01

    The long term interdiffusional stability of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium alloy composites is addressed. The matrix alloy that is most promising for use as a high temperature structural material for reliable long-term space power generation is Nb1Zr. As an ancillary project to this program, efforts were made to assess the nature and kinetics of interphase reaction between selected beryllide intermetallics and nickel and iron aluminides.

  18. Carbon Nanomaterials as Reinforcements for Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials including fellerenes, nanotubes (CNT) and nanofibers have been proposed for many applications. One of applications is to use the carbon nanomaterials as reinforcements for composites, especially for polymer matrices. Carbon nanotubes is a good reinforcement for lightweight composite applications due to its low mass density and high Young's modulus. Two obscures need to overcome for carbon nanotubes as reinforcements in composites, which are large quantity production and functioning the nanotubes. This presentation will discuss the carbon nanotube growth by chemical vapor deposition. In order to reduce the cost of producing carbon nanotubes as well as preventing the sliding problems, carbon nanotubes were also synthesized on carbon fibers. The synthesis process and characterization results of nanotubes and nanotubes/fibers will be discussed in the presentation.

  19. Continuous and Short Fiber Reinforced Composite in Root Post-Core System of Severely Damaged Incisors

    PubMed Central

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V.J

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the static load-bearing capacity of endodontically treated maxillary incisors restored with post-core complex made of experimental fiber composite resin (FC) and complete crown made of particulate filler composite (PFC). Further aim was to evaluate the effect of FC resin on the failure mode of the restoration. Material and Methods: The experimental composite resin (FC) was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers (3 mm in length) and 22.5 wt% of semi-interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) resin with 55 wt% of silane treated silica fillers. Thirty extracted sound upper central incisors were used. Twenty teeth were prepared by cutting the clinical crown 2 mm above the cemento-enamel junction horizontally. Restorations were made by two techniques (n=10). Group A (control group) contained samples of sound incisor teeth. Group B had teeth restored using glass fiber post (everStick, Stick- Teck) and PFC (Filtek Z250, 3M-ESPE) to build up core and complete crown. In Group C, the teeth were restored with FC as post-core and complete crown of PFC. The root canals were prepared and posts were cemented with a dual cure resin cement. The restorations were polymerized with a hand-light curing unit. All restored teeth were stored in water at room temperature for 24 h before they were statically loaded with speed of 1.0 mm/min until fracture. Data were analyzed using ANOVA (p=0.05). Failure modes were visually examined. Results: ANOVA revealed that restored incisors (Group B and C) had a statistically significantly lower load-bearing capacity (p<0.05) than the control group. Restorations made from FC post-core and PFC coverage (Group C) gave force value of 363 N (112 SD), which was higher than the value of Group B (211 N, 50 SD). Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, the teeth restored with experimental fiber composite post-core demonstrated higher load bearing capacity than those with fiber post and PFC core

  20. Buckling of Fiber Reinforced Composite Plates with Nanofiber Reinforced Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2010-01-01

    Anisotropic composite plates were evaluated with nanofiber reinforced matrices (NFRM). The nanofiber reinforcement volumes ratio in the matrix was 0.01. The plate dimensions were 20 by 10 by 1.0 in. (508 by 254 by 25.4 mm). Seven different loading condition cases were evaluated: three for uniaxial loading, three for pairs of combined loading, and one with three combined loadings. The anisotropy arose from the unidirectional plates having been at 30 from the structural axis. The anisotropy had a full 6 by 6 rigidities matrix which were satisfied and solved by a Galerkin buckling algorithm. The buckling results showed that the NFRM plates buckled at about twice those with conventional matrix.

  1. Composite laminate free edge reinforcement concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. E.; Gossard, T., Jr.; Jones, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    The presence of a free edge in a laminated composite structure can result in delamination of the composite under certain loading conditions. Linear finite element analysis predicts large or even singular interlaminar stresses near the free edge. Edge reinforcements which will reduce these interlaminar stresses, prevent or delay the onset of delaminations, and thereby increase the strength and life of the structure were studied. Finite element models are used to analyze reinforced laminates which were subsequently fabricated and loaded to failure in order to verify the analysis results.

  2. Examining graphite reinforcement in composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, R. E.; Yates, C. I.

    1980-01-01

    Structure of graphite layers in composite parts can be checked by pyrolizing epoxy portion of composite samples. After 2-3 hours in nitrogen atmosphere at 540 C, only graphite fibers remain. These can be separated and checked for proper number, thickness, and orientation.

  3. Thermoforming of Continuous Fibre Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites

    SciTech Connect

    McCool, Rauri; Murphy, Adrian; Wilson, Ryan; Jiang Zhenyu; Price, Mark

    2011-05-04

    The introduction of new materials, particularly for aerospace products, is not a simple, quick or cheap task. New materials require extensive and expensive qualification and must meet challenging strength, stiffness, durability, manufacturing, inspection and maintenance requirements. Growth in industry acceptance for fibre reinforced thermoplastic composite systems requires the determination of whole life attributes including both part processing and processed part performance data. For thermoplastic composite materials the interactions between the processing parameters, in-service structural performance and end of life recyclability are potentially interrelated. Given the large number and range of parameters and the complexity of the potential relationships, understanding for whole life design must be developed in a systematic building block approach. To assess and demonstrate such an approach this article documents initial coupon level thermoforming trials for a commercially available fibre reinforced thermoplastic laminate, identifying the key interactions between processing and whole life performance characteristics. To examine the role of the thermoforming process parameters on the whole life performance characteristics of the formed part requires a series of manufacturing trials combined with a series of characterisation tests on the manufacturing trial output. Using a full factorial test programme and considering all possible process parameters over a range of potential magnitudes would result in a very large number of manufacturing trials and accompanying characterisation tests. Such an approach would clearly be expensive and require significant time to complete, therefore failing to address the key requirement for a future design methodology capable of rapidly generating design knowledge for new materials and processes. In this work the role of mould tool temperature and blank forming temperature on the thermoforming of a commercially available

  4. Fiber Reinforced Composite Cores and Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Stephen W. (Inventor); Campbell, G. Scott (Inventor); Tilton, Danny E. (Inventor); Stoll, Frederick (Inventor); Sheppard, Michael (Inventor); Banerjee, Robin (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A fiber reinforced core panel is formed from strips of plastics foam helically wound with layers of rovings to form webs which may extend in a wave pattern or may intersect transverse webs. Hollow tubes may replace foam strips. Axial rovings cooperate with overlying helically wound rovings to form a beam or a column. Wound roving patterns may vary along strips for structural efficiency. Wound strips may alternate with spaced strips, and spacers between the strips enhance web buckling strength. Continuously wound rovings between spaced strips permit folding to form panels with reinforced edges. Continuously wound strips are helically wrapped to form annular structures, and composite panels may combine both thermoset and thermoplastic resins. Continuously wound strips or strip sections may be continuously fed either longitudinally or laterally into molding apparatus which may receive skin materials to form reinforced composite panels.

  5. Carbon oxidation in ceramic composites and the evaluation of interfacial sealing for oxidation resistant fiber-reinforced composite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glime, William Harrison, III

    1997-11-01

    Carbon offers desirable properties as a fiber-matrix interphase material in ceramic matrix composites (CMC's), but oxidation of carbon at temperatures above 500sp°C has limited its utility. In an effort to better understand the kinetics associated with carbon oxidation pertaining to CMC applications, the origin of non-planar morphologies observed in the reaction front of carbon fibers and interphases receding into a ceramic matrix in the temperature range of 700sp°C to 1000sp°C was analyzed. A numerical simulation based on the finite difference method is utilized to evaluate the parameters which govern the morphology of the receding carbon reaction front. The study indicates that the morphology of the reaction front contains information regarding the interplay between oxidation behavior and microstructural features of the carbon. Carbon oxidation was found to obey "weak-link" behavior, that is, a sub-component which is more susceptible to oxidation governs the recession kinetics. The implications of weak link oxidation to preservation of a carbon interphase in a ceramic composite are discussed. Interrupted interphases have demonstrated the ability to confine oxidation of a carbon interphase to a localized region adjacent to a matrix crack. Commercial SiC mono-filaments (SCS-6, Textron Specialty Materials) were modified with a laser to produce fibers with discontinuous carbon coatings that were used in experiments to study mechanical properties. The laser-scribed fibers were tested in isolation, used in single-fiber microcomposites, or incorporated into small bulk composite specimens using a powder processing route to produce the matrix. The mechanical performance of the various types of specimens prepared using the laser scribing technique is presented and these results are used in a simulation of ultimate composite properties. The effect of fiber matrix fusion, by direct bonding or through a reaction product which seals the interface, was investigated with

  6. Processing and characterization of smart composite reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalamkarov, Alexander L.; Fitzgerald, Stephen B.; MacDonald, Douglas O.; Georgiades, Anastasis V.

    1998-07-01

    The issues of processing and characterization of pultruded smart composite reinforcements with the embedded fiber optic sensors are discussed. These fiber reinforced polymer reinforcements incorporate the optical fiber sensors to provide a strain monitoring of structures. The required modification of the pultrusion processing technology to allow for the incorporation of fiber optic sensors is developed. Fabry Perot and Bragg Grating optical strain sensors were chosen due to their small size and excellent sensitivity. The small diameter of the sensor and optical fiber allow them to be embedded without adversely affecting the strength of the composite. Two types of reinforcement with vinylester resin were used to produce the experimental 9.5 mm diameter rods. The reinforcements were carbon and E-glass fibers. In order to fully characterize the pultrusion process, it was decided to subject the strain sensors separately to each of the variables pertinent to the pultrusion process. Thus, sensors were used to monitor strain caused by compaction pressure in the die, compaction pressure plus standard temperature profile, and finally compaction pressure plus temperature plus resin cure (complete pultrusion process). A strain profile was recorded for each experiment as the sensor travelled through the pultrusion die, and for the cool-down period after the sensor had exited the die.

  7. The Microstructure-Processing-Property Relationships in an Al Matrix Composite System Reinforced by Al-Cu-Fe Alloy Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Fei Tang

    2004-12-19

    Metal matrix composites (MMC), especially Al matrix composites, received a lot of attention during many years of research because of their promise for the development of automotive and aerospace materials with improved properties and performance, such as lighter weight and better structural properties, improved thermal conductivity and wear resistance. In order to make the MMC materials more viable in various applications, current research efforts on the MMCs should continue to focus on two important aspects, including improving the properties of MMCs and finding more economical techniques to produce MMCs. Solid state vacuum sintering was studied in tap densified Al powder and in hot quasi-isostatically forged samples composed of commercial inert gas atomized or high purity Al powder, generated by a gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) technique. The GARS process results in spherical Al powder with a far thinner surface oxide. The overall results indicated the enhanced ability of GARS-processed Al and Al alloy powders for solid state sintering, which may lead to simplification of current Al powder consolidation processing methods. Elemental Al-based composites reinforced with spherical Al-Cu-Fe alloy powders were produced by quasi-isostatic forging and vacuum hot pressing (VHP) consolidation methods. Microstructures and tensile properties of AYAl-Cu-Fe composites were characterized. It was proved that spherical Al-Cu-Fe alloy powders can serve as an effective reinforcement particulate for elemental Al-based composites, because of their high hardness and a preferred type of matrix/reinforcement interfacial bonding, with reduced strain concentration around the particles. Ultimate tensile strength and yield strength of the composites were increased over the corresponding Al matrix values, far beyond typical observations. This remarkable strengthening was achieved without precipitation hardening and without severe strain hardening during consolidation because of

  8. Vibrations of carbon nanotube-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formica, Giovanni; Lacarbonara, Walter; Alessi, Roberto

    2010-05-01

    This work deals with a study of the vibrational properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced composites by employing an equivalent continuum model based on the Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka approach. The theory allows the calculation of the effective constitutive law of the elastic isotropic medium (matrix) with dispersed elastic inhomogeneities (carbon nanotubes). The devised computational approach is shown to yield predictions in good agreement with the experimentally obtained elastic moduli of composites reinforced with uniformly aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The primary contribution of the present work deals with the global elastic modal properties of nano-structured composite plates. The investigated composite plates are made of a purely isotropic elastic hosting matrix of three different types (epoxy, rubber, and concrete) with embedded single-walled CNTs. The computations are carried out via a finite element (FE) discretization of the composite plates. The effects of the CNT alignment and volume fraction are studied in depth to assess how the modal properties are influenced both globally and locally. As a major outcome, the lowest natural frequencies of CNT-reinforced rubber composites are shown to increase up to 500 percent.

  9. Analysis of Graphite Reinforced Cementitious Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Robert E.; Gilbert, John A.; Spanyer, Karen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes analytical methods that can be used to determine the deflections and stresses in highly compliant graphite-reinforced cementitious composites. It is demonstrated that the standard transform section fails to provide accurate results when the elastic modulus ratio exceeds 20. So an alternate approach is formulated by using the rule of mixtures to determine a set of effective material properties for the composite. Tensile tests are conducted on composite samples to verify this approach; and, when the effective material properties are used to characterize the deflections of composite beams subject to pure bending, an excellent agreement is obtained. Laminated composite plate theory is also investigated as a means for analyzing even more complex composites, consisting of multiple graphite layers oriented in different directions. In this case, composite beams are analyzed by incorporating material properties established from tensile tests. Finite element modeling is used to verity the results and, considering the complexity of the samples, a very good agreement is obtained.

  10. Development of high-speed reactive processing system for carbon fiber-reinforced polyamide-6 composite: In-situ anionic ring-opening polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Seong, Dong Gi; Yi, Jin-Woo; Um, Moon-Kwang

    2016-05-01

    In order to manufacture carbon fiber-reinforced polyamide-6 (PA-6) composite, we optimized the reactive processing system. The in-situ anionic ring-opening polymerization of ɛ-caprolactam was utilized with proper catalyst and initiator for PA-6 matrix. The mechanical properties such as tensile strength, inter-laminar shear strength and compressive strength of the produced carbon fiber-reinforced PA-6 composite were measured, which were compared with the corresponding scanning electron microscope (SEM) images to investigate the polymer properties as well as the interfacial interaction between fiber and polymer matrix. Furthermore, kinetics of in-situ anionic ring-opening polymerization of ɛ-caprolactam will be discussed in the viewpoint of increasing manufacturing speed and interfacial bonding between PA-6 matrix and carbon fiber during polymerization.

  11. Development of Flax Fibre based Textile Reinforcements for Composite Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goutianos, S.; Peijs, T.; Nystrom, B.; Skrifvars, M.

    2006-07-01

    Most developments in the area of natural fibre reinforced composites have focused on random discontinuous fibre composite systems. The development of continuous fibre reinforced composites is, however, essential for manufacturing materials, which can be used in load-bearing/structural applications. The current work aims to develop high-performance natural fibre composite systems for structural applications using continuous textile reinforcements like UD-tapes or woven fabrics. One of the main problems in this case is the optimisation of the yarn to be used to manufacture the textile reinforcement. Low twisted yarns display a very low strength when tested dry in air and therefore they cannot be used in processes such as pultrusion or textile manufacturing routes. On the other hand, by increasing the level of twist, a degradation of the mechanical properties is observed in impregnated yarns (e.g., unidirectional composites) similar to off-axis composites. Therefore, an optimum twist should be used to balance processability and mechanical properties. Subsequently, different types of fabrics (i.e., biaxial plain weaves, unidirectional fabrics and non-crimp fabrics) were produced and evaluated as reinforcement in composites manufactured by well established manufacturing techniques such as hand lay-up, vacuum infusion, pultrusion and resin transfer moulding (RTM). Clearly, as expected, the developed materials cannot directly compete in terms of strength with glass fibre composites. However, they are clearly able to compete with these materials in terms of stiffness, especially if the low density of flax is taken into account. Their properties are however very favourable when compared with non-woven glass composites.

  12. Fatigue evaluation of composite-reinforced, integrally stiffened metal panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumesnil, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The fatigue behavior of composite-reinforced, integrally stiffened metal panels was investigated in combined metal and composite materials subjected to fatigue loading. The systems investigated were aluminum-graphite/epoxy, and aluminum-S glass/epoxy. It was found that the composite material would support the total load at limit stress after the metal had completely failed, and the weight of the composite-metal system would be equal to that of an all metal system which would carry the same total load at limit stress.

  13. Glass matrix composites. I - Graphite fiber reinforced glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Bacon, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental program is described in which graphite fibers of Hercules HMS and HTS, Thornel 300, and Celanese DG-12 were used to reinforce, both uniaxially and biaxially, borosilicate pyrex glass. Composite flexural strength distribution, strength as a function of test temperature, fracture toughness and oxidative stability were determined and shown to be primarily a function of fiber type and the quality of fiber-matrix bond formed during composite fabrication. It is demonstrated that the graphite fiber reinforced glass system offers unique possibilities as a high performance structural material.

  14. Modeling the minimum creep rate of discontinuous lamellar- reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomeusz, Michael F.; Wert, John A.

    1995-12-01

    An analytical model has been developed to predict the creep rate of discontinuous lamellar-reinforced composites in which both phases plastically deform. The model incorporates effects associated with lamellar orientation relative to the uniaxial stress axis. For modest to large differences between matrix and reinforcement creep rates, lamellar aspect ratio has a significant impact on composite creep rate. For a prescribed reinforcing phase volume fraction, microstructural inhomogeneity can have a pronounced effect on composite creep properties. In the case of uniaxially aligned rigid lamellar-reinforced composites, an inhomogeneous distribution of reinforcing lamellae in the microstructure substantially increases the composite creep rate. Model results demonstrate that there is no significant improvement in creep resistance for aligned fiber-reinforced composites compared to aligned lamellar-reinforced composites, unless the reinforcing phase is essentially nondeforming relative to the matrix phase.

  15. Mechanics of advanced fiber reinforced lattice composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Hua-Lin; Zeng, Tao; Fang, Dai-Ning; Yang, Wei

    2010-12-01

    Fiber reinforced lattice composites are light-weight attractive due to their high specific strength and specific stiffness. In the past 10 years, researchers developed three-dimensional (3D) lattice trusses and two-dimensional (2D) lattice grids by various methods including interlacing, weaving, interlocking, filament winding and molding hot-press. The lattice composites have been applied in the fields of radar cross-section reduction, explosive absorption and heat-resistance. In this paper, topologies of the lattice composites, their manufacturing routes, as well as their mechanical and multifunctional applications, were surveyed.

  16. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.; Prewo, K. M.

    1977-01-01

    The results of research for the origination of graphite-fiber reinforced glass matrix composites are presented. The method selected to form the composites consisted of pulling the graphite fiber through a slurry containing powdered glass, winding up the graphite fiber and the glass it picks up on a drum, drying, cutting into segments, loading the tape segment into a graphite die, and hot pressing. During the course of the work, composites were made with a variety of graphite fibers in a glass matrix.

  17. Tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix composites: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdanels, David L.

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix (W/Cu) composites have served as an ideal model system with which to analyze the properties of metal matrix composites. A series of research programs were conducted to investigate the stress-strain behavior of W/Cu composites; the effect of fiber content on the strength, modulus, and conductivity of W/Cu composites; and the effect of alloying elements on the behavior of tungsten wire and of W/Cu composites. Later programs investigated the stress-rupture, creep, and impact behavior of these composites at elevated temperatures. Analysis of the results of these programs as allows prediction of the effects of fiber properties, matrix properties, and fiber content on the properties of W/Cu composites. These analyses form the basis for the rule-of-mixtures prediction of composite properties which was universally adopted as the criteria for measuring composite efficiency. In addition, the analyses allows extrapolation of potential properties of other metal matrix composites and are used to select candidate fibers and matrices for development of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composite materials for high temperature aircraft and rocket engine turbine applications. The W/Cu composite efforts are summarized, some of the results obtained are described, and an update is provided on more recent work using W/Cu composites as high strength, high thermal conductivity composite materials for high heat flux, elevated temperature applications.

  18. Reinforcing Liner For Composite Cryogenic Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgeson, John E.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed fiber-reinforced liner for graphite/epoxy fuel tank prevents metal-foil leakage barrier from detaching at low temperatures. Consists of epoxy containing fibers of Spectra 1000. Tank holds inner layers of foil, adhesive, and proposed liner. Liner much thinner than shell, adds little weight, and subtracts little volume. Lined composite tank used to hold liquids from room temperature to cryogenic temperatures. Not suitable for oxygen, because organic materials in liner oxidized quickly.

  19. Tensile properties of nanoclay reinforced epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, H.; Trada, Mohan

    2013-08-01

    Kinetic epoxy resin was filled with nanoclay to increase tensile properties of the composite for civil and structural. This project manufactured samples with different percentages by weight of nanoclay in the composites in steps of 1 wt %, which were then post-cured in an oven. The samples were then subjected to tensile tests. The results showed that the composite with 3 wt % of nanoclay produced the highest yield and tensile strengths. However, the Young's modulus increased with increasing nanoparticulate loading. It is hoped that the discussion and results in this work would not only contribute towards the further development of nanoclay reinforced epoxy composites with enhanced material properties, but also provide useful information for the studies of fracture toughness, tensile properties and flexural properties of other composites.

  20. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Thompson, E. R.

    1980-01-01

    High levels of mechanical performance in tension, flexure, fatigue, and creep loading situations of graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites are discussed. At test temperatures of up to 813 K it was found that the major limiting factor was the oxidative instability of the reinforcing graphite fibers. Particular points to note include the following: (1) a wide variety of graphite fibers were found to be comparable with the glass matrix composite fabrication process; (2) choice of fiber, to a large extent, controlled resultant composite performance; (3) composite fatigue performance was found to be excellent at both 300 K and 703 K; (4) composite creep and stress rupture at temperatures of up to 813 K was limited by the oxidative stability of the fiber; (5) exceptionally low values of composite thermal expansion coefficient were attributable to the dimensional stability of both matrix and fiber; and (6) component fabricability was demonstrated through the hot pressing of hot sections and brazing using glass and metal joining phases.

  1. Fiber Reinforced Composite Materials Used for Tankage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Christy

    2005-01-01

    The Nonmetallic Materials and Processes Group is presently working on several projects to optimize cost while providing effect materials for the space program. One factor that must be considered is that these materials must meet certain weight requirements. Composites contribute greatly to this effort. Through the use of composites the cost of launching payloads into orbit will be reduced to one-tenth of the current cost. This research project involved composites used for aluminum pressure vessels. These tanks are used to store cryogenic liquids during flight. The tanks need some type of reinforcement. Steel was considered, but added too much weight. As a result, fiber was chosen. Presently, only carbon fibers with epoxy resin are wrapped around the vessels as a primary source of reinforcement. Carbon fibers are lightweight, yet high strength. The carbon fibers are wet wound onto the pressure vessels. This was done using the ENTEC Filament Winding Machine. It was thought that an additional layer of fiber would aid in reinforcement as well as containment and impact reduction. Kevlar was selected because it is light weight, but five times stronger that steel. This is the same fiber that is used to make bullet-proof vests trampolines, and tennis rackets.

  2. Creep deformation characteristics of ductile discontinuous fiber reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Biner, S.B.

    1993-10-01

    Role of material parameters and geometric parameters of ductile reinforcing phase on the creep deformation behavior of 20% discontinuously reinforced composite was numerically investigated including debonding and pull-out mechanisms. Results indicate that for rigidly bonded interfaces, the creep rate of the composite is not significantly influenced by the material properties and geometric parameters of the ductile reinforcing phase due to development of large hydrostatic stress and constrained deformation in the reinforcement. For debonding interfaces, the geometric parameters of the reinforcing phase are important; however, event with very weak interfacial behavior low composite creep rates can be achieved by suitable selection of the geometric parameters of the ductile reinforcing phase.

  3. Damping behavior of Discontinuous Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldar, Amit Kumar; Aggarwal, Ishan; Batra, N. K.

    2010-11-01

    Discontinuous fiber reinforced composites are being used in many antivibration applications due to their time and temperature dependent specific mechanical properties. For utilization of this material to specific engineering applications there is a need to understand the damping behavior of composites under dynamic loading. For this work, unreinforced and 20% long and short reinforced glass fiber polypropylene composite materials were tested for free transverse vibration damping characteristics under static as well as fatigue loading conditions. The damping characteristics are quantified by decay pattern and natural frequency. Presence of reinforced fibers increases the damping capacity. Among reinforcements, short fiber reinforced polypropylene shows increased damping capacity then long glass fiber reinforced polypropylene.

  4. Titanium reinforced boron-polyimide composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. A.; Clayton, K. I.

    1969-01-01

    Processing techniques for boron polyimide prepreg were developed whereby composites could be molded under vacuum bag pressure only. A post-cure cycle was developed which resulted in no loss in room temperature mechanical properties of the composite at any time during up to 16 hours at 650 F. A design utilizing laminated titanium foil was developed to achieve a smooth transition of load from the titanium attachment points into the boron-reinforced body of the structure. The box beam test article was subjected to combined bending and torsional loads while exposed to 650 F. Loads were applied incrementally until failure occurred at 83% design limit load.

  5. Reinforcing of Cement Composites by Estabragh Fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merati, A. A.

    2014-04-01

    The influence of Estabragh fibres has been studied to improve the performance characteristics of the reinforced cement composites. The concrete shrinkage was evaluated by counting the number of cracks and measuring the width of cracks on the surface of concrete specimens. Although, the Estabragh fibres lose their strength in an alkali environment of cement composites, but, the ability of Estabragh fibres to bridge on the micro cracks in the concrete matrix causes to decrease the width of the cracks on the surface of the concrete samples in comparison with the plain concrete. However, considering the mechanical properties of specimens such as bending strength and impact resistance, the specimens with 0.25 % of Estabragh fibre performed better in all respects compared to the physical and mechanical properties of reinforced cement composite of concrete. Consequently, by adding 0.25 % of Estabragh fibres to the cement composite of concrete, a remarkable improvement in physical and mechanical properties of fibre-containing cement composite is achieved.

  6. Nanotube reinforced thermoplastic polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shofner, Meisha Lei

    The inherent high strength, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity make nanotubes attractive reinforcements for polymer matrix composites. However, the structure that makes them desirable also causes highly anisotropic properties and limited reactivity with other materials. This thesis isolates these problems in two separate studies aimed at improving mechanical properties with single wall nanotube (SWNT) reinforced thermoplastic polymer composites. The two studies demonstrate the effect of solid freeform fabrication (SFF) and chemical functionalization on anisotropy and limited reactivity, respectively. Both studies showed mechanical property improvements. The alignment study demonstrates a maximum increase of 93% in tensile modulus with single wall nanotubes (SWNTs). The chemical functionalization study shows a larger increase in storage modulus for functionalized SWNTs as compared to purified SVWNTs with respective increases of 9% and 44% in storage modulus. Improved interfacial properties are also observed as a decrease in mechanical damping. Maximum property increases in composites are obtained when nanotubes are aligned, requiring additional processing consideration to the anisotropic structure. Melt spinning and extrusion processing effectively align nanotubes, but the end product of these techniques, composite fibers, requires further processing to be incorporated into finished parts. Extrusion-based SFF is a novel technique for processing nanotube reinforced composites because it allows for the direct fabrication of finished parts containing aligned nanotubes. SFF processing produces parts containing preferentially oriented nanotubes with improved mechanical properties when compared to isotropic composites. Functionalization of the nanotube surface disrupts the rope structure to obtain smaller ropes and promote further interfacial bonding. The chemically inert nature of nanotubes resulting from a structure containing few defects and the

  7. Properties of glass/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy hybrid polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R. H.; Sevkani, V. R.; Patel, B. R.; Patel, V. B.

    2016-05-01

    Composite Materials are well known for their tailor-made properties. For the fabrication of composites different types of reinforcements are used for different applications. Sometimes for a particular application, one type of reinforcement may not fulfill the requirements. Therefore, more than one type of reinforcements may be used. Thus, the idea of hybrid composites arises. Hybrid composites are made by joining two or more different reinforcements with suitable matrix system. It helps to improve the properties of composite materials. In the present work glass/carbon fiber reinforcement have been used with a matrix triglycidyl ether of tris(m-hydroxy phenyl) phosphate epoxy resin using amine curing agent. Different physical and mechanical properties of the glass, carbon and glass/carbon fiber reinforced polymeric systems have been found out.

  8. Fiber reinforced thermoplastic resin matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert J. (Inventor); Chang, Glenn E. C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Polyimide polymer composites having a combination of enhanced thermal and mechanical properties even when subjected to service temperatures as high as 700.degree. F. are described. They comprise (a) from 10 to 50 parts by weight of a thermoplastic polyimide resin prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane and (b) from 90 to 50 parts by weight of continuous reinforcing fibers, the total of (a) and (b) being 100 parts by weight. Composites based on polyimide resin formed from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane and pyromellitic dianhydride and continuous carbon fibers retained at least about 50% of their room temperature shear strength after exposure to 700.degree. F. for a period of 16 hours in flowing air. Preferably, the thermoplastic polyimide resin is formed in situ in the composite material by thermal imidization of a corresponding amide-acid polymer prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane. It is also preferred to initially size the continuous reinforcing fibers with up to about one percent by weight of an amide-acid polymer prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane. In this way imidization at a suitable elevated temperature results in the in-situ formation of a substantially homogeneous thermoplastic matrix of the polyimide resin tightly and intimately bonded to the continuous fibers. The resultant composites tend to have optimum thermo-mechanical properties.

  9. Processes for fabricating composite reinforced material

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D.; Ripley, Edward B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2015-11-24

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  10. Composite structural materials. [fiber reinforced composites for aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    Physical properties of fiber reinforced composites; structural concepts and analysis; manufacturing; reliability; and life prediction are subjects of research conducted to determine the long term integrity of composite aircraft structures under conditions pertinent to service use. Progress is reported in (1) characterizing homogeneity in composite materials; (2) developing methods for analyzing composite materials; (3) studying fatigue in composite materials; (4) determining the temperature and moisture effects on the mechanical properties of laminates; (5) numerically analyzing moisture effects; (6) numerically analyzing the micromechanics of composite fracture; (7) constructing the 727 elevator attachment rib; (8) developing the L-1011 engine drag strut (CAPCOMP 2 program); (9) analyzing mechanical joints in composites; (10) developing computer software; and (11) processing science and technology, with emphasis on the sailplane project.

  11. Nano polypeptide particles reinforced polymer composite fibers.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiashen; Li, Yi; Zhang, Jing; Li, Gang; Liu, Xuan; Li, Zhi; Liu, Xuqing; Han, Yanxia; Zhao, Zheng

    2015-02-25

    Because of the intensified competition of land resources for growing food and natural textile fibers, there is an urgent need to reuse and recycle the consumed/wasted natural fibers as regenerated green materials. Although polypeptide was extracted from wool by alkaline hydrolysis, the size of the polypeptide fragments could be reduced to nanoscale. The wool polypeptide particles were fragile and could be crushed down to nano size again and dispersed evenly among polymer matrix under melt extrusion condition. The nano polypeptide particles could reinforce antiultraviolet capability, moisture regain, and mechanical properties of the polymer-polypeptide composite fibers. PMID:25647481

  12. Toughened Matrix SiC Fiber Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Stanley R.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Morscher, Gregory N.; Kiser, James D.

    2005-01-01

    First matrix cracking stress is a critical parameter for application of Sic fiber reinforced composites in highly stressed, environmentally demanding applications such as turbine blades. High matrix fracture toughness is a key property that contributes to high composite fracture stress. Silicon nitride offers reduced matrix elastic modulus, lower coefficient of thermal expansion, and potentially high fracture toughness compared to Sic matrices. All of these factors can be used to advantage to increase matrix fracture stress. As a first model system we are pursuing toughened silicon nitride matrix composites reinforced with SCS-9 fibers. Fabrication is by tape casting the matrix plies and tape lay-up with fiber plies followed by hot pressing at 1800 C. Progress toward this end will be reported.

  13. Bioinspired Composites with Spatial and Orientational Control of Reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiroers, Ahmet; Studart, Andre; Complex Materials Team

    Living organisms combine soft and hard components to fabricate composite materials with out-standing mechanical properties. The optimum design and assembly of the anisotropic components reinforce the material in specific directions against multidirectional external loads. Although nature does it quite readily, it is still a challenge for material scientists to control the orientation and position of the colloidal components in a matrix. Here, we use external electric and magnetic fields to achieve positional and orientational control over colloid-polymer composites to fabricate mechanically robust materials to capture some of the essential features of natural systems. We first investigated the assembly of spherical micron-sized colloids using dielectrophoresis, as these particles provided an easily accessible and instructive length scale for performing initial experiments. We used dielectrophoresis for spatial control of reinforcing anisotropic components and magnetic fields to provide control over the orientation of these reinforcing constituents. The obtained composites with different orientational and spatial reinforcement showed enhanced mechanical properties, such as wear resistance, which exhibits similarities to tooth enamel. SNSF Ambizione Grant PZ00P2_148040.

  14. Fabrication of Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Setlock, John A.

    2000-01-01

    A method has been developed for the fabrication of small diameter, multifilament tow fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites. Its application has been successfully demonstrated for the Hi-Nicalon/celsian system. Strong and tough celsian matrix composites, reinforced with BN/SiC-coated Hi-Nicalon fibers, have been fabricated by infiltrating the fiber tows with the matrix slurry, winding the tows on a drum, cutting and stacking of the prepreg tapes in the desired orientation, and hot pressing. The monoclinic celsian phase in the matrix was produced in situ, during hot pressing, from the 0.75BaO-0.25SrO-Al2O3-2SiO2 mixed precursor synthesized by solid state reaction from metal oxides. Hot pressing resulted in almost fully dense fiber-reinforced composites. The unidirectional composites having approx. 42 vol% of fibers exhibited graceful failure with extensive fiber pullout in three-point bend tests at room temperature. Values of yield stress and strain were 435 +/- 35 MPa and 0.27 +/- 0.01 percent, respectively, and ultimate strengths of 900 +/- 60 MPa were observed. The Young's modulus of the composites was measured to be 165 +/- 5 GPa.

  15. Fibre reinforced composites in aircraft construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soutis, C.

    2005-02-01

    Fibrous composites have found applications in aircraft from the first flight of the Wright Brothers’ Flyer 1, in North Carolina on December 17, 1903, to the plethora of uses now enjoyed by them on both military and civil aircrafts, in addition to more exotic applications on unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), space launchers and satellites. Their growing use has risen from their high specific strength and stiffness, when compared to the more conventional materials, and the ability to shape and tailor their structure to produce more aerodynamically efficient structural configurations. In this paper, a review of recent advances using composites in modern aircraft construction is presented and it is argued that fibre reinforced polymers, especially carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) can and will in the future contribute more than 50% of the structural mass of an aircraft. However, affordability is the key to survival in aerospace manufacturing, whether civil or military, and therefore effort should be devoted to analysis and computational simulation of the manufacturing and assembly process as well as the simulation of the performance of the structure, since they are intimately connected.

  16. Processing and evaluation of smart composite reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalamkarov, Alexander L.; Fitzgerald, Stephen B.; MacDonald, Douglas O.

    1997-11-01

    The issues of processing and evaluation of pultruded smart composite reinforcements with embedded fiber optic sensors are discussed. The required modification of the pultrusion processing technology to allow for the incorporation of fiber optic sensors is developed. In order to fully evaluate the loads imposed on the Fabry Perot fiber optic sensors during the pultrusion process, the strain sensors were subjected to the separate variables of the total process. The following data was obtained for the carbon fiber rods. Compaction pressure alone caused negligible residual strain. The temperature profile caused a similar strain profile over the length of the pultrusion die. For the total pultrusion process, the residual strain after cooling appeared to present somewhat of a problem. For several experiments, the residual strain after exiting the pultrusion die was in the range of plus 200 to 400 microstrain, after which the sensors ceased to function. Calculations indicated that the radial shrinkage of the carbon fiber rods may have been sufficient to cause failure of the Fabry Perot sensors. A special procedure of reinforcing sensors prior to embedding them into the composite was successful in allowing the sensors to survive with only a slightly negative residual strain.

  17. Trans-Laminar-Reinforced (TLR) Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinders, Mark; Dickinson, Larry

    1997-01-01

    A Trans-Laminar-Reinforced (TLR) composite is defined as composite laminate with up to five percent volume of fibrous reinforcement oriented in a 'trans-laminar' fashion in the through-thickness direction. The TLR can be continuous threads as in 'stitched laminates', or it can be discontinuous rods or pins as in 'Z-Fiber(TM) materials. It has been repeatedly documented in the literature that adding TLR to an otherwise two dimensional laminate results in the following advantages: substantially improved compression-after-impact response; considerably increased fracture toughness in mode 1 (double cantilever beam) and mode 2 (end notch flexure); and severely restricted size and growth of impact damage and edge delamination. TLR has also been used to eliminate catastrophic stiffener disbonding in stiffened structures. TLR directly supports the 'Achilles heel' of laminated composites, that is delamination. As little as one percent volume of TLR significantly alters the mechanical response of laminates. The objective of this work was to characterize the effects of TLR on the in-plane and inter-laminar mechanical response of undamaged composite laminates. Detailed finite element models of 'unit cells', or representative volumes, were used to study the effects of adding TLR on the elastic constants; the in-plane strength; and the initiation of delamination. Parameters investigated included TLR material, TLR volume fraction, TLR diameter, TLR through-thickness angle, ply stacking sequence, and the microstructural features of pure resin regions and curved in-plane fibers. The work was limited to the linear response of undamaged material with at least one ply interface. An inter-laminar dominated problem of practical interest, a flanged skin in bending, was also modeled.

  18. Initial evaluation of continuous fiber reinforced NiAl composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, R. D.; Bowman, R. R.; Eldridge, J. I.

    1990-01-01

    NiAl is being evaluated as a potential matrix material as part of an overall program to develop and understand high-temperature structural composites. Currently, continuous fiber composites have been fabricated by the powder cloth technique incorporating either W(218) or single crystal Al2O3 fibers as reinforcements in both binary NiAl and a solute strengthened NiAl(.05 at. pct Zr) matrix. Initial evaluation of these composite systems have included: fiber push-out testing to measure matrix/fiber bond strengths, bend testing to determine strength as a function of temperature and composite structure, and thermal cycling to establish the effect of matrix and fiber properties on composite life. The effect of matrix/fiber bond strength and matrix strength on several composite properties will be discussed.

  19. Apparatus and process for freeform fabrication of composite reinforcement preforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Junsheng (Inventor); Wu, Liangwei (Inventor); Liu, Junhai (Inventor); Jang, Bor Z. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A solid freeform fabrication process and apparatus for making a three-dimensional reinforcement shape. The process comprises the steps of (1) operating a multiple-channel material deposition device for dispensing a liquid adhesive composition and selected reinforcement materials at predetermined proportions onto a work surface; (2) during the material deposition process, moving the deposition device and the work surface relative to each other in an X-Y plane defined by first and second directions and in a Z direction orthogonal to the X-Y plane so that the materials are deposited to form a first layer of the shape; (3) repeating these steps to deposit multiple layers for forming a three-dimensional preform shape; and (4) periodically hardening the adhesive to rigidize individual layers of the preform. These steps are preferably executed under the control of a computer system by taking additional steps of (5) creating a geometry of the shape on the computer with the geometry including a plurality of segments defining the preform shape and each segment being preferably coded with a reinforcement composition defining a specific proportion of different reinforcement materials; (6) generating programmed signals corresponding to each of the segments in a predetermined sequence; and (7) moving the deposition device and the work surface relative to each other in response to these programmed signals. Preferably, the system is also operated to generate a support structure for any un-supported feature of the 3-D preform shape.

  20. NDT of fiber-reinforced composites with a new fiber-optic pump-probe laser-ultrasound system.

    PubMed

    Pelivanov, Ivan; Buma, Takashi; Xia, Jinjun; Wei, Chen-Wei; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2014-06-01

    Laser-ultrasonics is an attractive and powerful tool for the non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E) of composite materials. Current systems for non-contact detection of ultrasound have relatively low sensitivity compared to contact peizotransducers. They are also expensive, difficult to adjust, and strongly influenced by environmental noise. Moreover, laser-ultrasound (LU) systems typically launch only about 50 firings per second, much slower than the kHz level pulse repetition rate of conventional systems. As demonstrated here, most of these drawbacks can be eliminated by combining a new generation of compact, inexpensive, high repetition rate nanosecond fiber lasers with new developments in fiber telecommunication optics and an optimally designed balanced probe beam detector. In particular, a modified fiber-optic balanced Sagnac interferometer is presented as part of a LU pump-probe system for NDT&E of aircraft composites. The performance of the all-optical system is demonstrated for a number of composite samples with different types and locations of inclusions. PMID:25302156

  1. An improved compression molding technology for continuous fiber reinforced composite laminate. Part 1: AS-4/LaRC-TPI 1500 (HFG) Prepreg system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Tan-Hung; Kidder, Paul W.; Reddy, Rakasi M.

    1991-01-01

    Poor processability of fiber reinforced high performance polyimide thermoplastic resin composites is a well recognized issue which, in many cases, prohibits the fabrication of composite parts with satisfactorily consolidated quality. Without modifying the resin matrix chemistry, improved compression modeling procedures were proposed and investigated with the AS-4/LaRC-TPI 1500 High Flow Grade (HFG) prepreg system. Composite panels with excellent C-scans can be consistently molded by this method under 700 F and a consolidation pressure as low as 100 psi. A mechanism for the consolidation of the composite under this improved molding technique is discussed. This mechanism reveals that a certain degree of matrix shear and tow filament slippage and nesting between plies occur during consolidation, which leads to a reduction of the consolidating pressure necessary to offset the otherwise intimate inter fiber-fiber contact and consequently achieves a better consolidation quality. Outstanding short beam shear strength and flexural strength were obtained from the molded panels. A prolonged consolidation step under low pressure, i.e., 100 psi at 700 F for 75 minutes, was found to significantly enhance the composite mechanical properties.

  2. Discontinuously reinforced intermetallic matrix composites via XD synthesis. [exothermal dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K. S.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    A review is given of recent results obtained for discontinuously reinforced intermetallic matrix composites produced using the XD process. Intermetallic matrices investigated include NiAl, multiphase NiAl + Ni2AlTi, CoAl, near-gamma titanium aluminides, and Ll2 trialuminides containing minor amounts of second phase. Such mechanical properties as low and high temperature strength, compressive and tensile creep, elastic modulus, ambient ductility, and fracture toughness are discussed as functions of reinforcement size, shape, and volume fraction. Microstructures before and after deformation are examined and correlated with measured properties. An observation of interest in many of the systems examined is 'dispersion weakening' at high temperatures and high strain rates. This behavior is not specific to the XD process; rather similar observations have been reported in other discontinuous composites. Proposed mechanisms for this behavior are presented.

  3. Coupled heating/forming optimization of knitted reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancrace, Johann

    The feasibility of knitted fabric reinforcement for highly flexible composites has been investigated for the thermoforming process. The composite sheets were made through compression molding before being shaped. We used thermoplastic elastomers as matrices: Thermoplastic Elastomers and Thermoplastic Olefins. The knit reinforcement was provided by jersey knitted fabrics of polyester fibers. We first introduced the fundamentals involved in the study. The manufacturing is presented through compression molding and thermoforming. The latter is a two-step process: IR heating and plug/pressure assisted deformations. For the IR heating phase, several material properties have been characterized: the emissivity of matrices, absorption, reflection and transmission of radiations in the composite structure have been studied. We particularly paid attention to the reflection on the composite surfaces. The non-reflected or useful radiations leading to the heating are quantified and simulated for three emitter-composite configurations. It has been found that the emitter temperatures and the angle of incidence have significant roles in the IR heating phase. Thermal properties such as calorific capacity and thermal conductivity of the composites were also presented. Thermograms were carried out with an IR camera. Equipment and Thermogram acquisitions were both presented. Optimization of emitters was performed for a three emitter system. The objective function method has been illustrated. Regarding mechanical purposes, the characterizations of the matrices, reinforcements and flexible composites have been carried out. The studied loadings were uniaxial traction, pure shear and biaxial inflation. For the uniaxial extension, both the reinforcement and the composite were found highly anisotropic regarding the orientation of the loading toward the coursewise of the fabric. The resulting strains and stresses to rupture are also found anisotropic. However, for pure shear loading we observed

  4. Ballistic impact fatigue behavior of spectra fiber-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.W.; Lee, B.L.

    1994-12-31

    The study examined the penetration failure mechanisms of Spectra fiber-reinforced composites under ballistic impact and assessed the roles played by resin matrix properties in controlling the process of impact damage propagation. In order to observe gradual propagation of damage, a concept of impact fatigue was introduced by subjecting the composite plates to a multiple number of repeated ballistic impact. When the striking velocity of,a projectile was below the ballistic limit, repeated impact resulted in a progressive growth of local delamination until full penetration of the projectile occurs. Preliminary results indicated that the vinyl ester resin matrix composites have a higher ballistic limit and longer impact fatigue life at a given striking velocity than the polyurethane matrix composites. Based on the test results of dynamic mechanical properties, more localized delamination of polyurethane matrix composites was attributed to a greater degree of stress wave attenuation and lower bending stiffness of material system.

  5. Graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic glass matrix composites for use at 1000 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Minford, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    The fabrication and properties of the graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composite system are described. By reinforcing borosilicate glass with graphite fibers it has been possible to develop a composite whose properties can be compared favorably with resin matrix counterparts. Both high elastic modulus and strength can be obtained and maintained to temperatures of approximately 600 C. In addition, composite dimensional stability is superior to resin or metal matrix systems due to the low thermal expansion behavior of the glass matrix.

  6. [Fiber-reinforced composite in fixed prosthodontics].

    PubMed

    Pilo, R; Abu Rass, Z; Shmidt, A

    2010-07-01

    Fiber reinforced composite (FRC) is composed of resin matrix and fibers filler. Common types of fibers: polyethylene, carbon and glass. Fibers can be continuous and aligned, discontinuous and aligned, discontinuous and randomly oriented. The architecture of the fibers is unidirectional, woven or braided. The two main types are: dry fibers or impregnated. Inclusion of fibers to resin composite increased its average flexural strength in 100-200 MPa. FRC can be utilized by the dentist in direct approach (splinting, temporary winged bridge) or indirect approach (laboratory made fixed partial denture). Laboratory fixed partial denture (FPD) is made from FRC substructure and Hybrid/Microfill particulate composite veneer. Main indications: interim temporary FPD or FPD in cases of questionable abutment teeth, in aesthetic cases where All Ceram FPD is not feasible. Retention is attained by adhesive cementation to minimally prepared teeth or to conventionally prepared teeth; other options are inlay-onlay bridges or hybrid bridges. Contraindications are: poor hygiene, inability to control humidity, parafunction habits, and more than two pontics. Survival rate of FRC FPD over 5 years is 75%, lower compared to porcelain fused to metal FPD which is 95%. Main reasons for failure are: fracture of framework and delamination of the veneer. Part of the failures is repairable. PMID:21485555

  7. Metal aircraft structural elements reinforced with graphite filamentary composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, K. R.; Ramsey, J.

    1972-01-01

    Strain compatibility equations are used to evaluate the thermal stresses existing when unidirectional graphite composites are bonded to aluminum structures. Based on thermal stresses and optimum placement of the composite, skin-stringer aluminum panels are optimized for minimum weight compression panels with selective composite reinforcement. Composite reinforced skin-stringer panels are thermal cycled to determine the effect of thermal fatigue on structural integrity. Both cycled and uncycled panels are tested in compression and tension. Test results are correlated with predicted loads. Use of filamentary graphite composites is an efficient method of reinforcing metal structures, but care must be taken to minimize thermal stresses.

  8. Fracture of fiber-reinforced composites analyzed via acoustic emission.

    PubMed

    Ereifej, Nadia S; Oweis, Yara G; Altarawneh, Sandra K

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the fracture resistance of composite resins using a three-point bending test and acoustic emission (AE) analysis. Three groups of specimens (n=15) were prepared: non-reinforced BelleGlass HP composite (NRC), unidirectional (UFRC) and multidirectional (MFRC) fiber-reinforced groups which respectively incorporated unidirectional Stick and multidirectional StickNet fibers. Specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine while an AE system was used to detect audible signals. Initial fracture strengths and AE amplitudes were significantly lower than those at final fracture in all groups (p<0.05). Initial fracture strength of UFRC (170.0 MPa) was significantly higher than MFRC (124.6 MPa) and NRC (87.9 MPa). Final fracture strength of UFRC (198.1 MPa) was also significantly higher than MFRC (151.0 MPa) and NRC (109.2 MPa). Initial and final fracture strengths were significantly correlated (r=0.971). It was concluded that fiber reinforcement improved the fracture resistance of composite resin materials and the monitoring of acoustic signals revealed significant information regarding the fracture process. PMID:25904176

  9. Quantitative radiographic analysis of fiber reinforced polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Baidya, K P; Ramakrishna, S; Rahman, M; Ritchie, A

    2001-01-01

    X-ray radiographic examination of the bone fracture healing process is a widely used method in the treatment and management of patients. Medical devices made of metallic alloys reportedly produce considerable artifacts that make the interpretation of radiographs difficult. Fiber reinforced polymer composite materials have been proposed to replace metallic alloys in certain medical devices because of their radiolucency, light weight, and tailorable mechanical properties. The primary objective of this paper is to provide a comparable radiographic analysis of different fiber reinforced polymer composites that are considered suitable for biomedical applications. Composite materials investigated consist of glass, aramid (Kevlar-29), and carbon reinforcement fibers, and epoxy and polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) matrices. The total mass attenuation coefficient of each material was measured using clinical X-rays (50 kev). The carbon fiber reinforced composites were found to be more radiolucent than the glass and kevlar fiber reinforced composites. PMID:11261603

  10. Fiber-Reinforced-Foam (FRF) Core Composite Sandwich Panel Concept for Advanced Composites Technologi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Fiber-Reinforced-Foam (FRF) Core Composite Sandwich Panel Concept for Advanced Composites Technologies Project - Preliminary Manufacturing Demonstration Articles for Ares V Payload Shroud Barrel Acreage Structure

  11. Creep behavior of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobstein, T. L.

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites were evaluated for use in space nuclear power conversion systems. The composite panels were fabricated using the arc-spray monotape technique at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The creep behavior of W/Nb composite material was determined at 1400 and 1500 K in vacuum over a wide range of applied loads. The time to reach 1 percent strain, the time to rupture, and the minimum creep rate were measured. The W/Nb composites exceeded the properties of monolithic niobium alloys significantly even when compared on a strength to density basis. The effect of fiber orientation on the creep strength also was evaluated. Kirkendall void formation was observed at the fiber/matrix interface; the void distribution differed depending on the fiber orientation relative to the stress axis. A relationship was found between the fiber orientation and the creep strength.

  12. Creep behavior of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobstein, Toni L.

    1992-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites were evaluated for use in space nuclear power conversion systems. The composite panels were fabricated using the arc-spray monotape technique at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The creep behavior of W/Nb composite material was determined at 1400 and 1500 K in vacuum over a wide range of applied loads. The time to reach 1 percent strain, the time to rupture, and the minimum creep rate were measured. The W/Nb composites exceeded the properties of monolithic niobium alloys significantly even when compared creep strength also was evaluated. Kirkendall void formation was observed at the fiber/matrix interface; the void distribution differed depending the fiber orientation relative to the stress axis. A relationship was found between the fiber orientation and the creep strength.

  13. Nanographene reinforced carbon/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Dhruv

    Carbon/Carbon Composites (CCC) are made of carbon reinforcement in carbon matrix and have high thermal stability and fatigue resistance. CCC are used in nose cones, heat shields and disc brakes of aircrafts due to their exceptional mechanical properties at high temperature. The manufacturing process of CCC involves a carbonization stage in which unwanted elements, except carbon, are eliminated from the polymer precursor. Carbonization results in the formation of voids and cracks due to the thermal mismatch between the reinforcement and the matrix and expulsion of volatiles from the polymer matrix. Thermal cracks and voids decrease the density and mechanical properties of the manufactured CCC. In this work, Nanographene Platelets (NGP) were explored as nanofillers to fill the voids/cracks and reduce thermal shrinkage in CCC. They were first compared with Vapor Grown Carbon Nanofibers (VGCNF) by dispersion of different concentrations (0.5wt%, 1.5wt%, 3wt%) in resole-type phenolic resin and were characterized to explore their effect on rheology, heat of reaction and wetting behavior. The dispersions were then cured to form nanocomposites and were characterized for morphology, flexure and thermal properties. Finally, NGP were introduced into the carbon/carboncomposites in two stages, first by spraying in different concentrations (0.5wt%, 1.5wt%, 3wt%, 5wt %) during the prepreg formation and later during densification by directly mixing in the corresponding densification mix. The manufactured NGP reinforced CCC were characterized for microstructure, porosity, bulk density and mechanical properties (Flexure and ILSS) which were further cross-checked by non-destructive techniques (vibration and ultrasonic). In this study, it was further found that at low concentration (≤ 1.5 wt%) NGP were more effective in increasing the heat of reaction and in decreasing the viscosity of the phenolic resin. The decrease in viscosity led to better wetting properties of NGP / phenolic

  14. Carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites for future automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, K.

    2016-05-01

    After a brief introduction to polymer composite properties and markets, the state of the art activities in the field of manufacturing of advanced composites for automotive applications are elucidated. These include (a) long fiber reinforced thermoplastics (LFT) for secondary automotive components, and (b) continuous carbon fiber reinforced thermosetting composites for car body applications. It is followed by future possibilities of carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites for e.g. (i) crash elements, (ii) racing car seats, and (iii) production and recycling of automotive fenders.

  15. Finite element analysis of the stiffness of fabric reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foye, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this work is the prediction of all three dimensional elastic moduli of textile fabric reinforced composites. The analysis is general enough for use with complex reinforcing geometries and capable of subsequent improvements. It places no restrictions on fabric microgeometry except that the unit cell be determinate and rectangular. The unit cell is divided into rectangular subcells in which the reinforcing geometries are easier to define and analyze. The analysis, based on inhomogeneous finite elements, is applied to a variety of weave, braid, and knit reinforced composites. Some of these predictions are correlated to test data.

  16. Analysis of woven fabrics for reinforced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dow, Norris F.; Ramnath, V.; Rosen, B. Walter

    1987-01-01

    The use of woven fabrics as reinforcements for composites is considered. Methods of analysis of properties are reviewed and extended, with particular attention paid to three-dimensional constructions having through-the-thickness reinforcements. Methodology developed is used parametrically to evaluate the performance potential of a wide variety of reinforcement constructions including hybrids. Comparisons are made of predicted and measured properties of representative composites having biaxial and triaxial woven, and laminated tape lay-up reinforcements. Overall results are incorporated in advanced weave designs.

  17. Natural Kenaf Fiber Reinforced Composites as Engineered Structural Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittenber, David B.

    theory, finite element method, and Castigliano's method in unidirectional tension and compression, but are less accurate for the more bond-dependent flexural and shear properties. With the acknowledged NFRP matrix bonding issues, the over-prediction of these theoretical models indicates that the flexural stiffness of the kenaf composite may be increased by up to 40% if a better bond between the fiber and matrix can be obtained. The sustainability of NFRPs was examined from two perspectives: environmental and socioeconomic. While the kenaf fibers themselves possess excellent sustainability characteristics, costing less while possessing a lesser environmental impact than the glass fibers, the vinyl ester resin used in the composites is environmentally hazardous and inflated the cost and embodied energy of the composite SIPs. Consistent throughout all the designs was a correlation between the respective costs of the raw materials and the respective environmental impacts. The socioeconomic study looked at the sustainability of natural fiber reinforced composite materials as housing materials in developing countries. A literature study on the country of Bangladesh, where the fibers in this study were grown, showed that the jute and kenaf market would benefit from the introduction of a value-added product like natural fiber composites. The high rate of homeless and inadequately housed in Bangladesh, as well as in the US and throughout the rest of the world, could be somewhat alleviated if a new, affordable, and durable material were introduced. While this study found that natural fiber composites possess sufficient mechanical properties to be adopted as primary structural members, the two major remaining hurdles needing to be overcome before natural fiber composites can be adopted as housing materials are the cost and sustainability of the resin system and the moisture resistance/durability of the fibers. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  18. Composites Reinforced in Three Dimensions by Using Low Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erb, Randall M.; Libanori, Rafael; Rothfuchs, Nuria; Studart, André R.

    2012-01-01

    The orientation and distribution of reinforcing particles in artificial composites are key to enable effective reinforcement of the material in mechanically loaded directions, but remain poor if compared to the distinctive architectures present in natural structural composites such as teeth, bone, and seashells. We show that micrometer-sized reinforcing particles coated with minimal concentrations of superparamagnetic nanoparticles (0.01 to 1 volume percent) can be controlled by using ultralow magnetic fields (1 to 10 milliteslas) to produce synthetic composites with tuned three-dimensional orientation and distribution of reinforcements. A variety of structures can be achieved with this simple method, leading to composites with tailored local reinforcement, wear resistance, and shape memory effects.

  19. Toughening reinforced epoxy composites with brominated polymeric additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, Z. (Inventor); Gilwee, W. J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Cured polyfunctional epoxy resins including tris(hydroxyphenyl)methane triglycidyl ether are toughened by addition of polybrominated polymeric additives having an EE below 1500 to the pre-cure composition. Carboxy-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber is optionally present in the pre-cure mixture as such or as a pre-formed copolymer with other reactants. Reinforced composites, particularly carbon-reinforced composites, of these resins are disclosed and shown to have improved toughness.

  20. Toughening reinforced epoxy composites with brominated polymeric additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, Z.; Gilwee, W. J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Cured polyfunctional epoxy resins including tris (hydroxyphenyl) methane triglycidyl ether are toughened by addition of polybrominated polymeric additives having an EE below 1500 to the pre-cure composition. Carboxy terminated butadiene acrylonitrile rubber is optionally present in the precure mixture as such or as a pre-formed copolymer with other reactants. Reinforced composites, particularly carbon reinforced composites, of these resins are disclosed and shown to have improved toughness.

  1. SiC Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    2003-01-01

    Celsian is a promising matrix material for fiber-reinforced composites for high temperature structural applications. Processing and fabrication of small diameter multifilament silicon carbide tow reinforced celsian matrix composites are described. Mechanical and microstructural properties of these composites at ambient and elevated temperatures are presented. Effects of high-temperature exposures in air on the mechanical behavior of these composites are also given. The composites show mechanical integrity up to 1100 C but degrade at higher temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres. A model has been proposed for the degradation of these composites in oxidizing atmospheres at high temperatures.

  2. Silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salvatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to a process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  3. Mechanical properties of some silicon carbide reinforced aluminum composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tsangarakis, N.; Andrews, B.O.; Cavallaro, C.

    1987-05-01

    The mechanical properties of several particulate and continuous fiber silicon carbide-reinforced aluminum composites were examined. The tensile strength of a 47 percent silicon carbide fiber unidirectionally-reinforced aluminum composite was 1273 and 76 MPa parallel and normal to the fiber direction, respectively. The tensile strength of (0 deg/90 deg) 4s and (0/sub 2/90/0)s composites were 629 and 864 MPa, respectively. The tensile properties of a 30 percent silicon carbide particulate reinforced aluminum were found to depend on the chemistry of the metal matrix. The endurance limits of the fiber and the particulate reinforced aluminum were at the most 55 percent and 33 percent of the respective tensile strengths. The fracture toughness of the fiber reinforced composite varied with specimen width, while that of the particulate reinforced composite was 21-29 MPa sq rt m. The fatigue crack growth rate in the latter composite decreased with material thickness. There were indications that the fatigue crack growth rate in the silicon carbide particulate reinforced aluminum may be independent of variations in the chemistry of the metal matrix. 6 references.

  4. Fracture behavior of glass fiber reinforced polymer composite

    SciTech Connect

    Avci, A.; Arikan, H.; Akdemir, A

    2004-03-01

    Chopped strand glass fiber reinforced particle-filled polymer composite beams with varying notch-to-depth ratios and different volume fractions of glass fibers were investigated in Mode I fracture using three-point bending tests. Effects of polyester resin content and glass fiber content on fracture behavior was also studied. Polyester resin contents were used 13.00%%, 14.75%, 16.50%, 18.00% and 19.50%, and glass fiber contents were 1% and 1.5% of the total weight of the polymer composite system. Flexural strength of the polymer composite increases with increase in polyester and fiber content. The critical stress intensity factor was determined by using several methods such as initial notch depth method, compliance method and J-integral method. The values of K{sub IC} obtained from these methods were compared.

  5. EB treatment of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szebényi, G.; Romhány, G.; Vajna, B.; Czvikovszky, T.

    2012-09-01

    A small amount — less than 0.5% — carbon nanotube reinforcement may improve the mechanical properties of epoxy based composite materials significantly. The basic technical problem on one side is the dispersion of the nanotubes into the viscous matrix resin, namely, the fine powder-like — less than 100 nanometer diameter — nanotubes are prone to form aggregates. On the other side, the good connection between the nanofiber and matrix, which is determining the success of the reinforcement, requires some efficient adhesion promoting treatment. The goal of our research was to give one such treatment capable of industrial size application. A two step curing epoxy/vinylester resin process technology has been developed where the epoxy component has been cured conventionally, while the vinylester has been cured by electron treatment afterwards. The sufficient irradiation dose has been selected according to Raman spectroscopy characterization. Using the developed hybrid resin system hybrid composites containing carbon fibers and multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been prepared. The effect of the electron beam induced curing of the vinylester resin on the mechanical properties of the composites has been characterized by three point bending and interlaminar shear tests, which showed clearly the superiority of the developed resin system. The results of the mechanical tests have been supported by AFM studies of the samples, which showed that the difference in the viscoelastic properties of the matrix constituents decreased significantly by the electron beam treatment.

  6. Strengthening composite resin restorations with ceramic whisker reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Xu, H H; Schumacher, G E; Eichmiller, F C; Antonucci, J M

    2000-01-01

    Due to their tendency to fracture, current composite formulations are unsuitable for use in large stress-bearing direct posterior restorations that involve cusps. This study investigated the use of single-crystalline ceramic whiskers for the reinforcement of composite resins. The whisker-reinforced composite materials exhibited physical characteristics (i.e., flexural strength, work-of-fracture, and elastic modulus) that were significantly greater (P < 0.05; Student's t test) than those of traditional composite formulations. The experimental materials also had a surface smoothness that was essentially comparable to hybrid composite control specimens. PMID:11404884

  7. Mechanical Properties of Particulate Reinforced Aluminium Alloy Matrix Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Sayuti, M.; Sulaiman, S.; Baharudin, B. T. H. T.; Arifin, M. K. A.; Suraya, S.; Vijayaram, T. R.

    2011-01-17

    This paper discusses the mechanical properties of Titanium Carbide (TiC) particulate reinforced aluminium-silicon alloy matrix composite. TiC particulate reinforced LM6 alloy matrix composites were fabricated by carbon dioxide sand molding process with different particulate weight fraction. Tensile strength, hardness and microstructure studies were conducted to determine the maximum load, tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and fracture surface analysis have been performed to characterize the morphological aspects of the test samples after tensile testing. Hardness values are measured for the TiC reinforced LM6 alloy composites and it has been found that it gradually increases with increased addition of the reinforcement phase. The tensile strength of the composites increased with the increase percentage of TiC particulate.

  8. Design aid for shear strengthening of reinforced concrete T-joints using carbon fiber reinforced plastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gergely, Ioan

    The research presented in the present work focuses on the shear strengthening of beam column joints using carbon fiber composites, a material considered in seismic retrofit in recent years more than any other new material. These composites, or fiber reinforced polymers, offer huge advantages over structural steel reinforced concrete or timber. A few of these advantages are the superior resistance to corrosion, high stiffness to weight and strength to weight ratios, and the ability to control the material's behavior by selecting the orientation of the fibers. The design and field application research on reinforced concrete cap beam-column joints includes analytical investigations using pushover analysis; design of carbon fiber layout, experimental tests and field applications. Several beam column joints have been tested recently with design variables as the type of composite system, fiber orientation and the width of carbon fiber sheets. The surface preparation has been found to be critical for the bond between concrete and composite material, which is the most important factor in joint shear strengthening. The final goal of this thesis is to develop design aids for retrofitting reinforced concrete beam column joints. Two bridge bents were tested on the Interstate-15 corridor. One bent was tested in the as-is condition. Carbon fiber reinforced plastic composite sheets were used to externally reinforce the second bridge bent. By applying the composite, the displacement ductility has been doubled, and the bent overall lateral load capacity has been increased as well. The finite element model (using DRAIN-2DX) was calibrated to model the actual stiffness of the supports. The results were similar to the experimental findings.

  9. NDE Elastic Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites are increasingly replacing metallic alloys as structural materials for primary components of fracture-critical structures. This trend is a result of the growing understanding of material behavior and recognition of the desirable properties of composites. A research program was conducted on NDE methods for determining the elastic properties of composites.

  10. Preliminary evaluation of fiber composite reinforcement of truck frame rails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The use of graphite fiber/resin matrix composite to effectively reinforce a standard steel truck frame rail is studied. A preliminary design was made and it was determined that the reinforcement weight could be reduced by a factor of 10 when compared to a steel reinforcement. A section of a 1/3 scale reinforced rail was fabricated to demonstrate low cost manufacturing techniques. The scale rail section was then tested and increased stiffness was confirmed. No evidence of composite fatigue was found after 500,000 cycles to a fiber stress of 34,000 psi. The test specimen failed in bending in a static test at a load 50 percent greater than that predicted for a non-reinforced rail.

  11. Compressive strength of the mineral reinforced aluminium alloy composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Rama; Sharma, Anju; Kumar, Suresh; Singh, Gurmel; Pandey, O. P.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the results of quasi-static compressive strength of aluminium alloy reinforced with different concentration of rutile mineral particles. The reinforced material shows increase in compressive strength with 5wt% rutile concentration as compared to the base alloy. This increase in compressive strength of composite is attributed to direct strengthening due to transfer of load from lower stiffness matrix (LM13 alloy) to higher stiffness reinforcement (rutile particles). Indirect strengthening mechanisms like increase in dislocation density at the matrix-reinforcement interface, grain size refinement of the matrix and dispersion strengthening are also the contributing factors. The decrease in compressive strength of composite with the increased concentration of rutile concentration beyond 5 wt.% can be attributed to the increase in dislocation density due to the void formation at the matrix-reinforcement interface.

  12. Fracture and fatigue of discontinuously reinforced copper/tungsten composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, B.; Ramani, S. V.

    1975-01-01

    The strength, toughness and resistance to cyclic crack propagation of composites consisting of copper reinforced with short tungsten wires of various lengths have been studied and the results compared with the behavior of continuously reinforced composites manufactured by the same method, i.e., by vacuum hot-pressing. It has been found that whereas the resistance to fatigue crack growth of continuously reinforced composites is very similar to that of continuous Al/stainless steel composites reported elsewhere, the addition of short fibers completely changes the mode of fracture, and no direct comparisons are possible. In effect, short fibers inhibit single crack growth by causing plastic flow to be distributed rather than localized, and although these composites are much less strong than continuous fiber composites, they nevertheless have much greater fatigue resistance.

  13. CODIFICATION OF FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITE PIPING

    SciTech Connect

    Rawls, G.

    2012-10-10

    The goal of the overall project is to successfully adapt spoolable FRP currently used in the oil industry for use in hydrogen pipelines. The use of FRP materials for hydrogen service will rely on the demonstrated compatibility of these materials for pipeline service environments and operating conditions. The ability of the polymer piping to withstand degradation while in service, and development of the tools and data required for life management are imperative for successful implementation of these materials for hydrogen pipeline. The information and data provided in this report provides the technical basis for the codification for fiber reinforced piping (FRP) for hydrogen service. The DOE has invested in the evaluation of FRP for the delivery for gaseous hydrogen to support the development of a hydrogen infrastructure. The codification plan calls for detailed investigation of the following areas: System design and applicable codes and standards; Service degradation of FRP; Flaw tolerance and flaw detection; Integrity management plan; Leak detection and operational controls evaluation; Repair evaluation. The FRP codification process started with commercially available products that had extensive use in the oil and gas industry. These products have been evaluated to assure that sufficient structural integrity is available for a gaseous hydrogen environment.

  14. Free vibration of composite re-bars in reinforced structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadioglu, Fethi

    2005-11-01

    The effect of composite rebar's shape in reinforced concrete beam-type structures on the natural frequencies and modes shapes is investigated through finite element analysis in this paper. Steel rebars are being replaced with composite rebars due to their better ability to resist corrosion in reinforced concrete structures for many infrastructure applications. A variety of composite rebar shapes can be obtained through the pultrusion process. It will be interesting to investigate their shape on free vibration characteristics. The results of natural frequencies and mode shapes are presented and compared for the different composite rebar shapes. The effects of various boundary conditions for different rebar shapes are also investigated.

  15. The elevated temperature behavior of particle reinforced Al matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    The elevated temperature modulus, strength and creep of SiC particle reinforced composites produced by the DURALCAN{trademark} are discussed. It is shown that the reinforcing particles provide an increased modulus over the complete temperature range studied, and the temperature dependence of the composite modulus is controlled by the temperature dependence of the matrix modulus. The composite strength decreases with increasing temperature, reflecting softening of the matrix due to over aging, and as a result, is dependent on the thermal stability of the matrix. The particles provide increased creep resistance, and there are differences between the creep of melt processed composites and those produced by powder metallurgy.

  16. Micromechanical simulation of the failure of fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landis, Chad M.; Beyerlein, Irene J.; McMeeking, Robert M.

    2000-03-01

    The strength of unidirectionally reinforced fiber composites is simulated using the three dimensional shear lag model of Landis, C. M., McGlockton, M. A. and McMeeking, R. M. (1999) (An improved shear lag model for broken fibers in composites. J. Comp. Mat. 33, 667-680) and Weibull fiber statistics. The governing differential equations for the fiber displacements and stresses are solved exactly for any configuration of breaks using an influence superposition technique. The model predicts the tensile strength of well bonded, elastic fiber/matrix systems with fibers arranged in a square array. Length and strength scalings are used which are relevant for elastic, local load sharing composites. Several hundred Monte Carlo simulations were executed to determine the statistical strength distributions of the composite for three values of the fiber Weibull modulus, m=5, 10 and 20. Stress-strain behavior and the evolution of fiber damage are studied. Bundle sizes of 10×10, 15×15, 20×20, 25×25, 30×30 and 35×35 fibers of various lengths are investigated to determine the dependence of strength on the composite size. The validity of weakest link statistics for composite strength is examined as well.

  17. Fiber-reinforced composites in fixed partial dentures

    PubMed Central

    Vallittu, Pekka

    2006-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite resin (FRC) prostheses offer the advantages of good aesthetics, minimal invasive treatment, and an ability to bond to the abutment teeth, thereby compensating for less-than-optimal abutment tooth retention and resistance form. These prostheses are composed of two types of composite materials: fiber composites to build the framework and hybrid or microfill particulate composites to create the external veneer surface. This review concentrates on the use of fiber reinforcement in the fabrication of laboratory or chairsidemade composite-fixed partial dentures of conventional preparation. Other applications of FRC in dentistry are briefly mentioned. The possibilities fiber reinforcement technology offers must be emphasized to the dental community. Rather than limiting discussion to whether FRC prostheses will replace metal-ceramic or full-ceramic prostheses, attention should be focused on the additional treatment options brought by the use of fibers. However, more clinical experience is needed. PMID:21526023

  18. Designing bioinspired composite reinforcement architectures via 3D magnetic printing

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Joshua J.; Fiore, Brad E.; Erb, Randall M.

    2015-01-01

    Discontinuous fibre composites represent a class of materials that are strong, lightweight and have remarkable fracture toughness. These advantages partially explain the abundance and variety of discontinuous fibre composites that have evolved in the natural world. Many natural structures out-perform the conventional synthetic counterparts due, in part, to the more elaborate reinforcement architectures that occur in natural composites. Here we present an additive manufacturing approach that combines real-time colloidal assembly with existing additive manufacturing technologies to create highly programmable discontinuous fibre composites. This technology, termed as ‘3D magnetic printing', has enabled us to recreate complex bioinspired reinforcement architectures that deliver enhanced material performance compared with monolithic structures. Further, we demonstrate that we can now design and evolve elaborate reinforcement architectures that are not found in nature, demonstrating a high level of possible customization in discontinuous fibre composites with arbitrary geometries. PMID:26494282

  19. Analytical, Numerical and Experimental Examination of Reinforced Composites Beams Covered with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasimzade, A. A.; Tuhta, S.

    2012-03-01

    In the article, analytical, numerical (Finite Element Method) and experimental investigation results of beam that was strengthened with fiber reinforced plastic-FRP composite has been given as comparative, the effect of FRP wrapping number to the maximum load and moment capacity has been evaluated depending on this results. Carbon FRP qualitative dependences have been occurred between wrapping number and beam load and moment capacity for repair-strengthen the reinforced concrete beams with carbon fiber. Shown possibilities of application traditional known analysis programs, for the analysis of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) strengthened structures.

  20. Improved compression molding technology for continuous fiber reinforced composite laminates. Part 2: AS-4/Polyimidesulfone prepreg system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, Robert M.; Hou, Tan-Hung; Kidder, Paul W.; Reddy, Rakasi M.

    1991-01-01

    AS-4/polyimidesulfone (PISO2) composite prepreg was utilized for the improved compression molding technology investigation. This improved technique employed molding stops which advantageously facilitate the escape of volatile by-products during the B-stage curing step, and effectively minimize the neutralization of the consolidating pressure by intimate interply fiber-fiber contact within the laminate in the subsequent molding cycle. Without the modifying the resin matrix properties, composite panels with both unidirectional and angled plies with outstanding C-scans and mechanical properties were successfully molded using moderate molding conditions, i.e., 660 F and 500 psi, using this technique. The size of the panels molded were up to 6.00 x 6.00 x 0.07 in. A consolidation theory was proposed for the understanding and advancement of the processing science. Processing parameters such as vacuum, pressure cycle design, prepreg quality, etc. were explored.

  1. Damping properties of fiber reinforced composite suitable for stayed cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianzhi; Sun, Baochen; Du, Yanliang

    2011-11-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) cables were initially most investigated to replace steel cables. To further explore the advantages of FRP cables, the potential ability of vibration control is studied in this paper emphasizing the designable characteristic of hybrid FRP cables. Fiber reinforced vinyl ester composites and fiber reinforced epoxy composites were prepared by the pultrusion method. Due to the extensive application of fiber reinforced composites, the temperature spectrum and frequency spectrum of loss factor for the composite were tested using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) equipment. The damping properties and damping mechanism of the composite were investigated and discussed at different temperatures and frequencies. The result indicates that the loss factor of the composites is increasing with the increase of the frequency from 0.1Hz to 2 Hz and decreasing with the decrease of the temperature from -20°C to 60°C. The loss factor of the carbon fiber composite is higher than that of the glass fiber for the same matrix. The loss factor of the vinyl ester composite is higher than that of the epoxy composite for the same fiber.

  2. Damping properties of fiber reinforced composite suitable for stayed cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianzhi; Sun, Baochen; Du, Yanliang

    2012-04-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) cables were initially most investigated to replace steel cables. To further explore the advantages of FRP cables, the potential ability of vibration control is studied in this paper emphasizing the designable characteristic of hybrid FRP cables. Fiber reinforced vinyl ester composites and fiber reinforced epoxy composites were prepared by the pultrusion method. Due to the extensive application of fiber reinforced composites, the temperature spectrum and frequency spectrum of loss factor for the composite were tested using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) equipment. The damping properties and damping mechanism of the composite were investigated and discussed at different temperatures and frequencies. The result indicates that the loss factor of the composites is increasing with the increase of the frequency from 0.1Hz to 2 Hz and decreasing with the decrease of the temperature from -20°C to 60°C. The loss factor of the carbon fiber composite is higher than that of the glass fiber for the same matrix. The loss factor of the vinyl ester composite is higher than that of the epoxy composite for the same fiber.

  3. Mechanical properties of fiber reinforced lightweight concrete composites

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Pena, M. ); Mobasher, B. )

    1994-01-01

    Hybrid composites with variable strength/toughness properties can be manufactured using combinations of brittle or ductile mesh in addition to brittle and ductile matrix reinforcements. The bending and tensile properties of thin sheet fiber cement composites made from these mixtures were investigated. Composites consisted of a woven mesh of either polyvinyl chloride (PVC) coated E-glass or polypropylene (PP) fibers for the surface reinforcement. In addition, chopped polypropylene, acrylic, nylon, and alkali-resistant (AR) glass fibers were used for the core reinforcement. It is shown that by controlling fiber contents, types, and combinations, design objectives such as strength, stiffness and toughness, can be achieved. Superior post-cracking behavior was measured for composites reinforced both with glass mesh and PP mesh. Load carrying capacity of PP mesh composites can be increased with the use of 1% or higher chopped PP fibers. Glass mesh composites with short AR glass fibers as matrix reinforcement indicate an increased matrix cracking strength and modulus of rupture. Combinations of PP mesh/short AR glass did not show a substantial improvement in the matrix ultimate strength. An increased nylon fiber surface area resulted in improved post peak response.

  4. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, which allows a shape to be formed prior to the cure, and is then pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Basalt fibers are used for the reinforcement in the composite system. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material.

  5. Multilayered Glass Fibre-reinforced Composites In Rotational Moulding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, W. C.; Harkin-Jones, E.; Kearns, M.; McCourt, M.

    2011-05-01

    The potential of multiple layer fibre-reinforced mouldings is of growing interest to the rotational moulding industry because of their cost/performance ratio. The particular problem that arises when using reinforcements in this process relate to the fact that the process is low shear and good mixing of resin and reinforcement is not optimum under those conditions. There is also a problem of the larger/heavier reinforcing agents segregating out of the powder to lay up on the inner part surface. In this study, short glass fibres were incorporated and distributed into a polymer matrix to produce fibre-reinforced polymer composites using the rotational moulding process and characterised in terms of morphology and mechanical properties.

  6. Designing with figer-reinforced plastics (planar random composites)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    The use of composite mechanics to predict the hygrothermomechanical behavior of planar random composites (PRC) is reviewed and described. These composites are usually made from chopped fiber reinforced resins (thermoplastics or thermosets). The hygrothermomechanical behavior includes mechanical properties, physical properties, thermal properties, fracture toughness, creep and creep rupture. Properties are presented in graphical form with sample calculations to illustrate their use. Concepts such as directional reinforcement and strip hybrids are described. Typical data that can be used for preliminary design for various PRCs are included. Several resins and molding compounds used to make PRCs are described briefly. Pertinent references are cited that cover analysis and design methods, materials, data, fabrication procedures and applications.

  7. An Assessment of Self-Healing Fiber Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Several reviews and books have been written concerning self-healing polymers over the last few years. These have focused primarily on the types of self-healing materials being studied, with minor emphasis given to composite properties. The purpose of this review is to assess the self-healing ability of these materials when utilized in fiber reinforced composites

  8. Recent progress in NASA Langley textile reinforced composites program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. Benson; Harris, Charles E.; Johnston, Norman J.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA LaRC is conducting and sponsoring research to explore the benefits of textile reinforced composites for civil transport aircraft primary structures. The objective of this program is to develop and demonstrate the potential of affordable textile reinforced composite materials to meet design properties and damage tolerance requirements of advanced aircraft structural concepts. In addition to in-house research, the program was recently expanded to include major participation by the aircraft industry and aerospace textile companies. The major program elements include development of textile preforms, processing science, mechanics of materials, experimental characterization of materials, and development and evaluation of textile reinforced composite structural elements and subcomponents. The NASA Langley in-house focus is as follows: development of a science-based understanding of resin transfer molding (RTM), development of powder-coated towpreg processes, analysis methodology, and development of a performance database on textile reinforced composites. The focus of the textile industry participation is on development of multidirectional, damage-tolerant preforms, and the aircraft industry participation is in the areas of design, fabrication and testing of textile reinforced composite structural elements and subcomponents. Textile processes such as 3D weaving, 2D and 3D braiding, and knitting/stitching are being compared with conventional laminated tape processes for improved damage tolerance. Through-the-thickness reinforcements offer significant damage tolerance improvements. However, these gains must be weighed against potential loss in in-plane properties such as strength and stiffness. Analytical trade studies are underway to establish design guidelines for the application of textile material forms to meet specific loading requirements. Fabrication and testing of large structural components are required to establish the full potential of textile reinforced

  9. The processing and properties of discontinuously reinforced aluminum composites

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, A.L.; Walker, J.A. )

    1991-08-01

    Discontinuously-reinforced aluminum (DRA) SiC whisker or particle-reinforced Al-alloy matrix composites produced by P/M methods have progressed toward commercial applications, supported by growing data bases and large-scale production facilities. Attention is presently given to the elastic modulus, plastic, ductile, and toughness characteristics of representative DRA formulations, as well as to the DRAs commercially available in the forms of sheets, extrusions, and optical and instrument grade structures able to supplant beryllium. 36 refs.

  10. Constitutive Modeling of Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, G. M.; Gates, T. S.; Wise, K. E.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a technique is presented for developing constitutive models for polymer composite systems reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Because the polymer molecules are on the same size scale as the nanotubes, the interaction at the polymer/nanotube interface is highly dependent on the local molecular structure and bonding. At these small length scales, the lattice structures of the nanotube and polymer chains cannot be considered continuous, and the bulk mechanical properties can no longer be determined through traditional micromechanical approaches that are formulated by using continuum mechanics. It is proposed herein that the nanotube, the local polymer near the nanotube, and the nanotube/polymer interface can be modeled as an effective continuum fiber using an equivalent-continuum modeling method. The effective fiber serves as a means for incorporating micromechanical analyses for the prediction of bulk mechanical properties of SWNT/polymer composites with various nanotube shapes, sizes, concentrations, and orientations. As an example, the proposed approach is used for the constitutive modeling of two SWNT/LaRC-SI (with a PmPV interface) composite systems, one with aligned SWNTs and the other with three-dimensionally randomly oriented SWNTs. The Young's modulus and shear modulus have been calculated for the two systems for various nanotube lengths and volume fractions.

  11. Characterization of mode II fracture behavior in fiber-reinforced ceramic composite utilizing laser interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mall, S.; Truskowski, J.W. USAF, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH )

    1992-09-01

    A test technique to characterize the mode II fracture behavior in fiber-reinforced ceramic composites utilizing laser interferometry was developed. This was demonstrated by measuring the mode II critical strain energy release rate at room temperature. The present study used the silicon-carbide-fiber/glass-ceramic matrix composite system. 13 refs.

  12. Rapid Prototyping of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, R.; Green, C.; Phillips, T.; Cipriani, R.; Yarlagadda, S.; Gillespie, J. W., Jr.; Effinger, M.; Cooper, K. C.

    2003-01-01

    For ceramics to be used as structural components in high temperature applications, their fracture toughness is improved by embedding continuous ceramic fibers. Ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials allow increasing the overall operating temperature, raising the temperature safety margins, avoiding the need for cooling, and improving the damping capacity, while reducing the weight at the same time. They also need to be reliable and available in large quantities as well. In this paper, an innovative rapid prototyping technique to fabricate continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites is described. The process is simple, robust and will be widely applicable to a number of high temperature material systems. This technique was originally developed at the University of Delaware Center for Composite Materials (UD-CCM) for rapid fabrication of polymer matrix composites by a technique called automated tow placement or ATP. The results of mechanical properties and microstructural characterization are presented, together with examples of complex shapes and parts. It is believed that the process will be able to create complex shaped parts at an order of magnitude lower cost than current chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) and polymer impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP) processes.

  13. Rapid Prototyping of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, R.; Green, C.; Phillips, T.; Cipriani, R.; Yarlagadda, S.; Gillespie, J.; Effinger, M.; Cooper, K. C.; Gordon, Gail (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    For ceramics to be used as structural components in high temperature applications, their fracture toughness is improved by embedding continuous ceramic fibers. Ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials allow increasing the overall operating temperature, raising the temperature safety margins, avoiding the need for cooling, and improving the damping capacity, while reducing the weight at the same time. They also need to be reliable and available in large quantities as well. In this paper, an innovative rapid prototyping technique to fabricate continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites is described. The process is simple, robust and will be widely applicable to a number of high temperature material systems. This technique was originally developed at the University of Delaware Center for Composite Materials (UD-CCM) for rapid fabrication of polymer matrix composites by a technique called automated tow placement or ATP. The results of mechanical properties and microstructural characterization are presented, together with examples of complex shapes and parts. It is believed that the process will be able to create complex shaped parts at an order of magnitude lower cost than current CVI and PIP processes.

  14. Reinforced composite sealants for solid oxide fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Sonja M.; Federmann, Dirk; Remmel, Josef; Pap, Michael

    Glass-ceramic sealants are commonly used as joining materials for planar solid oxide fuel cells stacks. Several requirements need to be fulfilled by these materials: beside of electrical insulation and appropriate thermal expansion, a good adhesion on the ceramic and metallic components of a SOFC stack is necessary to form a gas-tight joint. Even though the joining process might have been successful, failures and leaks often occur during the stack operation due to fracture of the brittle material under thermal stresses or during thermal cycling of the components. This study focusses on composite materials consisting of a glass matrix based on the system of BaO-CaO-SiO 2 and various filler materials, e.g. yttria-stabilized zirconia fibres or particles and silver particles. In order to evaluate a possible reinforcing influence of the filler material of the composite, tensile strength tests were carried out on circular butt joints. The highest strength values were found for the composite material with addition of silver particles, followed by the glass matrix itself without any filler addition and the lowest values were measured for the composite with YSZ particles. SEM investigations of cross-sections of the joints elucidated these results by the microstructure of the glass-ceramic sealants.

  15. Process of Making Boron-Fiber Reinforced Composite Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, Harry L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Johnston, Norman J. (Inventor); Marchello, Joseph M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The invention is an apparatus and method for producing a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composition from powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles and a linear array of boron fibers. The boron fibers are applied onto the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles and then are processed within a processing component having an impregnation bar assembly. After passing through variable-dimension forming nip-rollers, the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles with the boron fibers become a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composite tape. A driving mechanism pulls the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles with boron fibers through the processing line of the apparatus and a take-up spool collects the formed hybrid boron-fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite tape.

  16. Fabrication of tungsten wire reinforced nickel-base alloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentnall, W. D.; Toth, I. J.

    1974-01-01

    Fabrication methods for tungsten fiber reinforced nickel-base superalloy composites were investigated. Three matrix alloys in pre-alloyed powder or rolled sheet form were evaluated in terms of fabricability into composite monotape and multi-ply forms. The utility of monotapes for fabricating more complex shapes was demonstrated. Preliminary 1093C (2000F) stress rupture tests indicated that efficient utilization of fiber strength was achieved in composites fabricated by diffusion bonding processes. The fabrication of thermal fatigue specimens is also described.

  17. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Thompson, E. R.

    1981-01-01

    A broad group of fibers and matrices were combined to create a wide range of composite properties. Primary material fabrication procedures were developed which readily permit the fabrication of flat plate and shaped composites. Composite mechanical properties were measured under a wide range of test conditions. Tensile, flexure mechanical fatigue, thermal fatigue, fracture toughness, and fatigue crack growth resistance were evaluated. Selected fiber-matrix combinations were shown to maintain their strength at up to 1300 K when tested in an inert atmosphere. Composite high temperature mechanical properties were shown to be limited primarily by the oxidation resistance of the graphite fibers. Composite thermal dimensional stability was measured and found to be excellent.

  18. Constitutive Modeling of Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, G. M.; Gates, T. S.; Wise, K. E.; Park, C.; Siochi, E. J.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a technique is presented for developing constitutive models for polymer composite systems reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Because the polymer molecules are on the same size scale as the nanotubes, the interaction at the polymer/nanotube interface is highly dependent on the local molecular structure and bonding. At these small length scales, the lattice structures of the nanotube and polymer chains cannot be considered continuous, and the bulk mechanical properties can no longer be determined through traditional micromechanical approaches that are formulated by using continuum mechanics. It is proposed herein that the nanotube, the local polymer near the nanotube, and the nanotube/polymer interface can be modeled as an effective continuum fiber using an equivalent-continuum modeling method. The effective fiber serves as a means for incorporating micromechanical analyses for the prediction of bulk mechanical properties of SWNT/polymer composites with various nanotube lengths, concentrations, and orientations. As an example, the proposed approach is used for the constitutive modeling of two SWNT/polyimide composite systems.

  19. Unified micromechanics of damping for unidirectional fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    An integrated micromechanics methodology for the prediction of damping capacity in fiber-reinforced polymer matrix unidirectional composites has been developed. Explicit micromechanics equations based on hysteretic damping are presented relating the on-axis damping capacities to the fiber and matrix properties and volume fraction. The damping capacities of unidirectional composites subjected to off-axis loading are synthesized from thermal effect on the damping performance of unidirectional composites due to temperature and moisture variations is also modeled. The damping contributions from interfacial friction between broken fibers and matrix are incorporated. Finally, the temperature rise in continuously vibrating composite plies is estimated. Application examples illustrate the significance of various parameters on the damping performance of unidirectional and off-axis fiber reinforced composites.

  20. Technology and Development of Self-Reinforced Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcock, Ben; Peijs, Ton

    In recent years there has been an increasing amount of interest, both commercially and scientifically, in the emerging field of "self-reinforced polymer composites". These materials, which are sometimes also referred to as "single polymer composites", or "all-polymer composites", were first conceived in the 1970s, and are now beginning to appear in a range of commercial products. While high mechanical performance polymer fibres or tapes are an obvious precursor for composite development, various different technologies have been developed to consolidate these into two- or three-dimensional structures. This paper presents a review of the various processing techniques that have been reported in the literature for the manufacture of self-reinforced polymer composites from fibres or tapes of different polymers, and so exploit the fibre or tape performance in a commercial material or product.

  1. Composition and method for making polyimide resin-reinforced fabric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A composition for making polyimide resin reinforced fibers or fabric is discussed. The composition includes a polyfunctional ester, a polyfunctional amine, and an end capping agent. The composition is impregnated into fibers or fabric and heated to form prepreg material. The tack retention characteristics of this prepreg material are improved by incorporating into the composition a liquid olefinic material compatible with the other ingredients of the composition. The prepreg material is heated at a higher temperature to effect formation of the polyimide resin and the monomeric additive is incorporated in the polyimide polymer structure.

  2. High-strength fiber-reinforced plastic reinforcement of wood and wood composite

    SciTech Connect

    Tingley, D.A.; Eng, P.

    1996-12-31

    Research and development underway since 1982 has led to the development of a method of reinforcing wood and wood composite structural products (WWC) using high-strength fiber-reinforced plastic. This method allows the use of less wood fiber and lower grade wood fiber for a given load capacity. The first WWC in which reinforcement has been marketed is glulam beams. Marketed under the trade name FiRP{trademark} Reinforced glulam, the product has gained code approval and is now being used in the construction of buildings and bridges in the United States, Japan and other countries. The high-strength fiber-reinforced plastic (FiRP{trademark} Reinforced panel (RP)) has specific characteristics that are required to provide for proper use in WWC`s. This paper discusses these characteristics and the testing requirements to develop code approved allowable design values for carbon, aramid and fiberglass RP`s for such uses. Specific issues such as in-service characteristics, i.e. long term creep tests and tension-tension fatigue tests, are discussed.

  3. Micromechanical analysis of fiber-reinforced composites with interfacial phenomena. I - Modeling and analysis of discontinuous fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Kenji; Iwamoto, Masaharu; Araki, Shigetoshi; Yano, Tadayoshi

    1992-04-01

    A mechanical analysis is presented of fiber-reinforced composite material exhibiting matrix cracking and/or interface sliding between a fiber and a matrix, i.e., the problem of a bridging fiber, by the method of micromechanics. In the case where there are many kinds of inhomogeneities, the interaction between the inhomogeneities, which are neglected in Eshelby's (1961) generally used method, must be taken into consideration. The present method is the extension of the method of Taya and Chou (1981) to the analysis of fiber-reinforced composites with interfacial sliding.

  4. Simple stressed-skin composites using paper reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Bunnell, L.R.

    1990-11-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the composite reinforcement concept in a hands-on manner, using readily available materials; to demonstrate the consequences of certain defects in these structures; and to quantify the gains made by engineering composite construction, using a simple measurement of Young's modulus of electricity. The materials used were foam rubber beams, beams reinforced on one side by bonding with heavy paper, a beam reinforced on both sides by bonding with heavy paper, and a beam with a defect caused by using a piece of waxed paper midway to prevent bonding of the paper. The experiment is designed to teach students at the high school level or above the concept of Young's modulus, a measure of a material's stiffness. 2 figs. (BM)

  5. Natural Curaua Fiber-Reinforced Composites in Multilayered Ballistic Armor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Louro, Luis Henrique Leme; Trindade, Willian; Elias, Carlos Nelson; Ferreira, Carlos Luiz; de Sousa Lima, Eduardo; Weber, Ricardo Pondé; Miguez Suarez, João Carlos; da Silva Figueiredo, André Ben-Hur; Pinheiro, Wagner Anacleto; da Silva, Luis Carlos; Lima, Édio Pereira

    2015-10-01

    The performance of a novel multilayered armor in which the commonly used plies of aramid fabric layer were replaced by an equal thickness layer of distinct curaua fiber-reinforced composites with epoxy or polyester matrices was assessed. The investigated armor, in addition to its polymeric layer (aramid fabric or curaua composite), was also composed of a front Al2O3 ceramic tile and backed by an aluminum alloy sheet. Ballistic impact tests were performed with actual 7.62 caliber ammunitions. Indentation in a clay witness, simulating human body behind the back layer, attested the efficacy of the curaua-reinforced composite as an armor component. The conventional aramid fabric display a similar indentation as the curaua/polyester composite but was less efficient (deeper indentation) than the curaua/epoxy composite. This advantage is shown to be significant, especially in favor of the lighter and cheaper epoxy composite reinforced with 30 vol pct of curaua fiber, as possible substitute for aramid fabric in multilayered ballistic armor for individual protection. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the mechanism associated with the curaua composite ballistic performance.

  6. NATURAL FIBER OR GLASS REINFORCED POLYPROPYLENE COMPOSITES?

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzi, W.; Di Landro, L.; Casiraghi, A.; Pagano, M. R.

    2008-08-28

    Problems related to the recycle of conventional composite materials are becoming always more relevant for many industrial fields. Natural fiber composites (NFC) have recently gained much attention due to their low cost, environmental gains (eco-compatibility), easy disposal, reduction in volatile organic emissions, and their potential to compete with glass fiber composites (GFC). Interest in natural fibers is not only based over ecological aspects. NFC have good mechanical performances in relation to their low specific weight and low price. A characterization of mechanical properties, dynamic behavior, and moisture absorption is presented.

  7. Natural Fiber or Glass Reinforced Polypropylene Composites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzi, W.; Di Landro, L.; Casiraghi, A.; Pagano, M. R.

    2008-08-01

    Problems related to the recycle of conventional composite materials are becoming always more relevant for many industrial fields. Natural fiber composites (NFC) have recently gained much attention due to their low cost, environmental gains (eco-compatibility), easy disposal, reduction in volatile organic emissions, and their potential to compete with glass fiber composites (GFC). Interest in natural fibers is not only based over ecological aspects. NFC have good mechanical performances in relation to their low specific weight and low price. A characterization of mechanical properties, dynamic behavior, and moisture absorption is presented.

  8. Fiber Reinforced Composites for Insulation and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broughton, Roy M., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    The work involves two areas: Composites, optimum fiber placement with initial construction of a pressure vessel, and the general subject of insulation, a continual concern in harsh thermal environments. Insulation

  9. Plastic matrix composites with continuous fiber reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    1991-09-19

    Most plastic resins are not suitable for structural applications. Although many resins are extremely tough, most lack strength, stiffness, and deform under load with time. By mixing strong, stiff, fibrous materials into the plastic matrix, a variety of structural composite materials can be formed. The properties of these composites can be tailored by fiber selection, orientation, and other factors to suit specific applications. The advantages and disadvantages of fiberglass, carbon-graphite, aramid (Kevlar 49), and boron fibers are summarized.

  10. Studies on natural fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R. H.; Kapatel, P. M.; Machchhar, A. D.; Kapatel, Y. A.

    2016-05-01

    Natural fiber reinforced composites show increasing importance in day to days applications because of their low cost, lightweight, easy availability, non-toxicity, biodegradability and environment friendly nature. But these fibers are hydrophilic in nature. Thus they have very low reactivity and poor compatibility with polymers. To overcome these limitations chemical modifications of the fibers have been carried out. Therefore, in the present work jute fibers have chemically modified by treating with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions. These treated jute fibers have been used to fabricate jute fiber reinforced epoxy composites. Mechanical properties like tensile strength, flexural strength and impact strength have been found out. Alkali treated composites show better properties compare to untreated composites.

  11. Mesoscale simulations of particle reinforced epoxy-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Bradley W.; Springer, Harry Keo; Jordan, Jennifer L.; Spowart, Jonathan E.; Thadhani, Naresh

    2012-03-01

    Polymer matrix composites reinforced with metal powders have complex microstructures that vary greatly from differences in particle size, morphology, loading fractions, etc. The effects of the underlying microstructure on the mechanical and wave propagation behavior of these composites during dynamic loading conditions are not well understood. To better understand these effects, epoxy (Epon826/DEA) reinforced with different particle sizes of Al and loading fractions of Al and Ni were prepared by casting. Microstructures from the composites were then used in 2D plane strain mesoscale simulations. The effect of varying velocity loading conditions on the wave velocity was then examined to determine the Us-Up and particle deformation response as a function of composite configuration.

  12. Fatigue behavior of SiC reinforced titanium composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Grimes, H. H.

    1979-01-01

    The low cycle axial fatigue properties of 25 and 44 fiber volume percent SiC/Ti(6Al-4V) composites were measured at room temperature and at 650 deg C. The S-N curves for the composites showed no anticipated improvement over bulk matrix behavior at room temperature. Although axial and transverse tensile strength results suggest a degradation in SiC fiber strength during composite fabrication, it appears that the poor fatigue life of the composites was caused by a reduced fatigue resistance of the reinforced Ti(6Al-4V) matrix. The reduced matrix behavior was due, to the presence of flawed and fractured fibers created near the specimen surfaces by preparation techniques and to the large residual tensile stresses that can exist in fiber reinforced matrices. The effects of fatigue testing at high temperature are discussed.

  13. Fatigue behavior of SiC reinforced titanium composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Grimes, H. H.

    1979-01-01

    The low cycle axial fatigue properties of 25 and 44 fiber volume percent SiC/Ti(6Al-4V) composites were measured at room temperature and at 650 C. At room temperature, the S-N curves for the composites showed no anticipated improvement over bulk matrix behavior. Although axial and transverse tensile strength results suggest a degradation in SiC fiber strength during composite fabrication, it appears that the poor fatigue life of the composites was caused by a reduced fatigue resistance of the reinforced Ti(6Al-4V) matrix. Microstructural studies indicate that the reduced matrix behavior was due, in part, to the presence of flawed and fractured fibers created near the specimen surfaces by preparation techniques. Another possible contributing factor is the large residual tensile stresses that can exist in fiber-reinforced matrices. These effects, as well as the effects of fatigue testing at high temperature, are discussed.

  14. Crushing characteristics of continuous fiber-reinforced composite tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Jones, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    Composite tubes can be reinforced with continuous fibers. When such tubes are subjected to crushing loads, the response is complex and depends on interaction between the different mechanisms that control the crushing process. The modes of crushing and their controlling mechanisms are described. Also, the resulting crushing process and its efficiency are addressed.

  15. Fracture criteria for discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rack, H. J.; Goree, J. G.; Albritton, J.; Ratnaparkhi, P.

    1988-01-01

    Summarized is the progress achieved during the period September 16, 1987 to August 15, l988 on NASA Grant NAG1-724, Fracture Criteria for Discontinuously Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites. Appended are copies of three manuscripts prepared under NASA funding during the performance period.

  16. Fracture criteria for discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rack, H. J.; Goree, J. G.; Albritton, J.; Ratnarparkhi, P.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of sample configuration on the details of initial crack propagation in discontinuously whisker reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites was investigated. Care was taken to allow direct comparison of fracture toughness values utilizing differing sample configurations and orientations, holding all materials variables constant, e.g., extrusion ration, heat treatment, and chemistry.

  17. Doubly curved nanofiber-reinforced optically transparent composites

    PubMed Central

    Shams, Md. Iftekhar; Yano, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Doubly curved nanofiber-reinforced optically transparent composites with low thermal expansion of 15 ppm/k are prepared by hot pressing vacuum-filtered Pickering emulsions of hydrophobic acrylic resin monomer, hydrophilic chitin nanofibers and water. The coalescence of acrylic monomer droplets in the emulsion is prevented by the chitin nanofibers network. This transparent composite has 3D shape moldability, making it attractive for optical precision parts. PMID:26552990

  18. Doubly curved nanofiber-reinforced optically transparent composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Md. Iftekhar; Yano, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-01

    Doubly curved nanofiber-reinforced optically transparent composites with low thermal expansion of 15 ppm/k are prepared by hot pressing vacuum-filtered Pickering emulsions of hydrophobic acrylic resin monomer, hydrophilic chitin nanofibers and water. The coalescence of acrylic monomer droplets in the emulsion is prevented by the chitin nanofibers network. This transparent composite has 3D shape moldability, making it attractive for optical precision parts.

  19. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  20. Modeling the thermal conductivity of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Beecher, S.C.; Dinwiddie, R.B.

    1993-06-01

    A review of models for the prediction of the thermal conductivity of uni-directional fiber-reinforced composites will be presented. The ability of these models to give an accurate prediction of the composite thermal conductivity depends on the amount of information known about the constituent phase properties under the assumption that these properties do not change as a result of processing. Also presented are models that take into account the effects of fiber coatings.

  1. Fiber reinforced composites in prosthodontics – A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Sanjna; Ganesh, R.; Santhosh, S.

    2015-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC), prostheses offer the potential advantages of optimized esthetics, low wear of the opposing dentition and the ability to bond the prosthesis to the abutment teeth, thereby compensating for less-than-optimal abutment tooth retention and resistance form. These prostheses are composed of two types of composite materials: Fiber-composites to build the substructure and hybrid or micro fill particulate composites to create the external veneer surface. This article reviews the various types of FRCs and its mechanical properties. PMID:26015717

  2. Mechanical response of composite materials with through-the-thickness reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Dickinson, Larry C.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to identify the key geometrical parameters and quantify their influence on the mechanical response of through-the-thickness (TTT) reinforced composite materials. Composite laminates with TTT reinforcement fibers were fabricated using different TTT reinforcement materials and reinforcement methods and laminates were also fabricated of similar construction but without TTT reinforcement fibers. Coupon specimens were machined from these laminates and were destructively tested. TTT reinforcement yarns enhance damage tolerance and improve interlaminar strength. Thick-layer composites with TTT reinforcement yarns have equal or superior mechanical properties to thin-layer composites without TTT reinforcement yarns. A significant potential exists for fabrication cost reduction by using thick-layer composites with TTT reinforcement yarns. Removal of the surface loop of the TTT reinforcement improves compression strength. Stitching provides somewhat higher mechanical properties than integral weaving.

  3. New generation fiber reinforced polymer composites incorporating carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Eslam

    The last five decades observed an increasing use of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites as alternative construction materials for aerospace and infrastructure. The high specific strength of FRP attracted its use as non-corrosive reinforcement. However, FRP materials were characterized with a relatively low ductility and low shear strength compared with steel reinforcement. On the other hand, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been introduced in the last decade as a material with minimal defect that is capable of increasing the mechanical properties of polymer matrices. This dissertation reports experimental investigations on the use of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to produce a new generation of FRP composites. The experiments showed significant improvements in the flexure properties of the nanocomposite when functionalized MWCNTs were used. In addition, MWCNTs were used to produce FRP composites in order to examine static, dynamic, and creep behavior. The MWCNTs improved the off-axis tension, off-axis flexure, FRP lap shear joint responses. In addition, they reduced the creep of FRP-concrete interface, enhanced the fracture toughness, and altered the impact resistance significantly. In general, the MWCNTs are found to affect the behaviour of the FRP composites when matrix failure dominates the behaviour. The improvement in the mechanical response with the addition of low contents of MWCNTs would benefit many industrial and military applications such as strengthening structures using FRP composites, composite pipelines, aircrafts, and armoured vehicles.

  4. The assessment of metal fiber reinforced polymeric composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Wenchiang R.

    1990-01-01

    Because of their low cost, excellent electrical conductivity, high specific strength (strength/density), and high specific modulus (modulus/density) short metal fiber reinforced composites have enjoyed a widespread use in many critical applications such as automotive industry, aircraft manufacturing, national defense, and space technology. However, little data has been found in the study of short metal fibrous composites. Optimum fiber concentration in a resin matrix and fiber aspect ratio (length-to-diameter ratio) are often not available to a user. Stress concentration at short fiber ends is the other concern when the composite is applied to a load-bearing application. Fracture in such composites where the damage will be initiated or accumulated is usually difficult to be determined. An experimental investigation is therefore carefully designed and undertaken to systematically evaluate the mechanical properties as well as electrical properties. Inconel 601 (nickel based) metal fiber with a diameter of eight microns is used to reinforce commercially available thermoset polyester resin. Mechanical testing such as tensile, impact, and flexure tests along with electrical conductivity measurements is conducted to study the feasibility of using such composites. The advantages and limitations of applying chopped metal fiber reinforced polymeric composites are also discussed.

  5. In Vitro Study of Transverse Strength of Fiber Reinforced Composites

    PubMed Central

    Mosharraf, R.; Hashemi, Z.; Torkan, S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Reinforcement with fiber is an effective method for considerable improvement in flexural properties of indirect composite resin restorations. The aim of this in-vitro study was to compare the transverse strength of composite resin bars reinforced with pre-impregnated and non-impregnated fibers. Materials and Methods Thirty six bar type composite resin specimens (3×2×25 mm) were constructed in three groups. The first group was the control group (C) without any fiber reinforcement. The specimens in the second group (P) were reinforced with pre-impregnated fibers and the third group (N) with non-impregnated fibers. These specimens were tested by the three-point bending method to measure primary transverse strength. Data were statistically analyzed with one way ANOVA and Tukey’s tests. Results There was a significant difference among the mean primary transverse strength in the three groups (P<0.001). The post-hoc (Tukey) test showed that there was a significant difference between the pre-impregnated and control groups in their primary transverse strength (P<0.001). Regarding deflection, there was also a significant difference among the three groups (P=0.001). There were significant differences among the mean deflection of the control group and two other groups (PC&N<.001 and PC&P=.004), but there was no significant difference between the non-and pre-impregnated groups (PN&P=.813). Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that reinforcement with fiber considerably increased the transverse strength of composite resin specimens, but impregnation of the fiber used implemented no significant difference in the transverse strength of composite resin samples. PMID:22457836

  6. Innovative Composites Through Reinforcement Morphology Design - a Bone-Shaped-Short-Fiber Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.T.; Valdez, J.A.; Beyerlain, I.J.; Stout, M.G.; Zhou, S.; Shi, N.; Lowe, T.C.

    1999-06-29

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project is to improve the strength and toughness of conventional short-fiber composites by using innovative bone-shaped-short (BSS) fibers as reinforcement. We fabricated a model polyethylene BSS fiber-reinforced polyester-matrix composite to prove that fiber morphology, instead of interfacial strength, solves the problem. Experimental tensile and fracture toughness test results show that BSS fibers can bridge matrix cracks more effectively, and consume many times more energy when pulled out, than conventional-straight-short (CSS) fibers. This leads to both higher strength and fracture toughness for the BSS-fiber composites. A computational model was developed to simulate crack propagation in both BSS- and CSS-fiber composites, accounting for stress concentrations, interface debonding, and fiber pullout. Model predictions were validated by experimental results and will be useful in optimizing BSS-fiber morphology and other material system parameters.

  7. Development of Textile Reinforced Composites for Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. Benson

    1998-01-01

    NASA has been a leader in development of composite materials for aircraft applications during the past 25 years. In the early 1980's NASA and others conducted research to improve damage tolerance of composite structures through the use of toughened resins but these resins were not cost-effective. The aircraft industry wanted affordable, robust structures that could withstand the rigors of flight service with minimal damage. The cost and damage tolerance barriers of conventional laminated composites led NASA to focus on new concepts in composites which would incorporate the automated manufacturing methods of the textiles industry and which would incorporate through-the-thickness reinforcements. The NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program provided the resources to extensively investigate the application of textile processes to next generation aircraft wing and fuselage structures. This paper discusses advanced textile material forms that have been developed, innovative machine concepts and key technology advancements required for future application of textile reinforced composites in commercial transport aircraft. Multiaxial warp knitting, triaxial braiding and through-the-thickness stitching are the three textile processes that have surfaced as the most promising for further development. Textile reinforced composite structural elements that have been developed in the NASA ACT Program are discussed. Included are braided fuselage frames and window-belt reinforcements, woven/stitched lower fuselage side panels, stitched multiaxial warp knit wing skins, and braided wing stiffeners. In addition, low-cost processing concepts such as resin transfer molding (RTM), resin film infusion (RFI), and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) are discussed. Process modeling concepts to predict resin flow and cure in textile preforms are also discussed.

  8. Basalt fiber reinforced polymer composites: Processing and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiang

    A high efficiency rig was designed and built for in-plane permeability measurement of fabric materials. A new data derivation procedure to acquire the flow fluid pattern in the experiment was developed. The measurement results of the in-plane permeability for basalt twill 31 fabric material showed that a high correlation exists between the two principal permeability values for this fabric at 35% fiber volume fraction. This may be the most important scientific contribution made in this thesis. The results from radial measurements corresponded quite well with those from Unidirectional (UD) measurements, which is a well-established technique. No significant differences in mechanical properties were found between basalt fabric reinforced polymer composites and glass composites reinforced by a fabric of similar weave pattern. Aging results indicate that the interfacial region in basalt composites may be more vulnerable to environmental damage than that in glass composites. However, the basalt/epoxy interface may have been more durable than the glass/epoxy interface in tension-tension fatigue because the basalt composites have significantly longer fatigue life. In this thesis, chapter I reviews the literature on fiber reinforced polymer composites, with concentration on permeability measurement, mechanical properties and durability. Chapter II discusses the design of the new rig for in-plane permeability measurement, the new derivation procedure for monitoring of the fluid flow pattern, and the permeability measurement results. Chapter III compares the mechanical properties and durability between basalt fiber and glass fiber reinforced polymer composites. Lastly, chapter IV gives some suggestions and recommendations for future work.

  9. Effects of interphase regions on performance of carbon fiber reinforced thermoset composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lesko, J.J.; Case, S.W.; Reifsnider, K.L.

    1995-12-31

    The effects of systematically varied interphase materials on carbon fiber reinforced epoxy and vinyl ester matrix composites are under continuing investigation. Substantial differences in composite strength and fatigue durability have been observed between two composite material systems with epoxy matrices and contrasting interphases. The improvements were directly attributed to the application of a thermoplastic sizing miscible with the matrix resin, poly(vinylpyrrolidone), as opposed to a conventional epoxy sizing. In some cases, fiber dominated composite strength was improved by 50% and fatigue lives were increased by two orders of magnitude using the polyamide sizing. Distinct morphological differences resulted in the interphase regions using the different sizings, and thus, it was assumed that the local mechanical properties of the composites in this region were dissimilar. This work has now been extended to carbon fabric reinforced, vinyl ester/styrene matrix composites. Analogously, dramatically increased fatigue durability of these materials using poly(vinylpyrrolidone) sizings has also been observed.

  10. Novel Dental Composites Reinforced with Zirconia-Silica Ceramic Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Guangqing; Fan, Yuwei; Zhang, Jian-Feng; Hagan, Joseph; Xu, Xiaoming

    2011-01-01

    Objective To fabricate and characterize dental composites reinforced with various amounts of zirconia-silica (ZS) or zirconia-yttria-silica (ZYS) ceramic nanofibers. Methods Control composites (70 wt% glass particle filler, no nanofibers) and experimental composites (2.5, 5.0, and 7.5 wt% ZS or ZYS nanofibers replacing glass particle filler) were prepared by blending 29 wt% dental resin monomers, 70 wt% filler, and 1.0 wt% initiator, and polymerized by either heat or dental curing light. Flexural strength (FS), flexural modulus (FM), energy at break (EAB), and fracture toughness (FT) were tested after the specimens were stored in 37 °C deionized water for 24 h, 3 months, or 6 months. Degree of conversion (DC) of monomers in composites was measured using Fourier transformed near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy. Fractured surfaces were observed by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). The data were analyzed using ANOVA with Tukey’s Honestly Significant Differences test used for post hoc analysis. Results Reinforcement of dental composites with ZS or ZYS nanofibers (2.5% or 5.0%) can significantly increase the FS, FM and EAB of dental composites over the control. Further increase the content of ZS nanofiber (7.5%), however, decreases these properties (although they are still higher than those of the control). Addition of nanofibers did not decrease the long-term mechanical properties of these composites. All ZS reinforced composites (containing 2.5%, 5.0% and 7.5% ZS nanofibers) exhibit significantly higher fracture toughness than the control. The DC of the composites decreases with ZS nanofiber content. Significance Incorporation of ceramic nanofibers in dental composites can significantly improve their mechanical properties and fracture toughness and thus may extend their service life. PMID:22153326

  11. Fabrication of fibre reinforced nickel aluminide matrix composites by reactive processing

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, M.; Horsfall, I.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes the fabrication by reactive processing of short, and continuous, alumina fibre reinforced nickel aluminide matrix composites. The fibre is introduced into the aluminide system to increase toughness and high temperature strength. The short fibre reinforced nickel aluminide is formed by squeeze casting a porous preform containing nickel powder and SAFFIL fibre with an aluminium or aluminium alloy melt. The continuous fibre reinforced nickel aluminide is formed by squeeze casting a jig containing nickel coated ALMAX fibre. The short fibre reinforced composite (containing 10% and 20% volume fibre) reacted during infiltration with an aluminium melt to form a single phase intermetallic. Using an aluminium-copper melt the intermetallic formation was inhibited and a multi-phase composite was obtained. A preliminary study into reactive processing of this system by utilising a hot isostatic pressing (HIP) cycle is presented. HIP was required to prevent the formation of porosity due to an imbalance in the diffusive mobility of the various components. It was found that HIP was only effective on canned samples, the preferred encapsulation material being glass. The continuous fibre reinforced composite did not react to an intermetallic phase when infiltrated with an aluminum melt. Use of an aluminum-copper melt resulted in partial nickel-melt reaction producing various nickel-aluminum (-copper) phases. HIP was then used to form a two phase intermetallic matrix with no evidence of fibre damage.

  12. MODELING FUNCTIONALLY GRADED INTERPHASE REGIONS IN CARBON NANOTUBE REINFORCED COMPOSITES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, G. D.; Lagoudas, D. C.; Frankland, S. J. V.; Gates, T. S.

    2006-01-01

    A combination of micromechanics methods and molecular dynamics simulations are used to obtain the effective properties of the carbon nanotube reinforced composites with functionally graded interphase regions. The multilayer composite cylinders method accounts for the effects of non-perfect load transfer in carbon nanotube reinforced polymer matrix composites using a piecewise functionally graded interphase. The functional form of the properties in the interphase region, as well as the interphase thickness, is derived from molecular dynamics simulations of carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix. Results indicate that the functional form of the interphase can have a significant effect on all the effective elastic constants except for the effective axial modulus for which no noticeable effects are evident.

  13. Smart pultruded composite reinforcements incorporating fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalamkarov, Alexander L.; Fitzgerald, Stephen B.; MacDonald, Douglas O.; Georgiades, Anastasis V.

    1998-03-01

    The issues of processing, evaluation, experimental testing, and modeling of smart fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite materials are discussed. The specific application in view is the use of smart composite reinforcements for a monitoring of innovative bridges and structures. The pultrusion technology for the fabrication of fiber reinforced polymer composites with embedded fiber optic senors (Fabry Perot and Bragg Grating) is developed. The optical sensor/composite material interaction is studied. The tensile and shear properties of the pultruded carbon/vinylester and glass/vinylester rods with and without optical fibers are determined. The microstructural analysis of the smart pultruded FRP is carried out. The interfaces between the resin matrix and the acrylate and polyimide coated optical fibers are examined and interpreted in terms of the coatings's ability to resist high temperature and its compatibility with resin matrix. The strain monitoring during the pultrusion of composite parts using the embedded fiber optic sensors was performed. The strain readings from the sensors and the extensometer were compared in mechanical tensile tests.

  14. Finite Element Analysis of Drilling of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isbilir, Ozden; Ghassemieh, Elaheh

    2012-06-01

    Despite the increased applications of the composite materials in aerospace due to their exceptional physical and mechanical properties, the machining of composites remains a challenge. Fibre reinforced laminated composites are prone to different damages during machining process such as delamination, fibre pull-out, microcracks, thermal damages. Optimization of the drilling process parameters can reduces the probability of these damages. In the current research, a 3D finite element (FE) model is developed of the process of drilling in the carbon fibre reinforced composite (CFC). The FE model is used to investigate the effects of cutting speed and feed rate on thrust force, torque and delamination in the drilling of carbon fiber reinforced laminated composite. A mesoscale FE model taking into account of the different oriented plies and interfaces has been proposed to predict different damage modes in the plies and delamination. For validation purposes, experimental drilling tests have been performed and compared to the results of the finite element analysis. Using Matlab a digital image analysis code has been developed to assess the delamination factor produced in CFC as a result of drilling.

  15. Carbon aerogel composites prepared by ambient drying and using oxidized polyacrylonitrile fibers as reinforcements.

    PubMed

    Feng, Junzong; Zhang, Changrui; Feng, Jian; Jiang, Yonggang; Zhao, Nan

    2011-12-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced carbon aerogel composites (C/CAs) for thermal insulators were prepared by copyrolysis of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels reinforced by oxidized polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fiber felts. The RF aerogel composites were obtained by impregnating PAN fiber felts with RF sols, then aging, ethanol exchanging, and drying at ambient pressure. Upon carbonization, the PAN fibers shrink with the RF aerogels, thus reducing the difference of shrinkage rates between the fiber reinforcements and the aerogel matrices, and resulting in C/CAs without any obvious cracks. The three point bend strength of the C/CAs is 7.1 ± 1.7 MPa, and the thermal conductivity is 0.328 W m(-1) K(-1) at 300 °C in air. These composites can be used as high-temperature thermal insulators (in inert atmospheres or vacuum) or supports for phase change materials in thermal protection system. PMID:22047011

  16. Development of Cu Reinforced SiC Particulate Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harshpreet; Kumar, Lailesh; Nasimul Alam, Syed

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents the results of Cu-SiCp composites developed by powder metallurgy route and an attempt has been made to make a comparison between the composites developed by using unmilled Cu powder and milled Cu powder. SiC particles as reinforcement was blended with unmilled and as-milled Cu powderwith reinforcement contents of 10, 20, 30, 40 vol. % by powder metallurgy route. The mechanical properties of pure Cu and the composites developed were studied after sintering at 900°C for 1 h. Density of the sintered composites were found out based on the Archimedes' principle. X-ray diffraction of all the composites was done in order to determine the various phases in the composites. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDS (electron diffraction x-ray spectroscopy) was carried out for the microstructural analysis of the composites. Vickers microhardness tester was used to find out the hardness of the samples. Wear properties of the developed composites were also studied.

  17. Modeling the minimum creep rate of discontinuous lamellar-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomeusz, M.F.; Wert, J.A.

    1995-12-01

    An analytical model has been developed to predict the creep rate of discontinuous lamellar-reinforced composites in which both phases plastically deform. The model incorporates effects associated with lamellar orientation relative to the uniaxial stress axis. For modest to large differences between matrix and reinforcement creep rates, lamellar aspect ratio has a significant impact on composite creep rate. For a prescribed reinforcing phase volume fraction, microstructural inhomogeneity can have a pronounced effect on composite creep properties. In the case of uniaxially aligned rigid lamellar-reinforced composites, an inhomogeneous distribution of reinforcing lamellae in the microstructure substantially increases the composite creep rate. Model results demonstrate that there is no significant improvement in creep resistance for aligned fiber-reinforced composites compared to aligned lamellar-reinforced composites, unless the reinforcing phase is essentially nondeforming relative to the matrix phase.

  18. Microbiologically influenced degradation of fiber-reinforced polymeric composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, P.A.; Ray, R.I.; Little, B.J. ); Tucker, W.C. )

    1994-04-01

    Two fiber-reinforced polymer composites were examined for susceptibility to microbiologically influenced degradation. Composites, resins, and fibers were exposed to sulfur/iron-oxidizing, calcareous-depositing, ammonium-producing, hydrogen-producing, and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in batch culture. Surfaces were uniformly colonized by all physiological types of bacteria. Epoxy and vinyl ester neat resins, carbon fibers, and epoxy composites were not adversely affected by microbiological species. SRB degraded the organic surfactant on glass fibers and preferentially colonized fiber-vinyl ester interfaces. Hydrogen-producing bacteria appeared to disrupt bonding between fibers and vinyl ester resin and to penetrate the resin at the interface.

  19. Microbiologically influenced degradation of fiber reinforced polymeric composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, P.A.; Ray, R.I.; Little, B.J.; Tucker, W.C.

    1994-12-31

    Two fiber reinforced polymer composites were examined for susceptibility to microbiologically influenced degradation. Composites, resins, and fibers were exposed to sulfur/iron-oxidizing, calcareous-depositing, ammonium-producing, hydrogen-producing and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in batch culture. Surfaces were uniformly colonized by all physiological types of bacteria. Epoxy and vinyl ester neat resins, carbon fibers, and epoxy composites were not adversely affected by microbial species. SRB degraded the organic surfactant on glass fibers and preferentially colonized fiber-vinyl ester interfaces. Hydrogen-producing bacteria appeared to disrupt bonding between fibers and vinyl ester resin and to penetrate the resin at the interface.

  20. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, Kunigal; Argade, Shyam

    2003-01-01

    This report presents a critical review of the processing techniques for fabricating continuous fiber-reinforced CMCs for possible applications at elevated temperatures. Some of the issues affecting durability of the composite materials such as fiber coatings and cracking of the matrix because of shrinkage in PIP-process are also examined. An assessment of the potential inexpensive processes is also provided. Finally three potential routes of manufacturing C/SiC composites using a technology that NC A&T developed for carbon/carbon composites are outlined. Challenges that will be encountered are also listed.

  1. Analysis/design of strip reinforced random composites /strip hybrids/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Results are described which were obtained by applying advanced analysis methods and composite mechanics to a strip-reinforced random composite square panel with fixed ends. This was done in order to illustrate the use of these methods for the apriori assessment of the composite panel when subjected to complex loading conditions. The panel was assumed to be of E-Glass/Random Composite. The strips were assumed to be of three advanced unidirectional composites to cover a range of low, intermediate, and high modulus stiffness. The panels were assumed to be subjected to complex loadings to assess their adequacy as load-carrying members in auto body, aircraft engine nacelle, and windmill blade applications. The results show that strip hybrid panels can be several times more structurally efficient than the random composite base materials. Some of the results are presented in graphical form and procedures are described for use of these graphs as guides for preliminary design of strip hybrids.

  2. Analysis/design of strip reinforced random composites (strip hybrids)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Advanced analysis methods and composite mechanics were applied to a strip-reinforced random composite square panel with fixed ends to illustrate the use of these methods for the a priori assessment of the composite panel when subjected to complex loading conditions. The panel was assumed to be of E-glass random composite. The strips were assumed to be of three advanced unidirectional composites to cover a range of low, intermediate, and high modulus stiffness. The panels were assumed to be subjected to complex loadings to assess their adequacy as load-carrying members in auto body, aircraft engine nacelle and windmill blade applications. The results show that strip hybrid panels can be several times more structurally efficient than the random composite base materials. Some of the results are presented in graphical form and procedures are described for use of these graphs as guides for preliminary design of strip hybrids.

  3. Metal-bonded, carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    DOEpatents

    Sastri, S.A.; Pemsler, J.P.; Cooke, R.A.; Litchfield, J.K.; Smith, M.B.

    1996-03-05

    Metal bonded carbon fiber-reinforced composites are disclosed in which the metal and the composite are strongly bound by (1) providing a matrix-depleted zone in the composite of sufficient depth to provide a binding site for the metal to be bonded and then (2) infiltrating the metal into the matrix-free zone to fill a substantial portion of the zone and also provide a surface layer of metal, thereby forming a strong bond between the composite and the metal. The invention also includes the metal-bound composite itself, as well as the provision of a coating over the metal for high-temperature performance or for joining to other such composites or to other substrates. 2 figs.

  4. Metal-bonded, carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    DOEpatents

    Sastri, Suri A.; Pemsler, J. Paul; Cooke, Richard A.; Litchfield, John K.; Smith, Mark B.

    1996-01-01

    Metal bonded carbon fiber-reinforced composites are disclosed in which the metal and the composite are strongly bound by (1) providing a matrix-depleted zone in the composite of sufficient depth to provide a binding site for the metal to be bonded and then (2) infiltrating the metal into the matrix-free zone to fill a substantial portion of the zone and also provide a surface layer of metal, thereby forming a strong bond between the composite and the metal. The invention also includes the metal-bound composite itself, as well as the provision of a coating over the metal for high-temperature performance or for joining to other such composites or to other substrates.

  5. Mullite fiber reinforced reaction bonded Si3N4 composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saleh, T.; Sayir, A.; Lightfoot, A.; Haggerty, J.

    1996-01-01

    Fracture toughnesses of brittle ceramic materials have been improved by introducing reinforcements and carefully tailored interface layers. Silicon carbide and Si3N4 have been emphasized as matrices of structural composites intended for high temperature service because they combine excellent mechanical, chemical, thermal and physical properties. Both matrices have been successfully toughened with SiC fibers, whiskers and particles for ceramic matrix composite (CMC) parts made by sintering, hot pressing or reaction forming processes. These SiC reinforced CMCs have exhibited significantly improved toughnesses at low and intermediate temperature levels, as well as retention of properties at high temperatures for selected exposures; however, they are vulnerable to attack from elevated temperature dry and wet oxidizing atmospheres after the matrix has cracked. Property degradation results from oxidation of interface layers and/or reinforcements. The problem is particularly acute for small diameter (-20 tim) polymer derived SiC fibers used for weavable toes. This research explored opportunities for reinforcing Si3N4 matrices with fibers having improved environmental stability; the findings should also be applicable to SiC matrix CMCs.

  6. Nano-particulate dispersion and reinforcement of nanostructured composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Virginia Hiu-Hung

    2005-12-01

    This research investigated the feasibility of reinforcing polymer composites using 30 nm SiC nanoparticles in a vinyl ester resin. The SiC nanoparticles were examined using transmission electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. Gamma-methacryloxy propyl trimethoxy silane (MPS) was chosen as the coupling agent. Both mixing procedures with (1) the nanoparticles pretreated with a dilute MPS solution in an acid 5% (v/v) water-ethanol mixture and (2) the MPS sonicated as an integral blend with the filled vinyl ester, were attempted. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to study the silanol condensation between MPS and the SiC nanoparticles. The results show that ultrasonic mixing did not fully disperse the particles. Hence the composite strength did not improve although the modulus increased. The use of MPS improved the dispersion quality and hence the composite strength. The rheological behavior of SiC nanoparticle-filled vinyl ester resin systems was evaluated in terms of the Bingham, power law, Herschel-Bulkley, and Casson models. Even when the particle loading was less then 4% by weight, the viscosity of the nanoparticle suspension was found to increase much more than that of a microparticle suspension. This phenomenon may be the result of association between nanoparticles and polymer molecules, effectively making the nanoparticles larger. The resulting reduction in the mobility of polymer molecules also led to delayed curing. The maximum particle loading corresponding to infinite viscosity was determined as 0.1 volume fraction using the (1 - eta r-1/2) - φ dependence. The experimental optimum fractional weight per cent of the dispersants (wt. % dispersant/wt. % SiC) was found to be around 40% for 30 nm SiC nanoparticles, which is in close agreement with the theoretically calculated monolayer coverage dosage of 67%.

  7. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Probst, K.J.; Anderson, T.J.; Starr, T.L.

    1997-12-01

    Silicon carbide-based heat exchanger tubes are of interest to energy production and conversion systems due to their excellent high temperature properties. Fiber-reinforced SiC is of particular importance for these applications since it is substantially tougher than monolithic SiC, and therefore more damage and thermal shock tolerant. This paper reviews a program to develop a scaled-up system for the chemical vapor infiltration of tubular shapes of fiber-reinforced SiC. The efforts include producing a unique furnace design, extensive process and system modeling, and experimental efforts to demonstrate tube fabrication.

  8. Tokens for Success: Using the Graduated Reinforcement System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, Carla S.; Lagarde, Renee

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Graduated Reinforcement System, a simplifed token system that involves establishing a partnership with parents and students, identifying target behaviors, planning for record keeping, tallying daily/weekly points, designating the graduated reinforcement criteria, determining reinforcers for the three levels, awarding the reinforcer,…

  9. Mechanical Performance of Rotomoulded Wollastonite-Reinforced Polyethylene Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiaowen; Easteal, Allan J.; Bhattacharyya, Debes

    This paper describes the development of a new processing technology for rotational moulding of wollastonite microfibre (WE) reinforced polyethylene (PE). Manufacturing wollastonite-polyethylene composites involved blending, compounding by extrusion, and granulating prior to rotational moulding. The properties of the resulting composites were characterised by tensile and impact strength measurements. The results show that tensile strength increases monotonically with the addition of wollastonite fibres, but impact strength is decreased. In addition, the processability is also decreased after adding more than 12 vol% WE because of increased viscosity. The effects of a coupling agent, maleated polyethylene (MAPE), on the mechanical performance and processability were also investigated. SEM analysis reveals good adhesion between the fibre reinforcements and polyethylene matrix at the fracture surface with the addition of MAPE. It is proposed that fillers with small particles with high aspect ratio (such as wollastonite) provide a large interfacial area between the filler and the polymer matrix, and may influence the mobility of the molecular chains.

  10. Homogenization of long fiber reinforced composites including fiber bending effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Niordson, Christian F.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a homogenization method, which accounts for intrinsic size effects related to the fiber diameter in long fiber reinforced composite materials with two independent constitutive models for the matrix and fiber materials. A new choice of internal kinematic variables allows to maintain the kinematics of the two material phases independent from the assumed constitutive models, so that stress-deformation relationships, can be expressed in the framework of hyper-elasticity and hyper-elastoplasticity for the fiber and the matrix materials respectively. The bending stiffness of the reinforcing fibers is captured by higher order strain terms, resulting in an accurate representation of the micro-mechanical behavior of the composite. Numerical examples show that the accuracy of the proposed model is very close to a non-homogenized finite-element model with an explicit discretization of the matrix and the fibers.

  11. Elastic/viscoplastic behavior of fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C.; Sun, C. T.; Gates, T. S.

    1990-01-01

    An elastic/viscoplastic constitutive model was used to characterize the nonlinear and rate dependent behavior of a continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composite. This model was incorporated into a finite element program for the analysis of laminated plates and shells. Details on the finite element formulation with the proposed constitutive model were presented. The numerical results were compared with experimental data for uniaxial tension and three-point bending tests of (+ or - 45 deg)3s APC-2 laminates.

  12. Rate dependent constitutive models for fiber reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.

    1990-01-01

    A literature survey was conducted to assess the state-of-the-art in rate dependent constitutive models for continuous fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite (PMC) materials. Several recent models which include formulations for describing plasticity, viscoelasticity, viscoplasticity, and rate-dependent phenomenon such as creep and stress relaxation are outlined and compared. When appropriate, these comparisons include brief descriptions of the mathematical formulations, the test procedures required for generating material constants, and details of available data comparing test results to analytical predictions.

  13. Carbon fiber reinforced composites: their structural and thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jingquan; Yang, Dehua

    2010-07-01

    More and more astronomical telescopes use carbon fiber reinforced composites (CFRP). CFRP has high stiffness, high strength, and low thermal expansion. However, they are not isotropic in performance. Their properties are direction dependent. This paper discusses, in detail, the structural and thermal properties of carbon fiber structure members, such as tubes, plates, and honeycomb sandwich structures. Comparisons are provided both from the structural point of view and from the thermal point of view.

  14. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Matlin, W.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Liaw, P.K.

    1996-06-01

    Processing equipment for the infiltration of fiber-reinforced composite tubes is being designed that incorporates improvements over the equipment used to infiltrate disks. A computer-controlled machine-man interface is being developed to allow for total control of all processing variables. Additionally, several improvements are being made to the furnace that will reduce the complexity and cost of the process. These improvements include the incorporation of free standing preforms, cast mandrels, and simpler graphite heating elements.

  15. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Matlin, W.M.; Liaw, P.K.

    1996-08-01

    Processing equipment for the infiltration of fiber-reinforced composite tubes is being designed that incorporates improvements over the equipment used to infiltrate disks. A computer-controlled machine-man interface is being developed to allow for total control of all processing variables. Additionally, several improvements are being made to the furnace that will reduce the complexity and cost of the process. These improvements include the incorporation of free standing preforms, cast mandrels, and simpler graphite heating elements.

  16. Dynamic tensile strength of glass fiber reinforced pultruded composites

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, P.K.; Kumar, M.M.; Hui, D.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses the stress-strain behavior, fracture strength, influence of low temperature, and energy absorption in the diametral tensile splitting fracturing of a Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite. Experiments were conducted at low-temperature in a thermal chamber installed on a servo-hydraulic universal testing machine. The tensile strength was determined by diametral compression of disc samples at 24, {minus}5 and {minus}40 C.

  17. Glass fibres reinforced polyester composites degradation monitoring by surface analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croitoru, Catalin; Patachia, Silvia; Papancea, Adina; Baltes, Liana; Tierean, Mircea

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents a novel method for quantification of the modifications that occur on the surface of different types of gel-coated glass fibre-reinforced polyester composites under artificial UV-ageing at 254 nm. The method implies the adsorption of an ionic dye, namely methylene blue, on the UV-aged composite, and computing the CIELab colour space parameters from the photographic image of the coloured composite's surface. The method significantly enhances the colour differences between the irradiated composites and the reference, in contrast with the non-coloured ones. The colour modifications that occur represent a good indicative of the surface degradation, alteration of surface hydrophily and roughness of the composite and are in good correlation with the ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and optical microscopy results. The proposed method is easier, faster and cheaper than the traditional ones.

  18. Modeling of short fiber reinforced injection moulded composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, A.; Aswini, N.; Dandekar, C. R.; Makhe, S.

    2012-09-01

    A micromechanics based finite element model (FEM) is developed to facilitate the design of a new production quality fiber reinforced plastic injection molded part. The composite part under study is composed of a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) matrix reinforced with 30% by volume fraction of short carbon fibers. The constitutive material models are obtained by using micromechanics based homogenization theories. The analysis is carried out by successfully coupling two commercial codes, Moldflow and ANSYS. Moldflow software is used to predict the fiber orientation by considering the flow kinetics and molding parameters. Material models are inputted into the commercial software ANSYS as per the predicted fiber orientation and the structural analysis is carried out. Thus in the present approach a coupling between two commercial codes namely Moldflow and ANSYS has been established to enable the analysis of the short fiber reinforced injection moulded composite parts. The load-deflection curve is obtained based on three constitutive material model namely an isotropy, transversely isotropy and orthotropy. Average values of the predicted quantities are compared to experimental results, obtaining a good correlation. In this manner, the coupled Moldflow-ANSYS model successfully predicts the load deflection curve of a composite injection molded part.

  19. Interfacial stresses in shape memory alloy-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiremath, S. R.; Prajapati, Maulik; Rakesh, S.; Roy Mahapatra, D.

    2014-03-01

    Debonding of Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) wires in SMA reinforced polymer matrix composites is a complex phenomenon compared to other fabric fiber debonding in similar matrix composites. This paper focuses on experimental study and analytical correlation of stress required for debonding of thermal SMA actuator wire reinforced composites. Fiber pull-out tests are carried out on thermal SMA actuator at parent state to understand the effect of stress induced detwinned martensites. An ASTM standard is followed as benchmark method for fiber pull-out test. Debonding stress is derived with the help of non-local shear-lag theory applied to elasto-plastic interface. Furthermore, experimental investigations are carried out to study the effect of Laser shot peening on SMA surface to improve the interfacial strength. Variation in debonding stress due to length of SMA wire reinforced in epoxy are investigated for non-peened and peened SMA wires. Experimental results of interfacial strength variation due to various L/d ratio for non-peened and peened SMA actuator wires in epoxy matrix are discussed.

  20. Nondestructive testing of externally reinforced structures for seismic retrofitting using flax fiber reinforced polymer (FFRP) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Sfarra, S.; Paoletti, D.; Bendada, A.; Maldague, X.

    2013-05-01

    Natural fibers constitute an interesting alternative to synthetic fibers, e.g. glass and carbon, for the production of composites due to their environmental and economic advantages. The strength of natural fiber composites is on average lower compared to their synthetic counterparts. Nevertheless, natural fibers such as flax, among other bast fibers (jute, kenaf, ramie and hemp), are serious candidates for seismic retrofitting applications given that their mechanical properties are more suitable for dynamic loads. Strengthening of structures is performed by impregnating flax fiber reinforced polymers (FFRP) fabrics with epoxy resin and applying them to the component of interest, increasing in this way the load and deformation capacities of the building, while preserving its stiffness and dynamic properties. The reinforced areas are however prompt to debonding if the fabrics are not mounted properly. Nondestructive testing is therefore required to verify that the fabric is uniformly installed and that there are no air gaps or foreign materials that could instigate debonding. In this work, the use of active infrared thermography was investigated for the assessment of (1) a laboratory specimen reinforced with FFRP and containing several artificial defects; and (2) an actual FFRP retrofitted masonry wall in the Faculty of Engineering of the University of L'Aquila (Italy) that was seriously affected by the 2009 earthquake. Thermographic data was processed by advanced signal processing techniques, and post-processed by computing the watershed lines to locate suspected areas. Results coming from the academic specimen were compared to digital speckle photography and holographic interferometry images.

  1. Mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite whisker reinforced polyetherketoneketone composite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Converse, Gabriel L; Conrad, Timothy L; Roeder, Ryan K

    2009-12-01

    The apparent mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite (HA) whisker reinforced polyetherketoneketone (PEKK) scaffolds were evaluated in unconfined, uniaxial compression to investigate the effects of the porosity (75%, 82.5% and 90%), HA content (0, 20 and 40 vol%) and mold temperature (350, 365 and 375 ( composite function)C). Increased porosity resulted in a non-linear decrease in the elastic modulus and yield strength for both reinforced and unreinforced PEKK scaffolds, as expected. The increase in elastic modulus and yield strength with increased relative density followed a power-law, similar to trabecular bone and other open-cell foams. HA whisker reinforcement generally resulted in an increased elastic modulus from 0 to 20 vol% HA and a subsequent decrease from 20 to 40 vol% HA, while the yield strength and strain were decreased in scaffolds with 40 vol% HA compared to those with 0 or 20 vol% HA. Increased mold temperature resulted in an increased elastic modulus, yield strength and yield strain. These effects enabled the mechanical properties to be tailored to mimic human trabecular bone. The elastic modulus was greater than 50 MPa, and the yield strength was greater than 0.5 MPa, for scaffolds with 75% porosity at all combinations of reinforcement level and mold temperature. Scaffolds with 75% porosity and 20 vol% HA molded at 375 ( composite function)C exhibited a mean elastic modulus and yield strength of 149 MPa and 2.2 MPa, respectively, which was the highest of the conditions investigated in this study and similar to human vertebral trabecular bone. Therefore, HA whisker reinforced PEKK scaffolds may be advantageous for permanent implant fixation, including interbody spinal fusion. PMID:19716108

  2. Effects of high energy radiation on the mechanical properties of epoxy graphite fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, R. D.; Fornes, R. E.; Memory, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of high energy radiation on mechanical properties and on the molecular and structural properties of graphite fiber reinforced composites are assessed so that durability in space applications can be predicted. A listing of composite systems irradiated along with the maximum radiation dose applied and type of mechanical tests performed is shown. These samples were exposed to 1/2 MeV electrons.

  3. Multi-scale modeling of fiber and fabric reinforced cement based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soranakom, Chote

    With an increased use of fiber reinforced concrete in structural applications, proper characterization techniques and development of design guides are needed. This dissertation presents a multi-scale modeling approach for fiber and fabric reinforced cement-based composites. A micromechanics-based model of the yarn pullout mechanism due to the failure of the interfacial zone is presented. The effect of mechanical anchorage of transverse yarns is simulated using nonlinear spring elements. The yarn pullout mechanism was used in a meso-scale modeling approach to simulate the yarn bridging force in the crack evolution process. The tensile stress-strain response of a tension specimen that experiences distributed cracking can be simulated using a generalized finite difference approach. The stiffness degradation, tension stiffening, crack spacing evolution, and crack width characteristics of cement composites can be derived using matrix, interface and fiber properties. The theoretical models developed for fabric reinforced cement composites were then extended to cover other types of fiber reinforced concrete such as shotcrete, glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC), steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC), ferrocement and other conventional composite systems. The uniaxial tensile stress-strain response was used to formulate a generalized parametric closed-form solution for predicting flexural behavior of various composites at the macro-structural level. The flexural behaviors of these composites were modeled in a unified manner by means of a moment-curvature relationship based on the uniaxial material models. A variety of theoretical models were developed to address the various mechanisms including: an analytical yarn pullout model; a nonlinear finite difference fabric pullout model; a nonlinear finite difference tension model; closed-form solutions for strain-softening materials; closed-form solutions for strain-softening/hardening materials; and closed-form solutions for

  4. Buckling and Vibration of Fiber Reinforced Composite Plates With Nanofiber Reinforced Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2011-01-01

    Anisotropic composite plates were evaluated with nanofiber reinforced matrices (NFRM). The nanofiber reinforcement volumes ratio in the matrix was 0.01. The plate dimensions were 20 by 10 by 1.0 in. (508 by 254 by 25.4 mm). Seven different loading condition cases were evaluated for buckling: three for uniaxial loading, three for pairs of combined loading, and one with three combined loadings. The anisotropy arose from the unidirectional plates having been at 30 from the structural axis. The anisotropy had a full 6 by 6 rigidities matrix which were satisfied and solved by a Galerkin buckling algorithm. For vibration the same conditions were used with the applied cods about a small fraction of the buckling loads. The buckling and vibration results showed that the NFRM plates buckled at about twice those with conventional matrix.

  5. Carbon fibre-reinforced silicon nitride composites by slurry infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Grenet, C.; Plunkett, L.; Veyret, J.B.; Bullock, E.

    1995-12-01

    The present paper reports on the fabrication of long-carbon fibre reinforced silicon nitride matrix composites by liquid infiltration of an aqueous Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} slurry followed by hot-pressing. A methodology for the maximum volume and uniform infiltration of preforms has been developed by optimising slurry rheology and fibre wetting conditions. Fully infiltrated green forms of 55% theoretical density are achieved with some 40% volume fraction of fibres. The quality of the composites has been assessed by microstructural analysis and mechanical characterization.

  6. Ductility of a continuous fiber reinforced aluminum matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.; Leckie, Frederick A.

    1991-01-01

    The transverse properties of an aluminum alloy metal matrix composite reinforced by continuous alumina fibers have been investigated. The composite is subjected to both mechanical and cyclic thermal loading. The ductility can vary by an order of magnitude according to the operating conditions. For high mechanical and low thermal loading the ductility is small, for low mechanical and high thermal loading the ductility is an order of magnitude higher. Experiments on a beam in bending confirm that the ductility is strongly dependent on the loading conditions. The observations suggest a means of utilizing the inherent ductility of the matrix.

  7. Mechanical Properties of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Zirconium Diboride Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuffle, Kevin; Creegan, Peter; Nowell, Steven; Bull, Jeffrey D.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Continuous fiber reinforced zirconium diboride matrix composites, SCS-9a-(RBSiCZrB2)matrix, are being developed for leading edge, rocket nozzle and turbine engine applications. Recently, the composite materials have been characterized for tensile properties to 1250 C, the highest temperature tested. The tensile properties are fiber dominated as the matrix is microcracked on fabrication, but favorable failure characteristic are observed. Compression and shear mechanical testing results will be reported if completed. The effects of fiber volume fraction and matrix density on mechanical properties will be discussed. The target applications of the materials will be discussed. Specific testing being performed towards qualification for these applications will be included.

  8. Reinforcement Learning Based Web Service Compositions for Mobile Business

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Juan; Chen, Shouming

    In this paper, we propose a new solution to Reactive Web Service Composition, via molding with Reinforcement Learning, and introducing modified (alterable) QoS variables into the model as elements in the Markov Decision Process tuple. Moreover, we give an example of Reactive-WSC-based mobile banking, to demonstrate the intrinsic capability of the solution in question of obtaining the optimized service composition, characterized by (alterable) target QoS variable sets with optimized values. Consequently, we come to the conclusion that the solution has decent potentials in boosting customer experiences and qualities of services in Web Services, and those in applications in the whole electronic commerce and business sector.

  9. Fracture Analysis of Particulate Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Cornie, James A.

    2013-01-01

    A fracture analysis of highly loaded particulate reinforced composites was performed using laser moire interferometry to measure the displacements within the plastic zone at the tip of an advancing crack. Ten castings were made of five different particulate reinforcement-aluminum alloy combinations. Each casting included net-shape specimens which were used for the evaluation of fracture toughness, tensile properties, and flexure properties resulting in an extensive materials properties data. Measured fracture toughness range from 14.1 MPa for an alumina reinforced 356 aluminum alloy to 23.9 MPa for a silicon carbide reinforced 2214 aluminum alloy. For the combination of these K(sub Ic) values and the measured tensile strengths, the compact tension specimens were too thin to yield true plane strain K(sub Ic) values. All materials exhibited brittle behavior characterized by very small tensile ductility suggesting that successful application of these materials requires that the design stresses be below the elastic limit. Probabilistic design principles similar to those used with ceramics are recommended when using these materials. Such principles would include the use of experimentally determined design allowables. In the absence of thorough testing, a design allowable stress of 60 percent of the measured ultimate tensile stress is recommended.

  10. Stress corrosion of fiberglass-reinforced (FRP) composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sapalidis, S.N.; Hogg, P.J.; Kelley, D.H.; Youd, S.J.

    1997-12-01

    The stress corrosion characteristics of uniaxial glass fiber reinforced thermosetting resin composites have been examined in Hydrochloric acid at room temperature and 80 C. A simple technique based on linear elastic fracture mechanisms (LEFM) is presented for characterizing crack growth in these materials subjected to hostile acidic environments. The environmental stress corrosion cracking is investigated both for different types of resin and different types of glass fiber reinforcements. Two matrices were used: Bis-A epoxy vinyl ester resin (based on Bisphenol-A epoxy resin) and novolac epoxy vinyl ester resin (based on epoxidized novolac resin). Two glass fiber types were employed: standard E-glass fiber and R, a special type of E-glass with superior acid resistance. Model experiments using a modified double cantilever beam test with static loading have been carried out on unidirectional composite specimens in 1M Hydrochloric acid solution at room temperature and 80 C. The rate of rack growth in the specimens depends on the applied stress, the temperature and the environment. Consequently, the lifetime of a component or structure made from GRP, subjected to stress corrosion conditions, could be predicted provided the dependence of crack growth rate on stress intensity at the crack tip is known. Scanning electron microscopy studies of the specimen fracture surfaces have identified the characteristic failure mechanisms. The most thing findings of this work is that the selection of epoxy vinyl ester resins reinforced with R fiber exhibited superior resistance to crack growth at 80 C compared to similar E-glass reinforced composites at room temperatures.

  11. Puncture-Healing Thermoplastic Resin Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Keith L. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Grimsley, Brian W. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Czabaj, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A composite comprising a combination of a self-healing polymer matrix and a carbon fiber reinforcement is described. In one embodiment, the matrix is a polybutadiene graft copolymer matrix, such as polybutadiene graft copolymer comprising poly(butadiene)-graft-poly(methyl acrylate-co-acrylonitrile). A method of fabricating the composite is also described, comprising the steps of manufacturing a pre-impregnated unidirectional carbon fiber preform by wetting a plurality of carbon fibers with a solution, the solution comprising a self-healing polymer and a solvent, and curing the preform. A method of repairing a structure made from the composite of the invention is described. A novel prepreg material used to manufacture the composite of the invention is described.

  12. Thermal shock behavior of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, R.N.; Wang, H.

    1995-10-01

    The influence of fiber type and method of composite fabrication on the thermal shock behavior of 2-D fiber-reinforced ceramic composites is studied. Thermal shock tests are performed using a water quench technique, and thermal shock damage is characterized by both destructive and nondestructive techniques. It is shown that the composites possessed superior resistance to thermal shock damage than the monolithic ceramics. Catastrophic failure due to severe thermal stresses is prevented in composites and a significant portion of their original strength is retained at a quench temperature difference up to 1,000 C. These results along with an analysis of the thermal shock damage mechanism based on the destructive and nondestructive tests is described.

  13. Development of explosively bonded TZM wire reinforced Columbian sheet composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, H. E.; Carpenter, S. H.

    1972-01-01

    Methods of producing TZM molybdenum wire reinforced C129Y columbium alloy composites by explosive welding were studied. Layers of TZM molybdenum wire were wound on frames with alternate layers of C129Y columbium alloy foil between the wire layers. The frames held both the wire and foils in place for the explosive bonding process. A goal of 33 volume percent molybdenum wire was achieved for some of the composites. Variables included wire diameter, foil thickness, wire separation, standoff distance between foils and types and amounts of explosive. The program was divided into two phases: (1) development of basic welding parameters using 5 x 10-inch composites, and (2) scaleup to 10 x 20-inch composites.

  14. Three-dimensional printing fiber reinforced hydrogel composites.

    PubMed

    Bakarich, Shannon E; Gorkin, Robert; in het Panhuis, Marc; Spinks, Geoffrey M

    2014-09-24

    An additive manufacturing process that combines digital modeling and 3D printing was used to prepare fiber reinforced hydrogels in a single-step process. The composite materials were fabricated by selectively pattering a combination of alginate/acrylamide gel precursor solution and an epoxy based UV-curable adhesive (Emax 904 Gel-SC) with an extrusion printer. UV irradiation was used to cure the two inks into a single composite material. Spatial control of fiber distribution within the digital models allowed for the fabrication of a series of materials with a spectrum of swelling behavior and mechanical properties with physical characteristics ranging from soft and wet to hard and dry. A comparison with the "rule of mixtures" was used to show that the swollen composite materials adhere to standard composite theory. A prototype meniscus cartilage was prepared to illustrate the potential application in bioengineering. PMID:25197745

  15. Objective Surface Evaluation of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Stuart; Hall, Wayne

    2013-08-01

    The mechanical properties of advanced composites are essential for their structural performance, but the surface finish on exterior composite panels is of critical importance for customer satisfaction. This paper describes the application of wavelet texture analysis (WTA) to the task of automatically classifying the surface finish properties of two fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite construction types (clear resin and gel-coat) into three quality grades. Samples were imaged and wavelet multi-scale decomposition was used to create a visual texture representation of the sample, capturing image features at different scales and orientations. Principal components analysis was used to reduce the dimensionality of the texture feature vector, permitting successful classification of the samples using only the first principal component. This work extends and further validates the feasibility of this approach as the basis for automated non-contact classification of composite surface finish using image analysis.

  16. Mechanical property characterization of polymeric composites reinforced by continuous microfibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubayar, Ali

    Innumerable experimental works have been conducted to study the effect of polymerization on the potential properties of the composites. Experimental techniques are employed to understand the effects of various fibers, their volume fractions and matrix properties in polymer composites. However, these experiments require fabrication of various composites which are time consuming and cost prohibitive. Advances in computational micromechanics allow us to study the various polymer based composites by using finite element simulations. The mechanical properties of continuous fiber composite strands are directional. In traditional continuous fiber laminated composites, all fibers lie in the same plane. This provides very desirable increases in the in-plane mechanical properties, but little in the transverse mechanical properties. The effect of different fiber/matrix combinations with various orientations is also available. Overall mechanical properties of different micro continuous fiber reinforced composites with orthogonal geometry are still unavailable in the contemporary research field. In this research, the mechanical properties of advanced polymeric composite reinforced by continuous micro fiber will be characterized based on analytical investigation and FE computational modeling. Initially, we have chosen IM7/PEEK, Carbon Fiber/Nylon 6, and Carbon Fiber/Epoxy as three different case study materials for analysis. To obtain the equivalent properties of the micro-hetero structures, a concept of micro-scale representative volume elements (RVEs) is introduced. Five types of micro scale RVEs (3 square and 2 hexagonal) containing a continuous micro fiber in the polymer matrix were designed. Uniaxial tensile, lateral expansion and transverse shear tests on each RVE were designed and conducted by the finite element computer modeling software ANSYS. The formulae based on elasticity theory were derived for extracting the equivalent mechanical properties (Young's moduli, shear

  17. Discontinuous Fiber-reinforced Composites above Critical Length

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    Micromechanical physics of critical fiber length, describing a minimum filament distance for resin impregnation and stress transfer, has not yet been applied in dental science. As a test of the hypothesis that 9-micron-diameter, 3-mm-long quartz fibers would increase mechanical strength over particulate-filled composites, photocure-resin-pre-impregnated discontinuous reinforcement was incorporated at 35 wt% into 3M Corporation Z100, Kerr Corporation HerculiteXRV, and an experimental photocure paste with increased radiopaque particulate. Fully articulated four-point bend testing per ASTM C 1161-94 for advanced ceramics and Izod impact testing according to a modified unnotched ASTM D 256-00 specification were then performed. All photocure-fiber-reinforced composites demonstrated significant improvements over particulate-filled compounds (p < 0.001) for flexural strength, modulus, work of fracture, strain at maximum load, and Izod toughness, with one exception for the moduli of Z100 and the experimental reinforced paste. The results indicate that inclusion of pre-impregnated fibers above the critical aspect ratio yields major advancements regarding the mechanical properties tested. PMID:15790745

  18. Asymptotic Analysis of Fiber-Reinforced Composites of Hexagonal Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalamkarov, Alexander L.; Andrianov, Igor V.; Pacheco, Pedro M. C. L.; Savi, Marcelo A.; Starushenko, Galina A.

    2016-08-01

    The fiber-reinforced composite materials with periodic cylindrical inclusions of a circular cross-section arranged in a hexagonal array are analyzed. The governing analytical relations of the thermal conductivity problem for such composites are obtained using the asymptotic homogenization method. The lubrication theory is applied for the asymptotic solution of the unit cell problems in the cases of inclusions of large and close to limit diameters, and for inclusions with high conductivity. The lubrication method is further generalized to the cases of finite values of the physical properties of inclusions, as well as for the cases of medium-sized inclusions. The analytical formulas for the effective coefficient of thermal conductivity of the fiber-reinforced composite materials of a hexagonal structure are derived in the cases of small conductivity of inclusions, as well as in the cases of extremely low conductivity of inclusions. The three-phase composite model (TPhM) is applied for solving the unit cell problems in the cases of the inclusions with small diameters, and the asymptotic analysis of the obtained solutions is performed for inclusions of small sizes. The obtained results are analyzed and illustrated graphically, and the limits of their applicability are evaluated. They are compared with the known numerical and asymptotic data in some particular cases, and very good agreement is demonstrated.

  19. Dynamic fracture behaviour in fibre-reinforced cementitious composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Rena C.; Cifuentes, Héctor; Rivero, Ignacio; Ruiz, Gonzalo; Zhang, Xiaoxin

    2016-08-01

    The object of this work is to simulate the dynamic fracture propagation in fibre-reinforced cementitious composites, in particular, in steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC). Beams loaded in a three-point bend configuration through a drop-weight impact device are considered. A single cohesive crack is assumed to propagate at the middle section; the opening of this crack is governed by a rate-dependent cohesive law; the fibres around the fracture plane are explicitly represented through truss elements. The fibre pull-out behaviour is depicted by an equivalent constitutive law, which is obtained from an analytical load-slip curve. The obtained load-displacement curves and crack propagation velocities are compared with their experimental counterparts. The good agreement with experimental data testifies to the feasibility of the proposed methodology and paves the way to its application in a multi-scale framework.

  20. Corrosion and tribological properties of basalt fiber reinforced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Jin Cheol; Kim, Yun-Hae; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Moon, Kyung-Man; Park, Se-Ho

    2015-03-01

    This experiment has examined the corrosion and tribological properties of basalt fiber reinforced composite materials. There were slight changes of weight after the occurring of corrosion based on time and H2SO4 concentration, but in general, the weight increased. It is assumed that this happens due to the basalt fiber precipitate. Prior to the corrosion, friction-wear behavior showed irregular patterns compared to metallic materials, and when it was compared with the behavior after the corrosion, the coefficient of friction was 2 to 3 times greater. The coefficient of friction of all test specimen ranged from 0.1 to 0.2. Such a result has proven that the basalt fiber, similar to the resin rubber, shows regular patterns regardless of time and H2SO4 concentration because of the space made between resins and reinforced materials.

  1. Thermal Expansion of Carbon Nanofiber-Reinforced Multiscale Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poveda, Ronald L.; Achar, Sriniket; Gupta, Nikhil

    2012-10-01

    Improved dimensional stability of composites is desired in applications where they are exposed to varying temperature conditions. The current study aims at analyzing the effect of vapor-grown carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on the thermal expansion behavior of epoxy matrix composites and hollow particle-filled composites (syntactic foams). CNFs have a lower coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) than epoxy resin, which results in composites with increased dimensional stability as the CNF content is increased. The experimental measurements show that with 10 wt.% CNF, the composite has about 11.6% lower CTE than the matrix resin. In CNF-reinforced syntactic foams, the CTE of the composite decreases with increasing wall thickness and volume fraction of hollow particle inclusions. With respect to neat epoxy resin, a maximum decrease of 38.4% is also observed in the CNF/syntactic foams with microballoon inclusions that range from 15 vol.% to 50 vol.% in all composite mixtures. The experimental results for CNF/syntactic foam are in agreement with a modified version of Kerner's model. A combination of hollow microparticles and nanofibers has resulted in the ability to tailor the thermal expansion of the composite over a wide range.

  2. Nanofiber reinforcement of a geopolymer matrix for improved composite materials mechanical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, AKM Samsur

    reduced. By means of SEM, EDS and X-ray diffraction techniques, it was found that the longer and stronger SCW is more capable of reinforcing the microstructurally inhomogeneous geopolymer than the smaller diameter, shorter ANF. After heat treatment at 760 °C, the effectiveness of SCW as reinforcement in both fracture toughness and flexural strength was reduced by ~89% and ~43%, respectively, while, the ANF filled materials performed worse than the neat geopolymer. A strong interaction was suggested between ANF and geopolymer at high temperature by means of chemical reactions and diffusion. SEM & X-ray diffraction results suggested the formation of Al4C3 on the SCW surface, which could reduce the interface strength between SCW and geopolymer. Therefore it is suggested that the interface strength should be as high as required for load transfer and crack bridging. Finally, to investigate the potential synergy of a nano-filled matrix material and the fiber/matrix interface toughening mechanism of a continuous fiber composite, composite specimens were produced and tested. Flexural and shear strengths of Nextel 610 continuous fiber reinforced 2vol% SCW filled geopolymer matrix composites were investigated. Specimens were produced with cleaned Nextel fiber and with carbon-coated fibers to investigate the combinations of nano-filled matrix with continuous reinforcement that is well bonded (cleaned fiber) versus poorly bonded (carbon-coated fiber) to the matrix. The results showed that flexural strength of cleaned and coated fiber composites improved by ~35% and ~21% respectively, while shear strength of the similar composite systems improved by ~39.5% and ~24%. The results verified the effectiveness of SCW in toughening not only the neat geopolymer, but also continuous fiber reinforced geopolymer matrix composites.

  3. Evaluation of push-out bond strength of two fiber-reinforced composite posts systems using two luting cements in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kadam, Ajay; Pujar, Madhu; Patil, Chetan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The concept of using a “post” for the restoration of teeth has been practiced to restore the endodontically treated tooth. Metallic posts have been commonly used, but their delirious effects have led to the development of fiber-reinforced materials that have overcome the limitations of metallic posts. The use of glass and quartz fibers was proposed as an alternative to the dark color of carbon fiber posts as far as esthetics was concerned. “Debonding” is the most common failure in fiber-reinforced composite type of posts. This study was aimed to compare the push-out bond strength of a self-adhesive dual-cured luting agent (RelyX U100) with a total etch resin luting agent (Variolink II) used to cement two different FRC posts. Materials and Methods: Eighty human maxillary anterior single-rooted teeth were decoronated, endodontically treated, post space prepared and divided into four groups (n = 20); Group I: D.T. light post (RTD) and Variolink II (Ivoclare vivadent), Group II: D.T. light post (RTD) and RelyX U100 (3M ESPE), Group III: Glassix post (Nordin) and Variolink II (Ivoclare vivadent) and Group IV: Glassix post (Nordin) and RelyX U100 (3M ESPE). Each root was sectioned to get slices of 2 ± 0.05-mm thickness. Push-out tests were performed using a triaxial loading frame. To express bond strength in megapascals (Mpa), load value recorded in Newton (N) was divided by the area of the bonded interface. After testing the push-out strengths, the samples were analyzed under a stereomicroscope. Results: The mean values of the push-out bond strength show that Group I and Group III had significantly higher values than Group II and Group IV. The most common mode of failure observed was adhesive between dentin and luting material and between post and luting material. Conclusions: The mean push-out bond strengths were higher for Groups I and III where Variolink II resin cement was used for luting the fiber post, which is based on the total etch

  4. Short Fiber Reinforced Composite: a New Alternative for Direct Onlay Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Mangoush, Enas; Vallittu, Mangoush; Lassila, Lippo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the static load-bearing capacity of direct composite onlay restorations made of novel filling composite resin system which combines short fiber-reinforced composite resin (FC) and conventional particulate filler composite resin (PFC). Methods: Three groups of onlay restorations were fabricated (n = 8/group); Group A: made from conventional particulate filler composite resin (Z250, 3M-ESPE, USA, control), Group B: made from short fiber-reinforced composite resin (EverX posterior, StickTeck Ltd, member of GC group, Turku, Finland) as substructure with 1 mm surface layer of PFC, Group C: made from FC composite resin. The specimens were incrementally polymerized with a hand-light curing unit for 80 s before they were statically loaded with two different sizes (3 & 6 mm) of steel ball until fracture. Failure modes were visually examined. Data were analyzed using ANOVA (p = 0.05). Results: ANOVA revealed that onlay restorations made from FC composite resin had statistically significantly higher load-bearing capacity (1733 N) ( p < 0.05) than the control PFC composite resin (1081 N). Onlays made of FC composite resin with a surface layer of PFC gave force values of 1405 N which was statistically higher than control group ( p < 0.05). No statistically significant difference was found in the load-bearing capacity between groups loaded by different ball sizes Significance: Onlay restorations combining base of short fiber reinforced composite resin as substructure and surface layer of conventional composite resin displayed promising performance in high load bearing areas. PMID:24511331

  5. CP systems for steel reinforced concrete bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Soltesz, Steven M.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes are used for cathodic protection (CP) systems in Oregon?s reinforced concrete coastal bridges to prevent chloride-induced corrosion damage. Thermal-sprayed zinc performs well as an ICCP anode but the service life of the zinc anode is directly related to the average current density used to operate the systems. Oregon Department of Transportation (DOT) is investigating ways of monitoring the rebar corrosion in reinforced concrete bridges to identify conditions when protection of the rebar is needed. This approach reflects the fact that external protection may not be needed for all environmental conditions, leading Oregon DOT to examine the use of intermittent, galvanic, and constant voltage cathodic protection systems. Results from these types of systems are reported.

  6. Bioactive ceramic-reinforced composites for bone augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, K. E.

    2010-01-01

    Biomaterials have been used to repair the human body for millennia, but it is only since the 1970s that man-made composites have been used. Hydroxyapatite (HA)-reinforced polyethylene (PE) is the first of the ‘second-generation’ biomaterials that have been developed to be bioactive rather than bioinert. The mechanical properties have been characterized using quasi-static, fatigue, creep and fracture toughness testing, and these studies have allowed optimization of the production method. The in vitro and in vivo biological properties have been investigated with a range of filler content and have shown that the presence of sufficient bioactive filler leads to a bioactive composite. Finally, the material has been applied clinically, initially in the orbital floor and later in the middle ear. From this initial combination of HA in PE other bioactive ceramic polymer composites have been developed. PMID:20591846

  7. Nano-Fiber Reinforced Enhancements in Composite Polymer Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2009-01-01

    Nano-fibers are used to reinforce polymer matrices to enhance the matrix dependent properties that are subsequently used in conventional structural composites. A quasi isotropic configuration is used in arranging like nano-fibers through the thickness to ascertain equiaxial enhanced matrix behavior. The nano-fiber volume ratios are used to obtain the enhanced matrix strength properties for 0.01,0.03, and 0.05 nano-fiber volume rates. These enhanced nano-fiber matrices are used with conventional fiber volume ratios of 0.3 and 0.5 to obtain the composite properties. Results show that nano-fiber enhanced matrices of higher than 0.3 nano-fiber volume ratio are degrading the composite properties.

  8. Analytical and experimental investigation of aircraft metal structures reinforced with filamentary composites. Phase 1: Concept development and feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oken, S.; June, R. R.

    1971-01-01

    The analytical and experimental investigations are described in the first phase of a program to establish the feasibility of reinforcing metal aircraft structures with advanced filamentary composites. The interactions resulting from combining the two types of materials into single assemblies as well as their ability to function structurally were studied. The combinations studied were boron-epoxy reinforced aluminum, boron-epoxy reinforced titanium, and boron-polyimide reinforced titanium. The concepts used unidirectional composites as reinforcement in the primary loading direction and metal for carrying the transverse loads as well as its portion of the primary load. The program established that several realistic concepts could be fabricated, that these concepts could perform to a level that would result in significant weight savings, and that there are means for predicting their capability within a reasonable degree of accuracy. This program also encountered problems related to the application of polyimide systems that resulted in their relatively poor and variable performance.

  9. Ceramic composites reinforced with modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Lindemer, Terrence B.

    1990-01-01

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparaging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  10. Evaluation of a new fiber-reinforced resin composite.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, S; Saimi, Y; Ono, T

    2006-01-01

    Efficacy of the usage of an experimental fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) on mechanical properties of an indirect composite was investigated by means of three-point bending and Charpy impact tests. Bond strength between the FRC and the indirect composite was also evaluated by tensile testing. The FRC consisted of a matrix resin with 25% silanized milled glass fiber (11-microm diameter, 150-microm length) and 5% colloidal silica. The values of strain of proportional limit, total strain, and fracture energy of the FRC during the bending test (1.2%, 10.4%, and 41.6 x 10(-3) J) were significantly higher than those of the indirect composite (0.1%, 2.5%, and 11.9 x 10(-3) J). The impact strengths of the 1-mm specimens with FRC ranged from 15.2 to 15.9 kJ/m(2), and were significantly higher than that of the control (3.1 kJ/m(2)). The 2-mm specimens showed significant difference from the control when the FRC thickness was equal or greater than 0.5 mm. The bond strength after the thermocycling was 15.2 MPa, and all of the specimens exhibited cohesive fracture inside the indirect composite. Based upon the results, it was concluded that the FRC tested in this study improved toughness and impact resistance of the indirect composite. The interfacial bonding between the FRC and the indirect composite was strong enough to prevent delamination. PMID:16161120

  11. Creep of experimental short fiber-reinforced composite resin.

    PubMed

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Kaleem, Muhammad; Shinya, Akikazu; Vallittu, Pekka K; Satterthwaite, Julian D; Watts, David C; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the reinforcing effect of short E-glass fiber fillers oriented in different directions on composite resin under static and dynamic loading. Experimental short fiber-reinforced composite resin (FC) was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers, 22.5 wt% of resin, and 55 wt% of silane-treated silica fillers. Three groups of specimens (n=5) were tested: FC with isotropic fiber orientation, FC with anisotropic fiber orientation, and particulate-filled composite resin (PFC) as a control. Time-dependent creep and recovery were recorded. ANOVA revealed that after secondary curing in a vacuum oven and after storage in dry condition for 30 days, FC with isotropic fiber orientation (1.73%) exhibited significantly lower static creep value (p<0.05) than PFC (2.54%). For the different curing methods and storage conditions evaluated in this study, FC achieved acceptable static and dynamic creep values when compared to PFC. PMID:23037835

  12. Controlling the interface reaction in alumina reinforced aluminum composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, D.J.; Jin, I. . Kingston Research and Development Centre); Weatherly, G.C. . Inst. for Materials Research)

    1994-08-15

    Alumina particles are a good reinforcement for aluminum because of their high modulus, and low cost, and, as a result, are being used in the molten metal processed composites produced by DURALCAN. However, on the basis of experimental and theoretical studies, it is established that alumina is unstable in aluminum alloys containing magnesium, and a chemical reaction occurs at the interface. In principle, the interface reaction can be avoided by forming a protective coating on the particles, and there are compounds which do not react with Mg in molten Al. Barrier layers can be laid down by sputtering, sol-gel, and other techniques, but they add considerably to the cost of the reinforcement. An alternative approach, which can be used with melt processed composites, is to form the barrier layer in-situ, as part of the making of the composite. Previous work has demonstrated that the interface reaction occurs by a nucleation and growth process. If a situation can be created where the nucleation rate is very high, it may be possible to quickly generate a thin, dense interface layer which will isolate the alumina particle from the surrounding molten Al matrix, and thereby prevent extensive reaction from occurring. This paper reports how this can be achieved, and the nature of the barrier layer.

  13. Fabrication Routes for Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Composites (CFCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    1998-01-01

    The primary approaches used for fabrication of continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composite (CFCC) components have been reviewed. The CFCC fabrication issues related to fiber, interface, and matrix have been analyzed. The capabilities. advantages and limitations of the five matrix-infiltration routes have been compared and discussed. Today. the best fabrication route for the CFCC end-user is not clear and compromises need to be made depending on the details of the CFCC application. However, with time, this problem should be reduced as research continues to develop advanced CFCC constituents and fabrication routes.

  14. Fabrication Routes for Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Composites (CFCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    1998-01-01

    The primary approaches used for fabrication of continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composite (CFCC) components have been reviewed. The CFCC fabrication issues related to fiber, interface, and matrix have been analyzed. The capabilities, advantages and limitations of the five matrix-infiltration routes have been compared and discussed. Today, the best fabrication route for the CFCC end-user is not clear and compromises need to be made depending on the details of the CFCC application. However, with time, this problem should be reduced as research continues to develop advanced CFCC constituents and fabrication routes.

  15. Whisker-reinforced ceramic composites for heat engine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.

    1988-01-01

    Much work was undertaken to develop techniques of incorporating SiC whiskers into either a Si3N4 or SiC matrix. The result was the fabrication of ceramic composites with ever-increasing fracture toughness and strength. To complement this research effort, the fracture behavior of whisker-reinforced ceramics is studied so as to develop methodologies for the analysis of structural components fabricated from this toughened material. The results, outlined herein, focus on the following areas: the use of micromechanics to predict thermoelastic properties, theoretical aspects of fracture behavior, and reliability analysis.

  16. Fiber-reinforced Composite for Chairside Replacement of Anterior Teeth: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Garoushi, S; Vallittu, Pk; Lassila, Lvj

    2008-01-01

    A variety of therapeutic modalities, from implant to conventional Maryland prosthesis, can be used for the replacement of a missing anterior tooth. Whenever a minimal tooth reduction is preferred, a fiber reinforced composite (FRC) prosthesis could be a good alternative to conventional prosthetic techniques, chiefly as temporary restoration before making a final decision on the treatment. The purpose of this case report is to describe the clinical procedure of fabricating anterior chairside FRC prosthesis with pre-impregnated unidirectional E-glass fibers and veneered particulate filler composite. Fiber-reinforced composite in combination with adhesive technology appears to be a promising treatment option for replacing missing teeth. However, further and long-term clinical investigation will be required to provide additional information on the survival of directly-bonded anterior fixed prosthesis made with FRC systems. PMID:21499473

  17. High elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites for dental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yijun

    2007-12-01

    Dental restorations account for more than $3 billion dollars a year on the market. Among them, all-ceramic dental crowns draw more and more attention and their popularity has risen because of their superior aesthetics and biocompatibility. However, their relatively high failure rate and labor-intensive fabrication procedure still limit their application. In this thesis, a new family of high elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites and their mechanical properties are studied. Materials with higher elastic modulus, such as alumina and diamond, are used to replace the routine filler material, silica, in dental resin composites to achieve the desired properties. This class of composites is developed to serve (1) as a high stiffness support to all-ceramic crowns and (2) as a means of joining independently fabricated crown core and veneer layers. Most of the work focuses on nano-sized Al2O3 (average particle size 47 nm) reinforcement in a polymeric matrix with 50:50 Bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA): triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) monomers. Surfactants, silanizing agents and primers are examined to obtain higher filler levels and enhance the bonding between filler and matrix. Silane agents work best. The elastic modulus of a 57.5 vol% alumina/resin composite is 31.5 GPa compared to current commercial resin composites with elastic modulus <15 GPa. Chemical additives can also effectively raise the hardness to as much as 1.34 GPa. Besides>alumina, diamond/resin composites are studied. An elastic modulus of about 45 GPa is obtained for a 57 vol% diamond/resin composite. Our results indicate that with a generally monodispersed nano-sized high modulus filler, relatively high elastic modulus resin-based composite cements are possible. Time-dependent behavior of our resin composites is also investigated. This is valuable for understanding the behavior of our material and possible fatigue testing in the future. Our results indicate that with

  18. Hot extruded carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum matrix composite materials.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hansang; Leparoux, Marc

    2012-10-19

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced aluminum (Al) matrix composite materials were successfully fabricated by mechanical ball milling followed by powder hot extrusion processes. Microstructural analysis revealed that the CNTs were well dispersed at the boundaries and were aligned with the extrusion direction in the composites obtained. Although only a small quantity of CNTs were added to the composite (1 vol%), the Vickers hardness and the tensile strength were significantly enhanced, with an up to three-fold increase relative to that of pure Al. From the fractography of the extruded Al-CNT composite, several shapes were observed in the fracture surface, and this unique morphology is discussed based on the strengthening mechanism. The damage in the CNTs was investigated with Raman spectroscopy. However, the Al-CNT composite materials were not only strengthened by the addition of CNTs but also enhanced by several synergistic effects. The nanoindentation stress-strain curve was successfully constructed by setting the effective zero-load and zero-displacement points and was compared with the tensile stress-strain curve. The yield strengths of the Al-CNT composites from the nanoindentation and tensile tests were compared and discussed. We believe that the yield strength can be predicted using a simple nanoindentation stress/strain curve and that this method will be useful for materials that are difficult to machine, such as complex ceramics. PMID:23011263

  19. Hot extruded carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum matrix composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hansang; Leparoux, Marc

    2012-10-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced aluminum (Al) matrix composite materials were successfully fabricated by mechanical ball milling followed by powder hot extrusion processes. Microstructural analysis revealed that the CNTs were well dispersed at the boundaries and were aligned with the extrusion direction in the composites obtained. Although only a small quantity of CNTs were added to the composite (1 vol%), the Vickers hardness and the tensile strength were significantly enhanced, with an up to three-fold increase relative to that of pure Al. From the fractography of the extruded Al-CNT composite, several shapes were observed in the fracture surface, and this unique morphology is discussed based on the strengthening mechanism. The damage in the CNTs was investigated with Raman spectroscopy. However, the Al-CNT composite materials were not only strengthened by the addition of CNTs but also enhanced by several synergistic effects. The nanoindentation stress-strain curve was successfully constructed by setting the effective zero-load and zero-displacement points and was compared with the tensile stress-strain curve. The yield strengths of the Al-CNT composites from the nanoindentation and tensile tests were compared and discussed. We believe that the yield strength can be predicted using a simple nanoindentation stress/strain curve and that this method will be useful for materials that are difficult to machine, such as complex ceramics.

  20. Shock Interaction Studies on Glass Fibre Reinforced Epoxy Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, K. P. J.; Jagadeesh, G.; Jayaram, V.; Reddy, B. Harinath; Madhu, V.; Reddy, C. Jaya Rami

    Glass fibre reinforced polymer matrix composites are being extensively used for structural applications both in civil and defense sectors, owing to their high specific strength, stiffness and good energy absorbing capability. Understanding the dynamic response of these composites on shock loading is very essential for effective design of structures resistant to blast loads. In the present study, E- glass/epoxy composite laminate has been fabricated and evaluated for their mechanical properties such as tensile strength, flexural strength and inter laminar shear strength (ILSS). Further, dynamic response of E-glass laminates is presently studied by shock loading. When E-glass composite subjected to peak shock reflected pressure of 7.2 MPa and estimated temperature of about 14000 K for short duration, it underwent surface discolorations and charring of epoxy matrix. Post test analysis of the composite sample was carried out to study the damage analysis using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), changes in thermal properties of composites using Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA) and Thermo-Gravimetric Analyzer (TGA). The results of these investigations are discussed in this paper.

  1. Whisker-reinforced dental core buildup composites: effect of filler level on mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Xu, H H; Smith, D T; Schumacher, G E; Eichmiller, F C

    2000-12-15

    The strength and toughness of dental core buildup composites in large stress-bearing restorations need to be improved to reduce the incidence of fracture due to stresses from chewing and clenching. The aims of the present study were to develop novel core buildup composites reinforced with ceramic whiskers, to examine the effect of filler level, and to investigate the reinforcement mechanisms. Silica particles were fused onto the whiskers to facilitate silanization and to roughen the whisker surface for improved retention in the matrix. Filler level was varied from 0 to 70%. Flexural strength, compressive strength, and fracture toughness of the composites were measured. A nano-indentation system was used to measure elastic modulus and hardness. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the fracture surfaces of specimens. Whisker filler level had significant effects on composite properties. The flexural strength in MPa (mean +/- SD; n = 6) increased from (95+/-15) for the unfilled resin to (193+/- 8) for the composite with 50% filler level, then slightly decreased to (176+/-12) at 70% filler level. The compressive strength increased from (149+/-33) for the unfilled resin to (282+/-48) at 10% filler level, and remained equivalent from 10 to 70% filler level. Both the modulus and hardness increased monotonically with filler level. In conclusion, silica particle-fused ceramic single-crystalline whiskers significantly reinforced dental core buildup composites. The reinforcement mechanisms appeared to be crack deflection and bridging by the whiskers. Whisker filler level had significant effects on the flexural strength, compressive strength, elastic modulus, and hardness of composites. PMID:11033564

  2. Oxidation of carbon fiber surfaces for use as reinforcement in high-temperature cementitious material systems

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1990-05-22

    The interfacial bond characteristics between carbon fiber and a cement matrix, in high temperature fiber-reinforced cementitious composite systems, can be improved by the oxidative treatment of the fiber surfaces. Compositions and the process for producing the compositions are disclosed. 2 figs.

  3. Oxidation of carbon fiber surfaces for use as reinforcement in high-temperature cementitious material systems

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1990-01-01

    The interfacial bond characteristics between carbon fiber and a cement matrix, in high temperature fiber-reinforced cementitious composite systems, can be improved by the oxidative treatment of the fiber surfaces. Compositions and the process for producing the compositions are disclosed.

  4. Development of design data for graphite reinforced epoxy and polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheck, W. G.

    1974-01-01

    Processing techniques and design data were characterized for a graphite/epoxy composite system that is useful from 75 K to 450 K, and a graphite/polyimide composite system that is useful from 75 K to 589 K. The Monsanto 710 polyimide resin was selected as the resin to be characterized and used with the graphite fiber reinforcement. Material was purchased using the prepreg specification for the design data generation for both the HT-S/710 and HM-S/710 graphite/polyimide composite system. Lamina and laminate properties were determined at 75 K, 297 K, and 589 K. The test results obtained on the skin-stringer components proved that graphite/polyimide composites can be reliably designed and analyzed much like graphite/epoxy composites. The design data generated in the program includes the standard static mechanical properties, biaxial strain data, creep, fatigue, aging, and thick laminate data.

  5. Mechanical behavior of a composite reinforced overhead conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alawar, Ahmad

    A new type of overhead conductor with a polymer composite core is evaluated in terms of the mechanical properties and operating characteristics. The conductor is composed of trapezoidal O'-tempered aluminum wires helically wound around a hybrid glass/carbon composite core produced by pultrusion. The conductor is intended for electrical power transmission, and is designated ACCC/TW, for aluminum conductor composite core/trapezoidal wire. Measurements of core properties and conductor sag at high temperatures were compared to conventional ACSR (aluminum conductor, steel-reinforced) of the same diameter. The mechanical properties of ACCC/TW, such as the tensile strength, CTE and SAG performance, showed superiority to conventional ACSR. The ACCC/TW conductor also exhibited greater ampacity than ACSR conductor at all operating temperatures. A modification to a Numerical Sag Method for predicting conductor sag is presented that accurately predicts the observed bilinear sag behavior of composite conductors. The modified method is called the Hybrid Sag Method (HSM). It is used to predict the sag of conductors with conventional designs. The HSM predictions are compared with those obtained using a conventional graphical sag method. The HSM shows virtually the same accuracy as the graphical method for predicting sag for composite conductors operated under specific conditions. The HSM predictions of sag are validated by comparisons with experimental measurements. Tensile strength and storage modulus were measured to determine the temperature dependence of the composite core from 20°-200°C. The storage modulus was measured by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and showed temperature dependence nearly identical to the tensile strength for both composites. The correlation between storage modulus and tensile strength was analyzed in terms of the temperature-dependent matrix shear strength, and the storage modulus behavior is presented as a basis for projecting the strength

  6. Self Healing Fibre-reinforced Polymer Composites: an Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Ian P.; Trask, Richard S.; Williams, Hugo R.; Williams, Gareth J.

    Lightweight, high-strength, high-stiffness fibre-reinforced polymer composite materials are leading contenders as component materials to improve the efficiency and sustainability of many forms of transport. For example, their widespread use is critical to the success of advanced engineering applications, such as the Boeing 787 and Airbus A380. Such materials typically comprise complex architectures of fine fibrous reinforcement e.g. carbon or glass, dispersed within a bulk polymer matrix, e.g. epoxy. This can provide exceptionally strong, stiff, and lightweight materials which are inherently anisotropic, as the fibres are usually arranged at a multitude of predetermined angles within discrete stacked 2D layers. The direction orthogonal to the 2D layers is usually without reinforcement to avoid compromising in-plane performance, which results in a vulnerability to damage in the polymer matrix caused by out-of-plane loading, i.e. impact. Their inability to plastically deform leaves only energy absorption via damage creation. This damage often manifests itself internally within the material as intra-ply matrix cracks and inter-ply delaminations, and can thus be difficult to detect visually. Since relatively minor damage can lead to a significant reduction in strength, stiffness and stability, there has been some reticence by designers for their use in safety critical applications, and the adoption of a `no growth' approach (i.e. damage propagation from a defect constitutes failure) is now the mindset of the composites industry. This has led to excessively heavy components, shackling of innovative design, and a need for frequent inspection during service (Richardson 1996; Abrate 1998).

  7. CO2-laser-assisted processing of glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Christian; Emonts, Michael; Schares, Richard Ludwig; Stimpfl, Joffrey

    2013-02-01

    To fully exploit the potential of fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites (FRTC) and to achieve a broad industrial application, automated manufacturing systems are crucial. Investigations at Fraunhofer IPT have proven that the use of laser system technology in processing FRTC allows to achieve high throughput, quality, flexibility, reproducibility and out-of-autoclave processing simultaneously. As 90% of the FRP in Europe1 are glass fiber-reinforced a high impact can be achieved by introducing laser-assisted processing with all its benefits to glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics (GFRTC). Fraunhofer IPT has developed the diode laser-assisted tape placement (laying and winding) to process carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites (CFRTC) for years. However, this technology cannot be transferred unchanged to process milky transparent GFRTC prepregs (preimpregnated fibers). Due to the short wavelength (approx. 980 nm) and therefore high transmission less than 20% of the diode laser energy is absorbed as heat into non-colored GFRTC prepregs. Hence, the use of a different wave length, e.g. CO2-laser (10.6 μm) with more than 90% laser absorption, is required to allow the full potential of laser-assisted processing of GFRTC. Also the absorption of CO2-laser radiation at the surface compared to volume absorption of diode laser radiation is beneficial for the interlaminar joining of GFRTC. Fraunhofer IPT is currently developing and investigating the CO2-laser-assisted tape placement including new system, beam guiding, process and monitoring technology to enable a resource and energy efficient mass production of GFRP composites, e.g. pipes, tanks, masts. The successful processing of non-colored glass fiber-reinforced Polypropylene (PP) and Polyphenylene Sulfide (PPS) has already been proven.

  8. Flexural analysis of palm fiber reinforced hybrid polymer matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatachalam, G.; Gautham Shankar, A.; Raghav, Dasarath; Santhosh Kiran, R.; Mahesh, Bhargav; Kumar, Krishna

    2015-07-01

    Uncertainty in availability of fossil fuels in the future and global warming increased the need for more environment friendly materials. In this work, an attempt is made to fabricate a hybrid polymer matrix composite. The blend is a mixture of General Purpose Resin and Cashew Nut Shell Liquid, a natural resin extracted from cashew plant. Palm fiber, which has high strength, is used as reinforcement material. The fiber is treated with alkali (NaOH) solution to increase its strength and adhesiveness. Parametric study of flexure strength is carried out by varying alkali concentration, duration of alkali treatment and fiber volume. Taguchi L9 Orthogonal array is followed in the design of experiments procedure for simplification. With the help of ANOVA technique, regression equations are obtained which gives the level of influence of each parameter on the flexure strength of the composite.

  9. Synthesis And Characterization Of Reduced Size Ferrite Reinforced Polymer Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Borah, Subasit; Bhattacharyya, Nidhi S.

    2008-04-24

    Small sized Co{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite particles are synthesized by chemical route. The precursor materials are annealed at 400, 600 and 800 C. The crystallographic structure and phases of the samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The annealed ferrite samples crystallized into cubic spinel structure. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) micrographs show that the average particle size of the samples are <20 nm. Particulate magneto-polymer composite materials are fabricated by reinforcing low density polyethylene (LDPE) matrix with the ferrite samples. The B-H loop study conducted at 10 kHz on the toroid shaped composite samples shows reduction in magnetic losses with decrease in size of the filler sample. Magnetic losses are detrimental for applications of ferrite at high powers. The reduction in magnetic loss shows a possible application of Co-Ni ferrites at high microwave power levels.

  10. Fatigue strength of woven kenaf fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, A. E.; Aziz, M. A. Che Abdul

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, green composites provide alternative to synthetic fibers for non-bearing and load-bearing applications. According to literature review, lack of information is available on the fatigue performances especially when the woven fiber is used instead of randomly oriented fibers. In order to overcome this problem, this paper investigates the fatigue strength of different fiber orientations and number of layers of woven kenaf fiber reinforced composites. Four types of fiber orientations are used namely 0°, 15°, 30° and 45°. Additionally, two numbers of layers are also considered. It is revealed that the fatigue life has no strong relationship with the fiber orientations. For identical fiber orientations, the fatigue life can be predicted considerably using the normalized stress. However as expected, the fatigue life enhancement occur when the number of layer is increased.