Science.gov

Sample records for compositional streamline simulation

  1. Industrial Compositional Streamline Simulation for Efficient and Accurate Prediction of Gas Injection and WAG Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Margot Gerritsen

    2008-10-31

    Gas-injection processes are widely and increasingly used for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). In the United States, for example, EOR production by gas injection accounts for approximately 45% of total EOR production and has tripled since 1986. The understanding of the multiphase, multicomponent flow taking place in any displacement process is essential for successful design of gas-injection projects. Due to complex reservoir geometry, reservoir fluid properties and phase behavior, the design of accurate and efficient numerical simulations for the multiphase, multicomponent flow governing these processes is nontrivial. In this work, we developed, implemented and tested a streamline based solver for gas injection processes that is computationally very attractive: as compared to traditional Eulerian solvers in use by industry it computes solutions with a computational speed orders of magnitude higher and a comparable accuracy provided that cross-flow effects do not dominate. We contributed to the development of compositional streamline solvers in three significant ways: improvement of the overall framework allowing improved streamline coverage and partial streamline tracing, amongst others; parallelization of the streamline code, which significantly improves wall clock time; and development of new compositional solvers that can be implemented along streamlines as well as in existing Eulerian codes used by industry. We designed several novel ideas in the streamline framework. First, we developed an adaptive streamline coverage algorithm. Adding streamlines locally can reduce computational costs by concentrating computational efforts where needed, and reduce mapping errors. Adapting streamline coverage effectively controls mass balance errors that mostly result from the mapping from streamlines to pressure grid. We also introduced the concept of partial streamlines: streamlines that do not necessarily start and/or end at wells. This allows more efficient coverage and avoids

  2. Simulation and modeling of the elliptic streamline flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaisdell, G. A.; Shariff, K.

    1996-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations are performed for the elliptic streamline flow, which is a homogeneous turbulent flow that combines the effects of solid body rotation and strain. Simulations are run over a range of parameters in order to determine the effect of changing rotation and strain separately. For early times the nonlinear cascade is suppressed, but then is re-established at later times. The growth rate of turbulent kinetic energy agrees at early times with the trends from linear theory, but at later times the flow seems to approach an asymptotic state that is independent of the ratio of mean flow rotation rate to strain rate. A comparison with standard Reynolds stress turbulence models is made. It is found that for strong rotation rates, the models predict decay of the turbulence, while the simulations show exponential growth. Close examination of the simulation results shows that they are affected by excessively low Reynolds numbers. Suggestions for reducing low Reynolds number effects in future simulations is given.

  3. Robust streamline tracing for the simulation of porous media flow on general triangular and quadrilateral grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matringe, Sébastien F.; Juanes, Ruben; Tchelepi, Hamdi A.

    2006-12-01

    Streamline methods for subsurface-flow simulation have received renewed attention as fast alternatives to traditional finite volume or finite element methods. Key aspects of streamline simulation are the accurate tracing of streamlines and the computation of travel time along individual streamlines. In this paper, we propose a new streamline tracing framework that enables the extension of streamline methods to unstructured grids composed of triangular or quadrilateral elements and populated with heterogeneous full-tensor coefficients. The proposed method is based on the mathematical framework of mixed finite element methods, which provides approximations of the velocity field that are especially suitable for streamline tracing. We identify and implement two classes of velocity spaces: the lowest-order Raviart-Thomas space (low-order tracing) and the Brezzi-Douglas-Marini space of order one (high-order tracing), both on triangles and quadrilaterals. We discuss the implementation of the streamline tracing method in detail, and we investigate the performance of the proposed tracing strategy by means of carefully designed test cases. We conclude that, for the same computational cost, high-order tracing is more accurate (smaller error in the time-of-flight) and robust (less sensitive to grid distortion) than low-order tracing.

  4. Streamline-based Simulation of Geological CO2 Storage: Otway Case-Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazaro Vallejo, Lorena; Dance, Tess; Cinar, Yildiray; Laforce, Tara

    2010-05-01

    Three of the most important challenges for the near future: maximizing oil extraction, securing fresh water supplies and mitigating climate change through Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS), require a better understanding of flow in porous media. It has been shown by Qi et al [1] that an optimum injection strategy for CO2 storage can result in up to 90% of the injected CO2 being trapped in the pore network of the rock during the injection phase of a CO2 storage project. When the non-wetting phase saturation increases and then decreases in the pore space, part of the non-wetting phase is trapped in pores as a residual saturation. Injection of CO2 and water in alternating cycles can be used to engineer this trapping. With time, CO2 will dissolve in the brine surrounding it and finally precipitate as carbonate. The Otway Project, taking place in the south-east of Australia and lead by the Cooperative Research Centre for Greenhouse Gas Technologies (CO2CRC), is the world's largest research and geosequestration demonstration project [2]. CO2CRC has proposed testing the concept of using residual trapping to improve storage security by using Huff and Push injections. In this case, CO2 is injected in a depleted gas reservoir together with methane. The Huff and Push injection mechanism consists of a single well which alternates injection and production. Initially, brine is injected followed by a mixture of CO2/CH4/other gases (77/20/3 mole%) followed by a shut-in period. Then, when production starts the water front should move faster towards the production well and immobilise CO2 in the micro pores of the rock. Very little production of CO2 should be observed, confirming that it has been immobilized within the formation. Traditional grid-based reservoir simulations are used to predict fluid behaviour and to design injection strategies that maximize both oil extraction and trapping of carbon dioxide in the rock formation. Unlike conventional grid-based simulations, streamline

  5. Streamlined Island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-514, 15 October 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows a streamlined island in Marte Vallis, a large outflow channel system that crosses the 180oW meridian between the Elysium and Amazonis regions of Mars. The flow patterns on the floor of Marte Vallis might be the remains of lava flows or mud flows. Marte is the Spanish word for Mars. Most of the largest valleys on the red planet are named for 'Mars' in various languages. This island is located near 21.8oN, 175.3oW. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  6. A streamline splitting pore-network approach for computationally inexpensive and accurate simulation of transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmani, Yashar; Oostrom, Mart; Balhoff, Matthew T.

    2014-03-01

    Several approaches have been developed in the literature for solving flow and transport at the pore scale. Some authors use a direct modeling approach where the fundamental flow and transport equations are solved on the actual pore-space geometry. Such direct modeling, while very accurate, comes at a great computational cost. Network models are computationally more efficient because the pore-space morphology is approximated. Typically, a mixed cell method (MCM) is employed for solving the flow and transport system which assumes pore-level perfect mixing. This assumption is invalid at moderate to high Peclet regimes. In this work, a novel Eulerian perspective on modeling flow and transport at the pore scale is developed. The new streamline splitting method (SSM) allows for circumventing the pore-level perfect-mixing assumption, while maintaining the computational efficiency of pore-network models. SSM was verified with direct simulations and validated against micromodel experiments; excellent matches were obtained across a wide range of pore-structure and fluid-flow parameters. The increase in the computational cost from MCM to SSM is shown to be minimal, while the accuracy of SSM is much higher than that of MCM and comparable to direct modeling approaches. Therefore, SSM can be regarded as an appropriate balance between incorporating detailed physics and controlling computational cost. The truly predictive capability of the model allows for the study of pore-level interactions of fluid flow and transport in different porous materials. In this paper, we apply SSM and MCM to study the effects of pore-level mixing on transverse dispersion in 3-D disordered granular media.

  7. A streamline splitting pore-network approach for computationally inexpensive and accurate simulation of transport in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Mehmani, Yashar; Oostrom, Martinus; Balhoff, Matthew

    2014-03-20

    Several approaches have been developed in the literature for solving flow and transport at the pore-scale. Some authors use a direct modeling approach where the fundamental flow and transport equations are solved on the actual pore-space geometry. Such direct modeling, while very accurate, comes at a great computational cost. Network models are computationally more efficient because the pore-space morphology is approximated. Typically, a mixed cell method (MCM) is employed for solving the flow and transport system which assumes pore-level perfect mixing. This assumption is invalid at moderate to high Peclet regimes. In this work, a novel Eulerian perspective on modeling flow and transport at the pore-scale is developed. The new streamline splitting method (SSM) allows for circumventing the pore-level perfect mixing assumption, while maintaining the computational efficiency of pore-network models. SSM was verified with direct simulations and excellent matches were obtained against micromodel experiments across a wide range of pore-structure and fluid-flow parameters. The increase in the computational cost from MCM to SSM is shown to be minimal, while the accuracy of SSM is much higher than that of MCM and comparable to direct modeling approaches. Therefore, SSM can be regarded as an appropriate balance between incorporating detailed physics and controlling computational cost. The truly predictive capability of the model allows for the study of pore-level interactions of fluid flow and transport in different porous materials. In this paper, we apply SSM and MCM to study the effects of pore-level mixing on transverse dispersion in 3D disordered granular media.

  8. Composite Erosion by Computational Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2006-01-01

    Composite degradation is evaluated by computational simulation when the erosion degradation occurs on a ply-by-ply basis and the degrading medium (device) is normal to the ply. The computational simulation is performed by a multi factor interaction model and by a multi scale and multi physics available computer code. The erosion process degrades both the fiber and the matrix simultaneously in the same slice (ply). Both the fiber volume ratio and the matrix volume ratio approach zero while the void volume ratio increases as the ply degrades. The multi factor interaction model simulates the erosion degradation, provided that the exponents and factor ratios are selected judiciously. Results obtained by the computational composite mechanics show that most composite characterization properties degrade monotonically and approach "zero" as the ply degrades completely.

  9. Streamlining Federal Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mockler, John B.; Birdsall, Peter

    1983-01-01

    Proposes a way to streamline federal categorical program management while maintaining equity and equality. The proposal has three components: (1) incentives to state governments to adopt programs that meet federal objectives; (2) schoolwide coordination of programs; and (3) waivers from categorical program requirements under certain conditions.…

  10. Streamlining the EIS Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josephson, Julian

    1977-01-01

    A new publication service abstracts, indexes, and prepares microfiche of environmental impact statements (EIS). This new service is designed to streamline the EIS process by reducing the cost and time of preparation, by eliminating redundancy of similar statements, and by working with the government to standardize the preparation process. (MA)

  11. Fiber Composite Sandwich Thermostructural Behavior: Computational Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Aiello, R. A.; Murthy, P. L. N.

    1986-01-01

    Several computational levels of progressive sophistication/simplification are described to computationally simulate composite sandwich hygral, thermal, and structural behavior. The computational levels of sophistication include: (1) three-dimensional detailed finite element modeling of the honeycomb, the adhesive and the composite faces; (2) three-dimensional finite element modeling of the honeycomb assumed to be an equivalent continuous, homogeneous medium, the adhesive and the composite faces; (3) laminate theory simulation where the honeycomb (metal or composite) is assumed to consist of plies with equivalent properties; and (4) derivations of approximate, simplified equations for thermal and mechanical properties by simulating the honeycomb as an equivalent homogeneous medium. The approximate equations are combined with composite hygrothermomechanical and laminate theories to provide a simple and effective computational procedure for simulating the thermomechanical/thermostructural behavior of fiber composite sandwich structures.

  12. Simulating Microfracture In Metal-Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Chamis, Christos C.; Gotsis, Pascal K.

    1994-01-01

    Computational procedures developed for simulating microfracture in metal-matrix/fiber composite materials under mechanical and/or thermal loads at ambient and high temperatures. Procedures evaluate microfracture behavior of composites, establish hierarchies and sequences of fracture modes, and examine influences of compliant layers and partial debonding on properties of composites and on initiation of microfractures in them.

  13. A STREAMLINE APPROACH FOR HISTORY-MATCHING PRODUCTION DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Yuandong Wang; Anthony R. Kovscek

    2001-06-01

    This study proposes and develops a streamline approach for inferring field-scale effective permeability distributions based on dynamic production data including producer water-cut curve, well pressures, and rates. The streamline-based inverse approach simplifies the history-matching process significantly. The basic idea is to relate the water-cut curve at a producer to the water breakthrough of individual streamlines. By adjusting the effective permeability along streamlines, the breakthrough time of each streamline is found that reproduces the reference producer fractional-flow curve. Then the permeability modification along each streamline is mapped onto cells of the simulation grid. Modifying effective permeability at the streamline level greatly reduces the size of the inverse problem compared to modifications at the grid-block level. The approach outlined here is relatively direct and rapid. Limitations include that the forward flow problem must be solvable with streamlines, streamline locations do not evolve radically during displacement, no new wells are included, and relatively noise-free production data is available. It works well for reservoirs where heterogeneity determines flow patterns. Example cases illustrate computational efficiency, generality, and robustness of the proposed procedure. Advantages and limitations of this work, and the scope of future study, are also discussed.

  14. Polymer Composites Corrosive Degradation: A Computational Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2007-01-01

    A computational simulation of polymer composites corrosive durability is presented. The corrosive environment is assumed to manage the polymer composite degradation on a ply-by-ply basis. The degradation is correlated with a measured pH factor and is represented by voids, temperature and moisture which vary parabolically for voids and linearly for temperature and moisture through the laminate thickness. The simulation is performed by a computational composite mechanics computer code which includes micro, macro, combined stress failure and laminate theories. This accounts for starting the simulation from constitutive material properties and up to the laminate scale which exposes the laminate to the corrosive environment. Results obtained for one laminate indicate that the ply-by-ply degradation degrades the laminate to the last one or the last several plies. Results also demonstrate that the simulation is applicable to other polymer composite systems as well.

  15. Structural Composites Corrosive Management by Computational Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2006-01-01

    A simulation of corrosive management on polymer composites durability is presented. The corrosive environment is assumed to manage the polymer composite degradation on a ply-by-ply basis. The degradation is correlated with a measured Ph factor and is represented by voids, temperature, and moisture which vary parabolically for voids and linearly for temperature and moisture through the laminate thickness. The simulation is performed by a computational composite mechanics computer code which includes micro, macro, combined stress failure, and laminate theories. This accounts for starting the simulation from constitutive material properties and up to the laminate scale which exposes the laminate to the corrosive environment. Results obtained for one laminate indicate that the ply-by-ply managed degradation degrades the laminate to the last one or the last several plies. Results also demonstrate that the simulation is applicable to other polymer composite systems as well.

  16. Numerical Simulations of Thermographic Responses in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Cramer, K. Elliot; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Howell, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulations of thermographic responses in composite materials have been a useful for evaluating and optimizing thermographic analysis techniques. Numerical solutions are particularly beneficial for thermographic techniques, since the fabrication of specimens with realistic flaws is difficult. Simulations are presented with different ply layups that incorporated the anisotropic thermal properties that exist in each ply. The results are compared to analytical series solutions and thermal measurements on composites with flat bottom holes and delaminations.

  17. Streamlined acquisition handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA has always placed great emphasis on the acquisition process, recognizing it as among its most important activities. This handbook is intended to facilitate the application of streamlined acquisition procedures. The development of these procedures reflects the efforts of an action group composed of NASA Headquarters and center acquisition professionals. It is the intent to accomplish the real change in the acquisition process as a result of this effort. An important part of streamlining the acquisition process is a commitment by the people involved in the process to accomplishing acquisition activities quickly and with high quality. Too often we continue to accomplish work in 'the same old way' without considering available alternatives which would require no changes to regulations, approvals from Headquarters, or waivers of required practice. Similarly, we must be sensitive to schedule opportunities throughout the acquisition cycle, not just once the purchase request arrives at the procurement office. Techniques that have been identified as ways of reducing acquisition lead time while maintaining high quality in our acquisition process are presented.

  18. Hierarchical Simulation of Hot Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Singhal, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Computational procedures are described to simulate the thermal and mechanical behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMC) in the following three broad areas: (1) Behavior of HT-MMC's from micromechanics to laminate via Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer (METCAN), (2) tailoring of HT-MMC behavior for optimum specific performance via Metal Matrix Laminate Tailoring (MMLT), and (3) HT-MMC structural response for hot structural components via High Temperature Composite Analyzer (HITCAN). Representative results from each area are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of computational simulation procedures. The sample case results show that METCAN can be used to simulate material behavior such as strength, stress-strain response, and cyclic life in HTMMC's; MMLT can be used to tailor the fabrication process for optimum performance such as that for in-service load carrying capacity of HT-MMC's; and HITCAN can be used to evaluate static fracture and fatigue life of hot pressurized metal matrix composite rings.

  19. Scalable Computation of Streamlines on Very Large Datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Pugmire, David; Childs, Hank; Garth, Christoph; Ahern, Sean; Weber, Gunther H.

    2009-09-01

    Understanding vector fields resulting from large scientific simulations is an important and often difficult task. Streamlines, curves that are tangential to a vector field at each point, are a powerful visualization method in this context. Application of streamline-based visualization to very large vector field data represents a significant challenge due to the non-local and data-dependent nature of streamline computation, and requires careful balancing of computational demands placed on I/O, memory, communication, and processors. In this paper we review two parallelization approaches based on established parallelization paradigms (static decomposition and on-demand loading) and present a novel hybrid algorithm for computing streamlines. Our algorithm is aimed at good scalability and performance across the widely varying computational characteristics of streamline-based problems. We perform performance and scalability studies of all three algorithms on a number of prototypical application problems and demonstrate that our hybrid scheme is able to perform well in different settings.

  20. Simulated Data for High Temperature Composite Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Abumeri, Galib H.

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes an effective formal method that can be used to simulate design properties for composites that is inclusive of all the effects that influence those properties. This effective simulation method is integrated computer codes that include composite micromechanics, composite macromechanics, laminate theory, structural analysis, and multi-factor interaction model. Demonstration of the method includes sample examples for static, thermal, and fracture reliability for a unidirectional metal matrix composite as well as rupture strength and fatigue strength for a high temperature super alloy. Typical results obtained for a unidirectional composite show that the thermal properties are more sensitive to internal local damage, the longitudinal properties degrade slowly with temperature, the transverse and shear properties degrade rapidly with temperature as do rupture strength and fatigue strength for super alloys.

  1. Computational simulation methods for composite fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1988-01-01

    Structural integrity, durability, and damage tolerance of advanced composites are assessed by studying damage initiation at various scales (micro, macro, and global) and accumulation and growth leading to global failure, quantitatively and qualitatively. In addition, various fracture toughness parameters associated with a typical damage and its growth must be determined. Computational structural analysis codes to aid the composite design engineer in performing these tasks were developed. CODSTRAN (COmposite Durability STRuctural ANalysis) is used to qualitatively and quantitatively assess the progressive damage occurring in composite structures due to mechanical and environmental loads. Next, methods are covered that are currently being developed and used at Lewis to predict interlaminar fracture toughness and related parameters of fiber composites given a prescribed damage. The general purpose finite element code MSC/NASTRAN was used to simulate the interlaminar fracture and the associated individual as well as mixed-mode strain energy release rates in fiber composites.

  2. Regulatory Streamlining and Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Carl

    2006-07-11

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) engaged in numerous projects outlined under the scope of work discussed in the United States Department of Energy (DOE) grant number DE-FC26-04NT15456 awarded to the IOGCC. Numerous projects were completed that were extremely valuable to state oil and gas agencies as a result of work performed utilizing resources provided by the grant. There are numerous areas in which state agencies still need assistance. This additional assistance will need to be addressed under future scopes of work submitted annually to DOE's Project Officer for this grant. This report discusses the progress of the projects outlined under the grant scope of work for the 2005-2006 areas of interest, which are as follows: Area of Interest No. 1--Regulatory Streamlining and Improvement: This area of interest continues to support IOGCC's regulatory streamlining efforts that include the identification and elimination of unnecessary duplications of efforts between and among state and federal programs dealing with exploration and production on public lands. Area of Interest No. 2--Technology: This area of interest seeks to improve efficiency in states through the identification of technologies that can reduce costs. Area of Interest No. 3--Training and Education: This area of interest is vital to upgrading the skills of regulators and industry alike. Within the National Energy Policy, there are many appropriate training and education opportunities. Education was strongly endorsed by the President's National Energy Policy Development group. Acting through the governors offices, states are very effective conduits for the dissemination of energy education information. While the IOGCC favors the development of a comprehensive, long-term energy education plan, states are also supportive of immediate action on important concerns, such as energy prices, availability and conservation. Area of Interest No. 4--Resource Assessment and Development: This area

  3. Acquisition streamlining: A cultural change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Jesse

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: the defense systems management college, educational philosophy, the defense acquisition environment, streamlining initiatives, organizational streamlining types, defense law review, law review purpose, law review objectives, the Public Law Pilot Program, and cultural change.

  4. Acquisition streamlining: A cultural change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Jesse

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: the defense systems management college, educational philosophy, the defense acquisition environment, streamlining initiatives, organizational streamlining types, defense law review, law review purpose, law review objectives, the Public Law Pilot Program, and cultural change.

  5. Simulated oral wear of packable composites.

    PubMed

    Clelland, Nancy L; Villarroel, Soraya C; Knobloch, Lisa A; Seghi, Robert R

    2003-01-01

    Wear resistance has been a problem for the posterior application of resin composites. This study evaluated and compared the wear characteristics of two conventional and two packable composites. Opposing enamel wear was also measured. One traditional hybrid composite-Herculite XR (HXR), one micro-filled composite-Heliomolar (HM) and two packable composites-Filtek P60 (P60) and Surefil (SF) were formed into disks (n = 10) and used as substrates for the wear test. Enamel was harvested from extracted human third molars and machined into cusps with a 5-mm spherical radius (n = 40). The Oregon Health Sciences University oral wear simulator was used to evaluate abrasive wear and attrition of the composite materials and wear of the opposing enamel. The resulting enamel wear facets were measured and recorded in mm2 using optical scanning methods and a computer graphics program. Abrasion and attrition of the composite substrates were measured using a profilometer. Both sets of data were subjected to ANOVA and multiple comparison tests to determine significant differences. After wear testing, scanning electron micrographs were made using representative composite samples from each group. The packable composites showed significantly less attrition and abrasive wear (p < 0.001) than the conventional controls. The microfilled composite HM resulted in significantly lower enamel wear (p < 0.001) than the materials HXR and P60 but was not significantly different from the packable composite SF at the alpha = 0.05 level. The results of this in-vitro study suggest that packable composites may have improved wear resistance over some conventional composites. Clinical studies are needed to evaluate packable composites over time. PMID:14653301

  6. Process simulations for manufacturing of thick composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempner, Evan A.

    The availability of manufacturing simulations for composites can significantly reduce the costs associated with process development. Simulations provide a tool for evaluating the effect of processing conditions on the quality of parts produced without requiring numerous experiments. This is especially significant in parts that have troublesome features such as large thickness. The development of simulations for thick walled composites has been approached by examining the mechanics of resin flow and fiber deformation during processing, applying these evaluations to develop simulations, and evaluating the simulation with experimental results. A unified analysis is developed to describe the three-dimensional resin flow and fiber preform deformation during processing regardless of the manufacturing process used. It is shown how the generic governing evaluations in the unified analysis can be applied to autoclave molding, compression molding, pultrusion, filament winding, and resin transfer molding. A comparison is provided with earlier models derived individually for these processes. The evaluations described for autoclave curing were used to produce a one-dimensional cure simulation for autoclave curing of thick composites. The simulation consists of an analysis for heat transfer and resin flow in the composite as well as bleeder plies used to absorb resin removed from the part. Experiments were performed in a hot press to approximate curing in an autoclave. Graphite/epoxy laminates of 3 cm and 5 cm thickness were cured while monitoring temperatures at several points inside the laminate and thickness. The simulation predicted temperatures fairly closely, but difficulties were encountered in correlation of thickness results. This simulation was also used to study the effects of prepreg aging on processing of thick composites. An investigation was also performed on filament winding with prepreg tow. Cylinders were wound of approximately 12 mm thickness with pressure

  7. Metal matrix composites microfracture: Computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Caruso, John J.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1990-01-01

    Fiber/matrix fracture and fiber-matrix interface debonding in a metal matrix composite (MMC) are computationally simulated. These simulations are part of a research activity to develop computational methods for microfracture, microfracture propagation and fracture toughness of the metal matrix composites. The three-dimensional finite element model used in the simulation consists of a group of nine unidirectional fibers in three by three unit cell array of SiC/Ti15 metal matrix composite with a fiber volume ration of 0.35. This computational procedure is used to predict the fracture process and establish the hierarchy of fracture modes based on strain energy release rate. It is also used to predict stress redistribution to surrounding matrix-fibers due to initial and progressive fracture of fiber/matrix and due to debonding of fiber-matrix interface. Microfracture results for various loading cases such as longitudinal, transverse, shear and bending are presented and discussed. Step-by-step procedures are outlined to evaluate composite microfracture for a given composite system.

  8. NDE and SHM Simulation for CFRP Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, Cara A. C.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-based nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is a common technique for damage detection in composite materials. There is a need for advanced NDE that goes beyond damage detection to damage quantification and characterization in order to enable data driven prognostics. The damage types that exist in carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites include microcracking and delaminations, and can be initiated and grown via impact forces (due to ground vehicles, tool drops, bird strikes, etc), fatigue, and extreme environmental changes. X-ray microfocus computed tomography data, among other methods, have shown that these damage types often result in voids/discontinuities of a complex volumetric shape. The specific damage geometry and location within ply layers affect damage growth. Realistic threedimensional NDE and structural health monitoring (SHM) simulations can aid in the development and optimization of damage quantification and characterization techniques. This paper is an overview of ongoing work towards realistic NDE and SHM simulation tools for composites, and also discusses NASA's need for such simulation tools in aeronautics and spaceflight. The paper describes the development and implementation of a custom ultrasound simulation tool that is used to model ultrasonic wave interaction with realistic 3-dimensional damage in CFRP composites. The custom code uses elastodynamic finite integration technique and is parallelized to run efficiently on computing cluster or multicore machines.

  9. Conference Simulation in an English Composition Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Gail

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the use of a conference format in teaching a required English composition course. The focus of the course is student research and presentation; thus, simulating a conference was a natural fit for the course's overall goals. Students worked in one of four committees: the Call for Proposals Committee, the Proposal Evaluation…

  10. Simulating Clinical Carious Lesions in Composition Teeth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, E. R.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A step-by-step technique to alter stock composition teeth and create simulated carious conditions that are ideal or otherwise is presented. The procedures provide the student with life-like lesions, suitable in texture and location and similar to conditions found in the oral cavity. (MLW)

  11. Computational Simulation of Composite Structural Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    2004-01-01

    Progressive damage and fracture of composite structures subjected to monotonically increasing static, tension-tension cyclic, pressurization, and flexural cyclic loading are evaluated via computational simulation. Constituent material properties, stress and strain limits are scaled up to the structure level to evaluate the overall damage and fracture propagation for composites. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture due to monotonically increasing static and cyclic loads are included in the simulations. Results show the number of cycles to failure at different temperatures and the damage progression sequence during different degradation stages. A procedure is outlined for use of computational simulation data in the assessment of damage tolerance, determination of sensitive parameters affecting fracture, and interpretation of results with insight for design decisions.

  12. Computational Simulation of Composite Structural Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    Progressive damage and fracture of composite structures subjected to monotonically increasing static, tension-tension cyclic, pressurization, and flexural cyclic loading are evaluated via computational simulation. Constituent material properties, stress and strain limits are scaled up to the structure level to evaluate the overall damage and fracture propagation for composites. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture due to monotonically increasing static and cyclic loads are included in the simulations. Results show the number of cycles to failure at different temperatures and the damage progression sequence during different degradation stages. A procedure is outlined for use of computational simulation data in the assessment of damage tolerance, determination of sensitive parameters affecting fracture, and interpretation of results with insight for design decisions.

  13. Streamline coal slurry letdown valve

    DOEpatents

    Platt, Robert J.; Shadbolt, Edward A.

    1983-01-01

    A streamlined coal slurry letdown valve is featured which has a two-piece throat comprised of a seat and seat retainer. The two-piece design allows for easy assembly and disassembly of the valve. A novel cage holds the two-piece throat together during the high pressure letdown. The coal slurry letdown valve has long operating life as a result of its streamlined and erosion-resistance surfaces.

  14. Streamline coal slurry letdown valve

    DOEpatents

    Platt, R.J.; Shadbolt, E.A.

    1983-11-08

    A streamlined coal slurry letdown valve is featured which has a two-piece throat comprised of a seat and seat retainer. The two-piece design allows for easy assembly and disassembly of the valve. A novel cage holds the two-piece throat together during the high pressure letdown. The coal slurry letdown valve has long operating life as a result of its streamlined and erosion-resistance surfaces. 5 figs.

  15. Crashworthiness simulation of composite automotive structures

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, M E; Johnson, N L; Simunovic, S; Zywicz, E

    1998-06-01

    In 1990 the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC) began the investigation of crash worthiness simulation methods for composite materials. A contract was given to Livermore Software Technology Corporation (LSTC) to implement a new damage model in LS-DYNA3DTM specifically for composite structures. This model is in LS-DYNA3DTM and is in use by the ACC partners. In 1994 USCAR, a partnership of American auto companies, entered into a partnership called SCAAP (Super Computing Automotive Applications Partnership) for the express purpose of working with the National Labs on computational oriented research. A CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) was signed with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory to work in three distinctly different technical areas, one of which was composites material modeling for crash worthiness. Each Laboratory was assigned a specific modeling task. The ACC was responsible for the technical direction of the composites project and provided all test data for code verification. All new models were to be implemented in DYNA3D and periodically distributed to all partners for testing. Several new models have been developed and implemented. Excellent agreement has been shown between tube crush simulation and experiments.

  16. Coupled multi-disciplinary composites behavior simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Surendra N.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    The capabilities of the computer code CSTEM (Coupled Structural/Thermal/Electro-Magnetic Analysis) are discussed and demonstrated. CSTEM computationally simulates the coupled response of layered multi-material composite structures subjected to simultaneous thermal, structural, vibration, acoustic, and electromagnetic loads and includes the effect of aggressive environments. The composite material behavior and structural response is determined at its various inherent scales: constituents (fiber/matrix), ply, laminate, and structural component. The thermal and mechanical properties of the constituents are considered to be nonlinearly dependent on various parameters such as temperature and moisture. The acoustic and electromagnetic properties also include dependence on vibration and electromagnetic wave frequencies, respectively. The simulation is based on a three dimensional finite element analysis in conjunction with composite mechanics and with structural tailoring codes, and with acoustic and electromagnetic analysis methods. An aircraft engine composite fan blade is selected as a typical structural component to demonstrate the CSTEM capabilities. Results of various coupled multi-disciplinary heat transfer, structural, vibration, acoustic, and electromagnetic analyses for temperature distribution, stress and displacement response, deformed shape, vibration frequencies, mode shapes, acoustic noise, and electromagnetic reflection from the fan blade are discussed for their coupled effects in hot and humid environments. Collectively, these results demonstrate the effectiveness of the CSTEM code in capturing the coupled effects on the various responses of composite structures subjected to simultaneous multiple real-life loads.

  17. Streamlining Payload Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lufkin, Susan N.

    2010-01-01

    Payload integration onto space transport vehicles and the International Space Station (ISS) is a complex process. Yet, cargo transport is the sole reason for any space mission, be it for ferrying humans, science, or hardware. As the largest such effort in history, the ISS offers a wide variety of payload experience. However, for any payload to reach the Space Station under the current process, Payload Developers face a list of daunting tasks that go well beyond just designing the payload to the constraints of the transport vehicle and its stowage topology. Payload customers are required to prove their payload s functionality, structural integrity, and safe integration - including under less than nominal situations. They must also plan for or provide training, procedures, hardware labeling, ground support, and communications. In addition, they must deal with negotiating shared consumables, integrating software, obtaining video, and coordinating the return of data and hardware. All the while, they must meet export laws, launch schedules, budget limits, and the consensus of more than 12 panel and board reviews. Despite the cost and infrastructure overhead, payload proposals have increased. Just in the span from FY08 to FY09, the NASA Payload Space Station Support Office budget rose from $78M to $96M in attempt to manage the growing manifest, but the potential number of payloads still exceeds available Payload Integration Management manpower. The growth has also increased management difficulties due to the fact that payloads are more frequently added to a flight schedule late in the flow. The current standard ISS template for payload integration from concept to payload turn-over is 36 months, or 18 months if the payload already has a preliminary design. Customers are increasingly requiring a turn-around of 3 to 6-months to meet market needs. The following paper suggests options for streamlining the current payload integration process in order to meet customer schedule

  18. Computational simulation of hot composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Singhal, S. N.

    1991-01-01

    Three different computer codes developed in-house are described for application to hot composite structures. These codes include capabilities for: (1) laminate behavior (METCAN); (2) thermal/structural analysis of hot structures made from high temperature metal matrix composites (HITCAN); and (3) laminate tailoring (MMLT). Results for select sample cases are described to demonstrate the versatility as well as the application of these codes to specific situations. The sample case results show that METCAN can be used to simulate cyclic life in high temperature metal matrix composites; HITCAN can be used to evaluate the structural performance of curved panels as well as respective sensitivities of various nonlinearities, and MMLT can be used to tailor the fabrication process in order to reduce residual stresses in the matrix upon cool-down.

  19. Computational simulation of hot composites structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Singhal, S. N.

    1991-01-01

    Three different computer codes developed in-house are described for application to hot composite structures. These codes include capabilities for: (1) laminate behavior (METCAN); (2) thermal/structural analysis of hot structures made from high temperature metal matrix composites (HITCAN); and (3) laminate tailoring (MMLT). Results for select sample cases are described to demonstrate the versatility as well as the application of these codes to specific situations. The sample case results show that METCAN can be used to simulate cyclic life in high temperature metal matrix composites; HITCAN can be used to evaluate the structural performance of curved panels as well as respective sensitivities of various nonlinearities, and MMLT can be used to tailor the fabrication process in order to reduce residual stresses in the matrix upon cool-down.

  20. Dynamic Investigation of Release Characteristics of a Streamlined Internal Store from a Simulated Bomb Bay of the Republic F-105 Airplane at Mach Numbers of 0.8, 1.4, and 1.98, Coord. No. AF-222

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, John B.

    1956-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the 27- by 27-inch preflight jet of the Langley Pilotless Aircraft Research Station at Wallops Island, Va., of the release characteristics of a dynamically scaled streamlined-type internally carried store from a simulated bomb bay at Mach numbers M(sub o) of 0.8, 1.4, and 1.98. A l/17-scale model of the Republic F-105 half-fuselage and bomb-bay configuration was used with a streamlined store shape of a fineness ratio of 6.00. Simulated altitudes were 3,400 feet at M(sub o) = 0.8, 3,400, and 29,000 feet at M(sub o) = 1.4, and 29,000 feet at M(sub o) = 1.98. At supersonic speeds, high pitching moments are induced on the store in the vicinity of the bomb bay at high dynamic pressures. Successful ejections could not be made with the original configuration at supersonic speeds at near sea-level conditions. The pitching moments caused by unsymmetrical pressures on the store in a disturbed flow field were overcome by replacing the high-aspect-ratio fin with a low-aspect-ratio fin that had a 30-percent area increase which was less subject to aeroelastic effects. Release characteristics of the store were improved by orienting the fins so that they were in a more uniform flow field at the point of store release. The store pitching moments were shown to be reduced by increasing the simulated altitude. Favorable ejections were made at subsonic speeds at near sea-level conditions.

  1. The design of the Comet streamliner: An electric land speed record motorcycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Ethan Alexander

    The development of the land speed record electric motorcycle streamliner, the Comet, is discussed herein. Its design process includes a detailed literary review of past and current motorcycle streamliners in an effort to highlight the main components of such a vehicle's design, while providing baseline data for performance comparisons. A new approach to balancing a streamliner at low speeds is also addressed, a system henceforth referred to as landing gear, which has proven an effective means for allowing the driver to control the low speed instabilities of the vehicle with relative ease compared to tradition designs. This is accompanied by a dynamic stability analysis conducted on a test chassis that was developed for the primary purpose of understanding the handling dynamics of streamliners, while also providing a test bed for the implementation of the landing gear system and a means to familiarize the driver to the operation and handling of such a vehicle. Data gathered through the use of GPS based velocity tracking, accelerometers, and a linear potentiometer provided a means to validate a dynamic stability analysis of the weave and wobble modes of the vehicle through linearization of a streamliner model developed in the BikeSIM software suite. Results indicate agreement between the experimental data and the simulation, indicating that the conventional recumbent design of a streamliner chassis is in fact highly stable throughout the performance envelope beyond extremely low speeds. A computational fluid dynamics study was also performed, utilized in the development of the body of the Comet to which a series of tests were conducted in order to develop a shape that was both practical to transport and highly efficient. By creating a hybrid airfoil from a NACA 0018 and NACA 66-018, a drag coefficient of 0.1 and frontal area of 0.44 m2 has been found for the final design. Utilizing a performance model based on the proposed vehicle's motor, its rolling resistance, and

  2. A general formulation for compositional reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, F.; Guzman, J.; Galindo-Nava, A.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the authors present a general formulation to solve the non-linear difference equations that arise in compositional reservoir simulation. The general approach here presented is based on newton`s method and provides a systematic approach to generate several formulations to solve the compositional problem, each possessing a different degree of implicitness and stability characteristics. The Fully-Implicit method is at the higher end of the implicitness spectrum while the IMPECS method, implicit in pressure-explicit in composition and saturation, is at the lower end. They show that all methods may be obtained as particular cases of the fully-implicit method. Regarding the matrix problem, all methods have a similar matrix structure; the composition of the Jacobian matrix is however unique in each case, being in some instances amenable to reductions for optimal solution of the matrix problem. Based on this, a different approach to derive IMPECS type methods is proposed; in this case, the whole set of 2nc + 6 equations, that apply in each gridblock, is reduced to a single pressure equation through matrix reduction operations; this provides a more stable numerical scheme, compared to other published IMPCS methods, in which the subset of thermodynamic equilibrium equations is arbitrarily decoupled form the set of gridblock equations to perform such reduction. The authors discuss how the general formulation here presented can be used to formulate and construct an adaptive-implicit compositional simulators. They also present results on the numerical performance of FI, IMPSEC and IMPECS methods on some test problems.

  3. Ceramic matrix composites in simulated SSME environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbell, Thomas P.; Eckel, Andrew J.

    1988-01-01

    Future Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME)-type rocket engines can benefit from the use of fiber-reinforced ceramix matrix composites (FRCMC). Ceramics reinforced with long continuous fibers exhibit improved tolerance to severe thermomechanical and environmental exposures. An in-house NASA-Lewis program to evaluate the durability of FRCMC in simulated SSME environments is described. Primary tests involve multiple (one second) exposures of FRCMC specimens in a hydrogen/oxygen rocket test rig. This rig generates surface heating rates of 1000 to 2500 C/second. The FRCMC durability evaluation involves measurement of retained strength as a function of thermal shock severity and number of upshock cycles. Preliminary test results for monolithic silicon nitride (Si3N4) and silicon carbide (SiC), and one type of silicon based FRCMC, are presented. The test data are examined in terms of simple thermal shock theory.

  4. Direct numerical simulation of active fiber composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung J.; Hwang, Joon S.; Paik, Seung H.

    2003-08-01

    Active Fiber Composites (AFC) possess desirable characteristics for smart structure applications. One major advantage of AFC is the ability to create anisotropic laminate layers useful in applications requiring off-axis or twisting motions. AFC is naturally composed of two different constituents: piezoelectric fiber and matrix. Therefore, homogenization method, which is utilized in the analysis of laminated composite material, has been used to characterize the material properties. Using this approach, the global behaviors of the structures are predicted in an averaged sense. However, this approach has intrinsic limitations in describing the local behaviors in the level of the constituents. Actually, the failure analysis of AFC requires the knowledge of the local behaviors. Therefore, microscopic approach is necessary to predict the behaviors of AFC. In this work, a microscopic approach for the analysis of AFC was performed. Piezoelectric fiber and matrix were modeled separately and finite element method using three-dimensional solid elements was utilized. Because fine mesh is essential, high performance computing technology was applied to the solution of the immense degree-of-freedom problem. This approach is called Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of structure. Through the DNS of AFC, local stress distribution around the interface of fiber and matrix was analyzed.

  5. Simulating the Composite Propellant Manufacturing Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, Suzanne; Love, Gregory

    2000-01-01

    There is a strategic interest in understanding how the propellant manufacturing process contributes to military capabilities outside the United States. The paper will discuss how system dynamics (SD) has been applied to rapidly assess the capabilities and vulnerabilities of a specific composite propellant production complex. These facilities produce a commonly used solid propellant with military applications. The authors will explain how an SD model can be configured to match a specific production facility followed by a series of scenarios designed to analyze operational vulnerabilities. By using the simulation model to rapidly analyze operational risks, the analyst gains a better understanding of production complexities. There are several benefits of developing SD models to simulate chemical production. SD is an effective tool for characterizing complex problems, especially the production process where the cascading effect of outages quickly taxes common understanding. By programming expert knowledge into an SD application, these tools are transformed into a knowledge management resource that facilitates rapid learning without requiring years of experience in production operations. It also permits the analyst to rapidly respond to crisis situations and other time-sensitive missions. Most importantly, the quantitative understanding gained from applying the SD model lends itself to strategic analysis and planning.

  6. Surface-Streamline Flow Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langston, L.; Boyle, M.

    1985-01-01

    Matrix of ink dots covers matte surface of polyester drafting film. Film placed against wind-tunnel wall. Layer of methyl salicylate (oil of wintergreen) sprayed over dotted area. Ink dot streaklines show several characteristics of flow, including primary saddle point of separations, primary horseshoe vortex and smaller vortex at cylinder/ endwall junction. Surface streamline flow visualization technique suitable for use in low-speed windtunnels or other low-speed gas flows.

  7. Vision and air flow combine to streamline flying honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Gavin J.; Luu, Tien; Ball, David; Srinivasan, Mandyam V.

    2013-01-01

    Insects face the challenge of integrating multi-sensory information to control their flight. Here we study a ‘streamlining' response in honeybees, whereby honeybees raise their abdomen to reduce drag. We find that this response, which was recently reported to be mediated by optic flow, is also strongly modulated by the presence of air flow simulating a head wind. The Johnston's organs in the antennae were found to play a role in the measurement of the air speed that is used to control the streamlining response. The response to a combination of visual motion and wind is complex and can be explained by a model that incorporates a non-linear combination of the two stimuli. The use of visual and mechanosensory cues increases the strength of the streamlining response when the stimuli are present concurrently. We propose this multisensory integration will make the response more robust to transient disturbances in either modality. PMID:24019053

  8. Interactive Streamline Exploration and Manipulation Using Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Xin; Chen, Chun-Ming; Shen, Han-Wei; Wong, Pak C.

    2015-01-12

    Occlusion presents a major challenge in visualizing three-dimensional flow fields with streamlines. Displaying too many streamlines at once makes it difficult to locate interesting regions, but displaying too few streamlines risks missing important features. A more ideal streamline exploration model is to allow the viewer to freely move across the field that has been populated with interesting streamlines and pull away the streamlines that cause occlusion so that the viewer can inspect the hidden ones in detail. In this paper, we present a streamline deformation algorithm that supports such user-driven interaction with three-dimensional flow fields. We define a view-dependent focus+context technique that moves the streamlines occluding the focus area using a novel displacement model. To preserve the context surrounding the user-chosen focus area, we propose two shape models to define the transition zone for the surrounding streamlines, and the displacement of the contextual streamlines is solved interactively with a goal of preserving their shapes as much as possible. Based on our deformation model, we design an interactive streamline exploration tool using a lens metaphor. Our system runs interactively so that users can move their focus and examine the flow field freely.

  9. Probabilistic Simulation of Multi-Scale Composite Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2012-01-01

    A methodology is developed to computationally assess the non-deterministic composite response at all composite scales (from micro to structural) due to the uncertainties in the constituent (fiber and matrix) properties, in the fabrication process and in structural variables (primitive variables). The methodology is computationally efficient for simulating the probability distributions of composite behavior, such as material properties, laminate and structural responses. Bi-products of the methodology are probabilistic sensitivities of the composite primitive variables. The methodology has been implemented into the computer codes PICAN (Probabilistic Integrated Composite ANalyzer) and IPACS (Integrated Probabilistic Assessment of Composite Structures). The accuracy and efficiency of this methodology are demonstrated by simulating the uncertainties in composite typical laminates and comparing the results with the Monte Carlo simulation method. Available experimental data of composite laminate behavior at all scales fall within the scatters predicted by PICAN. Multi-scaling is extended to simulate probabilistic thermo-mechanical fatigue and to simulate the probabilistic design of a composite redome in order to illustrate its versatility. Results show that probabilistic fatigue can be simulated for different temperature amplitudes and for different cyclic stress magnitudes. Results also show that laminate configurations can be selected to increase the redome reliability by several orders of magnitude without increasing the laminate thickness--a unique feature of structural composites. The old reference denotes that nothing fundamental has been done since that time.

  10. Streamline-based microfluidic device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention provides a streamline-based device and a method for using the device for continuous separation of particles including cells in biological fluids. The device includes a main microchannel and an array of side microchannels disposed on a substrate. The main microchannel has a plurality of stagnation points with a predetermined geometric design, for example, each of the stagnation points has a predetermined distance from the upstream edge of each of the side microchannels. The particles are separated and collected in the side microchannels.

  11. Probabilistic simulation of uncertainties in composite uniaxial strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Stock, T. A.

    1990-01-01

    Probabilistic composite micromechanics methods are developed that simulate uncertainties in unidirectional fiber composite strengths. These methods are in the form of computational procedures using composite mechanics with Monte Carlo simulation. The variables for which uncertainties are accounted include constituent strengths and their respective scatter. A graphite/epoxy unidirectional composite (ply) is studied to illustrate the procedure and its effectiveness to formally estimate the probable scatter in the composite uniaxial strengths. The results show that ply longitudinal tensile and compressive, transverse compressive and intralaminar shear strengths are not sensitive to single fiber anomalies (breaks, intergacial disbonds, matrix microcracks); however, the ply transverse tensile strength is.

  12. Probabilistic simulation of multi-scale composite behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, D. G.; Shiao, M. C.; Singhal, S. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    A methodology is developed to computationally assess the probabilistic composite material properties at all composite scale levels due to the uncertainties in the constituent (fiber and matrix) properties and in the fabrication process variables. The methodology is computationally efficient for simulating the probability distributions of material properties. The sensitivity of the probabilistic composite material property to each random variable is determined. This information can be used to reduce undesirable uncertainties in material properties at the macro scale of the composite by reducing the uncertainties in the most influential random variables at the micro scale. This methodology was implemented into the computer code PICAN (Probabilistic Integrated Composite ANalyzer). The accuracy and efficiency of this methodology are demonstrated by simulating the uncertainties in the material properties of a typical laminate and comparing the results with the Monte Carlo simulation method. The experimental data of composite material properties at all scales fall within the scatters predicted by PICAN.

  13. A streamlined failure mode and effects analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Eric C. Smith, Koren; Terezakis, Stephanie; Croog, Victoria; Gollamudi, Smitha; Gage, Irene; Keck, Jordie; DeWeese, Theodore; Sibley, Greg

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Explore the feasibility and impact of a streamlined failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) using a structured process that is designed to minimize staff effort. Methods: FMEA for the external beam process was conducted at an affiliate radiation oncology center that treats approximately 60 patients per day. A structured FMEA process was developed which included clearly defined roles and goals for each phase. A core group of seven people was identified and a facilitator was chosen to lead the effort. Failure modes were identified and scored according to the FMEA formalism. A risk priority number,RPN, was calculated and used to rank failure modes. Failure modes with RPN > 150 received safety improvement interventions. Staff effort was carefully tracked throughout the project. Results: Fifty-two failure modes were identified, 22 collected during meetings, and 30 from take-home worksheets. The four top-ranked failure modes were: delay in film check, missing pacemaker protocol/consent, critical structures not contoured, and pregnant patient simulated without the team's knowledge of the pregnancy. These four failure modes hadRPN > 150 and received safety interventions. The FMEA was completed in one month in four 1-h meetings. A total of 55 staff hours were required and, additionally, 20 h by the facilitator. Conclusions: Streamlined FMEA provides a means of accomplishing a relatively large-scale analysis with modest effort. One potential value of FMEA is that it potentially provides a means of measuring the impact of quality improvement efforts through a reduction in risk scores. Future study of this possibility is needed.

  14. CASE STUDIES EXAMINING LCA STREAMLINING TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pressure is mounting for more streamlined Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methods that allow for evaluations that are quick and simple, but accurate. As part of an overall research effort to develop and demonstrate streamlined LCA, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has funded ...

  15. Probabilistic Simulation of Stress Concentration in Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Liaw, D. G.

    1994-01-01

    A computational methodology is described to probabilistically simulate the stress concentration factors (SCF's) in composite laminates. This new approach consists of coupling probabilistic composite mechanics with probabilistic finite element structural analysis. The composite mechanics is used to probabilistically describe all the uncertainties inherent in composite material properties, whereas the finite element is used to probabilistically describe the uncertainties associated with methods to experimentally evaluate SCF's, such as loads, geometry, and supports. The effectiveness of the methodology is demonstrated by using is to simulate the SCF's in three different composite laminates. Simulated results match experimental data for probability density and for cumulative distribution functions. The sensitivity factors indicate that the SCF's are influenced by local stiffness variables, by load eccentricities, and by initial stress fields.

  16. View-Dependent Streamline Deformation and Exploration.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xin; Edwards, John; Chen, Chun-Ming; Shen, Han-Wei; Johnson, Chris R; Wong, Pak Chung

    2016-07-01

    Occlusion presents a major challenge in visualizing 3D flow and tensor fields using streamlines. Displaying too many streamlines creates a dense visualization filled with occluded structures, but displaying too few streams risks losing important features. We propose a new streamline exploration approach by visually manipulating the cluttered streamlines by pulling visible layers apart and revealing the hidden structures underneath. This paper presents a customized view-dependent deformation algorithm and an interactive visualization tool to minimize visual clutter in 3D vector and tensor fields. The algorithm is able to maintain the overall integrity of the fields and expose previously hidden structures. Our system supports both mouse and direct-touch interactions to manipulate the viewing perspectives and visualize the streamlines in depth. By using a lens metaphor of different shapes to select the transition zone of the targeted area interactively, the users can move their focus and examine the vector or tensor field freely. PMID:26600061

  17. View-Dependent Streamline Deformation and Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xin; Edwards, John; Chen, Chun-Ming; Shen, Han-Wei; Johnson, Chris R.; Wong, Pak Chung

    2016-01-01

    Occlusion presents a major challenge in visualizing 3D flow and tensor fields using streamlines. Displaying too many streamlines creates a dense visualization filled with occluded structures, but displaying too few streams risks losing important features. We propose a new streamline exploration approach by visually manipulating the cluttered streamlines by pulling visible layers apart and revealing the hidden structures underneath. This paper presents a customized view-dependent deformation algorithm and an interactive visualization tool to minimize visual clutter in 3D vector and tensor fields. The algorithm is able to maintain the overall integrity of the fields and expose previously hidden structures. Our system supports both mouse and direct-touch interactions to manipulate the viewing perspectives and visualize the streamlines in depth. By using a lens metaphor of different shapes to select the transition zone of the targeted area interactively, the users can move their focus and examine the vector or tensor field freely. PMID:26600061

  18. An Analysis of Team Composition as It Affects Simulation Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnakumar, Parameswar; Chisholm, Thomas Alexander

    This study investigated the extent to which sex composition and average team academic achievement of student simulation teams affect team effectiveness. Seventy-four students in two sections of a marketing principles class were divided into 20 teams to test their decision-making skills. For 10 weeks, each team operated a simulated supermarket…

  19. Numerical Simulation of Textile Composite Stamping On Double Dome

    SciTech Connect

    Xiongqi Peng; Zia Ur Rehman

    2011-05-04

    Stamping is one of the most effective ways to form textile composites in industry for providing high-strength, low-weight and cost-effective products. This paper presents a fully continuum mechanics-based approach for stamping simulation of textile fiber reinforced composites by using finite element (FE) method. A previously developed non-orthogonal constitutive model is used to represent the anisotropic mechanical behavior of textile composites under large deformation during stamping. Simulation are performed on a balanced plain weave composite with 0 deg./90 deg. and {+-}45 deg. as initial yarn orientation over a benchmark double dome device. Simulation results show good agreement with experimental output in terms of a number of parameters selected for comparison.

  20. A Material Model for FE-Simulation of UD Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Composite materials are being increasingly used for industrial applications. CFRP is particularly suitable for lightweight construction due to its high specific stiffness and strength properties. Simulation methods are needed during the development process in order to reduce the effort for prototypes and testing. This is particularly important for CFRP, as the material is costly. For accurate simulations, a realistic material model is needed. In this paper, a material model for the simulation of UD-composites including non-linear material behaviour and damage is developed and implemented in Abaqus. The material model is validated by comparison with test results on a range of test specimens.

  1. Computational simulation of intermingled-fiber hybrid composite behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    Three-dimensional finite-element analysis and a micromechanics based computer code ICAN (Integrated Composite Analyzer) are used to predict the composite properties and microstresses of a unidirectional graphite/epoxy primary composite with varying percentages of S-glass fibers used as hydridizing fibers at a total fiber volume of 0.54. The three-dimensional finite-element model used in the analyses consists of a group of nine fibers, all unidirectional, in a three-by-three unit cell array. There is generally good agreement between the composite properties and microstresses obtained from both methods. The results indicate that the finite-element methods and the micromechanics equations embedded in the ICAN computer code can be used to obtain the properties of intermingled fiber hybrid composites needed for the analysis/design of hybrid composite structures. However, the finite-element model should be big enough to be able to simulate the conditions assumed in the micromechanics equations.

  2. Effects of streamline curvature on separation prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arolla, Sunil K.; Durbin, Paul A.

    2009-11-01

    In this study, the effects of streamline curvature on prediction of flow separation are investigated. The geometry is a circulation control airfoil, a high-lift configuration that has been under extensive research for more than two decades. A tangential jet is blown over a thick, rounded trailing edge, using the Coanda effect to delay separation. An attempt is made to understand, through numerical simulations, the dynamics of turbulent separation and reattachment on the Coanda surface. Highly curved, attached recirculation regions are seen to form. A physics based curvature correction proposed by Pettersson-Reif et al. (1999) is used in conjunction with ζ-f turbulence model. The chord-based Reynolds number is Re = 10^6. Two jet momentum coefficients of Cμ=0.03 and 0.1 are computed. In this paper, comparisons between the computed and experimental pressure distributions, velocity profiles and the position of flow detachment are presented. Comparisons with other closures such as Menter's SST model are also discussed.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of the strength of unidirectional composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, H.; Yasuada, J.

    1994-12-31

    This paper deals with a Monte Carlo simulation of the strength of unidirectional composites. Up to the present, most of simulation has been carried out against two-dimensional, sheet composites whereas the fibers in actual composites are dispersed in three-dimensions. In the present paper, a brief summary of the authors` experiment on micromechanics is first described. Weibull parameters of Torayca T300 carbon monofilaments of 25mm length were m = 5.1 and {alpha} = 3.17(GPa) and the ineffective length was 0.30mm. The tensile strength of carbon/epoxy unidirectional thin rod of 200mm length was 2.88GPa. The second subject of this paper is to estimate the strength of unidirectional composites from the experimental data of monofilament strength distribution and ineffective length. Hexagonal-array microcomposites of 7, 19, 37, 61 and 91 fibers with sample length of 1.5(number of links = 5), 3.0, 6.0 and 15.0mm are simulated. A kind of local load sharing is assumed in the simulation. The tensile strength obtained in the simulation was 2.97GPa which is fairly close to the experimental data, 2.88GPa. Thus, the present simulation can predict pretty well the experimental data.

  4. Streamlined Islands in Ares Valles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 10 June 2002) The Science Although liquid water is not stable on the surface of Mars today, there is substantial geologic evidence that large quantities of water once flowed across the surface in the distant past. Streamlined islands, shown here, are one piece of evidence for this ancient water. The tremendous force of moving water, possibly from a catastrophic flood, carved these teardrop-shaped islands within a much larger channel called Ares Valles. The orientation of the islands can be used as an indicator of the direction the water flowed. The islands have a blunt end that is usually associated with an obstacle, commonly an impact crater. The crater is resistant to erosion and creates a geologic barrier around which the water must flow. As the water flows past the obstacle, its erosive power is directed outward, leaving the area in the lee of the obstacle relatively uneroded. However, some scientists have also argued that the area in the lee of the obstacle might be a depositional zone, where material is dropped out of the water as it briefly slows. The ridges observed on the high-standing terrain in the leeward parts of the islands may be benches carved into the rock that mark the height of the water at various times during the flood, or they might be indicative of layering in the leeward rock. As the water makes its way downstream, the interference of the water flow by the obstacle is reduced, and the water that was diverted around the obstacle rejoins itself at the narrow end of the island. Therefore, the direction of the water flow is parallel to the orientation of the island, and the narrow end of the island points downstream. In addition to the streamlined islands, the channel floor exhibits fluting that is also suggestive of flowing water. The flutes (also known as longitudinal grooves) are also parallel to the direction of flow, indicating that the water flow was turbulent and probably quite fast, which is consistent with the hypothesized

  5. Analytic streamline calculations on linear tetrahedra

    SciTech Connect

    Diachin, D.P.; Herzog, J.A.

    1997-06-01

    Analytic solutions for streamlines within tetrahedra are used to define operators that accurately and efficiently compute streamlines. The method presented here is based on linear interpolation, and therefore produces exact results for linear velocity fields. In addition, the method requires less computation than the forward Euler numerical method. Results are presented that compare accuracy measurements of the method with forward Euler and fourth order Runge-Kutta applied to both a linear and a nonlinear velocity field.

  6. Process to Produce Iron Nanoparticle Lunar Dust Simulant Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-cheh; McNatt, Jeremiah

    2010-01-01

    A document discusses a method for producing nanophase iron lunar dust composite simulant by heating a mixture of carbon black and current lunar simulant types (mixed oxide including iron oxide) at a high temperature to reduce ionic iron into elemental iron. The product is a chemically modified lunar simulant that can be attracted by a magnet, and has a surface layer with an iron concentration that is increased during the reaction. The iron was found to be -iron and Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The simulant produced with this method contains iron nanoparticles not available previously, and they are stable in ambient air. These nanoparticles can be mass-produced simply.

  7. Joint statistics and conditional mean strain rates of streamline segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, P.; Gampert, M.; Peters, N.

    2013-07-01

    Based on four different direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows with Taylor-based Reynolds numbers ranging from Reλ = 50 to 300 among which are two homogeneous isotropic decaying, one forced and one homogeneous shear flow, streamlines are identified and the obtained space curves are parameterized with the pseudo-time as well as the arclength. Based on local extrema of the absolute value of the velocity along the streamlines, the latter are partitioned into segments following Wang (2010 J. Fluid Mech. 648 183-203). Streamline segments are then statistically analyzed based on both parameterizations using the joint probability density function of the pseudo-time lag τ (arclength l, respectively) between and the velocity difference Δu at the extrema: P(τ,Δu), (P(l,Δu)). We distinguish positive and negative streamline segments depending on the sign of the velocity difference Δu. Differences as well as similarities in the statistical description for both parameterizations are discussed. In particular, it turns out that the normalized probability distribution functions (pdfs) (of both parameterizations) of the length of positive, negative and all segments assume a universal shape for all Reynolds numbers and flow types and are well described by a model derived in Schaefer P et al (2012 Phys. Fluids 24 045104). Particular attention is given to the conditional mean velocity difference at the ending points of the segments, which can be understood as a first-order structure function in the context of streamline segment analysis. It determines to a large extent the stretching (compression) of positive (negative) streamline segments and corresponds to the convective velocity in phase space in the transport model equation for the pdf. While based on the random sweeping hypothesis a scaling \\langle |\\Delta u\\Vert\\tau \\rangle \\propto \\left (u_{ { rms}} \\varepsilon \\tau \\right )^{1/3} is found for the parameterization based on the pseudo-time, the

  8. A new technique for simulating composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volakis, John L.

    1991-01-01

    This project dealt with the development on new methodologies and algorithms for the multi-spectrum electromagnetic characterization of large scale nonmetallic airborne vehicles and structures. A robust, low memory, and accurate methodology was developed which is particularly suited for modern machine architectures. This is a hybrid finite element method that combines two well known numerical solution approaches. That of the finite element method for modeling volumes and the boundary integral method which yields exact boundary conditions for terminating the finite element mesh. In addition, a variety of high frequency results were generated (such as diffraction coefficients for impedance surfaces and material layers) and a class of boundary conditions were developed which hold promise for more efficient simulations. During the course of this project, nearly 25 detailed research reports were generated along with an equal number of journal papers. The reports, papers, and journal articles are listed in the appendices along with their abstracts.

  9. THE COMPOSITIONAL DIVERSITY OF EXTRASOLAR TERRESTRIAL PLANETS. II. MIGRATION SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Carter-Bond, Jade C.; O'Brien, David P.; Raymond, Sean N.

    2012-11-20

    Prior work has found that a variety of terrestrial planetary compositions are expected to occur within known extrasolar planetary systems. However, such studies ignored the effects of giant planet migration, which is thought to be very common in extrasolar systems. Here we present calculations of the compositions of terrestrial planets that formed in dynamical simulations incorporating varying degrees of giant planet migration. We used chemical equilibrium models of the solid material present in the disks of five known planetary host stars: the Sun, GJ 777, HD4203, HD19994, and HD213240. Giant planet migration has a strong effect on the compositions of simulated terrestrial planets as the migration results in large-scale mixing between terrestrial planet building blocks that condensed at a range of temperatures. This mixing acts to (1) increase the typical abundance of Mg-rich silicates in the terrestrial planets' feeding zones and thus increase the frequency of planets with Earth-like compositions compared with simulations with static giant planet orbits, and (2) drastically increase the efficiency of the delivery of hydrous phases (water and serpentine) to terrestrial planets and thus produce waterworlds and/or wet Earths. Our results demonstrate that although a wide variety of terrestrial planet compositions can still be produced, planets with Earth-like compositions should be common within extrasolar planetary systems.

  10. The Compositional Diversity of Extrasolar Terrestrial Planets. II. Migration Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter-Bond, Jade C.; O'Brien, David P.; Raymond, Sean N.

    2012-11-01

    Prior work has found that a variety of terrestrial planetary compositions are expected to occur within known extrasolar planetary systems. However, such studies ignored the effects of giant planet migration, which is thought to be very common in extrasolar systems. Here we present calculations of the compositions of terrestrial planets that formed in dynamical simulations incorporating varying degrees of giant planet migration. We used chemical equilibrium models of the solid material present in the disks of five known planetary host stars: the Sun, GJ 777, HD4203, HD19994, and HD213240. Giant planet migration has a strong effect on the compositions of simulated terrestrial planets as the migration results in large-scale mixing between terrestrial planet building blocks that condensed at a range of temperatures. This mixing acts to (1) increase the typical abundance of Mg-rich silicates in the terrestrial planets' feeding zones and thus increase the frequency of planets with Earth-like compositions compared with simulations with static giant planet orbits, and (2) drastically increase the efficiency of the delivery of hydrous phases (water and serpentine) to terrestrial planets and thus produce waterworlds and/or wet Earths. Our results demonstrate that although a wide variety of terrestrial planet compositions can still be produced, planets with Earth-like compositions should be common within extrasolar planetary systems.

  11. Numerical simulation of damage progression in unidirectional composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Michael

    1997-11-01

    The damage growth in unidirectional composite materials is a complex evolutionary process. The initiation, growth and interaction of these damage mechanisms are strongly influenced by the properties of the constituent materials. In addition, thermal residual stresses are usually induced in composite material during the curing process. Therefore it is essential to consider the effect of the properties of the constituent materials and thermal residual stresses on the fracture behavior of composite materials. In this study, a computational methodology that employs a hybrid micromechanical-anisotropic continuum model developed previously to simulate the damage growth on the constituent level of composite materials has been modified and extended to include the effect of temperature change. The unique features of this methodology is that multiple modes of damage can be simulated simultaneously, and the direction of damage growth, in the form of a crack path, needs not be pre-selected. More specifically, the methodology uses a special purpose finite element program, PSEUDO, with a node splitting and nodal force relaxation algorithm that is capable of generating new crack surfaces to simulate damage initiation and growth in unidirectional fiber reinforced composites. An incremental elastic-plastic algorithm with Jsb2 flow theory and isotropic hardening is incorporated to account for matrix plastic deformation when analyzing damage growth in metal matrix composites. Damage progression in two types of metal matrix composites, namely, the as-received boron/aluminum-5.6/6061-AR and the solution aged and treated boron/aluminum-5.6/6061-T6 metal matrix composites, with thermal residual stresses, have been analyzed. The results show that the thermal residual stresses do have significant effects on the damage initiation, damage progression and the notch strengths of the composite materials.

  12. Simulations of ferrite-dielectric-wire composite negative index materials.

    PubMed

    Rachford, Frederic J; Armstead, Douglas N; Harris, Vincent G; Vittoria, Carmine

    2007-08-01

    We perform extensive finite difference time domain simulations of ferrite based negative index of refraction composites. A wire grid is employed to provide negative permittivity. The ferrite and wire grid interact to provide both negative and positive index of refraction transmission peaks in the vicinity of the ferrite resonance. Notwithstanding the extreme anisotropy in the index of refraction of the composite, negative refraction is seen at the composite air interface allowing the construction of a focusing concave lens with a magnetically tunable focal length. PMID:17930783

  13. Streamlined Islands in Ares Valles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 10 June 2002) The Science Although liquid water is not stable on the surface of Mars today, there is substantial geologic evidence that large quantities of water once flowed across the surface in the distant past. Streamlined islands, shown here, are one piece of evidence for this ancient water. The tremendous force of moving water, possibly from a catastrophic flood, carved these teardrop-shaped islands within a much larger channel called Ares Valles. The orientation of the islands can be used as an indicator of the direction the water flowed. The islands have a blunt end that is usually associated with an obstacle, commonly an impact crater. The crater is resistant to erosion and creates a geologic barrier around which the water must flow. As the water flows past the obstacle, its erosive power is directed outward, leaving the area in the lee of the obstacle relatively uneroded. However, some scientists have also argued that the area in the lee of the obstacle might be a depositional zone, where material is dropped out of the water as it briefly slows. The ridges observed on the high-standing terrain in the leeward parts of the islands may be benches carved into the rock that mark the height of the water at various times during the flood, or they might be indicative of layering in the leeward rock. As the water makes its way downstream, the interference of the water flow by the obstacle is reduced, and the water that was diverted around the obstacle rejoins itself at the narrow end of the island. Therefore, the direction of the water flow is parallel to the orientation of the island, and the narrow end of the island points downstream. In addition to the streamlined islands, the channel floor exhibits fluting that is also suggestive of flowing water. The flutes (also known as longitudinal grooves) are also parallel to the direction of flow, indicating that the water flow was turbulent and probably quite fast, which is consistent with the hypothesized

  14. Defect Detection in Composite Coatings by Computational Simulation Aided Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, R. M.; Souza, M. P. V.; Rebello, J. M. A.

    2010-02-01

    Thermography is based on the measurement of superficial temperature distribution of an object inspected subjected to tension, normally thermal heat. This measurement is performed with a thermographic camera that detects the infrared radiation emitted by every object. In this work thermograph was simulated by COMSOL software for optimize experimental parameters in composite material coatings inspection.

  15. Testing and simulation of composite laminates under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Xinglai

    Owing to their high stiffness-to-weight and high strength-to-weight ratios, fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix composite laminates are excellent materials for high-performance structures. However, their properties in the thickness direction are very poor as they are weakly bonded by polymeric matrices through laminate interfaces. Accordingly, when a composite laminate is subjected to impact loading, high interlaminar stresses along with the low interlaminar strengths could easily result in interlaminar damage such as delamination. This thesis investigated the response of composite laminates under low-velocity impact and presented numerical techniques for impact simulation. To begin with, instrumented drop-weight impacts ranging from subperforation to perforation levels were introduced to composite laminates having various dimensions and thicknesses. Damaged composite laminates were then subjected to compression-after-impact tests for evaluations of residual properties. Experimental results revealed that perforation was an important damage milestone since impact parameters such as peak force, contact duration, maximum deflection and energy absorption, and residual properties such as compressive stiffness, strength and energy absorption all reached critical levels as perforation took place. It was also found that thickness played a more important role than in-plane dimensions in perforation process. In order to understand more about the relationship between laminate thickness and perforation resistance and to present an economical method to improve perforation resistance, thick laminated composite plates and their assembled counterparts were investigated and compared. An energy profile correlating the impact energy and absorbed energy at all energy levels for each type of composite plates investigated was established and found to be able to address the relationship between energy and damage. Experimental results concluded that increasing thickness was more efficient

  16. Micromechanical simulation of the failure of fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landis, Chad M.; Beyerlein, Irene J.; McMeeking, Robert M.

    2000-03-01

    The strength of unidirectionally reinforced fiber composites is simulated using the three dimensional shear lag model of Landis, C. M., McGlockton, M. A. and McMeeking, R. M. (1999) (An improved shear lag model for broken fibers in composites. J. Comp. Mat. 33, 667-680) and Weibull fiber statistics. The governing differential equations for the fiber displacements and stresses are solved exactly for any configuration of breaks using an influence superposition technique. The model predicts the tensile strength of well bonded, elastic fiber/matrix systems with fibers arranged in a square array. Length and strength scalings are used which are relevant for elastic, local load sharing composites. Several hundred Monte Carlo simulations were executed to determine the statistical strength distributions of the composite for three values of the fiber Weibull modulus, m=5, 10 and 20. Stress-strain behavior and the evolution of fiber damage are studied. Bundle sizes of 10×10, 15×15, 20×20, 25×25, 30×30 and 35×35 fibers of various lengths are investigated to determine the dependence of strength on the composite size. The validity of weakest link statistics for composite strength is examined as well.

  17. Impact assessment: Eroding benefits through streamlining?

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Alan; Pope, Jenny; Morrison-Saunders, Angus; Retief, Francois; Gunn, Jill A.E.

    2014-02-15

    This paper argues that Governments have sought to streamline impact assessment in recent years (defined as the last five years) to counter concerns over the costs and potential for delays to economic development. We hypothesise that this has had some adverse consequences on the benefits that subsequently accrue from the assessments. This hypothesis is tested using a framework developed from arguments for the benefits brought by Environmental Impact Assessment made in 1982 in the face of the UK Government opposition to its implementation in a time of economic recession. The particular benefits investigated are ‘consistency and fairness’, ‘early warning’, ‘environment and development’, and ‘public involvement’. Canada, South Africa, the United Kingdom and Western Australia are the jurisdictions tested using this framework. The conclusions indicate that significant streamlining has been undertaken which has had direct adverse effects on some of the benefits that impact assessment should deliver, particularly in Canada and the UK. The research has not examined whether streamlining has had implications for the effectiveness of impact assessment, but the causal link between streamlining and benefits does sound warning bells that merit further investigation. -- Highlights: • Investigation of the extent to which government has streamlined IA. • Evaluation framework was developed based on benefits of impact assessment. • Canada, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and Western Australia were examined. • Trajectory in last five years is attrition of benefits of impact assessment.

  18. Implications of streamlining theory for microbial ecology

    PubMed Central

    Giovannoni, Stephen J; Cameron Thrash, J; Temperton, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Whether a small cell, a small genome or a minimal set of chemical reactions with self-replicating properties, simplicity is beguiling. As Leonardo da Vinci reportedly said, ‘simplicity is the ultimate sophistication'. Two diverging views of simplicity have emerged in accounts of symbiotic and commensal bacteria and cosmopolitan free-living bacteria with small genomes. The small genomes of obligate insect endosymbionts have been attributed to genetic drift caused by small effective population sizes (Ne). In contrast, streamlining theory attributes small cells and genomes to selection for efficient use of nutrients in populations where Ne is large and nutrients limit growth. Regardless of the cause of genome reduction, lost coding potential eventually dictates loss of function. Consequences of reductive evolution in streamlined organisms include atypical patterns of prototrophy and the absence of common regulatory systems, which have been linked to difficulty in culturing these cells. Recent evidence from metagenomics suggests that streamlining is commonplace, may broadly explain the phenomenon of the uncultured microbial majority, and might also explain the highly interdependent (connected) behavior of many microbial ecosystems. Streamlining theory is belied by the observation that many successful bacteria are large cells with complex genomes. To fully appreciate streamlining, we must look to the life histories and adaptive strategies of cells, which impose minimum requirements for complexity that vary with niche. PMID:24739623

  19. METCAN updates for high temperature composite behavior: Simulation/verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H.-J.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    The continued verification (comparisons with experimental data) of the METCAN (Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer) computer code is updated. Verification includes comparisons at room and high temperatures for two composites, SiC/Ti-15-3 and SiC/Ti-6-4. Specifically, verification of the SiC/Ti-15-3 composite includes comparisons of strength, modulus, and Poisson's ratio as well as stress-strain curves for four laminates at room temperature. High temperature verification includes comparisons of strength and stress-strain curves for two laminates. Verification of SiC/Ti-6-4 is for a transverse room temperature stress-strain curve and comparisons for transverse strength at three temperatures. Results of the verification indicates that METCAN can be used with confidence to simulate the high temperature nonlinear behavior of metal matrix composites.

  20. Mesoscale simulations of particle reinforced epoxy-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Bradley W.; Springer, Harry Keo; Jordan, Jennifer L.; Spowart, Jonathan E.; Thadhani, Naresh

    2012-03-01

    Polymer matrix composites reinforced with metal powders have complex microstructures that vary greatly from differences in particle size, morphology, loading fractions, etc. The effects of the underlying microstructure on the mechanical and wave propagation behavior of these composites during dynamic loading conditions are not well understood. To better understand these effects, epoxy (Epon826/DEA) reinforced with different particle sizes of Al and loading fractions of Al and Ni were prepared by casting. Microstructures from the composites were then used in 2D plane strain mesoscale simulations. The effect of varying velocity loading conditions on the wave velocity was then examined to determine the Us-Up and particle deformation response as a function of composite configuration.

  1. Systems Biology and Ecology of Streamlined Bacterioplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannoni, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    The salient feature of streamlined cells is their small genome size, but "streamlining" refers more generally to selection that favors minimization of cell size and complexity. The essence of streamlining theory is that selection is most efficient in organisms that have large effective population sizes, and, in nutrient-limited systems, favors cell architecture that minimizes resources required for replication. Regardless of the cause of genome reduction, lost coding potential eventually dictates loss of function, raising the questions, what genome features are expendable, and how do cells become highly successful with a minimal genomic repertoire? One consequence of reductive evolution in streamlined organisms is atypical patterns of prototrophy, for example the recent discovery of a requirement for the thiamin precursor 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine in some plankton taxa. Examples such as this fit within the framework of the Black Queen Hypothesis, which describes genome reduction that results in reliance on community goods and increased community connectivity. Other examples of genome reduction include losses of regulatory functions, or replacement with simpler regulatory systems, and increased metabolic integration. In one such case, in the order Pelagibacterales, the PII system for regulating responses to N limitation has been replaced with a simpler system composed of fewer genes. Both the absence of common regulatory systems and atypical patterns of prototrophy have been linked to difficulty in culturing Pelagibacterales, lending credibility to the idea that streamlining might broadly explain the phenomenon of the uncultured microbial majority. The success of streamlined osmotrophic bacterioplankton suggests that they successfully compete for labile organic matter and capture a large share of this resource, but an alternative theory postulates they are not good resource competitors and instead prosper by avoiding predation. The answers to these

  2. Numerical simulation of multi-layered textile composite reinforcement forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Hamila, N.; Boisse, P.

    2011-05-01

    One important perspective in aeronautics is to produce large, thick or/and complex structural composite parts. The forming stage presents an important role during the whole manufacturing process, especially for LCM processes (Liquid Composites Moulding) or CFRTP (Continuous Fibre Reinforcements and Thermoplastic resin). Numerical simulations corresponding to multi-layered composite forming allow the prediction for a successful process to produce the thick parts, and importantly, the positions of the fibres after forming to be known. This paper details a set of simulation examples carried out by using a semi-discrete shell finite element made up of unit woven cells. The internal virtual work is applied on all woven cells of the element taking into account tensions, in-plane shear and bending effects. As one key problem, the contact behaviours of tool/ply and ply/ply are described in the numerical model. The simulation results not only improve our understanding of the multi-layered composite forming process but also point out the importance of the fibre orientation and inter-ply friction during formability.

  3. Numerical simulation of multi-layered textile composite reinforcement forming

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.; Hamila, N.; Boisse, P.

    2011-05-04

    One important perspective in aeronautics is to produce large, thick or/and complex structural composite parts. The forming stage presents an important role during the whole manufacturing process, especially for LCM processes (Liquid Composites Moulding) or CFRTP (Continuous Fibre Reinforcements and Thermoplastic resin). Numerical simulations corresponding to multi-layered composite forming allow the prediction for a successful process to produce the thick parts, and importantly, the positions of the fibres after forming to be known. This paper details a set of simulation examples carried out by using a semi-discrete shell finite element made up of unit woven cells. The internal virtual work is applied on all woven cells of the element taking into account tensions, in-plane shear and bending effects. As one key problem, the contact behaviours of tool/ply and ply/ply are described in the numerical model. The simulation results not only improve our understanding of the multi-layered composite forming process but also point out the importance of the fibre orientation and inter-ply friction during formability.

  4. Streamlined analysis of duplex sequencing data with Du Novo.

    PubMed

    Stoler, Nicholas; Arbeithuber, Barbara; Guiblet, Wilfried; Makova, Kateryna D; Nekrutenko, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Duplex sequencing was originally developed to detect rare nucleotide polymorphisms normally obscured by the noise of high-throughput sequencing. Here we describe a new, streamlined, reference-free approach for the analysis of duplex sequencing data. We show the approach performs well on simulated data and precisely reproduces previously published results and apply it to a newly produced dataset, enabling us to type low-frequency variants in human mitochondrial DNA. Finally, we provide all necessary tools as stand-alone components as well as integrate them into the Galaxy platform. All analyses performed in this manuscript can be repeated exactly as described at http://usegalaxy.org/duplex . PMID:27566673

  5. Homogeneous turbulence subjected to mean flow with elliptic streamlines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaisdell, G. A.; Shariff, K.

    1994-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations are performed for homogeneous turbulence with a mean flow having elliptic streamlines. This flow combines the effects of rotation and strain on the turbulence. Qualitative comparisons are made with linear theory for cases with high Rossby number. The nonlinear transfer process is monitored using a generalized skewness. In general, rotation turns off the nonlinear cascade; however, for moderate ellipticities and rotation rates the nonlinear cascade is turned off and then reestablished. Turbulence statistics of interest in turbulence modeling are calculated, including full Reynolds stress budgets.

  6. A Numerical Simulation Approach for Reliability Evaluation of CFRP Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D. S.-C.; Jenab, K.

    2013-02-01

    Due to the superior mechanical properties of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) materials, they are vastly used in industries such as aircraft manufacturers. The aircraft manufacturers are switching metal to composite structures while studying reliability (R-value) of CFRP. In this study, a numerical simulation method to determine the reliability of Multiaxial Warp Knitted (MWK) textiles used to make CFRP composites is proposed. This method analyzes the distribution of carbon fiber angle misalignments, from a chosen 0° direction, caused by the sewing process of the textile, and finds the R-value, a value between 0 and 1. The application of this method is demonstrated by an illustrative example.

  7. Computational simulation of high temperature metal matrix composite behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    Computational procedures are described to simulate the thermal and mechanical behavior of high temperature metal matrix composite (HT MMC) in the following four broad areas: (1) behavior of HT MMC from micromechanics to laminate; (2) HT MMC structural response for simple and complex structural components; (3) HT MMC microfracture; and (4) tailoring of HT MMC behavior for optimum specific performance. Representative results from each area are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the computational simulation procedures. Relevant reports are referenced for extended discussion regarding the specific area.

  8. 76 FR 75825 - Streamlining Inherited Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ...The Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (the Bureau) is requesting specific suggestions from the public for streamlining regulations it recently inherited from other Federal agencies. This document asks the public to identify provisions of the inherited regulations that the Bureau should make the highest priority for updating, modifying, or eliminating because they are outdated, unduly......

  9. Overhead Projection Cell for Streamline Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waage, Harold M.

    1969-01-01

    Describes the construction and operation of an overhead projection apparatus designed to demonstrate streamline flow of a liquid. The apparatus consists of a Plexiglass tank containing water in which plates forming the cell are submerged, a constant level reservoir, an overflow device and a system for marking the flow lines with a dye. (LC)

  10. Effects of simulated lightning on composite and metallic joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, W. E.; Plumer, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of simulated lightning strikes and currents on aircraft bonded joints and access/inspection panels were investigated. Both metallic and composite specimens were tested. Tests on metal fuel feed through elbows in graphite/epoxy structures were evaluated. Sparking threshold and residual strength of single lap bonded joints and sparking threshold of access/inspection panels and metal fuel feed through elbows are reported.

  11. Novel Nanotube Manufacturing Streamlines Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Nanotubes have novel qualities that make them uniquely qualified for a plethora of uses, including applications in electronics, optics, and other scientific and industrial fields. The NASA process for creating these nanostructures involves using helium arc welding to vaporize an amorphous carbon rod and then form nanotubes by depositing the vapor onto a water-cooled carbon cathode, which then yields bundles, or ropes, of single-walled nanotubes at a rate of 2 grams per hour using a single setup. This eliminates costs associated with the use of metal catalysts, including the cost of product purification, resulting in a relatively inexpensive, high-quality, very pure end product. While managing to be less expensive, safer, and simpler, the process also increases the quality of the nanotubes. Goddard's Innovative Partnerships Program (IPP) Office promoted the technology, and in 2005, Boise-based Idaho Space Materials Inc. (ISM) was formed and applied for a nonexclusive license for the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) manufacturing technology. ISM commercialized its products, and the inexpensive, robust nanotubes are now in the hands of the scientists who will create the next generation of composite polymers, metals, and ceramics that will impact the way we live. In fact, researchers are examining ways for these newfound materials to be used in the manufacture of transistors and fuel cells, large screen televisions, ultra-sensitive sensors, high-resolution atomic force microscopy probes, supercapacitors, transparent conducting films, drug carriers, catalysts, and advanced composite materials, to name just a few of the myriad technologies to benefit.

  12. Degradation of experimental composite materials and in vitro wear simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Givan, Daniel Allen

    2001-12-01

    The material, mechanical, and clinical aspects of surface degradation of resin composite dental restorative materials by in vitro wear simulation continues to be an area of active research. To investigate wear mechanisms, a series of experimental resin composites with variable and controlled filler particle shape and loading were studied by in vitro wear simulation. The current investigation utilized a simulation that isolated the wear environment, entrapped high and low modulus debris, and evaluated the process including machine and fluid flow dynamics. The degradation was significantly affected by filler particle shape and less by particle loading. The spherical particle composites demonstrated wear loss profiles suggesting an optimized filler loading may exist. This was also demonstrated by the trends in the mechanical properties. Very little difference in magnitude was noted for the wear of irregular particle composites as a function of particulate size; and as a group they were more wear resistant than spherical particle composites. This was the result of different mechanisms of wear that were correlated with the three-dimensional particle shape. The abrasive effects of the aggregate particles and the polymeric stabilization of the irregular shape versus the destabilization and "plucking" of the spherical particles resulted in an unprotected matrix that accounted for significantly greater wear of spherical composite. A model and analysis was developed to explain the events associated with the progressive material wear loss. The initial phase was explained by fatigue-assisted microcracking and loss of material segments in a zone of high stress immediately beneath a point of high stress contact. The early phase was characterized by the development of a small facet primarily by fatigue-assisted microcracking. Although the translation effects were minimal, some three-body and initial two-body wear events were also present. In the late phases, the abrasive effects

  13. Numerical Simulation of Delamination Growth in Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camanho, P. P.; Davila, C. G.; Ambur, D. R.

    2001-01-01

    The use of decohesion elements for the simulation of delamination in composite materials is reviewed. The test methods available to measure the interfacial fracture toughness used in the formulation of decohesion elements are described initially. After a brief presentation of the virtual crack closure technique, the technique most widely used to simulate delamination growth, the formulation of interfacial decohesion elements is described. Problems related with decohesion element constitutive equations, mixed-mode crack growth, element numerical integration and solution procedures are discussed. Based on these investigations, it is concluded that the use of interfacial decohesion elements is a promising technique that avoids the need for a pre-existing crack and pre-defined crack paths, and that these elements can be used to simulate both delamination onset and growth.

  14. Impact and Penetration Simulations for Composite Wing-like Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this research project was to develop methodologies for the analysis of wing-like structures subjected to impact loadings. Low-speed impact causing either no damage or only minimal damage and high-speed impact causing severe laminate damage and possible penetration of the structure were to be considered during this research effort. To address this goal, an assessment of current analytical tools for impact analysis was performed. Assessment of the analytical tools for impact and penetration simulations with regard to accuracy, modeling, and damage modeling was considered as well as robustness, efficient, and usage in a wing design environment. Following a qualitative assessment, selected quantitative evaluations will be performed using the leading simulation tools. Based on this assessment, future research thrusts for impact and penetration simulation of composite wing-like structures were identified.

  15. 48 CFR 52.207-2 - Notice of Streamlined Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Competition. 52.207-2 Section 52.207-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION....207-2 Notice of Streamlined Competition. As prescribed in 7.305(b), insert the following provision: Notice of Streamlined Competition (MAY 2006) (a) This solicitation is part of a streamlined...

  16. 48 CFR 52.207-2 - Notice of Streamlined Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Competition. 52.207-2 Section 52.207-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION....207-2 Notice of Streamlined Competition. As prescribed in 7.305(b), insert the following provision: Notice of Streamlined Competition (MAY 2006) (a) This solicitation is part of a streamlined...

  17. 48 CFR 52.207-2 - Notice of Streamlined Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Competition. 52.207-2 Section 52.207-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION....207-2 Notice of Streamlined Competition. As prescribed in 7.305(b), insert the following provision: Notice of Streamlined Competition (MAY 2006) (a) This solicitation is part of a streamlined...

  18. 48 CFR 52.207-2 - Notice of Streamlined Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Competition. 52.207-2 Section 52.207-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION....207-2 Notice of Streamlined Competition. As prescribed in 7.305(b), insert the following provision: Notice of Streamlined Competition (MAY 2006) (a) This solicitation is part of a streamlined...

  19. 48 CFR 52.207-2 - Notice of Streamlined Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Competition. 52.207-2 Section 52.207-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION....207-2 Notice of Streamlined Competition. As prescribed in 7.305(b), insert the following provision: Notice of Streamlined Competition (MAY 2006) (a) This solicitation is part of a streamlined...

  20. Characterization of Triaxial Braided Composite Material Properties for Impact Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Biniendak, Wieslaw K.; Arnold, William A.; Littell, Justin D.; Kohlman, Lee W.

    2009-01-01

    The reliability of impact simulations for aircraft components made with triaxial braided carbon fiber composites is currently limited by inadequate material property data and lack of validated material models for analysis. Improvements to standard quasi-static test methods are needed to account for the large unit cell size and localized damage within the unit cell. The deformation and damage of a triaxial braided composite material was examined using standard quasi-static in-plane tension, compression, and shear tests. Some modifications to standard test specimen geometries are suggested, and methods for measuring the local strain at the onset of failure within the braid unit cell are presented. Deformation and damage at higher strain rates is examined using ballistic impact tests on 61- by 61- by 3.2-mm (24- by 24- by 0.125-in.) composite panels. Digital image correlation techniques were used to examine full-field deformation and damage during both quasi-static and impact tests. An impact analysis method is presented that utilizes both local and global deformation and failure information from the quasi-static tests as input for impact simulations. Improvements that are needed in test and analysis methods for better predictive capability are examined.

  1. Simulating the Impact Response of Composite Airframe Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Littell, Justin D.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, NASA Langley Research Center obtained residual hardware from the US Army's Survivable Affordable Repairable Airframe Program (SARAP). The hardware consisted of a composite fuselage section that was representative of the center section of a Black Hawk helicopter. The section was fabricated by Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation and designated the Test Validation Article (TVA). The TVA was subjected to a vertical drop test in 2008 to evaluate a tilting roof concept to limit the intrusion of overhead mass items, such as the rotor transmission, into the fuselage cabin. As a result of the 2008 test, damage to the hardware was limited primarily to the roof. Consequently, when the post-test article was obtained in 2010, the roof area was removed and the remaining structure was cut into six different types of test specimens including: (1) tension and compression coupons for material property characterization, (2) I-beam sections, (3) T-sections, (4) cruciform sections, (5) a large subfloor section, and (6) a forward framed fuselage section. In 2011, NASA and Sikorsky entered into a cooperative research agreement to study the impact responses of composite airframe structures and to evaluate the capabilities of the explicit transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA®, to simulate these responses including damage initiation and progressive failure. Finite element models of the composite specimens were developed and impact simulations were performed. The properties of the composite material were represented using both a progressive in-plane damage model (Mat 54) and a continuum damage mechanics model (Mat 58) in LS-DYNA. This paper provides test-analysis comparisons of time history responses and the location and type of damage for representative I-beam, T-section, and cruciform section components.

  2. Streamlined ratemaking: recognizing challenges for consumers

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Jeffry

    2010-11-15

    Streamlined ratemaking can be problematic if improper ratemaking practices are employed, consumers are forced to bear risks that have traditionally been born by utilities and their shareholders, and utilities are no longer strongly motivated to provide safe and reliable service at the lowest reasonable cost. Measures can be taken that help preserve the regulator's role as a surrogate for competition, thereby ensuring that rates are both just and reasonable. (author)

  3. Simulation of Fatigue Behavior of High Temperature Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Mike T.; Singhal, Suren N.; Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1996-01-01

    A generalized relatively new approach is described for the computational simulation of fatigue behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMCs). This theory is embedded in a specialty-purpose computer code. The effectiveness of the computer code to predict the fatigue behavior of HT-MMCs is demonstrated by applying it to a silicon-fiber/titanium-matrix HT-MMC. Comparative results are shown for mechanical fatigue, thermal fatigue, thermomechanical (in-phase and out-of-phase) fatigue, as well as the effects of oxidizing environments on fatigue life. These results show that the new approach reproduces available experimental data remarkably well.

  4. Analysis of variable-thickness, streamlined transducer array windowing concepts for high speed underwater vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Robert M.

    2002-11-01

    Recent research in very high speed underwater vehicles shows they require a much more streamlined vehicle nose than the present rather flat tactical scale vehicle nose. It has been found that the common forward-facing transducer array with a constant thickness array window utilized on current lower speed vehicles is inadequate. Two newer alternate front-end array concepts suitable for lower drag, higher speed vehicles being investigated are (a) a variable thickness, streamlined array window on a flat forward facing array and (b) a streamlined vehicle nose structure consisting of a built-in distributed, conformal array. While these highly streamlined concepts are attractive from the standpoint of reducing vehicle drag at higher speeds, both require reexamination of the effects of high curvature on front-end sonar array performance. In the present paper, both above streamlined array concepts are numerically examined using the sara2d dynamic structural-acoustic Finite Element Analysis (FEA) code. First, the acoustic performance of a hemispherical array window is compared to a common equal aperture flat window in both transmit (outgoing acoustic wave) and receive (incident acoustic wave) modes. Second, a dynamic simulation of acoustic array beam-forming and beam-steering is performed for a conical shaped conformal array to assess the feasibility of the concept.

  5. Streamlining the RI/FS process

    SciTech Connect

    Dumas, L.; Doss, R.C.

    1998-07-01

    In 1994, Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E) contracted with CH2M HILL to manage remedial investigations and feasibility studies (RI/FS) at its former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites in Chico, Willows, and Marysville, California. These three sites had similar histories, MGP-related contaminants, similar geologic settings, and geographically were close together. Recognizing the advantages that may be gained, both in time and money, by streamlining the RI/FS process, PG and E and CH2M HILL combined the sites into one project. From the start of the project, PG and E and CH2M HILL looked for an implemented changes to the RI/FS process to streamline the project. These changes included combining deliverables, linking field programs at the three sites, and negotiating bulk discounts on laboratory and other services by combining the work to be done at the three sites under one contract. CH2M HILL later proposed additional measures to streamline the project that were eventually adopted by both PG and E and the regulatory agencies. PG and E and CH2M HILL are currently working with the regulatory agencies to negotiate realistic measures to address contaminants in soil and groundwater, and are jointly preparing the FS with the regulatory agencies using a unique means of documentation.

  6. Simulation of Forming and Wrinkling of Textile Composite Reinforcements

    SciTech Connect

    Hamila, N.; Wang, P.; Vidal-Salle, E.; Boisse, P.

    2011-05-04

    Because of the very weak textile bending stiffness, wrinkles are frequent during composite reinforcement forming. The simulation of the shape of these wrinkles during the forming process permits to verify there is no wrinkle in the useful part of the preform. In this paper the role of tensions, in-plane shear and bending rigidities in wrinkling development are analyzed. In-plane shear plays a main role for onset of wrinkles in double-curved shape forming but wrinkling is a global phenomenon depending on all strains and stiffnesses and on boundary conditions. The bending stiffness mainly determines the shape of the wrinkles and a membrane approach it is not sufficient to simulate wrinkles.

  7. An Enriched Shell Element for Delamination Simulation in Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElroy, Mark

    2015-01-01

    A formulation is presented for an enriched shell finite element capable of delamination simulation in composite laminates. The element uses an adaptive splitting approach for damage characterization that allows for straightforward low-fidelity model creation and a numerically efficient solution. The Floating Node Method is used in conjunction with the Virtual Crack Closure Technique to predict delamination growth and represent it discretely at an arbitrary ply interface. The enriched element is verified for Mode I delamination simulation using numerical benchmark data. After determining important mesh configuration guidelines for the vicinity of the delamination front in the model, a good correlation was found between the enriched shell element model results and the benchmark data set.

  8. Assessment of RANS to predict flows with large streamline curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J. L.; Wang, D. Z.; Cheng, H.; Gu, W. G.

    2013-12-01

    In order to provide a guideline for choosing turbulence models in computation of complex flows with large streamline curvature, this paper presents a comprehensive comparison investigation of different RANS models widely used in engineering to check each model's sensibility on the streamline curvature. First, different models including standard k-ε, Realizable k-ε, Renormalization-group (RNG) k-ε model, Shear-stress transport k-ω model and non-linear eddy-viscosity model v2-f model are tested to simulated the flow in a 2D U-bend which has the standard bench mark available. The comparisons in terms of non-dimensional velocity and turbulent kinetic energy show that large differences exist among the results calculated by various models. To further validate the capability to predict flows with secondary flows, the involved models are tested in a 3D 90° bend flow. Also, the velocities are compared. As a summary, the advantages and disadvantages of each model are analysed and guidelines for choice of turbulence model are presented.

  9. A fault and seismicity based composite simulation in northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıkılmaz, M. B.; Heien, E. M.; Turcotte, D. L.; Rundle, J. B.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2011-12-01

    We generate synthetic catalogs of seismicity in northern California using a composite simulation. The basis of the simulation is the fault based "Virtual California" (VC) earthquake simulator. Back-slip velocities and mean recurrence intervals are specified on model strike-slip faults. A catalog of characteristic earthquakes is generated for a period of 100 000 yr. These earthquakes are predominantly in the range M = 6 to M = 8, but do not follow Gutenberg-Richter (GR) scaling at lower magnitudes. In order to model seismicity on unmapped faults we introduce background seismicity which occurs randomly in time with GR scaling and is spatially associated with the VC model faults. These earthquakes fill in the GR scaling down to M = 4 (the smallest earthquakes modeled). The rate of background seismicity is constrained by the observed rate of occurrence of M > 4 earthquakes in northern California. These earthquakes are then used to drive the BASS (branching aftershock sequence) model of aftershock occurrence. The BASS model is the self-similar limit of the ETAS (epidemic type aftershock sequence) model. Families of aftershocks are generated following each Virtual California and background main shock. In the simulations the rate of occurrence of aftershocks is essentially equal to the rate of occurrence of main shocks in the magnitude range 4 < M < 7. We generate frequency-magnitude and recurrence interval statistics both regionally and fault specific. We compare our modeled rates of seismicity and spatial variability with observations.

  10. Concurrent Probabilistic Simulation of High Temperature Composite Structural Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdi, Frank

    1996-01-01

    A computational structural/material analysis and design tool which would meet industry's future demand for expedience and reduced cost is presented. This unique software 'GENOA' is dedicated to parallel and high speed analysis to perform probabilistic evaluation of high temperature composite response of aerospace systems. The development is based on detailed integration and modification of diverse fields of specialized analysis techniques and mathematical models to combine their latest innovative capabilities into a commercially viable software package. The technique is specifically designed to exploit the availability of processors to perform computationally intense probabilistic analysis assessing uncertainties in structural reliability analysis and composite micromechanics. The primary objectives which were achieved in performing the development were: (1) Utilization of the power of parallel processing and static/dynamic load balancing optimization to make the complex simulation of structure, material and processing of high temperature composite affordable; (2) Computational integration and synchronization of probabilistic mathematics, structural/material mechanics and parallel computing; (3) Implementation of an innovative multi-level domain decomposition technique to identify the inherent parallelism, and increasing convergence rates through high- and low-level processor assignment; (4) Creating the framework for Portable Paralleled architecture for the machine independent Multi Instruction Multi Data, (MIMD), Single Instruction Multi Data (SIMD), hybrid and distributed workstation type of computers; and (5) Market evaluation. The results of Phase-2 effort provides a good basis for continuation and warrants Phase-3 government, and industry partnership.

  11. Computational simulation of acoustic fatigue for hot composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Surendra N.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.; Nagpal, Vinod K.; Sutjahjo, Edhi

    1991-01-01

    Predictive methods/computer codes for the computational simulation of acoustic fatigue resistance of hot composite structures subjected to acoustic excitation emanating from an adjacent vibrating component are discussed. Select codes developed over the past two decades at the NASA Lewis Research Center are used. The codes include computation of acoustic noise generated from a vibrating component, degradation in material properties of a composite laminate at use temperature, dynamic response of acoustically excited hot multilayered composite structure, degradation in the first ply strength of the excited structure due to acoustic loading, and acoustic fatigue resistance of the excited structure, including the propulsion environment. Effects of the laminate lay-up and environment on the acoustic fatigue life are evaluated. The results show that, by keeping the angled plies on the outer surface of the laminate, a substantial increase in the acoustic fatigue life is obtained. The effect of environment (temperature and moisture) is to relieve the residual stresses leading to an increase in the acoustic fatigue life of the excited panel.

  12. Computational simulation of acoustic fatigue for hot composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, S. N.; Nagpal, V. K.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents predictive methods/codes for computational simulation of acoustic fatigue resistance of hot composite structures subjected to acoustic excitation emanating from an adjacent vibrating component. Select codes developed over the past two decades at the NASA Lewis Research Center are used. The codes include computation of (1) acoustic noise generated from a vibrating component, (2) degradation in material properties of the composite laminate at use temperature, (3) dynamic response of acoustically excited hot multilayered composite structure, (4) degradation in the first-ply strength of the excited structure due to acoustic loading, and (5) acoustic fatigue resistance of the excited structure, including propulsion environment. Effects of the laminate lay-up and environment on the acoustic fatigue life are evaluated. The results show that, by keeping the angled plies on the outer surface of the laminate, a substantial increase in the acoustic fatigue life is obtained. The effect of environment (temperature and moisure) is to relieve the residual stresses leading to an increase in the acoustic fatigue life of the excited panel.

  13. Simulating Future GPS Clock Scenarios with Two Composite Clock Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, Matthias; Matsakis, Demetrios; Greenhall, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Using the GPS Toolkit, the GPS constellation is simulated using 31 satellites (SV) and a ground network of 17 monitor stations (MS). At every 15-minutes measurement epoch, the monitor stations measure the time signals of all satellites above a parameterized elevation angle. Once a day, the satellite clock estimates the station and satellite clocks. The first composite clock (B) is based on the Brown algorithm, and is now used by GPS. The second one (G) is based on the Greenhall algorithm. The composite clock of G and B performance are investigated using three ground-clock models. Model C simulates the current GPS configuration, in which all stations are equipped with cesium clocks, except for masers at USNO and Alternate Master Clock (AMC) sites. Model M is an improved situation in which every station is equipped with active hydrogen masers. Finally, Models F and O are future scenarios in which the USNO and AMC stations are equipped with fountain clocks instead of masers. Model F is a rubidium fountain, while Model O is more precise but futuristic Optical Fountain. Each model is evaluated using three performance metrics. The timing-related user range error having all satellites available is the first performance index (PI1). The second performance index (PI2) relates to the stability of the broadcast GPS system time itself. The third performance index (PI3) evaluates the stability of the time scales computed by the two composite clocks. A distinction is made between the "Signal-in-Space" accuracy and that available through a GNSS receiver.

  14. A fault and seismicity based composite simulation in northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yikilmaz, M. B.; Heien, E.; Turcotte, D. L.; Rundle, J. B.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2010-12-01

    We generate synthetic catalogs of seismicity in northern California using a composite simulation. The basis of the simulation is the fault based “Virtual California” (VC) earthquake simulator. Back-slip velocities and mean recurrence intervals are specified on model strike-slip faults. A catalog of characteristic earthquakes is generated for a period of 100,000 years. These earthquakes are predominantly in the range M = 6 to 8, but do not follow Gutenberg-Richter (GR) scaling at lower magnitudes. In order to model seismicity on unmapped faults we introduce background seismicity which occurs randomly in time with GR scaling and is spatially associated with the VC model faults. These earthquakes fill in the GR scaling down to M = 4 (the smallest earthquakes modeled). The rate of background seismicity is constrained by the observed rate of occurrence of M > 4 earthquakes in northern California. These earthquakes are then used to drive the BASS (Branching Aftershock Sequence) model of aftershock occurrence. The BASS model is the self-similar limit of the ETAS (Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence) model. Families of aftershocks are generated following each Virtual California and background main shock. In the simulations the rate of occurrence of aftershocks is essentially equal to the rate of occurrence of main shocks in the magnitude range 4 < M < 7. It is also necessary to generate background seismicity that is random time but spatially associated with the VC model faults. A visual simulation illustrates the resulting seismicity. We generate frequency-magnitude and recurrence interval statistics both regionally and fault specific. We compare our modeled rates of seismicity with observations.

  15. A Composite Model for the Simulation of Seismicity (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcotte, D. L.; Yikilmaz, M. B.; Rundle, J. B.; Heien, E.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we present a composite model for the simulation of seismicity in a region. The model is composed of three parts: (1) Major faults are prescribed along with their mean slip rate and inter-event times. The Virtual California (VC) model is used to generate the major earthquakes on these faults. The output is dominated by characteristic earthquakes. The ability of earthquakes to bridge gaps between faults controls the occurrence of the largest earthquakes. (2) Background seismicity is generated at a random (Poissonian) times with magnitudes that are generated from a Gutenberg-Richter (GR) frequency-magnitude distributions. The Poissonian rate is prescribed to generate the present rate of magnitude 4+ earthquakes in the region. The locations of the background earthquakes is related statistically to the faults prescribed in (1) above. (3) Both VC and background earthquakes are parent earthquakes for the BASS model for aftershock generation (the BASS model is the scale-invariant limit of the ETAS model). To illustrate the output of this composite model we consider seismicity with M > 4 earthquakes in Northern California. We generate frequency-magnitude statistics from a 100,000 year simulation. Earthquakes with M > 7 are predominantly VC earthquakes. Earthquakes with 4 < M < 7 are predominantly background earthquakes and aftershocks of both background and VC earthquakes. The number of background earthquakes and aftershocks are approximately equal. We also give the yearly time series of M > 4 earthquakes for the period between two northern San Andreas characteristic earthquakes. We find good agreement with the observed numbers for the last 60 years. We also give the simulator GR and inter-event statistics for earthquakes on the San Andreas and Hayward faults.

  16. EDITORIAL: Modelling and simulation in polymer and composites processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Josè M.

    2004-05-01

    The general theme of this special section is modelling and simulation in polymer and composite processing. Composite processing in general involves reactive processing. During the last decade there have been numerous advances in modelling and simulation in both thermoplastic and reactive processing. This fact, coupled with the enormous advances in computing capability, has made Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) a reality. Industry nowadays depends on CAE to improve and/or develop new processes. There is no excuse not to take advantage of modelling and simulation. Another tendency is a clear move towards environmentally benign manufacturing; thus several papers in this issue discuss environmentally benign alternatives to traditional manufacturing for both composite and thermoplastics. The first two papers are a review of modelling and simulation; the first paper by Castro, Cabrera Rios and Mount-Campbell focuses on reactive processing, while the second by Kim and Turng discusses thermoplastics moulding. Another important issue is the need to use empirical modelling for cases where physics-based models are not available or are too cumbersome to use. For that reason the paper by Castro et al focuses on empirical modelling and the paper by Kim and Turng discusses exclusively physics-based modelling. The next three papers, two by Advani and collaborators and the third by Srinivasagupta and Kardos, refer to composite manufacturing. Advani's papers cover recent advances in Reactive Liquid Moulding, a process that has gained great acceptance as an environmentally benign alternative to open moulding. The paper by Srinivasagupta and Kardos covers the important issue of addressing simultaneously both environmental and economical design. In general the environmental optimum does not coincide with the economic optimum; this gives rise to the need to compromise. The Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) technique, discussed in the first paper, can be used to identify the best set of

  17. An overview of computational simulation methods for composite structures failure and life analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    Three parallel computational simulation methods are being developed at the LeRC Structural Mechanics Branch (SMB) for composite structures failure and life analysis: progressive fracture CODSTRAN; hierarchical methods for high-temperature composites; and probabilistic evaluation. Results to date demonstrate that these methods are effective in simulating composite structures failure/life/reliability.

  18. Simulating low-cost cameras for augmented reality compositing.

    PubMed

    Klein, Georg; Murray, David W

    2010-01-01

    Video see-through Augmented Reality adds computer graphics to the real world in real time by overlaying graphics onto a live video feed. To achieve a realistic integration of the virtual and real imagery, the rendered images should have a similar appearance and quality to those produced by the video camera. This paper describes a compositing method which models the artifacts produced by a small low-cost camera, and adds these effects to an ideal pinhole image produced by conventional rendering methods. We attempt to model and simulate each step of the imaging process, including distortions, chromatic aberrations, blur, Bayer masking, noise, sharpening, and color-space compression, all while requiring only an RGBA image and an estimate of camera velocity as inputs. PMID:20224133

  19. STREAMLINED LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT: A FINAL REPORT FROM THE SETAC-NORTH AMERICA STREAMLINED LCA WORKGROUP

    EPA Science Inventory

    The original goal of the Streamlined LCA workgroup was to define and document a process for a shortened form of LCA. At the time, because of the large amount of data needed to do a cradle-to-grave evaluation, it was believed that in addition to such a "full" LCA approach there w...

  20. Orthorhombic Titanium Matrix Composite Subjected to Simulated Engine Mission Cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.

    1997-01-01

    Titanium matrix composites (TMC's) are commonly made up of a titanium alloy matrix reinforced by silicon carbide fibers that are oriented parallel to the loading axis. These composites can provide high strength at lower densities than monolithic titanium alloys and superalloys in selected gas turbine engine applications. The use of TMC rings with unidirectional SiC fibers as reinforcing rings within compressor rotors could significantly reduce the weight of these components. In service, these TMC reinforcing rings would be subjected to complex service mission loading cycles, including fatigue and dwell excursions. Orthorhombic titanium aluminide alloys are of particular interest for such TMC applications because their tensile and creep strengths are high in comparison to those of other titanium alloys. The objective of this investigation was to assess, in simulated mission tests at the NASA Lewis Research Center, the durability of a SiC (SCS-6)/Ti-22Al-23Nb (at.%) TMC for compressor ring applications, in cooperation with the Allison Engine Company.

  1. Streamlining environmental product declarations: a stage model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Elisabeth; Lefebvre, Louis A.; Talbot, Stephane; Le Hen, Gael

    2001-02-01

    General public environmental awareness and education is increasing, therefore stimulating the demand for reliable, objective and comparable information about products' environmental performances. The recently published standard series ISO 14040 and ISO 14025 are normalizing the preparation of Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) containing comprehensive information relevant to a product's environmental impact during its life cycle. So far, only a few environmentally leading manufacturing organizations have experimented the preparation of EPDs (mostly from Europe), demonstrating its great potential as a marketing weapon. However the preparation of EPDs is a complex process, requiring collection and analysis of massive amounts of information coming from disparate sources (suppliers, sub-contractors, etc.). In a foreseeable future, the streamlining of the EPD preparation process will require product manufacturers to adapt their information systems (ERP, MES, SCADA) in order to make them capable of gathering, and transmitting the appropriate environmental information. It also requires strong functional integration all along the product supply chain in order to ensure that all the information is made available in a standardized and timely manner. The goal of the present paper is two fold: first to propose a transitional model towards green supply chain management and EPD preparation; second to identify key technologies and methodologies allowing to streamline the EPD process and subsequently the transition toward sustainable product development

  2. Streamlining Collaborative Planning in Spacecraft Mission Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Dhariti; Bopf, Michel; Fishman, Mark; Jones, Jeremy; Kerbel, Uri; Pell, Vince

    2000-01-01

    During the past two decades, the planning and scheduling community has substantially increased the capability and efficiency of individual planning and scheduling systems. Relatively recently, research work to streamline collaboration between planning systems is gaining attention. Spacecraft missions stand to benefit substantially from this work as they require the coordination of multiple planning organizations and planning systems. Up to the present time this coordination has demanded a great deal of human intervention and/or extensive custom software development efforts. This problem will become acute with increased requirements for cross-mission plan coordination and multi -spacecraft mission planning. The Advanced Architectures and Automation Branch of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is taking innovative steps to define collaborative planning architectures, and to identify coordinated planning tools for Cross-Mission Campaigns. Prototypes are being developed to validate these architectures and assess the usefulness of the coordination tools by the planning community. This presentation will focus on one such planning coordination too], named Visual Observation Layout Tool (VOLT), which is currently being developed to streamline the coordination between astronomical missions

  3. The length distribution of streamline segments in homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, P.; Gampert, M.; Peters, N.

    2012-04-01

    by Schaefer et al. ["Fast and slow changes of the length of gradient trajectories in homogenous shear turbulence," in Advances in Turbulence XII, edited by B. Eckhardt (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2009), pp. 565-572] we will refer to the morphological part of the evolution of streamline segments as slow changes while the topological part of the evolution is referred to as fast changes. This separation yields a transport equation for the probability density function (pdf) P(l) of the arclength l of streamline segments in which the slow changes translate into a convection and a diffusion term when terms up to second order are included and the fast changes yield integral terms. The overall temporal evolution (morphological and topological) of the arclength l of streamline segments is analyzed and associated with the motion of the above isosurface. This motion is diffusion controlled for small segments, while large segments are mainly subject to strain and pressure fluctuations. The convection velocity corresponds to the first order jump moment, while the diffusion term includes the second order jump moment. It is concluded, both theoretically and from direct numerical simulations (DNS) data of homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence at two different Reynolds numbers, that the normalized first order jump moment is quasi-universal, while the second order one is proportional to the inverse of the square root of the Taylor based Reynolds number Re_{λ }^{-1/2}. Its inclusion thus represents a small correction in the limit of large Reynolds numbers. Numerical solutions of the pdf equation yield a good agreement with the pdf obtained from the DNS data. The interplay of viscous drift acting on small segments and linear strain acting on large segments yield, as it has already been concluded for dissipation elements, that the mean length of streamline segments should scale with Taylor microscale.

  4. Determination of damping properties in laminated composites via numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Surana, K.S.; Ahmadi, A.R.

    1997-07-01

    This paper presents a numerical simulation procedure based on finite element method which could be utilized for establishing the damping characteristic of laminated composite material. Viscoelastic fluids such as upper convected Maxwell fluid and White Metzner fluids are used as sample problems to illustrate the procedure and its usefulness. For many viscoelastic materials, the damping characteristics are incorporated through what is known as loss factor while simulating dynamic response of structures containing such materials. The loss factor is directly related to the dissipative mechanism in the equations describing the behavior can be accurately obtained. In this paper the authors utilize p-version Least Squares Finite Element Method (LSFEM) to numerically solve the equations and then calculate loss factor in the post processing phase of the computations. The governing differential equations and the constitutive laws describing the material behavior are recast into a system of first order differential equations using auxiliary variables (often the stresses). Both the dependent and the auxiliary variables are interpolated over an element using unequal order C{sup 0} interpolations (element approximation). When the element approximation is substituted into the first order differential equations the authors obtain element error or residual equations. In LSFEM they minimize the integrated sum of squares of these errors over the whole discretization. They utilize Newton`s method with line search to obtain a solution iteratively.

  5. Similarity-Guided Streamline Placement with Error Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Cohen, J D; Krolik, J H

    2007-08-15

    Most streamline generation algorithms either provide a particular density of streamlines across the domain or explicitly detect features, such as critical points, and follow customized rules to emphasize those features. However, the former generally includes many redundant streamlines, and the latter requires Boolean decisions on which points are features (and may thus suffer from robustness problems for real-world data). We take a new approach to adaptive streamline placement for steady vector fields in 2D and 3D. We define a metric for local similarity among streamlines and use this metric to grow streamlines from a dense set of candidate seed points. The metric considers not only Euclidean distance, but also a simple statistical measure of shape and directional similarity. Without explicit feature detection, our method produces streamlines that naturally accentuate regions of geometric interest. In conjunction with this method, we also propose a quantitative error metric for evaluating a streamline representation based on how well it preserves the information from the original vector field. This error metric reconstructs a vector field from points on the streamline representation and computes a difference of the reconstruction from the original vector field.

  6. Hierarchical streamline bundles for visualizing 2D flow fields.

    SciTech Connect

    Shene, Ching-Kuang; Wang, Chaoli; Yu, Hongfeng; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2010-08-01

    We present hierarchical streamline bundles, a new approach to simplifying and visualizing 2D flow fields. Our method first densely seeds a flow field and produces a large number of streamlines that capture important flow features such as critical points. Then, we group spatially neighboring and geometrically similar streamlines to construct a hierarchy from which we extract streamline bundles at different levels of detail. Streamline bundles highlight multiscale flow features and patterns through a clustered yet non-cluttered display. This selective visualization strategy effectively accentuates visual foci and therefore is able to convey the desired insight into the flow fields. The hierarchical streamline bundles we have introduced offer a new way to characterize and visualize the flow structure and patterns in multiscale fashion. Streamline bundles highlight critical points clearly and concisely. Exploring the hierarchy allows a complete visualization of important flow features. Thanks to selective streamline display and flexible LOD refinement, our multiresolution technique is scalable and is promising for viewing large and complex flow fields. In the future, we would like to seek a cost-effective way to generate streamlines without enforcing the dense seeding condition. We will also extend this approach to handle real-world 3D complex flow fields.

  7. Leached components from dental composites in oral simulating fluids and the resultant composite strengths.

    PubMed

    Lee, S Y; Huang, H M; Lin, C Y; Shih, Y H

    1998-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the leached moieties of dental composites after storage in ethanol and organic acids of plaque and further evaluate the resultant effect on the diametral tensile strength (DTS) of the composites. Three commercial composites were used: Bis-GMA-based Z100, Bis-GMA/UDMA-based Heliomolar, and Bis-MPEPP-based Marathon One. The solutions used were: 99.9% acetic acid, 99% propionic acid and 75% ethanol. Specimens (4 mm diam. x 2 mm thick) were stored at 37 degrees C in 3 mL of solution for up to 30 days. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to characterize the leached moieties and DTS of the specimens after immersion was evaluated. Data were analysed using ANOVA and Tukey LSD test. The eluted substances were not all the same in different solutions and composites but mostly increased with immersion time, and included diluents (TEGDMA and decamethacrylate) and some additives, such as an ultra-violet stabilizer (TINUVINP), plasticizers (dicyclohexyl phthalate and bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate), initiator (triphenyl stibine), coupling agent (gamma-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane), and phenyl benzoate. The chief polymerizing monomers were not found. More kinds of components were found in the acetic acid and ethanol groups studied. The fewest kinds and quantities of leached moieties were found for Bis-GMA specimens and then Bis-GMA/UDMA ones, most of which are diluent agents. Bis-MPEPP specimens leached the most substances, which were composed mostly of a short phenyl group chain structure. The BisGMA composite showed the highest DTS (54.8 +/- 5.7 MPa), which was not greatly affected by the length of storage. Bis-GMA/UDMA (36.2 +/- 6.8 MPa) and Bis-MPEPP (26.1 +/- 4.5 MPa) composites were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) after 30 days storage in the ethanol (35-50%), in the propionic acid (25-30%), and in the acetic acid (40-60%). Irreversible processes such as the leaching of components occur in fluids simulating an oral

  8. Localized and generalized simulated wear of resin composites.

    PubMed

    Barkmeier, W W; Takamizawa, T; Erickson, R L; Tsujimoto, A; Latta, M; Miyazaki, M

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to examine the wear of resin composite materials using both a localized and generalized wear simulation model. Twenty specimens each of seven resin composites (Esthet•X HD [HD], Filtek Supreme Ultra [SU], Herculite Ultra [HU], SonicFill [SF], Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill [TB], Venus Diamond [VD], and Z100 Restorative [Z]) were subjected to a wear challenge of 400,000 cycles for both localized and generalized wear in a Leinfelder-Suzuki wear simulator (Alabama machine). The materials were placed in custom cylinder-shaped stainless steel fixtures. A stainless steel ball bearing (r=2.387 mm) was used as the antagonist for localized wear, and a stainless steel, cylindrical antagonist with a flat tip was used for generalized wear. A water slurry of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) beads was used as the abrasive media. A noncontact profilometer (Proscan 2100) with Proscan software was used to digitize the surface contours of the pretest and posttest specimens. AnSur 3D software was used for wear assessment. For localized testing, maximum facet depth (μm) and volume loss (mm(3)) were used to compare the materials. The mean depth of the facet surface (μm) and volume loss (mm(3)) were used for comparison of the generalized wear specimens. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc test were used for data analysis of volume loss for both localized and generalized wear, maximum facet depth for localized wear, and mean depth of the facet for generalized wear. The results for localized wear simulation were as follows [mean (standard deviation)]: maximum facet depth (μm)--Z, 59.5 (14.7); HU, 99.3 (16.3); SU, 102.8 (13.8); HD, 110.2 (13.3); VD, 114.0 (10.3); TB, 125.5 (12.1); SF, 195.9 (16.9); volume loss (mm(3))--Z, 0.013 (0.002); SU, 0.026 (0.006); HU, 0.043 (0.008); VD, 0.057 (0.009); HD, 0.058 (0.014); TB, 0.061 (0.010); SF, 0.135 (0.024). Generalized wear simulation results were as follows: mean depth of facet (μm)--Z, 9.3 (3

  9. Peridynamic modeling and simulation of polymer-nanotube composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henke, Steven F.

    In this document, we develop and demonstrate a framework for simulating the mechanics of polymer materials that are reinforced by carbon nanotubes. Our model utilizes peridynamic theory to describe the mechanical response of the polymer and polymer-nanotube interfaces. We benefit from the continuum formulation used in peridynamics because (1) it allows the polymer material to be coarse-grained to the scale of the reinforcing nanofibers, and (2) failure via nanotube pull-out and matrix tearing are possible based on energetic considerations alone (i.e. without special treatment). To reduce the degrees of freedom that must be simulated, the reinforcement effect of the nanotubes is represented by a mesoscale bead-spring model. This approach permits the arbitrary placement of reinforcement ``strands'' in the problem domain and motivates the need for irregular quadrature point distributions, which have not yet been explored in the peridynamic setting. We address this matter in detail and report on aspects of mesh sensitivity that we uncovered in peridynamic simulations. Using a manufactured solution, we study the effects of quadrature point placement on the accuracy of the solution scheme in one and two dimensions. We demonstrate that square grids and the generator points of a centroidal Voronoi tessellation (CVT) support solutions of similar accuracy, but CVT grids have desirable characteristics that may justify the additional computational cost required for their construction. Impact simulations provide evidence that CVT grids support fracture patterns that resemble those obtained on higher resolution cubic Cartesian grids with a reduced computational burden. With the efficacy of irregular meshing schemes established, we exercise our model by dynamically stretching a cylindrical specimen composed of the polymer-nanotube composite. We vary the number of reinforcements, alignment of the filler, and the properties of the polymer-nanotube interface. Our results suggest

  10. Quantum mechanical streamlines. I - Square potential barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschfelder, J. O.; Christoph, A. C.; Palke, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    Exact numerical calculations are made for scattering of quantum mechanical particles hitting a square two-dimensional potential barrier (an exact analog of the Goos-Haenchen optical experiments). Quantum mechanical streamlines are plotted and found to be smooth and continuous, to have continuous first derivatives even through the classical forbidden region, and to form quantized vortices around each of the nodal points. A comparison is made between the present numerical calculations and the stationary wave approximation, and good agreement is found between both the Goos-Haenchen shifts and the reflection coefficients. The time-independent Schroedinger equation for real wavefunctions is reduced to solving a nonlinear first-order partial differential equation, leading to a generalization of the Prager-Hirschfelder perturbation scheme. Implications of the hydrodynamical formulation of quantum mechanics are discussed, and cases are cited where quantum and classical mechanical motions are identical.

  11. Honeybee flight: a novel 'streamlining' response.

    PubMed

    Luu, Tien; Cheung, Allen; Ball, David; Srinivasan, Mandyam V

    2011-07-01

    Animals that move rapidly through the air can save considerable energy by reducing the drag that they need to overcome during flight. We describe a novel 'streamlining' response in tethered, flying honeybees in which the abdomen is held in a raised position when the visual system is exposed to a pattern of image motion that is characteristic of forward flight. This visually evoked response, which can be elicited without exposing the insect to any airflow, presumably serves to reduce the aerodynamic drag that would otherwise be produced by the abdomen during real flight. The response is critically dependent on the presence of appropriate image motion everywhere within the large field of view of the insect. Thus, our results also underscore the importance of using panoramic stimulation for the study of visually guided flight in insects, and reveal the relative importance of various regions of the visual field in assessing the speed of flight through the environment. PMID:21653815

  12. A Recipe for Streamlining Mission Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Andrew E.; Semancik, Susan K.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a project's design and implementation for streamlining mission management with knowledge capture processes across multiple organizations of a NASA directorate. Thc project's focus is on standardizing processes and reports; enabling secure information access and case of maintenance; automating and tracking appropriate workflow rules through process mapping; and infusing new technologies. This paper will describe a small team's experiences using XML technologies through an enhanced vendor suite of applications integrated on Windows-based platforms called the Wallops Integrated Scheduling and Document Management System (WISDMS). This paper describes our results using this system in a variety of endeavors, including providing range project scheduling and resource management for a Range and Mission Management Office; implementing an automated Customer Feedback system for a directorate; streamlining mission status reporting across a directorate; and initiating a document management, configuration management and portal access system for a Range Safety Office's programs. The end result is a reduction of the knowledge gap through better integration and distribution of information, improved process performance, automated metric gathering, and quicker identification of problem areas and issues. However, the real proof of the pudding comes through overcoming the user's reluctance to replace familiar, seasoned processes with new technology ingredients blended with automated procedures in an untested recipe. This paper shares some of the team's observations that led to better implementation techniques, as well as an IS0 9001 Best Practices citation. This project has provided a unique opportunity to advance NASA's competency in new technologies, as well as to strategically implement them within an organizational structure, while wetting the appetite for continued improvements in mission management.

  13. 75 FR 15689 - Streamlined Procedure for Appeal Brief Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office Streamlined Procedure for Appeal Brief Review AGENCY: United... Trademark Office (USPTO) is streamlining the procedure for the review of appeal briefs to increase the... responsibility for determining whether appeal briefs filed in patent applications comply with the...

  14. 48 CFR 12.602 - Streamlined evaluation of offers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... when the solicitation adequately describes the item's intended use. A technical evaluation would... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Streamlined evaluation of... ACQUISITION PLANNING ACQUISITION OF COMMERCIAL ITEMS Streamlined Procedures for Evaluation and...

  15. 48 CFR 212.602 - Streamlined evaluation of offers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Streamlined evaluation of offers. 212.602 Section 212.602 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... for Evaluation and Solicitation for Commercial Items 212.602 Streamlined evaluation of offers....

  16. On a modified streamline curvature method for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordova, Jeffrey Q.; Pearson, Carl E.

    1988-01-01

    A modification of the streamline curvature method leads to a quasilinear second-order partial differential equation for the streamline coordinate function. The existence of a stream function is not required. The method is applied to subsonic and supersonic nozzle flow, and to axially symmetric flow with swirl. For many situations, the associated numerical method is both fast and accurate.

  17. Cooperative phenomena in laminar fluids: Observation of streamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, Martin A.; Kretschmer, M.; Hoefner, H.; Konopka, U.; Morfill, G.E.; Ratynskaia, S.; Fortov, V.; Petrov, O.; Usachev, A.; Zobnin, A.

    2005-10-31

    Complex plasmas are an ideal model system to investigate laminar fluids as they allow to study fluids at the kinetic level. At this level we are able to identify streamlines particle by particle. This gives us the ability to research the behaviour of these streamlines as well as the behaviour of each individual particle of the streamline.We carried out our experiments in a modified GEC-RF-Reference cell. We trapped the particles within two glass rings and forced them to form a circular flow by using several stripe electrodes. In this flow the particles behave like an ideal fluid and form streamlines. By putting an obstacle into the flow we reduce the cross-section. To pass through this constricted cross-section some streamlines have to reconnect. After the obstacle the streamlines split up again. An analysis how streamlines split up and reconnect as result of external pressure on the fluid in our system is presented here.Streamlines also occur if two clouds of particles penetrate each other. We call this 'Lane formation'. Results from our PK-4 experiment are presented here also.

  18. 48 CFR 252.211-7000 - Acquisition streamlining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Acquisition streamlining. 252.211-7000 Section 252.211-7000 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... of Provisions And Clauses 252.211-7000 Acquisition streamlining. As prescribed in 211.002-70, use...

  19. 48 CFR 252.211-7000 - Acquisition streamlining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Acquisition streamlining. 252.211-7000 Section 252.211-7000 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... of Provisions And Clauses 252.211-7000 Acquisition streamlining. As prescribed in 211.002-70, use...

  20. Interpreting marine controlled source electromagnetic field behaviour with streamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pethick, A. M.; Harris, B. D.

    2013-10-01

    Streamlines represent particle motion within a vector field as a single line structure and have been used in many areas of geophysics. We extend the concept of streamlines to interactive three dimensional representations of the coupled vector fields generated during marine controlled source electromagnetic surveys. These vector fields have measurable amplitudes throughout many hundreds of cubic kilometres. Electromagnetic streamline representation makes electromagnetic interactions within complex geo-electrical setting comprehensible. We develop an interface to rapidly compute and interactively visualise the electric and magnetic fields as streamlines for 3D marine controlled source electromagnetic surveys. Several examples highlighting how interactive use has value in marine controlled source electromagnetic survey design, interpretation and teaching are provided. The first videos of electric, magnetic and Poynting vector field streamlines are provided along with the first published example of the airwave represented as streamlines. We demonstrate that the electric field airwave is a circulating vortex moving down and out from the air-water interface towards the ocean floor. The use of interactive streamlines is not limited to marine controlled source electromagnetic methods. Streamlines provides a high level visualisation tool for interpreting the electric and magnetic field behaviour generated by a wide range of electromagnetic survey configurations for complex 3D geo-electrical settings.

  1. Probabilistic Simulation for Combined Cycle Fatigue in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2010-01-01

    A methodology to compute probabilistic fatigue life of polymer matrix laminated composites has been developed and demonstrated. Matrix degradation effects caused by long term environmental exposure and mechanical/thermal cyclic loads are accounted for in the simulation process. A unified time-temperature-stress dependent multifactor interaction relationship developed at NASA Glenn Research Center has been used to model the degradation/aging of material properties due to cyclic loads. The fast probability integration method is used to compute probabilistic distribution of response. Sensitivities of fatigue life reliability to uncertainties in the primitive random variables (e.g., constituent properties, fiber volume ratio, void volume ratio, ply thickness, etc.) computed and their significance in the reliability-based design for maximum life is discussed. The effect of variation in the thermal cyclic loads on the fatigue reliability for a (0/+/- 45/90)s graphite/epoxy laminate with a ply thickness of 0.127 mm, with respect to impending failure modes has been studied. The results show that, at low mechanical cyclic loads and low thermal cyclic amplitudes, fatigue life for 0.999 reliability is most sensitive to matrix compressive strength, matrix modulus, thermal expansion coefficient, and ply thickness. Whereas at high mechanical cyclic loads and high thermal cyclic amplitudes, fatigue life at 0.999 reliability is more sensitive to the shear strength of matrix, longitudinal fiber modulus, matrix modulus, and ply thickness.

  2. View-dependent streamlines for 3D vector fields.

    PubMed

    Marchesin, Stéphane; Chen, Cheng-Kai; Ho, Chris; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a new streamline placement and selection algorithm for 3D vector fields. Instead of considering the problem as a simple feature search in data space, we base our work on the observation that most streamline fields generate a lot of self-occlusion which prevents proper visualization. In order to avoid this issue, we approach the problem in a view-dependent fashion and dynamically determine a set of streamlines which contributes to data understanding without cluttering the view. Since our technique couples flow characteristic criteria and view-dependent streamline selection we are able achieve the best of both worlds: relevant flow description and intelligible, uncluttered pictures. We detail an efficient GPU implementation of our algorithm, show comprehensive visual results on multiple datasets and compare our method with existing flow depiction techniques. Our results show that our technique greatly improves the readability of streamline visualizations on different datasets without requiring user intervention. PMID:20975200

  3. LOADING SIMULATION PROGRAM C

    EPA Science Inventory

    LSPC is the Loading Simulation Program in C++, a watershed modeling system that includes streamlined Hydrologic Simulation Program Fortran (HSPF) algorithms for simulating hydrology, sediment, and general water quality on land as well as a simplified stream transport model. LSPC ...

  4. A model equation for the joint distribution of the length and velocity difference of streamline segments in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, P.; Gampert, M.; Peters, N.

    2013-11-01

    Streamlines recently received attention as natural geometries of turbulent flow fields. Similar to dissipation elements in scalar fields, streamlines are segmented into smaller subunits based on local extreme points of the absolute value of the velocity field u along the streamline coordinate s, i.e., points where the projected gradient in streamline direction us = 0. Then, streamline segments are parameterized using their arclength l between two neighboring extrema and the velocity difference Δ at the extrema. Both parameters are statistical variables and streamline segments are characterized by the joint probability density function (jpdf) P(l, Δ). Based on a previously formulated model for the marginal pdf of the arclength, P(l), which contains terms that account for slow changes as well as fast changes of streamline segments, a model for the jpdf is formulated. The jpdf's, when normalized with the mean length, lm, and the standard deviation of the velocity difference σ, obtained from two different direct numerical simulations (DNS) cases of homogeneous isotropic decaying and forced turbulence at Taylor based Reynolds number of Reλ = 116 and Reλ = 206, respectively, turn out to be almost Reynolds number independent. The steady model solution is compared with the normalized jpdf's obtained from DNS and it is found to be in good agreement. Special attention is paid to the intrinsic asymmetry of the jpdf with respect to the mean length of positive and negative streamline segments, where due to the kinematic stretching of positive segments and compression of negative ones, the mean length of positive segments turns out to be larger than the mean length of negative ones. This feature is reproduced by the model and the ratio of the two length scales, which turns out to be an almost Reynolds number independent, dimensionless quantity, is well reproduced. Finally, a relation between the kinetic asymmetry of streamline segments and the dynamic asymmetry of the pdf

  5. Quantum streamlines within the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, C.-C.; Wyatt, Robert E.

    2008-09-28

    Quantum streamlines are investigated in the framework of the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism. The local structures of the quantum momentum function (QMF) and the Polya vector field near a stagnation point or a pole are analyzed. Streamlines near a stagnation point of the QMF may spiral into or away from it, or they may become circles centered on this point or straight lines. Additionally, streamlines near a pole display east-west and north-south opening hyperbolic structure. On the other hand, streamlines near a stagnation point of the Polya vector field for the QMF display general hyperbolic structure, and streamlines near a pole become circles enclosing the pole. Furthermore, the local structures of the QMF and the Polya vector field around a stagnation point are related to the first derivative of the QMF; however, the magnitude of the asymptotic structures for these two fields near a pole depends only on the order of the node in the wave function. Two nonstationary states constructed from the eigenstates of the harmonic oscillator are used to illustrate the local structures of these two fields and the dynamics of the streamlines near a stagnation point or a pole. This study presents the abundant dynamics of the streamlines in the complex space for one-dimensional time-dependent problems.

  6. Quantum streamlines within the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-Chun; Wyatt, Robert E

    2008-09-28

    Quantum streamlines are investigated in the framework of the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism. The local structures of the quantum momentum function (QMF) and the Polya vector field near a stagnation point or a pole are analyzed. Streamlines near a stagnation point of the QMF may spiral into or away from it, or they may become circles centered on this point or straight lines. Additionally, streamlines near a pole display east-west and north-south opening hyperbolic structure. On the other hand, streamlines near a stagnation point of the Polya vector field for the QMF display general hyperbolic structure, and streamlines near a pole become circles enclosing the pole. Furthermore, the local structures of the QMF and the Polya vector field around a stagnation point are related to the first derivative of the QMF; however, the magnitude of the asymptotic structures for these two fields near a pole depends only on the order of the node in the wave function. Two nonstationary states constructed from the eigenstates of the harmonic oscillator are used to illustrate the local structures of these two fields and the dynamics of the streamlines near a stagnation point or a pole. This study presents the abundant dynamics of the streamlines in the complex space for one-dimensional time-dependent problems. PMID:19045012

  7. Telescoping Mechanics: A New Paradigm for Composite Behavior Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Gotsis, P. K.; Mital. S. K.

    2004-01-01

    This report reviews the application of telescoping mechanics to composites using recursive laminate theory. The elemental scale is the fiber-matrix slice, the behavior of which propagates to laminate. The results from using applications for typical, hybrid, and smart composites and composite-enhanced reinforced concrete structures illustrate the versatility and generality of telescoping scale mechanics. Comparisons with approximate, single-cell, and two- and three-dimensional finite-element methods demonstrate the accuracy and computational effectiveness of telescoping scale mechanics for predicting complex composite behavior.

  8. Micromechanical simulation of damage progression in carbon phenolic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slattery, Kerry T.

    1993-01-01

    understanding of these macro damage mechanisms is that the loading environment and the material response to that environment are extremely complex. These types of damage are usually only observed in actual motor firings. Therefore, it is difficult and expensive to evaluate the reliability of new materials. Standard material tests which measure mechanical and thermal properties of test specimens can only provide a partial picture of how the material will respond in the service environment. The development of the ANALOG test procedure which can combine high heating rates and mechanical loads on a specimen will improve the understanding of the interactive effects of the various loads on the system. But a mechanistic model of material response which can account for the heterogeneity of the material, the progression of various micromechanical damage mechanisms, and the interaction of mechanical and thermal stresses on the material is required to accurately correlate material tests with response to service environments. A model based on fundamental damage mechanisms which is calibrated and verified under a variety of loading conditions will provide a general tool for predicting the response of rocket nozzles. The development of a micromechanical simulation technique was initiated and demonstrated to be effective for studying across-ply tensile failure of carbon/phenolic composites.

  9. Computational simulation of surface waviness in graphite/epoxy woven composites due to initial curing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanfeliz, Jose G.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    Several models simulating plain weave, graphite/epoxy woven composites are presented, along with the effects that the simultaneous application of pressure and thermal loads have on their surfaces. The surface effects created by moisture absorption are also examined. The computational simulation consisted of using a two-dimensional finite element model for the composite. The properties of the finite element (FE) model are calculated by using the in-house composite mechanics computer code ICAN (Integrated Composite ANalyzer). MSC/NASTRAN is used for the FE analysis which yields the composite's top surface normalized displacements. These results demonstrate the importance of parameters such as the cure temperature (T sub o) and the resin content in the curing process of polymer-matrix composites. The modification of these parameters will help tailor the composite system to the desired requirements and applications.

  10. Combined thermal and bending fatigue of high-temperature metal-matrix composites: Computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.

    1991-01-01

    The nonlinear behavior of a high-temperature metal-matrix composite (HT-MMC) was simulated by using the metal matrix composite analyzer (METCAN) computer code. The simulation started with the fabrication process, proceeded to thermomechanical cyclic loading, and ended with the application of a monotonic load. Classical laminate theory and composite micromechanics and macromechanics are used in METCAN, along with a multifactor interaction model for the constituents behavior. The simulation of the stress-strain behavior from the macromechanical and the micromechanical points of view, as well as the initiation and final failure of the constituents and the plies in the composite, were examined in detail. It was shown that, when the fibers and the matrix were perfectly bonded, the fracture started in the matrix and then propagated with increasing load to the fibers. After the fibers fractured, the composite lost its capacity to carry additional load and fractured.

  11. Combined bending and thermal fatigue of high-temperature metal-matrix composites - Computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    The nonlinear behavior of a high-temperature metal-matrix composite (HT-MMC) was simulated by using the metal matrix composite analyzer (METCAN) computer code. The simulation started with the fabrication process, proceeded to thermomechanical cyclic loading, and ended with the application of a monotonic load. Classical laminate theory and composite micromechanics and macromechanics are used in METCAN, along with a multifactor interaction model for the constituents behavior. The simulation of the stress-strain behavior from the macromechanical and the micromechanical points of view, as well as the initiation and final failure of the constituents and the plies in the composite, were examined in detail. It was shown that, when the fibers and the matrix were perfectly bonded, the fracture started in the matrix and then propagated with increasing load to the fibers. After the fibers fractured, the composite lost its capacity to carry additional load and fractured.

  12. Tensile strength of simulated and welded butt joints in W-Cu composite sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas J.; Watson, Gordon K.

    1994-01-01

    The weldability of W-Cu composite sheet was investigated using simulated and welded joints. The welded joints were produced in a vacuum hot press. Tensile test results showed that simulated joints can provide strength and failure mode data which can be used in joint design for actual weldments. Although all of the welded joints had flaws, a number of these joints were as strong as the W-Cu composite base material.

  13. Retrieval process development and enhancements waste simulant compositions and defensibility

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.R.; Golcar, G.R.; Geeting, J.G.H.

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the physical waste simulant development efforts of the EM-50 Tanks Focus Area at the Hanford Site. Waste simulants are used in the testing and development of waste treatment and handling processes because performing such tests using actual tank waste is hazardous and prohibitively expensive. This document addresses the simulant development work that supports the testing of waste retrieval processes using simulants that mimic certain key physical properties of the tank waste. Development and testing of chemical simulants are described elsewhere. This work was funded through the EM-50 Tanks Focus Area as part of the Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements (RPD&E) Project at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The mission of RPD&E is to understand retrieval processes, including emerging and existing processes, gather performance data on those processes, and relate the data to specific tank problems to provide end users with the requisite technical bases to make retrieval and closure decisions. Physical simulants are prepared using relatively nonhazardous and inexpensive materials rather than the chemicals known to be in tank waste. Consequently, only some of the waste properties are matched by the simulant. Deciding which properties need to be matched and which do not requires a detailed knowledge of the physics of the process to be tested using the simulant. Developing this knowledge requires reviews of available literature, consultation with experts, and parametric tests. Once the relevant properties are identified, waste characterization data are reviewed to establish the target ranges for each property. Simulants are then developed that possess the desired ranges of properties.

  14. Challenges of NDE simulation tool validation, optimization, and utilization for composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckey, Cara A. C.; Seebo, Jeffrey P.; Juarez, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Rapid, realistic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) simulation tools can aid in inspection optimization and prediction of inspectability for advanced aerospace materials and designs. NDE simulation tools may someday aid in the design and certification of aerospace components; potentially shortening the time from material development to implementation by industry and government. Furthermore, ultrasound modeling and simulation are expected to play a significant future role in validating the capabilities and limitations of guided wave based structural health monitoring (SHM) systems. The current state-of-the-art in ultrasonic NDE/SHM simulation is still far from the goal of rapidly simulating damage detection techniques for large scale, complex geometry composite components/vehicles containing realistic damage types. Ongoing work at NASA Langley Research Center is focused on advanced ultrasonic simulation tool development. This paper discusses challenges of simulation tool validation, optimization, and utilization for composites. Ongoing simulation tool development work is described along with examples of simulation validation and optimization challenges that are more broadly applicable to all NDE simulation tools. The paper will also discuss examples of simulation tool utilization at NASA to develop new damage characterization methods for composites, and associated challenges in experimentally validating those methods.

  15. Chemical composition analysis of simulated waste glass T10-G-16A

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K. M.

    2015-08-01

    In this report, SRNL provides chemical composition analyses of a simulated LAW glass designated T10-G-16A.The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component. No issues were identified in reviewing the analytical data.

  16. Impact Testing and Simulation of Composite Airframe Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Littell, Justin D.; Horta, Lucas G.; Annett, Martin S.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Seal, Michael D., II

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic tests were performed at NASA Langley Research Center on composite airframe structural components of increasing complexity to evaluate their energy absorption behavior when subjected to impact loading. A second objective was to assess the capabilities of predicting the dynamic response of composite airframe structures, including damage initiation and progression, using a state-of-the-art nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA. The test specimens were extracted from a previously tested composite prototype fuselage section developed and manufactured by Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation under the US Army's Survivable Affordable Repairable Airframe Program (SARAP). Laminate characterization testing was conducted in tension and compression. In addition, dynamic impact tests were performed on several components, including I-beams, T-sections, and cruciform sections. Finally, tests were conducted on two full-scale components including a subfloor section and a framed fuselage section. These tests included a modal vibration and longitudinal impact test of the subfloor section and a quasi-static, modal vibration, and vertical drop test of the framed fuselage section. Most of the test articles were manufactured of graphite unidirectional tape composite with a thermoplastic resin system. However, the framed fuselage section was constructed primarily of a plain weave graphite fabric material with a thermoset resin system. Test data were collected from instrumentation such as accelerometers and strain gages and from full-field photogrammetry.

  17. Homogenization and simulation for compositional flow in naturally fractured reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhangxin

    2007-02-01

    A dual porosity model of multidimensional, multicomponent, multiphase flow in naturally fractured reservoirs is derived by the mathematical theory of homogenization. A fully compositional model is considered where there are N chemical components, each of which may exist in any or all of the three phases: gas, oil, and water. Special attention is paid to developing a general approach to incorporating gravitational forces, pressure gradient effects, and effects of mass transfer between phases. In particular, general equations for the interactions between matrix and fracture systems are obtained under homogenization by a careful scaling of these effects. Using this dual porosity compositional model, numerical experiments are reported for the benchmark problems of the sixth comparative solution project organized by the society of petroleum engineers.

  18. Efficient seeding and defragmentation of curvature streamlines for colonic polyp detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lingxiao; Botha, Charl P.; Truyen, Roel; Vos, Frans M.; Post, Frits H.

    2008-03-01

    Many computer aided diagnosis (CAD) schemes have been developed for colon cancer detection using Virtual Colonoscopy (VC). In earlier work, we developed an automatic polyp detection method integrating flow visualization techniques, that forms part of the CAD functionality of an existing Virtual Colonoscopy pipeline. Curvature streamlines were used to characterize polyp surface shape. Features derived from curvature streamlines correlated highly with true polyp detections. During testing with a large number of patient data sets, we found that the correlation between streamline features and true polyps could be affected by noise and our streamline generation technique. The seeding and spacing constraints and CT noise could lead to streamline fragmentation, which reduced the discriminating power of our streamline features. In this paper, we present two major improvements of our curvature streamline generation. First, we adapted our streamline seeding strategy to the local surface properties and made the streamline generation faster. It generates a significantly smaller number of seeds but still results in a comparable and suitable streamline distribution. Second, based on our observation that longer streamlines are better surface shape descriptors, we improved our streamline tracing algorithm to produce longer streamlines. Our improved techniques are more effcient and also guide the streamline geometry to correspond better to colonic surface shape. These two adaptations support a robust and high correlation between our streamline features and true positive detections and lead to better polyp detection results.

  19. Optimal fabrication processes for unidirectional metal-matrix composites: A computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Morel, M.

    1990-01-01

    A method is proposed for optimizing the fabrication process of unidirectional metal matrix composites. The temperature and pressure histories are optimized such that the residual microstresses of the composite at the end of the fabrication process are minimized and the material integrity throughout the process is ensured. The response of the composite during the fabrication is simulated based on a nonlinear micromechanics theory. The optimal fabrication problem is formulated and solved with non-linear programming. Application cases regarding the optimization of the fabrication cool-down phases of unidirectional ultra-high modulus graphite/copper and silicon carbide/titanium composites are presented.

  20. Animating streamlines with repeated asymmetric patterns for steady flow visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chih-Kuo; Liu, Zhanping; Lee, Tong-Yee

    2012-01-01

    Animation provides intuitive cueing for revealing essential spatial-temporal features of data in scientific visualization. This paper explores the design of Repeated Asymmetric Patterns (RAPs) in animating evenly-spaced color-mapped streamlines for dense accurate visualization of complex steady flows. We present a smooth cyclic variable-speed RAP animation model that performs velocity (magnitude) integral luminance transition on streamlines. This model is extended with inter-streamline synchronization in luminance varying along the tangential direction to emulate orthogonal advancing waves from a geometry-based flow representation, and then with evenly-spaced hue differing in the orthogonal direction to construct tangential flow streaks. To weave these two mutually dual sets of patterns, we propose an energy-decreasing strategy that adopts an iterative yet efficient procedure for determining the luminance phase and hue of each streamline in HSL color space. We also employ adaptive luminance interleaving in the direction perpendicular to the flow to increase the contrast between streamlines.

  1. Compositional differences in simulated root exudates elicit a limited functional and compositional response in soil microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Michael S.; McCulley, Rebecca L.; Nelson, Jim A.; Bradford, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Inputs of low molecular weight carbon (LMW-C) to soil – primarily via root exudates– are expected to be a major driver of microbial activity and source of stable soil organic carbon. It is expected that variation in the type and composition of LMW-C entering soil will influence microbial community composition and function. If this is the case then short-term changes in LMW-C inputs may alter processes regulated by these communities. To determine if change in the composition of LMW-C inputs influences microbial community function and composition, we conducted a 90 day microcosm experiment whereby soils sourced from three different land covers (meadows, deciduous forests, and white pine stands) were amended, at low concentrations, with one of eight simulated root exudate treatments. Treatments included no addition of LMW-C, and the full factorial combination of glucose, glycine, and oxalic acid. After 90 days, we conducted a functional response assay and determined microbial composition via phospholipid fatty acid analysis. Whereas we noted a statistically significant effect of exudate treatments, this only accounted for ∼3% of the variation observed in function. In comparison, land cover and site explained ∼46 and ∼41% of the variation, respectively. This suggests that exudate composition has little influence on function compared to site/land cover specific factors. Supporting the finding that exudate effects were minor, we found that an absence of LMW-C elicited the greatest difference in function compared to those treatments receiving any LMW-C. Additionally, exudate treatments did not alter microbial community composition and observable differences were instead due to land cover. These results confirm the strong effects of land cover/site legacies on soil microbial communities. In contrast, short-term changes in exudate composition, at meaningful concentrations, may have little impact on microbial function and composition. PMID:26322029

  2. Compositional differences in simulated root exudates elicit a limited functional and compositional response in soil microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Michael S; McCulley, Rebecca L; Nelson, Jim A; Bradford, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Inputs of low molecular weight carbon (LMW-C) to soil - primarily via root exudates- are expected to be a major driver of microbial activity and source of stable soil organic carbon. It is expected that variation in the type and composition of LMW-C entering soil will influence microbial community composition and function. If this is the case then short-term changes in LMW-C inputs may alter processes regulated by these communities. To determine if change in the composition of LMW-C inputs influences microbial community function and composition, we conducted a 90 day microcosm experiment whereby soils sourced from three different land covers (meadows, deciduous forests, and white pine stands) were amended, at low concentrations, with one of eight simulated root exudate treatments. Treatments included no addition of LMW-C, and the full factorial combination of glucose, glycine, and oxalic acid. After 90 days, we conducted a functional response assay and determined microbial composition via phospholipid fatty acid analysis. Whereas we noted a statistically significant effect of exudate treatments, this only accounted for ∼3% of the variation observed in function. In comparison, land cover and site explained ∼46 and ∼41% of the variation, respectively. This suggests that exudate composition has little influence on function compared to site/land cover specific factors. Supporting the finding that exudate effects were minor, we found that an absence of LMW-C elicited the greatest difference in function compared to those treatments receiving any LMW-C. Additionally, exudate treatments did not alter microbial community composition and observable differences were instead due to land cover. These results confirm the strong effects of land cover/site legacies on soil microbial communities. In contrast, short-term changes in exudate composition, at meaningful concentrations, may have little impact on microbial function and composition. PMID:26322029

  3. Fast Ensemble Kalman Filter for Model Calibration with Streamline-Assisted Pseudo Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, M. J.; Khodabakhshi, M.; Jafarpour, B.

    2011-12-01

    Characterization and modeling of subsurface flow and transport properties is critical for modeling, performance prediction and design of a number of important environmental and energy applications, including groundwater flow and contaminant transport, energy recovery from geothermal and hydrocarbon reservoirs, and geologic storage of CO2. Inverse modeling is typically applied to infer hydraulic rock properties from available static and dynamic measurements. Data sparsity and nonlinearity with respect to model parameters often result in significant uncertainty and solution non-uniqueness in solving the resulting inverse problems. Stochastic methods have become increasingly popular for dealing with inverse modeling solution non-uniqueness and uncertainty quantification. In particular, the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) has been widely applied for stochastic characterization of aquifer hydraulic properties from dynamic field measurements. For practical applications, where large-scale models are used, the computational cost of the forward simulation severely constrains the number of model realizations that can be included in ensemble predictions. Consequently, the statistics computed from a limited-size ensemble becomes spurious, making the resulting EnKF model updates unreliable. Localization and local analysis methods have been introduced to mitigate the effect of spurious correlations by reducing or removing the unphysical numerical correlations between model parameters (and/or states) and observations at distant locations. While these methods have proven useful, they require prior tuning of localization parameters and do not address the impact of small ensemble size approximation on the existing physical correlations between parameters and close-by observations. An alternative approach to localization is to approximate the correct statistics from computationally efficient surrogate models. Here, we present an efficient streamline-based pseudo forecast method for

  4. A Homogenization Approach for Design and Simulation of Blast Resistant Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheyka, Michael

    Structural composites have been used in aerospace and structural engineering due to their high strength to weight ratio. Composite laminates have been successfully and extensively used in blast mitigation. This dissertation examines the use of the homogenization approach to design and simulate blast resistant composites. Three case studies are performed to examine the usefulness of different methods that may be used in designing and optimizing composite plates for blast resistance. The first case study utilizes a single degree of freedom system to simulate the blast and a reliability based approach. The first case study examines homogeneous plates and the optimal stacking sequence and plate thicknesses are determined. The second and third case studies use the homogenization method to calculate the properties of composite unit cell made of two different materials. The methods are integrated with dynamic simulation environments and advanced optimization algorithms. The second case study is 2-D and uses an implicit blast simulation, while the third case study is 3-D and simulates blast using the explicit blast method. Both case studies 2 and 3 rely on multi-objective genetic algorithms for the optimization process. Pareto optimal solutions are determined in case studies 2 and 3. Case study 3 is an integrative method for determining optimal stacking sequence, microstructure and plate thicknesses. The validity of the different methods such as homogenization, reliability, explicit blast modeling and multi-objective genetic algorithms are discussed. Possible extension of the methods to include strain rate effects and parallel computation is also examined.

  5. The Stress-strain Behavior of Polymer-Nanotube Composites from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankland, S. J. V.; Harik, V. M.; Odegard, G. M.; Brenner, D. W.; Gates, T. S.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Stress-strain curves of polymer-carbon nanotube composites are derived from molecular dynamics simulations of a single-walled carbon nanotube embedded in polyethylene. A comparison is made between the response to mechanical loading of a composite with a long, continuous nanotube (replicated via periodic boundary conditions) and the response of a composite with a short, discontinuous nanotube. Both composites are mechanically loaded in the direction of and transverse to the NT axis. The long-nanotube composite shows an increase in the stiffness relative to the polymer and behaves anisotropically under the different loading conditions. The short-nanotube composite shows no enhancement relative to the polymer, most probably because of its low aspect ratio. The stress-strain curves are compared with rule-of-mixtures predictions.

  6. Compositional grading of CZTSSe alloy using exponential and uniform grading laws in SCAPS-ID simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simya, O. K.; Mahaboobbatcha, A.; Balachander, K.

    2016-04-01

    The SCAPS (Solar cell capacitance simulation) program were employed to analyze the compositional dependence of CZTSSe (Copper Zinc Tin Sulphur Selenium) absorber layers with Cadmium Sulphide (CdS) as buffer layer and Zinc Oxide (ZnO) as window layer for thin film solar cells applications. The primary motivation of this simulation work is to optimize the composition for Se/(S + Se) ratio, which would yield higher efficiency. The exponential and uniform grading law in SCAPS were set for the composition grading y(x) over a layer, as well as to set the composition dependence P(y) of a property. By varying the different compositions with exponential law and by using uniform law for the same composition, best efficiency of 14.97% were achieved for 0.4-0.1 composition of sulphur and selenium with Se/(S + Se) ratio of 0.80. Higher efficiency were obtained with higher Se content. The influences of the band gap of the CZTSSe alloys, which decreases linearly with an increase in its Se content, were further analyzed. The corresponding open circuit voltage, short circuit voltage, fill factor and efficiency of the simulated values on a photovoltaic cell with Mo back contact were studied in detail.

  7. Aging of composite insulators; Simulation by electrical tests

    SciTech Connect

    de Tourreil, C.H. ); Lambeth, P.J.

    1990-07-01

    To assess the long-term performance of 72 kV and 230 kV composite long rod insulators different laboratory aging tests have been developed. This paper reports two principal diagnostic tests used to measure the performance of the insulators, the quick flashover salt fog (QFO SF), and the rapid flashover clean fog (RFO CF) tests. The aging processes were: cement coating and clean fog, salt fog, and cement coating and salt fog. Similar sets of insulators were aged also in the field for over three years, and all the insulators evaluated in the laboratory. The cement/salt fog aging process was found to be the most controllable and realistic, when the results were assessed by means of the RFO CF test.

  8. A Study of Two-Equation Turbulence Models on the Elliptic Streamline Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaisdell, Gregory A.; Qin, Jim H.; Shariff, Karim; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Several two-equation turbulence models are compared to data from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the homogeneous elliptic streamline flow, which combines rotation and strain. The models considered include standard two-equation models and models with corrections for rotational effects. Most of the rotational corrections modify the dissipation rate equation to account for the reduced dissipation rate in rotating turbulent flows, however, the DNS data shows that the production term in the turbulent kinetic energy equation is not modeled correctly by these models. Nonlinear relations for the Reynolds stresses are considered as a means of modifying the production term. Implications for the modeling of turbulent vortices will be discussed.

  9. Probabilistic simulation of long term behavior in polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, A. R.; Singhal, S. N.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1995-01-01

    A methodology to compute cumulative probability distribution functions (CDF) of fatigue life for different ratios, r of applied stress to the laminate strength based on first ply failure criteria has been developed and demonstrated. Degradation effects due to long term environmental exposure and mechanical cyclic loads are considered in the simulation process. A unified time-stress dependent multi-factor interaction equation model developed at NASA Lewis Research Center has been used to account for the degradation/aging of material properties due to cyclic loads. Fast probability integration method is used to perform probabilistic simulation of uncertainties. Sensitivity of fatigue life reliability to uncertainties in the primitive random variables are computed and their significance in the reliability based design for maximum life is discussed. The results show that the graphite/epoxy (0/+45/90) deg laminate with ply thickness 0.125 in. has 500,000 cycles life for applied stress to laminate strength ratio of 0.6 and a reliability of 0.999. Also, the fatigue life reliability has been found to be most sensitive to the ply thickness and matrix tensile strength. Tighter quality controls must therefore be enforced on ply thickness and matrix strength in order to achieve high reliability of the structure.

  10. Structural, Physical, and Compositional Analysis of Lunar Simulants and Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul; Street, Kenneth W.; Gaier, James

    2008-01-01

    Relative to the prior manned Apollo and unmanned robotic missions, planned Lunar initiatives are comparatively complex and longer in duration. Individual crew rotations are envisioned to span several months, and various surface systems must function in the Lunar environment for periods of years. As a consequence, an increased understanding of the surface environment is required to engineer and test the associated materials, components, and systems necessary to sustain human habitation and surface operations. The effort described here concerns the analysis of existing simulant materials, with application to Lunar return samples. The interplay between these analyses fulfills the objective of ascertaining the critical properties of regolith itself, and the parallel objective of developing suitable stimulant materials for a variety of engineering applications. Presented here are measurements of the basic physical attributes, i.e. particle size distributions and general shape factors. Also discussed are structural and chemical properties, as determined through a variety of techniques, such as optical microscopy, SEM and TEM microscopy, Mossbauer Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman microspectroscopy, inductively coupled argon plasma emission spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence mapping. A comparative description of currently available stimulant materials is discussed, with implications for more detailed analyses, as well as the requirements for continued refinement of methods for simulant production.

  11. Modeling and simulation of crack initiation and growth in particulate composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Y.W.; Lee, J.H.; Liu, C.T.

    1997-08-01

    A micro/macromechanical approach was used to model and simulate crack initiation and crack propagation in particulate composite structures. The approach used both the micromechanical and macromechanical analyses in tandem. The micromechanical analysis was based on a simplified micromechanical model and damage mechanics at the micro-level, and the macromechanical analysis utilized the finite element method. In using these methods, crack initiation and growth in a general shape of composite structure were investigated with an efficient computational effort. It was assumed that a crack initiates and/or propagates when localized damage is saturated. As a result, the crack length was assumed to be the size of the saturated damage zone. Matrix crack initiation and propagation at circular notch tips were simulated using this approach. Modeling and simulation were also conducted for cases of nonuniform particle distribution in particulate composite structures. Predicted results showed a good agreement with the experimental data.

  12. Measuring the composition-curvature coupling in binary lipid membranes by computer simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Barragán Vidal, I. A. Müller, M.; Rosetti, C. M.; Pastorino, C.

    2014-11-21

    The coupling between local composition fluctuations in binary lipid membranes and curvature affects the lateral membrane structure. We propose an efficient method to compute the composition-curvature coupling in molecular simulations and apply it to two coarse-grained membrane models—a minimal, implicit-solvent model and the MARTINI model. Both the weak-curvature behavior that is typical for thermal fluctuations of planar bilayer membranes as well as the strong-curvature regime corresponding to narrow cylindrical membrane tubes are studied by molecular dynamics simulation. The simulation results are analyzed by using a phenomenological model of the thermodynamics of curved, mixed bilayer membranes that accounts for the change of the monolayer area upon bending. Additionally the role of thermodynamic characteristics such as the incompatibility between the two lipid species and asymmetry of composition are investigated.

  13. Streamlining of the RELAP5-3D Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mesina, George L; Hykes, Joshua; Guillen, Donna Post

    2007-11-01

    RELAP5-3D is widely used by the nuclear community to simulate general thermal hydraulic systems and has proven to be so versatile that the spectrum of transient two-phase problems that can be analyzed has increased substantially over time. To accommodate the many new types of problems that are analyzed by RELAP5-3D, both the physics and numerical methods of the code have been continuously improved. In the area of computational methods and mathematical techniques, many upgrades and improvements have been made decrease code run time and increase solution accuracy. These include vectorization, parallelization, use of improved equation solvers for thermal hydraulics and neutron kinetics, and incorporation of improved library utilities. In the area of applied nuclear engineering, expanded capabilities include boron and level tracking models, radiation/conduction enclosure model, feedwater heater and compressor components, fluids and corresponding correlations for modeling Generation IV reactor designs, and coupling to computational fluid dynamics solvers. Ongoing and proposed future developments include improvements to the two-phase pump model, conversion to FORTRAN 90, and coupling to more computer programs. This paper summarizes the general improvements made to RELAP5-3D, with an emphasis on streamlining the code infrastructure for improved maintenance and development. With all these past, present and planned developments, it is necessary to modify the code infrastructure to incorporate modifications in a consistent and maintainable manner. Modifying a complex code such as RELAP5-3D to incorporate new models, upgrade numerics, and optimize existing code becomes more difficult as the code grows larger. The difficulty of this as well as the chance of introducing errors is significantly reduced when the code is structured. To streamline the code into a structured program, a commercial restructuring tool, FOR_STRUCT, was applied to the RELAP5-3D source files. The

  14. Simulation of aerosol chemical compositions in the Western Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrit, Mounir; Kata Sartelet, Karine; Sciare, Jean; Marchand, Nicolas; Pey, Jorge; Sellegri, Karine

    2016-04-01

    This work aims at evaluating the chemical transport model (CTM) Polair3d of the air-quality modelling platform Polyphemus during the ChArMex summer campaigns of 2013, using ground-based measurements performed at ERSA (Cape Corsica, France), and at determining the processes controlling organic aerosol concentrations at ERSA. Simulations are compared to measurements for concentrations of both organic and inorganic species, as well as the ratio of biogenic versus anthropogenic particles, and organic aerosol properties (oxidation state). For inorganics, the concentrations of sulphate, sodium, chloride, ammonium and nitrate are compared to measurements. Non-sea-salt sulphate and ammonium concentrations are well reproduced by the model. However, because of the geographic location of the measurement station at Cape Corsica which undergoes strong wind velocities and sea effects, sea-salt sulphate, sodium, chloride and nitrate concentrations are strongly influenced by the parameterizations used for sea-salt emissions. Different parameterizations are compared and a parameterization is chosen after comparison to sodium measurements. For organics, the concentrations are well modelled when compared to experimental values. Anthropogenic particles are influenced by emission of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC). Measurements allow us to refine the estimation of those emissions, which are currently missing in emission inventories. Although concentrations of biogenic particles are well simulated, the organic chemical compounds are not enough oxidised in the model. The observed oxidation state of organics shows that the oligomerisation of pinonaldehyde was over-estimated in Polyphemus. To improve the oxidation property of organics, the formation of extremely low volatile organic compounds from autoxidation of monoterpenes is added to Polyphemus, using recently published data from chamber experiments. These chemical compounds are highly oxygenated and are formed rapidly, as first

  15. Guided waves in anisotropic and quasi-isotropic aerospace composites: three-dimensional simulation and experiment.

    PubMed

    Leckey, Cara A C; Rogge, Matthew D; Raymond Parker, F

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) elastic wave simulations can be used to investigate and optimize nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM) ultrasonic damage detection techniques for aerospace materials. 3D anisotropic elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) has been implemented for ultrasonic waves in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite laminates. This paper describes 3D EFIT simulations of guided wave propagation in undamaged and damaged anisotropic and quasi-isotropic composite plates. Comparisons are made between simulations of guided waves in undamaged anisotropic composite plates and both experimental laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) wavefield data and dispersion curves. Time domain and wavenumber domain comparisons are described. Wave interaction with complex geometry delamination damage is then simulated to investigate how simulation tools incorporating realistic damage geometries can aid in the understanding of wave interaction with CFRP damage. In order to move beyond simplistic assumptions of damage geometry, volumetric delamination data acquired via X-ray microfocus computed tomography is directly incorporated into the simulation. Simulated guided wave interaction with the complex geometry delamination is compared to experimental LDV time domain data and 3D wave interaction with the volumetric damage is discussed. PMID:23769180

  16. Hysteresis in magnetic shape memory composites: Modeling and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Sergio; Lenz, Martin; Rumpf, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic shape memory alloys are characterized by the coupling between the reorientation of structural variants and the rearrangement of magnetic domains. This permits to control the shape change via an external magnetic field, at least in single crystals. Composite materials with single-crystalline particles embedded in a softer matrix have been proposed as a way to overcome the blocking of the reorientation at grain boundaries. We investigate hysteresis phenomena for small NiMnGa single crystals embedded in a polymer matrix for slowly varying magnetic fields. The evolution of the microstructure is studied within the rate-independent variational framework proposed by Mielke and Theil (1999). The underlying variational model incorporates linearized elasticity, micromagnetism, stray field and a dissipation term proportional to the volume swept by the twin boundary. The time discretization is based on an incremental minimization of the sum of energy and dissipation. A backtracking approach is employed to approximately ensure the global minimality condition. We illustrate and discuss the influence of the particle geometry (volume fraction, shape, arrangement) and the polymer elastic parameters on the observed hysteresis and compare with recent experimental results.

  17. Hysteresis in magnetic shape memory composites: Modeling and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Sergio; Lenz, Martin; Rumpf, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic shape memory alloys are characterized by the coupling between a structural phase transition and magnetic one. This permits to control the shape change via an external magnetic field, at least in single crystals. Composite materials with single-crystalline particles embedded in a softer matrix have been proposed as a way to overcome the blocking of the transformation at grain boundaries. We investigate hysteresis phenomena for small NiMnGa single crystals embedded in a polymer matrix for slowly varying magnetic fields. The evolution of the microstructure is studied within the rate-independent variational framework proposed by Mielke and Theil (1999). The underlying variational model incorporates linearized elasticity, micromagnetism, stray field and a dissipation term proportional to the volume swept by the phase boundary. The time discretization is based on an incremental minimization of the sum of energy and dissipation. A backtracking approach is employed to approximately ensure the global minimality condition. We illustrate and discuss the influence of the particle geometry (volume fraction, shape, arrangement) and the polymer elastic parameters on the observed hysteresis and compare with recent experimental results.

  18. The effects of simulated space environmental parameters on six commercially available composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Joan G.; Sykes, George F., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of simulated space environmental parameters on microdamage induced by the environment in a series of commercially available graphite-fiber-reinforced composite materials were determined. Composites with both thermoset and thermoplastic resin systems were studied. Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) exposures were simulated by thermal cycling; geosynchronous-orbit (GEO) exposures were simulated by electron irradiation plus thermal cycling. The thermal cycling temperature range was -250 F to either 200 F or 150 F. The upper limits of the thermal cycles were different to ensure that an individual composite material was not cycled above its glass transition temperature. Material response was characterized through assessment of the induced microcracking and its influence on mechanical property changes at both room temperature and -250 F. Microdamage was induced in both thermoset and thermoplastic advanced composite materials exposed to the simulated LEO environment. However, a 350 F cure single-phase toughened epoxy composite was not damaged during exposure to the LEO environment. The simuated GEO environment produced microdamage in all materials tested.

  19. Computational Simulation of Damage Propagation in Three-Dimensional Woven Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Dade; Minnetyan, Levon

    2005-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) woven composites have demonstrated multi-directional properties and improved transverse strength, impact resistance, and shear characteristics. The objective of this research is to develop a new model for predicting the elastic constants, hygrothermal effects, thermomechanical response, and stress limits of 3D woven composites; and to develop a computational tool to facilitate the evaluation of 3D woven composite structures with regard to damage tolerance and durability. Fiber orientations of weave and braid patterns are defined with reference to composite structural coordinates. Orthotropic ply properties and stress limits computed via micromechanics are transformed to composite structural coordinates and integrated to obtain the 3D properties. The various stages of degradation, from damage initiation to collapse of structures, in the 3D woven structures are simulated for the first time. Three dimensional woven composite specimens with various woven patterns under different loading conditions, such as tension, compression, bending, and shear are simulated in the validation process of this research. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture are included in these simulations.

  20. Computational simulation of composite structures with and without damage. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, Thomas F.

    1994-01-01

    A methodology is described which uses finite element analysis of various laminates to computationally simulate the effects of delamination damage initiation and growth on the structural behavior of laminated composite structures. The delamination area is expanded according to a set pattern. As the delamination area increases, how the structural response of the laminate changes with respect to buckling and strain energy release rate are investigated. Rules are presented for laminates of different configurations, materials and thickness. These results demonstrate that computational simulation methods can provide alternate methods to investigate the complex delamination damage mechanisms found in composite structures.

  1. Feasibility of generating quantitative composition images in dual energy mammography: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghoon; Kim, Ye-seul; Choi, Sunghoon; Lee, Haenghwa; Choi, Seungyeon; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in women. For years, mammography has been used as the gold standard for localizing breast cancer, despite its limitation in determining cancer composition. Therefore, the purpose of this simulation study is to confirm the feasibility of obtaining tumor composition using dual energy digital mammography. To generate X-ray sources for dual energy mammography, 26 kVp and 39 kVp voltages were generated for low and high energy beams, respectively. Additionally, the energy subtraction and inverse mapping functions were applied to provide compositional images. The resultant images showed that the breast composition obtained by the inverse mapping function with cubic fitting achieved the highest accuracy and least noise. Furthermore, breast density analysis with cubic fitting showed less than 10% error compare to true values. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the feasibility of creating individual compositional images and capability of analyzing breast density effectively.

  2. 75 FR 4031 - Streamlining Hard-Copy Postage Statement Processing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ... 111 Streamlining Hard-Copy Postage Statement Processing AGENCY: Postal Service\\TM\\. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The Postal Service\\TM\\ is proposing to revise Mailing Standards of the United States... statement processes for mailings accepted at Post Offices TM without PostalOne! access. Although we...

  3. Out-of-Core Streamline Visualization on Large Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueng, Shyh-Kuang; Sikorski, K.; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    1997-01-01

    It's advantageous for computational scientists to have the capability to perform interactive visualization on their desktop workstations. For data on large unstructured meshes, this capability is not generally available. In particular, particle tracing on unstructured grids can result in a high percentage of non-contiguous memory accesses and therefore may perform very poorly with virtual memory paging schemes. The alternative of visualizing a lower resolution of the data degrades the original high-resolution calculations. This paper presents an out-of-core approach for interactive streamline construction on large unstructured tetrahedral meshes containing millions of elements. The out-of-core algorithm uses an octree to partition and restructure the raw data into subsets stored into disk files for fast data retrieval. A memory management policy tailored to the streamline calculations is used such that during the streamline construction only a very small amount of data are brought into the main memory on demand. By carefully scheduling computation and data fetching, the overhead of reading data from the disk is significantly reduced and good memory performance results. This out-of-core algorithm makes possible interactive streamline visualization of large unstructured-grid data sets on a single mid-range workstation with relatively low main-memory capacity: 5-20 megabytes. Our test results also show that this approach is much more efficient than relying on virtual memory and operating system's paging algorithms.

  4. 48 CFR 12.603 - Streamlined solicitation for commercial items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REGULATION ACQUISITION PLANNING ACQUISITION OF COMMERCIAL ITEMS Streamlined Procedures for Evaluation and... Program, if applicable. (v) A list of contract line item number(s) and items, quantities and units of....212-2, Evaluation—Commercial Items, if used, and the specific evaluation criteria to be included...

  5. STREAMLINES IN STRATIFIED FLOW OVER A THREE-DIMENSIONAL HILL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fluid modeling study was performed in the EPA Fluid Modeling Facility's stratified towing tank to determine the effects of stratification on the flow field over a three-dimensional hill. Streamlines in the stratified flow over an axisymmetric hill were marked with a dye tracer ...

  6. 76 FR 24339 - Streamlining Service Delivery and Improving Customer Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... Delivery and Improving Customer Service By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and...). However, with advances in technology and service delivery systems in other sectors, the public's... Federal Government has a responsibility to streamline and make more efficient its service delivery...

  7. Numerical simulation of toughening of alumina particulate glass matrix composite by interfacial precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Kageyama, K.; Enoki, M.; Kishi, T.

    1994-12-31

    Strengthening and toughening by interfacial precipitation are strongly connected with crack bowing and deflection. In the present study, three dimensional numerical simulation of these events was performed on ceramics particulate glass matrix composites with interfacial precipitation by calculating the equations for a crack bowing and deflection. This numerical simulation revealed that fracture toughness and strength increased with the addition of interfacial precipitation because a crack bowing emerged. These results are in agreement with experimental data for fracture toughness.

  8. Forming simulation of woven composite fibers and its influence on structural performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divine, Vincent; Beauchesne, Erwan; Roy, Subir; Palaniswamy, Hariharasudhan

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, the interest in composite material as a replacement for metals has been growing. The automotive industry, in its constant quest for weight reduction, is now seriously considering composite materials as a substitute for sheet metal components to meet future fuel consumption standards. However, composite forming processes are expensive and difficult to control because of its complex composition with fiber and matrix layers or plies and its dependency on many parameters, such as non-linearity of tensile stiffness, effect of shear rate, temperature and friction. Hence, numerical simulation could be a viable approach to predict material behavior during composite forming. The objective of this study is to highlight capabilities of RADIOSS®, a non-linear finite element analysis based structural solver commonly used for stamping and crash analyses, to simulate forming simulation of composite plies made from woven fibers. For validation the well-known double dome model is used with material data published in NUMISHEET'05 proceedings. It is modeled as a woven fabric with an elastic anisotropic fabric material law available in RADIOSS. This material law is able to consider properties along the two directions of anisotropy, warp and weft. The compared result is the shear angle after stamping that is, the variation of angle between warp and weft fibers, at several prescribed points on the ply. The variation of this angle has a strong impact on material characteristics which severely deteriorates when a critical value is reached. Hence, a study on crash simulations is performed, after mapping fibers angles from stamping simulation.

  9. Simulation Based Low-Cost Composite Process Development at the US Air Force Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Brian P.; Lee, C. William; Curliss, David B.

    2003-01-01

    Low-cost composite research in the US Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Organic Matrix Composites Branch has focused on the theme of affordable performance. Practically, this means that we use a very broad view when considering the affordability of composites. Factors such as material costs, labor costs, recurring and nonrecurring manufacturing costs are balanced against performance to arrive at the relative affordability vs. performance measure of merit. The research efforts discussed here are two projects focused on affordable processing of composites. The first topic is the use of a neural network scheme to model cure reaction kinetics, then utilize the kinetics coupled with simple heat transport models to predict, in real-time, future exotherms and control them. The neural network scheme is demonstrated to be very robust and a much more efficient method that mechanistic cure modeling approach. This enables very practical low-cost processing of thick composite parts. The second project is liquid composite molding (LCM) process simulation. LCM processing of large 3D integrated composite parts has been demonstrated to be a very cost effective way to produce large integrated aerospace components specific examples of LCM processes are resin transfer molding (RTM), vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM), and other similar approaches. LCM process simulation is a critical part of developing an LCM process approach. Flow simulation enables the development of the most robust approach to introducing resin into complex preforms. Furthermore, LCM simulation can be used in conjunction with flow front sensors to control the LCM process in real-time to account for preform or resin variability.

  10. Coupled multi-disciplinary simulation of composite engine structures in propulsion environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Singhal, Surendra N.

    1992-01-01

    A computational simulation procedure is described for the coupled response of multi-layered multi-material composite engine structural components which are subjected to simultaneous multi-disciplinary thermal, structural, vibration, and acoustic loadings including the effect of hostile environments. The simulation is based on a three dimensional finite element analysis technique in conjunction with structural mechanics codes and with acoustic analysis methods. The composite material behavior is assessed at the various composite scales, i.e., the laminate/ply/constituents (fiber/matrix), via nonlinear material characterization model. Sample cases exhibiting nonlinear geometrical, material, loading, and environmental behavior of aircraft engine fan blades, are presented. Results for deformed shape, vibration frequency mode shapes, and acoustic noise emitted from the fan blade, are discussed for their coupled effect in hot and humid environments. Results such as acoustic noise for coupled composite-mechanics/heat transfer/structural/vibration/acoustic analyses demonstrate the effectiveness of coupled multi-disciplinary computational simulation the various advantages of composite materials compared to metals.

  11. Coupled multi-disciplinary simulation of composite engine structures in propulsion environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Singhal, Surendra N.

    1992-01-01

    A computational simulation procedure is described for the coupled response of multi-layered multi-material composite engine structural components which are subjected to simultaneous multi-disciplinary thermal, structural, vibration, and acoustic loadings including the effect of hostile environments. The simulation is based on a three dimensional finite element analysis technique in conjunction with structural mechanics codes and with acoustic analysis methods. The composite material behavior is assessed at the various composite scales, i.e., the laminate/ply/constituents (fiber/matrix), via a nonlinear material characterization model. Sample cases exhibiting nonlinear geometrical, material, loading, and environmental behavior of aircraft engine fan blades, are presented. Results for deformed shape, vibration frequency, mode shapes, and acoustic noise emitted from the fan blade, are discussed for their coupled effect in hot and humid environments. Results such as acoustic noise for coupled composite-mechanics/heat transfer/structural/vibration/acoustic analyses demonstrate the effectiveness of coupled multi-disciplinary computational simulation and the various advantages of composite materials compared to metals.

  12. A Simulation Based Metaheuristic Optimization of the Thermal Cure Cycle of Carbon-Epoxy Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlone, Pierpaolo; Palazzo, Gaetano S.

    2011-05-01

    In this paper a simulation based optimization procedure, based on the combination of the Simulated Annealing and the Nelder Mead algorithms, for the time reduction of the thermal cure cycle of composite laminates, has been proposed and discussed. The cycle time has been assumed as the objective function to be minimized, taking into account technological limitations by the means of a penalty function. Several simulations have been performed to test the proposed method and investigate the influence of the optimization algorithm parameters on the quality of the solution and the convergence rate of the algorithm, evidencing the capability of the procedure to converge to an optimal process window for cure cycle design.

  13. Strength Analysis and Process Simulation of Subway Contact Rail Support Bracket of Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedulov, Boris N.; Safonov, Alexander A.; Sergeichev, Ivan V.; Ushakov, Andrey E.; Klenin, Yuri G.; Makarenko, Irina V.

    2016-05-01

    An application of composites for construction of subway brackets is a very effective approach to extend their lifetime. However, this approach involves the necessity to prevent process-induced distortions of the bracket due to thermal deformation and chemical shrinkage. At present study, a process simulation has been carried out to support the design of the production tooling. The simulation was based on the application of viscoelastic model for the resin. Simulation results were verified by comparison with results of manufacturing experiments. To optimize the bracket structure the strength analysis was carried out as well.

  14. Recent Advances in VisIt: AMR Streamlines and Query-Driven Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Gunther; Ahern, Sean; Bethel, Wes; Borovikov, Sergey; Childs, Hank; Deines, Eduard; Garth, Christoph; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Joy, Kenneth; Martin, David; Meredith, Jeremy; Prabhat,; Pugmire, David; Rubel, Oliver; Van Straalen, Brian; Wu, Kesheng

    2009-11-12

    Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) is a highly effective method for simulations spanning a large range of spatiotemporal scales such as those encountered in astrophysical simulations. Combining research in novel AMR visualization algorithms and basic infrastructure work, the Department of Energy's (DOEs) Science Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET) has extended VisIt, an open source visualization tool that can handle AMR data without converting it to alternate representations. This paper focuses on two recent advances in the development of VisIt. First, we have developed streamline computation methods that properly handle multi-domain data sets and utilize effectively multiple processors on parallel machines. Furthermore, we are working on streamline calculation methods that consider an AMR hierarchy and detect transitions from a lower resolution patch into a finer patch and improve interpolation at level boundaries. Second, we focus on visualization of large-scale particle data sets. By integrating the DOE Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center's FastBit indexing technology into VisIt, we are able to reduce particle counts effectively by thresholding and by loading only those particles from disk that satisfy the thresholding criteria. Furthermore, using FastBit it becomes possible to compute parallel coordinate views efficiently, thus facilitating interactive data exploration of massive particle data sets.

  15. Simulation and moderation of the thermal response of confined pressed explosive compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Dagley, I.J.; Parker, R.P.; Jones, D.A.; Montelli, L.

    1996-09-01

    The effects on the thermal response of pressed polymer bonded explosives caused by varying their components have been assessed at two extreme heating rates using the Super Small-scale Cookoff Bomb. Tests were primarily conducted on RDX-based compositions containing 5% ethylene-vinyl acetate binder with varying amounts of PETN or TATB. Some experiments were numerically simulated using a one-dimensional finite difference code. The simulations are not able to predict the violence of the thermal response, but do accurately reproduce radial heat flow in the test assembly and satisfactorily predict both the time to thermal response and the surface temperature at response for the mixed explosive compositions. The influence of the ratio of the mixed explosives on the type of thermal response observed is discussed and several compositions which give very mild thermal responses have been identified.

  16. A Dynamic Transient Model to Simulate the Time Dependent Pultrusion Process of Glass/Polyester Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokrieh, Mahmood M.; Mahmoud Aghdami, Ashkan

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to introduce a novel dynamic transient model to simulate the time dependent pultrusion process of glass/polyester composites. The model is able to simulate the resin curing process systematically. The resin curing process is divided in two liquid and gel-solid phases. Physical properties of the resin including resin specific heat, viscosity and thermal conductivity change by altering the resin temperature and the degree of cure. It is shown that in liquid and gel-solid phases, some of the resin physical properties have significant role in heat transfer phenomenon and affect simulation results. The physical and mechanical properties of fibers do not change during the curing process of composites; therefore, an equivalent material is introduced instead of the resin-fiber compound. The model simulates the heat generation during the resin curing process. The degree of cure of the resin, used for the resin viscosity calculation, is an important parameter indicating the final stage of simulation of resin curing process. The components of the model are integrated in a finite element method. As case studies, the process of pultrusion of circular, rectangular and I cross-sections are simulated by the model. The results show that the model is able to simulate the pultrusion process very well.

  17. Development of a Neural Network Simulator for Studying the Constitutive Behavior of Structural Composite Materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Na, Hyuntae; Lee, Seung-Yub; Üstündag, Ersan; Ross, Sarah L.; Ceylan, Halil; Gopalakrishnan, Kasthurirangan

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a recent development and application of a noncommercial artificial neural network (ANN) simulator with graphical user interface (GUI) to assist in rapid data modeling and analysis in the engineering diffraction field. The real-time network training/simulation monitoring tool has been customized for the study of constitutive behavior of engineering materials, and it has improved data mining and forecasting capabilities of neural networks. This software has been used to train and simulate the finite element modeling (FEM) data for a fiber composite system, both forward and inverse. The forward neural network simulation precisely reduplicates FEM results several orders ofmore » magnitude faster than the slow original FEM. The inverse simulation is more challenging; yet, material parameters can be meaningfully determined with the aid of parameter sensitivity information. The simulator GUI also reveals that output node size for materials parameter and input normalization method for strain data are critical train conditions in inverse network. The successful use of ANN modeling and simulator GUI has been validated through engineering neutron diffraction experimental data by determining constitutive laws of the real fiber composite materials via a mathematically rigorous and physically meaningful parameter search process, once the networks are successfully trained from the FEM database.« less

  18. Simulations and measurements of annealed pyrolytic graphite-metal composite baseplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streb, F.; Ruhl, G.; Schubert, A.; Zeidler, H.; Penzel, M.; Flemmig, S.; Todaro, I.; Squatrito, R.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the usability of anisotropic materials as inserts in aluminum-matrix-composite baseplates for typical high performance power semiconductor modules using finite-element simulations and transient plane source measurements. For simulations, several physical modules can be used, which are suitable for different thermal boundary conditions. By comparing different modules and options of heat transfer we found non-isothermal simulations to be closest to reality for temperature distribution at the surface of the heat sink. We optimized the geometry of the graphite inserts for best heat dissipation and based on these results evaluated the thermal resistance of a typical power module using calculation time optimized steady-state simulations. Here we investigated the influence of thermal contact conductance (TCC) between metal matrix and inserts on the heat dissipation. We found improved heat dissipation compared to the plain metal baseplate for a TCC of 200 kW/m2/K and above.To verify the simulations we evaluated cast composite baseplates with two different insert geometries and measured their averaged lateral thermal conductivity using a transient plane source (HotDisk) technique at room temperature. For the composite baseplate we achieved local improvements in heat dissipation compared to the plain metal baseplate.

  19. Validation of an Advanced Material Model for Simulating the Impact and Shock Response of Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegg, Richard A.; Hayhurst, Colin J.; Nahme, Hartwig

    2001-06-01

    Validation of an advanced continuum based numerical model for the simulation of the shock response of composite materials during high rate transient dynamic loading is described. The constitutive model, implemented in AUTODYN-2D and 3D, allows for the representation of non-linear shock effects in combination with orthotropic stiffness and damage. Simulations of uniaxial flyer plate experiments on aramid and polyethylene fibre composite systems are presented and compared with experiment. The continuum model is shown to reproduce well the experimental VISAR velocity traces at the rear surface of the targets. Finally, practical application of the model as implemented in AUTODYN is demonstrated through the simulation of ballistic and hypervelocity impact events. Comparison with experiment is given where possible.

  20. Micromechanics analysis of space simulated thermal deformations and stresses in continuous fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, David E.

    1990-01-01

    Space simulated thermally induced deformations and stresses in continuous fiber reinforced composites were investigated with a micromechanics analysis. The investigation focused on two primary areas. First, available explicit expressions for predicting the effective coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) for a composite were compared with each other, and with a finite element (FE) analysis, developed specifically for this study. Analytical comparisons were made for a wide range of fiber/matrix systems, and predicted values were compared with experimental data. The second area of investigation focused on the determination of thermally induced stress fields in the individual constituents. Stresses predicted from the FE analysis were compared to those predicted from a closed-form solution to the composite cylinder (CC) model, for two carbon fiber/epoxy composites. A global-local formulation, combining laminated plate theory and FE analysis, was used to determine the stresses in multidirectional laminates. Thermally induced damage initiation predictions were also made.

  1. THE COMPOSITIONAL DIVERSITY OF EXTRASOLAR TERRESTRIAL PLANETS. I. IN SITU SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Jade C.; Lauretta, Dante S.; O'Brien, David P.

    2010-06-01

    Extrasolar planet host stars have been found to be enriched in key planet-building elements. These enrichments have the potential to drastically alter the composition of material available for terrestrial planet formation. Here, we report on the combination of dynamical models of late-stage terrestrial planet formation within known extrasolar planetary systems with chemical equilibrium models of the composition of solid material within the disk. This allows us to determine the bulk elemental composition of simulated extrasolar terrestrial planets. A wide variety of resulting planetary compositions are found, ranging from those that are essentially 'Earth like', containing metallic Fe and Mg silicates, to those that are dominated by graphite and SiC. This shows that a diverse range of terrestrial planets may exist within extrasolar planetary systems.

  2. Numerical simulations of interfacial debonding in ductile-phase reinforced intermetallic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Henshall, G.A.; Zywicz, E.; Strum, M.J.

    1993-08-10

    The fracture toughness of brittle intermetallic compounds can be improved by ductile-phase reinforcements. Effectiveness of the ductile phase in bridging cracks, and therefore increasing, the composite toughness, is known qualitatively to depend upon the extent of debonding, between the two phases. Numerical crack-growth simulations are used here to provide semi-quantitative predictions of the influence of interfacial debonding on the macroscopic stress-displacement behavior and, hence, the fracture toughness of an idealized Pb/glass composite. The interfacial toughness required to cause debonding, characterized by a constant critical energy release rate, is varied parametrically. As expected, higher interfacial toughness results in less interphase debonding, higher composite strength, and greater ductile-phase constraint. Consequently, the increase in ductile-phase triaxiality can potentially accelerate internal void formation and growth or facilitate cleavage fracture, either of which would likely decrease the toughness of the composite.

  3. Simulation and experimental characterization of polymer/carbon nanotubes composites for strain sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vivo, B.; Lamberti, P.; Spinelli, G.; Tucci, V.; Vertuccio, L.; Vittoria, V.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, a numerical model is presented in order to analyze the electrical characteristics of polymer composites filled by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) subject to tensile stress and investigate the possible usage of such materials as innovative sensors for small values of strain. The simulated mechano-electrical response of the nanocomposite is obtained through a multi-step approach which, through different modeling stages, provides a simple and effective tool for material analysis and design. In particular, at first, the morphological structures of the composites are numerically simulated by adopting a previously presented model based on a Monte Carlo procedure in which uniform distributions of the CNTs, approximated as of solid cylinders and ensuring some physical constraints, are dispersed inside a cubic volume representing the polymer matrix. Second, a geometrical analysis allows to obtain the percolation paths detected in the simulated structures. Suitable electrical networks composed by resistors and capacitors associated to the complex charge transport and polarization mechanisms occurring in the percolation paths are then identified. Finally, the variations of these circuit parameters, which are differently affected by the mechanical stresses applied to the composites, are considered to analyze the electromechanical characteristics of the composites and hence their performances as stress sensors. The proposed approach is used to investigate the impact on the electro-mechanical response of some physical properties of the base materials, such as the type of carbon nanotube, the height of energy barrier of polymer resin, as well as characteristics of the composite, i.e., the volume fraction of the filler. The tunneling effect between neighboring nanotubes is found to play a dominant role in determining the composite sensitivity to mechanical stresses. The simulation results are also compared with the experimental data obtained by performing stress tests on

  4. Validation of an Advanced Material Model for Simulating the Impact and Shock Response of Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegg, Richard A.; Hayhurst, Colin J.; Nahme, Hartwig

    2002-07-01

    Composite materials are now commonly used as ballistic and hypervelocity protection materials and the demand for simulation of impact on these materials is increasing. A new material model specifically designed for the shock response of anisotropic materials has been developed and implemented in the hydrocode AUTODYN. The model allows for the representation of non-linear shock effects in combination with anisotropic material stiffness and damage. The coupling of the equation of state and anisotropic response is based on the methodology proposed by Anderson et al. [2]. An overview of the coupled formulation is described in order to point out the important assumptions, key innovations and basic theoretical framework. The coupled model was originally developed by Century Dynamics and Fhg-EMI for assessing the hypervelocity impact response of composite satellite protection systems [1]. It was also identified that the developed model should also offer new possibilities and capabilities for modelling modern advanced armour materials. Validation of the advanced composite model is firstly shown via simulations of uniaxial strain flyer plate experiments on aramid and polyethylene fibre composite systems. Finally, practical application of the model as implemented in AUTODYN is demonstrated through the simulation of ballistic and hypervelocity impact events. Comparison with experiment is given where possible.

  5. Computational simulation of matrix micro-slip bands in SiC/Ti-15 composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, S. K.; Lee, H.-J.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    Computational simulation procedures are used to identify the key deformation mechanisms for (0)(sub 8) and (90)(sub 8) SiC/Ti-15 metal matrix composites. The computational simulation procedures employed consist of a three-dimensional finite-element analysis and a micromechanics based computer code METCAN. The interphase properties used in the analysis have been calibrated using the METCAN computer code with the (90)(sub 8) experimental stress-strain curve. Results of simulation show that although shear stresses are sufficiently high to cause the formation of some slip bands in the matrix concentrated mostly near the fibers, the nonlinearity in the composite stress-strain curve in the case of (90)(sub 8) composite is dominated by interfacial damage, such as microcracks and debonding rather than microplasticity. The stress-strain curve for (0)(sub 8) composite is largely controlled by the fibers and shows only slight nonlinearity at higher strain levels that could be the result of matrix microplasticity.

  6. Implementation science in the real world: a streamlined model.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Herschel; Anaya, Henry D

    2012-01-01

    The process of quality improvement may involve enhancing or revising existing practices or the introduction of a novel element. Principles of Implementation Science provide key theories to guide these processes, however, such theories tend to be highly technical in nature and do not provide pragmatic nor streamlined approaches to real-world implementation. This paper presents a concisely comprehensive six step theory-based Implementation Science model that we have successfully used to launch more than two-dozen self-sustaining implementations. In addition, we provide an abbreviated case study in which we used our streamlined theoretical model to successfully guide the development and implementation of an HIV testing/linkage to care campaign in homeless shelter settings in Los Angeles County. PMID:23163970

  7. A streamlined ribosome profiling protocol for the characterization of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Latif, Haythem; Szubin, Richard; Tan, Justin; Brunk, Elizabeth; Lechner, Anna; Zengler, Karsten; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2015-06-01

    Ribosome profiling is a powerful tool for characterizing in vivo protein translation at the genome scale, with multiple applications ranging from detailed molecular mechanisms to systems-level predictive modeling. Though highly effective, this intricate technique has yet to become widely used in the microbial research community. Here we present a streamlined ribosome profiling protocol with reduced barriers to entry for microbial characterization studies. Our approach provides simplified alternatives during harvest, lysis, and recovery of monosomes and also eliminates several time-consuming steps, in particular size-selection steps during library construction. Furthermore, the abundance of rRNAs and tRNAs in the final library is drastically reduced. Our streamlined workflow enables greater throughput, cuts the time from harvest to the final library in half (down to 3-4 days), and generates a high fraction of informative reads, all while retaining the high quality standards of the existing protocol. PMID:26054770

  8. Streamlining: Reducing costs and increasing STS operations effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersburg, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    The development of streamlining as a concept, its inclusion in the space transportation system engineering and operations support (STSEOS) contract, and how it serves as an incentive to management and technical support personnel is discussed. The mechanics of encouraging and processing streamlining suggestions, reviews, feedback to submitters, recognition, and how individual employee performance evaluations are used to motivation are discussed. Several items that were implemented are mentioned. Information reported and the methodology of determining estimated dollar savings are outlined. The overall effect of this activity on the ability of the McDonnell Douglas flight preparation and mission operations team to support a rapidly increasing flight rate without a proportional increase in cost is illustrated.

  9. Streamlining Throughput with the Implementation of a CT Coordinator.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kathleen; Johnson, Charles E; Porter, Linda; Bryant, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Imaging departments today are challenged with streamlining processes to keep up with advancements in healthcare, the increasing complexity of imaging studies and procedures, and bundling of charges for services rendered. Ordering providers are often required to get insurance pre-authorizations for imaging orders, and what is pre-authorized must be the study/procedure performed or reimbursement is not guaranteed. Insurance companies have inhibited radiologists from providing optimal service by placing restrictions on changing orders per radiologist protocol to best meet the individual needs of each patient. Many healthcare systems that are using a central scheduling model are losing money due to scans and procedures being inappropriately ordered and pre-authorized. Implementing a computed tomography (CT) coordinator can streamline throughput of imaging services in radiology departments. The CT improvement project described here used a Lean methodology Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA) approach to increase the effectiveness of an organization's ability to maximize process efficiency and revenue. PMID:26939293

  10. Streamline topologies and their bifurcations for mixed convective peristaltic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asghar, Z.; Ali, N.

    2015-09-01

    In this work our focus is on streamlines patterns and their bifurcations for mixed convective peristaltic flow of Newtonian fluid with heat transfer. The flow is considered in a two dimensional symmetric channel and the governing equations are simplified under widely taken assumptions of large wavelength and low Reynolds number in a wave frame of reference. In order to study the streamlines patterns, a system of nonlinear autonomous differential equations are established and dynamical systems approach is used to discuss the local bifurcations and their topological changes. We have discussed all types of bifurcations and their topological changes are presented graphically. We found that the vortices contract along the vertical direction whereas they expand along horizontal direction. A global bifurcations diagram is used to summarize the bifurcations. The trapping and backward flow regions are mainly affected by increasing Grashof number and constant heat source parameter in such a way that trapping region increases whereas backward flow region shrinks.

  11. Simulations of one-layer and multi-layer composite forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamila, N.; Hélénon, F.; Boisse, P.; Mabrouki, T.; De Luycker, E.; Chatel, S.

    2007-04-01

    The use of composite materials is strongly increasing in aeronautics industry. Consequently there is a need for numerical analysis of these composite components. To perform accurately the service live analyses, it is necessary to know the direction and the density of the fibres at any point of the part. These directions are mainly depending of the forming of the composite. Because they are woven, textile reinforcements can reach very large in-plane shear strain during manufacturing. A numerical tool that simulates this forming process permits to envisage the feasibility of a process without defect but also to know the directions of the reinforcements after shaping. These directions condition strongly the mechanical behaviour of the final textile composite structure. In addition, the angles between warp and weft yarns influence the permeability of the reinforcement and thus the filling of the resin in the case of a liquid moulding process. The forming of composite reinforcement can be made on a single ply or simultaneously on several plies. In this paper models for the single woven ply forming are compared. The extension to multiply forming simulation is then considered.

  12. Meso-scale simulations of particle reinforced epoxy-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Bradley W.; Springer, H. Keo; Jordan, Jennifer L.; Spowart, Jonathan E.; Thadhani, Naresh N.

    2011-06-01

    Polymer matrix composites reinforced with metal powders often exhibit complex microstructure characteristics that can vary greatly due to differences in particle size and distribution, morphology, loading fractions, and composite processing methods. The effects of these differences in underlying microstructure on the mechanical and wave propagation behavior of these composites under dynamic loading conditions are not well understood. To better understand these effects, epoxy (Epon826/DEA) reinforced with different particle loading fractions of aluminum (20 or 40% vol.), nominal particle size of aluminum (5 or 50 microns), and the addition of a stiffer second particle type (Ni, 10% vol., 50 micron nominal diameter) were prepared. Microstructures of the as cast composites were obtained and used in two dimensional meso-scale simulations. The effect of varying velocity loading conditions (>400 m/s) on the wave velocity was then examined to determine the Us--Up response as a function of composite configuration. In this presentation results from the meso-scale simulations will be shown and correlated to microstructure characteristics.

  13. Full-Scale Crash Test and Finite Element Simulation of a Composite Prototype Helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Boitnott, Richard L.; Lyle, Karen H.

    2003-01-01

    A full-scale crash test of a prototype composite helicopter was performed at the Impact Dynamics Research Facility at NASA Langley Research Center in 1999 to obtain data for validation of a finite element crash simulation. The helicopter was the flight test article built by Sikorsky Aircraft during the Advanced Composite Airframe Program (ACAP). The composite helicopter was designed to meet the stringent Military Standard (MIL-STD-1290A) crashworthiness criteria and was outfitted with two crew and two troop seats and four anthropomorphic dummies. The test was performed at 38-ft/s vertical and 32.5-ft/s horizontal velocity onto a rigid surface. An existing modal-vibration model of the Sikorsky ACAP helicopter was converted into a model suitable for crash simulation. A two-stage modeling approach was implemented and an external user-defined subroutine was developed to represent the complex landing gear response. The crash simulation was executed with a nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic finite element code. Predictions of structural deformation and failure, the sequence of events, and the dynamic response of the airframe structure were generated and the numerical results were correlated with the experimental data to validate the simulation. The test results, the model development, and the test-analysis correlation are described.

  14. Zephyr: an internet-based process to streamline engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, F A; Cavitt, R E; Jordan, C W; Mauvais, M J; Niven, W A; Taylor, J M; Taylor, S S; Vickers, D L; Warren, F E; Weaver, R L

    1998-07-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is implementing an Internet-based process pilot called 'Zephyr' to streamline engineering and commerce using the internet. Major benefits have accrued by using Zephyr in facilitating industrial collaboration, speeding the engineering development cycle, reducing procurement time, and lowering overall costs. Programs at LLNL are potentializing the efficiencies introduced since implementing Zephyr. Zephyr"s pilot functionality is undergoing full integration with Business Systems, Finance, and Vendors to support major programs at the Laboratory.

  15. Zephyr: A secure Internet process to streamline engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, C.W.; Niven, W.A.; Cavitt, R.E.

    1998-05-12

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is implementing an Internet-based process pilot called `Zephyr` to streamline engineering and commerce using the Internet. Major benefits have accrued by using Zephyr in facilitating industrial collaboration, speeding the engineering development cycle, reducing procurement time, and lowering overall costs. Programs at LLNL are potentializing the efficiencies introduced since implementing Zephyr. Zephyr`s pilot functionality is undergoing full integration with Business Systems, Finance, and Vendors to support major programs at the Laboratory.

  16. Simulations of Fiber Distribution Effects in Fiber-Reinforced Cement Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Bolander, John E.; Lim, Yun Mook

    2008-02-15

    This paper describes a lattice model for coupled moisture transport/stress analyses of fiber-reinforced cement composites (FRCC). Each fiber, and its interface with the matrix material, is explicitly represented within the three-dimensional material volume. This enables the direct study of fiber orientation and distribution effects on composite performance. Realistic, nonuniform fiber distributions can be specified as model input. Basic applications of the model are presented, with emphasis toward simulating the durability mechanics of FRCC exposed to drying environments. The modeling of functionally graded FRCC is an obvious potential extension of this work.

  17. Fatigue damage simulation of a laminated composite plate with a central hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessard, Larry B.; Liu, Bangyan

    A FEM technique is here used in conjunction with a modulus-degradation model to simulate the progression of damage in a laminated composite plate, which has a central hole and is subjected to tension-tension fatigue loading, as a function of load level and number of load cycles. Analytical models are developed to predict the residual elastic moduli changes that are due to both matrix cracking and delamination. The scheme as a whole is sufficiently general for application to numerous additional problems involving fatigue-loaded composites with stress concentrations.

  18. Quantification of InxGa1-xP composition modulation by nanometric scale HAADF simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, C. E.; Gutiérrez, M.; Araújo, D.; Rodríguez-Messmer, E.

    2013-03-01

    Multijunction solar cell efficiency is highly sensitive to structural and chemical variations. These variations can be quantified at nm scale in InGaP/InGaAs/Ge multijunctions using transmission electron microscopy modes, e.g. diffraction contrast (DC-CTEM) and high angle annular dark field (STEM-HAADF). These studies determined the structure and the composition modulation of InGaP layers with sensitivity below 1% of In composition. To quantify the In-related variation, STEM-HAADF profiles are compared to numerically simulated ones. The fit with the experimental contrast shows local variations of 4.25%In for distances below 30 nm.

  19. Microcracking in Composite Laminates: Simulation of Crack-Induced Ultrasound Attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, C. A. C.; Rogge, M. D.; Parker, F. R.

    2012-01-01

    Microcracking in composite laminates is a known precursor to the growth of inter-ply delaminations and larger scale damage. Microcracking can lead to the attenuation of ultrasonic waves due to the crack-induced scattering. 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) has been implemented to explore the scattering of ultrasonic waves due to microcracks in anisotropic composite laminates. X-ray microfocus computed tomography data was directly input into the EFIT simulation for these purposes. The validated anisotropic 3D EFIT code is shown to be a useful tool for exploring the complex multiple-scattering which arises from extensive microcracking.

  20. The self streamlining wind tunnel. [wind tunnel walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    A two dimensional test section in a low speed wind tunnel capable of producing flow conditions free from wall interference is presented. Flexible top and bottom walls, and rigid sidewalls from which models were mounted spanning the tunnel are shown. All walls were unperforated, and the flexible walls were positioned by screw jacks. To eliminate wall interference, the wind tunnel itself supplied the information required in the streamlining process, when run with the model present. Measurements taken at the flexible walls were used by the tunnels computer check wall contours. Suitable adjustments based on streamlining criteria were then suggested by the computer. The streamlining criterion adopted when generating infinite flowfield conditions was a matching of static pressures in the test section at a wall with pressures computed for an imaginary inviscid flowfield passing over the outside of the same wall. Aerodynamic data taken on a cylindrical model operating under high blockage conditions are presented to illustrate the operation of the tunnel in its various modes.

  1. Bathymetry, electromagnetic streamlines and the marine controlled source electromagnetic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pethick, Andrew 12Harris, Brett

    2014-07-01

    Seafloor topography must influence the strength and direction of electromagnetic fields generated during deep ocean controlled source electromagnetic surveying. Neither mathematical equation nor rules of thumb provide a clear perspective of how changes in water column thickness alters electromagnetic fields that engulf hundreds of cubic kilometres of air, ocean, host and reservoir. We use streamline visualisation to provide a generalised representation of how electromagnetic fields propagate into a 2D geo-electrical setting that includes strong bathymetry. Of particular interest are: (i)' dead zones' where electric fields at the ocean floor are demonstrated to be weak and (ii) the 'airwave' that appears in the electric field streamlines as circulating vortices with a shape that is clearly influenced by changes in ocean depth. Our analysis of the distribution of electric fields for deep and shallow water examples alludes to potential benefits from placement of receivers and/or transmitters higher in the water column as is the case for towed receiver geometries. Real-time streamline representation probably holds the most value at the survey planning stage, especially for shallow water marine EM surveys where ocean bottom topography is likely to be consequential.

  2. Ecosystem composition changes over the past millennium: model simulations and comparison with paleoecological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Rollinson, C.; Dietze, M.; McLachlan, J. S.; Poulter, B.; Quaife, T. L.; Raiho, A.; Ricciuto, D. M.; Schaefer, K. M.; Steinkamp, J.; Moore, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Over multi-decadal to multi-centennial timescales, ecosystem function and carbon storage is largely influenced by vegetation composition. The predictability of ecosystem responses to climate change thus depends on the understanding of long-term community dynamics. Our study aims to quantify the influence of the most relevant ecological factors that control plant distribution and abundance, in contemporary terrestrial biosphere models and in paleo-records, and constrain the model processes and parameters with paleoecological data. We simulated vegetation changes at 6 sites in the northeastern United States over the past 1160 years using 7 terrestrial biosphere models and variations (CLM4.5-CN, ED2, ED2-LU, JULES-TRIFFID, LINKAGES, LPJ-GUESS, LPJ-wsl) driven by common paleoclimatic drivers. We examined plant growth, recruitment, and mortality (including other carbon turnover) of the plant functional types (PFTs) in the models, attributed the responses to three major factors (climate, competition, and disturbance), and estimated the relative effect of each factor. We assessed the model responses against plant-community theories (bioclimatic limits, niche difference, temporal variation and storage effect, and disturbance). We found that vegetation composition were sensitive to realized niche differences (e.g. differential growth response) among PFTs. Because many models assume unlimited dispersal and sometimes recruitment, the "storage effect" constantly affects community composition. Fire was important in determining the ecosystem composition, yet the vegetation to fire feedback was weak in the models. We also found that vegetation-composition changes in the simulations were driven to a much greater degree by growth as opposed to by turnover/mortality, when compared with those in paleoecological records. Our work suggest that 1) for forecasting slow changes in vegetation composition, we can use paleo-data to better quantify the realized niches of PFTs and associated

  3. Multidisciplinary Simulation of Graphite-Composite and Cermet Fuel Elements for NTP Point of Departure Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Mark E.; Schnitzler, Bruce G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares the expected performance of two Nuclear Thermal Propulsion fuel types. High fidelity, fluid/thermal/structural + neutronic simulations help predict the performance of graphite-composite and cermet fuel types from point of departure engine designs from the Nuclear Thermal Propulsion project. Materials and nuclear reactivity issues are reviewed for each fuel type. Thermal/structural simulations predict thermal stresses in the fuel and thermal expansion mis-match stresses in the coatings. Fluid/thermal/structural/neutronic simulations provide predictions for full fuel elements. Although NTP engines will utilize many existing chemical engine components and technologies, nuclear fuel elements are a less developed engine component and introduce design uncertainty. Consequently, these fuel element simulations provide important insights into NTP engine performance.

  4. Streamline generation code for particle dynamics description in numerical models of turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalena, S.; Chuychai, P.; Mace, R. L.; Greco, A.; Qin, G.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2012-09-01

    Streamline Version 4 is a versatile Fortran 77 & C++ program for calculating charged test particle trajectories or field-lines for user-specified fields using the test-particle method. The user has the freedom to specify any type of field (analytical, tabulated in files, time dependent, etc.) and maintains complete control over initial conditions of trajectories/field-lines and boundary conditions of specified fields. The structure of Streamline was redesigned from previous versions in order to know not only particle or field-lines positions and velocities at each step of the simulations, but also the instantaneous field values as seen by particles. This was made to compute the instantaneous value of the particle's magnetic moment, but other applications are possible too. Accuracy tests of the code are shown for different cases, i.e., particles moving in constant magnetic field, magnetic plus constant electric field and wave field. In addition in the last part of the paper we concentrate our discussion on the study of velocity space diffusion of charged particles in turbulent slab fields, paying attention to the discretization of the fields and the temporal discretization of the dynamical equations. The diffusion of charged particles is a very common topic in plasma physics and astrophysics since it plays an important role in many different phenomena such as stochastic particle acceleration, diffusive shock acceleration, solar energetic particle propagation, and the scattering required for the solar modulation of galactic cosmic rays.

  5. Streamline based design guideline for deterministic microfluidic hydrodynamic single cell traps

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Aditi; Smith, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A prerequisite for single cell study is the capture and isolation of individual cells. In microfluidic devices, cell capture is often achieved by means of trapping. While many microfluidic trapping techniques exist, hydrodynamic methods are particularly attractive due to their simplicity and scalability. However, current design guidelines for single cell hydrodynamic traps predominantly rely on flow resistance manipulation or qualitative streamline analysis without considering the target particle size. This lack of quantitative design criteria from first principles often leads to non-optimal probabilistic trapping. In this work, we describe an analytical design guideline for deterministic single cell hydrodynamic trapping through the optimization of streamline distributions under laminar flow with cell size as a key parameter. Using this guideline, we demonstrate an example design which can achieve 100% capture efficiency for a given particle size. Finite element modelling was used to determine the design parameters necessary for optimal trapping. The simulation results were subsequently confirmed with on-chip microbead and white blood cell trapping experiments. PMID:25825618

  6. Simulation Based Investigation of Hidden Delamination Damage Detection in CFRP Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, Cara A. C.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Guided wave (GW) based damage detection methods have shown promise in structural health monitoring (SHM) and hybrid SHM-nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques. Much previous GW work in the aerospace field has been primarily focused on metallic materials, with a growing focus on composite materials. The work presented in this paper demonstrates how realistic three-dimensional (3D) GW simulations can aid in the development of GW based damage characterization techniques for aerospace composites. 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique is implemented to model GW interaction with realistic delamination damage. A local wavenumber technique is applied to simulation data in order to investigate the detectability of hidden delamination damage to enable accurate characterization of damage extent.

  7. Surface Roughness of Composite Resins after Simulated Toothbrushing with Different Dentifrices

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Bruna; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to evaluate, in vitro, the surface roughness of two composite resins submitted to simulated toothbrushing with three different dentifrices. Materials and Methods: Totally, 36 samples of Z350XT and 36 samples of Empress Direct were built and randomly divided into three groups (n = 12) according to the dentifrice used (Oral-B Pro-Health Whitening [OBW], Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief [CS], Colgate Total Clean Mint 12 [CT12]). The samples were submitted to 5,000, 10,000 or 20,000 cycles of simulated toothbrushing. After each simulated period, the surface roughness of the samples was measured using a roughness tester. Results: According to three-way analysis of variance, dentifrice (P = 0.044) and brushing time (P = 0.000) were significant. The composite resin was not significant (P = 0.381) and the interaction among the factors was not significant (P > 0.05). The mean values of the surface roughness (µm) followed by the same letter represent no statistical difference by Tukey's post-hoc test (P <0.05): Dentifrice: CT12 = 0.269a; CS Pro- Relief = 0.300ab; OBW = 0.390b. Brushing time: Baseline = 0,046ª; 5,000 cycles = 0.297b; 10,000 cycles = 0.354b; 20,000 cycles = 0.584c. Conclusion: Z350 XT and Empress Direct presented similar surface roughness after all cycles of simulated toothbrushing. The higher the brushing time, the higher the surface roughness of composite resins. The dentifrice OBW caused a higher surface roughness in both composite resins. PMID:26229362

  8. A Numerical Method for Simulating the Microscopic Damage Evolution in Composites Under Uniaxial Transverse Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Jie; Zhao, Libin; Zhang, Jianyu; Liu, Zhanli

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a new numerical method that combines a surface-based cohesive model and extended finite element method (XFEM) without predefining the crack paths is presented to simulate the microscopic damage evolution in composites under uniaxial transverse tension. The proposed method is verified to accurately capture the crack kinking into the matrix after fiber/matrix debonding. A statistical representative volume element (SRVE) under periodic boundary conditions is used to approximate the microstructure of the composites. The interface parameters of the cohesive models are investigated, in which the initial interface stiffness has a great effect on the predictions of the fiber/matrix debonding. The detailed debonding states of SRVE with strong and weak interfaces are compared based on the surface-based and element-based cohesive models. The mechanism of damage in composites under transverse tension is described as the appearance of the interface cracks and their induced matrix micro-cracking, both of which coalesce into transversal macro-cracks. Good agreement is found between the predictions of the model and the in situ experimental observations, demonstrating the efficiency of the presented model for simulating the microscopic damage evolution in composites.

  9. Composition and Simulation of Tank WM-180 Sodium Bearing Waste at INTEC

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, Jerry Dale

    2001-04-01

    The 1-million liters of sodium-bearing waste in the WM-180 tank at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center has been concentrated and will be the first to be processed, at its current composition, by vitrification to prepare the radioactive waste for disposition. The waste has been sampled and analyzed for cations, anions, and radionuclides in the liquid and in the small amount of solids that were entrained with the liquid during sampling. The analytical results have been evaluated and a non-radioactive simulant composition and preparation procedure developed and demonstrated to result in a clear solution. The evaluation and results are reported here. This simulant is suitable for performing laboratory and pilot-scale tests in order to develop the vitrification technology. The solids entrained from the tank with the liquid sample amount to 0.06% of the dissolved solids in the liquid. While their elemental and radionuclide composition was determined, qualitative characterization using x-ray diffraction was not possible. Because of the interest in the properties of solids that may be in the bottom of the WM-180 tank, for tank closure activities, thermodynamic modeling was performed of potential precipitates that may be in equilibrium with the solution. The results were used to derive a possible chemical composition of the solids.

  10. Simulation of mechanical performance limits and failure of carbon nanotube composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2016-02-01

    The mechanical properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) fiber composites are steadily approaching those of traditional carbon fiber composites. This work is focused on establishing a plausible upper bound on these properties by modeling the elastic deformations, yield, and fracture of idealized CNT composites using reactive molecular dynamics. Amorphous carbon (AC) was used for the matrix material because of its structural simplicity and physical compatibility with the CNT fillers. Three different arrangements of CNTs in the simulation cell were investigated: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. The SWNT and MWNT array systems are clearly idealizations, but the SWNT bundle system is a step closer to real systems in which individual tubes aggregate into large assemblies. Chemical crosslinking was modeled by adding bonds between the CNTs and AC to explore the balance between weakening the CNTs and improving fiber-matrix load transfer. The simulation results reported here clarify the impact of CNT dispersion, the extent of crosslinking, and CNT-templated matrix structuring on the mechanical properties of CNT composites.

  11. Tomography based numerical simulation of the demagnetizing field in soft magnetic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Arzbacher, S.; Petrasch, J.; Amann, P.; Weidenfeller, B.; Loerting, T.; Ostermann, A.

    2015-04-28

    The magneto-static behaviour of soft magnetic composites (SMCs) is investigated using tomography based direct numerical simulation. The microgeometry crucially affects the magnetic properties of the composite since a geometry dependent demagnetizing field is established inside the composite, which lowers the magnetic permeability. We determine the magnetic field information inside the SMC using direct numerical simulation of the magnetic field based on high resolution micro-computed tomography data of the SMC's microstructure as well as artificially generated data made of statistically homogeneous systems of identical fully penetrable spheres and prolate spheroids. Quasi-static electromagnetic behaviour and linear material response are assumed. The 3D magnetostatic Maxwell equations are solved using Whitney finite elements. Simulations show that clustering and percolation behaviour determine the demagnetizing factor of SMCs rather than the particle shape. The demagnetizing factor correlates with the slope of a 2-point probability function at its origin, which is related to the specific surface area of the SMC. Comparison with experimental results indicates that the relatively low permeability of SMCs cannot be explained by demagnetizing effects alone and suggests that the permeability of SMC particles has to be orders of magnitude smaller than the bulk permeability of the particle material.

  12. Comprehensively simulating the mixed-mode progressive delamination in composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhenyuan

    Delamination, or interlaminar debonding, is a commonly observed failure mechanism in composite laminates. It is of great significance to comprehensively simulate the mixed-mode progressive delamination in composite structures because by doing this, people can save a lot of effort in evaluating the safe load which a composite structure can endure. The objective of this thesis is to develop a numerical approach to simulating double-cantilever beam (DCB) and mixed-mode bending (MMB) tests and also of specifying/validating various cohesive models. A finite element framework, which consists of properly selecting time integration scheme (explicit dynamic), viscosity, load rate and mass scaling, is developed to yield converged and accurate results. Two illustrative cohesive laws (linear and power-law) are programmed with a user- defined material subroutine for ABAQUS/Explicit, VUMAT, and implemented into the finite element framework. Parameters defined in cohesive laws are studied to evaluate their effects on the predicted load-displacement curves. The finite element model, together with the predetermined model parameters, is found to be capable of producing converged and accurate results. The finite element framework, embedded with the illustrative cohesive laws, is found to be capable of handling various interfacial models. The present approach is concluded to be useful in simulating delamination with more sophisticated material models. Together with the method for determining model parameters, it can be used by computer codes other than ABAQUS.

  13. Probabilistic Simulation of Progressive Fracture in Bolted-Joint Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, L.; Singhal, S. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes computational methods to probabilistically simulate fracture in bolted composite structures. An innovative approach that is independent of stress intensity factors and fracture toughness was used to simulate progressive fracture. The effect of design variable uncertainties on structural damage was also quantified. A fast probability integrator assessed the scatter in the composite structure response before and after damage. Then the sensitivity of the response to design variables was computed. General-purpose methods, which are applicable to bolted joints in all types of structures and in all fracture processes-from damage initiation to unstable propagation and global structure collapse-were used. These methods were demonstrated for a bolted joint of a polymer matrix composite panel under edge loads. The effects of the fabrication process were included in the simulation of damage in the bolted panel. Results showed that the most effective way to reduce end displacement at fracture is to control both the load and the ply thickness. The cumulative probability for longitudinal stress in all plies was most sensitive to the load; in the 0 deg. plies it was very sensitive to ply thickness. The cumulative probability for transverse stress was most sensitive to the matrix coefficient of thermal expansion. In addition, fiber volume ratio and fiber transverse modulus both contributed significantly to the cumulative probability for the transverse stresses in all the plies.

  14. Tomography based numerical simulation of the demagnetizing field in soft magnetic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzbacher, S.; Amann, P.; Weidenfeller, B.; Loerting, T.; Ostermann, A.; Petrasch, J.

    2015-04-01

    The magneto-static behaviour of soft magnetic composites (SMCs) is investigated using tomography based direct numerical simulation. The microgeometry crucially affects the magnetic properties of the composite since a geometry dependent demagnetizing field is established inside the composite, which lowers the magnetic permeability. We determine the magnetic field information inside the SMC using direct numerical simulation of the magnetic field based on high resolution micro-computed tomography data of the SMC's microstructure as well as artificially generated data made of statistically homogeneous systems of identical fully penetrable spheres and prolate spheroids. Quasi-static electromagnetic behaviour and linear material response are assumed. The 3D magnetostatic Maxwell equations are solved using Whitney finite elements. Simulations show that clustering and percolation behaviour determine the demagnetizing factor of SMCs rather than the particle shape. The demagnetizing factor correlates with the slope of a 2-point probability function at its origin, which is related to the specific surface area of the SMC. Comparison with experimental results indicates that the relatively low permeability of SMCs cannot be explained by demagnetizing effects alone and suggests that the permeability of SMC particles has to be orders of magnitude smaller than the bulk permeability of the particle material.

  15. Simulation and evaluation of dielectric and magnetoelectric properties of diphasic and layered ferroic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsiao-Yuan

    The present demand in the development of tunable devices and meta-materials require better understanding of the composite systems. Ferroelectric based composites with solubility or impurities doped interstitially satisfied the specific condition necessary for applications of e.g. frequency, bias, temperature, etc. On the other hand, many composite materials using coupling phenomena have been reported to have their effective properties surpassing the natural materials. The improvement of the properties of composite materials lies on the better understanding of their coupling effects. Conventional science tries to derive theories based on observation and materials characterizations. Taken advantage of the rapid growing computer technology, one used to say "impossible to be measured" or "impossible to see" can now be virtually characterized and visualized by simulation models. In this thesis, computer models of dielectric properties, piezoelectricity, magnetostriction and magnetoelectricity were constructed and verified. And subsequently the materials of interest were simulated and discussed. First, a three dimensional finite element model on dielectric properties of two phases or materials mixture was constructed. The effective permittivity and tan(delta) of Ba0.5Sr0.5 TiO3:MgO composite were simulated and compared with the experimental results. Structural design parameters concepts such as layers stacking, geometry effect, and effect of size of inclusion were visualized and then discussed. Subsequently, dielectric properties of Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO 3:MgO composite were examined changing their volume fraction using Monte Carlo simulation. The type of connectivity of the Ba0.5Sr 0.5TiO3:MgO composite was also discussed. On the other hand, finite element method with Monte Carlo simulation was conducted for the composition (x)Pb0.2Sr0.8TiO3:(1-x)MgO from x=0 to 1 in the paraelectric phase (from -50°C to 200°C), and the results were computed and compared with the experimental

  16. Simulating the Response of a Composite Honeycomb Energy Absorber. Part 2; Full-Scale Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Annett, Martin S.; Jackson, Karen E.; Polanco, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has sponsored research to evaluate an externally deployable composite honeycomb designed to attenuate loads in the event of a helicopter crash. The concept, designated the Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA), is an expandable Kevlar(Registered TradeMark) honeycomb. The DEA has a flexible hinge that allows the honeycomb to be stowed collapsed until needed during an emergency. Evaluation of the DEA began with material characterization of the Kevlar(Registered TradeMark)-129 fabric/epoxy, and ended with a full-scale crash test of a retrofitted MD-500 helicopter. During each evaluation phase, finite element models of the test articles were developed and simulations were performed using the dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA(Registered TradeMark). The paper will focus on simulations of two full-scale impact tests involving the DEA, a mass-simulator and a full-scale crash of an instrumented MD-500 helicopter. Isotropic (MAT24) and composite (MAT58) material models, which were assigned to DEA shell elements, were compared. Based on simulations results, the MAT58 model showed better agreement with test.

  17. Simulation of Thermographic Responses of Delaminations in Composites with Quadrupole Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Howell, Patricia A.; Cramer, K. Elliott

    2016-01-01

    The application of the quadrupole method for simulating thermal responses of delaminations in carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites materials is presented. The method solves for the flux at the interface containing the delamination. From the interface flux, the temperature at the surface is calculated. While the results presented are for single sided measurements, with ash heating, expansion of the technique to arbitrary temporal flux heating or through transmission measurements is simple. The quadrupole method is shown to have two distinct advantages relative to finite element or finite difference techniques. First, it is straight forward to incorporate arbitrary shaped delaminations into the simulation. Second, the quadrupole method enables calculation of the thermal response at only the times of interest. This, combined with a significant reduction in the number of degrees of freedom for the same simulation quality, results in a reduction of the computation time by at least an order of magnitude. Therefore, it is a more viable technique for model based inversion of thermographic data. Results for simulations of delaminations in composites are presented and compared to measurements and finite element method results.

  18. Removal of arsenic from simulation wastewater using nano-iron/oyster shell composites.

    PubMed

    Fan, Liwei; Zhang, Shuili; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zhou, Hua; Lu, Zexiang; Wang, Siqun

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a nano-iron/oyster shell composite (NI/OS) was firstly prepared by an in-situ synthesis method to explore an efficient treatment technology for arsenic (As) contaminated wastewater. The micromorphologies and composition of the composite were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The effects of the preparation parameters, as well as the treatment conditions, on the removal of As(Ⅲ) were also investigated. The characterization results showed that iron nanoparticles with a diameter of 60 nm were introduced into the composite by an in-situ reduction method. The physicochemical properties of the iron nanoparticles, such as diameter and aggregation, were influenced by the iron source more than the choice of reductant and temperature in the synthesis process, and these properties were closely related to the treatment performance of the composite. Under the suitable reaction conditions of a pH value of 6.8, a temperature of 20 °C, and an initial concentration of As(Ⅲ) of 1.8 mg/L, As(Ⅲ) was almost completely removed from the simulation wastewater. PMID:25839745

  19. 3D Simulation of the Growth of Alloy Semiconductor Quantum Dots Considering Morphological and Compositional Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Junyan; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Narayanaswamy, Sridhar

    2012-02-01

    Fabrication of quantum dots (QDs) with high density may be realized by self-assembly via heteroepitaxial growth of thin films. Since the electronic and optoelectronic properties of QDs are sensitive to size, morphology, strain and especially composition, it is of great importance to control their composition profiles and morphology, and engineer the strain in them. Since the growth is a dynamic process, which carries out via surface diffusion driven primarily by strain relaxation and entropy change due to chemical intermixing, a strong coupling between morphological and composition evolutions during this process leads to a rather complex dynamics, which has not been fully understood. In this work, a 3-D finite element model is developed, which is capable of modeling the formation, self-assembly and coarsening of hetero-epitaxial alloy islands by considering the coupling of morphological and compositional evolution. Several interesting experimental observations, such as fast coarsening kinetics; asymmetries in composition profile and island shape; lateral motion of alloy islands have been observed in our simulations. Our model predictions have painted a rather complete picture for the entire dynamic evolution during the growth of nanoscale heteroepitaxial islands.

  20. A Selection of Composites Simulation Practices at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.

    2007-01-01

    One of the major areas of study at NASA Langley Research Center is the development of technologies that support the use of advanced composite materials in aerospace applications. Amongst the supporting technologies are analysis tools used to simulate the behavior of these materials. This presentation will discuss a number of examples of analysis tools and simulation practices conducted at NASA Langley. The presentation will include examples of damage tolerance analyses for both interlaminar and intralaminar failure modes. Tools for modeling interlaminar failure modes include fracture mechanics and cohesive methods, whilst tools for modeling intralaminar failure involve the development of various progressive failure analyses. Other examples of analyses developed at NASA Langley include a thermo-mechanical model of an orthotropic material and the simulation of delamination growth in z-pin reinforced laminates.

  1. Impact of filler size and distribution on roughness and wear of composite resin after simulated toothbrushing

    PubMed Central

    de OLIVEIRA, Gabriela Ulian; MONDELLI, Rafael Francisco Lia; CHARANTOLA RODRIGUES, Marcela; FRANCO, Eduardo Batista; ISHIKIRIAMA, Sérgio Kiyoshi; WANG, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Nanofilled composite resins are claimed to provide superior mechanical properties compared with microhybrid resins. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare nanofilled with microhybrid composite resins. The null hypothesis was that the size and the distribution of fillers do not influence the mechanical properties of surface roughness and wear after simulated toothbrushing test. Material and methods Ten rectangular specimens (15 mm x 5 mm x 4 mm) of Filtek Z250 (FZ2), Admira (A), TPH3 (T),Esthet-X (EX), Estelite Sigma (ES), Concept Advanced (C), Grandio (G) and Filtek Z350 (F) were prepared according to manufacturer's instructions. Half of each top surface was protected with nail polish as control surface (not brushed) while the other half was assessed with five random readings using a roughness tester (Ra). Following, the specimens were abraded by simulated toothbrushing with soft toothbrushes and slurry comprised of 2:1 water and dentifrice (w/w). 100,000 strokes were performed and the brushed surfaces were re-analyzed. Nail polish layers were removed from the specimens so that the roughness (Ra) and the wear could be assessed with three random readings (µm). Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's multiple-comparison test (α=0.05). Results Overall outcomes indicated that composite resins showed a significant increase in roughness after simulated toothbrushing, except for Grandio, which presented a smoother surface. Generally, wear of nanofilled resins was significantly lower compared with microhybrid resins. Conclusions As restorative materials suffer alterations under mechanical challenges, such as toothbrushing, the use of nanofilled materials seem to be more resistant than microhybrid composite resins, being less prone to be rougher and worn. PMID:23138735

  2. Streamline correction for the analysis of boundary layer turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Zoë S.; Baas, Andreas C. W.

    2012-10-01

    Improvements in the design and affordability of ultrasonic anemometers have provided significant contributions to aeolian research, by facilitating high frequency monitoring of three dimensional wind velocities. From these data it is possible to calculate quasi-instantaneous Reynolds stresses to evaluate boundary layer turbulence, moving beyond time-averaged measures, such as shear velocity (U*). As ultrasonic anemometry is used more frequently in aeolian geomorphology it is important to question accepted conventions concerning data processing and analysis. This paper examines data processing questions associated with the application of ultrasonic anemometry to field studies in aeolian geomorphology, through an investigation of three streamline correction routines, the two-step, three-step and planar-fit methods, on data recorded on a gently sloping beach at Magilligan Strand, Northern Ireland in May 2010. The planar-fit technique has not previously been used in aeolian geomorphology. Results are compared with data that have been corrected only for wind direction (yaw). The effects that these different methods have on quadrant analysis and Reynolds stress calculation are discussed. Streamline correction is applied as a time-variable procedure using a characteristic timescale of 8 s following analysis of the resultant wind speed energy spectrum. It is found that Reynolds shear stress is dependent on streamline correction method, with run mean estimates of resultant horizontal shear stress ranging from 0.05 to 0.11 N m- 2 depending on the technique. The two-step method consistently maximises the shear stress and when the resultant horizontal shear is calculated, it produces the most robust estimate for application to aeolian research. In contrast, the different methods have little effect on the identification or sequencing of turbulent structures using quadrant analysis. Streamline correction is an essential processing step when using Reynolds decomposition, however

  3. Studies of self streamlining wind tunnel real and imaginary flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, S. W. D.; Goodyer, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Testing in the low speed flexible walled tunnel in an effort to explain the reasons for data discrepancies at high angles of attack are presented. Automated transonic test sections were developed. The flexible walled tunnel was used in a new operating mode to a generated curved flow around the airfoil, allowing the extraction of purely rotary derivatives. Some straight wall, low speed pressure data, for wall and model, which is used for checking interference correction methods were reported. Computer software which includes an old streamlining algorithm and a prediction algorithm was examined.

  4. Prediction of airfoil stall using Navier-Stokes equations in streamline coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, D. H.; Sohn, C. H.; Oh, C. S.

    1992-01-01

    A Navier-Stokes procedure to calculate the flow about an airfoil at incidence was developed. The parabolized equations are solved in the streamline coordinates generated for an arbitrary airfoil shape using conformal mapping. A modified k-epsilon turbulence model is applied in the entire domain, but the eddy viscosity in the laminar region is suppressed artificially to simulate the region correctly. The procedure was applied to airfoils at various angles of attack, and the results are quite satisfactory for both laminar and turbulent flows. It is shown that the present choice of the coordinate system reduces the error due to numerical diffusion, and that the lift is accurately predicted for a wide range of incidence.

  5. Finite Element Simulation of Low Velocity Impact Damage on an Aeronautical Carbon Composite Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemanle Sanga, Roger Pierre; Garnier, Christian; Pantalé, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    Low velocity barely visible impact damage (BVID) in laminated carbon composite structures has a major importance for aeronautical industries. This contribution leads with the development of finite element models to simulate the initiation and the propagation of internal damage inside a carbon composite structure due by a low velocity impact. Composite plates made from liquid resin infusion process (LRI) have been subjected to low energy impacts (around 25 J) using a drop weight machine. In the experimental procedure, the internal damage is evaluated using an infrared thermographic camera while the indentation depth of the face is measured by optical measurement technique. In a first time we developed a robust model using homogenised shells based on degenerated tri-dimensional brick elements and in a second time we decided to modelize the whole stacking sequence of homogeneous layers and cohesive interlaminar interfaces in order to compare and validate the obtained results. Both layer and interface damage initiation and propagation models based on the Hashin and the Benzeggagh-Kenane criteria have been used for the numerical simulations. Comparison of numerical results and experiments has shown the accuracy of the proposed models.

  6. Simulation of Complex Cracking in Plain Weave C/SiC Composite under Biaxial Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Ron-Bin; Hsu, Su-Yuen

    2012-01-01

    Finite element analysis is performed on a mesh, based on computed geometry of a plain weave C/SiC composite with assumed internal stacking, to reveal the pattern of internal damage due to biaxial normal cyclic loading. The simulation encompasses intertow matrix cracking, matrix cracking inside the tows, and separation at the tow-intertow matrix and tow-tow interfaces. All these dissipative behaviors are represented by traction-separation cohesive laws. Not aimed at quantitatively predicting the overall stress-strain relation, the simulation, however, does not take the actual process of fiber debonding into account. The fiber tows are represented by a simple rule-of-mixture model where the reinforcing phase is a hypothetical one-dimensional material. Numerical results indicate that for the plain weave C/SiC composite, 1) matrix-crack initiation sites are primarily determined by large intertow matrix voids and interlayer tow-tow contacts, 2) the pattern of internal damage strongly depends on the loading path and initial stress, 3) compressive loading inflicts virtually no damage evolution. KEY WORDS: ceramic matrix composite, plain weave, cohesive model, brittle failure, smeared crack model, progressive damage, meso-mechanical analysis, finite element.

  7. Numerical simulation of shock initiation of Ni/Al multilayered composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sraj, Ihab; Knio, Omar M.; Specht, Paul E.; Thadhani, Naresh N.; Weihs, Timothy P.

    2014-01-14

    The initiation of chemical reaction in cold-rolled Ni/Al multilayered composites by shock compression is investigated numerically. A simplified approach is adopted that exploits the disparity between the reaction and shock loading timescales. The impact of shock compression is modeled using CTH simulations that yield pressure, strain, and temperature distributions within the composites due to the shock propagation. The resulting temperature distribution is then used as initial condition to simulate the evolution of the subsequent shock-induced mixing and chemical reaction. To this end, a reduced reaction model is used that expresses the local atomic mixing and heat release rates in terms of an evolution equation for a dimensionless time scale reflecting the age of the mixed layer. The computations are used to assess the effect of bilayer thickness on the reaction, as well as the impact of shock velocity and orientation with respect to the layering. Computed results indicate that initiation and evolution of the reaction are substantially affected by both the shock velocity and the bilayer thickness. In particular, at low impact velocity, Ni/Al multilayered composites with thick bilayers react completely in 100 ms while at high impact velocity and thin bilayers, reaction time was less than 100 μs. Quantitative trends for the dependence of the reaction time on the shock velocity are also determined, for different bilayer thickness and shock orientation.

  8. Simulating the Impact Response of Full-Scale Composite Airframe Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Littell, Justin D.; Seal, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center obtained a composite helicopter cabin structure in 2010 from the US Army's Survivable Affordable Repairable Airframe Program (SARAP) that was fabricated by Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation. The cabin had been subjected to a vertical drop test in 2008 to evaluate a tilting roof concept to limit the intrusion of overhead masses into the fuselage cabin. Damage to the cabin test article was limited primarily to the roof. Consequently, the roof area was removed and the remaining structure was cut into test specimens including a large subfloor section and a forward framed fuselage section. In 2011, NASA and Sikorsky entered into a cooperative research agreement to study the impact responses of composite airframe structures and to evaluate the capabilities of the explicit transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA®, to simulate these responses including damage initiation and progressive failure. Most of the test articles were manufactured of graphite unidirectional tape composite with a thermoplastic resin system. However, the framed fuselage section was constructed primarily of a plain weave graphite fabric material with a thermoset resin system. Test data were collected from accelerometers and full-field photogrammetry. The focus of this paper will be to document impact testing and simulation results for the longitudinal impact of the subfloor section and the vertical drop test of the forward framed fuselage section.

  9. On Complexities of Impact Simulation of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites: A Simplified Modeling Framework

    PubMed Central

    Alemi-Ardakani, M.; Milani, A. S.; Yannacopoulos, S.

    2014-01-01

    Impact modeling of fiber reinforced polymer composites is a complex and challenging task, in particular for practitioners with less experience in advanced coding and user-defined subroutines. Different numerical algorithms have been developed over the past decades for impact modeling of composites, yet a considerable gap often exists between predicted and experimental observations. In this paper, after a review of reported sources of complexities in impact modeling of fiber reinforced polymer composites, two simplified approaches are presented for fast simulation of out-of-plane impact response of these materials considering four main effects: (a) strain rate dependency of the mechanical properties, (b) difference between tensile and flexural bending responses, (c) delamination, and (d) the geometry of fixture (clamping conditions). In the first approach, it is shown that by applying correction factors to the quasistatic material properties, which are often readily available from material datasheets, the role of these four sources in modeling impact response of a given composite may be accounted for. As a result a rough estimation of the dynamic force response of the composite can be attained. To show the application of the approach, a twill woven polypropylene/glass reinforced thermoplastic composite laminate has been tested under 200 J impact energy and was modeled in Abaqus/Explicit via the built-in Hashin damage criteria. X-ray microtomography was used to investigate the presence of delamination inside the impacted sample. Finally, as a second and much simpler modeling approach it is shown that applying only a single correction factor over all material properties at once can still yield a reasonable prediction. Both advantages and limitations of the simplified modeling framework are addressed in the performed case study. PMID:25431787

  10. On complexities of impact simulation of fiber reinforced polymer composites: a simplified modeling framework.

    PubMed

    Alemi-Ardakani, M; Milani, A S; Yannacopoulos, S

    2014-01-01

    Impact modeling of fiber reinforced polymer composites is a complex and challenging task, in particular for practitioners with less experience in advanced coding and user-defined subroutines. Different numerical algorithms have been developed over the past decades for impact modeling of composites, yet a considerable gap often exists between predicted and experimental observations. In this paper, after a review of reported sources of complexities in impact modeling of fiber reinforced polymer composites, two simplified approaches are presented for fast simulation of out-of-plane impact response of these materials considering four main effects: (a) strain rate dependency of the mechanical properties, (b) difference between tensile and flexural bending responses, (c) delamination, and (d) the geometry of fixture (clamping conditions). In the first approach, it is shown that by applying correction factors to the quasistatic material properties, which are often readily available from material datasheets, the role of these four sources in modeling impact response of a given composite may be accounted for. As a result a rough estimation of the dynamic force response of the composite can be attained. To show the application of the approach, a twill woven polypropylene/glass reinforced thermoplastic composite laminate has been tested under 200 J impact energy and was modeled in Abaqus/Explicit via the built-in Hashin damage criteria. X-ray microtomography was used to investigate the presence of delamination inside the impacted sample. Finally, as a second and much simpler modeling approach it is shown that applying only a single correction factor over all material properties at once can still yield a reasonable prediction. Both advantages and limitations of the simplified modeling framework are addressed in the performed case study. PMID:25431787

  11. Dissecting the Effects of Simulated Cattle Activity on Floristic Composition and Functional Traits in Mediterranean Grasslands

    PubMed Central

    Dobarro, Iker; Pérez Carmona, Carlos; Peco, Begoña

    2013-01-01

    Livestock exerts direct and indirect effects on plant communities, changing colonization and extinction rates of species and the surrounding environmental conditions. There is scarce knowledge on how and to what extent these effects control the floristic and functional composition of plant communities in grasslands. We performed an experiment that included several treatments simulating trampling, defoliation, faeces addition and their combinations in a Mediterranean scrub community grazing-abandoned for at least 50 years. We monitored the plots for four years, and collected data on species composition, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and red∶far-red ratio (R∶FR), soil moisture and compaction. We estimated community weighted means (CWM) for height, habit, life cycle, seed mass and SLA. Neither compaction nor soil moisture were modified by the treatments, while PAR and R∶FR increased in all treatments in comparison to the Control and Faeces treatments. The floristic composition of all treatments, except for Faeces, converged over time, but deviated from that of the Control. The functional traits displayed the trends expected in the presence of grazing: loss of erect species and increased cover of short species with light seeds, with rosettes and prostrate habit. However, contrary to the results in literature, SLA was lower in all the treatments than Control plots. Like the results for floristic composition, all treatments except for Faeces converged towards a similar functional composition at the end of the four year period. The results of this study show the initial evolution of a Mediterranean plant community in the presence of grazing, driven primarily by the destructive action of livestock. These actions seem to directly affect the rates of extinction/colonization, and indirectly affect the light environment but not the soil conditions. However, their effects on floristic and trait composition do not seem to differ, at least at the small spatio

  12. COMPOSITION STRUCTURE OF INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS FROM MULTISPACECRAFT OBSERVATIONS, MODELING, AND COMPARISON WITH NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Reinard, Alysha A.; Mulligan, Tamitha E-mail: blynch@ssl.berkeley.edu

    2012-12-20

    We present an analysis of the ionic composition of iron for two interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) observed on 2007 May 21-23 by the ACE and STEREO spacecraft in the context of the magnetic structure of the ejecta flux rope, sheath region, and surrounding solar wind flow. This analysis is made possible due to recent advances in multispacecraft data interpolation, reconstruction, and visualization as well as results from recent modeling of ionic charge states in MHD simulations of magnetic breakout and flux cancellation coronal mass ejection (CME) initiation. We use these advances to interpret specific features of the ICME plasma composition resulting from the magnetic topology and evolution of the CME. We find that, in both the data and our MHD simulations, the flux ropes centers are relatively cool, while charge state enhancements surround and trail the flux ropes. The magnetic orientations of the ICMEs are suggestive of magnetic breakout-like reconnection during the eruption process, which could explain the spatial location of the observed iron enhancements just outside the traditional flux rope magnetic signatures and between the two ICMEs. Detailed comparisons between the simulations and data were more complicated, but a sharp increase in high iron charge states in the ACE and STEREO-A data during the second flux rope corresponds well to similar features in the flux cancellation results. We discuss the prospects of this integrated in situ data analysis and modeling approach to advancing our understanding of the unified CME-to-ICME evolution.

  13. Self-assembly of nanocomponents into composite structures: Derivation and simulation of Langevin equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankavich, S.; Shreif, Z.; Miao, Y.; Ortoleva, P.

    2009-05-01

    The kinetics of the self-assembly of nanocomponents into a virus, nanocapsule, or other composite structure is analyzed via a multiscale approach. The objective is to achieve predictability and to preserve key atomic-scale features that underlie the formation and stability of the composite structures. We start with an all-atom description, the Liouville equation, and the order parameters characterizing nanoscale features of the system. An equation of Smoluchowski type for the stochastic dynamics of the order parameters is derived from the Liouville equation via a multiscale perturbation technique. The self-assembly of composite structures from nanocomponents with internal atomic structure is analyzed and growth rates are derived. Applications include the assembly of a viral capsid from capsomers, a ribosome from its major subunits, and composite materials from fibers and nanoparticles. Our approach overcomes errors in other coarse-graining methods, which neglect the influence of the nanoscale configuration on the atomistic fluctuations. We account for the effect of order parameters on the statistics of the atomistic fluctuations, which contribute to the entropic and average forces driving order parameter evolution. This approach enables an efficient algorithm for computer simulation of self-assembly, whereas other methods severely limit the timestep due to the separation of diffusional and complexing characteristic times. Given that our approach does not require recalibration with each new application, it provides a way to estimate assembly rates and thereby facilitate the discovery of self-assembly pathways and kinetic dead-end structures.

  14. Modeling and simulations of diphasic composites for development of high energy density dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Sandeep Kesharsingh

    This doctoral research is focused on analytical and numerical modeling of diphasic composites for use in high energy density capacitors for pulsed power applications. An analytical model is presented based on an equivalent capacitance/impedance circuit used to express the effective permittivity of a composite dielectric with complex-shaped inclusions as functions of frequency and inclusion volume fraction. Zero-three (0-3) types of composites are investigated using this model. The results of this model are compared with different known effective medium theories (Maxwell Garnett, logarithmic, Bruggeman, series, and parallel mixing rules). Model predictions are also compared with published experimental data and are found to be in good agreement. Electrostatic field distribution characteristics and energy storage magnitudes for diphasic dielectrics containing high-permittivity inclusions in a low permittivity host phase (0-3 composite) have been evaluated analytically and numerically. Field distribution and energy storage were studied as a function of dielectric contrast (ratio of inclusion to host permittivity) and inclusion volume fraction. Information obtained from these studies was used to consider optimized diphasic dielectric traits that would lead to increases in energy density and breakdown behavior. Results of these simulations were also compared to the Maxwell Garnett (MG) mixing rule and the upper limit of applicability of the MG formulation in terms of inclusion volume fraction was established. It was determined that this limit was a function of the dielectric contrast.

  15. Computational Simulation of Damage Progression of Composite Thin Shells Subjected to Mechanical Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, P. K.; Chamis, C. C.; Minnetyan, L.

    1996-01-01

    Defect-free and defected composite thin shells with ply orientation (90/0/+/-75) made of graphite/epoxy are simulated for damage progression and fracture due to internal pressure and axial loading. The thin shells have a cylindrical geometry with one end fixed and the other free. The applied load consists of an internal pressure in conjunction with an axial load at the free end, the cure temperature was 177 C (350 F) and the operational temperature was 21 C (70 F). The residual stresses due to the processing are taken into account. Shells with defect and without defects were examined by using CODSTRAN an integrated computer code that couples composite mechanics, finite element and account for all possible failure modes inherent in composites. CODSTRAN traces damage initiation, growth, accumulation, damage propagation and the final fracture of the structure. The results show that damage initiation started with matrix failure while damage/fracture progression occurred due to additional matrix failure and fiber fracture. The burst pressure of the (90/0/+/- 75) defected shell was 0.092% of that of the free defect. Finally the results of the damage progression of the (90/0/+/- 75), defective composite shell was compared with the (90/0/+/- theta, where theta = 45 and 60, layup configurations. It was shown that the examined laminate (90/0/+/- 75) has the least damage tolerant of the two compared defective shells with the (90/0/+/- theta), theta = 45 and 60 laminates.

  16. Self-assembly of nanocomponents into composite structures: derivation and simulation of Langevin equations.

    PubMed

    Pankavich, S; Shreif, Z; Miao, Y; Ortoleva, P

    2009-05-21

    The kinetics of the self-assembly of nanocomponents into a virus, nanocapsule, or other composite structure is analyzed via a multiscale approach. The objective is to achieve predictability and to preserve key atomic-scale features that underlie the formation and stability of the composite structures. We start with an all-atom description, the Liouville equation, and the order parameters characterizing nanoscale features of the system. An equation of Smoluchowski type for the stochastic dynamics of the order parameters is derived from the Liouville equation via a multiscale perturbation technique. The self-assembly of composite structures from nanocomponents with internal atomic structure is analyzed and growth rates are derived. Applications include the assembly of a viral capsid from capsomers, a ribosome from its major subunits, and composite materials from fibers and nanoparticles. Our approach overcomes errors in other coarse-graining methods, which neglect the influence of the nanoscale configuration on the atomistic fluctuations. We account for the effect of order parameters on the statistics of the atomistic fluctuations, which contribute to the entropic and average forces driving order parameter evolution. This approach enables an efficient algorithm for computer simulation of self-assembly, whereas other methods severely limit the timestep due to the separation of diffusional and complexing characteristic times. Given that our approach does not require recalibration with each new application, it provides a way to estimate assembly rates and thereby facilitate the discovery of self-assembly pathways and kinetic dead-end structures. PMID:19466829

  17. Monte Carlo Simulation of Thermal Conductivity in Randomly Distributed Nanowire Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, W.; Yang, R.

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, we investigated the thermal conductivity of composites made of two types of randomly stacked nanowires with high contrast ratio of bulk thermal conductivity. Thermal conductivity predictions based on solving the phonon Boltzmann transport equation by using the Monte Carlo method are presented for different contrast ratios of thermal conductivity, sizes of nanowires and the volumetric fractions in the composites. For composites made of nanowires with high contrast ratio thermal conductivity, the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposites increase dramatically when the volumetric fraction of high thermal conductivity nanowire is higher than the geometry percolation threshold, although existing correlations in percolation theory do not fit the results due to the phonon interface scattering. On the other hand, when the the size of nanowires is small and the volumetric fraction of high thermal conductivity nanowire is less than percolation threshold, the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposites decreases with increasing the volumetric fraction of the high thermal conductivity nanowires. The results of this study may help the development of nanoscale thermoelectric materials in which the figure of merit is optimized by choosing appropriate nanowire size, property contrast and composition. RY acknowledges the funding support for this work by DoD/AFOSR MURI grant FA9550-06-1-0326. The simulation was conducted on a 24-node cluster supported by Intel Corporation and managed by Prof. Gang Chen and Mr. Lu Hu at MIT.

  18. User's guide and description of the streamline divergence computer program. [turbulent convective heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulyma, P. R.; Mcanally, J. V.

    1975-01-01

    The streamline divergence program was developed to demonstrate the capability to trace inviscid surface streamlines and to calculate outflow-corrected laminar and turbulent convective heating rates on surfaces subjected to exhaust plume impingement. The analytical techniques used in formulating this program are discussed. A brief description of the streamline divergence program is given along with a user's guide. The program input and output for a sample case are also presented.

  19. Discrete Meso-Element Simulation of Failure Behavior of Short-Fiber Composites under Shock Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Z. P.; Liu, Wenyan; Liu, Yunxin

    1999-06-01

    Recent years, it was paid more attention to better understanding the failure behavior and mechanism of heterogeneous materials at meso- scale level. In this paper, the crack initiation and development in epoxy composite reinforced with short steel fibre under dynamic loading were simulated and analyzed with 2D Discrete Meso-Element Dynamic Method. Results show that cracks initiate at the tips of fibres on the Loading side where stress concentrates. The effective strength of the composite sample is related to shape, orientation, weight percentage of the fibres, and particularly, the bonding strength between fibre and matrix. In the case of low bonding strength, the crack will propagate along the fibre and finally penetrate the whole sample. The differences compared with static loading are also discussed.

  20. A Damage Model for the Simulation of Delamination in Advanced Composites under Variable-Mode Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turon, A.; Camanho, P. P.; Costa, J.; Davila, C. G.

    2006-01-01

    A thermodynamically consistent damage model is proposed for the simulation of progressive delamination in composite materials under variable-mode ratio. The model is formulated in the context of Damage Mechanics. A novel constitutive equation is developed to model the initiation and propagation of delamination. A delamination initiation criterion is proposed to assure that the formulation can account for changes in the loading mode in a thermodynamically consistent way. The formulation accounts for crack closure effects to avoid interfacial penetration of two adjacent layers after complete decohesion. The model is implemented in a finite element formulation, and the numerical predictions are compared with experimental results obtained in both composite test specimens and structural components.

  1. Eco-friendly streamlined process for sporopollenin exine capsule extraction.

    PubMed

    Mundargi, Raghavendra C; Potroz, Michael G; Park, Jae Hyeon; Seo, Jeongeun; Tan, Ee-Lin; Lee, Jae Ho; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Sporopollenin exine capsules (SECs) extracted from Lycopodium clavatum spores are an attractive biomaterial possessing a highly robust structure suitable for microencapsulation strategies. Despite several decades of research into SEC extraction methods, the protocols commonly used for L. clavatum still entail processing with both alkaline and acidolysis steps at temperatures up to 180 °C and lasting up to 7 days. Herein, we demonstrate a significantly streamlined processing regimen, which indicates that much lower temperatures and processing durations can be used without alkaline lysis. By employing CHN elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and dynamic image particle analysis (DIPA), the optimum conditions for L. clavatum SEC processing were determined to include 30 hours acidolysis at 70 °C without alkaline lysis. Extending these findings to proof-of-concept encapsulation studies, we further demonstrate that our SECs are able to achieve a loading of 0.170 ± 0.01 g BSA per 1 g SECs by vacuum-assisted loading. Taken together, our streamlined processing method and corresponding characterization of SECs provides important insights for the development of applications including drug delivery, cosmetics, personal care products, and foods. PMID:26818918

  2. Eco-friendly streamlined process for sporopollenin exine capsule extraction

    PubMed Central

    Mundargi, Raghavendra C.; Potroz, Michael G.; Park, Jae Hyeon; Seo, Jeongeun; Tan, Ee-Lin; Lee, Jae Ho; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Sporopollenin exine capsules (SECs) extracted from Lycopodium clavatum spores are an attractive biomaterial possessing a highly robust structure suitable for microencapsulation strategies. Despite several decades of research into SEC extraction methods, the protocols commonly used for L. clavatum still entail processing with both alkaline and acidolysis steps at temperatures up to 180 °C and lasting up to 7 days. Herein, we demonstrate a significantly streamlined processing regimen, which indicates that much lower temperatures and processing durations can be used without alkaline lysis. By employing CHN elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and dynamic image particle analysis (DIPA), the optimum conditions for L. clavatum SEC processing were determined to include 30 hours acidolysis at 70 °C without alkaline lysis. Extending these findings to proof-of-concept encapsulation studies, we further demonstrate that our SECs are able to achieve a loading of 0.170 ± 0.01 g BSA per 1 g SECs by vacuum-assisted loading. Taken together, our streamlined processing method and corresponding characterization of SECs provides important insights for the development of applications including drug delivery, cosmetics, personal care products, and foods. PMID:26818918

  3. Analysis of Jupiter's Oval BA: A Streamlined Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sussman, Michael G.; Chanover, Nancy J.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Beebe, Reta F.

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel method of constructing streamlines to derive wind speeds within jovian vortices and demonstrate its application to Oval BA for 2001 pre-reddened Cassini flyby data, 2007 post-reddened New Horizons flyby data, and 1998 Galileo data of precursor Oval DE. Our method, while automated, attempts to combine the advantages of both automated and manual cloud tracking methods. The southern maximum wind speed of Oval BA does not show significant changes between these data sets to within our measurement uncertainty. The northern maximum dries appear to have increased in strength during this time interval, tvhich likely correlates with the oval's return to a symmetric shape. We demonstrate how the use of closed streamlines can provide measurements of vorticity averaged over the encircled area with no a priori assumptions concerning oval shape. We find increased averaged interior vorticity between pre- and post-reddened Oval BA, with the precursor Oval DE occupying a middle value of vorticity between these two.

  4. Eco-friendly streamlined process for sporopollenin exine capsule extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundargi, Raghavendra C.; Potroz, Michael G.; Park, Jae Hyeon; Seo, Jeongeun; Tan, Ee-Lin; Lee, Jae Ho; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Sporopollenin exine capsules (SECs) extracted from Lycopodium clavatum spores are an attractive biomaterial possessing a highly robust structure suitable for microencapsulation strategies. Despite several decades of research into SEC extraction methods, the protocols commonly used for L. clavatum still entail processing with both alkaline and acidolysis steps at temperatures up to 180 °C and lasting up to 7 days. Herein, we demonstrate a significantly streamlined processing regimen, which indicates that much lower temperatures and processing durations can be used without alkaline lysis. By employing CHN elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and dynamic image particle analysis (DIPA), the optimum conditions for L. clavatum SEC processing were determined to include 30 hours acidolysis at 70 °C without alkaline lysis. Extending these findings to proof-of-concept encapsulation studies, we further demonstrate that our SECs are able to achieve a loading of 0.170 ± 0.01 g BSA per 1 g SECs by vacuum-assisted loading. Taken together, our streamlined processing method and corresponding characterization of SECs provides important insights for the development of applications including drug delivery, cosmetics, personal care products, and foods.

  5. SafetyNet: Streamlining and Automating QA in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Scott W; Kessler, Marc L; Litzenberg, Dale W; Lee, Choonik; Irrer, Jim; Chen, Xiaoping; Acosta, Eduardo; Weyburne, Grant; Keranen, Wayne; Lam, Kwok; Covington, Elizabeth; Younge, Kelly C; Matuszak, Martha M; Moran, Jean M

    2016-01-01

    Proper quality assurance (QA) of the radiotherapy process can be time-consuming and expensive. Many QA efforts, such as data export and import, are inefficient when done by humans. Additionally, humans can be unreliable, lose attention, and fail to complete critical steps that are required for smooth operations. In our group we have sought to break down the QA tasks into separate steps and to automate those steps that are better done by software running autonomously or at the instigation of a human. A team of medical physicists and software engineers worked together to identify opportunities to streamline and automate QA. Development efforts follow a formal cycle of writing software requirements, developing software, testing and commissioning. The clinical release process is separated into clinical evaluation testing, training, and finally clinical release. We have improved six processes related to QA and safety. Steps that were previously performed by humans have been automated or streamlined to increase first-time quality, reduce time spent by humans doing low-level tasks, and expedite QA tests. Much of the gains were had by automating data transfer, implementing computer-based checking and automation of systems with an event-driven framework. These coordinated efforts by software engineers and clinical physicists have resulted in speed improvements in expediting patient-sensitive QA tests. PMID:26894365

  6. Stratified Flow Past a Hill: Dividing Streamline Concept Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo, Laura S.; Thompson, Michael Y.; Di Sabatino, Silvana; Fernando, Harindra J. S.

    2016-06-01

    The Sheppard formula (Q J R Meteorol Soc 82:528-529, 1956) for the dividing streamline height H_s assumes a uniform velocity U_∞ and a constant buoyancy frequency N for the approach flow towards a mountain of height h, and takes the form H_s/h=( {1-F} ) , where F=U_{∞}/Nh. We extend this solution to a logarithmic approach-velocity profile with constant N. An analytical solution is obtained for H_s/h in terms of Lambert-W functions, which also suggests alternative scaling for H_s/h. A `modified' logarithmic velocity profile is proposed for stably stratified atmospheric boundary-layer flows. A field experiment designed to observe H_s is described, which utilized instrumentation from the spring field campaign of the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) Program. Multiple releases of smoke at F≈ 0.3-0.4 support the new formulation, notwithstanding the limited success of experiments due to logistical constraints. No dividing streamline is discerned for F≈ 10, since, if present, it is too close to the foothill. Flow separation and vortex shedding is observed in this case. The proposed modified logarithmic profile is in reasonable agreement with experimental observations.

  7. Evaluation of the roughness and mass loss of the flowable composites after simulated toothbrushing abrasion.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Fernanda Cristina Pimentel; Wang, Linda; D'Alpino, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; Souza, João Batista de; Araújo, Paulo Amarante de; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco de Lia

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure mass loss and surface roughness changes of different brands of flowable resin composites after a simulated toothbrushing test. The null hypotheses were that there would be no differences in mass loss and no significant changes in surface roughness after this test and that there would be no correlation between the two variables. The tested materials were Aeliteflo (Bisco), Flow-It (Pentron), Flow-It LF (Pentron), Natural Flow (DFL) and Wave (SDI). Z100 (3M/ESPE) microhybrid and Silux Plus (3M/ESPE) microfilled resin composites were used as control materials. Twelve specimens (5 mm in diameter, 3 mm thick) of each material were prepared according to manufacturers' instructions. Toothbrushing abrasion was performed on all specimens from each of the materials using a simulator. The percentage mass loss and surface roughness were assessed before and after 100,000 brushstrokes, using a Sartorius analytical balance of 0.0001 g accuracy and a Hommel Tester T1000, respectively. The measurements of both properties were statistically compared by paired t-test and Tukey's test (p < 0.05). All materials presented a statistically significant mass loss comparing initial and final values, with the exception of Flow-It LF. However, no difference was revealed when comparing the mass loss of the different tested materials. All materials became rougher and Wave presented statistically higher roughness compared to the other resin composites. Flowable resin composites did not seem to be superior to the control groups, and they can be expected to wear by mass loss and to have an increased roughness of surface after toothbrushing action. The anticipated null hypotheses were partially accepted. PMID:15311320

  8. EVALUATION OF AP-FARM SIMULANT COMPOSITION FOR ROTARY MICROFILTER TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    HUBER HJ

    2011-09-19

    This document identifies the feed composition of a Hanford AP tank farm simulant for rotary microfiltration testing. The composition is based on an Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model run in combination with Tank Waste Information Network (TWINS) data and mineralogical studies of actual waste solids. The feed simulant is intended to be used in test runs at SRNL. The simulant will be prepared in two parts: (1) A supernate, composed of water-soluble salts and (2) The undissolved (actually, undissolvable) solids. Test slurries with distinct solids concentrations (e.g., 0.5, 5 and 10 wt%) are then prepared as needed. The base for the composition of supernate and solids is the modeled feed sequence for a deployment scenario of the Supplemental Pretreatment units within AP-farm. These units comprise a filtration part, the RMF, and a Cesium-removal part, a Small Column Ion Exchange. The primary use of this simulant is for filtration testing - however, in case that it is also used for ion-exchange tests, the amount of Cs-137 that would need to be added is available in Table 1 and Attachment 3. A modified model run (MMR-049) of the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) system plan 6 case 3 was performed to identify the feed sequence. Case 3 assumed supplemental treatment besides the low activity waste (LAW) melter with supplemental pretreatment supporting the pretreatment facility. The MMR did not cap the duration of supplemental pretreatment to 15 months, but rather used it throughout the entire treatment mission as an add-on option to the pretreatment facility at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Tank 241-AP-105 (AP-105) was chosen as the feed tank to the filtration unit. Other parameters included a fixed minimum of 0.5 wt% solids in the feed and a maximum Na-concentration of 5M in the supernate. The solids rejection from the filtration unit was set to 99.99% and the maximum allowed amount of solids within tank AP-105 was set

  9. 77 FR 36289 - Implementation of Indian Reservation Roads Program and Streamlining the Federal Delivery of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ... Delivery of Tribal Transportation Services AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... (IRR) funding among tribes; (2) streamlining BIA delivery of transportation program services to...

  10. FEAMAC/CARES Stochastic-Strength-Based Damage Simulation Tool for Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel; Bednarcyk, Brett; Pineda, Evan; Arnold, Steven; Mital, Subodh; Murthy, Pappu; Bhatt, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Reported here is a coupling of two NASA developed codes: CARES (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) with the MAC/GMC (Micromechanics Analysis Code/ Generalized Method of Cells) composite material analysis code. The resulting code is called FEAMAC/CARES and is constructed as an Abaqus finite element analysis UMAT (user defined material). Here we describe the FEAMAC/CARES code and an example problem (taken from the open literature) of a laminated CMC in off-axis loading is shown. FEAMAC/CARES performs stochastic-strength-based damage simulation response of a CMC under multiaxial loading using elastic stiffness reduction of the failed elements.

  11. Simulating Initial and Progressive Failure of Open-Hole Composite Laminates under Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhangxin; Zhu, Hao; Li, Yongcun; Han, Xiaoping; Wang, Zhihua

    2016-06-01

    A finite element (FE) model is developed for the progressive failure analysis of fiber reinforced polymer laminates. The failure criterion for fiber and matrix failure is implemented in the FE code Abaqus using user-defined material subroutine UMAT. The gradual degradation of the material properties is controlled by the individual fracture energies of fiber and matrix. The failure and damage in composite laminates containing a central hole subjected to uniaxial tension are simulated. The numerical results show that the damage model can be used to accurately predicte the progressive failure behaviour both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  12. Computer simulation of creep damage at crack tip in short fibre composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuangyin, Zhang; Tsai, L. W.

    1994-08-01

    Creep damage at crack tip in short fibre composites has been simulated by using the finite element method (FEM). The well-known Schapery non-linear viscoelastic constitutive relationship was used to characterize time-dependent behaviour of the material. A modified recurrence equation was adopted to accelerate the iteration. Kachanov-Rabotnov's damage evolution law was employed. The growth of the damage zone with time around the crack tip was calculated and the results were shown with the so-called “digit photo”, which was produced by the printer.

  13. Simulation on friction taper plug welding of AA6063-20Gr metal matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss; Nithin, Abeyram M.

    2016-05-01

    Friction taper plug welding a variant of friction welding is useful in welding of similar and dissimilar materials. It could be used for joining of composites to metals in sophisticated aerospace applications. In the present work numerical simulation of friction taper plug welding process is carried out using finite element based software. Graphite reinforced AA6063 is modelled using the software ANSYS 15.0 and temperature distribution is predicted. Effect of friction time on temperature distribution is numerically investigated. When the friction time is increased to 30 seconds, the tapered part of plug gets detached and fills the hole in the AA6063 plate perfectly.

  14. Simulation of High Velocity Impact on Composite Structures - Model Implementation and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schueler, Dominik; Toso-Pentecôte, Nathalie; Voggenreiter, Heinz

    2016-08-01

    High velocity impact on composite aircraft structures leads to the formation of flexural waves that can cause severe damage to the structure. Damage and failure can occur within the plies and/or in the resin rich interface layers between adjacent plies. In the present paper a modelling methodology is documented that captures intra- and inter-laminar damage and their interrelations by use of shell element layers representing sub-laminates that are connected with cohesive interface layers to simulate delamination. This approach allows the simulation of large structures while still capturing the governing damage mechanisms and their interactions. The paper describes numerical algorithms for the implementation of a Ladevèze continuum damage model for the ply and methods to derive input parameters for the cohesive zone model. By comparison with experimental results from gas gun impact tests the potential and limitations of the modelling approach are discussed.

  15. Simulation of High Velocity Impact on Composite Structures - Model Implementation and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schueler, Dominik; Toso-Pentecôte, Nathalie; Voggenreiter, Heinz

    2016-05-01

    High velocity impact on composite aircraft structures leads to the formation of flexural waves that can cause severe damage to the structure. Damage and failure can occur within the plies and/or in the resin rich interface layers between adjacent plies. In the present paper a modelling methodology is documented that captures intra- and inter-laminar damage and their interrelations by use of shell element layers representing sub-laminates that are connected with cohesive interface layers to simulate delamination. This approach allows the simulation of large structures while still capturing the governing damage mechanisms and their interactions. The paper describes numerical algorithms for the implementation of a Ladevèze continuum damage model for the ply and methods to derive input parameters for the cohesive zone model. By comparison with experimental results from gas gun impact tests the potential and limitations of the modelling approach are discussed.

  16. Stability of 3D Textile Composite Reinforcement Simulations: Solutions to Spurious Transverse Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, S.; Hamila, N.; Dupé, F.; Descamps, C.; Boisse, P.

    2016-08-01

    The simulation of thick 3D composite reinforcement forming brings to light new modeling challenges. The specific anisotropic material behavior due to the possible slippage between fibers induces, among other phenomena, the development of spurious transverse modes in bending-dominated 3D simulations. To obtain coherent finite element responses, two solutions are proposed. The first one uses a simple assumed strain formulation usually prescribed to prevent volumetric locking. This solution avoids spurious transverse modes by stiffening of the hourglass modes. Nevertheless the deformation obtained by this approach still suffers from the inability of the standard continuum mechanics of Cauchy to describe fibrous material deformation. The second proposed approach is based on the introduction of a bending stiffness which both avoids the spurious transverse modes and also improves the global behavior of the element formulation by enriching the underlying continuum. To emphasize the differences between different formulations, element stiffnesses are explicitly calculated and compared.

  17. Stability of 3D Textile Composite Reinforcement Simulations: Solutions to Spurious Transverse Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, S.; Hamila, N.; Dupé, F.; Descamps, C.; Boisse, P.

    2016-03-01

    The simulation of thick 3D composite reinforcement forming brings to light new modeling challenges. The specific anisotropic material behavior due to the possible slippage between fibers induces, among other phenomena, the development of spurious transverse modes in bending-dominated 3D simulations. To obtain coherent finite element responses, two solutions are proposed. The first one uses a simple assumed strain formulation usually prescribed to prevent volumetric locking. This solution avoids spurious transverse modes by stiffening of the hourglass modes. Nevertheless the deformation obtained by this approach still suffers from the inability of the standard continuum mechanics of Cauchy to describe fibrous material deformation. The second proposed approach is based on the introduction of a bending stiffness which both avoids the spurious transverse modes and also improves the global behavior of the element formulation by enriching the underlying continuum. To emphasize the differences between different formulations, element stiffnesses are explicitly calculated and compared.

  18. Equation-of-State Based Tie-Simplex Parameterization for Multiphase Thermal-Compositional Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iranshahr, A.; Voskov, D.; Tchelepi, H. A.

    2011-12-01

    Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) processes usually involve complex phase behaviors between the injected fluid (e.g., steam, hydrocarbon, CO2, sour) and the in-situ rock-fluid system. Several fundamental questions remain regarding equation-of-state computations for mixtures than can form three, or more, phases at equilibrium. In addition, numerical and computational issues related to proper coupling of the thermodynamic phase-behavior with multiphase flow multi-component transport must be resolved in order to model the behaviors of large-scale EOR processes accurately and efficiently. We describe a general negative-flash method for multi-component, thermal systems that can form three, or more, fluid phases. We prove that the new method is convergent to the unique solution. Based on our multiphase negative-flash technique, we have developed an adaptive tie-simplex parameterization framework for thermal-compositional simulation. We also prove that the tie-simplexes change continuously as a function of pressure, temperature, and composition. The continuity of the parameterized compositional space allows for interpolation in pressure and temperature using a limited number of tie-simplexes. We show that the tie-simplex framework constrains thermodynamic computations, and converges to the global minimum of the Gibbs free energy. The extended negative-flash approach accounts rigorously for tie-simplex degeneration (critical behavior) across phase boundaries. We study the behaviors of thermal-compositional reservoir displacement processes across a wide range of fluid mixtures, pressures, and temperatures. The focus is on the complex behaviors of the tie-triangles and tie-lines associated with three-phase, thermal steam-injection problems in heterogeneous formations. The algorithms that capture the complex combinations of the appearance and disappearance of multiple phases are described in detail. This tie-simplex based parameterization framework is integrated with a general

  19. Numerical simulation and experimental validation of Lamb wave propagation behavior in composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungwon; Uprety, Bibhisha; Mathews, V. John; Adams, Daniel O.

    2015-03-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) based on Acoustic Emission (AE) is dependent on both the sensors to detect an impact event as well as an algorithm to determine the impact location. The propagation of Lamb waves produced by an impact event in thin composite structures is affected by several unique aspects including material anisotropy, ply orientations, and geometric discontinuities within the structure. The development of accurate numerical models of Lamb wave propagation has important benefits towards the development of AE-based SHM systems for impact location estimation. Currently, many impact location algorithms utilize the time of arrival or velocities of Lamb waves. Therefore the numerical prediction of characteristic wave velocities is of great interest. Additionally, the propagation of the initial symmetric (S0) and asymmetric (A0) wave modes is important, as these wave modes are used for time of arrival estimation. In this investigation, finite element analyses were performed to investigate aspects of Lamb wave propagation in composite plates with active signal excitation. A comparative evaluation of two three-dimensional modeling approaches was performed, with emphasis placed on the propagation and velocity of both the S0 and A0 wave modes. Results from numerical simulations are compared to experimental results obtained from active AE testing. Of particular interest is the directional dependence of Lamb waves in quasi-isotropic carbon/epoxy composite plates. Numerical and experimental results suggest that although a quasi-isotropic composite plate may have the same effective elastic modulus in all in-plane directions, the Lamb wave velocity may have some directional dependence. Further numerical analyses were performed to investigate Lamb wave propagation associated with circular cutouts in composite plates.

  20. Study of glass transition temperature (Tg) of novel stress-sensitive composites using molecular dynamic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, B.; Liu, Y.; Zou, J.; Chattopadhyay, A.; Dai, L. L.

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the glass transition temperature (Tg) of novel stress-sensitive composites capable of detecting a damage precursor using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The molecular structures of a cross-linked epoxy network (which consist of epoxy resin, hardener and stress-sensitive material) have been simulated and experimentally validated. The chemical constituents of the molecular structures are di-glycidyl ether of bisphenol F (DGEBF: epoxy resin), di-ethylene tri-amine (DETA: hardener) and tris-(cinnamoyloxymethyl)-ethane (TCE: stress-sensitive material). The cross-linking degree is varied by manipulating the number of covalent bonds through tuning a cutoff distance between activated DGEBF and DETA during the non-equilibrium MD simulation. A relationship between the cross-linking degree and Tgs has been studied numerically. In order to validate a proposed MD simulation framework, MD-predicted Tgs of materials used in this study have been compared to the experimental results obtained by the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Two molecular models have been constructed for comparative study: (i) neat epoxy (epoxy resin with hardener) and (ii) smart polymer (neat epoxy with stress-sensitive material). The predicted Tgs show close agreement with the DSC results.

  1. Simulation studies of acceleration of heavy ions and their elemental compositions; IFSR--755

    SciTech Connect

    Toida, Mieko; Ohsawa, Yukiharu

    1996-07-01

    By using a one-dimensional, electromagnetic particle simulation code with full ion and electron dynamics, we have studied the acceleration of heavy ions by a nonlinear magnetosonic wave in a multi-ion-species plasma. First, we describe the mechanism of heavy ion acceleration by magnetosonic waves. We then investigate this by particle simulations. The simulation plasma contains four ion species: H, He, O, and Fe. The number density of He is taken to be 10% of that of H, and those of O and Fe are much lower. Simulations confirm that, as in a single-ion-species plasma, some of the hydrogens can be accelerated by the longitudinal electric field formed in the wave. Furthermore, they show that magnetosonic waves can accelerate all the particles of all the heavy species (He, O, and Fe) by a different mechanism, i.e., by the transverse electric field. The maximum speeds of the heavy species are about the same, of the order of the wave propagation speed. These are in good agreement with theoretical prediction. These results indicate that, if high-energy ions are produced in the solar corona through these mechanisms, the elemental compositions of these heavy ions can be similar to that of the background plasma, i.e., the corona.

  2. Carbon isotope composition of ambient CO2 and recycling: a matrix simulation model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    da Silveira Lobo Sternberg, Leonel; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between isotopic composition and concentration of ambient CO2 in a canopy and its associated convective boundary layer was modeled. The model divides the canopy and convective boundary layer into several layers. Photosynthesis, respiration, and exchange between each layer can be simulated by matrix equations. This simulation can be used to calculate recycling; defined here as the amount of respired CO2 re-fixed by photosynthesis relative to the total amount of respired CO2. At steady state the matrix equations can be solved for the canopy and convective boundary layer CO2 concentration and isotopic profile, which can be used to calculate a theoretical recycling index according to a previously developed equation. There is complete agreement between simulated and theoretical recycling indices for different exchange scenarios. Recycling indices from a simulation of gas exchange between a heterogeneous vegetation canopy and the troposphere also agreed with a more generalized form of the theoretical recycling equation developed here.

  3. Simulation of ultrasonic inspection of curved composites using a hybrid semi-analytical/numerical code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reverdy, Frédéric; Mahaut, Steve; Dominguez, Nicolas; Dubois, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    Carbon Fiber reinforced composites are increasingly used in structural parts in the aeronautics industry, as they allow to reduce the weight of aircrafts while maintaining high mechanical performances. However, such structures can be complicated to inspect due to their complex geometries and complex composite properties, leading to highly heterogeneous and anisotropic materials. Different potential damages and manufacturing flaws related to these parts are to be detected: porosities, ply waviness, delaminations after impact. Ultrasonic inspection, which is commonly used to test the full volume of composite panels, thus has to cope with both complex wave propagation (within anisotropic parts whose crystallographic orientation varies according to the layers structure) and flaw interaction (local distortion of plies such as ply waviness, small pores, structural noise due to periodicity patterns…). Developing NDT procedures for those parts therefore requires simulation tools to help for understanding those phenomena, and to optimize probes and techniques. Within the CIVA multi-techniques platform, CEA-LIST has developed semi-analytical tools for ultrasonic techniques, which have the advantages of high computational efficiency (fast calculations), but with limited range of application due to some hypothesis (for instance, homogenization approaches which don't allow to take account of structural noise). On the other hand, numerical methods such as finite element (FEM) or finite difference in time domain (FDTD) are more suitable to compute ultrasonic wave propagation and defect scattering in complex materials such as composite but require more computational efforts. Hybrid methods couple semi-analytical solutions and numerical computations in limited spatial domains to handle complex cases with high computation performances. In CIVA we have integrated a hybrid model that combines the semi-analytical methods developed at CEA to FDTD codes developed at Airbus Group

  4. Harmonization and streamlining of research oversight for pragmatic clinical trials.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, P Pearl; Carrithers, Judith; Patrick-Lake, Bray; Rice, Todd W; Corsmo, Jeremy; Hart, Raffaella; Drezner, Marc K; Lantos, John D

    2015-10-01

    The oversight of research involving human participants is a complex process that requires institutional review board review as well as multiple non-institutional review board institutional reviews. This multifaceted process is particularly challenging for multisite research when each site independently completes all required local reviews. The lack of inter-institutional standardization can result in different review outcomes for the same protocol, which can delay study operations from start-up to study completion. Hence, there have been strong calls to harmonize and thus streamline the research oversight process. Although the institutional review board is only one of the required reviews, it is often identified as the target for harmonization and streamlining. Data regarding variability in decision-making and interpretation of the regulations across institutional review boards have led to a perception that variability among institutional review boards is a primary contributor to the problems with review of multisite research. In response, many researchers and policymakers have proposed the use of a single institutional review board of record, also called a central institutional review board, as an important remedy. While this proposal has merit, the use of a central institutional review board for multisite research does not address the larger problem of completing non-institutional review board institutional review in addition to institutional review board review—and coordinating the interdependence of these reviews. In this article, we describe the overall research oversight process, distinguish between institutional review board and institutional responsibilities, and identify challenges and opportunities for harmonization and streamlining. We focus on procedural and organizational issues and presume that the protection of human subjects remains the paramount concern. Suggested modifications of institutional review board processes that focus on time

  5. Local Elastic Constants for Epoxy-Nanotube Composites from Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankland, S. J. V.; Gates, T. S.

    2007-01-01

    A method from molecular dynamics simulation is developed for determining local elastic constants of an epoxy/nanotube composite. The local values of C11, C33, K12, and K13 elastic constants are calculated for an epoxy/nanotube composite as a function of radial distance from the nanotube. While the results possess a significant amount of statistical uncertainty resulting from both the numerical analysis and the molecular fluctuations during the simulation, the following observations can be made. If the size of the region around the nanotube is increased from shells of 1 to 6 in thickness, then the scatter in the data reduces enough to observe trends. All the elastic constants determined are at a minimum 20 from the center of the nanotube. The C11, C33, and K12 follow similar trends as a function of radial distance from the nanotube. The K13 decreases greater distances from the nanotube and becomes negative which may be a symptom of the statistical averaging.

  6. Numerical simulation on the seismic absorption effect of the cushion in rigid-pile composite foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaolei; Li, Yaokun; Ji, Jing; Ying, Junhao; Li, Weichen; Dai, Baicheng

    2016-06-01

    In order to quantitatively study the seismic absorption effect of the cushion on a superstructure, a numerical simulation and parametric study are carried out on the overall FEA model of a rigid-pile composite foundation in ABAQUS. A simulation of a shaking table test on a rigid mass block is first completed with ABAQUS and EERA, and the effectiveness of the Drucker-Prager constitutive model and the finite-infinite element coupling method is proved. Dynamic time-history analysis of the overall model under frequent and rare earthquakes is carried out using seismic waves from the El Centro, Kobe, and Bonds earthquakes. The different responses of rigid-pile composite foundations and pile-raft foundations are discussed. Furthermore, the influence of thickness and modulus of cushion, and ground acceleration on the seismic absorption effect of the cushion are analyzed. The results show that: 1) the seismic absorption effect of a cushion is good under rare earthquakes, with an absorption ratio of about 0.85; and 2) the seismic absorption effect is strongly affected by cushion thickness and ground acceleration.

  7. Simulation of an Impact Test of the All-Composite Lear Fan Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockwell, Alan E.; Jones, Lisa E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An MSC.Dytran model of an all-composite Lear Fan aircraft fuselage was developed to simulate an impact test conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center Impact Dynamics Research Facility (IDRF). The test was the second of two Lear Fan impact tests. The purpose of the second test was to evaluate the performance of retrofitted composite energy-absorbing floor beams. A computerized photogrammetric survey was performed to provide airframe geometric coordinates, and over 5000 points were processed and imported into MSC.Patran via an IGES file. MSC.Patran was then used to develop the curves and surfaces and to mesh the finite element model. A model of the energy-absorbing floor beams was developed separately and then integrated into the Lear Fan model. Structural responses of components such as the wings were compared with experimental data or previously published analytical data wherever possible. Comparisons with experimental results were used to guide structural model modifications to improve the simulation performance. This process was based largely on qualitative (video and still camera images and post-test inspections) rather than quantitative results due to the relatively few accelerometers attached to the structure.

  8. A case study of development and application of a streamlined control and response modeling system for PM2.5 attainment assessment in China.

    PubMed

    Long, Shicheng; Zhu, Yun; Jang, Carey; Lin, Che-Jen; Wang, Shuxiao; Zhao, Bin; Gao, Jian; Deng, Shuang; Xie, Junping; Qiu, Xuezhen

    2016-03-01

    This article describes the development and application of a streamlined air control and response modeling system with a novel response surface modeling-linear coupled fitting method and a new module to provide streamlined model data for PM2.5 attainment assessment in China. This method is capable of significantly reducing the dimensions required to establish a response surface model, as well as capturing more realistic response of PM2.5 to emission changes with a limited number of model simulations. The newly developed module establishes a data link between the system and the Software for Model Attainment Test-Community Edition (SMAT-CE), and has the ability to rapidly provide model responses to emission control scenarios for SMAT-CE using a simple interface. The performance of this streamlined system is demonstrated through a case study of the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) in China. Our results show that this system is capable of reproducing the Community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model simulation results with maximum mean normalized error<3.5%. It is also demonstrated that primary emissions make a major contribution to ambient levels of PM2.5 in January and August (e.g., more than 50% contributed by primary emissions in Shanghai), and Shanghai needs to have regional emission control both locally and in its neighboring provinces to meet China's annual PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard. The streamlined system provides a real-time control/response assessment to identify the contributions of major emission sources to ambient PM2.5 (and potentially O3 as well) and streamline air quality data for SMAT-CE to perform attainment assessments. PMID:26969052

  9. The Effect of Depth on Drag During the Streamlined Glide: A Three-Dimensional CFD Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Novais, Maria L.; Silva, António J.; Mantha, Vishveshwar R.; Ramos, Rui J.; Rouboa, Abel I.; Vilas-Boas, J. Paulo; Luís, Sérgio R.; Marinho, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of depth on drag during the streamlined glide in swimming using Computational Fluid Dynamics. The Computation Fluid Dynamic analysis consisted of using a three-dimensional mesh of cells that simulates the flow around the considered domain. We used the K-epsilon turbulent model implemented in the commercial code Fluent® and applied it to the flow around a three-dimensional model of an Olympic swimmer. The swimmer was modeled as if he were gliding underwater in a streamlined prone position, with hands overlapping, head between the extended arms, feet together and plantar flexed. Steady-state computational fluid dynamics analyses were performed using the Fluent® code and the drag coefficient and the drag force was calculated for velocities ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 m/s, in increments of 0.50m/s, which represents the velocity range used by club to elite level swimmers during the push-off and glide following a turn. The swimmer model middle line was placed at different water depths between 0 and 1.0 m underwater, in 0.25m increments. Hydrodynamic drag decreased with depth, although after 0.75m values remained almost constant. Water depth seems to have a positive effect on reducing hydrodynamic drag during the gliding. Although increasing depth position could contribute to decrease hydrodynamic drag, this reduction seems to be lower with depth, especially after 0.75 m depth, thus suggesting that possibly performing the underwater gliding more than 0.75 m depth could not be to the benefit of the swimmer. PMID:23487502

  10. The Effect of Depth on Drag During the Streamlined Glide: A Three-Dimensional CFD Analysis.

    PubMed

    Novais, Maria L; Silva, António J; Mantha, Vishveshwar R; Ramos, Rui J; Rouboa, Abel I; Vilas-Boas, J Paulo; Luís, Sérgio R; Marinho, Daniel A

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of depth on drag during the streamlined glide in swimming using Computational Fluid Dynamics. The Computation Fluid Dynamic analysis consisted of using a three-dimensional mesh of cells that simulates the flow around the considered domain. We used the K-epsilon turbulent model implemented in the commercial code Fluent(®) and applied it to the flow around a three-dimensional model of an Olympic swimmer. The swimmer was modeled as if he were gliding underwater in a streamlined prone position, with hands overlapping, head between the extended arms, feet together and plantar flexed. Steady-state computational fluid dynamics analyses were performed using the Fluent(®) code and the drag coefficient and the drag force was calculated for velocities ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 m/s, in increments of 0.50m/s, which represents the velocity range used by club to elite level swimmers during the push-off and glide following a turn. The swimmer model middle line was placed at different water depths between 0 and 1.0 m underwater, in 0.25m increments. Hydrodynamic drag decreased with depth, although after 0.75m values remained almost constant. Water depth seems to have a positive effect on reducing hydrodynamic drag during the gliding. Although increasing depth position could contribute to decrease hydrodynamic drag, this reduction seems to be lower with depth, especially after 0.75 m depth, thus suggesting that possibly performing the underwater gliding more than 0.75 m depth could not be to the benefit of the swimmer. PMID:23487502

  11. Numerical Simulation of Impact Damage Induced by Orbital Debris on Shielded Wall of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniaev, Aleksandr; Telichev, Igor

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a methodology for numerical simulation of the formation of the front wall damage in composite overwrapped pressure vessels under hypervelocity impact. Both SPH particles and Lagrangian finite elements were employed in combination for numerical simulations. Detailed numerical models implementing two filament winding patterns with different degree of interweaving were developed and used to simulate 2.5 km/s and 5.0 km/s impacts of 5 mm-diameter spherical aluminum-alloy projectile. Obtained results indicate that winding pattern may have a pronounced effect on vessel damage in case of orbital debris impact, influencing propagation of the stress waves in composite material.

  12. Simulation of cold atmospheric plasma component composition and particle densities in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsanov, Gennady; Bekasov, Vladimir; Eliseev, Stepan; Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Sisoev, Sergey

    2015-11-01

    Recently discharges in air at atmospheric pressure were the subject of numerous studies. Of particular interest are the cold streams of air plasma, which contains large amounts of chemically active species. It is their action can be decisive in the interaction with living tissues. Therefore, in addition to its physical properties, it is important to know the component composition and particle densities. The goal was to develop a numerical model of atmospheric pressure glow microdischarge in air with the definition of the component composition of plasma. To achieve this goal the task was broken down into two sub-tasks, in the first simulated microdischarge atmospheric pressure in air using a simplified set of plasma chemical reactions in order to obtain the basic characteristics of the discharge, which are the initial approximations in the problem of the calculation of the densities with detailed plasma chemistry, including 53 spices and over 600 chemical reactions. As a result of the model was created, which can be adapted for calculating the component composition of plasma of various sources. Calculate the density of particles in the glow microdischarges and dynamics of their change in time.

  13. Simulation of cold atmospheric plasma component composition and particle densities in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsanov, Gennady; Chirtsov, Alexander; Kudryavtsev, Anatoliy

    2015-11-01

    Recently discharges in air at atmospheric pressure were the subject of numerous studies. Of particular interest are the cold streams of air plasma, which contains large amounts of chemically active species. It is their action can be decisive in the interaction with living tissues. Therefore, in addition to its physical properties, it is important to know the component composition and particle densities. The goal was to develop a numerical model of atmospheric pressure glow microdischarge in air with the definition of the component composition of plasma. To achieve this goal the task was divided into two sub-tasks, in the first simulated microdischarge atmospheric pressure in air using a simplified set of plasma chemical reactions in order to obtain the basic characteristics of the discharge, which are the initial approximations in the problem of the calculation of the densities with detailed plasma chemistry, including 53 spices and over 600 chemical reactions. As a result of the model was created, which can be adapted for calculating the component composition of plasma of various sources. Calculate the density of particles in the glow microdischarges and dynamics of their change in time.

  14. Production of particulate Composition B during simulated weathering of larger detonation residues.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Mark E; Schaefer, Charles E; Andaya, Christina; Fallis, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Explosives and energetics continue to be prominent contaminants on many military installations. This research was undertaken to understand the extent to which microscale (10's of μm) particles are produced when macroscale residues are weathered by artificial precipitation. Initial experiments, in which artificial rainwater was applied drip-wise to single chunks of Composition B detonation residues from multiple heights, confirmed that microscale particles were produced during precipitation-driven aging, with 30% of the explosive mass collected detected as particulate Composition B (e.g., particles >0.45 μm in diameter). Follow-on experiments, during which multiple cm-sized residue chunks were subjected to realistic simulated precipitation, demonstrated an initial large pulse of particulate Composition B, followed by sustained production of microscale particles that represented 15-20% of recovered explosives. These findings indicate that the effective footprint of detonation residues likely increases as particulates are produced by the production and spreading of microscale particles across the soil surface. Combined with results published elsewhere that microscale particles can move into porous media to become a distributed source term, these findings point to the need for inclusion of these processes in explosive contaminant fate and transport modeling. PMID:25262478

  15. Effects of Simulated Functional Loading Conditions on Dentin, Composite, and Laminate Structures

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Mary P.; Teitelbaum, Heather K.; Eick, J. David; Williams, Karen B.

    2008-01-01

    Use of composite restorations continues to increase, tempered by more potential problems when placed in posterior dentition. Thus, it is essential to understand how these materials function under stress-bearing clinical conditions. Since mastication is difficult to replicate in the laboratory, cyclic loading is frequently used within in vitro evaluations but often employs traditional fatigue testing, which typically does not simulate occlusal loading because higher stresses and loading frequencies are used, so failure mechanisms may be different. The present investigation utilized relevant parameters (specimen size; loading frequency) to assess the effects of cyclic loading on flexural mechanical properties and fracture morphology of (coronal) dentin, composite, and dentin-adhesive-composite “laminate” structures. Incremental monitoring of flexural modulus on individual beams over 60,000 loading cycles revealed a gradual increase across materials; post-hoc comparisons indicated statistical significance only for 1 versus 60k cycles. Paired specimens were tested (one exposed to 60k loading cycles, one to static loading only), and comparisons of flexural modulus and strength showed statistically significantly higher values for cyclically-loaded specimens across materials, with no observable differences in fracture morphology. Localized reorganization of dentin collagen and polymer chains could have increased flexural modulus and strength during cyclic loading, which may have implications toward the life and failure mechanisms of clinical restorations and underlying tooth structure. PMID:18823019

  16. Effects of simulated functional loading conditions on dentin, composite, and laminate structures.

    PubMed

    Walker, Mary P; Teitelbaum, Heather K; Eick, J David; Williams, Karen B

    2009-02-01

    Use of composite restorations continues to increase, tempered by more potential problems when placed in posterior dentition. Thus, it is essential to understand how these materials function under stress-bearing clinical conditions. Because mastication is difficult to replicate in the laboratory, cyclic loading is frequently used within in vitro evaluations but often employs traditional fatigue testing, which typically does not simulate occlusal loading because higher stresses and loading frequencies are used, so failure mechanisms may be different. This investigation utilized relevant parameters (specimen size, loading frequency) to assess the effects of cyclic loading on flexural mechanical properties and fracture morphology of (coronal) dentin, composite, and dentin-adhesive-composite "laminate" structures. Incremental monitoring of flexural modulus on individual beams over 60,000 loading cycles revealed a gradual increase across materials; post hoc comparisons indicated statistical significance only for 1 versus 60k cycles. Paired specimens were tested (one exposed to 60k loading cycles, one to static loading only), and comparisons of flexural modulus and strength showed statistically significantly higher values for cyclically loaded specimens across materials, with no observable differences in fracture morphology. Localized reorganization of dentin collagen and polymer chains could have increased flexural modulus and strength during cyclic loading, which may have implications toward the life and failure mechanisms of clinical restorations and underlying tooth structure. PMID:18823019

  17. A Tow-Level Progressive Damage for Simulating Carbon-Fiber Textile Composites: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Zywicz, E.

    2000-07-01

    A numerical approach to model the elasto-plastic and tensile damage response of tri-axially braided carbon-fiber polymeric-matrix composites is developed. It is micromechanically based and consists of a simplified unit cell geometry, a plane-stress tow-level constitutive relationship, a one-dimensional undulation constitutive law, and a non-traditional shell element integration rule. The braided composite lamina is idealized as periodic in the plane, and a simplified three-layer representative volume (RV) is assembled from axial and braider tows and pure resin regions. The constituents in each layer are homogenized with an iso-strain assumption in the fiber-direction and an iso-stress condition in the other directions. In the upper and lower layers, the fiber-direction strain is additively decomposed into an undulation and a tow portion. A finite-deformation tow model predicts the plane-stress tow response and is coupled to the undulation constitutive relationship. The overall braid model is implemented in DYNA3D and works with traditional shell elements. The finite-deformation tow constitutive relationship is derived from the fiber elasticity and the isotropic elasto-plastic power-law hardening matrix response using a thermodynamic framework and simple homogenization assumptions. The model replicates tensile damage evolution, in a smeared sense, parallel and perpendicular to the fiber axis and is regularized to yield mesh independent results. The tow-level model demonstrates reasonable agreement, prior to damage, with detailed three-dimensional FE (finite element) elasto-plastic simulations of aligned, periodically arranged, uni-directional composites. The 3-layer braid model response is compared with predictions obtained from detailed micromechanical simulations of the braid's unit cell in uni-axial extension, shear, and flexure for three braid angles. The elastic properties show good agreement as does the non-linear response for loadings dominated by the axial

  18. Numerical computation of space shuttle heating and surface streamlines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakich, J. V.; Lanfranco, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    Exact inviscid flow-field codes are used together with a quasi-three-dimensional boundary-layer analysis to provide estimates of the windward surface heating and streamline patterns of the shuttle orbiter vehicle. The accuracy and limitations of the methods are established by comparison with available wind-tunnel experiments and with more exact numerical solutions for simple flows. Flight predictions are presented showing the effects of finite-rate (nonequilibrium) chemical reactions, and the effects of varying boundary-layer edge conditions due to the growth of the boundary-layer into the inviscid flow (entropy layer swallowing). Differences between flow-field predictions at wind-tunnel and nominal flight conditions are discussed.

  19. Streamlined bilateral otologic surgery: how I do it.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Tara E; Redleaf, Miriam I

    2015-03-01

    Bilateral simultaneous otologic surgery is being performed more commonly among otologists. The benefits of performing bilateral simultaneous cochlear implants in the pediatric population, in particular, have become increasingly recognized as the safety and efficacy of this operation have been recognized in the literature. Here we present a streamlined method of performing bilateral simultaneous otologic surgery that emphasizes midline placement of facial nerve electrodes and a method of sterile preparation and draping that affords direct exposure to both ears at one time, without the need to turn the head or adjust the drapes multiple times throughout the operation. Our approach facilitates frequent and efficient alternation between ears throughout the operation, optimizing efficiency of motion and instrumentation for the surgeon, and reducing overall operative and general anesthesia time for the patient. PMID:25738727

  20. Lateral straining of turbulent boundary layers. I - Streamline divergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saddoughi, Seyed G.; Joubert, Peter N.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of prolonged streamline divergence on developing turbulent boundary layers is investigated using an experimental approximation of the source flow over a flat plate to achieve a simple divergence. Results are presented of hot-wire measurements for the planes of symmetry of two layers which had the same (low) Reynolds number and were developed in the presence of the same amount of simple divergence with a maximum divergence parameter of about 0.075 but with different (by a factor of 2) pressure-gradient parameters. It was found that there were two overlapping stages of development. In the initial stage, which covered a distance of about 20 initial boundary-layer thicknesses from the start of divergence, the coupled effects of both the pressure gradient and divergence were present. In the second region, which lasts nearly to the end of the diverging section, the pressure-gradient effects were negligible.

  1. Mean streamline aerodynamic performance analysis of centrifugal compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Aungier, R.H.

    1995-07-01

    Aerodynamic performance prediction models for centrifugal compressor impellers are presented. In combination with similar procedures for stationary components, previously published in the open literature, a comprehensive mean streamline performance analysis for centrifugal compressor stages is provided. The accuracy and versatility of the overall analysis is demonstrated for several centrifugal compressor stages of various types, including comparison with intrastage component performance data. Detailed validation of the analysis against experimental data has been accomplished for over a hundred stages, including stage flow coefficients from 0.009 to 0.15 and pressure ratios up to about 3.5. Its application to turbocharger stages includes pressure ratios up to 4.2, but with test uncertainty much greater than for the data used in the detailed validation studies.

  2. RBR ubiquitin ligases: Diversification and streamlining in animal lineages.

    PubMed

    Marín, Ignacio

    2009-07-01

    The patterns of emergence and disappearance in animal species of genes encoding RBR ubiquitin ligases are described. RBR genes can be classified into subfamilies (Parkin, Ariadne, Dorfin, ARA54, etc.) according to sequence and structural data. Here, I show that most animal-specific RBR subfamilies emerged early in animal evolution, and that ancient animals, before the cnidarian/bilaterian split, had a set of RBR genes, which was as complex as the one currently found in mammals. However, some lineages (nematodes, dipteran insects) have recently suffered multiple losses, leading to a highly simplified set of RBR genes. Genes of a particular RBR subfamily, characterized by containing a helicase domain and so far found only in plants, are present also in some animal species. The meaning of these patterns of diversification and streamlining are discussed at the light of functional data. Extreme evolutionary conservation may be related to gene products having housekeeping functions. PMID:19526189

  3. A Streamlined Strategy for Biohydrogen Production with an Alkaliphilic Bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne A; Wall, Judy D.; Mormile, Dr. Melanie R.; Begemann, Matthew B

    2012-01-01

    Biofuels are anticipated to enable a shift from fossil fuels for renewable transportation and manufacturing fuels, with biohydrogen considered attractive since it could offer the largest reduction of global carbon budgets. Currently, biohydrogen production remains inefficient and heavily fossil fuel-dependent. However, bacteria using alkali-treated biomass could streamline biofuel production while reducing costs and fossil fuel needs. An alkaliphilic bacterium, Halanaerobium strain sapolanicus, is described that is capable of biohydrogen production at levels rivaling neutrophilic strains, but at pH 11 and hypersaline conditions. H. sapolanicus ferments a variety of 5- and 6- carbon sugars derived from hemicellulose and cellulose including cellobiose, and forms the end products hydrogen and acetate. Further, it can also produce biohydrogen from switchgrass and straw pretreated at temperatures far lower than any previously reported and in solutions compatible with growth. Hence, this bacterium can potentially increase the efficiency and efficacy of biohydrogen production from renewable biomass resources.

  4. Streamlining Software Aspects of Certification: Report on the SSAC Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J.; Dorsey, Cheryl A.; Knight, John C.; Leveson, Nancy G.; McCormick, G. Frank

    1999-01-01

    The aviation system now depends on information technology more than ever before to ensure safety and efficiency. To address concerns about the efficacy of software aspects of the certification process, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) began the Streamlining Software Aspects of Certification (SSAC) program. The SSAC technical team was commissioned to gather data, analyze results, and propose recommendations to maximize efficiency and minimize cost and delay, without compromising safety. The technical team conducted two public workshops to identify and prioritize software approval issues, and conducted a survey to validate the most urgent of those issues. The SSAC survey, containing over two hundred questions about the FAA's software approval process, reached over four hundred industry software developers, aircraft manufacturers, and FAA designated engineering representatives. Three hundred people responded. This report presents the SSAC program rationale, survey process, preliminary findings, and recommendations.

  5. Streamlined HUB baffles for aeration at Norris Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Harshbarger, E.D.

    1984-07-01

    Streamlined hub baffles were installed and tested as aeration devices on both hydro turbines at Norris Dam. The results indicated that the baffles can induce significant aeration with only a small effect on unit operation. At the most efficient wicket gate opening, the airflow/waterflow ratio was about 2.2 to 3.2% which produced dissolved oxygen increases in the tailrace on the order of 2.5 to 3.0 mg/L when the incoming dissolved oxygen concentration was 1 mg/L or less. The baffles with aeration reduced unit efficiency less than 0.5% and reduced unit capacity less than 1 MW. For the final design, the baffles were bolted on and could be installed or removed in one eight-hour period or less.

  6. Classical free-streamline flow over a polygonal obstacle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elcrat, A. R.; Trefethen, L. N.

    1984-01-01

    In classical Kirchhoff flow, an ideal incompressible fluid flows past an obstacle and around a motionless wake bounded by free streamlines. Since 1869 it has been known that in principle, the two-dimensional Kirchhoff flow over a polygonal obstacle can be determined by constructing a conformal map onto a polygon in the log-hodograph plane. In practice, however, this idea has rarely been put to use except for very simple obstacles, because the conformal mapping problem has been too difficult. This paper presents a practical method for computing flows over arbitrary polygonal obstacles to high accuracy in a few seconds of computer time. We achieve this high speed and flexibility by working with a modified Schwarz-Christoffel integral that maps onto the flow region directly rather than onto the log-hodograph polygon. This integral and its associated parameter problem are treated numerically by methods developed earlier by Trefethen for standard Schwarz-Christoffel maps.

  7. Streamlined Genome Sequence Compression using Distributed Source Coding

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuang; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Chen, Feng; Cui, Lijuan; Cheng, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    We aim at developing a streamlined genome sequence compression algorithm to support alternative miniaturized sequencing devices, which have limited communication, storage, and computation power. Existing techniques that require heavy client (encoder side) cannot be applied. To tackle this challenge, we carefully examined distributed source coding theory and developed a customized reference-based genome compression protocol to meet the low-complexity need at the client side. Based on the variation between source and reference, our protocol will pick adaptively either syndrome coding or hash coding to compress subsequences of changing code length. Our experimental results showed promising performance of the proposed method when compared with the state-of-the-art algorithm (GRS). PMID:25520552

  8. Dissolution media simulating the intralumenal composition of the small intestine: physiological issues and practical aspects.

    PubMed

    Vertzoni, Maria; Fotaki, Nikoletta; Kostewicz, Edmund; Stippler, Erika; Leuner, Christian; Nicolaides, Eleftheria; Dressman, Jennifer; Reppas, Christos

    2004-04-01

    The objective of this study was to test various aspects of dissolution media simulating the intralumenal composition of the small intestine, including the suitability of the osmolality-adjusting agents and of the buffers, the substitution of crude sodium taurocholate (from ox bile) for pure sodium taurocholate and the substitution of partially hydrolysed soybean phosphatidylcholine for egg phosphatidylcholine. It was concluded that biorelevant media should contain sodium as the major cation species to better reflect the physiology. However, the use of non-physiologically relevant buffers is inevitable, especially for simulation of the fed state in the small intestine. The buffers used may affect the solubility product of weakly basic compounds with pK(a)(s) higher than about 5, the solubility of extremely highly lipophilic compounds due to salting in/out properties of the anion of the buffer and the stability of the dissolving compound. It is prudent in relevant situations to run an additional dissolution test in a modified fed state simulated intestinal fluid (FeSSIF) (or fasted state simulated intestinal fluid (FaSSIF), where applicable) containing alternative buffer species. Although a mixture of bile salts is physiologically more relevant than pure sodium taurocholate, this issue seems to be of practical importance in only a few cases. Adequate simulations in these cases will probably require the use of a number of pure substances and could substantially increase the cost of the test. Finally, unless the drug is extremely lipophilic (ca. logP> 5), egg phosphatidylcholine can be substituted by partially hydrolysed soybean phosphatidylcholine. PMID:15099440

  9. Lateral straining of turbulent boundary layers. Part 2. Streamline convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchapakesan, N. R.; Nickels, T. B.; Joubert, P. N.; Smits, A. J.

    1997-10-01

    Experimental measurements are presented showing the effects of streamline convergence on developing turbulent boundary layers. The longitudinal pressure-gradient in these experiments is nominally zero so the only extra rate-of-strain is the lateral convergence. Measurements have been made of mean flow and turbulence quantities at two different Reynolds numbers. The results show that convergence leads to a significant reduction in the skin-friction and an increase in the boundary layer thickness. There are also large changes in the Reynolds stresses with reductions occurring in the inner region and some increase in the outer flow. This is in contrast to the results of Saddoughi & Joubert (1991) for a diverging flow of the same included angle and zero pressure-gradient which show much smaller changes in the stresses and an approach to equilibrium. A new non-dimensional parameter, [beta]D, is proposed to characterize the local effect of the convergence and it is shown how this parameter is related to Clauser's pressure-gradient parameter, [beta]x. It is suggested that this is an equilibrium parameter for turbulent boundary layers with lateral straining. In the present flow case [beta]D increases rapidly with streamwise distance leading to a significant departure from equilibrium. Measurement of terms in the transport equations suggest that streamline convergence leads to a reduction in production and generation and large increases in mean advection. The recovery of the flow after the removal of convergence has been shown to be characterized by a significant increase in the turbulent transport of shear-stress and turbulent kinetic energy from the very near-wall region to the flow further out where the stresses have been depleted by convergence.

  10. The Cassini Solstice Mission: Streamlining Operations by Sequencing with PIEs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandermey, Nancy; Alonge, Eleanor K.; Magee, Kari; Heventhal, William

    2014-01-01

    The Cassini Solstice Mission (CSM) is the second extended mission phase of the highly successful Cassini/Huygens mission to Saturn. Conducted at a much-reduced funding level, operations for the CSM have been streamlined and simplified significantly. Integration of the science timeline, which involves allocating observation time in a balanced manner to each of the five different science disciplines (with representatives from the twelve different science instruments), has long been a labor-intensive endeavor. Lessons learned from the prime mission (2004-2008) and first extended mission (Equinox mission, 2008-2010) were utilized to design a new process involving PIEs (Pre-Integrated Events) to ensure the highest priority observations for each discipline could be accomplished despite reduced work force and overall simplification of processes. Discipline-level PIE lists were managed by the Science Planning team and graphically mapped to aid timeline deconfliction meetings prior to assigning discrete segments of time to the various disciplines. Periapse segments are generally discipline-focused, with the exception of a handful of PIEs. In addition to all PIEs being documented in a spreadsheet, allocated out-of-discipline PIEs were entered into the Cassini Information Management System (CIMS) well in advance of timeline integration. The disciplines were then free to work the rest of the timeline internally, without the need for frequent interaction, debate, and negotiation with representatives from other disciplines. As a result, the number of integration meetings has been cut back extensively, freeing up workforce. The sequence implementation process was streamlined as well, combining two previous processes (and teams) into one. The new Sequence Implementation Process (SIP) schedules 22 weeks to build each 10-week-long sequence, and only 3 sequence processes overlap. This differs significantly from prime mission during which 5-week-long sequences were built in 24 weeks

  11. Streamlined analysis of lactose-free dairy products.

    PubMed

    Morlock, Gertrud E; Morlock, Lauritz P; Lemo, Carot

    2014-01-10

    Functional food for lactose-intolerant consumers and its global prevalence has created a large market for commercially available lactose-free food products. The simplest approach for detection and quantitation of lactose in lactose-free dairy products was developed. A one-step sample preparation was employed and the resulting 10% sample solution was directly subjected to the chromatographic system. LODs down to 0.04 mg/L were obtained for dairy products by application volumes up to 250 μL on a rectangular start zone, which is the lowest LOD reported in matrix so far. The highly matrix-robust, streamlined approach was demonstrated for a broad range of dairy products, even with high fat and protein contents. The mean recovery rate for 11 types of dairy products spiked at the strictest lactose content discussed (0.01%) was 90.5±10.5% (n=11). The mean repeatability for 11 dairy products spiked at the 0.01% level was 1.3±1.0% (n=11). It is the simplest approach with regard to sample preparation at low running costs (0.3 Euro or 0.4 USD/analysis) and fast analysis time (3 min/analysis). It enabled an efficient product screening, and at the same time, the quantitation of lactose in relevant samples. This streamlined analysis is highly attractive to the field of food safety and quality control of lactose-free dairy products, for which a limit value for lactose is expected soon in the EU. This methodological concept can be transferred to other challenging fields. PMID:24360255

  12. Streamlined bioreactor-based production of human cartilage tissues.

    PubMed

    Tonnarelli, B; Santoro, R; Adelaide Asnaghi, M; Wendt, D

    2016-01-01

    Engineered tissue grafts have been manufactured using methods based predominantly on traditional labour-intensive manual benchtop techniques. These methods impart significant regulatory and economic challenges, hindering the successful translation of engineered tissue products to the clinic. Alternatively, bioreactor-based production systems have the potential to overcome such limitations. In this work, we present an innovative manufacturing approach to engineer cartilage tissue within a single bioreactor system, starting from freshly isolated human primary chondrocytes, through the generation of cartilaginous tissue grafts. The limited number of primary chondrocytes that can be isolated from a small clinically-sized cartilage biopsy could be seeded and extensively expanded directly within a 3D scaffold in our perfusion bioreactor (5.4 ± 0.9 doublings in 2 weeks), bypassing conventional 2D expansion in flasks. Chondrocytes expanded in 3D scaffolds better maintained a chondrogenic phenotype than chondrocytes expanded on plastic flasks (collagen type II mRNA, 18-fold; Sox-9, 11-fold). After this "3D expansion" phase, bioreactor culture conditions were changed to subsequently support chondrogenic differentiation for two weeks. Engineered tissues based on 3D-expanded chondrocytes were more cartilaginous than tissues generated from chondrocytes previously expanded in flasks. We then demonstrated that this streamlined bioreactor-based process could be adapted to effectively generate up-scaled cartilage grafts in a size with clinical relevance (50 mm diameter). Streamlined and robust tissue engineering processes, as the one described here, may be key for the future manufacturing of grafts for clinical applications, as they facilitate the establishment of compact and closed bioreactor-based production systems, with minimal automation requirements, lower operating costs, and increased compliance to regulatory guidelines. PMID:27232665

  13. 75 FR 29321 - Streamlined Procedure for Appeal Brief Review in Ex Parte Reexamination Proceedings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-25

    ... Patent and Trademark Office Streamlined Procedure for Appeal Brief Review in Ex Parte Reexamination... States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) is streamlining the procedure for the review of appeal briefs... whether appeal briefs filed in ex parte reexamination proceeding appeals comply with the...

  14. Self streamlining wind tunnel: Low speed testing and transonic test section design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, S. W. D.; Goodyer, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    Comprehensive aerodynamic data on an airfoil section were obtained through a wide range of angles of attack, both stalled and unstalled. Data were gathered using a self streamlining wind tunnel and were compared to results obtained on the same section in a conventional wind tunnel. The reduction of wall interference through streamline was demonstrated.

  15. 76 FR 22854 - Streamlined Patent Reexamination Proceedings; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ..., 75 FR 47269 (Aug. 5, 2010). Phase I includes a number of streamlined procedures and optional programs... Review in Ex Parte Reexamination Proceedings, 75 FR 29321 (May 25, 2010); Streamlined Procedure for Appeal Brief Review in Inter Partes Reexamination Proceedings, 75 FR 50750 (Aug. 17, 2010). Moreover,...

  16. A Vocabulary Approach to Partial Streamline Matching and Exploratory Flow Visualization.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jun; Wang, Chaoli; Shene, Ching-Kuang; Shaw, Raymond A

    2016-05-01

    Measuring the similarity of integral curves is fundamental to many important flow data analysis and visualization tasks such as feature detection, pattern querying, streamline clustering, and hierarchical exploration. In this paper, we introduce FlowString, a novel vocabulary approach that extracts shape invariant features from streamlines and utilizes a string-based method for exploratory streamline analysis and visualization. Our solution first resamples streamlines by considering their local feature scales. We then classify resampled points along streamlines based on the shape similarity around their local neighborhoods. We encode each streamline into a string of well-selected shape characters, from which we construct meaningful words for querying and retrieval. A unique feature of our approach is that it captures intrinsic streamline similarity that is invariant under translation, rotation and scaling. We design an intuitive interface and user interactions to support flexible querying, allowing exact and approximate searches for partial streamline matching. Users can perform queries at either the character level or the word level, and define their own characters or words conveniently for customized search. We demonstrate the effectiveness of FlowString with several flow field data sets of different sizes and characteristics. We also extend FlowString to handle multiple data sets and perform an empirical expert evaluation to confirm the usefulness of this approach. PMID:27045908

  17. Understanding Differences in the Response to Composition Change as Simulated by CCMVal Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, Anne R.; Strahan, Susan E.; Oman, Luke D.

    2012-01-01

    Chemistry climate models (CCMs) have a common conceptual basis. Differences in implementation lead to differences in the stratospheric ozone response to changes in composition and climate. Although evaluation by CCMVal-2 identified strengths and weaknesses of participant models, the evaluation results were not used to discriminate among projections for future ozone evolution, at least in part because the overall diagnostic evaluation did not cleanly relate to the differences in CCM response. Here we use a subset of CCMVal diagnostics and additional analysis to understand the differences in response. In the upper stratosphere, differences in simulated temperature and total odd nitrogen prior to increases in chlorine loading explain the large differences in CCM sensitivity. In the lower atmosphere, there are two principle contributions to differences in CCM sensitivity to chlorine and climate change. First, differences in the lower stratospheric ClO affect simulated sensitivity to chlorine. CCMs with best transport performance match NDACC column HCl measurements at a broad range of latitudes. Other CCMs disagree with observations due to differences in total inorganic chlorine, partitioning between HCl and ClONO2, or both. Differences in ClONO2 are directly related to differences in simulated ClO. Second, although all CCMs predict increased tropical upwelling, the rate of increase varies and contributes to differences in tropical ozone and the 60N-60S column average.

  18. Clustered streamlined forms in Athabasca Valles, Mars: Evidence for sediment deposition during floodwater ponding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burr, D.

    2005-01-01

    A unique clustering of layered streamlined forms in Athabasca Valles is hypothesized to reflect a significant hydraulic event. The forms, interpreted as sedimentary, are attributed to extensive sediment deposition during ponding and then streamlining of this sediment behind flow obstacles during ponded water outflow. These streamlined forms are analogous to those found in depositional basins and other loci of ponding in terrestrial catastrophic flood landscapes. These terrestrial streamlined forms can provide the best opportunity for reconstructing the history of the terrestrial flooding. Likewise, the streamlined forms in Athabasca Valles may provide the best opportunity to reconstruct the recent geologic history of this young Martian outflow channel. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Theory and Simulation of Magnetohydrodynamic Dynamos and Faraday Rotation for Plasmas of General Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kiwan

    2013-03-01

    Many astrophysical phenomena depend on the underlying dynamics of magnetic fields. The observations of accretion disks and their jets, stellar coronae, and the solar corona are all best explained by models where magnetic fields play a central role. Understanding these phenomena requires studying the basic physics of magnetic field generation, magnetic energy transfer into radiating particles, angular momentum transport, and the observational implications of these processes. Each of these topics comprises a large enterprise of research. However, more practically speaking, the nonlinearity in large scale dynamo is known to be determined by magnetic helicity(>), the topological linked number of knotted magnetic field. Magnetic helicity, which is also observed in solar physics, has become an important tool for observational and theoretical study. The first part of my work addresses one aspect of the observational implications of magnetic fields, namely Faraday rotation. It is shown that plasma composition affects the interpretation of Faraday rotation measurements of the field, and in turn how this can be used to help constrain unknown plasma composition. The results are applied to observations of astrophysical jets. The thesis then focuses on the evolution of magnetic fields. In particular, the dynamo amplification of large scale magnetic fields is studied with an emphasis on the basic physics using both numerical simulations and analytic methods. In particular, without differential rotation, a two and three scale mean field (large scale value + fluctuation scales) dynamo theory and statistical methods are introduced. The results are compared to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the Pencil code, which utilizes high order finite difference methods. Simulations in which the energy is initially driven into the system in the form of helical kinetic energy (via kinetic helicity) or helical magnetic energy (via magnetic helicity) reveal the exponential growth of

  20. Efficient parallel seismic simulations including topography and 3-D material heterogeneities on locally refined composite grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersson, Anders; Rodgers, Arthur

    2010-05-01

    The finite difference method on a uniform Cartesian grid is a highly efficient and easy to implement technique for solving the elastic wave equation in seismic applications. However, the spacing in a uniform Cartesian grid is fixed throughout the computational domain, whereas the resolution requirements in realistic seismic simulations usually are higher near the surface than at depth. This can be seen from the well-known formula h ≤ L-P which relates the grid spacing h to the wave length L, and the required number of grid points per wavelength P for obtaining an accurate solution. The compressional and shear wave lengths in the earth generally increase with depth and are often a factor of ten larger below the Moho discontinuity (at about 30 km depth), than in sedimentary basins near the surface. A uniform grid must have a grid spacing based on the small wave lengths near the surface, which results in over-resolving the solution at depth. As a result, the number of points in a uniform grid is unnecessarily large. In the wave propagation project (WPP) code, we address the over-resolution-at-depth issue by generalizing our previously developed single grid finite difference scheme to work on a composite grid consisting of a set of structured rectangular grids of different spacings, with hanging nodes on the grid refinement interfaces. The computational domain in a regional seismic simulation often extends to depth 40-50 km. Hence, using a refinement ratio of two, we need about three grid refinements from the bottom of the computational domain to the surface, to keep the local grid size in approximate parity with the local wave lengths. The challenge of the composite grid approach is to find a stable and accurate method for coupling the solution across the grid refinement interface. Of particular importance is the treatment of the solution at the hanging nodes, i.e., the fine grid points which are located in between coarse grid points. WPP implements a new, energy

  1. Damage Simulation in Non-Crimp Fabric Composite Plates Subjected to Impact Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satyanarayana, Arunkumar; Bogert, Philip B.; Aitharaju, Venkat; Aashat, Satvir; Kia, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Progressive failure analysis (PFA) of non-crimp fabric (NCF) composite laminates subjected to low velocity impact loads was performed using the COmplete STress Reduction (COSTR) damage model implemented through VUMAT and UMAT41 user subroutines in the frame works of the commercial finite element programs ABAQUS/Explicit and LS-DYNA, respectively. To validate the model, low velocity experiments were conducted and detailed correlations between the predictions and measurements for both intra-laminar and inter-laminar failures were made. The developed material and damage model predicts the peak impact load and duration very close with the experimental results. Also, the simulation results of delamination damage between the ply interfaces, in-plane matrix damages and fiber damages were all in good agreement with the measurements from the non-destructive evaluation data.

  2. Mass transfer model liquid phase catalytic exchange column simulation applicable to any column composition profile

    SciTech Connect

    Busigin, A.

    2015-03-15

    Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange (LPCE) is a key technology used in water detritiation systems. Rigorous simulation of LPCE is complicated when a column may have both hydrogen and deuterium present in significant concentrations in different sections of the column. This paper presents a general mass transfer model for a homogenous packed bed LPCE column as a set of differential equations describing composition change, and equilibrium equations to define the mass transfer driving force within the column. The model is used to show the effect of deuterium buildup in the bottom of an LPCE column from non-negligible D atom fraction in the bottom feed gas to the column. These types of calculations are important in the design of CECE (Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange) water detritiation systems.

  3. Multi-Terrain Impact Testing and Simulation of a Composite Energy Absorbing Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Lyle, Karen H.; Sparks, Chad E.; Sareen, Ashish K.

    2007-01-01

    Comparisons of the impact performance of a 5-ft diameter crashworthy composite fuselage section were investigated for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts. The fuselage concept, which was originally designed for impacts onto a hard surface only, consisted of a stiff upper cabin, load bearing floor, and an energy absorbing subfloor. Vertical drop tests were performed at 25-ft/s onto concrete, soft-soil, and water at NASA Langley Research Center. Comparisons of the peak acceleration values, pulse durations, and onset rates were evaluated for each test at specific locations on the fuselage. In addition to comparisons of the experimental results, dynamic finite element models were developed to simulate each impact condition. Once validated, these models can be used to evaluate the dynamic behavior of subfloor components for improved crash protection for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts.

  4. Multi-Terrain Impact Testing and Simulation of a Composite Energy Absorbing Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Lyle, Karen H.; Sparks, Chad E.; Sareen, Ashish K.

    2004-01-01

    Comparisons of the impact performance of a 5-ft diameter crashworthy composite fuselage section were investigated for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts. The fuselage concept, which was originally designed for impacts onto a hard surface only, consisted of a stiff upper cabin, load bearing floor, and an energy absorbing subfloor. Vertical drop tests were performed at 25-ft/s onto concrete, soft-soil, and water at NASA Langley Research Center. Comparisons of the peak acceleration values, pulse durations, and onset rates were evaluated for each test at specific locations on the fuselage. In addition to comparisons of the experimental results, dynamic finite element models were developed to simulate each impact condition. Once validated, these models can be used to evaluate the dynamic behavior of subfloor components for improved crash protection for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Impact Responses on Through-thickness Stitched Foam Core Sandwich Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Fan; Wu, Xiao-Qing; Li, Jia-Lu

    2013-12-01

    This paper was based on the explicit finite element codes to predict the impact behavior of through-thickness stitched foam core sandwich composites. It is proposed that the extent of the impact damage can be characterized by the token parameters of cracking width, penetration depth and damage angle; and observations made during the simulative analysis with such damage parameters. The results show that the same tendencies and characteristics are shown on the numerical and test results of impact force-displacement plots, and a good agreement is also obtained in damage parameters. In comparing the unstitched types, the through-thickness stitched sandwiches are optimal for both the peak loads shown on the numerical plots at 25.0 J; and demonstrate the fewer extent of impact damage with a 63.5 and 6.0 % decreasing to the cracking width and penetration depth respectively, and where a 52.0 % increasing to the damage angle.

  6. GPU-based simulations of fracture in idealized brick and mortar composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    William Pro, J.; Kwei Lim, Rone; Petzold, Linda R.; Utz, Marcel; Begley, Matthew R.

    2015-07-01

    Stiff ceramic platelets (or bricks) that are aligned and bonded to a second ductile phase with low volume fraction (mortar) are a promising pathway to produce stiff, high-toughness composites. For certain ranges of constituent properties, including those of some synthetic analogs to nacre, one can demonstrate that the deformation is dominated by relative brick motions. This paper describes simulations of fracture that explicitly track the motions of individual rigid bricks in an idealized microstructure; cohesive tractions acting between the bricks introduce elastic, plastic and rupture behaviors. Results are presented for the stresses and damage near macroscopic cracks with different brick orientations relative to the loading orientation. The anisotropic macroscopic initiation toughness is computed for small-scale yielding conditions and is shown to be independent of specimen geometry and loading configuration. The results are shown to be in agreement with previously published experiments on synthetic nacre.

  7. Accelerated equilibrium core composition search using a new MCNP-based simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifried, Jeffrey E.; Gorman, Phillip M.; Vujic, Jasmina L.; Greenspan, Ehud

    2014-06-01

    MocDown is a new Monte Carlo depletion and recycling simulator which couples neutron transport with MCNP and transmutation with ORIGEN. This modular approach to depletion allows for flexible operation by incorporating the accelerated progression of a complex fuel processing scheme towards equilibrium and by allowing for the online coupling of thermo-fluids feedback. MocDown also accounts for the variation of decay heat with fuel isotopics evolution. In typical cases, MocDown requires just over a day to find the equilibrium core composition for a multi-recycling fuel cycle, with a self-consistent thermo-fluids solution-a task that required between one and two weeks using previous Monte Carlo-based approaches.

  8. A hierarchical lattice spring model to simulate the mechanics of 2-D materials-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brely, Lucas; Bosia, Federico; Pugno, Nicola

    2015-07-01

    In the field of engineering materials, strength and toughness are typically two mutually exclusive properties. Structural biological materials such as bone, tendon or dentin have resolved this conflict and show unprecedented damage tolerance, toughness and strength levels. The common feature of these materials is their hierarchical heterogeneous structure, which contributes to increased energy dissipation before failure occurring at different scale levels. These structural properties are the key to exceptional bioinspired material mechanical properties, in particular for nanocomposites. Here, we develop a numerical model in order to simulate the mechanisms involved in damage progression and energy dissipation at different size scales in nano- and macro-composites, which depend both on the heterogeneity of the material and on the type of hierarchical structure. Both these aspects have been incorporated into a 2-dimensional model based on a Lattice Spring Model, accounting for geometrical nonlinearities and including statistically-based fracture phenomena. The model has been validated by comparing numerical results to continuum and fracture mechanics results as well as finite elements simulations, and then employed to study how structural aspects impact on hierarchical composite material properties. Results obtained with the numerical code highlight the dependence of stress distributions on matrix properties and reinforcement dispersion, geometry and properties, and how failure of sacrificial elements is directly involved in the damage tolerance of the material. Thanks to the rapidly developing field of nanocomposite manufacture, it is already possible to artificially create materials with multi-scale hierarchical reinforcements. The developed code could be a valuable support in the design and optimization of these advanced materials, drawing inspiration and going beyond biological materials with exceptional mechanical properties.

  9. [Coagulation characteristics of polyferric chloride-poly (epichlorohydrin-dimethylamine) composite flocculant for simulated water treatment].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-xin; Yang, Zhong-lian; Gao, Bao-yu; Wang, Yan; Yue, Qin-yan; Li, Qian

    2013-09-01

    Polyferric chloride (PFC) and poly (epichlorohydrin-dimethylamine) [P(EPI-DMA)] were applied as raw materials to prepare a novel inorganic-organic flocculant [PFC-P(EPI-DMA)] with various intrinsic viscosities (eta), basicity (B, OH/Fe molar ratio), and organic component fractions [omega(E)]. The PFC-P(EPI-DMA) prepared was then evaluated for the coagulation treatment of synthetic active dying wastewater and simulated ground water. Effects of B, and omega (E) on the Fe speciation distribution and coagulation performance of PFC-P(EPI-DMA) were comparatively examined as a function of coagulant dosage. The coagulation mechanism of PFC-P(EPI-DMA) was also discussed in this paper. Experimental results indicated the interaction effect of PFC and P (EPI-DMA) component in composite PFC-P (EPI-DMA). The effective Fe speciation content of PFC-EPI-DMA decreased with increasing omega(E), while it was maximized when eta = 850 mPa x As B value increased gradually, the Fe(b) concentration initially increased and then decreased, but the Fe(c) concentration kept continuously increasing. To some extent, higher eta and lower B value was favorable for the improvement of coagulation performance for coagulation treatment of both synthetic dyeing wastewater and simulated ground water. The omega (E) influence on the coagulation performance of PFC-P(EPI-DMA) was related to the treatment target. Both charge neutralization and adsorption bridging effect played roles in the coagulation process of the composite PFC-P(EPI-DMA). PMID:24288995

  10. Experimental evaluation and simulation of volumetric shrinkage and warpage on polymeric composite reinforced with short natural fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Jonnathan D.; Fajardo, Jorge I.; Cuji, Alvaro R.; García, Jaime A.; Garzón, Luis E.; López, Luis M.

    2015-09-01

    A polymeric natural fiber-reinforced composite is developed by extrusion and injection molding process. The shrinkage and warpage of high-density polyethylene reinforced with short natural fibers of Guadua angustifolia Kunth are analyzed by experimental measurements and computer simulations. Autodesk Moldflow® and Solid Works® are employed to simulate both volumetric shrinkage and warpage of injected parts at different configurations: 0 wt.%, 20 wt.%, 30 wt.% and 40 wt.% reinforcing on shrinkage and warpage behavior of polymer composite. Become evident the restrictive effect of reinforcing on the volumetric shrinkage and warpage of injected parts. The results indicate that volumetric shrinkage of natural composite is reduced up to 58% with fiber increasing, whereas the warpage shows a reduction form 79% to 86% with major fiber content. These results suggest that it is a highly beneficial use of natural fibers to improve the assembly properties of polymeric natural fiber-reinforced composites.

  11. Simulation of the reduction process of solid oxide fuel cell composite anode based on phase field method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Zhenjun; Shikazono, Naoki

    2016-02-01

    It is known that the reduction process influences the initial performances and durability of nickel-yttria-stabilized zirconia composite anode of the solid oxide fuel cell. In the present study, the reduction process of nickel-yttria stabilized zirconia composite anode is simulated based on the phase field method. An three-dimensional reconstructed microstructure of nickel oxide-yttria stabilized zirconia composite obtained by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy is used as the initial microstructure for the simulation. Both reduction of nickel oxide and nickel sintering mechanisms are considered in the model. The reduction rates of nickel oxide at different interfaces are defined based on the literature data. Simulation results are qualitatively compared to the experimental anode microstructures with different reduction temperatures.

  12. Laboratory analogues simulating Titan's atmospheric aerosols: Compared chemical compositions of grains and thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, Nathalie; Jomard, François; Vigneron, Jackie; Etcheberry, Arnaud; Cernogora, Guy

    2016-09-01

    Two sorts of solid organic samples can be produced in laboratory experiments simulating Titan's atmospheric reactivity: grains in the volume and thin films on the reactor walls. We expect that grains are more representative of Titan's atmospheric aerosols, but films are used to provide optical indices for radiative models of Titan's atmosphere. The aim of the present study is to address if these two sorts of analogues are chemically equivalent or not, when produced in the same N2-CH4 plasma discharge. The chemical compositions of both these materials are measured by using elemental analysis, XPS analysis and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. The main parameter probed is the CH4/N2 ratio to explore various possible chemical regimes. We find that films are homogeneous but significantly less rich in nitrogen and hydrogen than grains produced in the same experimental conditions. This surprising difference in their chemical compositions could be explained by the efficient etching occurring on the films, which stay in the discharge during the whole plasma duration, whereas the grains are ejected after a few minutes. The higher nitrogen content in the grains possibly involves a higher optical absorption than the one measured on the films, with a possible impact on Titan's radiative models.

  13. Studies of Hard and Soft Tissue Elemental Compositions in Mice and Rats Subjected to Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Rahul; Lane, Ryan A.; Fitch, Hannah M.; Ali, Nawab; Soulsby, Michael; Chowdhury, Parimal

    2009-03-01

    Microgravity has profound effects on skeletal as well as other body systems. To investigate the effect of microgravity, we have used a NASA validated Hind-limb suspension (HLS) animal model of simulated weightlessness. Groups of mice and rats were subjected to hind limb suspension between 1 and 14 days while the control groups were maintained without suspension for the same duration. To study the effect of diet, some groups of animals were fed on a special diet with defined composition. At term, the animals were sacrificed and the tibia, femur, and skull bones were collected. In addition, soft tissues from pancreas and muscles were also collected. All of the bones and tissues samples were analyzed for elemental analysis using Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) equipped on a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). In the EDS, 10-20 keV electrons bombarded the samples and a Si (Li) detector measured K-, L- and M-shell x-rays. Independently, X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) provided the data for comparison and normalization. Flame software, with Fuzzy Logic, was used to form elemental ratios. Elemental analysis of bone samples indicated a variation in the compositional ratios of calcium, potassium, oxygen and carbon in the leg bones and skulls of the HLS versus control specimens. These variations showed dependence on sample position in the bone.

  14. Simulations reveal the role of composition into the atomic-level flexibility of bioactive glass cements.

    PubMed

    Tian, Kun Viviana; Chass, Gregory A; Di Tommaso, Devis

    2016-01-14

    Bioactive glass ionomer cements (GICs), the reaction product of a fluoro-alumino-silicate glass and polyacrylic acid, have been in effective use in dentistry for over 40 years and more recently in orthopaedics and medical implantation. Their desirable properties have affirmed GIC's place in the medical materials community, yet are limited to non-load bearing applications due to the brittle nature of the hardened composite cement, thought to arise from the glass component and the interfaces it forms. Towards helping resolve the fundamental bases of the mechanical shortcomings of GICs, we report the 1st ever computational models of a GIC-relevant component. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations were employed to generate and characterise three fluoro-alumino-silicate glasses of differing compositions with focus on resolving the atomic scale structural and dynamic contributions of aluminium, phosphorous and fluorine. Analyses of the glasses revealed rising F-content leading to the expansion of the glass network, compression of Al-F bonding, angular constraint at Al-pivots, localisation of alumino-phosphates and increased fluorine diffusion. Together, these changes to the structure, speciation and dynamics with raised fluorine content impart an overall rigidifying effect on the glass network, and suggest a predisposition to atomic-level inflexibility, which could manifest in the ionomer cements they form. PMID:26646505

  15. Influence of Copolyester Composition on Adhesion to Soda-Lime Glass via Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Ben; Hofmann, John; Pasquinelli, Melissa A

    2016-06-01

    Copolyesters are a subset of polymers that have the desirable properties of strength and clarity while retaining chemical resistance, and are thus potential candidates for enhancing the impact resistance of soda-lime glass. Adhesion between the polymer and the glass relates to the impact performance of the system, as well as the longevity of the bond between the polymer and the glass under various conditions. Modifying the types of diols and diacids present in the copolyester provides a method for fine-tuning the physical properties of the polymer. In this study, we used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to examine the influence of the chemical composition of the polymers on adhesion of polymer film laminates to two soda-lime glass surfaces, one tin-rich and one oxygen-rich. By calculating properties such as adhesion energies and contact angles, these results provide insights into how the polymer-glass interaction is impacted by the polymer composition, temperature, and other factors such as the presence of free volume or pi stacking. These results can be used to optimize the adhesion of copolyester films to glass surfaces. PMID:27206103

  16. Performance of aged cement-polymer composite immobilizing borate waste simulates during flooding scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskander, S. B.; Bayoumi, T. A.; Saleh, H. M.

    2012-01-01

    An advanced composite of cement and water extended polyester based on the recycled Poly(ethylene terephthalate) waste was developed to incorporate the borate waste. Previous studies have reported the characterizations of the waste form (cement-polymer composite immobilizing borate waste simulates) after 28 days of curing time. The current work studied the performance of waste form aged for 7 years and subjected to flooding scenario during 260 days using three types of water. The state of waste form was assessed at the end of each definite interval of the water infiltration through visual examination and mechanical measurement. Scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and thermal analyses were used to investigate the changes that may occur in the microstructure of the waste form under aging and flooding effects. The actual experimental results indicated reasonable evidence for the durable waste form. Acceptable consistency was confirmed for the waste form even after aging 7 years and exposure to flooding scenario for 260 days.

  17. Fatty acid composition of plasma lipids and erythrocyte membranes during simulated extravehicular activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skedina, M. A.; Katuntsev, V. P.; Buravkova, L. B.; Naidina, V. P.

    Ten subjects (from 27 to 41 years) have been participated in 32 experiments. They were decompressed from ground level to 40-35 kPa in altitude chamber when breathed 100% oxygen by mask and performed repeated cycles of exercises (3.0 Kcal/min). The intervals between decompressions were 3-5 days. Plasma lipid and erythrocyte membrane fatty acid composition was evaluated in the fasting venous blood before and immediately after hypobaric exposure. There were 7 cases decompression sickness (DCS). Venous gas bubbles (GB) were detected in 27 cases (84.4%). Any significant changes in the fatty acid composition of erythrocyte membranes and plasma didn't practically induce after the first decompression. However, by the beginning of the second decompression the total lipid level in erythrocyte membranes decreased from 54.6 mg% to 40.4 mg% in group with DCS symptoms and from 51.2 mg% to 35.2 mg% (p < 0.05) without DCS symptoms. In group with DCS symptoms a tendency to increased level of saturated fatty acids in erythrocyte membranes (16:0, 18:0), the level of the polyunsaturated linoleic fatty acid (18:2) and arachidonic acid (20:4) tended to be decreased by the beginning of the second decompression. Insignificant changes in blood plasma fatty acid composition was observed in both groups. The obtained biochemical data that indicated the simulated extravehicular activity (EVA) condition is accompanied by the certain changes in the blood lipid metabolism, structural and functional state of erythrocyte membranes, which are reversible. The most pronounced changes are found in subjects with DCS symptoms.

  18. Effect of food and oral simulating fluids on structure of adhesive composite systems.

    PubMed

    Lee, S Y; Greener, E H; Mueller, H J

    1995-02-01

    This work evaluates the degradation of three adhesive/composite systems (Tenure/Marathon One. Scotchbond Multi-Purpose/Z100 and Optibond/Herculite XRV) upon immersion in 75% ethanol solution and in an artificial saliva (Moi-Stir). Shear bond strength (SBS) and diametral tensile strength (DTS) specimens were employed for this study. For the SBS specimens, the bonded interface and composite were exposed to food and oral simulating fluids at 37 degrees C for up to 30 days. A similar control series was stored in air. DTS specimens were stored in 75% ethanol at 37 degrees C for up to 30 days. The SBS specimens were sheared to failure. Small quantities of bonding resin were removed from the tooth side of the fractured surface and from the non-fractured fractured end of the composite for Fourier transform infrared microscopic evaluation. Similar scrapings were taken from DTS specimen surfaces. The infrared absorbance intensity (AI) of the major peaks was measured as a function of storage time and ratioed against the aromatic C = C (1609.4 cm-1) peak. The data were analysed using ANOVA and the Tukey LSD test. The AI of major peaks was similar for the materials stored either in air or in Moi-Stir for all testing periods. Storage in ethanol caused the AI of aliphatic C = C (1638 cm-1) and of O-H (approximately 3500 cm-1) bonds to significantly decrease (30-50%) for specimens of bonding resin while the AI of C = O bonds (1730 cm-1) increased (60-120%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7876413

  19. Radiative transfer equation modeling by streamline diffusion modified continuous Galerkin method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Feixiao; Li, Fengyan; Intes, Xavier; Kotha, Shiva P.

    2016-03-01

    Optical tomography has a wide range of biomedical applications. Accurate prediction of photon transport in media is critical, as it directly affects the accuracy of the reconstructions. The radiative transfer equation (RTE) is the most accurate deterministic forward model, yet it has not been widely employed in practice due to the challenges in robust and efficient numerical implementations in high dimensions. Herein, we propose a method that combines the discrete ordinate method (DOM) with a streamline diffusion modified continuous Galerkin method to numerically solve RTE. Additionally, a phase function normalization technique was employed to dramatically reduce the instability of the DOM with fewer discrete angular points. To illustrate the accuracy and robustness of our method, the computed solutions to RTE were compared with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations when two types of sources (ideal pencil beam and Gaussian beam) and multiple optical properties were tested. Results show that with standard optical properties of human tissue, photon densities obtained using RTE are, on average, around 5% of those predicted by MC simulations in the entire/deeper region. These results suggest that this implementation of the finite element method-RTE is an accurate forward model for optical tomography in human tissues.

  20. Radiative transfer equation modeling by streamline diffusion modified continuous Galerkin method.

    PubMed

    Long, Feixiao; Li, Fengyan; Intes, Xavier; Kotha, Shiva P

    2016-03-01

    Optical tomography has a wide range of biomedical applications. Accurate prediction of photon transport in media is critical, as it directly affects the accuracy of the reconstructions. The radiative transfer equation (RTE) is the most accurate deterministic forward model, yet it has not been widely employed in practice due to the challenges in robust and efficient numerical implementations in high dimensions. Herein, we propose a method that combines the discrete ordinate method (DOM) with a streamline diffusion modified continuous Galerkin method to numerically solve RTE. Additionally, a phase function normalization technique was employed to dramatically reduce the instability of the DOM with fewer discrete angular points. To illustrate the accuracy and robustness of our method, the computed solutions to RTE were compared with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations when two types of sources (ideal pencil beam and Gaussian beam) and multiple optical properties were tested. Results show that with standard optical properties of human tissue, photon densities obtained using RTE are, on average, around 5% of those predicted by MC simulations in the entire/deeper region. These results suggest that this implementation of the finite element method-RTE is an accurate forward model for optical tomography in human tissues. PMID:26953662

  1. Streamlined islands and the English Channel megaflood hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, J. S.; Oggioni, F.; Gupta, S.; García-Moreno, D.; Trentesaux, A.; De Batist, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recognising ice-age catastrophic megafloods is important because they had significant impact on large-scale drainage evolution and patterns of water and sediment movement to the oceans, and likely induced very rapid, short-term effects on climate. It has been previously proposed that a drainage system on the floor of the English Channel was initiated by catastrophic flooding in the Pleistocene but this suggestion has remained controversial. Here we examine this hypothesis through an analysis of key landform features. We use a new compilation of multi- and single-beam bathymetry together with sub-bottom profiler data to establish the internal structure, planform geometry and hence origin of a set of 36 mid-channel islands. Whilst there is evidence of modern-day surficial sediment processes, the majority of the islands can be clearly demonstrated to be formed of bedrock, and are hence erosional remnants rather than depositional features. The islands display classic lemniscate or tear-drop outlines, with elongated tips pointing downstream, typical of streamlined islands formed during high-magnitude water flow. The length-to-width ratio for the entire island population is 3.4 ± 1.3 and the degree-of-elongation or k-value is 3.7 ± 1.4. These values are comparable to streamlined islands in other proven Pleistocene catastrophic flood terrains and are distinctly different to values found in modern-day rivers. The island geometries show a correlation with bedrock type: with those carved from Upper Cretaceous chalk having larger length-to-width ratios (3.2 ± 1.3) than those carved into more mixed Paleogene terrigenous sandstones, siltstones and mudstones (3.0 ± 1.5). We attribute these differences to the former rock unit having a lower skin friction which allowed longer island growth to achieve minimum drag. The Paleogene islands, although less numerous than the Chalk islands, also assume more perfect lemniscate shapes. These lithologies therefore reached island

  2. Simulation Based Optimization of Complex Monolithic Composite Structures Using Cellular Core Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickmott, Curtis W.

    Cellular core tooling is a new technology which has the capability to manufacture complex integrated monolithic composite structures. This novel tooling method utilizes thermoplastic cellular cores as inner tooling. The semi-rigid nature of the cellular cores makes them convenient for lay-up, and under autoclave temperature and pressure they soften and expand providing uniform compaction on all surfaces including internal features such as ribs and spar tubes. This process has the capability of developing fully optimized aerospace structures by reducing or eliminating assembly using fasteners or bonded joints. The technology is studied in the context of evaluating its capabilities, advantages, and limitations in developing high quality structures. The complex nature of these parts has led to development of a model using the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) software Abaqus and the plug-in COMPRO Common Component Architecture (CCA) provided by Convergent Manufacturing Technologies. This model utilizes a "virtual autoclave" technique to simulate temperature profiles, resin flow paths, and ultimately deformation from residual stress. A model has been developed simulating the temperature profile during curing of composite parts made with the cellular core technology. While modeling of composites has been performed in the past, this project will look to take this existing knowledge and apply it to this new manufacturing method capable of building more complex parts and develop a model designed specifically for building large, complex components with a high degree of accuracy. The model development has been carried out in conjunction with experimental validation. A double box beam structure was chosen for analysis to determine the effects of the technology on internal ribs and joints. Double box beams were manufactured and sectioned into T-joints for characterization. Mechanical behavior of T-joints was performed using the T-joint pull-off test and compared to traditional

  3. Numerical simulation of the nonlinear response of composite plates under combined thermal and acoustic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Moorthy, Jayashree

    1995-01-01

    A time-domain study of the random response of a laminated plate subjected to combined acoustic and thermal loads is carried out. The features of this problem also include given uniform static inplane forces. The formulation takes into consideration a possible initial imperfection in the flatness of the plate. High decibel sound pressure levels along with high thermal gradients across thickness drive the plate response into nonlinear regimes. This calls for the analysis to use von Karman large deflection strain-displacement relationships. A finite element model that combines the von Karman strains with the first-order shear deformation plate theory is developed. The development of the analytical model can accommodate an anisotropic composite laminate built up of uniformly thick layers of orthotropic, linearly elastic laminae. The global system of finite element equations is then reduced to a modal system of equations. Numerical simulation using a single-step algorithm in the time-domain is then carried out to solve for the modal coordinates. Nonlinear algebraic equations within each time-step are solved by the Newton-Raphson method. The random gaussian filtered white noise load is generated using Monte Carlo simulation. The acoustic pressure distribution over the plate is capable of accounting for a grazing incidence wavefront. Numerical results are presented to study a variety of cases.

  4. Composition-Dependent Phase Concentrations from First Principles: Simulating Combinatorial Libraries of Transition Metal Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guo; Yan, Qimin; Zhou, Lan; Newhouse, Paul; Gregoire, John; Neaton, Jeffrey

    To identify material phases in experimental combinatorial libraries, we develop a theoretical model as a complementary approach to accelerate phase identification. In this approach, samples in a combinatorial library are simulated as mixtures in chemical equilibria. Each of these mixtures contains all the solid-state phases, which can possibly exist in the library. Using the total energies of these phases obtained in first-principle calculations, we calculate the Gibbs free energy changes in the corresponding chemical reactions, and subsequently evaluate the equilibrium concentrations of the phases in every sample according to the law of mass action. Furthermore, to test this approach, we simulate pseudobinary libraries MnxV1-xOy and CuxV1-xOy. Interestingly, we find that the composition-dependent phase concentrations calculated within our approach agree well with the experimental results measured with XRD spectroscopy. This work supported by DOE (the JCAP under Award Number DE-SC0004993 and the Molecular Foundry of LBNL), and computational resources provided by NERSC.

  5. Control software for two dimensional airfoil tests using a self-streamlining flexible walled transonic test section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, S. W. D.; Goodyer, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    Operation of the Transonic Self-Streamlining Wind Tunnel (TSWT) involved on-line data acquisition with automatic wall adjustment. A tunnel run consisted of streamlining the walls from known starting contours in iterative steps and acquiring model data. Each run performs what is described as a streamlining cycle. The associated software is presented.

  6. Streamline Variability Plots for Characterizing the Uncertainty in Vector Field Ensembles.

    PubMed

    Ferstl, Florian; Bürger, Kai; Westermann, Rüdiger

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method to visualize from an ensemble of flow fields the statistical properties of streamlines passing through a selected location. We use principal component analysis to transform the set of streamlines into a low-dimensional Euclidean space. In this space the streamlines are clustered into major trends, and each cluster is in turn approximated by a multivariate Gaussian distribution. This yields a probabilistic mixture model for the streamline distribution, from which confidence regions can be derived in which the streamlines are most likely to reside. This is achieved by transforming the Gaussian random distributions from the low-dimensional Euclidean space into a streamline distribution that follows the statistical model, and by visualizing confidence regions in this distribution via iso-contours. We further make use of the principal component representation to introduce a new concept of streamline-median, based on existing median concepts in multidimensional Euclidean spaces. We demonstrate the potential of our method in a number of real-world examples, and we compare our results to alternative clustering approaches for particle trajectories as well as curve boxplots. PMID:26390476

  7. Water Impact Test and Simulation of a Composite Energy Absorbing Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Sparks, Chad; Sareen, Ashish

    2003-01-01

    In March 2002, a 25-ft/s vertical drop test of a composite fuselage section was conducted onto water. The purpose of the test was to obtain experimental data characterizing the structural response of the fuselage section during water impact for comparison with two previous drop tests that were performed onto a rigid surface and soft soil. For the drop test, the fuselage section was configured with ten 100-lb. lead masses, five per side, that were attached to seat rails mounted to the floor. The fuselage section was raised to a height of 10-ft. and dropped vertically into a 15-ft. diameter pool filled to a depth of 3.5-ft. with water. Approximately 70 channels of data were collected during the drop test at a 10-kHz sampling rate. The test data were used to validate crash simulations of the water impact that were developed using the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic codes, MSC.Dytran and LS-DYNA. The fuselage structure was modeled using shell and solid elements with a Lagrangian mesh, and the water was modeled with both Eulerian and Lagrangian techniques. The fluid-structure interactions were executed using the fast general coupling in MSC.Dytran and the Arbitrary Lagrange-Euler (ALE) coupling in LS-DYNA. Additionally, the smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) meshless Lagrangian technique was used in LS-DYNA to represent the fluid. The simulation results were correlated with the test data to validate the modeling approach. Additional simulation studies were performed to determine how changes in mesh density, mesh uniformity, fluid viscosity, and failure strain influence the test-analysis correlation.

  8. Environmental and Mechanical Stability of Environmental Barrier Coated SA Tyrannohex SiC Composites Under Simulated Turbine Engine Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Halbig, Michael Charles; Sing, Mrityunjay

    2014-01-01

    The environmental stability and thermal gradient cyclic durability performance of SA Tyrannohex composites were investigated for turbine engine component applications. The work has been focused on investigating the combustion rig recession, cyclic thermal stress resistance and thermomechanical low cycle fatigue of uncoated and environmental barrier coated Tyrannohex SiC SA composites in simulated turbine engine combustion water vapor, thermal gradients, and mechanical loading conditions. Flexural strength degradations have been evaluated, and the upper limits of operating temperature conditions for the SA composite material systems are discussed based on the experimental results.

  9. Damage Detection with Streamlined Structural Health Monitoring Data

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Deng, Jun; Xie, Weizhi

    2015-01-01

    The huge amounts of sensor data generated by large scale sensor networks in on-line structural health monitoring (SHM) systems often overwhelms the systems’ capacity for data transmission and analysis. This paper presents a new concept for an integrated SHM system in which a streamlined data flow is used as a unifying thread to integrate the individual components of on-line SHM systems. Such an integrated SHM system has a few desirable functionalities including embedded sensor data compression, interactive sensor data retrieval, and structural knowledge discovery, which aim to enhance the reliability, efficiency, and robustness of on-line SHM systems. Adoption of this new concept will enable the design of an on-line SHM system with more uniform data generation and data handling capacity for its subsystems. To examine this concept in the context of vibration-based SHM systems, real sensor data from an on-line SHM system comprising a scaled steel bridge structure and an on-line data acquisition system with remote data access was used in this study. Vibration test results clearly demonstrated the prominent performance characteristics of the proposed integrated SHM system including rapid data access, interactive data retrieval and knowledge discovery of structural conditions on a global level. PMID:25884788

  10. A Streamlined Artificial Variable Free Version of Simplex Method

    PubMed Central

    Inayatullah, Syed; Touheed, Nasir; Imtiaz, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a streamlined form of simplex method which provides some great benefits over traditional simplex method. For instance, it does not need any kind of artificial variables or artificial constraints; it could start with any feasible or infeasible basis of an LP. This method follows the same pivoting sequence as of simplex phase 1 without showing any explicit description of artificial variables which also makes it space efficient. Later in this paper, a dual version of the new method has also been presented which provides a way to easily implement the phase 1 of traditional dual simplex method. For a problem having an initial basis which is both primal and dual infeasible, our methods provide full freedom to the user, that whether to start with primal artificial free version or dual artificial free version without making any reformulation to the LP structure. Last but not the least, it provides a teaching aid for the teachers who want to teach feasibility achievement as a separate topic before teaching optimality achievement. PMID:25767883

  11. A streamlined search technology for identification of synergistic drug combinations.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Andrea; Berndsen, Robert H; Ding, Xianting; Ho, Chih-Ming; Dyson, Paul J; van den Bergh, Hubert; Griffioen, Arjan W; Nowak-Sliwinska, Patrycja

    2015-01-01

    A major key to improvement of cancer therapy is the combination of drugs. Mixing drugs that already exist on the market may offer an attractive alternative. Here we report on a new model-based streamlined feedback system control (s-FSC) method, based on a design of experiment approach, for rapidly finding optimal drug mixtures with minimal experimental effort. We tested combinations in an in vitro assay for the viability of a renal cell adenocarcinoma (RCC) cell line, 786-O. An iterative cycle of in vitro testing and s-FSC analysis was repeated a few times until an optimal low dose combination was reached. Starting with ten drugs that target parallel pathways known to play a role in the development and progression of RCC, we identified the best overall drug combination, being a mixture of four drugs (axitinib, erlotinib, dasatinib and AZD4547) at low doses, inhibiting 90% of cell viability. The removal of AZD4547 from the optimized drug combination resulted in 80% of cell viability inhibition, while still maintaining the synergistic interaction. These optimized drug combinations were significantly more potent than monotherapies of all individual drugs (p < 0.001, CI < 0.3). PMID:26416286

  12. VISMASHUP: streamlining the creation of custom visualization applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, James P; Santos, Emanuele; Lins, Lauro; Freire, Juliana; Silva, Cl'audio T

    2010-01-01

    Visualization is essential for understanding the increasing volumes of digital data. However, the process required to create insightful visualizations is involved and time consuming. Although several visualization tools are available, including tools with sophisticated visual interfaces, they are out of reach for users who have little or no knowledge of visualization techniques and/or who do not have programming expertise. In this paper, we propose VISMASHUP, a new framework for streamlining the creation of customized visualization applications. Because these applications can be customized for very specific tasks, they can hide much of the complexity in a visualization specification and make it easier for users to explore visualizations by manipulating a small set of parameters. We describe the framework and how it supports the various tasks a designer needs to carry out to develop an application, from mining and exploring a set of visualization specifications (pipelines), to the creation of simplified views of the pipelines, and the automatic generation of the application and its interface. We also describe the implementation of the system and demonstrate its use in two real application scenarios.

  13. Streamlining Metadata and Data Management for Evolving Digital Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D.; Miller, S. P.; Peckman, U.; Smith, J.; Aerni, S.; Helly, J.; Sutton, D.; Chase, A.

    2003-12-01

    What began two years ago as an effort to stabilize the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) data archives from more than 700 cruises going back 50 years, has now become the operational fully-searchable "SIOExplorer" digital library, complete with thousands of historic photographs, images, maps, full text documents, binary data files, and 3D visualization experiences, totaling nearly 2 terabytes of digital content. Coping with data diversity and complexity has proven to be more challenging than dealing with large volumes of digital data. SIOExplorer has been built with scalability in mind, so that the addition of new data types and entire new collections may be accomplished with ease. It is a federated system, currently interoperating with three independent data-publishing authorities, each responsible for their own quality control, metadata specifications, and content selection. The IT architecture implemented at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) streamlines the integration of additional projects in other disciplines with a suite of metadata management and collection building tools for "arbitrary digital objects." Metadata are automatically harvested from data files into domain-specific metadata blocks, and mapped into various specification standards as needed. Metadata can be browsed and objects can be viewed onscreen or downloaded for further analysis, with automatic proprietary-hold request management.

  14. The Single Habitat Module Concept a Streamlined Way to Explore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambliss, Joe

    2012-01-01

    Many concepts have been proposed for exploring space. In early 2010 presidential direction called for reconsidering the approach to address changes in exploration destinations, use of new technologies and development of new capabilities to support exploration of space. Considering the proposed new technologies and capabilities that NASA was directed to pursue, the Single Habitathabitat module (SHMSHM) concept for a more streamlined approach to the infrastructure and conduct of exploration missions was developed. The SHM concept combines many of the new promising technologies with a central concept of mission architectures that uses a single habitat module for all phases of an exploration mission. Integrating mission elements near Earth and fully fueling them prior to departure of the vicinity of Earth provides the capability of using the single habitat both in transit to an exploration destination and while exploring the destination. The concept employs the capability to return the habitat and interplanetary propulsion system to Earth vicinity so that those elements can be reused on subsequent exploration missions. This paper describes the SHM concept, and the advantages it provides to accomplish exploration objectives.

  15. Unexpectedly Streamlined Mitochondrial Genome of the Euglenozoan Euglena gracilis

    PubMed Central

    Dobáková, Eva; Flegontov, Pavel; Skalický, Tomáš; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we describe the mitochondrial genome of the excavate flagellate Euglena gracilis. Its gene complement is reduced as compared with the well-studied sister groups Diplonemea and Kinetoplastea. We have identified seven protein-coding genes: Three subunits of respiratory complex I (nad1, nad4, and nad5), one subunit of complex III (cob), and three subunits of complex IV (cox1, cox2, and a highly divergent cox3). Moreover, fragments of ribosomal RNA genes have also been identified. Genes encoding subunits of complex V, ribosomal proteins and tRNAs were missing, and are likely located in the nuclear genome. Although mitochondrial genomes of diplonemids and kinetoplastids possess the most complex RNA processing machineries known, including trans-splicing and editing of the uridine insertion/deletion type, respectively, our transcriptomic data suggest their total absence in E. gracilis. This finding supports a scenario in which the complex mitochondrial processing machineries of both sister groups evolved relatively late in evolution from a streamlined genome and transcriptome of their common predecessor. PMID:26590215

  16. Unexpectedly Streamlined Mitochondrial Genome of the Euglenozoan Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Dobáková, Eva; Flegontov, Pavel; Skalický, Tomáš; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we describe the mitochondrial genome of the excavate flagellate Euglena gracilis. Its gene complement is reduced as compared with the well-studied sister groups Diplonemea and Kinetoplastea. We have identified seven protein-coding genes: Three subunits of respiratory complex I (nad1, nad4, and nad5), one subunit of complex III (cob), and three subunits of complex IV (cox1, cox2, and a highly divergent cox3). Moreover, fragments of ribosomal RNA genes have also been identified. Genes encoding subunits of complex V, ribosomal proteins and tRNAs were missing, and are likely located in the nuclear genome. Although mitochondrial genomes of diplonemids and kinetoplastids possess the most complex RNA processing machineries known, including trans-splicing and editing of the uridine insertion/deletion type, respectively, our transcriptomic data suggest their total absence in E. gracilis. This finding supports a scenario in which the complex mitochondrial processing machineries of both sister groups evolved relatively late in evolution from a streamlined genome and transcriptome of their common predecessor. PMID:26590215

  17. Damage detection with streamlined structural health monitoring data.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Deng, Jun; Xie, Weizhi

    2015-01-01

    The huge amounts of sensor data generated by large scale sensor networks in on-line structural health monitoring (SHM) systems often overwhelms the systems' capacity for data transmission and analysis. This paper presents a new concept for an integrated SHM system in which a streamlined data flow is used as a unifying thread to integrate the individual components of on-line SHM systems. Such an integrated SHM system has a few desirable functionalities including embedded sensor data compression, interactive sensor data retrieval, and structural knowledge discovery, which aim to enhance the reliability, efficiency, and robustness of on-line SHM systems. Adoption of this new concept will enable the design of an on-line SHM system with more uniform data generation and data handling capacity for its subsystems. To examine this concept in the context of vibration-based SHM systems, real sensor data from an on-line SHM system comprising a scaled steel bridge structure and an on-line data acquisition system with remote data access was used in this study. Vibration test results clearly demonstrated the prominent performance characteristics of the proposed integrated SHM system including rapid data access, interactive data retrieval and knowledge discovery of structural conditions on a global level. PMID:25884788

  18. Quasi-steady linked vortices with chaotic streamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco Fuentes, Oscar; Romero Arteaga, Angelica

    2010-11-01

    We study the dynamics of two or more toroidal filamentary vortices ---i.e. thin tubular vortices coiled on an immaterial torus--- in an otherwise quiescent, ideal fluid. Assuming that the vortices are identical and equally spaced on a meridional section of the torus, the flow evolution depends on the torus aspect ratio (R), the number of vortices (N), and the vortex topology (Vp,q, where p and q are coprime integers such that the Vp,q vortex winds p times round the torus symmetry axis and q times round the torus centerline). The evolution of sets of V1,1 and V1,2 vortices was computed using the Rosenhead--Moore approximation to evaluate the velocity field and a fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme to advance in time. It was found that vortex sets with N<6 and R<0.15 progressed along and rotated around the torus symmetry axis in an almost steady manner while each vortex in the set approximately preserved its shape. The velocity field, observed in the comoving frame, has two stagnation points. The stream tube starting at the forward stagnation point and the stream tube ending at the backward stagnation point transversely intersect along a finite number of streamlines. The three-dimensional chaotic tangle that arises has a geometry which depends primarily on the number of vortices N.

  19. Enhanced Performance of Streamline-Traced External-Compression Supersonic Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.

    2015-01-01

    A computational design study was conducted to enhance the aerodynamic performance of streamline-traced, external-compression inlets for Mach 1.6. The current study explored a new parent flowfield for the streamline tracing and several variations of inlet design factors, including the axial displacement and angle of the subsonic cowl lip, the vertical placement of the engine axis, and the use of porous bleed in the subsonic diffuser. The performance was enhanced over that of an earlier streamline-traced inlet such as to increase the total pressure recovery and reduce total pressure distortion

  20. Evaluation of intensity of artefacts in CBCT by radio-opacity of composite simulation models of implants in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kuusisto, N; Vallittu, P K; Lassila, L V J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim was to compare the intensity of artefacts in CBCT images caused by different percentages of radio-opacifying material in composite simulation models of implants. Titanium and zirconia models of implants were used as a reference for the evaluation of the intensity of artefacts. Methods: Seven different percentages of radio-opacifying BaAlSiO2 fillers were added to composite resin to fabricate seven step wedges and simulation models of implants. Titanium and zirconia simulation models of implants were also fabricated. Aluminium step wedge was used as a reference for the measurement of grey values in intraoral radiographs. Step wedges were exposed with a Planmeca Intra X-ray machine (Planmeca Oy, Helsinki, Finland). All composite, titanium and zirconia simulation models of implants were exposed with a SCANORA® 3D dental X-ray machine (Soredex, Tuusula, Finland). Images and grey values were analysed with ImageJ software (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD). To demonstrate possible artefacts between all the simulation models of implants, the images were also visually compared with each other using ImageJ software. Results: Artefacts were clearly present in CBCT images caused by titanium and zirconia and when the composite material consisted at least 20% BaAlSiO2. The intensity of artefacts increased when the radio-opacity of the composite material increased. Conclusions: Materials containing less radio-opacity produce less pronounced artefacts. The cut-off point for artefacts is at 20% radio-opaque filling material in composite material. PMID:25283364

  1. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals insights into the streamlined genomes of haplosclerid demosponges.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Christine; Conaco, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Sponges (Porifera) are one of the most ancestral metazoan groups. They are characterized by a simple body plan lacking the true tissues and organ systems found in other animals. Members of this phylum display a remarkable diversity of form and function and yet little is known about the composition and complexity of their genomes. In this study, we sequenced the transcriptomes of two marine haplosclerid sponges belonging to Demospongiae, the largest and most diverse class within phylum Porifera, and compared their gene content with members of other sponge classes. We recovered 44,693 and 50,067 transcripts expressed in adult tissues of Haliclona amboinensis and Haliclona tubifera, respectively. These transcripts translate into 20,280 peptides in H. amboinensis and 18,000 peptides in H. tubifera. Genes associated with important signaling and metabolic pathways, regulatory networks, as well as genes that may be important in the organismal stress response, were identified in the transcriptomes. Futhermore, lineage-specific innovations were identified that may be correlated with observed sponge characters and ecological adaptations. The core gene complement expressed within the tissues of adult haplosclerid demosponges may represent a streamlined and flexible genetic toolkit that underlies the ecological success and resilience of sponges to environmental stress. PMID:26738846

  2. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals insights into the streamlined genomes of haplosclerid demosponges

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Christine; Conaco, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Sponges (Porifera) are one of the most ancestral metazoan groups. They are characterized by a simple body plan lacking the true tissues and organ systems found in other animals. Members of this phylum display a remarkable diversity of form and function and yet little is known about the composition and complexity of their genomes. In this study, we sequenced the transcriptomes of two marine haplosclerid sponges belonging to Demospongiae, the largest and most diverse class within phylum Porifera, and compared their gene content with members of other sponge classes. We recovered 44,693 and 50,067 transcripts expressed in adult tissues of Haliclona amboinensis and Haliclona tubifera, respectively. These transcripts translate into 20,280 peptides in H. amboinensis and 18,000 peptides in H. tubifera. Genes associated with important signaling and metabolic pathways, regulatory networks, as well as genes that may be important in the organismal stress response, were identified in the transcriptomes. Futhermore, lineage-specific innovations were identified that may be correlated with observed sponge characters and ecological adaptations. The core gene complement expressed within the tissues of adult haplosclerid demosponges may represent a streamlined and flexible genetic toolkit that underlies the ecological success and resilience of sponges to environmental stress. PMID:26738846

  3. Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemanich, Donald, Ed.

    1974-01-01

    The articles in this special issue of the "Illinois English Bulletin" concern the state of composition instruction at the secondary and college levels. The titles and authors are "Monologues or Dialogues? A Plea for Literacy" by Dr. Alfred J. Lindsey, "Teaching Composition: Curiouser and Curiouser" by Denny Brandon, and "Teaching Writing to High…

  4. Composition of Simulated Martian Brines and Implications for the Origin of Martian Salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, M. A.; Moore, J. M.; Mellon, M. T.

    2004-01-01

    We report on laboratory experiments that have produced dilute brines under controlled conditions meant to simulate past and present Mars. We allowed an SNC-derived mineral mix to react with pure water under a simulated present-Mars atmosphere for seven months. We then subjected the same mineral mix to a similar aqueous environment for one year, but with a simulated Mars atmosphere that contained the added gases SO2, HCl and NO2. The addition of acidic gases was designed to mimic the effects of volcanic gases that may have been present in the martian atmosphere during periods of increased volcanic activity. The experiments were performed at one bar and at two different temperatures in order to simulate subsurface conditions where liquid water and rock are likely to interact on Mars. The dominant cations dissolved in the solutions we produced were Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Al(3+) and Na(+), while the major anions are dissolved C, F(-), SO4(2-) and Cl(-). Typical solution pH was 4.2 to 6.0 for experiments run with a Mars analog atmosphere, and 3.6-5.0 for experiments with acidic gases added. Abundance patterns of elements in the synthetic sulfate-chloride brines produced under acidic conditions were distinctly unlike those of terrestrial ocean water, terrestrial continental waters, and those measured in the martian fines at the Mars Pathfinder and Viking 1 and 2 landing sites. In particular, the S/Cl ratio in these experiments was about 200, compared with an average value of approx. 5 in martian fines. In contrast, abundance patterns of elements in the brines produced under a present day Mars analog atmosphere were quite similar to those measured in the martian fines at the Mars Pathfinder and Viking 1 and 2 landing sites. This suggests that salts present in the martian regolith may have formed over time as a result of the interaction of surface or subsurface liquid water with basalts in the presence of a martian atmosphere similar in composition to that of today, rather than

  5. Numerical simulations of composite supernova remnants for small σ pulsar wind nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorster, M. J.; Ferreira, S. E. S.; de Jager, O. C.; Djannati-Ataï, A.

    2013-03-01

    Context. Composite supernova remnants consist of a pulsar wind nebula located inside a shell-type remnant. The presence of a shell has implications on the evolution of the nebula, although the converse is generally not true. Aims: The purpose of this paper is two-fold. The first aim is to determine the effect of the pulsar's initial luminosity and spin-down rate, the supernova ejecta mass, and density of the interstellar medium on the evolution of a spherically-symmetric, composite supernova remnant expanding into a homogeneous medium. The second aim is to investigate the evolution of the magnetic field in the pulsar wind nebula when the the composite remnant expands into a non-uniform interstellar medium. Methods: The Euler conservation equations for inviscid flow, together with the magnetohydrodynamic induction law in the kinematic limit, are solved numerically for a number of scenarios where the ratio of magnetic to particle energy is σ < 0.01. The simulations in the first part of the paper is solved in a one-dimensional configuration. In the second part of the paper, the effect of an inhomogeneous medium on the evolution is studied using a two-dimensional, axisymmetric configuration. Results: It is found that the initial spin-down luminosity and density of the interstellar medium has the largest influence on the evolution of the pulsar wind nebula. The spin-down time-scale of the pulsar only becomes important when this value is smaller than the time needed for the reverse shock of the shell remnant to reach the outer boundary of the nebula. For a remnant evolving in a non-uniform medium, the magnetic field along the boundary of the nebula will evolve to a value that is larger than the magnetic field in the interior. If the inhomogeneity of the interstellar medium is enhanced, while the spin-down luminosity is decreased, it is further found that a magnetic "cloud" is formed in a region that is spatially separated from the position of the pulsar.

  6. Constraints on Lower Mantle Compositions Using Molecular Dynamic Simulations of MgSiO3 Perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, F. C.; Cohen, R. E.

    2001-05-01

    Since orthorhombic (Pbnm) (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite (pv) is believed to account for two-thirds of the volume of Earth's lower mantle, it is important to understand its thermal equation of state (EoS) and thermoelastic properties. We have done molecular dynamics simulations using the non-empirical VIB interatomic potential to investigate the EoS and elasticity of MgSiO3 perovskite under lower mantle pressures and temperatures [Marton and Cohen, 2000; Marton et al., in press]. This is a many-body potential obtained by overlapping spherical ions. Nominally charged ions give semi-quantitative, but less accurate results than desired for MgSiO3 perovskite. By varying the ionic charges, we found it possible to obtain excellent agreement with the much more computationally intensive first-principles LAPW method. P-V-T results were fitted to a thermal EoS of the form P(V,T) = P0(V,T_0) + a + b T, where T0 = 300 K, P0 is the isothermal Universal EoS [Vinet et al., 1987], and a + b T is the thermal pressure [Anderson, 1980]. With data at P = 0-140 GPa and T = 300-3000 K, we found V0 = 165.40 Å3, KT{0} = 273 GPa, K'T{0} = 3.86, a = -1.99 GPa, and b = 0.00664 GPa/K. Elastic constants calculated via the lattice fluctuation formula of Parrinello and Rahman [1982] give KTs at temperatures of 1000-3000 K and pressures of 25-140 GPa that agree within 0.1-5.0% with those obtained via the thermal EoS. Fixing V0 to the experimentally determined value of 162.49 Å3 [Mao et al., 1991] and using our EoS and elastic constants, we computed density (ρ ) and seismic velocity (v) profiles along a geotherm and found excellent agreement between simplified pyrolitic compositions consisting of 67 vol % perovskite (XMg = 0.93-0.96) and 33 vol % magnesiowüstite (mw) [(Mg,Fe)O] (XMg = 0.82-0.86) and the PREM and ak135 seismological models. To further investigate lower mantle composition, we will compare RMS percent misfits in ρ and v for pv+mw compositions with fixed amounts of Mg (XMg) and Si (Xpv

  7. Numerical Simulation of Pressure Infiltration Process for Making Metal Matrix Composites Using Dual-Scale Fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Pillai, Krishna M.

    2013-12-01

    Correct modeling of flow and solidification of metal melt in the pressure infiltration process (PIP) is important for accurate simulation and process optimization of the mold-filling process during the making of metal matrix composites. The fiber reinforcements used in this process often consist of fiber tows or bundles that are woven, stitched, or braided to create a dual-scale preform. The physics of melt flow in the dual-scale preform is very different from that in a single-scale preform created from a random distribution of fibers. As a result, the previous PIP simulations, which treat the preform as being single scale, are inaccurate. A pseudo dual-scale approach is presented where the melt flow through such dual-scale porous media is modeled using the conventional single-scale approach using two distinctly different permeabilities in tows and gaps. A three-dimensional finite difference model is developed to model the flow of molten metal in the dual- and single-scale preforms. To track the fluid front during the mold filling and infiltration, the volume of fluid method is used. A source-based method is used to deal with transient heat transfer and phase changes. The computational code is validated against an analytical solution and a published result. Subsequent study reveals that infiltration of an idealized dual-scale preform is marked by irregular flow fronts and an unsaturated region behind the front due to the formation of gas pockets inside fiber tows. Unlike the single-scale preform characterized by sharp temperature gradients near mold walls, the dual-scale preforms are marked by surging of high-temperature melts between tows and by the presence of sharp gradients on the gap-tow interfaces. The parameters such as the (gap-tow) permeability ratio, the (gap-tow) pore volume ratio, and the inlet pressure have a strong influence on the formation of the saturated region in the dual-scale preform.

  8. Enhanced Performance of Streamline-Traced External-Compression Supersonic Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.

    2015-01-01

    A computational design study was conducted to enhance the aerodynamic performance of streamline-traced, external-compression inlets for Mach 1.6. Compared to traditional external-compression, two-dimensional and axisymmetric inlets, streamline-traced inlets promise reduced cowl wave drag and sonic boom, but at the expense of reduced total pressure recovery and increased total pressure distortion. The current study explored a new parent flowfield for the streamline tracing and several variations of inlet design factors, including the axial displacement and angle of the subsonic cowl lip, the vertical placement of the engine axis, and the use of porous bleed in the subsonic diffuser. The performance was enhanced over that of an earlier streamline-traced inlet such as to increase the total pressure recovery and reduce total pressure distortion.

  9. Effects of surface pressures and streamline metrics on the calculation of laminar heating rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher J.; Dejarnette, Fred R.; Zoby, Vincent

    1988-01-01

    The effect of streamline geometry and pressure distributions on surface heating rates is examined for slender, spherically blunted cones. The modifications to the approximate aeroheating code include a curve fit of pressures computed by an Euler solution over a range of Mach numbers and cone angles. The streamline geometry is then found using the surface pressures and inviscid surface properties. Previously, streamlines were determined using the inviscid properties at the edge of the boundary layer when accounting for the effects of entropy-layer swallowing. Streamline calculations are now based on inviscid surface conditions rather than boundary-layer edge properties. However, the heating rates are calculated using inviscid properties at the edge of the boundary layer. Resulting heating rates compare favorably with solutions from the viscous-shock-layer equations.

  10. Streamline Integration Using MPI-Hybrid Parallelism on a Large Multicore Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Garth, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Streamline computation in a very large vector field data set represents a significant challenge due to the nonlocal and data-dependent nature of streamline integration. In this paper, we conduct a study of the performance characteristics of hybrid parallel programming and execution as applied to streamline integration on a large, multicore platform. With multicore processors now prevalent in clusters and supercomputers, there is a need to understand the impact of these hybrid systems in order to make the best implementation choice. We use two MPI-based distribution approaches based on established parallelization paradigms, parallelize over seeds and parallelize over blocks, and present a novel MPI-hybrid algorithm for each approach to compute streamlines. Our findings indicate that the work sharing between cores in the proposed MPI-hybrid parallel implementation results in much improved performance and consumes less communication and I/O bandwidth than a traditional, nonhybrid distributed implementation.

  11. Streamline integration using MPI-hybrid parallelism on a large multicore architecture.

    PubMed

    Camp, David; Garth, Christoph; Childs, Hank; Pugmire, Dave; Joy, Kenneth I

    2011-11-01

    Streamline computation in a very large vector field data set represents a significant challenge due to the nonlocal and data-dependent nature of streamline integration. In this paper, we conduct a study of the performance characteristics of hybrid parallel programming and execution as applied to streamline integration on a large, multicore platform. With multicore processors now prevalent in clusters and supercomputers, there is a need to understand the impact of these hybrid systems in order to make the best implementation choice. We use two MPI-based distribution approaches based on established parallelization paradigms, parallelize over seeds and parallelize over blocks, and present a novel MPI-hybrid algorithm for each approach to compute streamlines. Our findings indicate that the work sharing between cores in the proposed MPI-hybrid parallel implementation results in much improved performance and consumes less communication and I/O bandwidth than a traditional, nonhybrid distributed implementation. PMID:21885895

  12. A streamline curvature method for design of supercritical and subcritical airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barger, R. L.; Brooks, C. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    An airfoil design procedure, applicable to both subcritical and supercritical airfoils, is described. The method is based on the streamline curvature velocity equation. Several examples illustrating this method are presented and discussed.

  13. Streamline Integration using MPI-Hybrid Parallelism on a Large Multi-Core Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Camp, David; Garth, Christoph; Childs, Hank; Pugmire, Dave; Joy, Kenneth I.

    2010-11-01

    Streamline computation in a very large vector field data set represents a significant challenge due to the non-local and datadependentnature of streamline integration. In this paper, we conduct a study of the performance characteristics of hybrid parallel programmingand execution as applied to streamline integration on a large, multicore platform. With multi-core processors now prevalent in clustersand supercomputers, there is a need to understand the impact of these hybrid systems in order to make the best implementation choice.We use two MPI-based distribution approaches based on established parallelization paradigms, parallelize-over-seeds and parallelize-overblocks,and present a novel MPI-hybrid algorithm for each approach to compute streamlines. Our findings indicate that the work sharing betweencores in the proposed MPI-hybrid parallel implementation results in much improved performance and consumes less communication andI/O bandwidth than a traditional, non-hybrid distributed implementation.

  14. 3 CFR 13571 - Executive Order 13571 of April 27, 2011. Streamlining Service Delivery and Improving Customer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...-service options accessed by the Internet or mobile phone and improved processes that deliver services... service channels (such as online, phone, in-person, and mail services); (e) streamlining agency...

  15. Streamlined, Inexpensive 3D Printing of the Brain and Skull.

    PubMed

    Naftulin, Jason S; Kimchi, Eyal Y; Cash, Sydney S

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computed Tomography (CT) collect three-dimensional data (3D) that is typically viewed on two-dimensional (2D) screens. Actual 3D models, however, allow interaction with real objects such as implantable electrode grids, potentially improving patient specific neurosurgical planning and personalized clinical education. Desktop 3D printers can now produce relatively inexpensive, good quality prints. We describe our process for reliably generating life-sized 3D brain prints from MRIs and 3D skull prints from CTs. We have integrated a standardized, primarily open-source process for 3D printing brains and skulls. We describe how to convert clinical neuroimaging Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images to stereolithography (STL) files, a common 3D object file format that can be sent to 3D printing services. We additionally share how to convert these STL files to machine instruction gcode files, for reliable in-house printing on desktop, open-source 3D printers. We have successfully printed over 19 patient brain hemispheres from 7 patients on two different open-source desktop 3D printers. Each brain hemisphere costs approximately $3-4 in consumable plastic filament as described, and the total process takes 14-17 hours, almost all of which is unsupervised (preprocessing = 4-6 hr; printing = 9-11 hr, post-processing = <30 min). Printing a matching portion of a skull costs $1-5 in consumable plastic filament and takes less than 14 hr, in total. We have developed a streamlined, cost-effective process for 3D printing brain and skull models. We surveyed healthcare providers and patients who confirmed that rapid-prototype patient specific 3D models may help interdisciplinary surgical planning and patient education. The methods we describe can be applied for other clinical, research, and educational purposes. PMID:26295459

  16. Streamlined, Inexpensive 3D Printing of the Brain and Skull

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Sydney S.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computed Tomography (CT) collect three-dimensional data (3D) that is typically viewed on two-dimensional (2D) screens. Actual 3D models, however, allow interaction with real objects such as implantable electrode grids, potentially improving patient specific neurosurgical planning and personalized clinical education. Desktop 3D printers can now produce relatively inexpensive, good quality prints. We describe our process for reliably generating life-sized 3D brain prints from MRIs and 3D skull prints from CTs. We have integrated a standardized, primarily open-source process for 3D printing brains and skulls. We describe how to convert clinical neuroimaging Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images to stereolithography (STL) files, a common 3D object file format that can be sent to 3D printing services. We additionally share how to convert these STL files to machine instruction gcode files, for reliable in-house printing on desktop, open-source 3D printers. We have successfully printed over 19 patient brain hemispheres from 7 patients on two different open-source desktop 3D printers. Each brain hemisphere costs approximately $3–4 in consumable plastic filament as described, and the total process takes 14–17 hours, almost all of which is unsupervised (preprocessing = 4–6 hr; printing = 9–11 hr, post-processing = <30 min). Printing a matching portion of a skull costs $1–5 in consumable plastic filament and takes less than 14 hr, in total. We have developed a streamlined, cost-effective process for 3D printing brain and skull models. We surveyed healthcare providers and patients who confirmed that rapid-prototype patient specific 3D models may help interdisciplinary surgical planning and patient education. The methods we describe can be applied for other clinical, research, and educational purposes. PMID:26295459

  17. A size-composition resolved aerosol model for simulating the dynamics of externally mixed particles: SCRAM (v 1.0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, S.; Sartelet, K. N.; Seigneur, C.

    2015-06-01

    The Size-Composition Resolved Aerosol Model (SCRAM) for simulating the dynamics of externally mixed atmospheric particles is presented. This new model classifies aerosols by both composition and size, based on a comprehensive combination of all chemical species and their mass-fraction sections. All three main processes involved in aerosol dynamics (coagulation, condensation/evaporation and nucleation) are included. The model is first validated by comparison with a reference solution and with results of simulations using internally mixed particles. The degree of mixing of particles is investigated in a box model simulation using data representative of air pollution in Greater Paris. The relative influence on the mixing state of the different aerosol processes (condensation/evaporation, coagulation) and of the algorithm used to model condensation/evaporation (bulk equilibrium, dynamic) is studied.

  18. Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Air Inlet and Outlet Openings on a Streamline Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, John V

    1951-01-01

    In connection with the general problem of providing air flow to an aircraft power plant located within a fuselage, an investigation was conducted in the Langley 8-foot high-speed tunnel to determine the effect on external drag and pressure distribution of air inlet openings located at the nose of a streamline body. Air outlet openings located at the tail and at the 21-percent and 63-percent stations of the body were also investigated. Boundary layer transition measurements were made and correlated with the force and the pressure data. Individual openings were investigated with the aid of a blower and then practicable combinations of inlet and outlet openings were tested. Various modifications to the internal duct shape near the inlet opening and the aerodynamic effects of a simulated gun in the duct were also studied. The results of the tests suggested that outlet openings should be designed so that the static pressure of the internal flow at the outlet would be the same as the static pressure of the external flow in the vicinity of the opening.

  19. HYDROPHOBIC CHARACTERISTICS OF COMPOSITE INSULATORS IN SIMULATED INLAND ARID DESERT ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Yasin; Al-Arainy, Abdulrehman Ali; Malik, Nazar Hussain; Qureshi, Muhammad Iqbal

    2010-06-15

    Presently along with traditional insulators i.e. glass and porcelain, etc., the polymeric insulators are also used world widely. These polymeric insulators are very sensitive to various environmental parameters e.g. UV radiations, heat, etc. The UV radiation level in the central region of Saudi Arabia is high as compared to the recommended IEC-61109 standard for the accelerated aging of the composite insulators. In this study, thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) and Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer (EPDM) insulators were subjected to accelerated aging stress as per IEC standard as well as modified IEC standard simulating the inland arid desert's atmospheric conditions. The hydrophobic characteristics were studied by measuring the contact angle along the insulator surface before and after the accelerated aging of the samples. It was found that TPE loses its hydrophobic properties more as compared to EPDM insulator. This loss was proportional to the intensity of UV irradiation. The rate of recovery is also low for both the tested materials as compared to Silicone Rubber insulators.

  20. Simulating the sensitivity of cell nutritive environment to composition changes within the intervertebral disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wills, C. Ruiz; Malandrino, A.; van Rijsbergen, MM.; Lacroix, D.; Ito, K.; Noailly, J.

    2016-05-01

    Altered nutrition in the intervertebral disc affects cell viability and can generate catabolic cascades contributing to extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. Such degradation is expected to affect couplings between disc mechanics and nutrition, contributing to accelerate degenerative processes. However, the relation of ECM changes to major biophysical events within the loaded disc remains unclear. A L4-L5 disc finite element model including the nucleus (NP), annulus (AF) and endplates was used and coupled to a transport-cell viability model. Solute concentrations and cell viability were evaluated along the mid-sagittal plane path. A design of experiment (DOE) was performed. DOE parameters corresponded to AF and NP biochemical tissue measurements in discs with different degeneration grades. Cell viability was not affected by any parameter combinations defined. Nonetheless, the initial water content was the parameter that affected the most the solute contents, especially glucose. Calculations showed that altered NP composition could negatively affect AF cell nutrition. Results suggested that AF and NP tissue degeneration are not critical to nutrition-related cell viability at early-stage of disc degeneration. However, small ECM degenerative changes may alter significantly disc nutrition under mechanical loads. Coupling disc mechano-transport simulations and enzyme expression studies could allow identifying spatiotemporal sequences related to tissue catabolism.

  1. Probabilistic Simulation of Combined Thermo-Mechanical Cyclic Fatigue in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2011-01-01

    A methodology to compute probabilistically-combined thermo-mechanical fatigue life of polymer matrix laminated composites has been developed and is demonstrated. Matrix degradation effects caused by long-term environmental exposure and mechanical/thermal cyclic loads are accounted for in the simulation process. A unified time-temperature-stress-dependent multifactor-interaction relationship developed at NASA Glenn Research Center has been used to model the degradation/aging of material properties due to cyclic loads. The fast probability-integration method is used to compute probabilistic distribution of response. Sensitivities of fatigue life reliability to uncertainties in the primitive random variables (e.g., constituent properties, fiber volume ratio, void volume ratio, ply thickness, etc.) computed and their significance in the reliability-based design for maximum life is discussed. The effect of variation in the thermal cyclic loads on the fatigue reliability for a (0/+/-45/90)s graphite/epoxy laminate with a ply thickness of 0.127 mm, with respect to impending failure modes has been studied. The results show that, at low mechanical-cyclic loads and low thermal-cyclic amplitudes, fatigue life for 0.999 reliability is most sensitive to matrix compressive strength, matrix modulus, thermal expansion coefficient, and ply thickness. Whereas at high mechanical-cyclic loads and high thermal-cyclic amplitudes, fatigue life at 0.999 reliability is more sensitive to the shear strength of matrix, longitudinal fiber modulus, matrix modulus, and ply thickness.

  2. Probabilistic Simulation of Combined Thermo-Mechanical Cyclic Fatigue in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2010-01-01

    A methodology to compute probabilistically-combined thermo-mechanical fatigue life of polymer matrix laminated composites has been developed and is demonstrated. Matrix degradation effects caused by long-term environmental exposure and mechanical/thermal cyclic loads are accounted for in the simulation process. A unified time-temperature-stress-dependent multifactor-interaction relationship developed at NASA Glenn Research Center has been used to model the degradation/aging of material properties due to cyclic loads. The fast probability-integration method is used to compute probabilistic distribution of response. Sensitivities of fatigue life reliability to uncertainties in the primitive random variables (e.g., constituent properties, fiber volume ratio, void volume ratio, ply thickness, etc.) computed and their significance in the reliability-based design for maximum life is discussed. The effect of variation in the thermal cyclic loads on the fatigue reliability for a (0/+/-45/90)s graphite/epoxy laminate with a ply thickness of 0.127 mm, with respect to impending failure modes has been studied. The results show that, at low mechanical-cyclic loads and low thermal-cyclic amplitudes, fatigue life for 0.999 reliability is most sensitive to matrix compressive strength, matrix modulus, thermal expansion coefficient, and ply thickness. Whereas at high mechanical-cyclic loads and high thermal-cyclic amplitudes, fatigue life at 0.999 reliability is more sensitive to the shear strength of matrix, longitudinal fiber modulus, matrix modulus, and ply thickness.

  3. Efficient and robust compositional two-phase reservoir simulation in fractured media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zidane, A.; Firoozabadi, A.

    2015-12-01

    Compositional and compressible two-phase flow in fractured media has wide applications including CO2 injection. Accurate simulations are currently based on the discrete fracture approach using the cross-flow equilibrium model. In this approach the fractures and a small part of the matrix blocks are combined to form a grid cell. The major drawback is low computational efficiency. In this work we use the discrete-fracture approach to model the fractures where the fracture entities are described explicitly in the computational domain. We use the concept of cross-flow equilibrium in the fractures (FCFE). This allows using large matrix elements in the neighborhood of the fractures. We solve the fracture transport equations implicitly to overcome the Courant-Freidricks-Levy (CFL) condition in the small fracture elements. Our implicit approach is based on calculation of the derivative of the molar concentration of component i in phase (cαi ) with respect to the total molar concentration (ci ) at constant volume V and temperature T. This contributes to significant speed up of the code. The hybrid mixed finite element method (MFE) is used to solve for the velocity in both the matrix and the fractures coupled with the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method to solve the species transport equations in the matrix, and a finite volume (FV) discretization in the fractures. In large scale problems the proposed approach is orders of magnitude faster than the existing models.

  4. Multiscale Simulation of Damage Progression in 5-Harness Satin Weave Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qiang; Qu, Shaoxing

    2015-07-01

    A multiscale finite element (FE) model is developed to predict damage and failure of 5-harness satin weave composites both at the micro-scale (fiber, matrix and interface) and meso-scale (ply). In the meso-scale damage model, specific characteristics of the 5HS, such as the yarn undulation, shape and orientation, are taken into account to characterize the failure mechanisms of the interlaced yarns. In the micro-scale damage model of the study, a micro-model including matrix, interface and fibers is considered and simplified to a two-dimensional problem in the plane of a cross-section of the yarn. In the micro-FE model, cohesive elements based on a traction-separation law have been used which allows for some detailed interpretation of the micro-mechanical interaction of fiber and matrix under unidirectional tension. The predictions based on the numerical simulations are compared to the experimental data from the literature. The results indicate that the meso-FE model accurately captures weft yarn transverse damage. Moreover, the micro-FE model shows the contributions of failure from micro-mechanisms, including the in-plane matrix cracking and interfacial debonding.

  5. Prediction of Material Properties of Nanostructured Polymer Composites Using Atomistic Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, J.A.; Clancy, T.C.; Frankland, S.J.V.

    2009-01-01

    Atomistic models of epoxy polymers were built in order to assess the effect of structure at the nanometer scale on the resulting bulk properties such as elastic modulus and thermal conductivity. Atomistic models of both bulk polymer and carbon nanotube polymer composites were built. For the bulk models, the effect of moisture content and temperature on the resulting elastic constants was calculated. A relatively consistent decrease in modulus was seen with increasing temperature. The dependence of modulus on moisture content was less consistent. This behavior was seen for two different epoxy systems, one containing a difunctional epoxy molecule and the other a tetrafunctional epoxy molecule. Both epoxy structures were crosslinked with diamine curing agents. Multifunctional properties were calculated with the nanocomposite models. Molecular dynamics simulation was used to estimate the interfacial thermal (Kapitza) resistance between the carbon nanotube and the surrounding epoxy matrix. These estimated values were used in a multiscale model in order to predict the thermal conductivity of a nanocomposite as a function of the nanometer scaled molecular structure.

  6. Hydrophobic Characteristics of Composite Insulators in Simulated Inland Arid Desert Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Yasin; Al-Arainy, Abdulrehman Ali; Malik, Nazar Hussain; Qureshi, Muhammad Iqbal

    2010-06-01

    Presently along with traditional insulators i.e. glass and porcelain, etc., the polymeric insulators are also used world widely. These polymeric insulators are very sensitive to various environmental parameters e.g. UV radiations, heat, etc. The UV radiation level in the central region of Saudi Arabia is high as compared to the recommended IEC-61109 standard for the accelerated aging of the composite insulators. In this study, thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) and Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer (EPDM) insulators were subjected to accelerated aging stress as per IEC standard as well as modified IEC standard simulating the inland arid desert's atmospheric conditions. The hydrophobic characteristics were studied by measuring the contact angle along the insulator surface before and after the accelerated aging of the samples. It was found that TPE loses its hydrophobic properties more as compared to EPDM insulator. This loss was proportional to the intensity of UV irradiation. The rate of recovery is also low for both the tested materials as compared to Silicone Rubber insulators.

  7. Crystallization in simulated glasses from Hanford high-level nuclear waste composition range

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, P.; Smith, D.E.; Schweiger, M.J.

    1993-04-01

    Glass crystallization was investigated as part of a property-composition relationship study of Hanford waste glasses. Non-radioactive glass samples were heated in a gradient furnace over a wide range of temperatures. The liquidus temperature was measured, and primary crystalline phases were determined using optical microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (SEM/EDS). Samples have also been heat treated according to a simulated canister centerline cooling curve. The crystalline phases in these samples have been identified by optical microscopy, SEM/EDS, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Major components of the borosilicate glasses that were melted at approximately 1150{degrees}C were SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}O, CaO, MgO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}, and ``Others`` (sum of minor components). The major crystalline phases identified in this study were zircon, nepheline, calcium silicate, lithium silicate, and a range of solid solutions from clinopyroxenes, orthopyroxenes, olivines, and spiners.

  8. Improving Pharmaceutical Aerosol Delivery During Noninvasive Ventilation: Effects of Streamlined Components

    PubMed Central

    Longest, P. Worth; Golshahi, Laleh; Hindle, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol delivery efficiency during noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is known to be low (~10%) and is associated with poor outcomes of aerosol therapy. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the benefit of redesigning ventilation circuit components using a streamlining approach to improve aerosol delivery during nasal high flow therapy in adults with a conventional-sized aerosol from a mesh nebulizer. The ventilation circuit consisted of a humidifier, mesh nebulizer, mixing T-connector (with 90° angle), 10 mm tubing, and nasal cannula interface. In vitro experiments and computational fluid dynamics analyses were used to evaluate depositional losses in a system of existing components and a newly proposed streamlined T-connector and cannula at flow rates of 30 and 45 LPM. Streamlined designs reduced deposition in the T-connector by a factor of 4. In the nasal cannula, the streamlined designs reduced depositional losses by factors of 1.25–2.0. With the streamlined designs, the highest emitted dose achieved was >40% for a conventional-sized aerosol at 30 LPM. Streamlined geometries offer an effective method to significantly improve the delivery of aerosols through components of NIV systems. This increase in delivery efficiency is important for new inhaled medications with narrow therapeutic windows, increased costs, or long delivery times. PMID:23423706

  9. Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.; McCullough, R.L.; Pipes, R.B.

    1986-10-01

    The degree of control over material properties that is typified by hybrid composites is transforming engineering design. In part because homogeneous materials such as metals and alloys do not offer comparable control, specifying a material and designing a component have traditionally taken place separately. As composites begin to replace traditional materials in fields and such as aerospace, component design and the specification of a material are merging and becoming aspects of a single process. The controllable microstructure of a composite allows it to be tailored to match the distribution of stresses to which it will be subject. At the same time components must come to reflect the distinctive nature of composites: their directional properties and the intricate forms they can be given through processes such as injection molding, filament winding and three-dimensional weaving. The complexity inherent in conceiving components and their materials at the same time suggests engineering design will grow increasingly dependent on computers and multidisciplinary teams. Such an approach will harness the full potential of composites for the technologies of the future. 10 figures.

  10. Surface modification of fiber reinforced polymer composites and their attachment to bone simulating material.

    PubMed

    Hautamäki, M P; Puska, M; Aho, A J; Kopperud, H M; Vallittu, P K

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of fiber orientation of a fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) made of poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA) and E-glass to the surface fabrication process by solvent dissolution. Intention of the dissolution process was to expose the fibers and create a macroporous surface onto the FRC to enhance bone bonding of the material. The effect of dissolution and fiber direction to the bone bonding capability of the FRC material was also tested. Three groups of FRC specimens (n = 18/group) were made of PMMA and E-glass fiber reinforcement: (a) group with continuous fibers parallel to the surface of the specimen, (b) continuous fibers oriented perpendicularly to the surface, (c) randomly oriented short (discontinuous) fibers. Fourth specimen group (n = 18) made of plain PMMA served as controls. The specimens were subjected to a solvent treatment by tetrahydrofuran (THF) of either 5, 15 or 30 min of time (n = 6/time point), and the advancement of the dissolution (front) was measured. The solvent treatment also exposed the fibers and created a surface roughness on to the specimens. The solvent treated specimens were embedded into plaster of Paris to simulate bone bonding by mechanical locking and a pull-out test was undertaken to determine the strength of the attachment. All the FRC specimens dissolved as function of time, as the control group showed no marked dissolution during the study period. The specimens with fibers along the direction of long axis of specimen began to dissolve significantly faster than specimens in other groups, but the test specimens with randomly oriented short fibers showed the greatest depth of dissolution after 30 min. The pull-out test showed that the PMMA specimens with fibers were retained better by the plaster of Paris than specimens without fibers. However, direction of the fibers considerably influenced the force of attachment. The fiber reinforcement increases significantly the

  11. Numerical simulation of effective mechanical properties of stochastic composites with consideration for structural evolution under intensive dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Karakulov, Valerii V.; Smolin, Igor Yu. E-mail: skrp@ftf.tsu.ru; Skripnyak, Vladimir A. E-mail: skrp@ftf.tsu.ru

    2014-11-14

    Mechanical behavior of stochastic metal-ceramic composites with the aluminum matrix under high-rate deformation at shock-wave loading is numerically simulated with consideration for structural evolution. Effective values of mechanical parameters of metal-ceramic composites AlB{sub 4}C, AlSiC, and AlAl{sub 2}O{sub 3} are evaluated depending on different concentration of ceramic inclusions.

  12. Streamlining Data Access Services and Data Analysis Services Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Rio, N.; Pennington, D. D.; Pinheiro da Silva, P.; Benedict, K. K.

    2012-12-01

    There are few data analysis services capable of understanding and consuming data coming from multiple data access services. This lack of interoperability between data access services and data analysis services is indeed a major roadblock for science because it prevents the reuse and repurposing of both data and analytical software to support new scientific discoveries. In this presentation, we discuss this problem in light of the Earth, Life, and Semantic Web (ELSEWEB) project funded through NASA's ACCESS Program. The project uses the University of Kansas' Lifemapper system as its analytical Web Service platform, which models potential future species distributions under scenarios of climate change. In an effort to broaden the range of scenarios to include land cover/land use change, ELSEWEB aims to streamline the flow of highly heterogeneous geographic, social, and geological data hosted at UNM's Earth Data Analysis Center (EDAC) through a collection of OGC Web Coverage Services into Lifemapper. In turn, this integration will enable new modeling of complex factors associated with biotic change such as health and infectious disease, that depend not only on climate change and species distributions, but also on other human/environmental interactions. In this presentation we discuss the integration of Lifemapper and EDAC data and model services, provided by a third party semantic system, known as VisKo, that (1) translates Lifemapper data requirements to EDAC service invocations and (2) pipes the data output from EDAC into Lifemapper. VisKo is supported by a knowledge base of web service descriptions that contains information about interface requirements as well as invocation details, including service parameters. VisKo ontologies are designed to capture the knowledge required by the system to orchestrate and execute service pipelines that perform scientist's required computation. The ELSEWEB project also aims to expand VisKo's original goal of building visualization

  13. Simulation of reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets in a rotary hearth furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halder, Sabuj

    The primary motivation of this work is to evaluate a new alternative ironmaking process which involves the combination of a Rotary Hearth Furnace (RHF) with an iron bath smelter. This work is concerned primarily, with the productivity of the RHF. It is known that the reduction in the RHF is controlled by chemical kinetics of the carbon oxidation and wustite reduction reactions as well as by heat transfer to the pellet surface and within the pellet. It is heat transfer to the pellet which limits the number of layers of pellets in the pellet bed in the RHF and thus, the overall productivity. Different types of carbon like graphite, coal-char and wood charcoal were examined. Part of the research was to investigate the chemical kinetics by de-coupling it from the influence of heat and mass transfer. This was accomplished by carrying out reduction experiments using small iron-oxide-carbon powder composite mixtures. The reaction rate constants were determined by fitting the experimental mass loss with a mixed reaction model. This model accounts for the carbon oxidation by CO2 and wustite reduction by CO, which are the primary rate controlling surface-chemical reactions in the composite system. The reaction rate constants have been obtained using wustite-coal-char powder mixtures and wustite-wood-charcoal mixtures. The wustite for these mixtures was obtained from two iron-oxide sources: artificial porous analytical hematite (PAH) and hematite ore tailings. In the next phase of this study, larger scale experiments were conducted in a RHF simulator using spherical composite pellets. Measurement of the reaction rates was accomplished using off-gas analysis. Different combinations of raw materials for the pellets were investigated. These included artificial ferric oxide as well as naturally existing hematite and taconite ores. Graphite, coal-char and wood-charcoal were the reductants. Experiments were conducted using a single layer, a double layer and a triple layer of

  14. Fabrication and simulation of random and periodic composites for reduced stress wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCuiston, Ryan Charles

    During a ballistic impact event between a monolithic ceramic target and a projectile, a shock wave precedes the projectile penetration and propagates through the target. Shock wave induced damage, fundamentally caused by the creation of tensile stress, can reduce the, expected performance of the target material. If the shock wave could be prevented from propagating it would be possible to improve ballistic performance of the target material. Recent research on phononic band gap structures has shown that it is possible to design and fabricate biphasic structures that forbid propagation of low amplitude acoustic waves. The goal of this dissertation was to determine the feasibility of creating a structure that is capable of limiting and or defeating large amplitude shock wave propagation by applying the concepts of phononic band gap research. A model system of Al2O3 and WC-Co was selected based on processing, acoustic and ballistic criteria. Al2O 3/WC-Co composites were fabricated by die pressing and vacuum sintering. The WC-Co was added as discrete inclusions 0.5 to 1.5 mm in diameter up to 50 vol. %. The interfacial bonding between Al2O3 and WC-Co was characterized by indentation and microscopy to determine optimal sintering conditions. A tape casting and lamination technique was developed to fabricate large dimension Al2O3 samples with periodically placed WC-Co inclusions. Through transmission acoustic characterization of green tape cast and laminated samples showed acoustic velocity could be reduced significantly by proper WC-Co inclusion arrangement. Two dimensional finite element simulations were performed on a series of designed Al2O3 structures containing both random and periodically arrayed WC-Co inclusions. For a fixed loading scheme, the effects of WC-Co inclusion diameter, area fraction and stacking arrangement were studied. Structures were found to respond either homogenously, heterogeneously or in a mixed mode fashion to the propagating stress wave. The

  15. A Monte Carlo simulation on critical current distribution of bent-damaged multifilamentary Bi2223 composite tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, S.; Okuda, H.; Fujimoto, M.; Shin, J. K.; Oh, S. S.; Ha, D. W.

    2011-11-01

    It was attempted to reproduce the measured critical current ( I c) distributions of the Bi2223 composite tape bent by 0-0.833% by simulation. Simulation was carried out with a Monte Carlo method in combination with a model that correlates the critical current to damage evolution. Two variables that differ from specimen to specimen were input in the simulation. One was the damage strain parameter, with which the difference in extent of damage among specimens was expressed. Another was the original critical current ( I c0) values at zero bending strain. With the present simulation approach, the measured distributions of critical current at various bending strains, and the measured variations of average and coefficient of variation of critical current values with increasing bending strain were reproduced well.

  16. Simulation of Detecting Damage in Composite Stiffened Panel Using Lamb Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.; Ross, Richard W.; Huang, Guo L.; Yuan, Fuh G.

    2013-01-01

    Lamb wave damage detection in a composite stiffened panel is simulated by performing explicit transient dynamic finite element analyses and using signal imaging techniques. This virtual test process does not need to use real structures, actuators/sensors, or laboratory equipment. Quasi-isotropic laminates are used for the stiffened panels. Two types of damage are studied. One type is a damage in the skin bay and the other type is a debond between the stiffener flange and the skin. Innovative approaches for identifying the damage location and imaging the damage were developed. The damage location is identified by finding the intersection of the damage locus and the path of the time reversal wave packet re-emitted from the sensor nodes. The damage locus is a circle that envelops the potential damage locations. Its center is at the actuator location and its radius is computed by multiplying the group velocity by the time of flight to damage. To create a damage image for estimating the size of damage, a group of nodes in the neighborhood of the damage location is identified for applying an image condition. The image condition, computed at a finite element node, is the zero-lag cross-correlation (ZLCC) of the time-reversed incident wave signal and the time reversal wave signal from the sensor nodes. This damage imaging process is computationally efficient since only the ZLCC values of a small amount of nodes in the neighborhood of the identified damage location are computed instead of those of the full model.

  17. Mechanical properties of impact-assembled nanoparticle composites: Fabrication, measurements and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Rajesh

    Nanomaterials have assumed substantial importance due to their exotic chemical, mechanical, optical and electro-magnetic properties. Our research focuses on producing nanoparticulate building blocks for producing and evaluating superhard films and micropatterns. Nanoparticles of Si, Ti, their carbides and nitrides are generated by injecting gas-phase precursors into a thermal plasma jet and expanding the flow through a convergent boron nitride nozzle into a low-pressure chamber. The particles subsequently deposit onto temperature-controlled silicon or molybdenum substrates via hypersonic impaction. High impact velocities of about ˜1650 m/s (calculated for a 20 nm SiC particle) are the primary mechanism by which nanoparticles are consolidated into films. We have developed an aerodynamically focused nanoparticle beam deposition method for micromolding of nanoparticulate MEMS components. Evaluation of basic mechanical properties of such materials is of significant interest as they have been proposed to be extremely hard, wear- and friction-resistant. For engineering purposes, the Young's modulus of a material is one of the most important properties tied to design of components and coatings. We have developed a Nanoindenter-aided load-deflection measurement system for evaluating the Young's modulus of our nanoparticle composites. The Nanoindenter deflects clamped-clamped beams machined from our deposits using focused ion beam (FIB) milling. The nanoparticle beams behave elastically for small deformations. Porosity variation in our deposits was linked to variation of measured Young's moduli for the FIB-milled beams. Finally we have used discrete element method models (using PFC3D, Itasca Consulting Group) with support from molecular dynamics simulations to create a multiscale framework to mimic the measured Young's modulus behavior of our nanoparticulate deposits. We have found that higher impact velocity of the particles leads to larger contact radii between impacting

  18. Surface structure and composition determination by low-energy electron scattering and Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiebing

    This thesis reports on surface and surface alloy structural and compositional determination with low-energy electron scattering and Monte Carlo simulations. Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) technique and the newly developed low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) IV technique are used to measure the electron scattering intensity spectra and dynamical multiple scattering analysis is performed to optimize the surface structural and non-structural parameters via comparison between the experimental spectra and calculated ones. My work focuses on the following four surface systems. (111), (110) and (001) surface structures of the semimetal bismuth are determined with LEED. The unreconstructed (1x1) structure is revealed for all three surfaces. The interlayer spacings for several outermost layers are resolved. All results agree with those obtained by first-principles calculations. The Debye temperatures for the Bi(111) and Bi(110) surface are found to be lower than that of the Bi bulk. In conjunction with the LEED technique, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) observation is performed on the Bi(001) surface. Surface topology images show dominant bilayer steps and no single layer step. The newly developed LEEM-IV technique is used to investigate the PdCu surface alloy on the substrate Cu(001). Studies include quantifying the temporal evolution of Pd concentration on the Cu(001) terrace, mapping the 3D heterogeneous surface chemical composition, and identifying a step-overgrowth thin film growth mechanism. It is found that, at the initial deposition stages, Pd atoms reside in the second layer at the sample temperature of 473 K, and the Pd concentration increases exponentially with time. The heterogeneous structure and composition near the steps are found to be a result of the step-overgrowth. We highlight the LEEM-IV technique which provides a high lateral resolution at surfaces. We demonstrate a 3D profile of Pd concentration in the surface region by using the LEEM

  19. Discrete meso-element simulation of the failure behavior of short-fiber composites under dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenyan; Tang, Z. P.; Liu, Yunxin

    2000-04-01

    In recent years, more attention has been paid to a better understanding of the failure behavior and mechanism of heterogeneous materials at the meso-scale level. In this paper, the crack initiation and development in epoxy composites reinforced with short steel fibers under dynamic loading were simulated and analyzed with the 2D Discrete Meso-Element Dynamic Method. Results show that the damage process depends greatly on the binding property between matrix and fibers.

  20. PARAMETRIC EFFECTS OF ANTI-FOAM COMPOSITION, SIMULANT PROPERTIES AND NOBLE METALS ON THE GAS HOLDUP AND RELEASE OF A NON-NEWTONIAN WASTE SLURRY SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H; Charles Crawford, C; Mark Fowley, M

    2008-08-07

    Gas holdup tests were performed in bench-scale and small-scale mechanically-agitated mixing systems at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for a simulant of waste from the Hanford Tank 241-AZ-101. These featured additions of DOW Corning Q2-3183A anti-foam agent. Results indicated that this anti-foam agent (AFA) increased gas holdup in the waste simulant by about a factor of four and, counter-intuitively, that the holdup increased as the non-newtonian simulant shear strength decreased (apparent viscosity decreased). Such results raised the potential of increased flammable gas retention in Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) vessels mixed by air sparging and pulse-jet mixers (PJMs) during a Design Basis Event (DBE). Additional testing was performed to determine the effects of simulant properties, composition of alternate AFAs, and presence of trace noble metals. Key results are that: (1) Increased gas holdup resulting from addition of Q2-3183A is due to a decrease in surface tension that supports small bubbles which have low rise velocities. (2) Dow Corning 1520-US AFA shows it to be a viable replacement to Dow Corning Q2-3183A AFA. This alternative AFA, however, requires significantly higher dosage for the same anti-foam function. (3) Addition of noble metals to the AZ-101 waste simulant does not produce a catalytic gas retention effect with the AFA.

  1. Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, John G.

    The Composites market is arguably the most challenging and profitable market for phenolic resins aside from electronics. The variety of products and processes encountered creates the challenges, and the demand for high performance in critical operations brings value. Phenolic composite materials are rendered into a wide range of components to supply a diverse and fragmented commercial base that includes customers in aerospace (Space Shuttle), aircraft (interiors and brakes), mass transit (interiors), defense (blast protection), marine, mine ducting, off-shore (ducts and grating) and infrastructure (architectural) to name a few. For example, phenolic resin is a critical adhesive in the manufacture of honeycomb sandwich panels. Various solvent and water based resins are described along with resin characteristics and the role of metal ions for enhanced thermal stability of the resin used to coat the honeycomb. Featured new developments include pultrusion of phenolic grating, success in RTM/VARTM fabricated parts, new ballistic developments for military vehicles and high char yield carbon-carbon composites along with many others. Additionally, global regional market resin volumes and sales are presented and compared with other thermosetting resin systems.

  2. Research on Streamlines and Aerodynamic Heating for Unstructured Grids on High-Speed Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeJarnette, Fred R.; Hamilton, H. Harris (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Engineering codes are needed which can calculate convective heating rates accurately and expeditiously on the surfaces of high-speed vehicles. One code which has proven to meet these needs is the Langley Approximate Three-Dimensional Convective Heating (LATCH) code. It uses the axisymmetric analogue in an integral boundary-layer method to calculate laminar and turbulent heating rates along inviscid surface streamlines. It requires the solution of the inviscid flow field to provide the surface properties needed to calculate the streamlines and streamline metrics. The LATCH code has been used with inviscid codes which calculated the flow field on structured grids, Several more recent inviscid codes calculate flow field properties on unstructured grids. The present research develops a method to calculate inviscid surface streamlines, the streamline metrics, and heating rates using the properties calculated from inviscid flow fields on unstructured grids. Mr. Chris Riley, prior to his departure from NASA LaRC, developed a preliminary code in the C language, called "UNLATCH", to accomplish these goals. No publication was made on his research. The present research extends and improves on the code developed by Riley. Particular attention is devoted to the stagnation region, and the method is intended for programming in the FORTRAN 90 language.

  3. How does the composition affect the mechanical behaviour of simulated clay-rich fault gouges?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Elisenda; Spiers, Christopher J.; Hangx, Suzanne J. T.

    2014-05-01

    CO2 capture and storage (CCS) in depleted oil and gas reservoirs is seen as one of the most promising large-scale CO2-mitigation strategies. Prediction of the effect of fluid-rock interaction on the mechanical integrity and sealing capacity of a reservoir-seal system, on timescales of the order of 1,000 or 10,000 years, is important to ensure the safety and containment of a reservoir in relation to long-term CO2 storage. However, most chemical reactions in rock/CO2/brine systems are slow, which means that long-term effects of fluids on rock composition, microstructure, mechanical properties and transport properties cannot be easily reproduced under laboratory conditions. One way to overcome this problem is to use simulated fault gouges in experiments, investigating a range of possible mineralogical compositions resulting from CO2-exposure. Previous studies have shown that the mechanical and transport properties of clay-rich fault gouges are significantly influenced by the mineralogy, particularly by the presence and relative amount of secondary phases, such as quartz and/or carbonate. In CCS settings, where dissolution and/or precipitation of carbonates may play an important role, the carbonate:clay ratio is expected to influence fault frictional behaviour. This is supported by the different behaviour of phyllosilicates, which generally show stable slip behaviour (aseismic), compared to carbonates, which have shown to become prone to unstable slip (potentially seismic) with increasing temperature. However, little is known about the mechanical and transport properties of carbonate/clay mixtures. We investigated the effect of the carbonate:clay ratio on fault friction, fault reactivation potential and slip stability, i.e. seismic vs. aseismic behaviour, as well as transmissivity evolution during and after fault reactivation. We used two types of starting material, derived from crushed Opalinus Claystone (Mont Terri, Switzerland): i) untreated samples consisting

  4. Hybrid Particle-Element Simulation of Impact on Composite Orbital Debris Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the development of new numerical methods and new constitutive models for the simulation of hypervelocity impact effects on spacecraft. The research has included parallel implementation of the numerical methods and material models developed under the project. Validation work has included both one dimensional simulations, for comparison with exact solutions, and three dimensional simulations of published hypervelocity impact experiments. The validated formulations have been applied to simulate impact effects in a velocity and kinetic energy regime outside the capabilities of current experimental methods. The research results presented here allow for the expanded use of numerical simulation, as a complement to experimental work, in future design of spacecraft for hypervelocity impact effects.

  5. Graphical simulation for aerospace manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babai, Majid; Bien, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    Simulation software has become a key technological enabler for integrating flexible manufacturing systems and streamlining the overall aerospace manufacturing process. In particular, robot simulation and offline programming software is being credited for reducing down time and labor cost, while boosting quality and significantly increasing productivity.

  6. Effects of structure and composition of the CaP composite coatings on apatite formation and bioactivity in simulated body fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Lin, Changjian; Hu, Ren

    2009-01-01

    The surface properties of biomaterials determine the interactions between biomedical devices and the surrounding biological environment. The surface modification of biomaterials is extensively recognized as a key strategy in the design of the next generation of bone implants and tissue engineering. In this study, the highly ordered octacalcium phosphate (OCP) coating and OCP/protein coating with hierarchically porous structure in nano-micro scale were constructed on titanium substrate by electrochemically-induced deposition (ED). The formation behavior of apatite on OCP and OCP/protein coatings immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) was investigated in physicochemical aspects. It is indicated that soaked in SBF, the OCP and OCP/protein coatings are possible to induce relevant apatite formation on their surface, and the apatite-forming behavior in body environment is depended on the chemical composition and structure of the coatings. The apatite formed on OCP/protein composite coating possesses carbonated structure, needle-like crystals in nano scale, lower Ca/P ratio and higher degree of the preferred c-axis orientation, which are similar to the mineral composition and structure in natural bone, and hence called as bone-like apatite.

  7. Multiscale simulation of polymer nano-composites (PNC) using molecular dynamics (MD) and generalized interpolation material point method (GIMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Abilash R.

    Recent mechanical characterization experiments with pultruded E-Glass / polypropylene (PP) and compression molded E-Glass/Nylon-6 composite samples with 3-4 weight% nanoclay and baseline polymer (polymer without nanoclay) confirmed significant improvements in compressive strength (˜122%) and shear strength (˜60%) in the nanoclay modified nanocomposites, in comparison with baseline properties. Uniaxial tensile tests showed a small increase in tensile strength (˜3.4%) with 3 wt % nanoclay loading. While the synergistic reinforcing influence of nanoparticle reinforcement is obvious, a simple rule-of-mixtures approach fails to quantify the dramatic increase in mechanical properties. Consequently, there is an immediate need to investigate and understand the mechanisms at the nanoscale that are responsible for such unprecedented strength enhancements. In this work, an innovative and effective method to model nano-structured components in a thermoplastic polymer matrix is proposed. Effort will be directed towards finding fundamental answers to the reasons for significant changes in mechanical properties of nanoparticle-reinforced thermoplastic composites. This research ensues a multiscale modeling approach in which (a) a concurrent simulations scheme is developed to visualize atomistic behavior of polymer molecules as a function of continuum scale loading conditions and (b) a novel nanoscale damage mechanics model is proposed to capture the constitutive behavior of polymer nano composites (PNC). The proposed research will contribute towards the understanding of advanced nanostructured composite materials, which should subsequently benefit the composites manufacturing industry.

  8. Simulation and fabrication of 0-3 composite PZT films for ultrahigh frequency (100-300 MHz) ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoyang; Fei, Chunlong; Chen, Zeyu; Chen, Ruimin; Yu, Ping; Chen, Zhongping; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents simulation, fabrication, and characterization of single-element ultrahigh frequency (100-300-MHz) needle ultrasonic transducers based on 0-3 composite Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 (PZT) films prepared by using composite ceramic sol-gel film and sol-infiltration technique. The center frequency of the developed transducer at 300-MHz was the highest frequency of PbTiO3 ceramic-based ultrasonic transducers ever reported. Furthermore, a brief description of the composite model was followed by the development of a new expression for predicting the longitudinal velocity, the clamped dielectric constant, and the complex electromechanical coupling coefficient kt of these films, which is very important in ultrasonic transducer design. Moreover, these parameters are difficult to obtain by measuring the frequency dependence of impedance and phase angle because of the weak signal of the previous 0-3 composite films transducer (>100 MHz). The modeling results show that the Cubes model with a geometric factor n = 0.05 fits well with the measured data. This model will be helpful for developing the 0-3 composite systems for ultrahigh frequency ultrasonic transducer design.

  9. Development of FRP composite structural biomaterials: ultimate strength of the fiber/matrix interfacial bond in in vivo simulated environments.

    PubMed

    Latour, R A; Black, J

    1992-05-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are being developed as alternatives to metals for structural orthopedic implant applications. FRP composite fracture behavior and environmental interactions are distinctly different from those which occur in metals. These differences must be accounted for in the design and evaluation of implant performance. Fiber/matrix interfacial bond strength in a FRP composite is known to strongly influence fracture behavior. The interfacial bond strength of four candidate fiber/matrix combinations (carbon fiber/polycarbonate, carbon fiber/polysulfone, polyaramid fiber/polycarbonate, polyaramid fiber/polysulfone) were investigated at 37 degrees C in dry and in vivo simulated (saline, exudate) environments. Ultimate bond strength was measured by a single fiber-microdroplet pull-out test. Dry bond strengths were significantly decreased following exposure to either saline or exudate with bond strength loss being approximately equal in both the saline and exudate. Bond strength loss is attributed to the diffusion of water and/or salt ions into the sample and their interaction with interfacial bonding. Because bond degradation is dependent upon diffusion, diffusional equilibrium must be obtained in composite test samples before the full effect of the test environment upon composite mechanical behavior can be determined. PMID:1512281

  10. Numerical simulation of two-dimensional heat transfer in composite bodies with application to de-icing of aircraft components. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, D. F. K.

    1983-01-01

    Transient, numerical simulations of the de-icing of composite aircraft components by electrothermal heating were performed for a two dimensional rectangular geometry. The implicit Crank-Nicolson formulation was used to insure stability of the finite-difference heat conduction equations and the phase change in the ice layer was simulated using the Enthalpy method. The Gauss-Seidel point iterative method was used to solve the system of difference equations. Numerical solutions illustrating de-icer performance for various composite aircraft structures and environmental conditions are presented. Comparisons are made with previous studies. The simulation can also be used to solve a variety of other heat conduction problems involving composite bodies.

  11. Design Of A SCRAMJET Nozzle With Streamline Tracing Technique And Reference Temerature Methode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riehmer, J.; Gulhan, A.

    2011-05-01

    This study presents a method to find an optimal shape of a three-dimensional supersonic nozzle for a rectangular scramjet combustion chamber with rounded edges by taking into account the skin friction effects. The geometric and flow constraints are defined within the German DFG GRK 1095/2 project and the designed nozzle will be part of a scramjet demonstrator configuration [1]. The nozzle inlet conditions are mean values of the combustion chamber exit conditions with the assumption of a constant specific heat ratio. To generate the shape of the nozzle a streamline tracing technique is applied to an axis-symmetric flow field calculated by the Method of Characteristics (MOC). Skin friction in relatively high pressure supersonic flow from the combustion chamber is very dominant and cannot be neglected in the design process. Therefore the skin friction is calculated using the Reference Temperature Method (RTM) and used for the determination of the thrust and moment vectors. This allows considering viscous effects without boundary layer calculations. With this approach an optimal truncated ideal nozzle contour which yields the geometric constraints can be derived. For the validation of this method comparative calculations have been carried out with the DLR code TAU on an exemplary axis-symmetric supersonic nozzle for different flow conditions. Results showed a good agreement. Finally for the three-dimensional nozzle the analytical solution for the inviscous and viscous case provided comparable data like TAU simulations. Further simplifications of the approach for an efficient three-dimensional nozzle design will be addressed in the paper.

  12. Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, M.; Nosewicz, S.; Pietrzak, K.; Rojek, J.; Strojny-Nędza, A.; Mackiewicz, S.; Dutkiewicz, J.

    2014-11-01

    It is commonly known that the properties of sintered materials are strongly related to technological conditions of the densification process. This paper shows the sintering behavior of a NiAl-Al2O3 composite, and its individual components sintered separately. Each kind of material was processed via the powder metallurgy route (hot pressing). The progress of sintering at different stages of the process was tested. Changes in the microstructure were examined using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Metal-ceramics interface was clean and no additional phases were detected. Correlation between the microstructure, density, and mechanical properties of the sintered materials was analyzed. The values of elastic constants of NiAl/Al2O3 were close to intermetallic ones due to the volume content of the NiAl phase particularly at low densities, where small alumina particles had no impact on the composite's stiffness. The influence of the external pressure of 30 MPa seemed crucial for obtaining satisfactory stiffness for three kinds of the studied materials which were characterized by a high dense microstructure with a low number of isolated spherical pores.

  13. Self streamlining wind tunnel: Further low speed testing and final design studies for the transonic facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, S. W. D.

    1977-01-01

    Work has continued with the low speed self streamlining wind tunnel (SSWT) using the NACA 0012-64 airfoil in an effort to explain the discrepancies between the NASA Langley low turbulence pressure tunnel (LTPT) and SSWT results obtained with the airfoil stalled. Conventional wind tunnel corrections were applied to straight wall SSWT airfoil data, to illustrate the inadequacy of standard correction techniques in circumstances of high blockage. Also one SSWT test was re-run at different air speeds to investigate the effects of such changes on airfoil data and wall contours. Mechanical design analyses for the transonic self streamlining wind tunnel (TSWT) were completed by the application of theoretical airfoil flow field data to the elastic beam and streamline analysis. The control system for the transonic facility is outlined.

  14. Self streamlining wind tunnel: Further low speed testing and final design studies for the transonic facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, S. W. D.

    1978-01-01

    Work was continued with the low speed self streamlining wind tunnel (SSWT) using the NACA 0012-64 airfoil in an effort to explain the discrepancies between the NASA Langley low turbulence pressure tunnel (LTPT) and SSWT results obtained with the airfoil stalled. Conventional wind tunnel corrections were applied to straight wall SSWT airfoil data, to illustrate the inadequacy of standard correction techniques in circumstances of high blockage. Also one SSWT test was re-run at different air speeds to investigate the effects of such changes (perhaps through changes in Reynold's number and freestream turbulence levels) on airfoil data and wall contours. Mechanical design analyses for the transonic self-streamlining wind tunnel (TSWT) were completed by the application of theoretical airfoil flow field data to the elastic beam and streamline analysis. The control system for the transonic facility, which will eventually allow on-line computer operation of the wind tunnel, was outlined.

  15. The atmospheric composition geostationary satellite constellation for air quality and climate science: Evaluating performance with Observation System Simulation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, D. P.; Barre, J.; Worden, H. M.; Arellano, A. F.; Gaubert, B.; Anderson, J. L.; Mizzi, A. P.; Lahoz, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    Current satellite observations of tropospheric composition made from low Earth orbit provide at best one or two measurements each day at any given location. Coverage is global but sparse, often with large uncertainties in individual measurements that limit examination of local and regional atmospheric composition over short time periods. This has hindered the operational uptake of these data for monitoring air quality and population exposure, and for initializing and evaluating chemical weather forecasts. By the end of the current decade there are planned geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) satellite missions for atmospheric composition over North America, East Asia and Europe with additional missions proposed. Together, these present the possibility of a constellation of GEO platforms to achieve continuous time-resolved high-density observations of continental domains for mapping pollutant sources and variability on diurnal and local scales. We describe Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) to evaluate the contributions of these GEO missions to improve knowledge of near-surface air pollution due to intercontinental long-range transport and quantify chemical precursor emissions. We discuss the requirements on measurement simulation, chemical transport modeling, and data assimilation for a successful OSSE infrastructure. Our approach uses an efficient computational method to sample a high-resolution global GEOS-5 chemistry Nature Run over each geographical region of the GEO constellation. The demonstration carbon monoxide (CO) observation simulator, which is being expanded to other chemical pollutants, currently produces multispectral retrievals and captures realistic scene-dependent variation in measurement vertical sensitivity and cloud cover. We use the DART Ensemble Adjustment Kalman Filter to assimilate the simulated observations in a CAM-Chem global chemistry-climate model Control Run. The impact of observing over each region is evaluated using data

  16. Computational Simulation of Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.; Mital, Subodh K.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes a methodology which predicts the behavior of ceramic matrix composites and has been incorporated in the computational tool CEMCAN (CEramic Matrix Composite ANalyzer). The approach combines micromechanics with a unique fiber substructuring concept. In this new concept, the conventional unit cell (the smallest representative volume element of the composite) of the micromechanics approach is modified by substructuring it into several slices and developing the micromechanics-based equations at the slice level. The methodology also takes into account nonlinear ceramic matrix composite (CMC) behavior due to temperature and the fracture initiation and progression. Important features of the approach and its effectiveness are described by using selected examples. Comparisons of predictions and limited experimental data are also provided.

  17. Computational Simulation of the High Strain Rate Tensile Response of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.

    2002-01-01

    A research program is underway to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to high strain rate impact loads. Under these types of loading conditions, the material response can be highly strain rate dependent and nonlinear. State variable constitutive equations based on a viscoplasticity approach have been developed to model the deformation of the polymer matrix. The constitutive equations are then combined with a mechanics of materials based micromechanics model which utilizes fiber substructuring to predict the effective mechanical and thermal response of the composite. To verify the analytical model, tensile stress-strain curves are predicted for a representative composite over strain rates ranging from around 1 x 10(exp -5)/sec to approximately 400/sec. The analytical predictions compare favorably to experimentally obtained values both qualitatively and quantitatively. Effective elastic and thermal constants are predicted for another composite, and compared to finite element results.

  18. A bone composition model for Monte Carlo x-ray transport simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Hu; Keall, Paul J.; Graves, Edward E.

    2009-03-15

    In the megavoltage energy range although the mass attenuation coefficients of different bones do not vary by more than 10%, it has been estimated that a simple tissue model containing a single-bone composition could cause errors of up to 10% in the calculated dose distribution. In the kilovoltage energy range, the variation in mass attenuation coefficients of the bones is several times greater, and the expected error from applying this type of model could be as high as several hundred percent. Based on the observation that the calcium and phosphorus compositions of bones are strongly correlated with the bone density, the authors propose an analytical formulation of bone composition for Monte Carlo computations. Elemental compositions and densities of homogeneous adult human bones from the literature were used as references, from which the calcium and phosphorus compositions were fitted as polynomial functions of bone density and assigned to model bones together with the averaged compositions of other elements. To test this model using the Monte Carlo package DOSXYZnrc, a series of discrete model bones was generated from this formula and the radiation-tissue interaction cross-section data were calculated. The total energy released per unit mass of primary photons (terma) and Monte Carlo calculations performed using this model and the single-bone model were compared, which demonstrated that at kilovoltage energies the discrepancy could be more than 100% in bony dose and 30% in soft tissue dose. Percentage terma computed with the model agrees with that calculated on the published compositions to within 2.2% for kV spectra and 1.5% for MV spectra studied. This new bone model for Monte Carlo dose calculation may be of particular importance for dosimetry of kilovoltage radiation beams as well as for dosimetry of pediatric or animal subjects whose bone composition may differ substantially from that of adult human bones.

  19. Integration of streamlines from measured static pressure fields on a surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmers, H.

    1982-10-01

    Streamlines, which offer an intuitive illustration of three-dimensional boundary layer flow and its regions of mutual dependence, are obtained through the integration of numerically measured pressure fields by means of a shooting technique. The method is applied to static pressure data obtained by Meier and Kreplin (1978) for an axisymmetric ellipsoid. For the pressure field of the potential solution, the trajectories showed the expected asymptotic behavior, and it is shown that for a 30 deg inclination and 45 m/sec freestream velocity, the streamlines have a regular pattern.

  20. Local Simulations of Instabilities Driven by Composition Gradients in the ICM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlok, Thomas; Pessah, Martin E.

    2016-06-01

    The distribution of helium in the intracluster medium (ICM) permeating galaxy clusters is not well constrained due to the very high plasma temperature. Therefore, the plasma is often assumed to be homogeneous. A nonuniform helium distribution can, however, lead to biases when measuring key cluster parameters. This has motivated one-dimensional models that evolve the ICM composition assuming that the effects of magnetic fields can be parameterized or ignored. Such models for nonisothermal clusters show that helium can sediment in the cluster core, leading to a peak in concentration offset from the cluster center. The resulting profiles have recently been shown to be linearly unstable when the weakly collisional character of the magnetized plasma is considered. In this paper, we present a modified version of the MHD code Athena, which makes it possible to evolve a weakly collisional plasma subject to a gravitational field and stratified in both temperature and composition. We thoroughly test our implementation and confirm excellent agreement against several analytical results. In order to isolate the effects of composition, in this initial study we focus our attention on isothermal plasmas. We show that plasma instabilities, feeding off gradients in composition, can induce turbulent mixing and saturate by rearranging magnetic field lines and alleviating the composition gradient. Composition profiles that increase with radius lead to instabilities that saturate by driving the average magnetic field inclination to roughly 45°. We speculate that this effect may alleviate the core insulation observed in homogeneous settings, with potential consequences for the associated cooling flow problem.

  1. Ground-based simulation of the Earth's upper atmosphere oxygen impact on polymer composites with nanosized fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Lev; Chernik, Vladimir; Voronina, Ekaterina; Chechenin, Nikolay; Samokhina, Maria S.; Bondarenko, Gennady G.; Gaidar, Anna I.; Vorobyeva, Ekaterina A.; Petrov, Dmitrii V.; Chirskaya, Natalia P.

    The improvement of durability of polymer composites to the space environment impact is a very important task because these materials are considered currently as very promising type of materials for aerospace engineering. By embedding various nanosized fillers into a polymer matrix it is possible to obtain composites with required mechanical, thermal, electrical and optic properties. However, while developing such materials for operation in low Earth orbits (LEO), it is necessary to study thoroughly their durability to the impact of atomic oxygen (AO) of the Earth’s upper atmosphere, because AO is the main factor that causes erosion and damage of spacecraft surface materials in LEO. Ground-based simulation of AO impact on polymer composites was performed on a magnetoplasmadynamic accelerator developed at Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University. Polymer composite samples which were prepared as films of 30-50 mum thickness with different amount (3-20 wt%) of various inorganic and organic nanofillers including nanoparticles of metal oxides and carbides as well as polyethoxysiloxanes and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), were exposed to hyperthermal AO flow, and mass losses of samples were estimated. Changes in the structure of composite surface and in material optical properties were studied. The experiments demonstrated that embedding nanosized fillers into a polymer matrix can significantly reduced mass losses, and the good dispersion of fillers improves AO durability in comparison with initial polymers [1]. The computer simulation within the developed 2D Monte-Carlo model demonstrated a good agreement with the experimental data [2]. Special attention was given to the study of AO impact on aligned multiwalled CNTs and CNT-based composites [3]. Some results of computer simulation of hyperthermal oxygen atom interaction with CNT and graphene as well as with polymers are presented to discuss elementary processes which occur in nanostructures

  2. The Prediction and Simulation for the Mechanical Properties of Ceramic-Based Composites Reinforced with Nano-Micro Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Dongmei; Hu Jinshan; Yang Hong; Zhou Yinglong

    2010-05-21

    The global-local homogenization method with precise period boundary conditions is applied to predict and simulate the mechanical properties of ceramic composites reinforced by spherical nano-micro particles with enwrapping and nesting arrays. The numerical simulation is performed with different size ratios of nano-micro particles, and different configurations for representative volume element. The results show that the low radius ratios of nano-micro particles produce a larger effective Young's modulus for its more uniform dispersion, and the hexagon RVE with nesting array can make an overestimation for effective elastic modulus of ceramic composites, and the interfacial damage between nano-microscopic particles and matrix degenerates the effective elastic modulus. It shows in this paper that it is significant to improve the mechanical properties of ceramic materials by mixing some nano- and micro-particles into the matrix with good designed array methods from the viewpoints of nano-microscopic crystal structure, and a rational interfacial damage model should be further proposed to investigate the toughening mechanism of ceramic-composites reinforced with nano-micro particles.

  3. Simulating the Response of a Composite Honeycomb Energy Absorber. Part 1; Dynamic Crushing of Components and Multi-Terrain Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Polanco, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental and analytical evaluation of an externally deployable composite honeycomb structure that is designed to attenuate impact energy during helicopter crashes. The concept, designated the Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA), utilizes an expandable Kevlar (Registered Trademark) honeycomb to dissipate kinetic energy through crushing. The DEA incorporates a unique flexible hinge design that allows the honeycomb to be packaged and stowed until needed for deployment. Experimental evaluation of the DEA included dynamic crush tests of multi-cell components and vertical drop tests of a composite fuselage section, retrofitted with DEA blocks, onto multi-terrain. Finite element models of the test articles were developed and simulations were performed using the transient dynamic code, LSDYNA (Registered Trademark). In each simulation, the DEA was represented using shell elements assigned two different material properties: Mat 24, an isotropic piecewise linear plasticity model, and Mat 58, a continuum damage mechanics model used to represent laminated composite fabrics. DEA model development and test-analysis comparisons are presented.

  4. Two Simulated-Smog Atmospheres with Different Chemical Compositions Produce Contrasting Mutagenicity in Salmonella.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone (O3), particulate matter (PM), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) are criteria pollutants used to evaluate air quality. Using a 14.3-m3 Teflon-lined smog chamber with 120 UV bulbs to simulate solar radiation, we generated 2 simulated-smog atmospheres (SSA-1 & SSA-2) with differ...

  5. Investigation of L10 FePt-based soft/hard composite bit-patterned media by micromagnetic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Wei, Dan; Cao, Jiang-Wei; Wei, Fu-Lin

    2015-06-01

    The soft/hard composite patterned media have potential to be the next generation of magnetic recording, but the composing modes of soft and hard materials have not been investigated systematically. L10 FePt-based soft/hard composite patterned media with an anisotropic constant distribution are studied by micromagnetic simulation. Square arrays and hexagonal arrays with various pitch sizes are simulated for two composing types: the soft layer that encloses the hard dots and the soft layer that covers the whole surface. It is found that the soft material can reduce the switching fields of bits effectively for all models. Compared with the first type, the second type of models possess low switching fields, narrow switching field distributions, and high gain factors due to the introduction of inter-bit exchange coupling. Furthermore, the readout waveforms of the second type are not deteriorated by the inter-bit soft layers. Since the recording density of hexagonal arrays are higher than that of square arrays with the same center-to-center distances, the readout waveforms of hexagonal arrays are a little worse, although other simulation results are similar for these two arrays. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51171086 and 61272076) and the Young Scientists Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61003041).

  6. Fracture Resistance of Simulated Immature Teeth Obturated with Gutta-Percha or Resilon and Reinforced by Composite or Post

    PubMed Central

    Bolhari, Behnam; Mojazi Amiri, Elham; Kermanshah, Hamidreza; Ghabraei, Sholeh; Jamei, Azad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this ex- vivo study was to evaluate the fracture resistance of simulated immature teeth, obturated with Gutta-percha or Resilon and reinforced by either composite resin or fiber post. Materials and Methods: Eighty-four human maxillary incisors were divided into seven groups (n=12). Teeth in all groups were prepared until Peeso #5 (1.5mm) could be passed through the apex. Root ends received 4mm of MTA plug as an apical barrier. Groups received the followings: 1.Gutta-percha, 2.Resilon, 3.Gutta-percha + composite resin, 4.Resilon + composite resin, 5.Gutta-percha + fiber post, 6.Resilon + fiber post and 7.No obturation (control group). Access openings were filled with composite resin. Specimens were then subjected to oblique load using Instron Testing Machine. The mean peak load at fracture was recorded and analyzed using ANOVA. Results: Experimental groups had a significantly more fracture resistance than the control group (P< 0.05). No significant difference was seen between experimental groups. Teeth reinforced by fiber post showed favorable fracture resistance. Conclusion: Treatment plans used in this study increase the fracture resistance of immature teeth. Use of fiber posts in immature teeth, may be the most favorable clinically applicable technique. PMID:26056522

  7. Flexible composition and execution of high performance, high fidelity multiscale biomedical simulations

    PubMed Central

    Groen, D.; Borgdorff, J.; Bona-Casas, C.; Hetherington, J.; Nash, R. W.; Zasada, S. J.; Saverchenko, I.; Mamonski, M.; Kurowski, K.; Bernabeu, M. O.; Hoekstra, A. G.; Coveney, P. V.

    2013-01-01

    Multiscale simulations are essential in the biomedical domain to accurately model human physiology. We present a modular approach for designing, constructing and executing multiscale simulations on a wide range of resources, from laptops to petascale supercomputers, including combinations of these. Our work features two multiscale applications, in-stent restenosis and cerebrovascular bloodflow, which combine multiple existing single-scale applications to create a multiscale simulation. These applications can be efficiently coupled, deployed and executed on computers up to the largest (peta) scale, incurring a coupling overhead of 1–10% of the total execution time. PMID:24427530

  8. Review of strongly-coupled composite dark matter models and lattice simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kribs, Graham D.; Neil, Ethan T.

    2016-08-01

    We review models of new physics in which dark matter arises as a composite bound state from a confining strongly-coupled non-Abelian gauge theory. We discuss several qualitatively distinct classes of composite candidates, including dark mesons, dark baryons, and dark glueballs. We highlight some of the promising strategies for direct detection, especially through dark moments, using the symmetries and properties of the composite description to identify the operators that dominate the interactions of dark matter with matter, as well as dark matter self-interactions. We briefly discuss the implications of these theories at colliders, especially the (potentially novel) phenomenology of dark mesons in various regimes of the models. Throughout the review, we highlight the use of lattice calculations in the study of these strongly-coupled theories, to obtain precise quantitative predictions and new insights into the dynamics.

  9. Numerical simulation and experimental validation of the large deformation bending and folding behavior of magneto-active elastomer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, Robert; Roche, Juan; Lofland, Samuel E.; vonLockette, Paris R.

    2014-09-01

    This work seeks to provide a framework for the numerical simulation of magneto-active elastomer (MAE) composite structures for use in origami engineering applications. The emerging field of origami engineering employs folding techniques, an array of crease patterns traditionally on a single flat sheet of paper, to produce structures and devices that perform useful engineering operations. Effective means of numerical simulation offer an efficient way to optimize the crease patterns while coupling to the performance and behavior of the active material. The MAE materials used herein are comprised of nominally 30% v/v, 325 mesh barium hexafarrite particles embedded in Dow HS II silicone elastomer compound. These particulate composites are cured in a magnetic field to produce magneto-elastic solids with anisotropic magnetization, e.g. they have a preferred magnetic axis parallel to the curing axis. The deformed shape and/or blocked force characteristics of these MAEs are examined in three geometries: a monolithic cantilever as well as two- and four-segment composite accordion structures. In the accordion structures, patches of MAE material are bonded to a Gelest OE41 unfilled silicone elastomer substrate. Two methods of simulation, one using the Maxwell stress tensor applied as a traction boundary condition and another employing a minimum energy kinematic (MEK) model, are investigated. Both methods capture actuation due to magnetic torque mechanisms that dominate MAE behavior. Comparison with experimental data show good agreement with only a single adjustable parameter, either an effective constant magnetization of the MAE material in the finite element models (at small and moderate deformations) or an effective modulus in the minimum energy model. The four-segment finite element model was prone to numerical locking at large deformation. The effective magnetization and modulus values required are a fraction of the actual experimentally measured values which suggests a

  10. Numerical simulating and experimental study on the woven carbon fiber-reinforced composite laminates under low-velocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hanyang; Tang, Zhanwen; Pan, Lingying; Zhao, Weidong; Sun, Baogang; Jiang, Wenge

    2016-05-01

    Impact damage has been identified as a critical form of the defects that constantly threatened the reliability of composite structures, such as those used in the aerospace structures and systems. Low energy impacts can introduce barely visible damage and cause the degradation of structural stiffness, furthermore, the flaws caused by low-velocity impact are so dangerous that they can give rise to the further extended delaminations. In order to improve the reliability and load carrying capacity of composite laminates under low-velocity impact, in this paper, the numerical simulatings and experimental studies on the woven fiber-reinforced composite laminates under low-velocity impact with impact energy 16.7J were discussed. The low velocity impact experiment was carried out through drop-weight system as the reason of inertia effect. A numerical progressive damage model was provided, in which the damages of fiber, matrix and interlamina were considered by VUMT subroutine in ABAQUS, to determine the damage modes. The Hashin failure criteria were improved to cover the failure modes of fiber failure in the directions of warp/weft and delaminations. The results of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) were compared with the experimental results of nondestructive examination including the results of ultrasonic C-scan, cross-section stereomicroscope and contact force - time history curves. It is found that the response of laminates under low-velocity impact could be divided into stages with different damage. Before the max-deformation of the laminates occurring, the matrix cracking, fiber breakage and delaminations were simulated during the impactor dropping. During the releasing and rebounding period, matrix cracking and delaminations areas kept increasing in the laminates because of the stress releasing of laminates. Finally, the simulating results showed the good agreements with the results of experiment.

  11. Isotopic composition of Murchison organic compounds: Intramolecular carbon isotope fractionation of acetic acid. Simulation studies of cosmochemical organic syntheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, G. U.; Cronin, J. R.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Chang, S.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, in our laboratories, samples of Murchison acetic acid were decarboxylated successfully and the carbon isotopic composition was measured for the methane released by this procedure. These analyses showed significant differences in C-13/C-12 ratios for the methyl and carboxyl carbons of the acetic acid molecule, strongly suggesting that more than one carbon source may be involved in the synthesis of the Murchison organic compounds. On the basis of this finding, laboratory model systems simulating cosmochemical synthesis are being studied, especially those processes capable of involving two or more starting carbon sources.

  12. Multiparametric topological analysis (MTA) for the study of the primary CR composition: Performances with Auger simulated data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Urso, D.; Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C.; Guarino, F.; Valore, L.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2008-04-01

    We describe the application of a multiparametric analysis to estimate the UHE Cosmic Rays composition. The proposed method, MTA (Multiparametric Topological Analysis), is based on the study of the correlations among different shower observables. This technique is designed to fully exploit the complementarity of Auger fluorescence and ground array data. In the present work, we report the results of the application to Conex showers, fully simulated through the Auger detector, using only parameters describing the longitudinal development of air showers as recorded by fluorescence detector for hybrid data.

  13. Visual unified modeling language for the composition of scenarios in modeling and simulation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbert, Michael L.; Swayne, Daniel E.

    2006-05-01

    The Department of Defense uses modeling and simulation systems in many various roles, from research and training to modeling likely outcomes of command decisions. Simulation systems have been increasing in complexity with the increased capability of low-cost computer systems to support these DOD requirements. The demand for scenarios is also increasing, but the complexity of the simulation systems has caused a bottleneck in scenario development due to the limited number of individuals with knowledge of the arcane simulator languages in which these scenarios are written. This research combines the results of previous efforts from the Air Force Institute of Technology in visual modeling languages to create a language that unifies description of entities within a scenario with its behavior using a visual tool that was developed in the course of this research. The resulting language has a grammar and syntax that can be parsed from the visual representation of the scenario. The language is designed so that scenarios can be described in a generic manner, not tied to a specific simulation system, allowing the future development of modules to translate the generic scenario into simulation system specific scenarios.

  14. STABLE PLUME DISPERSION OVER AN ISOLATED HILL: RELEASES ABOVE THE DIVIDING-STREAMLINE HEIGHT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were conducted in a stably stratified towing tank wherein the density gradient was linear and the dividing-streamline height H(D) was half the hill height. Effluent was released at three elevations above H(D). Pairs of tows were made such that, in one tow, the hill (u...

  15. 75 FR 50750 - Streamlined Procedure for Appeal Brief Review in Inter Partes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-17

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office Streamlined Procedure for Appeal Brief Review in Inter Partes... appeal briefs filed in inter partes reexamination proceeding appeals to increase the efficiency of the... determining whether appeal briefs filed in inter partes reexamination proceedings (i.e., appellant's...

  16. 64 FR 62566 - Streamlining of Regulations for Real Estate and Chattel Appraisals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1999-11-17

    ... 0560-AF69 Streamlining of Regulations for Real Estate and Chattel Appraisals AGENCIES: Rural Housing... procedures from the Agency's regulations governing real estate and chattel appraisals used in conjunction with the Farm Loan Programs, and clarifies the requirement that Agency real estate appraisals...

  17. 77 FR 68790 - Program Comment Issued for Streamlining Section 106 Review for Actions Affecting Post-1945...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    .../archive/NotesDocs/25-25%2815%29_FR.pdf ). (A) Reinforced concrete slab bridges (i) Reinforced concrete... Concrete and Steel Bridges AGENCY: Advisory Council on Historic Preservation. ACTION: Program Comment issued for streamlining Section 106 review for undertakings affecting post-1945 concrete and...

  18. 24 CFR 903.12 - What are the streamlined Annual Plan requirements for small PHAs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Annual Plan requirements for fiscal years in which its 5-Year Plan is also due. For the fiscal year in which its 5-Year Plan is also due, the streamlined Annual Plan of the small PHA shall consist of the... Plan requirements for small PHAs? 903.12 Section 903.12 Housing and Urban Development...

  19. 24 CFR 903.12 - What are the streamlined Annual Plan requirements for small PHAs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Annual Plan requirements for fiscal years in which its 5-Year Plan is also due. For the fiscal year in which its 5-Year Plan is also due, the streamlined Annual Plan of the small PHA shall consist of the... Plan requirements for small PHAs? 903.12 Section 903.12 Housing and Urban Development...

  20. 24 CFR 903.12 - What are the streamlined Annual Plan requirements for small PHAs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Annual Plan requirements for fiscal years in which its 5-Year Plan is also due. For the fiscal year in which its 5-Year Plan is also due, the streamlined Annual Plan of the small PHA shall consist of the... Plan requirements for small PHAs? 903.12 Section 903.12 Housing and Urban Development...

  1. 24 CFR 903.12 - What are the streamlined Annual Plan requirements for small PHAs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Annual Plan requirements for fiscal years in which its 5-Year Plan is also due. For the fiscal year in which its 5-Year Plan is also due, the streamlined Annual Plan of the small PHA shall consist of the... Plan requirements for small PHAs? 903.12 Section 903.12 Housing and Urban Development...

  2. Implementing an Enterprise Information System to Reengineer and Streamline Administrative Processes in a Distance Learning Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdous, M'hammed; He, Wu

    2009-01-01

    During the past three years, we have developed and implemented an enterprise information system (EIS) to reengineer and facilitate the administrative process for preparing and teaching distance learning courses in a midsized-to-large university (with 23,000 students). The outcome of the implementation has been a streamlined and efficient process…

  3. Streamlining the Online Course Development Process by Using Project Management Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdous, M'hammed; He, Wu

    2008-01-01

    Managing the design and production of online courses is challenging. Insufficient instructional design and inefficient management often lead to issues such as poor course quality and course delivery delays. In an effort to facilitate, streamline, and improve the overall design and production of online courses, this article discusses how we…

  4. The effects of streamline curvature and swirl on turbulent flows in curved ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Chih-Hsiung; Farokhi, Saeed

    1990-01-01

    A technique for improving the numerical predictions of turbulent flows with the effect of streamline curvature is developed. Separated flows, the flow in a curved duct, and swirling flows are examples of flow fields where streamline curvature plays a dominant role. A comprehensive literature review on the effect of streamline curvature was conducted. New algebraic formulations for the eddy viscosity incorporating the kappa-epsilon turbulence model are proposed to account for various effects of streamline curvature. The loci of flow reversal of the separated flows over various backward-facing steps are employed to test the capability of the proposed turbulence model in capturing the effect of local curvature. The inclusion of the effect of longitudinal curvature in the proposed turbulence model is validated by predicting the distributions of the static pressure coefficients in an S-bend duct and in 180 degree turn-around ducts. The proposed turbulence model embedded with transverse curvature modification is substantiated by predicting the decay of the axial velocities in the confined swirling flows. The numerical predictions of different curvature effects by the proposed turbulence models are also reported.

  5. Zephyr: A secure Internet-based process to streamline engineering procurements using the World Wide Web

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, C.W.; Cavitt, R.E.; Niven, W.A.; Warren, F.E.; Taylor, S.S.; Sharick, T.M.; Vickers, D.L.; Mitschkowetz, N.; Weaver, R.L.

    1996-08-13

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is piloting an Internet- based paperless process called `Zephyr` to streamline engineering procurements. Major benefits have accrued by using Zephyr in reducing procurement time, speeding the engineering development cycle, facilitating industrial collaboration, and reducing overall costs. Programs at LLNL are benefiting by the efficiencies introduced since implementing Zephyr`s engineering and commerce on the Internet.

  6. Modification of axial compressor streamline program for analysis of engine test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    An existing axial compressor streamline analysis computer program to allow input of measured radial pressure and temperature profiles obtained from engine or cascade data is described. The proposed modifications increase the input flexibility and are accomplished without changing the computer program's input format.

  7. 77 FR 50691 - Request for Information (RFI): Guidance on Data Streamlining and Reducing Undue Reporting Burden...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... Burden for HHS-Funded HIV Prevention, Treatment, and Care Services Grantees AGENCY: Office of the... among HHS grantees funded to provide HIV prevention, treatment, and care services. DATES: To be assured..., Room 443-H, 200 Independence Ave. SW., Washington, DC 20201. Attention: HIV Data Streamlining....

  8. A computer program to calculate radiating viscous stagnation streamline flow with strong blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. L.; Garrett, L. B.

    1973-01-01

    A computer program (program LEE) has been developed to calculate the fully coupled solution of the radiating viscous stagnation streamline flow with strong blowing. The report describes the digital computer program, including FORTRAN IV listing, flow charts, instructions for the user, and a test case with input and output. Program LEE is available through COSMIC.

  9. 76 FR 79112 - Policies To Promote Rural Radio Service and To Streamline Allotment and Assignment Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... and retention of radio service in and to smaller communities and rural areas. DATES: Oppositions to... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Policies To Promote Rural Radio Service and To Streamline Allotment and Assignment... for evaluating mutually exclusive proposals for radio service, as well as for applications to change...

  10. 48 CFR 13.005 - Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act of 1994 list of inapplicable laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act of 1994 list of inapplicable laws. 13.005 Section 13.005 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES SIMPLIFIED ACQUISITION PROCEDURES 13.005 Federal Acquisition...

  11. STREAMLINING LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT (SYSTEMS ANALYSIS BRANCH, SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    After having completed work on investigating streamlining the life cycle inventory phase of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), research efforts focused on the impact phase of LCA in the third and final year of this cooperative agreement. A simplified life cycle impact assessment model,...

  12. EBSCO's Usage Consolidation Attempts to Streamline Gathering, Storage, and Reporting of Usage Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remy, Charlie

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of EBSCO's new Usage Consolidation product designed to streamline the harvesting, storage, and analysis of usage statistics from electronic resources. Strengths and weaknesses of the product are discussed as well as an early beta partner's experience. In the current atmosphere of flat or declining budgets, libraries…

  13. Effects of complex terrain on atmospheric flow: dividing streamline observations and quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael; Fernando, Harindra; di Sabatino, Silvana; Leo, Laura; University of Notre Dame Team

    2013-11-01

    As part of the MATERHORN field campaign on atmospheric flow in mountainous terrain, the dividing streamline concept for stratified flow over obstacles was investigated using smoke flow visualization and meteorological measurements. At small Froude numbers (Fr < 1), a stratified flow approaching a mountain either possesses enough kinetic energy to pass over the summit or else flow around the sides, with dividing streamlines separating the two scenarios. An isolated northwestern peak of the Granite Mountain, approximately 60 m in height, was used for the study. Incoming flow velocities and temperature profiles were measured upstream using sonic anemometers and thermocouples mounted on a 32 m tower, while onsite measurements were taken with portable weather stations. Sufficiently strong stratification was developed around 3:00AM GMT, with Froude numbers in the range for dividing streamlines to exist. In the first trial, suitably placed red smoke releases were used and in another trial white smoke was released from a 25 m crane. In both cases well-defined dividing streamlines were observed and its vertical location was at a height about half of the mountain height, which is consistent with theoretical results based on Shepard's formula. This research was supported by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) grant number N00014-11-1-0709.

  14. Expected Benefits of Streamlining Undergraduate Medical Education by Early Commitment to Specific Medical Specialties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benbassat, Jochanan; Baumal, Reuben

    2012-01-01

    Undergraduate medical education is too long; it does not meet the needs for physicians' workforce; and its content is inconsistent with the job characteristics of some of its graduates. In this paper we attempt to respond to these problems by streamlining medical education along the following three reforms. First, high school graduates would be…

  15. Impact Testing and Simulation of a Crashworthy Composite Fuselage Section with Energy-Absorbing Seats and Dummies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.

    2002-01-01

    A 25-ft/s vertical drop test of a composite fuselage section was conducted with two energy-absorbing seats occupied by anthropomorphic dummies to evaluate the crashworthy features of the fuselage section and to determine its interaction with the seats and dummies. The 5-ft diameter fuselage section consists of a stiff structural floor and an energy-absorbing subfloor constructed of Rohacel foam blocks. The experimental data from this test were analyzed and correlated with predictions from a crash simulation developed using the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic computer code, MSC.Dytran. The anthropomorphic dummies were simulated using the Articulated Total Body (ATB) code, which is integrated into MSC.Dytran.

  16. Impact Testing and Simulation of a Crashworthy Composite Fuselage Section with Energy-Absorbing Seats and Dummies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.

    2002-01-01

    A 25-ft/s vertical drop test of a composite fuselage section was conducted with two energy-absorbing seats occupied by anthropomorphic dummies to evaluate the crashworthy features of the fuselage section and to determine its interaction with the seats and dummies. The 5-ft. diameter fuselage section consists of a stiff structural floor and an energy-absorbing subfloor constructed of Rohacel foam blocks. The experimental data from this test were analyzed and correlated with predictions from a crash simulation developed using the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic computer code, MSC.Dytran. The anthropomorphic dummies were simulated using the Articulated Total Body (ATB) code, which is integrated into MSC.Dytran.

  17. Numerical simulation of the middle atmosphere chemical composition and temperature under changing solar conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zadorozhny, A. M.; Dyominov, I. G.; Tuchkov, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    There are given results of the numerical experiments on modelling the influence of solar activity on chemical composition and temperature of the middle atmosphere. The consideration is made for peculiarities of solar activity impact under different values of antropogenic pollution of the atmosphere with chlorofluorocarbons and other stuff.

  18. Simulated and Experimental Damping Properties of a SMA/Fiber Glass Laminated Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaboldi, S.; Bassani, P.; Biffi, C. A.; Tuissi, A.; Carnevale, M.; Lecis, N.; Loconte, A.; Previtali, B.

    2011-07-01

    In this article, an advanced laminated composite is developed, combining the high damping properties of shape memory alloy (SMA) with mechanical properties and light weight of a glass-fiber reinforced polymer. The composite is formed by stacking a glass-fiber reinforced epoxy core between two thin patterned strips of SMA alloy, and two further layers of fiber-glass reinforced epoxy. The bars of the laminated composite were assembled and cured in autoclave. The patterning was designed to enhance the interface adhesion between matrix and SMA inserts and optimally exploit the damping capacity of the SMA thin ribbons. The patterned ribbons of the SMA alloy were cut by means of a pulsed fiber laser source. Damping properties at different amplitudes on full scale samples were investigated at room temperature with a universal testing machine through dynamic tension tests, while temperature dependence was investigated by dynamic mechanical analyses (DMA) on smaller samples. Experimental results were used in conjunction with FEM analysis to optimize the geometry of the inserts. Experimental decay tests on the laminated composite have been carried out to identify the adimensional damping value related to their first flexural mode.

  19. Large-scale computational simulation for optimal design of curved piezoelectric actuator using composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Soon Wan; Hwang, In Seong; Kim, Seung Jo

    2004-07-01

    In this paper, the electromechanical displacements of curved piezoelectric actuators with laminated composite material are calculated using high performance computing technology, and the optimal configuration of composite curved actuator is proposed. To predict the pre-stress in the device due to the mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion, carbon-epoxy and glass-epoxy as well as PZT ceramic are numerically modeled by using hexahedral solid elements. Because the modeling of these thin layers causes the numbers of degree of freedom to increase, large-scale structural analyses are performed through the PEGASUS supercomputer which is composed of 400 Intel Xeon CPUs. In the first stage, the curved shape of the actuator and the internal stress in each layer are obtained by the cured curvature analysis. Subsequently, the displacement due to the piezoelectric force by an applied voltage is also calculated and the performance of composite curved actuator is investigated by comparing the displacements according to the configuration of the actuator. To consider the finite deformation in the first stage and include the pre-stress in each layer in the second analysis stage, nonlinear finite element analyses will be carried out. The thickness and the elastic constants of laminated composite are chosen as design factors.

  20. Shrinkage of Dental Composite in Simulated Cavity Measured with Digital Image Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianying; Thakur, Preetanjali; Fok, Alex S. L.

    2014-01-01

    Polymerization shrinkage of dental resin composites can lead to restoration debonding or cracked tooth tissues in composite-restored teeth. In order to understand where and how shrinkage strain and stress develop in such restored teeth, Digital Image Correlation (DIC) was used to provide a comprehensive view of the displacement and strain distributions within model restorations that had undergone polymerization shrinkage. Specimens with model cavities were made of cylindrical glass rods with both diameter and length being 10 mm. The dimensions of the mesial-occlusal-distal (MOD) cavity prepared in each specimen measured 3 mm and 2 mm in width and depth, respectively. After filling the cavity with resin composite, the surface under observation was sprayed with first a thin layer of white paint and then fine black charcoal powder to create high-contrast speckles. Pictures of that surface were then taken before curing and 5 min after. Finally, the two pictures were correlated using DIC software to calculate the displacement and strain distributions. The resin composite shrunk vertically towards the bottom of the cavity, with the top center portion of the restoration having the largest downward displacement. At the same time, it shrunk horizontally towards its vertical midline. Shrinkage of the composite stretched the material in the vicinity of the “tooth-restoration” interface, resulting in cuspal deflections and high tensile strains around the restoration. Material close to the cavity walls or floor had direct strains mostly in the directions perpendicular to the interfaces. Summation of the two direct strain components showed a relatively uniform distribution around the restoration and its magnitude equaled approximately to the volumetric shrinkage strain of the material. PMID:25079865

  1. Shrinkage of dental composite in simulated cavity measured with digital image correlation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianying; Thakur, Preetanjali; Fok, Alex S L

    2014-01-01

    Polymerization shrinkage of dental resin composites can lead to restoration debonding or cracked tooth tissues in composite-restored teeth. In order to understand where and how shrinkage strain and stress develop in such restored teeth, Digital Image Correlation (DIC) was used to provide a comprehensive view of the displacement and strain distributions within model restorations that had undergone polymerization shrinkage. Specimens with model cavities were made of cylindrical glass rods with both diameter and length being 10 mm. The dimensions of the mesial-occlusal-distal (MOD) cavity prepared in each specimen measured 3 mm and 2 mm in width and depth, respectively. After filling the cavity with resin composite, the surface under observation was sprayed with first a thin layer of white paint and then fine black charcoal powder to create high-contrast speckles. Pictures of that surface were then taken before curing and 5 min after. Finally, the two pictures were correlated using DIC software to calculate the displacement and strain distributions. The resin composite shrunk vertically towards the bottom of the cavity, with the top center portion of the restoration having the largest downward displacement. At the same time, it shrunk horizontally towards its vertical midline. Shrinkage of the composite stretched the material in the vicinity of the "tooth-restoration" interface, resulting in cuspal deflections and high tensile strains around the restoration. Material close to the cavity walls or floor had direct strains mostly in the directions perpendicular to the interfaces. Summation of the two direct strain components showed a relatively uniform distribution around the restoration and its magnitude equaled approximately to the volumetric shrinkage strain of the material. PMID:25079865

  2. Corrosion of SiC and oxide-composite ceramics by a simulated steam-reformer atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Federer, J.I.; Kim, H.E.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1991-09-01

    To achieve higher process efficiency by using pressurized reactants and/or heat transfer fluids, the US DOE is promoting development of high-pressure heat exchanger systems under cost-sharing agreements with industrial contractors. The steam reformer would contain more than 600 tubes. Because the combination of high temperature and pressure differential of 12.7 kg/cm{sup 2} (180 psig) across the tube wall is too severe for metallic tubes, ceramic materials are being considered for reformer tubes. Their use is expected to increase the efficiency of steam reformers by about 19%. At ORNL, four SiC ceramics, a SiC-TiB{sub 2} composite, a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-bonded SiC ceramic, and two alumina-matrix composites were selected as candidate materials for heat exchanger/steam-reformer tubes. These commercially available materials were exposed to a simulated steam-reformer atmosphere for up to 2000 h at 1260{degrees}C to assess their corrosion behavior and the effect of the exposure on their flexure strength (in air) at 20 and 1260{degrees}C. The approximate partial pressures of the constituents of the gas mixture at 1 atm total pressure were 0.54 H{sub 2}, 0.13 CO, 0.03 CO{sub 2}m 0.004 CH{sub 4}, and 0.30 H{sub 2}O. All but one material had net weight gains during the exposure test. The flexure strengths of the SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics and the SiC-TiB{sub 2} composite at 20 and 1260{degrees}C were not changed significantly by corrosion. The strengths of the alumina-matrix composites were decreased by corrosion; however, the strength of one of these (reinforced with SiC whiskers) was still higher than that of any other material after 500 h. The other alumina composite (containing SiC particles) exhibited the largest strength decrease of any material. The strength retention of the SiC ceramics and the SiC-TiB{sub 2} composite and the strength loss of the composites were associated with surface layers caused by corrosion. 12 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Simulated space environmental effects on a polyetherimide and its carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Kristen T.; Stancil, Phillip C.; Harries, Wynford L.; Long, Edward R., Jr.; Thibeault, Sheila A.

    1993-01-01

    The selection of materials for spacecraft construction requires identification of candidate materials which can perform reliably in the space environment. Understanding the effects of the space environment on the materials is an important step in the selection of candidate materials. This work examines the effects of energetic electrons, thermal cycling, electron radiation in conjunction with thermal cycling, and atomic oxygen on a thermoplastic polyetherimide and its carbon-fiber-reinforced composites. Composite materials made with non-sized fibers as well as materials made with fibers sized with an epoxy were evaluated. The mechanical and thermomechanical properties of the materials were studied and spectroscopic techniques were used to investigate the mechanisms for the observed effects. Considerations for future material development are suggested.

  4. Particle fracture simulation in non-uniform microstructures of metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.; Moorthy, S.

    1998-01-23

    This paper deals with the evolution of damage in microstructures of reinforced ductile-matrix composites, by particle cracking and splitting. A small deformation Voronoi Cell finite element model is developed, in which each element may consist of a matrix phase, an inclusion phase and a crack phase. Brittle inclusions may be of arbitrary shapes and sizes, and may be dispersed non-uniformly in the matrix. Damage initiation of inclusions is assumed to follow a maximum principal stress theory. Complete particle cracking or splitting is assumed at the onset of damage. The model is validated by a few comparison studies. Various geometric patterns are studied to test the effectiveness of the model, as well as to understand the effect of morphology on damage evolution. Actual microstructures from optical micrographs of Al-Si-Mg composite systems are analyzed and compared with experimentally observed results. Quantitative characterization and statistical analysis is conducted to correlate morphological parameters with mechanical response.

  5. Comparison of ALE and SPH Simulations of Vertical Drop Tests of a Composite Fuselage Section into Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fuchs, Yvonne T.

    2008-01-01

    Simulation of multi-terrain impact has been identified as an important research area for improved prediction of rotorcraft crashworthiness within the NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Aeronautics Program on Rotorcraft Crashworthiness. As part of this effort, two vertical drop tests were conducted of a 5-ft-diameter composite fuselage section into water. For the first test, the fuselage section was impacted in a baseline configuration without energy absorbers. For the second test, the fuselage section was retrofitted with a composite honeycomb energy absorber. Both tests were conducted at a nominal velocity of 25-ft/s. A detailed finite element model was developed to represent each test article and water impact was simulated using both Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) and Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) approaches in LS-DYNA, a nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic finite element code. Analytical predictions were correlated with experimental data for both test configurations. In addition, studies were performed to evaluate the influence of mesh density on test-analysis correlation.

  6. Simulation of the isotopic composition of stratospheric water vapour - Part 1: Description and evaluation of the EMAC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichinger, R.; Jockel, P.; Brinkop, S.; Werner, M.; Lossow, S.

    2015-05-01

    This modelling study aims at an improved understanding of the processes that determine the water vapour budget in the stratosphere by means of the investigation of water isotope ratios. An additional (and separate from the actual) hydrological cycle has been introduced into the chemistry-climate model EMAC, including the water isotopologues HDO and H218O and their physical fractionation processes. Additionally an explicit computation of the contribution of methane oxidation to H2O and HDO has been incorporated. The model expansions allow detailed analyses of water vapour and its isotope ratio with respect to deuterium throughout the stratosphere and in the transition region to the troposphere. In order to assure the correct representation of the water isotopologues in the model's hydrological cycle, the expanded system has been evaluated in several steps. The physical fractionation effects have been evaluated by comparison of the simulated isotopic composition of precipitation with measurements from a ground-based network (GNIP) and with the results from the isotopologue-enabled general circulation model ECHAM5-wiso. The model's representation of the chemical HDO precursor CH3D in the stratosphere has been confirmed by a comparison with chemical transport models (1-D, CHEM2D) and measurements from radiosonde flights. Finally, the simulated stratospheric HDO and the isotopic composition of water vapour have been evaluated, with respect to retrievals from three different satellite instruments (MIPAS, ACE-FTS, SMR). Discrepancies in stratospheric water vapour isotope ratios between two of the three satellite retrievals can now partly be explained.

  7. Simulation of the isotopic composition of stratospheric water vapour - Part 1: Description and evaluation of the EMAC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichinger, R.; Jöckel, P.; Brinkop, S.; Werner, M.; Lossow, S.

    2014-09-01

    This modelling study aims on an improved understanding of the processes, that determine the water vapour budget in the stratosphere by means of the investigation of water isotope ratios. At first, a separate hydrological cycle has been introduced into the chemistry-climate model EMAC, including the water isotopologues HDO and H218O and their physical fractionation processes. Additionally an explicit computation of the contribution of methane oxidation to HDO has been incorporated. The model expansions allow detailed analyses of water vapour and its isotope ratio with respect to deuterium throughout the stratosphere and in the transition region to the troposphere. In order to assure the correct representation of the water isotopologues in the model's hydrological cycle, the expanded system has been evaluated in several steps. The physical fractionation effects have been evaluated by comparison of the simulated isotopic composition of precipitation with measurements from a ground-based network (GNIP) and with the results from the isotopologue-enabled general circulation model ECHAM5-wiso. The model's representation of the chemical HDO precursor CH3D in the stratosphere has been confirmed by a comparison with chemical transport models (CHEM1D, CHEM2D) and measurements from radiosonde flights. Finally, the simulated stratospheric HDO and the isotopic composition of water vapour have been evaluated, with respect to retrievals from three different satellite instruments (MIPAS, ACE-FTS, SMR). Discrepancies in stratospheric water vapour isotope ratios between two of the three satellite retrievals can now partly be explained.

  8. Simulation of the impact of thunderstorm activity on atmospheric gas composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyshlyaev, S. P.; Mareev, E. A.; Galin, V. Ya.

    2010-08-01

    A chemistry-climate model of the lower and middle atmosphere has been used to estimate the sensitivity of the atmospheric gas composition to the rate of thunderstorm production of nitrogen oxides at upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric altitudes. The impact that nitrogen oxides produced by lightning have on the atmospheric gas composition is treated as a subgrid-scale process and included in the model parametrically. The natural uncertainty in the global production rate of nitrogen oxides in lightning flashes was specified within limits from 2 to 20 Tg N/year. Results of the model experiments have shown that, due to the variability of thunderstorm-produced nitrogen oxides, their concentration in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere can vary by a factor of 2 or 3, which, given the influence of nitrogen oxides on ozone and other gases, creates the potential for a strong perturbation of the atmospheric gas composition and thermal regime. Model calculations have shown the strong sensitivity of ozone and the OH hydroxyl to the amount of lightning nitrogen oxides at different atmospheric altitudes. These calculations demonstrate the importance of nitrogen oxides of thunderstorm origin for the balance of atmospheric odd ozone and gases linked to it, such as ozone and hydroxyl radicals. Our results demonstrate that one important task is to raise the accuracy of estimates of the rate of nitrogen oxide production by lightning discharges and to use physical parametrizations that take into account the local lightning effects and feedbacks arising in this case rather than climatological data in models of the gas composition and general circulation of the atmosphere.

  9. Effect of food and oral simulating fluids on dentine bond and composite strength.

    PubMed

    Lee, S Y; Greener, E H; Mueller, H J; Chiu, C H

    1994-12-01

    The effect of up to 30 days' immersion in 75% ethanol solution and in an artificial saliva (Moi-Stir) on the dentine shear bond strength (SBS) of three adhesive/composite systems (Tenure/Marathon One, Scotchbond Multi-Purpose/Z100 and Optibond/Herculite XRV) was evaluated. Two control series were stored either in 100% humidity or in air. Diametral tensile specimens (DTS) of the composites studied were stored in 75% ethanol for up to 30 days. The fracture mode and morphology of the failure interface were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data were analysed using ANOVA and the Tukey LSD test. The SBS for all systems stored in Moi-Stir (24.8 +/- 3.0 MPa) and air (28.3 +/- 3.0 MPa) was not influenced by length of storage. Microscopic (SEM) examination of the debonded air, and Moi-Stir stored specimens showed that failure had primarily occurred through the dentine. Significant decreases (30-50%) in the SBS of all systems occurred after immersion in 75% ethanol. There was no significant difference among brands. The DTS of the composites showed significant decreases as a function of ethanol exposure. Marathon One and Herculite XRV showed significantly lower DTS after 14 days' storage while Z100 showed no reduction in DTS until after 30 days. The decrease in both SBS and DTS after storage in ethanol was a function of the square root of time (P < 0.001) and followed Fick's laws of diffusion. Ethanol diffusivity was approximated as 1.8 x 10(-6) cm2 s-1 for both SBS and DTS specimens, suggesting that alcohol attack in SBS specimens occurred primarily in the composite system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7844264

  10. The Effect of Dose Rate on Composite Durability When Exposed to a Simulated Long-Term Lunar Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; O'Rourke, Mary Jane; Hill, Charles; Nutt, Steven; Atwell, William

    2011-01-01

    Human exploration of space beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) requires a safe living and working environment for crew. Composite materials are one type of material being investigated by NASA as a multi-functional structural approach to habitats for long-term use in space or on planetary surfaces with limited magnetic fields and atmosphere. These materials provide high strength with the potential for decreased weight and increased radiation protection of crew and electronics when compared with conventional aluminum structures. However, these materials have not been evaluated in a harsh radiation environment, as would be experienced outside of LEO or on a planetary surface. Thus, NASA has been investigating the durability of select composite materials in a long-term radiation environment. Previously, NASA exposed composite samples to a simulated, accelerated 30-year radiation treatment and tensile stresses similar to those of a habitat pressure vessel. The results showed evidence of potential surface oxidation and enhanced cross-linking of the matrix. As a follow-on study, we performed the same accelerated exposure alongside an exposure with a decreased dose rate. The slower dose ]rate is comparable to a realistic scenario, although still accelerated. Strain measurements were collected during exposure and showed that with a fastdose rate, the strain decreased with time, but with a slow ]dose rate, the strain increased with time. After the radiation exposures, samples were characterized via tensile tests, flexure tests, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The results of these tests will be discussed.

  11. Nanostructured hydroxyapatite/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) composite coating for controlling magnesium degradation in simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ian; Akari, Khalid; Liu, Huinan

    2013-09-20

    Biodegradable magnesium (Mg) and its alloys have many attractive properties (e.g. comparable mechanical properties to cortical bone) for orthopedic implant applications, but they degrade too rapidly in the human body to meet clinical requirements. Nanostructured hydroxyapatite (nHA)/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) composite coatings provide synergistic properties for controlling degradation of Mg-based substrates and improving bone-implant integration. In this study, nHA/PLGA composites were spin coated onto Mg-based substrates and the results showed that the nHA/PLGA coatings retained nano-scale features with nHA dispersed in PLGA matrix. In comparison with non-coated Mg, the nHA/PLGA composite coated Mg increased the corrosion potential and decreased the corrosion current in revised simulated body fluid (rSBF). After 24 h of immersion in rSBF, increased calcium phosphate (CaP) deposition and formation of Mg-substituted CaP rosettes were observed on the surface of the nHA/PLGA coated Mg, indicating greater bioactivity. In contrast, no significant CaP was deposited on the PLGA coated Mg. Since both PLGA coating and nHA/PLGA coating showed some degree of delamination from Mg-based substrates during extended immersion in rSBF, the coating processing and properties should be further optimized in order to take full advantage of biodegradable Mg and nHA/PLGA nanocomposites for orthopedic applications. PMID:23975041

  12. Nanostructured hydroxyapatite/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) composite coating for controlling magnesium degradation in simulated body fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ian; Akari, Khalid; Liu, Huinan

    2013-09-01

    Biodegradable magnesium (Mg) and its alloys have many attractive properties (e.g. comparable mechanical properties to cortical bone) for orthopedic implant applications, but they degrade too rapidly in the human body to meet clinical requirements. Nanostructured hydroxyapatite (nHA)/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) composite coatings provide synergistic properties for controlling degradation of Mg-based substrates and improving bone-implant integration. In this study, nHA/PLGA composites were spin coated onto Mg-based substrates and the results showed that the nHA/PLGA coatings retained nano-scale features with nHA dispersed in PLGA matrix. In comparison with non-coated Mg, the nHA/PLGA composite coated Mg increased the corrosion potential and decreased the corrosion current in revised simulated body fluid (rSBF). After 24 h of immersion in rSBF, increased calcium phosphate (CaP) deposition and formation of Mg-substituted CaP rosettes were observed on the surface of the nHA/PLGA coated Mg, indicating greater bioactivity. In contrast, no significant CaP was deposited on the PLGA coated Mg. Since both PLGA coating and nHA/PLGA coating showed some degree of delamination from Mg-based substrates during extended immersion in rSBF, the coating processing and properties should be further optimized in order to take full advantage of biodegradable Mg and nHA/PLGA nanocomposites for orthopedic applications.

  13. A Progressive Damage Model for unidirectional Fibre Reinforced Composites with Application to Impact and Penetration Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerschbaum, M.; Hopmann, C.

    2016-06-01

    The computationally efficient simulation of the progressive damage behaviour of continuous fibre reinforced plastics is still a challenging task with currently available computer aided engineering methods. This paper presents an original approach for an energy based continuum damage model which accounts for stress-/strain nonlinearities, transverse and shear stress interaction phenomena, quasi-plastic shear strain components, strain rate effects, regularised damage evolution and consideration of load reversal effects. The physically based modelling approach enables experimental determination of all parameters on ply level to avoid expensive inverse analysis procedures. The modelling strategy, implementation and verification of this model using commercially available explicit finite element software are detailed. The model is then applied to simulate the impact and penetration of carbon fibre reinforced cross-ply specimens with variation of the impact speed. The simulation results show that the presented approach enables a good representation of the force-/displacement curves and especially well agreement with the experimentally observed fracture patterns. In addition, the mesh dependency of the results were assessed for one impact case showing only very little change of the simulation results which emphasises the general applicability of the presented method.

  14. Two Simulated-Smog Atmospheres with Different Chemical Compositions Produce Contrasting Mutagenicity in Salmonella**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone (O3), particulate matter (PM), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) are criteria pollutants used to evaluate air quality. Using EPA’s Mobile Reaction Chamber (MRC), we generated 2 simulated-smog atmospheres (SSA-1 & SSA-2) with different concentrations of these criteria pol...

  15. DPDE-based mesoscale simulations of shock response of HE composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, P.; Dwivedi, S.; Brennan, J.; Thadhani, N.; Horie, Y.

    2014-05-01

    The dissipative particle dynamics with energy conservation (DPDE) method is extended to simulate the shock response of high energetic (HE) materials at micron length scales. The symmetrical impact of an RDX impactor and target plates with 1μm diameter spheres is simulated at planar impact velocities of 208 m/s and 876 m/s with a Lennard-Jones-like potential, dissipative, and random forces, and artificial viscosity force between particles. The in situ shock quantities were obtained using Hardy's averaging. In situ longitudinal stresses from simulations were 0.84 and 3.82 GPa. Values from the literature are 0.81 and 2.92 GPa at the two impact velocities, respectively. The uniaxial strain condition was predicted with equal lateral stresses and negligible shear stresses. The higher stress value at 876 m/s may be due to lack of inelasticity in the interparticle potential. The temperature increases of 5.5 0K and 93.7 0K, respectively, were predicted assuming dissipation of a fraction of the potential energy. It is concluded that the DPDE method holds promise for a unified computational framework for multi-scale simulations of HE.

  16. Multiscale simulation process and application to additives in porous composite battery electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieser, Christian; Prill, Torben; Schladitz, Katja

    2015-03-01

    Structure-resolving simulation of porous materials in electrochemical cells such as fuel cells and lithium ion batteries allows for correlating electrical performance with material morphology. In lithium ion batteries characteristic length scales of active material particles and additives range several orders of magnitude. Hence, providing a computational mesh resolving all length scales is not reasonably feasible and requires alternative approaches. In the work presented here a virtual process to simulate lithium ion batteries by bridging the scales is introduced. Representative lithium ion battery electrode coatings comprised of μm-scale graphite particles as active material and a nm-scale carbon/polymeric binder mixture as an additive are imaged with synchrotron radiation computed tomography (SR-CT) and sequential focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM), respectively. Applying novel image processing methodologies for the FIB/SEM images, data sets are binarized to provide a computational grid for calculating the effective mass transport properties of the electrolyte phase in the nanoporous additive. Afterwards, the homogenized additive is virtually added to the micropores of the binarized SR-CT data set representing the active particle structure, and the resulting electrode structure is assembled to a virtual half-cell for electrochemical microheterogeneous simulation. Preliminary battery performance simulations indicate non-negligible impact of the consideration of the additive.

  17. A Progressive Damage Model for unidirectional Fibre Reinforced Composites with Application to Impact and Penetration Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerschbaum, M.; Hopmann, C.

    2016-01-01

    The computationally efficient simulation of the progressive damage behaviour of continuous fibre reinforced plastics is still a challenging task with currently available computer aided engineering methods. This paper presents an original approach for an energy based continuum damage model which accounts for stress-/strain nonlinearities, transverse and shear stress interaction phenomena, quasi-plastic shear strain components, strain rate effects, regularised damage evolution and consideration of load reversal effects. The physically based modelling approach enables experimental determination of all parameters on ply level to avoid expensive inverse analysis procedures. The modelling strategy, implementation and verification of this model using commercially available explicit finite element software are detailed. The model is then applied to simulate the impact and penetration of carbon fibre reinforced cross-ply specimens with variation of the impact speed. The simulation results show that the presented approach enables a good representation of the force-/displacement curves and especially well agreement with the experimentally observed fracture patterns. In addition, the mesh dependency of the results were assessed for one impact case showing only very little change of the simulation results which emphasises the general applicability of the presented method.

  18. Streamline simulation of surfactant enhanced aquifer remediation. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tunison, D.I.

    1996-12-01

    Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (NAPLs) are a recognized source of groundwater contamination. Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation (SEAR) shows promise in increasing the efficiency and effectiveness over traditional `pump and treat` NAPL remediation processes. Laboratory results are not always consistent with the effects observed in field applications because of the complex interactions that occur in the subsurface. Mathematical modeling is required to enable accurate prediction and understanding of SEAR.

  19. Simulating the evolution of the chemical composition of the 1988/89 winter vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. L.; Mckenna, D. S.; Poole, L. R.; Solomon, S.

    1990-01-01

    During the 1988/89 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) observations of the chemical composition and aerosol characteristics of the winter vortex were obtained from a NASA ER-2 aircraft. In this paper we present interpretations of observations obtained on three ER-2 flights using a Lagrangian coupled photochemical-microphysical model. It is argued that observations obtained on Jaunary 16 and 19, and February 10, represent different stages of the chemical evolution of the vortex, from the early stages of chlorine release, the onset of denitrification and the intensively processed state.

  20. Aerofoil testing in a self-streamlining flexible walled wind tunnel. Ph.D. Thesis - Jul. 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Mark Charles

    1988-01-01

    Two-dimensional self-streamlining flexible walled test sections eliminate, as far as experimentally possible, the top and bottom wall interference effects in transonic airfoil testing. The test section sidewalls are rigid, while the impervious top and bottom walls are flexible and contoured to streamline shapes by a system of jacks, without reference to the airfoil model. The concept of wall contouring to eliminate or minimize test section boundary interference in 2-D testing was first demonstrated by NPL in England during the early 40's. The transonic streamlining strategy proposed, developed and used by NPL has been compared with several modern strategies. The NPL strategy has proved to be surprisingly good at providing a wall interference-free test environment, giving model performance indistinguishable from that obtained using the modern strategies over a wide range of test conditions. In all previous investigations the achievement of wall streamlining in flexible walled test sections has been limited to test sections up to those resulting in the model's shock just extending to a streamlined wall. This work however, has also successfully demonstrated the feasibility of 2-D wall streamlining at test conditions where both model shocks have reached and penetrated through their respective flexible walls. Appropriate streamlining procedures have been established and are uncomplicated, enabling flexible walled test sections to cope easily with these high transonic flows.

  1. The impact of a streamlined funding application process on application time: two cross-sectional surveys of Australian researchers

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Adrian G; Graves, Nicholas; Clarke, Philip; Herbert, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine if streamlining a medical research funding application process saved time for applicants. Design Cross-sectional surveys before and after the streamlining. Setting The National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia. Participants Researchers who submitted one or more NHMRC Project Grant applications in 2012 or 2014. Main outcome measures Average researcher time spent preparing an application and the total time for all applications in working days. Results The average time per application increased from 34 working days before streamlining (95% CI 33 to 35) to 38 working days after streamlining (95% CI 37 to 39; mean difference 4 days, bootstrap p value <0.001). The estimated total time spent by all researchers on applications after streamlining was 614 working years, a 67-year increase from before streamlining. Conclusions Streamlined applications were shorter but took longer to prepare on average. Researchers may be allocating a fixed amount of time to preparing funding applications based on their expected return, or may be increasing their time in response to increased competition. Many potentially productive years of researcher time are still being lost to preparing failed applications. PMID:25596201

  2. Simulation of Electrolyte Composition Effects on High Energy Lithium-Ion Cells

    SciTech Connect

    K. Gering

    2014-09-01

    An important feature of the DUALFOIL model for simulation of lithium-ion cells [1,2] is rigorous accounting for non-ideal electrolyte properties. Unfortunately, data are available on only a few electrolytes [3,4]. However, K. Gering has developed a model for estimation of electrolyte properties [5] and recently generated complete property sets (density, conductivity, activity coefficient, diffusivity, transport number) as a function of temperature and salt concentration. Here we use these properties in an enhanced version of the DUALFOIL model called DISTNP, available in Battery Design Studio [6], to examine the effect of different electrolytes on cell performance. Specifically, the behavior of a high energy LiCoO2/graphite 18650-size cell is simulated. The ability of Battery Design Studio to si

  3. Ambient-Potential Composite Ewald Method for ab Initio Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Giese, Timothy J; York, Darrin M

    2016-06-14

    A new approach for performing Particle Mesh Ewald in ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations with extended atomic orbital basis sets is presented. The new approach, the Ambient-Potential Composite Ewald (CEw) method, does not perform the QM/MM interaction with Mulliken charges nor electrostatically fit charges. Instead the nuclei and electron density interact directly with the MM environment, but in a manner that avoids the use of dense Fourier transform grids. By performing the electrostatics with the underlying QM density, the CEw method avoids self-consistent field instabilities that have been encountered with simple charge mapping procedures. Potential of mean force (PMF) profiles of the p-nitrophenyl phosphate dissociation reaction in explicit solvent are computed from PBE0/6-31G* QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations with various electrostatic protocols. The CEw profiles are shown to be stable with respect to real-space Ewald cutoff, whereas the PMFs computed from truncated and switched electrostatics produce artifacts. PBE0/6-311G**, AM1/d-PhoT, and DFTB2 QM/MM simulations are performed to generate two-dimensional PMF profiles of the phosphoryl transesterification reactions with ethoxide and phenoxide leaving groups. The semiempirical models incorrectly produce a concerted ethoxide mechanism, whereas PBE0 correctly produces a stepwise mechanism. The ab initio reaction barriers agree more closely to experiment than the semiempirical models. The failure of Mulliken-charge QM/MM-Ewald is analyzed. PMID:27171914

  4. Elemental composition of dog foods using nitric acid and simulated gastric digestions.

    PubMed

    Kelly, David G; White, Steven D; Weir, Ron D

    2013-05-01

    Eighteen dry dog foods obtained commercially in the United States were digested using microwave assisted nitric acid digestion and a simulated gastric digestion. Digests were analysed for 23 elements using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Data, expressed as dry matter concentrations, were compared to published nitric acid digestion results. Nitric acid data obtained in the present study were not statistically different from published data, with the exception of Mo, Sn, Sb, Tl and Th. However, significant differences in individual intra-sample results were observed between published studies and the present work. Simulated gastric digestions demonstrated lower extraction efficiencies (<50% nitric acid digestions) that were statistically significant. Much lower bioavailability was observed for Al, Ba and Pb. In general, elemental concentrations were determined to be lower than the appropriate Mineral Tolerance Limit or consistent with background concentrations in foodstuffs. Evaluation against Reference Doses (RfDs) showed concentrations for many elements obtained by nitric acid digestion to be above RfD levels. However, the respective simulated gastric digestion data were below or only moderately elevated above RfDs. Only arsenic displayed median and maximum concentrations at factors of five and ten above the relevant RfD. PMID:23402861

  5. Experimental Results in Support of Simulating Progressive Crush in Carbon-Fiber Textile Composites

    SciTech Connect

    DeTeresa, S J; Allison, L M; Cunningham, B J; Freeman, DC; Saculla, M D; Sanchez, R J; Winchester, S W

    2001-04-02

    This report summarizes the findings of an experimental program conducted to support the modeling of the crush behavior of triaxial braid carbon fiber composites. The matrix material as well as braided panels and tubes were characterized in order to determine material properties, to assess failure modes, and to provide a test bed for new analytical and numerical tools developed specifically for braided composites. The matrix material selected by the ACC was an epoxy vinyl ester (Ashland Hetron 922). Tensile tests were used to compare two formulations-one used by the ACC and one recommended by the resin supplier. The latter was a faster reacting system and gelled in one-third the time of the ACC formulation. Both formulations had an average elongation at failure that was only half of the resin supplier's reported value. Only one specimen of each type came close to the reported elongation value and it was shown that failure invariably initiated at both surface and internal defects. Overall, the tensile properties of the two formulations were nearly identical, but those of the ACC system were more consistent. The properties of the ACC matrix formulation were measured in tension, shear, and compression and the average properties obtained in these tests are summarized.

  6. Structure-borne noise of railway composite bridge: Numerical simulation and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhen; Liu, Quanmin; Pei, Shiling; Song, Lizhong; Zhang, Xun

    2015-09-01

    In order to investigate the characteristics of the noise from steel-concrete composite bridges under high-speed train loading, a model used to predict the bridge-borne noise is established and validated through a field experiment. The numerical model for noise prediction is developed based on the combination of spatial train-track-bridge coupled vibration theory and Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA). Firstly, train-track-bridge coupled vibration is adopted to obtain the velocity time history of the bridge deck vibration. Then, the velocity time history is transferred into frequency domain through FFT to serve as the vibratory energy of SEA deck subsystems. Finally, the transmission of the vibratory energy is obtained by solving the energy balance equations of SEA, and the sound radiation is computed using the vibro-acoustic theory. The numerically computed noise level is verified by a field measurement. It is determined that the dominant frequency of steel-concrete composite bridge-borne noise is 20-1000 Hz. The noise from the bottom flange of steel longitudinal girder is less than other components in the whole frequency bands, while the noise from web of steel longitudinal girder is dominant in high frequency range above 315 Hz. The noise from concrete deck dominates in low-frequency domain ranges from 80 Hz to 160 Hz.

  7. Simulation of the Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) process and the development of light-weight composite bridging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Marc J.

    A continued desire for increased mobility in the aftermath of natural disasters, or on the battlefield, has lead to the need for improved light-weight bridging solutions. This research investigates the development of a carbon/epoxy composite bridging system to meet the needs for light-weight bridging. The research focuses on two main topics. The first topic is that of processing composite structures and the second is the design and testing of these structures. In recent years the Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) process has become recognized as a low-cost manufacturing alternative for large Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) composite structures for civil, military, and aerospace applications. The success of the VARTM process (complete wet-out) is very sensitive to the resin injection strategy used and the proper placement of flow distribution materials and inlet and vacuum ports. Predicting the flow front pattern, the time required for infusing a part with resin, and the time required to bleed excess resin at the end of filling, is critical to ensure that the part will become completely impregnated and desired fiber volume fractions achieved prior to the resin gelling (initiation of cure). In order to eliminate costly trial and error experiments to determine the optimal infusion strategy, this research presents a simulation model which considers in-plane flow as well as flow through the thickness of the preform. In addition to resin filling, the current model is able to simulate the bleeding of resin at the end of filling to predict the required bleeding time to reach desired fiber volume fractions for the final part. In addition to processing, the second portion of the dissertation investigates the design and testing of composite bridge deck sections which also serve as short-span bridging for gaps up to 4 m in length. The research focuses on the design of a light-weight core material for bridge decking as well as proof loading of short-span bridge

  8. Reactive Molecular Dynamics Simulations on the Disintegration of PVDF, FP-POSS, and Their Composite during Atomic Oxygen Impact.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fanlin; Peng, Chao; Liu, Yizhi; Qu, Jianmin

    2015-07-30

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) is a kind of important piezoelectric polymer used in spacecraft industry. But the atomic oxygen (AO) is the most abundant element in the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment. AO collision degradation is an important issue in the application of PVDF on spacecrafts. To investigate the erosion behaviors of PVDF during AO impacts and how to improve the stability of PVDF against AO impacts, the temperature evolution, mass loss, and erosion yields of neat PVDF, neat polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes compound (3,3,3-trifluoropropyl)8Si8O12 (FP-POSS) and the PVDF/FP-POSS composite under AO impacts, as well as some key disintegrated structures and separated chemical compositions, were researched using the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the reactive ReaxFF force field. The simulation erosion yield result of PVDF is very close to the experiment results, which shows our simulations are reliable. The results of the temperature evolution, mass loss, and erosion yield of three materials show that the antierosion performance of PVDF is not outstanding. However, incorporating FP-POSS into PVDF matrix enhances the stability of PVDF against AO impact greatly and reduces the temperature rise, mass loss, and the erosion yield of PVDF rapidly. A detailed analysis on the flight chemical compositions and key snapshots of the structures reveals that the erosion process on PVDF and PVDF/FP-POSS is continuous and should be derived from the same PVDF matrix in two materials. In contrast, the erosion process on FP-POSS is stepped. The erosion will not take place until the number of AO reaches a specific value. There is a barrier for the erosion of high-energy AO because of the stable cagelike Si-O frame in FP-POSS molecules. This should be chiefly responsible for the high stability of FP-POSS and the reinforcement mechanism of FP-POSS on PVDF against AO impacts. This work is helpful for people to understand the erosion details of PVDF and POSS and

  9. Spherical Coordinate Systems for Streamlining Suited Mobility Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Elizabeth; Cowley, Matthew S.; Harvill. Lauren; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2014-01-01

    When describing human motion, biomechanists generally report joint angles in terms of Euler angle rotation sequences. However, there are known limitations in using this method to describe complex motions such as the shoulder joint during a baseball pitch. Euler angle notation uses a series of three rotations about an axis where each rotation is dependent upon the preceding rotation. As such, the Euler angles need to be regarded as a set to get accurate angle information. Unfortunately, it is often difficult to visualize and understand these complex motion representations. One of our key functions is to help design engineers understand how a human will perform with new designs and all too often traditional use of Euler rotations becomes as much of a hindrance as a help. It is believed that using a spherical coordinate system will allow ABF personnel to more quickly and easily transmit important mobility data to engineers, in a format that is readily understandable and directly translatable to their design efforts. Objectives: The goal of this project is to establish new analysis and visualization techniques to aid in the examination and comprehension of complex motions. Methods: This project consisted of a series of small sub-projects, meant to validate and verify the method before it was implemented in the ABF's data analysis practices. The first stage was a proof of concept, where a mechanical test rig was built and instrumented with an inclinometer, so that its angle from horizontal was known. The test rig was tracked in 3D using an optical motion capture system, and its position and orientation were reported in both Euler and spherical reference systems. The rig was meant to simulate flexion/extension, transverse rotation and abduction/adduction of the human shoulder, but without the variability inherent in human motion. In the second phase of the project, the ABF estimated the error inherent in a spherical coordinate system, and evaluated how this error would

  10. Simulation of Delamination Under High Cycle Fatigue in Composite Materials Using Cohesive Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camanho, Pedro P.; Turon, Albert; Costa, Josep; Davila, Carlos G.

    2006-01-01

    A new thermodynamically consistent damage model is proposed for the simulation of high-cycle fatigue crack growth. The basis for the formulation is an interfacial degradation law that links Fracture Mechanics and Damage Mechanics to relate the evolution of the damage variable, d, with the crack growth rate da/dN. The damage state is a function of the loading conditions (R and (Delta)G) as well as the experimentally-determined crack growth rates for the material. The formulation ensures that the experimental results can be reproduced by the analysis without the need of additional adjustment parameters.

  11. Electric field driven fractal growth in polymer electrolyte composites: Experimental evidence of theoretical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawar, Anit; Chandra, Amita

    2012-11-01

    The influence of electric field on the diffusion limited aggregation has been observed experimentally. The observation provides experimental confirmation of the theoretical model proposed by Zhi-Jie Tan et al. [Phys. Lett. A 268 (2000) 112]. Most strikingly, a transition from a disordered ramified pattern to an ordered pattern (chain-like growth) has been observed. The growth is governed by diffusion, convection and migration in an electric field which give rise to the different patterns. This Letter can also be considered as an experimental evidence of computer simulated fractal growth given by Huang and Hibbert [Physica A 233 (1996) 888].

  12. Bridging the scales in atmospheric composition simulations using a nudging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Isidoro, Massimo; Maurizi, Alberto; Russo, Felicita; Tampieri, Francesco

    2010-05-01

    Studying the interaction between climate and anthropogenic activities, specifically those concentrated in megacities/hot spots, requires the description of processes in a very wide range of scales from local, where anthropogenic emissions are concentrated to global where we are interested to study the impact of these sources. The description of all the processes at all scales within the same numerical implementation is not feasible because of limited computer resources. Therefore, different phenomena are studied by means of different numerical models that can cover different range of scales. The exchange of information from small to large scale is highly non-trivial though of high interest. In fact uncertainties in large scale simulations are expected to receive large contribution from the most polluted areas where the highly inhomogeneous distribution of sources connected to the intrinsic non-linearity of the processes involved can generate non negligible departures between coarse and fine scale simulations. In this work a new method is proposed and investigated in a case study (August 2009) using the BOLCHEM model. Monthly simulations at coarse (0.5° European domain, run A) and fine (0.1° Central Mediterranean domain, run B) horizontal resolution are performed using the coarse resolution as boundary condition for the fine one. Then another coarse resolution run (run C) is performed, in which the high resolution fields remapped on to the coarse grid are used to nudge the concentrations on the Po Valley area. The nudging is applied to all gas and aerosol species of BOLCHEM. Averaged concentrations and variances over Po Valley and other selected areas for O3 and PM are computed. It is observed that although the variance of run B is markedly larger than that of run A, the variance of run C is smaller because the remapping procedure removes large portion of variance from run B fields. Mean concentrations show some differences depending on species: in general mean

  13. Simulation of Particle Size Effect on Dynamic Properties and Fracture of PTFE-W-Al Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbold, Eric; Cai, Jing; Benson, David; Nesterenko, Vitali

    2007-06-01

    Recent investigations of the dynamic compressive strength of cold isostatically pressed (CIP) composites of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), tungsten and aluminum powders show significant differences depending on the size of metallic particles. PTFE and aluminum mixtures are known to be energetic under dynamic and thermal loading. The addition of tungsten increases density and overall strength of the sample. Multi-material Eulerian and arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian methods were used for the investigation due to the complexity of the microstructure, relatively large deformations and the ability to handle the formation of free surfaces in a natural manner. The calculations indicate that the observed dependence of sample strength on particle size is due to the formation of force chains under dynamic loading in samples with small particle sizes even at larger porosity in comparison with samples with large grain size and larger density.

  14. Simulation of Particle Size Effect on Dynamic Properties and Fracture of PTFE-W-Al Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbold, E. B.; Cai, J.; Benson, D. J.; Nesterenko, V. F.

    2007-12-01

    Recent investigations of the dynamic compressive strength of cold isostatically pressed composites of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), tungsten (W) and aluminum (Al) powders show significant differences depending on the size of metallic particles. The addition of W increases the density and changes the overall strength of the sample depending on the size of W particles. To investigate relatively large deformations, multi-material Eulerian and arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian methods, which have the ability to efficiently handle the formation of free surfaces, were used. The calculations indicate that the increased sample strength with fine metallic particles is due to the dynamic formation of force chains. This phenomenon occurs for samples with a higher porosity of the PTFE matrix compared to samples with larger particle size of W and a higher density PTFE matrix.

  15. Laboratory Simulations of Titan's Surface Composition and its Relation to Atmospheric Haze Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebree, Joshua A.; Schmitt, Angela M.; Trainer, Melissa G.; Li, Xiang; Pinnick, Veronica T.; Getty, Stephanie A.; Loeffler, Mark; Anderson, Carrie M.; Brinckerhoff, William B.

    2014-06-01

    The arrival of the Cassini spacecraft in orbit around Saturn has led to the discovery of benzene at ppm levels, as well as large positive ions evocative of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Titan's atmosphere. Recently, the assignment of the band at 3.28 μm as observed by the Visual-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) to gas-phase PAHs provides further evidence that these molecules are prevalent on Titan. These observations suggest that aromatic reaction pathways play an important role in the photochemistry of Titan's atmosphere, in particular in the formation of large organic species. These aerosols eventually settle out of the atmosphere onto the surface of Titan giving rise to the different surface albedos that are observed by the VIMS instrument onboard Cassini. We will present results from a laboratory study of the UV irradiation of ppm-level aromatic precursors to understand their influence on the observable characteristics of Titan's surface. Spectroscopic measurements of our analog aerosols compare favorably to observations of Titan's haze by VIMS and by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) in the far-infrared. In addition, the broad aerosol emission feature centered at approximately 145 wn is of particular interest. From the broadness of this feature, we speculate that the emission is a blended composite of low-energy vibrations of large molecules such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their nitrogen containing counterparts, polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycles (PANHs). A further comparison of our aerosol spectra to the surface observations carried out by Cassini also shows a strong correlation between the aerosol makeup and the surface albedo of Titan. Using laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) MS/MS techniques we confirm the presence of large (5+ rings) PAHs/PANHs in our aerosols and discuss possible formation pathways.

  16. Assessment of the Radiation Attenuation Properties of Several Lead Free Composites by Monte Carlo Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Kazempour, M.; Saeedimoghadam, M.; Shekoohi Shooli, F.; Shokrpour, N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In diagnostic radiology lead apron, are usually used to protect patients and radiology staff against ionizing radiation. Lead apron is a desirable shield due to high absorption and effective attenuation of x-ray photons in the diagnostic radiology range. Objective: Although lead aprons have good radiation protection properties, in recent years, researchers have been looking for alternative materials to be used instead of lead apron because of some problems derived from lead-content of aprons. Because of its lead-content, these radiation protection garments are so heavy and uncomfortable for the staff to wear, particularly in long-time uses. In addition, lead is a toxic element and its disposal is associated with environmental and human-health hazards. Method: In this study, several new combinations of lead free materials ((W-Si), (W-Sn-Ba-EPVC ), (W-Sn-Cd-EPVC)) have been investigated in the energy range of diagnostic radiology in two geometries: narrow and broad beam. Geometries of the radiation attenuation characteristics of these materials was assessed in 40, 60, 90 and 120 kVp and the results compared with those of some lead-containing materials ((Pb-Si), (Pb-EPVC)). Results: Lead shields still provide better protection in low energies (below 40 kVp). Combination of W-Sn-Cd-EPVC has shown the best radiation attenuation features in 60 and 90 kVp and the composition of (W-Sn-Ba-EPVC) represents the best attenuation in 120 kVp, even better than previously mentioned lead- containing composites. Conclusion: Lead free shields are completely effective for protection against X-ray energies in the range of 60 to 120 kVp. PMID:26157732

  17. The development of a self-streamlining flexible walled transonic test section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J.; Wolf, S. W. D.

    1980-01-01

    This design eliminates the uncertainties in data from conventional transonic test sections. Sidewalls are rigid, and the flexible floor and ceiling are positioned by motorized jacks controlled by on-line computer to minimize run times. The tunnel-computer combination is self-streamlining without reference to the model. Data is taken from the model only when the walls are good streamlines, and is corrected for the small, known but inevitable residual interferences. Two-dimensional validation testing in the Mach range up to about 0.85 where the walls are just supercritical shows good agreement with reference data using a height:chord ratio of 1.5. Techniques are under development to extend Mach number above 1. This work has demonstrated the feasibility of almost eliminating wall interferences, improving flow quality, and reducing power requirements or increasing Reynolds number. Extensions to three-dimensional testing are outlined.

  18. A note on problems in 3D boundary layer computations in streamline coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholtysik, M.; Bettelini, M.; Fanneløp, T. K.

    1994-01-01

    Turbulent boundary layers with convergent and divergent external streamlines over a flat plate in the neighbourhood of a plane of symmetry have been computed using a finite-difference method based on streamline coordinates. While the results for the divergent case are generally satisfactory, error growth has been observed for the convergent flowfield. This is most pronounced near the lateral boundary of the computational domain, but also occurs in the plane of symmetry. As an ad-hoc engineering solution, a modified and more restrictive definition of the domain of dependence is proposed, which eliminates the part of the computational domain where the largest error growth occurs. The observed tendency to instability in the convergent case is confirmed by a simplified stability analysis after von Neumann of the uncoupled governing equations.

  19. Streamlining behaviour of the red urchin Strongylocentrotus franciscanus in response to flow.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Hannah L; Britton-Simmons, Kevin H

    2011-08-15

    This work was motivated by subtidal observations of red urchins (Strongylocentrotus franciscanus) moving their spines into streamlined positions as water current increased in the field. Trials in a flume across flow speeds from 0 to 65 cm s(-1) enabled us to observe the change in overall shape of the urchins and quantify the decrease in spine angle that occurred as flow speeds increased. The effect of this behaviour on drag and lift was measured with physical models made from urchin tests with spines in the `up' position (typical in stagnant and slow velocities) and in the `down' position (typical of posture in high velocities). Streamlining spines decreased the drag, but increased the lift experienced by urchin models at flow speeds between 10 and 40 cm s(-1), current velocities that are commonly encountered by these animals in the field in Washington, USA. Total force (combination of drag and lift) was similar for `up' and `down' models at all flow speeds, lift comprising the majority of the force for `down' models, and drag slightly higher for `up' models. Live urchins in the field routinely adopt a streamlined `down' posture in flow, suggesting that they may be better able to cope with lift than drag. This behaviour, although affecting hydrodynamic forces and enabling S. franciscanus to remain attached to the substratum in high currents, may lead to reduced capture of drift kelp, which is entrapped on upright spines and then eaten, delivery of which is positively related to flow speed. Urchins living in deep subtidal habitats rely on drift kelp capture but must stay attached to the substratum to be successful in a habitat. Therefore, this streamlining behaviour may be an important factor enabling S. franciscanus to persist in deep, high-current areas. PMID:21795560

  20. Dynamic finite element simulations of composite stiffened panels with a transverse-isotropic viscoelastic energy dissipation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Thomas; Doreille, Mathias; Merazzi, Silvio; Vescovini, Riccardo; Bisagni, Chiara

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a methodology for predicting the damped response and energy dissipation of laminated composite structures, subjected to dynamic loads. Starting from simple coupon tests to characterize the material, the numerical simulation of damping properties is made possible by a novel linear viscoelastic model that has been developed and implemented in the finite element code B2000++. A nonlinear optimization procedure is adopted to fit experimental data and define the exponential Maxwell parameter model. To illustrate the potentialities of the method, the post-buckling analysis of a relatively complex aeronautical panel is presented, accounting not only for geometric nonlinearities, but also for viscoelastic effects. The results illustrate the effects due to material dissipation, their relation to the effects of inertia, and the influence of geometric imperfections on the response of the panel.