Sample records for compound nmvoc emissions

  1. An improved speciated NMVOC emission inventory for Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Zhang, Q.; Streets, D. G.; He, K.; Shao, M.; Yu, X.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate speciation mapping process of Non-Methane Volatile Organic Compounds (NMVOC) emissions has an important impact on the performance of chemical transfer models in simulating ozone mixing ratios. In this work, we developed an improved speciated anthropogenic NMVOC emissions database based on total NMVOC emissions in the INTEX-B Asian inventory, by using an explicit assignment approach and updated NMVOC profiles. NMVOC profiles were selected and aggregated from a wide range of local measurements and the SPECIATE database developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. To reduce potential uncertainty from individual measurements, composite profiles were developed and applied by grouping and averaging similar source profiles with acceptable quality. We found that many of the NMVOC profiles didn't include Oxygenated Volatile Organic Compounds (OVOCs) when samples were analyzed by GC-MS. The fraction of OVOCs should be corrected when using those profiles for sources with significant emissions of OVOCs. With these improvements, the new NMVOC speciated inventory estimated 57% more OVOCs and 44% less ethene compared to the original INTEX-B inventory, which are more consistent with in-situ measurements. Ozone Formation Potentials (OFPs) of the new inventory are 30% higher than INTEX-B, implying more ozone might be produced in models with the new inventory. Sensitivity tests of different profiles for residential biofuel combustion found that both individual NMVOC emissions and OFPs are very sensitive to profile selection and aggregation, indicating that reliable source profile measurements and a standardized emission process model are desirable for reducing uncertainties in speciated NMVOC emission inventory development.

  2. Spatial and temporal variation of historical anthropogenic NMVOCs emission inventories in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Y.; Cai, H.; Xie, S. D.

    2008-12-01

    Multiyear emission inventories of anthropogenic NMVOCs in China for 1980-2005 were established based on time-varying statistical data, literature surveyed and model calculated emission factors, which were further gridded at a high spatial resolution of 40 km×40 km using the GIS methodology. Results show a continuous growth trend of China's historical NMVOCs emissions during the period of 1980-2005, with the emission increasing by 4.2 times at an annual average rate of 10.6% from 3.91 Tg in 1980 to 16.49 Tg in 2005. Vehicles, biomass burning, industrial processes, fossil fuel combustion, solvent utilization, and storage and transport generated 5.50 Tg, 3.84 Tg, 2.76 Tg, 1.98 Tg, 1.87 Tg, and 0.55 Tg of NMVOCs, respectively, in 2005. Motorcycles, biofuel burning, heavy duty vans, synthetic fibre production, biomass open burning, and industrial and commercial consumption were primary emission sources. Besides, source contributions of NMVOCs emissions showed remarkable annual variation. However, emissions of these sources had been continuously increasing, which coincided well with China's economic growth. Spatial distribution of NMVOCs emissions illustrates that high emissions mainly concentrates in developed regions of northern, eastern and southern coastal areas, which produced more emissions than the relatively underdeveloped western and inland regions. Particularly, southeastern, northern, and central China covering 35.2% of China's territory, generated 59.4% of the total emissions, while the populous capital cities covering merely 4.5% of China's territory, accounted for 24.9% of the national emissions. Annual variation of regional emission intensity shows that emissions concentrating in urban areas tended to transfer to rural areas year by year. Moreover, eastern, southern, central, and northeastern China were typical areas of high emission intensity and had a tendency of expanding to the northwestern China, which revealed the transfer of emission-intensive plants to these areas, together with the increase of biomass open burning.

  3. Impacts of NMVOC emissions on human health in European countries for 2000-2010: Use of sector-specific substance profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Alexis; Hauschild, Michael Z.

    2014-03-01

    Non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOC) are known to cause damages to human health via two main pathways, viz. the direct toxic effects exerted by certain substances (termed here human toxicity) and their indirect effects related to photochemical ozone formation (POF). To comprehensively assess the damages at national level and thus define adequate air pollution abatement policies, substance breakdowns are needed. However, these are not readily available as total NMVOC emissions are only reported at sector level. In this study, we developed a reproducible methodology that combines available speciation profiles, i.e. distributions of substances emitted per type of sources, and sectoral NMVOC information to reach country-specific, substance-specific emission profiles. Annual emission inventories, including 270 single substances and 52 unrefined groups of substances, were determined for 31 European countries within the period 2000-2010. Using life cycle impact assessment methods for POF and human toxicity, impacts on human health were quantified. The results indicated that a strong linear correlation exists between POF impacts and the total NMVOC emissions, suggesting that air pollution abatement policies could use total NMVOC emissions as a proxy for reducing these impacts. Despite underlying uncertainties, the results also demonstrated that the POF impacts from NMVOC are negligible compared to their direct toxic impacts. The analysis of the results revealed that the toxic impacts (i) are caused by few substances, such as formaldehyde, acrolein and furan, (ii) primarily stem from transportation sectors and from residential sources, and (iii) are found not to correlate with total NMVOC emissions. Our findings therefore suggest the need for supporting air pollution abatement strategies with comprehensive impact assessments, which, in addition to complementing emission- and concentration-based indicators, should allow identifying country-specific improvement potentials at substance and sector levels.

  4. Spatial and temporal variation of emission inventories for historical anthropogenic NMVOCs in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Y.; Cai, H.; Xie, S. D.

    2008-06-01

    Multiyear emission inventories of anthropogenic NMVOCs in China for 1980-2005 were compiled based on time-varying statistical data, literature surveyed and model calculated emission factors, and were gridded at a high spatial resolution of 40 km×40 km using the GIS methodology. Chinese NMVOCs emissions had increased by 4.3 times at an annual average rate of 10.7% from 3.92 Tg in 1980 to 16.5 Tg in 2005. Vehicles, biomass burning, industrial processes, fossil fuel combustion, solvent utilization, and storage and transport generated 5.49 Tg, 3.91 Tg, 2.76 Tg, 1.98 Tg, 1.87 Tg, and 0.55 Tg of NMVOCs, respectively. Motorcycles, biofuel burning, heavy-duty vehicles, synthetic fibre production, biomass open burning, and industrial and commercial consumption were primary emission sources. Besides, from 1980 to 2005, vehicle emission increased notably from 6% to 33%, along with a slight increase for fossil fuel combustion from 9% to 12% and for industrial processes from 11% to 17%. Meanwhile, biomass burning emission decreased from 41% to 23%, along with the decrease of storage and transport and solvent utilization from 9% to 3% and from 28% to 11%, respectively. Varieties of NMVOCs emissions coincided well with China's economic growth. Conversions in economic structure and adjustment of fuel consumption structure in China during the period were the reasons for conspicuous variation of source contributions. The developed eastern and coastal regions produced more emissions than the relatively underdeveloped western and inland regions. Particularly, southeastern, northern, and central China covering 35% of China's territory, generated 59% of the total emissions, while the populous capital cities covering merely 4.5% of China's territory, accounted for 25% of the national emissions. Moreover, rural areas also experienced emission growth during the past two and a half decades, the reason of which was transfer of emission-intensive plants from city to county, inefficient fuel utilization, and biomass burning.

  5. NMVOCs speciated emissions from mobile sources and their effect on air quality and human health in the metropolitan area of Buenos Aires, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angiola, Ariela; Dawidowski, Laura; Gomez, Dario; Granier, Claire

    2014-05-01

    Since 2007, more than half of the world's population live in urban areas. Urban atmospheres are dominated by pollutants associated with vehicular emissions. Transport emissions are an important source of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) emissions, species of high interest because of their negative health effects and their contribution to the formation of secondary pollutants responsible for photochemical smog. NMVOCs emissions are generally not very well represented in emission inventories and their speciation presents a high level of uncertainty. In general, emissions from South American countries are still quite unknown for the international community, and usually present a high degree of uncertainty due to the lack of available data to compile emission inventories. Within the Inter-American Institute for Global Change Research (IAI, www.iai.int) projects, UMESAM (Urban Mobile Emissions in South American Megacities) and SAEMC (South American Emissions, Megacities and Climate, http://saemc.cmm.uchile.cl/), the effort was made to compute on-road transport emission inventories for South American megacities, namely Bogota, Buenos Aires, Lima, Sao Paulo and Santiago de Chile, considering megacities as urban agglomerations with more than 5 million inhabitants. The present work is a continuation of these projects, with the aim to extend the calculated NMVOCs emissions inventory into the individual species required by CTMs. The on-road mobile sector of the metropolitan area of Buenos Aires (MABA), Argentina, accounted for 70 Gg of NMVOCs emissions for 2006, without considering two-wheelers. Gasoline light-duty vehicles were responsible for 64% of NMVOCs emissions, followed by compressed natural gas (CNG) light-duty vehicles (22%), diesel heavy-duty vehicles (11%) and diesel light-duty vehicles (7%). NMVOCs emissions were speciated according to fuel and technology, employing the European COPERT (Ntziachristos & Samaras, 2000) VOCs speciation scheme for gasoline and diesel vehicles and the USEPA SPECIATE (Simon et al., 2010) profile for CNG vehicles. NMVOCs emissions were composed of 31% aromatic compounds, 29% linear alkanes, 20% olefins, 12% ramified alkanes, 7% aldehydes and negligible contributions from cycloalkanes, ketones, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other NMVOCs. Aromatic compounds dominated gasoline light-duty vehicles' emissions (~45%), while linear alkanes those of CNG light-duty vehicles (~80%). Aldehydes' contributions increased for diesel light and heavy-duty vehicles. VOCs speciation schemes for transport emissions were collected from the literature from Europe, USA, Asia, Oceania and Latin America with the aim to account for the associated uncertainty by compound for each fuel and technology type. The resulting individual NMVOCs emissions were used to calculate the corresponding tropospheric ozone formation (Carter, 1994), as well as the human toxicity potential in terms of 1.4 dichlorobenzene. Olefins and aromatic compounds in terms of species, and gasoline in terms of fuels, were found to impose the highest risk in urban environments regarding air quality and human health.

  6. Chemical speciation and source apportionment of Non-Methane Volatile Organic Compounds (NMVOCs) in a Middle Eastern country

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salameh, Therese; Sauvage, Stéphane; Afif, Charbel; Borbon, Agnès; Locoge, Nadine

    2014-05-01

    NMVOCs, emitted from various sources, are of particular interest since they contribute to the formation of tropospheric ozone, PAN and secondary organic aerosols resulting in negative impacts on human health, climate and on the environment. To identify abatement measures, a profound knowledge of emission sources and their composition is a prerequisite. Air pollution in the Middle East region remains difficult to assess and understand because of a lack of ground-based measurements and the limited information on NMVOC chemical speciation and source apportionment. Based on a large database of NMVOC observations obtained in Beirut, the capital of Lebanon (a developing country in the Middle East region, located in Western Asia on the eastern shore of the Mediterranean Sea), the overall objective of this work is to apportion the sources of NMVOCs encountered in Lebanon. First, source profiles were determined with field measurements close to the main potential emitters namely the road transport, gasoline vapour, power generation and solvent uses. The results obtained are compared to other studies held in other regions and are used to assess the emission inventory developed for Lebanon. Secondly, two intensive field campaigns were held in a receptor site in Beirut during summer 2011 and winter 2012 in order to obtain a large time resolved dataset. The PMF analysis of this dataset was applied to apportion anthropogenic sources in this area. In both seasons, combustion (road transport and power generation) and gasoline evaporation, especially in winter, were the main sources contributing to the NMVOCs in Beirut. The results will support model implementation especially by completing the emission inventory established for the year 2010 by Waked et al. 2012 according to the EEA/EMEP guidelines because of the lack of Lebanon-specific emission factor.

  7. Air quality and radiative forcing impacts of anthropogenic volatile organic compound emissions from ten world regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, M. M.; Schwarzkopf, M. D.; Adelman, Z.; West, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) influence air quality and global climate change through their effects on secondary air pollutants and climate forcers. Here we simulate the air quality and radiative forcing (RF) impacts of changes in ozone, methane, and sulfate from halving anthropogenic NMVOC emissions globally and from 10 regions individually, using a global chemical transport model and a standalone radiative transfer model. Halving global NMVOC emissions decreases global annual average tropospheric methane and ozone by 36.6 ppbv and 3.3 Tg, respectively, and surface ozone by 0.67 ppbv. All regional reductions slow the production of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), resulting in regional to intercontinental PAN decreases and regional NOx increases. These NOx increases drive tropospheric ozone increases nearby or downwind of source regions in the Southern Hemisphere (South America, Southeast Asia, Africa, and Australia). Some regions' NMVOC emissions contribute importantly to air pollution in other regions, such as East Asia, the Middle East, and Europe, whose impact on US surface ozone is 43%, 34%, and 34% of North America's impact. Global and regional NMVOC reductions produce widespread negative net RFs (cooling) across both hemispheres from tropospheric ozone and methane decreases, and regional warming and cooling from changes in tropospheric ozone and sulfate (via several oxidation pathways). The 100 yr and 20 yr global warming potentials (GWP100, GWP20) are 2.36 and 5.83 for the global reduction, and 0.079 to 6.05 and -1.13 to 18.9 among the 10 regions. The NMVOC RF and GWP estimates are generally lower than previously modeled estimates, due to the greater NMVOC/NOx emissions ratios simulated, which result in less sensitivity to NMVOC emissions changes and smaller global O3 burden responses, in addition to differences in the representation of NMVOCs and oxidation chemistry among models. Accounting for a fuller set of RF contributions may change the relative magnitude of each region's impacts. The large variability in the RF and GWP of NMVOCs among regions suggest that regionally specific metrics may be necessary to include NMVOCs in multi-gas climate trading schemes.

  8. Historical industrial emissions of non-methane volatile organic compounds in China for the period of 1980-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Kaiqiong; Yang, Lixian; Lin, Junmin; Wang, Peitao; Yang, Yi; Ye, Daiqi; Wang, Liming

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a new classification of industrial sector on basis of a source-tracing method for the historical industrial emissions of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs). The industrial sources were divided into four major source categories: production of NMVOCs, storage and transport, industrial processes using NMVOCs as raw materials, and processes using NMVOCs-containing products. Multiyear emission inventories of NMVOCs from industrial sources were established for the period of 1980-2010 in China, covering 98 contributing industrial sources. The inventories were developed by the emission factor method, and further gridded at a spatial resolution of 50 km × 50 km based on GIS methodology, using population data as spatial surrogate. The result showed that China's industrial NMVOCs emissions had increased by 11.6 times at an average annual rate of 8.5% from 1.15 Tg in 1980 to 13.35 Tg in 2010. The four major source categories generated 19.6% (2.63 Tg, production of NMVOCs), 9.6% (1.295 Tg, storage and transport), 13.2% (1.769 Tg, industrial processes using NMVOCs as raw materials), and 57.4% (7.662 Tg, processes using NMVOCs-containing products) of the total emissions from China in 2010. Moreover, the top four industrial emissions sources were oil refinery, architectural decoration, machinery equipment and printing, accounted for 48.3% all together. With respect to the spatial distribution, the emissions mostly occurred in the eastern, northern and southern parts of China, all being much higher than that in the western part. The top four emission provinces were Shandong, Jiangsu, Guangdong, and Zhejiang, accounting for 38.3% of the national emissions. As for the past 30 years, the national industrial NMVOCs emissions increased year-by-year, being in pace with the accelerated industrialization process and the sharp economic growth, especially the rapid expansion of the high-emission industries. Particularly, the oil refinery, product oil and solvent distribution, architectural decoration, and mechanical equipment manufacture became the four largest contributors, accounting for 15.9-34.3%, 6.5-10.2%, 7-8%, and 6-7% of national industrial NMVOCs.

  9. Characterizing non-methane volatile organic compounds emissions from a swine concentrated animal feeding operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumsey, Ian C.; Aneja, Viney P.; Lonneman, William A.

    2012-02-01

    Emissions of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) were determined from a swine concentrated animal feeding operation (CAFO) in North Carolina. NMVOCs were measured in air samples collected in SUMMA and fused-silica lined (FSL) canisters and were analyzed using a gas chromatography flame ionization detection (GC-FID) system. Measurements were made from both an anaerobic lagoon and barn in each of the four seasonal sampling periods during the period June 2007 through April 2008. In each sampling period, nine to eleven canister samples were taken from both the anaerobic lagoon and barn over a minimum of four different days during a period of ˜1 week. Measurements of meteorological and physiochemical parameters were also made during the sampling period. In lagoon samples, six NMVOCs were identified that had significantly larger emissions in comparison to other NMVOCs. This included three alcohols (ethanol, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, and methanol), two ketones (acetone and methyl ethyl ketone (MEK)) and an aldehyde (acetaldehyde). The overall average fluxes for these NMVOCs, ranged from 0.18 ?g m -2 min -1 for 2-ethyl-1-hexanol to 2.11 ?g m -2 min -1 for acetone, with seasonal fluxes highest in the summer for four (acetone, acetaldehyde, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and MEK) of the six compounds In barn samples, there were six NMVOCs that had significantly larger concentrations and emissions in comparison to other NMVOCs. These consisted of two alcohols (methanol and ethanol), an aldehyde (acetaldehyde), two ketones (acetone and 2,3-butanedione), and a phenol (4-methylphenol). Overall average barn concentration ranged from 2.87 ppb for 4-methylphenol to 16.12 ppb for ethanol. Overall average normalized barn emission rates ranged from 0.10 g day -1 AU -1 (1 AU (animal unit) = 500 kg of live animal weight) for acetaldehyde to 0.45 g day -1 AU -1 for ethanol. The NMVOCs, 4-methylphenol and 2,3-butanedione, which have low odor thresholds (odor thresholds = 1.86 ppb and 0.068-0.264 ppb for 4-methylphenol, and = 4.37 ppb and 1.42-7.39 ppb for 2-3-butanedione) and an offensive odor were identified in canister samples. Both 4-methylphenol and 2,3-butanedione barn concentrations exceeded their odor thresholds frequently. HAPs were identified in lagoon samples (methanol, acetaldehyde and MEK) and barn samples (methanol, acetaldehyde and 4-methylphenol) that were also classified as NMVOCs with significantly larger lagoon and barn emissions in comparison with other NMVOCs. The overall average lagoon fluxes and overall average normalized barn emissions for NMVOCs reported in this paper were used to estimate their North Carolina swine CAFO emissions. Of the NMVOCs, ethanol was estimated to have the largest North Carolina swine CAFO emission at 206,367 kg yr -1. The barns were found to have higher emissions than the lagoons for all NMVOCs, contributing between 68.6 to ˜100% of individual compounds estimated North Carolina swine CAFO emissions.

  10. Emissions of nonmethane volatile organic compounds from open crop residue burning in the Yangtze River Delta region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Shinji; Tanimoto, Hiroshi; Inomata, Satoshi; Saito, Shinji; Pan, Xiaole; Kanaya, Yugo; Taketani, Fumikazu; Wang, Zifa; Chen, Hongyan; Dong, Huabin; Zhang, Meigen; Yamaji, Kazuyo

    2014-06-01

    Open crop residue burning is one of the major sources of air pollutants including the precursors of photooxidants like ozone and secondary organic aerosol. We made measurements of trace gases including nonmethane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) in a rural area in central East China in June 2010. During the campaign, we identified six biomass burning events in total through the simultaneous enhancement of carbon monoxide and acetonitrile. Four cases represented fresh plumes (<2 h after emission), and two cases represented aged plumes (>3 h after emission), as determined by photochemical age. While we were not able to quantify formic acid, we identified an enhancement of major oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) as well as low molecular alkanes and alkenes, and aromatic hydrocarbons in these plumes. The observed normalized excess mixing ratios (NEMRs) of OVOCs and alkenes showed dependence on air mass age, even in fresh smoke plumes, supporting the view that these species are rapidly produced and destructed, respectively, during plume evolution. Based on the NEMR data in the fresh plumes, we calculated the emission factors (EFs) of individual NMVOC. The comparison to previous reports suggests that the EFs of formaldehyde and acetic acid have been overestimated, while those of alkenes have been underestimated. Finally, we suggest that open burning of wheat residue in China releases about 0.34 Tg NMVOCs annually. If we applied the same EFs to all crops, the annual NMVOC emissions would be 2.33 Tg. The EFs of speciated NMVOCs can be used to improve the existing inventories.

  11. Air quality and radiative forcing impacts of anthropogenic volatile organic compound emissions from ten world regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, M. M.; Schwarzkopf, M. D.; Adelman, Z.; West, J. J.

    2013-08-01

    Non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) influence air quality and global climate change through their effects on secondary air pollutants and climate forcers. Here we simulate the air quality and radiative forcing (RF) impacts of changes in ozone, methane, and sulfate from halving anthropogenic NMVOC emissions globally and from 10 regions individually, using a global chemical transport model and a standalone radiative transfer model. Halving global NMVOC emissions decreases global annual average tropospheric methane and ozone by 36.6 ppbv and 3.3 Tg, respectively, and surface ozone by 0.67 ppbv. All regional reductions slow the production of PAN, resulting in regional to intercontinental PAN decreases and regional NOx increases. These NOx increases drive tropospheric ozone increases nearby or downwind of source regions in the Southern Hemisphere (South America, Southeast Asia, Africa, and Australia). Some regions' NMVOC emissions contribute importantly to air pollution in other regions, such as East Asia, Middle East, and Europe, whose impact on US surface ozone is 43%, 34%, and 34% of North America's impact. Global and regional NMVOC reductions produce widespread negative net RFs (cooling) across both hemispheres from tropospheric ozone and methane decreases, and regional warming and cooling from changes in tropospheric ozone and sulfate (via several oxidation pathways). The total global net RF for NMVOCs is estimated as 0.0277 W m-2 (~1.8% of CO2 RF since the preindustrial). The 100 yr and 20 yr global warming potentials (GWP100, GWP20) are 2.36 and 5.83 for the global reduction, and 0.079 to 6.05 and -1.13 to 18.9 among the 10 regions. The NMVOC RF and GWP estimates are generally lower than previously modeled estimates, due to differences among models in ozone, methane, and sulfate sensitivities, and the climate forcings included in each estimate. Accounting for a~fuller set of RF contributions may change the relative magnitude of each region's impacts. The large variability in the RF and GWP of NMVOCs among regions suggest that regionally-specific metrics may be necessary to include NMVOCs in multi-gas climate trading schemes.

  12. Emission, speciation, and evaluation of impacts of non-methane volatile organic compounds from open dump site.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Dipanjali; Ray, Sandipan; Chakraborty, Sucharita; Rao, Padma S; Akolkar, A B; Chowdhury, M; Srivastava, Anjali

    2014-07-01

    Surface emission from Dhapa, the only garbage disposal ground in Kolkata, is a matter of concern to the local environment and also fuels the issues of occupational and environmental health. Surface emission of the Dhapa landfill site was studied using a flux chamber measurement for nonmethane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs). Eighteen noncarbonyl volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and 14 carbonyl VOCs, including suspected and known carcinogens, were found in appreciable concentrations. The concentrations of the target species in the flux chamber were found to be significantly higher for most of the species in summer than winter. Surface emission rate of landfill gas was estimated by using two different approaches to assess the applicability for an open landfill site. It was found that the emissions predicted using the model Land GEM version 3.02 is one to two orders less than the emission rate calculated from flux chamber measurement for the target species. Tropospheric ozone formation has a serious impact for NMVOC emission. The total ozone-forming potential (OFP) of the Dhapa dumping ground considering all target NMVOCs was estimated to be 4.9E+04 and 1.2E+05 g/day in winter and summer, respectively. Also, it was found that carbonyl VOCs play a more important role than noncarbonyl VOCs for tropospheric ozone formation. Cumulative cancer risk estimated for all the carcinogenic species was found to be 2792 for 1 million population, while the total noncancer hazard index (HI) was estimated to be 246 for the occupational exposure to different compounds from surface emission to the dump-site workers at Dhapa. Implications: This paper describes the real-time surface emission of NMVOCs from an open municipal solid waste (MSW) dump site studied using a flux chamber. Our study findings indicate that while planning for new landfill site in tropical meteorology, real-time emission data must be considered, rather than relying on modeled data. The formation of tropospheric ozone from emitted NMVOC has also been studied. Our result shows how an open landfill site acts as a source and adds to the tropospheric ozone for the airshed of a metropolitan city. PMID:25122957

  13. Inventorying emissions from nature in Europe

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Simpson; Wilfried Winiwarter; Gunnar Börjesson; Steve Cinderby; Antonio Ferreiro; Alex Guenther; C. Nicholas Hewitt; Robert Janson; M. Aslam K. Khalil; Susan Owen; Tom E. Pierce; Hans Puxbaum; Martha Shearer; Ute Skiba; Rainer Steinbrecher; Leonor Tarrasón; Mats G. Öquist

    1999-01-01

    As part of the work of the Economic Commission for Europe of the United Nations Task Force on Emission Inventories, a new set of guidelines has been developed for assessing the emissions of sulphur, nitrogen oxides, NH3, CH4, and nonmethane volatile organic compounds (NMVOC) from biogenic and other natural sources in Europe. This paper gives the background to these guidelines,

  14. Emission trends and mitigation options for air pollutants in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. X.; Zhao, B.; Cai, S. Y.; Klimont, Z.; Nielsen, C.; McElroy, M. B.; Morikawa, T.; Woo, J. H.; Kim, Y.; Fu, X.; Xu, J. Y.; Hao, J. M.; He, K. B.

    2014-01-01

    Emissions of air pollutants in East Asia play an important role in the regional and global atmospheric environment. In this study we evaluated the recent emission trends of sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matters (PM), and non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOC) in East Asia, and projected their future emissions up to 2030 with six emission scenarios. The results will provide future emission projections for the modeling community of the model inter-comparison program for Asia (MICS-Asia). During 2005-2010, the emissions of SO2 and PM2.5 in East Asia decreased by 15 % and 11%, respectively, mainly attributable to the large scale deployment of FGD for China's power plants, and the promotion of high-efficient PM removal technologies in China's power plants and cement industry. During this period, the emissions of NOx and NMVOC increased by 25% and 15%, driven by the rapid increase in the emissions from China owing to inadequate control strategies. In contrast, the NOx and NMVOC emissions in East Asia except China decreased by 13-17% mainly due to the implementation of tight vehicle emission standards in Japan and South Korea. Under current legislation and current implementation status, NOx, SO2, and NMVOC emissions in East Asia are estimated to increase by about one quarter by 2030 from the 2010 levels, while PM2.5 emissions are expected to decrease by 7%. Assuming enforcement of new energy-saving policies, emissions of NOx, SO2, PM2.5 and NMVOC in East Asia are expected to decrease by 28%, 36%, 28%, and 15% respectively compared with the baseline case. The implementation of the "progressive" end-of-pipe control measures is expected to lead to another one third reduction of the baseline emissions of NOx, and about one quarter reduction for SO2, PM2.5, and NMVOC. With the full implementation of maximum feasible reduction measures, the emissions of NOx, SO2, and PM2.5 in East Asia are expected to account for only about one quarter and NMVOC for one third of the levels of the baseline projection. Compared with previous projections, this study projects larger reduction in NOx and SO2 emissions by considering aggressive govermental plans and standards scheduled to be implemented in the next decade, and quantifies the significant effects of detailed progressive control measures on NMVOC emissions up to 2030.

  15. Emission trends and mitigation options for air pollutants in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. X.; Zhao, B.; Cai, S. Y.; Klimont, Z.; Nielsen, C. P.; Morikawa, T.; Woo, J. H.; Kim, Y.; Fu, X.; Xu, J. Y.; Hao, J. M.; He, K. B.

    2014-07-01

    Emissions of air pollutants in East Asia play an important role in the regional and global atmospheric environment. In this study we evaluated the recent emission trends of sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter (PM), and non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOC) in East Asia, and projected their future emissions up until 2030 with six emission scenarios. The results will provide future emission projections for the modeling community of the model inter-comparison program for Asia (MICS-Asia). During 2005-2010, the emissions of SO2 and PM2.5 in East Asia decreased by 15 and 12%, respectively, mainly attributable to the large-scale deployment of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) at China's power plants, and the promotion of highly efficient PM removal technologies in China's power plants and cement industry. During this period, the emissions of NOx and NMVOC increased by 25 and 15%, driven by rapid increase in the emissions from China due to inadequate control strategies. In contrast, the NOx and NMVOC emissions in East Asia except China decreased by 13-17%, mainly due to the implementation of stringent vehicle emission standards in Japan and South Korea. Under current regulations and current levels of implementation, NOx, SO2, and NMVOC emissions in East Asia are projected to increase by about one-quarter over 2010 levels by 2030, while PM2.5 emissions are expected to decrease by 7%. Assuming enforcement of new energy-saving policies, emissions of NOx, SO2, PM2.5 and NMVOC in East Asia are expected to decrease by 28, 36, 28, and 15%, respectively, compared with the baseline case. The implementation of "progressive" end-of-pipe control measures would lead to another one-third reduction of the baseline emissions of NOx, and about one-quarter reduction of SO2, PM2.5, and NMVOC. Assuming the full application of technically feasible energy-saving policies and end-of-pipe control technologies, the emissions of NOx, SO2, and PM2.5 in East Asia would account for only about one-quarter, and NMVOC for one-third, of the levels of the baseline projection. Compared with previous projections, this study projects larger reductions in NOx and SO2 emissions by considering aggressive governmental plans and standards scheduled to be implemented in the next decade, and quantifies the significant effects of detailed progressive control measures on NMVOC emissions up until 2030.

  16. High Arctic Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schollert, Michelle; Buchard, Sebrina; Faubert, Patrick; Michelsen, Anders; Rinnan, Riikka

    2013-04-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emitted from terrestrial vegetation participate in oxidative reactions, affecting the tropospheric ozone concentration and the lifetimes of greenhouse gasses such as methane. Also, they affect the formation of secondary organic aerosols. BVOCs thus provide a strong link between the terrestrial biosphere, the atmosphere and the climate. Global models of BVOC emissions have assumed minimal emissions from the high latitudes due to low temperatures, short growing seasons and sparse vegetation cover. However, measurements from this region of the world are lacking and emissions from the High Arctic have not been published yet. The aim of this study was to obtain the first estimates for BVOC emissions from the High Arctic. Hereby, we wish to add new knowledge to the understanding of global BVOC emissions. Measurements were conducted in NE Greenland (74°30' N, 20°30' W) in four vegetation communities in the study area. These four vegetation communities were dominated by Cassiope tetragona, Salix arctica, Vaccinium uliginosum and Kobresia myosuroides/Dryas octopetela/Salix arctica, respectively. Emissions were measured by enclosure technique and collection of volatiles into adsorbent cartridges in August 2009. The volatiles were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry following thermal desorption. Isoprene showed highest emissions in S. arctica-dominated heath, where it was the dominant single BVOC. However, isoprene emission decreased below detection limit in the end of August when the temperature was at or below 10°C. According to a principal component analysis, monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions were especially associated with C. tetragona-dominated heath. Especially S. arctica and C. tetragona dominated heaths showed distinct patterns of emitted BVOCs. Emissions of BVOC from the studied high arctic heaths were clearly lower than the emissions observed previously in subarctic heaths with more dense vegetation and higher ambient temperature. However, high arctic BVOC emissions are expected to increase in the future as a result of the predicted pronounced climate warming effects in the High Arctic. Therefore, we suggest that further studies should be conducted to investigate the effects of climate changes in the region in order to gain new knowledge and understanding of future global BVOC emissions.

  17. Emission inventory of non-methane volatile organic compounds from anthropogenic sources in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sumit; Goel, Anju; Gupta, Divya; Kumar, Atul; Mishra, Arabinda; Kundu, Seema; Chatani, Satoru; Klimont, Zbigniew

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a new inventory of NMVOC emissions from anthropogenic sources in India for the year 2010. The main new element of this inventory, compared to previous work for India, is the use of new and more detailed data on solvent use sectors and oil production and distribution system. The results are presented at the national and state level for major sectors and VOC species. Finally, the annual emissions were spatially distributed at a fine resolution of 36 × 36 km2 using detailed spatial information. The total anthropogenic NMVOC emissions in India in 2010 were estimated at 9.81 Tg which is in the range of the estimates made in most other studies. The majority of emissions (60%) originated from residential combustion of biomass for cooking. Solvent use sectors and oil production and distribution contributed about 20% followed by transport (12%) and open burning of agricultural residues (7%). Specie-wise distribution shows highest contribution from alkenes and alkynes (38%), followed by alkanes (22%), and aromatics (16%).

  18. Predicting the emission of volatile organic compounds from silage systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a precursor to smog, emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere is an environmental concern in some regions. The major VOC emission source from farms is silage, with emissions coming from the silo face, mixing wagon, and feed bunk. The major compounds emitted are alcohols wit...

  19. GLOBAL INVENTORY OF VOLATILE COMPOUND EMISSIONS FROM ANTHROPOGENIC SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a global inventory anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions that includes a separate inventory for each of seven pollutant groups--paraffins, olefins, aromatics, formaldehyde, other aldehydes, other aromatics, and marginally reactive compounds....

  20. GLOBAL INVENTORY OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS FORM ANTHROPOGENIC SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a global inventory anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions that includes a separate inventory for each of seven pollutant groups--paraffins, olefins, aromatics, formaldehyde, other aldehydes, other aromatics, and marginally reactive compounds....

  1. EMISSION OF VOLATILE COMPOUNDS BY SEEDS UNDER DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Small mammals locate buried wet seeds more efficiently than buried dry seeds. This may be attributable to emission of volatile compounds by the seeds. To test this hypothesis I measured emission of volatile compounds from seeds of three plant species (Pinus contorta, Purshia tr...

  2. Non-methane volatile organic compounds in Africa: A view from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marais, Eloise Ann

    Isoprene emissions affect human health, air quality, and the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. Globally anthropogenic non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOC) emissions are lower than that of isoprene, but local hotspots are hazardous to human health and air quality. In Africa the tropics are a large source of isoprene, while Nigeria appears as a large contributor to regional anthropogenic NMVOC emissions. I make extensive use of space-based formaldehyde (HCHO) observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and the chemical transport model (CTM) GEOS-Chem to estimate and examine seasonality of isoprene emissions across Africa, and identify sources and air quality consequences of anthropogenic NMVOC emissions in Nigeria. To estimate isoprene emissions I first developed a filtering scheme to remove (1) contamination from biomass burning and anthropogenic influences; and (2) displacement of HCHO from the isoprene emission source diagnosed with the GEOS-Chem CTM. Conversion to isoprene emissions is with NOx-dependent GEOS-Chem HCHO yields, obtained as the local sensitivity S of the HCHO column ?HCHO to a perturbation Delta in isoprene emissions EISOP (S = Delta?HCHO/DeltaE ISOP). The error in OMI-derived isoprene emissions is 40% at low levels of NOx and 40-90% under high-NOx conditions and is reduced by spatial and temporal averaging to the extent that errors are random. Weak isoprene emission seasonality in equatorial forests is driven predominantly by temperature, while large seasonality in northern and southern savannas is driven by temperature and leaf area index. The largest contribution of African isoprene emissions to surface ozone and particulate matter, determined with GEOS-Chem, of 8 ppbv and 1.5 ?g m-3, respectively, is over West Africa. The OMI HCHO data feature a large enhancement over Nigeria that is due to anthropogenic NMVOC emissions. With the OMI HCHO data, coincident satellite observations of atmospheric composition, aircraft measurements, and GEOS-Chem I estimate Nigerian NMVOC emissions that are higher per capita than China (5.7 Tg C a-1). Should Nigeria develop its electricity sector to sustain economic growth with local natural gas and coal reserves NO x emissions will exacerbate wintertime (December-February) surface ozone pollution that exceeds 90 ppbv due to poor ventilation and the Harmattan inversion layer.

  3. 7, 68436902, 2007 An Asian emission

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to inte- grate historical, present, and future emissions in Asia on the basis of a consistent methodology for 2010 and 2020 of SO2, NOx, CO, NMVOC, black carbon (BC), and organic carbon (OC) from fuel combustion by increases in coal combustion in the power plants and industrial sectors. NMVOC emissions also rapidly

  4. Volatile organic compound emissions from dairy facilities in central California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from dairy facilities are thought to be an important contributor to high ozone levels in central California, but emissions inventories from these sources contain significant uncertainties. In this work, VOC emissions were measured at two central Califor...

  5. POTENTIAL EMISSIONS OF HAZARDOUS ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM SEWAGE SLUDGE INCINERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory thermal decomposition studies were undertaken to evaluate potential organic emissions from sewage sludge incinerators. Precisely controlled thermal decomposition experiments were conducted on sludge spiked with mixtures of hazardous organic compounds, on the mixtures o...

  6. COMPOUND FORMS OF FOSSIL FUEL FLY ASH EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A methodology for identifying inorganic compounds in particulate emissions from fossil fuel combustion processes is described. Samples collected from power plants burning coal and oil fuels of different compositions provided a typical range of fly ashes for the investigations. El...

  7. GLOBAL INVENTORY OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS FROM ANTHROPOGENIC SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the development of a global inventory of anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. t includes VOC estimates for seven classes of VOCs: paraffins, olefins, aromatics (benzene, toluene, xylene), formaldehyde, other aldehydes, other aromatics, and ...

  8. EMISSIONS OF REACTIVE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM UTILITY BOILERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of the measurement of emission factors for reactive volatile organic compounds (VOC) from 43 utility boilers firing bituminous coal, lignite, oil, and natural gas. The boilers ranged in size from 9 to 910 MW. The median reactive VOC emission factors were ...

  9. MICROBIAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION RATES AND EXPOSURE MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the results from a study that examined microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC) emissions from six fungi and one bacterial species (Streptomyces spp.) commonly found in indoor environments. Data are presented on peak emission rates from inoculated agar plate...

  10. EMISSIONS OF FUMIGANT COMPOUNDS THROUGH AGRICULTURAL FILMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Controlling atmospheric emissions of soil-applied fumigants is important for protecting air quality, and containment of fumigants in the soil increases efficacy. High-density polyethylene (HDPE) films are commonly used in soil fumigation with methyl bromide (MeBr), but these films are permeable to M...

  11. CASE STUDY OF SULPHUR COMPOUNDS EMISSIONS CHARACTERIZATION

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in approximately five minutes with a Flame Ionisation Detector (FID). The funnel (an open chamber, 0.7 m diameter analysers and different chambers. The static chamber was first used in order to locate the methane hot spots of the hydrogen sulphide emissions was monitored with two dynamic chambers and a period of several days. Hydrogen

  12. Emission of charged particles from excited compound nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Kalandarov, Sh. A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Institute for Nuclear Physics, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2010-11-24

    The formation and decay of excited compound nucleus are studied within the dinuclear system model[1]. The cross sections of complex fragment emission are calculated and compared with experimental data for the reactions {sup 3}He+{sup 108}Ag, {sup 78,82}Kr+{sup 12}C. Angular momentum dependence of cluster emission in {sup 78}Kr+{sup 12}C and {sup 40}Ca+{sup 78}Kr reactions is demonstrated.

  13. Compilation and analyses of emissions inventories for NOAA`s atmospheric chemistry project. Progress report, August 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Benkovitz, C.M.; Mubaraki, M.A.

    1997-09-01

    Global inventories of anthropogenic emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for circa 1985 and 1990 and Non-Methane Volatile Organic Compounds (NMVOCs) for circa 1990 have been compiled by this project. Work on the inventories has been carried out under the umbrella of the Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA) of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) Program. The 1985 NO{sub x} inventory was compiled using default data sets of global emissions that were refined via the use of more detailed regional data sets; this inventory is being distributed to the scientific community at large as the GEIA Version 1A inventory. Global emissions of NO{sub x} for 1985 are estimated to be 21 Tg N y{sup -1}, with approximately 84% originating in the Northern Hemisphere. The 1990 inventories of NO{sub x} and NMVOCs were compiled using unified methodologies and data sets in collaboration with the Netherlands National Institute of Public Health and Environmental Protection (Rijksinstituut Voor Volksgezondheid en Milieuhygiene, RIVM) and the Division of Technology for Society of the Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research, (IMW-TNO); these emissions will be used as the default estimates to be updated with more accurate regional data. The NMVOC inventory was gridded and speciated into 23 chemical categories.

  14. Measuring Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds from Silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions are considered to be important precursors to smog and ozone production. An experimental protocol was developed to obtain undisturbed silage samples from silage storages. Samples were placed in a wind tunnel where temperature, humidity, and air flow were cont...

  15. A global model of natural volatile organic compound emissions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alex Guenther; C. Nicholas Hewitt; David Erickson; Ray Fall; Chris Geron; Tom Graedel; Peter Harley; Lee Klinger; Manuel Lerdau; W. A. McKay; Tom Pierce; Bob Scholes; Rainer Steinbrecher; Raja Tallamraju; John Taylor; Pat Zimmerman

    1995-01-01

    Numerical assessments of global air quality and potential changes in atmospheric chemical constituents require estimates of the surface fluxes of a variety of trace gas species. We have developed a global model to estimate emissions of volatile organic compounds from natural sources (NVOC). Methane is not considered here and has been reviewed in detail elsewhere. The model has a highly

  16. Biogenic volatile organic compound emissions from vegetation fires

    PubMed Central

    CICCIOLI, PAOLO; CENTRITTO, MAURO; LORETO, FRANCESCO

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to provide an overview of the current state of the art on research into the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from vegetation fires. Significant amounts of VOCs are emitted from vegetation fires, including several reactive compounds, the majority belonging to the isoprenoid family, which rapidly disappear in the plume to yield pollutants such as secondary organic aerosol and ozone. This makes determination of fire-induced BVOC emission difficult, particularly in areas where the ratio between VOCs and anthropogenic NOx is favourable to the production of ozone, such as Mediterranean areas and highly anthropic temperate (and fire-prone) regions of the Earth. Fire emissions affecting relatively pristine areas, such as the Amazon and the African savannah, are representative of emissions of undisturbed plant communities. We also examined expected BVOC emissions at different stages of fire development and combustion, from drying to flaming, and from heatwaves coming into contact with unburned vegetation at the edge of fires. We conclude that forest fires may dramatically change emission factors and the profile of emitted BVOCs, thereby influencing the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere, the physiology of plants and the evolution of plant communities within the ecosystem. PMID:24689733

  17. Biogenic volatile organic compound emissions from vegetation fires.

    PubMed

    Ciccioli, Paolo; Centritto, Mauro; Loreto, Francesco

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this paper was to provide an overview of the current state of the art on research into the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from vegetation fires. Significant amounts of VOCs are emitted from vegetation fires, including several reactive compounds, the majority belonging to the isoprenoid family, which rapidly disappear in the plume to yield pollutants such as secondary organic aerosol and ozone. This makes determination of fire-induced BVOC emission difficult, particularly in areas where the ratio between VOCs and anthropogenic NOx is favourable to the production of ozone, such as Mediterranean areas and highly anthropic temperate (and fire-prone) regions of the Earth. Fire emissions affecting relatively pristine areas, such as the Amazon and the African savannah, are representative of emissions of undisturbed plant communities. We also examined expected BVOC emissions at different stages of fire development and combustion, from drying to flaming, and from heatwaves coming into contact with unburned vegetation at the edge of fires. We conclude that forest fires may dramatically change emission factors and the profile of emitted BVOCs, thereby influencing the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere, the physiology of plants and the evolution of plant communities within the ecosystem. PMID:24689733

  18. VOC (VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION FACTORS FOR THE NAPAP (NATIONAL ACID PRECIPITATION ASSESSMENT PROGRAM) EMISSION INVENTORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of the generation of emission factors for volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions for a number of source classification categories (SCCs), as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). Each SCC represents a process or function t...

  19. Evaluation of Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Megacities and Wildfires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmons, L. K.; Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Riemer, D. D.; Lamarque, J.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Mirage Science Team; Arctas Science Team

    2011-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play a critical role in determining air quality through their impact on ozone production and other pollutants. Tropospheric chemistry models use a variety of treatments for the lumping of VOCs in their chemical mechanisms, as a compromise between detailed treatment and computational speed. However, emission inventories are frequently provided for only total VOCs with little or no information on how to split the emissions among the model species, introducing additional uncertainty to the model simulations. Global model simulations using the Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers (MOZART-4) and several different emission inventories are evaluated through detailed comparison to aircraft and surface observations. In particular, correlations between measured VOCs and CO are used to test the emission inventory emission ratios of the modeled VOC species. For example, megacity VOC emissions will be evaluated with surface measurements in Mumbai, Shanghai and Tokyo, as well as aircraft measurements from the NSF/MIRAGE experiment downwind of Mexico City. Wildfire emissions in Siberia, Canada and California will be evaluated using airborne observations of the NASA/ARCTAS experiment.

  20. Volatile organic compound emissions: an inventory for Western Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, A.H.; Campobasso, A.; Camps, R.; Cremer, G.; Long, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    The report gives details of an inventory compiled by CONCAWE and covering man-made non-methane volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions in Western Europe. The survey shows that the major man-made sources are road transport and solvents, each contributing around 40%. Total oil industry operations account for around 8%, with refining operations contribution about 2%. The major oil industry contribution comes from the distribution of gasoline, including vehicle refuelling (5%).

  1. Emission of volatile sulfur compounds from spruce trees

    SciTech Connect

    Rennenberg, H.; Huber, B.; Schroeder, P.; Stahl, K.; Haunold, W.; Georgil, H.W.; Slovik, S.; Pfanz, H. (Fraunhofer Institut fuer Atmosphaerische Umweltforschung, Garmisch-Partenkirchen (West Germany))

    1990-03-01

    Spruce (Picea abies L.) trees from the same clone were supplied with different, but low, amounts of plant available sulfate in the soil (9.7-18.1 milligrams per 100 grams of soil). Branches attached to the trees were enclosed in a dynamic gas exchange cuvette and analyzed for the emission of volatile sulfur compounds. Independent of the sulfate supply in the soil, H{sub 2}S was the predominant reduced sulfur compound continuously emitted from the branches with high rates during the day and low rates in the night. In the light, as well as in the dark, the rates of H{sub 2}S emission increased exponentially with increasing water vapor flux from the needles. Approximately 1 nanomole of H{sub 2}S was found to be emitted per mole of water. When stomata were closed completely, only minute emission of H{sub 2}S was observed. Apparently, H{sub 2}S emission from the needles is highly dependent on stromatal aperture, and permeation through the cuticle is negligible. In several experiments, small amounts of dimethylsulfide and carbonylsulfide were also detected in a portion of the samples. However, SO{sub 2} was the only sulfur compound consistently emitted from branches of spruce trees in addition to H{sub 2}S. Emission of SO{sub 2} mainly proceeded via an outburst starting before the beginning of the light period. The total amount of SO{sub 2} emitted from the needles during this outburst was correlated with the plant available sulfate in the soil. The diurnal changes in sulfur metabolism that may result in an outburst of SO{sub 2} are discussed.

  2. 75 FR 82363 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Ohio; Volatile Organic Compound Emission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-30

    ...Implementation Plans; Ohio; Volatile Organic Compound Emission Control Measures...lithographic and letterpress printing volatile organic compound (VOC) rule for approval...press, with potential VOC ink oil emissions from the...

  3. 40 CFR 60.502 - Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. 60.502 ...Standards of Performance for Bulk Gasoline Terminals § 60.502 ...Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. On and...

  4. 40 CFR 60.502 - Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. 60.502 ...Standards of Performance for Bulk Gasoline Terminals § 60.502 ...Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. On and...

  5. 40 CFR 60.502 - Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. 60.502 ...Standards of Performance for Bulk Gasoline Terminals § 60.502 ...Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. On and...

  6. 40 CFR 60.502 - Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. 60.502 ...Standards of Performance for Bulk Gasoline Terminals § 60.502 ...Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. On and...

  7. 40 CFR 60.502 - Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. 60.502 ...Standards of Performance for Bulk Gasoline Terminals § 60.502 ...Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. On and...

  8. ECCAD : Emissions of Atmospheric Compounds and Compilation of Ancillary Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabine, Darras; Claire, Granier; Vincent, Pignot; Renaud, Bodichon; Aude, Mieville; Cathy, Liousse; Mireille, Paulin; Cathy, Boonne

    2010-05-01

    There is considerable uncertainty in estimating surface emissions of atmospheric compounds for the recent past and up to now, no single data set exists which would describe the geographical and temporal distribution of emissions for all species relevant to air quality, atmospheric composition change and climate change in a comprehensive and consistent manner. We will describe the ECCAD project, which has two major goals. The first goal is to provide scientific users with an easy access to a large number of existing datasets on surface emissions of atmospheric compounds at the global and regional scales. We are also providing access to ancillary data required to quantify surface emissions. The other goal is to provide data manipulation tools as well as statistical information over the different regions (climatic regions, continents, oceans, OECD regions, etc.). These tools allow an easy identification of each dataset characteristicss and differences between the datasets. Visualization tools are also provided, and the users can download the data of interest. The data in ECCAD are currently used in different international projects. The most recent addition to the database include the emissions developed in support of the IPCC AR5 report, and the data used in the MACC and CITYZEN European projects. The emissions are provided as gridded data at a 0.5 or 1° spatial resolution. Time periodicity and temporal coverage periods vary among the datasets from one year to up to 150 years. The database will be described, and examples of the tools will be presented. We will also provide information on the access to the datasets.

  9. Terpene Emissions From a Deciduous Forest - Variation of Compound Composition and Emission Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzke, C.; Koppmann, R.

    2003-12-01

    Plants emit a complex mixture of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). These hydrocarbons play an important role in atmospheric chemistry because of their high chemical reactivity. Due to the complexity of the chemical system there are still large uncertainties about environmental and especially physiological influences affecting amount and pattern of these emissions. In general, VOC emissions are affected by meteorological parameters like temperature and light intensity as well as ecophysiological parameters like herbivore attack and allelopathic effects. Moreover an influence of the developmental status of the emitting plants is likely. Aim of our work was to get insight in the emission behaviour concerning terpenes by carrying out long-term measurements in the field. Applying the branch enclosure technique terpene emissions from beech (Fagus silvatica L.) were investigated for two successive vegetation periods (2002-2003). In both years main compounds emitted were the monoterpenes sabinene, alpha- and beta-pinene and tricyclene. The emission rates changed over the day up to two orders of magnitude as a function of temperature and light. While the specific emission patterns changed only little over the year, the emission rates showed significant variations. Highest emission rates were observed in summer and lowest were found in fall. However, no emissions were found in early spring although leaves were fully developed and temperature and light conditions were moderate. Moreover a seasonality characterized by a temperature independent decline of emissions in late summer was found. The results underline the importance to characterize the annual variation of emission behavior. Especially for the up-scaling to global VOC emissions, seasonal influences have to be considered to achieve realistic emission inventories.

  10. Emission of volatile organic compounds from silage: Compounds, sources, and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Sasha D.; Howard, Cody; Muck, Richard E.; Franco, Roberta B.; Montes, Felipe; Green, Peter G.; Mitloehner, Frank; Trabue, Steven L.; Rotz, C. Alan

    2013-10-01

    Silage, fermented cattle feed, has recently been identified as a significant source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere. A small number of studies have measured VOC emission from silage, but not enough is known about the processes involved to accurately quantify emission rates and identify practices that could reduce emissions. Through a literature review, we have focused on identifying the most important compounds emitted from corn silage (the most common type of silage in the US) and the sources of these compounds by quantifying their production and emission potential in silage and describing production pathways. We reviewed measurements of VOC emission from silage and assessed the importance of individual silage VOCs through a quantitative analysis of VOC concentrations within silage. Measurements of VOC emission from silage and VOCs present within silage indicated that alcohols generally make the largest contribution to emission from corn silage, in terms of mass emitted and potential ozone formation. Ethanol is the dominant alcohol in corn silage; excluding acids, it makes up more than half of the mean mass of VOCs present. Acids, primarily acetic acid, may be important when emission is high and all VOCs are nearly depleted by emission. Aldehydes and esters, which are more volatile than acids and alcohols, are important when exposure is short, limiting emission of more abundant but less volatile compounds. Variability in silage VOC concentrations is very high; for most alcohols and acids, tolerance intervals indicate that 25% of silages have concentrations a factor of two away from median values, and possibly much further. This observation suggests that management practices can significantly influence VOC concentrations. Variability also makes prediction of emissions difficult. The most important acids, alcohols, and aldehydes present in silage are probably produced by bacteria (and, in the case of ethanol, yeasts) during fermentation and storage of silage. Aldehydes may also be produced aerobically by spoilage microorganisms through the oxidation of alcohols. Abiotic reactions may be important for production of methanol and esters. Although silage additives appear to affect VOC production in individual studies, bacterial inoculants have not shown a consistent effect on ethanol, and effects on other VOCs have not been studied. Production of acetic acid is understood, and production could be minimized, but a decrease could lead to an increase in other, more volatile and more reactive, VOCs. Chemical additives designed for controlling yeasts and undesirable bacteria show promise for reducing ethanol production in corn silage. More work is needed to understand silage VOC production and emission from silage, including: additional measurements of VOC concentrations or production in silage of all types, and an exploration of the causes of variability; accurate on-farm measurements of VOC emission, including an assessment of the importance of individual ensiling stages and practices that could reduce emission of existing VOCs; and work on understanding the sources of silage VOCs and possible approaches for reducing production.

  11. Anthropogenic emissions of highly reactive volatile organic compounds in eastern Texas

    E-print Network

    Mickley, Loretta J.

    Anthropogenic emissions of highly reactive volatile organic compounds in eastern Texas inferred) columns provide top-down constraints on emissions of highly reactive volatile organic compounds (HRVOCs Anthropogenic highly reactive volatile organic compounds (AHRVOCs) with atmospheric lifetimes of less than a day

  12. Temperature dependence of volatile organic compound evaporative emissions from motor vehicles

    E-print Network

    Silver, Whendee

    summer 2001. Additional gasoline- related VOC emissions not shown in Figure 1 occur at service stationsTemperature dependence of volatile organic compound evaporative emissions from motor vehicles Juli tailpipe sources to motor vehicle volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. Contributions were determined

  13. Identification of nonmethane organic compound emissions from grassland vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Yoshiko; Doskey, Paul V.

    Emissions of nonmethane organic compounds (NMOCs) from grassland vegetation were collected in Summa ® passivated stainless-steel canisters with a static enclosure technique and were analyzed by high-resolution gas chromatography with flame ionization and ion trap mass spectrometric detectors. Approximately 40 NMOCs with 6-10 carbon atoms were observed in samples analyzed by high-resolution gas chromatography with the flame ionization detector. Nineteen NMOCs in this molecular weight range (6 aliphatic oxygenates; 1 aromatic hydrocarbon; and 4 acyclic, 5 monocyclic, and 3 bicyclic monoterpenoids) were identified by ion trap mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometry was particularly useful for identifying myrcene and cis-3-hexenylacetate, which coeluted on a fused-silica capillary column coated with a 1-?m-thick film of polydimethylsiloxane. An evaluation of the reactivity of the grassland emissions revealed that the aliphatic oxygenates have lifetimes of a few hours with respect to oxidation by OH and O 3 in the atmosphere. This value is similar to the lifetimes of the bicyclic monoterpenoids. The expected lifetimes of the monoterpenoids with respect to oxidation by NO 3 are only several minutes.

  14. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION RATES FROM MIXED DECIDUOUS AND CONIFEROUS FORESTS IN NORTHERN WISCONSIN, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from forests play an important role in regulating the atmospheric trace gas composition including global tropospheric ozone concentrations. However, more information is needed on VOC emission rates from different forest regio...

  15. CONTROL OF INDUSTRIAL VOC (VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND) EMISSIONS BY CATALYTIC INCINERATION. VOLUME 9. QUALITY ASSURANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radian Corporation, under contract to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, performed site selection, test plan development, and performance tests of catalytic incinerators used for volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions control at industrial sites. VOC emissions are of co...

  16. NATURAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION RATE ESTIMATES FOR U.S. WOODLAND LANDSCAPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) emission rate factors are estimated for 49 tree genera based on a review of foliar emission rate measurements. oliar VOC emissions are grouped into three categories: isoprene, monoterpenes and other VOC'S. ypical emission rates at a leaf temperatur...

  17. Predicting the emission rate of volatile organic compounds fromvinyl flooring

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Steven S.; Little, John C.; Hodgson, Alfred T.

    2001-03-01

    A model for predicting the rate at which a volatile organic compound (VOC) is emitted from a diffusion-controlled material is validated for three contaminants (n-pentadecane, n-tetradecane, and phenol) found in vinyl flooring (VF). Model parameters are the initial VOC concentration in the material-phase (C{sub 0}), the material/air partition coefficient (K), and the material-phase diffusion coefficient (D). The model was verified by comparing predicted gas-phase concentrations to data obtained during small-scale chamber tests, and by comparing predicted material-phase concentrations to those measured at the conclusion of the chamber tests. Chamber tests were conducted with the VF placed top side up and bottom side up. With the exception of phenol, and within the limits of experimental precision, the mass of VOCs recovered in the gas phase balances the mass emitted from the material phase. The model parameters (C{sub 0}, K, and D) were measured using procedures that were completely independent of the chamber test. Gas- and material-phase predictions compare well to the bottom-side-up chamber data. The lower emission rates for the top-side-up orientation may be explained by the presence of a low-permeability surface layer. The sink effect of the stainless steel chamber surface was shown to be negligible.

  18. On-line measurements of emissions and atmospheric fate of compounds from agricultural waste management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural emissions impact air quality on a local and regional basis. Research on the emissions and reduction of greenhouse gases from agriculture has become commonplace due to concerns about climate but other chemical compounds also impact air quality. These include compounds that are photochemi...

  19. Atmospheric nitrogen compounds II: emissions, transport, transformation, deposition and assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aneja, Viney P.; Roelle, Paul A.; Murray, George C.; Southerland, James; Erisman, Jan Willem; Fowler, David; Asman, Willem A. H.; Patni, Naveen

    The Atmospheric Nitrogen Compounds II: Emissions, Transport, Transformation, Deposition and Assessment workshop was held in Chapel Hill, NC from 7 to 9 June 1999. This international conference, which served as a follow-up to the workshop held in March 1997, was sponsored by: North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources; North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, North Carolina Office of the State Health Director; Mid-Atlantic Regional Air Management Association; North Carolina Water Resources Research Institute; Air and Waste Management Association, RTP Chapter; the US Environmental Protection Agency and the North Carolina State University (College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, and North Carolina Agricultural Research Service). The workshop was structured as an open forum at which scientists, policy makers, industry representatives and others could freely share current knowledge and ideas, and included international perspectives. The workshop commenced with international perspectives from the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and Denmark. This article summarizes the findings of the workshop and articulates future research needs and ways to address nitrogen/ammonia from intensively managed animal agriculture. The need for developing sustainable solutions for managing the animal waste problem is vital for shaping the future of North Carolina. As part of that process, all aspects of environmental issues (air, water, soil) must be addressed as part of a comprehensive and long-term strategy. There is an urgent need for North Carolina policy makers to create a new, independent organization that will build consensus and mobilize resources to find technologically and economically feasible solutions to this aspect of the animal waste problem.

  20. NATURAL EMISSIONS OF NON-METHANE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS, CARBON MONOXIDE, AND OXIDES OF NITROGEN FROM NORTH AMERICA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The magnitudes, distributions, controlling processes and uncertainties associated with North American natural emissions of oxidant precursors are reviewed. Natural emissions are repsonsible for a major portion of the compounds, including non-methane volatile organic compounds (N...

  1. Global emissions and models of photochemically active compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.; Atherton, C.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Graedel, T.E. [AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States)

    1993-05-20

    Anthropogenic emissions from industrial activity, fossil fuel combustion, and biomass burning are now known to be large enough (relative to natural sources) to perturb the chemistry of vast regions of the troposphere. A goal of the IGAC Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA) is to provide authoritative and reliable emissions inventories on a 1{degree} {times} 1{degree} grid. When combined with atmospheric photochemical models, these high quality emissions inventories may be used to predict the concentrations of major photochemical products. Comparison of model results with measurements of pertinent species allows us to understand whether there are major shortcomings in our understanding of tropospheric photochemistry, the budgets and transport of trace species, and their effects in the atmosphere. Through this activity, we are building the capability to make confident predictions of the future consequences of anthropogenic emissions. This paper compares IGAC recommended emissions inventories for reactive nitrogen and sulfur dioxide to those that have been in use previously. We also present results from the three-dimensional LLNL atmospheric chemistry model that show how emissions of anthropogenic nitrogen oxides might potentially affect tropospheric ozone and OH concentrations and how emissions of anthropogenic sulfur increase sulfate aerosol loadings.

  2. INFLUENCE OF OXYGENETAED COMPOUNDS IN GASOLINE ON EXHAUST EMISSIONS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. KATSIKARIS; A. VRACHNOS; S. POULOPOULOS

    The effect of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) or ethanol addition in unleaded gasoline, on exhaust gases emissions from an OPEL 1.61 motor of General Motors equipped with a catalytic converter and a power absorption unit, was studied. It was observed that with oxygenated fuels, HC and CO emissions were significantly lower. Similar differences were confirmed at the exhaust gases

  3. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM VEGETATION IN SOUTHERN YUNNAN PROVINCE, CHINA: EMISSION RATES AND SOME POTENTIAL REGIONAL IMPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little information is currently available regarding emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) in southern Asia. To address the need for BVOC emission estimates in regional atmospheric chemistry simulations, 95 common plant species were screened for emissions of BVO...

  4. Emissions of volatile organic compounds from vegetation and the implications for atmospheric chemistry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fred Fehsenfeld; Jack Calvert; Ray Fall; Paul Goldan; A. B. Guenther; C. N. Hewitt; Brian Lamb; Shaw Liu; Michael Trainer; Hal Westberg; Pat Zimmerman

    1992-01-01

    Vegetation provides a major source of reactive carbon entering the atmosphere. These compounds play an important role in (1) shaping global tropospheric chemistry, (2) regional photochemical oxidant formation, (3) balancing the global carbon cycle, and (4) production of organic acids which contribute to acidic deposition in rural areas. Present estimates place the total annual global emission of these compounds between

  5. REASSESSMENT OF BIOGENIC VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS IN THE ATLANTA AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses a reassessment of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions in the Atlanta area, using a new system for specific tree genera at hourly and county levels. (NOTE: Localized estimates of BVOC emissions are important inputs for photochemical oxidant simu...

  6. Modeling emissions of volatile organic compounds from silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Photochemical smog is a major air pollution problem and a significant cause of premature death in the U.S. Smog forms in the presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are emitted primarily from industry and motor vehicles in the U.S. However, dairy farms may be an important source in so...

  7. Modeling emissions of volatile organic compounds from silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), necessary reactants for photochemical smog formation, are emitted from numerous sources. Limited available data suggest that dairy farms emit VOCs with cattle feed, primarily silage, being the primary source. Process-based models of VOC transfer within and from si...

  8. Emission of charged particles from excited compound nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kalandarov, Sh. A.; Adamian, G. G. [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, RU-141980 Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute of Nuclear Physics, Tashkent, UZ-702132 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Antonenko, N. V. [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, RU-141980 Moscow (Russian Federation); Scheid, W. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik der Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, D-35392 Giessen (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    The process of complex fragment emission is studied within the dinuclear system model. Cross sections of complex fragment emission are calculated and compared with experimental data for the reactions {sup 3}He+{sup nat}Ag, {sup 78,86}Kr+{sup 12}C, and {sup 63}Cu+{sup 12}C. The mass distributions of the products of these reactions, isotopic distributions for the {sup 3}He+{sup nat}Ag and {sup 78}Kr+{sup 12}C reactions, and average total kinetic energies of the products of the {sup 78}Kr+{sup 12}C reaction are predicted.

  9. Effects of bulking agent addition on odorous compounds emissions during composting of OFMSW.

    PubMed

    Shao, Li-Ming; Zhang, Chun-Yan; Wu, Duo; Lü, Fan; Li, Tian-Shui; He, Pin-Jing

    2014-08-01

    The effects of rice straw addition level on odorous compounds emissions in a pilot-scale organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) composting plant were investigated. The cumulative odorous compounds emissions occurred in a descending order of 40.22, 28.71 and 27.83 mg/dry kg of OFMSW for piles with rice straw addition level at ratio of 1:10, 2:10 and 3:10 (mixing ratio of rice straw to OFMSW on a wet basis), respectively. The mixing ratio of rice straw to OFMSW had a statistically significant effect on the reduction of malodorous sulfur compounds emissions, which had no statistically significant effect on the reduction of VFAs, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, aromatics and ammonia emissions during composting, respectively. The cumulative emissions of malodorous sulfur compounds from piles with the increasing rice straw addition level were 1.17, 1.08 and 0.88 mg/dry kg of OFMSW, respectively. The optimal mixing ratio of rice straw to OFMSW was 1:5. Using this addition level, the cumulative malodorous sulfur compounds emissions based on the organic matter degradation were the lowest during composting of OFMSW. PMID:24820662

  10. Regional atmospheric emissions determined from measurements at Jeju Island, Korea: Halogenated compounds from China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jooil; Li, Shanlan; Kim, Kyung-Ryul; Stohl, Andreas; Mühle, Jens; Kim, Seung-Kyu; Park, Mi-Kyung; Kang, Dong-Jin; Lee, Gangwoong; Harth, Christina M.; Salameh, Peter K.; Weiss, Ray F.

    2010-06-01

    High-frequency in-situ measurements of a wide range of halogenated compounds including chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), halons, hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), and other chlorinated and brominated compounds have been made at Gosan (Jeju Island, Korea). Regional emissions of HCFC-22 (CHClF2) calculated from inverse modeling were combined with interspecies correlation methods to estimate national emissions for China, a major emitter of industrial halogenated gases. Our results confirm the signs of successful phase-out of primary ozone-depleting species such as CFCs, halons and many chlorinated or brominated compounds, along with substantial emissions of replacement HCFCs. Emissions derived for HFCs, PFCs, and SF6 were compared to published estimates and found to be a significant fraction of global totals. Overall, Chinese emissions of the halogenated compounds discussed here represent 19(14-17)% and 20(15-26)% of global emissions when evaluated in terms of their Ozone Depletion Potentials and 100-year Global Warming Potentials, respectively.

  11. Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Dry Mill Fuel Ethanol Production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Brady; Gregory C. Pratt; L.-W. Chen; M. C. Chang; Norman Robinson; Dana Trimble; Steven Kohl; John Watson; Hsing-Wang Li; Yee-Lin Wu; Wen-Jhy Lee; Guo-Ping Chang-Chien; Joao Gomes; Joana Nascimento; Helena Rodrigues; David Schaad; James Halley; Vince Alaimo; David Epperson; Miriam Lev-On; Hal Taback; Jeffrey Siegell; Karin Ritter; Yu Zhou; Lixin Fu; Linglin Cheng; Pao-Wen Liu; Qingzhong Yuan; Kalliat Valsaraj; Danny Reible; Clinton Willson; Wipada Sanongraj; Yongsheng Chen; John Crittenden; Hugo Destaillats; David Hand; David Perram; Roy Taylor; Sangil Lee; Armistead Russell; Karsten Baumann

    2007-01-01

    Ethanol fuel production is growing rapidly in the rural Midwest, and this growth presents potential environmental impacts. In 2002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) entered into enforcement actions with 12 fuel ethanol plants in Minnesota. The enforcement actions uncovered underreported emissions and resulted in consent decrees that required pollution control equipment be

  12. Oil-field emissions of volatile organic compounds. Final report, April 1988-March 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanath, R.S.; Van Sandt, J.H.

    1989-04-01

    This report presents data that determine the composition of volatile organic compound emissions from oil production fields in Tulsa County, Oklahoma. Five points in the crude-oil production process were samples: well heads, gathering tasks, oilfield pipeline tanks, pipeline terminal tanks, and refinery crude-oil storage tanks. The samples were collected in Summa polished stainless steel canisters and analyzed by a gas chromatograph with dual flame ionization detectors. The analytical technique looked for ninety specific compounds; thirty were detected and are reported. In general the compounds in greatest abundance were ethane, propane, n-butane, 2-methyl butane, and n-pentane. The data developed are for the composition of the volatile organic compounds; volatile organic-compound emission rates were not determined.

  13. Toxic volatile organic compounds in environmental tobacco smoke: Emission factors for modeling exposures of California populations

    SciTech Connect

    Daisey, J.M.; Mahanama, K.R.R.; Hodgson, A.T. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to measure emission factors for selected toxic air contaminants in environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) using a room-sized environmental chamber. The emissions of 23 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including, 1,3-butadiene, three aldehydes and two vapor-phase N-nitrosamines were determined for six commercial brands of cigarettes and reference cigarette 1R4F. The commercial brands were selected to represent 62.5% of the cigarettes smoked in California. For each brand, three cigarettes were machine smoked in the chamber. The experiments were conducted over four hours to investigate the effects of aging. Emission factors of the target compounds were also determined for sidestream smoke (SS). For almost all target compounds, the ETS emission factors were significantly higher than the corresponding SS values probably due to less favorable combustion conditions and wall losses in the SS apparatus. Where valid comparisons could be made, the ETS emission factors were generally in good agreement with the literature. Therefore, the ETS emission factors, rather than the SS values, are recommended for use in models to estimate population exposures from this source. The variabilities in the emission factors ({mu}g/cigarette) of the selected toxic air contaminants among brands, expressed as coefficients of variation, were 16 to 29%. Therefore, emissions among brands were Generally similar. Differences among brands were related to the smoked lengths of the cigarettes and the masses of consumed tobacco. Mentholation and whether a cigarette was classified as light or regular did not significantly affect emissions. Aging was determined not to be a significant factor for the target compounds. There were, however, deposition losses of the less volatile compounds to chamber surfaces.

  14. Historical variations of biogenic volatile organic compound emission inventories in China, 1981-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. Y.; Xie, S. D.

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the variations in temporal and spatial distribution of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions in China, historical BVOC emission inventories at a spatial resolution of 36 km × 36 km for the period of 1981-2003 were developed firstly. Based on the time-varying statistical data and Vegetation Atlas of China (1:1,000,000), emissions of isoprene, 37 monoterpenes, 32 sesquiterpenes, and other volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) were estimated using MEGANv2.1 driven by WRF model. Results show China's BVOC emissions had increased by 28.01% at an annual average rate of 1.27% from 37.89 Tg in 1981 to 48.50 Tg in 2003. Emissions of isoprene, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and OVOCs had increased by 41.60%, 34.78%, 41.05%, and 4.89%, respectively. With fixed meteorological variables, the estimated BVOC emissions would increase by 19.25%, resulting from the increasing of vegetation biomass during the last 23 years. On average, isoprene, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and OVOCs were responsible for 52.40%, 12.73%, 2.58%, and 32.29% of the national BVOC emissions, respectively. ?-pinene and ?-pinene, farnesene and caryophyllene were the largest contributors to the total monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions, respectively. The highest emissions were found over northeastern, southeastern, southwestern China, Qinling Mountain, and Hainan and Taiwan provinces. The regions with high emissions had been expanding over the years, especially in the Changbai Mountain, southern China, and southwestern forest regions. The lowest emissions in southern China occurred in 1984-1988. Almost all the provinces had experienced increasing emissions, but their contributions to the national emissions differed significantly over the past 23 years. Yunnan, Guangxi, Heilongjiang, Jiangxi, Fujian, Guangdong, and Sichuan provinces always dominated the national BVOC emissions, excluding in 1977-1981, when the three northeastern provinces had relatively lower emissions.

  15. Dielectric barrier discharge carbon atomic emission spectrometer: universal GC detector for volatile carbon-containing compounds.

    PubMed

    Han, Bingjun; Jiang, Xiaoming; Hou, Xiandeng; Zheng, Chengbin

    2014-01-01

    It was found that carbon atomic emission can be excited in low temperature dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), and an atmospheric pressure, low power consumption, and compact microplasma carbon atomic emission spectrometer (AES) was constructed and used as a universal and sensitive gas chromatographic (GC) detector for detection of volatile carbon-containing compounds. A concentric DBD device was housed in a heating box to increase the plasma operation temperature to 300 °C to intensify carbon atomic emission at 193.0 nm. Carbon-containing compounds directly injected or eluted from GC can be decomposed, atomized, and excited in this heated DBD for carbon atomic emission. The performance of this new optical detector was first evaluated by determination of a series of volatile carbon-containing compounds including formaldehyde, ethyl acetate, methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, and 1-pentanol, and absolute limits of detection (LODs) were found at a range of 0.12-0.28 ng under the optimized conditions. Preliminary experimental results showed that it provided slightly higher LODs than those obtained by GC with a flame ionization detector (FID). Furthermore, it is a new universal GC detector for volatile carbon-containing compounds that even includes those compounds which are difficult to detect by FID, such as HCHO, CO, and CO2. Meanwhile, hydrogen gas used in conventional techniques was eliminated; and molecular optical emission detection can also be performed with this GC detector for multichannel analysis to improve resolution of overlapped chromatographic peaks of complex mixtures. PMID:24328147

  16. Emissions of isoprene, monoterpene and short-chained carbonyl compounds from Eucalyptus spp. in southern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winters, Anthony J.; Adams, Mark A.; Bleby, Tim M.; Rennenberg, Heinz; Steigner, Dominik; Steinbrecher, Rainer; Kreuzwieser, Jürgen

    Eucalypts are among the highest emitters of biogenic volatile organic compounds, yet there is relatively little data available from field studies of this genus. Emissions of isoprene, monoterpenes and the short-chained carbonyls formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acetone were determined from four species ( Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Eucalyptus globulus, Eucalyptus grandis, and Eucalytpus viminalis) in Australia. A smaller comparative study was conducted on E. camaldulensis in south-eastern Australia. Carbonyl emissions, reported here for the first time from eucalypts, were generally comparable with rates reported for other species, with diurnal emissions peaking at about 4, 75 and 34 nmol m -2 min -1 for acetone, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde respectively. There was wide variation in diurnal isoprene and monoterpene emissions between species, but under standard conditions, isoprene emissions were much lower than previous reports. Conversely, standard emission rates of monoterpenes were as much as six times greater than previous reports for some species. Emission of each carbonyl was correlated with its ambient concentration across different species, but more weakly related to temperature. Acetaldehyde emission in particular was significantly correlated with transpiration, but not with sap flow or with ethanol concentrations in xylem sap, suggesting fermentation within the leaf and stomatal conductance are primary controlling processes. Differences in acetaldehyde exchange velocities between sites, in addition to transpiration differences, suggest stomata may indeed exert long term emission regulation, in contrast to compounds for which no biological sink exists.

  17. SPATIAL AND SOURCE TYPE DISTRIBUTION OF EMISSIONS OF SELECTED TOXIC VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN THE UNITED STATES IN 1990

    EPA Science Inventory

    The annual anthropogenic emission, principal contributing source types, and spatial distributions for selected toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCS) are presented for the United States. oxic compounds addressed include acrylonitrile, benzene, perchloroethylene, and trichloroeth...

  18. Emissions of non-methane organic compounds from a grassland site

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoshiko Fukui; P. V. Doskey

    1996-01-01

    A mixture of oxygenated hydrocarbons (OxHCs), isoprene, and monoterpenes was detected in the emissions from a grassland site in the Midwestern United States. A plot dominated by crown vetch (Coronilla varia) and bluegrass (Poa spp.), exhibited a constant decrease in emissions of total non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) from 580 μg m⁻² hr⁻¹ in June 1992 to 150 μg m{sup -

  19. NATURAL EMISSIONS OF NON-METHANE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS, CARBON MONOXIDE, AND OXIDES OF NITROGEN FROM NORTH AMERICA. (R825259)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract The magnitudes, distributions, controlling processes and uncertainties associated with North American natural emissions of oxidant precursors are reviewed. Natural emissions are responsible for a major portion of the compounds, including non-methane volatile o...

  20. Effects of climate change on volatile organic compound emissions from soil and litter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, C. M.; Fierer, N.

    2012-12-01

    Our knowledge of the variability and magnitude of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from soil and litter is relatively limited compared to what we know about VOC emissions from terrestrial plants. With climate change expecting to alter plant community composition, nitrogen (N) deposition rates, mean annual temperatures, and precipitation patterns, it is unknown how production and consumption of VOCs from litter and soil will respond. We spent the last four years quantifying VOC emissions from soil and litter, comparing VOC emissions to CO2 emissions, and identifying the biotic and abiotic controls on emission rates with both lab and field experiments using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). In all studies, methanol was the dominant VOC flux. VOC emissions were not driven by abiotic processes, as microbial sources accounted for 78% to 99% of the total VOC emissions from decomposing litter. Litter chemistry was correlated with the types of VOCs emitted and the net emissions of carbon as VOCs was found to be up to 88% of that emitted as CO2 suggesting that VOCs likely represent an important component of the carbon cycle in many terrestrial systems. Nitrogen additions drastically reduced VOC emissions from litter to near zero, though it is still not understood whether this was due to an increase in consumption or a decrease in production. Finally, field and lab experiments show that temperature and moisture are both important controls of certain VOC emissions from soils, but that the effects of these factors on VOC emissions are not necessarily equivalent to their effects on CO2 emissions. Together, these series of studies are moving us toward a predictive understanding of VOC emissions from soil and litter with the ultimate goal of incorporating these VOC emissions into global models of terrestrial VOC dynamics.

  1. The contribution of evaporative emissions from gasoline vehicles to the volatile organic compound inventory in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Schifter, I; Díaz, L; Rodríguez, R; González-Macías, C

    2014-06-01

    The strategy for decreasing volatile organic compound emissions in Mexico has been focused much more on tailpipe emissions than on evaporative emissions, so there is very little information on the contribution of evaporative emissions to the total volatile organic compound inventory. We examined the magnitudes of exhaust and evaporative volatile organic compound emissions, and the species emitted, in a representative fleet of light-duty gasoline vehicles in the Metropolitan Area of Mexico City. The US "FTP-75" test protocol was used to estimate volatile organic compound emissions associated with diurnal evaporative losses, and when the engine is started and a journey begins. The amount and nature of the volatile organic compounds emitted under these conditions have not previously been accounted in the official inventory of the area. Evaporative emissions from light-duty vehicles in the Metropolitan Area of Mexico City were estimated to be 39 % of the total annual amount of hydrocarbons emitted. Vehicles built before 1992 (16 % of the fleet) were found to be responsible for 43 % of the total hydrocarbon emissions from exhausts and 31 % of the evaporative emissions of organic compounds. The relatively high amounts of volatile organic compounds emitted from older vehicles found in this study show that strong emission controls need to be implemented in order to decrease the contribution of evaporative emissions of this fraction of the fleet. PMID:24526614

  2. Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emissions from Abies alba in a French forest.

    PubMed

    Moukhtar, S; Couret, C; Rouil, L; Simon, V

    2006-02-01

    Air quality studies need to be based on accurate and reliable data, particularly in the field of the emissions. Biogenic emissions from forests, crops, and grasslands are now considered as major compounds in photochemical processes. Unfortunately, depending on the type of vegetation, these emissions are not so often reliably defined. As an example, although the silver fir (Abies alba) is a very widespread conifer tree in the French and European areas, its standard emission rate is not available in the literature. This study investigates the isoprene and monoterpenes emission from A. alba in France measured during the fieldwork organised in the Fossé Rhénan, from May to June 2003. A dynamic cuvette method was used. Limonene was the predominant monoterpene emitted, followed by camphene, alpha-pinene and eucalyptol. No isoprene emission was detected. The four monoterpenes measured showed different behaviours according to micrometeorological conditions. In fact, emissions of limonene, alpha-pinene and camphene were temperature-dependant while eucalyptol emissions were temperature and light dependant. Biogenic volatile organic compounds emissions were modeled using information gathered during the field study. Emissions of the three monoterpenes previously quoted were achieved using the monoterpenes algorithm developed by Tingey et al. (1980) [Tingey D, Manning M, Grothaus L, Burns W. Influence of light and temperature on monoterpene emission rates from slash pine. Plant Physiol 1980;65: 797-801.] and the isoprene algorithm [Guenther, A., Monson, R., Fall, R., 1991. Isoprene and monoterpene emission rate variability: observations with eucalyptus and emission rate algorithm development. J Geophys Res 26A: 10799-10808.]; [Guenther, A., Zimmerman, P., Harley, P., Monson, R., Fall, R., 1993. Isoprene and monoterpene emission rate variability: model evaluation and sensitivity analysis. J Geophys Res 98D: 12609-12617.]) was used for the eucalyptol emission. With these methods, simulation results and observations agreed fairly well. The standard emission rate (303 K) and beta-coefficient averaged for limonene, camphene and alpha-pinene were respectively of 0.63 microg gdw-1 h-1 and 0.06 K-1. For eucalyptol, the standard emission rate (T=303 K and PAR=1000 micromol m-2 s-1) was 0.26 microg gdw-1 h-1. This classified A. alba as a weak monoterpenes emitter. PMID:16140360

  3. Emissions of volatile organic compounds during the decomposition of plant litter

    E-print Network

    Fierer, Noah

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds during the decomposition of plant litter Christopher M plant litter decomposition, and such VOCs can have wideranging impacts on atmospheric chemistry of the relative importance of biotic versus abiotic sources of these VOCs and whether distinct types of litter

  4. BIOGENIC VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS FROM A LOWLAND TROPICAL WET FOREST IN COSTA RICA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Twenty common plant species were screened for emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCS) at a lowland tropical wet forest site in Costa Rica. Ten of the species. examined emitted substantial quantities of isoprene. These species accounted for 35-50% of the total bas...

  5. Emission of volatile organic compounds after land application of cattle manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beef cattle manure can serve as a valuable source of nutrients for crop production. However, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) following land application may pose an odor nuisance to downwind populations. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of application method, diet, so...

  6. EMISSION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM DRUM-MIX ASPHALT PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research program was undertaken in order to develop a quantitative estimate of the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from drum-mix asphalt plants. The study was carried out by field sampling of five drum-mix plants under a variety of operating conditions. Include...

  7. GASEOUS HC1 AND CHLORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS FROM REFUSE FIRED WASTE-TO-ENERGY SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The emissions from a water wall mass fired municipal waste incinerator and a refuse derived fuel (RDF) fired incinerator were sampled for chlorinated organic compounds and hydrochloric acid (HCl). The sampling was performed to evaluate the extractive sampling methods used to meas...

  8. EMISSIONS OF DIOXINS AND RELATED COMPOUNDS FROM COMBUSTION AND INCINERATION SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report on the emissions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans was prepared as a contribution to the Pilot Study on International Information Exchange on Dioxins and Related Compounds. he report describes the state of the art with respect to combustion and th...

  9. Flooding induced emissions of volatile signalling compounds in three tree species with differing waterlogging tolerance.

    PubMed

    Copolovici, Lucian; Niinemets, Ulo

    2010-09-01

    To gain insight into variations in waterlogging responsiveness, net assimilation rate, stomatal conductance, emissions of isoprene and marker compounds of anoxic metabolism ethanol and acetaldehyde, and stress marker compounds nitric oxide (NO), volatile products of lipoxygenase (LOX) pathway and methanol were studied in seedlings of temperate deciduous tree species Alnus glutinosa, Populus tremula and Quercus rubra (from highest to lowest waterlogging tolerance) throughout sustained root zone waterlogging of up to three weeks. In all species, waterlogging initially resulted in reductions in net assimilation and stomatal conductance and enhanced emissions of ethanol, acetaldehyde, NO, LOX products and methanol, followed by full or partial recovery depending on process and species. Strong negative correlations between g(s) and internal NO concentration and NO flux, valid within and across species, were observed throughout the experiment. Isoprene emission capacity was not related to waterlogging tolerance. Less waterlogging tolerant species had greater reduction and smaller acclimation capacity in foliage physiological potentials, and larger emission bursts of volatile stress marker compounds. These data collectively provide encouraging evidence that emissions of volatile organics and NO can be used as quantitative measures of stress tolerance and acclimation kinetics in temperate trees. PMID:20444211

  10. Oxidized and reduced biogenic nitrogen compound emissions into the rural troposphere: Characterization and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelle, Paul Andrew

    2001-12-01

    Using a dynamic flow-through chamber technique in conjunction with a state-of-the-art mobile laboratory, this research attempts to characterize and model oxidized and reduced biogenic nitrogen compound emissions into the rural troposphere. Nitrogen compound emissions are known to have profound effects on air quality. Consequences associated with increased emissions of oxidized and reduced nitrogen species are known to be increased tropospheric ozone production, fine particulate aerosol production, nitrate contamination of drinking water, eutrophication and acidification of soil and water bodies. It is well recognized that soil emissions can contribute a substantial percent of the total inventory for both the oxidized and reduced species, but great uncertainty still exists in this inventory. A controlled experiment involving the application of municipal waste biosolids to agricultural soils was shown to enhance NO emissions. A more detailed analysis throughout several seasons found the nitric oxide emissions from biosolid amended soils to have a strong temperature dependence and that their source strength is much larger relative to soils amended with chemically derived fertilizers. Emissions of nitric oxide from biosolid amended soils were modeled using the MultiScale Air Quality Simulation Platform (MAQSIP). Results from this model indicated that ozone concentrations can decrease by approximately 12% (in the evening) and increase by approximately 2% (during the daylight hours) when these biosolid amended soils are taken into consideration in the land use database. Emissions of ammonia from soils amended with swine waste effluent were also measured and modeled. This study revealed that while the average source strength of ammonia from soils is significantly smaller than that of the lagoons, the much larger surface area of the soils causes them to also be an important emissions source. A fundamental mechanistic mass transfer model is presented and discussed in terms of its applicability for estimating NH3 flux and was found to be an effective predictor of the NH3 emissions for time periods immediately following slurry application.

  11. Emission of volatile sulfur compounds during composting of municipal solid waste (MSW)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hongyu [Beijing Building Materials Academy of Science Research/State Key Laboratory of Solid Waste Reuse for Building Material, Beijing 100041 (China); College of Resources and Environment Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Schuchardt, Frank [Johann Heinrich von Thuenen-Institute, Institute of Agricultural Technology and Biosystems Engineering, Bundesallee 50, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Li, Guoxue, E-mail: ligx@cau.edu.cn [College of Resources and Environment Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Yang, Jinbing; Yang, Qingyuan [College of Resources and Environment Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ? We compare the volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) emissions during three types of municipal solid wastes (MSWs) composting. ? The VSCs released from the kitchen waste composting was significantly higher than that from 15–80 mm fraction of MSW. ? Among the five VSCs, H{sub 2}S was the most abundant compound with 39.0–43.0% of total VSCs released. ? Addition of 20% cornstalks could significantly reduce the VSCs emissions during kitchen waste composting. - Abstract: Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) are the main source for malodor from composting plants. In this study, the VSCs generated from composting of 15–80 mm municipal solid waste (T0), kitchen waste (T1) and kitchen waste mixed dry cornstalks (T2) were measured in 60 L reactors with forced aeration for a period of 30 days. The VSCs detected in all treatments were hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), methyl mercaptan (MM), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbon bisulfide (CS{sub 2}) and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS). Over 90% of the VSCs emissions occurred during the first 15 days, and reached their peak values at days 4–7. The emission profiles of five VSCs species were significantly correlated with internal materials temperature and outlet O{sub 2} concentration (p < 0.05). Total emissions of the VSCs were 216.1, 379.3 and 126.0 mg kg{sup ?1} (dry matter) for T0, T1 and T2, respectively. Among the five VSCs, H{sub 2}S was the most abundant compound with 39.0–43.0% of total VSCs released. Composting of kitchen waste from separate collection posed a negative influence on the VSC and leachate production because of its high moisture content. An addition of dry cornstalks at a mixing ratio of 4:1 (wet weight) could significantly reduce the VSCs emissions and avoid leachate. Compared to pure kitchen waste, VSCs were reduced 66.8%.

  12. Diurnal and seasonal emissions of volatile organic compounds from cork oak ( Quercus suber) trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pio, C. A.; Silva, P. A.; Cerqueira, M. A.; Nunes, T. V.

    The emissions of volatile organic compounds from Quercus suber (cork oak) were investigated at two rural sites in Portugal using a branch enclosure method with subsequent analysis by gas chromatography/flame ionization detection. Q. suber leaves released important amounts of monoterpenes, mainly in the form of limonene, ?-pinene, ?-pinene and sabinene. However, significant temporal and intraspecific variations in the relative abundance of the dominant compounds were found during this survey. Emissions from Q. suber were strongly dependent on light and temperature, showing a similar behaviour to that of plant species known to be isoprene producers. But, this work also revealed that, although at lower rates, emissions of monoterpenes continued in the dark for several hours. Emission rates were quite well predicted by algorithms based on the Guenther and Tingey equations; correlations of measurements with modelled data were, on average, r2=0.80. A pronounced seasonal variation was recorded for the emissions of monoterpenes. During the 1-yr study period, standard emission rates ranged between a minimum of 0.2 ?g g dw-1 h -1, in winter, and a maximum of 20-30 ?g g dw-1 h -1, in summer.

  13. Cost effectiveness of introducing a new European evaporative emissions test procedure for petrol vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, Gary; Martini, Giorgio; Mellios, Giorgos

    2014-10-01

    Evaporative emissions of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) arise from the vehicle's fuel system due to changes in ambient and vehicle temperatures, and contribute to urban smog. This paper presents an economic analysis of the societal costs and benefits of implementing a revised European evaporative emission test procedure for petrol vehicles under four scenarios for the period 2015-2040. The paper concludes that the most cost-effective option is the implementation of an aggressive purging strategy over 48 h and improved canister durability (scenario 2+). The average net benefit of implementing this scenario is €146,709,441 at a 6% discount rate. Per vehicle benefits range from €6-9 but when fuel savings benefits are added, total benefits range from €13-18. This is compared to average additional cost per vehicle of €9.

  14. Human-induced changes in US biogenic volatile organic compound emissions: evidence from long-term forest

    E-print Network

    Moorcroft, Paul R.

    Human-induced changes in US biogenic volatile organic compound emissions: evidence from long Road, Durham, NH 03824-3525, USA Abstract Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by woody vegetation organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by vegeta- tion are important chemical species that affect the oxidative

  15. Emissions of volatile organic compounds inferred from airborne flux measurements over a megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, T.; Apel, E.; Hodzic, A.; Riemer, D.; Blake, D.; Wiedinmyer, C.

    2008-07-01

    Toluene and benzene are used for assessing the ability to measure disjunct eddy covariance (DEC) fluxes of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) on aircraft. Statistically significant correlation between vertical wind speed and mixing ratios suggests that airborne VOC eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements using PTR-MS are feasible. City-average midday toluene and benzene fluxes are calculated to be on the order of 15.5±4.0 mg/m2/h and 4.7±2.3 mg/m2/h respectively. These values argue for an underestimation of toluene and benzene emissions in current inventories used for the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA). Wavelet analysis of instantaneous toluene and benzene measurements during city overpasses is tested as a tool to assess surface emission heterogeneity. High toluene to benzene flux ratios above an industrial district (e.g. 10 15) including the International airport (e.g. 3 5) and a mean flux (concentration) ratio of 3.2±0.5 (3.9±0.3) across Mexico City indicate that evaporative fuel and industrial emissions play an important role for the prevalence of aromatic compounds. Based on a tracer model, which was constrained by BTEX (Benzene/Toluene/Ethylbenzene/m,p,o-Xylenes) compound concentration ratios, the fuel marker methyl-tertiary-butyl-ether (MTBE) and the biomass burning marker acetonitrile (CH3CN), we show that a combination of industrial, evaporative fuel, and exhaust emissions account for >90% of all BTEX sources. Our observations suggest that biomass burning emissions play a minor role for the abundance of BTEX compounds (0 10%) in the MCMA.

  16. Emissions of volatile organic compounds inferred from airborne flux measurements over a megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, T.; Apel, E.; Hodzic, A.; Riemer, D. D.; Blake, D. R.; Wiedinmyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    Toluene and benzene are used for assessing the ability to measure disjunct eddy covariance (DEC) fluxes of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) on aircraft. Statistically significant correlation between vertical wind speed and mixing ratios suggests that airborne VOC eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements using PTR-MS are feasible. City-median midday toluene and benzene fluxes are calculated to be on the order of 14.1±4.0 mg/m2/h and 4.7±2.3 mg/m2/h, respectively. For comparison the adjusted CAM2004 emission inventory estimates toluene fluxes of 10 mg/m2/h along the footprint of the flight-track. Wavelet analysis of instantaneous toluene and benzene measurements during city overpasses is tested as a tool to assess surface emission heterogeneity. High toluene to benzene flux ratios above an industrial district (e.g. 10-15 g/g) including the International airport (e.g. 3-5 g/g) and a mean flux (concentration) ratio of 3.2±0.5 g/g (3.9±0.3 g/g) across Mexico City indicate that evaporative fuel and industrial emissions play an important role for the prevalence of aromatic compounds. Based on a tracer model, which was constrained by BTEX (BTEX- Benzene/Toluene/Ethylbenzene/m, p, o-Xylenes) compound concentration ratios, the fuel marker methyl-tertiary-butyl-ether (MTBE) and the biomass burning marker acetonitrile (CH3CN), we show that a combination of industrial, evaporative fuel, and exhaust emissions account for >87% of all BTEX sources. Our observations suggest that biomass burning emissions play a minor role for the abundance of BTEX compounds in the MCMA (2-13%).

  17. Digital controlled luminescent emission via patterned deposition of lanthanide coordination compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua-Bin; Liu, Meng; Lei, Xiaoping; Wen, Tian; Zhang, Jian

    2014-08-13

    Presented here is a new direct patterning method, printer-type lithography technology, for the formation of lanthanide coordination compounds (LCCs) single crystal in different spatial locations. We first integrate this technology in digital controlled emission by patterned deposition of LCCs. We demonstrate its usefulness in the control of emission intensity by regulating print cycles, so that the emission intensity can be digitally controlled. This printer technology can also be used to precisely control the location at which a single LCC crystal is grown, which provides great promise in the application of anticounterfeiting barcode. Besides, by varying the stoichiometric ratio of the lanthanide ions in the identical cartridge, a fluent change of emission colors from white, orange, pink, to blue green was achieved. Therefore, this low-cost and high-throughput patterning technique can be readily applied to a wide range of areas including micro-/nanofabrication, optics, and electronics studies. PMID:25003217

  18. Emission of reactive terpene compounds from orange orchards and their removal by within-canopy processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciccioli, Paolo; Brancaleoni, Enzo; Frattoni, Massimiliano; di Palo, Vincenzo; Valentini, Riccardo; Tirone, Giampiero; Seufert, Guenther; Bertin, Nadia; Hansen, Ute; Csiky, Olav; Lenz, Roman; Sharma, Meeta

    1999-04-01

    VOC emission from orange orchards was determined in the framework of two field campaigns aimed at assessing the contribution of vegetation emissions to tropospheric ozone formation in the Valencia Citrus belt. Branch emission from different varieties of Citrus sinensis and Citrus Clementi was dominated by ?-caryophyllene during the summer period and by linalool during the blossoming season (April-May). Large emission of D-limonene from soil was also measured. Data collected with the enclosure technique were upscaled to determine canopy emission rates of terpene compounds. Values obtained were compared with fluxes measured by relaxed eddy accumulation. Substantial removal of ?-caryophyllene and linalool was detected during transport from the canopy into the atmospheric boundary layer. While within-canopy removal of the sesquiterpene component was fully consistent with laboratory studies indicating the high reactivity of this compound with ozone, linalool losses were more difficult to explain. Although high canopy fluxes of acetone and acetaldehyde suggested linalool decomposition by gas-phase reactivity, removal by heterogeneous chemistry seems the more likely explanation for the observed losses.

  19. Emissions of halogenated compounds in East Asia determined from measurements at Jeju Island, Korea.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanlan; Kim, Jooil; Kim, Kyung-Ryul; Mühle, Jens; Kim, Seung-Kyu; Park, Mi-Kyung; Stohl, Andreas; Kang, Dong-Jin; Arnold, Tim; Harth, Christina M; Salameh, Peter K; Weiss, Ray F

    2011-07-01

    High-frequency in situ measurements at Gosan (Jeju Island, Korea) during November 2007 to December 2008 have been combined with interspecies correlation analysis to estimate national emissions of halogenated compounds (HCs) in East Asia, including the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), halons, hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)), and other chlorinated and brominated compounds. Our results suggest that overall China is the dominant emitter of HCs in East Asia, however significant emissions are also found in South Korea, Japan and Taiwan for HFC-134a, HFC-143a, C(2)F(6), SF(6), CH(3)CCl(3), and HFC-365mfc. The combined emissions of CFCs, halon-1211, HCFCs, HFCs, PFCs, and SF(6) from all four countries in 2008 are 25.3, 1.6, 135, 42.6, 3.6, and 2.0 kt/a, respectively. They account for approximately 15%, 26%, 29%, 16%, 32%, and 26.5% of global emissions, respectively. Our results show signs that Japan has successfully phased out CFCs and HCFCs in compliance with the Montreal Protocol (MP), Korea has started transitioning from HCFCs to HFCs, while China still significantly consumes HCFCs. Taiwan, while not directly regulated under the MP, is shown to have adapted the use of HFCs. Combined analysis of emission rates and the interspecies correlation matrix presented in this study proves to be a powerful tool for monitoring and diagnosing changes in consumption of HCs in East Asia. PMID:21649439

  20. Extended Research on Detection of Deception Using Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2006-06-01

    A system that captures and analyzes volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from skin surfaces may offer a viable alternative method to the polygraph instrument currently in use for detecting deception in U.S. government settings. Like the involuntary autonomic central nervous system response data gathered during polygraph testing, VOC emissions from the skin may provide data that can be used to detect stress caused by deception. Detecting VOCs, then, may present a noninvasive, non-intrusive method for observing, recording, and quantifying evidence of stress or emotional change.

  1. Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound Emission Rates From Urban Vegetation in Southeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, B.; Graessli, M.; Bai, J.; Huang, A.; Li, N.; Guenther, A.

    2005-12-01

    Currently, the country of China is growing economically at an extraordinary pace. With this growth comes an increase in emissions of anthropogenic pollutants such as hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides from factories and vehicles. To accurately determine the effects of these pollutants on regional ozone production, and to best determine mitigation strategies, biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions must be considered in regional atmospheric chemistry models. To date, few studies have been carried out to determine BVOC emission factors for plant species that occur in China. Considering that approximately 20% of the world's population resides in this region, it is important to develop accurate databases for BVOC emissions for the country of China. This experiment took place during May and June of 2005 and was based in the Fairy Lake Botanical Gardens (FLBG) located to the northeast of the city of Shenzhen. The city of Shenzhen is located in southeast China in Guangdong province. The city was designated a 'special economic zone' in 1980 and has experienced intense population and economic growth ever since. The dense city is surrounded by hilly rural areas of forest on three sides, and Hong Kong to the south. The purpose of the experiment was to evaluate emissions of BVOC from plants that are important to the Shenzhen region as well as to southeastern China. Over 150 species of plants were screened for emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes. These species include most of the dominant trees and shrubs planted in the Shenzhen area. Samples were collected at the FLBG as well as at various locations around the city of Shenzhen. BVOC emission samples were collected and analyzed in one of two ways. First, a Teflon enclosure was placed over a plant's branch with a constant flow of ambient air passing through the enclosure. Samples were then pumped into a Teflon bag for analysis. Samples were analyzed within 30 minutes by gas chromatography (GC) with either a photo ionization or flame ionization detector. Second, single plant leaves were placed into a light and temperature controlled leaf cuvette. Scrubbed air was passed through the cuvette, and was then collected on adsorbent cartridges for later analysis. Sample cartridges were returned to the US and analyzed by GC with a mass spectrometry for detection and identification of compounds. Results indicate a wide range of emissions for isoprene and monoterpenes. The observed emissions are compared with previous studies and taxonomic relationships are described. The emission rate measurements will be combined with detailed satellite-based landcover distribution database and used to characterize regional biogenic VOC emissions. In addition, the results of the emission survey will be used to identify low emitting plants that can be recommended for planting in subtropical urban areas.

  2. Assessing methods to estimate emissions of non-methane organic compounds from landfills.

    PubMed

    Saquing, Jovita M; Chanton, Jeffrey P; Yazdani, Ramin; Barlaz, Morton A; Scheutz, Charlotte; Blake, Don R; Imhoff, Paul T

    2014-11-01

    The non-methane organic compound (NMOC) emission rate is used to assess compliance with landfill gas emission regulations by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). A recent USEPA Report (EPA/600/R-11/033) employed a ratio method to estimate speciated NMOC emissions (i.e., individual NMOC emissions): speciated NMOC emissions=measured methane (CH4) emission multiplied by the ratio of individual NMOCs concentration relative to CH4 concentration (C(NMOCs)/C(CH4)) in the landfill header gas. The objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate the efficacy of the ratio method in estimating speciated NMOC flux from landfills; (2) determine for what types of landfills the ratio method may be in error and why, using recent field data to quantify the spatial variation of (C(NMOCs)/C(CH4)) in landfills; and (3) formulate alternative models for estimating NMOC emissions from landfills for cases in which the ratio method results in biased estimates. This study focuses on emissions through landfill covers measured with flux chambers and evaluates the utility of the ratio method for estimating NMOC emission through this pathway. Evaluation of the ratio method was performed using CH4 and speciated NMOC concentration and flux data from 2012/2013 field sampling of four landfills, an unpublished landfill study, and literature data from three landfills. The ratio method worked well for landfills with thin covers (<40 cm), predicting composite NMOC flux (as hexane-C) to within a factor of 10× for 13 out of 15 measurements. However, for thick covers (?40 cm) the ratio method overestimated NMOC emissions by ?10× for 8 out of 10 measurements. Alternative models were explored incorporating other chemical properties into the ratio method. A molecular weight squared (MW)(2)-modified ratio equation was shown to best address the tendency of the current ratio method to overestimate NMOC fluxes for thick covers. While these analyses were only performed using NMOC fluxes through landfill covers measured with flux chambers, results indicate the current USEPA approach for estimating NMOC emissions may overestimate speciated NMOC emission ?10× for many compounds. PMID:25108756

  3. Feeding of large pine weevil on Scots pine stem triggers localised bark and systemic shoot emission of volatile organic compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juha Heijari; James D. Blande; Jarmo K. Holopainen

    2011-01-01

    Feeding by the large pine weevil (Hylobius abietis L.) causes severe damage to the bark of Scots pine (Maus sylvestris L.) seedlings. We measured photosynthesis, the emission of volatile organic compounds from intact and weevil-damaged bark and systemic emissions from undamaged foliage. Feeding damage did not affect photosynthesis. Monoterpenes dominated the emissions from the feeding site, although some sesquiterpenes were

  4. Contribution of flowering trees to urban atmospheric biogenic volatile organic compound emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghi, R.; Helmig, D.; Guenther, A.; Duhl, T.; Daly, R.

    2012-10-01

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) from urban trees during and after blooming were measured during spring and early summer 2009 in Boulder, Colorado. Air samples were collected onto solid adsorbent cartridges from branch enclosures on the tree species crabapple (Malus sp.), horse chestnut (Aesculus carnea, "Ft. McNair"), honey locust (Gleditsia triacanthos, "Sunburst"), and hawthorn (Crataegus laevigata, "Pauls Scarlet"). These species constitute ~ 65% of the insect-pollinated fraction of the flowering tree canopy (excluding catkin-producing trees) from the street area managed by the City of Boulder. Samples were analyzed for C10-C15 BVOC by thermal desorption and gas chromatography coupled to a flame ionization detector and a mass spectrometer (GC/FID/MS). Identified emissions and emission rates from these four tree species during the flowering phase were found to vary over a wide range. Monoterpene emissions were identified for honey locust, horse chestnut and hawthorn. Sesquiterpene emissions were observed in horse chestnut and hawthorn samples. Crabapple flowers were found to emit significant amounts of benzyl alcohol and benzaldehyde. Floral BVOC emissions increased with temperature, generally exhibiting exponential temperature dependence. Changes in BVOC speciation during and after the flowering period were observed for every tree studied. Emission rates were significantly higher during the blooming compared to the post-blooming state for crabapple and honey locust. The results were scaled to the dry mass of leaves and flowers contained in the enclosure. Only flower dry mass was accounted for crabapple emission rates as leaves appeared at the end of the flowering period. Total normalized (30 °C) monoterpene emissions from honey locust were higher during flowering (5.3 ?gC g-1 h-1) than after flowering (1.2 ?gC g-1 h-1). The total normalized BVOC emission rate from crabapple (93 ?gC g-1 h-1) during the flowering period is of the same order as isoprene emissions from oak trees, which are among the highest BVOC flowering period floral emissions observed from plants to date. These findings illustrate that during the relatively brief springtime flowering period, floral emissions constitute by far the most significant contribution to the BVOC flux from these tree species, some of which are leafless at this time. Experimental results were integrated into the MEGAN biogenic emission model and simulations were performed to estimate the contribution of floral BVOC emissions to the total urban BVOC flux during the spring flowering period. The floral BVOC emitted during this three-month simulation are equivalent to 11% of the integrated monoterpene flux for the Boulder urban area.

  5. Emission of volatile organic compounds after land application of cattle manure.

    PubMed

    Woodbury, Bryan L; Gilley, John E; Parker, David B; Marx, David B; Miller, Daniel N; Eigenberg, Roger A

    2014-07-01

    Beef cattle manure can serve as a valuable source of nutrients for crop production. However, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) after land application may pose an odor nuisance to downwind populations. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of land application method, diet, soil moisture content, and time since manure application on VOC emissions. Manure was collected from feedlot pens where cattle were fed diets containing 0, 10, or 30% wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS). Land application methods included surface-applying manure (i.e., no-tillage) or incorporating manure using disk tillage. The effects of soil moisture content on VOC emissions was determined by adding water to each of the plots approximately 24 h after manure application. Isovaleric acid, butyric acid, and 4-methylphenol contributed 28.9, 18.0, and 17.7%, respectively, of the total measured odor activity values. In general, the largest emissions of volatile fatty acids and aromatics were measured during the initial collection periods on the no-tillage plots under dry soil moisture conditions. Emissions of volatile fatty acids and aromatics were reduced after water additions because these compounds were stored in the soil-water matrix rather than released into the atmosphere. In contrast, sulfide emissions generally increased with the addition of the water, especially on the plots containing manure from the 30% WDGS diet. Sulfur content of manure increases with higher percentages of WDGS feed stock. Application method, diet, soil moisture content, and time since application should be considered when estimating VOC emissions. PMID:25603069

  6. Substrate-induced volatile organic compound emissions from compost-amended soils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin S. A. Seewald; Wolfgang Singer; Brigitte A. Knapp; Ingrid H. Franke-Whittle; Armin Hansel; Heribert Insam

    2010-01-01

    The agronomic effects of composts, mineral fertiliser and combinations thereof on chemical, biological and physiological soil\\u000a properties have been studied in an 18-year field experiment. The present study aimed at tracing treatment effects by evaluating\\u000a the volatile organic compound (VOC) emission of the differently treated soils: non-amended control, nitrogen fertilisation\\u000a and composts (produced from organic waste and sewage sludge, respectively)

  7. Impacts of global emissions of CO, NO x , and CH4 on China tropospheric hydroxyl free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Mingfeng; Lin, Yunping; Fan, Xinqiang; Peng, Li; Zhao, Chunsheng

    2012-07-01

    Using the global chemistry and transport model MOZART, the simulated distributions of tropospheric hydroxyl free radicals (OH) over China and its sensitivities to global emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NO x ), and methane (CH4) were investigated in this study. Due to various distributions of OH sources and sinks, the concentrations of tropospheric OH in east China are much greater than in west China. The contribution of NO + perhydroxyl radical (HO2) reaction to OH production in east China is more pronounced than that in west China, and because of the higher reaction activity of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs), the contributions to OH loss by NMVOCs exceed those of CO and take the dominant position in summer. The results of the sensitivity runs show a significant increase of tropospheric OH in east China from 1990 to 2000, and the trend continues. The positive effect of double emissions of NO x on OH is partly offset by the contrary effect of increased CO and CH4 emissions: the double emissions of NO x will cause an increase of OH of 18.1%-30.1%, while the increases of CO and CH4 will cause a decrease of OH of 12.2%-20.8% and 0.3%-3.0%, respectively. In turn, the lifetimes of CH4, CO, and NO x will increase by 0.3%-3.1% with regard to double emissions of CH4, 13.9%-26.3% to double emissions of CO and decrease by 15.3%-23.2% to double emissions of NO x .

  8. Contribution of flowering trees to urban atmospheric biogenic volatile organic compound emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghi, R.; Helmig, D.; Guenther, A.; Duhl, T.; Daly, R.

    2012-04-01

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) from urban trees during and after blooming were measured during spring and early summer 2009 in Boulder, Colorado. Air samples were collected onto solid adsorbent cartridges from branch enclosures on the following trees: crabapple, horse chestnut, honey locust and hawthorn. These species constitute ~65% of the insect-pollinated fraction of the flowering tree canopy (excluding catkin-producing trees) from the total street area managed by the City of Boulder. Samples were subsequently analyzed for C10 - C15 BVOC by thermal desorption and gas chromatography coupled to a flame ionization detector and a mass spectrometer (GC/FID/MS). Identified emissions and emission rates from these four tree species during the flowering phase were found to vary over a wide range. Monoterpene emissions were identified for honey locust, horse chestnut and hawthorn. Sesquiterpene emissions were observed in horse chestnut and hawthorn samples. Crabapple flowers were found to emit significant amounts of benzyl alcohol and benzaldehyde. Floral BVOC emissions were found to increase with temperature, generally exhibiting exponential temperature dependence. Changes in BVOC speciation during and after the flowering period were observed for every tree studied. Emission rates were significantly higher during the blooming compared to the vegetative state for crabapple and honey locust. Total normalized (30oC) monoterpene emissions from honey locust were 4.3 fold higher during flowering (5.26 ?gC g-1h-1) than after flowering (1.23 ?gC g-1h-1). The total normalized BVOC emission rate from crabapple (93 ?gC g-1h-1) during the flowering period is of the same order as isoprene emissions from oak trees, which are among the highest BVOC emissions observed to date. These findings illustrate that during the relatively brief springtime flowering period, floral emissions constitute by far the most significant contribution to the BVOC flux from these tree species, some of which are leafless at this time. These experimental results were integrated into the MEGAN biogenic emission model and simulations were performed to estimate the contribution of floral BVOC emissions to the total urban BVOC flux during the spring flowering period. The floral BVOC emitted during this three-month simulation constitute eleven percent of the cumulative monoterpene flux for the Boulder urban area.

  9. Contribution of flowering trees to urban atmospheric biogenic volatile organic compound emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghi, R.; Helmig, D.; Guenther, A.; Duhl, T.; Daly, R.

    2012-03-01

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) from urban trees during and after blooming were measured during spring and early summer 2009 in Boulder, Colorado. Air samples were collected onto solid adsorbent cartridges from branch enclosures on the tree species crabapple, horse chestnut, honey locust, and hawthorn. These species constitute ~65 % of the insect-pollinated fraction of the flowering tree canopy (excluding catkin-producing trees) from the street area managed by the City of Boulder. Samples were analyzed for C10-C15 BVOC by thermal desorption and gas chromatography coupled to a flame ionization detector and a mass spectrometer (GC/FID/MS). Identified emissions and emission rates from these four tree species during the flowering phase were found to vary over a wide range. Monoterpene emissions were identified for honey locust, horse chestnut and hawthorn. Sesquiterpene emissions were observed in horse chestnut and hawthorn samples. Crabapple flowers were found to emit significant amounts of benzyl alcohol and benzaldehyde. Floral BVOC emissions increased with temperature, generally exhibiting exponential temperature dependence. Changes in BVOC speciation during and after the flowering period were observed for every tree studied. Emission rates were significantly higher during the blooming compared to the vegetative state for crabapple and honey locust. Total normalized (30 °C) monoterpene emissions from honey locust were higher during flowering (5.26 ?g Cg-1 h-1) than after flowering (1.23 ?g Cg-1 h-1). The total normalized BVOC emission rate from crabapple (93 ?g Cg-1 h-1) during the flowering period is of the same order as isoprene emissions from oak trees, which are among the highest BVOC emissions observed from plants to date. These findings illustrate that during the relatively brief springtime flowering period, floral emissions constitute by far the most significant contribution to the BVOC flux from these tree species, some of which are leafless at this time. Experimental results were integrated into the MEGAN biogenic emission model and simulations were performed to estimate the contribution of floral BVOC emissions to the total urban BVOC flux during the spring flowering period. The floral BVOC emitted during this three-month simulation are equivalent to 11 % of the cumulative monoterpene flux for the Boulder urban area.

  10. Impacts of simulated herbivory on volatile organic compound emission profiles from coniferous plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faiola, C. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2015-01-01

    The largest global source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere is from biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. This study investigated the effects of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on plant emissions from five different coniferous species: bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata), blue spruce (Picea pungens), western redcedar (Thuja plicata), grand fir (Abies grandis), and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). Herbivory was simulated in the laboratory via exogenous application of methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a herbivory proxy. Gas-phase species were measured continuously with a gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer and flame ionization detector (GC-MS-FID). Stress responses varied between the different plant types and even between experiments using the same set of saplings. The compounds most frequently impacted by the stress treatment were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 1,8-cineol, beta-myrcene, terpinolene, limonene, and the cymene isomers. Individual compounds within a single experiment often exhibited a different response to the treatment from one another.

  11. Variation in biogenic volatile organic compound emission pattern of Fagus sylvatica L. due to aphid infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joó, É.; Van Langenhove, H.; Šimpraga, M.; Steppe, K.; Amelynck, C.; Schoon, N.; Müller, J.-F.; Dewulf, J.

    2010-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been the focus of interest to understand atmospheric processes and their consequences in formation of ozone or aerosol particles; therefore, VOCs contribute to climate change. In this study, biogenic VOCs (BVOCs) emitted from Fagus sylvatica L. trees were measured in a dynamic enclosure system. In total 18 compounds were identified: 11 monoterpenes (MT), an oxygenated MT, a homoterpene (C 14H 18), 3 sesquiterpenes (SQT), isoprene and methyl salicylate. The frequency distribution of the compounds was tested to determine a relation with the presence of the aphid Phyllaphis fagi L. It was found that linalool, (E)-?-ocimene, ?-farnesene and a homoterpene identified as (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene (DMNT), were present in significantly more samples when infection was present on the trees. The observed emission spectrum from F. sylvatica L. shifted from MT to linalool, ?-farnesene, (E)-?-ocimene and DMNT due to the aphid infection. Sabinene was quantitatively the most prevalent compound in both, non-infected and infected samples. In the presence of aphids ?-farnesene and linalool became the second and third most important BVOC emitted. According to our investigation, the emission fingerprint is expected to be more complex than commonly presumed.

  12. Patterns in volatile organic compound emissions along a savanna-rainforest gradient in central Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, L. F.; Greenburg, J.; Guenther, A.; Tyndall, G.; Zimmerman, P.; M'bangui, M.; Moutsamboté, J.-M.; Kenfack, D.

    1998-01-01

    In temperate regions the chemistry of the lower troposphere is known to be significantly affected by biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by plants. The chemistry of the lower troposphere over the tropics, however, is poorly understood, in part because of the considerable uncertainties in VOC emissions from tropical ecosystems. Present global VOC models predict that base emissions of isoprene from tropical rainforests are considerably higher than from savannas. These global models of VOC emissions which rely mainly on species inventories are useful, but significant improvement might be made with more ecologically based models of VOC emissions by plants. Ecosystems along a successional transect from woodland savanna to primary rainforest in central Africa were characterized for species composition and vegetation abundance using ground surveys and remotely sensed data. A total of 336 species (mostly trees) at 13 sites were recorded, and 208 of these were measured for VOC emissions at near-optimal light and temperature conditions using a leaf cuvette and hand-held photoionization detector (PID). A subset of 59 species was also sampled using conventional VOC emission techniques in order to validate the PID technique. Results of ecological and VOC emission surveys indicate both phylogenetic and successional patterns along the savanna-rainforest transect. Genera and families of trees which tend to emit isoprene include Lophira, Irvingia, Albizia, Artocarpus, Ficus, Pterocarpus, Caesalpiniaceae, Arecaceae, and Moraceae. Other taxa tend to contain stored VOCs (Annonaceae and Asteraceae). Successional patterns suggest that isoprene emissions are highest in the relatively early successional Isoberlinia forest communities and progressively decrease in the later successional secondary and primary rainforest communities. Stored VOCs appear to increase along the savanna-rainforest succession, but these data are more tentative. These findings are consistent with successional patterns of isoprene and terpene fluxes in North American forests and highlight the feasibility of constructing better predictive models of VOC emissions.

  13. Behavior of VOCs and Carbonyl Compounds Emission from Different Types of Wallpapers in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jungyun; Kim, Suejin; Kim, ARong; Lee, Wooseok; Han, Jinseok; Cha, Jun-Seok

    2014-01-01

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and carbonyls from three types of commercially available wallpapers (i.e., PVC-coated, paper-backed, natural material-coated) in Korea were evaluated using a 20 L small chamber. A total of 332 products were tested for emission factors, frequencies of occurrence and composition ratios. Toluene and formaldehyde concentrations were below Korean standard values for all products; however, the total VOC (TVOC) concentrations exceeded current standards (4.0 mg/m2·h) for 30 products. The TVOC emission factor for PVC-coated wallpapers, for which polymer materials are used in the manufacturing process, was seven and 16 times higher than those of paper-backed and natural material-coated wallpapers, respectively. The detection frequencies for toluene and formaldehyde were the highest (82.5%) and fourth highest (79.5%), respectively among the 50 target chemical species. The composition ratios for BTEX ranged from 0.3% to 5.1% and unidentified VOCs, which were not qualitatively analyzed using standard gas methods, ranged from 90.2% to 94.8%. Among six carbonyl compounds (acrolein was not detected in any type of wallpaper), acetone had the highest concentrations in PVC-coated (44.6%) and paper-backed (66.6%) wallpapers. Formaldehyde emissions were highest (64.6%) for natural material-coated wallpapers, a result of the formaldehyde-based resin used in the manufacturing process for these products. PMID:24747540

  14. Obtaining quantitative vapor emissions estimates of polychlorinated biphenyls and other semivolatile organic compounds from contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Mills, William J; Bennett, Erin R; Schmidt, Charles E; Thibodeaux, Louis J

    2004-10-01

    Soils contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) represent a potentially major, ongoing source of these compounds to the environment, especially during warmer temperatures. A great deal of work has been devoted to understanding the mechanisms that govern the vaporization of SVOCs from soil, but to date, few quantitative estimates have been published regarding emissions from contaminated sites. The present paper describes methods for obtaining quantitative estimates of SVOCs from soils based on flux chamber measurements, modeling, and ambient air measurements. On wet (i.e., H2O) soils, SVOCs at very low chemical loading levels on the adsorption sites (the so-called critical chemical concentration, critical loading, or saturation concentration) will behave, for volatilization purposes, as the pure-liquid substance would. For one soil, the PCB critical concentration was determined to be 775 ppm (95% confidence interval, 5.40E+02). Flux chamber-measured emissions from two contaminated sites were used and compared to model estimated values. The results agree reasonably well and indicate that the modeling approach used provided a conservative upper bound on the emissions. These approaches can be used to develop emissions estimates for SVOC-contaminated sites and inputs to air dispersion models. PMID:15511106

  15. Behavior of VOCs and carbonyl compounds emission from different types of wallpapers in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jungyun; Kim, Suejin; Kim, Arong; Lee, Wooseok; Han, Jinseok; Cha, Jun-Seok

    2014-04-01

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and carbonyls from three types of commercially available wallpapers (i.e., PVC-coated, paper-backed, natural material-coated) in Korea were evaluated using a 20 L small chamber. A total of 332 products were tested for emission factors, frequencies of occurrence and composition ratios. Toluene and formaldehyde concentrations were below Korean standard values for all products; however, the total VOC (TVOC) concentrations exceeded current standards (4.0 mg/m²·h) for 30 products. The TVOC emission factor for PVC-coated wallpapers, for which polymer materials are used in the manufacturing process, was seven and 16 times higher than those of paper-backed and natural material-coated wallpapers, respectively. The detection frequencies for toluene and formaldehyde were the highest (82.5%) and fourth highest (79.5%), respectively among the 50 target chemical species. The composition ratios for BTEX ranged from 0.3% to 5.1% and unidentified VOCs, which were not qualitatively analyzed using standard gas methods, ranged from 90.2% to 94.8%. Among six carbonyl compounds (acrolein was not detected in any type of wallpaper), acetone had the highest concentrations in PVC-coated (44.6%) and paper-backed (66.6%) wallpapers. Formaldehyde emissions were highest (64.6%) for natural material-coated wallpapers, a result of the formaldehyde-based resin used in the manufacturing process for these products. PMID:24747540

  16. Emission of volatile sulfur compounds during composting of municipal solid waste (MSW).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyu; Schuchardt, Frank; Li, Guoxue; Yang, Jinbing; Yang, Qingyuan

    2013-04-01

    Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) are the main source for malodor from composting plants. In this study, the VSCs generated from composting of 15-80 mm municipal solid waste (T0), kitchen waste (T1) and kitchen waste mixed dry cornstalks (T2) were measured in 60 L reactors with forced aeration for a period of 30 days. The VSCs detected in all treatments were hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methyl mercaptan (MM), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbon bisulfide (CS2) and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS). Over 90% of the VSCs emissions occurred during the first 15 days, and reached their peak values at days 4-7. The emission profiles of five VSCs species were significantly correlated with internal materials temperature and outlet O2 concentration (p<0.05). Total emissions of the VSCs were 216.1, 379.3 and 126.0 mg kg(-1) (dry matter) for T0, T1 and T2, respectively. Among the five VSCs, H2S was the most abundant compound with 39.0-43.0% of total VSCs released. Composting of kitchen waste from separate collection posed a negative influence on the VSC and leachate production because of its high moisture content. An addition of dry cornstalks at a mixing ratio of 4:1 (wet weight) could significantly reduce the VSCs emissions and avoid leachate. Compared to pure kitchen waste, VSCs were reduced 66.8%. PMID:23312132

  17. Development of a material with reproducible emission of selected volatile organic compounds - ?-Chamber study.

    PubMed

    Nohr, Michael; Horn, Wolfgang; Wiegner, Katharina; Richter, Matthias; Lorenz, Wilhelm

    2014-07-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found indoors have the potential to affect human health. Typical sources include building materials, furnishings, cleaning agents, etc. To address this risk, chemical emission testing is used to assess the potential of different materials to pollute indoor air. One objective of the European Joint Research Project "MACPoll" (Metrology for Chemical Pollutants in Air) aims at developing and testing a reference material for the quality control of the emission testing procedure. Furthermore, it would enable comparison of measurement results between test laboratories. The heterogeneity of the majority of materials makes it difficult to find a suitable reference sample. In the present study, styrene, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, N-methyl-?-pyrrolidone, lindane, n-hexadecane, 1,2-dimethyl- and 1,2-di-n-butyl-phthalate were added to 12 commercially available lacquers (6 alkyd and 6 acrylic polymer based lacquers) serving as carrier substrate. After homogenization, the mixtures were loaded into a Markes Micro-Chamber/Thermal Extractor (?-CTE™) for curing and investigation of the emission behavior for each compound. For almost all of the investigated chemicals, the preferred glossy acrylic lacquer showed emissions that were reproducible with a variation of less than 20% RSD. Such lacquer systems have therefore been shown to be good candidates for use as reference materials in inter-laboratory studies. PMID:24418066

  18. Emission characteristics of particulate matter and volatile organic compounds in cow dung combustion.

    PubMed

    Park, Duckshin; Barabad, Mona L; Lee, Gwangjae; Kwon, Soon-Bark; Cho, Youngmin; Lee, Duckhee; Cho, Kichul; Lee, Kiyoung

    2013-11-19

    Biomass fuel is used for cooking and heating, especially in developing countries. Combustion of biomass fuel can generate high levels of indoor air pollutants, including particulate matter (PM) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This study characterized PM and VOC emissions from cow dung combustion in a controlled experiment. Dung from grass-fed cows was dried and combusted using a dual-cone calorimeter. Heat fluxes of 10, 25, and 50 kW/m(2) were applied. The concentrations of PM and VOCs were determined using a dust spectrometer and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, respectively. PM and VOC emission factors were much higher for the lower heat flux, implying a fire ignition stage. When the heat flux was 50 kW/m(2), the CO2 emission factor was highest and the PM and VOC emission factors were lowest. Particle concentrations were highest in the 0.23-0.3 ?m size range at heat fluxes of 25 and 50 kW/m(2). Various toxic VOCs, including acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, benzene, and toluene, were detected at high concentrations. Although PM and VOC emission factors at 50 kW/m(2) were lower, they were high enough to cause extremely high indoor air pollution. The characteristics of PM and VOC emissions from cow dung combustion indicated potential health effects of indoor air pollution in developing countries. PMID:24180364

  19. Investigating Sources and Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds in California's San Joaquin Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentner, D. R.; Harley, R. A.; Weber, R.; Karlik, J. F.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2011-12-01

    Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are regulated both as primary air pollutants and as precursors to the formation of secondary organic aerosol and tropospheric ozone. The San Joaquin Valley, a non-attainment area for ozone and PM2.5, contains a variety of point, area, and mobile VOC sources that contribute to both primary and secondary pollution. Using ambient measurements of over 100 different VOCs and Intermediate Volatility Organic Compounds (IVOCs) made at multiple field sites, we assess the magnitude and importance of various VOC sources in the San Joaquin Valley. Hourly measurements were made during the spring and summer of 2010 via in-situ gas chromatography in Bakersfield, CA as part of the CalNex experiment and also at a rural site located 100 km north of Bakersfield. Additionally, in-situ measurements of fresh motor vehicle exhaust were made in Oakland's Caldecott tunnel during the summer of 2010. Measurements include a broad array of anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs ranging in size from 1 to 17 carbon atoms, including many compounds with functional groups or substituents (e.g. aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, halogens, sulfur, & nitrogen). Using statistical methods of source apportionment, covariance, source receptor modeling, and air parcel back trajectories, we assess the impact of various sources on observed VOC concentrations at our field sites in the San Joaquin Valley. Prevalent sources include gasoline and diesel-vehicle exhaust, petroleum extraction/refining, biogenic emissions from agricultural crops and natural vegetation, and emissions from dairy operations and animal husbandry. We use measurements of fresh motor vehicle emissions from the Caldecott tunnel to constrain apportionment of gasoline and diesel-related VOCs and IVOCs in the San Joaquin Valley. Initial results from Bakersfield show substantial influence from local anthropogenic VOC sources, but there is evidence for transport of emissions from both anthropogenic and biogenic sources elsewhere in the region. For example, large biogenic sources appear to be regional rather than local since concentrations of isoprene peak in the late afternoon/evening suggesting transport from northern parts of the valley. We observed elevated concentrations of numerous alcohols and carbonyls in the San Joaquin Valley; for example mixing ratios of ethanol and acetone at the Bakersfield supersite had inner quartile ranges of 1.2-9.4 ppbv and 0.58-1.6 ppbv, with daytime averages near 2 and 1 ppbv, respectively. Additionally, we assess the sources and emissions of the IVOCs observed in the San Joaquin Valley, which include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, large biogenic compounds, and high molecular weight alkanes and aromatics.

  20. Effects of nonmethane volatile organic compounds on microbial community of methanotrophic biofilter.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Gwan; Lee, Eun-Hee; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2013-07-01

    Effects of nonmethane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) on methanotrophic biofilter were investigated. Laboratory-scale biofilters packed with pumice and granular-activated carbon (10:1, w/w) were operated with CH4 and NMVOCs including dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and benzene/toluene (B/T). DMS alone exhibited a positive effect on the methanotrophic performance; however, the coexistence of B/T removed this effect. B/T alone exerted no effect on the performance. Pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR revealed that the NMVOCs strongly influenced the bacterial and methanotrophic communities but not the population density of methanotrophs. DMS alone diversified and changed both bacterial and methantrophic communities, but its effects were nullified by the presence of B/T. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed significant correlations between the NMVOCs and community composition and significant interaction between DMS and B/T. DMS did not affect the distribution of types I/II methanotrophs (60/40), while B/T increased the abundance of type I to 82 %. DMS and B/T favored the growth of the methanotrophic bacteria Methylosarcina and Methylomonas, respectively. These results suggest that NMVOCs can be a significant abiotic factor influencing methane biofiltration. PMID:23053093

  1. Variable emissions of microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs) from root-associated fungi isolated from Scots pine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäck, Jaana; Aaltonen, Hermanni; Hellén, Heidi; Kajos, Maija K.; Patokoski, Johanna; Taipale, Risto; Pumpanen, Jukka; Heinonsalo, Jussi

    2010-09-01

    Soils emit a large variety of volatile organic compounds. In natural ecosystems, measurements of microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC) exchange rates between soil and atmosphere are difficult due to e.g. the spatial heterogeneity of the belowground organisms, and due to the many potential sources for the same compounds. We measured in laboratory conditions the MVOC emission rates and spectra of eight typical fungi occurring in boreal forest soils. The studied species are decomposers ( Gymnopilus penetrans, Ophiostoma abietinum), ectomycorrhizal ( Cenococcum geophilum, Piloderma olivaceum, Suillus variegatus, Tomentellopsis submollis) and endophytic fungi ( Meliniomyces variabilis, Phialocephala fortinii). The MVOC emissions contained altogether 21 known and 6 unidentified compounds whose emission rates were >0.1 ?g g(DW) -1 h -1. The most abundant compounds were the short-chain carbonyl compounds (acetone and acetaldehyde). The greatest carbonyl emissions were measured from P. olivaceum (1.9 mg acetone g(DW) -1 h -1) and P. fortinii (0.114 mg acetaldehyde g(DW) -1 h -1). Terpenoid emissions (isoprene, mono- and sesquiterpenes) were detected from some fungal cultures, but in relatively small amounts. We conclude that soil micro-organisms can potentially be responsible for significant emissions of volatiles, especially short-chain oxygenated compounds, to the below-canopy atmosphere.

  2. Volatile organic compound emissions from unconventional natural gas production: Source signatures and air quality impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarthout, Robert F.

    Advances in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing over the past two decades have allowed access to previously unrecoverable reservoirs of natural gas and led to an increase in natural gas production. Intensive unconventional natural gas extraction has led to concerns about impacts on air quality. Unconventional natural gas production has the potential to emit vast quantities of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere. Many VOCs can be toxic, can produce ground-level ozone or secondary organic aerosols, and can impact climate. This dissertation presents the results of experiments designed to validate VOC measurement techniques, to quantify VOC emission rates from natural gas sources, to identify source signatures specific to natural gas emissions, and to quantify the impacts of these emissions on potential ozone formation and human health. Measurement campaigns were conducted in two natural gas production regions: the Denver-Julesburg Basin in northeast Colorado and the Marcellus Shale region surrounding Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. An informal measurement intercomparison validated the canister sampling methodology used throughout this dissertation for the measurement of oxygenated VOCs. Mixing ratios of many VOCs measured during both campaigns were similar to or higher than those observed in polluted cities. Fluxes of natural gas-associated VOCs in Colorado ranged from 1.5-3 times industry estimates. Similar emission ratios relative to propane were observed for C2-C6 alkanes in both regions, and an isopentane:n-pentane ratio ?1 was identified as a unique tracer for natural gas emissions. Source apportionment estimates indicated that natural gas emissions were responsible for the majority of C2-C8 alkanes observed in each region, but accounted for a small proportion of alkenes and aromatic compounds. Natural gas emissions in both regions accounted for approximately 20% of hydroxyl radical reactivity, which could hinder federal ozone standard compliance in downwind cities. A health risk assessment showed no increase in cancer or chronic non-cancer risk at locations near natural gas wells in Pennsylvania, but the contribution of natural gas emissions to total risk was 3-6 times higher near wells. These results will assist policy makers, natural gas producers, and citizen stakeholders in crafting effective policies to control VOC emissions from natural gas production activities.

  3. Ozone formation potentials of organic compounds from different emission sources in the South Coast Air Basin of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianjun; Luo, Dongmin

    2012-08-01

    Different organic compounds exhibit different propensities for ozone formation. Two approaches were used to study the ozone formation potentials or source reactivities of different anthropogenic organic compounds emission categories in California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB). The first approach was based on the combination of total organic gases (TOG) emission speciation profiles and the maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) scale of organic species. The second approach quantified ozone impacts from different emission sources by performing 3-dimensional air quality model sensitivity analysis involving increased TOG emissions from particular sources. The source reactivities derived from these two approaches agree reasonably well for 58 anthropogenic organic compounds emission categories in the SoCAB. Both approaches identify TOG emissions from mobile sources as having the highest reactivity. Source reactivities from both approaches were also combined with TOG emissions from each source category to produce a 2005 reactivity-based anthropogenic TOG emission inventory for the SoCAB. The top five reactivity-based anthropogenic TOG emission sources in the SoCAB during 2005 were: light-duty passenger cars, off-road equipment, consumer products, light-duty trucks category 2 (i.e., 3751-5750 lb), and recreational boats. This is in contrast to the mass-based TOG emission inventory, which indicates that livestock waste and composting emission categories were two of the five largest mass-based anthropogenic TOG emission sources. The reactivity-based TOG emission inventory is an important addition to the mass-based TOG emission inventory because it represents the ozone formation potentials from emission sources and can be used to assist in determining targeted sources for developing organic compounds reduction policies.

  4. Emission of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs) during aerobic decomposition of food wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ting; Wang, Xinming; Li, Dejun; Yi, Zhigang

    2010-12-01

    Food wastes collected from typical urban residential communities were investigated for the emission of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs) during laboratory-controlled aerobic decomposition in an incubator for a period of 41 days. Emission of VOSCs from the food wastes totaled 409.9 mg kg -1 (dry weight), and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), methyl 2-propenyl disulfide, carbonyl sulfide and methyl 1-propenyl sulfide were the five most abundant VOSCs, with shares of 75.5%, 13.5%, 4.8%, 2.2% and 1.3% in total 15 VOSCs released, respectively. The emission fluxes of major VOSCs were very low at the beginning (day 0). They peaked at days 2-4 and then decreased sharply until they leveled off after 10 days of incubation. For most VOSCs, over 95% of their emission occurred in the first 10 days. The time series of VOSC emission fluxes, as well as their significant correlation with internal food waste temperature ( p < 0.05) during incubation, suggested that production of VOSC species was induced mainly by microbial activities during the aerobic decomposition instead of as inherited. Released VOSCs accounted for 5.3% of sulfur content in the food wastes, implying that during aerobic decomposition considerable portion of sulfur in food wastes would be released into the atmosphere as VOSCs, primarily as DMDS, which is very short-lived in the atmosphere and thus usually less considered in the sources and sinks of reduced sulfur gases.

  5. PROJECTION METHODOLOGY FOR FUTURE STATE LEVEL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS FROM STATIONARY SOURCES (VERSION 1.8)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents the model framework used to estimate state level and national future volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions and control costs for stationary industrial and utility sources. The framework involves a projection approach using the 1980 National Acid Precipitat...

  6. A Genetically-Based Latitudinal Cline in the Emission of Herbivore-Induced Plant Volatile Organic Compounds

    E-print Network

    Agrawal, Anurag

    gradient . Monarch butterfly Danaus plexippus . Volatile organic compounds Introduction Geographic patterns in a common garden near the range center. Feeding by specialist Danaus plexippus (monarch) larvae induced VOCs, and field environmental conditions (temperature, light, and humidity) also influenced emissions. Monarch

  7. IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND LAND COVER CHANGE ON BIOGENIC VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (BVOCS) EMISSIONS IN TEXAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significant amounts of vegetation and forests in eastern and central Texas are the source of substantial emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which, when mixed with nitrogen oxides from anthropogenic sources, can lead to ozone formation. The biogenic emis...

  8. Online measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds from aircraft

    E-print Network

    Herndon, S. C.

    A detailed understanding of the climate and air quality impacts of aviation requires measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds (I/SVOCs) from aircraft. Currently both the ...

  9. A NONSTEADY-STATE ANALYTICAL MODEL TO PREDICT GASEOUS EMISSIONS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM LANDFILLS. (R825689C072)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract A general mathematical model is developed to predict emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from hazardous or sanitary landfills. The model is analytical in nature and includes important mechanisms occurring in unsaturated subsurface landfill environme...

  10. K ? X-Ray Emission Spectra and Chemical Environments of Phosphorus in Some Selected Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Chikara; Yorikawa, Hiroharu; Muramatsu, Shinji

    1996-09-01

    The phosphorus K? emissionfluorescence spectra from10 selected compounds are measured with a high-resolution two-crystalvacuum spectrometer. The phosphorus compounds studied include inorganiccompounds K2HPO3, NaH2PO2·H2O, NaH2PO3·2.5H2O, Ca2P2O7, Cu2P2O7 and (NaPO3)6; and organic compoundstri-o-tolylphosphine (o-CH3C6H4)3P,tri-m-tolylphosphine (m-CH3C6H4)3P,tri-p-tolylphosphine (p-CH3C6H4)3P andtriphenylphosphine oxide (C6H5)3PO. The measured P K?emission spectra are discussed in relation to chemical environmentsaround phosphorus atom in the compounds. It is shown that the P K?emission spectra are strongly influenced by chemical environments. Theeffect of o-, m- and p-methyl substitution at the benzene ring(position isomerism) is observed in theemission spectra of tri-o-tolylphosphine, tri-m-tolylphosphineand tri-p-tolylphosphine.

  11. Volatile organic compound emissions from green waste composting: Characterization and ozone formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Anuj; Alaimo, Christopher P.; Horowitz, Robert; Mitloehner, Frank M.; Kleeman, Michael J.; Green, Peter G.

    2011-04-01

    Composting of green waste separated from the disposed solid waste stream reduces biodegradable inputs into landfills, and contributes valuable soil amendments to agriculture. Agencies in regions with severe air quality challenges, such as California's San Joaquin Valley (SJV), have raised concerns about gases emitted during the composting process, which are suspected to contribute to persistent high levels of ground-level ozone formation. The goal of the current study is to thoroughly characterize volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from green waste compost piles of different ages (fresh tipped piles, 3-6 day old windrows, and 2-3 week old windrows). Multiple sampling and analytical approaches were applied to ensure the detection of most gaseous organic components emitted. More than 100 VOCs were detected and quantified in this study, including aliphatic alkanes, alkenes, aromatic hydrocarbons, biogenic organics, aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, furans, acids, esters, ether, halogenated hydrocarbons and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS). Alcohols were found to be the dominating VOC in the emissions from a compost pile regardless of age, with fluxes ranging from 2.6 to 13.0 mg m -2 min -1 with the highest emissions coming from the younger composting windrows (3-6 days). Average VOC emissions other than alcohols were determined to be 2.3 mg m -2 min -1 from younger windows, which was roughly two times higher than either the fresh tipping pile (1.2 mg m -2 min -1) or the older windrows (1.4 mg m -2 min -1). It was also observed that the older windrows emit a slightly larger proportion of more reactive compounds. Approximately 90% of the total VOCs were found to have maximum incremental reactivity of less than 2. Net ozone formation potential of the emissions was also assessed.

  12. Measurements of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from wood stains using an electronic balance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.S.; Nong, G.; Shaw, C.Y.; Wang, J.

    1999-07-01

    An emissions test method using an electronic balance is introduced for measuring the TVOC emission rates of oil-based wood stains, with a detailed procedure for preparing test specimens. The emission characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from an artificial wood stain and an oil-based commercial wood stain were determined. Results showed that VOC emissions from both stains included a surface evaporation and an internal diffusion sub-process. With regard to time, the entire emission period could be divided into three periods: (1) an initial evaporation-controlled period that was characterized by a high and fast decaying emission rate, (2) a transition period (following the initial period) in which the emissions transited from an evaporation-controlled to an internal diffusion-controlled process, and (3) an internal diffusion-controlled period that was characterized by a low and slowly decaying emission rate. For the commercial wood stain tested, the length of the initial period was approximately three hours, and about 46% of the emittable VOC mass was emitted during this short period. The transition period was between 3 and 6.5 hours from the start of testing and only accounted for about 4% of VOC mass emitted. The rest (about 50%) of the VOC mass was emitted in the diffusion-controlled period over a long period of time. Comparison between the commercial wood stain and an artificial wood stain suggested that the pigments/solids in the wood stain had significant effect on the time scales and amount of mass emitted during each emission period. The presence of additional VOCs in the commercial wood stain might have also affected the emission profiles. These results are useful for developing better models for predicting the emission rates. The electronic balance method was also compared with those determined from the TVOC concentrations measured at the chamber exhaust (referred to as chamber method). Results show that the two methods agreed well with each other, confirming the validity of the complete mixing assumption that is often used in environmental chamber testing. These results are useful for developing standard test protocols for testing wet building materials such as wood stains, varnishes, and paints.

  13. The Amazonian Floodplains, an ecotype with challenging questions on volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesselmeier, J.

    2012-12-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions are affected by a variety of biotic and abiotic factors such as light intensity, temperature, CO2 and drought. Another factor usually overlooked but very important for the tropical rainforest in Amazonia is regular flooding. According to recent estimates, the total Amazonian floodplain area easily ranges up to 700,000 km^2, including whitewater river floodplains (várzea) blackwater regions (igapó) and further clearwater regions. Regarding the total Amazonian wetlands the area sums up to more than 2.000.000 km^2, i.e. 30% of Amazonia. To survive the flooding periods causing anoxic conditions for the root system of up to several months, vegetation has developed several morphological, anatomical and physiological strategies. One is to switch over the root metabolism to fermentation, thus producing ethanol as one of the main products. Ethanol is a toxic metabolite which is transported into the leaves by the transpiration stream. From there it can either be directly emitted into the atmosphere, or can be re-metabolized to acetaldehyde and/or acetate. All of these compounds are volatile enough to be partly released into the atmosphere. We observed emissions of ethanol, acetaldehyde and acetic acid under root anoxia. Furthermore, plant stress induced by flooding also affected leaf primary physiological processes as well as other VOC emissions such as the release of isoprenoids and other volatiles. For example, Hevea spruceana could be identified as a monoterpene emitting tree species behaving differently upon anoxia depending on the origin, with increasing emissions of the species from igapó and decreasing with the corresponding species from várzea. Contrasting such short term inundations, studies of VOC emissions under long term conditions (2-3 months) did not confirm the ethanol/acetaldehyde emissions, whereas emissions of other VOC species decreased considerably. These results demonstrate that the transfer of our knowledge based on short-term experiments is risky being transferred to an ecotype which is governed under natural conditions by long term flooding. Furthermore, contrasting such experiments with usually young trees (saplings or a few years old) nothing is known about the emission behavior of adult trees under field conditions.

  14. Investigation and estimation of emission sources of 54 volatile organic compounds in ambient air in Tokyo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshi, Jun-ya; Amano, Saeko; Sasaki, Yuko; Korenaga, Takashi

    Atmospheric concentrations of 52 hydrocarbons and two aldehydes at roadside and urban sites in Tokyo metropolitan area, Japan were analyzed using GC/MS and HPLC. Monthly sampling was conducted during April 2003-March 2005. Annual average concentrations of individual volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at the roadside site were 1.7-1.9 times higher than at the urban site, suggesting that vehicle exhausts strongly affect VOC concentrations. Since high temperatures and under the stagnant meteorological conditions might increase VOC concentrations in air, the levels of alkanes, alkenes, and aromatic hydrocarbons rose in summer and autumn in 2003 and 2004. The VOCs concentrations against benzene (VOCs/Bz) suggest classifying three groups of VOCs: those mainly from mobile emission sources, those mainly from stationary sources, and those comprising unstable compounds such as aldehydes and 1,3-butadiene. The VOC/Bz technique was applied to registered VOC data from the Pollutant Release and Transfer Register (PRTR). Results show that these VOCs in ambient air in Tokyo reflect the PRTR estimated release amounts. The VOC/Bz technique based on environmental monitoring data is useful to estimate non-registered VOCs such as butane and isopentane. Results show the possibility of estimating emission sources using VOC/Bz ratios from environmental monitoring data, even when sufficient information on the emission sources are not available.

  15. Trends, temporal and spatial characteristics, and uncertainties in biomass burning emissions in the Pearl River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Min; Zheng, Junyu; Yin, Shasha; Zhang, Yingyi

    2011-08-01

    Multi-year inventories of biomass burning emissions were established in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region for the period 2003-2007 based on the collected activity data and emission factors. The results indicated that emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO 2), nitrogen oxide (NO x), ammonia (NH 3), methane (CH 4), organic carbon (OC), non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOC), carbon monoxide (CO), and fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) presented clear declining trends. Domestic biofuel burning was the major contributor, accounting for more than 60% of the total emissions. The preliminary temporal profiles were established with MODIS fire count information, showing that higher emissions were observed in winter (from November to March) than other seasons. The emissions were spatially allocated into grid cells with a resolution of 3 km × 3 km, using GIS-based land use data as spatial surrogates. Large amount of emissions were observed mostly in the less developed areas in the PRD region. The uncertainties in biomass burning emission estimates were quantified using Monte Carlo simulation; the results showed that there were higher uncertainties in organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) emission estimates, ranging from -71% to 133% and -70% to 128%, and relatively lower uncertainties in SO 2, NO x and CO emission estimates. The key uncertainty sources of the developed inventory included emission factors and parameters used for estimating biomass burning amounts.

  16. Volatile organic compound emission rates from mixed deciduous and coniferous forests in Northern Wisconsin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isebrands, J. G.; Guenther, A. B.; Harley, P.; Helmig, D.; Klinger, L.; Vierling, L.; Zimmerman, P.; Geron, C.

    Biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from forests play an important role in regulating the atmospheric trace gas composition including global tropospheric ozone concentrations. However, more information is needed on VOC emission rates from different forest regions of the world to understand regional and global impacts and to implement possible mitigation strategies. The mixed deciduous and coniferous forests of northern Wisconsin, USA, were predicted to have significant VOC emission rates because they are comprised of many genera (i.e. Picea, Populus, Quercus, Salix) known to be high VOC emitters. In July 1993, a study was conducted on the Chequamegon National Forest near Rhinelander, WI, to identify and quantify VOC emitted from major trees, shrubs, and understory herbs in the mixed northern forests of this region. Emission rates were measured at various scales - at the leaf level with cuvettes, the branch level with branch enclosures, the canopy level with a tower based system, and the landscape level with a tethered balloon air sampling system. Area-average emission rates were estimated by scaling, using biomass densities and species composition along transects representative of the study site. Isoprene (C 5H 8) was the primary VOC emitted, although significant quantities of monoterpenes (C 10H 16) were also emitted. The highest emission rates of isoprene (at 30°C and photosynthetically active radiation of 1000 ?mol m -2 s -1) were from northern red oak ( Quercus rubra, >110 ?g(C) g -1 h -1); aspen ( Populus tremuloides, >77); willow ( Salix spp., >54); and black spruce ( Picea mariana, >10). Emission rates of hybrid poplar clones ranged from 40 to 90 ?g(C) g -1 h -1 at 25°C; those of Picea provenances were generally <10, and emission rates of a hybrid between North American and European spruces were intermediate to parental rates. More than 30 species of plants were surveyed from the sites, including several from previously unstudied genera such as Alnus, Chamaedaphne, Ledum, Tilia, Rubus, and Sphagnum. Based on the measured isoprene concentrations in the daytime atmospheric surface layer and mixed layer, area-averaged fluxes of isoprene were estimated to be about 1 mg(C) m -2 h -1. This estimate agrees reasonably well with model predictions. Our results indicate that mixed forests in the Lake States region of the USA are a significant source of reactive VOC to the atmosphere. Accurate estimates of these emissions are required for determining appropriate regulatory air pollution control strategies. Future studies are needed to extrapolate these estimates to other landscapes and to better understand the factors controlling observed variations in VOC emissions.

  17. Past and Future Changes in Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound Emissions Simulated with a Global Dynamic Vegetation Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Lathiere; D. A. Hauglustaine; N. de Noblet-Ducoudre; G. Krinner; G. A. Folberth

    2005-01-01

    The terrestrial biosphere is an essential component of the surface-atmosphere interactions, emitting highly reactive compounds such as isoprene, monoterpenes, methanol and other alcohols, acetone, or aldehydes, in the troposphere. Those volatile organic compounds (VOC) are strongly involved in tropospheric chemistry, and participate not only to gas phase reactions but also to particulate formation. Moreover, biogenic VOC emissions are very sensitive

  18. Characteristics of volatile organic compounds emission profiles from hot road bitumens.

    PubMed

    Boczkaj, Grzegorz; Przyjazny, Andrzej; Kami?ski, Marian

    2014-07-01

    A procedure for the investigation and comparison of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emission profiles to the atmosphere from road bitumens with various degrees of oxidation is proposed. The procedure makes use of headspace analysis and gas chromatography with universal as well as selective detection, including gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The studies revealed that so-called vacuum residue, which is the main component of the charge, contains variable VOC concentrations, from trace to relatively high ones, depending on the extent of thermal cracking in the boiler of the vacuum distillation column. The VOC content in the oxidation product, so-called oxidized paving bitumen, is similarly varied. There are major differences in VOC emission profiles between vacuum residue and oxidized bitumens undergoing thermal cracking. The VOC content in oxidized bitumens, which did not undergo thermal cracking, increases with the degree of oxidation of bitumens. The studies revealed that the total VOC content increases from about 120 ppm for the raw vacuum residue to about 1900 ppm for so-called bitumen 35/50. The amount of volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the volatile fraction of fumes of oxidized bitumens increases with the degree of oxidation of bitumen and constitutes from 0.34% to 3.66% (w/w). The contribution of volatile nitrogen compounds (VNCs) to total VOC content remains constant for the investigated types of bitumens (from 0.16 to 0.28% (w/w) of total VOCs). The results of these studies can also find use during the selection of appropriate bitumen additives to minimize their malodorousness. The obtained data append the existing knowledge on VOC emission from oxidized bitumens. They should be included in reports on the environmental impact of facilities in which hot bitumen binders are used. PMID:24875867

  19. Emissions and Secondary Organic Aerosol Production from Semivolatile and Intermediate Volatility Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, A. L.; Presto, A. A.; Miracolo, M. A.; Donahue, N. M.; Kroll, J. H.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    Organic aerosols are a highly-dynamic system dominated by both variable gas-particle partitioning and chemical evolution. Important classes of organics include semivolatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds (SVOC and IVOC, respectively). SVOCs are compounds that exist in both the gas and particle phases at typical atmospheric conditions while IVOC are low-volatility vapors that exist exclusively in the gas phase. Both classes have saturation concentrations that are orders of magnitude lower than volatile organic compounds (VOC) that are the traditional subjects of atmosphere chemistry, such as monoterpenes, alkyl benzenes, etc. The SVOC and IVOC are poorly represented for in current atmospheric chemistry models. Source testing indicates that SVOC and IVOC emissions from biomass combustion, diesel engines and other sources exceed the primary organic aerosol emissions; thus the oxidation of these vapors could serve as a significant source of organic aerosol in the atmosphere. The formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from the reactions between OH radicals and SVOCs and IVOCs was investigated in the Carnegie Mellon University smog chamber. Experiments were conducted with n-alkanes and emission surrogates (diesel fuel and lubricating oil). SVOC oxidation produces oxidized organic aerosol but little new organic aerosol mass. This behavior can be explained by the coupled effects of partitioning and aging. Oxidation of SVOC vapors creates low volatility species that partition into the condensed phase; this oxidation also reduces the SVOC vapor concentration which, in turn, requires particle-phase SVOC to evaporate to maintain phase equilibrium. In contrast, oxidation of IVOC results in sustained production of SOA consistent with a reaction with relatively slow kinetics and high mass yield. Aerosol Mass Spectrometer data indicates that the SOA formed from IVOC has a mass spectrum that is quite similar to the oxygenated organic aerosol factor observed in field studies.

  20. Study of the dynamics of induced emission from organic compounds under pulsed laser pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylova, T. N.; Artyukhov, V. Ya.; Nikonov, S. Yu.; Gadirov, R. M.

    2013-09-01

    A numerical modeling technique has been used to study the dynamics of generation of induced emission in a series of organic compounds: coumarin (7-amino-4-methylcoumarin and 6-bromo-3-(4-(4-bromophenyl) thiazole-2-yl)-coumarin) and rhodamine 6G. The effect of concentration on the lasing wavelength (rhodamine 6G) has been elucidated, along with the lasing capability of 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin at different pump pulse durations. The reasons for the absence of lasing in 6-bromo-3-(4-(4-bromophenyl)thiazole-2-yl)-coumarin have been investigated.

  1. Application of horizontal spiral coil heat exchanger for volatile organic compounds (VOC) emission control.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, P M; Dawande, S D

    2013-04-01

    The petroleum products have wide range of volatility and are required to be stored in bulk. The evaporation losses are significant and it is a economic as well as environmental concern, since evaporative losses of petroleum products cause increased VOC in ambient air. Control of these losses poses a major problem for the storage tank designers. Ever rising cost of petroleum products further adds to the gravity of the problem. Condensation is one of the technologies for reducing volatile organic compounds emissions. Condensation is effected by condenser, which is basically a heat exchanger and the heat exchanger configuration plays an important role. The horizontal spiral coil heat exchanger is a promising configuration that finds an application in VOC control. This paper attempts to understand underlying causes of emissions and analyse the option of horizontal spiral coil heat exchanger as vent condenser. PMID:25464701

  2. Application of horizontal spiral coil heat exchanger for volatile organic compounds (VOC) emission control.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, P M; Dawande, S D

    2013-04-01

    The petroleum products have wide range of volatility and are required to be stored in bulk. The evaporation losses are significant and it is a economic as well as environmental concern, since evaporative losses of petroleum products cause increased VOC in ambient air. Control of these losses poses a major problem for the storage tank designers. Ever rising cost of petroleum products further adds to the gravity of the problem. Condensation is one of the technologies for reducing volatile organic compounds emissions. Condensation is effected by condenser, which is basically a heat exchanger and the heat exchanger configuration plays an important role. The horizontal spiral coil heat exchanger is a promising configuration that finds an application in VOC control. This paper attempts to understand underlying causes of emissions and analyse the option of horizontal spiral coil heat exchanger as vent condenser. PMID:25508332

  3. Characterizing reduced sulfur compounds emissions from a swine concentrated animal feeding operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumsey, Ian C.; Aneja, Viney P.; Lonneman, William A.

    2014-09-01

    Reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs) emissions from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have become a potential environmental and human health concern, as a result of changes in livestock production methods. RSC emissions were determined from a swine CAFO in North Carolina. RSC measurements were made over a period of ?1 week from both the barn and lagoon during each of the four seasonal periods from June 2007 to April 2008. During sampling, meteorological and other environmental parameters were measured continuously. Seasonal hydrogen sulfide (H2S) barn concentrations ranged from 72 to 631 ppb. Seasonal dimethyl sulfide (DMS; CH3SCH3) and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS; CH3S2CH3) concentrations were 2-3 orders of magnitude lower, ranging from 0.18 to 0.89 ppb and 0.47 to 1.02 ppb, respectively. The overall average barn emission rate was 3.3 g day-1 AU-1 (AU (animal unit) = 500 kg of live animal weight) for H2S, which was approximately two orders of magnitude higher than the DMS and DMDS overall average emissions rates, determined as 0.017 g day-1 AU-1 and 0.036 g day-1 AU-1, respectively. The overall average lagoon flux was 1.33 ?g m-2 min-1 for H2S, which was approximately an order of magnitude higher than the overall average DMS (0.12 ?g m-2 min-1) and DMDS (0.09 ?g m-2 min-1) lagoon fluxes. The overall average lagoon emission for H2S (0.038 g day-1 AU-1) was also approximately an order of magnitude higher than the overall average DMS (0.0034 g day-1 AU-1) and DMDS (0.0028 g day-1 AU-1) emissions. H2S, DMS and DMDS have offensive odors and low odor thresholds. Over all four sampling seasons, 77% of 15 min averaged H2S barn concentrations were an order of magnitude above the average odor threshold. During these sampling periods, however, DMS and DMDS concentrations did not exceed their odor thresholds. The overall average barn and lagoon emissions from this study were used to help estimate barn, lagoon and total (barn + lagoon) RSC emissions from swine CAFOs in North Carolina. Total (barn + lagoon) H2S emissions from swine CAFOs in North Carolina were estimated to be 1.22*106 kg yr-1. The barns had significantly higher H2S emissions than the lagoons, contributing ?98% of total North Carolina H2S swine CAFO emissions. Total (barn + lagoon) emissions for DMS and DMDS were 1-2 orders of magnitude lower, with barns contributing ?86% and ?93% of total emissions, respectively. H2S swine CAFO emissions were estimated to contribute ?18% of North Carolina H2S emissions.

  4. MODEL FOR EVALUATION OF REFINERY AND SYNFUELS VOC (VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS) EMISSION DATA. VOLUME 2. APPENDICES B AND C

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the development of a model for estimating emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from petroleum refineries and synfuel plants. The model, responding to a need to define a consistent and comprehensive approach for estimating VOC emissions from these tw...

  5. MODEL FOR EVALUATION OF REFINERY AND SYNFUELS VOC (VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS) EMISSION DATA. VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL REPORT AND APPENDIX A

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the development of a model for estimating emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from petroleum refineries and synfuel plants. The model, responding to a need to define a consistent and comprehensive approach for estimating VOC emissions from these tw...

  6. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS FROM LATEX PAINT-PART 2. TEST HOUSE STUDIES AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY (IAQ) MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emission models developed using small chamber data were combined with an Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) model to analyze the impact of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from latex paint on indoor environments. Test house experiments were conducted to verify the IAQ model's pred...

  7. Characteristics of volatile organic compounds from motorcycle exhaust emission during real-world driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Jiun-Horng; Huang, Pei-Hsiu; Chiang, Hung-Lung

    2014-12-01

    The number of motorcycles has increased significantly in Asia, Africa, Latin American and Europe in recent years due to their reasonable price, high mobility and low fuel consumption. However, motorcycles can emit significant amounts of air pollutants; therefore, the emission characteristics of motorcycles are an important consideration for the implementation of control measures for motorcycles in urban areas. Results of this study indicate that most volatile organic compound (VOC) emission factors were in the range of several decades mg/km during on-road driving. Toluene, isopentane, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, m,p-xylene, and o-xylene were the most abundant VOCs in motorcycle exhaust, with emission factors of hundreds mg/km. Motorcycle exhaust was 15.4 mg/km for 15 carbonyl species. Acetaldehyde, acetone, formaldehyde and benzaldehyde were the major carbonyl species, and their emission factors ranged from 1.4 to 3.5 mg/km 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, m,p-xylene, 1-butene, toluene, o-xylene, 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene, propene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, isoprene, m-diethylbenzene, and m-ethyltoluene were the main ozone formation potential (OFP) species, and their OFP was 200 mg-O3/km or higher.

  8. Carbonyl compound emissions from passenger cars fueled with methanol/gasoline blends.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong; Ge, Yunshan; Hao, Chunxiao; Han, Xiukun; Fu, Mingliang; Yu, Linxiao; Shah, Asad Naeem

    2010-08-01

    Carbonyl compound emissions from two passenger cars fueled with different methanol/gasoline blends (M15 and M100) and operated with three-way catalytic converters (TWC) were investigated. The tests were performed on a chassis dynamometer with constant volume sampling over the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC). Carbonyls were trapped on dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) cartridges. The hydrazones formed on the cartridge were analyzed by means of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and detected with a variable wavelength detector. The results show that when cars were fueled with methanol/gasoline blends, carbon monoxide (CO) and total hydrocarbon (THC) emissions decreased by 9-21% and 1-55% respectively, while nitrogen oxide (NO(x)) emissions increased by 175-233%. Compared with gasoline vehicles, formaldehyde emissions with M15 and M100 were two and four times higher respectively, and total carbonyls with M15 and M100 increased by 3% and 104% respectively. With the use of the new TWC, both regulated gas pollutants and formaldehyde decreased. The new TWC caused a decrease of 5% and 31% in formaldehyde concentration for M15 and M100, respectively. Specific reactivity (SR) with the new TWC was reduced from 5.92 to 5.72 for M15 and from 7.00 to 6.93 for M100, indicating that M15 and M100 with the new TWC were friendlier to the environment. PMID:20510438

  9. Gas phase carbonyl compounds in ship emissions: Differences between diesel fuel and heavy fuel oil operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reda, Ahmed A.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.; Orasche, J.; Abbaszade, G.; Lintelmann, J.; Arteaga-Salas, J. M.; Stengel, B.; Rabe, R.; Harndorf, H.; Sippula, O.; Streibel, T.; Zimmermann, R.

    2014-09-01

    Gas phase emission samples of carbonyl compounds (CCs) were collected from a research ship diesel engine at Rostock University, Germany. The ship engine was operated using two different types of fuels, heavy fuel oil (HFO) and diesel fuel (DF). Sampling of CCs was performed from diluted exhaust using cartridges and impingers. Both sampling methods involved the derivatization of CCs with 2,4-Dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH). The CCs-hydrazone derivatives were analyzed by two analytical techniques: High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Diode Array Detector (HPLC-DAD) and Gas Chromatography-Selective Ion Monitoring-Mass Spectrometry (GC-SIM-MS). Analysis of DNPH cartridges by GC-SIM-MS method has resulted in the identification of 19 CCs in both fuel operations. These CCs include ten aliphatic aldehydes (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propanal, isobutanal, butanal, isopentanal, pentanal, hexanal, octanal, nonanal), three unsaturated aldehydes (acrolein, methacrolein, crotonaldehyde), three aromatic aldehyde (benzaldehyde, p-tolualdehyde, m,o-molualdehyde), two ketones (acetone, butanone) and one heterocyclic aldehyde (furfural). In general, all CCs under investigation were detected with higher emission factors in HFO than DF. The total carbonyl emission factor was determined and found to be 6050 and 2300 ?g MJ-1 for the operation with HFO and DF respectively. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were found to be the dominant carbonyls in the gas phase of ship engine emission. Formaldehyde emissions factor varied from 3500 ?g MJ-1 in HFO operation to 1540 ?g MJ-1 in DF operation, which is 4-30 times higher than those of other carbonyls. Emission profile contribution of CCs showed also a different pattern between HFO and DF operation. The contribution of formaldehyde was found to be 58% of the emission profile of HFO and about 67% of the emission profile of DF. Acetaldehyde showed opposite behavior with higher contribution of 16% in HFO compared to 11% for DF. Heavier carbonyls (more than two carbon atoms) showed also more contribution in the emission profile of the HFO fuel (26%) than in DF (22%).

  10. Past and future changes in biogenic volatile organic compound emissions simulated with a global dynamic vegetation model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Lathière; D. A. Hauglustaine; N. De Noblet-Ducoudré; G. Krinner; G. A. Folberth

    2005-01-01

    Based on an interactive global biogenic emission and dynamic vegetation model, we investigate the evolution of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by the terrestrial biosphere in four scenarios: the Last Glacial Maximum (21,000 years BP), the preindustrial (1850s), present-day (1990s) and the future (2100). The combined effects of foliar expansion, climate change and ecosystems redistribution impact strongly on biogenic emissions.

  11. Emission of complex fragments for compound nuclei formed far from the stability line for A{approx}120

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Del Campo, J.

    1996-10-01

    Experiments and calculations are presented for the emission of complex fragments (Z>2) from compound nuclei around mass 120 and for bombarding energies below 15 MeV/nucleon. It is shown that a strong enhancement in the emission of complex fragments (especially for Z=6) is expected for compound nuclei formed close or at the N=Z line. Several predictions are given that could be tested with the radioactive beams soon to be available. Also results from a recent experiment that utilizes the emission of complex fragments for {gamma}-ray nuclear spectroscopy studies are presented.

  12. The emission patterns of volatile organic compounds during aerobic biotreatment of municipal solid waste using continuous and intermittent aeration.

    PubMed

    He, Pin-Jing; Tang, Jia-Fu; Yang, Na; Fang, Jing-Jing; He, Xiao; Shao, Li-Ming

    2012-04-01

    Because volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are one of the main concerns during municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment, the release patterns and the environmental effects of VOCs were investigated during laboratory-scale aerobic biotreatments of MSW with continuous and intermittent negative ventilation. When the same airflow amounts were used, intermittent ventilation was found to reduce the total VOC emissions from continuous ventilation process by 28%. In this study, 23 types of volatile organic compounds were analyzed, of which butyraldehyde, ethanol, and butanone were emitted in the highest concentrations of 748, 372, and 260 mg/m3, respectively. During the aerobic biotreatment process, ketones, aldehydes, and alcohols were primarily released during the first 4 days, accounting for 86-98% of the total VOC emissions during this period. The emission concentrations of malodorous sulfide compounds displayed two peaks on day 4 and day 9, with the contribution to the total VOC emissions being enhanced from less than 10% to 76-83%. The release of terpenes and aromatics lasted for more than 10 days with no significant emission peaks and the proportions of those compounds in the total VOCs increased gradually, but no more than 50% even at the end of the process. Considering the strength of the odors, aldehydes were the predominant contributors at the beginning of the experiment, whereas malodorous sulfide compounds became the most odorous compound as the biological process continued. Most of the VOCs emitted at the concentrations beneath the level causing health threat to the workers. PMID:22616288

  13. Gaseous HC1 and chlorinated organic compound emissions from refuse-fired waste-to-energy systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nunn, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    The emissions from a water-wall mass-fired municipal-waste incinerator and a refuse-derived-fuel (RDF) fired incinerator were sampled for chlorinated organic compounds and hydrochloric acid (HCl). The sampling was performed to evaluate the extractive sampling methods used to measure the compounds. Sampling the chlorinated organic compound emissions was conducted using a modified version of the EPA Reference 5 Method, which included an XAD-2 resin cartridge. HC1 was sampled with an impinger train using basic absorbing solutions. The recovered chlorinated organics were separated into chlorophenols, chlorobenzenes, poly-chlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (CDDs), and chlorinated dibenzofurans (CDFs), and quantitated. The results of the analysis are presented in terms of the compounds distributions within the sampling systems as well as the emission rates.

  14. Technology status report: Off-gas treatment technologies for chlorinated volatile organic compound air emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Rossabi, J.; Haselow, J.S.

    1992-04-15

    The purpose of this document is to review technologies for treatment of air streams that contain chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCS) and to describe a Department of Energy Office of Technology Development program that is planned to demonstrate innovative technologies for the abatement of CVOC emissions. This report describes the first phase of testing of off-gas treatment technologies. At least one more phase of testing is planned. Guidance for the preparation of this document was provided by a predecisional draft outline issued by the Department of Energy's Office of Technology Development. The report is intended to evaluate the technical and regulatory aspects, public acceptance, and estimated costs of technologies selected for development and testing. These technologies are compared to currently practiced or baseline methods for treatment of CVOC-laden airstreams. A brief overview is provided rather than detailed cost and data comparisons because many of these technologies have not yet been field tested. A description of other promising technologies for the treatment of CVOC emissions is also included. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) were used for industrial cleaning and solvent applications for several decades. These chemicals can be classified as CVOCS. As a result of past standard disposal practices, these types of compounds are persistent groundwater and soil contaminants throughout the United States and the Department of Energy Complex.

  15. Technology status report: Off-gas treatment technologies for chlorinated volatile organic compound air emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Rossabi, J.; Haselow, J.S.

    1992-04-15

    The purpose of this document is to review technologies for treatment of air streams that contain chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCS) and to describe a Department of Energy Office of Technology Development program that is planned to demonstrate innovative technologies for the abatement of CVOC emissions. This report describes the first phase of testing of off-gas treatment technologies. At least one more phase of testing is planned. Guidance for the preparation of this document was provided by a predecisional draft outline issued by the Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development. The report is intended to evaluate the technical and regulatory aspects, public acceptance, and estimated costs of technologies selected for development and testing. These technologies are compared to currently practiced or baseline methods for treatment of CVOC-laden airstreams. A brief overview is provided rather than detailed cost and data comparisons because many of these technologies have not yet been field tested. A description of other promising technologies for the treatment of CVOC emissions is also included. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) were used for industrial cleaning and solvent applications for several decades. These chemicals can be classified as CVOCS. As a result of past standard disposal practices, these types of compounds are persistent groundwater and soil contaminants throughout the United States and the Department of Energy Complex.

  16. Volatile organic compound emissions from wastewater treatment plants in Taiwan: legal regulations and costs of control.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wen-Hsi; Hsu, Shu-Kang; Chou, Ming-Shean

    2008-09-01

    This study assessed volatile organic compound (VOC) emission characteristics from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in five Taiwanese industrial districts engaged in numerous manufacturing processes, including petrochemical, science-based industry (primarily semiconductors, photo-electronics, electronic products and biological technology), as well as multiple manufacturing processes (primarily pharmaceuticals and paint manufacturing). The most aqueous hydrocarbons dissolved in the wastewater of Taiwanese WWTPs were acetone, acrylonitrile, methylene chloride, and chloroform for the petrochemical districts; acetone, chloroform, and toluene for the science-based districts; and chlorinated and aromatic hydrocarbons for the multiple industrial districts. The aqueous pollutants in the united WWTPs were closely related to the characteristics of the manufacturing plants in the districts. To effectively prevent VOC emissions from the primary treatment section of petrochemical WWTPs, the updated regulations governing VOC emissions were issued by the Taiwanese Environmental Protection Administration in September 2005, legally mandating a seal cover system incorporating venting and air purification equipment. Cost analysis indicates that incinerators with regenerative heat recovery are optimal for treating high VOC concentrations, exceeding 10,000 ppm as CH(4), from the oil separation basins. However, the emission concentrations, ranging from 100 to 1,000 ppm as CH(4) from the other primary treatment facilities and bio-treatment stages, should be collected and then injected into the biological oxidation basins via existing or new blowers. The additional capital and operating costs required to treat the VOC emissions of 1,000 ppm as CH(4) from primary treatment facilities are less than USD 0.1 for per m(3) wastewater treatment capacity. PMID:17825475

  17. [Source emission characteristics and impact factors of volatile halogenated organic compounds from wastewater treatment plant].

    PubMed

    He, Jie; Wang, Bo-Guang; Liu, Shu-Le; Zhao, De-Jun; Tang, Xiao-Dong; Zou, Yu

    2011-12-01

    A low enrichment method of using Tenax as absorbent and liquid nitrogen as refrigerant has been established to sample the volatile halogenated organic compounds in Guangzhou Liede municipal wastewater treatment plant as well as its ambient air. The composition and concentration of target halogenated hydrocarbons were analyzed by combined thermal desorption/GC-MS to explore its sources profile and impact factors. The result showed that 19 halogenated organic compounds were detected, including 11 halogenated alkanets, 3 halogenated alkenes, 3 halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons and 2 haloesters, with their total concentrations ranged from 34.91 microg x m(-3) to 127.74 microg x m(-3) and mean concentrations ranged from n.d. to 33.39 microg x m(-3). Main pollutants of the studied plant were CH2Cl2, CHCl3, CFC-12, C2H4Cl2, CFC-11, C2HCl3 and C2Cl4, they came from the wastewater by volatilization. Among the six processing units, the dehydration room showed the highest level of halogenated organic compounds, followed by pumping station, while the sludge thickener was the lowest. The emissions from pumping station, aeration tank and biochemical pool were significantly affected by temperature and humidity of environment. PMID:22468521

  18. Approaches for quantifying reactive and low-volatility biogenic organic compound emissions by vegetation enclosure techniques - part B: applications.

    PubMed

    Ortega, John; Helmig, Detlev; Daly, Ryan W; Tanner, David M; Guenther, Alex B; Herrick, Jeffrey D

    2008-06-01

    The focus of the studies presented in the preceding companion paper (Part A: Review) and here (Part B: Applications) is on defining representative emission rates from vegetation for determining the roles of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions in atmospheric chemistry and aerosol processes. The review of previously published procedures for identifying and quantifying BVOC emissions has revealed a wide variety of experimental methods used by various researchers. Experimental details become increasingly critical for quantitative emission measurements of low volatility monoterpenes (MT) and sesquiterpenes (SQT). These compounds are prone to be lost inadvertently by uptake to materials in contact with the sample air or by reactions with atmospheric oxidants. These losses become more prominent with higher molecular weight compounds, potentially leading to an underestimation of their emission rates. We present MT and SQT emission rate data from numerous experiments that include 23 deciduous tree species, 14 coniferous tree species, 8 crops, and 2 shrubs. These data indicate total, normalized (30 degrees C) basal emission rates from <10 to 5600ngCg(-1)h(-1) for MT, and from <10 to 1150ngCg(-1)h(-1) for SQT compounds. Both MT and SQT emissions have exponential dependencies on temperature (i.e. rates are proportional to e(betaT)). The inter-quartile range of beta-values for MT was between 0.12 and 0.17K(-1), which is higher than the value commonly used in models (0.09K(-1)). However many of the MT emissions also exhibited light dependencies, making it difficult to separate light and temperature influences. The primary light-dependent MT was ocimene, whose emissions were up to a factor of 10 higher than light-independent MT emissions. The inner-quartile range of beta-values for SQT was between 0.15 and 0.21K(-1). PMID:18471857

  19. Toxic Volatile Organic Compounds in Environmental Tobacco Smoke:Emission Factors for Modeling Exposures of California Populations

    SciTech Connect

    Daisey, J.M.; Mahanama, K.R.R.; Hodgson, A.T.

    1994-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to measure emission factors for selected toxic air in environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) using a room-sized environmental chamber. The emissions of 23 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including 1,3-butadiene, three aldehydes and two vapor-phase N-nitrosarnines were determined for six commercial brands of cigarettes and reference cigarette 1R4F. The commercial brands were selected to represent 62.5% of the cigarettes smoked in California. For each brand, three cigarettes were machine smoked in the chamber. The experiments were conducted over four hours to investigate the effects of aging. Emission factors of the target compounds were also determined for sidestream smoke (SS). For almost all target compounds, the ETS emission factors were significantly higher than the corresponding SS values probably due to less favorable combustion conditions and wall losses in the SS apparatus. Where valid comparisons could be made, the ETS emission factors were generally in good agreement with the literature. Therefore, the ETS emission factors, rather than the SS values, are recommended for use in models to estimate population exposures from this source. The variabilities in the emission factors (pgkigarette) of the selected toxic air contaminants among brands, expressed as coefficients of variation, were 16 to 29%. Therefore, emissions among brands were generally similar. Differences among brands were related to the smoked lengths of the cigarettes and the masses of consumed tobacco. Mentholation and whether a cigarette was classified as light or regular did not significantly affect emissions. Aging was determined not to be a significant factor for the target compounds. There were, however, deposition losses of the less volatile compounds to chamber surfaces.

  20. Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Larrea tridentate (Creosote bush) during the North American Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, K. J.; Kurc, S. A.; Guenther, A. B.; Scott, R. L.; Huxman, T. E.; Abrell, L.

    2009-12-01

    The North American monsoon is experienced as a pronounced increase in rainfall from an extremely dry June (< 5 mm precipitation) to a rainy July (> 80 mm) over large areas of the Sonoran desert in southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. While the sudden availability of water, high temperatures and solar insolation is known to stimulate the primary productivity of the Sonoran desert, little is known about the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from this region. Atmospheric VOCs impact climate and air quality by influencing the oxidizing capacity and acidity of the atmosphere and by contributing to aerosol particles. Although it is often a dominant species in North and South American deserts and is known for the production of a rich set of VOCs, few measurements of VOC emissions from creosote bush exist. We present preliminary results from a field study in southern Arizona aimed at quantifying the exchange rates of VOCs from a creosote bush dominated ecosystem during and after the monsoon season. Ecosystem exchange rates were measured with the technique of virtual disjunct eddy covariance (PTR-MS) and relaxed eddy accumulation (GC-MS). Branch enclosure studies show a diurnal pattern of VOCs emissions typically observed in other forest sites including oxygenated VOCs and volatile isoprenoids. However, a large number of additional VOCs mainly derived from the oxidation of fatty acids and the Shikimic Acid Pathway are also released.

  1. Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Dairy Farming and their effect on San Joaquin Valley Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, D. R.; Yang, M.; Meinardi, S.; Krauter, C.; Rowland, F. S.

    2009-05-01

    The San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District of California issued a report identifying dairies as a main source of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). A dairy study funded by the California Air Resources Board commenced shortly after the report was issued. Our University of California Irvine group teamed with California State University Fresno to determine the major sources of VOCs from various dairy operations and from a variety of dairy types. This study identified ethanol and methanol as two gases produced in major quantities throughout the dairies in the San Joaquin valley as by-products of yeast fermentation of silage. Three different types of sampling protocols were employed in order to determine the degree of enhancement of the target oxygenates in the valley air shed. Their sources, emission profiles, and emission rates were determined from whole air samples collected at various locations at the six dairies studied. An assessment of the impact of dairy emissions in the valley was achieved by using data obtained on low altitude NASA DC-8 flights through the valley, and from ground level samples collected though out the valley in a grid like design. Our data suggest that a significant amount of O3 production in the valley may come from methanol, ethanol, and acetaldehyde (a photochemical by-product ethanol oxidation). Our findings indicate that improvement to valley air quality may be obtained by focusing on instituting new silage containment practices and regulations.

  2. LC-MS analysis of carbonyl compounds and their occurrence in diesel emissions.

    PubMed

    Jakober, Chris A; Charles, M Judith; Kleeman, Michael J; Green, Peter G

    2006-07-15

    Liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) ion trap mass spectrometry (ITMS) is applied to atmospheric aerosol relevant carbonyls. Characterization of positive and negative ion detection mass spectra are presented for 24 model compounds analyzed in their underivatized and O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine (PFBHA) oxime forms. The addition of PFBHA derivatization enhanced the detection and sensitivity for many of the carbonyls investigated. For all but five of the carbonyls examined, a pseudomolecular (M + H)+ ion is the base peak in the APCI positive ion mass spectra of PFBHA oxime derivatives and is observed in four of the five exceptions. Application of the evaluated analysis methodology to heavy-duty diesel source emissions facilitated the quantification of 10 aliphatic carbonyls (5 C5-C9 ketones, 4 C6 unsaturated ketones, 1 C6 dicarbonyl) and 14 aromatic carbonyls (1 C9 aldehyde, 5 C8-C13 ketones, 8 C6-C14 quinones). Diesel truck engine emission factors spanning 0.55-540 microg km(-1) were measured for gas- and particle-phase carbonyls. Good agreement was observed for gas-phase emission factors with results obtained by gas chromatography with ITMS. PMID:16841933

  3. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the food and drink industries of the European community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passant, Neil R.; Richardson, Stephen J.; Swannell, Richard P. J.; Gibson, N.; Woodfield, M. J.; van der Lugt, Jan Pieter; Wolsink, Johan H.; Hesselink, Paul G. M.

    Estimates were made of the amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released into the atmosphere as a result of the industrial manufacture and processing of food and drink in the European Community. The estimates were based on a review of literature sources, industrial and government contacts and recent measurements. Data were found on seven food manufacturing sectors (baking, vegetable oil extraction, solid fat processing, animal rendering, fish meal processing, coffee production and sugar beet processing) and three drink manufacturing sectors (brewing, spirit production and wine making). The principle of a data quality label is advocated to illustrate the authors' confidence in the data, and to highlight areas for further research. Emissions of ethanol from bread baking and spirit maturation were found to be the principle sources. However, significant losses of hexane and large quantities of an ill-defined mixture of partially oxidized hydrocarbons were noted principally from seed oil extraction and the drying of plant material, respectively. This latter mixture included low molecular weight aldehydes, carboxylic acids, ketones, amines and esters. However, the precise composition of many emissions were found to be poorly understood. The total emission from the food and drink industry in the EC was calculated as 260 kt yr -1. However, many processes within the target industry were found to be completely uncharacterized and therefore not included in the overall estimate (e.g. soft drink manufacture, production of animal food, flavourings, vinegar, tea, crisps and other fried snacks). Moreover, the use of data quality labels illustrated the fact that many of our estimates were based on limited data. Hence, further emissions monitoring is recommended from identified sources (e.g. processing of sugar beet, solid fat and fish meal) and from uncharacterized sources.

  4. The tropical forest and fire emissions experiment: method evaluation of volatile organic compound emissions measured by PTR-MS, FTIR, and GC from tropical biomass burning

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. G. Karl; T. J. Christian; R. J. Yokelson; P. Artaxo; W. Min Hao; A. Guenther

    2007-01-01

    Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from fires in tropical forest fuels were quantified us- ing Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTRMS), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and gas chromatography (GC) coupled to PTRMS (GC-PTR-MS). We investigated VOC emissions from 19 controlled labora- tory fires at the USFS (United States Forest Service) Fire Sciences Laboratory and 16 fires during an intensive air- borne

  5. Aggregation-induced emission compounds as new assisted matrices for laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chenxi; Niu, Caixia; Na, Na; He, Dacheng; Ouyang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Here, N,N'-bis(4-hydroxylsalicylidene)-p-phenylenediamine (BSPD-OH), N,N'-bis(4-methoxylsalicylidene)-p-phenylenediamine (BSPD-OMe) and N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-p-phenylenediamine (BSPD), which belong to the same category of aggregation-induced emission (AIE) compounds based on Schiff base reactions, were synthesized and applied as new matrices in the analysis of small molecules by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). This type of AIE compounds can be good MALDI matrices. Conventional organic matrices often produce large amounts of matrix ions, hindering the analysis of low molecular weight (LMW) compounds. However, these AIE compounds generate few matrix ions and less background interference because their presence as aggregates decreases the generation of matrix interference. The sensitivity of the AIE matrix is high because the aggregates can improve the absorption of the applied laser emissions. We can regulate the ionization efficiency of the AIE matrix by changing its aggregation state. During this study, BSPD-OH exhibited better ionization efficiency than the other two AIE matrices because it has more phenolic hydroxyl groups. BSPD-OH was successfully applied to the analysis of various LMW compounds including amino acids, organic amine compounds, isoquinoline compounds and fluoroquinolones compounds. This material also can be employed during the qualitative and quantitative analysis of LMW metabolites in human urine without requiring complicated separation processes. PMID:25467482

  6. Tracing CO2 fluxes and plant volatile organic compound emissions by stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Christiane; Wegener, Frederik; Jardine, Kolby

    2014-05-01

    Plant metabolic processes exert a large influence on global climate and air quality through the emission of the greenhouse gas CO2 and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Despite the enormous importance, processes controlling plant carbon allocation into primary and secondary metabolism, such as respiratory CO2 emission and VOC synthesis, remains unclear. The vegetation exerts a large isotopic imprint on the atmosphere through both, photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination and fractionation during respiratory CO2 release (?13Cres). While the former is well understood, many processes driving carbon isotope fractionation during respiration are unknown1. There are striking differences in variations of ?13Cres between plant functional groups, which have been proposed to be related to carbon partitioning in the metabolic branching points of the respiratory pathways and secondary metabolism, which are linked via a number of interfaces including the central metabolite pyruvate2. Notably, it is a known substrate in a large array of secondary pathways leading to the biosynthesis of many volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as volatile isoprenoids, oxygenated VOCs, aromatics, fatty acid oxidation products, which can be emitted by plants. Here we investigate if carbon isotope fractionation in light and dark respired CO2 is associated with VOC emissions in the atmosphere. Specifically, we hypothesize that a high carbon flux through the pyruvate into various VOC synthesis pathways is associated with a pronounced 13C-enrichment of respired CO2 above the putative substrate, as it involves the decarboxylation of the 13C-enriched C-1 from pyruvate. Based on simultaneous real-time measurements of stable carbon isotope composition of branch respired CO2 (CRDS) and VOC fluxes (PTR-MS) we traced carbon flow into these pathways by pyruvate positional labeling. We demonstrated that in a Mediterranean shrub the 13C-enriched C-1 from pyruvate is released in substantial amounts as CO2 in the light. Simultaneously, naturally 13C depleted C-2 and C-3 carbon atoms of the acetyl-moiety are emitted as a variety of VOCs. Moreover, during light-dark transitions leaf emission bursts of the oxygenated metabolite acetaldehyde were observed as part of the PDH bypass pathway in the cytosol2. This may be a new piece of evidence for the origin of 13C-enriched ?13CO2 which is released during Light-Enhanced Dark Respiration (LEDR). Our study provides the first evidence that the isotopic signature of respired CO2 is closely linked to carbon partitioning between anabolic and catabolic pathways and plants strategies of carbon investment into secondary compound synthesis. Werner C. & Gessler A. (2011) Diel variations in the carbon isotope composition of respired CO2 and associated carbon sources: a review of dynamics and mechanisms. Biogeosciences 8, 2437-2459 Jardine K, Wegener F, Abrell L, vonHaren J, Werner C (2014) Phytogenic biosynthesis and emission of methyl acetate. PCE 37, 414-424.

  7. ? 13 C and ?D of volatile organic compounds in an alumina industry stack emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitzthum von Eckstaedt, Christiane; Grice, Kliti; Ioppolo-Armanios, Marisa; Jones, Mark

    2011-10-01

    Compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) is becoming more widely accepted as a tool for determining the sources of contaminants and monitoring their transport and fate in the environment. However, measuring ?D of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in atmospheric samples is still underexplored. The present study applies thermal desorption-gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (TD-GC-irMS) for the first time to measure stable hydrogen isotope analyses of VOCs in an alumina refinery emission. ? 13C data is also collected. A sampling train was designed using TenaxTA as the adsorbent material to gain reliable and reproducible results for CSIA. ? 13C values for VOCs (C 6-C 14) ranged from -22 to -31‰, which is similar to ? 13C value range reported for naturally occurring components. The ?D values (21 to -137‰) in this study were consistently more enriched in D compared to ?D values of VOCs previously reported making the ? values of VOCs in the industrial stack unique. Therefore ?D analysis may provide a means for tracking VOCs in atmospheric samples.

  8. Impacts of uncertainty in AVOC emissions on the summer RO x budget and ozone production rate in the three most rapidly-developing economic growth regions of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; An, Junling; Li, Ying; Tang, Yujia; Lin, Jian; Qu, Yu; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Bing; Zhai, Jing

    2014-11-01

    High levels of uncertainty in non-methane volatile organic compound (NMVOC) emissions in China could lead to significant variation in the budget of the sum of hydroxyl (OH) and peroxy (HO2, RO2) radicals (RO x = OH + HO2 + RO2) and the ozone production rate [P(O3)], but few studies have investigated this possibility, particularly with three-dimensional air quality models. We added diagnostic variables into the WRF-Chem model to assess the impact of the uncertainty in anthropogenic NMVOC (AVOC) emissions on the RO x budget and P(O3) in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region, Yangtze River Delta, and Pearl River Delta of China. The WRF-Chem simulations were compared with satellite and ground observations, and previous observation-based model studies. Results indicated that 68% increases (decreases) in AVOC emissions produced 4%-280% increases (2%-80% decreases) in the concentrations of OH, HO2, and RO2 in the three regions, and resulted in 35%-48% enhancements (26%-39% reductions) in the primary RO x production and ˜ 65% decreases (68%-73% increases) of the P(O3) in Beijing, Shanghai, and Guangzhou. For the three cities, the two largest contributors to the RO x production rate were the reaction of O1D + H2O and photolysis of HCHO, ALD2, and others; the reaction of OH + NO2 (71%-85%) was the major RO x sink; and the major contributor to P(O3) was the reaction of HO2 + NO (˜ 65%). Our results showed that AVOC emissions in 2006 from Zhang et al. (2009) have been underestimated by ˜ 68% in suburban areas and by > 68% in urban areas, implying that daily and hourly concentrations of secondary organic aerosols and inorganic aerosols could be substantially underestimated, and cloud condensation nuclei could be underestimated, whereas local and regional radiation was overestimated.

  9. Emissions of volatile organic compounds from Quercus ilex L. measured by Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry under different environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzinger, R.; Sandoval-Soto, L.; Rottenberger, S.; Crutzen, P. J.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2000-08-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions of the Mediterranean holm oak (Quercus ilex L.) were investigated using a fast Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) instrument for analysis. This technique is able to measure compounds with a proton affinity higher than water with a high time resolution of 1 s per compound. Hence nearly all VOCs can be detected on-line. We could clearly identify the emission of methanol, acetaldehyde, ethanol, acetone, acetic acid, isoprene, monoterpenes, toluene, and C10-benzenes. Some other species could be tentatively denominated. Among these are the masses 67 (cyclo pentadiene), mass 71 (tentatively attributed to methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and metacrolein (MACR)), 73 (attributed to methyl ethyl ketone (MEK)), 85 (C6H12 or hexanol), and 95 (vinylfuran or phenol). The emissions of all these compounds (identified as well as nonidentified) together represent 99% of all masses detected and account for a carbon loss of 0.7-2.9% of the net photosynthesis. Of special interest was a change in the emission behavior under changing environmental conditions such as flooding or fast light/dark changes. Flooding of the root system caused an increase of several VOCs between 60 and 2000%, dominated by the emission of ethanol and acetaldehyde, which can be explained by the well described production of ethanol under anoxic conditions of the root system and the recently described subsequent transport and partial oxidation to acetaldehyde within the green leaves. However, ethanol emissions were dominant. Additionally, bursts of acetaldehyde with lower ethanol emission were also found under fast light/dark changes. These bursts are not understood.

  10. Emissions of amides (N,N-dimethylformamide and formamide) and other obnoxious volatile organic compounds from different mattress textile products.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Pandey, Sudhir K; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Sohn, Jong Ryeul; Oh, J-M

    2015-04-01

    The emission rates of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), formamide (FAd), and certain hazardous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured from seventeen mattress textile samples with four different raw material types: polyurethane (PU: n=3), polyester/polyethylene (PE: n=7), ethylene vinyl acetate (EV: n=3), and polyvinyl chloride (PC: n=4). To simulate the emissions in a heated room during winter season, measurements were made under temperature-controlled conditions, i.e., 50°C by using a mini-chamber system made of a midget impinger. Comparison of the data indicates that the patterns were greatly distinguished between DMF and FAd. PU products yielded the highest mean emission rates of DMF (2940?gm(-2)h(-1): n=3) followed by PE (325?gm(-2)h(-1): n=7), although its emission was not seen from other materials (EV and PC). In contrast, the pattern of FAd emission was moderately reversed from that of DMF: EV>PC>PE>PU. The results of our analysis confirm that most materials used for mattress production have the strong potential to emit either DMF or FAd in relatively large quantities while in use in children?s care facilities, especially in winter months. Moreover, it was also observed that an increase in temperature (25°C to 50°C) had a significant impact on the emission rate of FAd and other hazardous VOCs. In addition to the aforementioned amides, the study revealed significant emissions of a number of hazardous VOCs, such as aromatic and carbonyl compounds. PMID:25064375

  11. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria modulate root-system architecture in Arabidopsis thaliana through volatile organic compound emission

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francisca M. Gutiérrez-Luna; José López-Bucio; Josué Altamirano-Hernández; Eduardo Valencia-Cantero; Homero Reyes de la Cruz; Lourdes Macías-Rodríguez

    2010-01-01

    Extensive communication occurs between plants and microorganisms during different stages of plant development in which signaling molecules from the two partners play an important role. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emission by certain plant-growth promoting rhizo- bacteria (PGPR) has been found to be involved in plant growth. However, little is known about the role of bacterial VOCs in plant developmental processes.

  12. DETERMINATION OF ORGANOTIN COMPOUNDS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES BY SUPERCRITICAL FLUID EXTRACTION AND GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH ATOMIC EMISSION DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The extraction of six tetraalkyltin and seven ionic organotin compounds from spiked topsoil samples with supercritical carbon dioxide and carbon dioxide modified with 5% methanol was investigated. nalysis of the soil extracts was performed by GC with atomic emission detection (AE...

  13. AN IMPROVED MODEL FOR ESTIMATING EMISSIONS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM FORESTS IN THE EASTERN UNITED STATES (Journal)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regional estimates of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions are important inputs for models of atmospheric chemistry and carbon budgets. Since forests are the primary emitters of BVOCs, it is important to develop reliable estimates of their areal coverage and BVOC e...

  14. CAPILLARY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-ATOMIC EMISSION DETECTION METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF PENTYLATED ORGANOTIN COMPOUNDS: INTERLABORATORY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A capillary gas chromatography-atomic emission detection (GC-AED) method was developed for the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory in Las Vegas, NV, for determination of selected organotin compounds. Here we report on an interlabora...

  15. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from feedlot pen surface materials as affected by within pen location, moisture, and temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the effects of pen location, moisture, and temperature on emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from surface materials obtained from feedlot pens where beef cattle were fed a diet containing 30% wet distillers grain plus solubles. Surface material...

  16. An Evaluation of Hazardous Air Pollutants and Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Tank Barges in Memphis, TN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many urban centers have population centers near river ports, which may be affected by volatile organic compound (VOC) and hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions from tank barge traffic. This study will examine Memphis, Tennessee and West Memphis, Arkansas. Both cities (located ...

  17. BIOGENIC VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS (BVOCS) I. IDENTIFICATIONS FROM THREE CONTINENTAL SITES IN THE U.S.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vegetation composition and biomass were surveyed for three specific sites in Atlanta, GA; near Rhinelander, WI; and near Hayden, CO. At each research site, emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from the dominant vegetation species were sampled by enclosing bran...

  18. Contribution of the Gasoline Distribution Cycle to Volatile Organic Compound Emissions in the Metropolitan Area of Mexico City

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Schifter; M. Magdaleno; L. Díaz; B. Krüger; J. León; M. E. Palmerín; R. Casas; A. Melgarejo; E. López-Salinas

    2002-01-01

    Gasoline distribution in the metropolitan area of Mexico City (MAMC) represents an area of opportunity for the abatement of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. The gasoline distribution in this huge urban center encompasses several operations: (1) storage in bulk and distribution plants, (2) transportation to gasoline service stations, (3) unloading at service stations’ underground tanks, and (4) gasoline dispensing. In

  19. Influence of suspended particles on indoor semi-volatile organic compounds emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Kang; Chen, Qun; Hao, Jun-Hong

    2013-11-01

    Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) have been attracting more and more attentions to many researchers in these years. Because SVOCs have a strong tendency for adsorption to suspended particles, we take the effect of suspended particles into account to study the transport mechanism of SVOCs in the air. We establish a mathematical model to describe the transport mechanism of SVOCs, and study the transport processes of both gas- and particle-phase di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) in Field and Laboratory Emission Cells (FLECs). The predictions by the proposed model not only fit well with the experimental data of previous studies, but also show that the gas-phase DEHP concentration increases rapidly in the first few seconds and increases slowly during the following 200 days due to different transport mechanisms in the two periods. Meanwhile, when the particle radiuses are of the order of micron and the air changes per hour (ACH) is large enough, the characteristic time for DEHP getting gas/particle equilibrium is much longer than the residence time of a particle in the flow field, and thus there is no significant influence of suspended particles on the total concentration of DEHP in the air. Oppositely, the influence of particles on DEHP emission will be enhanced for a cycling air flow system with a small ACH, where increasing ACH will reduce the concentrations of particle-phase SVOCs. Besides, if the particle radiuses are of the order of nanometer, decreasing the particle radiuses will shorter the characteristic time for DEHP getting gas/particle equilibrium, and finally increase the particle-phase concentration of DEHP.

  20. Online measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds from aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, E. S.; Hunter, J. F.; Carrasquillo, A. J.; Franklin, J. P.; Herndon, S. C.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Kroll, J. H.

    2013-03-01

    A detailed understanding of the climate and air quality impacts of aviation requires detailed measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds (I/SVOCs) from aircraft. Currently both the amount and chemical composition of aircraft I/SVOC emissions remain poorly characterized. Here we characterize I/SVOC emissions from aircraft, using a novel instrument for the online, quantitative measurement of the mass loading and composition of low-volatility organic vapors. Emissions from the NASA DC8 aircraft were sampled on the ground, 143 m downwind of the engines and characterized as a function of engine power from ground idle (~4% maximum rated thrust) through 85% power. Results show that I/SVOC emissions are highest during engine-idle operating conditions, with decreasing but non-zero I/SVOC emissions at higher engine powers. Comparison of I/SVOC emissions with total hydrocarbon (THC) measurements, VOC measurements, and an established emissions profile indicates that I/SVOCs comprise 10-20% of the total organic gas phase emissions at idle, and an increasing fraction of the total gas phase organic emissions at higher powers. Positive matrix factorization of online mass spectra is used to identify three distinct types of I/SVOC emissions: aliphatic, aromatic and oxygenated. The volatility and chemical composition of the emissions suggest that unburned fuel is the dominant source of I/SVOCs at idle, while pyrolysis products make up an increasing fraction of the I/SVOCs at higher powers. Oxygenated I/SVOC emissions were detected at lower engine powers (?30%) and may be linked to cracked, partially oxidized or unburned fuel components.

  1. Online measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds from aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, E. S.; Hunter, J. F.; Carrasquillo, A. J.; Franklin, J. P.; Herndon, S. C.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Kroll, J. H.

    2013-08-01

    A detailed understanding of the climate and air quality impacts of aviation requires measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds (I/SVOCs) from aircraft. Currently both the amount and chemical composition of aircraft I/SVOC emissions remain poorly characterized. Here we characterize I/SVOC emissions from aircraft, using a novel instrument for the online, quantitative measurement of the mass loading and composition of low-volatility organic vapors. Emissions from the NASA DC8 aircraft were sampled on the ground 143 m downwind of the engines and characterized as a function of engine power from idle (4% maximum rated thrust) through 85% power. Results show that I/SVOC emissions are highest during engine idle operating conditions, with decreasing but non-zero I/SVOC emissions at higher engine powers. Comparison of I/SVOC emissions with total hydrocarbon (THC) measurements, VOC measurements, and an established emissions profile indicates that I/SVOCs comprise 10-20% of the total organic gas-phase emissions at idle, and an increasing fraction of the total gas-phase organic emissions at higher powers. Positive matrix factorization of online mass spectra is used to identify three distinct types of I/SVOC emissions: aliphatic, aromatic and oxygenated. The volatility and chemical composition of the emissions suggest that unburned fuel is the dominant source of I/SVOCs at idle, while pyrolysis products make up an increasing fraction of the I/SVOCs at higher powers. Oxygenated I/SVOC emissions were detected at lower engine powers (?30%) and may be linked to cracked, partially oxidized or unburned fuel components.

  2. Effects of gasoline aromatic content on emissions of volatile organic compounds and aldehydes from a four-stroke motorcycle.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yung-Chen; Tsai, Jiun-Horng

    2013-01-01

    A new four-stroke carburettor motorcycle engine without any engine adjustments was used to study the impact of fuel aromatic content on the exhaust emissions of organic air pollutants (volatile organic compounds and carbonyls). Three levels of aromatic content, i.e. 15, 25, and 50% (vol.) aromatics mixed with gasoline were tested. The emissions of aromatic fuel were compared with those of commercial unleaded gasoline. The results indicated that the A 15 (15 vol% aromatics in gasoline) fuel exhibited the greatest total organic emission improvement among these three aromatic fuels as compared with commercial gasoline, reaching 59%. The highest emission factors of alkanes, alkenes, and carbonyl groups appeared in the reference fuel (RF) among all of the test fuels. A 15 showed the highest emission reduction in alkanes (73%), aromatics (36%), and carbonyls (28%), as compared to those of the RF. The highest emission reduction ofalkenes was observed when using A25 as fuel. A reduction in fuel aromatic content from 50 to 25 and 15 vol% in gasoline decreased benzene and toluene emissions, but increased the aldehyde emissions. In general, the results showed that the highest emission reductions for the most of measured organic pollutants appeared when using A 15 as the fuel. PMID:24527614

  3. Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Associated with Natural Gas Production in the Uintah Basin, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warneke, C.; Geiger, F.; Zahn, A.; Graus, M.; De Gouw, J. A.; Gilman, J. B.; Lerner, B. M.; Roberts, J. M.; Edwards, P. M.; Dube, W. P.; Brown, S. S.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Williams, E. J.; Petron, G.; Kofler, J.; Sweeney, C.; Karion, A.; Dlugokencky, E. J.

    2012-12-01

    Technological advances such as hydraulic fracturing have led to a rapid increase in the production of natural gas from several basins in the Rocky Mountain West, including the Denver-Julesburg basin in Colorado, the Uintah basin in Utah and the Upper Green River basin in Wyoming. There are significant concerns about the impact of natural gas production on the atmosphere, including (1) emissions of methane, which determine the net climate impact of this energy source, (2) emissions of reactive hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides, and their contribution to photochemical ozone formation, and (3) emissions of air toxics with direct health effects. The Energy & Environment - Uintah Basin Wintertime Ozone Study (UBWOS) in 2012 was focused on addressing these issues. During UBWOS, measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were made using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) instruments from a ground site and a mobile laboratory. Measurements at the ground site showed mixing ratios of VOCs related to oil and gas extraction were greatly enhanced in the Uintah basin, including several days long periods of elevated mixing ratios and concentrated short term plumes. Diurnal variations were observed with large mixing ratios during the night caused by low nighttime mixing heights and a shift in wind direction during the day. The mobile laboratory sampled a wide variety of individual parts of the gas production infrastructure including active gas wells and various processing plants. Included in those point sources was a new well that was sampled by the mobile laboratory 11 times within two weeks. This new well was previously hydraulically fractured and had an active flow-back pond. Very high mixing ratios of aromatics were observed close to the flow-back pond. The measurements of the mobile laboratory are used to determine the source composition of the individual point sources and those are compared to the VOC enhancement ratios observed at the ground site. The source composition of most point sources was similar to the typical enhancement ratios observed at the ground site, whereas the new well with the flow-back pond showed a somewhat different composition.

  4. A tedler bag sampling system for toxic organic compounds in source emission sampling and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pau, J.C.; Knoll, J.E.; Midgett, M.R. (Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

    1991-08-01

    The Atmospheric Research and Exposure Assessment Laboratory (AREAL) of the US Environmental Protection Agency at Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, has studied the Tedlar bag for the applicability of this material in sampling different organic compounds and has designed a Tedlar Bag Sampling System which reduces the sampling rate from 1-1.5 L/min to 50 mL/min to make the sample volume more manageable. This new, smaller version of the original Tedlar bag sampling system was designed to meet the following criteria: It must hold a negative pressure of 10 in. of water to extract emission air samples from a negative-pressure stack; The bag must be visible so that the operator can see it inflate during sampling; It must be small enough to be easily handled; and It must not show any bias compared to the standard sampling system which collects the samples at a much higher rate. This system was designed at AREAL and tested in the field side by side with the conventional large bag sampling system for possible bias of the small bag in sampling.

  5. Bacterial pathogen indicators regrowth and reduced sulphur compounds' emissions during storage of electro-dewatered biosolids.

    PubMed

    Navab-Daneshmand, Tala; Enayet, Samia; Gehr, Ronald; Frigon, Dominic

    2014-10-01

    Electro-dewatering (ED) increases biosolids dryness from 10-15 to 30-50%, which helps wastewater treatment facilities control disposal costs. Previous work showed that high temperatures due to Joule heating during ED inactivate total coliforms to meet USEPA Class A biosolids requirements. This allows biosolids land application if the requirements are still met after the storage period between production and application. In this study, we examined bacterial regrowth and odour emissions during the storage of ED biosolids. No regrowth of total coliforms was observed in ED biosolids over 7d under aerobic or anaerobic incubations. To mimic on-site contamination during storage or transport, ED samples were seeded with untreated sludge. Total coliform counts decreased to detection limits after 4d in inoculated samples. Olfactometric analysis of ED biosolids odours showed that odour concentrations were lower compared to the untreated and heat-treated control biosolids. Furthermore, under anaerobic conditions, odorous reduced sulphur compounds (methanethiol, dimethyl sulphide and dimethyl disulphide) were produced by untreated and heat-treated biosolids, but were not detected in the headspaces above ED samples. The data demonstrate that ED provides advantages not only as a dewatering technique, but also for producing biosolids with lower microbial counts and odour levels. PMID:25065797

  6. Re-Evaluation of Clinical Dementia Diagnoses with Pittsburgh Compound B Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Degerman Gunnarsson, M.; Lindau, M.; Santillo, A.F.; Wall, A.; Engler, H.; Lannfelt, L.; Basun, H.; Kilander, L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives There is an overlap regarding Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) retention in patients clinically diagnosed as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and non-AD dementia. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether there are any differences between PIB-positive and PIB-negative patients in a mixed cohort of patients with neurodegenerative dementia of mild severity regarding neuropsychological test performance and regional cerebral glucose metabolism measured with [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). Methods Eighteen patients clinically diagnosed as probable AD or frontotemporal dementia were examined with PIB PET, FDG PET and neuropsychological tests and followed for 5-9 years in a clinical setting. Results The PIB-positive patients (7 out of 18) had slower psychomotor speed and more impaired visual episodic memory than the PIB-negative patients; otherwise performance did not differ between the groups. The initial clinical diagnoses were changed in one third of the patients (6 out of 18) during follow-up. Conclusions The subtle differences in neuropsychological performance, the overlap of hypometabolic patterns and clinical features between AD and non-AD dementia highlight the need for amyloid biomarkers and a readiness to re-evaluate the initial diagnosis. PMID:24516415

  7. Impact of marcellus shale natural gas development in southwest pennsylvania on volatile organic compound emissions and regional air quality.

    PubMed

    Swarthout, Robert F; Russo, Rachel S; Zhou, Yong; Miller, Brandon M; Mitchell, Brittney; Horsman, Emily; Lipsky, Eric; McCabe, David C; Baum, Ellen; Sive, Barkley C

    2015-03-01

    The Marcellus Shale is the largest natural gas deposit in the U.S. and rapid development of this resource has raised concerns about regional air pollution. A field campaign was conducted in the southwestern Pennsylvania region of the Marcellus Shale to investigate the impact of unconventional natural gas (UNG) production operations on regional air quality. Whole air samples were collected throughout an 8050 km(2) grid surrounding Pittsburgh and analyzed for methane, carbon dioxide, and C1-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Elevated mixing ratios of methane and C2-C8 alkanes were observed in areas with the highest density of UNG wells. Source apportionment was used to identify characteristic emission ratios for UNG sources, and results indicated that UNG emissions were responsible for the majority of mixing ratios of C2-C8 alkanes, but accounted for a small proportion of alkene and aromatic compounds. The VOC emissions from UNG operations accounted for 17 ± 19% of the regional kinetic hydroxyl radical reactivity of nonbiogenic VOCs suggesting that natural gas emissions may affect compliance with federal ozone standards. A first approximation of methane emissions from the study area of 10.0 ± 5.2 kg s(-1) provides a baseline for determining the efficacy of regulatory emission control efforts. PMID:25594231

  8. A temporally and spatially resolved validation of emission inventories by measurements of ambient volatile organic compounds in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.; Shao, M.; Chen, W.; Yuan, B.; Lu, S.; Zhang, Q.; Zeng, L.; Wang, Q.

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is essential for ground-level ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) abatement measures. We made VOC measurements at 27 sites and online observations at an urban site in Beijing from July 2009 to January 2012. Based on these measurement data, we determined the spatial and temporal distribution of VOCs, estimated their annual emission strengths based on their emission ratios relative to carbon monoxide (CO), and quantified the relative contributions of various sources using the chemical mass balance (CMB) model. These results from ambient measurements were compared with existing emission inventories to evaluate the spatial distribution, species-specific emissions, and source structure of VOCs in Beijing. The measured VOC distributions revealed a hotspot in the southern suburban area of Beijing, whereas current emission inventories suggested that VOC emissions were concentrated in downtown areas. Compared with results derived from ambient measurements, the annual inventoried emissions of oxygenated VOC (OVOC) species and C2-C4 alkanes may be underestimated, while the emissions of styrene and 1,3-butadiene may be overestimated by current inventories. Source apportionment using the CMB model identified vehicular exhaust as the most important VOC source, with the relative contribution of 49%, in good agreement with the 40-51% estimated by emission inventories. The relative contribution of paint and solvent utilization obtained from the CMB model was 14%, significantly lower than the value of 32% reported by one existing inventory. Meanwhile, the relative contribution of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) usage calculated using the CMB model was 6%, whereas LPG usage contribution was not reported by current emission inventories. These results suggested that VOC emission strengths in southern suburban area of Beijing, annual emissions of C2-C4 alkanes, OVOCs and some alkenes, and the contributions of solvent and paint utilization and LPG usage in current inventories all require significant revisions.

  9. Salt Lakes of Western Australia - Emissions of natural volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattler, Tobias; Krause, Torsten; Schöler, Heinfried; Kamilli, Katharina; Held, Andreas; Zetzsch, Cornelius; Ofner, Johannes; Junkermann, Wolfgang; Atlas, Elliot

    2013-04-01

    Western Australia is a semi-/arid region that is heavily influenced by global climate change and agricultural land use. The area is known for its many saline lakes with a wide range of hydrogeochemical parameters. This area has been repeatedly investigated since 2006 and consists of ephemeral saline and saline groundwater sourced lakes with a pH reaching from 2.5 to 7.1. The semi-/arid region was originally covered by natural eucalyptus forests, but land-use has changed considerably after large scale deforestation from 1950 to 1970. Today the region is mostly used for growing wheat and live stock. The deforestation led to a rising groundwater table, bringing dissolved salts and minerals to the surface. In the last decades, a concurrent alteration of rain periods has been observed. A reason could be the regional formation of ultra-fine particles that were measured with car-based and airborne instruments around the salt lakes in several campaigns between 2006 and 2011. These ultra-fine particles emitted from the lakes and acting as cloud condensation nuclei can modify cloud microphysics and thus suppress rain events [1]. New data from a campaign in 2012 accentuates the importance of these hyper saline environments for the local climate. Ground-based particle measurements around the salt lakes in 2012 were accompanied by novel chamber experiments directly on the lakes. The 1.5 m³ cubic chamber was constructed from transparent PTFE foil permitting photochemistry within while preventing dilution of the air due to lateral wind transport. This experimental setup allows linking the measured data directly to the chemistry of and above the salt lakes. Another advantage of the PTFE chamber is the enrichment of volatile organic compounds (VOC) that are emitted from salt lakes as possible precursors for the ultra-fine particles. Chamber air was sampled using stainless steel canisters. Sediment, crust and water samples were taken for investigation of potential VOC emissions in the laboratory using GC-MS technique. Different VOC and halogenated volatile compounds (VOX), exceeding atmospheric background concentrations, where identified from the sampled chamber air. Their enrichment or depletion over the time in the chamber allows for postulated reaction pathways leading to the formation of ultra-fine particles. Soil and water samples showed a variety of highly volatile and semi-volatile VOC/VOX. An abiotic formation of these VOC/VOX seems conclusive due to iron-catalysed reactions below the salt crust [2]. The salt crust is the link through which VOC/VOX pass from the soil/groundwater to the atmosphere. During desiccation salt crystals grow, trapping gases as fluid inclusions (FI). The study of FI provides qualitative emission data of VOC/VOX during desiccation which can be released upon wetting to the atmosphere. This study includes the emission of VOC/VOX from hyper saline terrestrial environments and their role in the atmospheric formation of climate relevant ultra-fine particles. [1] Junkermann et al., 2009, Atmos.Chem.Phys., 9, 6531-6539 [2] Huber et al., 2009, Environ.Sci.Technol., 43 (13), 4934-4939

  10. Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from forested areas in Turkey: determination of specific emission rates for thirty-one tree species.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Yagmur Meltem; Yaman, Baris; Koca, Husnu; Dasdemir, Okan; Kara, Melik; Altiok, Hasan; Dumanoglu, Yetkin; Bayram, Abdurrahman; Tolunay, Doganay; Odabasi, Mustafa; Elbir, Tolga

    2014-08-15

    Normalized biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emission rates for thirty one tree species that cover the 98% of national forested areas in Turkey were determined. Field samplings were performed at fourteen different forested areas in Turkey using a specific dynamic enclosure system. The selected branches of tree species were enclosed in a chamber consisted of a transparent Nalofan bag. The air-flows were sampled from both inlet and outlet of the chamber by Tenax-filled sorbent tubes during photosynthesis of trees under the presence of sunlight. Several environmental parameters (temperature, humidity, photosynthetically active radiation-PAR, and CO2) were continuously monitored inside and outside the enclosure chamber during the samplings. Collected samples were analyzed using a gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) system equipped with a thermal desorber (TD). Sixty five BVOCs classified in five major groups (isoprene, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, oxygenated sesquiterpenes, and other oxygenated compounds) were analyzed. Emission rates were determined by normalization to standard conditions (1000 ?mol/m(2)s PAR and 30 °C temperature for isoprene and 30 °C temperature for the remaining compounds). In agreement with the literature, isoprene was mostly emitted by broad-leaved trees while coniferous species mainly emitted monoterpenes. Several tree species such as Sweet Chestnut, Silver Lime, and European Alder had higher monoterpene emissions although they are broad-leaved species. High isoprene emissions were also observed for a few coniferous species such as Nordmann Fir and Oriental Spruce. The highest normalized total BVOC emission rate of 27.1 ?g/gh was observed for Oriental Plane while South European Flowering Ash was the weakest BVOC emitter with a total normalized emission rate of 0.031 ?g/gh. Monoterpene emissions of broad-leaved species mainly consisted of sabinene, limonene and trans-beta-ocimene, while alpha-pinene, beta-pinene and beta-myrcene were generally emitted by coniferous species. Oxygenated compounds were the third most prominent BVOC group and sesquiterpenes had slightly lower contributions. PMID:24858222

  11. Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results

    SciTech Connect

    Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

    1990-08-01

    This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program`s Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

  12. Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results

    SciTech Connect

    Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

    1990-08-01

    This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program's Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

  13. Do volatile organic compound emissions of Tunisian cork oak populations originating from contrasting climatic conditions differ in their responses to summer drought?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Staudt; Amel Ennajah; Florent Mouillot; Richard Joffre

    2008-01-01

    The intrinsic variability of volatile organic compound emissions and photosynthetic parameters in response to two drying cycles was investigated on Quercus suber L. saplings originating from three Tunisian populations native to contrasting climates. Emissions mainly included monoterpenes plus traces of sesquiterpenes and methylsalicylate that steadily decreased during the experiment unrelated to treatments. Instead, monoterpene emissions increased by 30% during a

  14. A novel approach to emission modelling of biogenic volatile organic compounds in Europe: improved seasonality and land-cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oderbolz, D. C.; Aksoyoglu, S.; Keller, J.; Barmpadimos, I.; Steinbrecher, R.; Skjøth, C. A.; Plaß-Dülmer, C.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2012-08-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) emitted from vegetation are important for the formation of secondary pollutants such as ozone and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere. Therefore, BVOC emission are an important input for air quality models. To model these emissions with high spatial resolution, the accuracy of the underlying vegetation inventory is crucial. We present a BVOC emission model that accommodates different vegetation inventories and uses satellite-based measurements of greenness instead of pre-defined vegetation periods. This approach to seasonality implicitly treats effects caused by water or nutrient availability, altitude and latitude on a plant stand. Additionally, we test the influence of proposed seasonal variability in enzyme activity on BVOC emissions. In its present setup, the emission model calculates hourly emissions of isoprene, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and the oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOC) methanol, formaldehyde, formic acid, ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetone and acetic acid. In this study, emissions based on three different vegetation inventories are compared with each other and diurnal and seasonal variations in Europe are investigated for the year 2006. Two of these vegetation inventories require information on tree-cover as an input. We compare three different land-cover inventories (USGS GLCC, GLC2000 and Globcover 2.2) with respect to tree-cover. The often-used USGS GLCC land-cover inventory leads to a severe reduction of BVOC emissions due to a potential miss-attribution of broad-leaved trees and reduced tree-cover compared to the two other land-cover inventories. To account for uncertainties in the land-cover classification, we introduce land-cover correction factors for each relevant land-use category to adjust the tree-cover. The results are very sensitive to these factors within the plausible range. For June 2006, total monthly BVOC emissions decreased up to -27% with minimal and increased up to +71% with maximal factors, while in January 2006, the changes in monthly BVOC emissions were -54 and +56% with minimal and maximal factors, respectively. The new seasonality approach leads to a reduction in the annual emissions compared with non-adjusted data. The strongest reduction occurs in OVOC (up to -32%), the weakest in isoprene (as little as -19%). If also enzyme seasonality is taken into account, however, isoprene reacts with the steepest decrease of annual emissions, which are reduced by -44% to -49%, annual emissions of monoterpenes reduce between -30 and -35%. The sensitivity of the model to changes in temperature depends on the climatic zone but not on the vegetation inventory. The sensitivity is higher for temperature increases of 3 K (+31% to +64%) than decreases by the same amount (-20 to -35%). The climatic zones "Cold except summer" and "arid" are most sensitive to temperature changes in January for isoprene and monoterpenes, respectively, while in June, "polar" is most sensitive to temperature for both isoprene and monoterpenes. Our model predicts the oxygenated volatile organic compounds to be the most abundant fraction of the annual European emissions (3571-5328 Gg yr-1), followed by monoterpenes (2964-4124 Gg yr-1), isoprene (1450-2650 Gg yr-1) and sesquiterpenes (150-257 Gg yr-1). We find regions with high isoprene emissions (most notably the Iberian Peninsula), but overall, oxygenated VOC dominate with 43-45% (depending on the vegetation inventory) contribution to the total annual BVOC emissions in Europe. Isoprene contributes between 18-21%, monoterpenes 33-36% and sesquiterpenes contribute 1-2%. We compare the concentrations of biogenic species simulated by an air quality model with measurements of isoprene and monoterpenes in Hohenpeissenberg (Germany) for both summer and winter. The agreement between observed and modelled concentrations is better in summer than in winter. This can partly be explained with the difficulty to model weather conditions in winter accurately, but also with the increased an

  15. A comprehensive emission inventory of biogenic volatile organic compounds in Europe: improved seasonality and land-cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oderbolz, D. C.; Aksoyoglu, S.; Keller, J.; Barmpadimos, I.; Steinbrecher, R.; Skjøth, C. A.; Plaß-Dülmer, C.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2013-02-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) emitted from vegetation are important for the formation of secondary pollutants such as ozone and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere. Therefore, BVOC emission are an important input for air quality models. To model these emissions with high spatial resolution, the accuracy of the underlying vegetation inventory is crucial. We present a BVOC emission model that accommodates different vegetation inventories and uses satellite-based measurements of greenness instead of pre-defined vegetation periods. This approach to seasonality implicitly treats effects caused by water or nutrient availability, altitude and latitude on a plant stand. Additionally, we test the influence of proposed seasonal variability in enzyme activity on BVOC emissions. In its present setup, the emission model calculates hourly emissions of isoprene, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and the oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOC) methanol, formaldehyde, formic acid, ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetone and acetic acid. In this study, emissions based on three different vegetation inventories are compared with each other and diurnal and seasonal variations in Europe are investigated for the year 2006. Two of these vegetation inventories require information on tree-cover as an input. We compare three different land-cover inventories (USGS GLCC, GLC2000 and Globcover 2.2) with respect to tree-cover. The often-used USGS GLCC land-cover inventory leads to a severe reduction of BVOC emissions due to a potential miss-attribution of broad-leaved trees and reduced tree-cover compared to the two other land-cover inventories. To account for uncertainties in the land-cover classification, we introduce land-cover correction factors for each relevant land-use category to adjust the tree-cover. The results are very sensitive to these factors within the plausible range. For June 2006, total monthly BVOC emissions decreased up to -27% with minimal and increased up to +71% with maximal factors, while in January 2006, the changes in monthly BVOC emissions were -54 and +56% with minimal and maximal factors, respectively. The new seasonality approach leads to a reduction in the annual emissions compared with non-adjusted data. The strongest reduction occurs in OVOC (up to -32%), the weakest in isoprene (as little as -19%). If also enzyme seasonality is taken into account, however, isoprene reacts with the steepest decrease of annual emissions, which are reduced by -44% to -49%, annual emissions of monoterpenes reduce between -30 and -35%. The sensitivity of the model to changes in temperature depends on the climatic zone but not on the vegetation inventory. The sensitivity is higher for temperature increases of 3 K (+31% to +64%) than decreases by the same amount (-20 to -35%). The climatic zones "Cold except summer" and "arid" are most sensitive to temperature changes in January for isoprene and monoterpenes, respectively, while in June, "polar" is most sensitive to temperature for both isoprene and monoterpenes. Our model predicts the oxygenated volatile organic compounds to be the most abundant fraction of the annual European emissions (3571-5328 Gg yr-1), followed by monoterpenes (2964-4124 Gg yr-1), isoprene (1450-2650 Gg yr-1) and sesquiterpenes (150-257 Gg yr-1). We find regions with high isoprene emissions (most notably the Iberian Peninsula), but overall, oxygenated VOC dominate with 43-45% (depending on the vegetation inventory) contribution to the total annual BVOC emissions in Europe. Isoprene contributes between 18-21%, monoterpenes 33-36% and sesquiterpenes contribute 1-2%. We compare the concentrations of biogenic species simulated by an air quality model with measurements of isoprene and monoterpenes in Hohenpeissenberg (Germany) for both summer and winter. The agreement between observed and modelled concentrations is better in summer than in winter. This can partly be explained with the difficulty to model weather conditions in winter accurately, but also with the increased an

  16. Comparative oxidation and net emissions of methane and selected non-methane organic compounds in landfill cover soils.

    PubMed

    Schuetz, Charlotte; Bogner, Jean; Chanton, Jeffrey; Blake, Donald; Morcet, Muriel; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2003-11-15

    The surface emissions of methane (CH4) and non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) were determined at two different areas at a French landfill: a permanently covered and fully vegetated area (40 cm coarse sand + 80 cm of loam) and a temporarily covered area (40 cm of coarse sand). The 37 NMOCs quantified in the landfill gas samples included alkanes (C1-C10), alkenes (C1-C4), halogenated hydrocarbons (including (H)CFCs), and aromatic hydrocarbons. Both positive and negative CH4 fluxes ranging from -0.01 to 0.008 g m(-2) d(-1) were measured from the permanently covered cell. However, high spatial variation was observed, and a hot spot with a high flux (10 g m(-2) d(-1)) was identified. A higher CH4 emission occurred from the temporarily covered cell (CH4 flux of 49.9 g m(-2) d(-1)) as compared to the permanently covered cell. The NMOC fluxes from the permanently covered zone were all very small with both positive and negative fluxes in the order of 10(-7) to 10(-5) g m(-2) d(-1). Higher and mainly positive NMOC fluxes in the order of 10(-5) to 10(-4) g m(-2) d(-1) were obtained from the temporarily covered zone. The lower emission from the permanently covered and fully vegetated cell was attributable to the thicker soil layer, which functions as microbial habitat for methanotrophic bacteria. The NMOC oxidation capacity was investigated in soil microcosms incubated with CH4. Maximal oxidation rates for the halogenated aliphatic compounds varied between 0.06 and 8.56 microg (g of soil)(-1) d(-1). Fully substituted hydrocarbons (tetrachloromethane, perchloroethylene, CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-113) were not degraded in the presence of CH4 and O2. Benzene and toluene were rapidly degraded, giving very high maximal oxidation rates (28 and 39 microg (g of soil)(-1) d(-1)). On the basis of the emission measurements and the batch experiments conducted, a general pattern was observed between emissions and biodegradability of various NMOCs. The emissions mainly consisted of compounds that were not degradable or slowly degradable, while an uptake of easily degradable compounds was registered. As an example, perchloroethylene, trichloromethane, CFC-11, and CFC-12 were emitted, while atmospheric consumption of aromatic hydrocarbons and lower chlorinated hydrocarbons such as vinyl chloride, dichloromethane, and chloromethane was observed. This study demonstrates that landfill soil covers show a significant potential for CH4 oxidation and co-oxidation of NMOCs. Under certain conditions, landfills may even function as sinks for CH4 and selected NMOCs, like aromatic hydrocarbons and lower chlorinated compounds. PMID:14655701

  17. Emissions of C6-C8 aromatic compounds in the United States: Constraints from tall tower and aircraft measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lu; Millet, Dylan B.; Baasandorj, Munkhbayar; Griffis, Timothy J.; Travis, Katherine R.; Tessum, Christopher W.; Marshall, Julian D.; Reinhart, Wesley F.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Müller, Markus; Wisthaler, Armin; Graus, Martin; Warneke, Carsten; Gouw, Joost

    2015-01-01

    present two full years of continuous C6-C8 aromatic compound measurements by PTR-MS at the KCMP tall tower (Minnesota, US) and employ GEOS-Chem nested grid simulations in a Bayesian inversion to interpret the data in terms of new constraints on US aromatic emissions. Based on the tall tower data, we find that the RETRO inventory (year-2000) overestimates US C6-C8 aromatic emissions by factors of 2.0-4.5 during 2010-2011, likely due in part to post-2000 reductions. Likewise, our implementation of the US EPA's NEI08 overestimates the toluene flux by threefold, reflecting an inventory bias in non-road emissions plus uncertainties associated with species lumping. Our annual top-down emission estimates for benzene and C8 aromatics agree with the NEI08 bottom-up values, as does the inferred contribution from non-road sources. However, the NEI08 appears to underestimate on-road emissions of these compounds by twofold during the warm season. The implied aromatic sources upwind of North America are more than double the prior estimates, suggesting a substantial underestimate of East Asian emissions, or large increases there since 2000. Long-range transport exerts an important influence on ambient benzene over the US: on average 43% of its wintertime abundance in the US Upper Midwest is due to sources outside North America. Independent aircraft measurements show that the inventory biases found here for C6-C8 aromatics also apply to other parts of the US, with notable exceptions for toluene in California and Houston, Texas. Our best estimates of year-2011 contiguous US emissions are 206 (benzene), 408 (toluene), and 822 (C8 aromatics) GgC.

  18. Nitrogen compound emission from biomass burning in tropical African savanna FOS\\/DECAFE 1991 experiment (Lamto, Ivory Coast)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Delmas; Jean Pierre Lacaux; Jean Claude Menaut; Luc Abbadie; Xavier Roux; Gunter Helas; Jurgen Lobert

    1995-01-01

    Gaseous nitrogen compounds (NOx, NOy, NH3, N2O) were measured at ground level in smoke plumes of prescribed savanna fires in Lamto, in the southern Ivory Coast, during the FOS\\/DECAFE experiment in January 1991. During the flaming phase, the linear regression between d[NOx] and d[CO2] (differences in concentration between smoke plumes and atmosheric background) results volumic emission ratio d[NOx]\\/d[CO2]=1.37×10-3 with only

  19. Carbon nanostructures as catalytic support for chemiluminescence of sulfur compounds in a molecular emission cavity analysis system.

    PubMed

    Safavi, Afsaneh; Maleki, Norouz; Doroodmand, Mohammad Mahdi; Koleini, Mohammad Mehdi

    2009-06-30

    The effect of different substrates including stainless steel, activated carbon, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), fullerenes (C60, C70, etc.) and SWCNTs doped with iron and palladium nanoparticles were compared for catalytic chemiluminescence reaction of sulfur compounds in a flame-containing cavity of molecular emission cavity analysis (MECA) system. Different forms of CNT substrates were fabricated using electric arc-discharge method. The blue emission of excited S2 was monitored using a CCD camera. The results demonstrate that, due to the high surface area, plenty of basal planes, high thermal conductivity, and high flexibility of the carbon nanostructure as appropriate support, carbon nanostructures play an important role in catalytic chemiluminescence emission of sulfur compounds in MECA. Moreover, the presence of metallic nanoparticles doped on carbon nanostructures enhances their catalytic effect. The results revealed that under similar conditions, SWCNTs/Pd doped nanoparticles, SWCNTs/Fe doped nanoparticles, SWCNTs, MWCNTs and fullerenes have the most catalytic effects on chemiluminescence of sulfur compounds, respectively. PMID:19463563

  20. Effect of land-use change and management on biogenic volatile organic compound emissions - selecting climate-smart cultivars.

    PubMed

    Rosenkranz, Maaria; Pugh, Thomas A M; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Arneth, Almut

    2014-09-25

    Land-use change (LUC) has fundamentally altered the form and function of the terrestrial biosphere. Increasing human population, the drive for higher living standards and the potential challenges of mitigating and adapting to global environmental change mean that further changes in LUC are unavoidable. LUC has direct consequences on climate not only via emissions of greenhouse gases and changing the surface energy balance but also by affecting the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). Isoprenoids, which dominate global BVOC emissions, are highly reactive and strongly modify atmospheric composition. The effects of LUC on BVOC emissions and related atmospheric chemistry have been largely ignored so far. However, compared with natural ecosystems, most tree species used in bioenergy plantations are strong BVOC emitters, whereas intensively cultivated crops typically emit less BVOCs. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on LUC-driven BVOC emissions and how these might affect atmospheric composition and climate. We further discuss land management and plant-breeding strategies, which could be taken to move towards climate-friendly BVOC emissions while simultaneously maintaining or improving key ecosystem functions such as crop yield under a changing environment. PMID:25255900

  1. A Tree's Response to Herbivory: Quantification of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound Emissions

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    standard by comparing the amount of n-octane "seen" by the FID to the amount of n-octane injected signal is determined by the number of carbons in and the complexity of each compound, an effective carbon number is used to calculate the moles of the compound from the integrated area. Acknowledgements

  2. Optimizing the emission inventory of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) based on network observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sheng-Po; Liu, Wen-Tzu; Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Chang, Julius S.; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2014-02-01

    Hourly observations of 56 non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) performed by a network of photochemical assessment monitoring stations (PAMS) at 11 locations across Taiwan were used to evaluate 56 speciated emissions and the resulting simulations of an air quality model. Based on the PAMS observations at two urban sites, emission modification was made for the 56 PAMS species in the model. To further test the applicability of this emission correction approach, the same modified emissions were subject to seven different meteorological conditions and comparison with observations of all the 11 PAMS sites. Originally there was a minimum of only 8 of 56 species showed agreement with observations for the worst of the 11 PAMS sites and 28 of 56 species for the best site. With modified emissions, the number increased to 13-52 species across the 11 PAMS sites, demonstrating that the simple urban based correction procedure has broad applicability. When applying this modification of PAMS emissions to the simulations of other air quality gases, SO2 and NOx showed small changes compared with observations (-0.27% and -2.51%, respectively), while total VOC concentrations showed significant changes (+15.28%) as a result of the adjustment in VOC emissions (+26.7%). Although VOCs are the precursor of ozone, the relatively large changes in VOC did not seem to affect ozone formation to the similar extent, only resulting in the changes of average O3 by 2.9 ppb (+9.41%). It shows that although the emission modification improves individual VOC simulations, the performance in oxidant simulation is still largely unaltered. Although the original U.S. VOC emission profiles can capture the general features of ambient VOCs, further optimization of emissions may still be needed by referencing extensive observations, so that emissions can better fit domestic conditions and accuracy in model simulations can be improved.

  3. Role of management strategies and environmental factors in determining the emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds from urban greenspaces.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yuan; Ge, Ying; Gu, Baojing; Min, Yong; Tani, Akira; Chang, Jie

    2014-06-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from urban greenspace have recently become a global concern. To identify key factors affecting the dynamics of urban BVOC emissions, we built an estimation model and utilized the city of Hangzhou in southeastern China as an example. A series of single-factor scenarios were first developed, and then nine multifactor scenarios using a combination of different single-factor scenarios were built to quantify the effects of environmental changes and urban management strategies on urban BVOC emissions. Results of our model simulations showed that (1) annual total BVOC emissions from the metropolitan area of Hangzhou were 4.7×10(8) g of C in 2010 and were predicted to be 1.2-3.2 Gg of C (1 Gg=10(9) g) in our various scenarios in 2050, (2) urban management played a more important role in determining future urban BVOC emissions than environmental changes, and (3) a high ecosystem service value (e.g., lowest BVOC/leaf mass ratio) could be achieved through positive coping in confronting environmental changes and adopting proactive urban management strategies on a local scale, that is, to moderately increase tree density while restricting excessive greenspace expansion and optimizing the species composition of existing and newly planted trees. PMID:24811523

  4. Which emission sources are responsible for the volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere of Pearl River Delta?

    PubMed

    Guo, H; Cheng, H R; Ling, Z H; Louie, P K K; Ayoko, G A

    2011-04-15

    A field measurement study of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was simultaneously carried out in October-December 2007 at an inland Pearl River Delta (PRD) site and a Hong Kong urban site. A receptor model i.e. positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to the data for the apportionment of pollution sources in the region. Five and six sources were identified in Hong Kong and the inland PRD region, respectively. The major sources identified in the region were vehicular emissions, solvent use and biomass burning, whereas extra sources found in inland PRD included liquefied petroleum gas and gasoline evaporation. In Hong Kong, the vehicular emissions made the most significant contribution to ambient VOCs (48 ± 4%), followed by solvent use (43 ± 2%) and biomass burning (9 ± 2%). In inland PRD, the largest contributor to ambient VOCs was solvent use (46 ± 1%), and vehicular emissions contributed 26 ± 1% to ambient VOCs. The percentage contribution of vehicular emission in Hong Kong in 2007 is close to that obtained in 2001-2003, whereas in inland PRD the contribution of solvent use to ambient VOCs in 2007 was at the upper range of the results obtained in previous studies and twice the 2006 PRD emission inventory. The findings advance our knowledge of ozone precursors in the PRD region. PMID:21316844

  5. Volatile organic compounds in the Pearl River Delta: Identification of source regions and recommendations for emission-oriented monitoring strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zibing; Zhong, Liuju; Lau, Alexis Kai Hon; Yu, Jian Zhen; Louie, Peter K. K.

    2013-09-01

    For the purpose of systematically characterizing the ambient volatile organic compound (VOC) levels and their emission sources in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) of China, a grid study with VOC samples simultaneously taken at 84 sites over the PRD was conducted in summer and winter of 2008 and 2009. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) model was applied to identify the major VOC contributing sources and their temporal and spatial variations. Nine sources were identified, with gasoline exhaust, industrial emission and LPG leakage & propellant emission the top three significant sources. They accounted for 23%, 16% and 13% of the ambient VOC levels, respectively. Control measures should be therefore targeted on mitigating the VOC emissions from the traffic-related and industrial-related sources. The total VOC level did not show strong increase from 5 a.m. to 10 a.m. during all the four sampling campaigns, which may result from stronger wind and higher mixing height at 10 a.m. Three hotspot areas with significant VOC contributions were identified by source apportionment analysis: (1) the Pearl River Estuary; (2) an area from Central Dongguan to North Shenzhen; and (3) the Zhuhai-Zhongshan-Jiangmen area. For better characterizing the roles of VOC and NOx in producing the secondary pollutants and to identify specific sources emitting excessive concentrations of precursors, the emission-oriented Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Station (PAMS) network is recommended to be established in the PRD. Three PAMS networks are suggested in correspondence to the three identified hotspot areas.

  6. Influences of chlorine content on emission of HCl and organic compounds in waste incineration using fluidized beds.

    PubMed

    Wey, M Y; Liu, K Y; Yu, W J; Lin, C L; Chang, F Y

    2008-01-01

    HCl and some organic compounds are the precursors of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs) in municipal solid waste incinerators. In this work, a lab-scale fluidized bed incinerator is adopted to study the relationship between the organic and the inorganic chlorine contents of artificial wastes and the emissions of HCl and organic compounds. The lower threshold limit (LTL) of chlorine content below which HCl and organic compounds are not generated is studied. Experimental results showed that organic chlorides had a greater potential to release chlorine than inorganic chlorides. The generation of organic pollutants fell, but the emissions of HCl increased with the temperature. The concentrations of chlorophenols (CPs)/chlorobenzenes (CBs) increased with chlorine contents. No LTL existed for HCl regardless of whether CaO was added. The LTL for CPs was between 0.1 and 0.3wt% of inorganic chloride, but there was none for organic sources. For CBs, the LTL was between 0.5 and 1.0wt% for inorganics at 700 and 800 degrees C, but 0.1-0.3 wt% at 700 degrees C and 0.3-0.5 wt% at 800 degrees C for organics. The production of PAHs and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) was related to the surplus hydrogen ions that were not reacted with the chlorine. Adding CaO inhibited the production of HCl, CBs and CPs, but did not seriously affect PAHs and BTEX. PMID:17320369

  7. Effects of a combined Diesel particle filter-DeNOx system (DPN) on reactive nitrogen compounds emissions: a parameter study.

    PubMed

    Heeb, Norbert V; Haag, Regula; Seiler, Cornelia; Schmid, Peter; Zennegg, Markus; Wichser, Adrian; Ulrich, Andrea; Honegger, Peter; Zeyer, Kerstin; Emmenegger, Lukas; Zimmerli, Yan; Czerwinski, Jan; Kasper, Markus; Mayer, Andreas

    2012-12-18

    The impact of a combined diesel particle filter-deNO(x) system (DPN) on emissions of reactive nitrogen compounds (RNCs) was studied varying the urea feed factor (?), temperature, and residence time, which are key parameters of the deNO(x) process. The DPN consisted of a platinum-coated cordierite filter and a vanadia-based deNO(x) catalyst supporting selective catalytic reduction (SCR) chemistry. Ammonia (NH?) is produced in situ from thermolysis of urea and hydrolysis of isocyanic acid (HNCO). HNCO and NH? are both toxic and highly reactive intermediates. The deNO(x) system was only part-time active in the ISO8178/4 C1cycle. Urea injection was stopped and restarted twice. Mean NO and NO? conversion efficiencies were 80%, 95%, 97% and 43%, 87%, 99%, respectively, for ? = 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2. HNCO emissions increased from 0.028 g/h engine-out to 0.18, 0.25, and 0.26 g/h at ? = 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2, whereas NH? emissions increased from <0.045 to 0.12, 1.82, and 12.8 g/h with maxima at highest temperatures and shortest residence times. Most HNCO is released at intermediate residence times (0.2-0.3 s) and temperatures (300-400 °C). Total RNC efficiencies are highest at ? = 1.0, when comparable amounts of reduced and oxidized compounds are released. The DPN represents the most advanced system studied so far under the VERT protocol achieving high conversion efficiencies for particles, NO, NO?, CO, and hydrocarbons. However, we observed a trade-off between deNO(x) efficiency and secondary emissions. Therefore, it is important to adopt such DPN technology to specific application conditions to take advantage of reduced NO(x) and particle emissions while avoiding NH? and HNCO slip. PMID:23214996

  8. Evaluating the performance of pyrogenic and biogenic emission inventories against one decade of space-based formaldehyde columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavrakou, T.; Müller, J.-F.; de Smedt, I.; van Roozendael, M.; van der Werf, G. R.; Giglio, L.; Guenther, A.

    2009-02-01

    A new one-decade (1997-2006) dataset of formaldehyde (HCHO) columns retrieved from GOME and SCIAMACHY is compared with HCHO columns simulated by an updated version of the IMAGES global chemical transport model. This model version includes an optimized chemical scheme with respect to HCHO production, where the short-term and final HCHO yields from pyrogenically emitted non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) are estimated from the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) and an explicit speciation profile of pyrogenic emissions. The model is driven by the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED) version 1 or 2 for biomass burning, whereas biogenic emissions are provided either by the Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA), or by a newly developed inventory based on the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) algorithms driven by meteorological fields from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The comparisons focus on tropical ecosystems, North America and China, which experience strong biogenic and biomass burning NMVOC emissions reflected in the enhanced measured HCHO columns. These comparisons aim at testing the ability of the model to reproduce the observed features of the HCHO distribution on the global scale and at providing a first assessment of the performance of the current emission inventories. The high correlation coefficients (r>0.7) between the observed and simulated columns over most regions indicate a good consistency between the model, the implemented inventories and the HCHO dataset. The use of the MEGAN-ECMWF inventory improves the model/data agreement in almost all regions, but biases persist over parts of Africa and Australia. Although neither GFED version is consistent with the data over all regions, a better agreement is achieved over Indonesia and Southern Africa when GFEDv2 is used, but GFEDv1 succeeds better in getting the correct seasonal patterns and intensities of the fire episodes over the Amazon basin, as reflected in the significantly higher correlations calculated in this region. Although the uncertainties in the HCHO retrievals, especially over fire scenes, can be quite large, this study provides a first assessment about whether the improved methodologies and input data implemented in GFEDv2 and MEGAN-ECMWF lead to better results in the comparisons of modelled with observed HCHO column measurements.

  9. Global fire emission estimates (2007-2012) derived from inversion of formaldehyde columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauwens, Maite; Stavrakou, Trissevgeni; Müller, Jean-Francois; De Smedt, Isabelle; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2014-05-01

    Wildfires have a strong impact on the chemistry and composition of the atmosphere and the radiative forcing. The fire emission estimates bear, however, important uncertainties due to the limited amount of field measurements, uncertainties in satellite burned area products, as well as empirical relations used for fuel type allocations. Atmospheric inversions are an alternative approach that provides new independent constraints on the fire estimates. This method involves measurements of trace gases combined with atmospheric models, where optimization algorithms are used to minimize the discrepancy between the model and the observations by adjusting the emission estimates. In this communication, we present global emission estimates of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs), inferred from inversion of formaldehyde (HCHO) columns retrieved from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) instrument (De Smedt et al., 2012). The IMAGESv2 global CTM provides the relationship between the emissions and the vertical columns. The Global Fire Emissions Database version 3 (GFEDv3, van der Werf et al., 2010) is used as a priori bottom-up inventory in the model. The agreement between formaldehyde columns calculated by the IMAGESv2 model and the formaldehyde columns from GOME-2 is optimized using the adjoint modelling technique (Stavrakou et al., 2009). The obtained top-down fire emission estimates between 2007 and 2012 are available at the GlobEmission data portal (http://www.globemission.eu) on a monthly basis and at 0.5°x0.5° spatial resolution. The emission estimates are evaluated against three independent emission inventories: GFEDv3 (van der Werf et al., 2010), GFAS (Kaiser et al., 2012) and FINN (Wiedinmyer et al., 2011). Furthermore, simulated CO columns over the fire-affected regions will be compared with CO columns retrieved from the IASI sensor (George et al., 2009).

  10. Plasma Source Development for Effective Dissociation and Abatement of Perfluorinated Compounds for the Reduction of Gas Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, Leonard J.

    2001-10-01

    Perfluorinated gas compounds (PFCs) are widely used in the semiconductor industry for etching process and for cleaning of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) systems. However, most of these compounds have very high infrared adsorbance strengths and long life times (i.e. several times greater than carbon dioxide). Thus their emissions can strongly contribute to global warming if left unabated. To reduce PFC emissions, the industry has adopted high power density, sub-atmospheric plasma sources to completely dissociate F-bearing compounds at the point of use or to completely convert PFC emissions within the post process exhaust stream. Many electrodeless plasma sources have been applied including microwave, conventional inductive, and ferrite-based inductive plasma devices. As a general scaling rule, most all of these devices provide effective electric field strengths on the order 1-10 V/cm and power densities of 0.1-10 W/cm3 into electronegative discharges at pressures ranging from 0.1-100 Torr. To explore one contemporary example, we examine the properties a ferrite-based, inductively-coupled plasma source as applied to typical processes used in CVD chamber clean and PFC-based etching processes. Along with the operational properties of this device, we examine mass spectroscopy measurements of residual gases from the source when used to (1) fully dissociate high flows of pure NF3 and mixtures of C3F8/O2 and (2) abate moderate flows of CF4, C2F6 and SF6 in combination with O2 or H2O vapor. Also, we review select plasma engineering topics related to these PFC abatement approaches whose study would greatly advance the performance and cost effectiveness of plasma abatement technology within the industry.

  11. Soil humic-like organic compounds in prescribed fire emissions using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chalbot, M-C; Nikolich, G; Etyemezian, V; Dubois, D W; King, J; Shafer, D; Gamboa da Costa, G; Hinton, J F; Kavouras, I G

    2013-10-01

    Here we present the chemical characterization of the water-soluble organic carbon fraction of atmospheric aerosol collected during a prescribed fire burn in relation to soil organic matter and biomass combustion. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we observed that humic-like substances in fire emissions have been associated with soil organic matter rather than biomass. Using a chemical mass balance model, we estimated that soil organic matter may contribute up to 41% of organic hydrogen and up to 27% of water-soluble organic carbon in fire emissions. Dust particles, when mixed with fresh combustion emissions, substantially enhances the atmospheric oxidative capacity, particle formation and microphysical properties of clouds influencing the climatic responses of atmospheric aeroso. Owing to the large emissions of combustion aerosol during fires, the release of dust particles from soil surfaces that are subjected to intense heating and shear stress has, so far, been lacking. PMID:23867697

  12. ANALYSIS OF SOCMI (SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICAL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY) VOC (VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND) FUGITIVE EMISSIONS DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an examination of fugitive emission data from Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry (SOCMI) processing units (Collected under earlier EPA studies) for correlations between process variables and leak frequency. Although line temperature did ...

  13. 76 FR 74014 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Illinois; Volatile Organic Compound Emission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-30

    ...percent. Specific adhesive application methods (e.g. electrostatic spray) and work practices are also required to reduce emissions...limits (e.g. production resin applied via atomized spray would need to comply with a weighted average...

  14. Biogenic volatile organic compound emissions from nine tree species used in an urban tree-planting program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, A. J.; Helmig, D.; Baroch, C.; Daly, R.; Davis, S.

    2014-10-01

    The biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions of nine urban tree species were studied to assess the air quality impacts from planting a large quantity of these trees in the City and County of Denver, Colorado, through the Mile High Million tree-planting initiative. The deciduous tree species studied were Sugar maple, Ohio buckeye, northern hackberry, Turkish hazelnut, London planetree, American basswood, Littleleaf linden, Valley Forge elm, and Japanese zelkova. These tree species were selected using the i-Tree Species Selector (itreetools.org). BVOC emissions from the selected tree species were investigated to evaluate the Species Selector data under the Colorado climate and environmental growing conditions. Individual tree species were subjected to branch enclosure experiments in which foliar emissions of BVOC were collected onto solid adsorbent cartridges. The cartridge samples were analyzed for monoterpenes (MT), sesquiterpenes (SQT), and other C10-C15 BVOC using thermal desorption-gas chromatography-flame ionization detection/mass spectroscopy (GC-FID/MS). Individual compounds and their emission rates (ER) were identified. MT were observed in all tree species, exhibiting the following total MT basal emission rates (BER; with a 1-? lower bound, upper bound uncertainty window): Sugar maple, 0.07 (0.02, 0.11) ?g g-1 h-1; London planetree, 0.15 (0.02, 0.27) ?g g-1 h-1; northern hackberry, 0.33 (0.09, 0.57) ?g g-1 h-1; Japanese zelkova, 0.42 (0.26, 0.58) ?g g-1 h-1; Littleleaf linden, 0.71 (0.33, 1.09) ?g g-1 h-1; Valley Forge elm, 0.96 (0.01, 1.92) ?g g-1 h-1; Turkish hazelnut, 1.30 (0.32, 2.23) ?g g-1 h-1; American basswood, 1.50 (0.40, 2.70) ?g g-1 h-1; and Ohio buckeye, 6.61 (1.76, 11.47) ?g g-1 h-1. SQT emissions were seen in five tree species with total SQT BER of: London planetree, 0.11 (0.01, 0.20) ?g g-1 h-1; Japanese zelkova, 0.11 (0.05, 0.16) ?g g-1 h-1; Littleleaf linden, 0.13 (0.06, 0.21) ?g g-1 h-1; northern hackberry, 0.20 (0.11, 0.30) ?g g-1 h-1; and Ohio buckeye, 0.44 (0.06, 0.83) ?g g-1 h-1. The following trees exhibited emissions of other C10-C15 volatile organic compounds (VOC): Littleleaf linden, 0.15 (0.10, 0.20) ?g g-1 h-1; Ohio buckeye, 0.39 (0.14, 0.65) ?g g-1 h-1; and Turkish hazelnut, 0.72 (0.49, 0.95) ?g g-1 h-1. All tree species studied in this experiment were confirmed to be low isoprene emitters. Compared to many other potential urban tree species, the selected trees can be considered low to moderate BVOC emitters under Colorado growing conditions, with total emission rates one-tenth to one-hundredth the rates of potential high-BVOC emitting trees. The emissions data were used to estimate the impact of this targeted tree planting on the urban BVOC flux and atmospheric VOC burden. Selecting the low-emitting tree species over known high BVOC emitters is equivalent to avoiding VOC emissions from nearly 500,000 cars from the inner city traffic.

  15. Volatile organic compound and formaldehyde emissions from Populus davidiana wood treated with low molecular weight urea-formaldehyde resin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Xian; Shen, Jun; Lei, Cheng-Shuai; Feng, Qi

    2014-09-01

    Populus davidiana wood was usually impregnated with low molecular weight thermosetting resins to improve its physical and mechanical properties. However, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and formaldehyde emitted from treated wood have lead to poor indoor air quality (IAQ). The trends of VOC and formaldehyde emissions as a function of the weight percent gain (WPG) factor were mainly investigated in this work. Aldehydes and alkanes were the predominant compositions indentified in the VOC emissions, although low amount of ketones, terpenes and alcohols were also found. With the increase in WPG, VOC and formaldehyde concentrations improved. However, their concentration began to decrease when WPG was over 44.06% (VOC) and 36.35% (formaldehyde), respectively. The modulus of elasticity (MOE) of untreated and treated wood at different WPG levels was detected. It showed that treatment of wood with UF resin significantly improved the mechanical properties. Therefore, it is probably helpful to comprehensively analyze correlations among environmental performance, mechanical performance and processing costs. PMID:25204077

  16. Carbonyl compound emissions from a heavy-duty diesel engine fueled with diesel fuel and ethanol-diesel blend.

    PubMed

    Song, Chonglin; Zhao, Zhuang; Lv, Gang; Song, Jinou; Liu, Lidong; Zhao, Ruifen

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the carbonyl emissions from a direct injection heavy-duty diesel engine fueled with pure diesel fuel (DF) and blended fuel containing 15% by volume of ethanol (E/DF). The tests have been conducted under steady-state operating conditions at 1200, 1800, 2600 rpm and idle speed. The experimental results show that acetaldehyde is the most predominant carbonyl, followed by formaldehyde, acrolein, acetone, propionaldehyde and crotonaldehyde, produced from both fuels. The emission factors of total carbonyls vary in the range 13.8-295.9 mg(kWh)(-1) for DF and 17.8-380.2mg(kWh)(-1) for E/DF, respectively. The introduction of ethanol into diesel fuel results in a decrease in acrolein emissions, while the other carbonyls show general increases: at low engine speed (1200 rpm), 0-55% for formaldehyde, 4-44% for acetaldehyde, 38-224% for acetone, and 5-52% for crotonaldehyde; at medium engine speed (1800 rpm), 106-413% for formaldehyde, 4-143% for acetaldehyde, 74-113% for acetone, 114-1216% for propionaldehyde, and 15-163% for crotonaldehyde; at high engine speed (2600 rpm), 36-431% for formaldehyde, 18-61% for acetaldehyde, 22-241% for acetone, and 6-61% for propionaldehyde. A gradual reduction in the brake specific emissions of each carbonyl compound from both fuels is observed with increase in engine load. Among three levels of engine speed employed, both DF and E/DF emit most CBC emissions at high engine speed. On the whole, the presence of ethanol in diesel fuel leads to an increase in aldehyde emissions. PMID:20416922

  17. A genetically-based latitudinal cline in the emission of herbivore-induced plant volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Wason, Elizabeth L; Agrawal, Anurag A; Hunter, Mark D

    2013-08-01

    The existence of predictable latitudinal variation in plant defense against herbivores remains controversial. A prevailing view holds that higher levels of plant defense evolve at low latitudes compared to high latitudes as an adaptive plant response to higher herbivore pressure on low-latitude plants. To date, this prediction has not been examined with respect to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that many plants emit, often thus attracting the natural enemies of herbivores. Here, we compared genetically-based constitutive and herbivore-induced aboveground vegetative VOC emissions from plants originating across a gradient of more than 10° of latitude (>1,500 km). We collected headspace VOCs from Asclepias syriaca (common milkweed) originating from 20 populations across its natural range and grown in a common garden near the range center. Feeding by specialist Danaus plexippus (monarch) larvae induced VOCs, and field environmental conditions (temperature, light, and humidity) also influenced emissions. Monarch damage increased plant VOC concentrations and altered VOC blends. We found that genetically-based induced VOC emissions varied with the latitude of plant population origin, although the pattern followed the reverse of that predicted-induced VOC concentration increased with increasing latitude. This pattern appeared to be driven by a greater induction of sesquiterpenoids at higher latitudes. In contrast, constitutive VOC emission did not vary systematically with latitude, and the induction of green leafy volatiles declined with latitude. Our results do not support the prevailing view that plant defense is greater at lower than at higher latitudes. That the pattern holds only for herbivore-induced VOC emission, and not constitutive emission, suggests that latitudinal variation in VOCs is not a simple adaptive response to climatic factors. PMID:23888386

  18. Significant light and temperature dependent monoterpene emissions from European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and their potential impact on the European volatile organic compound budget

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Dindorf; U. Kuhn; L. Ganzeveld; G. Schebeske; P. Ciccioli; C. Holzke; R. Köble; G. Seufert; J. Kesselmeier

    2006-01-01

    By using a dynamic branch enclosure system the emission of monoterpenes from European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) was investigated during two consecutive summer vegetation periods in the years of 2002 and 2003 in Germany. All measurements were performed under field conditions within the framework of the ECHO project (Emission and Chemical Transformation of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds, AFO 2000). European

  19. Canopy light cues affect emission of constitutive and methyl jasmonate-induced volatile organic compounds in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Kegge, Wouter; Weldegergis, Berhane T; Soler, Roxina; Eijk, Marleen Vergeer-Van; Dicke, Marcel; Voesenek, Laurentius A C J; Pierik, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    The effects of plant competition for light on the emission of plant volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were studied by investigating how different light qualities that occur in dense vegetation affect the emission of constitutive and methyl-jasmonate-induced VOCs. Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia (Col-0) plants and Pieris brassicae caterpillars were used as a biological system to study the effects of light quality manipulations on VOC emissions and attraction of herbivores. VOCs were analysed using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry and the effects of light quality, notably the red : far red light ratio (R : FR), on expression of genes associated with VOC production were studied using reverse transcriptase–quantitative PCR. The emissions of both constitutive and methyl-jasmonate-induced green leaf volatiles and terpenoids were partially suppressed under low R : FR and severe shading conditions. Accordingly, the VOC-based preference of neonates of the specialist lepidopteran herbivore P. brassicae was significantly affected by the R : FR ratio. We conclude that VOC-mediated interactions among plants and between plants and organisms at higher trophic levels probably depend on light alterations caused by nearby vegetation. Studies on plant–plant and plant–insect interactions through VOCs should take into account the light quality within dense stands when extrapolating to natural and agricultural field conditions. PMID:23845065

  20. Approaches for quantifying reactive and low-volatility biogenic organic compound emissions by vegetation enclosure techniques - part A.

    PubMed

    Ortega, John; Helmig, Detlev

    2008-06-01

    The high reactivity and low vapor pressure of many biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) make it difficult to measure whole-canopy fluxes of BVOC species using common analytical techniques. The most appropriate approach for estimating these BVOC fluxes is to determine emission rates from dynamic vegetation enclosure measurements. After scaling leaf- and branch-level emission rates to the canopy level, these fluxes can then be used in models to determine BVOC influences on atmospheric chemistry and aerosol processes. Previously published reports from enclosure measurements show considerable variation among procedures with limited guidelines or standard protocols to follow. This article reviews this literature and describes the variety of enclosure types, materials, and analysis techniques that have been used to determine BVOC emission rates. The current review article is followed by a companion paper which details a comprehensive enclosure technique that incorporates both recommendations from the literature as well as insight gained from theoretical calculations and practical experiences. These methods have yielded new BVOC emission data for highly reactive monoterpenes (MT) and sesquiterpenes (SQT) from a variety of vegetation species. PMID:18279913

  1. Volatile organic compound emissions from the oil and natural gas industry in the Uintah Basin, Utah: oil and gas well pad emissions compared to ambient air composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warneke, C.; Geiger, F.; Edwards, P. M.; Dube, W.; Pétron, G.; Kofler, J.; Zahn, A.; Brown, S. S.; Graus, M.; Gilman, J. B.; Lerner, B. M.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; de Gouw, J. A.; Roberts, J. M.

    2014-10-01

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with oil and natural gas production in the Uintah Basin, Utah were measured at a ground site in Horse Pool and from a NOAA mobile laboratory with PTR-MS instruments. The VOC compositions in the vicinity of individual gas and oil wells and other point sources such as evaporation ponds, compressor stations and injection wells are compared to the measurements at Horse Pool. High mixing ratios of aromatics, alkanes, cycloalkanes and methanol were observed for extended periods of time and for short-term spikes caused by local point sources. The mixing ratios during the time the mobile laboratory spent on the well pads were averaged. High mixing ratios were found close to all point sources, but gas well pads with collection and dehydration on the well pad were clearly associated with higher mixing ratios than other wells. The comparison of the VOC composition of the emissions from the oil and natural gas well pads showed that gas well pads without dehydration on the well pad compared well with the majority of the data at Horse Pool, and that oil well pads compared well with the rest of the ground site data. Oil well pads on average emit heavier compounds than gas well pads. The mobile laboratory measurements confirm the results from an emissions inventory: the main VOC source categories from individual point sources are dehydrators, oil and condensate tank flashing and pneumatic devices and pumps. Raw natural gas is emitted from the pneumatic devices and pumps and heavier VOC mixes from the tank flashings.

  2. Emissions of terpenoids, benzenoids, and other biogenic gas-phase organic compounds from agricultural crops and their potential implications for air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentner, D. R.; Ormeño, E.; Fares, S.; Ford, T. B.; Weber, R.; Park, J.-H.; Brioude, J.; Angevine, W. M.; Karlik, J. F.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-11-01

    Agriculture comprises a substantial fraction of land cover in many regions of the world, including California's San Joaquin Valley, which is out of compliance with state and federal standards for tropospheric ozone and particulate matter (PM2.5). Emissions from vegetation and other biogenic and anthropogenic sources react in the atmosphere to produce ozone and secondary organic aerosol, which comprises a substantial fraction of PM2.5. Using data from three measurement campaigns, we examine emissions of reactive gas-phase organic carbon from agricultural crops and their potential to impact regional air quality relative to anthropogenic emissions in California's San Joaquin Valley. Emission rates for a suite of biogenic terpenoid compounds were measured in a greenhouse for 25 representative crops from California in 2008, and ambient measurements of terpenoids and other biogenic compounds in the volatile and intermediate-volatility organic compound range were made over an orange orchard in a rural area of the San Joaquin Valley during two seasons in 2010: summer and spring flowering. When accounting for both emissions of reactive precursors and the deposition of ozone to an orange orchard, the net effect of the orange trees is a net source of ozone in the springtime during flowering, and relatively neutral for most of the summer until the fall when it becomes a sink. Flowering was a major emission event and caused a large increase in emissions including a suite of compounds that had not been measured in the atmosphere before. Such biogenic emission events need to be better parameterized in models as they have significant potential to impact regional air quality since emissions increase by an order of magnitude. In regions like the San Joaquin Valley, the mass of biogenic emissions from agricultural crops during the summer (without flowering) and the potential ozone and secondary organic aerosol formation from these emissions are on the same order as anthropogenic emissions from motor vehicles and must be considered in air quality models and secondary pollution control strategies.

  3. Volatile organic compound emissions from different stages of Cananga odorata flower development.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiao-Wei; Hao, Chao-Yun; He, Shu-Zhen; Wu, Gang; Tan, Le-He; Xu, Fei; Hu, Rong-Suo

    2014-01-01

    Headspace-solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) was used to identify the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of the different flower development stages of Cananga odorata for the evaluation of floral volatile polymorphism as a basis to determine the best time of harvest. Electronic nose results, coupled with discriminant factor analysis, suggested that emitted odors varied in different C. odorata flower development stages, including the bud, display-petal, initial-flowering, full-flowering, end-flowering, wilted-flower, and dried flower stages. The first two discriminant factors explained 97.52% of total system variance. Ninety-two compounds were detected over the flower life, and the mean Bray-Curtis similarity value was 52.45% among different flower development stages. A high level of volatile polymorphism was observed during flower development. The VOCs were largely grouped as hydrocarbons, esters, alcohols, aldehydes, phenols, acids, ketones, and ethers, and the main compound was ?-caryophyllene (15.05%-33.30%). Other identified compounds were ?-cubebene, D-germacrene, benzyl benzoate, and ?-cubebene. Moreover, large numbers of VOCs were detected at intermediate times of flower development, and more hydrocarbons, esters, and alcohols were identified in the full-flowering stage. The full-flowering stage may be the most suitable period for C. odorata flower harvest. PMID:24979401

  4. EMISSION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS AND COMBUSTION GASES DURING HAZARDOUSWASTE COFIRING IN A WATERTUBE PACKAGE BOILER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the sorptionand desorption of organic compounds on combustion-generated sootduring the cofiring of hazardous organics with fuel oil in afull-scale boiler. orption of organics was accomplished by firinga watertube package boiler ...

  5. COMPARISON OF EMISSION PROFILES FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM COTTON AND POLYPROPYLENE-BASED TARP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A high electric field, radio-frequency ion mobility analyzer (RF-IMS) was used as a small detector in gas chromatographic separations of mixtures of volatile organic compounds including alcohols, aldehydes, esters, ethers, pheromes, and other chemical attractants for insects. The detector was equip...

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF EMISSIONS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM INTERIOR ALKYD PAINT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alkyd paint continues to be used indoors for application to wood trim, cabinet surfaces, and some kitchen and bathroom walls. Paint may represent a significant source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) indoors depending on the frequency of use and amount of surface paint. The U...

  7. Microbial communities related to volatile organic compound emission in automobile air conditioning units.

    PubMed

    Diekmann, Nina; Burghartz, Melanie; Remus, Lars; Kaufholz, Anna-Lena; Nawrath, Thorben; Rohde, Manfred; Schulz, Stefan; Roselius, Louisa; Schaper, Jörg; Mamber, Oliver; Jahn, Dieter; Jahn, Martina

    2013-10-01

    During operation of mobile air conditioning (MAC) systems in automobiles, malodours can occur. We studied the microbial communities found on contaminated heat exchanger fins of 45 evaporators from car MAC systems which were operated in seven different regions of the world and identified corresponding volatile organic compounds. Collected biofilms were examined by scanning electron microscopy and fluorescent in situ hybridization. The detected bacteria were loosely attached to the metal surface. Further analyses of the bacteria using PCR-based single-strand conformation polymorphism and sequencing of isolated 16S rRNA gene fragments identified highly divergent microbial communities with multiple members of the Alphaproteobacteriales, Methylobacteria were the prevalent bacteria. In addition, Sphingomonadales, Burkholderiales, Bacillales, Alcanivorax spp. and Stenotrophomonas spp. were found among many others depending on the location the evaporators were operated. Interestingly, typical pathogenic bacteria related to air conditioning systems including Legionella spp. were not found. In order to determine the nature of the chemical compounds produced by the bacteria, the volatile organic compounds were examined by closed loop stripping analysis and identified by combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Sulphur compounds, i.e. di-, tri- and multiple sulphides, acetylthiazole, aromatic compounds and diverse substituted pyrazines were detected. Mathematical clustering of the determined microbial community structures against their origin identified a European/American/Arabic cluster versus two mainly tropical Asian clusters. Interestingly, clustering of the determined volatiles against the origin of the corresponding MAC revealed a highly similar pattern. A close relationship of microbial community structure and resulting malodours to the climate and air quality at the location of MAC operation was concluded. PMID:23179618

  8. EMISSION OF SULFUR-BEARING COMPOUNDS FROM MOTOR VEHICLE AND AIRCRAFT ENGINES. A REPORT TO CONGRESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report was generated in response to section 403(g) of The Clean Air Act as amended August, 1977. The report covers (1) a review of emission factors for H2SO4, SO2, sulfate, H2S, and carbonyl sulfide from motor vehicles, motor vehicle engines and aircraft engines; (2) a revie...

  9. Volatile acetic acid and formaldehyde emission from plywood treated with boron compound

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Colak; G. Colakoglu

    2004-01-01

    The effects of plywood on formaldehyde and volatile acetic acid emissions treated with borax and boric acid were investigated. The treated plywood samples were manufactured by using two different methods; each veneer was first impregnated by a dipping method before the first group of plywood was manufactured. The second group of plywood panels was produced by adding preservatives (borax, boric

  10. Emission of volatile organic compounds as affected by feedlot location, moisture, and temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the effects within pen location, moisture, and temperature on odor emission from manure resulting from a diet containing 30% wet distillers grain with solubles. Pen surface material was collected from three locations. Material from each pen was consolidated for each specific...

  11. Impacts of nitrogen fertilization on volatile organic compound emissions from decomposing plant litter

    E-print Network

    Fierer, Noah

    litter C H R I S T O P H E R M . G R A Y * and NOAH FIERER* *Department of Ecology and Evolutionary on plant emis- sions, with few studies on VOC emissions from decomposing plant litter, another potentially increases in nitrogen (N) availability can influence litter decomposition rates, we do not know how VOC

  12. Volatile Organic Compound Emission from Quercus suber, Quercus canariensis, and its hybridisation product Quercus afares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welter, S.; Bracho Nuñez, A.; Staudt, M.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2009-04-01

    Oaks represent one of the most important plant genera in the Northern hemisphere and include many intensively VOC emitting species. The major group constitutes the isoprene emitters, but also monoterpene emitters and non-emitters can be found. These variations in the oak species might partly be due to their propensity for inter- and intraspecific hybridisation. This study addresses the foliar VOC production of the former hybridisation product the deciduous Quercus afares and its parents, two very distant species: the evergreen monoterpene emitter Quercus suber and the deciduous isoprene emitter Quercus canariensis. The measurements were performed in Southern France, applying two different methods. Plants were investigated in situ in the field with a portable gas exchange measuring system as well as in the laboratory on cut branches with an adapted enclosure system. Quercus afares was found to be a monoterpene emitting species. However, the monoterpene emission was lower and the composition different to that of Quercus suber. Whereas Quercus suber trees belonged to the pinene type most individuals of Quercus afares were identified to represent a limonene type. Quercus canariensis emitted besides high amounts of isoprene also linalool and (Z)-3-hexenylacetate. Emissions from Quercus suber and Quercus afares were higher in the field measurements than in the laboratory on cut branches whereas Quercus canariensis exhibited lower isoprene emissions from cut branches. The results demonstrate the need of further emission studies on a plant species level.

  13. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS FROM 46 IN-USE PASSENGER CARS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions from automobiles have long been considered a prime source of pollutants involved in smog formation and ozone production. The reactive potential of the species emitted has been studied extensively, and many reactivity schemes have been proposed. Most of the data on the d...

  14. Acoustic emission analysis as a non-destructive test procedure for fiber compound structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, J.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of acoustic emission analysis is explained in scientific terms. The detection of acoustic events, their localization, damage discrimination, and event summation curves are discussed. A block diagram of the concept of damage-free testing of fiber-reinforced synthetic materials is depicted. Prospects for application of the concept are assessed.

  15. Color- and morphology-controlled self-assembly of new electron-donor-substituted aggregation-induced emission compounds.

    PubMed

    Niu, Caixia; Zhao, Liu; Fang, Tao; Deng, Xuebin; Ma, Hui; Zhang, Jiaxin; Na, Na; Han, Jingsa; Ouyang, Jin

    2014-03-11

    Four electron-donor-substituted aggregation-induced emission (AIE) compounds, N,N'-bis(4-methoxylsalicylidene)-p-phenylenediamine (BSPD-OMe), N,N'-bis(4-methylsalicylidene)-p-phenylenediamine (BSPD-Me), N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-p-phenylenediamine (BSPD), and N,N'-bis(4-hydroxylsalicylidene)-p-phenylenediamine (BSPD-OH), are designed and synthesized. They are all found to exhibit controlled self-assembly behaviors and good thermal properties. By changing the terminal electron-donor groups, they are controlled to self-assemble into three emission colors (green, yellow, and orange) and four morphologies (microblocks, microparticles, microrods, and nanowires) in THF/water mixtures. Their self-assembled structures were investigated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fluorescent microscopy images, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) techniques. In addition, the emission colors of BSPD-OH can be successfully controlled to three colors (green ? yellow ? orange) through simply changing the water fraction (fw). Their thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) results indicate that their thermal decomposition temperatures (Td, corresponding to 5% weight loss) range from 282 to 319 °C. Their differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) data show that BSPD-OH bears a glass-transition temperature (Tg) of 118 °C. The good Td and Tg values will ensure them to be luminogens for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The theoretical calculations and single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of BSPD-OMe and BSPD suggest that the stronger electron donor substituent can twist the molecular conformation, decrease the degree of ? conjugation, increase the energy gap, and then induce the emission colors' blue shift and morphology variation. The results are meaningful in controlling the emission colors and self-assembly shapes of these derivatives, and they also provide a novel but facile way to get color-tunable AIE luminogens for OLEDs. PMID:24571508

  16. Trends in the emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from light-duty gasoline vehicles tested on chassis dynamometers in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Yanbo; Fuentes, Mark; Rieger, Paul

    2014-02-01

    We present fleet average VOC emission rate trends for the longest running in-use light-duty gasoline Vehicle Surveillance Program (VSP) in Southern California. Tailpipe emissions data from a limited number of vehicles tested as part of the VSP show that the 2003 fleet average emissions decreased by about 80% for most VOCs relative to the 1995 fleet. Vehicle evaporative emission rates decreased more than 90% for most compounds from the 1999 to the 2003 fleet. Tailpipe benzene-normalized emission rate ratios for most compounds were relatively stable. Evaporative emission rate ratios and weight percentages have changed significantly from the 1999 fleet to the 2003 fleet indicating a significant change in the evaporative emission species patterns. The tailpipe NMHC (Non-Methane HydroCarbon) emission reductions observed between the 1995 fleet and the 2003 fleet likely resulted from the retirement of non-catalyst vehicles in the fleets (49%) and the combined effect of the turn-over of catalyst-equipped vehicles and switch to Phase III gasoline (27%). Our results are consistent with those observed in the Swiss tunnel study. Benzene-normalized emission rate ratios for C2 compounds, aldehydes, and 1,3 butadiene are much higher in tailpipe exhaust than those in evaporative emissions. C4-C5 hydrocarbon ratios in evaporative emissions are much higher than those in exhaust. C8 aromatic compound ratios are comparable for tailpipe and evaporative emissions (hot-soak). Such ratio differences can be used to estimate the relative contributions of vehicle exhaust and evaporative emission to ambient VOCs. The contribution of emissions from malfunctioning vehicles to total fleet emissions increased from 16% to 32% for the 1995 fleet to the 2003 fleet even though the percentage of malfunctioning vehicles in the fleet decreased from 10% to 5%. Most malfunctioning vehicles are vehicles that are at least 10 years old and generally have higher acetylene emission rate ratios. The effective identification and control of these malfunctioning vehicles will become increasingly important for improving mobile source emission estimates as well as reducing future tailpipe emissions.

  17. Serratia odorifera : analysis of volatile emission and biological impact of volatile compounds on Arabidopsis thaliana

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marco Kai; Elena Crespo; Simona M. Cristescu; Frans J. M. Harren; Wittko Francke; Birgit Piechulla

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria emit a wealth of volatiles. The combination of coupled gas chromatography\\/mass spectrometry (GC\\/MS) and proton-transfer-reaction\\u000a mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) analyses provided a most comprehensive profile of volatiles of the rhizobacterium Serratia odorifera 4Rx13. An array of compounds, highly dominated by sodorifen (approximately 50%), a bicyclic oligomethyl octadiene, could\\u000a be detected. Other volatiles included components of the biogeochemical sulfur cycle such

  18. A Tedlar Bag Sampling System for Toxic Organic Compounds in Source Emission Sampling and Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jimmy C. Pau; Joseph E. Knoll; M. Rodney Midgett

    1991-01-01

    The Atmospheric Research and Exposure Assessment Laboratory (AREAL) of the US Environmental Protection Agency at Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, has studied the Tedlar bag for the applicability of this material in sampling different organic compounds and has designed a Tedlar Bag Sampling System which reduces the sampling rate from 1-1.5 L\\/min to 50 mL\\/min to make the sample volume

  19. Levels of selected organic compounds in materials for candle production and human exposure to candle emissions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Lau; H. Fiedler; O. Hutzinger; K.-H. Schwind; J. Hosseinpour

    1997-01-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD), dibenzofurans (PCDF) selected chlorinated pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and some volatile organic compounds (VOC) were analysed in the exhaust fumes of candles made from different waxes and finishing materials. To guarantee defined burning conditions a chamber was developed for the sampling of the exhaust fumes. Using a simple exposure model, the inhalative uptake of PCDD\\/PCDF by

  20. Particulate Matter Sampling and Volatile Organic Compound Removal for Characterization of Spark Ignited Direct Injection Engine Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Matthias, Nicholas; Farron, Carrie; Foster, David E.; Andrie, Michael; Krieger, Roger; Najt, Paul; Narayanaswamy, Kushal; Solomon, Arun S.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2012-01-01

    More stringent emissions regulations are continually being proposed to mitigate adverse human health and environmental impacts of internal combustion engines. With that in mind, it has been proposed that vehicular particulate matter (PM) emissions should be regulated based on particle number in addition to particle mass. One aspect of this project is to study different sample handling methods for number based aerosol measurements, specifically, two different methods for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs). One method is a thermodenuder (TD) and the other is an evaporative chamber/diluter (EvCh). These sample handling methods have been implemented in an engine test cell with a spark ignited direct injection (SIDI) engine. The engine was designed for stoichiometric, homogeneous combustion. SIDI is of particular interest for improved fuel efficiency compared to other SI engines, however, the efficiency benefit comes with greater PM emissions and may therefore be subject to the proposed number based PM regulation. Another aspect of this project is to characterize PM from this engine in terms of particle number and composition

  1. Particulate Matter Sampling and Volatile Organic Compound Removal for Characterization of Spark Ignited Direct Injection Engine Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Matthias, Nicholas; Farron, Carrie; Foster, David E.; Andrie, Michael; Krieger, Roger; Najt, Paul M.; Narayanaswamy, Kushal; Solomon, Arun S.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2012-01-01

    More stringent emissions regulations are continually being proposed to mitigate adverse human health and environmental impacts of internal combustion engines. With that in mind, it has been proposed that vehicular particulate matter (PM) emissions should be regulated based on particle number in addition to particle mass. One aspect of this project is to study different sample handling methods for number based aerosol measurements, specifically, two different methods for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs). One method is a thermodenuder (TD) and the other is an evaporative chamber/diluter (EvCh). These sample handling methods have been implemented in an engine test cell with a spark ignited direct injection (SIDI) engine. The engine was designed for stoichiometric, homogeneous combustion. SIDI is of particular interest for improved fuel efficiency compared to other SI engines, however, the efficiency benefit comes with greater PM emissions and may therefore be subject to the proposed number based PM regulation. Another aspect of this project is to characterize PM from this engine in terms of particle number and composition.

  2. Interim report on testing of off-gas treatment technologies for abatement of atmospheric emissions of chlorinated volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Haselow, J.S.; Jarosch, T.R.; Rossabi, J.; Burdick, S.; Lombard, K.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to briefly summarize the results to date of the off-gas treatment program for atmospheric emissions of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs), in particular trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE). This program is part of the Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development`s Integrated Demonstration for Treatment of Organics in Soil and Water at a Non-Arid Site. The off-gas treatment program was initiated after testing of in-situ air stripping with horizontal wells was completed. That successful test expectedly produced atmospheric emissions of CVOCs that were unabated. It was decided after that test that an off-gas treatment program would complement the Integrated Demonstration not only because off-gas treatment is an integral portion of remediation of CVOC contamination in groundwater and soil but also because several technologies were being developed across the US to mitigate CVOC emissions. A single platform for testing off-gas treatment technologies would facilitate systematic and unbiased evaluation of the emerging technologies.

  3. Charged-particle evaporation from hot 164Yb compound nuclei and the role of 5He emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charity, R. J.; Korolija, M.; Sarantites, D. G.; Sobotka, L. G.

    1997-08-01

    A systematic study of the decay properties of 164Yb compound nuclei with excitation energies of 100-300 MeV was performed. The emission patterns of light charged particles detected in coincidence with evaporation residues produced in 64Ni+100Mo and 16O+148Sm reactions have been measured and compared to statistical model predictions. There is found to be significant disagreement between the experiment and the model calculations in the magnitude of the multiplicities and the peak position in the energy spectra. For deuterons and tritons, significant nonstatistical components were present at all excitation energies. The proton energy spectrum did not exhibit any entrance-channel dependence at an excitation energy of ~170 MeV. However for ? particles, there is an enhancement in the spectrum at the lowest kinetic energies for the more symmetric reaction. It is suggested that the emission and subsequent decay of 5He fragments, can account for a large fraction of the apparent, and often reported, decrease in the Coulomb barrier for ? particle emission.

  4. Influence of particulate trap oxidizers on emission of mutagenic compounds by diesel automobiles.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, R E; Devillez, G; Smith, L R

    1989-06-01

    Diesel exhaust particles are known to contain mutagenic and carcinogenic chemicals. The aim of this study was to determine whether, and to what extent, catalytic particulate trap oxidizers on light-duty diesel engines may reduce the emission of particle-associated mutagenic chemicals into the environment. Exhaust particles were collected from Mercedes Benz and Volkswagen diesel automobiles, equipped with or without the manufacturer's exhaust traps, while running on a chassis dynamometer under specified load conditions. Exhaust particles were collected from a dilution tunnel onto 20" X 20" Teflon-coated fiberglass filters. Mutagenesis tests of dichloromethane (DCM) extracts of the particles were conducted using the Ames Salmonella bacterial test system. The mutation rate was calculated in terms of histidine revertants per mile of travel during a set of standard test cycles. With both vehicles the traps produced an 87-92% reduction in the total amount of particulate material collected by the filters. There was no significant change in the specific mutagenic activity (revertants per microgram of DCM particle extract) with or without the traps. These studies support the notion that installation of exhaust traps which reduce particulate emission on diesel-powered vehicles will also reduce the emission of particle-associated mutagenic and carcinogenic materials into the environment. PMID:2473105

  5. Odor compounds in waste gas emissions from agricultural operations and food industries.

    PubMed

    Rappert, S; Müller, R

    2005-01-01

    In the last decades, large-scale agricultural operations and food industries have increased. These operations generate numerous types of odors. The reduction of land areas available for isolation of agricultural and food processing industrial operations from the public area and the increase in sensitivity and demand of the general public for a clean and pleasant environment have forced all of these industries to control odor emissions and toxic air pollutants. To develop environmentally sound, sustainable agricultural and food industrial operations, it is necessary to integrate research that focuses on modern analytical techniques and latest sensory technology of measurement and evaluation of odor and pollution, together with a fundamental knowledge of factors that are the basic units contributing to the production of odor and pollutants. Without a clear understanding of what odor is, how to measure it, and where it originates, it will be difficult to control the odor. The present paper reviews the available information regarding odor emissions from agricultural operations and food industries by giving an overview about odor problems, odor detection and quantification, and identifying the sources and the mechanisms that contribute to the odor emissions. Finally, ways of reducing or controlling the odor problem are discussed. PMID:16129591

  6. Anthropogenic emissions in Nigeria and implications for atmospheric ozone pollution: A view from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marais, E. A.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K.; Lerot, C.; Zhang, L.; Yu, K.; Kurosu, T. P.; Chance, K.; Sauvage, B.

    2014-12-01

    Nigeria has a high population density and large fossil fuel resources but very poorly managed energy infrastructure. Satellite observations of formaldehyde (HCHO) and glyoxal (CHOCHO) reveal very large sources of anthropogenic nonmethane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) from the Lagos megacity and oil/gas operations in the Niger Delta. This is supported by aircraft observations over Lagos and satellite observations of methane in the Niger Delta. Satellite observations of carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) show large seasonal emissions from open fires in December-February (DJF). Ventilation of central Nigeria is severely restricted at that time of year, leading to very poor ozone air quality as observed from aircraft (MOZAIC) and satellite (TES). Simulations with the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model (CTM) suggest that maximum daily 8-h average (MDA8) ozone exceeds 70 ppbv over the region on a seasonal mean basis, with significant contributions from both open fires (15-20 ppbv) and fuel/industrial emissions (7-9 ppbv). The already severe ozone pollution in Nigeria could worsen in the future as a result of demographic and economic growth, although this would be offset by a decrease in open fires.

  7. Characterization of Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions at Sites of Oil Sands Extraction and Upgrading in northern Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero, J.; Simpson, I. J.; Meinardi, S.; Blake, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    The crude oil reserves in Canada's oil sands are second only to Saudi Arabia, holding roughly 173 billion barrels of oil in the form of bitumen, an unconventional crude oil which does not flow and cannot be pumped without heating or dilution. Oil sands deposits are ultimately used to make the same petroleum products as conventional forms of crude oil, though more processing is required. Hydrocarbons are the basis of oil, coal and natural gas and are an important class of gases emitted into the atmosphere during oil production, particularly because of their effects on air quality and human health. However, they have only recently begun to be independently assessed in the oil sands regions. As part of the 2008 ARCTAS airborne mission, whole air samples were collected in the boundary layer above the surface mining operations of northern Alberta. Gas chromatography analysis revealed enhanced concentrations of 53 VOCs (C2 to C10) over the mining region. When compared to local background levels, the measured concentrations were enhanced up to 1.1-400 times for these compounds. To more fully characterize emissions, ground-based studies were conducted in summer 2010 and winter 2011 in the oil sands mining and upgrading areas. The data from the 200 ground-based samples revealed enhancements in the concentration of 65 VOCs. These compounds were elevated up to 1.1-3000 times above background concentrations and include C2-C8 alkanes, C1-C5 alkyl nitrates, C2-C4 alkenes and potentially toxic aromatic compounds such as benzene, toluene, and xylenes.

  8. Performance of a pilot-scale biotrickling filter in controlling the volatile organic compound emissions in a furniture manufacturing facility.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Soria, Vicente; Gabaldón, Carmen; Penya-Roja, Josep M; Palau, Jordi; Alvarez-Hornos, F Javier; Sempere, Feliu; Soriano, Carlos

    2009-08-01

    A 0.75-m3 pilot-scale biotrickling filter was run for over 1 yr in a Spanish furniture company to evaluate its performance in the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) contained in the emission of two different paint spray booths. The first one was an open front booth used to manually paint furniture, and the second focus was an automatically operated closed booth operated to paint pieces of furniture. In both cases, the VOC emissions were very irregular, with rapid and extreme fluctuations. The pilot plant was operated at an empty bed residence time (EBRT) ranging from 10 to 40 sec, and good removal efficiencies of VOCs were usually obtained. When a buffering activated carbon prefilter was installed, the system performance was improved considerably, so a much better compliance with legal constraints was reached. After different shutdowns in the factory, the period to recover the previous performance of the biotrickling reactor was minimal. A weekend dehydration strategy was developed and implemented to control the pressure drop associated with excessive biomass accumulation. PMID:19728494

  9. From emissions to ambient mixing ratios: online seasonal field measurements of volatile organic compounds over a Norway spruce-dominated forest in central Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourtsoukidis, E.; Williams, J.; Kesselmeier, J.; Jacobi, S.; Bonn, B.

    2014-07-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are substantial contributors to atmospheric chemistry and physics and demonstrate the close relationship between biosphere and atmosphere. Their emission rates are highly sensitive to meteorological and environmental changes with concomitant impacts on atmospheric chemistry. We have investigated seasonal isoprenoid and oxygenated VOC (oxVOC) fluxes from a Norway spruce (Picea abies) tree in central Germany and explored the emission responses under various atmospheric conditions. Emission rates were quantified by using dynamic branch enclosure and proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) techniques. Additionally, ambient mixing ratios were derived through application of a new box model treatment on the dynamic chamber measurements. These are compared in terms of abundance and origin with the corresponding emissions. Isoprenoids dominate the BVOC emissions from Norway spruce, with monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes accounting for 50.8 ± 7.2% and 19.8 ± 8.1% respectively of the total emissions. Normalizing the VOC emission rates, we have observed a trend of reduction of carbon-containing emissions from April to November, with an enhancement of oxVOC. Highest emission rates were observed in June for all measured species, with the exception of sesquiterpenes, which were emitted most strongly in April. Finally, we evaluate the temperature-dependent algorithm that seems to describe the temperature-dependent emissions of methanol, acetaldehyde and monoterpenes but only with the use of the monthly derived values for emission potential, Es, and temperature dependency, ? factor.

  10. Development and Application of a Fast Chromatography Technique for Analysis of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds in Plant Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. E.; Kato, S.; Nakashima, Y.; Yamazakii, S.; Kajii, Y. J.

    2011-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emitted from vegetation constitute the largest fraction (>90 %) of total global non-methane VOC supplied to the atmosphere, yet the chemical complexity of these emissions means that achieving comprehensive measurements of BVOCs, and in particular the less volatile terpenes, is not straightforward. As such, there is still significant uncertainty associated with the contribution of BVOCs to the tropospheric oxidation budget, and to atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. The rate of BVOC emission from vegetation is regulated by environmental conditions such as light intensity and temperature, and thus can be highly variable, necessitating high time-resolution BVOC measurements. In addition, the numerous monoterpene and sesquiterpene isomers, which are indistinguishable by some analytical techniques, have greatly varying lifetimes with respect to atmospheric oxidants, and as such quantification of each individual isomer is fundamental to achieving a comprehensive characterisation of the impact of BVOCs upon the atmospheric oxidation capacity. However, established measurement techniques for these trace gases typically offer a trade-off between sample frequency and the level of speciation; detailed information regarding chemical composition may be obtained, but with reduced time resolution, or vice versa. We have developed a Fast-GC-FID technique for quantification of a range of monoterpene, sesquiterpene and oxygenated C10 BVOC isomers, which retains the separation capability of conventional gas chromatography, yet offers considerably improved sample frequency. Development of this system is ongoing, but currently a 20 m x 0.18 mm i.d resistively heated metal column is employed to achieve chromatographic separation of thirteen C10-C15 BVOCs, within a total cycle time of ~15 minutes. We present the instrument specifications and analytical capability, together with the first application of this Fast-GC technique for BVOC analysis, monitoring BVOC emissions from white spruce (Picea glauca) during plant chamber studies.

  11. Erbium-ytterbium-yttrium compounds for light emission at 1.54microm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhoutte, Michiel

    Silicon microphotonics? has emerged as the leading technology to overcome the interconnect bottleneck that limits a further increase of computation power following Moore's law. Optical interconnects between different electronic microprocessors in an electronic-photonic integrated circuit (EPIC) can provide a fast, low-loss and highbandwidth alternative to electrical interconnects, which suffer from issues such as resistive heating, RC delays and channel crosstalk at an increasing device density. A crucial device in such an electronic-photonic integrated circuit is a compact, highgain and low power optical amplifier to compensate for signal attenuation due to propagation losses and to recover signal strength after subsequent 3dB splits during fanout of the optical signal to different microprocessors. Erbium ions (Er3+) are an excellent candidate to provide amplification around .. = 1.54pm for optical telecommunications. Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs) have already enabled long-haul optical data. transmission through silica optical fibers, but scaling down a fiber amplifier to an on-chip erbium-doped waveguide amplifier (EDWA) brings along significant materials and device design challenges. In this thesis, erbium-ytterbium oxide (Erx Yb2-xO 3) and erbium-ytterbium-yttrium silicate (ErxYhyY 2-x-ySi2O7) compounds are investigated as novel materials systems for the development of EDWAs. The high erbium and ytterbium solubility (>1022 cm-3) and refractive index (1.71 < n < 1.92) make these materials excellent candidates for compact, low-power optical amplifiers. Erx Yb2-xO 3 and ErxYhyY2-x-ySi2O 7 thin films were deposited on SiO2 and analyzed structurally and optically. The role of ytterbium in these compounds is twofold. First, ytterbium can be used as an alternative to yttrium for dilution of the erbium concentration in order to mitigate parasitic concentration quenching effects. Second, ytterbium acts as a sensitizer for erbium during optical pumping at lambda = 980nm. Comparison of the different oxide and silicate thin films reveals that the alpha-disilicate phase is the best candidate for an EDWA gain medium pumped at lambda = 980nm. By means of rate and propagation equations, the composition of an Er xYhyY2-x-ySi2O7 gain medium was optimized for application as a 3dB EDWA. The optimal composition was found to be Er0.025Yb0.200Yb0.200Y1.775Si 2O7, which provides a 1.5dB/cm gain at only 3mW of pump power. In terms of the figure of merit 3dB gain/(device area ? pump power), this material outperforms other EDWA materials reported in literature. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs mit.edu)

  12. Insect herbivore feeding and their excretion contribute to volatile organic compounds emission to the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zebelo, S.; Gnavi, G.; Bertea, C.; Bossi, S.; Andrea, O.; Cordero, C.; Rubiolo, P.; Bicchi, C.; Maffei, M.

    2011-12-01

    Secondary plant metabolites play an important role in insect plant interactions. The Lamiaceae family, especially Mentha species, accumulate secondary plant metabolites in their glandular trichomes, mainly mono and sesquiterpenes. Here we show that mint plants respond to herbivory by changing the quality and quantity of leaf secondary plant metabolite components. The volatiles from herbivore damaged, mechanical damage and healthy plant were collected by HS-SPME and analyzed by GC-MS. Plants with the same treatment were kept for genomic analysis. Total RNA was extracted from the above specified treatments. The terpenoid quantitative gene expressions (qPCR) were then assayed. Upon herbivory, M. aquatica synthesizes and emits (+)-menthofuran and the other major monoterpene (+)-pulegone emitted by healthy and mechanically damaged plants. Herbivory was found to up-regulate the expression of genes involved in terpenoid biosynthesis. The increased emission of (+)-menthofuran was correlated with the upregulation of (+)-menthofuran synthase. In addition we analysed the VOC composition of C. herbacea frass from insects feeding on Mentha aquatica. VOCs were sampled by HS-SPME and analyzed by GCxGC-qMS, and the results compared through quantitative comparative analysis of 2D chromatographic data. Most terpenoids from M. aquatica were completely catabolized by C. herbacea and were absent in the frass volatile fraction. On the other hand, the monoterpene 1,8-cineole was oxidized and frass yielded several new hydroxy-1,8-cineoles, among which 2?-OH-, 3?-OH-, 3?-OH- and 9-OH-1,8-cineole. The role of VOC emitted during herbivory and frass excretion on secondary organic aerosol formation is discussed.

  13. Effect of vegetation removal and water table drawdown on the non-methane biogenic volatile organic compound emissions in boreal peatland microcosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faubert, Patrick; Tiiva, Päivi; Rinnan, Åsmund; Räty, Sanna; Holopainen, Jarmo K.; Holopainen, Toini; Rinnan, Riikka

    2010-11-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions are important in the global atmospheric chemistry and their feedbacks to global warming are uncertain. Global warming is expected to trigger vegetation changes and water table drawdown in boreal peatlands, such changes have only been investigated on isoprene emission but never on other BVOCs. We aimed at distinguishing the BVOCs released from vascular plants, mosses and peat in hummocks (dry microsites) and hollows (wet microsites) of boreal peatland microcosms maintained in growth chambers. We also assessed the effect of water table drawdown (-20 cm) on the BVOC emissions in hollow microcosms. BVOC emissions were measured from peat samples underneath the moss surface after the 7-week-long experiment to investigate whether the potential effects of vegetation and water table drawdown were shown. BVOCs were sampled using a conventional chamber method, collected on adsorbent and analyzed with GC-MS. In hummock microcosms, vascular plants increased the monoterpene emissions compared with the treatment where all above-ground vegetation was removed while no effect was detected on the sesquiterpenes, other reactive VOCs (ORVOCs) and other VOCs. Peat layer from underneath the surface with intact vegetation had the highest sesquiterpene emissions. In hollow microcosms, intact vegetation had the highest sesquiterpene emissions. Water table drawdown decreased monoterpene and other VOC emissions. Specific compounds could be closely associated to the natural/lowered water tables. Peat layer from underneath the surface of hollows with intact vegetation had the highest emissions of monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and ORVOCs whereas water table drawdown decreased those emissions. The results suggest that global warming would change the BVOC emission mixtures from boreal peatlands following changes in vegetation composition and water table drawdown.

  14. Emissions of terpenoids, benzenoids, and other biogenic gas-phase organic compounds from agricultural crops and their potential implications for air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentner, D. R.; Ormeño, E.; Fares, S.; Ford, T. B.; Weber, R.; Park, J.-H.; Brioude, J.; Angevine, W. M.; Karlik, J. F.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2014-06-01

    Agriculture comprises a substantial, and increasing, fraction of land use in many regions of the world. Emissions from agricultural vegetation and other biogenic and anthropogenic sources react in the atmosphere to produce ozone and secondary organic aerosol, which comprises a substantial fraction of particulate matter (PM2.5). Using data from three measurement campaigns, we examine the magnitude and composition of reactive gas-phase organic carbon emissions from agricultural crops and their potential to impact regional air quality relative to anthropogenic emissions from motor vehicles in California's San Joaquin Valley, which is out of compliance with state and federal standards for tropospheric ozone PM2.5. Emission rates for a suite of terpenoid compounds were measured in a greenhouse for 25 representative crops from California in 2008. Ambient measurements of terpenoids and other biogenic compounds in the volatile and intermediate-volatility organic compound ranges were made in the urban area of Bakersfield and over an orange orchard in a rural area of the San Joaquin Valley during two 2010 seasons: summer and spring flowering. We combined measurements from the orchard site with ozone modeling methods to assess the net effect of the orange trees on regional ozone. When accounting for both emissions of reactive precursors and the deposition of ozone to the orchard, the orange trees are a net source of ozone in the springtime during flowering, and relatively neutral for most of the summer until the fall, when it becomes a sink. Flowering was a major emission event and caused a large increase in emissions including a suite of compounds that had not been measured in the atmosphere before. Such biogenic emission events need to be better parameterized in models as they have significant potential to impact regional air quality since emissions increase by several factors to over an order of magnitude. In regions like the San Joaquin Valley, the mass of biogenic emissions from agricultural crops during the summer (without flowering) and the potential ozone and secondary organic aerosol formation from these emissions are on the same order as anthropogenic emissions from motor vehicles and must be considered in air quality models and secondary pollution control strategies.

  15. Non-methane volatile organic compounds predict odor emitted from five tunnel ventilated broiler sheds.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kathleen R; Parcsi, Gavin; Stuetz, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    Non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) emitted from mechanically ventilated poultry sheds in similar stages (32-36 d) of broiler production were measured by thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS), then identified using parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC2) and the NIST11 database. Calibration models predicting odor measured by dilution olfactometry from NMVOC concentrations via orthogonal projection to latent structures (O-PLS) made good predictions (Rp(2)=0.83-0.87, RMSEp=137-175OU) using one to eight NMVOCs with either one or two latent variables representing odor concentration and character, respectively. Similar changes in odorant composition were observed in each sampling campaign, with samples collected early in the day more odorous and more sulfurous than samples collected later in the day. High litter moisture favored sulfur-containing odorants over alcohols, aldehydes and ketones but had little bearing on perceived odor, whereas high bird density favored alcohols, aldehydes and ketones over sulfur-containing odorants. Eight VOCs that were important predictors of odor across all sheds in order of decreasing importance were dimethyl sulfide (DMS), dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS), 2-3 butanedione, 3-methyl-butanal, 1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, acetoin, and 2-butanone. Four additional NMVOCs also influenced perceived odor although less predictably; these were n-hexane, 2-butanol, dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), and 1-octen-3-ol. All of the odorants are associated with microbial or fungal activity in the litter and manure, except n-hexane, which may originate from hexane-extracted soybean meal in the chicken feed. The organosulfides measured in this study may have arisen from the field sites as well as from the degradation of thiols captured on sorbent tubes during analysis by TD-GC/MS. PMID:24188627

  16. The emission patterns of volatile organic compounds during aerobic bio-treatment of municipal solid waste using continuous and intermittent aeration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    He Pin-Jing; Tang Jia-Fu; Yang Na; Fang Jing-Jing; He Xiao; Shao Li-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Because volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are one of the main concerns during municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment, the release patterns and the environmental effects of VOCs were investigated during lab-scale aerobic bio-treatments of MSW with continuous and intermittent negative ventilation. When the same airflow amounts were used, intermittent ventilation was found to reduce the total VOC emissions from continuous ventilation

  17. Emissions of organo-metal compounds via the leachate and gas pathway from two differently pre-treated municipal waste materials - A landfill reactor study

    SciTech Connect

    Michalzik, B. [Institute of Geography, Georg-August University Goettingen, Unit of Landscape Ecology, Goldschmidtstrasse 5, 37073 Goettingen (Germany)], E-mail: bmichal@gwdg.de; Ilgen, G.; Hertel, F. [Bayreuth Institute of Terrestrial Ecosystem Research (BITOEK/BayCEER), Central Laboratory Unit, University of Bayreuth, Dr. Hans- Frisch-Strasse 1-3, 95448 Bayreuth (Germany); Hantsch, S.; Bilitewski, B. [Institute for Waste Management and Contaminated Site Treatment, Dresden University of Technology, Pratzschwitzer Strasse 15, 01796 Pirna (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Due to their broad industrial production and use as PVC-stabilisers, agro-chemicals and anti-fouling agents, organo-metal compounds are widely distributed throughout the terrestrial and marine biogeosphere. Here, we focused on the emission dynamics of various organo-metal compounds (e.g., di,- tri-, tetra-methyl tin, di-methyl mercury, tetra-methyl lead) from two different kinds of pre-treated mass waste, namely mechanically-biologically pre-treated municipal solid waste (MBP MSW) and municipal waste incineration ash (MWIA). In landfill simulation reactors, the emission of the organo-metal compounds via the leachate and gas pathway was observed over a period of 5 months simulating different environmental conditions (anaerobic with underlying soil layer/aerated/anaerobic). Both waste materials differ significantly in their initial amounts of organo-metal compounds and their environmental behaviour with regard to the accumulation and depletion rates within the solid material during incubation. For tri-methyl tin, the highest release rates in leachates were found in the incineration ash treatments, where anaerobic conditions in combination with underlying soil material significantly promoted its formation. Concerning the gas pathway, anaerobic conditions considerably favour the emission of organo-metal compounds (tetra-methyl tin, di-methyl mercury, tetra-methyl lead) in both the MBP material and especially in the incineration ash.

  18. Emissions of organo-metal compounds via the leachate and gas pathway from two differently pre-treated municipal waste materials -- A landfill reactor study.

    PubMed

    Michalzik, B; Ilgen, G; Hertel, F; Hantsch, S; Bilitewski, B

    2007-01-01

    Due to their broad industrial production and use as PVC-stabilisers, agro-chemicals and anti-fouling agents, organo-metal compounds are widely distributed throughout the terrestrial and marine biogeosphere. Here, we focused on the emission dynamics of various organo-metal compounds (e.g., di,- tri-, tetra-methyl tin, di-methyl mercury, tetra-methyl lead) from two different kinds of pre-treated mass waste, namely mechanically-biologically pre-treated municipal solid waste (MBP MSW) and municipal waste incineration ash (MWIA). In landfill simulation reactors, the emission of the organo-metal compounds via the leachate and gas pathway was observed over a period of 5 months simulating different environmental conditions (anaerobic with underlying soil layer/aerated/anaerobic). Both waste materials differ significantly in their initial amounts of organo-metal compounds and their environmental behaviour with regard to the accumulation and depletion rates within the solid material during incubation. For tri-methyl tin, the highest release rates in leachates were found in the incineration ash treatments, where anaerobic conditions in combination with underlying soil material significantly promoted its formation. Concerning the gas pathway, anaerobic conditions considerably favour the emission of organo-metal compounds (tetra-methyl tin, di-methyl mercury, tetra-methyl lead) in both the MBP material and especially in the incineration ash. PMID:16714103

  19. Anthropogenic emissions of highly reactive volatile organic compounds in eastern Texas inferred from oversampling of satellite (OMI) measurements of HCHO columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lei; Jacob, Daniel J.; Mickley, Loretta J.; Marais, Eloïse A.; Cohan, Daniel S.; Yoshida, Yasuko; Duncan, Bryan N.; González Abad, Gonzalo; Chance, Kelly V.

    2014-11-01

    Satellite observations of formaldehyde (HCHO) columns provide top-down constraints on emissions of highly reactive volatile organic compounds (HRVOCs). This approach has been used previously in the US to estimate isoprene emissions from vegetation, but application to anthropogenic emissions has been stymied by lack of a discernable HCHO signal. Here we show that temporal oversampling of HCHO data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) for 2005–2008 enables detection of urban and industrial plumes in eastern Texas including Houston, Port Arthur, and Dallas/Fort Worth. By spatially integrating the HCHO enhancement in the Houston plume observed by OMI we estimate an anthropogenic HCHO source of 250 ± 140 kmol h?1. This implies that anthropogenic HRVOC emissions in Houston are 4.8 ± 2.7 times higher than reported by the US Environmental Protection Agency inventory, and is consistent with field studies identifying large ethene and propene emissions from petrochemical industrial sources.

  20. From emissions to ambient mixing ratios: on-line seasonal field measurements of volatile organic compounds over a Norway spruce dominated forest in central Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourtsoukidis, E.; Williams, J.; Kesselmeier, J.; Jacobi, S.; Bonn, B.

    2013-11-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) are substantial contributors to atmospheric chemistry and physics and demonstrate the close relationship between biosphere and atmosphere. Their emission rates are highly sensitive to meteorological and environmental changes with concomitant impacts on atmospheric chemistry. We have investigated seasonal isoprenoid and oxygenated VOC (oxVOC) fluxes from a Norway spruce (Picea abies) tree in Central Germany and explored the emission responses under various atmospheric conditions. Emission rates were quantified by using dynamic branch enclosure and Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) techniques. Additionally, ambient mixing ratios were derived through application of a new box model treatment on the dynamic chamber measurements. These are compared in terms of abundance and origin with the corresponding emissions. Isoprenoids govern the BVOC emissions from Norway spruce, with monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes accounting for 50.8 ± 7.2% and 19.8 ± 8.1% respectively of the total emissions. Normalizing the VOC emission rates, we have observed a trend of reduction of carbon containing emissions from April to November, with an enhancement of oxVOC. Highest emission rates were observed in June for all measured species, with the exception of sesquiterpenes that were emitted most strongly in April. We exploit the wide range of conditions experienced at the site to filter the dataset with a combination of temperature, ozone and absolute humidity values in order to derive the emission potential and temperature dependency development for the major chemical species investigated. A profound reduction of monoterpene emission potential (E30) and temperature dependency (?) was found under low temperature regimes, combined with low ozone levels (E30MT, LTLO3=56 ± 9.1 ng g(dw)-1 h-1, ?MT,LTLO3=0.03±0.01 K-1) while a combination of both stresses was found to alter their emissions responses with respect to temperature substantially (E30MT,HTHO3=1420.1 ± 191.4 ng g(dw)-1 h-1, ?MT,HTHO3=0.15 ± 0.02 K-1). Moreover, we have explored compound relationships under different atmospheric condition sets, addressing possible co-occurrence of emissions under specific conditions. Finally, we evaluate the temperature dependent algorithm that seems to describe the temperature dependent emissions. Highest emission deviations were observed for monoterpenes and these emission fluctuations were attributed to a fraction which is triggered by an additional light dependency.

  1. Survey of volatile organic compounds associated with automotive emissions in the urban airshed of São Paulo, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colón, Maribel; Pleil, Joachim D.; Hartlage, Thomas A.; Lucia Guardani, M.; Helena Martins, M.

    The Metropolitan Region of São Paulo (MRSP), Brazil, is one of the largest metropolitan areas in the world (population 17 million, approx.) and relies heavily on alcohol-based fuels for automobiles. It is estimated that about 40% of the total volume of fuel is ethanol with some vehicles using pure ethanol and others a gasoline/ethanol blend. As such, São Paulo is an excellent example of an oxygenates-dominated airshed of mobile sources and is most likely indicative of the future in heavily populated areas in the US such as Los Angeles where "oxy-fuels" are becoming an important replacement for the conventional pure petroleum-based fuels. In this work, we surveyed the ambient air to identify and quantify the organic compounds associated with the evaporative and exhaust emissions of these fuels and to begin to understand the potential for human exposure. Because this was an initial test without detailed prior knowledge of the airshed of the area, we applied two different air sampling methods for various time periods to assess the ambient concentrations of a variety of polar and nonpolar volatile organic compounds (VOCs). For quality assurance (QA), we collected all the samples in duplicate (whole-air samples in Summa canisters and adsorbent-based samples on Perkin-Elmer Air Toxics tubes) at various flow rates to test performance. All samples were collected over identical time frames, typically for 1-, 2-, and 4-h periods per day at six different locations over a period of 1 week. Overall São Paulo results demonstrate that mean concentrations of single-ring aromatics are 2-3 times higher, volatile aldehydes are 5-10 times higher, and simple alcohols 10-100 times higher as compared to results of a recent study performed by EPA in the Los Angeles basin. C 4-C 11n-alkanes were only slightly elevated in São Paulo.

  2. Diel Variation of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound Emissions- A field Study in the Sub, Low and High Arctic on the Effect of Temperature and Light.

    PubMed

    Lindwall, Frida; Faubert, Patrick; Rinnan, Riikka

    2015-01-01

    Many hours of sunlight in the midnight sun period suggest that significant amounts of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) may be released from arctic ecosystems during night-time. However, the emissions from these ecosystems are rarely studied and limited to point measurements during daytime. We measured BVOC emissions during 24-hour periods in the field using a push-pull chamber technique and collection of volatiles in adsorbent cartridges followed by analysis with gas chromatography- mass spectrometry. Five different arctic vegetation communities were examined: high arctic heaths dominated by Salix arctica and Cassiope tetragona, low arctic heaths dominated by Salix glauca and Betula nana and a subarctic peatland dominated by the moss Warnstorfia exannulata and the sedge Eriophorum russeolum. We also addressed how climate warming affects the 24-hour emission and how the daytime emissions respond to sudden darkness. The emissions from the high arctic sites were lowest and had a strong diel variation with almost no emissions during night-time. The low arctic sites as well as the subarctic site had a more stable release of BVOCs during the 24-hour period with night-time emissions in the same range as those during the day. These results warn against overlooking the night period when considering arctic emissions. During the day, the quantity of BVOCs and the number of different compounds emitted was higher under ambient light than in darkness. The monoterpenes ?-fenchene, ? -phellandrene, 3-carene and ?-terpinene as well as isoprene were absent in dark measurements during the day. Warming by open top chambers increased the emission rates both in the high and low arctic sites, forewarning higher emissions in a future warmer climate in the Arctic. PMID:25897519

  3. Using a biological aerated filter to treat mixed water-borne volatile organic compounds and assessing its emissions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wen-Hsi

    2009-01-01

    A biological aerated filter (BAF) was evaluated as a fixed-biofilm process to remove water-borne volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a multiple layer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) manufacturing plant in southern Taiwan. The components of VOC were identified to be toluene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, bromodichloromethane and isopropanol (IPA). The full-scale BAF was constructed of two separate reactors in series, respectively, using 10- and 15-cm diameter polypropylene balls as the packing materials and a successful preliminary bench-scale experiment was performed to feasibility. Experimental results show that the BAF removed over 90% chemical oxygen demand (COD) from the influent with (1188 +/- 605) mg/L of COD. A total organic loading of 2.76 kg biochemical oxygen demand (BOD)/(m3 packing x d) was determined for the packed bed, in which the flow pattern approached that of a mixed flow. A limited VOC concentration of (0.97 +/- 0.29) ppmv (as methane) was emitted from the BAF system. Moreover, the emission rate of VOC was calculated using the proposed formula, based on an air-water mass equilibrium relationship, and compared to the simulated results obtained using the Water 9 model. Both estimation approaches of calculation and model simulation revealed that 0.1% IPA (0.0031-0.0037 kg/d) were aerated into a gaseous phase, and 30% to 40% (0.006-0.008 kg/d) of the toluene were aerated. PMID:20108681

  4. Emission of organic compounds from mould and core binders used for casting iron, aluminium and bronze in sand moulds.

    PubMed

    Tiedje, Niels; Crepaz, Rudolf; Eggert, Torben; Bey, Niki

    2010-12-01

    Emissions from mould and core sand binders commonly used in the foundry industry have been investigated. Degradation of three different types of binders was investigated: Furfuryl alcohol (FA), phenolic urethane (PU) and resol-CO2 (RC). In each group of binders, at least two different binder compositions were tested. A test method that provides uniform test conditions is described. The method can be used as a general test method to analyse off gases from binders. Moulds, containing a standard size casting, were produced and the amount and type of organic compounds, resulting from thermal degradation of binders, was monitored when cast iron, bronze and aluminium was poured in the moulds. Binder degradation was measured by collecting off gases in a specially designed ventilation hood at a constant flow rate. Samples were taken from the ventilation system and analysed for hydrocarbons and CO content. It is shown how off-gases vary with time after pouring and shake out. Also the composition of off-gases is analysed and shown. It is further shown how the composition of off-gasses varies between different types of binders and with varying composition of the binders as well as function of the thermal load on the moulding sand. PMID:20954042

  5. Real-world emissions of carbonyl compounds from in-use heavy-duty diesel trucks and diesel Back-Up Generators (BUGs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, Aniket A.; Shah, Sandip D.; Zhu, Xiaona; Miller, J. Wayne; Cocker, David R.

    Emissions of carbonyl compounds such as formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein are of interest to the scientific and regulatory communities due to their suspected or likely impacts on human health. The present work investigates emissions of carbonyl compounds from nine Class 8 heavy-duty diesel (HDD) tractors and also from nine diesel-powered backup generators (BUGs); the former were chosen because of their ubiquity as an emission source, and the latter because of their proximity to centers of human activity. The HDD tractors were operated on the ARB 4-Mode heavy heavy-duty diesel truck (HHDDT) driving cycle, while the BUGs were operated on the ISO 8178 Type D2 5-mode steady-state cycle and sampled using a mobile emissions laboratory (UCR MEL) equipped with a full-scale dilution tunnel. Samples were analyzed using the SAE930142 (Auto/Oil) method for 11 aldehydes, from formaldehyde to hexanaldehyde, and 2 ketones (acetone and methyl ethyl ketone). Although absolute carbonyl emissions varied widely by BUG, the relative contributions of the different carbonyls were similar (e.g., median: 56% for formaldehyde). A slight increasing trend with engine load was observed for relative formaldehyde contribution, but not for acetaldehyde contribution, for the BUGs. On-road per-mile carbonyl emission factors were a strong function of operating mode of the ARB HHDDT cycle, and found to decrease in the order Creep>Transient>Cruise. This order is qualitatively similar to emission factors for PAHs and n-alkanes determined for the same set of Class 8 diesel tractors in an earlier work. In general, relative carbonyl contributions for the HDD tractors were similar to those for BUGs (e.g., median: 54% for formaldehyde). These results indicate that while engine operating mode and application appear to exert a strong influence on the total absolute mass emission rate of the carbonyls measured, they do not appear to exert as strong an influence on the relative mass emission rates of individual carbonyls.

  6. Quantifying Marine Emissions of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds Using Laboratory Measurements of Plankton Monocultures and Field Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabolis, A. W.; Meskhidze, N.; Kamykowski, D.; Reed, R. E.

    2010-12-01

    Marine biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) have been suggested to contribute significant portion of the organic carbon present in ocean atmosphere. In this study emission rates of 40 different hydrocarbons are quantified for lab-grown non-axenic phytoplankton monocultures and ambient samples from the Pamlico-Neuse Estuary, NC. The outcome of environmental conditions on production of BVOCs was examined for different light and temperature conditions. These different regimes are considered proxies for physiological stress-induced effects observed in natural ecosystems. The samples were incubated in a climate controlled room; they were then transferred to smaller volumes (200 ml) for analysis. BVOCs accumulated in the water and headspace above the water were measured by bubbling hydrocarbon-free gas mixture through the sample and passing the gas stream through a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry system equipped with a sample pre-concentrator. Inside the pre-concentrator, the compounds were trapped on a sorbent material, heated, and flushed into the GC-MS column. The pre-concentrator/GC-MS system gave at least 1000 times magnification of the sample concentrations, allowing detection of low ppt levels of hydrocarbons. Here we report results for lab-grown diatoms Thalassiosira weissflogii and Thalassiosira pseudonana, prymnesiophyte Pleurochrysis carterae, and dinoflagellates Karina brevis and Procentrum minimum, as well as field samples. To make results widely usable, all the emissions are normalized to Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration and cell counts. Our results show that diatoms had the highest isoprene production rate of 2.8 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 with ranges between 1.4 and 3.6 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 at light levels between 90 and 900 ?E m-2 s-1, respectively. The prymnesiophyte and dinoflagellate species had isoprene production rates of 1.3±0.4 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 with a similar light dependency as diatoms. Field samples had comparable isoprene production rate of 3.5 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 with ranges between 0.6 and 4.1 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 for similar light levels and temperatures between 18 to 30°C. Three monoterpenes detected were ?-pinene, camphene, and d-limonene. Diatoms had the highest ?-pinene and d-limonene production rates of 0.045 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 and 0.015 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1, respectively. The prymnesiophyte species had the highest camphene production of 0.021 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1. Production rates of d-limonene and camphene did not show a well-defined light dependency, but both isoprene and ?-pinene showed an increase in terpene production with increasing light intensities. Field samples show ?-pinene, d-limonene, and camphene production rates of 0.05 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1, 0.02 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1 and 0.018 ?mol (g Chl-a)-1 h-1, respectively. Field samples acclimated at 26°C had the highest terpene production rates. This study tabulates a large number of BVOC emission rates for various phytoplankton species under diverse environmental conditions.

  7. Biogenic emissions and ambient concentrations of hydrocarbons, carbonyl compounds and organic acids from ponderosa pine and cottonwood trees at rural and forested sites in Central New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva-Fierro, Ignacio; Popp, Carl J.; Martin, Randal S.

    Direct emission rates of carbonyl compounds, carboxylic acids and hydrocarbons from Populus fremontil (cottonwood) and Pinus ponderosa (ponderosa pine) trees were studied during the summer of 1997. Ambient air concentrations of these compounds in the vicinity of the sampled trees were also identified and quantified. Study sites were Socorro, NM and Langmuir Laboratory, NM a rural and forested, high mountain site, respectively, located in Central New Mexico. A dynamic branch enclosure method was used to perform the sampling of tree emissions, that are given at standard atmospheric temperature of 303 K, and 1000 ?mol m -2 s -1 PAR. Average emission rates of acetic and formic acid, respectively, from cottonwood were 470±540 and 310±300 ng g -1 h -1 and from ponderosa pine were 170±180 and 210±210 ng g -1 h -1. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde average emission rates, respectively, from ponderosa pine were 500±400 and 250±190 ng g -1 h -1, and from cottonwood were 4070±3570 and 1190±1360 ng g -1 h -1. Cottonwood had an average isoprene emission rate of 9050±10700 ng g -1 h -1, while ponderosa pine had emission rates of ?-pinene and ?-pinene of 450±1100 and 520±1050 ng g -1 h -1, respectively. Total mass emissions of carbon compounds measured from cottonwood were four times larger than from ponderosa pine. Seasonal, diurnal, and temperature dependence of concentrations in ambient air and emission rates from trees are also discussed. Average ambient air concentrations of acetic and formic acid, respectively, were 2.7±3.8 and 0.7±0.9 ppbv for the rural site, and 1.7±2.0 and 0.6±0.5 ppbv for the mountain site. The average range of carbonyl compound concentrations in ambient air was from 0.3 to 3.4 ppbv for various carbonyl compounds with about 60% of the ambient carbonyls consisting of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acetone. Isoprene and monoterpene concentrations in ambient air were usually below the detection limit.

  8. Estimation of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from the terrestrial ecosystem in China using real-time remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Huang, X.; Li, J.; Song, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Because of the high emission intensity and reactivity, biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) play a significant role in the terrestrial ecosystems, human health, secondary pollution, global climate change and the global carbon cycle. Past estimations of BVOC emissions in China were based on outdated algorithms and limited meteorological data, and there have been significant inconsistences between the land surface parameters of dynamic models and those of BVOC estimation models, leading to large inaccuracies in the estimated results. To refine BVOC emission estimations for China and to further explore the role of BVOCs in atmospheric chemical processes, we used the latest algorithms of MEGAN (Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature) with MM5 (the Fifth-Generation Mesoscale Model) providing highly resolved meteorological data, to estimate the biogenic emissions of isoprene (C5H8) and seven monoterpene species (C10H16) in 2006. Real-time MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data were introduced to update the land surface parameters and improve the simulation performance of MM5, and to modify the influence of leaf area index (LAI) and leaf age deviation from standard conditions. In this study, the annual BVOC emissions for the whole country totaled 12.97 Tg C, a relevant value much lower than that given in global estimations but higher than the past estimations in China. Therein, the most important individual contributor was isoprene (9.36 Tg C), followed by ?-pinene (1.24 Tg C yr-1) and ?-pinene (0.84 Tg C yr-1). Due to the considerable regional disparity in plant distributions and meteorological conditions across China, BVOC emissions presented significant spatial-temporal variations. Spatially, isoprene emission was concentrated in South China, which is covered by large areas of broadleaf forests and shrubs. On the other hand, Southeast China was the top-ranking contributor of monoterpenes, in which the dominant vegetation genera consist of evergreen coniferous forests (mainly Pinus massoniana). Temporally, BVOC emissions primarily occurred in July and August during periods of high temperatures, high solar radiation and dense plant cover, with daily emissions peaking at about 13:00~14:00 hours (Beijing Time, BJT) and reaching their lowest values at night. Additionally, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of biogenic origin (14.7 Tg yr-1) were approximately one-third less than anthropogenic emissions (23.2 Tg yr-1) and showed distinct spatial distributions. We present a reasonable estimation of BVOC emissions, which provides important information for further exploration of the role of BVOCs in atmospheric processes.

  9. Surface emission determination of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from a closed industrial waste landfill using a self-designed static flux chamber.

    PubMed

    Gallego, E; Perales, J F; Roca, F J; Guardino, X

    2014-02-01

    Closed landfills can be a source of VOC and odorous nuisances to their atmospheric surroundings. A self-designed cylindrical air flux chamber was used to measure VOC surface emissions in a closed industrial landfill located in Cerdanyola del Vallès, Catalonia, Spain. The two main objectives of the study were the evaluation of the performance of the chamber setup in typical measurement conditions and the determination of the emission rates of 60 different VOC from that industrial landfill, generating a valuable database that can be useful in future studies related to industrial landfill management. Triplicate samples were taken in five selected sampling points. VOC were sampled dynamically using multi-sorbent bed tubes (Carbotrap, Carbopack X, Carboxen 569) connected to SKC AirCheck 2000 pumps. The analysis was performed by automatic thermal desorption coupled with a capillary gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry detector. The emission rates of sixty VOC were calculated for each sampling point in an effort to characterize surface emissions. To calculate average, minimum and maximum emission values for each VOC, the results were analyzed by three different methods: Global, Kriging and Tributary area. Global and Tributary area methodologies presented similar values, with total VOC emissions of 237 ± 48 and 222 ± 46 g day(-1), respectively; however, Kriging values were lower, 77 ± 17 gd ay(-1). The main contributors to the total emission rate were aldehydes (nonanal and decanal), acetic acid, ketones (acetone), aromatic hydrocarbons and alcohols. Most aromatic hydrocarbon (except benzene, naphthalene and methylnaphthalenes) and aldehyde emission rates exhibited strong correlations with the rest of VOC of their family, indicating a possible common source of these compounds. B:T ratio obtained from the emission rates of the studied landfill suggested that the factors that regulate aromatic hydrocarbon distributions in the landfill emissions are different from the ones from urban areas. Environmental conditions (atmospheric pressure, temperature and relative humidity) did not alter the pollutant emission fluxes. PMID:24176707

  10. The contribution of vehicular emission to the atmospheric concentrations of carbon compounds in the Metropolitan Area of Sao Paulo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, M.; Fornaro, A.; Miranda, R.; Ynoue, R. Y.; Freitas, E. D.; LAPAt-Laboratorio de Analise dos Processos Atmosfericos

    2013-05-01

    It is recognized that megacities have regional and global effects on climate, and that aerosols and Green House Gases (GHG) constitute the principal tracer of those effects. Such is the case in the Metropolitan Area of Sao Paulo (MASP), one of the largest mega-cities in the world. MASP has a population of almost 20 million inhabitants. The main source of air pollution is the transport sector. In this region, there are approximately 6.5 million passenger cars and commercial vehicles: 85% light duty, 3% heavy-duty diesel vehicles (diesel + 3% bio-diesel) and 12% motorcycles. Of the light duty vehicle, approximately 55% burn a mixture (v/v) of 78% gasoline with 22% ethanol (referred to as gasohol), 4% use hydrated ethanol (95% ethanol + 5% water), 38% flexible fuel vehicles capable of burning both gasohol as hydrated ethanol, and 2% use diesel. In average 50% of the fuel used in MASP is ethanol what brings the necessity of more studies to understand the formation of photochemical oxidants and secondary particles. According to the São Paulo State Environmental Protection Agency, 97% of carbon monoxide (CO), 85% of hydrocarbons (HC), 82% of nitrogen oxides (NOx), 36% of sulfur dioxide emitted, and 36% of all inhalable particulate matter (PM10) are emitted by the vehicular fleet. Concerning particles, 75% of the Fine Particle Concentration is related to the burning of fuel, mainly diesel. The fine particles are composed of Organic Carbon (40%), Black Carbon (30%), ions (15%) and metals. It is known that the soot is warming the climate and is important to the radiative balance. Another important driver to the radiative balance, the CO2 is mainly emitted by the transport sector, which is responsible for 57% of its emission. A comprehensive project under development has the objective of determine the role of MASP as the source of gaseous and particle compounds to the atmosphere of the region and in a mesoscale perspective. The project with funding from the São Paulo Science Foundation, called NARROWING THE UNCERTAINTIES ON AEROSOL AND CLIMATE CHANGES IN SÃO PAULO STATE - NUANCE-SPS, comprising various subprojects, employ measurements and modeling to study gaseous and particles in the atmosphere: sources; evolution in the atmosphere; formation of secondary particles; deposition; and potential impact on the climate and human health. Ground-based and vertical profile measurements are being performed (in situ, ozonesondes and LIDAR). Emission inventory is being elaborated based on the measurements of emission factors from the vehicular fleet. The formation of ozone and fine particles is being modeled with the WRF-Chem (weather and research forecast with chemistry) model. The influence of the megacity emission to the concentration of the secondary pollutants is being evaluated and correlated to health impacts.

  11. Using IASI and MIPAS in combination to characterise CO and other volatile organic compound emissions from fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, David; Sembhi, Harjinder; Remedios, John; Tereszchuk, Keith

    2013-04-01

    Short-lived species emitted from wildfires, such as carbon monoxide (CO) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), carry a lot of information on atmospheric processes relating to chemistry, convection and emission. These disruptive events are indirectly a climatological feature of the Earth's atmosphere and its climate response and occur at sufficient frequency to make studying and understanding biomass plume chemistry vital. Accurate measurement of trace gases from these events will also aid improvements in climate/chemistry models. In this study, we utilise IASI, MIPAS and ACE data to derive wildfire emissions of VOCs, in the context of two periods; the early 2009 Black Saturday fires and the BORTAS campaign fires. Using the complementary viewing angles of IASI (nadir) and MIPAS/ACE (limb), results will be shown which illustrate observations of aged plume composition, chemistry, distribution and area along with information about vertical distribution. The Black Saturday fires were a particularly severe event over South-Eastern Australia which burnt an area of 450,000 km2, with up to 400 individual fires being identified on February 7th 2009 alone. Driven by weeks of little or no rainfall and record-breaking temperatures, we show that the plumes from this event, contained enhanced VOC amounts and mixed within the lower stratosphere, reaching altitudes up to 18 km. Enhancement ratios, using CO as a reference, show potential secondary formation of HCOOH within the plume. We are able to track the evolution of the plume with IASI data for up to 20 days after the initial event. The second case study is comparison to results from a recent aircraft campaign over North America in July/August 2011 (BORTAS). The NERC-funded campaign was dedicated to studying the impact of local pollution events over North America and aged plumes originated from Asia and Siberia. In the context of the campaign aims, we investigated CO, VOC chemistry and aerosol signatures in boreal biomass plumes. The most significant event was a series of fires over North-west Ontario which we show released a significant quantity of CO and formic acid. The validation of IASI formic acid from this event with in-situ data is particularly good. We also derive the time-evolution of a variety of VOCs (including PAN) within aged plumes, using comparisons of MIPAS and ACE data. These plumes originate from both the boreal forests of North America and Siberia, and show excellent agreement between these independent datasets. Particularly large enhancements of PAN were discovered from Siberian forest fires in late July 2011.

  12. Particulate Matter Sampling and Volatile Organic Compound Removal for Characterization of Spark Ignited Direct Injection Engine Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Matthias, Nick; Farron, Carrie; Foster, David E.; Andrie, Mike; Krieger, Roger; Najt, Paul; Narayanaswamy, Kushal; Solomon, Arun; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2012-01-01

    More stringent emissions regulations are continually being proposed to mitigate adverse human health and environmental impacts of internal combustion. With that in mind, it has been proposed that vehicular particulate matter (PM) emissions should be regulated based on particle number in addition to particle mass. One aspect of this project is to study different sample handling methods for number based aerosol measurements, specifically, two different methods for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from an aerosol sample. One method is a Dekati Thermodenuder (TD) and the other is an evaporative chamber/diluter (EvCh). These sample handling methods have been implemented for this project in an engine test cell built around a direct injection spark ignited (DISI) engine. The engine was designed for stoichiometric, homogeneous combustion. Direct injection is of particular interest for improved fuel efficiency but this comes with the production of a significant amount of (PM) and may therefore be subject to the proposed number based regulation. Another aspect of this project is to characterize PM from this engine in terms of particle number and composition. The first interesting observation is that PM number distributions, acquired using a TSI SMPS, have a large accumulation mode (30-294 nm) but a very small nuclei mode (8-30 nm). This is understood to represent a lack of condensation particles meaning that neither the exhaust conditions nor the sample handling conditions are conducive to condensation. This lack of nuclei mode does not, however, represent a lack of VOCs in the sample. It has been observed, using mass spectral analysis (limited to PM>50 nm), that PM from the DISI engine has approximately 40% organic content through varying operating conditions. This begs the question of how effective different sample handling methods are at removing these VOCs. For one specific operating condition, called Cold Start, the un-treated PM was 40% organic. The TD reduced this by 7% while the EvCh reduced it by 13%. For other operating conditions, PM treated for volatile removal actually exhibited an increase in organic fraction on the order of 5%. This addition appears to be sensitive to the gaseous hydrocarbon concentrations in the exhaust although a precise correlation has not yet been derived. It has been concluded that VOCs are tightly bound to the PM carbon core and thus are not effectively removed by either treatment method.

  13. Air pollutant emissions from on-road vehicles in China, 1999-2011.

    PubMed

    Lang, Jianlei; Cheng, Shuiyuan; Zhou, Ying; Zhang, Yonglin; Wang, Gang

    2014-10-15

    The on-road vehicular emission in China from 1999 to 2011 was estimated, based on the emission factors of vehicles with different emission standards calculated by the COPERT model. The CO, NMVOC, NOX, BC and OC emissions changed from 19.7 Tg, 4.4 Tg, 2.3 Tg, 47.1 Gg and 74.4 Gg in 1999 to 32.7 Tg, 4.1 Tg, 7.6 Tg, 177.6 Gg and 101.5 Gg in 2011, respectively. The general trend for CO, NOX and BC was increasing, while the tendency for NMVOC and OC was firstly increase before 2002 and then decrease from 2003. The spatial analysis results showed that high emissions occurred in developed provinces (Guangdong, Shandong, Hebei, Jiangsu and Henan). The correlation between vehicular emissions and GDP were further investigated and good linear correlation was found. The not-obvious change of the inter-annual (1999-2011) fitted straight line slope and the sustained increasing emissions for NOX and BC suggested that the challenge of mitigating vehicular NOX and BC emissions is severe in China. The contribution from different vehicle types was also analyzed. Passenger car (PC) and motorcycle (MC) was the main contributor to the CO and NMVOC emissions. However, the contribution ratio of MC was decreasing from 36.6% and 68.8% in 1999 to 15.7% and 25.7% in 2011. Heavy duty truck (HDT) was the dominant contributor to NOX, BC and OC, with proportions of 58.9%, 57.6% and 52.8% in 2011, respectively. In addition, the uncertainty of the estimated emissions was also assessed based on the Monte Carlo simulation. PMID:25051424

  14. Observations and models of emissions of volatile terpenoid compounds from needles of ponderosa pine trees growing in situ: control by light, temperature and stomatal conductance.

    PubMed

    Harley, Peter; Eller, Allyson; Guenther, Alex; Monson, Russell K

    2014-09-01

    Terpenoid emissions from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa subsp. scopulorum) were measured in Colorado, USA over two growing seasons to evaluate the role of incident light, needle temperature, and stomatal conductance in controlling emissions of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) and several monoterpenes. MBO was the dominant daylight terpenoid emission, comprising on average 87% of the total flux, and diurnal variations were largely determined by light and temperature. During daytime, oxygenated monoterpenes (especially linalool) comprised up to 75% of the total monoterpenoid flux from needles. A significant fraction of monoterpenoid emissions was dependent on light and 13CO2 labeling studies confirmed de novo production. Thus, modeling of monoterpenoid emissions required a hybrid model in which a significant fraction of emissions was dependent on both light and temperature, while the remainder was dependent on temperature alone. Experiments in which stomata were forced to close using abscisic acid demonstrated that MBO and a large fraction of the monoterpene flux, presumably linalool, could be limited at the scale of seconds to minutes by stomatal conductance. Using a previously published model of terpenoid emissions, which explicitly accounts for the physicochemical properties of emitted compounds, we were able to simulate these observed stomatal effects, whether induced experimentally or arising under naturally fluctuation conditions of temperature and light. This study shows unequivocally that, under naturally occurring field conditions, de novo light-dependent monoterpenes comprise a significant fraction of emissions in ponderosa pine. Differences between the monoterpene composition of ambient air and needle emissions imply a significant non-needle emission source enriched in ?-3-carene. PMID:25015120

  15. Observations and models of emissions of volatile terpenoid compounds from needles of ponderosa pine trees growing in situ: Controls by light, temperature and stomatal conductance

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, P.; Eller, Allyson; Guenther, Alex B.; Monson, Russell K.

    2014-07-14

    Terpenoid emissions from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa subsp. scopulorum) were measured in Colorado, USA over two growing seasons to evaluate the role of incident light, needle temperature and stomatal conductance in controlling emissions of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) and several monoterpenes. MBO was the dominant daylight terpenoid emission, comprising on average 87% of the total flux, and diurnal variations were largely determined by light and temperature. During daytime, oxygenated monoterpenes (especially linalool) comprised up to 75% of the total monoterpenoid flux from needles. A significant fraction of monoterpenoid emissions was light dependent and 13CO2 labeling studies confirmed de novo production. Thus, modeling of monoterpenoid emissions required a hybrid model in which a significant fraction of emissions was dependent on both light and temperature, while the remainder was dependent on temperature alone. Experiments in which stomata were forced to close using abscisic acid demonstrated that MBO and a large fraction of the monoterpene flux, presumably linalool, could be limited at the scale of seconds to minutes by stomatal conductance. Using a previously published model of terpenoid emissions which explicitly accounts for the physico-chemical properties of emitted compounds, we are able to simulate these observed stomatal effects, whether induced through experimentation or arising under naturally fluctuation conditions of temperature and light. This study shows unequivocally that, under naturally occurring field conditions, de novo light dependent monoterpenes can comprise a large fraction of emissions. Differences between the monoterpene composition of ambient air and needle emissions imply a significant non-needle emission source enriched in ?-3-carene.

  16. Exposure to volatile organic compounds for individuals with occupations associated with potential exposure to motor vehicle exhaust and\\/or gasoline vapor emissions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wan-Kuen Jo; Ki-Berm Song

    2001-01-01

    Workers who work near volatile organic compounds (VOCs) source(s), motor vehicle exhausts and\\/or gasoline vapor emissions, are suspected to be exposed to highly-elevated VOC levels during their work-time. This study confirmed this suspicion and evaluated the work-time exposure VOCs for traffic police officers, parking garage attendants, service station attendants, roadside storekeepers and underground storekeepers, by measuring the concentrations of six

  17. Implementation and evaluation of a comprehensive emission model for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieser, Johannes; Aulinger, Armin; Matthias, Volker; Quante, Markus

    2010-05-01

    Crucial input data sets for Chemical Transport Models (CTM) are the meteorological fields and the emissions data. While there are several publicly available meteorological models, the situation for European emission models is still different. European emissions data either lack spatial and temporal resolution, only cover specific countries or are proprietary and not free to use. In this work the US EPA emission model SMOKE (Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions) has been successfully adapted and partially extended to create European emissions input for CTMs. The modified version of the SMOKE emission model (SMOKE/E) uses official and publicly available data sets and statistics to create emissions of CO, NOx, SO2, NH3, PM2.5, PM10, NMVOC. Currently it supports VOC splits for several photochemical mechanisms, namely CB4, CB5 and RADM2. PM2.5 is split into elemental carbon, organic carbon, sulfate, nitrate and other particles. Additionally emissions of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) have been modelled with SMOKE Europe. The temporal resolution of the emissions is one hour, the horizontal resolution is up to 1x1 km². SMOKE/E also implements plume in grid calculations for vertical distribution of point sources. The vertical resolution is infinitely variable and is implemented in the form of pressure levels. The area covered by the emission model at this point is Europe and it's surrounding countries, including north Africa and parts of Asia. Thus far SMOKE Europe has been used to create European emissions on a 54x54km² grid covering the whole of Europe and a 18x18km² nested grid over the North and Baltic Sea for the years 1990-2006. The currently implemented datasets allow for the calculation of emissions between 1970-2010. Besides this future emissions scenarios for the timespan 2010-2020 are being calculated using the EMEP projections. The created emissions have been statistically compared to the gridded EMEP emissions as well as to data from other emission models for the base years 2000 and 2001. The 54x54km² emissions data for 2000 were used as input for the CMAQ4.6 CTM and the calculated air concentrations were compared to EMEP measurements in Europe. Statistical comparison of Ozone and three particulate species (NH4,NO3,SO4) showed that SMOKE/E performs very good under the tested circumstances. O3 : (NMB 0.71) (SD 0.68) (F2 0.83) (CORR 0.55) using 48 Stations (hourly) NH4: (NMB 0.25) (SD 1.01) (F2 0.55) (CORR 0.53) using 8 Stations (daily) NO3: (NMB 0.42) (SD 0.60) (F2 0.40) (CORR 0.45) using 7 Stations (daily) SO4: (NMB 0.34) (SD 0.84) (F2 0.65) (CORR 0.55) using 21 Stations (daily) Abbreviations: Normalized Mean Bias (NMB), Standard Deviation (SD), Factor of 2 (F2), Correlation (CORR). The calculated air concentrations were compared with CMAQ runs using two purchased emissions datasets. It could be shown that the modified SMOKE model produces results comparable to those of commonly used European emissions data sets. For the future it is planed to implement emissions of heavy metals and polyfluorinated compounds into the SMOKE Europe model.

  18. Experimental study of effect of nitrogenous compounds in fuel on the emission of oxides of nitrogen from gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Svinukhov, V.P.; Filippova, E.M.

    1987-11-01

    Results of a study are presented on the relation between the output of nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide in the exhaust gas of a gas turbine and the combined nitrogen content of the fuel to which organic nitrogen compounds, including piperidine, pyridine, and analine, have been added. The exhaust gases were analyzed continuously for nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and unburnt hydrocarbons. Nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide were assessed by chemiluminescence analysis. The nitrogen compounds used were selected because of the presence of similar high molecular structure compounds in petroleum and cracking distillates and also in coal liquefaction products.

  19. Differences in source emission rates of volatile organic compounds in inner-city residences of New York City and Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Sax, Sonja N; Bennett, Deborah H; Chillrud, Steven N; Kinney, Patrick L; Spengler, John D

    2004-01-01

    The Toxics Exposure Assessment Columbia-Harvard (TEACH) Project characterized personal, indoor, and outdoor concentrations of a suite of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for high school students living in New York City (NYC) and Los Angeles (LA). This paper presents the analysis of VOC measurements collected indoors and outdoors for 46 students' homes in NYC and for 41 students' homes in LA across two seasons. Dual-sorbent thermal desorption tubes were used for the collection of 15 VOCs and C(18) 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine-coated cartridges were used for the collection of seven aldehydes. Air-exchange rates (AERs) were also measured using a perfluorocarbon tracer gas method. The AERs were lower in the winter in both cities, averaging 1 h(-1) in NYC and 1.4 h(-1) in LA, compared with 1.8 h(-1) in NYC in the summer and 2.5 h(-1) in LA in the fall. Higher AERs were generally associated with lower indoor-outdoor ratios with significant differences for the compounds with indoor sources, including chloroform, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, and formaldehyde. Using a mass-balance model to account for AER and other housing parameters, effective source emission rates (SER) were calculated for each compound. Based on I/O ratios and source emission rates, VOCs could be divided into: (1). indoor-source-influenced compounds, (2). those with contributions from both indoor and outdoor sources, and (3). those with mostly outdoor sources. Significant indoor sources were found for the following six compounds (mean emission rates presented): chloroform (0.11 mg/h), 1,4-dichlorobenzene (19 mg/h), formaldehyde (5 mg/h), acetaldehyde (2 mg/h), benzaldehyde (0.6 mg/h), and hexaldehyde (2 mg/h). Although chloroform had variable I/O ratios across seasons, SERs, which accounted for AER, were similar in both cities for both seasons (e.g., LA means 0.12 and 0.11 mg/h in winter and fall, respectively). Formaldehyde had substantially higher indoor emission rates in the summer in NYC compared to winter (3.8 vs. 1.6 mg/h) but lower in the fall in LA compared to winter (4.3 vs. 5.0 mg/h). Uncertainty analysis determined that source strength calculations were not sensitive to measurement error for a subset of homes in LA. PMID:15118751

  20. and Uncertainty in Stationary Natural Gas-fueled Internal Combustion Engine NOx and Total Organic Compounds Emission Factors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Christopher Frey

    Quantitative methods for characterizing both variability and uncertainty are applied to case studies of emission factors for stationary natural gas-fueled internal combustion engines. NOx and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) emission data sets for lean burn engines were analyzed. Data were available for uncontrolled engines and for engines with pre-combustion chamber (PCC) and \\

  1. GAS-PHASE MASS TRANSFER MODEL FOR PREDICTING VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) EMISSION RATES FROM INDOOR POLLUTANT SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analysis of the impact of sources on indoor pollutant concentrations and occupant exposure to indoor pollutants requires knowledge of the emission rates from the sources. Emission rates are often determined by chamber testing and the data from the chamber test are fitted to an em...

  2. Estimation of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from the terrestrial ecosystem in China using real-time remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Huang, X.; Li, J.; Song, Y.

    2012-03-01

    Because of the high emission rate and reactivity, biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) play a significant role in the terrestrial ecosystems, human health, secondary pollution, global climate change and the global carbon cycle. Past estimations of BVOC emissions in China were based on outdated algorithms and coarsely resolved meteorological data, and there have been significant inconsistences between the land surface parameters of dynamic models and those of BVOC estimation models, leading to large inaccuracies in the estimated results. To refine BVOC emission estimations for China and to further explore the role of BVOCs in the atmosphere, we used the latest algorithms of MEGAN (Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature), with MM5 (the Fifth-Generation Mesoscale Model) providing highly resolved meteorological data, to estimate the biogenic emissions of isoprene (C5H8) and seven monoterpene species (C10H16) in 2006. Real-time MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data were introduced to update the land surface parameters and to improve the simulation performance of MM5, and to determine the influence of leaf area index (LAI) and leaf age deviation from standard conditions. In this study, the annual BVOC emissions for the whole country totaled 12.97 Tg C, a relevant value compared with past studies. Therein, the most important individual contributor was isoprene (9.36 Tg C yr-1), followed by ?-pinene (1.24 Tg C yr-1) and ?-pinene (0.84 Tg C yr-1). Due to the considerable regional disparity in plant distributions and meteorological conditions across China, BVOC emissions presented significant spatial and temporal variations. Spatially, isoprene emission was concentrated in South China, which is covered by large areas of broadleaf forests and shrubs. While Southeast China was the top-ranking contributor of monoterpenes, in which the dominant vegetation genera consist of evergreen coniferous forests. Temporally, BVOC emissions primarily occurred in July and August, with daily emissions peaking at about 13:00∼14:00 h (Beijing Time, BJT). In this study, we present an improved estimation of BVOC emissions, which provides important information for further exploration of the role of BVOCs in atmospheric processes.

  3. BIOGENIC VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS (BVOCS) II. LANDSCAPE FLUX POTENTIALS FROM THREE CONTINENTAL SITES IN THE U.S.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landscape flux potentials for biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) were derived for three ecosystems in the continental U. S. (Fernbank Forest, Atlanta, GA; Willow Creek, Rhinelander, WI; Temple Ridge, CO). Analytical data from branch enclosure measurements reported in a ...

  4. SEASONAL AND ANNUAL MODELING OF REDUCED NITROGEN COMPOUNDS OVER THE EASTERN UNITED STATES: EMISSIONS, AMBIENT LEVELS, AND DEPOSITION AMOUNTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detailed description of the distributions and seasonal trends of atmospheric nitrogen compounds is of considerable interest given their role in formation of acidic substances, tropospheric ozone and particulate matter and nutrient loading effects resulting from their deposition t...

  5. Quantifying the uncertainty in simulating global tropospheric composition due to the variability in global emission estimates of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. E.; van Velthoven, P. F. J.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.

    2012-11-01

    The emission of organic compounds from biogenic processes acts as an important source of trace gases in remote regions away from urban conurbations, and is likely to become more important in future decades due to the further mitigation of anthropogenic emissions that affect air quality and climate forcing. In this study we examine the contribution of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) towards global tropospheric composition using the global 3-D chemistry transport model TM5 and the recently developed modified CB05 chemical mechanism. By comparing regional BVOC emission estimates we show that biogenic processes act as dominant sources for many regions and exhibit a large variability in the annually and seasonally integrated emission fluxes. By performing sensitivity studies we find that the contribution of BVOC species containing between 1 to 3 carbon atoms has an impact on the resident mixing ratios of tropospheric O3 and CO, accounting for ~3% and ~11% of the simulated global distribution, respectively. This is approximately a third of the cumulative effect introduced by isoprene and the monoterpenes. By examining an ensemble of 3-D global chemistry-transport simulations which adopt different global BVOC emission inventories we determine the associated uncertainty introduced towards simulating the composition of the troposphere for the year 2000. By comparing the model ensemble values against a~composite of atmospheric measurements we show that the effects on tropospheric O3 are limited to the lower troposphere (with an uncertainty between -2% to 10%), whereas that for tropospheric CO extends up to the upper troposphere (with an uncertainty of between 10 to 45%). Comparing the mixing ratios for low molecular weight alkenes in TM5 against surface measurements taken in Europe implies that the cumulative emission estimates are too low, regardless of the chosen BVOC inventory. This variability in the global distribution of CO due to BVOC emissions introduces an associated uncertainty in the tropospheric CO burden of ~11%, which impacts strongly on the oxidative capacity of the troposphere, introducing an uncertainty in the atmospheric lifetime of the greenhouse gas CH4 of ~3%. This study thus identifies the necessity of placing further constraints on non-CH4 global biogenic emission estimates in large-scale global atmospheric chemistry models.

  6. Quantifying the uncertainty in simulating global tropospheric composition due to the variability in global emission estimates of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. E.; van Velthoven, P. F. J.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.

    2013-03-01

    The emission of organic compounds from biogenic processes acts as an important source of trace gases in remote regions away from urban conurbations, and is likely to become more important in future decades due to the further mitigation of anthropogenic emissions that affect air quality and climate forcing. In this study we examine the contribution of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) towards global tropospheric composition using the global 3-D chemistry transport model TM5 and the recently developed modified CB05 chemical mechanism. By comparing regional BVOC emission estimates we show that biogenic processes act as dominant sources for many regions and exhibit a large variability in the annually and seasonally integrated emission fluxes. By performing sensitivity studies we find that the contribution of BVOC species containing between 1 to 3 carbon atoms has an impact on the resident mixing ratios of tropospheric O3 and CO, accounting for ~2.5% and ~10.8% of the simulated global distribution, respectively. This is approximately a third of the cumulative effect introduced by isoprene and the monoterpenes. By examining an ensemble of 3-D global chemistry transport simulations which adopt different global BVOC emission inventories we determine the associated uncertainty introduced towards simulating the composition of the troposphere for the year 2000. By comparing the model ensemble values against a composite of atmospheric measurements we show that the effects on tropospheric O3 are limited to the lower troposphere (with an uncertainty between -2% to 10%), whereas that for tropospheric CO extends up to the upper troposphere (with an uncertainty of between 10 to 45%). Comparing the mixing ratios for low molecular weight alkenes in TM5 against surface measurements taken in Europe implies that the cumulative emission estimates are too low, regardless of the chosen BVOC inventory. This variability in the global distribution of CO due to BVOC emissions introduces an associated uncertainty in the tropospheric CO burden of 11.4%, which impacts strongly on the oxidative capacity of the troposphere, introducing an uncertainty in the atmospheric lifetime of the greenhouse gas CH4 of ~3.3%. This study thus identifies the necessity of placing further constraints on non-CH4 global biogenic emission estimates in large-scale global atmospheric chemistry models.

  7. Design and performance of a direct-reading, multichannel spectrometer for the determination of chlorinated purgeable organic compounds by flame infrared-emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kubala, S W; Tilotta, D C; Busch, M A; Busch, K W

    1991-06-01

    The feasibility of determining chlorinated, purgeable organic compounds (POCs) in aqueous samples by flame infrared-emission (FIRE) spectrometry was evaluated with a specially designed, multichannel, dispersive spectrometer having sufficient resolving power to prevent interference from large amounts of non-halogenated POCs that could also be present in the sample. The polychromator was based on a Czerny-Turner optical mounting with a 0.15-m focal length, a nominal focal ratio of f/3, and a reciprocal linear dispersion of 0.15 mum/mm in the first order. The HCl and CO(2) infrared emission bands (3.77 and 4.42 mum, respectively) were monitored in two analytical channels, while a third reference channel, used for background subtraction, monitored the H(2)O background emission at 2.8 mum. Instrumental performance was evaluated with dichloromethane, trichloromethane, trichloroethylene, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane and monochlorobenzene as test compounds, and parameters such as the linear dynamic range, reproducibility, detection limit and signal-to-noise ratio, and extent of spectral crosstalk between channels were determined. The feasibility of performing a quantitative analysis of a two-component mixture of dichloromethane and trichloromethane at trace levels was demonstrated. PMID:18965190

  8. Measurements of volatile organic compounds at a suburban ground site (T1) in Mexico City during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign: measurement comparison, emission ratios, and source attribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bon, D. M.; Ulbrich, I. M.; de Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Kuster, W. C.; Alexander, M. L.; Baker, A.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Blake, D.; Fall, R.; Jimenez, J. L.; Herndon, S. C.; Huey, L. G.; Knighton, W. B.; Ortega, J.; Springston, S.; Vargas, O.

    2011-03-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) mixing ratios were measured with two different instruments at the T1 ground site in Mexico City during the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign in March of 2006. A gas chromatograph with flame ionization detector (GC-FID) quantified 18 light alkanes, alkenes and acetylene while a proton-transfer-reaction ion-trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS) quantified 12 VOC species including oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) and aromatics. A GC separation system was used in conjunction with the PIT-MS (GC-PIT-MS) to evaluate PIT-MS measurements and to aid in the identification of unknown VOCs. The VOC measurements are also compared to simultaneous canister samples and to two independent proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometers (PTR-MS) deployed on a mobile and an airborne platform during MILAGRO. VOC diurnal cycles demonstrate the large influence of vehicle traffic and liquid propane gas (LPG) emissions during the night and photochemical processing during the afternoon. Emission ratios for VOCs and OVOCs relative to CO are derived from early-morning measurements. Average emission ratios for non-oxygenated species relative to CO are on average a factor of ~2 higher than measured for US cities. Emission ratios for OVOCs are estimated and compared to literature values the northeastern US and to tunnel studies in California. Positive matrix factorization analysis (PMF) is used to provide insight into VOC sources and processing. Three PMF factors were distinguished by the analysis including the emissions from vehicles, the use of liquid propane gas and the production of secondary VOCs + long-lived species. Emission ratios to CO calculated from the results of PMF analysis are compared to emission ratios calculated directly from measurements. The total PIT-MS signal is summed to estimate the fraction of identified versus unidentified VOC species.

  9. New insights into halocarbon emissions in boreal regions: Forest fires and Alberta oil sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, I. J.; Barletta, B.; Meinardi, S.; Marrero, J.; Rowland, F. S.; Akagi, S. K.; Yokelson, R. J.; Blake, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Boreal forest fires and Alberta oil sands represent two major co-located trace gas emission sources within the boreal ecosystem. During the airborne ARCTAS mission in summer 2008, UC-Irvine performed the most comprehensive characterization of halocarbon emissions from boreal forest fires to date. In summer 2008 and 2010 we also performed the first independent characterizations of halocarbon emissions from Alberta's oil sands industry. In both cases the measurements were made using whole air sampling followed by gas chromatography analysis using electron capture detection and mass spectrometer detection. In the case of boreal forest fires, of 26 speciated halocarbons that were measured, only the simplest halocarbons were emitted from the fires (CH3Cl, CH3Br, CH3I, 1,2-C2H4Cl2, C2H5Cl and CH2Br2) (Simpson et al., 2011). These compounds were released in relatively small quantities and together they represented <0.3% of the total carbon released from boreal forest fires in the form of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs). Even though CH3Cl was the most abundantly emitted halocarbon, its average global emission from boreal forest fires (0.011 ± 0.003 Tg yr-1) was very small compared to its global source budget. The poly-chlorinated compounds CH2Cl2, CHCl3 and CH3CCl3 were not released from the fires. In the case of the Alberta oil sands, based on airborne measurements during the ARCTAS mission, 15 of 26 measured halocarbons were statistically enhanced over the oil sands compared to local background values (Simpson et al., 2010). The short-lived solvents C2HCl3, C2Cl4, C2H5Cl and CHCl3 were the most strongly enhanced halocarbons, with maximum values that were 1.5-34× the local background. A subsequent ground-based study in 2010 detected even stronger halocarbon enhancements downwind of upgraders and tailings sand at the oil sands surface mining sites. For example C2HCl3 and CHBrCl2 mixing ratios were up to 60-85× the local background values. Long-lived halocarbons such as HFC-152a, HFC-134a, HCFC-142b and HCFC-22 were also elevated downwind of the mining and upgrading operations. Together these results suggest that boreal forest fires are a relatively minor halocarbon source, and that halocarbon emissions from the Alberta oil sands industry require further investigation.

  10. Emission of odorous volatile organic compounds from a municipal manure treatment plant and their removal using a biotrickling filter.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Jun; Wu, Yan-Di; Zhang, Yan-Li; Zeng, Pei-Yuan; Tu, Xiang; Xu, Mei-Ying; Sun, Guo-Ping

    2015-04-01

    Odorous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from municipal manure treatment facilities are considered as a major nuisance issue for operators and nearby residents. In this study, up to 71 odorous VOCs were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry at the manure treatment plant. These compounds can be classified into five different categories, including alkanes, olefins, aromatics, volatile organosulphur compounds and terpenes. Toluene, dimethyl disulphide, dimethyl sulphide, xylene and ethylbenzene were the five most abundant pollutants. A pilot-scale biotrickling filter (BTF) was employed to treat the complex odorous gases. Correlation analysis showed that the removal efficiency (RE) of the BTF was related with the molecular weight and chemical structure of contaminants. Higher than 85% of REs could be reached for aromatic, terpenes and most alkanes compounds after 180 days of operation. Comparatively, most olefins and partial alkanes compounds with a molecular weight lower than 70 were not removed easily. The REs of these compounds ranged from 0% to 94%, and the average removal efficiency (RE) was only about 33.3%. PMID:25300536

  11. Trends in multi-pollutant emissions from a technology-linked inventory for India: I. Industry and transport sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadavarte, Pankaj; Venkataraman, Chandra

    2014-12-01

    Emissions estimation, for research and regulatory applications including reporting to international conventions, needs treatment of detailed technology divisions and high-emitting technologies. Here we estimate Indian emissions, for 1996-2015, of aerosol constituents (PM2.5, BC and OC) and precursor gas SO2, ozone precursors (CO, NOx, NMVOC and CH4) and greenhouse gases (CO2 and N2O), using a common fuel consumption database and consistent assumptions. Six source categories and 45 technologies/activities in the industry and transport sectors were used for estimating emissions for 2010. Mean emission factors, developed at the source-category level, were used with corresponding fuel consumption data, available for 1996-2011, projected to 2015. New activities were included to account for fugitive emissions of NMVOC from chemical and petrochemical industries. Dynamic emission factors, reflecting changes in technology-mix and emission regulations, were developed for thermal power plants and on-road transport vehicles. Modeled emission factors were used for gaseous pollutants for on-road vehicles. Emissions of 2.4 (0.6-7.5) Tg y-1 PM2.5, 0.23 (0.1-0.7) Tg y-1 BC, 0.15 (0.04-0.5) Tg y-1 OC, 7.3 (6-10) Tg y-1 SO2, 19 (7.5-33) Tg y-1 CO, 1.5 (0.1-9) Tg y-1 CH4, 4.3 (2-9) Tg y-1 NMVOC, 5.6 (1.7-15.9) Tg y-1 NOx, 1750 (1397-2231) Tg y-1 CO2 and 0.13 (0.05-0.3) Tg y-1 N2O were estimated for 2015. Significant emissions of aerosols and their precursors were from coal use in thermal power and industry (PM2.5 and SO2), and on-road diesel vehicles (BC), especially superemitters. Emissions of ozone precursors were largely from thermal power plants (NOx), on-road gasoline vehicles (CO and NMVOC) and fugitive emissions from mining (CH4). Highly uncertain default emission factors were the principal contributors to uncertainties in emission estimates, indicating the need for region specific measurements.

  12. Analysis of accumulation, extractability, and metabolization of five different phenylarsenic compounds in plants by ion chromatography with mass spectrometric detection and by atomic emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Anne-Christine; Kutschera, Kristin; Mattusch, Jürgen; Otto, Matthias

    2008-12-01

    Phenylated arsenic compounds occur as highly toxic contaminants in former military areas where they were formed as degradation products of chemical warfare agents. Some phenylarsenic compounds such as roxarsone and aminophenylarsonic acids were applied as food additive and veterinary drugs in stock-breeding and therefore pose an environmental risk in agricultural used sites. Very few data exist in the literature concerning uptake and effects of phenylarsenic compounds in plants growing on contaminated soils. In this study, the accumulation, extractability, and metabolization of five different phenylarsenic compounds, phenylarsonic acid, p- and o-aminophenylarsonic acid, phenylarsine oxide, and 3-nitro-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid called roxarsone, by the terrestrial plant Tropaeolum majus were investigated. Ion chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to differentiate these arsenic compounds, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy was used for total arsenic quantification. All compounds considered were taken up by the roots and transferred to stalks, leaves, and flowers. The strongest accumulation was observed for unsubstituted phenylarsonic acid followed by its trivalent analogue phenylarsine oxide that was mostly oxidized in soil whereas the amino- or nitro- and hydroxy-substituted phenylarsonic acids were accumulated to a smaller degree. The highest extraction yield of 90% for ground leaf material was achieved by 0.1M phosphate buffer, pH 7.7, in a two-step extraction with a total extraction time of 24h. The extraction of higher amounts of arsenic (50-70% of total arsenic present in leaves depending on arsenic species application) from non-ground intact leaves with deionized water in comparison with the buffer (20-40% of total arsenic) is ascribed to osmotic effects. The arsenic species analysis revealed a cleavage of the amino groups from the phenyl ring for plants treated with aminophenylarsonic acids. A further important metabolic effect consisted in the production of inorganic arsenate and arsenite from the phenylated arsonic acid groups. PMID:18848716

  13. Predicting chemotherapeutic response to small-cell lung cancer of platinum compounds by thallium-201 single-photon emission computerized tomography.

    PubMed Central

    Tokuchi, Y.; Isobe, H.; Takekawa, H.; Hanada, T.; Ishida, T.; Ogura, S.; Itoh, K.; Furudate, M.; Saito, K.; Kawakami, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Thallium-201 single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) was used to clarify the relationship between 201Tl uptake and the response in chemotherapy to platinum compounds in 21 patients with small-cell lung cancer. 201Tl-SPECT scans were obtained twice: at 15 min (early scan) and 120 min (delayed scan) after an intravenous injection of 111 MBq (3 mCi) of thallium-201 chloride. We obtained the uptake ratio from each scan and calculated the retention index:uptake ratio = region of interest uptake/contralateral normal lung uptake; retention index = (delayed ratio - early ratio)/early ratio. After 201Tl scintigraphy, 12 patients received chemotherapy consisting of platinum compounds and nine were treated with chemoradiation. Among patients receiving only chemotherapy, the retention index correlated with the responses to chemotherapy. In an in vitro study, ouabain, an inhibitor of the Na,K-ATPase pump, reduced sensitivity to cisplatin and inhibited intracellular thallium uptake in the small-cell lung cancer cell line. These studies suggest that 201Tl-SPECT is a useful indicator of response to chemotherapy with platinum compounds in small-cell lung cancer, and that Na,K-ATPase is commonly involved in transporting both thallium and platinum compounds into cancer cells. PMID:9579847

  14. Simultaneous inductively coupled argon plasma emission spectrometer as a multi-element-specific detector for high pressure liquid chromatography: the determination of arsenic, selenium, and phosphorus compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irgolic, Kurt J.; Stockton, R. A.; Chakraborti, D.; Beyer, W.

    A Bausch & Lomb-ARL Model 34000 simultaneous inductively coupled plasma (ICP) emission spectrometer was interfaced with a high pressure liquid chromatograph to serve as a multi-element-specific detector. The standard ARL software was modified and a new program written to allow the chromatogram to be displayed graphically on-line. The HPLC-ICP system performance was demonstrated by the separation of arsenite, arsenate, methylarsonic acid, dimethylarsinic acid, phenylarsonic acid, selenite, and phosphate on a reverse-phase column. The detection limit for arsenic is 130 ?g l -1 at 100 ?l injection volumes. The arsenic signals are not dependent on the nature of the arsenic compounds. This HPLC-ICP system allows the quantitative determination of compounds with similar retention times provided they contain different elements determinable by ICP-AES.

  15. Assessment of China's virtual air pollution transport embodied in trade by a consumption-based emission inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H. Y.; Zhang, Q.; Davis, S. J.; Guan, D.; Liu, Z.; Huo, H.; Lin, J. T.; Liu, W. D.; He, K. B.

    2014-10-01

    High anthropogenic emissions from China have resulted in serious air pollution, and it has attracted considerable academic and public concern. The physical transport of air pollutants in the atmosphere has been extensively investigated, however, understanding the mechanisms how the pollutants were transferred through economic and trade activities remains challenge. In this work, we assessed China's virtual air pollutant transport embodied in trade, by using consumption-based accounting approach. We first constructed a consumption-based emission inventory for China's four key air pollutants (primary PM2.5, sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOC)) in 2007, based on the bottom-up sectoral emission inventory concerning their production activities - a production-based inventory. We used a multiregional input-output (MRIO) model to integrate the sectoral production-based emissions and the associated economic and trade activities, and finally obtained consumption-based inventory. Unlike the production-based inventory, the consumption-based inventory tracked emissions throughout the supply chain related to the consumption of goods and services and hereby identified the emission flows followed the supply chains. From consumption-based perspective, emissions were significantly redistributed among provinces due to interprovincial trade. Large amount of emissions were embodied in the net imports of east regions from northern and central regions; these were determined by differences in the regional economic status and environmental policies. We also calculated the emissions embodied in exported and imported goods and services. It is found that 15-23% of China's pollutant emissions were related to exports for foreign consumption; that proportion was much higher for central and export-oriented coastal regions. It is suggested that measures should be introduced to reduce air pollution by integrating cross-regional consumers and producers in national agreements to encourage efficiency improvement in the supply chain and optimizing consumption structure internationally. The consumption-based air pollutants emission inventory developed in this work can be further used to attribute pollution to different economic activities and final demand types with the aid of air quality models.

  16. Organic liquids storage tanks volatile organic compounds (VOCS) emissions dispersion and risk assessment in developing countries: the case of Dar-es-Salaam City, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Msafiri M

    2006-05-01

    The emission estimation of nine volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from eight organic liquids storage tanks companies in Dar-es-Salaam City Tanzania has been done by using US EPA standard regulatory storage tanks emission model (TANKS 4.9b). Total VOCs atmospheric emission has been established to be 853.20 metric tones/yr. It has been established further that petrol storage tanks contribute about 87% of total VOCs emitted, while tanks for other refined products and crude oil were emitting 10% and 3% of VOCs respectively. Of the eight sources (companies), the highest emission value from a single source was 233,222.94 kg/yr and the lowest single source emission value was 6881.87 kg/yr. The total VOCs emissions estimated for each of the eight sources were found to be higher than the standard level of 40,000 kg/yr per source for minor source according to US EPA except for two sources, which were emitting VOCs below the standard level. The annual emissions per single source for each of the VOCs were found to be below the US EPA emissions standard which is 2,000 kg/yr in all companies except the emission of hexane from company F1 which was slightly higher than the standard. The type of tanks used seems to significantly influence the emission rate. Vertical fixed roof tanks (VFRT) emit a lot more than externally floating roof tanks (EFRT) and internally floating roof tanks (IFRT). The use of IFRT and EFRT should be encouraged especially for storage of petrol which had highest atmospheric emission contribution. Model predicted atmospheric emissions are less than annual losses measured by companies in all the eight sources. It is possible that there are other routes for losses beside atmospheric emissions. It is therefore important that waste reduction efforts in these companies are directed not only to reducing atmospheric emissions, but also prevention of the spillage and leakage of stored liquid and curbing of the frequently reported illegal siphoning of stored products. Emission rates for benzene, toluene, and xylene were used as input to CALPUFF air dispersion model for the calculation of spatial downwind concentrations from area sources. By using global positioning system (GPS) and geographical information system (GIS) the spatial benzene concentration contributed by organic liquid storage tanks has been mapped for Dar-es-Salaam City. Highest concentrations for all the three toxic pollutants were observed at Kigamboni area, possibly because the area is located at the wind prevailing direction from the locations of the storage tanks. The model predicted concentrations downwind from the sources were below tolerable concentrations by WHO and US-OSHA. The highest 24 hrs averaging time benzene concentration was used for risk assessment in order to determine maximum carcinogenic risk amongst the population exposed at downwind. Established risk for adult and children at 2.9x10(-3) and 1.9x10(-3) respectively, are higher than the acceptable US-EPA risk of 1x10(-6). It is very likely that the actual VOCs concentrations in some urban areas in Tanzania including Dar-es-Salaam City are much higher than the levels reported in this study when other sources such as petrol stations and motor vehicles on the roads are considered. Tanzania Government therefore need to put in place: an air quality policy and legislation, establish air quality guidelines and acquire facilities which will enable the implementation of air quality monitoring and management programmes. PMID:16779602

  17. Comprehensive source apportionment of volatile organic compounds using observational data, two receptor models, and an emission inventory in Tokyo metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morino, Y.; Ohara, T.; Yokouchi, Y.; Ooki, A.

    2011-01-01

    Source contributions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were comprehensively evaluated using an observational data set, two receptor models, and an emission inventory. Hourly concentrations of C2-C8 nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) were measured at Saitama, which is near the northern edge of Tokyo, throughout 2007. Estimates of background NMHC concentrations at the Saitama site corresponded well with median NMHC concentrations at a remote island in Japan in winter and spring. Source contributions of ?NMHCs (differences between ambient and background concentrations) calculated by the chemical mass balance (CMB) model and positive matrix factorization (PMF) corresponded with each other within a factor of 2. The two receptor models estimated that vehicle exhaust, gasoline vapor, liquefied natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and other evaporative sources contributed 14%-25%, 9%-16%, 7%-10%, and 49%-71%, respectively, to total VOC concentrations on a mass basis. These values agreed with the emission inventory except for the LPG values. In addition, the CMB and PMF results explained at least two thirds of the observed total ?NMHC values. These results suggest that the current emission inventory roughly captures the individual contributions and total amount of VOC emissions. However, characterization of background NMHCs is necessary to fully understand the VOC budget.

  18. USE OF BIOASSAY-DIRECTED CHEMICAL ANALYSIS FOR IDENTIFYING MUTAGENIC COMPOUNDS IN URBAN AIR AND COMBUSTION EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioassay-directed chemical analysis fractionation has been used for 30 years to identify mutagenic classes of compounds in complex mixtures. Most studies have used the Salmonella (Ames) mutagenicity assay, and we have recently applied this methodology to two standard reference sa...

  19. CHARACTERIZATION OF LOW-VOC LATEX PAINTS: VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND CONTENT, VOC AND ALDEHYDE EMISSIONS, AND PAINT PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of laboratory tests to evaluate commercially available latex paints advertised as "low-odor," "low-VOC (volatile organic compound)," or "no-VOC." Measurements were performed to quantify the total content of VOCs in the paints...

  20. A Novel Multifunctional Photocatalytic Oxidation (PCO) Gel Preventing Mold\\/Mildew Growth and Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emission

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yao Gao

    2011-01-01

    With the increasing time people spend indoors, the indoor environment quality draws more and more attention. The concentration of indoor pollutants is usually much higher than outdoors, in which volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and mold\\/mildew are both major pollutants and cause many health problems to residents. Efforts devoted from academy and industry to protecting people from indoor environment problems are

  1. APPLICATION OF SOLID PHASE MICROEXTRACTION TO COMPARE EMISSIONS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM CATTLE AND SWINE MANURES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Odors from livestock operations are a complex mixture of volatile carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen compounds. Currently, detailed volatiles analysis is both time consuming and requires specialized equipment and methods. This work describes the application of a new method that utilizes a dynamic flux c...

  2. Seasonal and annual modeling of reduced nitrogen compounds over the eastern United States: Emissions, ambient levels, and deposition amounts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rohit Mathur; Robin L. Dennis

    2003-01-01

    Detailed description of the distributions and seasonal trends of atmospheric nitrogen compounds is of considerable interest given their role in formation of acidic substances, tropospheric ozone and particulate matter and nutrient loading effects resulting from their deposition to sensitive ecosystems. While the oxidized nitrogen species have received considerable research and regulatory attention over the past several decades, little effort has

  3. Protocol for determining the daily volatile organic compound emission rate of automobile and light-duty truck topcoat operations

    SciTech Connect

    Salman, D.

    1988-12-01

    The protocol determines the daily VOC emission rate (pounds of VOC per gallon of coating solids deposited) for a complete automobile and light-duty truck topcoat operation. The protocol is designed for use in cases where (1) the topcoat emission limit is stated in units of pounds of VOC per gallon of solids deposited, (2) compliance is to be demonstrated for each day, and (3) the entire topcoat operation (i.e., all spray booths, flash-off areas and bake ovens where topcoat is applied, dried, and cured; except final off-line repair) is treated as a single entity.

  4. BIOASSAY-DIRECTED CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF ORGANIC EXTRACTS OF EMISSIONS FROM A LABORATORY-SCALE INCINERATOR: COMBUSTION OF SURROGATE COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes using a prototype/pilot-scale rotary kiln (73 kill) to examine the chemical composition and biological effect's of emissions produced when operating the kiln under suboptimal conditions resulting from batch charging. he surrogate wastes evaluated included comb...

  5. SEMI-VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM VEHICLES POWERED BY GASOLINE, DIESEL AND ALTERNATIVE FUELS: EMISSIONS AND FIELD MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study will result in the development of a new method for the rapid measurement of SVOCs. The characterization of VOC and SVOC emissions of vehicles with different fuel types will improve our understanding of the processes leading to secondary organic aerosol pollution and...

  6. EMISSIONS FROM SLUDGE INCINERATORS WITH VENTURI AND TRAY SCRUBBERS AND WET ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATORS - METALS, CHROMIUM AND NICKEL COMPOUNDS, AND ORGANICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    At Site 5 (continuing a numbering system initiated in a previous 4-site project) tests were only conducted for methods development purposes. At Site 6, emissions were measured at the inlet and outlet of the control device. At Site 7, an evaluation of CO and THC CEMSs was performe...

  7. Response of fine particulate matter to emission changes of oxides of nitrogen and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds in the eastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandra P. Tsimpidi; Vlassis A. Karydis; Spyros N. Pandis [Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, Patras (Greece). Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical Processes

    2008-11-15

    A three-dimensional chemical transport model (Particulate Matter Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions) is used to investigate changes in fine particle (PM2.5) concentrations in response to 50% emissions changes of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during July 2001 and January 2002 in the eastern United States. The reduction of NOx emissions by 50% during the summer results in lower average oxidant levels and lowers PM2.5 (8% on average), mainly because of reductions of sulfate (9-11%), nitrate (45-58%), and ammonium (7-11%). The organic particulate matter (PM) slightly decreases in rural areas, whereas it increases in cities by a few percent when NOx is reduced. Reduction of NOx during winter causes an increase of the oxidant levels and a rather complicated response of the PM components, leading to small net changes. Sulfate increases (8-17%), nitrate decreases (18-42%), organic PM slightly increases, and ammonium either increases or decreases a little. The reduction of VOC emissions during the summer causes on average a small increase of the oxidant levels and a marginal increase in PM2.5. This small net change is due to increases in the inorganic components and decreases of the organic ones. Reduction of VOC emissions during winter results in a decrease of the oxidant levels and a 5-10% reduction of PM2.5 because of reductions in nitrate (4-19%), ammonium (4-10%), organic PM (12-14%), and small reductions in sulfate. Although sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) reduction is the single most effective approach for sulfate control, the coupled decrease of SO{sub 2} and NOx emissions in both seasons is more effective in reducing total PM2.5 mass than the SO{sub 2} reduction alone. 34 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Fast online emission monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in wastewater and product streams (using stripping with direct steam injection).

    PubMed

    Schocker, Alexander; Lissner, Bert

    2012-03-01

    Open-loop stripping analysis (also referred to as dynamic headspace) is a very flexible and robust technology for online monitoring of volatile organic compounds in wastewater or coolant. However, the quality and reliability of the analytical results depend strongly on the temperature during the stripping process. Hence, the careful and constant heating of the liquid phase inside the stripping column is a critical parameter. In addition, this stripping at high temperatures extends the spectrum of traceable organics to less volatile and more polar compounds with detection limits down to the ppm-level. This paper presents a novel and promising approach for fast, efficient, and constant heating by the direct injection of process steam into the strip medium. The performance of the system is demonstrated for temperatures up to 75 °C and traces of various hydrocarbons in water (e.g., tetrahydrofuran, methanol, 1-propanol, n-butanol, ethylbenzene). PMID:22186871

  9. Using a biological aerated filter to treat mixed water-borne volatile organic compounds and assessing its emissions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wen-Hsi CHENG

    2009-01-01

    A biological aerated filter (BAF) was evaluated as a fixed-biofilm process to remove water-borne volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a multiple layer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) manufacturing plant in southern Taiwan. The components of VOC were identified to be toluene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, bromodichloromethane and isopropanol (IPA). The full-scale BAF was constructed of two separate reactors in series, respectively, using 10- and

  10. Volatile organic compound emissions from the oil and natural gas industry in the Uinta Basin, Utah: point sources compared to ambient air composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warneke, C.; Geiger, F.; Edwards, P. M.; Dube, W.; Pétron, G.; Kofler, J.; Zahn, A.; Brown, S. S.; Graus, M.; Gilman, J.; Lerner, B.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; de Gouw, J. A.; Roberts, J. M.

    2014-05-01

    The emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with oil and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin, Utah were measured at a ground site in Horse Pool and from a NOAA mobile laboratory with PTR-MS instruments. The VOC compositions in the vicinity of individual gas and oil wells and other point sources such as evaporation ponds, compressor stations and injection wells are compared to the measurements at Horse Pool. High mixing ratios of aromatics, alkanes, cycloalkanes and methanol were observed for extended periods of time and short-term spikes caused by local point sources. The mixing ratios during the time the mobile laboratory spent on the well pads were averaged. High mixing ratios were found close to all point sources, but gas wells using dry-gas collection, which means dehydration happens at the well, were clearly associated with higher mixing ratios than other wells. Another large source was the flowback pond near a recently hydraulically re-fractured gas well. The comparison of the VOC composition of the emissions from the oil and natural gas wells showed that wet gas collection wells compared well with the majority of the data at Horse Pool and that oil wells compared well with the rest of the ground site data. Oil wells on average emit heavier compounds than gas wells. The mobile laboratory measurements confirm the results from an emissions inventory: the main VOC source categories from individual point sources are dehydrators, oil and condensate tank flashing and pneumatic devices and pumps. Raw natural gas is emitted from the pneumatic devices and pumps and heavier VOC mixes from the tank flashings.

  11. Developmental patterns of emission of scent compounds and related gene expression in roses of the cultivar Rosa x hybrida cv. 'Yves Piaget'.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaomin; Baldermann, Susanne; Cao, Shuyan; Lu, Yao; Liu, Caixia; Hirata, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Naoharu

    2015-02-01

    2-Phenylethanol (2PE) and 3,5-dimethoxytoluene (DMT) are characteristic scent compounds in specific roses such as Rosa x hybrida cv. 'Yves Piaget'. We analyzed the endogenous concentrations and emission of 2PE and DMT during the unfurling process in different floral organs, as well as changes in transcript levels of the two key genes, PAR and OOMT2. The emission of both 2PE and DMT increased during floral development to reach peaks at the fully unfurled stage. The relative transcripts of PAR and OOMT2 also increased during floral development. Whereas the maximum for OOMT2 was found at the fully unfurled stage (stage 4), similar expression levels of PAR were detected at stage 4 and the senescence stage (stage 6). The results demonstrate a positive correlation between the expression levels of PAR and OOMT2 and the emission of 2PE and DMT. In addition, endogenous volatiles and relative transcripts showed tissue- and development-specific patterns. PMID:25576838

  12. Opportunity Analysis for Recovering Energy from Industrial Waste Heat and Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Vish V.; Davies, Richard W.; Holbery, Jim D.

    2006-04-01

    United States industry consumed 32.5 Quads (34,300 PJ) of energy during 2003, which was 33.1% of total U.S. energy consumption (EIA 2003 Annual Energy Review). The U.S. industrial complex yields valuable goods and products. Through its manufacturing processes as well as its abundant energy consumption, it supports a multi-trillion dollar contribution to the gross domestic product and provides millions of jobs in the U.S. each year. Industry also yields waste products directly through its manufacturing processes and indirectly through its energy consumption. These waste products come in two forms, chemical and thermal. Both forms of waste have residual energy values that are not routinely recovered. Recovering and reusing these waste products may represent a significant opportunity to improve the energy efficiency of the U.S. industrial complex. This report was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Industrial Technologies Program (DOE-ITP). It analyzes the opportunity to recover chemical emissions and thermal emissions from U.S. industry. It also analyzes the barriers and pathways to more effectively capitalize on these opportunities. A primary part of this analysis was to characterize the quantity and energy value of the emissions. For example, in 2001, the industrial sector emitted 19% of the U.S. greenhouse gases (GHG) through its industrial processes and emitted 11% of GHG through electricity purchased from off-site utilities. Therefore, industry (not including agriculture) was directly and indirectly responsible for emitting 30% of the U.S. GHG. These emissions were mainly comprised of carbon dioxide (CO2), but also contained a wide-variety of CH4 (methane), CO (carbon monoxide), H2 (hydrogen), NMVOC (non-methane volatile organic compound), and other chemicals. As part of this study, we conducted a survey of publicly available literature to determine the amount of energy embedded in the emissions and to identify technology opportunities to capture and reuse this energy. As shown in Table E-1, non-CO2 GHG emissions from U.S. industry were identified as having 2180 peta joules (PJ) or 2 Quads (quadrillion Btu) of residual chemical fuel value. Since landfills are not traditionally considered industrial organizations, the industry component of these emissions had a value of 1480 PJ or 1.4 Quads. This represents approximately 4.3% of the total energy used in the United States Industry.

  13. Phenolic Compounds and Cell Structure in Bilberry Leaves Affected by Emissions from a Zn–Pb Smelter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Bia?o?ska; A. M. Zobel; M. Kura?; T. Tykarska; K. Sawicka-Kapusta

    2007-01-01

    Vaccinium myrtillus L. is a common shrub in the herbaceous layer of pine forests. In connection with resistance to pollution it has been widely\\u000a used in the environmental monitoring based on heavy metal accumulations in the foliage. The present study investigates leaves\\u000a of bilberry growing under influence of emissions from a Zn–Pb smelter. Determination of heavy metal levels by AAS

  14. Asthma and the indoor environment: the significance of emission of formaldehyde and volatile organic compounds from newly painted indoor surfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Wieslander; D. Norbäck; E. Björnsson; C. Janson; G. Boman

    1996-01-01

    As a part of the worldwide European Community Respiratory Health Survey, possible relations between asthma and emissions\\u000a from newly painted indoor surfaces were studied. The participants (n= 562) answered a self-administered questionnaire, with questions on symptoms and indoor exposures, including indoor painting,\\u000a during the last 12 months. The participants also underwent a structured interview, spirometry, peak flow measurements at home

  15. In vitro-in vivo study on the effects of plant compounds on rumen fermentation, microbial abundances and methane emissions in goats.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Fernández, G; Abecia, L; Martín-García, A I; Ramos-Morales, E; Hervás, G; Molina-Alcaide, E; Yáñez-Ruiz, D R

    2013-12-01

    Two in vitro and one in vivo experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of a selection of plant compounds on rumen fermentation, microbial concentration and methane emissions in goats. Treatments were: control (no additive), carvacrol (CAR), cinnamaldehyde (CIN), eugenol (EUG), propyl propane thiosulfinate (PTS), propyl propane thiosulfonate (PTSO), diallyl disulfide (DDS), a mixture (40 : 60) of PTS and PTSO (PTS+PTSO), and bromochloromethane (BCM) as positive control with proven antimethanogenic effectiveness. Four doses (40, 80, 160 and 320 µl/l) of the different compounds were incubated in vitro for 24 h in diluted rumen fluid from goats using two diets differing in starch and protein source within the concentrate (Experiment 1).The total gas production was linearly decreased (P<0.012) by all compounds, with the exception of EUG and PTS+PTSO (P? 0.366). Total volatile fatty-acid (VFA) concentration decreased (P? 0.018) only with PTS, PTSO and CAR, whereas the acetate:propionate ratio decreased (P? 0.002) with PTS, PTSO and BCM, and a tendency (P=0.064) was observed for DDS. On the basis of results from Experiment 1, two doses of PTS, CAR, CIN, BCM (160 and 320 µl/l), PTSO (40 and 160 µl/l) and DDS (80 and 320 µl/l) were further tested in vitro for 72 h (Experiment 2). The gas production kinetics were affected (P? 0.045) by all compounds, and digested NDF (DNDF) after 72 h of incubation was only linearly decreased (P? 0.004) by CAR and PTS. The addition of all compounds linearly decreased (P? 0.009) methane production, although the greatest reductions were observed for PTS (up to 96%), DDS (62%) and BCM (95%). No diet-dose interaction was observed. To further test the results obtained in vitro, two groups of 16 adult non-pregnant goats were used to study in vivo the effect of adding PTS (50, 100 and 200 mg/l rumen content per day) and BCM (50, 100 and 160 mg/l rumen content per day) during the 9 days on methane emissions (Experiment 3). The addition of PTS and BCM resulted in linear reductions (33% and 64%, respectively, P? 0.002) of methane production per unit of dry matter intake, which were lower than the maximum inhibition observed in vitro (87% and 96%, respectively). We conclude that applying the same doses in vivo as in vitro resulted in a proportional lower extent of methane decrease, and that PTS at 200 mg/l rumen content per day has the potential to reduce methane emissions in goats. Whether the reduction in methane emission observed in vivo persists over longer periods of treatments and improves feed conversion efficiency requires further research. PMID:24237672

  16. Development of a high-resolution (1 km × 1 km, 1 h) emission model for Spain: The High-Elective Resolution Modelling Emission System (HERMES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldasano, José María; Güereca, Leonor Patricia; López, Eugeni; Gassó, Santiago; Jimenez-Guerrero, Pedro

    This work presents the results of the development and application of the High-Elective Resolution Modelling Emission System (HERMES). HERMES generates the emissions for Spain needed for the application of high-resolution chemistry transport models, taking the year 2004 as reference with a temporal resolution of 1 h and a spatial resolution of 1 km 2 considering both anthropogenic (power generation, industrial activities, on-road traffic, ports, airports, solvent use, domestic and commercial fossil fuel use) and biogenic sources (vegetation), using a bottom-up approach, up-to-date information and state-of-the-art methodologies for emission estimation. HERMES is capable of calculating emissions by sector-specific sources or by individual installations and stacks. The annual addition of hourly sectorial emissions leads to an estimation of total annual emissions as follows: NO x, 795 kt; NMVOCs, 1025 kt; CO, 1236 kt; SO 2, 1142 kt and TSP, 180 kt; which are distributed principally in the greater areas of the main cities, highways and large point sources. NO x, SO 2 and PM 2.5 highly correlate with the power generation by coal use, achieving higher emission levels during summertime due to the increase of electricity demand by cooling systems. NMVOCs show high correlation with temperature and solar radiation (mainly as a consequence of the important weight of biogenic emissions) causing the maximum emissions during the daylight hours of summer months. CO emissions are mostly influenced by the on-road traffic; consequently the higher emissions are attained in summer because of the increase of daily average traffic during holidays. The most significant total emission sources are on-road traffic (38%), combustion in power generation plants (33%), biogenic sources (12%) and combustion in manufacturing industries (9%). The inventory generated with HERMES emission model has been successfully integrated within the Spanish Ministry of the Environment's air quality forecasting system (Caliope project), being the emission core for the validation and assessment of air quality simulations in Spain.

  17. Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds and subsequent photochemical production of secondary organic aerosol in mesocosm studies of temperate and tropical plant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyche, K. P.; Ryan, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.; Alfarra, M. R.; McFiggans, G.; Carr, T.; Monks, P. S.; Smallbone, K. L.; Capes, G.; Hamilton, J. F.; Pugh, T. A. M.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Silver birch (Betula pendula) and three Southeast Asian tropical plant species (Ficus cyathistipula, Ficus benjamina and Caryota millis) from the pantropical fig and palm genera were grown in a purpose-built and environment-controlled whole-tree chamber. The volatile organic compounds emitted from these trees were characterised and fed into a linked photochemical reaction chamber where they underwent photo-oxidation under a range of controlled conditions (relative humidity or RH ~65-89%, volatile organic compound-to-NOx or VOC / NOx ~3-9 and NOx ~2 ppbV). Both the gas phase and the aerosol phase of the reaction chamber were monitored in detail using a comprehensive suite of on-line and off-line chemical and physical measurement techniques. Silver birch was found to be a high monoterpene and sesquiterpene but low isoprene emitter, and its emissions were observed to produce measurable amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) via both nucleation and condensation onto pre-existing seed aerosol (YSOA 26-39%). In contrast, all three tropical species were found to be high isoprene emitters with trace emissions of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. In tropical plant experiments without seed aerosol there was no measurable SOA nucleation, but aerosol mass was shown to increase when seed aerosol was present. Although principally isoprene emitting, the aerosol mass produced from tropical fig was mostly consistent (i.e. in 78 out of 120 aerosol mass calculations using plausible parameter sets of various precursor specific yields) with condensation of photo-oxidation products of the minor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) co-emitted; no significant aerosol yield from condensation of isoprene oxidation products was required in the interpretations of the experimental results. This finding is in line with previous reports of organic aerosol loadings consistent with production from minor biogenic VOCs co-emitted with isoprene in principally isoprene-emitting landscapes in Southeast Asia. Moreover, in general the amount of aerosol mass produced from the emissions of the principally isoprene-emitting plants was less than would be expected from published single-VOC experiments, if co-emitted species were solely responsible for the final SOA mass. Interpretation of the results obtained from the fig data sets leaves room for a potential role for isoprene in inhibiting SOA formation under certain ambient atmospheric conditions, although instrumental and experimental constraints impose a level of caution in the interpretation of the results. Concomitant gas- and aerosol-phase composition measurements also provide a detailed overview of numerous key oxidation mechanisms at work within the systems studied, and their combined analysis provides insight into the nature of the SOA formed.

  18. Characterization of low-VOC latex paints: Volatile organic compound content, VOC and aldehyde emissions, and paint performance. Final report, January 1997--January 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Fortmann, R.; Lao, H.C.; Ng, A.; Roache, N.

    1999-04-01

    The report gives results of laboratory tests to evaluate commercially available latex paints advertised as `low-odor,` `low-VOC (volatile organic compound),` or `no-VOC.` Measurements were performed to quantify the total content of VOCs in the paints and to identify the predominant VOCs and aldehydes in the emissions following application to test substrates. The performance of the paints was evaluated and compared to that of commonly used conventional latex paints by American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard methods that measured parameters such as scrubbability, cleanability, and hiding power. The report describes the paints that were tested, the test methods, and the experimental data. Results are presented that can be used to evaluate the low-odor/low-VOC paints as alternatives to conventional latex wall paints that contain and emit higher concentrations of VOCs.

  19. Effects of chlorides on emissions of toxic compounds in waste incineration: study on partitioning characteristics of heavy metal.

    PubMed

    Wang, K S; Chiang, K Y; Lin, S M; Tsai, C C; Sun, C J

    1999-04-01

    Chlorides derived from plastics and food residue content in MSW will affect the formation and partitioning of metal chlorides in the incineration discharges. Our study investigated the effects of waste-derived chlorides on the partitioning of heavy metals in a single-metal combustion system. The results indicate that the heavy metal partitioning behaviors are mainly affected by the presence of chloride, alkaline metals (i.e., Na, K) and moisture in the wastes. The configuration of the metal partitioning is determined by the availability of chlorine, hydrogen, and alkaline metals, or the extent to which the elements may divide from their compounds at a given combustion temperature. The effects of chlorides, including PVC, C2Cl4, FeCl3, NaCl and KCl, were also discussed. PMID:10101850

  20. Effect of regional precursor emission controls on long-range ozone transport - Part 1: short-term changes in ozone air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, J. J.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.; Fiore, A. M.

    2009-03-01

    Observations and models demonstrate that ozone and its precursors can be transported between continents and across oceans. We model the influences of 10% reductions in anthropogenic nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from each of nine world regions on surface ozone air quality in that region and all other regions. In doing so, we quantify the relative importance of long-range transport between all source-receptor pairs, for direct short-term ozone changes. We find that for population-weighted concentrations during the three-month "ozone-season", the strongest inter-regional influences are from Europe to the Former Soviet Union, East Asia to Southeast Asia, and Europe to Africa. The largest influences per unit of NOx reduced, however, are seen for source regions in the tropics and Southern Hemisphere, which we attribute mainly to greater sensitivity to changes in NOx in the lower troposphere, and secondarily to increased vertical convection to the free troposphere in tropical regions, allowing pollutants to be transported further. Results show, for example, that NOx reductions in North America are ~20% as effective per unit NOx in reducing ozone in Europe during summer, as NOx reductions from Europe itself. Reducing anthropogenic emissions of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) and carbon monoxide (CO) by 10% in selected regions, can have as large an impact on long-range ozone transport as NOx reductions, depending on the source region. We find that for many source-receptor pairs, the season of greatest long-range influence does not coincide with the season when ozone is highest in the receptor region. Reducing NOx emissions in most source regions causes a larger decrease in export of ozone from the source region than in ozone production outside of the source region.

  1. Effect of regional precursor emission controls on long-range ozone transport - Part 1: Short-term changes in ozone air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, J. J.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.; Fiore, A. M.

    2009-08-01

    Observations and models demonstrate that ozone and its precursors can be transported between continents and across oceans. We model the influences of 10% reductions in anthropogenic nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from each of nine world regions on surface ozone air quality in that region and all other regions. In doing so, we quantify the relative importance of long-range transport between all source-receptor pairs, for direct short-term ozone changes. We find that for population-weighted concentrations during the three-month "ozone-season", the strongest inter-regional influences are from Europe to the Former Soviet Union, East Asia to Southeast Asia, and Europe to Africa. The largest influences per unit of NOx reduced, however, are seen for source regions in the tropics and Southern Hemisphere, which we attribute mainly to greater sensitivity to changes in NOx in the lower troposphere, and secondarily to increased vertical convection to the free troposphere in tropical regions, allowing pollutants to be transported further. Results show, for example, that NOx reductions in North America are ~20% as effective per unit NOx in reducing ozone in Europe during summer, as NOx reductions from Europe itself. Reducing anthropogenic emissions of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) and carbon monoxide (CO) by 10% in selected regions, can have as large an impact on long-range ozone transport as NOx reductions, depending on the source region. We find that for many source-receptor pairs, the season of greatest long-range influence does not coincide with the season when ozone is highest in the receptor region. Reducing NOx emissions in most source regions causes a larger decrease in export of ozone from the source region than in ozone production outside of the source region.

  2. Atmospheric emissions and attenuation of non-methane organic compounds in cover soils at a French landfill.

    PubMed

    Scheutz, C; Bogner, J; Chanton, J P; Blake, D; Morcet, M; Aran, C; Kjeldsen, P

    2008-01-01

    In addition to methane (CH(4)) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)), landfill gas may contain more than 200 non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) including C(2+)-alkanes, aromatics, and halogenated hydrocarbons. Although the trace components make up less than 1% v/v of typical landfill gas, they may exert a disproportionate environmental burden. The objective of this work was to study the dynamics of CH(4) and NMOCs in the landfill cover soils overlying two types of gas collection systems: a conventional gas collection system with vertical wells and an innovative horizontal gas collection layer consisting of permeable gravel with a geomembrane above it. The 47 NMOCs quantified in the landfill gas samples included primarily alkanes (C(2)-C(10)), alkenes (C(2)-C(4)), halogenated hydrocarbons (including (hydro)chlorofluorocarbons ((H)CFCs)), and aromatic hydrocarbons (BTEXs). In general, both CH(4) and NMOC fluxes were all very small with positive and negative fluxes. The highest percentages of positive fluxes in this study (considering all quantified species) were observed at the hotspots, located mainly along cell perimeters of the conventional cell. The capacity of the cover soil for NMOC oxidation was investigated in microcosms incubated with CH(4) and oxygen (O(2)). The cover soil showed a relatively high capacity for CH(4) oxidation and simultaneous co-oxidation of the halogenated aliphatic compounds, especially at the conventional cell. Fully substituted carbons (TeCM, PCE, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, HFC-134a, and HCFC-141b) were not degraded in the presence of CH(4) and O(2). Benzene and toluene were also degraded with relative high rates. This study demonstrates that landfill soil covers show a significant potential for CH(4) oxidation and co-oxidation of NMOCs. PMID:18032020

  3. Measurement of ?-emission branching ratios for ^{154,156,158}Gd compound nuclei: Tests of surrogate nuclear reaction approximations for (n,?) cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scielzo, N. D.; Escher, J. E.; Allmond, J. M.; Basunia, M. S.; Beausang, C. W.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Burke, J. T.; Clark, R. M.; Dietrich, F. S.; Fallon, P.; Gibelin, J.; Goldblum, B. L.; Lesher, S. R.; McMahan, M. A.; Norman, E. B.; Phair, L.; Rodriquez-Vieitez, E.; Sheets, S. A.; Thompson, I. J.; Wiedeking, M.

    2010-03-01

    The surrogate nuclear reaction method can be used to determine neutron-induced reaction cross sections from measured decay properties of a compound nucleus created using a different reaction and calculated formation cross sections. The reliability of (n,?) cross sections determined using the Weisskopf-Ewing and ratio approximations are explored for the Gd155,157(n,?) reactions. Enriched gadolinium targets were bombarded with 22-MeV protons and ? rays were detected in coincidence with scattered protons using the Silicon Telescope Array for Reaction Studies/Livermore-Berkeley Array for Collaborative Experiments (STARS/LiBerACE) silicon and germanium detector arrays. The ?-emission probabilities for the Gd154,156,158 compound nuclei were measured at excitation energies up to 12 MeV. It is found that the approximations yield results that deviate from directly measured Gd155,157(n,?) cross sections at low energies. To extract reliable cross sections, a more sophisticated analysis should be developed that takes into account angular-momentum differences between the neutron-induced and surrogate reactions.

  4. Determination of white phosphorus residues in ducks: An atomic emission detection/compound-independent calibration-based method of generating residue data for risk assessment and environmental monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, J.J.; Goldade, D.A.; Kohler, D.J.; Cummings, J.L.

    2000-05-01

    Analysis of phosphorus concentrations in the gizzards of ducks harvested from munitions sites is necessary to ascertain if acute phosphorus toxicity was the cause of death and to estimate potential secondary hazards to predators and scavengers, such as eagles that readily consume the dead ducks. Gas chromatography-atomic emission detection analysis permitted compound-independent quantification of white phosphorus standards following analysis of the stable phosphorus-containing compound triethyl phosphate. The white phosphorus standards were then used to quantify white phosphorus residues in duck gizzard extracts by gas chromatography-flame photometric detection analysis. For gizzards containing less than 0.01 {micro}g of phosphorus, quantification was based on a three-point calibration curve. For gizzards containing 0.01 {micro}g or more of white phosphorus, single-point calibration was used. Mean recoveries for phosphorus-fortified gizzards ranged from 73 to 91%. The method limit of detection was 0.013 {micro}g of phosphorus. This method was successfully applied to the quantification of white phosphorus in ducks collected from Eagle River Flats, AK. Potential applications to risk assessment and environmental monitoring are also discussed.

  5. Measurement of gamma-emission branching ratios for {sup 154,156,158}Gd compound nuclei: Tests of surrogate nuclear reaction approximations for (n,gamma) cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Scielzo, N. D.; Escher, J. E.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Burke, J. T.; Dietrich, F. S.; Lesher, S. R.; Sheets, S. A.; Thompson, I. J. [Physical Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Allmond, J. M.; Beausang, C. W. [Department of Physics, University of Richmond, Richmond, Virginia 23173 (United States); Basunia, M. S.; Clark, R. M.; Fallon, P.; Gibelin, J.; McMahan, M. A.; Phair, L. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Goldblum, B. L. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Norman, E. B. [Physical Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Rodriquez-Vieitez, E. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    The surrogate nuclear reaction method can be used to determine neutron-induced reaction cross sections from measured decay properties of a compound nucleus created using a different reaction and calculated formation cross sections. The reliability of (n,gamma) cross sections determined using the Weisskopf-Ewing and ratio approximations are explored for the {sup 155,157}Gd(n,gamma) reactions. Enriched gadolinium targets were bombarded with 22-MeV protons and gamma rays were detected in coincidence with scattered protons using the Silicon Telescope Array for Reaction Studies/Livermore-Berkeley Array for Collaborative Experiments (STARS/LiBerACE) silicon and germanium detector arrays. The gamma-emission probabilities for the {sup 154,156,158}Gd compound nuclei were measured at excitation energies up to 12 MeV. It is found that the approximations yield results that deviate from directly measured {sup 155,157}Gd(n,gamma) cross sections at low energies. To extract reliable cross sections, a more sophisticated analysis should be developed that takes into account angular-momentum differences between the neutron-induced and surrogate reactions.

  6. Speciation of inorganic and organometallic compounds in solid biological samples by thermal vaporization and plasma emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hanamura, S.; Smith, B.W.; Winefordner, J.D.

    1983-11-01

    By means of thermal vaporization, inorganic, organic, and metallorganic species are separated and elemental emission in a microwave plasma is detected as a function of vaporization temperature. Solid samples of 250 mg or more are used to avoid problems with sample heterogeneity. The precision of characteristic appearance temperatures is +/-2/sup 0/C. The single electrode atmosphere pressure microwave plasma system is extremely tolerant to the introduction of water, organic solvents, and air. The measurement system contained a repetition wavelength scan device to allow background correction. The plasma temperature was 5500 K. The system was used to measure C, H, N, O, and Hg in orchard leaves and in tuna fish. 9 figures, 5 tables.

  7. Characterizing Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from Oil and Natural Gas Operations in Haynesville, Fayetteville, and Marcellus Shale Regions via Aircraft Observations During SENEX 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, J.; Lerner, B. M.; Dumas, M.; Hughes, D.; Jaksich, A.; Hatch, C. D.; Graus, M.; Peischl, J.; Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Holloway, J.; Trainer, M.; Aikin, K.; Kaiser, J.; Keutsch, F. N.; Wolfe, G. M.; Hanisco, T. F.; Warneke, C.; De Gouw, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    The 2013 SENEX (Southeast Nexus) field campaign took place in June and July 2013 with to ascertain how the interaction of natural and anthropogenic emissions influence climate change and air quality throughout the southeastern United States. Five of the research flights utilizing the NOAA WP-3D aircraft focused on areas of intensive oil and natural gas production from various shale plays. These areas included the Haynesville shale in eastern Texas and western Louisiana, the Fayetteville shale in northern Arkansas, and the Marcellus shale in western Pennsylvania. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook 2013 report, (1) the Haynesville, Fayetteville, and Marcellus shale collectively account for approximately 75% of the dry shale gas produced in the U.S., and (2) shale gas is expected to provide the largest source of growth in the U.S. natural gas supply over the next few decades. Depending on the particular shale formation, raw natural gas can contain significant amounts of non-methane hydrocarbons in the form of natural gas liquids (e.g., ethane, propane, butanes) and natural gas condensate (e.g., pentanes, cycloalkanes, and aromatics). Trace gases including methane, aromatics, formaldehyde, other oxygenated VOCs, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxides were measured by multiple instruments aboard the NOAA WP-3D research aircraft. Up to 72 whole air samples (WAS) were collected in flight and analyzed in the field post-flight for a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Whole air samples provide a detailed chemical snapshot that can be combined with higher time-resolved measurements in order to provide a more comprehensive chemical analysis. In this presentation, we will compare the emissions composition of the Haynesville, Fayetteville, and Marcellus shale plays to investigate the relative importance of primary VOC emissions on the formation of secondary pollutants such as ozone, oxygenated VOCs, and secondary organic aerosol.

  8. Secretions from the ventral eversible gland of Spodoptera exigua caterpillars activate defense-related genes and induce emission of volatile organic compounds in tomato, Solanum lycopersicum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Plant induced defense against herbivory are generally associated with metabolic costs that result in the allocation of photosynthates from growth and reproduction to the synthesis of defense compounds. Therefore, it is essential that plants are capable of sensing and differentiating mechanical injury from herbivore injury. Studies have shown that oral secretions (OS) from caterpillars contain elicitors of induced plant responses. However, studies that shows whether these elicitors originated from salivary glands or from other organs associated with feeding, such as the ventral eversible gland (VEG) are limited. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the secretions from the VEG gland of Spodoptera exigua caterpillars contain elicitors that induce plant defenses by regulating the expression of genes involved in the biosynthesis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other defense-related genes. To test this hypothesis, we quantified and compared the activity of defense-related enzymes, transcript levels of defense-related genes and VOC emission in tomato plants damaged by S. exigua caterpillars with the VEG intact (VEGI) versus plants damaged by caterpillars with the VEG ablated (VEGA). Results The quantified defense-related enzymes (i.e. peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, and lipoxigenase) were expressed in significantly higher amounts in plants damaged by VEGI caterpillars than in plants damaged by VEGA caterpillars. Similarly, the genes that encode for the key enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid and terpene synthase genes that regulate production of terpene VOCs, were up-regulated in plants damaged by VEGI caterpillars. Moreover, the OS of VEGA caterpillars were less active in inducing the expression of defense genes in tomato plants. Increased emissions of VOCs were detected in the headspace of plants damaged by VEGI caterpillars compared to plants damaged by VEGA caterpillars. Conclusion These results suggest that the VEG of S. exigua caterpillars contains elicitors of late plant defense signaling in tomato which trigger defense-related enzymatic activity, regulate expression of defense-related genes, and induce emission of plant VOCs. These signaling cascades may have important ramifications for plant-insect and tritrophic interactions. PMID:24885633

  9. Crystal structure of Eu{sup 2+}-doped M{sub 3}MgSi{sub 2}O{sub 8} (M: Ba, Sr, Ca) compounds and their emission properties

    SciTech Connect

    Yonesaki, Yoshinori [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medical and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Miyamae 7-32, Kofu 400-8511 (Japan)], E-mail: yonesaki@yamanashi.ac.jp; Takei, Takahiro; Kumada, Nobuhiro; Kinomura, Nobukazu [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medical and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Miyamae 7-32, Kofu 400-8511 (Japan)

    2009-03-15

    Emission properties of Eu{sup 2+}-doped M{sub 3}MgSi{sub 2}O{sub 8} (M: Ba, Sr, Ca) are discussed in terms of the crystal structure. When Ba{sup 2+} ions account for over one third of M{sup 2+} ions, M{sub 3}MgSi{sub 2}O{sub 8} crystallizes in glaserite-type trigonal structure, while Ba-free compounds crystallize in merwinite-type monoclinic structure. Under UV excitation, the Eu{sup 2+}-doped glaserite-type compounds exhibit an intense blue emission assigned to 5d-4f electron transition at about 435 nm, regardless of the molar ratio of Ba{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+} ions. By contrast, the Eu{sup 2+}-doped merwinite-type compounds show an emission color sensitive to the ratio. A detailed analysis of the emission spectra reveals that the emission chromaticity for the Eu{sup 2+}-doped M{sub 3}MgSi{sub 2}O{sub 8} is composed of two emission peaks reflecting two different sites accommodating M{sup 2+} ion. - Graphical abstract: Structure of glaserite-type M{sub 3}MgSi{sub 2}O{sub 8} illustrated with MgO{sub 6} octahedra and SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra.

  10. Biologically produced volatile compounds: N2O emissions from the soil and the N2O global budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banin, A.; Whitten, R.; Livingston, G.; Lawless, J.

    1985-01-01

    N2O dynamics were studied at the soil-atmosphere interface and their effects on the global N2O budget. Troposphere nitrous oxide (N2O) concentration has increased by 0.2 to 0.4 pct. per year over the period 1975 to 1982, amounting to a net addition to the atmosphere of 2.8 to 5.6 Tg N2O-N per year. This perturbation, if continued into the future, will affect stratospheric chemical cycles, and the thermal balance of the Earth. In turn it will have direct and indirect global effects on the biosphere. The only well documented heat sinks identified to date are the stratospheric photolytic decomposition processes. However, quantitatively, they do not account for all the known sources. Emission from soils is the least understood and most variable component in the N2O budget. An automated field station that will measure N2O fluxes and interchanges over long periods of time is being developed. At each station, the source/sink relations of N2O at the soil-atmosphere interface will be measured and their relations to environmental conditions are documented and quantified. The results from the perennial measurements will generate the data base on which global budgets for N2O will be constructed and related to ecosystem parameters.

  11. Monitoring the emission of volatile organic compounds from flowers of Jasminum sambac using solid-phase micro-extraction fibers and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Pragadheesh, Vppalayam Shanmugam; Yadav, Anju; Chanotiya, Chandan Singh; Rout, Prasanta Kumar; Uniyal, Girish Chandra

    2011-09-01

    Solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME) was studied as a solvent free alternative method for the extraction and characterization of volatile compounds in intact and plucked flowers of Jasminum sambac at different day time intervals using gas chromatography (GC-FID) and gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry. The analytes identified included alcohols, esters, phenolic compounds, and terpenoids. The main constituents identified in the flower aroma using different fibers were cis-3-hexenyl acetate, (E)-beta-ocimene, linalool, benzyl acetate, and (E,E)-alpha-farnesene. The benzyl acetate proportion decreased from morning to afternoon and then increased in evening collections. PDMS fiber showed a high proportion of (E,E)-alpha-farnesene in jasmine floral aroma. Among other constituents identified, cis-3-hexenyl acetate, linalool, and benzyl acetate were major aroma contributors in plucked and living flowers extracts using PDMS/DVB, Carboxen/PDMS, and DVB/Carboxen/PDMS fibers. PDMS/DVB recorded the highest emission for benzyl acetate while the (E)-beta-ocimene proportion was highest in DVB/Carboxen/PDMS when compared with the rest. The highest linalool content, with increasing proportion from morning to noon, was found using mixed coating fibers. Almost negligible volatile adsorption was recorded for the polyacrylate fiber for intact flower aroma, whereas it was most effective for benzyl acetate, followed by indole under plucked conditions. Moreover, the highest amounts extracted, evaluated from the sum of peak areas, were achieved using Carboxen/PDMS, and DVB/Carboxen/PDMS. Introduction of a rapid, and solvent free SPME method for the analysis of multicomponent volatiles can be successfully employed to monitor the extraction and characterization of flower aroma constituents. PMID:21941909

  12. Emission and Chemical Transformation of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds(ECHO)- Investigation in and above a Mixed Forest Stand: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppmann, R.; FZJ Echo Team; Kesselmeier, J.; Meixner, F. X.; MPI Echo Team; Warnke, J.; Hoffmann, T.; Aubrun, S.; Leitl, B.; Schatzmann, M.; Dlugi, R.; Zelger, M.; Kleffmann, J.; Neftel, A.; Hansel, A.; Thomas, C.; Neininger, B.

    2003-12-01

    The objective of the ECHO project is to provide a better understanding of forest stands as a complex source of reactive trace gases into the troposphere. This will be achieved by a unique combination of field, laboratory, and simulation experiments investigating chemical and dynamical processes within the canopy and thus the forest stand as a net source of reactive trace compounds into the planetary boundary layer. The field experiments were carried out in the Stetternicher Forest on the area of the Research Center J\\x81lich. The area has been a deciduous forest for more than 300 years and is surrounded by farmland. Dominating tree species are oaks, beech, and birch. Prevailing wind direction is from the south west, more seldom from the south east. The site is only weakly influenced by urban air masses. At the site three towers were set up, which were equipped with a large set of instruments to measure micrometeorological parameters, biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds, ozone, nitrogen oxides, and CO, as well as radiation in and above the forest. Additionally, measurements of meteorological parameters were done at the meteorological tower up to a height of 120 m and with a SODAR-RASS system up to 300 m. The first field study took place between June 3 and July 12, 2002, the second field campaign between June 23 and August 1, 2003. As a speciality of the ECHO project, important aspects of the different processes determining the net emission from forest stands into the atmosphere are investigated in laboratory and simulation experiments. The chemical processing of the trace gas mixtures observed in the forest stand is investigated in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR under controlled conditions. This enables a detailed study of the chemical processes under exclusion of transport processes and sensitivity studies by direct modification of individual chemical parameters. Emission and uptake of VOC by plants are investigated in plant chambers under defined conditions. The soil as a source of nitrogen oxide is investigated in a lysimeter experiment. The flow dynamics of the forest site is investigated in detail in wind tunnel experiments using a 1:300 scale model of the field site.

  13. Potential odorous volatile organic compound emissions from feces and urine from cattle fed corn-based diets with wet distillers grains and solubles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, Kristin E.; Parker, David B.; Cole, N. Andy

    2012-12-01

    Odor and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions are a concern at animal feeding operations (AFOs). The issue has become more prevalent as human residences move into areas once occupied only by agriculture. Odors near AFOs are generally caused by odorous VOCs emitted from manure, the mixture of feces and urine. Wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS) are a by-product of the ethanol industry, and WDGS have become a staple in many beef cattle finishing diets. The objective of this research was to determine specific VOC emissions from frozen feces and urine of cattle fed steam-flaked corn (SFC)-based diets containing 0, 15, 30, or 45% WDGS. No differences in flux were detected across dietary treatments for phenol, indole, skatole, or 4-methylphenol (P > 0.23). Dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide flux in feces were not different across treatments (P > 0.35) and the flux of volatile fatty acids (VFA) such as acetic, propionic, isobutyric, butyric, isovaleric, and valeric were not different across treatments (P > 0.25). There was a tendency for dimethyl disulfide flux from urine to be greater for cattle consuming an SFC-based diet with 15% WDGS than the other diets (P = 0.10). Furthermore, flux of acetic, propionic, isobutyric, butyric, and isovaleric acid from the urine were not different (P > 0.61) across dietary treatment. There were no significant differences in odor activity value (OAV) across treatments for feces, and only a tendency for dimethyl disulfide in the feces (P = 0.09). Thus, there was no obvious indication that feeding WDGS in conjunction with SFC affects flux of odor or odorous VOC from beef manure. The summed OAV was three times higher in the urine than feces, and a single odorous compound (4-methylphenol) accounted for 97.6%and 67.3% of the OAV in urine and feces, respectively. Therefore, engineering or dietary strategies to reduce odor from beef cattle manure should focus on controlling or reducing 4-methylphenol concentrations in the urine and feces.

  14. The contributions of high- and low altitude emission sources to the near ground concentrations of air pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ?or?evi?, Dragana S.; Šolevi?, Tatjana M.

    2008-02-01

    The scale of transport through the atmosphere depends on the effective height of an emission source, the meteorological conditions and the physico-chemical characteristics of the pollutants. Atmospheric surface temperature inversions play a significant role in the problem of air pollution since their upper edge acts as a natural barrier to the vertical dispersion of pollutants. When the altitude of an emission source is lower than the edge of the boundary layer, the pollution remains below the upper edge and spreads by advection inside the lower layer towards the ground. However, if the altitude of the emission source is higher than the edge of the boundary layer, then the pollution spreads above the barrier. An analysis of a pollution episode during one month (August 2004) in an urban atmosphere of industrial city, using results of continuous monitoring of minute-by-minute fluctuations of the pollutants' concentrations, is presented. Region of a developed industrial town as a model was investigated. The investigated region is characterized by maximum number of surface temperature inversions during the nights in August and their furlough during the day time. With a combination of local meteorological information, that is the number of surface temperature inversions of the atmosphere, the results showed that the concentrations of pollutants originating from low altitude emission sources, e.g. organic pollutants, were higher at night. The near ground concentrations of SO 2, originating from high-(industrial stacks) and low altitude (traffic) sources, and the PM 10 originating from various sources i.e. from complex mechanisms of formation e.g. traffic emissions, SOA mechanisms and re-suspensions, were the same during the night and during the day. However, concentrations of NH 3 from high altitude sources (fertilizer plant) were higher during the day. Cluster Analysis and Principal Component Analysis showed associations of highest correlation between pollutants, which are constituents of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs), which signify strong influences of emission from low altitude sources e.g. oil pollutants from near industrial zone.

  15. Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds and subsequent photochemical production of secondary organic aerosol in mesocosm studies of temperate and tropical plant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyche, K. P.; Ryan, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.; Alfarra, M. R.; McFiggans, G.; Carr, T.; Monks, P. S.; Smallbone, K. L.; Capes, G.; Hamilton, J. F.; Pugh, T. A. M.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2014-06-01

    Silver birch (Betula pendula) and three Southeast Asian tropical plant species (Ficus cyathistipula, Ficus benjamina and Caryota millis) from the pantropical fig and palm genera were grown in a purpose-built and environment-controlled whole-tree chamber. The volatile organic compounds emitted from these trees were characterised and fed into a linked photochemical reaction chamber where they underwent photooxidation under a range of controlled conditions (RH ∼65-89%, VOC/NOx ∼3-9 and NOx ∼2 ppbV). Both the gas phase and the aerosol phase of the reaction chamber were monitored in detail using a comprehensive suite of on-line and off-line, chemical and physical measurement techniques. Silver birch was found to be a high monoterpene and sesquiterpene, but low isoprene emitter, and its emissions were observed to produce measureable amounts of SOA via both nucleation and condensation onto pre-existing seed aerosol (YSOA 26-39%). In contrast, all three tropical species were found to be high isoprene emitters with trace emissions of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. In tropical plant experiments without seed aerosol there was no measurable SOA nucleation, but aerosol mass was shown to increase when seed aerosol was present. Although principally isoprene emitting, the aerosol mass produced from tropical fig was mostly consistent (i.e., in 78 out of 120 aerosol mass calculations using plausible parameter sets of various precursor specific yields) with condensation of photooxidation products of the minor VOCs co-emitted; no significant aerosol yield from condensation of isoprene oxidation products was required in the interpretations of the experimental results. This finding is in line with previous reports of organic aerosol loadings consistent with production from minor biogenic VOCs co-emitted with isoprene in principally-isoprene emitting landscapes in Southeast Asia. Moreover, in general the amount of aerosol mass produced from the emissions of the principally-isoprene-emitting plants, was less than would be expected from published single-VOC experiments, if co-emitted species were solely responsible for the final SOA mass. Interpretation of the results obtained from the fig data sets, leaves room for a potential role for isoprene in inhibiting SOA formation under certain ambient atmospheric conditions, although instrumental and experimental constraints impose a level of caution in the interpretation of the results. Concomitant gas and aerosol phase composition measurements also provide a detailed overview of numerous key oxidation mechanisms at work within the systems studied and their combined analysis provides insight into the nature of the SOA formed.

  16. Hole Distribution in (Sr,Ca,Y,La)14Cu24O41 Compounds Studied by X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabasawa, Eiki; Nakamura, Jin; Yamada, Nobuyoshi; Kuroki, Kazuhiko; Yamazaki, Hisashi; Watanabe, Masamitsu; Denlinger, Jonathan D.; Shin, Shik; Perera, Rupert C. C.

    2008-03-01

    The polarization dependence of soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) near the O 1s absorption edge was measured on two-leg ladder single-crystalline samples of (Sr,Ca,Y,La)14Cu24O41 (14-24-41). The hole distributions in 14-24-41 compounds are determined by polarization analysis. For samples with less than or equal to 5 holes/chemical formula (c.f.), all holes reside on the edge-shared chain layer. In the case of Sr14-xCaxCu24O41 (6 holes/c.f.), there is approximately one hole on the two-leg ladder layer, with about five holes remaining on the edge-shared chain layer. By Ca substitution for Sr in the Sr14-xCaxCu24O41 samples, 0.3 holes transfer from the edge-shared chain to the two-leg ladder layer. It is possible that some of the holes on the two-leg ladder layer move from the rung sites to the leg sites upon Ca substitution.

  17. Emissions from India's transport sector: Statewise synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandra, T. V.; Shwetmala

    A decentralized emission inventories are prepared for road transport sector of India in order to design and implement suitable technologies and policies for appropriate mitigation measures. Globalization and liberalization policies of the government in 90's have increased the number of road vehicles nearly 92.6% from 1980-1981 to 2003-2004. These vehicles mainly consume non-renewable fossil fuels, and are a major contributor of green house gases, particularly CO 2 emission. This paper focuses on the statewise road transport emissions (CO 2, CH 4, CO, NO x, N 2O, SO 2, PM and HC), using region specific mass emission factors for each type of vehicles. The country level emissions (CO 2, CH 4, CO, NO x, N 2O, SO 2 and NMVOC) are calculated for railways, shipping and airway, based on fuel types. In India, transport sector emits an estimated 258.10 Tg of CO 2, of which 94.5% was contributed by road transport (2003-2004). Among all the states and Union Territories, Maharashtra's contribution is the largest, 28.85 Tg (11.8%) of CO 2, followed by Tamil Nadu 26.41 Tg (10.8%), Gujarat 23.31 Tg (9.6%), Uttar Pradesh 17.42 Tg (7.1%), Rajasthan 15.17 Tg (6.22%) and, Karnataka 15.09 Tg (6.19%). These six states account for 51.8% of the CO 2 emissions from road transport.

  18. Evaluation of the stability of a mixture of volatile organic compounds on sorbents for the determination of emissions from indoor materials and products using thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Brown, Veronica M; Crump, Derrick R; Plant, Neil T; Pengelly, Ian

    2014-07-11

    The standard method for the determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in indoor and test chamber air (ISO 16000-6:2011) specifies sampling onto the sorbent Tenax TA followed by analysis using thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS). The informative Annex D to the standard suggests the use of multi-sorbent samplers to extend the volatility range of compounds which can be determined. The aim of this study was to investigate the storage performance of Tenax TA and two multi-sorbent tubes loaded with a mixture of nine VOCs of relevance for material emissions testing. The sorbent combinations tested were quartz wool/Tenax TA/Carbograph™ 5TD and quartz wool/Tenax TA/Carbopack™ X. A range of loading levels, loading conditions (humidities and air volume), storage times (1-4 weeks) and storage conditions (refrigerated and ambient) were investigated. Longer term storage trials (up to 1 year) were conducted with Tenax TA tubes to evaluate the stability of tubes used for proficiency testing (PT) of material emissions analyses. The storage performance of the multi-sorbent tubes tested was found to be equal to that for Tenax TA, with recoveries after 4 weeks storage of within about 10% of the amounts loaded. No consistent differences in recoveries were found for the different loading or storage conditions. The longer term storage trials also showed good recovery for these compounds, although two other compounds, hexanal and BHT, were found to be unstable when stored on Tenax TA. The results of this study provide confidence in the stability of nine analytes for up to 4 weeks on two multi-sorbent tubes for material emissions testing and the same compounds loaded on Tenax TA sorbent for a recently introduced PT scheme for material emissions testing. PMID:24877978

  19. Volatile organic compounds emission control in industrial pollution source using plasma technology coupled with F-TiO2/?-Al2O3.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tao; Chen, Rui; Xia, Ni; Li, Xiaoyang; He, Xianxian; Zhao, Wenjuan; Carr, Tim

    2015-06-01

    Volatile organic compounds' (VOCs) effluents, which come from many industries, are triggering serious environmental problems. As an emerging technology, non-thermal plasma (NTP) technology is a potential technology for VOCs emission control. NTP coupled with F-TiO2/?-Al2O3 is used for toluene removal from a gaseous influent at normal temperature and atmospheric pressure. NTP is generated by dielectric barrier discharge, and F-TiO2/?-Al2O3 can be prepared by sol-gel method in the laboratory. In the experiment, the different packed materials were packed into the plasma reactor, including ?-Al2O3, TiO2/?-Al2O3 and F-TiO2/?-Al2O3. Through a series of characterization methods such as X-ray diffraction, scanning electronic microscopy and Brunner-Emmet-Teller measurements, the results show that the particle size distribution of F-TiO2 is relatively smaller than that of TiO2, and the pore distribution of F-TiO2 is more uniformly distributed than that of TiO2. The relationships among toluene removal efficiency, reactor input energy density, and the equivalent capacitances of air gap and dielectric barrier layer were investigated. The results show that the synergistic technology NTP with F-TiO2/?-Al2O3 resulted in greater enhancement of toluene removal efficiency and energy efficiency. Especially, when packing with F-TiO2/?-Al2O3 in NTP reactor, toluene removal efficiency reaches 99% and higher. Based on the data analysis of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, the experimental results showed that NTP reactor packed with F-TiO2/?-Al2O3 resulted in a better inhibition for by-products formation effectively in the gas exhaust. PMID:25428439

  20. Emission and profile characteristic of volatile organic compounds emitted from coke production, iron smelt, heating station and power plant in Liaoning Province, China.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianwu; Deng, Hao; Bai, Zhipeng; Kong, Shaofei; Wang, Xiuyan; Hao, Jiming; Han, Xinyu; Ning, Ping

    2015-05-15

    107 kinds of C2-C12 volatile organic compound (VOC) mass concentrations and profiles for four types of coal-fired stationary sources in Liaoning Province were studied by a dilution sampling system and GC-MS analysis method, which are of significant importance with regard to VOC emissions in northeast of China. The results showed that there were some differences among these VOC source profiles. The total mass concentrations of analyzed 107 VOC species varied from 10,917 to 19,652?gm(-3). Halogenated hydrocarbons exhibited higher mass percentages for the VOC source profiles of iron smelt (48.8%) and coke production plant (37.7%). Aromatic hydrocarbons were the most abundant in heating station plant (69.1%). Ketones, alcohols and acetates held 45.0% of total VOCs in thermal power plant. For non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), which are demanded for photochemical assessment in the USA, toluene and n-hexane were the most abundant species in the iron smelt, coke production and thermal power plant, with the mass percentages of 64.8%, 52.7% and 38.6%, respectively. Trimethylbenzene, n-propylbenzene and o,m-ethyltoluene approximately accounted for 70.0% in heating station plant. NMHCs emitted from coke production, iron smelt, heating station and power plant listed above presented different chemical reactivities. The average OH loss rate of NMHCs from heating station, was 4 to 5.6 times higher than that of NMHCs from iron smelt, coke production and power plant, which implies that VOCs emitted from heating station in northeast of China should be controlled firstly to avoid photochemical ozone pollution and protect human health. There are significant variations in the ratios of benzene/toluene and m, p-xylene/ethylbenzene of these coal-fired source profiles. The representativeness of the coal-fired sources studied and the VOC samples collected should be more closely examined. The accuracy of VOC source profiles related to coal-fired processes is highly dependent on location and sampling method. PMID:25704266

  1. Development of a road transport emission inventory for Greece and the Greater Athens Area: effects of important parameters.

    PubMed

    Fameli, K M; Assimakopoulos, V D

    2015-02-01

    Traffic is considered one of the major polluting sectors and as a consequence a significant cause for the measured exceedances of ambient air quality limit values mainly in urban areas. The Greater Athens Area (located in Attica), the most populated area in Greece, faces severe air pollution problems due to the combination of high road traffic emissions, complex topography and local meteorological conditions. Even though several efforts were made to construct traffic emission inventories for Greece and Attica, still there is not a spatially and temporally resolved one, based on data from relevant authorities and organisations. The present work aims to estimate road emissions in Greece and Attica based on the top down approach. The programme COPERT 4 was used to calculate the annual total emissions from the road transport sector for the period 2006-2010 and an emission inventory for Greece and Attica was developed with high spatial (6 × 6 km(2) for Greece and 2 × 2 km(2) for Attica) and temporal (1-hour) resolutions. The results revealed that about 40% of national CO?, CO, VOC and NMVOC values and 30% of NOx and particles are emitted in Attica. The fuel consumption and the subsequent reduction of annual mileage driven in combination with the import of new engine anti-pollution technologies affected CO?, CO, VOC and NMVOC emissions. The major part of CO (56.53%) and CO? (66.15%) emissions was due to passenger cars (2010), while heavy duty vehicles (HDVs) were connected with NOx, PM?.? and PM?? emissions with 51.27%, 43.97% and 38.13% respectively (2010). The fleet composition, the penetration of diesel fuelled cars, the increase of urban average speed and the fleet renewal are among the most effective parameters towards the emission reduction strategies. PMID:25461080

  2. A BIOGENIC ROLE IN EXPOSURE TO TWO TOXIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biogenic sources play an important role in ozone and particulate concentrations through emissions of volatile organic compounds. The same emissions also contribute to chronic toxic exposures from formaldehyde and acetaldehyde because each compound arises through primary and se...

  3. Effect of biogenic volatile organic compound emissions on tropospheric chemistry during the Atmospheric Pollution Over the Paris Area (ESQUIF) campaign in the Ile-de-France region

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Derognat; M. Beekmann; M. Baeumle; D. Martin; H. Schmidt

    2003-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of biogenic isoprene and terpene emissions on photochemical species levels in the French Ile-de-France region during several photooxidant pollution episodes in summer 1998 and 1999 during the Atmospheric Pollution Over the Paris Area (ESQUIF) project. The effect of biogenic emissions on both ozone produced on a continental scale and advected in Ile-de-France and on ozone

  4. CONTROL OF INDUSTRIAL VOC (VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND) EMISSIONS BY CATALYTIC INCINERATION. VOLUME 6. CATALYTIC INCINERATOR PERFORMANCE AT INDUSTRIAL SITE C-4

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radian Corporation is conducting a testing program for the EPA to document the performance of catalytic incinerators applied to industrial processes for volatile organic compound (VOC) control. Performance data collected at each test site is being summarized in a series of test r...

  5. A framework for modeling non-steady state concentrations of semivolatile organic compounds indoors ? I. Emissions from diffusional sources and sorption by interior surfaces

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past two decades, more than 20 mass transfer models have been developed for the sources, sinks, and barriers for volatile and semivolatile organic compounds (VOCs and SVOCs) in the indoor environment. While these models have greatly improved our understanding of VOC and ...

  6. Effect of mechanical damage on emission of volatile organic compounds from plant leaves and implications for evaluation of host plant specificity of prospective biological control agents of weeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assessment of host plant specificity is a critical step in the evaluation of classical biological control agents of weeds, which is necessary for avoiding possible damage to nontarget plants. Volatile organic compounds (VOC) emitted by plants likely play an important role in determining which plant...

  7. Standardization of flux chamber and wind tunnel flux measurements for quantifying volatile organic compound and ammonia emissions from area sources at animal feeding operations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variety of wind tunnels and flux chambers have been used to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and ammonia (NH3) at animal feeding operations (AFO). However, there has been little regard to the extreme variation and potential inaccuracies caused by inappropriate air velocity or sw...

  8. CONTROL OF INDUSTRIAL VOC (VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND) EMISSIONS BY CATALYTIC INCINERATION. VOLUME 3. CATALYTIC INCINERATOR PERFORMANCE AT INDUSTRIAL SITE C-1

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radian Corporation is conducting a testing program for the EPA (Contract No. 68-02-3171, Work Assignment 50) to document the performance of catalytic incinerators applied to industrial processes for volatile organic compound (VOC) control. Performance data collected at each test ...

  9. Identification of Seasonal Variations in Volatile Sulfur Compound Formation and Emission From the Secondary Treatment System at a Large Wastewater Treatment Plant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Offensive odors associated with gaseous emissions from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are a nuisance to residential communities that exist in close proximity to these facilities. The purpose of this study was to identify, quantify and determine source locations of significant volatile sulfur c...

  10. Use of thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) on identification of odorant emission focus by volatile organic compounds characterisation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Navas, Carlos; Forteza, Rafael; Cerdà, Víctor

    2012-11-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from several different municipal solid wastes' treatment plants in Mallorca (Spain) have been analysed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS). Ambient (immission) air was collected during February and March 2011 by active sampling onto sorbents Tenax™ TA and Carboxen™ 1000. The study presents the chemical characterisation of 93 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from an overall set of 84 immission air samples. 70 VOCs were positively identified. The linear fit for all 93 external standard calibration, from 10 mg L(-1) to 150 mg L(-1) (n=4), was within the range 0.974compounds (RSCs) and municipal solid wastes show contribution of a wide sort of VOCs. The use of a chemometric approach for variable's reduction to 12 principal components enables evaluation of similarities and dissimilarities between facilities. PCA clearly related samples to its corresponding facility on the basis of their VOCs composition and the ambient temperature. PMID:22776256

  11. Volatile Organic Compound emissions from soil: using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS) for the real time observation of microbial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, P. R.; Behrendt, T.; Klapthor, A.; Meixner, F. X.; Williams, J.

    2014-08-01

    In this study we report on the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and nitric oxide (NO) from two contrasting soils (equatorial rainforest and arid cotton field) analyzed in a laboratory based dynamic chamber system. The effect of soil moisture and soil temperature on VOC and NO emission was examined in laboratory incubation experiments by measuring as a pre-saturated soil dried out. Our results suggest that real time monitoring of VOC emissions from soil using a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) instrument can be used to improve our understanding of the release mechanisms of trace gases (e.g. NO, N2O) that are involved in the nitrogen cycle. Moreover, we report on the release rate of various VOC species, many of which exhibit a temperature dependent response indicative of biological production, namely a temperature amplification factor (Q10) ∼ 2-3. Contrary to the conventional modeling of NO emissions from soils, that the release of NO from the overall community across the range of soil water content can be modeled as an optimum function, we suggest that VOC measurements indicate there exist multiple distinct contributing microbial guilds releasing NO. These microbial guilds could likely be individually identified with the observed VOC profiles. Using a cotton field soil sample from a Sache oasis (Taklimakan desert, Xinijang, P. R. China), we identify five VOC emission groups with varying degrees of NO co-emission. An equatorial rainforest soil (Suriname) was shown to emit a variety of VOC including acetaldehyde, acetone, DMS, formaldehyde, and isoprene that vary strongly and individually as a function of temperature and soil moisture content. PTR-TOF-MS with high time resolution, sensitivity, and molecular specificity is an ideal tool for the real time analysis of VOC and NO emitting processes in soil systems. These experiments can be used as a template for future experiments to more completely and specifically identify the active microbial guilds in soils and to characterize the impact of soil VOC emissions on the atmosphere.

  12. Compound Interest

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Riches

    2007-10-16

    Albert Einstein called compound interest the 8th wonder of the world. Find out why compound interest and the time value of money are so important. What is Interest Click on the following link to read about the different types of interest. Loans and Interest So why learn about compound interest? Using time and interest to your advantage, you can make more money than you have ever dreamed of. See how the time value of ...

  13. Characterization of Halyomorpha halys (brown marmorated stink bug) biogenic volatile organic compound emissions and their role in secondary organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Danielle; Dutcher, Dabrina; Raymond, Timothy

    2013-11-01

    The formation of aerosols is a key component in understanding cloud formation in the context of radiative forcings and global climate modeling. Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are a significant source of aerosols, yet there is still much to be learned about their structures, sources, and interactions. The aims of this project were to identify the BVOCs found in the defense chemicals of the brown marmorated stink bug Halymorpha halys and quantify them using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and test whether oxidation of these compounds by ozone-promoted aerosol and cloud seed formation. The bugs were tested under two conditions: agitation by asphyxiation and direct glandular exposure. Tridecane, 2(5H)-furanone 5-ethyl, and (E)-2-decenal were identified as the three most abundant compounds. H. halys were also tested in the agitated condition in a smog chamber. It was found that in the presence of 100-180 ppm ozone, secondary aerosols do form. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC) were used to characterize the secondary aerosols that formed. This reaction resulted in 0.23 microg/ bug of particulate mass. It was also found that these secondary organic aerosol particles could act as cloud condensation nuclei. At a supersaturation of 1%, we found a kappa value of 0.09. Once regional populations of these stink bugs stablilize and the populations estimates can be made, the additional impacts of their contribution to regional air quality can be calculated. PMID:24344570

  14. Influence of olive (cv Grignano) fruit ripening and oil extraction under different nitrogen regimes on volatile organic compound emissions studied by PTR-MS technique.

    PubMed

    Vezzaro, Alice; Boschetti, Andrea; Dell'Anna, Rossana; Canteri, Roberto; Dimauro, Mariano; Ramina, Angelo; Ferasin, Massimo; Giulivo, Claudio; Ruperti, Benedetto

    2011-03-01

    Volatile organic compounds of extra virgin olive oils obtained from the local Italian cultivar Grignano were measured by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Oils were extracted by olives harvested at different ripening stages across veraison, performing each extraction step and the whole extraction process in nitrogen atmosphere to observe the changes in the volatile profiles of the oils. Principal component analysis carried out on the full spectral signature of the PTR-MS measurements showed that the stage of ripening has a stronger effect on the global definition of volatile profiles than the use of nitrogen during oil extraction. The fingerprint-like chemical information provided by the spectra were used to construct a heat map, which allowed the dynamical representation of the multivariate nature of mass evolution during the ripening process. This provided the first evidence that some groups of volatile organic compounds displayed a time course of regulation with coordinated increasing or decreasing trends in association with specific stages of fruit ripening. PMID:21225248

  15. CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Continuous emissions monitoring of hazardous and mixed waste thermal treatment processes is desired for verification of emission compliance, process control, and public safety perception. pecies of particular interest include trace metals and organic compounds resulting from inco...

  16. Development and evaluation of a countercurrent parallel-plate membrane diffusion denuder for the removal of gas-phase compounds from vehicular emissions.

    PubMed

    Papapostolou, Vasileios; Lawrence, Joy E; Ferguson, Stephen T; Wolfson, Jack M; Koutrakis, Petros

    2011-11-01

    Diffusion denuders have been commonly used to remove trace gases from an aerosol (mixture of gases and particles), while allowing the particles to remain suspended in air. We present the design and evaluation of a high-flow (16.7?L min?¹) countercurrent parallel-plate membrane diffusion denuder that has high removal efficiencies for both non-reactive gases such as carbon monoxide (89%), as well as volatile organic compounds (80-85%) from an automobile exhaust. Particle losses were approximately 15% for particles around 100 nm in diameter. This denuder is suitable for toxicological tests involving both human and animal exposures to combustion aerosols. The denuder may also be used for other applications, for example, to reduce the effect of gas-phase sampling artifacts on particle composition. PMID:22035125

  17. ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICAL EMISSIONS FROM COMBUSTION SOURCES: DIESEL PARTICULATE EMISSIONS AND DOMESTIC WASTE OPEN BURN EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) from combustion sources are poorly characterized due to the large number of compounds present in the emissions, the complexity of the analytical separations required, and the uncertainty regarding identification of chemicals with...

  18. A high-resolution and multi-year emissions inventory for biomass burning in Southeast Asia during 2001-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yusheng; Yamaguchi, Yasushi

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning (BB) emissions from forest fires, agricultural waste burning, and peatland combustion contain large amounts of greenhouse gases (e.g., CO2, CH4, and N2O), which significantly impact ecosystem productivity, global atmospheric chemistry, and climate change. With the help of recently released satellite products, biomass density based on satellite and observation data, and spatiotemporal variable combustion factors, this study developed a new high-resolution and multi-year emissions inventory for BB in Southeast Asia (SEA) during 2001-2010. The 1-km grid was effective for quantifying emissions from small-sized fires that were frequently misinterpreted by coarse grid data due to their large smoothed pixels. The average annual BB emissions in SEA during 2001-2010 were 277 Gg SO2, 1125 Gg NOx, 55,388 Gg CO, 3831 Gg NMVOC, 553 Gg NH3, 324 Gg BC, 2406 Gg OC, 3832 Gg CH4, 817,809 Gg CO2, and 99 Gg N2O. Emissions were high in western Myanmar, Northern Thailand, eastern Cambodia, northern Laos, and South Sumatra and South Kalimantan of Indonesia. Emissions from forest burning were the dominant contributor to the total emissions among all land types. The spatial pattern of BB emissions was consistent with that of the burned areas. In addition, BB emissions exhibited similar temporal trends from 2001 to 2010, with strong interannual and intraannual variability. Interannual and intraannual emission peaks were seen during 2004, 2007, 2010, and January-March and August-October, respectively.

  19. Speciation analysis of triethyl-lead and tributyl-tin compounds in human urine by liquid-liquid extraction and gas chromatography microwave-induced plasma atomic emission detection.

    PubMed

    Zachariadis, George A; Rosenberg, Erwin

    2012-05-01

    This work describes the development of a fast method for speciation analysis of triethyl-lead and tributyl-tin species in urine samples after in situ derivatization by tetraethyl- or tetrapropyl-borate reagents. The alkylation reaction is done in the aqueous and urine medium and the less-polar derivatives are extracted in hexane by liquid-liquid extraction. The species were extracted and the extract was efficiently collected from the aqueous phase after centrifugation. Finally, the organometallic species are separated by gas chromatography and determined from the emission signals of elemental lead and tin. Atomic lead and tin are formed from the organolead and organotin compounds during atomization of the column eluate in a microwave-induced helium plasma source. The simultaneous measurement of lead (Pb) at 405.780 nm and tin (Sn) at 303.419 nm was achieved by an atomic emission detector. Finally, the analytes were determined with satisfactory precision (<5%) and detection limits of 0.05 ?g Pb/L and 0.48 ?g Sn/L, respectively, when 10 mL of urine is extracted with 1 mL of hexane and 1 ?L of extract is injected. PMID:22689489

  20. Organosulfur Compounds

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Reich, Ieva

    Quiz questions from the organic chemistry question bank provide students with an excellent opportunity to review key concepts. This set of questions focuses on organosulfur compounds, with a special emphasis on thiols and sulfides.

  1. Polybenzimidazole compounds

    DOEpatents

    Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jones, Michael G. (Pocatello, ID)

    2010-08-10

    A PBI compound that includes imidazole nitrogens, at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2--, where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The PBI compound may exhibit similar thermal properties in comparison to the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may exhibit a solubility in an organic solvent greater than the solubility of the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may occur at about room temperature and/or at about atmospheric pressure. Substituting may use at least five equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted or, preferably, about fifteen equivalents.

  2. Polybenzimidazole compounds

    DOEpatents

    Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID); Jones, Michael G. (Chubbuck, ID); Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Trowbridge, Tammy L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-11-22

    A PBI compound includes imidazole nitrogens at least a portion of which are substituted with a moiety containing a carbonyl group, the substituted imidazole nitrogens being bonded to carbon of the carbonyl group. At least 85% of the nitrogens may be substituted. The carbonyl-containing moiety may include RCO--, where R is alkoxy or haloalkyl. The PBI compound may exhibit a first temperature marking an onset of weight loss corresponding to reversion of the substituted PBI that is less than a second temperature marking an onset of decomposition of an otherwise identical PBI compound without the substituted moiety. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may use more than 5 equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted.

  3. Multipurpose Compound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Specially formulated derivatives of an unusual basic compound known as Alcide may be the answer to effective treatment and prevention of the disease bovine mastitis, a bacterial inflammation of a cow's mammary gland that results in loss of milk production and in extreme cases, death. Manufactured by Alcide Corporation the Alcide compound has killed all tested bacteria, virus and fungi, shortly after contact, with minimal toxic effects on humans or animals. Alcide Corporation credits the existence of the mastitis treatment/prevention products to assistance provided the company by NERAC, Inc.

  4. Identification of surrogate compounds for the emission of PCdd/F (I-TEQ value) and evaluation of their on-line real-time detectability in flue gases of waste incineration plants by REMPI-TOFMS mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Blumenstock, M; Zimmermann, R; Schramm, K W; Kettrup, A

    2001-01-01

    Correlations between products of incomplete combustion (PIC), e.g., chloroaromatic compounds, can be used to characterise the emissions from combustion processes, like municipal or hazardous waste incineration. A possible application of such relationships may be the on-line real-time monitoring of a characteristic surrogate, e.g., with Resonance-Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (REMPI-TOFMS). In this paper, we report the relationships of homologues and individual congeners of chlorinated benzenes (PCBz), dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD), dibenzofurans (PCDF) and phenols (PCPh) to the International Toxicity Equivalent (I-TEQ) of the PCDD/F (I-TEQ value) in the flue gas and stack gas of a 22 MW hazardous waste incinerator (HWI). As the REMPI detection sensitivity is decreasing with the increase of the degree of chlorination, this study focuses on the lower chlorinated species of the compounds mentioned above. Lower chlorinated species, e.g., chlorobenzene (MCBz), 1,4-dichlorobenzene, 2,4,6-trichlorodibenzofuran or 2,4-dichlorophenol, were identified as I-TEQ surrogates in the flue gas. In contrast to the higher chlorinated phenols, the lower chlorinated phenols (degree of chlorination <4) were not reliable as surrogates in the stack gas. The identified surrogates are evaluated in terms of their detectability by REMPI-TOFMS laser mass spectrometry. The outcome is that MCBz is the best suited surrogate for (indirect) on-line measuring of the I-TEQ value in the flue gas by REMPI-TOFMS. The correlation coefficient r of the MCBz concentration to the I-TEQ in the flue gas was 0.85. PMID:11219675

  5. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 63% of US magnesium compounds production during 2000. Premier Services in Florida, Dow Chemical in Michigan, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties, and Rohm & Haas recovered dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias from seawater. And Premier Services' recoveries, in Nevada, were from magnasite.

  6. Nickel Compounds

    Cancer.gov

    Nickel is a silvery-white metallic element found in the earth’s crust. It can be combined with other elements to form nickel compounds. Because of its unique properties, nickel has many industrial uses. Most nickel is used in metal alloys because it imparts useful properties, such as corrosion resistance, heat resistance, hardness, and strength.

  7. Aromatic Compounds

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Reich, Ieva

    These organic chemistry quiz questions from the JCE question bank focus on the topic of aromatic compounds. Included in the quiz are questions on nomenclature, synthesis, electrophilic substitution, and huckel's rule. These questions provide great review and practice material for students.

  8. The Influence of Ozone Precursor Emissions from Four World Regions on Tropospheric Composition and Radiative Climate Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, Meridith; Naik, Vaishali; West, J. Jason; Schwarzkopf, M. Daniel; Fiore, Arlene M.; Collins, William J.; Dentener, Frank J.; Shindell, Drew T.; Atherton, Cyndi; Bergmann, Daniel; Duncan, Bryan N.; Hess, Peter; MacKenzie, Ian A.; Marmer, Elina; Schultz, Martin G.; Szopa, Sophie; Wild, Oliver; Zeng, Guang

    2012-01-01

    Ozone (O3) precursor emissions influence regional and global climate and air quality through changes in tropospheric O3 and oxidants, which also influence methane (CH4) and sulfate aerosols (SO4 (sup 2-)). We examine changes in the tropospheric composition of O3, CH4, SO4 (sup 2-) and global net radiative forcing (RF) for 20% reductions in global CH4 burden and in anthropogenic O3 precursor emissions (NOx, NMVOC, and CO) from four regions (East Asia, Europe and Northern Africa, North America, and South Asia) using the Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution Source-Receptor global chemical transport model (CTM) simulations, assessing uncertainty (mean plus or minus 1 standard deviation) across multiple CTMs. We evaluate steady state O3 responses, including long-term feedbacks via CH4. With a radiative transfer model that includes greenhouse gases and the aerosol direct effect, we find that regional NOx reductions produce global, annually averaged positive net RFs (0.2 plus or minus 0.6 to 1.7 2 mWm(sup -2)/Tg N yr(sup -1), with some variation among models. Negative net RFs result from reductions in global CH4 (-162.6 plus or minus 2 mWm(sup -2) for a change from 1760 to 1408 ppbv CH4) and regional NMVOC (-0.4 plus or minus 0.2 to 0.7 plus or minus 0.2 mWm(sup -2)/Tg C yr(sup -1) and CO emissions (-0.13 plus or minus 0.02 to -0.15 plus or minus 0.02 mWm(sup-2)/Tg CO yr(sup-1). Including the effect of O3 on CO2 uptake by vegetation likely makes these net RFs more negative by -1.9 to- 5.2 mWm(sup -2)/Tg N yr(sup -1), -0.2 to -0.7 mWm(sup -2)/Tg C yr(sup -1), and -0.02 to -0.05 mWm(sup -2)/ Tg CO yr(sup -1). Net RF impacts reflect the distribution of concentration changes, where RF is affected locally by changes in SO4 (sup -2), regionally to hemispherically by O3, and globally by CH4. Global annual average SO4 2 responses to oxidant changes range from 0.4 plus or minus 2.6 to -1.9 plus or minus 1.3 Gg for NOx reductions, 0.1 plus or minus 1.2 to -0.9 plus or minus 0.8 Gg for NMVOC reductions, and -0.09 plus or minus 0.5 to -0.9 plus or minus 0.8 Gg for CO reductions, suggesting additional research is needed. The 100-year global warming potentials (GWP(sub 100)) are calculated for the global CH4 reduction (20.9 plus or minus 3.7 without stratospheric O3 or water vapor, 24.2 plus or minus 4.2 including those components), and for the regional NOx, NMVOC, and CO reductions (18.7 plus or minus 25.9 to 1.9 plus or minus 8.7 for NOx, 4.8 plus or minus 1.7 to 8.3 plus or minus 1.9 for NMVOC, and 1.5 plus or minus 0.4 to 1.7 plus or minus 0.5 for CO). Variation in GWP(sub 100) for NOx, NMVOC, and CO suggests that regionally specific GWPs may be necessary and could support the inclusion of O3 precursors in future policies that address air quality and climate change simultaneously. Both global net RF and GWP100 are more sensitive to NOx and NMVOC reductions from South Asia than the other three regions.

  9. Reducing emissions of carbonyl compounds and regulated harmful matters from a heavy-duty diesel engine fueled with paraffinic/biodiesel blends at one low load steady-state condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan-Chung; Wu, Tzi-Yi; Ou-Yang, Wen-Chung; Chen, Chung-Bang

    This study investigated the emissions of carbonyl compounds (CBCs) and regulated harmful matters (traditional pollutants) from an HDDE (heavy-duty diesel engine) at one low load steady-state condition, 24.5% of the max load (40 km h -1), using five test fuels: premium diesel fuel (D100), P100 (100% palm-biodiesel), P20 (20% palm-biodiesel + 80% premium diesel fuel), PF80P20 (80% paraffinic fuel + 20% palm-biodiesel), and PF95P05 (95% paraffinic fuel + 5% palm-biodiesel). Experimental results indicate that formaldehyde was the major carbonyl in the exhaust, accounting for 70.3-75.4% of total CBC concentrations for all test fuels. Using P100 and P20 instead of D100 in the HDDE increased CBC concentrations by 9.74% and 2.89%, respectively. However, using PF80P20 and PF95P05 as alternative fuels significantly reduced CBC concentrations by 30.3% and 24.2%, respectively. Using PF95P05 instead of D100 decreased CBCs by 30.3%, PM by 11.1%, THC by 39.0%, CO by 34.0%, NOx by 24.3%, and CO 2 by 7.60%. The wide usage of paraffinic-palmbiodiesel blends as alternative fuels could protect the environment. However, it should be noted that only one engine operated at one low load steady-state condition was investigated.

  10. A32A-0126: A BIOGENIC ROLE IN EXPOSURE TO TWO TOXIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biogenic sources play an important role in ozone and particulate concentrations through emissions of volatile organic compounds. The same emissions also contribute to chronic toxic exposures from formaldehyde and acetaldehyde because each compound arises through primary and sec...

  11. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, seawater and natural brines accounted for 51% of US magnesium compounds production. World magnesia production was estimated to be 14.5 Mt. Most of the production came from China, North Korea, Russia and Turkey. Although no specific production figures are available, Japan and the United States are estimated to account for almost one-half of the world's capacity from seawater and brines.

  12. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 60 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production during 2002. Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida. They were also recovered from well brines in Michigan by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties and Rohm & Haas. And they were recovered from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals.

  13. 40 CFR 98.63 - Calculating GHG emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production § 98.63 Calculating...Annual emissions of each PFC compound from aluminum production (metric tons PFC). Em...Emissions of the individual PFC compound from aluminum production for the month “m”...

  14. 78 FR 70007 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Missouri; Restriction of Emission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ...State of Missouri; Restriction of Emission of Sulfur Compounds and Emissions Banking and Trading...Missouri rule ``Restriction of Emission of Sulfur Compounds'' will remove redundant sulfur dioxide standards and outdated compliance...

  15. 78 FR 69995 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Missouri; Restriction of Emission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ...State of Missouri; Restriction of Emission of Sulfur Compounds and Emissions Banking and Trading AGENCY...Missouri rule ``Restriction of Emission of Sulfur Compounds'' removes redundant sulfur dioxide standards and outdated compliance...

  16. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 60% of US magnesium compounds production in 2001. Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater in Florida by Premier Chemicals. They were also recovered from Michigan well brines by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties and Rohm & Haas. And Premier Chemicals recovered dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias from magnesite in Nevada. Reilly Industries and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah.

  17. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 54 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2010. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its operation mentioned above.

  18. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 40 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2009. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover, and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its operation mentioned above.

  19. Trends in multi-pollutant emissions from a technology-linked inventory for India: II. Residential, agricultural and informal industry sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Apoorva; Sadavarte, Pankaj; Rao, Anand B.; Venkataraman, Chandra

    2014-12-01

    Dispersed traditional combustion technologies, characterized by inefficient combustion and significant emissions, are widely used in residential cooking and "informal industries" including brick production, food and agricultural product processing operations like drying and cooking operations related to sugarcane juice, milk, food-grain, jute, silk, tea and coffee. In addition, seasonal agricultural residue burning in field is a discontinuous source of significant emissions. Here we estimate fuel consumption in these sectors and agricultural residue burned using detailed technology divisions and survey-based primary data for 2010 and projected between 1996 and 2015. In the residential sector, a decline in the fraction of solid biomass users for cooking from 79% in 1996 to 65% in 2010 was offset by a growing population, leading to a nearly constant population of solid biomass users, with a corresponding increase in the population of LPG users. Emissions from agriculture followed the growth in agricultural production and diesel use by tractors and pumps. Trends in emissions from the informal industries sector followed those in coal combustion in brick kilns. Residential biomass cooking stoves were the largest contributors to emissions of PM2.5, OC, CO, NMVOC and CH4. Highest emitting technologies of BC were residential kerosene wick lamps. Emissions of SO2 were largely from coal combustion in Bull's trench kilns and other brick manufacturing technologies. Diesel use in tractors was the major source of NOx emissions. Uncertainties in emission estimates were principally from highly uncertain emission factors, particularly for technologies in the informal industries.

  20. Road traffic emission inventory for air quality modelling and to evaluate the abatement strategies: A case of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Bang Quoc; Clappier, Alain

    2011-07-01

    A road traffic Emission Inventory (EI) is generated for Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Vietnam. For generating the EI for road traffic sources, we used the new EMISENS model, which combines the top-down and bottom-up approaches. The bulk emission factors of traffic stem from another study that estimated the emission factors for HCMC by using an inverse air quality model method. The results show that the motorcycles are responsible for the bulk of traffic emissions (contributing 94% of CO, 68% of NMVOC, 61% of SO2 and 99% of CH4). Four scenarios for reducing of the traffic emissions are designed using the HCMC's plan for reduction of emissions. Two scenarios are the reduction scenarios for the year of 2015 and 2020. In addition, two scenarios are the Business as Usual scenario for the year of 2015 and 2020. If the local government does not have any plan for reduction of emissions (scenario of Business as Usual) the emissions will increase rapidly. If the government follows the planning as set out by the local managers, the emissions of the city will decrease.

  1. Low emission turbo compound engine system

    DOEpatents

    Vuk; Carl T. (Denver, IA)

    2011-05-31

    A diesel or HHCI engine has an air intake and an exhaust for products of combustion. A pair of turbochargers receive the products of combustion in a series relationship and an exhaust aftertreatment device receive the products of combustion from the downstream turbine. A power turbine receives the output from the exhaust aftertreatment device and an EGR system of the power turbine passes a selected portion of the output to a point upstream of the upstream turbocharger compressor. A device adds fuel to the aftertreatment device to regenerate the particulate filter and the power turbine recoups the additional energy. The power turbine may be used to drive accessories or the prime output of the engine.

  2. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 52 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2006. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from sea-water by Premier Chemicals in Florida; from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas; and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from brucite by Applied Chemical Magnesias in Texas, from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas from their operations mentioned above. About 59 percent of the magnesium compounds consumed in the United States was used for refractories that are used mainly to line steelmaking furnaces. The remaining 41 percent was consumed in agricultural, chemical, construction, environmental and industrial applications.

  3. Fun with Compound Words

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Huggins

    2012-04-12

    Identify and create compound words We will be studying compound words! First we need to find out what a compound word is, go to this website and read about compound words.What is a compound word Now that you have read about compound words lets do some fun activities to help us review. First go to Compound word flashcards, here you will ...

  4. PHOBEA/ITCT 2002 airborne observations of transpacific transport of ozone, CO, volatile organic compounds, and aerosols to the northeast Pacific: Impacts of Asian anthropogenic and Siberian boreal fire emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertschi, I. T.; Jaffe, D. A.; Jaeglé, L.; Price, H. U.; Dennison, J. B.

    2004-12-01

    During the spring of 2002, vertical profiles of O3, CO, nonmethane volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and total aerosol scattering were collected over the northwestern coast of Washington State as part of the University of Washington's Photochemical Ozone Budget of the Eastern North Pacific Atmosphere (PHOBEA) research campaign. These observations coincided with NOAA's Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation 2002 (NOAA-ITCT 2K2) project. Thirteen research flights were conducted from 29 March through 23 May and several well-defined polluted layers of varying thickness (˜0.2 to >3 km) were observed at altitudes between 0 and 6 km. These layers were characterized by correlated enhancements of O3, CO, VOCs, and particles. We observed rapid transpacific transport of polluted air masses on 15 April and 14, 17, and 23 May 2002, with ?O3 and ?CO (where ? refers to the enhancement over background) exceeding 30 and 60 ppbv, respectively, and total aerosol scattering of green light ("?sp (550 nm)") exceeding 65 Mm-1. These episodes were efficient in transporting O3 to the northeast (NE) Pacific troposphere, with ?O3/?CO ratios in the pollution layers varying from 0.22 to 0.42 mol mol-1. In contrast, the average ??sp (550 nm)/?CO ratio of the mid-May events (0.66 ± 0.21 (1?)) was more than twice that of the 15 April event (0.32 ± 0.05). The correlation between O3, CO, aerosols, and VOCs coupled with back-trajectory analyses, satellite data, and the GEOS-CHEM global chemical transport model indicate that the primary source of pollution observed on 15 April originated from a mixture of Asian anthropogenic and biomass-burning emissions. For the May events, our analyses indicate that the early onset of the 2002 Siberian fire season was a significant source of the pollution episodes observed in May.

  5. Bismaleimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Adams, J.E.; Jamieson, D.R.

    1986-01-14

    Bismaleimides of the formula shown in the diagram wherein R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] each independently is H, C[sub 1-4]-alkyl, C[sub 1-4]-alkoxy, Cl or Br, or R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1--3; and the alkylene bridging group, optionally, is substituted by 1--3 methyl groups or by fluorine, form polybismaleimide resins which have valuable physical properties. Uniquely, these compounds permit extended cure times, i.e., they remain fluid for a time sufficient to permit the formation of a homogeneous melt prior to curing.

  6. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 57 percent of magnesium compounds produced in the United States in 2011. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties LLC from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia LLC in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash Wendover LLC and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma Inc. in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its brine operation in Michigan.

  7. Impact of aviation emissions on the Arctic environment - GEM-AC model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, J. W.; Porebska, M.; Semeniuk, K.; Lupu, A.

    2013-12-01

    The continuing decrease of ice cover over the Artic allows for the increase in shipping and industrial activities in the region. These activities lead to the increase of anthropogenic emissions from shipping, prospecting, exploration, and smelting. Emissions from shipping are dominant and their magnitude and impact on the Arctic environment have been addressed in recent publications. The objective of this study is investigate the impact of the increased demand for commercial aviation transport to the Arctic on the air quality near the ground as well as the impact of aviation emissions injected at cruise altitudes (9-11 km ) which in many cases will be above the tropopause. We will present results from the GEM-AC model simulations for several aviation emissions scenarios. GEM-AC (Global Environmental Multiscale model for Atmospheric Chemistry) is a chemical weather model based on the GEM model developed by the Meteorological Service of Canada for operational weather forecasting where air quality, free tropospheric, and stratospheric chemistry process are on-line and interactive. In vertical, the model domain is defined on hybrid levels from the surface to ~60km. The gas-phase chemistry includes detailed reactions of Ox, NOx, HOx, CO, CH4, NMVOCs, halocarbons, ClOx and BrO. Also, the model can address aerosol microphysics and gas-aerosol partitioning. The model will be run on a global variable grid with ~30 km uniform horizontal resolution over the Arctic.

  8. Development of multiple-species 1km×1km resolution hourly basis emissions inventory for Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannari, Akiyoshi; Tonooka, Yutaka; Baba, Tsuyoshi; Murano, Kentaro

    A new atmospheric emissions inventory, called "EAGrid2000-Japan", was developed to provide reliable fundamental data for studies of the long-range transport of air pollution in the East Asia region, specifically targeting Japan, in the year 2000. In the development of this inventory, emissions from the Japanese region were estimated in detail with high temporal and spatial resolution: temporally, hourly by month, and spatially, 30? in latitude and 45? in longitude, equivalent to approximately 1km×1km resolution. Anthropogenic annual emissions in Japan were estimated to be as follows: SO2, 0.87 Tg; NOx, 2.4 Tg; NMVOC, 2.0 Tg; NH3, 0.41 Tg; CO, 5.4 Tg; PM10, 0.19 Tg; PM2.5, 0.15 Tg; and CO2, 1.2 Pg. Using this detailed inventory, multiple nesting techniques can be applied to long-range transport model simulations to distinguish the contribution originating on the Asian continent from the local sources in the Japanese region. Also, the importance of emission variations, specifically diurnal, weekly and seasonal variations, was highlighted based on the estimations.

  9. Blue Photoluminescence From Silacyclobutene Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernisz, Udo

    1999-04-01

    Organosilicon compounds in which the Si atom is bound to an aromatic moiety such as a phenyl group, exhibit strong blue photoluminescence when excited with UV light (for example at a wavelength of 337 nm). This phenomenon was investigated quantitatively at room temperature and at the temperature of liquid nitrogen (78 K) by measuring the emission and excitation spectra of the total luminescence, and of the phosphorescence, for a silacyclobutene compound in which two phenyl groups are joined across the C=C double bond of the ring. The effect of a series of organic substituents on the Si atom was investigated as well as the time dependence of the phosphorescence intensity decay for this class of materials. A tentative model of the energy levels in this compound is proposed. The observation of visible blue emission -- in contrast to photoluminescence in the UV from the aromatic groups -- is explained by the Si-C bond lowering the energy of the molecular orbitals, an effect that is currently under study for a range of Si-containing compounds. Synthesis of the silacyclobutene compounds was performed at the laboratory of Prof. N. Auner, now at J.W. Goethe Universität, Frankfurt, Germany. His contributions, and those of his collaborators, to the work reported here are gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Reduction on NOx emissions on urban areas by changing specific vehicle fleets: effects on NO2 and O3 concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncalves, M.; Jimenez, P.; Baldasano, J.

    2007-12-01

    The largest amount of NOx emissions in urban areas comes from on-road traffic, which is the largest contributor to urban air pollution (Colvile et al., 2001). Currently different strategies are being tested in order to reduce its effects; many of them oriented to the reduction of the unitary vehicles emissions, by alternative fuels use (such as biofuels, natural gas or hydrogen) or introduction of new technologies (such as hybrid electric vehicles or fuel cells). Atmospheric modelling permits to predict their consequences on tropospheric chemistry (Vautard et al., 2007). Hence, this work assesses the changes on NO2 and O3 concentrations when substituting a 10 per cent of the urban private cars fleets by petrol hybrid electric cars (HEC) or by natural gas cars (NGC) in Madrid and Barcelona urban areas (Spain). These two cities are selected in order to highlight the different patterns of pollutants transport (inland vs. coastal city) and the different responses to emissions reductions. The results focus on a typical summertime episode of air pollution, by means of the Eulerian air quality model ARW- WRF/HERMES/CMAQ, applied with high resolution (1-hr, 1km2) since of the complexity of both areas under study. The detailed emissions scenarios are implemented in the HERMES traffic emissions module, based on the Copert III-EEA/EMEP-CORINAIR (Nztiachristos and Samaras, 2000) methodology. The HEC introduction reduces NOx emissions from on-road traffic in a 10.8 per cent and 8.2 per cent; and the NGC introduction in a 10.3 per cent and 7.8 per cent, for Madrid and Barcelona areas, respectively. The scenarios also affect the NMVOCs reduction (ranging from -3.1 to -6.9 per cent), influencing the tropospheric photochemistry through the NOx/NMVOCs ratio. The abatement of the NO photooxidation but also to the reduction on primary NO2 involves a decrease on NO2 levels centred on urban areas. For example, the NO2 24-hr average concentration in downtown areas reduces up to 8 per cent (-6 ?g m-3 on average). The urban areas are VOC-controlled, therefore the reduction on NOx emissions involves a minor increase on tropospheric O3 concentration (Jiménez and Baldasano, 2004), up to 1.5 per cent at some points. Nevertheless, the O3 precursors reduction has positive effects in the downwind areas affected by the urban plume, slightly reducing the O3 levels, but at the regional scale the reduction applied on urban traffic emissions has negligible effects. Both scenarios tested are very similar in terms of emissions reductions and air quality changes, which means that the NOx/NMVOCs ratio do not involve an O3-sensitivity regime variation among scenarios. The HEC scenario is more effective in reducing NO2 levels in urban areas than the NGC scenario (with maximum reductions affecting a larger area) and involves a larger increase in urban O3 concentration.

  11. Low emissions diesel fuel

    DOEpatents

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Dorsey, G.F.; West, B.H.

    1998-05-05

    A method and matter of composition for controlling NO{sub x} emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO{sub x} produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

  12. Low emissions diesel fuel

    DOEpatents

    Compere, Alicia L. (Knoxville, TN); Griffith, William L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Farragut, TN); West, Brian H. (Kingston, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A method and matter of composition for controlling NO.sub.x emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO.sub.x produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

  13. Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2012-10-23

    Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

  14. Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2010-09-07

    Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

  15. Destruction of Volatile Organic Compounds Using Catalytic Oxidation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Kosusko; Carlos M. Nunez

    1990-01-01

    Catalytic oxidation is an air pollution control technique in which volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and vapor-phase air toxics in an air emission stream are oxidized with the help of a catalyst Design of catalytic systems for control of point source emissions is based on stream-specific characteristics and desired control efficiency. This paper discusses the key emission stream characteristics and VOC

  16. LEVEL SET REGULARIZATION IN POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY 1 Level Set Method for Positron Emission

    E-print Network

    Chan, Tony F.

    LEVEL SET REGULARIZATION IN POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY 1 Level Set Method for Positron Emission for integrated Petroleum Research). #12;LEVEL SET REGULARIZATION IN POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY 2 Abstract In positron emission tomography (PET) a radioactive compound is injected into the body to promote a tissue

  17. GLOBAL ORGANIC EMISSIONS FROM VEGETATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The book chapter discusses several aspects of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from vegetation. It begins with a section on emission measurements that includes a brief history of enclosure and above-canopy flux measurements as well as a discussion of existing d...

  18. PASSENGER CAR HYDROCARBON EMISSIONS SPECIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emission factors for over 60 individual hydrocarbon compounds were determined for four passenger cars. The cars included a 1963 Chevrolet, a 1977 Mustang, and 1978 Monarch, and 1979 LTD II. The speciation data is reported for both tailpipe and evaporative emissions. The tailpipe ...

  19. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND MODEL-QUALITY ASSURANCE AND SENSITIVITY TESTING (VERSION 1.8)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes test runs of the Volatile Organic Compound Model (VOCM), Version 1.8. VOCM predicts future emission levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by projecting uncontrolled base year emissions into the future. These projected emissions are then reduced by const...

  20. Mathematical modeling of atmospheric fine particle-associated primary organic compound concentrations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wolfgang F. Rogge; Lynn M. Hildemann; Monica A. Mazurek; Glen R. Cass; Bernd R. T. Simoneit

    1996-01-01

    An atmospheric transport model has been used to explore the relationship between source emissions and ambient air quality for individual particle phase organic compounds present in primary aerosol source emissions. An inventory of fine particulate organic compound emissions was assembled for the Los Angeles area in the year 1982. Sources characterized included noncatalyst- and catalyst-equipped diesel trucks, paved road dust,

  1. Mathematical modeling of atmospheric fine particle-associated primary organic compound concentrations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wolfgang F. Rogge; Lynn M. Hildemann; Monica A. Mazurek; Glen R. Cass; Bernd R. T. Simoneit

    1996-01-01

    An atmospheric transport model has been used to explore the relationship between source emissions and ambient air quality for individual particle phase organic compounds present in primary aerosol source emissions. An inventory of fine particulate organic compound emissions was assembled for the Los Angeles area in the year 1982. Sources characterized included noncatalyst- and catalyst-equipped autos, diesel trucks, paved road

  2. Modeling total reduced sulfur and sulfur dioxide emissions from a kraft recovery boiler using an artificial neural network, and, Investigating volatile organic compounds in an urban intermountain valley using a TD/GC/MS methodology and intrinsic tracer molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, Christopher Louis

    2000-11-01

    Back-propagation neural networks were trained to predict total reduced sulfur (TRS) and SO2 emissions from kraft recovery boiler operational data. A 0.721 coefficient of correlation was achieved between actual and predicted sulfur emissions on test data withheld from network training. The artificial neural network (ANN) models found an inverse, linear relationship between TRS/SO2 emissions and percent opacity. A number of relationships among operating parameters and sulfur emissions were identified by the ANN models. These relationships were used to formulate strategies for reducing sulfur emissions. Disagreement between ANN model predictions on a subsequent data set revealed an additional scenario for sulfur release not present in the training data. ANN modeling was demonstrated to be an effective tool for analyzing process variables when balancing productivity and environmental concerns. Five receptor sites distributed in the Missoula Valley, Montana, were employed to investigate possible VOC (benzene, 2,3,4-trimethylpentane, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-/p-xylene, o-xylene, naphthalene, acetone, chloroform, ?-pinene, ?-pinene, p-cymene and limonene) sources. The most dominant source of VOCs was found to be vehicle emissions. Furthermore, anthropogenic sources of terpenoids overwhelmed biogenic emissions, on a local scale. Difficulties correlating wind direction and pollutant levels could be explained by wind direction variability, low wind speed and seasonally dependent meteorological factors. Significant evidence was compiled to support the use of p-cymene as a tracer molecule for pulp mill VOC emissions. Apportionment techniques using o-xylene and p-cymene as tracers for automobile and pulp mill emissions, respectively, were employed to estimate each source's VOC contribution. Motor vehicles were estimated to contribute between 56 and 100 percent of the aromatic pollutants in the Missoula Valley airshed, depending upon the sampling location. Pulp mill emissions were estimated to account from 1 to 34 percent of the aromatic chemicals in the airshed. Measured ambient chloroform levels were attributable to the pulp mill (12-70%) and non-point source urban emissions (7.5-30%).

  3. Luminescence of Lanthanide-Dimethyl Sulfoxide Compound Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Mingzhen; Li, Yuebin; Hossu, Marius; Joly, Alan G.; Liu, Zhongxin; Liu, Zuli; Chen, Wei

    2011-08-04

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has the ability to penetrate living tissues without causing significant damage. Of foremost importance to our understanding of the possible functions of DMSO in biological systems is its ability to replace some of the water molecules associated with the cellular constituents, or to affect the structure of the omnipresent water. Luminescence probes have been widely used for biological studies such as labeling, imaging and detection. Luminescence probes formed in DMSO may find new applications. Here, luminescence compounds formed by refluxing lanthanide nitrates of Ce, La, Tb, Yb, Nd, Gd and Eu in DMSO are reported and their luminescence properties investigated. Based on their luminescence spectral properties, the compounds can be classified into four classes. For compounds-I with Yb, Ce, and La, the excitation and emission spectra are very broad and their excitation or emission peaks are shifted to longer wavelengths when the monitored emission or excitation wavelength is longer . For compounds-II with Gd and Nd, both the excitation and emission spectra are very broad but their emission wavelengths change little at different excitation wavelengths. For Tb-DMSO as compound-III, both the typical emissions from the f - f transitions of Tb3+ and a broad emission at 445 nm are observed. At low temperatures of reaction, the f - f emissions are dominant, while at high temperatures such as 180 oC of reaction, the broad emission at 445 nm is dominant. For compound-IV with Eu-DMSO compounds, the dominant emissions are from the f - f transitions of Eu3+ and only a weak broad emission is observed, which is likely from the d - f transition of Eu2+ rather than from the metal to ligand charge transfer states.

  4. Destruction of air emissions using catalytic oxidation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Kosusko; G. M. Ramsey

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses key emission stream characteristics and hazardous air pollutant (HAP) characteristics that affect the applicability of catalytic oxidation as an air pollution control technique in which volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and vapor-phase air toxics in an air emission stream are oxidized with the help of a catalyst. Design of catalytic systems for control of point-source emissions is based

  5. Sanskrit Compound Processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Anil; Mittal, Vipul; Kulkarni, Amba

    Sanskrit is very rich in compound formation. Typically a compound does not code the relation between its components explicitly. To understand the meaning of a compound, it is necessary to identify its components, discover the relations between them and finally generate a paraphrase of the compound. In this paper, we discuss the automatic segmentation and type identification of a compound using simple statistics that results from the manually annotated data.

  6. Variation of the Eu(II) emission wavelength by substitution of fluoride by hydride in fluorite-type compounds EuH(x)F(2-x) (0.20 ? x ? 0.67).

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Nathalie; Meijerink, Andries; Kohlmann, Holger

    2014-05-19

    Mixed-hydride fluorides EuHxF2-x were prepared by the solid-state reaction of EuF2 and EuH2 under hydrogen gas pressure in an autoclave. Eu(II) luminescence is observed for 0.20 ? x ? 0.67, while pure EuF2 does not show any emission. The energy of the emission depends strongly on the degree of substitution x. For low hydride contents, yellow emission is observed, whereas higher hydride contents lead to red emission. The red shift is attributed to the nephelauxetic effect of the hydride anion. Remarkably, limited concentration quenching is observed in EuHxF2-x (0.20 ? x ? 0.67). This observation is explained by suppression of long-range energy migration due to disorder in the local environment of Eu(2+) in the mixed H/F crystals. The strong x dependence of the luminescence maxima proves hydride-fluoride substitution to be a valuable tool to tune the emission wavelength of Eu(II)-containing phosphors. PMID:24806073

  7. Air emissions inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory -- 1995 emissions report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This report presents the 1995 update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources. The air contaminants reported include nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, particulates, and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs).

  8. Luminescence and structure of europium compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G Vicentini; L. B Zinner; J Zukerman-Schpector; K Zinner

    2000-01-01

    Europium complexes in the +3 oxidation state, with coordination numbers six, seven, eight, nine and ten are under consideration. In most cases, single crystals or isomorphous compounds were studied by X-ray structural analyses. An attempt is made to correlate the results with the emission spectrum interpretation. Only articles containing both aspects are included in this review. Some general remarks concerning

  9. Spatiotemporal distribution of carbonyl compounds in China.

    PubMed

    Ho, K F; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Huang, R-J; Dai, W T; Cao, J J; Tian, Linwei; Deng, W J

    2015-02-01

    A sampling campaign was carried out at nine Chinese cities in 2010/2011. Fifteen monocarbonyls (C# = 1-9) were quantified. Temperature is the rate-determining factor of the summertime carbonyl levels. The carbonyl emissions in winter are mainly driven by the primary anthropogenic sources like automobile. A molar ratio of propionaldehyde to nonaldehyde is a barometer of the impact of atmospheric vegetation emission which suggesting that strong vegetation emissions exist in summer and high propionaldehyde abundance is caused by fossil fuel combustion in winter. Potential health risk assessment of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde was conducted and the highest cumulative risks were observed at Chengdu in summer and Wuhan in winter. Because of the strong photochemical reaction and large amount of anthropogenic emissions, high concentrations of carbonyl compounds were observed in Chengdu. The use of ethanol-blended gasoline in Wuhan is the key reason of acetaldehyde emission and action should be taken to avoid potential health risks. PMID:25433759

  10. Atmospheric peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN): a global budget and source attribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, E. V.; Jacob, D. J.; Yantosca, R. M.; Sulprizio, M. P.; Millet, D. B.; Mao, J.; Paulot, F.; Singh, H. B.; Roiger, A.; Ries, L.; Talbot, R. W.; Dzepina, K.; Pandey Deolal, S.

    2014-03-01

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) formed in the atmospheric oxidation of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) is the principal tropospheric reservoir for nitrogen oxide radicals (NOx = NO + NO2). PAN enables the transport and release of NOx to the remote troposphere with major implications for the global distributions of ozone and OH, the main tropospheric oxidants. Simulation of PAN is a challenge for global models because of the dependence of PAN on vertical transport as well as complex and uncertain NMVOC sources and chemistry. Here we use an improved representation of NMVOCs in a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) and show that it can simulate PAN observations from aircraft campaigns worldwide. The immediate carbonyl precursors for PAN formation include acetaldehyde (44% of the global source), methylglyoxal (30%), acetone (7%), and a suite of other isoprene and terpene oxidation products (19%). A diversity of NMVOC emissions is responsible for PAN formation globally including isoprene (37%) and alkanes (14%). Anthropogenic sources are dominant in the extratropical Northern Hemisphere outside the growing season. Open fires appear to play little role except at high northern latitudes in spring, although results are very sensitive to plume chemistry and plume rise. Lightning NOx is the dominant contributor to the observed PAN maximum in the free troposphere over the South Atlantic.

  11. Atmospheric peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN): a global budget and source attribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, E. V.; Jacob, D. J.; Yantosca, R. M.; Sulprizio, M. P.; Millet, D. B.; Mao, J.; Paulot, F.; Singh, H. B.; Roiger, A.-E.; Ries, L.; Talbot, R. W.; Dzepina, K.; Pandey Deolal, S.

    2013-10-01

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) formed in the atmospheric oxidation of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs), is the principal tropospheric reservoir for nitrogen oxide radicals (NOx = NO + NO2). PAN enables the transport and release of NOx to the remote troposphere with major implications for the global distributions of ozone and OH, the main tropospheric oxidants. Simulation of PAN is a challenge for global models because of the dependence of PAN on vertical transport as well as complex and uncertain NMVOC sources and chemistry. Here we use an improved representation of NMVOCs in a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) and show that it can simulate PAN observations from aircraft campaigns worldwide. The immediate carbonyl precursors for PAN formation include acetaldehyde (44% of the global source), methylglyoxal (30%), acetone (7%), and a suite of other isoprene and terpene oxidation products (19%). A diversity of NMVOC emissions is responsible for PAN formation globally including isoprene (37%) and alkanes (14%). Anthropogenic sources are dominant in the extratropical Northern Hemisphere outside the growing season. Open fires appear to play little role except at high northern latitudes in spring, although results are very sensitive to plume chemistry and plume rise. Lightning NOx is the dominant contributor to the observed PAN maximum in the free troposphere over the South Atlantic.

  12. EVALUATION OF THE WALKTHROUGH SURVEY METHOD FOR DETECTION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND LEAKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    During 1978 and 1979, the Emission Standards and Engineering Division of EPA's Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards conducted a fugitive volatile organic compound (VOC) emission sampling program in organic chemical manufacturing plants and petroleum refineries. As a part ...

  13. TANKS Emissions Estimation Software, Version 4.09D

    EPA Science Inventory

    TANKS is a Windows-based computer software program that estimates volatile organic compound (VOC) and hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions from fixed- and floating-roof storage tanks. TANKS is based on the emission estimation procedures from ...

  14. CONTROL OF HYDROCARBON EMISSIONS FROM GASOLINE LOADING BY REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of the capabilities of refrigeration systems, operated at three temperatures, to control volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from truck loading at bulk gasoline terminals. Achievable VOC emission rates were calculated for refrigeration sy...

  15. Dinitroso and polynitroso compounds

    PubMed Central

    Gowenlock, Brian G.; Richter-Addo, George B.

    2005-01-01

    The growing interest in the chemistry of C-nitroso compounds (RN=O; R = alkyl or aryl group) is due in part to the recognition of their participation in various metabolic processes of nitrogen-containing compounds. C-Nitroso compounds have a rich organic chemistry in their own right, displaying interesting intra- and intermolecular dimerization processes and addition reactions with unsaturated compounds. In addition, they have a fascinating coordination chemistry. While most of the attention has been directed towards C-nitroso compounds containing a single –NO moiety, there is an emerging area of research dealing with dinitroso and polynitroso compounds. In this critical review, we present and discuss the synthetic routes and properties of these relatively unexplored dinitroso and polynitroso compounds, and suggest areas of further development involving these compounds. (126 references.) PMID:16100619

  16. Caulking compound poisoning

    MedlinePLUS

    Caulking compounds are substances used to seal cracks and holes around windows and other openings. Caulking compound poisoning occurs when someone swallows these substances. This is for information only and not ...

  17. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  18. Elements & Compounds Atoms (Elements)

    E-print Network

    Frey, Terry

    #12;Elements & Compounds #12;Atoms (Elements) Molecules (Compounds) Cells Elements & Compounds #12;Nucleus Electrons Cloud of negative charge (2 electrons) Fig. 2.5: Simplified model of a Helium (He) Atom He 4.002602 2 Helium Mass Number (~atomic mass) = number of Neutrons + Protons = 4 for Helium Atomic

  19. 75 FR 19252 - Delegation of New Source Performance Standards and National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-14

    ...Performance Standards and National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air...Standards (NSPS) and National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air...Bulk Gasoline Terminals...Organic Compound (VOC) Yes. Emissions from the Polymer...

  20. MANUAL METHOD FOR MEASUREMENT OF REDUCED SULFUR COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A manual method for measuring reduced sulfur compounds in Kraft pulp mill and sulfur recovery plant emissions was evaluated. The method involves removing SO2 from the gas stream (if present) with a citric acid-potassium citrate buffer, that passes reduced sulfur compounds; therma...

  1. RESEARCH AREA -- MOBILE SOURCE EMISSIONS (EMISSIONS CHARACTERIZATION AND PREVENTION BRANCH, APPCD, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this program is to characterize mobile source emissions which are one of the largest sources of tropospheric ozone precursor emissions (CO, NOx, and volotile organic compounds) in the U.S. The research objective of the Emissions Characterization and Prevention Br...

  2. Focused ion beam and field-emission microscopy of metallic filaments in memory devices based on thin films of an ambipolar organic compound consisting of oxadiazole, carbazole, and fluorene units

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, Christopher; Bowen, Leon; Lee, Myung Won; Fisher, Alison L.; Linton, Katherine E.; Bryce, Martin R.; Petty, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the mechanism of operation of organic thin film resistive memory architectures based on an ambipolar compound consisting of oxadiazole, carbazole, and fluorene units. Cross-sections of the devices have been imaged by electron microscopy both before and after applying a voltage. The micrographs reveal the growth of filaments, with diameters of 50?nm–100?nm, on the metal cathode. We suggest that these are formed by the drift of aluminium ions from the anode and are responsible for the observed switching and negative differential resistance phenomena in the memory devices.

  3. Thiophenic Sulfur Compounds Released During Coal Pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Mengwen; Kong, Jiao; Dong, Jie; Jiao, Haili; Li, Fan

    2013-06-01

    Thiophenic sulfur compounds are released during coal gasification, carbonization, and combustion. Previous studies indicate that thiophenic sulfur compounds degrade very slowly in the environment, and are more carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogenous compounds. Therefore, it is very important to study the principle of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal conversion, in order to control their emission and promote clean coal utilization. To realize this goal and understand the formation mechanism of thiophenic sulfur compounds, this study focused on the release behavior of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis, which is an important phase for all coal thermal conversion processes. The pyrolyzer (CDS-5250) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Focus GC-DSQII) were used to analyze thiophenic sulfur compounds in situ. Several coals with different coal ranks and sulfur contents were chosen as experimental samples, and thiophenic sulfur compounds of the gas produced during pyrolysis under different temperatures and heating rates were investigated. Levels of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene were obtained during pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 1300°C, and heating rates ranging from 6°C/ms to 14°C/ms and 6°C/s to 14°C/s. Moreover, the relationship between the total amount of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene released during coal pyrolysis and the organic sulfur content in coal was also discussed. This study is beneficial for understanding the formation and control of thiophenic sulfur compounds, since it provides a series of significant results that show the impact that operation conditions and organic sulfur content in coal have on the amount and species of thiophenic sulfur compounds produced during coal pyrolysis. PMID:23781126

  4. Thiophenic Sulfur Compounds Released During Coal Pyrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Mengwen; Kong, Jiao; Dong, Jie; Jiao, Haili; Li, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Thiophenic sulfur compounds are released during coal gasification, carbonization, and combustion. Previous studies indicate that thiophenic sulfur compounds degrade very slowly in the environment, and are more carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogenous compounds. Therefore, it is very important to study the principle of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal conversion, in order to control their emission and promote clean coal utilization. To realize this goal and understand the formation mechanism of thiophenic sulfur compounds, this study focused on the release behavior of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis, which is an important phase for all coal thermal conversion processes. The pyrolyzer (CDS-5250) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (Focus GC-DSQII) were used to analyze thiophenic sulfur compounds in situ. Several coals with different coal ranks and sulfur contents were chosen as experimental samples, and thiophenic sulfur compounds of the gas produced during pyrolysis under different temperatures and heating rates were investigated. Levels of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene were obtained during pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 1300°C, and heating rates ranging from 6°C/ms to 14°C/ms and 6°C/s to 14°C/s. Moreover, the relationship between the total amount of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene released during coal pyrolysis and the organic sulfur content in coal was also discussed. This study is beneficial for understanding the formation and control of thiophenic sulfur compounds, since it provides a series of significant results that show the impact that operation conditions and organic sulfur content in coal have on the amount and species of thiophenic sulfur compounds produced during coal pyrolysis. PMID:23781126

  5. Gaseous emissions from flooded rice paddy agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redeker, K. R.; Meinardi, S.; Blake, D.; Sass, R.

    2003-07-01

    Modification of continental land for agricultural use has increased over the last century. Atmospheric impact of this land use change has only been addressed for a few ecosystems and compounds. This paper provides, to date, the most comprehensive examination of gaseous emissions from rice paddies. We report seasonal emission ranges and integrated emission totals for 55 chemical species. This paper is the first to report emissions of isoprene, ethyl chloride, bromoform, alkyl nitrates, bromodichloromethane, hexane, and benzene from rice paddies. Emissions of alkyl nitrates, bromoform, ethyl chloride, and bromodichloromethane by terrestrial ecosystems have never before been observed. For species where emissions were observed we tentatively ascribe possible mechanisms of production; photochemical or biological production in the water column or rice plant mediated. For some compounds, during periods of maximum emissions, ambient rice paddy air concentrations may be concentrated enough to affect regional atmospheric chemistry.

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF TOXIC GASEOUS EMISSIONS FROM INDUSTRIAL

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    concentrations of aromatic (BTEX) and chlorinated hydrocarbons were also measured. Gaseous emissions were assessment : VOC, and among them, BTEX and chlorinated compounds. The aim of this study was to establish

  7. National Environmental Research Institute University of Aarhus . Denmark

    E-print Network

    data for projection of SO2, NOX, NH3, NMVOC, TSP, PM10 and PM2.5 for Denmark. The emissions, NMVOC, TSP, PM10 and PM2.5 Layout: Ann-Katrine Holme Christoffersen ISBN: 978-87-7073-028-0 ISSN mobile sources 55 4.3 Fuel use and emission results (SO2, NOX, NMVOC, NH3, TSP, PM10, PM2.5) 61 4.4 Model

  8. Assessment of biomass open burning emissions in Indonesia and potential climate forcing impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permadi, Didin Agustian; Kim Oanh, Nguyen Thi

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents an emission inventory (EI) for biomass open burning (OB) sources including forest, agro-residue and municipal solid waste (MSW) in Indonesia for year 2007. The EI covered toxic air pollutants and greenhouse gases (GHGs) and was presented as annual and monthly average for every district, and further on a grid of 0.25° × 0.25°. A rigorous analysis of activity data and emission factor ranges was done to produce the low, best and high emission estimates for each species. Development of EI methodology for MSW OB which, to our best knowledge, has not been presented in detail in the literature was a focus of this paper. The best estimates of biomass OB emission of toxic air pollutants for the country, in Gg, were: 9.6 SO2; 98 NOx; 7411 CO; 335 NMVOC; 162 NH3; 439 PM10; 357 PM2.5; 24 BC; and 147 OC. The best emission estimates of GHGs, in Gg, were: 401 CH4, 57,247 CO2; and 3.6 N2O. The low and high values of the emission estimates for different species were found to range from -86% to +260% of the corresponding best estimates. Crop residue OB contributed more than 80% of the total biomass OB emissions, followed by forest fire of 2-12% (not including peat soil fire emission) and MSW (1-8%). An inter-annual active fires count for Indonesia showed relatively low values in 2007 which may be attributed to the high rainfall intensity under the influence of La Niña climate pattern in the year. Total estimated net climate forcing from OB in Indonesia was 110 (20 year horizon) and 73 (100 year horizon) Tg CO2 equivalents which is around 0.9-1.1% of that reported for the global biomass OB for both time horizons. The spatial distribution showed higher emissions in large urban areas in Java and Sumatra Island, while the monthly emissions indicated higher values during the dry months of August-October.

  9. Endocrine disrupting chemical emissions from combustion sources: diesel particulate emissions and domestic waste open burn emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhu, Sukh; Gullett, Brian; Striebich, Richard; Klosterman, Joy; Contreras, Jesse; DeVito, Michael

    Emissions of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) from combustion sources are poorly characterized due to the large number of compounds present in the emissions, the complexity of the analytical separations required, and the uncertainty regarding identification of chemicals with endocrine effects. In this work, multidimensional gas chromatographic-mass spectrometry (MDGC-MS) was used to characterize emissions from both controlled (diesel engine) and uncontrolled (open burning of domestic waste) combustion sources. The results of this study suggest that, by using MDGC-MS, one can resolve a much greater percentage of the chromatogram and identify about 84% of these resolved compounds. This increase in resolution helped to identify and quantify various classes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the combustion emissions that had not been identified previously. Significant emissions (when compared to industrial sources) of known EDCs, dioctyl phthalate (over ˜2,500,000 kg year -1) and bisphenol A (over ˜75,000 kg year -1) were estimated from uncontrolled domestic waste burning. Emissions of several suspected EDCs (oxygenated PAHs) were observed in both diesel soot and the uncontrolled domestic waste burn samples. The emission rates of known and suspected EDCs estimated in this study suggest that combustion emissions need to be characterized for EDCs to further assess its importance as a source of EDC exposure.

  10. XAFS Model Compound Library

    DOE Data Explorer

    Newville, Matthew

    The XAFS Model Compound Library contains XAFS data on model compounds. The term "model" compounds refers to compounds of homogeneous and well-known crystallographic or molecular structure. Each data file in this library has an associated atoms.inp file that can be converted to a feff.inp file using the program ATOMS. (See the related Searchable Atoms.inp Archive at http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/adb/) This Library exists because XAFS data on model compounds is useful for several reasons, including comparing to unknown data for "fingerprinting" and testing calculations and analysis methods. The collection here is currently limited, but is growing. The focus to date has been on inorganic compounds and minerals of interest to the geochemical community. [Copied, with editing, from http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/ModelLib/

  11. Preparation of uranium compounds

    DOEpatents

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Montreal, Marisa J; Thomson, Robert K; Cantat, Thibault; Travia, Nicholas E

    2013-02-19

    UI.sub.3(1,4-dioxane).sub.1.5 and UI.sub.4(1,4-dioxane).sub.2, were synthesized in high yield by reacting turnings of elemental uranium with iodine dissolved in 1,4-dioxane under mild conditions. These molecular compounds of uranium are thermally stable and excellent precursor materials for synthesizing other molecular compounds of uranium including alkoxide, amide, organometallic, and halide compounds.

  12. Diurnal and Seasonal Variability of Gasoline-Related Volatile Organic Compounds in Riverside, CA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. R. Gentner; R. A. Harley; A. M. Miller; A. H. Goldstein

    2008-01-01

    On and off-road mobile source emissions are the dominant contributor to urban anthropogenic volatile organic compound (AVOC) emissions. Analyses of speciated gasoline samples from California for both summer and winter indicate significant differences in chemical composition due to intentional seasonal adjustments to liquid fuel composition. Ambient air measurements of ~60 compounds, including VOCs, were measured via in-situ gas chromatography during

  13. Analysis of volatile organic compounds from illicit cocaine samples

    SciTech Connect

    Robins, W.H.; Wright, B.W.

    1994-07-01

    Detection of illicit cocaine hydrochloride shipments can be improved if there is a greater understanding of the identity and quantity of volatile compounds present. This study provides preliminary data concerning the volatile organic compounds detected in a limited Set of cocaine hydrochloride samples. In all cases, cocaine was one of the major volatile compounds detected. Other tropeines were detected in almost all samples. Low concentrations of compounds that may be residues of processing solvents were observed in some samples. The equilibrium emissivity of. cocaine from cocaine hydrochloride was investigated and a value of 83 parts-per-trillion was determined.

  14. INDOOR EMISSIONS FROM CONVERSION VARNISHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conversion varnishes are two-component, acid-catalyzed varnishes that are commonly used to finish cabinets. They are valued for their water- and stain-resistance, as well as their appearance. They have been found, however, to contribute to indoor emissions of organic compounds. F...

  15. Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivier, J. G. J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Presents the objective and methodology chosen for the construction of a global emissions source database called EDGAR and the structural design of the database system. The database estimates on a regional and grid basis, 1990 annual emissions of greenhouse gases, and of ozone depleting compounds from all known sources. (LZ)

  16. Transition metal atomic multiplets in the ligand K-edge x-ray absorption spectra and multiple oxidation states in the L2,3 emission of strongly correlated compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Mier, J.; Olalde-Velasco, P.; Yang, W.-L.; Denlinger, J.

    2014-07-01

    We present results that show that atomic multiplet ligand field calculations are in very good agreement with experimental x-ray absorption spectra at the L2,3 edge of transition metal (TM) di-fluorides (MF2, MCrCu). For chromium more than one TM oxidation state is needed to achieve such an agreement. We also show that signature of the TM atomic multiplet can be found at the pre-edge of the fluorine K-edge x-ray absorption spectra. TM atomic multiplet ligand field calculations with a structureless core hole show good agreement with the observed pre-edges in the experimental fluorine absorption spectra. Preliminary results for the comparison between calculated and experimental resonant x-ray emission spectra for nominal CrF2 with more than one oxidation state indicate the presence of three chromium oxidation states in the bulk.

  17. Emission estimates for air pollution transport models.

    SciTech Connect

    Streets, D. G.

    1998-10-09

    The results of studies of energy consumption and emission inventories in Asia are discussed. These data primarily reflect emissions from fuel combustion (both biofuels and fossil fuels) and were collected to determine emissions of acid-deposition precursors (SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}) and greenhouse gases (CO{sub 2} CO, CH{sub 4}, and NMHC) appropriate to RAINS-Asia regions. Current work is focusing on black carbon (soot), volatile organic compounds, and ammonia.

  18. 40 CFR 63.4166 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...gaseous organic mass emissions as carbon at the inlet and...total all of the outlet emissions. ER23JY02.016...total gaseous organic emissions mass flow rate, kg...organic compounds as carbon in the vent gas,...

  19. NEAR-REAL-TIME MEASUREMENT OF TRACE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM COMBUSTION PROCESSES USING AN ON-LINE GAS CHROMATOGRAPH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA's current regulatory approach for combustion and incineration sources emphasizes the use of real-time continuous emission monitors (CEMs) for particulate, Metals, and volatile, semivolatile, and of nonvolatile organic compounds to monitor source emissions. Currently...

  20. Ringed-Carbon Compounds

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    WGBH Educational Foundation

    2007-02-12

    In this interactive activity adapted from NOVA, learn about alkaloids and steroids, both examples of compounds with carbon rings. Short videos with interviews,animations, and photographs are featured.

  1. MANUFACTURE OF LIMONOID COMPOUNDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present invention relates to methods for manufacturing limonoid compounds. The invention provides methods for isolating limonoid A-ring lactone acid salts, limonoid glycoside monocarboxylic acids, limonoid glycoside dicarboxylic acids, limonoid glycoside monocarboxylic acid salts, and limonoid ...

  2. Heart testing compound

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN)

    1985-01-01

    The compound 15-(p-[.sup.125 I]-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

  3. Heart testing compound

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Goodman, M.M.

    1983-06-29

    The compound 15-(p-(/sup 125/I)-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

  4. Projections of air pollutant emissions and its impacts on regional air quality in China in 2020

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, J.; Wang, S. X.; Chatani, S.; Zhang, C. Y.; Wei, W.; Hao, J. M.; Klimont, Z.; Cofala, J.; Amann, M.

    2010-11-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of air pollutants in China influence not only local and regional environments but also the global atmospheric environment; therefore, it is important to understand how China's air pollutant emissions will change and how they will affect regional air quality in the future. Emission scenarios in 2020 were projected using forecasts of energy consumption and emission control strategies based on emissions in 2005, and on recent development plans for key industries in China. We developed four emission scenarios: REF[0] (current control legislations and implementation status), PC[0] (improvement of energy efficiencies and current environmental legislation), PC[1] (improvement of energy efficiencies and better implementation of environmental legislation), and PC[2] (improvement of energy efficiencies and strict environmental legislation). Under the REF[0] scenario, the emission of SO2, NOx, VOC and NH3 will increase by 17%, 50%, 49% and 18% in 2020, while PM will be reduced by 10% over East China, compared to that in 2005. In PC[2], sustainable energy polices will reduce SO2, NOx and PM10 emissions by 4.1 Tg, 2.6 Tg and 1.8 Tg, respectively; better implementation of current control policies will reduce SO2, NOx and PM10 emission by 2.9 Tg, 1.8 Tg, and 1.4 Tg, respectively; strict emission standards will reduce SO2, NOx and PM10 emissions by 3.2 Tg, 3.9 Tg, and 1.7 Tg, respectively. Under the PC[2] scenario, SO2 and PM10 emissions will decrease by 18% and 38%, while NOx and VOC emissions will increase by 3% and 8%, compared to that in 2005. Future air quality in China was simulated using the Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) with 2005 emissions and 2020 emission scenarios. Under REF[0] emissions, the concentrations of SO2, NO2, hourly maximum ozone in summer, PM2.5, total sulfur and nitrogen depositions will increase by 5~47%, 45~53%, 8~12%, 4~15%, 4~37% and 7~14%, respectively, over East China. Under the PC[2] emission scenario, the concentrations of SO2, NO2, hourly maximal ozone in summer, PM2.5, total sulfur and nitrogen depositions will change by -28%~16%, -1%~11%, 1%~2%, -24%~-12%, -24%~13%, and 0~3%, respectively. The individual impacts of SO2, NOx, NH3, NMVOC and primary PM emission changes on ozone and PM2.5 concentrations have been analyzed using sensitivity analysis. The results suggest that NOx emission control need to be enhanced during the summertime to obtain both ozone and PM2.5 reduction benefits. NH3 emission controls should also be considered in order to reduce total nitrogen deposition in the future.

  5. Chemistry of peroxide compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volnov, I. I.

    1981-01-01

    The history of Soviet research from 1866 to 1967 on peroxide compounds is reviewed. This research dealt mainly with peroxide kinetics, reactivity and characteristics, peroxide production processes, and more recently with superoxides and ozonides and emphasis on the higher oxides of group 1 and 2 elements. Solid state fluidized bed synthesis and production of high purity products based on the relative solubilities of the initial, intermediate, and final compounds and elements in liquid ammonia are discussed.

  6. Hydrides of intermetallic compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Oesterreicher

    1981-01-01

    s  Aspects of the progress over the recent years on hydrides of intermetallic compounds are reviewed with emphasis on structure,\\u000a stability, solid-state properties, catalysis, and kinetics. Some new routes to an understanding of hydride phenomenology are\\u000a indicated. Generally speaking hydrides represent but one special aspect of intermetallic compounds. They are, however, unique\\u000a as model systems for questions concerning the stability of

  7. Phenolic Molding Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Koji; Charles, Ted; de Keyser, Hendrik

    Phenolic Molding Compounds continue to exhibit well balanced properties such as heat resistance, chemical resistance, dimensional stability, and creep resistance. They are widely applied in electrical, appliance, small engine, commutator, and automotive applications. As the focus of the automotive industry is weight reduction for greater fuel efficiency, phenolic molding compounds become appealing alternatives to metals. Current market volumes and trends, formulation components and its impact on properties, and a review of common manufacturing methods are presented. Molding processes as well as unique advanced techniques such as high temperature molding, live sprue, and injection/compression technique provide additional benefits in improving the performance characterisitics of phenolic molding compounds. Of special interest are descriptions of some of the latest innovations in automotive components, such as the phenolic intake manifold and valve block for dual clutch transmissions. The chapter also characterizes the most recent developments in new materials, including long glass phenolic molding compounds and carbon fiber reinforced phenolic molding compounds exhibiting a 10-20-fold increase in Charpy impact strength when compared to short fiber filled materials. The role of fatigue testing and fatigue fracture behavior presents some insight into long-term reliability and durability of glass-filled phenolic molding compounds. A section on new technology outlines the important factors to consider in modeling phenolic parts by finite element analysis and flow simulation.

  8. National Environmental Research Institute University of Aarhus . Denmark

    E-print Network

    , NMVOC and NH3 for the years 1985-2006; (3) Particulate matter: TSP, PM10, PM2.5 for the years 2000. Keywords: Emission Inventory; Emissions; Projections; UNECE; EMEP; NOX; CO; NMVOC; SOX; NH3; TSP; PM10; PM2.5

  9. National Environmental Research Institute University of Aarhus . Denmark

    E-print Network

    , NMVOC, CO, par- ticulate matter (PM), heavy metals, dioxins and PAH. From 1990-2006 the fuel use and CO2, domestic aviation, working equipment and machinery, SO2, NOX, NMVOC, CH4, CO, CO2, N2O, PM, heavy metals\\ Methodologies 6 Emissions from road transport 7 Emissions from other mobile sources 8 Heavy metals 9 PAH's 9

  10. Automotive sulfate emission data.

    PubMed Central

    Somers, J H

    1975-01-01

    This paper discusses automotive sulfate emission results obtained by the Office of Mobile Source Air Pollution Control of EPA, General Motors, Ford, Chrysler, and Esso. This work has been directed towards obtaining sulfate emission factors for cars with and without catalyst. While the EPA and Chrysler investigations have found significant sulfate formation in noncatalyst cars, GM, Ford, and Esso have found only trace levels from noncatalyst cars. All of these investigators agree that much higher quantities of sulfate are emitted from catalyst cars. The work done to date shows pelleted catalysts to have much lower sulfate emissions over the low speed-EPA Federal Test Procedures than monolith catalysts. This is probably due to temporary storage of sulfates on the catalyst due to chemical interaction with the alumina pellets. The sulfate compounds are, to a large degree, emitted later under higher speed conditions which result in higher catalyst temperatures which decompose the alumina salt. Future work will be directed towards further elucidation of this storage mechanism as well as determining in detail how factors such as air injection rate and catalyst location affect sulfate emissions. PMID:50932

  11. Projections of air pollutant emissions and its impacts on regional air quality in China in 2020

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, J.; Wang, S. X.; Chatani, S.; Zhang, C. Y.; Wei, W.; Hao, J. M.; Klimont, Z.; Cofala, J.; Amann, M.

    2011-04-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of air pollutants in China influence not only local and regional environments but also the global atmospheric environment; therefore, it is important to understand how China's air pollutant emissions will change and how they will affect regional air quality in the future. Emission scenarios in 2020 were projected using forecasts of energy consumption and emission control strategies based on emissions in 2005, and on recent development plans for key industries in China. We developed four emission scenarios: REF[0] (current control legislations and implementation status), PC[0] (improvement of energy efficiencies and current environmental legislation), PC[1] (improvement of energy efficiencies and better implementation of environmental legislation), and PC[2] (improvement of energy efficiencies and strict environmental legislation). Under the REF[0] scenario, the emission of SO2, NOx, VOC and NH3 will increase by 17%, 50%, 49% and 18% in 2020, while PM10 emissions will be reduced by 10% over East China, compared to that in 2005. In PC[2], sustainable energy polices will reduce SO2, NOx and PM10 emissions by 4.1 Tg, 2.6 Tg and 1.8 Tg, respectively; better implementation of current control policies will reduce SO2, NOx and PM10 emission by 2.9 Tg, 1.8 Tg, and 1.4 Tg, respectively; strict emission standards will reduce SO2, NOx and PM10 emissions by 3.2 Tg, 3.9 Tg, and 1.7 Tg, respectively. Under the PC[2] scenario, SO2 and PM10 emissions will decrease by 18% and 38%, while NOx and VOC emissions will increase by 3% and 8%, compared to that in 2005. Future air quality in China was simulated using the Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model (CMAQ). Under REF[0] emissions, compared to 2005, the surface concentrations of SO2, NO2, hourly maximum ozone in summer, PM2.5, total sulfur and nitrogen depositions will increase by 28%, 41%, 8%, 8%, 19% and 25%, respectively, over east China. Under the PC[2] emission scenario, the surface concentrations of SO2, PM2.5, total sulfur depositions will decrease by 18%, 16% and 15%, respectively, and the surface concentrations of NO2, nitrate, hourly maximum ozone in summer, total nitrogen depositions will be kept as 2005 level, over east China. The individual impacts of SO2, NOx, NH3, NMVOC and primary PM emission changes on ozone and PM2.5 concentrations have been analyzed using sensitivity analysis. The results suggest that NOx emission control need to be enhanced during the summertime to obtain both ozone and PM2.5 reduction benefits. NH3 emission controls should also be considered in order to reduce both nitrate concentration and total nitrogen deposition in the future.

  12. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... paint strippers, and kerosene for space heaters or gasoline for lawn mowers, buy only as much as you will use right away. Keep exposure to emissions from products containing methylene chloride to a minimum. ...

  13. Fine-tuning dual emission and aggregation-induced emission switching in NPI-BODIPY dyads.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sanjoy; Thilagar, Pakkirisamy

    2014-07-14

    Three new NPI-BODIPY dyads 1-3 (NPI = 1,8-naphthalimide, BODIPY = boron-dipyrromethene) were synthesized, characterized, and studied. The NPI and BODIPY moieties in these dyads are electronically separated by oxoaryl bridges, and the compounds only differ structurally with respect to methyl substituents on the BODIPY fluorophore. The NPI and BODIPY moieties retain their optical features in molecular dyads 1-3. Dyads 1-3 show dual emission in solution originating from the two separate fluorescent units. The variations of the dual emission in these compounds are controlled by the structural flexibilities of the systems. Dyads 1-3, depending on their molecular flexibilities, show considerably different spectral shapes and dissimilar intensity ratios of the two emission bands. The dyads also show significant aggregation-induced emission switching (AIES) on formation of nano-aggregates in THF/H2O with changes in emission color from green to red. Whereas the flexible and aggregation-prone compound 1 shows AIES, rigid systems with less favorable intermolecular interactions (i.e., 2 and 3) show aggregation-induced quenching of emission. Correlations of the emission intensity and structural flexibility were found to be reversed in solution and aggregated states. Photophysical and structural investigations suggested that intermolecular interactions (e.g., ?-? stacking) play a major role in controlling the emission of these compounds in the aggregated state. PMID:24895089

  14. Destruction of volatile organic compounds using catalytic oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Kosusko, M.; Nunez, C.M.

    1990-01-01

    Catalytic oxidation is an air pollution control technique in which volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and vapor-phase air toxics in an air emission stream are oxidized with the help of a catalyst. Design of catalytic systems for control of point source emissions is based on stream-specific characteristics and desired control efficiency. The paper discusses the key emission stream characteristics and VOC characteristics that affect the applicability of catalytic oxidation. The application of catalytic oxidation technology to four types of air emission sources is discussed: (1) groundwater stripping operations; (2) graphic arts facilities; (3) flexographic printing plants; and (4) latex monomer production. The characteristics of each of these emissions are discussed along with the catalytic technology used to control these emissions.

  15. Destruction of volatile organic compounds using catalytic oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Kosusko, M.; Nunez, C.M. (Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA))

    1990-02-01

    Catalytic oxidation is an air pollution control technique in which volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and vapor-phase air toxics in an air emission stream are oxidized with the help of a catalyst. Design of catalytic systems for control of point source emissions is based on stream-specific characteristics and desired control efficiency. This paper discusses the key emission stream characteristics and VOC characteristics that affect the applicability of catalytic oxidation. The application of catalytic oxidation technology to four types of air emission sources is discussed: (1) groundwater stripping operations; (2) graphic arts facilities; (3) flexographic printing plants; and (4) latex monomer production. The characteristics of each of these emissions are discussed along with the catalytic technology used to control these emissions.

  16. Flux Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds from an Urban Landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco, E.; Lamb, Brian K.; Pressley, S.; Allwine, Eugene J.; Westberg, Halvor; Jobson, B Tom T.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Prazeller, Peter; Molina, Luisa; Molina, Mario J.

    2005-10-19

    Direct measurements of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions that include all anthropogenic and biogenic emission sources in urban areas are a missing requirement to evaluate emission inventories and constrain current photochemical modelling practices. Here we demonstrate the use of micrometeorological techniques coupled with fast-response sensors to measure urban VOC fluxes from a neighborhood of Mexico City, where the spatial variability of surface cover and roughness is high. Fluxes of olefins, methanol, acetone, toluene and C2-benzenes were measured and compared with the local gridded emission inventory. VOC fluxes exhibited a clear diurnal pattern with a strong relationship to vehicular traffic. Recent photochemical modeling results suggest that VOC emissions are significantly underestimated in Mexico City1, but the measured VOC fluxes described here indicate that the official emission inventory2 is essentially correct. Thus, other explanations are needed to explain the photochemical modelling results.

  17. Biogenic volatile organic compounds - small is beautiful

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, S. M.; Asensio, D.; Li, Q.; Penuelas, J.

    2012-12-01

    While canopy and regional scale flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds (bVOCs) are essential to obtain an integrated picture of total compound reaching the atmosphere, many fascinating and important emission details are waiting to be discovered at smaller scales, in different ecological and functional compartments. We concentrate on bVOCs below ground to <2m above ground level. Emissions at leaf scale are well documented and widely presented, and are not discussed here. Instead we describe some details of recent research on rhizosphere bVOCs, and bVOCs associated with pollination of flowers. Although bVOC emissions from soil surfaces are small, bVOCs are exuded by roots of some plant species, and can be extracted from decaying litter. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the rhizosphere provide a specialised carbon source for micro-organisms, helping to define the micro-organism community structure, and impacting on nutrient cycles which are partly controlled by microorganisms. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the soil system could also affect the aboveground structure of ecosystems because of their role in plant defence strategies and as mediating chemicals in allelopathy. A gradient of monoterpene concentration was found in soil around Pinus sylvestris and Pinus halepensis, decreasing with distance from the tree. Some compounds (?-pinene, sabinene, humulene and caryophyllene) in mineral soil were linearly correlated with the total amount of each compound in the overlying litter, indicating that litter might be the dominant source of these compounds. However, ?-pinene did not fall within the correlation, indicating a source other than litter, probably root exudates. We also show that rhizosphere bVOCs can be a carbon source for soil microbes. In a horizontal gradient from Populus tremula trees, microbes closest to the tree trunk were better enzymatically equipped to metabolise labeled monoterpene substrate. Monoterpenes can also increase the degradation rate in soil of the persistant organic pollutants, likely acting as analogues for the cometabo-lism of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) Flowers of a ginger species (Alpinia kwangsiensis) and a fig species (Ficus hispida) showed different bVOC signals pre- and post pollination. For Ficus hispida, there are three floral stages of a fig-wasp dependency mechanism: receptive, post pollinator and interfloral. Of 28 compounds detected, transcaryophyllene with trans-?-farnesene were the most important at the receptor stage, trans-caryophyllene was the most abundant at the post-pollinator stage, and isoprene was the most abundant in the interfloral stage. Alpinia kwangsiensis presents two morphologies for the reproductive parts of the flower. The "anaflexistyle" morphology has the flower style lowered in the morning and raised in the afternoon. This is reversed for the "cataflexistyle" morphology. The bVOC mixture emitted by each morphology in morning and afternoon was complex. However for compounds showing a difference (cis-ocimene and Z + E epoxy -ocimene), the emissions from the anaflexistyle were greater than from the cataflexistyle, and were greater in the afternoon compared with the morning emissions. Where large flowering plant species are abundant, big changes in monoterpene emissions at < 2m above ground level over relatively small periods of time during pollination are likely to be missed in larger scale integrated flux measurements.

  18. EFFECTS OF VENTILATION RATES AND PRODUCT LOADING ON ORGANIC EMISSION RATES FROM PARTICLEBOARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the effects of ventilation rates and product loading on organic emission rates from particleboard. Recently, investigators have confirmed the presence of varied and significant amounts of organic compounds in indoor environment, including compounds known or su...

  19. VOC EMISSION REDUCTION STUDY AT THE HILL AIR FORCE BASE BUILDING 515 PAINTING FACILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the development of safe and cost effective strategies for controlling volatile organic compound (voc) emissions from Air Force painting facilities. A series of sampling and analysis tests were conducted to measure hazardous constituent compound concentrations...

  20. Metalloid compounds as drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sekhon, B. S.

    2013-01-01

    The six elements commonly known as metalloids are boron, silicon, germanium, arsenic, antimony, and tellurium. Metalloid containing compounds have been used as antiprotozoal drugs. Boron-based drugs, the benzoxaboroles have been exploited as potential treatments for neglected tropical diseases. Arsenic has been used as a medicinal agent and arsphenamine was the main drug used to treat syphilis. Arsenic trioxide has been approved for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Pentavalent antimonials have been the recommended drug for visceral leishmaniasis and cutaneous leishmaniasis. Tellurium (IV) compounds may have important roles in thiol redox biological activity in the human body, and ammonium trichloro (dioxoethylene-O, O’-)tellurate (AS101) may be a promising agent for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Organosilicon compounds have been shown to be effective in vitro multidrug-resistance reverting agents. PMID:24019824

  1. Natural chlorinated compounds in forest soils - spatiotemporal patterns of chloroform and related compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, C. N.; Jacobsen, O. S.; Laier, T.

    2011-12-01

    Chloroform is a volatile chlorinated organic compound. It is a widespread pollutant from various anthropogenic sources, but most of the chloroform in the atmosphere originates from natural sources. The terrestrial environment and especially soils seem to be important contributors to the atmospheric chloroform and may also cause apparent pollution of groundwater with this compound. We hereby present the results of a field study concerning chloroform concentrations above and below the soil surface, as well as emissions from the soil to the atmosphere using closed flux chambers. The study was performed in two coniferous forests- a mixed pine/spruce plantation and a sheer spruce plantation located on sandy soils in Denmark. In both forests, great seasonal variations in top soil concentrations and emissions of chloroform were observed, as expected for a volatile compound, formed with the involvement of soil biota. On the other hand, concentrations in the groundwater showed only minor temporal patterns. Surprisingly, horizontal variations as great as two orders of magnitude, in both concentrations in top soil air and emissions, were found - not just between different stands, but also on the scale of a few meters within single stands. This spatial variation was patchy rather than completely random and the forest floor could be divided into chloroform "High Spot" and "Low Spot" areas, which also affected the concentration of chloroform in shallow groundwater. Since previous estimates of global chloroform emissions from soil are all based on very small datasets, the discovery of the chloroform High Spots might influence the interpretation of these estimates. Furthermore, the large spatial variation might explain why it has been extremely difficult to predict and identify locations of chloroform formation resulting in the ?g/L concentrations sometimes observed in groundwater. During the study, we discovered the presence of novel natural trichloroacetyl containing compounds in soil and other forest compartments. The concentration of these compounds showed a similar spatial pattern as that of chloroform and in some areas it was even found that the compounds could leach into the shallow groundwater. It has been suggested that the mechanism behind the formation of chloroform is an unspecific chlorination of organic matter by extracellular chloroperoxidases, excreted by microorganisms in the soil. The presence of trichloroacetyl containing compounds supports this hypothesis.

  2. Recent changes in anthropogenic reactive nitrogen compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronache, Constantin

    2014-05-01

    Significant anthropogenic perturbations of the nitrogen cycle are the result of rapid population growth, with mounting need for food and energy production. The increase of reactive nitrogen compounds (such as NOx, HNO3, NH3, and N2O) has a significant impact on human health, environment, and climate. NOx emissions contribute to O3 chemistry, aerosol formation and acidic precipitation. Ammonia is a notable atmospheric pollutant that may deteriorate ecosystems and contribute to respiratory problems. It reacts with acidic gases to form aerosols or is deposited back to ecosystems. The application of fertilizers accounts for most of the N2O production, adding to greenhouse gas emissions. We analyze the change of some reactive nitrogen compounds based on observations, in eastern United States. Results show that the control of NOx and SO2 emissions over the last decades caused a significant decrease of acidic deposition. The nitrate deposition is highest in eastern US, while the ammonium ion concentration is highest in central US regions. Overall, the inorganic nitrogen wet deposition from nitrate and ammonium is enhanced in central, and eastern US. Research shows that sensitive ecosystems in northeastern regions exhibit a slow recovery from the accumulated effects of acidic deposition. Given the growing demand for nitrogen in agriculture and industry, we discuss possible pathways to reduce the impact of excess reactive nitrogen on the environment.

  3. Speciation and quantification of volatile organic compounds sorbed to PM 10 fraction associated with confined animal feeding operations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) associated with confined animal feeding operations (CAFO) is of regulatory interested due to the potential emissions of both ozone precursors compounds and hazardous air pollutants. Emissions of VOC from CAFO occur in both gaseous phase and sorption onto particulate ...

  4. Fun with Ionic Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logerwell, Mollianne G.; Sterling, Donna R.

    2007-01-01

    Ionic bonding is a fundamental topic in high school chemistry, yet it continues to be a concept that students struggle to understand. Even if they understand atomic structure and ion formation, it can be difficult for students to visualize how ions fit together to form compounds. This article describes several engaging activities that help…

  5. Aminopropyl thiophene compounds

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN); Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1990-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals useful in brain imaging comprising radiohalogenated thienylethylamine derivatives. The compounds are 5-halo-thiophene-2-isopropyl amines able to cross the blood-brain barrier and be retained for a sufficient length of time to allow the evaluation of regional blood flow by radioimaging of the brain.

  6. Compound floating pivot micromechanisms

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-04-24

    A new class of tilting micromechanical mechanisms have been developed. These new mechanisms use compound floating pivot structures to attain far greater tilt angles than are practical using other micromechanical techniques. The new mechanisms are also capable of bi-directional tilt about multiple axes.

  7. 8-fluoropurine compounds

    DOEpatents

    Barrio, Jorge R. (Agoura Hills, CA); Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar (Los Angeles, CA); Namavari, Mohammad (Los Angeles, CA); Phelps, Michael E. (Encino, CA)

    2001-01-01

    An efficient, regiocontrolled approach to the synthesis of 8-fluoropurines by direct fluorination of purines with dilute elemental fluorine, or acetyl hypofluorite, is provided. In a preferred embodiment, a purine compound is dissolved in a polar solvent and reacted with a dilute mixture of F.sub.2 in He or other inert gas.

  8. Tagging Classical Sanskrit Compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brendan S. Gillon

    2009-01-01

    The paper sets out a prima facie case for the claim that the classification of Sanskrit compounds in P??inian tradition can be retrieved from a very slight\\u000a augmentation of the usual enriched context free rules.

  9. A compound parabolic concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Manrique, J.A.

    1984-05-01

    A compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) for solar energy applications is presented in this work. A prototype was built and its thermal performance was determined. Operating temperatures of the order of 150 /sup 0/C with a reasonable efficiency can be attained by means of a fixed CPC.

  10. Compound semiconductor radiation detectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan Owens; A. Peacock

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the potential benefits of using compound semiconductors for the detection of X- and ?-ray radiation. While Si and Ge have become detection standards for energy dispersive spectroscopy in the laboratory, their use for an increasing range of applications is becoming marginalized by one or more of their physical limitations; namely the need for ancillary cooling systems or bulky

  11. PERSISTENT PERFLUORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have gained notoriety in the recent past. Global distribution of PFCs in wildlife, environmental samples and humans has sparked a recent increase in new investigations concerning PFCs. Historically PFCs have been used in a wide variety of consume...

  12. Resultative Verb Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Claudia

    1990-01-01

    Demonstrates that structure and interpretation of Resultative Verb Compound (RVC) in the field of Chinese linguistics is neither indiosyncratic nor pragmatically determined as suggested in an earlier study. Rather, RCV formation and interpretation is determined by semantic features of verbs, and these features determine the well-formedness and…

  13. EXPOSURE AND EMISSION EVALUATIONS OF METHYL ETHYL KETOXIME (MEKO) IN ALKYD PAINTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Small environmental chamber tests were conducted to characterize the emissions of a toxic chemical compound -- methylethylketoxime (MEKO) -- from three different alkyd paints. It was found that MEKO emissions occurred almost immediately after each alkyd paint was applied to a pin...

  14. AN APPROACH TO A UNIFIED PROCESS-BASED REGIONAL EMISSION FLUX MODELING PLATFORM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The trend towards episodic modeling of environmentally-dependent emissions is increasing, with models available or under development for dust, ammonia, biogenic volatile organic compounds, soil nitrous oxide, pesticides, sea salt, and chloride, mercury, and wildfire emissions. T...

  15. IMPROVING EMISSIONS ESTIMATES WITH COMPUTATIONAL INTELLIGENCE, DATABASE EXPANSION, AND COMPREHENSIVE VALIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses an EPA investigation of techniques to improve methods for estimating volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from area sources. Using the automobile refinishing industry for a detailed area source case study, an emission estimation method is being developed...

  16. Seasonal monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions from Pinus taeda and Pinus virginiana

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seasonal volatile organic compound emission data from loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) and Virginia pine (Pinus virginiana) were collected using branch enclosure techniques in Central North Carolina, USA. Pinus taeda monoterpene emission rates were at least ten times higher than oxyge...

  17. INORGANIC COMPOUND IDENTIFICATIOON OF FLY ASH EMISSIONS FROM MUNICIPAL INCINERATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particulate matter emitted as fly ash from municipal refuse and sludge incineration operations consists largely (>90 percent) of inorganic species, including soot. Although commonly these inorganics are referred to as oxides, it is evident from the compositions of the waste being...

  18. Electroreduction of Halogenated Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondinini, Sandra; Vertova, Alberto

    The electroreductive cleavage of the carbon-halogen bond in halogenated organic compounds has been extensively studied for more than 70 years, since it is prodromal to a large variety of synthetic applications in organic electrochemistry. Over the years the research interest have progressively included the environmental applications, since several organic halocompounds are known to have (or have had) a serious environmental impact because of their (present or past) wide use as cleaning agents, herbicides, cryogenic fluids, reagents (e.g. allyl and vinyl monomers) for large production materials, etc. Recent studies have also demonstrated the wide spread out- and in-door-presence of volatile organic halides, although at low level, in connexion with residential and non-residential (e.g. stores, restaurants and transportation) activities. In this context, the detoxification of emissions to air, water and land by the selective removal of the halogen group represents a valid treatment route, which, although not leading to the complete mineralization of the pollutants, produces less harmful streams to be easily treated by electrochemical or conventional techniques. The electroreduction process is analysed and discussed in terms of electrode material, reaction medium, cell design and operation, and of substrate classification.

  19. Process for rejuvenating automobile emission control catalysts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    McArthur

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for the rejuvenation of an automobile emission control catalyst poisoned with compounds of lead and\\/or phosphorus comprising: (1) initially extracting lead sulfate deposits from the catalyst with an aqueous ammonium salt (preferrably ammonium acetate) solution; (2) exposing the catalyst to an atmosphere containing SOâ, or SOâ and air, at 300° to 700°C until other lead compounds

  20. Destruction of volatile organic compounds via catalytic incineration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. A. Tichenor; M. A. Palazzolo

    1985-01-01

    EPA's Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory conducts and sponsors research on technology to reduce or eliminate emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC's) from industrial\\/commercial sources. Recently, a study on the use of catalytic oxidation to destroy VOC's (including potentially toxic air pollutants) was completed by Radian Corporation under an EPA contract. The study was designed to investigate the effect

  1. Compound Chondrules fused Cold

    E-print Network

    Hubbard, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    About 4-5% of chondrules are compound: two separate chondrules stuck together. This is commonly believed to be the result of the two component chondrules having collided shortly after forming, while still molten. This allows high velocity impacts to result in sticking. However, at T ~ 1100K, the temperature below which chondrules collide as solids (and hence usually bounce), coalescence times for droplets of appropriate composition are measured in tens of seconds. Even at 1025K, at which temperature theory predicts that the chondrules must have collided extremely slowly to have stuck together, the coalescence time scale is still less than an hour. These coalescence time scales are too short for the collision of molten chondrules to explain the observed frequency of compound chondrules. We suggest instead a scenario where chondrules stuck together in slow collisions while fully solid; and the resulting chondrule pair was subsequently briefly heated to a temperature in the range of 900-1025K. In that temperatur...

  2. Immunomodulating compounds in Basidiomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Masashi; Nishitani, Yosuke

    2013-01-01

    Mushrooms are distinguished as important food containing immunomodulating and anticancer agents. These compounds belong mostly to polysaccharides especially ?-d-glucans. Among them, ?-1,3-glucan with side chain ?-1,6-glucose residues have more important roles in immunomodulating and antitumor activities. In this review, we have introduced polysaccharide mainly from Lentinula edodes and Agaricus blazei Murill with immunomodulating and antitumor activities. In addition, the mechanism of activation of immune response and signal cascade are also reviewed. PMID:23704809

  3. Immunomodulating compounds in Basidiomycetes.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Masashi; Nishitani, Yosuke

    2013-05-01

    Mushrooms are distinguished as important food containing immunomodulating and anticancer agents. These compounds belong mostly to polysaccharides especially ?-d-glucans. Among them, ?-1,3-glucan with side chain ?-1,6-glucose residues have more important roles in immunomodulating and antitumor activities. In this review, we have introduced polysaccharide mainly from Lentinula edodes and Agaricus blazei Murill with immunomodulating and antitumor activities. In addition, the mechanism of activation of immune response and signal cascade are also reviewed. PMID:23704809

  4. METHODS FOR ANALYZING INORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN PARTICLES EMITTED FROM STATIONARY SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research described was initiated with the objective of developing methods to identify and measure inorganic compounds in particulate emissions which emanate from sources using or processing fossil fuels. An extensive literature review was carried out to ascertain prior knowle...

  5. SPECIATION OF HAZARDOUS INORGANIC COMPOUNDS BY FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED (FTIR) SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes an extension of the application of infrared methodology to characterize hazardous inorganic compounds in solid inorganic emissions, based on recent advances in instrumentation for Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The improved instrumentation, c...

  6. THE EFFECT OF CONTRALATERAL PURE TONES ON THE COMPOUND ACTION POTENTIAL IN HUMANS

    E-print Network

    Najem, Fadi Jamil

    2013-08-31

    The compound action potential (CAP) has been suggested in the literature as an alternative to otoacoustic emissions (OAE) for evaluating the efferent auditory system, and is thought to overcome some of the drawbacks ...

  7. Compound library management.

    PubMed

    Chan, James A; Hueso-Rodríguez, Juan A

    2002-01-01

    The increasing size of the collections used for drug-discovery purposes has demanded both hardware and software automation of compound management in order to cope with the increasing demands of HTS. Splitting the collection into a number of copies in different formats is a desirable approach to keep a balance between rapid response to the demands and best storage conditions. Flexibility to different assay configurations can be provided with the appropriate selection of liquid handlers, and the informatic management systems should be accessible to keep track of the samples and link them to a variety of information that can help interpret HTS data. In this respect, QC data on the compounds and quality checks of the equipment used are highly desirable. It is also prudent for a large organization with different research sites to have a unified database and compatible plate format and concentration in order to be able to exchange samples and share screening results. The accomplishment of all the previous requirements is the only way to ensure an efficient and effective compound library management. PMID:12029818

  8. Antifungal compounds from cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Shishido, Tânia K; Humisto, Anu; Jokela, Jouni; Liu, Liwei; Wahlsten, Matti; Tamrakar, Anisha; Fewer, David P; Permi, Perttu; Andreote, Ana P D; Fiore, Marli F; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes found in a range of environments. They are infamous for the production of toxins, as well as bioactive compounds, which exhibit anticancer, antimicrobial and protease inhibition activities. Cyanobacteria produce a broad range of antifungals belonging to structural classes, such as peptides, polyketides and alkaloids. Here, we tested cyanobacteria from a wide variety of environments for antifungal activity. The potent antifungal macrolide scytophycin was detected in Anabaena sp. HAN21/1, Anabaena cf. cylindrica PH133, Nostoc sp. HAN11/1 and Scytonema sp. HAN3/2. To our knowledge, this is the first description of Anabaena strains that produce scytophycins. We detected antifungal glycolipopeptide hassallidin production in Anabaena spp. BIR JV1 and HAN7/1 and in Nostoc spp. 6sf Calc and CENA 219. These strains were isolated from brackish and freshwater samples collected in Brazil, the Czech Republic and Finland. In addition, three cyanobacterial strains, Fischerella sp. CENA 298, Scytonema hofmanni PCC 7110 and Nostoc sp. N107.3, produced unidentified antifungal compounds that warrant further characterization. Interestingly, all of the strains shown to produce antifungal compounds in this study belong to Nostocales or Stigonematales cyanobacterial orders. PMID:25871291

  9. Compound semiconductor SPAD arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Eric S.; Naydenkov, Mikhail; Hyland, James T.

    2013-06-01

    Single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) are revolutionizing ultra-sensitive photodetection applications, providing single photon sensitivity, high quantum efficiency and low dark noise at or near room temperature. When aggregated into arrays, these devices have demonstrated the ability to operate as photon number resolving detectors with wide dynamic range, or as single-photon imaging detectors. SPAD array performance has reached a point where replacing vacuum tube based MCP and PMT photodetectors for most applications is inevitable. Compound semiconductor SPAD arrays offer the unique proposition to tailor performance to match application specific wavelength, speed and radiation hardness requirements. We present a theoretical framework describing performance limits to compound semiconductor SPAD arrays and our latest experimental results detailing the performance of GaAs SPAD arrays. These devices achieve nanosecond rise and fall times, excellent photon number resolving capability, and low dark count rates. Single photon number resolving is demonstrated with 4% single photon detection efficiency at room temperature with dark count rates below 7 Mcps/mm2. Compound semiconductor SPAD arrays have the opportunity to provide orders of magnitude improvement in dark count rate and radiation hardness over silicon SPAD arrays, as well as the ability to detect wavelengths where silicon is blind.

  10. Destruction of air emissions using catalytic oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Kosusko, M.; Ramsey, G.M.

    1988-05-01

    This paper discusses key emission stream characteristics and hazardous air pollutant (HAP) characteristics that affect the applicability of catalytic oxidation as an air pollution control technique in which volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and vapor-phase air toxics in an air emission stream are oxidized with the help of a catalyst. Design of catalytic systems for control of point-source emissions is based on stream-specific characteristics and desired control efficiency. The application of catalytic oxidation to four types of air emission sources is discussed: groundwater stripping operations, graphics arts (heatset printing) facilities, flexographic printing plants, and latex monomer production. The characteristics of each emission are discussed along with the catalytic technology used to control it. In addition, several catalytic systems are identified for control of air emissions, along with information about their technology and their position in the market place. Finally, some rough economics are presented which compare catalytic oxidation, carbon adsorption, and thermal incineration systems.

  11. The composition of gasoline engine hydrocarbon emissions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Pelz; N. M. Dempster; G. E. Hundleby; P. R. Shore

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-three hydrocarbon components were analyzed in the exhaust emissions from a 2.3 liter gasoline engine. The effect of a three-way catalyst on emission rates was investigated, as was the effect of addition to fuel of specific aromatic and olefinic compounds. The addition of 1-hexene and 1-octene (olefins) caused statistically significant increases in reactive olefins ethene and propene - in the

  12. Study of building material emissions and indoor air quality

    E-print Network

    Yang, Xudong, 1966-

    1999-01-01

    Building materials and furnishings emit a wide variety of indoor pollutants, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs). At present, no accurate models are available to characterize material emissions and sorption under ...

  13. CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR FUGITIVE VOC EMISSIONS FROM CHEMICAL PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This handbook contains information concerning volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from the synthetic organic chemicals manufacturing industry (SOCMI), petroleum refineries, on-shore natural gas processing plants, polymer manufacturing plants, benzene from particular equipme...

  14. Mitigating enteric methane emissions: Where are the biggest opportunities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many opportunities exist to reduce enteric methane emissions per unit of product from ruminant livestock. These include alterations in feeding management and nutrition, addition of compounds to modify rumen function, genetic improvements to increase animal lifetime productivity (including health and...

  15. Special Risks of Pharmacy Compounding

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Consumer Updates RSS Feed The Special Risks of Pharmacy Compounding Search the Consumer Updates Section Get Consumer ... page: A Troubling Trend What You Can Do Pharmacy compounding is a practice in which a licensed ...

  16. Phenolic compounds in Catharanthus roseus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Natali Rianika Mustafa; Robert Verpoorte

    2007-01-01

    Besides alkaloids Catharanthus roseus produces a wide spectrum of phenolic compounds, this includes C6C1 compounds such as 2,3-dihydoxybenzoic acid, as well as\\u000a phenylpropanoids such as cinnamic acid derivatives, flavonoids and anthocyanins. The occurrence of these compounds in C. roseus is reviewed as well as their biosynthesis and the regulation of the pathways. Both types of compounds compete with the indole

  17. Offset Compound Gear Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Mark A.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Lewicki, David G.

    2010-01-01

    The Offset Compound Gear Drive is an in-line, discrete, two-speed device utilizing a special offset compound gear that has both an internal tooth configuration on the input end and external tooth configuration on the output end, thus allowing it to mesh in series, simultaneously, with both a smaller external tooth input gear and a larger internal tooth output gear. This unique geometry and offset axis permits the compound gear to mesh with the smaller diameter input gear and the larger diameter output gear, both of which are on the same central, or primary, centerline. This configuration results in a compact in-line reduction gear set consisting of fewer gears and bearings than a conventional planetary gear train. Switching between the two output ratios is accomplished through a main control clutch and sprag. Power flow to the above is transmitted through concentric power paths. Low-speed operation is accomplished in two meshes. For the purpose of illustrating the low-speed output operation, the following example pitch diameters are given. A 5.0 pitch diameter (PD) input gear to 7.50 PD (internal tooth) intermediate gear (0.667 reduction mesh), and a 7.50 PD (external tooth) intermediate gear to a 10.00 PD output gear (0.750 reduction mesh). Note that it is not required that the intermediate gears on the offset axis be of the same diameter. For this example, the resultant low-speed ratio is 2:1 (output speed = 0.500; product of stage one 0.667 reduction and stage two 0.750 stage reduction). The design is not restricted to the example pitch diameters, or output ratio. From the output gear, power is transmitted through a hollow drive shaft, which, in turn, drives a sprag during which time the main clutch is disengaged.

  18. Carcinogenic effect of nickel compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Haitian Lu; Xianglin Shi; Max Costa; Chuanshu Huang

    2005-01-01

    Nickel is a widely distributed metal that is industrially applied in many forms. Accumulated epidemiological evidence confirms that exposures to nickel compounds are associated with increased nasal and lung cancer incidence, both in mostly occupational exposures. Although the molecular mechanisms by which nickel compounds cause cancer are still under intense investigation, the carcinogenic actions of nickel compounds are thought to

  19. Titanium alkoxide compound

    DOEpatents

    Boyle, Timothy J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-08-14

    A titanium alkoxide composition is provided, as represented by the chemical formula (OC.sub.6H.sub.5N).sub.2Ti(OC.sub.6H.sub.5NH.sub.2).sub.2. As prepared, the compound is a crystalline substance with a hexavalent titanium atom bonded to two OC.sub.6H.sub.5NH.sub.2 groups and two OC.sub.6H.sub.5N groups with a theoretical molecular weight of 480.38, comprising 60.01% C, 5.04% H and 11.66% N.

  20. Transition Metal Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomskii, Daniel I.

    2014-10-01

    1. Localised and itinerant electrons in solids; 2. Isolated transition metal ions; 3. Transition metal ions in crystals; 4. Mott–Hubbard vc charge-transfer insulators; 5. Exchange interaction and magnetic structures; 6. Cooperative Jahn–Teller effect and orbital ordering; 7. Charge ordering in transition metal compounds; 8. Ferroelectrics, magnetoelectrics and multiferroics; 9. Doping of correlated systems and correlated metals; 10. Metal-insulator transitions; 11. Kondoeffect, mixed valence and heavy fermions; Appendix A. Some historical notes; Appendix B. A layman's guide to second quantization; Appendix C. Phase transitions and free energy expansion: Landau theory in a nutshell.