Sample records for compounds xvi calorimetric

  1. Synthesis, calorimetric, structural and conductivity studies in a new thallium selenate tellurate adduct compound

    SciTech Connect

    Ktari, L. [Laboratoire de l'Etat Solide (LES), Faculte des Sciences de Sfax, 3000 Sfax (Tunisia); Abdelhedi, M. [Laboratoire de l'Etat Solide (LES), Faculte des Sciences de Sfax, 3000 Sfax (Tunisia); Laboratoire Leon Brouillon LLB, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Bouhlel, N. [Laboratoire de l'Etat Solide (LES), Faculte des Sciences de Sfax, 3000 Sfax (Tunisia); Dammak, M., E-mail: meddammak@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de l'Etat Solide (LES), Faculte des Sciences de Sfax, 3000 Sfax (Tunisia); Cousson, A. [Laboratoire Leon Brouillon LLB, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2009-08-05

    The crystal structure of the thallium selenate tellurate Tl{sub 2}SeO{sub 4}.Te(OH){sub 6} (TlSeTe) was determined by X-ray diffraction method. The title compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system with P2{sub 1}/c space group. The following parameters are: a = 12.358(3) A; b = 7.231(1) A; c = 11.986(2) A; {beta} = 111.092(2){sup o}; Z = 4. The structure can be regarded as being built of isolated TeO{sub 6} octahedra and SeO{sub 4} tetrahedra. The Tl{sup +} cations are intercalated between these kinds of polyhedra. The main feature of this structure is the coexistence of two different and independent anions (SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and TeO{sub 6}{sup 6-}) in the same unit cell. The structure is stable due to O-H...O hydrogen bonds which link tetrahedral and octahedral groups. Crystals of Tl{sub 2}SeO{sub 4}.Te(OH){sub 6} undergo three endothermal transitions at 373, 395 and 437 K. These transitions are detected by DSC and analyzed by dielectric measurements with impedance spectroscopy. The evolution of conductivity versus temperature showed the presence of a protonic conduction phase transition at 437 K. The phase transition at 373 K can be related to a structural phase transition, whereas the one at 395 K is ascribed as likely due to a ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transition.

  2. Electronic calorimetric computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckelman, J. D.

    1968-01-01

    Electronic calorimetric computer calculates nuclear reactor thermal power output to a nominal accuracy of 1 percent. Heat balance is determined by an electronic approach. The thermal power is calculated using the inlet and outlet temperatures and the volume of cooling water and is displayed by a digital readout system.

  3. Superconductivity in the misfit compound of (LaSe)1.14(NbSe2): STM/S, calorimetric and magnetization studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuely, P.; Szabo, P.; Kacmarcik, J.; Pribulova, Z.; Samuely, T.; Rodrigo, J. G.; Marcenat, C.; Klein, T.; Cario, L.

    2013-03-01

    (LaSe)1.14(NbSe2) is a low temperature superconductor with Tc around 1.2 K belonging to the family of the lamellar chalcogenides. Electron transfer from the LaSe to the NbSe2 slab results in a natural layered system of the insulating LaSe and (super) conducting NbSe2 sheets. In our previous investigations of the anisotropic transport [P. Szabó et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 5990 (2001)] indications have been found that this system behaves as a stack of Josephson-coupled superconducting NbSe2 sheets separated by insulating LaSe layers. We test this hypothesis by STM/S measurements at subkelvin temperatures and in magnetic fields. Superconducting energy gap obtained by STM opens at the same temperature and field where the interlayer resistivity starts to increase before drop to zero value. Before any conclusions are made homogeneity of the superconducting parameters is to be tested. STM indicates large areas without any gap but calorimetric measurements have shown the bulk superconductivity and magnetization revealed extremely low pinning.

  4. Calorimetric Gas Sensors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanini, Margherita; Visser, J. H.; Nietering, K. E.; McBride, J. R.; Logothetis, E. M.

    1998-03-01

    Calorimetric gas sensors measure the concentration of combustibles species by detecting the temperature rise resulting from the oxidation process on a catalytic element. These devices are widely used to monitor in air the concentration of flammable species close to their explosion limit. Recently, research and development efforts have been directed towards applying this technology to measure low concentrations of hydrocarbons in a gas mixture at elevated temperatures with little amount of excess oxygen. The presentation discusses the advantages of using batch-fabricated Si micromachined devices over larger ceramic-type calorimeters to achieve high sensitivity and a fast response time. The effects limiting the performance of these devices will also be explained.

  5. Prototype of calorimetric flow microsensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazhin, Oleg

    2012-11-01

    An analytical model of calorimetric flow sensor has been developed. The results of the application of this model are utilized to develop a calorimetric flow microsensor with optimal functional characteristics. The technology to manufacture the microsensor is described. A prototype of the microsensor suitable to be used in the mass air flow meter has been designed. The basic characteristics of the microsensor are presented.

  6. Calorimetric gas sensor

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, A.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Smith, J.H.; Moreno, D.J.; Manginell, R.P.; Senturia, S.D.; Huber, R.J.

    1998-11-10

    A combustible gas sensor is described that uses a resistively heated, noble metal-coated, micromachined polycrystalline Si filament to calorimetrically detect the presence and concentration of combustible gases. The filaments tested to date are 2 {micro}m thick {times} 10{micro}m wide {times} 100, 250, 500, or 1000 {micro}m-long polycrystalline Si; some are overcoated with a 0.25 {micro}m-thick protective CVD Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer. A thin catalytic Pt film was deposited by CVD from the precursor Pt(acac){sub 2} onto microfilaments resistively heated to approximately 500 C; Pt deposits only on the hot filament. Using a constant-resistance-mode feedback circuit, Pt-coated filaments operating at ca. 300 C (35 mW input power) respond linearly, in terms of the change in supply current required to maintain constant resistance (temperature), to H{sub 2} concentrations between 100 ppm and 1% in an 80/20 N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} mixture. Other catalytic materials can also be used. 11 figs.

  7. Calorimetric gas sensor

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, Antonio J. (Albuquerque, NM); Hughes, Robert C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Smith, James H. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, Daniel J. (Albuquerque, NM); Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Senturia, Stephen D. (Brookline, MA); Huber, Robert J. (Bountiful, UT)

    1998-01-01

    A combustible gas sensor that uses a resistively heated, noble metal-coated, micromachined polycrystalline Si filament to calorimetrically detect the presence and concentration of combustible gases. The filaments tested to date are 2 .mu.m thick.times.10 .mu.m wide.times.100, 250, 500, or 1000 .mu.m-long polycrystalline Si; some are overcoated with a 0.25 .mu.m-thick protective CVD Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 layer. A thin catalytic Pt film was deposited by CVD from the precursor Pt(acac).sub.2 onto microfilaments resistively heated to approximately 500.degree. C.; Pt deposits only on the hot filament. Using a constant-resistance-mode feedback circuit, Pt-coated filaments operating at ca. 300.degree. C. (35 mW input power) respond linearly, in terms of the change in supply current required to maintain constant resistance (temperature), to H.sub.2 concentrations between 100 ppm and 1% in an 80/20 N.sub.2 /O.sub.2 mixture. Other catalytic materials can also be used.

  8. PREFACE: Symmetries in Science XVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-10-01

    This volume of the proceedings ''Symmetries in Science XVI'' is dedicated to the memory of Miguel Lorente and Allan Solomon who both participated several times in these Symposia. We lost not only two great scientists and colleagues, but also two wonderful persons of high esteem whom we will always remember. Dieter Schuch, Michael Ramek There is a German saying ''all good things come in threes'' and ''Symmetries in Science XVI'', convened July 20–26, 2013 at the Mehrerau Monastery, was our third in the sequel of these symposia since taking it over from founder Bruno Gruber who instigated it in 1988 (then in Lochau). Not only the time seemed to have been perfect (one week of beautiful sunshine), but also the medley of participants could hardly have been better. This time, 34 scientists from 16 countries (more than half outside the European Union) came together to report and discuss their latest results in various fields of science, all related to symmetries. The now customary grouping of renowned experts and talented newcomers was very rewarding and stimulating for all. The informal, yet intense, discussions at ''Gasthof Lamm'' occurred (progressively later) each evening till well after midnight and finally till almost daybreak! However, prior to the opening ceremony and during the conference, respectively, we were informed that Miguel Lorente and Allan Solomon had recently passed away. Both attended the SIS Symposia several times and had many friends among present and former participants. Professor Peter Kramer, himself a long–standing participant and whose 80th birthday commemoration prevented him from attending SIS XVI, kindly agreed to write the obituary for Miguel Lorente. Professors Richard Kerner and Carol Penson (both also former attendees) penned, at very short notice, the tribute to Allan Solomon. The obituaries are included in these Proceedings and further tributes have been posted to our conference website. In 28 lectures and an evening poster–session, topics ranging from theoretical chemistry and molecular physics via fundamental problems in quantum theory to thermodynamics, nonlinear dynamics, soliton theory and finally cosmology, were examined and lively discussed. Nearly all the talks can also be viewed on the conference website. The majority of participants contributed to these Proceedings but some were unable to do so as their results were either previously submitted or published elsewhere. We refer to: · Quesne C 2013, J. Math. Phys. 54, 102102. · Spera M 2013, (Nankai Series in Pure, Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics): 11 Symmetries and Groups in Contemporary Physics: pp. 593–598 Proceedings of the XXIX International Colloquium on Group–Theoretical Methods in Physics Tianjin, China, 20 – 26 August 2012 (World Scientific, Singapore) · Snobl L and Winternitz P 2014, Classification and Identification of Lie Algebras, CRM Monograph Series 33 (Montreal) ISBN–10: 0–8218–4355–9, ISBN–13: 978–0–8218–4355–0 (http://www.ams.org/bookstore?fn=20&arg1=crmmseries&ikey=CRMM-33). Our personal thanks to Daniel and family! Endless support from the Schenk Family who, among other things, sponsored (yet again) the entire conference dinner (including wines and banquet hall) meant that some costs could be alleviated. We could therefore assist various colleagues from economically–weak countries, despite the lack of external funding. A financial deficit meant we would have had to forego the Conference Proceedings, published in previous years by IOP. After long deliberations, and with donations from Gerhard Berssenbrügge, Dr. Dr. Stephan Hauk and Dr. Volker Weisswange, this could be facilitated. We are very grateful to these private donors for their generous and wholehearted support. The staff of Collegium Mehrerau is also to be thanked for their hospitality. Finally, our sincere thanks to Yvette not only for her preparatory work and support during the conference, but also for her persistent interest and help in producing the Proceedings within a reasonable time. Dieter Schuc

  9. EDITORIAL: XVI Brazilian Colloquium on Orbital Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo, Cristiano F.; Macau, Elbert E. N.; Prado, Antonio B. A.; Hetem Jnr, Annibal

    2013-10-01

    The XVI Brazilian Colloquium on Orbital Dynamics was held from 26-30 November 2012, at the Biazi Grand Hotel, Serra Negra, São Paulo, Brazil. The Brazilian Colloquia on Orbital Dynamics are scientific events that occur bi-annually and are designed to develop those areas of research in celestial mechanics, orbital dynamics, planetary science, fundamental astronomy, aerospace engineering, and nonlinear systems and chaos. The meeting has been held for 30 years and it brings together researchers, professors and students from South American and also from other continents. Acknowledgements National Council for Scientific and Technological Development - CNPq Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Level - CAPES São Paulo Research Foundation - FAPESP

  10. 2007 Site environmental report xvi the environmental and Waste Management

    E-print Network

    2007 Site environmental report xvi the environmental and Waste Management services Division field Division radiological Control Division lead chapter authors environmental and waste management services contributors environmental and waste management services division Arland Carsten, Consultant Mark Davis George

  11. A calorimetric method to determine water activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2011-01-01

    A calorimetric method to determine water activity covering the full range of the water activity scale is presented. A dry stream of nitrogen gas is passed either over the solution whose activity should be determined or left dry before it is saturated by bubbling through water in an isothermal calorimeter. The unknown activity is in principle determined by comparing the

  12. Fast Electron Thermometry for Ultrasensitive Calorimetric Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparinetti, S.; Viisanen, K. L.; Saira, O.-P.; Faivre, T.; Arzeo, M.; Meschke, M.; Pekola, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate radio-frequency thermometry on a micrometer-sized metallic island below 100 mK. Our device is based on a normal-metal-insulator-superconductor tunnel junction coupled to a resonator with transmission readout. In the first generation of the device, we achieve 90 ? K /?{Hz } noise-equivalent temperature with 10 MHz bandwidth. We measure the thermal relaxation time of the electron gas in the island, which we find to be of the order of 100 ? s . Such a calorimetric detector, upon optimization, can be seamlessly integrated into superconducting circuits, with immediate applications in quantum-thermodynamics experiments down to single quanta of energy.

  13. Calorimetric thermobarometry of experimentally shocked quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ocker, Katherine D.; Gooding, James L.; Hoerz, Friedrich

    1994-01-01

    Structural damage in experimentally shock-metamorphosed, granular quartz is quantitatively measurable by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Shock-induced loss of crystallinity is witnessed by disappearance of the alpha/beta phase transformation and evolution of a broad endoenthalpic strain peak at 650-900 K. The strain-energy peak grows rapidly at less than 10 GPa but declines with increasing shock pressure; it approaches zero at 32 GPa where vitrification is extensive. Effects of grain size and post-shock thermal history must be better understood before calorimetric thermobarometry of naturally shocked samples becomes possible.

  14. EDITORIAL: Special issue: CAMOP MOLEC XVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascenzi, Daniela; Franceschi, Pietro; Tosi, Paolo

    2007-09-01

    In this special issue of CAMOP/Physica Scripta we would like to present a picture of the state-of-the-art in the field of the dynamics of molecular systems. It contains a collection of papers submitted in association with the most recent MOLEC meeting (MOLEC XVI), which was held in September 2006 in Levico Terme (Italy) to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the MOLEC conference series. The series of biennial European Conferences on the Dynamics of Molecular Systems (MOLEC) started in 1976, when the first meeting was held in Trento (Italy). Successive conferences were organized in Brandbjerg Højskole (Denmark, 1978), Oxford (UK, 1980), Nijmegen (The Netherlands, 1982), Jerusalem (Israel, 1984), Aussois (France, 1986), Assisi (Italy, 1988), Bernkastel-Kues (Germany, 1990), Prague (Czech Republic, 1992), Salamanca (Spain, 1994), Nyborg Strand (Denmark, 1996), Bristol (UK, 1998), Jerusalem (Israel, 2000), Istanbul (Turkey, 2002) and Nunspeet (The Netherlands, 2004). This is the second time that Physica Scripta has hosted a special issue dedicated to MOLEC. The previous issue ( Physica Scripta (2006) 73 C1-C89) was edited by Steven Stolte and Harold Linnartz following the MOLEC 2004 conference. Following the philosophy of CAMOP, we have asked invited speakers to summarize important problems in their research area, with the objective of setting forth the current thinking of leading researchers in atomic, molecular and optical physics. This comprises discussions of open questions, important new applications, new theoretical and experimental approaches and also predictions of where the field is heading. In addition to being authoritative contributions of acknowledged experts, we hope that the papers also appeal to non-specialists as each work contains a clear and broad introduction and references to the accessible literature. The present special issue comprises 17 papers, which are arranged according to the following topics: theoretical and experimental studies of molecular collisions and chemically reactive systems (papers by Toennies, Cavalli et al, Varandas, Nyman, Allan et al, Liu et al, Boxford et al); cooling and alignment of molecular systems (papers by Kumarappan et al, van de Meerakker et al); photon-matter interactions, spectroscopy and photodissociation (papers by Fárník and Buck, Golan et al, Borghesani et al, Coreno et al); theory of complex systems (papers by Villarreal et al, Bodo et al, Yurtsever and Calvo). The final contribution concerns the dynamics of systems of biological relevance (paper by Denicke et al). The paper by Toennies, one of the founding fathers of the MOLEC conference and winner of the MOLEC award in 1996, presents a comprehensive account of the experimental developments in the field of low energy collisions over the last 30 years, and provides a short outlook on how the most recent cooling and ultra cooling techniques (helium droplets and electro-magnetic laser traps) could open up new perspectives in the field of chemical reaction dynamics. Cavalli et al present a theoretical interpretation of overlapping resonances in the reactive cross section for the benchmark reaction F + H2?HF + H, explained by the formation of a short-lived state located in the transition state region and of a van der Waals metastable state in the exit valley. The subject of accurate ab initio calculations for potential energy surfaces is addressed by Varandas in a paper describing suitable modelling strategies to obtain intermolecular potentials at near spectroscopic resolution. In the following paper, Nyman gives an overview of how thermal rate constants for polyatomic chemical reactions can be calculated from first principles: the reaction H2 + CH3?CH4 + H is used as an example and theoretical results are compared with experimental ones. The `uncharted territory' of collision dynamics at the gas-liquid interface is explored in the pioneering contribution by Allan et al, in which experimental results on the reactivity of O atoms with long chain liquid hydrocarbons are interpreted with the aid of molecular dynamic

  15. Radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Baker, John (Livermore, CA); Collins, Leland F. (Pleasanton, CA); Kuklo, Thomas C. (Ripon, CA); Micali, James V. (Dublin, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system for measuring the average power of a beam such as a laser beam, including a calorimeter configured to operate over a wide range of coolant flow rates and being cooled by continuously flowing coolant for absorbing light from a laser beam to convert the laser beam energy into heat. The system further includes a flow meter for measuring the coolant flow in the calorimeter and a pair of thermistors for measuring the temperature difference between the coolant inputs and outputs to the calorimeter. The system also includes a microprocessor for processing the measured coolant flow rate and the measured temperature difference to determine the average power of the laser beam.

  16. Calorimetric sensors for energy deposition measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Langenbrunner, J.; Cooper, R. [Bechtel Nevada, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Morgan, G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1998-12-31

    A calorimetric sensor with several novel design features has been developed. These sensors will provide an accurate sampling of thermal power density and energy deposition from proton beams incident on target components of accelerator-based systems, such as the Accelerator Production of Tritium Project (APT) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). A small, solid slug (volume = 0.347 cc) of target material is suspended by kevlar fibers and surrounded by an adiabatic enclosure in an insulating vacuum canister of stainless steel construction. The slug is in thermal contact with a low-mass, calibrated, 100-k{Omega} thermistor. Power deposition caused by the passage of radiation through the slug is calculated from the rate of temperature rise of the slug. The authors have chosen slugs composed of Pb, Al, and LiAl.

  17. The interaction of new piroxicam analogues with lipid bilayers--a calorimetric and fluorescence spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Maniewska, Jadwiga; Szcz??niak-Si?ga, Berenika; Po?a, Andrzej; Sroda-Pomianek, Kamila; Malinka, Wies?aw; Michalak, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to assess the ability of new piroxicam analogues to interact with the lipid bilayers. The results of calorimetric and fluorescence spectroscopic experiments of two new synthesized analogues of piroxicam, named PR17 and PR18 on the phase behavior of phospholipid bilayers and fluorescence quenching of fluorescent probes (Laurdan and Prodan), which molecular location within membranes is known with certainty, are shown in present work. The presented results revealed that, depending on the details of chemical structure, the studied compounds penetrated the lipid bilayers. PMID:25856831

  18. Nanowell-patterned TiO2 microcantilevers for calorimetric chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongkyu; Kim, Seonghwan; Chae, Inseok; Jeon, Sangmin; Thundat, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    A sensitive calorimetric sensor using a TiO2 microcantilever with nanowells patterned on one of its sides is described. This single material cantilever is sensitive to temperature change without relying on the metal deposition-based bimetallic effect. The thermomechanical sensitivity originates from the structure dependent variations in both the elastic modulus and thermal expansion coefficient due to the presence of ordered nanowells. These cantilever beams offer an alternate and efficient chemical sensing route for vapor phase analytes using photothermal spectroscopy. Selective and sensitive detection of organophosphorus compounds, as well as their photocatalytic decomposition under ultraviolet light exposure are demonstrated.

  19. 76 FR 45309 - Social Security Ruling 11-1p; Titles II and XVI: Procedures for Handling Requests To File...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ...XVI: Procedures for Handling Requests To File Subsequent Applications for Disability...procedures for handling your request to file a disability claim when you have a pending...XVI: Procedures for Handling Requests To File Subsequent Applications for...

  20. The CALorimetric Electron Telescope, CALET, Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, Shoji

    We are developing the CALorimetric Electron Telescope, CALET, mission for the Japanese Experiment Module Exposed Facility, JEM-EF, of the International Space Station. Major scientific objectives are to search for nearby cosmic ray sources and dark matter by carrying out a precise measurement of the electrons in GeV 20 TeV and the gamma-rays in 20 MeV TeV. CALET has a unique capability to observe electrons and gamma-rays over 1 TeV since the hadron rejection power is more than 105 and the energy resolution better than a few percent over 100 GeV. The detector consists of an Imaging Calorimeter (IMC) with scintillating fiber belts and tungsten plates, a Total Absorption Calorimeter (TASC) with BGO logs, a Silicon Pixel Array (SIA) and a Scintillator Anti-Coincidence System (SACS). CALET has also a capability to measure protons and nuclei in 10 GeV 1000 TeV, and will have a function to monitor solar activity and gamma-ray bursts with additional instruments. The phase A study has started on a schedule of launch in 2013 by H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) for 5 years observation.

  1. TECHNICAL DESIGN NOTE A differential formulation of the T-History calorimetric method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Alvarez, L.; Herrera, J. N.; Meneses-Fabian, C.

    2010-12-01

    We present a differential formulation of the T-History calorimetric method in order to achieve thermodynamic consistency with phase transitions theory and to include the important experimental effect of the speed of the thermal process in calorimetric calculations. To illustrate the applicability of the new formulation, we show some numerical results which give an acceptable description of calorimetric measures.

  2. Calorimetric Investigation of Hydrogen Bonding of Formamide and Its Methyl Derivatives in Organic Solvents and Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varfolomeev, Mikhail A.; Rakipov, Ilnaz T.; Solomonov, Boris N.

    2013-04-01

    Formamide and its derivatives have a large number of practical applications; also they are structural fragments of many biomolecules. Hydrogen bonds strongly affect their physicochemical properties. In the present work a calorimetric study of formamide and its methyl derivatives was carried out. Enthalpies of solution at infinite dilution of formamide, N-methylformamide, and N, N-dimethylformamide in organic solvents at 298.15 K were measured. The relationships between the obtained enthalpies of solvation and the structure of the studied compounds were observed. Hydrogen-bond enthalpies of amides with chlorinated alkanes, ethers, ketones, esters, nitriles, amines, alcohols, and water were determined. The strength of hydrogen bonds of formamide, N-methylformamide, and N, N-dimethylformamide with proton donor solvents is practically equal. Enthalpies of hydrogen bonds of formamide with the proton acceptor solvents are two times larger in magnitude than the enthalpies of N-methylformamide. The process of hydrogen bonding of amides in aliphatic alcohols and water is complicated. The obtained enthalpies of hydrogen bonding in aliphatic alcohols vary considerably from the amide structure due to the competition between solute-solvent and solvent-solvent hydrogen bonds. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic measurements were carried out to explain the calorimetric data. Hydration enthalpies of methyl derivatives of formamides contain a contribution of the hydrophobic effect. New thermochemical data on the hydrogen bonding of formamides may be useful for predicting the properties of biomacromolecules.

  3. Volume XVI, No. 1 A publication of the U.S. Army Installation Management Agency

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    . January/February 2004 Vol. XVI, No. 1 Printed on recycled paper. U.S. Army Installation Management Agency of installation services through Common Levels of Support by Karan Foutch 12 Don't be caught by the tire TRAP

  4. Isoperibolic Calorimetric Measurements of the Fleischmann-Pons Effect

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melvin H. Miles; Martin Fleischmann

    Important advantages exist for selecting a Dewar type isoperibolic calorimeter for measurements of anomalous excess enthalpy produced by the Fleischmann-Pons Effect (FPE). These advantages include a wide dynamic range for both the cell temperature and cell input power, direct visual observations inside the cell during calorimetric experiments, relative low cost, self- purification of the system, the safety of an open

  5. Calorimetric glass transition explained by hierarchical dynamic facilitation

    E-print Network

    Garrahan, Juan P.

    Calorimetric glass transition explained by hierarchical dynamic facilitation Aaron S. Keysa Contributed by David Chandler, February 11, 2013 (sent for review November 15, 2012) The glass transition different on cooling than on heating, and the response to melting a glass depends markedly on the cooling

  6. Gas flow meter based on calorimetric flow microsensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazhin, Oleg

    2014-12-01

    A prototype of mass gas flow meter was developed on the basis of calorimetric flow microsensor. Design and manufacturing technology of the flow meter were elaborated. Test procedure was carried out and results were provided. Developed prototype of flow meter can diagnose gas mass flow rates in a wide range.

  7. Calorimetric Vacuum Emissometry At 773 To 923 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, Michael J.; Banks, Bruce A.; Stidham, Curtis; Kussmaul, Michael; Diflippo, Frank

    1993-01-01

    Report describes design, construction, and tests of calorimetric vacuum emissometer (CVE) intended to measure total hemispherical emittances of materials in vacuum at temperatures from 773 to 923 K. Results of measurements by CVE compared with those of hohlraum (blackbody) reflectometer and open-air elevated-temperature emissometer. CVE measurements take more time but more accurate.

  8. Biodegradable composites filled with halloysite nanonotubes: Calorimetric investigations and structural issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Pietro; Vetrano, Barbara; Acierno, Domenico

    2012-07-01

    Halloysite nanotubes were dispersed in a commercially biodegradable blends by melt compounding. Bionanocomposites based on a film-grade commercial blend of poly(hydroxybutirate)-co-valerate PHBV and poly(butylene adipate-co-therephthalate) PBAT and containg up to 10% by weigth of tubular clays (HNTs) were prepared by using a twin-screw lab extruder and filmed by a film-blowing equipment. Film samples were subjected to thermal and structural investigations. Calorimetric analysis showed that signals shape is clearly affected by the heating and cooling rate, respectively. Structural investigations performed by X-Ray diffraction tests satisfactorily allowed to interpret thermal behavior highlighting the occurrence of different crystalline modifications, depending on the scanning thermal rate, the inclusion of filler and its chemical functionalization.

  9. Characterization of Gels and Networks Using New Calorimetric Techniques

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-Marie Nedelec; Mohamed Baba

    Recent developments of calorimetric techniques for the characterization of porous materials and gels are presented. In particular\\u000a thermoporosimetry is introduced along with recent applications to soft materials like gels and polymers. In a second part,\\u000a photo-DSC technique is presented with the new developments for the study of gels networks and photo-ageing of polymers. An\\u000a overview of the potential of the

  10. 45 CFR 233.145 - Expiration of medical assistance programs under titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social Security Act. 233.145 Section 233...IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social Security Act. (a) Under the provisions...IV-A, X, XIV or XVI of the Social Security Act for aid or...

  11. 45 CFR 233.145 - Expiration of medical assistance programs under titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social Security Act. 233.145 Section 233...IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social Security Act. (a) Under the provisions...IV-A, X, XIV or XVI of the Social Security Act for aid or...

  12. 45 CFR 233.145 - Expiration of medical assistance programs under titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social Security Act. 233.145 Section 233...IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social Security Act. (a) Under the provisions...IV-A, X, XIV or XVI of the Social Security Act for aid or...

  13. 45 CFR 233.145 - Expiration of medical assistance programs under titles I, IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social Security Act. 233.145 Section 233...IV-A, X, XIV and XVI of the Social Security Act. (a) Under the provisions...IV-A, X, XIV or XVI of the Social Security Act for aid or...

  14. Formation and properties of ice XVI obtained by emptying a type sII clathrate hydrate.

    PubMed

    Falenty, Andrzej; Hansen, Thomas C; Kuhs, Werner F

    2014-12-11

    Gas hydrates are ice-like solids, in which guest molecules or atoms are trapped inside cages formed within a crystalline host framework (clathrate) of hydrogen-bonded water molecules. They are naturally present in large quantities on the deep ocean floor and as permafrost, can form in and block gas pipelines, and are thought to occur widely on Earth and beyond. A natural point of reference for this large and ubiquitous family of inclusion compounds is the empty hydrate lattice, which is usually regarded as experimentally inaccessible because the guest species stabilize the host framework. However, it has been suggested that sufficiently small guests may be removed to leave behind metastable empty clathrates, and guest-free Si- and Ge-clathrates have indeed been obtained. Here we show that this strategy can also be applied to water-based clathrates: five days of continuous vacuum pumping on small particles of neon hydrate (of structure sII) removes all guests, allowing us to determine the crystal structure, thermal expansivity and limit of metastability of the empty hydrate. It is the seventeenth experimentally established crystalline ice phase, ice XVI according to the current ice nomenclature, has a density of 0.81 grams per cubic centimetre (making it the least dense of all known crystalline water phases) and is expected to be the stable low-temperature phase of water at negative pressures (that is, under tension). We find that the empty hydrate structure exhibits negative thermal expansion below about 55 kelvin, and that it is mechanically more stable and has at low temperatures larger lattice constants than the filled hydrate. These observations attest to the importance of kinetic effects and host-guest interactions in clathrate hydrates, with further characterization of the empty hydrate expected to improve our understanding of the structure, properties and behaviour of these unique materials. PMID:25503235

  15. Formation and properties of ice XVI obtained by emptying a type sII clathrate hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falenty, Andrzej; Hansen, Thomas C.; Kuhs, Werner F.

    2014-12-01

    Gas hydrates are ice-like solids, in which guest molecules or atoms are trapped inside cages formed within a crystalline host framework (clathrate) of hydrogen-bonded water molecules. They are naturally present in large quantities on the deep ocean floor and as permafrost, can form in and block gas pipelines, and are thought to occur widely on Earth and beyond. A natural point of reference for this large and ubiquitous family of inclusion compounds is the empty hydrate lattice, which is usually regarded as experimentally inaccessible because the guest species stabilize the host framework. However, it has been suggested that sufficiently small guests may be removed to leave behind metastable empty clathrates, and guest-free Si- and Ge-clathrates have indeed been obtained. Here we show that this strategy can also be applied to water-based clathrates: five days of continuous vacuum pumping on small particles of neon hydrate (of structure sII) removes all guests, allowing us to determine the crystal structure, thermal expansivity and limit of metastability of the empty hydrate. It is the seventeenth experimentally established crystalline ice phase, ice XVI according to the current ice nomenclature, has a density of 0.81 grams per cubic centimetre (making it the least dense of all known crystalline water phases) and is expected to be the stable low-temperature phase of water at negative pressures (that is, under tension). We find that the empty hydrate structure exhibits negative thermal expansion below about 55 kelvin, and that it is mechanically more stable and has at low temperatures larger lattice constants than the filled hydrate. These observations attest to the importance of kinetic effects and host-guest interactions in clathrate hydrates, with further characterization of the empty hydrate expected to improve our understanding of the structure, properties and behaviour of these unique materials.

  16. Measurement of the calorimetric energy scale in MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnell, Jeffrey J.; /Oxford U.

    2005-06-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. A neutrino beam is created at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois and fired down through the Earth. Measurements of the energy spectra and composition of the neutrino beam are made both at the source using the Near detector and 735 km away at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota using the Far detector. By comparing the spectrum and flavour composition of the neutrino beam between the two detectors neutrino oscillations can be observed. Such a comparison depends on the accuracy of the relative calorimetric energy scale. This thesis details a precise measurement of the calorimetric energy scale of the MINOS Far detector and Calibration detector using stopping muons with a new ''track window'' technique. These measurements are used to perform the relative calibration between the two detectors. This calibration has been accomplished to 1.7% in data and to significantly better than 2% in the Monte Carlo simulation, thus achieving the MINOS relative calibration target of 2%. A number of cross-checks have been performed to ensure the robustness of the calorimetric energy scale measurements. At the Calibration detector the test-beam energy between run periods is found to be consistent with the detector response to better than 2% after the relative calibration is applied. The muon energy loss in the MINOS detectors determined from Bethe-Bloch predictions, data and Monte Carlo are compared and understood. To estimate the systematic error on the measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameters caused by a relative miscalibration a study is performed. A 2% relative miscalibration is shown to cause a 0.6% bias in the values of {Delta}m{sup 2} and sin{sup 2}(2{theta}).

  17. Calorimetric determination of the enthalpy of formation for pyrophyllite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorodova, L. P.; Kiseleva, I. A.; Mel'Chakova, L. V.; Vigasina, M. F.; Spiridonov, E. M.

    2011-09-01

    A calorimetric study of the natural pyrophyllite was performed by high-temperature melt calorimetry on a Tian-Calvet calorimeter. Based on experimentally determined in this work for pyrophyllite and gibbsite, as well as previously obtained for corundum and quartz, the total value of the enthalpy increment for the sample heated from room temperature to 973 K and the enthalpy of dissolution at 973 K by Hess's law, the enthalpy of formation of pyrophyllite of Al2[(OH)2/Si4O10] composed of elements was calculated at 298.15 K: ?f H {el/o}(298.15 K) = -5639.8 ± 5.7 kJ/mol.

  18. A TEMPORAL MAP IN GEOSTATIONARY ORBIT: THE COVER ETCHING ON THE EchoStar XVI ARTIFACT

    SciTech Connect

    Weisberg, Joel M., E-mail: jweisber@carleton.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Carleton College, Northfield, MN 55057 (United States); Paglen, Trevor, E-mail: trevor@paglen.com

    2012-10-01

    Geostationary satellites are unique among orbital spacecraft in that they experience no appreciable atmospheric drag. After concluding their respective missions, geostationary spacecraft remain in orbit virtually in perpetuity. As such, they represent some of human civilization's longest lasting artifacts. With this in mind, the EchoStar XVI satellite, to be launched in fall 2012, will play host to a time capsule intended as a message for the deep future. Inspired in part by the Pioneer Plaque and Voyager Golden Records, the EchoStar XVI Artifact is a pair of gold-plated aluminum jackets housing a small silicon disk containing 100 photographs. The Cover Etching, the subject of this paper, is etched onto one of the two jackets. It is a temporal map consisting of a star chart, pulsar timings, and other information describing the epoch from which EchoStar XVI came. The pulsar sample consists of 13 rapidly rotating objects, 5 of which are especially stable, having spin periods <10 ms and extremely small spin-down rates. In this paper, we discuss our approach to the time map etched onto the cover and the scientific data shown on it, and we speculate on the uses that future scientists may have for its data. The other portions of the EchoStar XVI Artifact will be discussed elsewhere.

  19. Nutritional and psycho-physiological assessment of members of the XVI Antarctica expedition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    NARINDER K. SATIJA; ANAJANA G. VIJ; K. SRIDHARAN

    2000-01-01

    The present studies are aimed to evaluate the effects of physiological stress and metabolic requirements necessary to maintain homeostasis and physical and mental functions during stay at Antarctica in expedition members. Nutritional and psycho-physiological assement of the members of the XVI Indian Scientific Expedition to Antarctica was carried alongwith supplementation of vitamins, viz., vitamins, viz., vitamin C and vitamin E

  20. Anjan Chakravartty. A Metaphysics for Scien-tific Realism: Knowing the Unobservable. xvi

    E-print Network

    Chakravartty, Anjan

    Anjan Chakravartty. A Metaphysics for Scien- tific Realism: Knowing the Unobservable. xvi 272 pp., figs., tables, index. Cambridge: Cam- bridge University Press, 2007. £45 (cloth). A Metaphysics to a non-Humean metaphysics, this might be reason enough to make it unattractive to all those who prefer

  1. Low-temperature calorimetric properties of zinc ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, J. C.; Hamdeh, H. H.; Chen, Y. Y.; Lin, S. H.; Yao, Y. D.; Willey, R. J.; Oliver, S. A.

    1995-10-01

    Calorimetric measurements between 1 and 40 K by a thermal relaxation technique have been made on zinc ferrite nanoparticles prepared from an aerogel process. The expected ?-type heat-capacity peak near 10 K, which corresponds to a long-range antiferromagnetic transition in the bulk form of this material, is greatly suppressed. Broad peaks begin to prevail after the sample is annealed at 500 or 800 °C, but ball milling of the nanoparticles leads to almost complete disappearance of the low-temperature ordering. In all cases, calorimetrically based magnetic entropy at 40 K accounts for only a fraction of 2R ln(2S+1) with S=5/2 for Fe3+. These results are corroborated by magnetic data, which also indicate magnetic ordering at high temperatures. Such observations can be understood by considering the relative distribution of Fe3+ between two nonequivalent (A and B) sites in the spinel-type lattice. In particular, the as-prepared fine particles show large Fe3+ occupancy of the A sites, whereas these ions prefer the B sites in bulk zinc ferrite. Meanwhile, the lattice heat capacity is enhanced, yielding effective Debye temperatures of 225, 285, 345, and 360 K for the as-prepared, 500 °C-annealed, 800 °C-annealed, and ball milled sample, respectively, in contrast to 425 K for the bulk material.

  2. Empirical free energy calculation: comparison to calorimetric data.

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Z.; Delisi, C.; Vajda, S.

    1997-01-01

    An effective free energy potential, developed originally for binding free energy calculation, is compared to calorimetric data on protein unfolding, described by a linear combination of changes in polar and nonpolar surface areas. The potential consists of a molecular mechanics energy term calculated for a reference medium (vapor or nonpolar liquid), and empirical terms representing solvation and entropic effects. It is shown that, under suitable conditions, the free energy function agrees well with the calorimetric expression. An additional result of the comparison is an independent estimate of the side-chain entropy loss, which is shown to agree with a structure-based entropy scale. These findings confirm that simple functions can be used to estimate the free energy change in complex systems, and that a binding free energy evaluation model can describe the thermodynamics of protein unfolding correctly. Furthermore, it is shown that folding and binding leave the sum of solute-solute and solute-solvent van der Waals interactions nearly invariant and, due to this invariance, it may be advantageous to use a nonpolar liquid rather than vacuum as the reference medium. PMID:9300497

  3. 78 FR 17744 - Social Security Ruling, SSR 13-2p; Titles II and XVI: Evaluating Cases Involving Drug Addiction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ...Docket No. SSA-2012-0006] Social Security Ruling, SSR 13-2p; Titles II and XVI: Evaluating Cases Involving Drug Addiction and Alcoholism (DAA); Correction AGENCY: Social Security Administration. ACTION: Notice of Social Security...

  4. 78 FR 22361 - Social Security Ruling, SSR 13-1p; Titles II and XVI: Agency Processes for Addressing Allegations...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ...II and XVI: Agency Processes for Addressing Allegations of Unfairness, Prejudice, Partiality, Bias, Misconduct, or Discrimination by Administrative Law Judges (ALJs); Correction AGENCY: Social Security Administration. ACTION: Notice of Social...

  5. 78 FR 8217 - Social Security Ruling, SSR 13-1p; Titles II and XVI: Agency Processes for Addressing Allegations...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ...II and XVI: Agency Processes for Addressing Allegations of Unfairness, Prejudice, Partiality, Bias, Misconduct, or Discrimination by Administrative Law Judges (ALJs); Correction AGENCY: Social Security Administration. ACTION: Notice of Social...

  6. 78 FR 9987 - Social Security Ruling, SSR 13-1p; Titles II and XVI: Agency Processes for Addressing Allegations...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ...II and XVI: Agency Processes for Addressing Allegations of Unfairness, Prejudice, Partiality, Bias, Misconduct, or Discrimination by Administrative Law Judges (ALJs); Correction AGENCY: Social Security Administration. ACTION: Notice of Social...

  7. 20 CFR 408.930 - Are title II and title XVI benefits subject to adjustment to recover title VIII overpayments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Are title II and title XVI benefits subject to...ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Underpayments and Overpayments Adjustment of Title II Benefits § 408.930 Are...

  8. Nanoclay modified polycarbonate blend nanocomposites: Calorimetric and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zicans, Janis; Meri, Remo Merijs; Ivanova, Tatjana; Berzina, Rita; Kalnins, Martins; Maksimovs, Roberts

    2014-05-01

    The research is devoted to characterization of polycarbonate (PC)/acrylonitrile-butadiene styrene (ABS) blend nanocomposites in respects to it mechanical and calorimetric properties. It is shown that PC blend with 10wt% of ABS is more suitable for development of polymer-clay nanocomposites than PC blend with 40wt.% of ABS. It is revealed that the greatest modulus and strength increment is observed for PC/10wt.%ABS blend nanocomposites, containing aromatic organomodifier treated clay (Dellite 43B). It is also determined that optimal nanofiller content for the investigated PC/10%ABS blend is 1.5 wt.%. Increase of mechanical characteristics of PC/10wt.%ABS blend nanocomposites is accompanied with the rise of glass transition temperatures of both polymeric phases, particularly that of PC.

  9. Calorimetric studies of the ammonia-water system with application to the outer solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarger, J.; Lunine, J. I.; Burke, M.

    1993-07-01

    A series of heating experiments was performed on the condensed ammonia-water system using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The water-rich samples were cooled quickly to below 130 K, then heated at a variety of rates. Rather than a single peritectic melt at 176 K, expected for the equilibrium system of water ice and ammonia dihydrate, four enthalpic transitions were repeatedly seen in the temperature range 150-176 K. These transitions are generally consistent with the earlier calorimetric results of Van Kasteren (1973), who interpreted the lowest temperature exotherm as crystallization of an amorphous ammonia-water compound formed during cooling. We propose that both sets of experiments are seeing the crystallization of ammonia monohydrate, which is metastable relative to the dihydrate, followed by partial remelting and crystallization of dihydrate upon further heating. The apparent stability of the monohydrate in the dihydrate equilibrium field implies a potentially complex behavior of ammonia-water ices in satellites. Possible self-heating of the mixture by several tens of degrees up to the 170 K eutectic could make mobilization of ammonia-water liquids in icy satellite interiors energetically easier than previously thought.

  10. Temperature-dependent infrared and calorimetric studies on arsenicals adsorption from solution to hematite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sabur, Md Abdus; Goldberg, Sabine; Gale, Adrian; Kabengi, Nadine; Al-Abadleh, Hind A

    2015-03-10

    To address the lack of systematic and surface sensitive studies on the adsorption energetics of arsenic compounds on metal (oxyhydr)oxides, we conducted temperature-dependent ATR-FTIR studies for the adsorption of arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid, and dimethylarsinic acid on hematite nanoparticles at pH 7. Spectra were collected as a function of concentration and temperature in the range 5-50 °C (278-323 K). Adsorption isotherms were constructed from spectral features assigned to surface arsenic. Values of K(eq), adsorption enthalpy, and entropy were extracted from fitting the Langmuir model to the data and from custom-built triple-layer surface complexation models derived from our understanding of the adsorption mechanism of each arsenical. These spectroscopic and modeling results were complemented with flow-through calorimetric measurements of molar heats of adsorption. Endothermic adsorption processes were predicted from the application of mathematical models with a net positive change in adsorption entropy. However, experimentally measured heats of adsorption were exothermic for all three arsenicals studied herein, with arsenate releasing 1.6-1.9 times more heat than methylated arsenicals. These results highlight the role of hydration thermodynamics on the adsorption of arsenicals, and are consistent with the spectral interpretation of type of surface complexes each arsenical form in that arsenate is mostly dominated by bidentate, MMA by a mixture of mono- and bidentate, and DMA by mostly outer sphere. PMID:25695733

  11. Genomic analysis of the blood attributed to Louis XVI (1754–1793), king of France

    PubMed Central

    Olalde, Iñigo; Sánchez-Quinto, Federico; Datta, Debayan; Marigorta, Urko M.; Chiang, Charleston W. K.; Rodríguez, Juan Antonio; Fernández-Callejo, Marcos; González, Irene; Montfort, Magda; Matas-Lalueza, Laura; Civit, Sergi; Luiselli, Donata; Charlier, Philippe; Pettener, Davide; Ramírez, Oscar; Navarro, Arcadi; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Marquès-Bonet, Tomàs; Lalueza-Fox, Carles

    2014-01-01

    A pyrographically decorated gourd, dated to the French Revolution period, has been alleged to contain a handkerchief dipped into the blood of the French king Louis XVI (1754–1793) after his beheading but recent analyses of living males from two Bourbon branches cast doubts on its authenticity. We sequenced the complete genome of the DNA contained in the gourd at low coverage (~2.5×) with coding sequences enriched at a higher ~7.3× coverage. We found that the ancestry of the gourd's genome does not seem compatible with Louis XVI's known ancestry. From a functional perspective, we did not find an excess of alleles contributing to height despite being described as the tallest person in Court. In addition, the eye colour prediction supported brown eyes, while Louis XVI had blue eyes. This is the first draft genome generated from a person who lived in a recent historical period; however, our results suggest that this sample may not correspond to the alleged king. PMID:24763138

  12. A Temporal Map in Geostationary Orbit: The Cover Etching on the EchoStar XVI Artifact

    E-print Network

    Weisberg, J M

    2012-01-01

    Geostationary satellites are unique among orbital spacecraft in that they experience no appreciable atmospheric drag. After concluding their respective missions, geostationary spacecraft remain in orbit virtually in perpetuity. As such, they represent some of human civilization's longest lasting artifacts. With this in mind, the EchoStar XVI satellite, to be launched in fall 2012, will play host to a time capsule intended as a message for the deep future. Inspired in part by the Pioneer Plaque and Voyager Golden Records, the EchoStar XVI Artifact is a pair of gold-plated aluminum jackets housing a small silicon disc containing one hundred photographs. The Cover Etching, the subject of this paper, is etched onto one of the two jackets. It is a temporal map consisting of a star chart, pulsar timings, and other information describing the epoch from which EchoStar XVI came. The pulsar sample consists of 13 rapidly rotating objects, 5 of which are especially stable, having spin periods < 10 ms and extremely sma...

  13. Genomic analysis of the blood attributed to Louis XVI (1754-1793), king of France.

    PubMed

    Olalde, Iñigo; Sánchez-Quinto, Federico; Datta, Debayan; Marigorta, Urko M; Chiang, Charleston W K; Rodríguez, Juan Antonio; Fernández-Callejo, Marcos; González, Irene; Montfort, Magda; Matas-Lalueza, Laura; Civit, Sergi; Luiselli, Donata; Charlier, Philippe; Pettener, Davide; Ramírez, Oscar; Navarro, Arcadi; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Marquès-Bonet, Tomàs; Lalueza-Fox, Carles

    2014-01-01

    A pyrographically decorated gourd, dated to the French Revolution period, has been alleged to contain a handkerchief dipped into the blood of the French king Louis XVI (1754-1793) after his beheading but recent analyses of living males from two Bourbon branches cast doubts on its authenticity. We sequenced the complete genome of the DNA contained in the gourd at low coverage (~2.5×) with coding sequences enriched at a higher ~7.3× coverage. We found that the ancestry of the gourd's genome does not seem compatible with Louis XVI's known ancestry. From a functional perspective, we did not find an excess of alleles contributing to height despite being described as the tallest person in Court. In addition, the eye colour prediction supported brown eyes, while Louis XVI had blue eyes. This is the first draft genome generated from a person who lived in a recent historical period; however, our results suggest that this sample may not correspond to the alleged king. PMID:24763138

  14. Adiabatic Heat of Hydration Calorimetric Measurements for Reference Saltstone Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, James

    2006-01-12

    The production of nuclear materials for weapons, medical, and space applications from the mid-1950's through the late-1980's at the Savannah River Site (SRS) generated approximately 35 million gallons of liquid high-level radioactive waste, which is currently being processed into vitrified glass for long-term storage. Upstream of the vitrification process, the waste is separated into three components: high activity insoluble sludge, high activity insoluble salt, and very low activity soluble salts. The soluble salt represents 90% of the 35 million gallons of overall waste and is processed at the SRS Saltstone Facility, where it mixed with cement, blast furnace slag, and flyash, creating a grout-like mixture. The resulting grout is pumped into aboveground storage vaults, where it hydrates into concrete monoliths, called saltstone, thus immobilizing the low-level radioactive salt waste. As the saltstone hydrates, it generates heat that slowly diffuses out of the poured material. To ensure acceptable grout properties for disposal and immobilization of the salt waste, the grout temperature must not exceed 95 C during hydration. Adiabatic calorimetric measurements of the heat generated for a representative sample of saltstone were made to determine the time-dependent heat source term. These measurements subsequently were utilized as input to a numerical conjugate heat transfer model to determine the expected peak temperatures for the saltstone vaults.

  15. Laser calorimetric absorptance testing of samples with varying geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasa, Istvan; Jensen, Lars O.; Ristau, Detlev

    2014-12-01

    Laser calorimetry is based on the measurement and evaluation of the temperature increase caused by absorption in the sample exposed to laser radiation. A temperature distribution develops in the irradiated sample as a result of dependence on the thermal diffusivity of the sample. Therefore, finding a correlation between the temperature increase and absorption becomes a complex task. This challenge was met by keeping the sample geometry at a standard size and simulating the thermal distribution for a number of optical materials. Using this method, Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) developed a calorimetric test setup that offers fully calibrated absorptance values for sample diameters of 25 mm (or 1 in.) with a total error of below 13% and a relative measurement error of below 5%. However, this technique is limited to the above-mentioned sample geometry. This work presents an approach to adjust the measurement configuration to numerous sample sizes for standard circular laser components. Finite element analysis and experimental verification are presented for exemplary values of the samples' diameters. Based on the different sample mount concept, this procedure allows utilizing flexibility in test wavelength and angle of incidence, combined with the sensitivity level sufficient for current optical materials.

  16. THEORETICAL WAVELENGTHS OF Fe XVI L-SHELL TRANSITIONS AND COMPARISON WITH LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS AND CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF CAPELLA

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P. [Physics Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Diaz, F.; Ishikawa, Y. [Department of Chemistry and the Chemical Physics Program, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 00931 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    We have used the relativistic multi-reference Moller-Plesset perturbation theory to calculate the energy levels of Fe XVI, including those of the autoionizing levels with a hole state in the L shell. Comparison of the resulting L-shell transition wavelengths with those from recent laboratory measurements shows remarkable agreement, i.e., agreement within the experimental uncertainties. Our calculation allows us to predict the wavelength of the second strongest 2p-3d Fe XVI line, which has not yet been directly observed in the laboratory, to be 15.266 A. This wavelength is within 0.0042 A of the strong Fe XVII line commonly labeled 3D. Relying on the high accuracy of our calculations, we have reassigned two previously identified lines and predict a different location than previously thought for the strongest Fe XVI magnetic quadrupole transition. Inspection of the spectra of Capella recorded with the transmission grating spectrometers on the Chandra X-ray Observatory yields features corresponding to the predicted location of the innershell excited Fe XVI lines. These features have not been identified before. Our analysis shows that these features are most likely from Fe XVI.

  17. Neutron detection by measuring capture gammas in a calorimetric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pausch, Guntram; Herbach, Claus-Michael; Kong, Yong; Lentering, Ralf; Plettner, Cristina; Roemer, Katja; Scherwinski, Falko; Stein, Juergen; Schotanus, Paul; Wilpert, Thomas

    2011-10-01

    The neutron capture detector (NCD) is introduced as a novel detection scheme for thermal and epithermal neutrons that could provide large-area neutron counters by using common detector materials and proven technologies. The NCD is based on the fact that neutron captures are usually followed by prompt gamma cascades, where the sum energy of the gammas equals to the total excitation energy of typically 6-9 MeV. This large sum energy is measured in a calorimetric approach and taken as the signature of a neutron capture event. An NCD consists of a neutron converter, comprising of constituents with large elemental neutron capture cross-section like cadmium or gadolinium, which is embedded in common scintillator material. The scintillator must be large and dense enough to absorb with reasonable probability a portion of the sum energy that exceeds the energy of gammas emitted by common (natural, medical, industrial) radiation sources. An energy window, advantageously complemented with a multiplicity filter, then discriminates neutron capture signals against background. The paper presents experimental results obtained at the cold-neutron beam of the BER II research reactor, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, and at other neutron sources with a prototype NCD, consisting of four BGO crystals with embedded cadmium sheets, and with a benchmark configuration consisting of two separate NaI(Tl) detectors. The detector responses are in excellent agreement with predictions of a simulation model developed for optimizing NCD configurations. NCDs could be deployed as neutron detectors in radiation portal monitors (RPMs). Advanced modular scintillation detector systems could even combine neutron and gamma sensitivity with excellent background suppression at minimum overall expense.

  18. Thermodynamic properties of chlorite and berthierine derived from calorimetric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, Philippe; Gailhanou, Hélène; Rogez, Jacques; Mikaelian, Georges; Kawaji, Hitoshi; Warmont, Fabienne; Gaboreau, Stéphane; Grangeon, Sylvain; Grenèche, Jean-Marc; Vieillard, Philippe; Fialips, Claire I.; Giffaut, Eric; Gaucher, Eric C.; Claret, F.

    2014-09-01

    In the context of the deep waste disposal, we have investigated the respective stabilities of two iron-bearing clay minerals: berthierine ISGS from Illinois [USA; (Al0.975FeIII0.182FeII1.422Mg0.157Li0.035Mn0.002)(Si1.332Al0.668)O5(OH)4] and chlorite CCa-2 from Flagstaff Hill, California [USA; (Si2.633Al1.367)(Al1.116FeIII0.215Mg2.952FeII1.712Mn0.012Ca0.011)O10(OH)8]. For berthierine, the complete thermodynamic dataset was determined at 1 bar and from 2 to 310 K, using calorimetric methods. The standard enthalpies of formation were obtained by solution-reaction calorimetry at 298.15 K, and the heat capacities were measured by heat-pulse calorimetry. For chlorite, the standard enthalpy of formation is measured by solution-reaction calorimetry at 298.15 K. This is completing the entropy and heat capacity obtained previously by Gailhanou et al. (Geochim Cosmochim Acta 73:4738-4749, 2009) between 2 and 520 K, by using low-temperature adiabatic calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. For both minerals, the standard entropies and the Gibbs free energies of formation at 298.15 K were then calculated. An assessment of the measured properties could be carried out with respect to literature data. Eventually, the thermodynamic dataset allowed realizing theoretical calculations concerning the berthierine to chlorite transition. The latter showed that, from a thermodynamic viewpoint, the main factor controlling this transition is probably the composition of the berthierine and chlorite minerals and the nature of the secondary minerals rather than temperature.

  19. Comparing M31 and Milky Way Satellites: The Extended Star Formation Histories of Andromeda II and Andromeda XVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Skillman, Evan D.; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Monelli, Matteo; Dolphin, Andrew E.; McConnachie, Alan; Bernard, Edouard J.; Gallart, Carme; Aparicio, Antonio; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Cassisi, Santi; Cole, Andrew A.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Irwin, Mike; Martin, Nicolas F.; Mayer, Lucio; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Navarro, Julio F.; Stetson, Peter B.

    2014-07-01

    We present the first comparison between the lifetime star formation histories (SFHs) of M31 and Milky Way (MW) satellites. Using the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we obtained deep optical imaging of Andromeda II (And II; MV = -12.0 log(M sstarf/M ?) ~ 6.7) and Andromeda XVI (And XVI; MV = -7.5 log(M sstarf/M ?) ~ 4.9) yielding color-magnitude diagrams that extend at least 1 mag below the oldest main-sequence turnoff, and are similar in quality to those available for the MW companions. And II and And XVI show strikingly similar SFHs: both formed 50%-70% of their total stellar mass between 12.5 and 5 Gyr ago (z ~ 5-0.5) and both were abruptly quenched ~5 Gyr ago (z ~ 0.5). The predominance of intermediate age populations in And XVI makes it qualitatively different from faint companions of the MW and clearly not a pre-reionization fossil. Neither And II nor And XVI appears to have a clear analog among MW companions, and the degree of similarity in the SFHs of And II and And XVI is not seen among comparably faint-luminous pairs of MW satellites. These findings provide hints that satellite galaxy evolution may vary substantially among hosts of similar stellar mass. Although comparably deep observations of more M31 satellites are needed to further explore this hypothesis, our results underline the need for caution when interpreting satellite galaxies of an individual system in a broader cosmological context. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program #13028.

  20. Collagen XVI induces formation of focal contacts on intestinal myofibroblasts isolated from the normal and inflamed intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Ratzinger, Sabine; Eble, Johannes A; Pasoldt, Anja; Opolka, Alfred; Rogler, Gerhard; Grifka, Joachim; Grässel, Susanne

    2010-04-01

    In Crohn's disease (CD) the stress-shield of intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts (ISEMF) provided by intact tissue is disturbed due to inflammation and thus, cells start with remodelling activities. This is characterized by increased numbers of collagen-producing ISEMF causing an uncontrolled, irreversible wound-healing response to the chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Reconstitution of the original ECM leads ISEMF to exit this cycle. In contrast, during fibrosis, ISEMF persist. It is known that ISEMF produce and deposit collagen types I, III, IV and V; however synthesis and the role of fibrillar peripheral molecules like collagen type XVI have not been addressed yet. Here, we have analyzed the distribution of collagen XVI in the normal and inflamed bowel wall, its gene and protein expression by ISEMF of different inflammation stages, the cell-matrix interactions in different phases of the inflammatory process and their effect on cell spreading, proliferation and migration. Collagen XVI is deposited in the submucosa of the intestinal wall where it co-localizes with fibrillin-1 and integrin alpha1. ISEMF reveal increasing gene and protein expression of collagen XVI concurrent to increasing inflammation. ISEMF reveal more mature focal adhesion contacts when seeded on collagen XVI resulting in an extensive cell spreading. This involves recruitment of alpha1beta1 integrin, which shows increased cell surface expression on ISEMF in late stages of inflammation. We assume that collagen XVI promotes persistence of ISEMF in the normal and, even stronger in the inflamed bowel wall by stabilizing focal adhesion contacts via cell-matrix interaction preferentially through recruitment of alpha1ss1 integrin into the tips of the focal adhesion contacts. PMID:19931388

  1. [The strength of the shaman in Brazilian colonial medicine of the XVI and XVIII centuries].

    PubMed

    Botelho, João Bosco

    2004-01-01

    The strategy of the colonial conquest of Brazil by the Portuguese, between the XVI and XVIII centuries was linked to the complex set of political, economic and military forces from the Metropolis and the Church. In the first contacts with the Indian populations, on the coast, the colonizing elements, chiefly, the religious ones, perceived the extraordinary importance of the Indian shaman in the organizational structure of the autochthonous populations. Thus, the physical and moral destruction of the Indian shaman and his substitution by healing doctors and priests had become a fundamental part of the plans designed by the Metropolis and the Church in consolidating the territorial conquest. PMID:15726752

  2. Effect of Heat Generation of Ultrasound Transducer on Ultrasonic Power Measured by Calorimetric Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Takeyoshi; Kikuchi, Tsuneo

    2013-07-01

    Ultrasonic power is one of the key quantities closely related to the safety of medical ultrasonic equipment. An ultrasonic power standard is required for establishment of safety. Generally, an ultrasonic power standard below approximately 20 W is established by the radiation force balance (RFB) method as the most accurate measurement method. However, RFB is not suitable for high ultrasonic power because of thermal damage to the absorbing target. Consequently, an alternative method to RFB is required. We have been developing a measurement technique for high ultrasonic power by the calorimetric method. In this study, we examined the effect of heat generation of an ultrasound transducer on ultrasonic power measured by the calorimetric method. As a result, an excessively high ultrasonic power was measured owing to the effect of heat generation from internal loss in the transducer. A reference ultrasound transducer with low heat generation is required for a high ultrasonic power standard established by the calorimetric method.

  3. Thermal radiation from hot surfaces measured by optical and calorimetric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oconnor, G. T.

    The radiative heat loss from a surface is determined by its total hemispherical emittance, which consequently plays an important role in aerospace and solar applications. This study compares emittances measured calorimetrically with values derived from near normal incidence spectral reflectance measurements. This optical derivation is based on a number of assumptions which limit the accuracy if not sufficiency fulfilled. These assumptions include sample specularity, a straybody character beyond the range of measurement, only small variations of emittance with temperature, and a perfectly smooth sample surface. The comparison of calorimetrically and optically derived emittance performed in this study not only quantifies the errors introduced by insufficient fulfillment of the assumptions but also identifies which assumption causes the dominant error. The calorimetric emissometer, constructed for this study and based on a heat flow sensor, was calibrated with aluminum and nickel thin films, resulting in good agreement with literature values.

  4. Proceedings of the XVI International Conference on Thermoelectrics, Dresden, Germany, August 26-29, 1997 Skutterudites: An Update

    E-print Network

    technologies. This is true in particular for high power (over 200 W) automobile waste heat recovery and spaceProceedings of the XVI International Conference on Thermoelectrics, Dresden, Germany, August 26 a good potential for achieving ZT values substantially larger than for state-of-the- art thermoelectric

  5. Heat capacty, relative enthalpy, and calorimetric entropy of silicate minerals: an empirical method of prediction.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, G.R., Jr.; Haas, J.L., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Through the evaluation of experimental calorimetric data and estimates of the molar isobaric heat capacities, relative enthalpies and entropies of constituent oxides, a procedure for predicting the thermodynamic properties of silicates is developed. Estimates of the accuracy and precision of the technique and examples of its application are also presented. -J.A.Z.

  6. Calorimetric Investigation of Kinetics of Solid Phase Dissolution: Calcium Carbonate Dissolution in Aqueous EDTA Solution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nikola Kallay; Vlasta Tomaši?; Suzana Žalac; Ljerka Bre?evi?

    1997-01-01

    The calorimetric method for examination of the kinetics of solid phase dissolution is presented. The thermograms are interpreted by considering the heat evolution due to the reaction as well as the heat transfer in the calorimeter. The kinetic interpretation is based on the change of particle surface area during the dissolution process. The experimental results confirm the applicability of the

  7. First Calorimetric Measurement of OI-line in the Electron Capture Spectrum of $^{163}$Ho

    E-print Network

    P. C. -O. Ranitzsch; C. Hassel; M. Wegner; S. Kempf; A. Fleischmann; C. Enss; L. Gastaldo; A. Herlert; K. Johnston

    2014-08-30

    The isotope $^{163}$Ho undergoes an electron capture process with a recommended value for the energy available to the decay, $Q_{\\rm EC}$, of about 2.5 keV. According to the present knowledge, this is the lowest $Q_{\\rm EC}$ value for electron capture processes. Because of that, $^{163}$Ho is the best candidate to perform experiments to investigate the value of the electron neutrino mass based on the analysis of the calorimetrically measured spectrum. We present for the first time the calorimetric measurement of the atomic de-excitation of the $^{163}$Dy daughter atom upon the capture of an electron from the 5s shell in $^{163}$Ho, OI-line. The measured peak energy is 48 eV. This measurement was performed using low temperature metallic magnetic calorimeters with the $^{163}$Ho ion implanted in the absorber. We demonstrate that the calorimetric spectrum of $^{163}$Ho can be measured with high precision and that the parameters describing the spectrum can be learned from the analysis of the data. Finally, we discuss the implications of this result for the Electron Capture $^{163}$Ho experiment, ECHo, aiming to reach sub-eV sensitivity on the electron neutrino mass by a high precision and high statistics calorimetric measurement of the $^{163}$Ho spectrum.

  8. Calorimetric control for high cell density cultivation of a recombinant Escherichia coli strain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard Biener; Anne Steinkämper; Johannes Hofmann

    2010-01-01

    In order to achieve maximum productivity of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli high cell density cultivation (HCDC) strategies have been the subject of many studies. The aim of this work was the application of calorimetric methods to HCDC. The specific growth rate of a recombinant E. coli strain producing green fluorescent protein (GFP) was controlled during fed-batch cultivations by estimating

  9. Low temperature sugar-water equilibrium curve by a rapid calorimetric method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Hoff; S CORRERA

    1995-01-01

    A simple rapid enthalpic method based upon a unique calorimetric measurement was developed and applied to sugar solutions at low temperatures to determine the amount of unfreezable water. The experimental results were in good agreement with those obtained by the usual freezing point depression method. The experimental data were also used to test the validity of several literature semi-empirical models

  10. Calorimetric bioprocess monitoring by small modifications to a standard bench-scale bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Torsten; Breuer, Uta; Harms, Hauke; Maskow, Thomas

    2007-05-31

    Heat released during whole cell bioconversions provides information about the stoichiometry and kinetics of growth and product formation. It is considered as a potent control variable because it reflects immediately changes in metabolism. Furthermore, the sensitivity of calorimetric measurements is improving with increasing ratios of heat producing volume to heat exchanging surface and therefore with any scaling-up. However, the development and testing of calorimetry-based control strategies at the bench scale is difficult. Common microcalorimeters are unsuited due to their high price, the reactor volume (1-100mL) and the reactor design. Reaction calorimeters are even more expensive, less sensitive than microcalorimeters and often not adapted to bioprocesses. This paper describes a way-out by integrating calorimetric measurement principles into bench-scale standard bioreactors. The proposed solution benefits from all the measurement and control features of bench-scale bioreactors for, e.g. aeration, stirring, pH-control and substrate dosage. The additional calorimetric option can be easily constructed and integrated into an existing bioreactor at relatively low cost. The achieved sensitivity of 50 mW L(-1), stability of 0.2 mW L(-1)h(-1) and response time of a 1-2 min is in the same magnitude or even better than those of established reaction calorimeters. The calorimetrically monitored growth of the halophilic strain Halomonas elongata DMSZ 2581(T) demonstrates the applicability of the proposed solution for bioprocess analysis and control. PMID:17397956

  11. The Hydrogen Bonding of Cytosinewith Guanine:Calorimetric and`H-NMR Analysis

    E-print Network

    Williams, Loren

    The Hydrogen Bonding of Cytosinewith Guanine:Calorimetric and`H-NMR Analysis of the Molecular of hydrogen-bondformation between guanine (G) and cytusine (C) in o-dichloro- benzene and in chloroformat 25°C forming hydrogen bonds. Consequently, hydrogen-bond formation in our system is primarily between the bases

  12. 20 CFR 408.931 - How much will we withhold from your title II and title XVI benefits to recover a title VIII...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...much will we withhold from your title II and title XVI benefits to recover a...ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Underpayments and Overpayments Adjustment of Title II Benefits § 408.931 How...

  13. Adsorption of arsenic ions on Brazilian sepiolite: effect of contact time, pH, concentration, and calorimetric investigation.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Denis L; Batista, Adriano C; da Costa, Paulo C Corrêa; Viana, Rúbia R; Airoldi, Claudio

    2010-06-01

    The original sepiolite clay mineral has been collected from Amazon region, Brazil. The compound 2-aminomethylpyridine (AMP) was anchored onto Amazon sepiolite surface by heterogeneous route. The natural (SPT) and modified (SPT(AMP)) sepiolite samples were characterized by elemental analysis, SEM, N(2) adsorption, and nuclear magnetic nuclei of (29)Si and (13)C. The well-defined peaks obtained in the (13)C NMR spectrum in the 0-160 ppm region confirmed the attachment of organic functional groups as pendant chains bonded into the porous clay. The ability of these materials to remove As(V) from aqueous solution was followed by a series of adsorption isotherms at room temperature and pH 4.0. The maximum number of moles adsorbed was determined to be 7.26×10(-2) and 11.70×10(-2) mmol g(-1) for SPT and SPT(AMP), respectively. In order to evaluate the clay samples as adsorbents in dynamic system, a glass column was fulfilled with clay samples (1.0 g) and it was fed with 2.0×10(-2) mmol dm(-3) As(V) at pH 4.0. The energetic effects caused by metal cations adsorption were determined through calorimetric titrations. Thermodynamics indicated the existence of favorable conditions for such As(V)-nitrogen interactions. PMID:20307889

  14. Characterisation of fresh and aged terpenic resins by micro-FTIR and GC-MS analyses of varnishes in XVI-XVII centuries paintings.

    PubMed

    Cartoni, Giampaolo; Russo, Mario Vincenzo; Spinelli, Francesca; Talarico, Fabio

    2003-11-01

    Resinous materials, generally added to drying oils, were often employed as final protective films in paintings, both in tempera and oil techniques. Most of the resins used in fine arts come from exudates of plants. Natural resins are mainly composed by terpenoids. Among these resins, dammar, rosin, mastic, elemi gum, Venice turpentine were frequently employed in easel paintings. The aim of this work is the identification of natural resins in samples collected from works of art. In this paper we propose to use micro-FTIR spectrometry as a preliminary and non destructive technique to detect the presence of resinous materials in microsamples collected from paintings, followed by GC-MS analyses to obtain a precise identification of the resin. To reach this aim commercial resins, employed as standard, were analysed previously by micro-FTIR spectrometry and then analysed by GC-MS chromatography, searching characteristic chemical compounds used as "markers" of resins. The results obtained on standards allowed us to successfully analyse samples collected from two works of art: the "Portrait of a Young Gentleman", by Lorenzo Lotto (XVI century), and the "Madonna with the Infant Jesus and Saints": by Carlo Maratta (XVII secolo). PMID:14703854

  15. Characterization of photochemical-cured acrylates with calorimetric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strehmel, Bernd; Anwand, Dirk; Wetzel, Henrik

    1994-05-01

    Radical polymerization kinetics of different kinds of diacrylates was investigated in linear polymers (binders) by using an isoperibolic calorimeter. For all experiments benzoin compounds were added as photoinitiator. The ester between acrylic acid and bisphenol-A-diglycidylether (DDGDA) and hexamethylenediacrylate were used as monomers. Both compounds have a high limiting conversion and a large polymerization rate in the binders investigated. Additionally, three kinds of termination reaction were observed: first order, second order, and primary radical termination. The last reaction was mainly found in the case of using the hexamethylenediacrylate monomer. The materials were investigated by DSC to determine the phase behavior. Both monomers form one phase with the binder (polymethylmethacrylate, PMMA). In contrast, a phase separation was observed between the crosslinked hexamethylenediacrylate and PMMA. Formations of semi- interpenetrating networks were found in the case of crosslinked DDGDA and PMMA. The glass transition temperatures were determined at different polymerization degrees also. The obtained results indicate that most of the network formation occurred in the glassy state. Fluorescence probe technique was applied to study changes in the mobility during network formation. The fluorescence probe crystal violet (CV) was used because this compound shows a strong free volume-dependent fluorescence. It was found that in the glassy state, where most of networks were formed, a large variation of the molecular mobility was observed during irradiation of the photopolymers. This result was in agreement with the observations during DSC experiments.

  16. Thermodynamic properties by non-calorimetric methods: Progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strube, M. Michael; Chirico, R. D.; Collier, W. B.; Steele, W. V.

    This project for the Office of Energy Research focuses on the noncalorimetric determination of thermodynamic properties of polynuclear aromatic molecules through the extension of existing correlation methodologies and through molecular spectroscopy with statistical mechanics. This report highlights progress during the first third of the contract period. Important advances include: derivation of group-contribution parameters for estimation of thermodynamic properties for polycyclic hydrocarbon and nitrogen-containing compounds; calculation of thermodynamic properties for eight key monocyclic compounds based on new and literature spectra were completed for the derivation of 'ring- correction' property estimation parameters; design and construction of a long pathlength, far-infrared sample cell for the collection of vapor-phase spectra of low vapor-pressure compounds; development of a method to predict the vibrational frequencies of two- and three-ring polycyclic molecules to an accuracy sufficient for identifying the fundamental vibrations in experimental spectra; and development of a method to calculate the kinetic energy expansions as a function of the coordinate for the ring-puckering, ring-twisting (in-phase), and ring-twisting (out-of-phase) vibrations of 9,10-dihydroanthracene and related molecules.

  17. An Empirical Model for the Calorimetrically-Defined Glass Transition Temperature with Applications to Natural Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, J. K.; Nicholls, J.

    2002-12-01

    Glassy rocks have long held a special fascination for petrologists and geochemists because they record the composition of the melt phase attending magmatic processes. Naturally-occurring silicate glasses form under a variety of geological conditions and they commonly form the main constituent in silicic volcanic rocks and in rapidly cooled mafic rocks. Glass also occurs in rocks with cooling histories that are substantially slower, such as the interiors of lava flows or mantle xenoliths. The glass transition temperature (Tg) marks the transition from the liquid to the glassy state. From a petrological perspective, the calorimetrically-defined glass transition temperature is an important limiting value for the temperature conditions at which many magmatic processes take place. Glass formation is a boundary between changing environmental states. Above Tg, rates of nucleation, crystallization and vesiculation are sufficiently fast to drive magmatic processes. Conversely, where the liquid line of descent (e.g., T-XMelt path) intersects the Tg of the melt, glass forms and many magmatic processes effectively cease. The purpose of this paper is to provide a means of exploring the T-XMelt conditions for glass formation in natural magmatic systems. Specifically, we present an empirical model of predicting the thermodynamic glass transition temperature (Tg) as a function of melt composition. Operationally, the model produces temperature-dependent expressions for the heat contents of a silicate melt and glass of known composition. The point of intersection of the heat content curves for glass and melt defines the calorimetric value of Tg. Our model is constructed from experimental calorimetric heat content and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) heat capacity measurements on silicate melts and glasses produced over the past 20 years. Calorimetric data in the model include over 500 experiments on 60 melt compositions and 250 observations on 30 glass compositions. Additional constraints on the model derive from independent estimates of the thermodynamic Tg. The model reproduces most of the measured calorimetric-values of Tg to within 30oC. The model also provides volcanologists with a tool for tracking (TMagma-Tg) through magmatic processes such as fractional crystallization, vesiculation, partial melting. It can be used to forecast the termination of liquid lines of descent by glass formation and provides geothermometric constraints on magmatic systems by converting glass compositions into minimum pre-eruption temperatures.

  18. GYROTRON POWER BALANCE BASED ON CALORIMETRIC MEASUREMENTS IN THE DIII-D ECH SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    GORELOV,I.A; LOHR,J.M; BAITY,JR.,F.W; CAHALAN,P; CALLIS,R.W; PONCE,D; CHIU,H.K

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 A powerful microwave system operating at the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency on the DIII-D tokamak was upgraded up to six assemblies of 110 GHz gyrotrons in 2003. three Gycom gyrotrons nominally generate 750 kW for 2 s pulses, with the pulse length limit resulting from the peak temperature allowed on the boron nitride rf output window. Three Communications and Power Industries (CPI) gyrotrons with diamond windows have been recently installed and have been tested to 0.9-1.0 MW for 5 s pulses. Heat loading on internal parts of the gyrotrons, the matching optics unit and the dummy loads is measured calorimetrically. This paper discusses the calorimetry system and calorimetric measurements of gyrotron performance.

  19. Calorimetric determination of H + \\/M + (M = Li, Cs) ion exchange in ? -titanium hydrogen phosphate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eliana González; Camino Trobajo; Ricardo Llavona; José R. García; Julio Rodríguez

    1989-01-01

    H+\\/M+ (M = Li, Cs) ion exchange in?-titanium phosphate (?-TIP) at 25°C and under static conditions has been studied. Titration and hydrolysis curves and the exchange isotherms were determined. The substitution was followed by X-ray diffraction. Direct calorimetric measurements were carried out at different degrees of conversion and the variation of the exchange enthalpy was obtained. The shape of the

  20. Calorimetric studies of solid wastes, sewage sludge, wastewaters and their effects on soil biodegradation processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Dziejowski; I. Bia?obrzewski

    2011-01-01

    Calorimetric studies of solid wastes, sewage sludge, wastewaters and their environmental effects focus on three main research\\u000a areas. The first research area involves determination of selected thermal and physical parameters characterizing the above\\u000a substances, such as specific heat, thermal conductivity and others. The second area covers processes of total or gradual destruction\\u000a of the examined substances at a fixed composition

  1. Al–Ga–Zn Phase Diagram. Calorimetric study of the isobaric invariants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Aragon; K. Jardet; P. Satre; A. Sebaoun

    2000-01-01

    The Al–Ga–Zn ternary phase diagram presents two isobaric invariant reactions: a eutectic at 231C and a metatectic at 1231C\\u000a [1–3]. Calorimetric measurements on the two isobaric invariant reactions have been carried out. First the Tammann method has\\u000a enabled us to determine the composition of their limits on five isopletic cross sections. Then, the compositions of the invariant\\u000a phases have been

  2. Cutting heat dissipation in high-speed machining of carbon steel based on the calorimetric method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yanming Quan; Zhenwei He; Yong Dou

    2008-01-01

    The cutting heat dissipation in chips, workpiece, tool and surroundings during the high-speed machining of carbon steel is\\u000a quantitatively investigated based on the calorimetric method. Water is used as the medium to absorb the cutting heat; a self-designed\\u000a container suitable for the high-speed lathe is used to collect the chips, and two other containers are adopted to absorb the\\u000a cutting

  3. Calorimetric studies of Pd\\/D 2O+LiOD electrolysis cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melvin H. Miles

    2000-01-01

    New experiments in sensitive calorimeters displayed the characteristics of the excess power effect during seven different occasions. These measurements clearly show the anomalous increase in the cell temperature despite the steadily decreasing electrical input power during Pd\\/D2O+LiOD\\/Pt electrolysis. This strange behavior can be modeled by the use of an anomalous excess power term in the calorimetric equations. Two thermistors used

  4. Mechanisms of Organic-inorganic Interactions in Soils and Aqueous Environments Elucidated using Calorimetric Techniques

    E-print Network

    Harvey, Omar R.

    2011-08-08

    Mechanisms of Organic-Inorganic Interactions in Soils and Aqueous Environments Elucidated Using Calorimetric Techniques. (May 2010) Omar R. Harvey, B.S. University of the West Indies; M.S., University of Florida Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr... family vi ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to thank my advisor, Dr. Herbert, and my committee members, Drs. Bill Batchelor, Ronald Kaiser, Patrick Louchouarn, and Youjun Deng, for their assistance and support throughout the course of this research...

  5. Calorimetric Studies of the Behavior of Hydrogen in Vanadium and Vanadium Alloys

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenji Watanabe; Yuh Fukai

    1985-01-01

    Calorimetric measurements have been made on vanadium hydride (and deuteride) to investigate the origin of excess specific heat due to H(D) atoms and the mechanism of phase transitions. The specific heat in the alpha phase was found to increase linearly with H(D) concentration at the rate of 2.0± 0.1 kB\\/H atom and 2.4± 0.1 kB\\/D atom at 240°C, nearly independent

  6. Use of calorimetric assay for operational and accountability measurements of pure plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Cremers, Teresa L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sampson, Thomas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Plutonium pure metal products (PMP) are high purity plutonium metal items produced by electrorefining. The plutonium metal is produced as an approximately 3-kg ring. Accountability measurements for the electro-refining runs are typically balance/weight factor (incoming impure metal), chemistry (pure metal rings), and calorimetric assay or neutron counting of the crucibles and other wastes. The PMP items are qualified for their end use by extensive chemical assay. After PMP materials are made they are often sent to the vault for storage before being sent to the casting process, the next step in the production chain. The chemical assay of PMP items often takes a few weeks; however, before the metal items are allowed into the vault they must be measured. Non-destructive assay personnel measure the metals either by multiplicity neutron counting or calorimetric assay, depending on which instrument is available, thus generating comparisons between non-destructive assay and chemical assay. The suite of measurements, calorimetric assay, chemical assay, and neutron mUltiplicity counting is compared for a large group of PMP items.

  7. On-device extraction of thermal thin-film properties in calorimetric flow sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beigelbeck, Roman; Talic, Almir; Cerimovic, Samir; Kohl, Franz; Keplinger, Franz

    2011-06-01

    In diaphragm-based micromachined calorimetric flow sensors, the convective heat transfer through the test fluid competes with the spurious heat shunt induced by the thin-film diaphragm where the heater and the temperature sensors are embedded. Therefore, accurate knowledge of the thermal transport properties (thermal conductivity and diffusivity) and the emissivity of the diaphragm is mandatory for design, simulation, and optimization of such devices. However, these parameters can differ considerably from those stated for bulk material and they are typically dependent on the production process. Commonly used methods for their determination require the fabrication of custom specimens. In order to overcome this serious drawback, we developed a novel technique to extract the thermal thin-film properties directly from measurements carried out on calorimetric flow sensors. Here, the heat transfer frequency response from the heater to the thermistors is measured and compared to a theoretically obtained relationship arising from an extensive two-dimensional analytical model. This model covers the heat generation by the heater, the heat conduction in the diaphragm, the radiation loss at the diaphragm's surface, and the heat sink caused by the supporting silicon frame. In this contribution, we report in detail on the measurement setup, the theoretical model for the associated parameter extraction, and the results obtained from measurements on calorimetric flow sensors featuring dielectric thin-film diaphragms made of PECVD Si3N4.

  8. Photoionization and Electron-Ion Recombination of Ar XVI and Ar XVII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana

    2012-06-01

    Results on photoionization and electron-ion recombination of Ar XVII and Ar XVII obtained from unified method will be reported. The method, based on relativistic Breit-Pauli R-matrix method and close-coupling approximation, (i) subsumes both the radiative and dielectronic recombination and (ii) provides self-consistent sets of photoionization and recombination cross sections, ?PI and ?RC. Important features for level-specific ?PI and recombination rate coefficients (?R), such as for diagnostic w, x, y, z X-ray lines of Ar XVII in the ultraviolet region of astrophysical spectra will be illustrated. Monochromatic decay dominates the low energy photoionization and low temperature recombination rates. However, high energy resonances in ?PI introduce a DR bump at high temperature recombination. While the 1s-2p core excitations enhance the background of ?PI(nSLJ) at n=2 thresholds. the resonances become much weaker beyond them. The extensive sets of results correspond to fine structure levels with n <=10 and 0 <=l <=9. They include 98 levels of Ar XVI of total angular momenta 1/2 <=J <= 17/2 and 191 levels of Ar XVII of 0 <=J <=9. The present ?R(T) with temperature show good agreement with ava

  9. Universality in gelation of epoxy acrylate with various photoinitiators: a photo differential scanning calorimetric study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. Do?ruyol; F. Karasu; D. K. Balta; N. Arsu; Ö. Pekcan

    2008-01-01

    Photo-differential scanning calorimetric (Photo-DSC) technique was used to study the gelation of P-3038 (epoxy acrylate (EA) 75% and tripropyleneglycoldiacrylate (TPGDA) 25%) in the presence of various thioxanthone-based initiators, namely, thioxanthone (TX), 5-thia-naphtacene-12-one (TX-NP), 2-(carboxymethoxy) thioxanthone (TX-OCH2COOH), 2-thioxanthone-thioacetic acid (TX-SCH2COOH), and 2-mercaptothioxanthone (TX-SH). Photopolymerization reactions were performed under identical conditions of temperature, initiator concentration, and UV light intensity. Photo-DSC technique allowed

  10. Calorimetric study of the interactions between surfactants and dextran modified with deoxycholic acid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guangyue Bai; Vasco Castro; Marieta Nichifor; Margarida Bastos

    2010-01-01

    Dextran modified with deoxycholic acid (Dex-DCA) was synthesized by grafting DCA along the polymer backbone, with degrees\\u000a of substitution (DS)—2% and 3%. The thermodynamics of the association processes of the mixed systems is followed by isothermal\\u000a titration calorimetry for sodium deoxycholate\\/sodium dodecyl sulfate (NaDCA\\/NaDS), Dex-DCA with different surfactants—Dex-DCA\\/NaDS,\\u000a Dex-DCA\\/NaDCA, and Dex-DCA\\/DTAB (dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide). Calorimetric measurements for the micellization processes\\u000a of

  11. A statistical mechanical deconvolution of the differential scanning calorimetric profiles of the thermal denaturation of cyanomethemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Safarian, Shahrokh; Alimohammadi, Masoud; Saberi, Abbas Ali; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2005-04-01

    A differential scanning calorimetric study of the thermal unfolding of horse cyanomethemoglobin (as an irreversible protein system) was carried out in phosphate-EDTA buffer (20 mM phosphate, 1 mM EDTA) pH 7.2. The calorimetric rescanning of the protein solution was found to be irreversible and the process unfolded state --> final state appears to follow first order kinetic. Assuming the system to be comprised of n reversible states and one irreversible final state, the number of particles participating in the reversible states changes with time because they ultimately transit to the final irreversible denatured state. Hence, we carried out the deconvolution analysis using the grand canonical ensembles instead of just the canonical ensembles. This change was effected by introducing a correction term into the related equations which determines the outlet share of those particles exiting from the reversible states and converting into the final irreversible state. This approach provided an improved interpretation of the experimental data, which supports the following two-step process for the thermal denaturation of cyanomethemoglobin: alpha(2)beta(2) --> (alpha + alphabeta + beta)(excited) --> alpha(melt) + (alphabeta)(melt) + (beta(melt). PMID:16096723

  12. Calorimetric thermoelectric gas sensor for the detection of hydrogen, methane and mixed gases.

    PubMed

    Park, Nam-Hee; Akamatsu, Takafumi; Itoh, Toshio; Izu, Noriya; Shin, Woosuck

    2014-01-01

    A novel miniaturized calorimeter-type sensor device with a dual-catalyst structure was fabricated by integrating different catalysts on the hot (Pd/?-Al2O3) and cold (Pt/?-Al2O3) ends of the device. The device comprises a calorimeter with a thermoelectric gas sensor (calorimetric-TGS), combining catalytic combustion and thermoelectric technologies. Its response for a model fuel gas of hydrogen and methane was investigated with various combustor catalyst compositions. The calorimetric-TGS devices detected H2, CH4, and a mixture of the two with concentrations ranging between 200 and 2000 ppm at temperatures of 100-400 °C, in terms of the calorie content of the gases. It was necessary to reduce the much higher response voltage of the TGS to H2 compared to CH4. We enhanced the H2 combustion on the cold side so that the temperature differences and response voltages to H2 were reduced. The device response to H2 combustion was reduced by 50% by controlling the Pt concentration in the Pt/?-Al2O3 catalyst on the cold side to 3 wt%. PMID:24818660

  13. Calorimetric Thermoelectric Gas Sensor for the Detection of Hydrogen, Methane and Mixed Gases

    PubMed Central

    Park, Nam-Hee; Akamatsu, Takafumi; Itoh, Toshio; Izu, Noriya; Shin, Woosuck

    2014-01-01

    A novel miniaturized calorimeter-type sensor device with a dual-catalyst structure was fabricated by integrating different catalysts on the hot (Pd/?-Al2O3) and cold (Pt/?-Al2O3) ends of the device. The device comprises a calorimeter with a thermoelectric gas sensor (calorimetric-TGS), combining catalytic combustion and thermoelectric technologies. Its response for a model fuel gas of hydrogen and methane was investigated with various combustor catalyst compositions. The calorimetric-TGS devices detected H2, CH4, and a mixture of the two with concentrations ranging between 200 and 2000 ppm at temperatures of 100–400 °C, in terms of the calorie content of the gases. It was necessary to reduce the much higher response voltage of the TGS to H2 compared to CH4. We enhanced the H2 combustion on the cold side so that the temperature differences and response voltages to H2 were reduced. The device response to H2 combustion was reduced by 50% by controlling the Pt concentration in the Pt/?-Al2O3 catalyst on the cold side to 3 wt%. PMID:24818660

  14. Calorimetric method of ac loss measurement in a rotating magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, P K; Coombs, T A; Campbell, A M

    2010-07-01

    A method is described for calorimetric ac-loss measurements of high-T(c) superconductors (HTS) at 80 K. It is based on a technique used at 4.2 K for conventional superconducting wires that allows an easy loss measurement in parallel or perpendicular external field orientation. This paper focuses on ac loss measurement setup and calibration in a rotating magnetic field. This experimental setup is to demonstrate measuring loss using a temperature rise method under the influence of a rotating magnetic field. The slight temperature increase of the sample in an ac-field is used as a measure of losses. The aim is to simulate the loss in rotating machines using HTS. This is a unique technique to measure total ac loss in HTS at power frequencies. The sample is mounted on to a cold finger extended from a liquid nitrogen heat exchanger (HEX). The thermal insulation between the HEX and sample is provided by a material of low thermal conductivity, and low eddy current heating sample holder in vacuum vessel. A temperature sensor and noninductive heater have been incorporated in the sample holder allowing a rapid sample change. The main part of the data is obtained in the calorimetric measurement is used for calibration. The focus is on the accuracy and calibrations required to predict the actual ac losses in HTS. This setup has the advantage of being able to measure the total ac loss under the influence of a continuous moving field as experienced by any rotating machines. PMID:20687748

  15. Calorimetric method of ac loss measurement in a rotating magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoshal, P. K. [Oxford Instruments NanoScience, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX13 5QX (United Kingdom); Coombs, T. A.; Campbell, A. M. [Department of Engineering, Electrical Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    A method is described for calorimetric ac-loss measurements of high-T{sub c} superconductors (HTS) at 80 K. It is based on a technique used at 4.2 K for conventional superconducting wires that allows an easy loss measurement in parallel or perpendicular external field orientation. This paper focuses on ac loss measurement setup and calibration in a rotating magnetic field. This experimental setup is to demonstrate measuring loss using a temperature rise method under the influence of a rotating magnetic field. The slight temperature increase of the sample in an ac-field is used as a measure of losses. The aim is to simulate the loss in rotating machines using HTS. This is a unique technique to measure total ac loss in HTS at power frequencies. The sample is mounted on to a cold finger extended from a liquid nitrogen heat exchanger (HEX). The thermal insulation between the HEX and sample is provided by a material of low thermal conductivity, and low eddy current heating sample holder in vacuum vessel. A temperature sensor and noninductive heater have been incorporated in the sample holder allowing a rapid sample change. The main part of the data is obtained in the calorimetric measurement is used for calibration. The focus is on the accuracy and calibrations required to predict the actual ac losses in HTS. This setup has the advantage of being able to measure the total ac loss under the influence of a continuous moving field as experienced by any rotating machines.

  16. Thermochemistry of hydrotalcite-like compounds relevant to the fate and transport of aqueous metal and anionic species in the environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rama Kumar Allada

    2004-01-01

    Interest in hydrotalcite-like compounds (HTLCs) has grown due to their role in controlling the mobility of aqueous metals in the environment as well as their use as catalysts, catalyst precursors and specialty chemicals. Although these materials have been studied in a number of contexts, little is known of their thermodynamic properties. Initial calorimetric measurements of the heats of formation of

  17. Soluble expression and sodium channel activity of lt16a, a novel framework XVI conotoxin from the M-superfamily.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Maojun; Wang, Lei; Wu, Yun; Liu, Junliang; Sun, Dandan; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Feng, Yuchao; Qin, Mengying; Chen, Shangwu; Xu, Anlong

    2015-05-01

    A peptide toxin, lt16a, from the venom of the worm-hunting Conus litteratus, shares the typical signal peptide sequences of M-superfamily conotoxins, which usually contain six cysteine residues that are arranged in a CC-C-C-CC pattern. Interestingly, lt16a comprises 21 amino acid residues in its mature region and has a cysteine framework XVI, which is arranged in a C-C-CC pattern. The coding region of lt16a was cloned into the pTRX vector and the fusion protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. After cleaving the fusion protein and purifying the protein lt16a using chromatography, the mass of lt16a was found by mass spectrometry to be consistent with the expected mass of 2357.7 Da. Whole-cell patch clamp experiments demonstrated that lt16a could inhibit both the TTX-sensitive and TTX-resistant sodium currents in adult rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. The inhibition of lt16a on TTX-resistant sodium currents was stronger than on TTX-sensitive sodium currents. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a framework XVI conotoxin that can inhibit voltage-gated sodium channel currents in mammalian sensory neurons. This report helps facilitates an understanding of the sequence diversity of conotoxins. PMID:25600641

  18. Inner-shell Absorption Lines of Fe~VI-- Fe~XVI: A Many-body Perturbation Theory Approach

    E-print Network

    Ming F. Gu; Tomer Holczer; Ehud Behar; Steven M. Kahn

    2005-12-15

    We provide improved atomic calculation of wavelengths, oscillator strengths, and autoionization rates relevant to the $2\\to 3$ inner-shell transitions of Fe~VI--XVI, the so-called Fe~M-shell unresolved transition array (UTA). A second order many-body perturbation theory is employed to obtain accurate transition wavelengths, which are systematically larger than previous theoretical results by 15--45~m{\\AA}. For a few transitions of Fe~XVI and Fe~XV where laboratory measurements exist, our new wavelengths are accurate to within a few m{\\AA}. Using these new calculations, the apparent discrepancy in the velocities between the Fe~M-shell UTA and other highly ionized absorption lines in the outflow of NGC 3783 disappears. The oscillator strengths in our new calculation agree well with the previous theoretical data, while the new autoionization rates are significantly larger, especially for lower charge states. We attribute this discrepancy to the missing autoionization channels in the previous calculation. The increased autoionization rates may slightly affect the column density analysis of the Fe~M-shell UTA for sources with high column density and very low turbulent broadening. The complete set of atomic data is provided as an electronic table.

  19. ESTIMATION OF BARE-SOIL EVAPORATION USING A CALORIMETRIC APPROACH WITH HEAT FLUX MEASURED AT MULTIPLE DEPTHS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An assumption in calorimetric methods for soil heat flux is that sensible heat terms can be balanced (i.e., if the heat flux is known at one depth, the heat flux at another depth may be determined by monitoring the change in heat storage). Latent heat from water evaporation is assigned to the energy...

  20. A calorimetric analysis of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell and the production of H2O2 at the cathode

    E-print Network

    Kjelstrup, Signe

    31.08.2009 1 A calorimetric analysis of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell and the production of H2O2 A calorimeter has been constructed and used to measure the total heat production of a single polymer electrolyte and measure the thermal signature of the low temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell. This paper reports

  1. R. Brugnera -DIS 2008, London 7-11 April 2008 1J/ helicity XVI International Workshop on Deep-Inelastic Scattering and Related Subjects

    E-print Network

    R. Brugnera - DIS 2008, London 7-11 April 2008 1J/ helicity XVI International Workshop on Deep-Inelastic Scattering and Related Subjects London, 7 -11 April 2008 Riccardo Brugnera Padova University and INFN and various theoretical predictions conclusions #12;R. Brugnera - DIS 2008, London 7-11 April 2008 2J

  2. Ocean Optics XVI Conference, Santa Fe, New Mexico, November 18-22, 2002 BIO-OPTICAL EVIDENCE OF LAND-SEA INTERACTIONS

    E-print Network

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Ocean Optics XVI Conference, Santa Fe, New Mexico, November 18-22, 2002 BIO-OPTICAL EVIDENCE Rico. However, the complexity of the bay's optical properties and certain limitations of the technology, allowing a better understanding of such bio-optical variability. A new sampling design with twenty

  3. 'Gold bug' sheds new light on old question Page 1 Vol. XVI, Issue 41 for the Amherst campus of the University of Massachusetts August 24, 2001

    E-print Network

    Lovley, Derek

    'Gold bug' sheds new light on old question Page 1 Vol. XVI, Issue 41 for the Amherst campus of the University of Massachusetts August 24, 2001 Go `Gold bug' sheds new light on old question Lovley uses pollution cleanup technology to explain gold deposits by Paula Hartman Cohen, News Office Staff Derek Lovley

  4. The Bayer Facts of Science Education XVI: "US STEM Workforce Shortage--Myth or Reality? Fortune 1000 Talent Recruiters on the Debate"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Science Education and Technology, 2014

    2014-01-01

    A major debate is currently underway in the USA about whether there is, in fact, a science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workforce shortage in the country or not. This is the subject of the "Bayer Facts of Science Education XVI: US STEM Workforce Shortage--Myth or Reality? Fortune 1000 Talent Recruiters on the Debate."…

  5. Transport and calorimetric studies on CeNi2Al3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y, Sankararao; Shanmukharao Samatham, S.; D, Venkateshwarlu; Gangrade, Mohan; Ganesan, V.

    2014-09-01

    Transport and calorimetric properties of Kondo lattice system CeNi2Al3 are reported. CeNi2Al3 shows good agreement with Grand Kadowaki-Woods relation with degeneracy of the quasi-particle N=6. The nonmagnetic nature of CeNi2Al3 is evident from resistivity measurement even though magnetic elements Ce and Ni are present. Three signatures, deviation from the normal metallic behaviour in resistivity above 140 K, relatively low charge carrier concentration (1021 cm?3) and energy gap Eg~11.6 meV obtained from two band model shed light on the most basic notions related to the semimetal nature of CeNi2Al3.

  6. Analytical and experimental characterization of a miniature calorimetric sensor in pulsatile flow

    E-print Network

    Gelderblom, H; Haartsen, J R; Rutten, M C M; van de Ven, A A F; van de Vosse, F N; 10.1017/S0022112010004234

    2011-01-01

    The behaviour of a miniature calorimetric sensor, which is under consideration for catheter-based coronary artery flow assessment, is investigated in both steady and pulsatile tube flow. The sensor is composed of a heating element operated at constant power, and two thermopiles that measure flow-induced temperature differences over the sensor surface. An analytical sensor model is developed, which includes axial heat conduction in the fluid and a simple representation of the solid wall, assuming a quasi-steady sensor response to the pulsatile flow. To reduce the mathematical problem, described by a two-dimensional advection-diffusion equation, a spectral method is applied. A Fourier transform is then used to solve the resulting set of ordinary differential equations and an analytical expression for the fluid temperature is found. To validate the analytical model, experiments with the sensor mounted in a tube have been performed in steady and pulsatile water flow with various amplitudes and Strouhal numbers. E...

  7. A high pressure calorimetric experiment to validate the liquid-liquid critical point hypothesis in water

    E-print Network

    Manuel I. Marques

    2007-01-23

    An experimental proposal to test the existence of a liquid-liquid critical point in water, based on high pressure calorimetric measurements, is presented on this paper. Considering the existence of an intramolecular correlation in the water molecule we show how the response of the specific heat at high pressure is different depending on the existence, or not, of the second critical point. If the liquid-liquid critical point hypothesis is true there must be a maximum in the specific heat at some temperature $T>T_{H}$ for any pressure $P>P_{c}$ (being $T_{H}$ the homogeneous nucleation temperature and $P_{c}$ the pressure of the second critical point). This maximum does not appear for the singularity free scenario.

  8. Calorimetric and dynamic light-scattering investigation of cationic surfactant--DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, S; Onori, G; Cametti, C

    2006-12-01

    By means of combined calorimetric and dynamic light-scattering measurements, we have investigated the conformational behavior of DNA chains after thermal melting in the presence of a cationic surfactant at different concentrations, up to a surfactant-to-phosphate group molar ratio close to unity. Both the specific heat capacity, C(ex)(p) and the hydrodynamic radius R of the DNA chains provide support for the existence of two structural arrangements with different thermal stabilities, coexisting in the bulk solution. Although a component remains an elongated unfolded DNA chain originated in the thermal denaturation, the second component, consisting of DNA-surfactant complexes, assumes a compact structure with an average size of about 80 nm, whose thermal denaturation occurs at temperatures higher than 100 degrees C. PMID:17134241

  9. Calorimetric study on the effect of 60Co ?-rays on the growth of microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirkner, Sandra; Takahashi, Katsutada; Furuta, Masakazu; Hayashi, Toshio

    2002-03-01

    Using a calorimeter equipped with 24 sample units, the heat evolution from growing Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Escherichia coli and spores of Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus stearothermophilus was detected in the form of growth thermograms. Irradiation with 60Co ?-rays affected the growth pattern, which was used for a quantitative analysis of the effect on microorganisms. Irradiation of B. pumilus and B. stearothermophilus spores led to dose-dependent delays in growth, indicating a bactericidal effect. In case of 60Co ?-irradiated S. cerevisiae, a dose-dependent reduction of the growth rate constant was observed together with the retardation in growth, indicating a combination of bactericidal and bacteriostatic effects. An equation to determine the number of survivors on the basis of the retardation in growth t? and the growth rate constant ? was developed, which proved the opportunity to use the calorimetric technique in predictive microbiology.

  10. Radioactivity measurements of metallic [sup 192]Ir sources by calorimetric methods

    SciTech Connect

    Genka, Tsuguo; Iwamoto, Seikichi; Takeuchi, Norio (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan))

    1992-01-01

    The necessity of establishing the traceability of dose measurement in brachytherapy [sup 192]Ir sources is realized by physicians and researchers in the medical field. Standard sources of various shapes such as [open quotes]hairpin,[close quotes] [open quotes]single pin,[close quotes] [open quotes]thin wire,[close quotes] and [open quotes]seed[close quotes] for calibrating ionization chambers in hospitals are being demanded. Nominal activities of not only these source products but also the standard sources have been so far specified by [open quotes]apparent[close quotes] values. Determination of [open quotes]absolute[close quotes] activity by an established means such as 4pi-beta-gamma coincidence counting is not practical because quantitative dissolution of metallic iridium is very difficult. We tried to determine the [open quotes]absolute[close quotes] activity by a calorimetric method in a fully nondestructive way.

  11. Rapid discrimination of DNA strands using an opto-calorimetric microcantilever sensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongkyu; Hwang, Kyo Seon; Kim, Seonghwan; Thundat, Thomas

    2014-12-21

    A rapid technique for quantitative detection and discrimination of DNA strands without using immobilized probe molecules is demonstrated using an opto-calorimetric, self-powered sensor based on a Pb(Zr(0.52)Ti(0.48))O3 (PZT) microcantilever. Microcalorimetric infrared (IR) spectroscopy provides excellent chemical selectivity based on the unique molecular vibrational characteristics of each nucleotide in the mid IR region. The piezoelectric and pyroelectric properties of the PZT microcantilever were exploited in the quantitative detection and discrimination of adsorbed DNA strands with their spectral characteristics. We report the unique spectral characteristics of different DNA nucleotides that are monitored by wavelength-dependent temperature variations for different relative molar ratio of each nucleotide. This approach offers a fast, label-free technique which is highly sensitive and selective for the detection of single nucleotide differences in DNA strands and has the potential to be used as a rapid prescreening biosensor for various biomolecules. PMID:25300415

  12. Idebenone loaded solid lipid nanoparticles: calorimetric studies on surfactant and drug loading effects.

    PubMed

    Sarpietro, Maria Grazia; Accolla, Maria Lorena; Puglisi, Giovanni; Castelli, Francesco; Montenegro, Lucia

    2014-08-25

    In this study we prepared solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), by the phase inversion temperature (PIT) method, using cetyl palmitate as solid lipid and three different non-ionic emulsifiers of the polyoxyethylene ethers family (ceteth-20, isoceteth-20, oleth-20). These SLN were loaded with different amount of idebenone (IDE), an antioxidant drug useful in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and skin oxidative damages. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was employed to evaluate the effects of the different emulsifiers and the different amounts of drug loaded on the thermotropic behavior of SLN and to investigate how the drug was arranged into these nanoparticles. The IDE seemed to be located into different regions of the SLN depending on its concentration and on the surfactant used. The results of this study suggest that the calorimetric studies performed on SLN could provide valuable information to optimize SLN design and drug release from these carriers. PMID:24845103

  13. Calorimetric quantification of linked equilibria in cyclodextrin/lipid/detergent mixtures for membrane-protein reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Textor, Martin; Vargas, Carolyn; Keller, Sandro

    2015-04-01

    Reconstitution from detergent micelles into lipid bilayer membranes is a prerequisite for many in vitro studies on purified membrane proteins. Complexation by cyclodextrins offers an efficient and tightly controllable way of removing detergents for membrane-protein reconstitution, since cyclodextrins sequester detergents at defined stoichiometries and with tuneable affinities. To fully exploit the potential advantages of cyclodextrin for membrane-protein reconstitution, we establish a quantitative model for predicting the supramolecular transition from mixed micelles to vesicles during cyclodextrin-mediated detergent extraction. The model is based on a set of linked equilibria among all pseudophases present in the course of the reconstitution process. Various isothermal titration-calorimetric protocols are used for quantifying a detergent's self-association as well as its colloidal and stoichiometric interactions with lipid and cyclodextrin, respectively. The detergent's critical micellar concentration, the phase boundaries in the lipid/detergent phase diagram, and the dissociation constant of the cyclodextrin/detergent complex thus obtained provide all thermodynamic parameters necessary for a quantitative prediction of the transition from micelles to bilayer membranes during cyclodextrin-driven reconstitution. This is exemplified and validated by stepwise complexation of the detergent lauryldimethylamine N-oxide in mixtures with the phospholipid 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine upon titration with 2-hydroxypropyl-?-cyclodextrin, both in the presence and in the absence of the membrane protein Mistic. The calorimetric approach presented herein quantitatively predicts the onset and completion of the reconstitution process, thus obviating cumbersome trial-and-error efforts and facilitating the rational optimisation of reconstitution protocols, and can be adapted to different cyclodextrin/lipid/detergent combinations. PMID:25583305

  14. Calorimetric calibration of head coil SAR estimates displayed on a clinical MR scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorny, Krzysztof R.; Bernstein, Matt A.; Felmlee, Joel P.; Ward, Heidi A.; McGee, Kiaran P.; Lanners, Diana M.; Lee, Kendall H.

    2008-05-01

    Calorimetric measurements were performed to determine the average specific absorption rates (SAR) resulting from MRI head examinations. The data were compared with average head coil SAR estimates displayed by the MR scanner in order to refine the imaging protocols used in imaging patients with implanted deep brain stimulators (DBS). The experiments were performed using transmit-receive (TR) head coil on clinical 1.5 T General Electric MR scanners running 11.0 M4 revision software. The average applied SAR was derived from temperature increases measured inside a head phantom, due to deposition of RF energy during MRI scanning with a spin echo imaging sequence. The measurements were repeated for varied levels of RF transmit gain (TG) and analyzed with a range of entered patient weights. The measurements demonstrate that the ratio of the actual average head SAR to the scanner-displayed value (coil correction factor) decreases for decreasing TG or for increasing patient weight and may vary between 0.3 and 2.1. An additional retrospective patient study, however, shows that not all combinations of TG and patient weight are encountered clinically and, instead, TG generally increases with the patient weight. As a result, a much narrower range of coil correction factors (e.g., typically 0.5-1.0) will be encountered in practice. The calorimetric method described in this work could aid the physicians and technologists in refinement of the model-dependent SAR estimates displayed by the MR scanner, and in selection of imaging parameters for MR head examinations within allowable SAR safety levels.

  15. Calorimetric and spectroscopic studies of the thermotropic phase behavior of lipid bilayer model membranes composed of a homologous series of linear saturated phosphatidylserines.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, R N; McElhaney, R N

    2000-01-01

    The thermotropic phase behavior of lipid bilayer model membranes composed of the even-numbered, N-saturated 1,2-diacyl phosphatidylserines was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and by Fourier-transform infrared and (31)P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. At pH 7.0, 0.1 M NaCl and in the absence of divalent cations, aqueous dispersions of these lipids, which have not been incubated at low temperature, exhibit a single calorimetrically detectable phase transition that is fully reversible, highly cooperative, and relatively energetic, and the transition temperatures and enthalpies increase progressively with increases in hydrocarbon chain length. Our spectroscopic observations confirm that this thermal event is a lamellar gel (L(beta))-to-lamellar liquid crystalline (L(alpha)) phase transition. However, after low temperature incubation, the L(beta)/L(alpha) phase transition of dilauroyl phosphatidylserine is replaced by a higher temperature, more enthalpic, and less cooperative phase transition, and an additional lower temperature, less enthalpic, and less cooperative phase transition appears in the longer chain phosphatidylserines. Our spectroscopic results indicate that this change in thermotropic phase behavior when incubated at low temperatures results from the conversion of the L(beta) phase to a highly ordered lamellar crystalline (L(c)) phase. Upon heating, the L(c) phase of dilauroyl phosphatidylserine converts directly to the L(alpha) phase at a temperature slightly higher than that of its original L(beta)/L(alpha) phase transition. Calorimetrically, this process is manifested by a less cooperative but considerably more energetic, higher-temperature phase transition, which replaces the weaker L(beta)/L(alpha) phase transition alluded to above. However, with the longer chain compounds, the L(c) phase first converts to the L(beta) phase at temperatures some 10-25 degrees C below that at which the L(beta) phase converts to the L(alpha) phase. Our results also suggest that shorter chain homologues form L(c) phases that are structurally related to, but more ordered than, those formed by the longer chain homologues, but that these L(c) phases are less ordered than those formed by other phospholipids. These studies also suggest that polar/apolar interfaces of the phosphatidylserine bilayers are more hydrated than those of other glycerolipid bilayers, possibly because of interactions between the polar headgroup and carbonyl groups of the fatty acyl chains. PMID:11023908

  16. Concurrent calorimetric and interferometric studies of steady-state natural convection from miniaturized horizontal single plate-fin systems and plate-fin arrays

    E-print Network

    Harahap, Filino

    Concurrent calorimetric and interferometric studies have been conducted to investigate the effect that reduction of the base-plate dimensions has on the steady-state performance of the rate of natural convection heat ...

  17. Concurrent calorimetric and interferometric studies of steady-state natural convection from miniaturized horizontal single plate-fin systems and plate-fin arrays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Filino Harahap; Herry Lesmana; Poetro Lebdo Sambegoro

    2010-01-01

    Concurrent calorimetric and interferometric studies have been conducted to investigate the effect that reduction of the base-plate\\u000a dimensions has on the steady-state performance of the rate of natural convection heat transfer from miniaturized horizontal\\u000a single plate-fin systems and plate-fin arrays. The effect was studied through comparison of the present results with those\\u000a of earlier relevant calorimetric, interferometric, or numerical studies.

  18. Compound Interest

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Riches

    2007-10-16

    Albert Einstein called compound interest the 8th wonder of the world. Find out why compound interest and the time value of money are so important. What is Interest Click on the following link to read about the different types of interest. Loans and Interest So why learn about compound interest? Using time and interest to your advantage, you can make more money than you have ever dreamed of. See how the time value of ...

  19. Effect of Temperature on Xylanase II from Trichoderma reesei QM 9414: A Calorimetric, Catalytic, and Conformational Study

    PubMed Central

    López, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    The secondary structure of xylanase II from Trichoderma reesei is lost in an apparent irreversible cooperative process as temperature is increased with a midpoint transition of 58.8 ± 0.1°C. The shift of the spectral centre of mass above 50°C is also apparently cooperative with midpoint transition of 56.3 ± 0.2°C, but the existence of two isofluorescent points in the fluorescence emission spectra suggests a non-two-state process. Further corroboration comes from differential scanning calorimetry experiments. At protein concentrations ?0.56?mg·mL?1 the calorimetric transition is reversible and the data were fitted to a non-two-state model and deconvoluted into six transitions, whereas at concentrations greater than 0.56?mg·mL?1 the calorimetric transition is irreversible with an exothermic contribution to the thermogram. The apparent Tm increased linearly with the scan rate according to first order inactivation kinetics. The effect of additives on the calorimetric transition of xylanase is dependent on their nature. The addition of sorbitol transforms reversible transitions into irreversible transitions while stabilizing the protein as the apparent Tm increases linearly with sorbitol concentration. d-Glucono-1,5-lactone, a noncompetitive inhibitor in xylanase kinetics, and soluble xylan change irreversible processes into reversible processes at high protein concentration. PMID:25276420

  20. Improvement in the Selectivity of Semiconducting Resistive-type NO2 Sensors Linked with Calorimetric Hydrocarbon Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Yasushi; Ogita, Masami

    2002-09-01

    Improvement in the selectivity of semiconducting resistive-type NO2 sensors has been achieved by numerical compensation derived from the output of calorimetric hydrocarbon sensors. The electrical resistance of resistive-type sensors using thick-film SnO2 increases due to exposure to NO2, whereas its resistance is decreased by i-C4H10. Oxidizing gases such as O2 and NO2 which are electronegative are adsorbed on the surface of n-type semiconductors, whereas reducing gases such as hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide react with these adsorbed oxidizing gases, causing electrons to return to the semiconductor. Calorimetric sensors are based on the principle of catalytic combustion between reducing gases and atmospheric oxygen on the surface of gas-detecting materials, therefore they are sensitive to reducing gases such as hydrocarbons, but are insensitive to oxidizing gases. It was found that the resistance of NO2 sensors in the range from 0 to 100 ppm NO2 was unaffected by the co-existence of 0 to 300 ppm i-C4H10 using a semiconducting NO2 sensor, a calorimetric sensor and numerical compensation.

  1. Measurement and Modeling of Inner-Shell Satellites of Na-like Fe XVI between 14.5 ?A and 18 ?A

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, A; Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Gu, M F

    2007-09-10

    We have used the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's EBIT-I electron beam ion trap to perform measurements of the wavelengths and relative intensities of the X-ray lines from inner-shell satellite transitions in sodium-like Fe XVI. The measurements were carried out with high-resolution crystal and grating spectrometers and covered the 14.5-18 {angstrom} wavelength band. Contrary to predicted line strengths and positions found in the literature, our results show that the strongest inner-shell satellites of Fe XVI are located near 15.2 {angstrom}. This is near the location of the 3d {yields} 2p intercombination line in Fe XVII. Calculations using the Flexible Atomic Code are presented, which agree well with the EBIT-I measurements.

  2. Phase transitions in the urea/n-nonadecane system by calorimetric techniques.

    PubMed

    López-Echarri, A; Ruiz-Larrea, I; Fraile-Rodríguez, A; Díaz-Hernández, J; Breczewski, T; Bocanegra, E H

    2007-05-01

    A calorimetric study of urea/n-nonadecane, CO(NH(2))(2)/C(19)H(40), and the deuterated derivatives, CO(ND(2))(2)/C(19)D(40) and CO(NH(2))(2)/C(19)D(40), around the structural phase transition temperature is presented. For this purpose differential scanning (DSC), temperature-modulated (AC) and adiabatic calorimetry have been used and the obtained results are compared. Leaving apart the noticeable peak associated with the main phase transition at 158.5, 149.4 and 154 K respectively, small anomalies of the specific heat are found at lower temperatures and their corresponding entropic and enthalpic changes are reported. Heating and cooling experiments show the influence of the temperature rate and the thermal history on the detailed profile of the specific heat traces. The presence of thermal hysteresis and latent heat as a way to characterize the order of the phase transitions is discussed. Finally, a tentative approach to the urea and the alkyl chain contributions to the specific heat and their influence on the phase transition mechanisms is presented. PMID:21691002

  3. Electron energy and charge albedos - calorimetric measurement vs Monte Carlo theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, G.J.; Ruggles, L.E.; Miller, G.H.; Halbleib, J.A.

    1981-11-01

    A new calorimetric method has been employed to obtain saturated electron energy albedos for Be, C, Al, Ti, Mo, Ta, U, and UO/sub 2/ over the range of incident energies from 0.1 to 1.0 MeV. The technique was so designed to permit the simultaneous measurement of saturated charge albedos. In the cases of C, Al, Ta, and U the measurements were extended down to about 0.025 MeV. The angle of incidence was varied from 0/sup 0/ (normal) to 75/sup 0/ in steps of 15/sup 0/, with selected measurements at 82.5/sup 0/ in Be and C. In each case, state-of-the-art predictions were obtained from a Monte Carlo model. The generally good agreement between theory and experiment over this extensive parameter space represents a strong validation of both the theoretical model and the new experimental method. Nevertheless, certain discrepancies at low incident energies, especially in high-atomic-number materials, and at all energies in the case of the U energy albedos are not completely understood.

  4. Optical and Calorimetric Studies of Cholesterol-Rich Filamentous, Helical Ribbon and Crystal Microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Miroshnikova, Y. A.; Elsenbeck, M.; Zastavker, Y. V. [Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering, Needham, MA (United States); Kashuri, K; Iannacchione, G. S. [Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA (United States)

    2009-04-19

    Formation of biological self-assemblies at all scales is a focus of studies in fields ranging from biology to physics to biomimetics. Understanding the physico-chemical properties of these self-assemblies may lead to the design of bio-inspired structures and technological applications. Here we examine self-assembled filamentous, helical ribbon, and crystal microstructures formed in chemically defined lipid concentrate (CDLC), a model system for cholesterol crystallization in gallbladder bile. CDLC consists of cholesterol, bilayer-forming amphiphiles, micelle-forming amphiphiles, and water. Phase contrast and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy indicate the presence of three microstructure types in all samples studied, and allow for an investigation of the structures' unique geometries. Additionally, confocal microscopy is used for qualitative assessment of surface and internal composition. To complement optical observations, calorimetric (differential-scanning and modulation) experiments, provide the basis for an in-depth understanding of collective and individual thermal behavior. Observed ''transition'' features indicate clustering and ''straightening'' of helical ribbons into short, increasingly thickening, filaments that dissolve with increasing temperature. These results suggest that all microstructures formed in CDLC may coexist in a metastable chemical equilibrium. Further investigation of the CDLC thermal profile should uncover the process of cholesterol crystallization as well as the unique design and function of microstructures formed in this system.

  5. Interaction of methotrexate, folates, and pyridine nucleotides with dihydrofolate reductase: calorimetric and spectroscopic binding studies.

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, S; Kaufman, B T

    1978-01-01

    The thermodynamic parameters, deltaG, deltaH, and deltaS characterizing the tight binding of methotrexate, folates, and pyridine nucleotides to chicken liver dihydrofolate reductase (5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate: NADP+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.5.1.3) have been determined from calorimetric and fluorescence measurements. At 25 degrees the binding of NADPH and NADP+ is characterized by small negative enthalpies and large positive entropies whereas the binding of the folates and methotrexate is accompanied by large negative enthalpies and small negative entropies. In addition, the enthalpy of methotrexate-enzyme interaction demonstrates a proton transfer associated with binding; this is not the case with folate and dihydrofolate, thus confirming the conclusions drawn from the observed difference spectra characteristic of the interaction of methotrexate and substrates with the enzyme. The implications of these results are discussed in terms of the nature of the binding process, conformational changes in the enzyme, and the nature of the active site region. PMID:28523

  6. Calorimetric studies and lessons on fires and explosions of a chemical plant producing CHP and DCPO.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jing-Ming; Su, Mao-Sheng; Huang, Chiao-Ying; Duh, Yih-Shing

    2012-05-30

    Cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) has been used in producing phenol, dicumyl peroxide (DCPO) and as an initiator for synthesizing acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) resin by copolymerization in Taiwan. Four incidents of fire and explosion induced by thermal runaway reactions were occurred in a same plant producing CHP, DCPO and bis-(tert-butylperoxy isopropyl) benzene peroxide (BIBP). The fourth fire and explosion occurred in the CHP reactor that resulted in a catastrophic damage in reaction region and even spread throughout storage area. Descriptions on the occurrences of these incidents were assessed by the features of processes, reaction schemes and unexpected side reactions. Calorimetric data on thermokinetics and pressure were used for explaining the practical consequences or which the worst cases encountered in this kind of plant. Acceptable risk associated with emergency relief system design is vital for a plant producing organic peroxide. These basic data for designing an inherently safer plant can be conducted from adiabatic calorimetry. An encouraging deduction has been drawn here, these incidents may be avoided by the implementation of API RP 520, API RP 521, DIERS technology, OSHA 1910.119 and AIChE's CCPS recommended PSM elements. PMID:22459975

  7. First calorimetric determination of heat of extraction of 248Cm in a bi-phasic system

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh R. Martin; Peter R. Zalupski

    2011-06-01

    This report presents a summary of the work performed to meet FCR&D level 2 milestone M21SW050201, 'Complete the first calorimetric determination of heat of extraction of 248Cm in a bi-phasic system'. This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics FCR&D work package. To complement previous work undertaken under this work package we have extended out heat of extraction studies by di-2-ethyl-hexyl-phosphoric acid to curium. This report also details the heat of extraction of samarium in the same system. This work was performed to not only test the methodology but also to check for consistency with the heats of extraction obtained with those in the prior literature. The heat of extraction for samarium that was obtained in this study was -9.6 kJ mol-1, which is in reasonable agreement with the previously obtained value of -10.9 kJ mol-1. The curium heat of extraction was performed under two sets of conditions and the obtained heats of extraction were in reasonable agreement with each other at -16.0 {+-} 1.1 and -16.8 {+-} 1.5 kJ mol-1.

  8. Calorimetrically obtained information about the efficiency of ectoine synthesis from glucose in Halomonas elongata.

    PubMed

    Maskow, T; Babel, W

    2001-07-01

    Compatible solutes are becoming more and more attractive commercially. Thus, knowledge of the efficiency of synthesis of compatible solutes from different carbon substrates is very important. As the growth rate and rates of formation of compatible solutes correspond to the heat flux, calorimetric measurements are particularly suitable for providing this information. By growing microorganisms continuously in a calorimeter, and generating a feeding stream with gradually increasing salinity without changing any other growth conditions, we were able to determine the efficiency of growth-associated synthesis of compatible solutes. This was shown for Halomonas elongata DMSZ 2581(T) growing on glucose, which synthesizes (at 25 degrees C) 1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidinecarboxylic acid (ectoine) as its main osmotic counterweight. The requirement of biologically usable energy for its growth-associated synthesis was found to be very low: a 100% efficiency of the conversion of the substrate-carbon into ectoine is both theoretically possible and was reached approximately in practice. The growth rate and yield coefficient were essentially independent of the ectoine formation rate, and the rate of substrate-carbon assimilation was far greater than the rate of dissimilation. The specific maximum growth rate was limited by the rate of formation of ectoine. PMID:11420137

  9. A calorimetric study of the hydrolysis and peroxide complex formation of the uranyl(VI) ion.

    PubMed

    Zanonato, Pier Luigi; Di Bernardo, Plinio; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2014-02-14

    The enthalpies of reaction for the formation of uranyl(vi) hydroxide {[(UO2)2(OH)2](2+), [(UO2)3(OH)4](2+), [(UO2)3(OH)5](+), [(UO2)3(OH)6](aq), [(UO2)3(OH)7](-), [(UO2)3(OH)8](2-), [(UO2)(OH)3](-), [(UO2)(OH)4](2-)} and peroxide complexes {[UO2(O2)(OH)](-) and [(UO2)2(O2)2(OH)](-)} have been determined from calorimetric titrations at 25 °C in a 0.100 M tetramethyl ammonium nitrate ionic medium. The hydroxide data have been used to test the consistency of the extensive thermodynamic database published by the Nuclear Energy Agency (I. Grenthe, J. Fuger, R. J. M. Konings, R. J. Lemire, A. B. Mueller, C. Nguyen-Trung and H. Wanner, Chemical Thermodynamics of Uranium, North-Holland, Amsterdam, 1992 and R. Guillaumont, T. Fanghänel, J. Fuger, I. Grenthe, V. Neck, D. J. Palmer and M. R. Rand, Update on the Chemical Thermodynamics of Uranium, Neptunium, Plutonium, Americium and Technetium, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2003). A brief discussion is given about a possible structural relationship between the trinuclear complexes [(UO2)3(OH)n](6-n), n = 4-8. PMID:24301256

  10. Short-pulse Calorimetric Load for High Power Millimeter-wave Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandini, F.; Bruschi, A.; Cirant, S.; Gittini, G.; Granucci, G.; Muzzini, V.; Sozzi, C.; Spinicchia, N.

    2007-02-01

    A spherical compact matched load, for high vacuum operation suited for short pulses (2 MW, 0.1 s) precise measurement has been designed to test high power gyrotrons Bruschi, Gandini, Muzzini, Spinicchia, Cirant, Gittini, Granucci, Mellera, Nardone, Simonetto, and Sozzi (Fusion Eng. Des. 56 57:649 654, 2001); Bruschi, Cirant, Gandini, Granucci, Mellera, Muzzini, Nardone, Simonetto, Sozzi, and Spinicchia (Nucl. Fusion 43:1513 1519, 2003); Bruschi, Cirant, Gandini, Gittini, Granucci, Mellera, Muzzini, Nardone, Simonetto, Sozzi, Spinicchia, Angella, and Signorelli (Development of CW and short-pulse calorimetric loads for high power millimeter-wave Beams, 23rd Symposium on Fusion Technology, September 20 24, 2004, Venice, Italy). In order to enhance the power handling capability of the load and to reduce the operation problems that may arise from an excessive reflection from the load, a ray tracing code has been written to model the power distribution on the inner surface and the pattern of the reflected radiation. The outcome of this code has been used to select a more convenient profile for the spreading mirror of the load and to optimize a pre-load specially conceived to minimize the power reflected fraction.

  11. Status and performance of the CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriani, O.; Akaike, Y.; Asaoka, Y.; Asano, K.; Bagliesi, M. G.; Bigongiari, G.; Binns, W. R.; Bongi, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Cassese, A.; Castellini, G.; Cherry, M. L.; Collazuol, G.; Ebisawa, K.; Di Felice, V.; Fuke, H.; Guzik, T. G.; Hams, T.; Hasebe, N.; Hareyama, M.; Hibino, K.; Ichimura, M.; Ioka, K.; Israel, M. H.; Javaid, A.; Kamioka, E.; Kasahara, K.; Katayose, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Kataoka, R.; Kawanaka, N.; Kitamura, H.; Kotani, T.; Krawczynski, H. S.; Krizmanic, J. F.; Kubota, A.; Kuramata, S.; Lomtadze, T.; Maestro, P.; Marcelli, L.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Mitchell, J. W.; Miyake, S.; Mizutani, K.; Motz, H. M.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, K.; Mori, M.; Mori, N.; Munakata, K.; Murakami, H.; Nakagawa, Y. E.; Nakahira, S.; Nishimura, J.; Okuno, S.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozawa, S.; Palma, F.; Papini, P.; Rauch, B. F.; Ricciarini, S.; Sakamoto, T.; Sasaki, M.; Shibata, M.; Shimizu, Y.; Shiomi, A.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Takahashi, I.; Takayanagi, M.; Takita, M.; Tamura, T.; Tateyama, N.; Terasawa, T.; Tomida, H.; Torii, S.; Tunesada, Y.; Uchihori, Y.; Ueno, S.; Vannuccini, E.; Wefel, J. P.; Yamaoka, K.; Yanagita, S.; Yoshida, A.; Yoshida, K.; Yuda, T.

    2014-11-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) space experiment, currently under development by Japan in collaboration with Italy and the United States, will measure the flux of cosmic-ray electrons (including positrons) to 20 TeV, gamma rays to 10 TeV and nuclei with Z=1 to 40 up to 1,000 TeV during a two-year mission on the International Space Station (ISS), extendable to five years. These measurements are essential to search for dark matter signatures, investigate the mechanism of cosmic-ray acceleration and propagation in the Galaxy and discover possible astrophysical sources of high-energy electrons nearby the Earth. The instrument consists of two layers of segmented plastic scintillators for the cosmic-ray charge identification (CHD), a 3 radiation length thick tungsten-scintillating fiber imaging calorimeter (IMC) and a 27 radiation length thick lead-tungstate calorimeter (TASC). CALET has sufficient depth, imaging capabilities and excellent energy resolution to allow for a clear separation between hadrons and electrons and between charged particles and gamma rays. The instrument will be launched to the ISS within 2014 Japanese Fiscal Year (by the end of March 2015) and installed on the Japanese Experiment Module-Exposed Facility (JEM-EF). In this paper, we will review the status and main science goals of the mission and describe the instrument configuration and performance.

  12. HIGH-ACCURACY MR-MP PERTURBATION THEORY ENERGY AND RADIATIVE RATES CALCULATIONS FOR CORE-EXCITED TRANSITIONS IN Fe XVI

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, F.; Vilkas, M. J.; Ishikawa, Y. [Department of Chemistry and the Chemical Physics Program, University of Puerto Rico, P.O. Box 23346, San Juan, PR 00931-3346 (Puerto Rico); Beiersdorfer, P., E-mail: beiersdorfer1@llnl.gov [Physics Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Accurate theoretical energy level, lifetime, and transition probability calculations of core-excited Fe XVI were performed employing the relativistic Multireference Moller-Plesset perturbation theory. In these computations the term energies of the highly excited n {<=} 5 states arising from the configuration 1s {sup 2}2s{sup k} 2p{sup m} 3l {sup p} nl' {sup q}, where k + m + p + q = 9, l {<=} 3 and p + q {<=} 2 are considered, including those of the autoionizing levels with a hole-state in the L-shell. All even and odd parity states of sodium-like iron ion were included for a total of 1784 levels. Comparison of the calculated L-shell transition wavelengths with those from laboratory measurements shows excellent agreement. Therefore, our calculation may be used to predict the wavelengths of as of yet unobserved Fe XVI, such as the second strongest 2p-3d Fe XVI line, which has not been directly observed in the laboratory and which blends with one of the prominent Fe XVII lines.

  13. Organosulfur Compounds

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Reich, Ieva

    Quiz questions from the organic chemistry question bank provide students with an excellent opportunity to review key concepts. This set of questions focuses on organosulfur compounds, with a special emphasis on thiols and sulfides.

  14. Polybenzimidazole compounds

    DOEpatents

    Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jones, Michael G. (Pocatello, ID)

    2010-08-10

    A PBI compound that includes imidazole nitrogens, at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2--, where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The PBI compound may exhibit similar thermal properties in comparison to the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may exhibit a solubility in an organic solvent greater than the solubility of the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may occur at about room temperature and/or at about atmospheric pressure. Substituting may use at least five equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted or, preferably, about fifteen equivalents.

  15. Polybenzimidazole compounds

    DOEpatents

    Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID); Jones, Michael G. (Chubbuck, ID); Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Trowbridge, Tammy L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-11-22

    A PBI compound includes imidazole nitrogens at least a portion of which are substituted with a moiety containing a carbonyl group, the substituted imidazole nitrogens being bonded to carbon of the carbonyl group. At least 85% of the nitrogens may be substituted. The carbonyl-containing moiety may include RCO--, where R is alkoxy or haloalkyl. The PBI compound may exhibit a first temperature marking an onset of weight loss corresponding to reversion of the substituted PBI that is less than a second temperature marking an onset of decomposition of an otherwise identical PBI compound without the substituted moiety. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may use more than 5 equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted.

  16. An IR and Calorimetric Investigation of the Structural, Crystal-Chemical and Thermodynamic Properties of Hydrogrossular

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, C. A.; Dachs, E.

    2012-04-01

    The garnet class of phases is extremely broad in terms of composition and structural properties. Garnet is found in nature and various synthetic garnet phases have a number of important technical applications. There exist the rock-forming silicate garnets that are so widespread geologically. An additional class is given by the so-called "hydrogarnets" in which the tetrahedral site (Wyckoff position 24d) is empty. At relatively low temperatures there is complete solid solution between Ca3Al2Si3O12 and Ca3Al2H12O12, for example. The substitution mechanism can be written as O4H4 \\lrarr SiO4. The latter, pure OH-containing end-member, which has not been found in nature, is termed katoite/hydrogrossular. Its structure has been investigated by various workers by X-ray and neutron diffraction and by proton NMR, IR and Raman spectroscopic methods. At ambient conditions the structure has the "standard" garnet cubic symmetry of Ia-3d. At high pressures, and possibly at low temperatures, a different structure may occur. We measured the low temperature IR spectra and heat capacity of katoite in order to understand its structural, crystal-chemical and thermophysical properties. A sample of Ca3Al2H12O12 was synthesized hydrothermally in Au capsules at 250 °C and 3 kb water pressure. X-ray powder measurements show that about 98-99% katoite was obtained. Powder IR spectra were recorded between 298 K and 10 K. The measured spectra are considerably different in the high wavenumber region, where O-H stretching modes occur, between 298 K and 10 K. At room temperature the IR-active O-H band located around 3662 cm-1 is broad and it narrows and shifts to higher wavenumbers and also develops structure below about 80 K. Concomitantly, additional weak intensity O-H bands located around 3600 cm-1 begin to appear and they become sharper and increase in intensity with further decreases in temperature down to 10 K. The spectra indicate that the vibrational behavior of individual OH groups and their collective interactions measurably affect the lattice dynamic (i.e. thermodynamic) behavior. The low temperature heat capacity behavior was investigated with a commercially designed relaxation calorimeter between 5 and 300 K on a mg-sized sample. The heat capacity data are well behaved at T < 300 K and show a monotonic decrease in magnitude with decreasing temperature. A standard third-law entropy value of So = 421.7 ± 1.6 J/mol·K was calculated. Using this new calorimetric-based So value and published standard enthalpy of formation data for katoite, a calorimetric-based Gibbs free energy of formation at 298 K can be obtained as ?G°f = -5021.2 kJ/mol. The Cp data show no evidence for any phase transition as possibly expected by the change in OH-mode behavior with decreasing temperature. We have no explanation for the appearance of the additional modes. It is worth noting that the katoite crystal structure in terms of lattice dynamic or thermodynamic behavior should be thought of having OH groups and not O4H4 clusters or polyhedral units as is often written in the literature. The single crystallographic OH group in katoite shows very weak, if any, hydrogen bonding and the H atoms have large amplitudes of vibration. The weak H bonding controls the nature of low energy OH-related vibrations and this leads to its large So value.

  17. Calorimetric relaxation in pharmaceutical molecular glasses and its utility in understanding their stability against crystallization.

    PubMed

    Tombari, E; Ferrari, C; Johari, G P; Shanker, Ravi M

    2008-09-01

    Glassy states of three pharmaceuticals, acetaminophen, griseofulvin, and nifedipine, and an acetaminophen-aspirin (1:1 mol) alloy were made by slow cooling of the melt and studied by calorimetry. Measurements were performed by cooling and heating at significantly slow rates of 20 K/h, which were comparable to the rate used in adiabatic calorimetry. The results were modeled in terms of a nonexponential, nonlinear structural relaxation. The calorimetric relaxation of all four pharmaceutical samples were less nonexponential than those of polymeric or inorganic glasses, and this finding was attributed to additional contributions to energy change that would arise from temperature and time dependent variation in the hydrogen bond population, the extent of isomerization, and/or the ionic equilibria that exist in these materials. Four calculated and relevant parameters for the pharmaceutical samples were, ln A = -183, beta = 0.75, x = 0.4, and Delta h* = 457 kJ/mol for acetaminophen, ln A = -170, beta = 0.75, x = 0.45, and Delta h* = 516 kJ/mol for griseofulvin, ln A = -189, beta = 0.69, x = 0.39, and Delta h* = 503 kJ/mol for nifedipine, and ln A = -160, beta = 0.70, x = 0.50, and Delta h* = 363 kJ/mol for the acetaminophen-aspirin alloy. The significance of these parameters and, in particular, their values are discussed in the context of the stability of the pharmaceuticals against crystallization and compared against the significance of the localized motions of the JG relaxation in the same context. Acetaminophen was found to be significantly more prone to crystallization on heating than the other two pharmaceuticals as well as the acetaminophen-aspirin alloy. PMID:18683970

  18. Calorimetric Study of Magnetic Field-Induced Phase Transitions in - Fulvalenium) -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortune, Nathanael Alexander

    The particular class of organic conductors known as the Bechgaard salts exhibit a variety of highly anisotropic magnetic, thermal, and electrical phenomena. At low temperatures (below 10 kelvin), the application of a strong magnetic field establishes an effectively lower-dimensional anisotropic Fermi surface, as manifested in a variety of quasi one dimensional and quasi two dimensional thermodynamic and transport properties. Most dramatically, an increasing magnetic field--after suppression of superconductivity, induces a second order phase transition from a metallic to a spin density wave semimetal, followed by a series of first order phase transitions between density wave semimetallic states. This thesis concerns the thermodynamic nature of the low temperature magnetic field induced phase transitions in the Bechgaard charge-transfer salt (TMTSF)2-Cl(O)4. Presented here are the first measurements of the specific heat in magnetic fields up to 30 tesla, as well as the design and construction of a small sample calorimeter capable of operating at dilution refrigerator temperatures in the challenging environment of the high field resistive Bitter magnets. From transport measurements, the existence of a magnetic field induced reentrance into the metallic state has previously been inferred. In this thesis, the unambiguous bulk thermodynamic character of the reentrance is calorimetrically demonstrated. The behavior of the electronic specific heat at the reentrant transition is shown to be consistent with magnetic field enhanced localization. Additionally, quantum oscillations in the high field semimetallic state and the presence of additional structure above the reentrant field are observed. Although these oscillations have also been observed in magnetoresistance and magnetization, the magnitude of the oscillations in the specific heat calls into question all known models for the physical origin of these oscillations.

  19. Calorimetric studies of the kinetic unfreezing of molecular motions in hydrated lysozyme, hemoglobin, and myoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Sartor, G; Mayer, E; Johari, G P

    1994-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) studies of the glassy states of as-received and hydrated lysozyme, hemoglobin, and myoglobin powders, with water contents of < or = 0.25, < or = 0.30, and < or = 0.29 g/g of protein, show that their heat capacity slowly increases with increasing temperature, without showing an abrupt increase characteristic of glass-->liquid transition. Annealing (also referred to as physical aging) of the hydrated proteins causes their DSC scans to show an endothermic region, similar to an overshoot, immediately above the annealing temperature. This annealing effect appears at all temperatures between approximately 150 and 300 K. The area under these peaks increases with increasing annealing time at a fixed temperature. The effects are attributed to the presence of a large number of local structures in which macromolecular segments diffuse at different time scales over a broad range. The lowest time scale corresponds to the > N-H and -O-H group motions which become kinetically unfrozen at approximately 150-170 K on heating at a rate of 30 K min-1 and which have a relaxation time of 5-10 s in this temperature range. The annealing effects confirm that the individual glass transition of the relaxing local regions is spread over a temperature range up to the denaturation temperature region of the proteins. The interpretation is supported by simulation of DSC scans in which the distribution of relaxation times is assumed to be exceptionally broad and in which annealing done at several temperatures over a wide range produces endothermic effects (or regions of DSC scans) qualitatively similar to those observed for the hydrated proteins. PMID:8130342

  20. Microplate differential calorimetric biosensor for ascorbic acid analysis in food and pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Vermeir, S; Nicolaï, B M; Verboven, P; Van Gerwen, P; Baeten, B; Hoflack, L; Vulsteke, V; Lammertyn, J

    2007-08-15

    In this paper we report on the development of a label-free low-volume (12.5 microL), high-throughput microplate calorimetric biosensor for fast ascorbic acid quantification in food and pharmaceutical products. The sensor is based on microplate differential calorimetry (MiDiCal) technology in which the heat generation, due to the exothermic reaction between ascorbic acid and ascorbate oxidase, is differentially monitored between two neighboring wells of an IC-built wafer. A severe discrepancy is found between expected and observed sensor readings. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of these findings a mathematical model, taking into account the biochemical reactions and diffusion properties of oxygen, ascorbic acid, and ascorbate oxidase, is developed. This model shows that oxygen depletion in the microliter reaction volumes, immediately after injection of sample (ascorbic acid) into the well, causes the enzymatic reaction to slow down. Calibration experiments show that the sensor's signal is linearly correlated to the area under the output versus time profile for the ascorbic acid concentration range from 2.4 to 350 mM with a limit of detection of 0.8 mM. Validation experiments on fruit juice samples, food supplements, and a pain reliever supplemented with ascorbic acid reveal that the designed method correlates well with HPLC reference measurements. The main advantages of the presented biosensor are the low analysis cost due to the low amounts of enzyme and reagents required and the possibility to integrate the device in fully automated laboratory analysis systems for high-throughput screening and analysis. PMID:17616167

  1. Measurement And Modeling Of Fe VIII To Fe XVI M-shell Emission In The Extreme Ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, Peter; Lepson, J. K.; Hurwitz, M.

    2007-05-01

    The solar EUV emission near 200 Å is presently being studied with high resolution with the Cosmic Hot Interstellar Plasma Spectrometer (CHIPS), which focuses on the emission between 90 and 270 Å, and with the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode, which focuses on the region 180 to 204 Å and 250 to 290 Å. The Solar EUV Experiment on the TIMED spacecraft also observes this spectral band but with greatly reduced resolution. The spectrum in this region is dominated by emission from moderate charge states of iron. The interpretation of the data relies on accurate and complete plasma emission models, notably CHIANTI. We have performed a series of laboratory measurements of the 3-3 emission from M-shell iron ions. The measurements cover the range 170 - 250 Å and are made at an electron density of about 1011 cm-3. Emission from Fe VIII through Fe XVI has been identified. Excellent agreement with CHIANTI predictions is found. A few weak transitions are noted in the laboratory data that are predicted by CHIANTI to be vanishingly small and should not have been observed. These are tentatively attributed to transitions in Fe XV. A comparison with observations from CHIPS is also presented. This work was supported in part by NASA's Solar and Heliospheric Physics Supporting Research and Technology Program. Work at UC-LLNL was performed under the auspices of the DOE by under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  2. Crop changes from the XVI century to the present in a hill/mountain area of eastern Liguria (Italy)

    PubMed Central

    Gentili, Rodolfo; Gentili, Elio; Sgorbati, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronological information on the composition and structure of agrocenoses and detailed features of land cover referring to specific areas are uncommon in ethnobotanical studies, especially for periods before the XIX century. The aim of this study was to analyse the type of crop or the characteristics of soil cover from the XVI century to the present. Methods This diachronic analysis was accomplished through archival research on the inventories of the Parish of St. Mary and those of the Municipality of Pignone and from recent surveys conducted in an area of eastern Liguria (Italy). Results Archival data revealed that in study area the primary means of subsistence during the last five centuries, until the first half of the XX century, was chestnuts. In the XVIII and XIX centuries, crop diversification strongly increased in comparison with previous and subsequent periods. In more recent times, the abandonment of agricultural practices has favoured the re-colonisation of mixed woodland or cluster-pine woodland. Conclusion Ancient documents in the ecclesiastic or municipal inventories can be a very useful tool for enhancing the knowledge of agricultural practice, as well as of subsistence methods favoured by local populations during a particular time and for reconstructing land use change over time. PMID:19361339

  3. Calorimetric determination of the thermodynamic behavior of reversible liquid-phase reactions for use in energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, P.F.

    1983-01-01

    A new calorimetric method of determining equilibrium mole fractions of labile species that participate in reversible, liquid-phase reactions has been developed. This technique relies on the fact that a reactant-solvent mixture of just the right composition will shift the equilibrium neither to the left nor to the right and thus will neither absorb nor generate heat when injected into an equilibrium mixture. Using the open-system energy balance, initial mole fraction valves for each constituent, and the experimentally determined composition of the reactant-solvent mixture which causes no reaction, the equilibrium mole fraction of each constituent can be determined.

  4. Investigation of ferroelectric phase transitions of water in nanoporous silicates in simultaneous electrical noise and calorimetric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordonskiy, G. S.; Orlov, A. O.

    2014-08-01

    The phase transitions of water in the nanoporous silicate materials SBA-15 and MCM-41 with an ordered system of cylindrical pores have been investigated. Measurements of low-frequency electrical noises (Barkhausen noises) in the frequency range of 1-100 Hz have been performed simultaneously with relative calorimetric measurements. It has been found that the voltage of electrical fluctuations increases approximately 100 times in the temperature range from -30 to -50°C, which is associated with the first-order and second-order ferroelectric phase transitions. It has been assumed that the ferroelectric ice XI can be formed in capillary pores of the materials under investigations.

  5. Multipurpose Compound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Specially formulated derivatives of an unusual basic compound known as Alcide may be the answer to effective treatment and prevention of the disease bovine mastitis, a bacterial inflammation of a cow's mammary gland that results in loss of milk production and in extreme cases, death. Manufactured by Alcide Corporation the Alcide compound has killed all tested bacteria, virus and fungi, shortly after contact, with minimal toxic effects on humans or animals. Alcide Corporation credits the existence of the mastitis treatment/prevention products to assistance provided the company by NERAC, Inc.

  6. Raman spectra of gases. XVI - Torsional transitions in ethanol and ethanethiol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durig, J. R.; Bucy, W. E.; Wurrey, C. J.; Carreira, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    The Raman spectra of gaseous ethanol and ethanethiol have been investigated. Thiol torsional fundamentals for the gauche conformer of EtSH and EtSD have been observed and the asymmetric potential function for this vibration has been calculated. Methyl torsional transitions and overtones have also been observed for both of these molecules. Barriers to internal rotation for the methyl top are calculated to be 3.77 and 3.84 kcal/mol for the EtSH and EtSD compounds, respectively. Hydroxyl torsional fundamentals were observed at 207 and 170 per cm in the EtOH and EtOD spectra, respectively. Overtones of the methyl torsion in both molecules yield a barrier to internal rotation of 3.62 kcal/mol for the gauche conformer.

  7. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 63% of US magnesium compounds production during 2000. Premier Services in Florida, Dow Chemical in Michigan, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties, and Rohm & Haas recovered dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias from seawater. And Premier Services' recoveries, in Nevada, were from magnasite.

  8. Nickel Compounds

    Cancer.gov

    Nickel is a silvery-white metallic element found in the earth’s crust. It can be combined with other elements to form nickel compounds. Because of its unique properties, nickel has many industrial uses. Most nickel is used in metal alloys because it imparts useful properties, such as corrosion resistance, heat resistance, hardness, and strength.

  9. Aromatic Compounds

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Reich, Ieva

    These organic chemistry quiz questions from the JCE question bank focus on the topic of aromatic compounds. Included in the quiz are questions on nomenclature, synthesis, electrophilic substitution, and huckel's rule. These questions provide great review and practice material for students.

  10. Calorimetric and spectroscopic studies of aminoglycoside binding to AT-rich DNA triple helices

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Hongjuan; Kumar, Sunil; Dosen-Micovic, Ljiljana; Arya, Dev P.

    2013-01-01

    Calorimetric and fluorescence techniques were used to characterize the binding of aminoglycosides-neomycin, paromomycin, and ribostamycin, with 5?-dA12-x-dT12-x-dT12-3? intramolecular DNA triplex (x = hexaethylene glycol) and poly(dA).2poly(dT) triplex. Our results demonstrate the following features: (1) UV thermal analysis reveals that the Tm for triplex decreases with increasing pH value in the presence of neomycin, while the Tm for the duplex remains unchanged. (2) The binding affinity of neomycin decreases with increased pH, although there is an increase in observed binding enthalpy. (3) ITC studies conducted in two buffers (sodium cacodylate and MOPS) yield the number of protonated drug amino groups (?n) as 0.29 and 0.40 for neomycin and paromomycin interaction with 5?-dA12-x-dT12-x-dT12-3?, respectively. (4) The specific heat capacity change (?Cp) determined by ITC studies is negative, with more negative values at lower salt concentrations. From 100 mM to 250 mM KCl, the ?Cp ranges from ?402 to ?60 cal/(mol K) for neomycin. At pH 5.5, a more positive ?Cp is observed, with a value of ?98 cal/(mol K) at 100 mM KCl. ?Cp is not significantly affected by ionic strength. (5) Salt dependence studies reveal that there are at least three amino groups of neomycin participating in the electrostatic interactions with the triplex. (6) FID studies using thiazole orange were used to derive the AC50 (aminoglycoside concentration needed to displace 50% of the dye from the triplex) values. Neomycin shows a seven fold higher affinity than paromomycin and eleven fold higher affinity than ribostamycin at pH 6.8. (7) Modeling studies, consistent with UV and ITC results, show the importance of an additional positive charge in triplex recognition by neomycin. The modeling and thermodynamic studies indicate that neomycin binding to the DNA triplex depends upon significant contributions from charge as well as shape complementarity of the drug to the DNA triplex Watson–Hoogsteen groove. PMID:20167243

  11. Development of Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters for High Precision Measurements of Calorimetric Re-187 and Ho-163 Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranitzsch, P. C.-O.; Porst, J.-P.; Kempf, S.; Pies, C.; Schafer, S.; Hengstler, D.; Fleischmann, A.; Enss, C.; Gastaldo, L.

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of calorimetric spectra following atomic weak decays, beta (b) and electron capture (EC), of nuclides having a very low Q-value, can provide an impressively high sensitivity to a non-vanishing neutrino mass. The achievable sensitivity in this kind of experiments is directly connected to the performance of the used detectors. In particular an energy resolution of a few eV and a pulse formation time well below 1 microsecond are required. Low temperature Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters (MMCs) for soft X-rays have already shown an energy resolution of 2.0 eV FWHM and a pulse rise-time of about 90 ns for fully micro-fabricated detectors. We present the use of MMCs for high precision measurements of calorimetric spectra following the beta-decay of Re-187 and the EC of Ho-163. We show results obtained with detectors optimized for Re-187 and for Ho-163 experiments respectively. While the detectors equipped with superconducting Re absorbers have not yet reached the aimed performance, a first detector prototype with a Au absorber having implanted Ho-163 ions already shows excellent results. An energy resolution of 12 eV FWHM and a rise time of 90 ns were measured.

  12. Geant4 simulation of the Elekta XVI kV CBCT unit for accurate description of potential late toxicity effects of image-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochu, F. M.; Burnet, N. G.; Jena, R.; Plaistow, R.; Parker, M. A.; Thomas, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes the modelisation of the Elekta XVI Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) machine components with Geant4 and its validation against calibration data taken for two commonly used machine setups. Preliminary dose maps of simulated CBCTs coming from this modelisation work are presented. This study is the first step of a research project, GHOST, aiming to improve the understanding of late toxicity risk in external beam radiotherapy patients by simulating dose depositions integrated from different sources (imaging, treatment beam) over the entire treatment plan. The second cancer risk will then be derived from different models relating irradiation dose and second cancer risk.

  13. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, seawater and natural brines accounted for 51% of US magnesium compounds production. World magnesia production was estimated to be 14.5 Mt. Most of the production came from China, North Korea, Russia and Turkey. Although no specific production figures are available, Japan and the United States are estimated to account for almost one-half of the world's capacity from seawater and brines.

  14. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 60 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production during 2002. Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida. They were also recovered from well brines in Michigan by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties and Rohm & Haas. And they were recovered from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals.

  15. Calorimetric Study of Adsorption of Alkanes in High-Silica Zeolites Scott Savitz, Flor Siperstein, Raymond J. Gorte, and Alan L. Myers

    E-print Network

    Siperstein, Flor R.

    Calorimetric Study of Adsorption of Alkanes in High-Silica Zeolites Scott Savitz, Flor Siperstein of six high-silica zeolites (TON, MTW, UTD-1, MFI, FER, FAU). Three of these zeolites (TON, MTW, UTD-1 spherical cavities. Since the adsorbate molecules are nonpolar and the zeolites possess a high Si/Al ratio

  16. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 60% of US magnesium compounds production in 2001. Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater in Florida by Premier Chemicals. They were also recovered from Michigan well brines by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties and Rohm & Haas. And Premier Chemicals recovered dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias from magnesite in Nevada. Reilly Industries and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah.

  17. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 54 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2010. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its operation mentioned above.

  18. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 40 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2009. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover, and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its operation mentioned above.

  19. Calorimetric study of glass transition in molecular liquids consisting of globular associates: dicyclorohexylmethanol and tricyclohexylmethanol.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Yasuhisa; Suzuki, Yu-ta; Sumita, Masato; Saito, Kazuya

    2012-04-01

    Heat capacities of liquids and liquid-quenched glasses (LQGs) of dicyclorohexylmethanol (DCHM) and tricyclohexylmethanol (TCHM) were measured by adiabatic calorimetry. Upon cooling the liquid compounds, they undergo glass transitions around 250 and 265 K, respectively. Temperature dependence of the FT-IR spectrum of TCHM liquid showed the gradual formation of dimers in the supercooled state with decreasing temperature. The magnitude of heat capacity jump at glass transition is discussed through a comparison with other low-molecular mass LQG. Combining the present results with previous heat capacity results on crystalline TCHM, residual entropies of LQG and standard thermodynamic quantities are established for both compounds. PMID:22414072

  20. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 52 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2006. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from sea-water by Premier Chemicals in Florida; from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas; and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from brucite by Applied Chemical Magnesias in Texas, from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas from their operations mentioned above. About 59 percent of the magnesium compounds consumed in the United States was used for refractories that are used mainly to line steelmaking furnaces. The remaining 41 percent was consumed in agricultural, chemical, construction, environmental and industrial applications.

  1. Fun with Compound Words

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Huggins

    2012-04-12

    Identify and create compound words We will be studying compound words! First we need to find out what a compound word is, go to this website and read about compound words.What is a compound word Now that you have read about compound words lets do some fun activities to help us review. First go to Compound word flashcards, here you will ...

  2. Thermochemistry of Bithiophenes and Thienyl Radicals. A Calorimetric and Computational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel A. V.; Santos, Ana Filipa L. O. M.; Gomes, José R. B.; Roux, María Victoria; Temprado, Manuel; Jiménez, Pilar; Notario, Rafael

    2009-09-01

    The relative stabilities of 2,2'- and 3,3'-bithiophenes were evaluated by experimental thermochemistry and the results compared with data obtained from state of the art calculations, which were also extended to 2,3'-bithiophene. The standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpies of formation of crystalline 2,2'-bithiophene and 3,3'-bithiophene were calculated from the standard molar energies of combustion, in oxygen, to yield CO2 (g) and H2SO4·115H2O, measured by rotating-bomb combustion calorimetry at T = 298.15 K. The vapor pressures of these two compounds were measured as a function of temperature by Knudsen effusion mass-loss technique. The standard molar enthalpies of sublimation, at T = 298.15 K, were derived from the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. The experimental values were used to calculate the standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) enthalpies of formation of the title compounds in the gaseous phase; the results were analyzed and interpreted in terms of enthalpic increments and molecular structure. Standard ab initio molecular orbital calculations at the G3(MP2)//B3LYP level were performed. Enthalpies of formation, using homodesmotic reactions, were calculated and compared with experimental data. The computational study was also extended to the isomeric compound 2,3'-bithiophene. Detailed inspections of the molecular and electronic structures of the compounds studied were carried out. Finally, bond dissociation enthalpies (BDE) and enthalpies of formation of thienyl radicals were also computed.

  3. A measurement of the beta spectrum of 63Ni using a new type of calorimetric cryogenic detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitskell, R. J.; Angrave, L. C.; Booth, N. E.; Hahn, A. D.; Salmon, G. L.; Swift, A. M.

    1996-02-01

    A beta spectrometer has been developed using a new type of cryogenic particle detector. The detectors consist of series arrays of superconducting tunnel junctions (SASTJs) fabricated on single crystals of InSb operated at 50 mK. Two detectors are used to completely enclose a beta electron source and are able to make fully calorimetric measurements of beta decay, eliminating both back-scattering and final state effects. We report the results from a precision measurement of the beta spectrum of a 63Ni source. In addition, we will detail the stages in the design and operation of this cryogenic detector which were carried out in order to collect a large number of events (˜10 8) over long periods (˜28 days).

  4. Apparatus for calorimetric measurements of losses in MgB2 superconductors exposed to alternating currents and external magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taxt, H.; Magnusson, N.; Runde, M.

    2013-02-01

    Inexpensive superconducting wires with low AC losses would open up for a large superconductor market in AC electrical power applications. One candidate for this market is the MgB2 conductor. In the development of an AC optimized superconductor, high-quality measurements of the AC losses under application-like conditions must be available. This article describes an apparatus built for this purpose. The measurement method is calorimetric. The temperature increase of the superconductor sample is measured and compared to the temperature increase due to a heater with known heat input. The system is designed for measurements of losses due to magnetic fields combined with transport currents. Results from tests verifying the capabilities of the system are given, as well as from initial AC loss measurements on a tape-shaped MgB2 superconductor.

  5. Application of Calorimetric Low Temperature Detectors (CLTD's) for Precise Stopping Power Measurements of Heavy Ions in Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echler, A.; Egelhof, P.; Grabitz, P.; Kettunen, H.; Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Laitinen, M.; Müller, K.; Rossi, M.; Trzaska, W. H.; Virtanen, A.

    2014-09-01

    Calorimetric low temperature detectors (CLTD's) have been included in a B-ToF setup, that has already been used several times to perform energy loss measurements at the accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä. The new experimental setup enabled a precise determination of stopping power data for 0.05-1 MeV/u Xe ions in carbon, nickel and gold. The results are presented and compared to data from literature and theoretical predictions. As a by-product, due to the excellent energy resolution of CLTD's for heavy ions at low energies, an observation of channeling effects in very thin polycrystalline targets and a determination of the channeling energy loss for 0.1-0.5 MeV/u Xe-ions in Ni- and Au-absorbers was possible.

  6. Thermodynamic study of rhodamine 123-calf thymus DNA interaction: determination of calorimetric enthalpy by optical melting study.

    PubMed

    Masum, Abdulla Al; Chakraborty, Maharudra; Pandya, Prateek; Halder, Umesh Chandra; Islam, Md Maidul; Mukhopadhyay, Subrata

    2014-11-20

    In this paper, the interaction of rhodamine123 (R123) with calf thymus DNA has been studied using molecular modeling and other biophysical methods like UV-vis spectroscopy, fluoremetry, optical melting, isothermal titration calorimetry, and circular dichroic studies. Results showed that the binding energy is about -6 to -8 kcal/mol, and the binding process is favored by both negative enthalpy change and positive entropy change. A new method to determine different thermodynamic properties like calorimetric enthalpy and heat capacity change has been introduced in this paper. The obtained data has been crossed-checked by other methods. After dissecting the free-energy contribution, it was observed that the binding was favored by both negative hydrophobic free energy and negative molecular free energy which compensated for the positive free energies due to the conformational change loss of rotational and transitional freedom of the DNA helix. PMID:25383921

  7. A micromachined calorimetric gas sensor: an application of electrodeposited nanostructured palladium for the detection of combustible gases.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Philip N; Guerin, Samuel

    2003-01-01

    Palladium films with regular nanoarchitectures were electrochemically deposited from the hexagonal (H1) lyotropic liquid crystalline phase of the nonionic surfactant octaethyleneglycol monohexadecyl ether (C16EO8) onto micromachined silicon hotplate structures. The H1-e Pd films were shown to have high surface areas (approximately 28 m2 g(-1)) and to act as effective and stable catalysts for the detection of methane in air on heating to 500 degrees C. The response of the H1-e Pd-coated planar pellistors was found to be linearly proportional to the concentration of methane between 0 and 2.5% in air with a detection limit below 0.125%. Our results show that the electrochemical deposition of nanostructured metal films offers a promising approach to the fabrication of micromachined calorimetric gas sensors for combustible gases. PMID:12530828

  8. Bismaleimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Adams, J.E.; Jamieson, D.R.

    1986-01-14

    Bismaleimides of the formula shown in the diagram wherein R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] each independently is H, C[sub 1-4]-alkyl, C[sub 1-4]-alkoxy, Cl or Br, or R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1--3; and the alkylene bridging group, optionally, is substituted by 1--3 methyl groups or by fluorine, form polybismaleimide resins which have valuable physical properties. Uniquely, these compounds permit extended cure times, i.e., they remain fluid for a time sufficient to permit the formation of a homogeneous melt prior to curing.

  9. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 57 percent of magnesium compounds produced in the United States in 2011. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties LLC from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia LLC in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash Wendover LLC and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma Inc. in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its brine operation in Michigan.

  10. A calorimetric study of early hydration of alkali-slag cements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Caijun Shi; Robert L. Day

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines the early hydration of alkali-slag cements activated by different sodium compounds, such as NaOH, Na2CO3, Na2SiO3.5H2O, Na3PO4, Na2HPO4 and NaF, at 25 and 50 °C. A conduction calorimeter was used to monitor hydration kinetics. It was found that the initial pH of activator solution has an important role in dissolving the slag and in promoting the early

  11. A Calorimetric Study of Almandine: Are the Thermodynamic Properties of the End-Member Aluminosilicate Garnets Finally Known Quantitatively?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dachs, E.; Geiger, C. A.; Benisek, A.

    2012-12-01

    The aluminosilicate garnets (E3Al2Si3O12 with E = Fe2+, Mn2+, Ca, Mg) form an important rock-forming mineral group. Much study has been directed toward determining their thermodynamic properties. The iron end-member almandine (Fe3Al2Si3O12) is a key phase in many petrologic investigations. As part of an ongoing calorimetric and thermodynamic study of the aluminosilicate garnets, the heat capacity of three synthetic well-characterized polycrystalline almandine garnets and one natural almandine-rich single crystal was measured. The various garnets were characterized by optical microscopy, electron-microprobe analysis, X-ray powder diffraction and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. Heat capacity measurements were performed in the temperature range 3 to 300 K using relaxation calorimetry and between 282 and 764 K using DSC methods. From the former, So values between 336.7 ± 0.8 and 337.8 ± 0.8 J/molK are calculated for the different samples. The smaller value is considered the best So for end-member stoichiometric almandine, because it derives from the "best" Fe3+-free synthetic sample. The Cp behavior for almandine at T > 298 K is given by the polynomial (in J/molK): Cp = 649.06(±4) - 3837.57(±122)T-0.5 - 1.44682(±0.06)107T-2 + 1.94834(±0.09)109T-3, which is calculated using DSC data together with one published heat-content datum determined by transposed-drop calorimetry along with a new determination that gives H1181K - H302K = 415.0 ± 3.2 kJ/mole. Almandine shows a ?-type heat-capacity anomaly at low temperatures resulting from a paramagnetic-antiferromagnetic phase transition at about 9 K. The lattice heat capacity was calculated using the single-parameter phonon dispersion model of Komada and Westrum (1997), which allows the non-lattice heat capacity (Cex) behavior to be modelled. An analysis shows the presence of an electronic heat-capacity contribution (Cel - Schottky anomaly) around 17 K that is superimposed on a larger magnetic heat-capacity effect (Cmag). The calculated lattice entropy at 298.15 K is Svib = 303.3 J/molK and it contributes about 90% to the total standard entropy at 298 K. The non-lattice entropy is Sex = 33.4 J/molK and consists of Smag = 32.1 J/molK and Sel = 1.3 J/molK contributions. Using the So = 336.7 J/molK value and the Cp polynomial for almandine, we derived its enthalpy of formation, ?Hof, from an analysis of experimental phase equilibrium results on the reactions almandine + 3rutile = 3ilmenite + sillimanite + 2quartz and 2ilmenite = 2iron + 2rutile + O2. ?Hof = -5269.63 kJ/mol was obtained. So for grossular, pyrope, spessartine, and almandine, as well as their Cp behavior to high temperatures, have all been measured calorimetrically. Uncertainties in older calorimetric studies appear to have been resolved. The standard thermodynamic properties Vo and So are now well determined for all four garnets. In addition, ?Hof for all, except possibly spessartine, also appear to be well known.

  12. Isothermal calorimetric investigation of a reversible reaction in rapidly solidified Fe/sub 40/Fi/sub 40/B/sub 20/

    SciTech Connect

    Cost, J.R.; Elliott, R.O.; Stanley, J.T.

    1983-01-01

    A new method is described for isothermal calorimetric measurement of time-dependent reversible reactions in which the rate of heat flow is small compared to the noise and zero drift of the measurement. Results using this method are presented which measure enthalpy changes associated with reversible phase changes in a rapidly solidified Fe/sub 40/Ni/sub 40/B/sub 20/ alloy.

  13. New calorimetric studies of inorganic fluorine compounds. [Silver uranium fluoride, AgUF/sub 6/; cesium fluoroxysulfate, CsSO/sub 4/F

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hare, P.A.G.; Flotow, H.E.; Appleman, E.H.; Malm, J.G.

    1982-04-01

    In this paper, recently determined enthalpies of formation are presented for two fluorides, silver(I) uranium(V) fluoride, AgUF/sub 6/, and cesium fluoroxysulfate, CsSO/sub 4/F. In addition the derivation of entropy is presented for CsSO/sub 4/F.

  14. Backbone nuclear relaxation characteristics and calorimetric investigation of the human Grb7-SH2/erbB2 peptide complex

    PubMed Central

    Ivancic, Monika; Spuches, Anne M.; Guth, Ethan C.; Daugherty, Margaret A.; Wilcox, Dean E.; Lyons, Barbara A.

    2005-01-01

    Grb7 is a member of the Grb7 family of proteins, which also includes Grb10 and Grb14. All three proteins have been found to be overexpressed in certain cancers and cancer cell lines. In particular, Grb7 (along with the receptor tyrosine kinase erbB2) is overexpressed in 20%–30% of breast cancers. Grb7 binds to erbB2 and may be involved in cell signaling pathways that promote the formation of metastases and inflammatory responses. In a prior study, we reported the solution structure of the Grb7-SH2/erbB2 peptide complex. In this study, T1, T2, and steady-state NOE measurements were performed on the Grb7-SH2 domain, and the backbone relaxation behavior of the domain is discussed with respect to the potential function of an insert region present in all three members of this protein family. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies were completed measuring the thermodynamic parameters of the binding of a 10-residue phosphorylated peptide representative of erbB2 to the SH2 domain. These measurements are compared to calorimetric studies performed on other SH2 domain/phosphorylated peptide complexes available in the literature. PMID:15930003

  15. Calorimetric Low-Temperature Detectors for X-Ray Spectroscopy on Trapped Highly-Charged Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilbourne, Caroline; Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Andrianov, V.; Bleile, A.; Echler, A.; Egelhof, P.; Ilieva, S.; Kilbourne, C.; McCammon, D.

    2012-01-01

    The application of Calorimetric Low-Temperature Detectors (CLTDs) has been proposed at the Heavy-Ion TRAP facility HITRAP which is currently being installed at the Helmholtz Research Center for Heavy Ion Research GSI. This cold ion trap setup will allow the investigation of X-rays from ions practically at rest, for which the excellent energy resolution of CLTDs can be used to its full advantage. However, the relatively low intensities at HITRAP demand larger solid angles and an optimized cryogenic setup. The influence of external magnetic fields has to be taken into account. CLTDs will also be a substantial part of the instrumental equipment at the future Facility for Antiproton and Heavy Ion Research (FAIR), for which a wide variety of high-precision X-ray spectroscopy experiments has been proposed. This contribution will give an overview on the chances and challenges for the application of CLTDs at HITRAP as well as perspectives for future experiments at the FAIR facility.

  16. Elastic and Irreversible Energies of a Two-Stage Martensitic Transformation in NiTi Utilizing Calorimetric Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanba, Asheesh; Hamilton, Reginald F.

    2014-06-01

    Elastic energy and irreversible energy are quantified based on calorimetric measurements. We analyze energetics for each stage of the stress-free, thermally induced two-stage phase transformation A ? R ? B19' in an aged Ni-rich NiTi shape memory alloy. Heating/cooling rates are imposed from 1 K/min up to 100 K/min. We compare energetic analysis after multiple thermal cycles to virgin ( i.e., first-cycle) material. Fundamental thermodynamic formulations are applied from two perspectives: the free energy change d G, and the rate of change of free energy expressed as d G/d f m. Two measures of irreversible contributions are defined: the difference between the forward and reverse transformation heats, and the product of the entropy and the thermal hysteresis. Higher values are determined for the former. For scan rates of 10 K/min and greater, the energetic values become relatively stable. Substantial variations are evident at 1, 5, and 10 K/min. The scan rate impacts the elastic strain energy and irreversible energy of the B19' markedly compared with the R-phase transition. The findings are rationalized considering morphologic changes at the lower scan rates and the impacts on elastic and irreversible energies.

  17. A base-triggerable catanionic mixed lipid system: isothermal titration calorimetric and single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies.

    PubMed

    Tarafdar, Pradip K; Reddy, S Thirupathi; Swamy, Musti J

    2010-11-01

    Lipid-based, base-triggerable systems will be useful for colon specific targeted delivery of drugs and pharmaceuticals. In light of this, a catanionic surfactant system, composed of O-lauroylethanolamine hydrochloride (OLEA·HCl) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), has been designed. The aggregates formed by near equimolar mixtures of OLEA·HCl-SDS have shown lability at basic pH, indicating that the system may be useful for developing colon specific drug delivery system(s). Turbidimetric and isothermal titration calorimetric studies revealed that OLEA·HCl forms a 1:1 (mol/mol) complex with SDS. The three-dimensional structure of the equimolar OLEA-SDS complex has been solved by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Analysis of the molecular packing and intermolecular interactions in the crystal lattice revealed a hydrogen bonding belt in the headgroup region of the complex and dispersion interactions among the acyl chains as the main factors stabilizing the complex. These observations will be useful in understanding specific interactions between lipids in more complex systems, e.g., biomembranes. PMID:20936832

  18. Simultaneous measurements of high-temperature total hemispherical emissivity and thermal conductivity using a steady-state calorimetric technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Tairan; Tan, Peng; Duan, Minghao

    2015-01-01

    A method was developed to simultaneously measure the total hemispherical emissivity and the thermal conductivity of samples at high temperatures. The inverse problem to determine the emissivity and thermal conductivity from steady-state high-temperature calorimetric experiments was established based on models for these two quantities. The accuracy of the inverse solution was numerically analyzed for various noise levels for samples with various thermophysical properties. The simulation results illustrate that the calculation accuracies for the emissivity and thermal conductivity strongly depend on the proportions of the radiation and conduction heat fluxes in the strip sample arising from the temperature distributions in the sample. Steady-state high-temperature experiments with nickel samples were used to experimentally verify the method. The inverse solution results for the emissivity and thermal conductivity calculated from the measured data agree well with reported data in the literature. This research provides a useful reference for measuring the total hemispherical emissivity and thermal conductivity of conductive samples at high temperatures.

  19. Calorimetric and thermomechanical properties of titanium-based orthodontic wires: DSC-DMA relationship to predict the elastic modulus.

    PubMed

    Laino, Giuliana; De Santis, Roberto; Gloria, Antonio; Russo, Teresa; Quintanilla, David Suárez; Laino, Alberto; Martina, Roberto; Nicolais, Luigi; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2012-03-01

    Orthodontic treatment is strongly dependent on the loads developed by metal wires, and the choice of an orthodontic archwire should be based on its mechanical performance. The desire of both orthodontists and engineers would be to predict the mechanical behavior of archwires. To this aim, Gum Metal (Toyota Central R&L Labs., Inc.), TMA (ORMCO), 35°C Copper NiTi (SDS ORMCO), Thermalloy Plus (Rocky Mountain), Nitinol SE (3M Unitek), and NiTi (SDS ORMCO) were tested according to dynamic mechanical analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. A model was also developed to predict the elastic modulus of superelastic wires. Results from experimental tests have highlighted that superelastic wires are very sensitive to temperature variations occurring in the oral environment, while the proposed model seems to be reliable to predict the Young's modulus allowing to correlate calorimetric and mechanical data. Furthermore, Gum Metal wire behaves as an elastic material with a very low Young's modulus, and it can be particularly useful for the initial stage of orthodontic treatments. PMID:21343211

  20. Examination of the calorimetric spectrum to determine the neutrino mass in low-energy electron capture decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, R. G. H.

    2015-03-01

    Background: The standard kinematic method for determining neutrino mass from the ? decay of tritium or other isotope is to measure the shape of the electron spectrum near the endpoint. A similar distortion of the "visible energy" remaining after electron capture is caused by neutrino mass. There has been a resurgence of interest in using this method with 163Ho, driven by technological advances in microcalorimetry. Recent theoretical analyses offer reassurance that there are no significant theoretical uncertainties. Purpose: The theoretical analyses consider only single vacancy states in the daughter 163Dy atom. It is necessary to consider configurations with more than one vacancy that can be populated owing to the change in nuclear charge. Method: The shakeup and shake-off theory of Carlson and Nestor is used as a basis for estimating the population of double-vacancy states. Results: A spectrum of satellites associated with each primary vacancy created by electron capture is presented. Conclusions: The theory of the calorimetric spectrum is more complicated than has been described heretofore. There are numerous shakeup and shake-off satellites present across the spectrum, and some may be very near the endpoint. The spectrum shape is presently not understood well enough to permit a sensitive determination of the neutrino mass in this way.

  1. A Raman spectroscopic and differential scanning calorimetric study of the different crystalline phases of guaiacol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tylli, Henrik; Konschin, Henrik; Tenhu, Heikki

    1990-04-01

    Low-frequency (10-200 cm -1) Raman spectra of two crystalline phases of guaiacol and its deuterated analogues were recorded. The spectra of the two phases ? and ? are completely different in the lattice region, the lattice bands of the low-temperature ? phase being shifted to higher wavenumbers. A factor-group analysis was performed, assuming that the compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2 1/ c with four molecules in the unit cell. The phase transition was studied with differential scanning calorimetry. For slowly cooled samples, two distinct endotherms were detected upon heating, a crystal—crystal transition in the temperature range 250-260 K, and a melting peak at around 303 K. Rapid cooling of liquid samples caused vitrification, and upon heating a second-order phase transition from a glassy to an amorphous state was observed at 205 K. Crystallization was found to begin at 230 K and occurred in two stages. On the basis of the lattice region spectral analysis and the DSC measurements, it seems probable that the phase transition involves both methoxyl group conformational motion and changes in hydrogen-bonding patterns.

  2. Composite bone cements loaded with a bioactive and ferrimagnetic glass-ceramic. Part I: Morphological, mechanical and calorimetric characterization.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Matteo; Miola, Marta; Bretcanu, Oana; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara; Gerbaldo, Roberto; Laviano, Francesco; Verné, Enrica

    2014-02-01

    Hyperthermia is a technique for destroying cancer cells which involves the exposition of body's tissue to a controlled heat, normally between 41? and 46?. It has been reported that ferro- or ferrimagnetic materials can heat locally, if they are placed (after being implanted) under an alternating magnetic field, damaging only tumoral cells and not the healthy ones. The power loss produced by the magnetic materials can be dissipated in the form of heat. This phenomenon has to be regulated in order to obtain a controlled temperature inside the tissues. The material that was produced and characterized in this work is composed of two phases: a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) matrix in which a ferrimagnetic biocompatible/bioactive glass ceramic is dispersed. This composite material is intended to be applied as bone filler for the hyperthermic treatment of bone tumors. The ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic belongs to the system SiO2-Na2O-CaO-P2O5-FeO-Fe2O3 and contains magnetite (FeO*Fe2O3) inside an amorphous bioactive residual phase. The composite material possesses structural, magnetic and bioactivity properties. The structural ones are conferred by PMMA which acts as filler for the bone defect or its damaged area. Bioactivity is conferred by the composition of the residual amorphous phase of the glass-ceramic and magnetic properties are conferred by magnetite crystals embedded in the bioactive glass-ceramic. The characterization involved the following tests: morphological and chemical characterization (scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersion spectrometry-micro computed tomography analysis), calorimetric tests and mechanical test (compression and flexural four point test). In vitro assessment of biological behavior will be the object of the part II of this work. PMID:24505077

  3. Energetics of the binding of phototoxic and cytotoxic plant alkaloid sanguinarine to DNA: Isothermal titration calorimetric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Anupam; Hossain, Maidul; Maiti, Motilal; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2008-10-01

    Sanguinarine is a medically important plant alkaloid with remarkable pharmacological and biological activities. DNA binding is considered to be an important aspect in its mode of action. Isothermal titration calorimetric technique was used for the first time to derive the thermodynamic aspects of the interaction of the phototoxic and cytotoxic plant alkaloid sanguinarine with natural calf thymus DNA and four synthetic DNAs of differing base pair sequences under various environmental conditions The affinity of binding of sanguinarine (iminium form) was found to be in the order of 10 5 M -1 to calf thymus DNA. The binding affinity to calf thymus DNA decreased with increase of ionic strength and temperature. The salt dependence of the binding data showed that release of 0.55 U of the cations per bound alkaloid. The binding of the iminium form was exothermic under all conditions, but the uncharged alkanolamine form showed no binding to DNA. The heat capacity changes obtained from the temperature dependence of enthalpy indicated a value of -140 cal/mol K. Sanguinarine showed high specificity to alternating purine-pyrimidine sequences with affinity of the order 10 6 M -1 and the affinity to the polynucleotides varied in the order poly(dG-dC)·poly(dG-dC) > poly(dA-dT)·poly(dA-dT) > poly(dA)·poly(dT) > poly(dG)·poly(dC). The binding to alternating GC polymer was exothermic and enthalpy driven, to the homo GC polymer was exothermic and favoured by both negative enthalpy and positive entropy changes, to the alternating AT polymer was exothermic and enthalpy driven while to the homo AT polymer was endothermic and entropy driven.

  4. Sanskrit Compound Processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Anil; Mittal, Vipul; Kulkarni, Amba

    Sanskrit is very rich in compound formation. Typically a compound does not code the relation between its components explicitly. To understand the meaning of a compound, it is necessary to identify its components, discover the relations between them and finally generate a paraphrase of the compound. In this paper, we discuss the automatic segmentation and type identification of a compound using simple statistics that results from the manually annotated data.

  5. Electrical properties and conduction mechanism of [C2H5NH3]2CuCl4 compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, C. Ben; Karoui, K.; Jomni, F.; Guidara, K.; Rhaiem, A. Ben

    2015-02-01

    The [(C2H5)NH3]2CuCl4 compound was prepared and characterized by several technique: the X-ray powder diffraction confirms the purity of the synthetized compound, the differential scanning calorimetric show several phase transitions at 236 K, 330 K, 357 K and 371 K, the dialectical properties confirms the ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transition at 238 K, which is reported by V. Kapustianyk et al. (2007) [1]. The two semi-circles observed in the complex impedance identify the presence of the grain interior and grain boundary contributions to the electrical response in this material. The equivalent circuit is modeled by a combination series of two parallel RP-CPE circuits. The temperature dependence of the alternative current conductivity (?g) and direct current conductivity (?dc) confirm the observed transitions in the calorimetric study. The (AC) electrical conduction in [(C2H5)NH3]2CuCl4 was studied by two processes that can be attributed to a hopping transport mechanism: the non-overlapping small polaron tunneling (NSPT) model in phase III and the correlated barrier hopping (CBH) model in phases I, II, IV, V and VI.

  6. THE IRON PROJECT AND THE RMAX PROJECT: Radiative and CollisionalProcesses of Iron Ions - Fe I, Fe II, Fe XVI, Fe XVII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montenegro, Maximiliano; Nahar, Sultana; Pradhan, Anil; Sur, Chiranjib

    2008-05-01

    Results from work in progress under the Iron Project and Rmax Project on electron impact excitation and radiative processes of photo-excitations, photoionization and electron-ion recombination will be reported. Whereas the Iron Project is involved in scattering and radiative atomic processes of iron and iron-peak elements, and the Rmax Project aims particularly at the X-ray spectroscopy of astrophysical objects. We will present (i) collision strengths of Fe II at low energies using an accurate wavefunction needed for spectral analysis of infrared region, (ii) oscillator strengths and radiative decay rates for allowed and forbidden transitions in Fe I and Fe II, (iii) photoionization and electron-ion recombination of ground state of Fe XVI for over a large energy/temperature range up to and including K-shell ionization and core excitations as observed in X-ray spectra, and (iv) photoionization cross sections of large number fine structure levels (n<=10 and 0 <= 10) needed for astrophysical and modeling work. Relativistic approach in the Breit-Pauli approximation is being employed to study these atomic processes.

  7. Dinitroso and polynitroso compounds

    PubMed Central

    Gowenlock, Brian G.; Richter-Addo, George B.

    2005-01-01

    The growing interest in the chemistry of C-nitroso compounds (RN=O; R = alkyl or aryl group) is due in part to the recognition of their participation in various metabolic processes of nitrogen-containing compounds. C-Nitroso compounds have a rich organic chemistry in their own right, displaying interesting intra- and intermolecular dimerization processes and addition reactions with unsaturated compounds. In addition, they have a fascinating coordination chemistry. While most of the attention has been directed towards C-nitroso compounds containing a single –NO moiety, there is an emerging area of research dealing with dinitroso and polynitroso compounds. In this critical review, we present and discuss the synthetic routes and properties of these relatively unexplored dinitroso and polynitroso compounds, and suggest areas of further development involving these compounds. (126 references.) PMID:16100619

  8. Caulking compound poisoning

    MedlinePLUS

    Caulking compounds are substances used to seal cracks and holes around windows and other openings. Caulking compound poisoning occurs when someone swallows these substances. This is for information only and not ...

  9. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  10. Elements & Compounds Atoms (Elements)

    E-print Network

    Frey, Terry

    #12;Elements & Compounds #12;Atoms (Elements) Molecules (Compounds) Cells Elements & Compounds #12;Nucleus Electrons Cloud of negative charge (2 electrons) Fig. 2.5: Simplified model of a Helium (He) Atom He 4.002602 2 Helium Mass Number (~atomic mass) = number of Neutrons + Protons = 4 for Helium Atomic

  11. Identifying the critical point of the weakly first-order itinerant magnet DyCo2 with complementary magnetization and calorimetric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, K.; Dupas, A.; Mudryk, Y.; Pecharsky, V. K.; Gschneidner, K. A.; Caplin, A. D.; Cohen, L. F.

    2013-04-01

    We examine the character of the itinerant magnetic transition of DyCo2 by different calorimetric methods, thereby separating the heat capacity and latent heat contributions to the entropy—allowing direct comparison to other itinerant electron metamagnetic systems. The heat capacity exhibits a large ?-like peak at the ferrimagnetic ordering phase transition, a signature that is remarkably similar to La(Fe,Si)13, where it is attributed to giant spin fluctuations. Using calorimetric measurements, we also determine the point at which the phase transition ceases to be first order: the critical magnetic field, ?0Hcrit = 0.4 ± 0.1 T and temperature Tcrit = 138.5 ± 0.5 K, and we compare these values to those obtained from analysis of magnetization by application of the Shimizu inequality for itinerant electron metamagnetism. Good agreement is found between these independent measurements, thus establishing the phase diagram and critical point with some confidence. In addition, we find that the often-used Banerjee criterion may not be suitable for determination of first order behavior in itinerant magnet systems.

  12. Thermodynamic properties of illite, smectite and beidellite by calorimetric methods: Enthalpies of formation, heat capacities, entropies and Gibbs free energies of formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailhanou, H.; Blanc, P.; Rogez, J.; Mikaelian, G.; Kawaji, H.; Olives, J.; Amouric, M.; Denoyel, R.; Bourrelly, S.; Montouillout, V.; Vieillard, P.; Fialips, C. I.; Michau, N.; Gaucher, E. C.

    2012-07-01

    The thermodynamic properties of three aluminous 2:1 clay minerals were acquired at 1.013 bars and at temperatures between 5 and 500 K using various calorimetric methods. Calorimetric measurements were performed on hydrated and dehydrated <2 ?m clay fractions of smectite MX-80 (Wyoming), illite IMt-2 (Silver Hill) and beidellite SBId-1 (Black Jack Mine). After purification, the mineralogical analyses gave the following structural formulae: NaKCa(SiAl)(AlMgFe0.1733+Fe0.0352+)O(OH)2,KNa(SiAl)(AlMgFe0.2923+Fe0.0842+)O(OH)2 and CaK(SiAl)(AlMgFe0.1123+)O(OH)2 for smectite MX-80, illite IMt-2 and beidellite SBId-1, respectively. Heat capacities were measured by low temperature adiabatic calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry, from 5 to 500 K. Standard enthalpies of formation were obtained from solution-reaction calorimetry at 298.15 K. The standard Gibbs free energies of formation of the clay minerals were also calculated, together with the equilibrium constants at 25 °C, for anhydrous and hydrated minerals. A comparison between these experimental data and estimated values obtained from prediction models available in the literature, enabled the calculation method that appears to be the most relevant to be selected, at least for aluminous 2:1 clay minerals.

  13. Calorimetric system and method

    DOEpatents

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A. (Ames, IA); Pecharsky, Vitalij K. (Ames, IA); Moorman, Jack O. (Boone, IA)

    1998-09-15

    Apparatus for measuring heat capacity of a sample where a series of measurements are taken in succession comprises a sample holder in which a sample to be measured is disposed, a temperature sensor and sample heater for providing a heat pulse thermally connected to the sample, and an adiabatic heat shield in which the sample holder is positioned and including an electrical heater. An electrical power supply device provides an electrical power output to the sample heater to generate a heat pulse. The electrical power from a power source to the heat shield heater is adjusted by a control device, if necessary, from one measurement to the next in response to a sample temperature-versus-time change determined before and after a previous heat pulse to provide a subsequent sample temperature-versus-time change that is substantially linear before and after the subsequent heat pulse. A temperature sensor is used and operable over a range of temperatures ranging from approximately 3K to 350K depending upon the refrigerant used. The sample optionally can be subjected to dc magnetic fields such as from 0 to 12 Tesla (0 to 120 kOe).

  14. Calorimetric system and method

    DOEpatents

    Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.; Pecharsky, V.K.; Moorman, J.O.

    1998-09-15

    Apparatus is described for measuring heat capacity of a sample where a series of measurements are taken in succession comprises a sample holder in which a sample to be measured is disposed, a temperature sensor and sample heater for providing a heat pulse thermally connected to the sample, and an adiabatic heat shield in which the sample holder is positioned and including an electrical heater. An electrical power supply device provides an electrical power output to the sample heater to generate a heat pulse. The electrical power from a power source to the heat shield heater is adjusted by a control device, if necessary, from one measurement to the next in response to a sample temperature-versus-time change determined before and after a previous heat pulse to provide a subsequent sample temperature-versus-time change that is substantially linear before and after the subsequent heat pulse. A temperature sensor is used and operable over a range of temperatures ranging from approximately 3K to 350K depending upon the refrigerant used. The sample optionally can be subjected to dc magnetic fields such as from 0 to 12 Tesla (0 to 120 kOe). 18 figs.

  15. Micromechanical calorimetric sensor

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN); Doktycz, Mitchel J. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01

    A calorimeter sensor apparatus is developed utilizing microcantilevered spring elements for detecting thermal changes within a sample containing biomolecules which undergo chemical and biochemical reactions. The spring element includes a bimaterial layer of chemicals on a coated region on at least one surface of the microcantilever. The chemicals generate a differential thermal stress across the surface upon reaction of the chemicals with an analyte or biomolecules within the sample due to the heat of chemical reactions in the sample placed on the coated region. The thermal stress across the spring element surface creates mechanical bending of the microcantilever. The spring element has a low thermal mass to allow detection and measuring of heat transfers associated with chemical and biochemical reactions within a sample placed on or near the coated region. A second surface may have a different material, or the second surface and body of microcantilever may be of an inert composition. The differential thermal stress between the surfaces of the microcantilever create bending of the cantilever. Deflections of the cantilever are detected by a variety of detection techniques. The microcantilever may be approximately 1 to 200 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. A sensitivity for detection of deflections is in the range of 0.01 nanometers. The microcantilever is extremely sensitive to thermal changes in samples as small as 30 microliters.

  16. Identification of polyphenolic compounds in the flesh of Argan (Morocco) fruits.

    PubMed

    Khallouki, Farid; Haubner, Roswitha; Ricarte, Irvila; Erben, Gerhard; Klika, Karel; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Owen, Robert W

    2015-07-15

    High performance liquid chromatography coupled with negative electrospray ionization (HPLC-ESI) along with fragmentation patterns generated by nano-electrospray ionization (nano-ESI-MS-MS) and NMR techniques were utilized for the identification of phenolic compounds in Argan fruits. A total of 15.4g/kg was determined represented by catechins (39%), flavonoids (28%), procyanidins (26%), free phenolic acids (6%) and phenolic acid glycosides (1%). Twenty-one phenolic compounds were identified for the first time in Argan fruits namely III. epicatechin-(4??8)-catechin dimer (procyanidin B1), IV. p-coumaric acid glycoside, VI. epicatechin-(4??8)-epicatechin dimer (procyanidin B2), VIII. caffeic acid glycoside, XIX. epicatechin-(4??8)-epicatechin-(4??8)-epicatechin trimer (procyanidin C1), X. p-hydroxybenzaldehyde XI. ferulic acid glycoside, XII. vanillic acid, XIII. sinapic acid glycoside, XVI. p-coumaric acid, XVII. ferulic acid, XVIII. sinapic acid, XIX. rutin pentoside, XX. quercetin glycopentoside, XXI. 4,4'-dihydroxy-3,3'-imino-di-benzoic acid, XXV. quercetin-3-O-rhamnogalactoside, XXVII. quercetin glycohydroxybenzoate, XXVIII. quercetin glycocaffeate, XXIX. quercetin glycosinapate, XXX. quercetin glycoferulate and XXXI. quercetin glycocoumarate. PMID:25722154

  17. The Bayer Facts of Science Education XVI: US STEM Workforce Shortage— Myth or Reality? Fortune 1000 Talent Recruiters on the Debate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer Corporation

    2014-10-01

    A major debate is currently underway in the USA about whether there is, in fact, a science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workforce shortage in the country or not. This is the subject of the Bayer Facts of Science Education XVI: US STEM Workforce Shortage—Myth or Reality? Fortune 1000 Talent Recruiters on the Debate. An ongoing public opinion research project commissioned by Bayer Corporation, the Bayer Facts surveys examine US STEM education, diversity and workforce issues. The 16th in the series, the newest survey asks talent recruiters at some of the country's largest employers—those included in the Fortune 1000—to weigh in on current and future demand for new hires with 2- and 4-year STEM degrees. As professionals responsible for scouting, recruiting and hiring talent at Fortune 1000 companies, both STEM and non-STEM alike, these individuals are on the frontlines, tasked with assessing and filling their companies' workforce needs. The survey asks the recruiters whether new hires with 2- and 4-year STEM degrees are as, more or less in demand than their peers without STEM degrees? Are more new STEM jobs being created at their companies than non-STEM jobs? Can they find adequate numbers of qualified candidates in a timely manner and how fierce is the competition for STEM degree holders? To answer these and other questions, the survey polled 150 talent recruiters at Fortune 1000 companies, both STEM and non-STEM alike. The survey also asks the recruiters about diversion in STEM, workforce diversity in the pipeline, the role of community colleges in developing the STEM pipeline and the desired skills and competencies of new hires.

  18. Combinatorial materials research applied to the development of new surface coatings XVI: fouling-release properties of amphiphilic polysiloxane coatings.

    PubMed

    Stafslien, Shane J; Christianson, David; Daniels, Justin; VanderWal, Lyndsi; Chernykh, Andrey; Chisholm, Bret J

    2015-02-01

    High-throughput methods were used to prepare and characterize the fouling-release (FR) properties of an array of amphiphilic polysiloxane-based coatings possessing systematic variations in composition. The coatings were derived from a silanol-terminated polydimethylsiloxane, a silanol-terminated polytrifluorpropylmethylsiloxane (CF3-PDMS), 2-[methoxy(polyethyleneoxy)propyl]-trimethoxysilane (TMS-PEG), methyltriacetoxysilane and hexamethyldisilazane-treated fumed silica. The variables investigated were the concentration of TMS-PEG and the concentration of CF3-PDMS. In general, it was found that the TMS-PEG and the CF3-PDMS had a synergist effect on FR properties with these properties being enhanced by combining both compounds into the coating formulations. In addition, reattached adult barnacles removed from coatings possessing both TMS-PEG and relatively high levels of CF3-PDMS displayed atypical base-plate morphologies. The majority of the barnacles removed from these coatings exhibited a cupped or domed base-plate as compared to the flat base-plate observed for the control coating that did not contain TMS-PEG or CF3-PDMS. Coating surface analysis using water contact angle measurements indicated that the presence of CF3-PDMS facilitated migration of TMS-PEG to the coating/air interface during the film formation/curing process. In general, coatings containing both TMS-PEG and relatively high levels of CF3-PDMS possessed excellent FR properties. PMID:25647177

  19. Calorimetric, X-Ray Diffraction, and Spectroscopic Studies of the Thermotropic Phase Behavior and Organization of Tetramyristoyl Cardiolipin Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Ruthven N. A. H.; Zweytick, Dagmar; Pabst, Georg; Lohner, Karl; McElhaney, Ronald N.

    2007-01-01

    The thermotropic phase behavior and organization of aqueous dispersions of the quadruple-chained, anionic phospholipid tetramyristoyl diphosphatidylglycerol or tetramyristoyl cardiolipin (TMCL) was studied by differential scanning calorimetry, x-ray diffraction, 31P NMR, and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. At physiological pH and ionic strength, our calorimetric studies indicate that fully equilibrated aqueous dispersions of TMCL exhibit two thermotropic phase transitions upon heating. The lower temperature transition is much less cooperative but of relatively high enthalpy and exhibits marked cooling hysteresis, whereas the higher temperature transition is much more cooperative and also exhibits a relatively high enthalpy but with no appreciable cooling hysteresis. Also, the properties of these two-phase transitions are sensitive to the ionic strength of the dispersing buffer. Our spectroscopic and x-ray diffraction data indicate that the lower temperature transition corresponds to a lamellar subgel (Lc?) to gel (L?) phase transition and the higher temperature endotherm to a L? to lamellar liquid-crystalline (L?) phase transition. At the Lc?/L? phase transition, there is a fivefold increase of the thickness of the interlamellar aqueous space from ?11 Å to ?50 Å, and this value decreases slightly at the L?/L? phase transition. The bilayer thickness (i.e., the mean phosphate-phosphate distance across the bilayer) increases from 42.8 Å to 43.5 Å at the Lc?/L? phase transition, consistent with the loss of the hydrocarbon chain tilt of ?12°, and decreases to 37.8 Å at the L?/L? phase transition. The calculated cross-sectional areas of the TMCL molecules are ?79 Å2 and ?83 Å2 in the Lc? and L? phases, respectively, and we estimate a value of ?100 Å2 in the L? phase. The combination of x-ray and FTIR spectroscopic data indicate that in the Lc? phase, TMCL molecules possess tilted all-trans hydrocarbon chains packed into an orthorhombic subcell in which the zig-zag planes of the chains are parallel, while in the L? phase the untilted, all-trans hydrocarbon chains possess rotational mobility and are packed into a hexagonal subcell, as are the conformationally disordered hydrocarbon chains in the L? phase. Our FTIR spectroscopic results demonstrate that the four carbonyl groups of the TMCL molecule become progressively more hydrated as one proceeds from the Lc? to the L? and then to the L? phase, while the two phosphate moieties of the polar headgroup are comparably well hydrated in all three phases. Our 31P-NMR results indicate that although the polar headgroup retains some mobility in the Lc? phase, its motion is much more restricted in the L? and especially in the L? phase than that of other phospholipids. We can explain most of our experimental results on the basis of the relatively small size of the polar headgroup of TMCL relative to other phospholipids and the covalent attachment of the two phosphate moieties to a single glycerol moiety, which results in a partially immobilized polar headgroup that is more exposed to the solvent than in other glycerophospholipids. Finally, we discuss the biological relevance of the unique properties of TMCL to the structure and function of cardiolipin-containing biological membranes. PMID:17293402

  20. XAFS Model Compound Library

    DOE Data Explorer

    Newville, Matthew

    The XAFS Model Compound Library contains XAFS data on model compounds. The term "model" compounds refers to compounds of homogeneous and well-known crystallographic or molecular structure. Each data file in this library has an associated atoms.inp file that can be converted to a feff.inp file using the program ATOMS. (See the related Searchable Atoms.inp Archive at http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/adb/) This Library exists because XAFS data on model compounds is useful for several reasons, including comparing to unknown data for "fingerprinting" and testing calculations and analysis methods. The collection here is currently limited, but is growing. The focus to date has been on inorganic compounds and minerals of interest to the geochemical community. [Copied, with editing, from http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/ModelLib/

  1. Preparation of uranium compounds

    DOEpatents

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Montreal, Marisa J; Thomson, Robert K; Cantat, Thibault; Travia, Nicholas E

    2013-02-19

    UI.sub.3(1,4-dioxane).sub.1.5 and UI.sub.4(1,4-dioxane).sub.2, were synthesized in high yield by reacting turnings of elemental uranium with iodine dissolved in 1,4-dioxane under mild conditions. These molecular compounds of uranium are thermally stable and excellent precursor materials for synthesizing other molecular compounds of uranium including alkoxide, amide, organometallic, and halide compounds.

  2. A Search for Low-Mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles Using Voltage-Assisted Calorimetric Ionization Detection in the SuperCDMS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hertel, S. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Martinez, C.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Moore, D. C.; Nadeau, P.; Nelson, R. H.; Page, K.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redi, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, Richard; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2014-01-27

    SuperCDMS is an experiment designed to directly detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored candidate for dark matter ubiquitous in the Universe. In this Letter, we present WIMP-search results using a calorimetric technique we call CDMSlite, which relies on voltage-assisted Luke-Neganov amplification of the ionization energy deposited by particle interactions. The data were collected with a single 0.6 kg germanium detector running for ten live days at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. A low energy threshold of (electron equivalent) was obtained, which allows us to constrain new WIMP-nucleon spin-independent parameter space for WIMP masses below 6 GeV/c^2.

  3. Ringed-Carbon Compounds

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    WGBH Educational Foundation

    2007-02-12

    In this interactive activity adapted from NOVA, learn about alkaloids and steroids, both examples of compounds with carbon rings. Short videos with interviews,animations, and photographs are featured.

  4. MANUFACTURE OF LIMONOID COMPOUNDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present invention relates to methods for manufacturing limonoid compounds. The invention provides methods for isolating limonoid A-ring lactone acid salts, limonoid glycoside monocarboxylic acids, limonoid glycoside dicarboxylic acids, limonoid glycoside monocarboxylic acid salts, and limonoid ...

  5. Heart testing compound

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN)

    1985-01-01

    The compound 15-(p-[.sup.125 I]-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

  6. Heart testing compound

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Goodman, M.M.

    1983-06-29

    The compound 15-(p-(/sup 125/I)-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

  7. Chemistry of peroxide compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volnov, I. I.

    1981-01-01

    The history of Soviet research from 1866 to 1967 on peroxide compounds is reviewed. This research dealt mainly with peroxide kinetics, reactivity and characteristics, peroxide production processes, and more recently with superoxides and ozonides and emphasis on the higher oxides of group 1 and 2 elements. Solid state fluidized bed synthesis and production of high purity products based on the relative solubilities of the initial, intermediate, and final compounds and elements in liquid ammonia are discussed.

  8. Hydrides of intermetallic compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Oesterreicher

    1981-01-01

    s  Aspects of the progress over the recent years on hydrides of intermetallic compounds are reviewed with emphasis on structure,\\u000a stability, solid-state properties, catalysis, and kinetics. Some new routes to an understanding of hydride phenomenology are\\u000a indicated. Generally speaking hydrides represent but one special aspect of intermetallic compounds. They are, however, unique\\u000a as model systems for questions concerning the stability of

  9. Phenolic Molding Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Koji; Charles, Ted; de Keyser, Hendrik

    Phenolic Molding Compounds continue to exhibit well balanced properties such as heat resistance, chemical resistance, dimensional stability, and creep resistance. They are widely applied in electrical, appliance, small engine, commutator, and automotive applications. As the focus of the automotive industry is weight reduction for greater fuel efficiency, phenolic molding compounds become appealing alternatives to metals. Current market volumes and trends, formulation components and its impact on properties, and a review of common manufacturing methods are presented. Molding processes as well as unique advanced techniques such as high temperature molding, live sprue, and injection/compression technique provide additional benefits in improving the performance characterisitics of phenolic molding compounds. Of special interest are descriptions of some of the latest innovations in automotive components, such as the phenolic intake manifold and valve block for dual clutch transmissions. The chapter also characterizes the most recent developments in new materials, including long glass phenolic molding compounds and carbon fiber reinforced phenolic molding compounds exhibiting a 10-20-fold increase in Charpy impact strength when compared to short fiber filled materials. The role of fatigue testing and fatigue fracture behavior presents some insight into long-term reliability and durability of glass-filled phenolic molding compounds. A section on new technology outlines the important factors to consider in modeling phenolic parts by finite element analysis and flow simulation.

  10. Improving ITC studies of cyclodextrin inclusion compounds by global analysis of conventional and non-conventional experiments

    PubMed Central

    Bertaut, Eléonore

    2014-01-01

    Summary The study of 1:1 cyclodextrin inclusion compounds by isothermal titration calorimetry was explored in a theoretical and experimental point of view to compare the efficiency of conventional and non-conventional experiments. All direct and competitive protocols were described and evaluated in terms of accuracy on both binding constant and inclusion enthalpy. Significant improvement in the calorimetric characterization may be obtained by means of the global analysis of non-conventional experiments coupled to the standard titration protocol. While the titration-release approach proved to be the most accurate strategy for classical complexations, the valuable contribution of other non-conventional experiments was demonstrated for issues concerning weak stability, enthalpy, or solubility. PMID:25550724

  11. Metalloid compounds as drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sekhon, B. S.

    2013-01-01

    The six elements commonly known as metalloids are boron, silicon, germanium, arsenic, antimony, and tellurium. Metalloid containing compounds have been used as antiprotozoal drugs. Boron-based drugs, the benzoxaboroles have been exploited as potential treatments for neglected tropical diseases. Arsenic has been used as a medicinal agent and arsphenamine was the main drug used to treat syphilis. Arsenic trioxide has been approved for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Pentavalent antimonials have been the recommended drug for visceral leishmaniasis and cutaneous leishmaniasis. Tellurium (IV) compounds may have important roles in thiol redox biological activity in the human body, and ammonium trichloro (dioxoethylene-O, O’-)tellurate (AS101) may be a promising agent for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Organosilicon compounds have been shown to be effective in vitro multidrug-resistance reverting agents. PMID:24019824

  12. PREFACE: Sensors & their Applications XVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyriacou, Panicos; O'Riordan, Alan

    2011-08-01

    This volume records the Proceedings of the sixteenth conference in the biennial Sensors and Their Applications series which took place at the Clarion Hotel, Cork, Ireland between 12-14 September 2011. The conference is organized by the Instrument Science and Technology Group of the Institute of Physics. On this occasion, the conference was hosted by Tyndall National Institute at University College Cork. This year the conference returns to Ireland, having last been held in Limerick in 2003. The conference proceedings record the continuing growth of the sensors community nationally and internationally. The conferences bring together contributions from scientists and engineers from academia, research institutes and industrial establishments, and therefore provide an excellent opportunity for these communities to present and discuss the latest results in the field of sensors, instrumentation and measurement. Amongst the more traditional themes, such as optical sensing, there is growth in new areas such as biomedical sensing and instrumentation, and nanosensing, which is reflected in this volume. Similarly the contribution of modelling and simulation techniques in sensor and instrumentation design and their applications is acknowledged by a session in this area. The sessions across the conference are supported by notable contributions from invited speakers. We would like to thank all of our colleagues in the sensor and instrumentation community who have supported this event by contributing manuscripts. Our thanks also go to Tyndall National Institute for hosting this conference and all the sponsors who, with their generous financial and in-kind contributions, enabled the better organization of this conference. We would also like to thank all the members of the Instrument Science and Technology Group for their support, and in particular for refereeing the submitted manuscripts. We are also pleased to express our thanks to the Conference Department of the Institute of Physics for their invaluable support in organising this event. We are especially grateful to Dawn Stewart for her responsive and efficient day-to-day handling of this event, as well as to Claire Garland for her planning and management of this event. We hope that the conference authors, participants and a wider audience will find these proceedings to be of interest and to serve as a useful reference text. Panicos KyriacouConference ChairmanAlan O'RiordanConference Local Chairman

  13. CHAPTER XVI TUNICATES AND LANCELETS

    E-print Network

    to the vertebrates and are included with them in the phYlum Chordata to which the higher animals, InclUding man, belong. In modern classifications they are given the rank vf a subphylum of the Chordata. They are

  14. Electrical properties, phase transitions and conduction mechanisms of the [(C2H5)NH3]2CdCl4 compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, C. Ben; Karoui, K.; Saidi, S.; Guidara, K.; Rhaiem, A. Ben

    2014-10-01

    The [(C2H5)NH3]2CdCl4 hybrid material was prepared and its calorimetric study and electric properties were investigated at low temperature. The X-ray powder diffractogram has shown that the compound is crystallized in the orthorhombic system with Abma space group, and the refined unit cell parameters are a=7.546 Å, b=7.443 Å, and c=21.831 Å. The calorimetric study has revealed two endothermic peaks at 216 K and 357 K, which are confirmed by the variation of fp and ?dc as a function of temperature. The equivalent circuit based on the Z-View-software was proposed and the conduction mechanisms were determined. The obtained results have been discussed in terms of the correlated barrier hopping model (CBH) in phase I (low temperature (OLT)), non-overlapping small polaron tunneling model (NSPT) in phase II (room temperature (ORT)) and the overlapping large polaron tunneling model in phase III (high temperature (OHT)). The density of localized states NF(E) at the Fermi level and the binding energy Wm were calculated. The variation of the dielectric loss log(??) with log(?) was found to follow the empirical law, ??=B ?m(T).

  15. Electromagnetic and calorimetric measurements for AC losses of a YBa2Cu3O7-? coated conductor with Ni-alloy substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, D. N.; Sastry, P. V. P. S. S.; Knoll, D. C.; Schwartz, J.

    2006-10-01

    The AC losses of a rolling-assisted-biaxially-textured-substrate (RABiTS™) processed YBa2Cu3O7-? (YBCO) coated conductor (Goyal et al 1996 Appl. Supercond. 4 403-27) with Ni-alloy substrate and Cu stabilizer were measured at 77 K by both calorimetric (CM) and electromagnetic (EM) methods. In the CM method, improvements in the measurement were observed when a Cernox temperature sensor was used to measure the temperature rise on the sample instead of a differential thermocouple. The effect of heat transferred from current leads was taken into account to improve the accuracy of the CM results. In the EM method, the magnetization losses of the sample in a perpendicular applied field were measured by an in-plane pick-up coil. The calculation of the calibration factor C of the pick-up coil is discussed. Good agreement between AC loss results obtained from the CM and EM methods confirmed the validity of our measurements and calculations.

  16. A chip-calorimetric approach to the analysis of Ag nanoparticle caused inhibition and inactivation of beads-grown bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Tom; Mühling, Martin; Wolf, Antje; Mariana, Frida; Maskow, Thomas; Mertens, Florian; Neu, Thomas R; Lerchner, Johannes

    2013-11-01

    With the increasing complexity of model systems for the investigation of antibacterial effects of nanoparticles, the demands on appropriate analysis methods are rising. In case of biofilms grown on small particles, the high inhomogeneity of the samples represents a major challenge for traditional biofilm analysis. For this purpose, we developed a new calorimetric method which allows non-invasive and real-time investigation of the effects of nanoparticles on beads-grown biofilms which meets the requirements for an increased sample throughput. The method employs a newly developed chip calorimeter that is able to detect changes in the metabolic activity of biofilm samples within minutes. Using this novel device, the antibacterial effect of silver nanoparticles on Pseudomonas putida biofilms grown on agarose beads was investigated. The superparamagnetic properties of the embedded particles within the agarose beads allow an automated sample throughput. Growth inhibition and inactivation effects of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on biofilm bacteria were quantified by analyzing the metabolic heat production rate. As a result, a concentration dependent manner of growth inhibition and inactivation was found demonstrating the suitability and sensitivity of the methodology. PMID:23968644

  17. Fun with Ionic Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logerwell, Mollianne G.; Sterling, Donna R.

    2007-01-01

    Ionic bonding is a fundamental topic in high school chemistry, yet it continues to be a concept that students struggle to understand. Even if they understand atomic structure and ion formation, it can be difficult for students to visualize how ions fit together to form compounds. This article describes several engaging activities that help…

  18. Aminopropyl thiophene compounds

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN); Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1990-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals useful in brain imaging comprising radiohalogenated thienylethylamine derivatives. The compounds are 5-halo-thiophene-2-isopropyl amines able to cross the blood-brain barrier and be retained for a sufficient length of time to allow the evaluation of regional blood flow by radioimaging of the brain.

  19. Compound floating pivot micromechanisms

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-04-24

    A new class of tilting micromechanical mechanisms have been developed. These new mechanisms use compound floating pivot structures to attain far greater tilt angles than are practical using other micromechanical techniques. The new mechanisms are also capable of bi-directional tilt about multiple axes.

  20. 8-fluoropurine compounds

    DOEpatents

    Barrio, Jorge R. (Agoura Hills, CA); Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar (Los Angeles, CA); Namavari, Mohammad (Los Angeles, CA); Phelps, Michael E. (Encino, CA)

    2001-01-01

    An efficient, regiocontrolled approach to the synthesis of 8-fluoropurines by direct fluorination of purines with dilute elemental fluorine, or acetyl hypofluorite, is provided. In a preferred embodiment, a purine compound is dissolved in a polar solvent and reacted with a dilute mixture of F.sub.2 in He or other inert gas.

  1. Tagging Classical Sanskrit Compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brendan S. Gillon

    2009-01-01

    The paper sets out a prima facie case for the claim that the classification of Sanskrit compounds in P??inian tradition can be retrieved from a very slight\\u000a augmentation of the usual enriched context free rules.

  2. A compound parabolic concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Manrique, J.A.

    1984-05-01

    A compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) for solar energy applications is presented in this work. A prototype was built and its thermal performance was determined. Operating temperatures of the order of 150 /sup 0/C with a reasonable efficiency can be attained by means of a fixed CPC.

  3. Compound semiconductor radiation detectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan Owens; A. Peacock

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the potential benefits of using compound semiconductors for the detection of X- and ?-ray radiation. While Si and Ge have become detection standards for energy dispersive spectroscopy in the laboratory, their use for an increasing range of applications is becoming marginalized by one or more of their physical limitations; namely the need for ancillary cooling systems or bulky

  4. PERSISTENT PERFLUORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have gained notoriety in the recent past. Global distribution of PFCs in wildlife, environmental samples and humans has sparked a recent increase in new investigations concerning PFCs. Historically PFCs have been used in a wide variety of consume...

  5. Resultative Verb Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Claudia

    1990-01-01

    Demonstrates that structure and interpretation of Resultative Verb Compound (RVC) in the field of Chinese linguistics is neither indiosyncratic nor pragmatically determined as suggested in an earlier study. Rather, RCV formation and interpretation is determined by semantic features of verbs, and these features determine the well-formedness and…

  6. Compound Chondrules fused Cold

    E-print Network

    Hubbard, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    About 4-5% of chondrules are compound: two separate chondrules stuck together. This is commonly believed to be the result of the two component chondrules having collided shortly after forming, while still molten. This allows high velocity impacts to result in sticking. However, at T ~ 1100K, the temperature below which chondrules collide as solids (and hence usually bounce), coalescence times for droplets of appropriate composition are measured in tens of seconds. Even at 1025K, at which temperature theory predicts that the chondrules must have collided extremely slowly to have stuck together, the coalescence time scale is still less than an hour. These coalescence time scales are too short for the collision of molten chondrules to explain the observed frequency of compound chondrules. We suggest instead a scenario where chondrules stuck together in slow collisions while fully solid; and the resulting chondrule pair was subsequently briefly heated to a temperature in the range of 900-1025K. In that temperatur...

  7. Immunomodulating compounds in Basidiomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Masashi; Nishitani, Yosuke

    2013-01-01

    Mushrooms are distinguished as important food containing immunomodulating and anticancer agents. These compounds belong mostly to polysaccharides especially ?-d-glucans. Among them, ?-1,3-glucan with side chain ?-1,6-glucose residues have more important roles in immunomodulating and antitumor activities. In this review, we have introduced polysaccharide mainly from Lentinula edodes and Agaricus blazei Murill with immunomodulating and antitumor activities. In addition, the mechanism of activation of immune response and signal cascade are also reviewed. PMID:23704809

  8. Immunomodulating compounds in Basidiomycetes.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Masashi; Nishitani, Yosuke

    2013-05-01

    Mushrooms are distinguished as important food containing immunomodulating and anticancer agents. These compounds belong mostly to polysaccharides especially ?-d-glucans. Among them, ?-1,3-glucan with side chain ?-1,6-glucose residues have more important roles in immunomodulating and antitumor activities. In this review, we have introduced polysaccharide mainly from Lentinula edodes and Agaricus blazei Murill with immunomodulating and antitumor activities. In addition, the mechanism of activation of immune response and signal cascade are also reviewed. PMID:23704809

  9. Compound library management.

    PubMed

    Chan, James A; Hueso-Rodríguez, Juan A

    2002-01-01

    The increasing size of the collections used for drug-discovery purposes has demanded both hardware and software automation of compound management in order to cope with the increasing demands of HTS. Splitting the collection into a number of copies in different formats is a desirable approach to keep a balance between rapid response to the demands and best storage conditions. Flexibility to different assay configurations can be provided with the appropriate selection of liquid handlers, and the informatic management systems should be accessible to keep track of the samples and link them to a variety of information that can help interpret HTS data. In this respect, QC data on the compounds and quality checks of the equipment used are highly desirable. It is also prudent for a large organization with different research sites to have a unified database and compatible plate format and concentration in order to be able to exchange samples and share screening results. The accomplishment of all the previous requirements is the only way to ensure an efficient and effective compound library management. PMID:12029818

  10. Antifungal compounds from cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Shishido, Tânia K; Humisto, Anu; Jokela, Jouni; Liu, Liwei; Wahlsten, Matti; Tamrakar, Anisha; Fewer, David P; Permi, Perttu; Andreote, Ana P D; Fiore, Marli F; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes found in a range of environments. They are infamous for the production of toxins, as well as bioactive compounds, which exhibit anticancer, antimicrobial and protease inhibition activities. Cyanobacteria produce a broad range of antifungals belonging to structural classes, such as peptides, polyketides and alkaloids. Here, we tested cyanobacteria from a wide variety of environments for antifungal activity. The potent antifungal macrolide scytophycin was detected in Anabaena sp. HAN21/1, Anabaena cf. cylindrica PH133, Nostoc sp. HAN11/1 and Scytonema sp. HAN3/2. To our knowledge, this is the first description of Anabaena strains that produce scytophycins. We detected antifungal glycolipopeptide hassallidin production in Anabaena spp. BIR JV1 and HAN7/1 and in Nostoc spp. 6sf Calc and CENA 219. These strains were isolated from brackish and freshwater samples collected in Brazil, the Czech Republic and Finland. In addition, three cyanobacterial strains, Fischerella sp. CENA 298, Scytonema hofmanni PCC 7110 and Nostoc sp. N107.3, produced unidentified antifungal compounds that warrant further characterization. Interestingly, all of the strains shown to produce antifungal compounds in this study belong to Nostocales or Stigonematales cyanobacterial orders. PMID:25871291

  11. Compound semiconductor SPAD arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Eric S.; Naydenkov, Mikhail; Hyland, James T.

    2013-06-01

    Single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) are revolutionizing ultra-sensitive photodetection applications, providing single photon sensitivity, high quantum efficiency and low dark noise at or near room temperature. When aggregated into arrays, these devices have demonstrated the ability to operate as photon number resolving detectors with wide dynamic range, or as single-photon imaging detectors. SPAD array performance has reached a point where replacing vacuum tube based MCP and PMT photodetectors for most applications is inevitable. Compound semiconductor SPAD arrays offer the unique proposition to tailor performance to match application specific wavelength, speed and radiation hardness requirements. We present a theoretical framework describing performance limits to compound semiconductor SPAD arrays and our latest experimental results detailing the performance of GaAs SPAD arrays. These devices achieve nanosecond rise and fall times, excellent photon number resolving capability, and low dark count rates. Single photon number resolving is demonstrated with 4% single photon detection efficiency at room temperature with dark count rates below 7 Mcps/mm2. Compound semiconductor SPAD arrays have the opportunity to provide orders of magnitude improvement in dark count rate and radiation hardness over silicon SPAD arrays, as well as the ability to detect wavelengths where silicon is blind.

  12. Special Risks of Pharmacy Compounding

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Consumer Updates RSS Feed The Special Risks of Pharmacy Compounding Search the Consumer Updates Section Get Consumer ... page: A Troubling Trend What You Can Do Pharmacy compounding is a practice in which a licensed ...

  13. Dielectric, calorimetric and elastic anomalies associated with the first order [Formula: see text] phase transition in (Ca, Sr)TiO(3) perovskites.

    PubMed

    Manchado, J; Romero, F J; Gallardo, M C; Del Cerro, J; Darling, T W; Taylor, P A; Buckley, A; Carpenter, M A

    2009-07-22

    Conduction calorimetry has been used to determine with high precision the latent heat and variation in heat capacity which accompany the first order [Formula: see text] phase transition in perovskites with compositions (Ca(1-x)Sr(x))TiO(3), x = 0.65, 0.68, 0.74 (CST65, CST68, CST74). In CST65 (CST68), the latent heat is dissipated/absorbed over a temperature interval of ?11 K (?6 K), which is centred on ?292 K (?258 K) during cooling and ?302 K (?270 K) during heating. The magnitude of the latent heat diminishes with increasing SrTiO(3) content and was not detected in CST74. Integration of the latent heat and excess heat capacity yields small excess entropies, which are consistent with the structural changes being displacive rather than order-disorder in origin. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy measurements on the same CST65 sample as used for dielectric and calorimetric measurements through the same temperature intervals have allowed quantitative correlations to be made with the bulk modulus, shear modulus and acoustic dissipation parameter, Q(-1). The dielectric anomaly and changes in Q(-1) can be understood as being linear combinations of the properties of the separate I4/mcm and Pbcm phases in proportion to their volume fractions across the two-phase field. A change of only ?0.5-1 GPa has been detected in the bulk modulus but the shear modulus softens by ?5-8 GPa as the transition interval is approached from above and below. This shear mode softening presumably reflects clustering and/or phonon softening in both the I4/mcm and Pbcm structures. This pattern of structure-property relations could be typical of first order transitions in perovskites where there is no group/subgroup relationship between the high and low symmetry phases. PMID:21828539

  14. Phenolic compounds in Catharanthus roseus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Natali Rianika Mustafa; Robert Verpoorte

    2007-01-01

    Besides alkaloids Catharanthus roseus produces a wide spectrum of phenolic compounds, this includes C6C1 compounds such as 2,3-dihydoxybenzoic acid, as well as\\u000a phenylpropanoids such as cinnamic acid derivatives, flavonoids and anthocyanins. The occurrence of these compounds in C. roseus is reviewed as well as their biosynthesis and the regulation of the pathways. Both types of compounds compete with the indole

  15. Offset Compound Gear Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Mark A.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Lewicki, David G.

    2010-01-01

    The Offset Compound Gear Drive is an in-line, discrete, two-speed device utilizing a special offset compound gear that has both an internal tooth configuration on the input end and external tooth configuration on the output end, thus allowing it to mesh in series, simultaneously, with both a smaller external tooth input gear and a larger internal tooth output gear. This unique geometry and offset axis permits the compound gear to mesh with the smaller diameter input gear and the larger diameter output gear, both of which are on the same central, or primary, centerline. This configuration results in a compact in-line reduction gear set consisting of fewer gears and bearings than a conventional planetary gear train. Switching between the two output ratios is accomplished through a main control clutch and sprag. Power flow to the above is transmitted through concentric power paths. Low-speed operation is accomplished in two meshes. For the purpose of illustrating the low-speed output operation, the following example pitch diameters are given. A 5.0 pitch diameter (PD) input gear to 7.50 PD (internal tooth) intermediate gear (0.667 reduction mesh), and a 7.50 PD (external tooth) intermediate gear to a 10.00 PD output gear (0.750 reduction mesh). Note that it is not required that the intermediate gears on the offset axis be of the same diameter. For this example, the resultant low-speed ratio is 2:1 (output speed = 0.500; product of stage one 0.667 reduction and stage two 0.750 stage reduction). The design is not restricted to the example pitch diameters, or output ratio. From the output gear, power is transmitted through a hollow drive shaft, which, in turn, drives a sprag during which time the main clutch is disengaged.

  16. Carcinogenic effect of nickel compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Haitian Lu; Xianglin Shi; Max Costa; Chuanshu Huang

    2005-01-01

    Nickel is a widely distributed metal that is industrially applied in many forms. Accumulated epidemiological evidence confirms that exposures to nickel compounds are associated with increased nasal and lung cancer incidence, both in mostly occupational exposures. Although the molecular mechanisms by which nickel compounds cause cancer are still under intense investigation, the carcinogenic actions of nickel compounds are thought to

  17. Titanium alkoxide compound

    DOEpatents

    Boyle, Timothy J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-08-14

    A titanium alkoxide composition is provided, as represented by the chemical formula (OC.sub.6H.sub.5N).sub.2Ti(OC.sub.6H.sub.5NH.sub.2).sub.2. As prepared, the compound is a crystalline substance with a hexavalent titanium atom bonded to two OC.sub.6H.sub.5NH.sub.2 groups and two OC.sub.6H.sub.5N groups with a theoretical molecular weight of 480.38, comprising 60.01% C, 5.04% H and 11.66% N.

  18. Transition Metal Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomskii, Daniel I.

    2014-10-01

    1. Localised and itinerant electrons in solids; 2. Isolated transition metal ions; 3. Transition metal ions in crystals; 4. Mott–Hubbard vc charge-transfer insulators; 5. Exchange interaction and magnetic structures; 6. Cooperative Jahn–Teller effect and orbital ordering; 7. Charge ordering in transition metal compounds; 8. Ferroelectrics, magnetoelectrics and multiferroics; 9. Doping of correlated systems and correlated metals; 10. Metal-insulator transitions; 11. Kondoeffect, mixed valence and heavy fermions; Appendix A. Some historical notes; Appendix B. A layman's guide to second quantization; Appendix C. Phase transitions and free energy expansion: Landau theory in a nutshell.

  19. Boronated porphyrin compounds

    DOEpatents

    Kahl, Stephen B. (Portola Valley, CA); Koo, Myoung-Seo (San Francisco, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A compound is described having the structure ##STR1## where R preferably is ##STR2## and most preferably R.sup.3 is a closo-carborane and R.sup.2 is --H, an alkyl or aryl having 1 to about 7 carbon atoms, This invention was made with Government support under NIH Grant No. CA-37961 awarded by the Department of Health and Human Services and under the Associated Universities Inc. Contract No. De-AC02-76CH00016 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The Government has rights in this invention.

  20. The use of selective extraction chromatographic columns as an alternative to solvent extraction for the separation of uranium followed by the use of Arsenazo III as a calorimetric reagent for uranium determination

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.J.; Del Mastro, J.R.

    1994-10-01

    The use of U/TEVA{reg_sign} Spec columns as an alternative to solvent extraction for separation of uranium prior to its determination by various techniques (calorimetric, phosphorescence, and mass spectroscopy) was investigated. U/TEVA{reg_sign} Spec columns have several advantages over the widely used 4-methyl-2-pentanone solvent extraction method. Among the advantages are: (1) no hazardous liquid organic waste, that creates regulatory waste disposal problems, is generated; (2) a clean separation of U from Zr, F, and fission products is obtained; (3) the sample preparation time is reduced; and (4) the exposure of analysts to ionizing radiation is reduced because the entire procedure may be performed in a hot cell using remote operations. This study also investigated the use of Arsenazo III (1,8-dihydroxynapthalene-3,6-disulfonic acid-2,7-bis [<-azo-2>-phenylarsonic acid]) as a calorimetric reagent to determine uranium concentrations over a wide range in waste streams and product streams at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Process and waste stream samples were passed through a U/TEVA{reg_sign} Spec column to selectively remove the uranium. The uranium bearing fraction is compatible with the pH range for color development with Arsenazo III. Arsenazo III may be added to the uranium fraction, at a 3:1 mole ratio (Arsenazo:Uranium) at the high end of the method (10 {mu}/mL). Arsenazo III forms a highly stable complex with uranium. Stability tests from this and other studies show that the colored complex of Arsenazo III with U(VI) forms within one minute and remains stable for several hours. The complex with U(VI) varies in color with pH. However, with excess reagent, the color is varying shades of purple. Since the samples were passed through a highly selective extraction chromatographic column prior to adding the calorimetric reagent, no interferences were observed.

  1. Semivolatile Organic Compounds (SVOCs) Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are a group of compounds that includes some

    E-print Network

    Iglesia, Enrique

    for years indoors, akin to persistent organic pollutants in the outdoor environment (POPs). Many SVOCs alterSemivolatile Organic Compounds (SVOCs) Background Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs products, and additives to materials such as vinyl flooring, furniture, clothing, cookware, food packaging

  2. Using Raman spectroscopy to understand the origin of the phase transitions observed in [(C3H7)4N]2Zn2Cl6 compound.

    PubMed

    Ben Gzaiel, M; Oueslati, A; Chaabane, I; Bulou, A; Hlel, F; Gargouri, M

    2015-06-15

    Phase transitions of the centrosymmetric compound, [(C3H7)4N]2Zn2Cl6, were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and dielectric measurements. Two reversible order-disorder and displacive phase transitions are observed at T1=327K and T2=347K with 3K and 4K hysteresis respectively, indicating a first order character. The evolution of Raman line shifts, "?", and the half-width, "??", versus temperature show some singularities associated with the transitions, suggesting that they are governed by the reorientational and the displacement of the organic part. Besides the results of the dielectric permittivity study confirms the conclusion drawn from the calorimetric and Raman measurements that the phase transition located in the vicinity of the temperature of the dielectric proprieties is characterized by change of dynamical state of cation. PMID:25782180

  3. Turbo compound engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, H.

    1988-05-24

    A turbo compound engine having a first exhaust turbine coupled to an exhaust pipe of an internal combustion engine and a second exhaust turbine coupled to an exhaust port of the first exhaust turbine is described comprising: a first generator drivable by the first exhaust turbine; a second generator drivable by the second exhaust turbine; a motor operatively coupled to an output shaft of the internal combustion engine; speed detecting means for detecting the speed of rotation of the internal combustion engine; and control means for controlling the frequency of electric power, which is the sum of electric power outputs from the first and second generators and supplied to the motor, based on a signal from the speed detecting means, in order to control operation of the motor.

  4. Thermodynamics of organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammon, B. E.; Smith, N. K.

    1982-11-01

    This research program consisted of an integrated and interrelated effort of basic and applied research in chemical thermodynamics and thermochemistry. Knowledge of variation of physical and thermodynamic properties with molecular structure was used to select compounds for study that because of high ring strain or unusual steric effects may have good energy characteristics per unit volume or per unit mass and thus be useful in the synthesis of high energy fuels. These materials were synthesized, and their thermodynamic properties were evaluated. In cooperation with researcher at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, ramjet fuels currently in use were subjected to careful thermodynamic evaluation by measurements of heat capacity, enthalpy of combustion and vapor pressure. During the last year of this effort, seven kerosene-type fuels produced by British Petroleum and seven jet fuels produced from shale oil were studied.

  5. Microoptical telescope compound eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duparré, Jacques W.; Schreiber, Peter; Matthes, André; Pshenay–Severin, Ekaterina; Bräuer, Andreas; Tünnermann, Andreas; Völkel, Reinhard; Eisner, Martin; Scharf, Toralf

    2005-02-01

    A new optical concept for compact digital image acquisition devices with large field of view is developed and proofed experimentally. Archetypes for the imaging system are compound eyes of small insects and the Gabor Superlens. A paraxial 3x3 matrix formalism is used to describe the telescope arrangement of three microlens arrays with different pitch to find first order parameters of the imaging system. A 2mm thin imaging system with 21x3 channels, 70ºx10º field of view and 4.5mm x 0.5mm image size is optimized and analyzed using sequential and non sequential raytracing and fabricated by microoptics technology. Anamorphic lenses, where the parameters are a function of the considered optical channel, are used to achieve a homogeneous optical performance over the whole field of view. Captured images are presented and compared to simulation results.

  6. Dioxin and Related Compounds

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1994-01-01

    This substantial new site, provided by the Environmental Protection Agency's National Center for Environmental Assessment, addresses the mechanism of Dioxin contamination and describes NCEA's Dioxin Reassessment efforts. The site provides full descriptions and molecular graphics of "Dioxins and related compounds" (Furans, PCB's), as well as EPA Summaries on Dioxin exposure, Dioxin risk, and dose response. The Dioxin Exposure Initiative seeks to quantitatively link dioxin sources to general population exposures using "source measurements, environmental media and national food surveys, and fate and transport modeling." Further links to EPA Regulations and EPA Analytical Methods round out the site. Note that many of the documents at the site are available in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) or WordPerfect format.

  7. Calorimetric Insight into Coupling between Functionalized Primary Alkyl Halide and Vinylic Organocuprate Reagent: Experimental Determination of Reaction Enthalpies in the Synthesis of (R)-Ethyl 3-(tert-butyldimethylsilyloxy)hex-5-enoate - a Key Lactonized Statin Side Chain Precursor.

    PubMed

    Casar, Zdenko; Tramšek, Marko; Goršek, Andreja

    2010-03-01

    The first calorimetric study of coupling between organocuprate, derived from Grignard reagent (vinyl magnesium chloride), and primary alkyl halide (e.g. (S)-ethyl 3-(tert-butyldimethylsilyloxy)-4-iodobutanoate) has been conducted. This transformation is paramountly important for efficient preparation of (R)-ethyl 3-(tert-butyldimethylsilyloxy)hex-5-enoate - a key lactonized statin side chain precursor. The results obtained give thorough calorimetric insight into this complex low-temperature synthesis as well as a new understanding of the suggested reductive elimination of the final intermediates in the coupling reaction. Namely, the surprising unexpected spontaneous three-step exothermal event has been observed during controlled progressive heating of the mixture of the final intermediates to the room temperature. This phenomenon confirms that coupling between functionalized primary alkyl halide and vinylic organocuprate reagent is not a simple SN2 substitution reaction. The presented study provides among others the first reported values of reaction enthalpies and corresponding adiabatic temperature rises of reaction mixture for all exothermic events that occurred in the (R)-ethyl 3-(tert-butyldimethylsilyloxy)hex-5-enoate synthesis. The obtained results ensure consequential thermal process safety knowledge which can be incorporated into safe process scale-up as well as design of reactor system with sufficient cooling capacity for industrial production of (R)-ethyl 3-(tert-butyldimethylsilyloxy)hex-5-enoate. Moreover, the results provide a basic guidance for other organocuprate coupling reaction systems. PMID:24061657

  8. Bioactive compounds from Rumex plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heng-Xing Liang; Huan-Qin Dai; Hai-An Fu; Xiao-Ping Dong; Abiodun Humphrey Adebayo; Li-Xin Zhang; Yong-Xian Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Two new naphthalene acylglucosides, rumexneposides A (1) and B (2), together with 12 known compounds (3-14), were isolated from the roots of Rumex nepalensis. Their structures were established by chemical and spectroscopic methods. The biological activities of compounds 1-14 as well as an additional 11 compounds previously isolated from R. nepalensis and Rumex hastatus (15–25) were evaluated against Mycobacterium tuberculosis,

  9. Method of preparing metallocene compounds

    DOEpatents

    Rosenblum, Myron (Lexington, MA); Matchett, Stephen A. (Lisle, IL)

    1992-01-01

    This invention describes a novel method of preparing metallocene compounds. The invention is based on synthesis of novel bis cyclopentadienides that, under appropriate conditions, will either encapsulate a transition metal to produce a metallocene such as ferrocene, or ferrocene derivative, or will yield a polymeric metallocene. Compounds produced by this process are useful as catalysts in propulsion systems, or as anti-knock compounds in gasolines.

  10. Biomedical Compounds from Marine organisms

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Rajeev Kumar; Zi-rong, Xu

    2004-01-01

    The Ocean, which is called the ‘mother of origin of life’, is also the source of structurally unique natural products that are mainly accumulated in living organisms. Several of these compounds show pharmacological activities and are helpful for the invention and discovery of bioactive compounds, primarily for deadly diseases like cancer, acquired immuno-deficiency syndrome (AIDS), arthritis, etc., while other compounds have been developed as analgesics or to treat inflammation, etc. The life-saving drugs are mainly found abundantly in microorganisms, algae and invertebrates, while they are scarce in vertebrates. Modern technologies have opened vast areas of research for the extraction of biomedical compounds from oceans and seas.

  11. ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN FISSION REACTORS. II. THORIO-ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1960-01-01

    The advantages of the use of organic liquids in fission reactors to ; minmize corrosion and pressure problems were studied relative to the solution of ; thorium in such fluids. Thorio-organic compounds were prepared from organic ; acids, diketones, and other chelating compounds. Salts of carboxylic and phospho-; organic acids were insoluble. The chelate with dibenzoylmethane was soluble in ;

  12. Compound power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.R.

    1991-02-05

    This patent describes a compound motor for a vehicle. It comprises: an engine defining therein a chamber for the combustion of fuel, an intake passage leading to the combustion chamber and an exhaust passage leading from the combustion chamber; a drive shaft extending from the engine; means in the engine for rotating the drive shaft in response to the combustion of fuel in the chamber; a rotary compressor at the entry end of the intake passage; a turbine at the exit end of the exhaust passage, the turbine being drivable by exhaust gases from the combustion chamber; means for selectively transferring rotational motion of the turbine to the compressor, the transferring means including a clutch for mechanically connecting or disconnecting the compressor from the turbine; a planetary gear set having a sun gear member, a ring gear member surrounding the sun gear member, a planet gear member rotatable about its own axis and meshed between the sun gear member and the ring gear member, and a planet carrier member upon which the planet gear member is mounted for revolution about the sun gear member; a gear train between one of the members of the planetary gear set and the turbine; another one of the members of the planetary gear set being driven by the shaft extending from the engine; and a final output shaft driven by a third member of the planetary gear set.

  13. Micro-machined calorimetric biosensors

    DOEpatents

    Doktycz, Mitchel J. (Knoxville, TN); Britton, Jr., Charles L. (Alcoa, TN); Smith, Stephen F. (Loudon, TN); Oden, Patrick I. (Plano, TX); Bryan, William L. (Knoxville, TN); Moore, James A. (Powell, TN); Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN); Warmack, Robert J. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for detecting and monitoring micro-volumetric enthalpic changes caused by molecular reactions. Micro-machining techniques are used to create very small thermally isolated masses incorporating temperature-sensitive circuitry. The thermally isolated masses are provided with a molecular layer or coating, and the temperature-sensitive circuitry provides an indication when the molecules of the coating are involved in an enthalpic reaction. The thermally isolated masses may be provided singly or in arrays and, in the latter case, the molecular coatings may differ to provide qualitative and/or quantitative assays of a substance.

  14. ATMOSPHERIC FREONS AND HALOGENATED COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient levels of atmospheric Freons, halogenated hydrocarbons, and SF6 were measured at various locations in the U.S.A. Compounds such as CCl3F, CCl2F2, CH3-CCl3, and CCl4 were ubiquitious and generally measured at sub ppb levels. Tropospherically reactive compounds such as C2Cl...

  15. Bilingual Reading of Compound Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ko, In Yeong; Wang, Min; Kim, Say Young

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated whether bilingual readers activate constituents of compound words in one language while processing compound words in the other language via decomposition. Two experiments using a lexical decision task were conducted with adult Korean-English bilingual readers. In Experiment 1, the lexical decision of real English…

  16. Macrocyclic compounds as corrosion inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Quraishi, M.A.; Rawat, J.; Ajmal, M. [Aligarh Muslim Univ., Uttar Pradesh (India)

    1998-12-01

    The influence of three macrocyclic compounds on corrosion of mild steel (MS) in hydrochloric acid (HCl) was investigated using weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, alternating current (AC) impedance, and hydrogen permeation techniques. All the investigated compounds showed significant efficiencies and reduced permeation of hydrogen through MS in HCl. Inhibition efficiency (IE) varied with the nature and concentrations of the inhibitors, temperature, and concentrations of the acid solutions. The addition of iodide ions (I{sup {minus}}) increased IE of all the tested compounds as a result of the synergistic effect. Potentiodynamic polarization results revealed that macrocyclic compounds acted as mixed inhibitors in 1 M HCl to 5 M HCl. Adsorption on the metal surface obeyed Temkin`s adsorption isotherm. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) of the polished MS surface, exposed with tetraphenyldithia-octaazacyclotetradeca-hexaene (PTAT) proved adsorption of this compound on the surface through nitrogen and sulfur atoms.

  17. Devices for collecting chemical compounds

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R; Groenewold, Gary S

    2013-12-24

    A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from a fixed surface so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

  18. Antiparasitic Compounds That Target DNA

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, W. David; Tanious, Farial A.; Mathis, Amanda; Tevis, Denise; Hall, James Edwin; Boykin, David W.

    2008-01-01

    Designed, synthetic heterocyclic diamidines have excellent activity against eukaryotic parasites that cause diseases such as sleeping sickness and leishmania and adversely affect millions of people each year. The most active compounds bind specifically and strongly in the DNA minor groove at AT sequences. The compounds enter parasite cells rapidly and appear first in the kinetoplast that contains the mitochondrial DNA of the parasite. With time the compounds are also generally seen in the cell nucleus but are not significantly observed in the cytoplasm. The kinetoplast decays over time and disappears from the mitochondria of treated cells. At this point the compounds begin to be observed in other regions of the cell, such as the acidocalcisomes. The cells typically die in 24–48 hours after treatment. Active compounds appear to selectively target extended AT sequences and induce changes in kinetoplast DNA minicircles that cause a synergistic destruction of the catenated kinetoplast DNA network and cell death. PMID:18343228

  19. Effect of Cholesterol and Ergosterol on the Compressibility and Volume Fluctuations of Phospholipid-Sterol Bilayers in the Critical Point Region: A Molecular Acoustic and Calorimetric Study

    PubMed Central

    Krivanek, Roland; Okoro, Linus; Winter, Roland

    2008-01-01

    Although sterol-phospholipid interactions have been of interest for many years now, a complete thermodynamic profile of these systems is still missing. To contribute to a better understanding of the thermodynamic functions of these systems, we determined isothermal compressibility coefficient data for dipalmitoylphosphocholine (DPPC) and DPPC-containing cholesterol and ergosterol vesicles by means of molecular acoustics (ultrasound velocimetry and densimetry) and differential scanning and pressure perturbation calorimetric techniques. A particular focus was on the influence of the differential structural properties of the two sterols on the thermodynamic properties of lipid bilayers, and on the nature of the critical point region of phospholipid-sterol systems by determining thermodynamic fluctuation parameters. Contrary to significant changes in conformational and dynamical properties of the DPPC-sterol membranes, no marked differences were found in the various thermodynamic properties studied, including the adiabatic (\\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\beta}_{{\\mathrm{S}}}^{{\\mathrm{lipid}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}) and isothermal (\\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\beta}_{{\\mathrm{T}}}^{{\\mathrm{lipid}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}) compressibility, as well as the volume fluctuations. Differences in \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\beta}_{{\\mathrm{T}}}^{{\\mathrm{lipid}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} and \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\beta}_{{\\mathrm{S}}}^{{\\mathrm{lipid}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} become dramatic in the gel-fluid transition region only, due to a significant degree of slow relaxational processes in the microsecond time range in the transition region. Our data show no evidence for the existence of a typical critical point phenomenon in the concentration and temperature range where a critical point in the DPPC-sterol phase diagram is expected to appear. Hence, on a macroscopic level, it seems more appropriate to describe the sterol-phospholipid binary mixtures in the liquid-ordered/liquid-disordered coexistence region as a phase region consisting essentially of small nanodomains only. Such small-domain dimensions, with a series of particular properties such as increased line energy, spontaneous curvature, and limited lifetime, seem also to be typical of raftlike domains in cell membranes. PMID:18199673

  20. Membrane rejection of nitrogen compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S.; Lueptow, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    Rejection characteristics of nitrogen compounds were examined for reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, and low-pressure reverse osmosis membranes. The rejection of nitrogen compounds is explained by integrating experimental results with calculations using the extended Nernst-Planck model coupled with a steric hindrance model. The molecular weight and chemical structure of nitrogen compounds appear to be less important in determining rejection than electrostatic properties. The rejection is greatest when the Donnan potential exceeds 0.05 V or when the ratio of the solute radius to the pore radius is greater than 0.8. The transport of solute in the pore is dominated by diffusion, although convective transport is significant for organic nitrogen compounds. Electromigration contributes negligibly to the overall solute transport in the membrane. Urea, a small organic compound, has lower rejection than ionic compounds such as ammonium, nitrate, and nitrite, indicating the critical role of electrostatic interaction in rejection. This suggests that better treatment efficiency for organic nitrogen compounds can be obtained after ammonification of urea.

  1. Polishing compound for plastic surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Stowell, M.S.

    1995-08-22

    A polishing compound for plastic surfaces is disclosed. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains fine particles silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{trademark}, LEXAN{trademark}, LUCITE{trademark}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired. 5 figs.

  2. Polishing compound for plastic surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Stowell, Michael S. (New Ellenton, SC)

    1995-01-01

    A polishing compound for plastic surfaces. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains fine particles silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS.TM., LEXAN.TM., LUCITE.TM., polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

  3. Hypersensitivity to mercuric fluorescein compounds.

    PubMed

    Barranco Sanz, P; Martín Muñoz, F; López Serrano, C; Martín Esteban, M; Ojeda Casas, J A

    1989-01-01

    The mercurial compounds are known to be a common cause of allergic contact dermatitis. Immediate hypersensitivity is rarely induced by mercurial organic derivatives. However, none of the published cases showed both immediate and delayed hypersensitivity as was the case of one of our two patients. A boy and a woman experienced urticaria and anaphylaxis, respectively after topical application of Merchromine (Merbromine). We were able to demonstrate immediate hypersensitivity in both patients to mercuric fluorescein compounds by skin test and histamine liberation. In addition, the child but not the woman, showed delayed hypersensitivity to mercurial compounds. PMID:2479247

  4. Polishing compound for plastic surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Stowell, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    A polishing compound for plastic surfaces is disclosed. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains colloidal silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{sup TM}, LEXAN{sup TM}, LUCITE{sup TM}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

  5. Compound curvature laser window development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhoff, Vincent G.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has developed and implemented a unique process for forming flawless compound curvature laser windows. These windows represent a major part of specialized, nonintrusive laser data acquisition systems used in a variety of compressor and turbine research test facilities. This report summarizes the main aspects of compound curvature laser window development. It is an overview of the methodology and the peculiarities associated with the formulation of these windows. Included in this discussion is new information regarding procedures for compound curvature laser window development.

  6. Arene complexes of transition metals in reactions with nucleophilic reagents. XVI. Kinetics and mechanism of the reaction of the. pi. -arene complexes of chromium and iron and piperidine

    SciTech Connect

    Oleinik, I.I.; Kun, P.P.; Litvak, V.V.; Shteingarts, V.D.

    1988-05-20

    The kinetics of the reaction of ..pi..-arene complexes of the (/eta/-XC/sub 6/H/sub 4/Cl)ML type (where ML = Cr(CO)/sub 3/ (X = p-Cl), Cr/sup +/(/eta/-C/sub 6/H/sub 5/Cl) (X = H), Fe/sup +/(/eta/-C/sub 5/H/sub 5/) (X = H)) with piperidine in acetone suggest that in the second and third cases the controlling stage is the transformation of the intermediate sigma complex into the reaction products almost entirely by a path with catalysis by the reagent while in the first case it is the formation of the intermediate. The marked increase in the catalytic effect of piperidine in the transition from neutral to cationic ..pi..-arene complexes show that the charge of the metal-complex fragment, coordinated with the arene, has a significant effect on the ratio of the rates of transformation of the intermediate sigma complex into the initial compounds and the final reaction products.

  7. Routes to Novel Azo compounds 

    E-print Network

    Iannarelli, Paul M.

    Routes to novel heterocyclic azo compounds and components of use as potential inkjet dyes were investigated. A new route to fluorenones from biphenyl acid chlorides using FVP (Flash Vacuum Pyrolysis) has been discovered. ...

  8. Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

    1996-01-01

    A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chloated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis.

  9. Nitric Oxide-Releasing Compounds

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The five WebWare Molecules for December derive from the article Nitrogen-Based Diazeniumdiolates: Versatile Nitric Oxide-Releasing Compounds for Biomedical Research and Potential Clinical Applications by Joseph E. Saavedra and Larry K. Keefer.

  10. Photochemical dimerization of organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, Robert H. (Bethany, CT); Brown, Stephen H. (Princeton, NJ); Muedas, Cesar A. (New Haven, CT); Ferguson, Richard R. (Branford, CT)

    1992-01-01

    At least one of selectivity and reaction rate of photosensitized vapor phase dimerizations, including dehydrodimerizations, hydrodimerizations and cross-dimerizations of saturated and unsaturated organic compounds is improved by conducting the dimerization in the presence of hydrogen or nitrous oxide.

  11. Polishing compound for plastic surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Stowell, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    This invention is comprised of a polishing compound for plastic materials. The compound includes approximately by approximately by weight 25 to 80 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 12 parts mineral spirits, 50 to 155 parts abrasive paste, and 15 to 60 parts water. Preferably, the compound includes approximately 37 to 42 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, up to 8 parts mineral spirits, 95 to 110 parts abrasive paste, and 50 to 55 parts water. The proportions of the ingredients are varied in accordance with the particular application. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{trademark}, LEXAN{trademark}, LUCITE{trademark}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

  12. Crystallographic properties of fertilizer compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, A.W.; Dillard, E.F.; Thrasher, R.D.; Waerstad, K.R.; Hunter, S.R.; Kohler, J.J.; Scheib, R.M.

    1991-02-01

    This bulletin is a compilation of crystallographic data collected at NFERC on 450 fertilizer-related compounds. In TVA's fertilizer R and D program, petrographic examination, XRD, and infrared spectroscopy are combined with conventional chemical analysis methods in identifying the individual compounds that occur in fertilizer materials. This handbook brings together the results of these characterization studies and supplemental crystallographic data from the literature. It is in one-compound-per-page, loose-leaf format, ordered alphabetically by IUPAC name. Indexes provided include IUPAC name, formula, group, alternate formula, synonyms, x-ray data, optical data. Tables are given for solids, compounds in commercial MAP and DAP, and matrix materials in phosphate rock.

  13. Volatile Organic Compounds in Uremia

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Luzia; Slodzinski, Rafael; Jankowski, Joachim; Zidek, Walter; Westhoff, Timm H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although “uremic fetor” has long been felt to be diagnostic of renal failure, the compounds exhaled in uremia remain largely unknown so far. The present work investigates whether breath analysis by ion mobility spectrometry can be used for the identification of volatile organic compounds retained in uremia. Methods Breath analysis was performed in 28 adults with an eGFR ?60 ml/min per 1.73 m2, 26 adults with chronic renal failure corresponding to an eGFR of 10–59 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and 28 adults with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) before and after a hemodialysis session. Breath analysis was performed by ion mobility spectrometryafter gas-chromatographic preseparation. Identification of the compounds of interest was performed by thermal desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Results Breath analyses revealed significant differences in the spectra of patients with and without renal failure. Thirteen compounds were chosen for further evaluation. Some compounds including hydroxyacetone, 3-hydroxy-2-butanone and ammonia accumulated with decreasing renal function and were eliminated by dialysis. The concentrations of these compounds allowed a significant differentiation between healthy, chronic renal failure with an eGFR of 10–59 ml/min, and ESRD (p<0.05 each). Other compounds including 4-heptanal, 4-heptanone, and 2-heptanone preferentially or exclusively occurred in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Conclusion Impairment of renal function induces a characteristic fingerprint of volatile compounds in the breath. The technique of ion mobility spectrometry can be used for the identification of lipophilic uremic retention molecules. PMID:23049998

  14. Aza compounds as anion receptors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, H.S.; Yang, X.Q.; McBreen, J.

    1998-01-06

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of Li{sup +} ion in alkali metal batteries. 3 figs.

  15. Aza compounds as anion receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hung Sui (East Setauket, NY); Yang, Xiao-Qing (Port Jefferson Station, NY); McBreen, James (Bellport, NY)

    1998-01-06

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of Li.sup.+ ion in alkali metal batteries.

  16. Miniature curved artificial compound eyes

    PubMed Central

    Floreano, Dario; Pericet-Camara, Ramon; Viollet, Stéphane; Ruffier, Franck; Brückner, Andreas; Leitel, Robert; Buss, Wolfgang; Menouni, Mohsine; Expert, Fabien; Juston, Raphaël; Dobrzynski, Michal Karol; L’Eplattenier, Geraud; Recktenwald, Fabian; Mallot, Hanspeter A.; Franceschini, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    In most animal species, vision is mediated by compound eyes, which offer lower resolution than vertebrate single-lens eyes, but significantly larger fields of view with negligible distortion and spherical aberration, as well as high temporal resolution in a tiny package. Compound eyes are ideally suited for fast panoramic motion perception. Engineering a miniature artificial compound eye is challenging because it requires accurate alignment of photoreceptive and optical components on a curved surface. Here, we describe a unique design method for biomimetic compound eyes featuring a panoramic, undistorted field of view in a very thin package. The design consists of three planar layers of separately produced arrays, namely, a microlens array, a neuromorphic photodetector array, and a flexible printed circuit board that are stacked, cut, and curved to produce a mechanically flexible imager. Following this method, we have prototyped and characterized an artificial compound eye bearing a hemispherical field of view with embedded and programmable low-power signal processing, high temporal resolution, and local adaptation to illumination. The prototyped artificial compound eye possesses several characteristics similar to the eye of the fruit fly Drosophila and other arthropod species. This design method opens up additional vistas for a broad range of applications in which wide field motion detection is at a premium, such as collision-free navigation of terrestrial and aerospace vehicles, and for the experimental testing of insect vision theories. PMID:23690574

  17. Miniature curved artificial compound eyes.

    PubMed

    Floreano, Dario; Pericet-Camara, Ramon; Viollet, Stéphane; Ruffier, Franck; Brückner, Andreas; Leitel, Robert; Buss, Wolfgang; Menouni, Mohsine; Expert, Fabien; Juston, Raphaël; Dobrzynski, Michal Karol; L'Eplattenier, Geraud; Recktenwald, Fabian; Mallot, Hanspeter A; Franceschini, Nicolas

    2013-06-01

    In most animal species, vision is mediated by compound eyes, which offer lower resolution than vertebrate single-lens eyes, but significantly larger fields of view with negligible distortion and spherical aberration, as well as high temporal resolution in a tiny package. Compound eyes are ideally suited for fast panoramic motion perception. Engineering a miniature artificial compound eye is challenging because it requires accurate alignment of photoreceptive and optical components on a curved surface. Here, we describe a unique design method for biomimetic compound eyes featuring a panoramic, undistorted field of view in a very thin package. The design consists of three planar layers of separately produced arrays, namely, a microlens array, a neuromorphic photodetector array, and a flexible printed circuit board that are stacked, cut, and curved to produce a mechanically flexible imager. Following this method, we have prototyped and characterized an artificial compound eye bearing a hemispherical field of view with embedded and programmable low-power signal processing, high temporal resolution, and local adaptation to illumination. The prototyped artificial compound eye possesses several characteristics similar to the eye of the fruit fly Drosophila and other arthropod species. This design method opens up additional vistas for a broad range of applications in which wide field motion detection is at a premium, such as collision-free navigation of terrestrial and aerospace vehicles, and for the experimental testing of insect vision theories. PMID:23690574

  18. Low-temperature heat capacity of diopside glass (CaMgSi2O6): A calorimetric test of the configurational-entropy theory applied to the viscosity of liquid silicates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richet, P.; Robie, R.A.; Hemingway, B.S.

    1986-01-01

    Heat-capacity measurements have been made between 8 and 370 K on an annealed and a rapidly quenched diopside glass. Between 15 and 200 K, Cp does not depend significantly on the thermal history of the glass. Below 15 K Cp is larger for the quenched than for the annealed specimen. The opposite is true above 200 K as a result of what is interpreted as a secondary relaxation around room temperature. The magnitude of these effects, however, is small enough that the relative entropies S(298)-S(0) of the glasses differ by only 0.5 J/mol K, i.e., a figure within the combined experimental uncertainties. The insensitivity of relative entropies to thermal history supports the assumption that the configurational heat capacity of the liquid may be taken as the heat capacity difference between the liquid and the glass (??Cp). Furthermore, this insensitivity allows calculation of the residual entropies at 0 K of diopside glasses as a function of the fictive temperature from the entropy of fusion of diopside and the heat capacities of the crystalline, glassy and liquid phases. For a glass with a fictive temperature of 1005 K, for example, this calorimetric residual entropy is 24.3 ?? 3 J/mol K, in agreement with the prediction made by RICHET (1984) from an analysis of the viscosity data with the configurational-entropy theory of relaxation processes of Adam and Gibbs (1965). In turn, all the viscosity measurements for liquid diopside, which span the range 0.5-4?? 1013 poise, can be quantitatively reproduced through this theory with the calorimetrically determined entropies and ??Cp data. Finally, the unclear significance of "activation energies" for structural interpretations of viscosity data is emphasized, and the importance of ??Cp and glass-transition temperature systematics for determining the composition and temperature dependences of the viscosity is pointed out. ?? 1986.

  19. Blue Photoluminescence From Silacyclobutene Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernisz, Udo

    1999-04-01

    Organosilicon compounds in which the Si atom is bound to an aromatic moiety such as a phenyl group, exhibit strong blue photoluminescence when excited with UV light (for example at a wavelength of 337 nm). This phenomenon was investigated quantitatively at room temperature and at the temperature of liquid nitrogen (78 K) by measuring the emission and excitation spectra of the total luminescence, and of the phosphorescence, for a silacyclobutene compound in which two phenyl groups are joined across the C=C double bond of the ring. The effect of a series of organic substituents on the Si atom was investigated as well as the time dependence of the phosphorescence intensity decay for this class of materials. A tentative model of the energy levels in this compound is proposed. The observation of visible blue emission -- in contrast to photoluminescence in the UV from the aromatic groups -- is explained by the Si-C bond lowering the energy of the molecular orbitals, an effect that is currently under study for a range of Si-containing compounds. Synthesis of the silacyclobutene compounds was performed at the laboratory of Prof. N. Auner, now at J.W. Goethe Universität, Frankfurt, Germany. His contributions, and those of his collaborators, to the work reported here are gratefully acknowledged.

  20. Associative asymmetry of compound words.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Jeremy B; Boulton, Kathy L; Gagné, Christina L

    2014-07-01

    Early verbal-memory researchers assumed participants represent memory of a pair of unrelated items with 2 independent, separately modifiable, directional associations. However, memory for pairs of unrelated words (A-B) exhibits associative symmetry: a near-perfect correlation between accuracy on forward (A ??) and backward (?? B) cued recall. This was viewed as arguing against the independent-associations hypothesis and in favor of the hypothesis that associations are remembered as holistic units. Here we test the Holistic Representation hypothesis further by examining cued recall of compound words. If we suppose preexisting words are more unitized than novel associations, the Holistic Representation hypothesis predicts compound words (e.g., ROSE BUD) will have a higher forward-backward correlation than novel compounds (e.g., BRIEF TAX). We report the opposite finding: Compound words, as well as noncompound words, exhibited less associative symmetry than novel compounds. This challenges the Holistic Representation account of associative symmetry. Moreover, preexperimental associates (positional family size) influenced associative symmetry-but asymmetrically: Increasing family size of the last constituent increasing decoupled forward and backward recall, but family size of the 1st constituent had no such effect. In short, highly practiced, meaningful associations exhibit associative asymmetry, suggesting associative symmetry is not diagnostic of holistic representations but, rather, is a characteristic of ad hoc associations. With additional learning, symmetric associations may be replaced by directional, independently modifiable associations as verbal associations become embedded within a rich knowledge structure. PMID:24773284

  1. Extraterrestrial Organic Compounds in Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botta, Oliver; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Many organic compounds or their precursors found in meteorites originated in the interstellar or circumstellar medium and were later incorporated into planetesimals during the formation of the solar system. There they either survived intact or underwent further processing to synthesize secondary products on the meteorite parent body. The most distinct feature of CI and CM carbonaceous chondrites, two types of stony meteorites, is their high carbon content (up to 3% of weight), either in the form of carbonates or of organic compounds. The bulk of the organic carbon consists of an insoluble macromolecular material with a complex structure. Also present is a soluble organic fraction, which has been analyzed by several separation and analytical procedures. Low detection limits can be achieved by derivatization of the organic molecules with reagents that allow for analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. The CM meteorite Murchison has been found to contain more than 70 extraterrestrial amino acids and several other classes of compounds including carboxylic acids, hydroxy carboxylic acids, sulphonic and phosphonic acids, aliphatic, aromatic and polar hydrocarbons, fullerenes, heterocycles as well as carbonyl compounds, alcohols, amines and amides. The organic matter was found to be enriched in deuterium, and distinct organic compounds show isotopic enrichments of carbon and nitrogen relative to terrestrial matter.

  2. Antitumor Compounds from Marine Actinomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Olano, Carlos; Méndez, Carmen; Salas, José A.

    2009-01-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the main treatments used to combat cancer. A great number of antitumor compounds are natural products or their derivatives, mainly produced by microorganisms. In particular, actinomycetes are the producers of a large number of natural products with different biological activities, including antitumor properties. These antitumor compounds belong to several structural classes such as anthracyclines, enediynes, indolocarbazoles, isoprenoides, macrolides, non-ribosomal peptides and others, and they exert antitumor activity by inducing apoptosis through DNA cleavage mediated by topoisomerase I or II inhibition, mitochondria permeabilization, inhibition of key enzymes involved in signal transduction like proteases, or cellular metabolism and in some cases by inhibiting tumor-induced angiogenesis. Marine organisms have attracted special attention in the last years for their ability to produce interesting pharmacological lead compounds. PMID:19597582

  3. Hydrophobic Compounds Reshape Membrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Barnoud, Jonathan; Rossi, Giulia; Marrink, Siewert J.; Monticelli, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Cell membranes have a complex lateral organization featuring domains with distinct composition, also known as rafts, which play an essential role in cellular processes such as signal transduction and protein trafficking. In vivo, perturbations of membrane domains (e.g., by drugs or lipophilic compounds) have major effects on the activity of raft-associated proteins and on signaling pathways, but they are difficult to characterize because of the small size of the domains, typically below optical resolution. Model membranes, instead, can show macroscopic phase separation between liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains, and they are often used to investigate the driving forces of membrane lateral organization. Studies in model membranes have shown that some lipophilic compounds perturb membrane domains, but it is not clear which chemical and physical properties determine domain perturbation. The mechanisms of domain stabilization and destabilization are also unknown. Here we describe the effect of six simple hydrophobic compounds on the lateral organization of phase-separated model membranes consisting of saturated and unsaturated phospholipids and cholesterol. Using molecular simulations, we identify two groups of molecules with distinct behavior: aliphatic compounds promote lipid mixing by distributing at the interface between liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains; aromatic compounds, instead, stabilize phase separation by partitioning into liquid-disordered domains and excluding cholesterol from the disordered domains. We predict that relatively small concentrations of hydrophobic species can have a broad impact on domain stability in model systems, which suggests possible mechanisms of action for hydrophobic compounds in vivo. PMID:25299598

  4. Complex Compound Chemical Heat Pumps

    E-print Network

    Rockenfeller, U.; Langeliers, J.; Horn, G.

    to adsorbate. Barium chloride, for instance, can complex up to 8 moles of ammonia in Complex compound solid-vapor fluid pairs can one coordination step. be used in heat of reaction heat pumps for temperature amplifier (TA) as well as heat BaC1 2 ? n NH 3... ~ BaCl 2 + n NH 3 amplifier (HA) cycle configurations. (1) This report describes the conceptual hardware with 0 ~ n ~ 8 design for complex compound industrial heat pumps. The main emphasis was directed towards a SOLID-VAroR HEAT OF REACTIOO...

  5. Halogenated Compounds from Marine Algae

    PubMed Central

    Cabrita, Maria Teresa; Vale, Carlos; Rauter, Amélia Pilar

    2010-01-01

    Marine algae produce a cocktail of halogenated metabolites with potential commercial value. Structures exhibited by these compounds go from acyclic entities with a linear chain to complex polycyclic molecules. Their medical and pharmaceutical application has been investigated for a few decades, however other properties, such as antifouling, are not to be discarded. Many compounds were discovered in the last years, although the need for new drugs keeps this field open as many algal species are poorly screened. The ecological role of marine algal halogenated metabolites has somehow been overlooked. This new research field will provide valuable and novel insight into the marine ecosystem dynamics as well as a new approach to comprehending biodiversity. Furthermore, understanding interactions between halogenated compound production by algae and the environment, including anthropogenic or global climate changes, is a challenging target for the coming years. Research of halogenated metabolites has been more focused on macroalgae than on phytoplankton. However, phytoplankton could be a very promising material since it is the base of the marine food chain with quick adaptation to environmental changes, which undoubtedly has consequences on secondary metabolism. This paper reviews recent progress on this field and presents trends on the role of marine algae as producers of halogenated compounds. PMID:20948909

  6. [Further Compounds from Centaurea stoebe.].

    PubMed

    Huneck, S; Jakupovic, J; Schuster, A

    1986-10-01

    From CENTAUREA STOEBE the following compounds have been isolated: cnicin, salonitenolide, salonitenolid-8- O-(4'-acetoxy-5'-hydroxyangelate), stoebenolide, 3-hydroxy-2-methylbutyrolactone, and 3-(3, 4-dihydroxy-5-methoxyphenyl)-prop-1-yl 3-hydroxy-11-methyloctadecanoate. PMID:17345351

  7. Turbo-compound compressor system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Watanabe; K. Horiai; T. Mashiko; H. Kato; H. Yamaguchi; T. Nishiyama

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a turbo-compound compressor system including a booster compressor connected to a power recovery turbine disposed downstream of the outlet of an expansion turbine in a turbocharger for an internal combustion engine and drivable by the exhaust gas and a rotary positive-displacement air compressor drivable by the engine. The air is delivered by the booster compressor supplied to

  8. Heterogeneous Catalysis by Heteropoly Compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. V. Kozhevnikov; Innovative Catalysis

    \\u000a Heteropoly compounds (HPC) include polyoxometalates (POM) —nanosized metal-oxygen cluster anions (heteropoly anions)— as the\\u000a principal building blocks [1]. These anions form by a self-assembly process in solution and can be isolated as as heteropoly acids or salts with appropriate\\u000a countercations, e.g., H+, alkali metal cation, etc.

  9. Intermetallic rare-earth compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. N. R. Taylor; K. N. R

    1971-01-01

    The physical properties of many of the rare-earth intermetallic compounds have been collected together. They are discussed in terms of the role that the magnetic exchange and crystal field interactions play in determining these properties. It is pointed out that in this vast number of materials there is an ideal chance of establishing which of several second-order terms are effective

  10. Infrared Spectroscopy of Deuterated Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacCarthy, Patrick

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures used, and typical results obtained are provided for an experiment (based on the potassium bromide pressed-pellet method) involving the infrared spectroscopy of deuterated compounds. Deuteration refers to deuterium-hydrogen exchange at active hydrogen sites in the molecule. (JN)

  11. Magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effect in Ho{sub 6-x}Er{sub x}MnBi{sub 2} compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Fang; Yuan Fengying; Cao Yang; Gao Chunjing; Hao Yanming [Tian Jin University of Science and Technology, Tian Jin 300222 (China); Zhang Jian [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130 (China); Shen Jun [Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Sun Jirong; Shen Baogen [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism, Institute of Physics, and Centre for Condensed Matter Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2010-05-15

    Magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effect of compounds Ho{sub 6-x}Er{sub x}MnBi{sub 2} (x=0,3,6) are investigated experimentally. All the compounds crystallize in the hexagonal Zr{sub 6}CoAs{sub 2}-type structure and show a sharp drop in the magnetization around their respective magnetic ordering temperature, which is 201 K (x=0), 147 K (x=3), and 98 K (x=6), respectively. Either thermal or magnetic hysteresis around the phase transition is not observed, suggesting a second order phase transition nature. The magnetic entropy change ({Delta}S{sub m}) calculated from the Maxwell relation using the collected magnetization data is 10.6 (x=6), 7.3 (x=3), and 5.0 J kg{sup -1} K{sup -1} (x=0), respectively. The shape of the {Delta}S{sub m}-T curve has a good symmetry below and above the magnetic ordering temperature, and the value of the magnetic entropy change increases monotonously with increasing field change. The calorimetric technique has also been used for Er{sub 6}MnBi{sub 2} to check the credibility of the magnetic method.

  12. Olive oil phenolic compounds affect the release of aroma compounds.

    PubMed

    Genovese, Alessandro; Caporaso, Nicola; Villani, Veronica; Paduano, Antonello; Sacchi, Raffaele

    2015-08-15

    Twelve aroma compounds were monitored and quantified by dynamic headspace analysis after their addition in refined olive oil model systems with extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) biophenols to simulate EVOO aroma. The influence of polyphenols on aroma release was studied under simulated mouth conditions by using human saliva, and SPME-GC/MS analysis. While few differences were observed in orthonasal assay (without saliva), interesting results were obtained for retronasal aroma. Biophenols caused generally the lowest headspace release of almost all volatile compounds. However, only ethyl esters and linalool concentrations were significantly lower in retronasal than orthonasal assay. Saliva also caused higher concentration of hexanal, probably due to hydroperoxide lyase (HPL) action on linoleyl hydroperoxides. Epicatechin was compared to EVOO phenolics and the behaviour was dramatically different, likely to be due to salivary protein-tannin binding interactions, which influenced aroma headspace release. These results were also confirmed using two extra virgin olive oils. PMID:25794752

  13. Potent antifouling compounds produced by marine Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; He, Hongping; Schulz, Stefan; Liu, Xin; Fusetani, Nobushino; Xiong, Hairong; Xiao, Xiang; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2010-02-01

    Biofouling causes huge economic loss and a recent global ban on organotin compounds as antifouling agents has increased the need for safe and effective antifouling compounds. Five structurally similar compounds were isolated from the crude extract of a marine Streptomyces strain obtained from deep-sea sediments. Antifouling activities of these five compounds and four other structurally-related compounds isolated from a North Sea Streptomyces strain against major fouling organisms were compared to probe structure-activity relationships of compounds. The functional moiety responsible for antifouling activity lies in the 2-furanone ring and that the lipophilicity of compounds substantially affects their antifouling activities. Based on these findings, a compound with a straight alkyl side-chain was synthesized and proved itself as a very effective non-toxic, anti-larval settlement agent against three major fouling organisms. The strong antifouling activity, relatively low toxicity, and simple structures of these compounds make them promising candidates for new antifouling additives. PMID:19818601

  14. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Houston, TX)

    1989-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  15. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1989-07-18

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

  16. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

    1993-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  17. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1993-09-07

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 figures.

  18. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

    1994-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  19. Informatics in compound library management.

    PubMed

    Warne, Mark; Pemberton, Louise

    2009-01-01

    The ability to accurately and efficiently manage inventory is critical to ensure cost-effectiveness and guarantee integrity of samples in drug discovery. While many large companies utilise both customised and off-the-shelf automated systems for compound library management, these systems do not come cheaply. Without doubt, for large pharma the return on investment for one of these systems can be justified; however, the upfront cost is typically prohibitive for smaller businesses looking to stretch their limited cash reserves as far as possible. At Exelgen we have shown that for any business with the combination of fit-for-purpose informatics, relatively inexpensive laboratory hardware and well-constructed SOPs (standard operating procedures), it is possible to undertake cost-effective, large-scale compound library management in a small business environment. The informatics and hardware environment deployed at Exelgen are described in detail. PMID:19551357

  20. Biodegradation of chlorinated phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Annachhatre, A P; Gheewala, S H

    1996-01-01

    Chlorophenolic compounds are generated from a number of industrial manufacturing processes including pulp and paper manufacture. These compounds are found to be toxic and recalcitrant and hence their discharge into the environment must be regulated. Slow and partial degradation of chlorophenols under aerobic and anaerobic natural environment has been observed. Aerobic biodegradation of chlorophenols proceeds through the formation of catechols while under anaerobic conditions, reductive dehalogenation is the preferred metabolic pathway. Number and position of chlorine substituents on the phenolic ring has influence on the rate and extent of biodegradation of chlorophenols. In engineered systems, acclimatization of biomass to chlorophenols markedly enhances the biodegradation ability by reducing the initial lag phase and by countering inhibition. Partial removal of chlorophenols between 40-60% is usually observed in aerobic and anaerobic processes. Removal can be enhanced by a combination of aerobic and anaerobic operations. PMID:14536923

  1. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1994-06-14

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

  2. Catalytic Decomposition of Organophosphorus Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalkova, A.; Leszczynski, J.

    Organophosphorus compounds have several applications (agricultural, industrial, and military). Nevertheless, assessments of the hazards from these applications quite often do not take into account chemical processes during their interactions with environment. The management of contaminants requires considerable knowledge and understanding of contaminant behavior. Unique properties of clay minerals and metal oxides, such as high adsorption and catalytic ability, have resulted in their applications as natural adsorbents and catalysts in the development of cleanup technologies. Knowledge of molecular structure, transformation mechanisms, and the spectrum of potential intermediates/products of the contaminant decomposition is helpful for developing remediation processes. An understanding of the physical characteristics of the adsorption sites of selected soil ingredients, the physical and chemical characteristics of the contaminant, details of sorption of contaminants on soil and in water solution, and also their distribution within the environment is of particular interest. Application of computational chemistry (CC) can provide deeper insight into the aforementioned characteristics of organophosphorus compounds.

  3. Percutaneous absorption of uranium compounds.

    PubMed

    de Rey, B M; Lanfranchi, H E; Cabrini, R L

    1983-04-01

    Percutaneous absorption of soluble and insoluble uranium compounds has been induced in order to obtain information on penetration routes and the tissue injury produced by uranium salts. The high electron density of uranium provided a reliable way to visualize, by electron microscopy, the precise localization of the heavy compounds within the tissues. Few minutes after topical application of uranyl nitrate, dense deposits of uranium were observed at the epidermal barrier level. A few hours later, dense deposits were seen filling the intercellular spaces and were also scattered in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Mortality and body weight measurements indicated the high toxicity of uranyl nitrate and ammonium uranyl tricarbonate; uranyl acetate and ammonium diuranate were less toxic. As no penetration was achieved after uranium dioxide, no variations were detected on these parameters. PMID:6832127

  4. Bacterial Degradation of Aromatic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jong-Su; Keum, Young-Soo; Li, Qing X.

    2009-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are among the most prevalent and persistent pollutants in the environment. Petroleum-contaminated soil and sediment commonly contain a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heterocyclic aromatics. Aromatics derived from industrial activities often have functional groups such as alkyls, halogens and nitro groups. Biodegradation is a major mechanism of removal of organic pollutants from a contaminated site. This review focuses on bacterial degradation pathways of selected aromatic compounds. Catabolic pathways of naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene are described in detail. Bacterial catabolism of the heterocycles dibenzofuran, carbazole, dibenzothiophene, and dibenzodioxin is discussed. Bacterial catabolism of alkylated PAHs is summarized, followed by a brief discussion of proteomics and metabolomics as powerful tools for elucidation of biodegradation mechanisms. PMID:19440284

  5. Catalytic application of niobium compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kozo Tanabe

    2003-01-01

    Salient examples of catalytic application of niobium compounds and materials are demonstrated. Niobium oxides, when small amounts are added to known catalysts, markedly enhance catalytic activity and selectivity and prolong catalyst life for various reactions. Moreover, niobium oxides exhibit a pronounced effect as supports of metal or metal oxide catalysts. Hydrated niobium pentoxide (niobic acid, Nb2O5·nH2O) and niobium phosphate which

  6. Compound fiber ring resonator: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Lit, J.W.Y. [Wilfrid Laurier Univ., Waterloo, Ontario (Canada)

    1994-06-01

    A compound fiber ring resonator is made with a Fabry-Perot etalon built inside a fiber ring that is fed through a 2 x 2 directional single-mode fiber coupler. It is theoretically analyzed by an unfolded equivalent model and a transfer-matrix method. The output intensities are presented, and four cases are discussed. The results may be useful in applications such as fiber spectrum analyzers, sensors, and lasers. 25 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Bioactive Compounds from Northern Plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anja Hohtola; Giuseppina Rea; Bruno Berra

    \\u000a Northern conditions are characterised by long days with much light and low temperatures during the growing season. It has\\u000a been claimed that herbs and berries grown in the north are stronger tasting compared to those of southern origin. The compounds\\u000a imparting aroma and color to berries and herbs are secondary metabolites which in plants mostly act as chemical means of

  8. Stress relaxation in molding compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenner, Vernal H.; Harper, Brian D.; Itkin, Vladimir Y.

    1997-07-01

    Stress relaxation tests have heen carried out on an epoxy-based molding compound at temperatures ranging from ambient to 260°C. It is found that horizontal shifting produces coherent master curves which are different for different levels of imposed strain, i.e., the material behavior is nonlinear. The use of constant strain rate tensile test data to augment stress relaxation data in forming the broadest viscoelastic representation of the material is discussed.

  9. Compounds That Promote Seed Germination

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The two molecules for this month come from the section Compound in Smoke Provides the Spark for Germination in the article about "Research Advances" by Angela G. King. These molecules have been demonstrated to stimulate seed germination under various conditions. The butenolide moiety is frequently encountered in natural products. An interesting approach to the synthesis of such molecules can be found in this Organic Letters article (accessed January 2005).

  10. Biological effects of organolead compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Grandjean, P.

    1984-01-01

    This book is the first extensive review published on this significant environmental health problem. The sources and occurrence of environmental organolead contamination are reviewed. The biotransformation, biochemical and morphological effects are described in detail with extensive electron micrographs and experimental results. Human exposures and intoxications are examined, and the health significance of organolead pollution is discussed. This book will be of key interest to researchers in heavy metal toxicology and environmental health. CONTENTS: Short Review of Properties of Organolead Compounds. Gasoline Additives: Past, Present, and Future. Microbial Methylation of Lead. Organic Lead in the Aquatic Environment. Analysis of Airborne Organic Lead. Atmospheric Occurrence of Organolead Compounds. Toxic Effects in Plant Organisms. Metabolism and Toxicokinetics. Genotoxic Effects. Induction of Anion Transport in Biological Membranes. Effects on Mitochondria and Other Enzyme Systems. Effects on Membrane Formation in the Central Nervous System. Effects on Reproduction and Hormone Metabolism. Experimental Pathology of Short-Chain Alkyllead Compounds. Possible Mechanisms for the Selective Neurotoxicity. Gasoline Sniffing Syndrome. Organolead Exposures and Intoxications. Preventive Measures in the Occupational Setting. Governmental Regulations.

  11. Compound facial expressions of emotion

    PubMed Central

    Du, Shichuan; Tao, Yong; Martinez, Aleix M.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the different categories of facial expressions of emotion regularly used by us is essential to gain insights into human cognition and affect as well as for the design of computational models and perceptual interfaces. Past research on facial expressions of emotion has focused on the study of six basic categories—happiness, surprise, anger, sadness, fear, and disgust. However, many more facial expressions of emotion exist and are used regularly by humans. This paper describes an important group of expressions, which we call compound emotion categories. Compound emotions are those that can be constructed by combining basic component categories to create new ones. For instance, happily surprised and angrily surprised are two distinct compound emotion categories. The present work defines 21 distinct emotion categories. Sample images of their facial expressions were collected from 230 human subjects. A Facial Action Coding System analysis shows the production of these 21 categories is different but consistent with the subordinate categories they represent (e.g., a happily surprised expression combines muscle movements observed in happiness and surprised). We show that these differences are sufficient to distinguish between the 21 defined categories. We then use a computational model of face perception to demonstrate that most of these categories are also visually discriminable from one another. PMID:24706770

  12. Physiological modelling of organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Andersen, M E

    1991-06-01

    In pharmacokinetic modelling the body is represented as a set of compartments. The characteristics of these compartments are defined either by fitting predetermined mathematical equations to the data ('data-based compartments') or by defining compartments based on the actual biological structure of the animal ('physiologically based compartments'). Physiological models of chemical disposition are developed using these physiologically based compartments. These models then consist of sets of organs or types of tissue compartments whose characteristics are based as far as possible on the anatomy and physiology of the test species. Individual organs or types of tissue are defined with respect to their blood flow, volume, kinetic constants for metabolism, storage capacity for the compound involved, protein binding and other relevant characteristics. Linking these compartments together in a proper anatomical arrangement yields the physiological model for compound disposition. This paper provides an overview of the basics for constructing physiological models for organic compounds, focusing on the structure of individual compartments in these models and the data required for model development. Some past applications of physiological models are reviewed and speculation offered on future developments in this field. PMID:1888102

  13. Bioactive compounds from northern plants.

    PubMed

    Hohtola, Anja

    2010-01-01

    Northern conditions are characterised by long days with much light and low temperatures during the growing season. It has been chimed that herbs and berries grown in the north are stronger tasting compared to those of southern origin. The compounds imparting aroma and color to berries and herbs are secondary metabolites which in plants mostly act as chemical means of defense. Recently, the production of secondary metabolites using plant cells has been the subject of expanding research. Light intensity, photoperiod and temperature have been reported to influence the biosynthesis of many secondary metabolites. Native wild aromatic and medicinal plant species of different families are being studied to meet the needs of raw material for the expanding industry of e.g., health-promoting food products known as nutraceutics. There are already a large number of known secondary compounds produced by plants, but the recent advances in modern extraction and analysis should enable many more as yet unknown compounds to be found, characterised and utilised. Rose root (Rhodiola rosea) is a perennial herbaceous plant which inhabits mountain regions throughout Europe, Asia and east coastal regions of North America. The extract made from the rhizomes acts as a stimulant like the Ginseng root. Roseroot has been categorized as an adaptogen and is reported to have many pharmacological properties. The biologically active components of the extract are salitroside tyrosol and cinnamic acid glycosides (rosavin, rosarin, rosin). Round-leaved sundew (Drosera rotundifolia L.) has circumboreal distribution. It inhabits nutrient-poor, moist and sunny areas such as peat bogs and wetlands. Sundew leaves are collected from the wild-type for various medicinal preparations and can be utilized in treating e.g., as an important "cough-medicine" for different respiratory diseases. The antimicrobial activity of extracts of aerial parts against various bacteria has been investigated. Drosera produces various secondary metabolites. The most abundant, among these compounds, are the naphthoquinones. Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) is a characteristic field layer species in boreal forests. Bilberry and other northern Vaccinium species, berries and leaves, contain high amounts of phenolic compounds. Bilberries are known for its exceptionally high amounts ofanthocyanins with powerful antioxidant capacity. They have been shown to possess beneficial health effects, like having a protective role in cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Many flavonoids also seem to have antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal and antiallergenic properties. The effect of ingested cranberry (V. oxycoccus) juice has been shown to prevent urinary tract infections in women. PMID:21520706

  14. Anaerobic biodegradation of aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Jothimani, P; Kalaichelvan, G; Bhaskaran, A; Selvaseelan, D Augustine; Ramasamy, K

    2003-09-01

    Many aromatic compounds and their monomers are existing in nature. Besides they are introduced into the environment by human activity. The conversion of these aromatic compounds is mainly an aerobic process because of the involvement of molecular oxygen in ring fission and as an electron acceptor. Recent literatures indicated that ring fission of monomers and obligomers mainly occurs in anaerobic environments through anaerobic respiration with nitrate, sulphate, carbon dioxide or carbonate as electron acceptors. These anaerobic processes will help to work out the better situation for bioremediation of contaminated environments. While there are plenty of efforts to reduce the release of these chemicals to the environment, already contaminated sites need to be remediated not only to restore the sites but to prevent the leachates spreading to nearby environment. Basically microorganisms are better candidates for breakdown of these compounds because of their wider catalytic mechanisms and the ability to act even in the absence of oxygen. These microbes can be grouped based on their energy mechanisms. Normally, the aerobic counterparts employ the enzymes like mono-and-dioxygenases. The end product is basically catechol, which further may be metabolised to CO2 by means of quinones reductases cycles. In the absense of reductases compounds, the reduced catechols tend to become oxidised to form many quinone compounds. The quinone products are more recalcitrant and lead to other aesthetic problems like colour in water, unpleasant odour, etc. On the contrary, in the reducing environment this process is prevented and in a cascade of pathways, the cleaved products are converted to acetyl co-A to be integrated into other central metabolite paths. The central metabolite of anaerobic degradation is invariably co-A thio-esters of benzoic acid or hydroxy benzoic acid. The benzene ring undergoes various substitution and addition reactions to form chloro-, nitro-, methyl- compounds. For complete degradation the side chains must be removed first and then the benzene ring is activated by carboxylation or hydroxylation or co-A thioester formation. In the next step the activated ring is converted to a form that can be collected in the central pool of metabolism. The third step is the channeling reaction in which the products of the catalysis are directed into central metabolite pool. The enzymes involved in these mechanisms are mostly benzyl co-A ligase, benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase. Other enzymes involved in this path are yet to be purified though many of the reactions products that have been theoretically postulated have been identified. This is mainly due to the instability of intermediate compounds as well as the association of the enzyme substrate is femoral and experimental conditions need to be sophisticated further for isolation of these enzymes. The first structural genes of benzoate and hydroxy benzoate ligases were isolated from Rhodopseudomonas palustris. This gene cluster of 30 kb size found in Rhodopseudomonas palustris coded for the Bad A protein. Similarly, some of the bph A,B,C and D cluster of genes coding for the degradation of pentachlorobenzenes were located in Pseudomonas pseudoalgaligenesKF 707. PMID:15242297

  15. Lipid encapsulated phenolic compounds by fluidization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenolic compounds exhibit antioxidant and antimicrobial activities with applications as functional food and feed additives. Ferulic acid, a phenolic compound present in grain crops and lignocellulose biomass, was encapsulated with saturated triglycerides using a laboratory fluidizer. Stability of t...

  16. Aroma compounds in fresh cut pomegranate arils.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little published information exists regarding flavor and aroma compounds in pomegranate (Punica granatum). Although arils have fruity and sweet characteristics, we found no publications describing actual compounds responsible for their typical flavor. Since most commercial usage of pomegranates in...

  17. Hyperpolarizable compounds and devices fabricated therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Therien, M.J.; DiMagno, S.G.

    1998-07-21

    Substituted compounds having relatively large molecular first order hyperpolarizabilities are provided, along with devices and materials containing them. In general, the compounds bear electron-donating and electron-withdrawing chemical substituents on a polyheterocyclic core. 13 figs.

  18. The Chemistry of Highly Fluorinated Compounds

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The featured molecules for January come from the paper Fluorous Compounds and Their Role in Separation Chemistry by Maria Angeles Ubeda and Roman Dembinski. This paper explores the use of highly fluorinated compounds as solvents, catalysts, and reagents.

  19. Polyfluorinated Compounds: Past, Present, and Future

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interest and concern about polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs), such as perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), erfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and an increasing number of other related compounds is growing as more is learned about these ubiquitous anthropogenic substances. Many of these co...

  20. Hyperpolarizable compounds and devices fabricated therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Therien, Michael J. (Philadelphia, PA); DiMagno, Stephen G. (Lincoln, NE)

    1998-01-01

    Substituted compounds having relatively large molecular first order hyperpolarizabilities are provided, along with devices and materials containing them. In general, the compounds bear electron-donating and electron-withdrawing chemical substituents on a polyheterocyclic core.

  1. Compound Interest to e and i

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Cohen, Donald, 1939-

    Graphing and exploring simple interest and compound interest. Examples of interest earned on one dollar at 6 percent compounded daily, monthly, quarterly, annually. Patterns, infinite sequence. Sample problems with some answers from Chapter 11 of Don Cohen's worksheet book.

  2. xvi Preface to the second edition Acknowledgments

    E-print Network

    Fitelson, Branden

    Harman, Jaegwon Kim, Christopher Kulp, Jonathan Kvanvig, Bruce Russell, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Ernest the anonymous readers for the Press but also Michael Pace, Bruce Russell; Mark Owen Webb, and especially Claudio

  3. XVI Reunio da Sociedade Brasileira de Cristalografia

    E-print Network

    Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

    desenvolvimento de novas metodologias é uma característica de todas as áreas da ciência e, em particular da criação de novas linhas. Pode-se destacar nos últimos dois anos a conclusão e entrada em operação do anel existente e a estruturação de uma nova linha, o aperfeiçoamento

  4. Planck 2013 results. XVI. Cosmological parameters

    E-print Network

    Ade, P.A.R.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartlett, J.G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J.P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J.J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Calabrese, E.; Cappellini, B.; Cardoso, J.F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, L.Y.; Chiang, H.C.; Christensen, P.R.; Church, S.; Clements, D.L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.M.; Desert, F.X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Ensslin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A.A.; Franceschi, E.; Gaier, T.C.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Gjerlow, E.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J.E.; Haissinski, J.; Hamann, J.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hou, Z.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J.M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Laureijs, R.J.; Lawrence, C.R.; Leach, S.; Leahy, J.P.; Leonardi, R.; Leon-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Macias-Perez, J.F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D.J.; Martin, P.G.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P.R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.B.; Mendes, L.; Menegoni, E.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Millea, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M.A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I.J.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, D.; Pearson, T.J.; Peiris, H.V.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G.W.; Prezeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.L.; Rachen, J.P.; Reach, W.T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubino-Martin, J.A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Spencer, L.D.; Starck, J.L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.S.; Sygnet, J.F.; Tauber, J.A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Turler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; Wehus, I.K.; White, M.; White, S.D.M.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first results based on Planck measurements of the CMB temperature and lensing-potential power spectra. The Planck spectra at high multipoles are extremely well described by the standard spatially-flat six-parameter LCDM cosmology. In this model Planck data determine the cosmological parameters to high precision. We find a low value of the Hubble constant, H0=67.3+/-1.2 km/s/Mpc and a high value of the matter density parameter, Omega_m=0.315+/-0.017 (+/-1 sigma errors) in excellent agreement with constraints from baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) surveys. Including curvature, we find that the Universe is consistent with spatial flatness to percent-level precision using Planck CMB data alone. We present results from an analysis of extensions to the standard cosmology, using astrophysical data sets in addition to Planck and high-resolution CMB data. None of these models are favoured significantly over standard LCDM. The deviation of the scalar spectral index from unity is insensitive to the additi...

  5. Butein is a novel anti-adipogenic compound[S

    PubMed Central

    Song, No-Joon; Yoon, Hyang-Jin; Kim, Ki Hyun; Jung, So-Ra; Jang, Woo-Seok; Seo, Cho-Rong; Lee, Young Min; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk; Hong, Joung-Woo; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Park, Ki-Moon; Lee, Kang Ro; Park, Kye Won

    2013-01-01

    Rhus verniciflua Stokes (RVS) has been used as a traditional herbal medicine for its various biological activities including anti-adipogenic effects. Activity-guided separation led to the identification of the anti-adipogenic functions of butein. Butein, a novel anti-adipogenic compound, robustly suppressed lipid accumulation and inhibited expression of adipogenic markers. Molecular studies showed that activated transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?) and suppressed signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathways were mediated by butein. Analysis of the temporal expression profiles suggests that TGF-? signaling precedes the STAT3 in the butein-mediated anti-adipogenic cascade. Small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of STAT3 or SMAD2/3 blunted the inhibitory effects of butein on adipogenesis indicating that an interaction between two signaling pathways is required for the action of butein. Upon butein treatments, stimulation of TGF-? signaling was still preserved in STAT3 silenced cells, whereas regulation of STAT3 signaling by butein was significantly impaired in SMAD2/3 silenced cells, further showing that TGF-? acts upstream of STAT3 in the butein-mediated anti-adipogenesis. Taken together, the present study shows that butein, a novel anti-adipogenic compound from RVS, inhibits adipocyte differentiation through the TGF-? pathway followed by STAT3 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? signaling, further implicating potential roles of butein in TGF-?- and STAT3-dysregulated diseases. PMID:23468131

  6. Determination of organic compounds in bottled waters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stavroula V. Leivadara; Anastasia D. Nikolaou; Themistokles D. Lekkas

    2008-01-01

    The presence of organic compounds in bottled waters available in the Greek market and their fate when the representative samples exposed at different conditions were the main purposes of this study. The determination of the organic compounds was performed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry techniques. Disinfection by-products compounds, such as trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs), were detected at low concentrations

  7. Highly thermally conductive, low stress molding compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. S. Chen; R. H. Y. Lo

    1996-01-01

    There has been an ongoing interest in highly thermally conductive molding compounds for many years. One major reason is the desire to find a low cost alternative to heat sinks, heat spreaders, and fans for large plastic packages. Of course, the new compound should exhibit the same reliability and attributes as the lower conductivity compound it is replacing. One feature

  8. Semiconducting compounds and devices incorporating same

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, Tobin J; Facchetti, Antonio; Boudreault, Pierre-Luc; Miyauchi, Hiroyuki

    2014-06-17

    Disclosed are molecular and polymeric compounds having desirable properties as semiconducting materials. Such compounds can exhibit desirable electronic properties and possess processing advantages including solution-processability and/or good stability. Organic transistor and photovoltaic devices incorporating the present compounds as the active layer exhibit good device performance.

  9. Thin films of mixed metal compounds

    DOEpatents

    Mickelsen, Reid A. (Bellevue, WA); Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA)

    1985-01-01

    A compositionally uniform thin film of a mixed metal compound is formed by simultaneously evaporating a first metal compound and a second metal compound from independent sources. The mean free path between the vapor particles is reduced by a gas and the mixed vapors are deposited uniformly. The invention finds particular utility in forming thin film heterojunction solar cells.

  10. Compound words and structure in the lexicon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Fiorentino; David Poeppel

    2007-01-01

    The structure of lexical entries and the status of lexical decomposition remain controversial. In the psycholinguistic literature, one aspect of this debate concerns the psychological reality of the morphological complexity difference between compound words (teacup) and single words (crescent). The present study investigates morphological decomposition in compound words using visual lexical decision with simultaneous magnetoencephalography (MEG), comparing compounds, single words,

  11. NUCLEAR ORIENTATION EXPERIMENTS ON CERIUM INTERMETALLIC COMPOUNDS

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    L-63 NUCLEAR ORIENTATION EXPERIMENTS ON CERIUM INTERMETALLIC COMPOUNDS A. BENOIT, J. FLOUQUET, M.O. experiments in other Ce intermetallic compounds in order to deter- mine at very low temperatures by melting a small amount of radioactive LaCe alloys with the constituents of the intermetallic compound

  12. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY); Rovani, Jr., Joseph F. (Laramie, WY); Bomstad, Theresa M. (Waxahachie, TX); Sorini-Wong, Susan S. (Laramie, WY); Wong, Gregory K. (Laramie, WY)

    2011-03-01

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  13. Some statistics on intermetallic compounds.

    PubMed

    Dshemuchadse, Julia; Steurer, Walter

    2015-02-01

    It is still largely unknown why intermetallic phases show such a large variety of crystal structures, with unit cell sizes varying between 1 and more than 20?000 atoms. The goal of our study was, therefore, to get a general overview of the symmetries, unit cell sizes, stoichiometries, most frequent structure types, and their stability fields based on the Mendeleev numbers as ordering parameters. A total of 20829 structures crystallizing in 2166 structure types have been studied for this purpose. Thereby, the focus was on a subset of 6441 binary intermetallic compounds, which crystallize in 943 structure types. PMID:25470110

  14. Enantioselective effects in coordination compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurganov, Alexander A.; Ponomareva, T. M.; Davankov, Vadim A.

    1990-02-01

    The information that has appeared during the last 15 years relating to enantioselectivity in the formation and reactions of kinetically inert and kinetically labile complexes is classified in the present review. Attention is mainly given to chiral discrimination of ligands that are exchanged in the internal or external coordination spheres of the complexes. The occurrence of enantioselective effects has also been recorded in reactions of coordination compounds that occur without ligand exchange, in particular, in photochemical processes. The variety of forms in which enantioselectivity is displayed is shown and methods for studying it are described. The bibliography includes 223 references.

  15. Pharmaceutical Compounds Studied Using NEXAFS

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Booth, A.; Braun, Simon; Lonsbourough, Tom; Schroeder, Sven L. M. [Molecular Materials Center, University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Purton, John; Patel, Sunil [Daresubry SRS (United Kingdom)

    2007-02-02

    Total Electron Yield (TEY) oxygen K-edge NEXAFS detects the presence of strongly adsorbed water molecules on poloxamer-coated pharmaceutical actives, which provides a useful spectroscopic indicator for bioavailability. The results are supported by complementary XPS measurements. Carbon K-edge spectra obtained in a high-pressure NEXAFS cell were used in situ to establish how a polymer coating spread on a drug surface by using humidity induced dispersion of the coating. Finally, we demonstrate how combined Carbon and Oxygen K-edge measurements can be used to characterize amorphous surface layers on micronised crystals of a drug compound.

  16. Anisotropies in Quaternary Intermetallic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. C.

    2008-03-01

    From the high-temperature series expansion of magnetic susceptibilities and the anisotropic Weiss temperatures, the first Steven's parameter, B2^0 , and the magnetic exchange interaction constant Jex^ll of each R^=3 ions magnetic sublattice in quaternary intermetallic compounds, RNi2B2C B(R= Tm, Er, Ho, Dy, and Tb) were obtained. The R =Dy system shows the biggest B2^0 value and the R = Tb system does the smallest one. Also we have measured and analyzed the anisotropic M(H) isotherms as a function of applied magnetic fields for H perpendicular and parallel to the c-axis for each compounds to check out our crystalline electric field (CEF) results obtained from the previous mentioned method by using the anisotropic Weiss temperatures. It turned out that most of the temperature dependence of magnetization curve M (T) for H perpendicular the c-axis at low temperature comes from the temperature dependent population of the singlet ground state in group L among groups L(low-lying levels of ground states), H(high levels of ground states), and M(first excited states).

  17. Prebiotic Evolution of Nitrogen Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrhenius, G.

    1999-01-01

    Support from this four year grant has funded our research on two general problems. One involves attempts to model the abiotic formation of simple source compounds for functional biomolecules, their concentration from dilute state in the hydrosphere and, in several cases, surface induced reactions to form precursor monomers for bioactive end products (refs. 1-5). Because of the pervasiveness and antiquity of phosphate based biochemistry and the catalytic activity of RNA we have exploring the hypothesis of an RNA World as an early stage in the emergence of life. This concept is now rather generally considered, but has been questioned due to the earlier lack of an experimentally demonstrated successful scheme for the spontaneous formation of ribose phosphate, the key backbone molecule in RNA. That impediment has now been removed. This has been achieved by demonstrating probable sources of activated (condensed) highly soluble and strongly sorbed phosphates in nature (Refs. 1,2) and effective condensation of aldehyde phosphates to form ribose phosphate in high yield (ref.6), thereby placing the RNA World concept on a somewhat safer experimental footing. Like all work in this field these experiments are oversimplifications that largely ignore competing side reactions with other compounds expected to be present. None the less our choice of experimental conditions aim at selective processes that eliminate interfering reactions. We have also sought to narrow the credibility gap by simulating geophysically and geochemically plausible conditions surrounding the putative prebiotic reactions.

  18. Corrosion Preventive Compounds Lifetime Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Stephanie M.; Kammerer, Catherine C.; Copp, Tracy L.

    2007-01-01

    Lifetime Testing of Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) was performed to quantify performance in the various environments to which the Space Shuttle Orbiter is exposed during a flight cycle. Three CPCs are approved for use on the Orbiter: RD Calcium Grease, Dinitrol AV-30, and Braycote 601 EF. These CPCs have been rigorously tested to prove that they mitigate corrosion in typical environments, but little information is available on how they perform in the unique combination of the coastal environment at the launch pad, the vacuum of low-earth orbit, and the extreme heat of reentry. Currently, there is no lifetime or reapplication schedule established for these compounds that is based on this combination of environmental conditions. Aluminum 2024 coupons were coated with the three CPCs and exposed to conditions that simulate the environments to which the Orbiter is exposed. Uncoated Aluminum 2024 coupons were exposed to the environmental conditions as a control. Visual inspection and Electro- Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) were performed on the samples in order to determine the effectiveness of the CPCs. The samples were processed through five mission life cycles or until the visual inspection revealed the initiation of corrosion and EIS indicated severe degradation of the coating.

  19. Corrosion Preventive Compounds Lifetime Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Stephanie M.; Kammerer, Catherine C.

    2007-01-01

    Lifetime Testing of Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) was performed to quantify performance in the various environments to which the Space Shuttle Orbiter is exposed during a flight cycle. Three CPCs are approved for use on the Orbiter: HD Calcium Grease, Dinitrol AV-30, and Braycote 601 EF. These CPCs have been rigorously tested to prove that they mitigate corrosion in typical environments, but little information is available on how they perform in the unique combination of the coastal environment at the launch pad, the vacuum of low-earth orbit, and the extreme heat of reentry. Currently, there is no lifetime or reapplication schedule established for these compounds that is based on this combination of environmental conditions. Aluminum 2024 coupons were coated with the three CPCs and exposed to conditions that simulate the environments to which the Orbiter is exposed. Uncoated Aluminum 2024 coupons were exposed to the environmental conditions as a control. Visual inspection and Electro- Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) were performed on the samples in order to determine the effectiveness of the CPCs. The samples were processed through five mission life cycles or until the visual inspection revealed the initiation of corrosion and EIS indicated severe degradation of the coating.

  20. Elastomer Compound Developed for High Wear Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, D.; Feuer, H.; Flanagan, D.; Rodriguez, G.; Teets, A.; Touchet, P.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Army is currently spending 300 million dollars per year replacing rubber track pads. An experimental rubber compound has been developed which exhibits 2 to 3 times greater service life than standard production pad compounds. To improve the service life of the tank track pads various aspects of rubber chemistry were explored including polymer, curing and reinforcing systems. Compounds that exhibited superior physical properties based on laboratory data were then fabricated into tank pads and field tested. This paper will discuss the compounding studies, laboratory data and field testing that led to the high wear elastomer compound.

  1. INSENSITIVE HIGH-NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

    SciTech Connect

    D. CHAVEZ; ET AL

    2001-03-01

    The conventional approach to developing energetic molecules is to chemically place one or more nitro groups onto a carbon skeleton, which is why the term ''nitration'' is synonymous to explosives preparation. The nitro group carries the oxygen that reacts with the skeletal carbon and hydrogen fuels, which in turn produces the heat and gaseous reaction products necessary for driving an explosive shock. These nitro-containing energetic molecules typically have heats of formation near zero and therefore most of the released energy is derived from the combustion process. Our investigation of the tetrazine, furazan and tetrazole ring systems has offered a different approach to explosives development, where a significant amount of the chemical potential energy is derived from their large positive heats of formation. Because these compounds often contain a large percentage of nitrogen atoms, they are usually regarded as high-nitrogen fuels or explosives. A general artifact of these high-nitrogen compounds is that they are less sensitive to initiation (e.g. by impact) when compared to traditional nitro-containing explosives of similar performances. Using the precursor, 3,6-bis-(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-s-tetrazine, several useful energetic compounds based on the s-tetrazine system have been synthesized and studied. Some of the first compounds are 3,6-diamino-s-tetrazine-1,4-dioxide (LAX-112) and 3,6-dihydrazino-s-tetrazine (DHT). LAX-112 was once extensively studied as an insensitive explosive by Los Alamos; DHT is an example of a high-nitrogen explosive that relies entirely on its heat of formation for sustaining a detonation. Recent synthesis efforts have yielded an azo-s-tetrazine, 3,3'-azobis(6-amino-s-tetrazine) or DAAT, which has a very high positive heat of formation. The compounds, 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azoxyfurazan (DAAF) and 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azofurazan (DAAzF), may have important future roles in insensitive explosive applications. Neither DAAF nor DAAzF can be initiated by laboratory impact drop tests, yet both have in some aspects better explosive performances than 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene TATB--the standard of insensitive high explosives. The thermal stability of DAAzF is equal to that of hexanitrostilbene (HNS), yet it too is a better explosive performer. The recently discovered tetrazol derivative, 3,6-bis-(1H-1,2,3,4-tetrazol-5-ylamino)-s-tetrazine (BTATz) was measured to have exceptional positive heats of formation and to be insensitive to explosive initiation. Because of its high burn rate with low sensitivity to pressure, this material is of great interest to the propellant community.

  2. Role of an invariant lysine residue in folate binding on Escherichia coli thymidylate synthase: calorimetric and crystallographic analysis of the K48Q mutant

    PubMed Central

    Arvizu-Flores, Aldo A.; Sugich-Miranda, Rocio; Arreola, Rodrigo; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D.; Velazquez-Contreras, Enrique F.; Montfort, William R.; Maley, Frank; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R.

    2008-01-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) catalyzes the reductive methylation of deoxyuridine monophosphate (dUMP) using methylene tetrahydrofolate (CH2THF) as cofactor, the glutamate tail of which forms a water-mediated hydrogen-bond with an invariant lysine residue of this enzyme. To understand the role of this interaction, we studied the K48Q mutant of Escherichia coli TS using structural and biophysical methods. The kcat of the K48Q mutant was 430 fold lower than wild-type TS in activity, while the the Km for the (R)-stereoisomer of CH2THF was 300 µM, about 30 fold larger than Km from the wild-type TS. Affinity constants were determined using isothermal titration calorimetry, which showed that binding was reduced by one order of magnitude for folate-like TS inhibitors, such as propargyl-dideaza folate (PDDF) or compounds that distort the TS active site like BW1843U89 (U89). The crystal structure of the K48Q-dUMP complex revealed that dUMP binding is not impaired in the mutamt, and that U89 in a ternary complex of K48Q-nucleotide-U89 was bound in the active site with subtle differences relative to comparable wild type complexes. PDDF failed to form ternary complexes with K48Q and dUMP. Thermodynamic data correlated with the structural determinations, since PDDF binding was dominated by enthalpic effects while U89 had an important entropic component. In conclusion, K48 is critical for catalysis since it leads to a productive CH2THF binding, while mutation at this residue does not affect much the binding of inhibitors that do not make contact with this group. PMID:18403248

  3. Thin films of mixed metal compounds

    DOEpatents

    Mickelsen, R.A.; Chen, W.S.

    1985-06-11

    Disclosed is a thin film heterojunction solar cell, said heterojunction comprising a p-type I-III-IV[sub 2] chalcopyrite substrate and an overlying layer of an n-type ternary mixed metal compound wherein said ternary mixed metal compound is applied to said substrate by introducing the vapor of a first metal compound to a vessel containing said substrate from a first vapor source while simultaneously introducing a vapor of a second metal compound from a second vapor source of said vessel, said first and second metals comprising the metal components of said mixed metal compound; independently controlling the vaporization rate of said first and second vapor sources; reducing the mean free path between vapor particles in said vessel, said gas being present in an amount sufficient to induce homogeneity of said vapor mixture; and depositing said mixed metal compound on said substrate in the form of a uniform composition polycrystalline mixed metal compound. 5 figs.

  4. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

    1993-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

  5. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1993-01-05

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70 C and 500 C and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

  6. Volatile organic compound sensing devices

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, Gregory D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moore, Glenn A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Reagen, William K. (Stillwater, MN)

    1995-01-01

    Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

  7. Volatile organic compound sensing devices

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Reagen, W.K.

    1995-08-29

    Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs. 15 figs.

  8. Dilithium hexaorganostannate(IV) compounds.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Ireen; Zeckert, Kornelia; Zahn, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Hypercoordination of main-group elements such as the heavier Group?14 elements (silicon, germanium, tin, and lead) usually requires strong electron-withdrawing ligands and/or donating groups. Herein, we present the synthesis and characterization of two hexaaryltin(IV) dianions in form of their dilithium salts [Li2(thf)2{Sn(2-py(Me))6}] (py(Me)=C5H3N-5-Me) (2) and [Li2{Sn(2-py(OtBu))6}] (py(OtBu)=C5H3N-6-OtBu) (3). Both complexes are stable in the solid state and solution under inert conditions. Theoretical investigations of compound 2 reveal a significant valence 5s-orbital contribution of the tin atom forming six strongly polarized tin-carbon bonds. PMID:25314245

  9. New permanent magnets; manganese compounds.

    PubMed

    Coey, J M D

    2014-02-12

    The exponential growth of maximum energy product that prevailed in the 20th century has stalled, leaving a market dominated by two permanent magnet materials, Nd2Fe14B and Ba(Sr)Fe12O19, for which the maximum theoretical energy products differ by an order of magnitude (515 kJ m(-3) and 45 kJ m(-3), respectively). Rather than seeking to improve on optimized Nd-Fe-B, it is suggested that some research efforts should be devoted to developing appropriately priced alternatives with energy products in the range 100-300 kJ m(-3). The prospects for Mn-based hard magnetic materials are discussed, based on known Mn-based compounds with the tetragonal L10 or D022 structure or the hexagonal B81 structure. PMID:24469291

  10. Optical detection of alkali compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenborg, R.C.; Baughcum, S.L.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments to evaluate the photofragment fluorescence diagnostic technique for NaCl, KCl, and NaOH in terms of discrimination potential, sensitivity, and quantitative behavior have been completed. All results so far make this technique look very promising for potential applications in post-combustion coal gas streams. Based on the success of the investigations to date, we are continuing to expand the application of the photofragment technique to other gas-phase alkali compounds of importance in fossil fuel combustion. In particular, work is now in progress to investigate potassium hydroxide, KOH. Ongoing experiments are to determine (1) the optimum wavelength for K* production, (2) whether KOH can be measured in the presence of KCl, (3) if the signals linearly track the KOH monomer density, and (4) the absolute sensitivity of the technique for KOH in high-temperature environments.

  11. Antimycobacterial compounds from Piper sanctum.

    PubMed

    Mata, Rachel; Morales, Iliana; Pérez, Olga; Rivero-Cruz, Isabel; Acevedo, Laura; Enriquez-Mendoza, Isolda; Bye, Robert; Franzblau, Scott; Timmermann, Barbara

    2004-12-01

    Bioassay-guided chromatographic separation of the antimycobacterial extract of the leaves of Piper sanctum afforded 14 new compounds, identified as 2-oxo-12-(3',4'-methylenedioxyphenyl)dodecane (1), 2-oxo-14-(3',4'-methylenedioxyphenyl)tetradecane (2), 2-oxo-16-(3',4'-methylenedioxyphenyl)hexadecane (3), 2-oxo-18-(3',4'-methylenedioxyphenyl)octadecane (4), 2-oxo-14-(3',4'-methylenedioxyphenyl)-trans-13-tetradecene (5), 2-oxo-16-(3',4'-methylenedioxyphenyl)-trans-15-hexadecene (6), 2-oxo-18-(3',4'-methylenedioxyphenyl)-trans-17-octadecene (7), 2-oxo-16-phenyl-trans-3-hexadecene (8), methyl [6-(10-phenyldecanyl)tetrahydropyran-2-yl]acetate (9), methyl 2-(6-tridecyltetrahydro-2H-pyran-2-yl)acetate (10), methyl 2-(5-tetradecyltetrahydro-2-furanyl)acetate (11), 2-oxo-14-(3',4'-methylenedioxyphenyl)-trans-3-tetradecene (12), 2-oxo-16-(3',4'-methylenedioxyphenyl)-trans-3-hexadecene (13), and 2-oxo-16-phenyl-3-hexadecane (14). In addition, p-eugenol (15), methyleugenol (16), Z-piperolide (17), demethoxyyangonin (18), 5,6-dehydro-7,8-dihydromethysticin (19), cepharanone B (20), piperolactam A (21), cepharadione B (22), N-trans-feruloyltyramine (23), and N-trans-(p-coumaroyl)tyramine (24) were obtained from the anti-TBC stem extract of the plant. GC-MS and HPLC analyses of the essential oils of the leaves and stem revealed that safrol (25) was the major component of the oils. Compounds 2, 3, 6, 18-21, and 24 inhibited the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis when tested by the MABA assay, with MIC values ranging from 4 to 64 microg/mL. PMID:15620234

  12. Characterizing the secondary hydration shell on hydrated myoglobin, hemoglobin, and lysozyme powders by its vitrification behavior on cooling and its calorimetric glass-->liquid transition and crystallization behavior on reheating.

    PubMed Central

    Sartor, G; Hallbrucker, A; Mayer, E

    1995-01-01

    For hydrated metmyoglobin, methemoglobin, and lysozyme powders, the freezable water fraction of between approximately 0.3-0.4 g water/g protein up to approximately 0.7-0.8 g water/g protein has been fully vitrified by cooling at rates up to approximately 1500 K min-1 and the influence of cooling rate characterized by x-ray diffractograms. This vitreous but freezable water fraction started to crystallize at approximately 210 K to cubic ice and at approximately 240 K to hexagonal ice. Measurements by differential scanning calorimetry have shown that this vitreous but freezable water fraction undergoes, on reheating at a rate of 30 K min-1, a glass-->liquid transition with an onset temperature of between approximately 164 and approximately 174 K, with a width of between approximately 9 and approximately 16 degrees and an increase in heat capacity of between approximately 20 and approximately 40 J K-1 (mol of freezable water)-1 but that the glass transition disappears upon crystallization of the freezable water. These calorimetric features are similar to those of water imbibed in the pores of a synthetic hydrogel but very different from those of glassy bulk water. The difference to glassy bulk water's properties is attributed to hydrophilic interaction and H-bonding of the macromolecules' segments with the freezable water fraction, which thereby becomes dynamically modified. Abrupt increase in minimal or critical cooling rate necessary for complete vitrification is observed at approximately 0.7-0.8 g water/g protein, which is attributed to an abrupt increase of water's mobility, and it is remarkably close to the threshold value of water's mobility on a hydrated protein reported by Kimmich et al. (1990, Biophys. J. 58:1183). The hydration level of approximately 0.7-0.8 g water/g protein is approximately that necessary for completing the secondary hydration shell. PMID:8599674

  13. Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2012-10-23

    Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

  14. Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2010-09-07

    Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

  15. Oxygen stabilized zirconium vanadium intermetallic compound

    DOEpatents

    Mendelsohn, Marshall H. (Woodridge, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1982-01-01

    An oxygen stabilized intermetallic compound having the formula Zr.sub.x OV.sub.y where x=0.7 to 2.0 and y=0.18 to 0.33. The compound is capable of reversibly sorbing hydrogen at temperatures from -196.degree. C. to 450.degree. C. at pressures down to 10.sup.-6 Torr. The compound is also capable of selectively sorbing hydrogen from gaseous mixtures in the presence of CO and CO.sub.2.

  16. Efficient sequential estimation for compound poisson processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. R. Adke; E. S. Murphree

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses uniformly minimum variance, unbiased sequential estimation of a real-valued parametric function for a compound Poisson process when the compounding random variables belong to the exponential family. The characterization of Cramer-Rao efficient plans by Stefanov (1982 b) is shown to be incomplete by obtaining a new efficient plan for the compound Poisson-Bernoulli process. This new plan completes the

  17. High-Strength, Superelastic Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Malcolm; Noebe, Ronald; Dellacorte, Christopher; Bigelow, Glen; Thomas, Fransua

    2013-01-01

    In a previous disclosure, the use of 60- NiTiNOL, an ordered intermetallic compound composed of 60 weight percent nickel and 40 weight percent titanium, was investigated as a material for advanced aerospace bearings due to its unique combination of physical properties. Lessons learned during the development of applications for this material have led to the discovery that, with the addition of a ternary element, the resulting material can be thermally processed at a lower temperature to attain the same desirable hardness level as the original material. Processing at a lower temperature is beneficial, not only because it reduces processing costs from energy consumption, but because it also significantly reduces the possibility of quench cracking and thermal distortion, which have been problematic with the original material. A family of ternary substitutions has been identified, including Hf and Zr in various atomic percentages with varying concentrations of Ni and Ti. In the present innovation, a ternary intermetallic compound consisting of 57.6 weight percent Ni, 39.2 weight percent Ti, and 3.2 weight percent Hf (54Ni-45Ti-1Hf atomic percent) was prepared by casting. In this material, Hf substitutes for some of the Ti atoms in the material. In an alternate embodiment of the innovation, Zr, which is close in chemical behavior to Hf, is used as the substitutional element. With either substitution, the solvus temperature of the material is reduced, and lower temperatures can be used to obtain the necessary hardness values. The advantages of this innovation include the ability to solution-treat the material at a lower temperature and still achieve the required hardness for bearings (at least 50 Rockwell C) and superelastic behavior with recoverable strains greater than 2%. Most structural alloys will not return to their original shape after being deformed as little as 0.2% (a tenth of that possible with superelastic materials like 60 NiTiNOL). Because lower temperatures can be used in the heat treatment process, less energy will be consumed, and there will be less dimensional distortion and quench cracking. This results in fewer scrap parts, less material waste from large amounts of material removal, and fewer machining steps to rework parts that are out of specification. This material has a combination of properties that have been previously unobtainable. The material has a Young s modulus of approximately 95 GPa (about half that of conventional steels), moderate density (10 to 15% lower than conventional steels), excellent corrosion resistance, and high hardness (58 to 62 HRC). These properties make this material uniquely suited for advanced bearings.

  18. Hydrodesulfurization catalyst by Chevrel phase compounds

    DOEpatents

    McCarty, K.F.; Schrader, G.L.

    1985-05-20

    A process is disclosed for the hydrodesulfurization of sulfur-containing hydrocarbon fuel with reduced ternary molybdenum sulfides, known as Chevrel phase compounds. Chevrel phase compounds of the general composition M/sub x/Mo/sub 6/S/sub 8/, with M being Ho, Pb, Sn, Ag, In, Cu, Fe, Ni, or Co, were found to have hydrodesulfurization activities comparable to model unpromoted and cobalt-promoted MoS/sub 2/ catalysts. The most active catalysts were the ''large'' cation compounds (Ho, Pb, Sn), and the least active catalysts were the ''small'' cation compounds (Cu, Fe, Ni, Co.).

  19. Two new compounds isolated from Liriope muscari.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Zhi-Hao; Cheng, Xian-Long; Liu, Jing; He, Yi; Zhou, Chao; Guo, Ying; Lin, Rui-Chao; Wang, Gang-Li

    2012-01-01

    Two new compounds, (2S,3R)-methyl 7-hydroxy-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-phenyl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-2,3-dihydrobenzofuran-5-carboxylate (1) and (4R,5S)-5-(3-hydroxy-2,6-dimethylphenyl)-4-isopropyldihydrofuran-2-one (2), tentatively named norcurlignan and limlactone, respectively, were isolated from Liriope muscari, together with the known compound (-)-pinoresinol (3). The structures of these compounds were elucidated and characterized on the basis of 1D NMR, 2D NMR, CD and MS data. The in vitro antioxidant activities of compounds 1-3 were assessed by the DPPH and ABTS scavenging methods. PMID:22832879

  20. Comprehending compounds: evidence for metaphoric skill?

    PubMed

    Gottfried, G M

    1997-02-01

    Previous studies of children's comprehension of compound nouns show that three-year-olds can identify the appropriate referent for a compound when shown picture arrays that include salient distractors. The four studies presented here investigate comprehension of one kind of compound, metaphoric compounds (i.e. noun-noun compounds in which one noun expresses similarity to another object, as in catfish). Forty-four three-year-olds, 45 five-year-olds and 22 adults were shown a series of picture arrays and were asked to identify referents of various types of metaphoric compounds. The arrays included target pictures that had metaphoric resemblances based on shape (e.g. bug shaped like a stick) or on colour/pattern (e.g. shells with black and white stripes, like a zebra). Results showed that three- and five-year-olds can comprehend a shape-based metaphoric compounds such as stick-bug, even when faced with salient distractors (e.g. a stick, a bug next to a stick). The younger children had some difficulty with colour-based compounds, such as zebra-shells. Overall, five-year-olds outperformed three-year-olds but performed significantly less well than adults. However, even at age 3, children did not show a general expectation to interpret the compounds literally. PMID:9154013

  1. Hydrodesulfurization catalysis by Chevrel phase compounds

    DOEpatents

    McCarty, Kevin F. (Livermore, CA); Schrader, Glenn L. (Ames, IA)

    1985-12-24

    A process is disclosed for the hydrodesulfurization of sulfur-containing hydrocarbon fuel with reduced ternary molybdenum sulfides, known as Chevrel phase compounds. Chevrel phase compounds of the general composition M.sub.x Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8, with M being Ho, Pb, Sn, Ag, In, Cu, Fe, Ni, or Co, were found to have hydrodesulfurization activities comparable to model unpromoted and cobalt-promoted MoS.sub.2 catalysts. The most active catalysts were the "large" cation compounds (Ho, Pb, Sn), and the least active catalysts were the "small" cation compounds (Cu, Fe, Ni, Co.).

  2. Electroreduction of Halogenated Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondinini, Sandra; Vertova, Alberto

    The electroreductive cleavage of the carbon-halogen bond in halogenated organic compounds has been extensively studied for more than 70 years, since it is prodromal to a large variety of synthetic applications in organic electrochemistry. Over the years the research interest have progressively included the environmental applications, since several organic halocompounds are known to have (or have had) a serious environmental impact because of their (present or past) wide use as cleaning agents, herbicides, cryogenic fluids, reagents (e.g. allyl and vinyl monomers) for large production materials, etc. Recent studies have also demonstrated the wide spread out- and in-door-presence of volatile organic halides, although at low level, in connexion with residential and non-residential (e.g. stores, restaurants and transportation) activities. In this context, the detoxification of emissions to air, water and land by the selective removal of the halogen group represents a valid treatment route, which, although not leading to the complete mineralization of the pollutants, produces less harmful streams to be easily treated by electrochemical or conventional techniques. The electroreduction process is analysed and discussed in terms of electrode material, reaction medium, cell design and operation, and of substrate classification.

  3. Superconducting compounds and alloys research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, G.

    1975-01-01

    Resistivity measurements as a function of temperature were performed on alloys of the binary material system In sub(1-x) Bi sub x for x varying between 0 and 1. It was found that for all single-phase alloys (the pure elements, alpha-In, and the three intermetallic compounds) at temperatures sufficiently above the Debye-temperature, the resistivity p can be expressed as p = a sub o T(n), where a sub o and n are composition-dependent constants. The same exponential relationship can also be applied for the sub-system In-In2Bi, when the two phases are in compositional equilibrium. Superconductivity measurements on single and two-phase alloys can be explained with respect to the phase diagram. There occur three superconducting phases (alpha-In, In2Bi, and In5Bi3) with different transition temperatures in the alloying system. The magnitude of the transition temperatures for the various intermetallic phases of In-Bi is such that the disappearance or occurrence of a phase in two component alloys can be demonstrated easily by means of superconductivity measurements.

  4. Heterogeneous Integration of Compound Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutanabbir, Oussama; Gösele, Ulrich

    2010-08-01

    The ability to tailor compound semiconductors and to integrate them onto foreign substrates can lead to superior or novel functionalities with a potential impact on various areas in electronics, optoelectronics, spintronics, biosensing, and photovoltaics. This review provides a brief description of different approaches to achieve this heterogeneous integration, with an emphasis on the ion-cut process, also known commercially as the Smart-Cut™ process. This process combines semiconductor wafer bonding and undercutting using defect engineering by light ion implantation. Bulk-quality heterostructures frequently unattainable by direct epitaxial growth can be produced, provided that a list of technical criteria is fulfilled, thus offering an additional degree of freedom in the design and fabrication of heterogeneous and flexible devices. Ion cutting is a generic process that can be employed to split and transfer fine monocrystalline layers from various crystals. Materials and engineering issues as well as our current understanding of the underlying physics involved in its application to cleaving thin layers from freestanding GaN, InP, and GaAs wafers are presented.

  5. Epitaxial Growth of Condensed Aromatic Polycyclic Compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Suito; N. Uyeda; M. Ashida

    1962-01-01

    THE epitaxial growth of thin crystalline films vacuum evaporated on a surface of single crystal is a very common phenomenon nowadays. However, the materials used so far have been mostly restricted only to metals or inorganic compounds. Recently, being concerned with the semiconductor behaviour. vacuum-evaporated films of various kinds of condensed aromatic polycyclic compounds have been often dealt with by

  6. THE COMPOUNDING PARAMETER IN SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roumyana Slabakova

    2002-01-01

    This article presents an experimental study investigating the Compounding Parameter in the L2 Spanish interlanguage of English and French native speakers in the light of the Subset Principle (SP) and its predictions for the L2 development process. The Compounding Parameter (Snyder 1995, 2001 ) argues that languages permit complex predic ate constructions like verb -particles, resultatives, and double objects if

  7. A[subscript 2]: Element or Compound?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stains, Marilyne; Talanquer, Vicente

    2007-01-01

    Particulate questions were used to investigate the strength of the mental association between the concept of compound and microscopic representations of molecules in students with different levels of chemistry preparation. The results have suggested that the mental association between the concepts of compound and particulate representations of…

  8. A new compound from Geum rivale L.

    PubMed

    Ming, Dong-Sheng; Jiang, Ren-Wang; But, Paul Pui-Hay; Towers, G H Neil; Yu, De-Quan

    2002-09-01

    A new compound, 1-O-methyl-6-O-caffeoyl-beta-D-glucopyranose (1), has been isolated from the aerial part of G. rivale, together with five known compounds, cecropiacic acid (2), niga-ichgoside (3), gallic acid (4), 1-o-protocatechuoylglucose (5), and sucrose (6). Their structures were elucidated by spectral methods and chemical reactions. PMID:12118512

  9. A new compound from Geum rivale L

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dong-Sheng Ming; Ren-Wang Jiang; Paul Pui-Hay But; G. H. Neil Towers; De-Quan Yu

    2002-01-01

    A new compound, 1- O -methyl-6- O -caffeoyl- g - d -glucopyranose ( 1 ), has been isolated from the aerial part of G. rivale , together with five known compounds, cecropiacic acid ( 2 ), niga-ichgoside ( 3 ), gallic acid ( 4 ), 1- o -protocatechuoylglucose ( 5 ), and sucrose ( 6 ). Their structures were elucidated

  10. Thermal Stability of Graphite Fluoride Intercalation Compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. M. Paasonen; A. S. Nazarov

    2001-01-01

    It is shown that the thermolysis of graphite fluoride intercalation compounds involves a few stages, the last of which is the exothermic decomposition of the intercalation host. The thermal stability of these compounds is determined by the nature of the intercalant.

  11. Hybrid Compounding in New Zealand English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degani, Marta; Onysko, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates hybrid compound formation of Maori and English terms in present day New Zealand English (NZE). On the background of Maori and English language contact, the phenomenon of hybrid compounding emerges as a process that, on the one hand, symbolizes the vitality of the Maori element in NZE and, on the other hand, marks the…

  12. Compounds from the roots of Jasminum sambac.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lin-Hong; Hu, Min; Yan, Yong-Ming; Lu, Qing; Cheng, Yong-Xian

    2012-01-01

    Four new compounds (+)-jasminoids A, B, C, and D, together with seven known compounds, were isolated from the roots of Jasminum sambac. Their structures were identified using spectroscopic methods. This study provides a better understanding to the chemical composition of J. sambac roots that have been thought to be one ingredient of an ancient prescription 'Ma-Fei-San'. PMID:23134371

  13. (CHINA) PERFLUORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUND EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide range of perfluorinated organic compounds (PFCs) has been used in a variety of industrial processes and consumer products. The most commonly studied PFCs include perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), but there are many more compounds in this c...

  14. Care and Feeding of the Compound Microscope

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Keirle, Matt

    This lab activity from the Biotechnology Alliance for Suncoast Biology Educators is intended to demonstrate appropriate use of a microscope. It covers the basic care and operation of a compound light microscope. The lesson includes information on how a compound microscope works, a diagram of its parts, tips for usage, a practice activity, and a checklist for putting the microscope away.

  15. Heterogeneous photocatalytic reactions of sulfur aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Samokhvalov, Alexander

    2011-11-18

    Sulfur aromatic compounds, such as mono-, di-, tri-, and tetraalkyl-substituted thiophene, benzothiophenes, dibenzothiophenes, are the molecular components of many fossils (petroleum, oil shale, tar sands, bitumen). Structural units of natural, cross-linked heteroaromatic polymers present in brown coals, turf, and soil are similar to those of sulfur aromatic compounds. Many sulfur aromatic compounds are found in the streams of petroleum refining and upgrading (naphthas, gas oils) and in the consumer products (gasoline, diesel, jet fuels, heating fuels). Besides fossils, the structural fragments of sulfur aromatic compounds are present in molecules of certain organic semiconductors, pesticides, small molecule drugs, and in certain biomolecules present in human body (pheomelanin pigments). Photocatalysis is the frontier area of physical chemistry that studies chemical reactions initiated by absorption of photons by photocatalysts, that is, upon electronic rather than thermal activation, under "green" ambient conditions. This review provides systematization and critical review of the fundamental chemical and physicochemical information on heterogeneous photocatalysis of sulfur aromatic compounds accumulated in the last 20-30 years. Specifically, the following topics are covered: physicochemical properties of sulfur aromatic compounds, major classes of heterogeneous photocatalysts, mechanisms and reactive intermediates of photocatalytic reactions of sulfur aromatic compounds, and the selectivity of these reactions. Quantum chemical calculations of properties and structures of sulfur aromatic compounds, their reactive intermediates, and the structure of adsorption complexes formed on the surface of the photocatalysts are also discussed. PMID:21809426

  16. Compound Verbs in Persian: An Euphemistic Phraseology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salies, Tania Gastao

    An analysis of the compound verb system of Persian marks constructions euphemistically by producing an indirect order effect and by alternating different compound and simple forms that bear the same denotation but are governed by a rigorous code of ethics. What really carries the semantic reference in these cases is the process of construing…

  17. Exploring marine resources for bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Kiuru, Paula; D?Auria, M Valeria; Muller, Christian D; Tammela, Päivi; Vuorela, Heikki; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari

    2014-09-01

    Biodiversity in the seas is only partly explored, although marine organisms are excellent sources for many industrial products. Through close co-operation between industrial and academic partners, it is possible to successfully collect, isolate and classify marine organisms, such as bacteria, fungi, micro- and macroalgae, cyanobacteria, and marine invertebrates from the oceans and seas globally. Extracts and purified compounds of these organisms can be studied for several therapeutically and industrially significant biological activities, including anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antibacterial, and anticoagulant activities by applying a wide variety of screening tools, as well as for ion channel/receptor modulation and plant growth regulation. Chromatographic isolation of bioactive compounds will be followed by structural determination. Sustainable cultivation methods for promising organisms and biotechnological processes for selected compounds can be developed, as well as biosensors for monitoring the target compounds. The (semi)synthetic modification of marine-based bioactive compounds produces their new derivatives, structural analogs and mimetics that could serve as hit or lead compounds and be used to expand compound libraries based on marine natural products. The research innovations can be targeted for industrial product development in order to improve the growth and productivity of marine biotechnology. Marine research aims at a better understanding of environmentally conscious sourcing of marine biotechnology products and increased public awareness of marine biodiversity. Marine research is expected to offer novel marine-based lead compounds for industries and strengthen their product portfolios related to pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, cosmetic, agrochemical, food processing, material and biosensor applications. PMID:25203732

  18. Crystal structure analysis of intermetallic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, R. A., Jr.; Downey, J. W.; Dwight, A. E.

    1968-01-01

    Study concerns crystal structures and lattice parameters for a number of new intermetallic compounds. Crystal structure data have been collected on equiatomic compounds, formed between an element of the Sc, Ti, V, or Cr group and an element of the Co or Ni group. The data, obtained by conventional methods, are presented in an easily usable tabular form.

  19. Two new compounds from Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Fang; Yan, Yong-Ming; Wang, Xin-Long; Ma, Xiu-Jing; Fu, Xue-Yan; Cheng, Yong-Xian

    2014-10-01

    Two pairs of new enantiomers, lucidulactones A and B (1 and 2), and two known compounds were isolated from Ganoderma lucidum. Their structures were determined by means of spectroscopic methods. The chiral HPLC was used to separate the ( - )- and (+)-antipodes of the new compounds. PMID:25295637

  20. Reduced Phosphorus Compounds in the Environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Siyuan C. Morton; Marc Edwards

    2005-01-01

    Reduced phosphorus compounds (phosphorus with oxidation number less than +5) are and often ignored component of the global phosphorus cycle. This paper highlights environments in which reduced phosphorus compounds may be significant, reviews their importance in industrial applications and products, and examines their possible production by anaerobic bacteria or the steel industry. The role of reduced phosphorus in corrosion of

  1. The Surface Tension of Pure Liquid Compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph J. Jasper

    1972-01-01

    The surface tension tables presented herein are the result of a literature survey, evaluation, and compilation of data of some 2200 pure liquid compounds, 226 of which were reported for a single temperature. These are arranged with related compounds in the increasing order of their molecular weights. As far as possible the method of measurement, nature of atmosphere to which

  2. Ambient Air Monitoring for Sulfur Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrest, Joseph; Newman, Leonard

    1973-01-01

    A literature review of analytical techniques available for the study of compounds at low concentrations points up some of the areas where further research is needed. Compounds reviewed are sulfur dioxide, sulfuric acid, ammonium sulfate and bisulfate, metal sulfates, hydrogen sulfide, and organic sulfides. (BL)

  3. Perfluorinated Compounds: Emerging POPs with Potential Immunotoxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have been recognized as an important class of environmental contaminants commonly detected in blood samples of both wildlife and humans. These compounds have been in use for more than 60 years as surface treatment chemicals, polymerization aids, an...

  4. Nitroaromatic Compounds, from Synthesis to Biodegradation

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Kou-San; Parales, Rebecca E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Nitroaromatic compounds are relatively rare in nature and have been introduced into the environment mainly by human activities. This important class of industrial chemicals is widely used in the synthesis of many diverse products, including dyes, polymers, pesticides, and explosives. Unfortunately, their extensive use has led to environmental contamination of soil and groundwater. The nitro group, which provides chemical and functional diversity in these molecules, also contributes to the recalcitrance of these compounds to biodegradation. The electron-withdrawing nature of the nitro group, in concert with the stability of the benzene ring, makes nitroaromatic compounds resistant to oxidative degradation. Recalcitrance is further compounded by their acute toxicity, mutagenicity, and easy reduction into carcinogenic aromatic amines. Nitroaromatic compounds are hazardous to human health and are registered on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's list of priority pollutants for environmental remediation. Although the majority of these compounds are synthetic in nature, microorganisms in contaminated environments have rapidly adapted to their presence by evolving new biodegradation pathways that take advantage of them as sources of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. This review provides an overview of the synthesis of both man-made and biogenic nitroaromatic compounds, the bacteria that have been identified to grow on and completely mineralize nitroaromatic compounds, and the pathways that are present in these strains. The possible evolutionary origins of the newly evolved pathways are also discussed. PMID:20508249

  5. Organochlorine Compounds and Risk of Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Tongzhang Zheng, of Yale University, New Haven, CT, and colleagues conducted a hospital-based case-control study in Connecticut to investigate risk for breast cancer associated with exposure to organochlorine compounds. Levels of organochlorine compounds are being measured in breast adipose (fatty) tissue and blood serum obtained from women who had surgery or biopsies for breast cancer or benign breast disease.

  6. Volatile organic compounds in ambient aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Kumi; Mizuno, Riichi; Igawa, Manabu

    2010-07-01

    In order to investigate the concentration levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ambient aerosols, monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs) and chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHs) in the particulate phase were measured simultaneously with those in the gas phase in the urban atmosphere. Six compounds were detected in the aerosols at concentrations from 0.051 (1,2-dichloroethane) to 1.75 ng m - 3 (benzene). Benzene was detected as the most dominant compound in the aerosols, although toluene was the most dominant compound in the gas phase. The VOCs in the aerosols had concentrations comparable to those reported for some semi-volatile organic compounds (SOCs) in the aerosols. The concentrations of the VOCs in the aerosols were primarily controlled by the aerosol mass loading. Temperature and relative humidity had no significant effect on the gas/particle partitioning of the VOCs. Our results also suggested that the hygroscopic properties of the aerosols should be considered to discuss the partitioning of the VOCs.

  7. Herbal Compounds and Toxins Modulating TRP Channels

    PubMed Central

    Vriens, Joris; Nilius, Bernd; Vennekens, Rudi

    2008-01-01

    Although the benefits are sometimes obvious, traditional or herbal medicine is regarded with skepticism, because the mechanism through which plant compounds exert their powers are largely elusive. Recent studies have shown however that many of these plant compounds interact with specific ion channels and thereby modulate the sensing mechanism of the human body. Especially members of the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels have drawn large attention lately as the receptors for plant-derived compounds such as capsaicin and menthol. TRP channels constitute a large and diverse family of channel proteins that can serve as versatile sensors that allow individual cells and entire organisms to detect changes in their environment. For this family, a striking number of empirical views have turned into mechanism-based actions of natural compounds. In this review we will give an overview of herbal compounds and toxins, which modulate TRP channels. PMID:19305789

  8. Water-soluble constituents of caraway: aromatic compound, aromatic compound glucoside and glucides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tetsuko Matsumura; Toru Ishikawa; Junichi Kitajima

    2002-01-01

    From the water-soluble portion of the methanolic extract of caraway (fruit of Carum carvi L.), an aromatic compound, an aromatic compound glucoside and a glucide were isolated together with 16 known compounds. Their structures were clarified as 2-methoxy-2-(4?-hydroxyphenyl)ethanol, junipediol A 2-O-?-d-glucopyranoside and l-fucitol, respectively.

  9. Thiophenic Sulfur Compounds Released During Coal Pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Mengwen; Kong, Jiao; Dong, Jie; Jiao, Haili; Li, Fan

    2013-06-01

    Thiophenic sulfur compounds are released during coal gasification, carbonization, and combustion. Previous studies indicate that thiophenic sulfur compounds degrade very slowly in the environment, and are more carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogenous compounds. Therefore, it is very important to study the principle of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal conversion, in order to control their emission and promote clean coal utilization. To realize this goal and understand the formation mechanism of thiophenic sulfur compounds, this study focused on the release behavior of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis, which is an important phase for all coal thermal conversion processes. The pyrolyzer (CDS-5250) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Focus GC-DSQII) were used to analyze thiophenic sulfur compounds in situ. Several coals with different coal ranks and sulfur contents were chosen as experimental samples, and thiophenic sulfur compounds of the gas produced during pyrolysis under different temperatures and heating rates were investigated. Levels of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene were obtained during pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 1300°C, and heating rates ranging from 6°C/ms to 14°C/ms and 6°C/s to 14°C/s. Moreover, the relationship between the total amount of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene released during coal pyrolysis and the organic sulfur content in coal was also discussed. This study is beneficial for understanding the formation and control of thiophenic sulfur compounds, since it provides a series of significant results that show the impact that operation conditions and organic sulfur content in coal have on the amount and species of thiophenic sulfur compounds produced during coal pyrolysis. PMID:23781126

  10. Thiophenic Sulfur Compounds Released During Coal Pyrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Mengwen; Kong, Jiao; Dong, Jie; Jiao, Haili; Li, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Thiophenic sulfur compounds are released during coal gasification, carbonization, and combustion. Previous studies indicate that thiophenic sulfur compounds degrade very slowly in the environment, and are more carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogenous compounds. Therefore, it is very important to study the principle of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal conversion, in order to control their emission and promote clean coal utilization. To realize this goal and understand the formation mechanism of thiophenic sulfur compounds, this study focused on the release behavior of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis, which is an important phase for all coal thermal conversion processes. The pyrolyzer (CDS-5250) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (Focus GC-DSQII) were used to analyze thiophenic sulfur compounds in situ. Several coals with different coal ranks and sulfur contents were chosen as experimental samples, and thiophenic sulfur compounds of the gas produced during pyrolysis under different temperatures and heating rates were investigated. Levels of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene were obtained during pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 1300°C, and heating rates ranging from 6°C/ms to 14°C/ms and 6°C/s to 14°C/s. Moreover, the relationship between the total amount of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene released during coal pyrolysis and the organic sulfur content in coal was also discussed. This study is beneficial for understanding the formation and control of thiophenic sulfur compounds, since it provides a series of significant results that show the impact that operation conditions and organic sulfur content in coal have on the amount and species of thiophenic sulfur compounds produced during coal pyrolysis. PMID:23781126

  11. Two-step thermal spin transition and LIESST relaxation of the polymeric spin-crossover compounds Fe(X-py)2[Ag(CN)2]2 (X=H, 3-methyl, 4-methyl, 3,4-dimethyl, 3-Cl).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Velamazán, J Alberto; Carbonera, Chiara; Castro, Miguel; Palacios, Elías; Kitazawa, Takafumi; Létard, Jean-François; Burriel, Ramón

    2010-08-01

    In the series of polymeric spin-crossover compounds Fe(X-py)(2)[Ag(CN)(2))](2) (py=pyridine, X=H, 3-Cl, 3-methyl, 4-methyl, 3,4-dimethyl), magnetic and calorimetric measurements have revealed that the conversion from the high-spin (HS) to the low-spin (LS) state occurs by two-step transitions for three out of five members of the family (X=H, 4-methyl, and X=3,4-dimethyl). The two other compounds (X=3-Cl and 3-methyl) show respectively an incomplete spin transition and no transition at all, the latter remaining in the HS state in the whole temperature range. The spin-crossover behaviour of the compound undergoing two-step transitions is well described by a thermodynamic model that considers both steps. Calculations with this model show low cooperativity in this type of systems. Reflectivity and photomagnetic experiments reveal that all of the compounds except that with X=3-methyl undergo light-induced excited spin state trapping (LIESST) at low temperatures. Isothermal HS-to-LS relaxation curves at different temperatures support the low-cooperativity character by following an exponential decay law, although in the thermally activated regime and for aX=H and X=3,4-dimethyl the behaviour is well described by a double exponential function in accordance with the two-step thermal spin transition. The thermodynamic parameters determined from this isothermal analysis were used for simulation of thermal relaxation curves, which nicely reproduce the experimental data. PMID:20583049

  12. An isoperibol micro-bomb calorimeter for measurement of the enthalpy of combustion of organic compounds. Application to the study of succinic acid and acetanilide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aarón Rojas; Alejandro Valdés

    2003-01-01

    A micro static-bomb combustion calorimeter, developed from a 1107 Parr semi-micro bomb, has been provided with a new micro-bomb and calorimetric bucket. In the best conditions of operation, the energy equivalent of this calorimetric arrangement is just ?(calor)=(731.82±0.22) J·K?1, which means an uncertainty of 0.03 per cent for the calibration with benzoic acid NIST 39j. This combustion calorimeter has been

  13. TRABALHOS ACEITOS NO XVI SBSR(Para localizar: Ctrl+F) (PAPERS ACCEPTED FOR XVI SBSR)

    E-print Network

    Avaliação da cobertura vegetal por meio dos índices de vegetação SR, NDVI, SAVI e EVI na subbacia do vale índices de vegetação NDVI, SAVI e IAF na caracterização da cobertura vegetativa da região Norte de Minas 79 Identificação das fases de cultivo da canadeaçúcar a partir do perfil temporal de NDVI do sensor

  14. Thermodynamic properties of organic iodine compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Laurent; Gaona, Xavier

    2011-11-01

    A critical evaluation has been made of the thermodynamic properties reported in the literature for 43 organic iodine compounds in the solid, liquid, or ideal gas state. These compounds include aliphatic, cyclic and aromatic iodides, iodophenols, iodocarboxylic acids, and acetyl and benzoyl iodides. The evaluation has been made on the basis of carbon number systematics and group additivity relations, which also allowed to provide estimates of the thermodynamic properties of those compounds for which no experimental data were available. Standard molal thermodynamic properties at 25 °C and 1 bar and heat capacity coefficients are reported for 13 crystalline, 29 liquid, and 39 ideal gas organic iodine compounds, which can be used to calculate the corresponding properties as a function of temperature and pressure. Values derived for the standard molal Gibbs energy of formation at 25 °C and 1 bar of these crystalline, liquid, and ideal gas organic iodine compounds have subsequently been combined with either solubility measurements or gas/water partition coefficients to obtain values for the standard partial molal Gibbs energies of formation at 25 °C and 1 bar of 32 aqueous organic iodine compounds. The thermodynamic properties of organic iodine compounds calculated in the present study can be used together with those for aqueous inorganic iodine species to predict the organic/inorganic speciation of iodine in marine sediments and petroleum systems, or in the near- and far-field of nuclear waste repositories.

  15. Development of artemisinin compounds for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Lai, Henry C; Singh, Narendra P; Sasaki, Tomikazu

    2013-02-01

    Artemisinin contains an endoperoxide moiety that can react with iron to form cytotoxic free radicals. Cancer cells contain significantly more intracellular free iron than normal cells and it has been shown that artemisinin and its analogs selectively cause apoptosis in many cancer cell lines. In addition, artemisinin compounds have been shown to have anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, anti-metastasis, and growth inhibition effects. These properties make artemisinin compounds attractive cancer chemotherapeutic drug candidates. However, simple artemisinin analogs are less potent than traditional cancer chemotherapeutic agents and have short plasma half-lives, and would require high dosage and frequent administration to be effective for cancer treatment. More potent and target-selective artemisinin-compounds are being developed. These include artemisinin dimers and trimers, artemisinin hybrid compounds, and tagging of artemisinin compounds to molecules that are involved in the intracellular iron-delivery mechanism. These compounds are promising potent anticancer compounds that produce significantly less side effect than traditional chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:22935909

  16. Distributed imaging using compound eye sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Peter K.; Ara, Farhana; Thomas, Paul J.; Hornsey, Richard I.

    2004-10-01

    The capture of a wide field of view (FOV) scene by dividing it into multiple sub-images is a technique with many precedents in the natural world, the most familiar being the compound eyes of insects and arthropods. Artificial structures of networked cameras and simple compound eyes have been constructed for applications in robotics and machine vision. Previous work in this laboratory has explored the construction and calibration of sensors which produce multiple small images (of ~150 pixels in diameter) for high-speed object tracking. In this paper design options are presented for electronic compound eyes consisting of 101 - 103 identical 'eyelets'. To implement a compound eye, multiple sub-images can be captured by distributing cameras and/or image collection optics. Figures of merit for comparisons will be developed to illustrate the impact of design choices on the field of view, resolution, information rate, image processing, calibration, environmental sensitivity and compatibility with integrated CMOS imagers. Whereas compound eyes in nature are outward-looking, the methodology and subsystems for an outward-looking compound-eye sensor are similar for in an inward-looking sensor, although inward-looking sensors have a common region viewable to all eyelets simultaneously. The paper addresses the design considerations for compound eyes in both outward-looking and inward-looking configurations.

  17. Risk and liabilities of prescribing compounded medications.

    PubMed

    Randell, Michael D; Duffy, Phillip J

    2014-07-01

    Complications resulting from the use of compounded medications have become a troubling trend nationwide. There is a significant potential for patients to suffer serious harm from the use of substandard medications prepared by compounding pharmacies, and the reality of this problem has been demonstrated in several well-publicized incidences of serious medical complications, including patient deaths, that directly resulted from the use of medications prepared at compounding pharmacies. Unlike US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs, compounded products are not required to meet evidentiary standards for establishing safety and efficacy. Moreover, these products are not held to Good Manufacturing Practices, which require regular inspections, quality control testing, and rejection of material not meeting specifications. Physicians, as well as other prescribers, need to be aware that when a patient suffers harm from using a compounded medication, those injured patients may bring negligence and malpractice claims, not only against the pharmacy and the pharmacist responsible for preparing the medication, but also against the prescribing physician and the physician’s practice. Consequently, the best way for physicians to manage professional risk and avoid both litigation and potential negative patient outcomes related to compounded pharmaceuticals is to not use these products if there is an FDA-approved product available. However, if the use of a compounded medication is medically necessary, then physicians should adhere to the FDA guidance concerning traditional compounding. Moreover, it would be prudent for any physician who intends to either resell or participate in the distribution of compounded products beyond the direct treatment of their patients to consider obtaining the appropriate insurance coverage for this activity. PMID:25276868

  18. Application of bicyclic and cage compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. D.; Archuleta, B. S.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a literature survey of the field of bicyclic and cage compounds were presented, with the objective of identifying those types of compounds with unusual physical and chemical stability, and determining what practical applications have been found for these compounds. Major applications have been as polymers, polymer additives, medicinals, and pesticides. Lesser applications have included fuels, fuel additives, lubricants, lubricant additives, and perfumes. Several areas where further work might be useful were also outlined; these are primarily in the areas of polymers, polymer additives, medicinals, and synthetic lubricants.

  19. Compound leaf development in model plant species.

    PubMed

    Bar, Maya; Ori, Naomi

    2015-02-01

    Plant leaves develop in accordance with a common basic program, which is flexibly adjusted to the species, developmental stage and environment. Two key stages of leaf development are morphogenesis and differentiation. In the case of compound leaves, the morphogenesis stage is prolonged as compared to simple leaves, allowing for the initiation of leaflets. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of how plant hormones and transcriptional regulators modulate compound leaf development, yielding a substantial diversity of leaf forms, focusing on four model compound leaf organisms: cardamine (Cardamine hirsuta), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), medicago (Medicago truncatula) and pea (Pisum sativum). PMID:25449728

  20. Triaryl Pyrazoline Compound Inhibits Flavivirus RNA Replication

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francesc Puig-Basagoiti; Mark Tilgner; Brett M. Forshey; Sean M. Philpott; Noel G. Espina; David E. Wentworth; Scott J. Goebel; Paul S. Masters; Barry Falgout; Ping Ren; David M. Ferguson; Pei-Yong Shi

    2006-01-01

    Triaryl pyrazoline {(5-(4-chloro-phenyl)-3-thiophen-2-yl-4,5-dihydro-pyrazol-1-yl)-phenyl-methanone} in- hibits flavivirus infection in cell culture. The inhibitor was identified through high-throughput screening of a compound library using a luciferase-expressing West Nile (WN) virus infection assay. The compound inhibited an epidemic strain of WN virus without detectable cytotoxicity (a 50% effective concentration of 28 M and a compound concentration of >300 M required to reduce 50%

  1. HEALTH EFFECTS ASSESSMENT FOR VANADIUM AND COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes and evaluates information relevant to a preliminary interim assessment of adverse health effects associated with specific chemicals or compounds. The Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (Superfund) uses these documents in preparing cost-benefit analyse...

  2. HEALTH EFFECTS ASSESSMENT FOR TIN AND COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes and evaluates information relevant to a preliminary interim assessment of adverse health effects associated with specific chemicals or compounds. The Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (Superfund) uses these documents in preparing cost-benefit analyse...

  3. HEALTH EFFECTS ASSESSMENT FOR ANTIMONY AND COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes and evaluates information relevant to a preliminary interim assessment of adverse health effects associated with specific chemicals or compounds. The Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (Superfund) uses these documents in preparing cost-benefit analyse...

  4. Digital Construction Platform: A Compound Arm Approach

    E-print Network

    Spielberg, Nathan A.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a novel large-scale Digital Construction Platform (DCP) for on-site sensing, analysis, and fabrication. The DCP is an in-progress research project consisting of a compound robotic arm system comprised of a ...

  5. Microwave spectra of some volatile organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    A computer-controlled microwave (MRR) spectrometer was used to catalog reference spectra for chemical analysis. Tables of absorption frequency, peak absorption intensity, and integrated intensity are included for 26 volatile organic compounds, all but one of which contain oxygen.

  6. Thermodynamic Analysis of Ionic Compounds: Synthetic Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Claude H.

    1986-01-01

    Shows how thermodynamic cycles can be used to understand trends in heats of formation and aqueous solubilities and, most importantly, how they may be used to choose synthetic routes to new ionic compounds. (JN)

  7. ANALYSIS OF FISH HOMOGENATES FOR PERFLUORINATED COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) which include PFOS and PFOA are widely distributed in wildlife. Whole fish homogenates were analyzed for PFCs from the upper Mississippi, the Missouri and the Ohio rivers. Methods development, validation data, and preliminary study results will b...

  8. Botanical Compounds: Effects on Major Eye Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Tuan-Phat; Mann, Shivani N.; Mandal, Nawajes A.

    2013-01-01

    Botanical compounds have been widely used throughout history as cures for various diseases and ailments. Many of these compounds exhibit strong antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic properties. These are also common damaging mechanisms apparent in several ocular diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, cataract, and retinitis pigmentosa. In recent years, there have been many epidemiological and clinical studies that have demonstrated the beneficial effects of plant-derived compounds, such as curcumin, lutein and zeaxanthin, danshen, ginseng, and many more, on these ocular pathologies. Studies in cell cultures and animal models showed promising results for their uses in eye diseases. While there are many apparent significant correlations, further investigation is needed to uncover the mechanistic pathways of these botanical compounds in order to reach widespread pharmaceutical use and provide noninvasive alternatives for prevention and treatments of the major eye diseases. PMID:23843879

  9. BEHAVIORAL TOXICITY OF TRIALKYLTIN COMPOUNDS: A REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triethyltin (TET) and trimethyltin (TMT) are neurotoxic organotin compounds which produce different patterns of toxicity in adult animals. Exposure to TET produces behavioral toxicity (decreased motor activity, grip strength, operant response rate and startle response amplitude) ...

  10. Detection of odorous compounds in breath.

    PubMed

    Van den Velde, S; van Steenberghe, D; Van Hee, P; Quirynen, M

    2009-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan play a major role in oral malodor. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that other compounds found in mouth air can also contribute to halitosis. Mouth air of 40 healthy volunteers and 40 persons with halitosis was analyzed and compared by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, two sulfur monitors, and organoleptically. Nearly 700 different compounds were detected. Hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan, dimethyl sulfide, di- and trisulfide were increased in persons with breath odor. These compounds were all significantly correlated with the organoleptic score. We concluded that hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan and, to a much lesser extent, dimethyl sulfide, di- and trisulfide can contribute to oral malodor. The role of other compounds, such as amines and organic acids, seems insignificant. PMID:19329466

  11. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY OF SEVERAL TOXIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hydroxyl radical initiated gas phase oxidation of several toxic compounds in nitrous acid, oxides of nitrogen, in air mixtures were investigated. The chemical species studied were: formaldehyde, acrylonitrile, vinylidene chloride, trichloroethylene, allyl chloride, acetaldehy...

  12. Production method for making rare earth compounds

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R. William (Ames, IA); Ellis, Timothy W. (Ames, IA); Dennis, Kevin W. (Ames, IA); Hofer, Robert J. (Ames, IA); Branagan, Daniel J. (Ames, IA)

    1997-11-25

    A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g. a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g. a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g. Nd.sub.2 Fe.sub.14 B or LaNi.sub.5) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

  13. Production method for making rare earth compounds

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R.W.; Ellis, T.W.; Dennis, K.W.; Hofer, R.J.; Branagan, D.J.

    1997-11-25

    A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g., a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g., a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g., Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B or LaNi{sub 5}) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

  14. Food applications of natural antimicrobial compounds

    PubMed Central

    Lucera, Annalisa; Costa, Cristina; Conte, Amalia; Del Nobile, Matteo A.

    2012-01-01

    In agreement with the current trend of giving value to natural and renewable resources, the use of natural antimicrobial compounds, particularly in food and biomedical applications, becomes very frequent. The direct addition of natural compounds to food is the most common method of application, even if numerous efforts have been made to find alternative solutions to the aim of avoiding undesirable inactivation. Dipping, spraying, and coating treatment of food with active solutions are currently applied to product prior to packaging as valid options. The aim of the current work is to give an overview on the use of natural compounds in food sector. In particular, the review will gather numerous case-studies of meat, fish, dairy products, minimally processed fruit and vegetables, and cereal-based products where these compounds found application. PMID:23060862

  15. New twisted intermetallic compound superconductor: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, W. D.; Brown, G. V.; Laurence, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Method for processing Nb3Sn and other intermetallic compound superconductors produces a twisted, stabilized wire or tube which can be used to wind electromagnetics, armatures, rotors, and field windings for motors and generators as well as other magnetic devices.

  16. Fission Barriers of Compound Superheavy Nuclei

    E-print Network

    Sheikh, J. A.

    The dependence of fission barriers on the excitation energy of the compound nucleus impacts the survival probability of superheavy nuclei synthesized in heavy-ion fusion reactions. In this work, we investigate the isentropic ...

  17. Stress-Induced Enzyme Compounds Methamphetamine Neurotoxicity

    MedlinePLUS

    ... has side effects, including gastrointestinal bleeding. Implications Beyond Drug Abuse The finding that neuroinflammation can damage dopamine and ... this article APA style citation National Institute on Drug Abuse. Stress-Induced Enzyme Compounds Methamphetamine Neurotoxicity Retrieved from ...

  18. Perfluorinated Compounds In The Ohio River Basin

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) in waterways include pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), alkylphenols, endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and perfluorinated alkyl compounds (PFCs). Their distributions and persistence in the aquatic environment remain p...

  19. Stabilized lanthanum sulphur compounds. [thermoelectric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, G. H.; Elsner, N. B.; Shearer, C. H. (inventors)

    1983-01-01

    Lanthanum sulfide is maintained in the stable cubic phase form over a temperature range of from 500 C to 1500 C by adding to it small amounts of calcium, barium, or strontium. This compound is an excellent thermoelectric material.

  20. MOLECULAR BASIS OF BIODEGRADATION OF CHLOROAROMATIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons are widely used in industry and agriculture and comprise the bulk of environmental pollutants. lthough simple aromatic compounds are biodegradable by a variety of degradative pathways, their halogenated counterparts are more resistant to bacteria...

  1. MOLECULAR BASIS OF BIODEGRADATION OF CHLOROAROMATIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons are widely used in industry and agriculture, and comprise the bulk of environmental pollutants. Although simple aromatic compounds are biodegradable by a variety of degradative pathways, their halogenated counterparts are more resistant to bacter...

  2. Volatile organic compounds from garden waste

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ken Wilkins; Kjeld Larsen

    1996-01-01

    About 170 compounds were identified in the headspace or liquid exudate from garden waste. Typical for microbiological growth were branched and straight chain alcohols, carboxylic acids and esters C2–C8. Several of the substances have been identified in early studies of compost For some waste samples the organosulfur compound concentration (C1 and C3 mono-, di- and trisulfides) was ca. 10 mg\\/m3

  3. Metal Compounds in Therapy and Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrams, Michael J.; Murrer, Barry A.

    1993-08-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of metal-containing compounds in medicine. This review describes several therapeutic applications, such as the use of platinum complexes in cancer chemotherapy, gold compounds in the treatment of arthritis, gallium in hypercalcemia, bismuth in anti-ulcer medication, and sodium nitroprusside in hypertension. The use of metal radionuclides in diagnosis and radiotherapy and the role of paramagnetic metal complexes as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging are also discussed.

  4. Bioremediation and phytoremediation: Chlorinated and recalcitrant compounds

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    Bioremediation and phytoremediation have progressed, especially with regard to the treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated sites. Sites contaminated with chlorinated and recalcitrant compounds have proven more resistant to these approaches, but exciting progress is being made both in the laboratory and in the field. This book brings together the latest breakthrough thinking and results in bioremediation, with chapters on cometabolic processes, aerobic and anaerobic mechanisms, biological reductive dechlorination processes, bioaugmentation, biomonitoring, and phytoremediation of recalcitrant organic compounds.

  5. Organic compounds passage through RO membranes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dan Libotean; Jaume Giralt; Robert Rallo; Yoram Cohen; Francesc Giralt; Harry F. Ridgway; Grisel Rodriguez; Don Phipps

    2008-01-01

    Organic solute permeation, sorption, and rejection by reverse osmosis membranes, from aqueous solutions, were studied experimentally and via artificial neural networks (ANN)-based quantitative structure–property relations (QSPR), for a set of fifty organic compounds for polyamide and cellulose acetate membranes. Membrane solute sorption and passage for dead-end filtration model experiments were quantified based on radioactivity measurements for radiolabeled compounds in the

  6. Aza crown ether compounds as anion receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hung Sui (East Setauket, NY); Yang, Xiao-Oing (Port Jefferson Station, NY); McBreen, James (Bellport, NY)

    1998-08-04

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI.sup.+ ion in alkali metal batteries.

  7. Aza crown ether compounds as anion receptors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, H.S.; Yang, X.O.; McBreen, J.

    1998-08-04

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI{sup +} ion in alkali metal batteries. 3 figs.

  8. Compound Charpy specimens by adhesive joining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoneim, M. M.; Hammad, F. H.; Pachur, D.; Britz, L.

    1992-03-01

    Compound (reconstituted) Charpy specimens were manufactured by an adhesive joining method in which each half of a previously tested specimen formed the central section of a new testpiece. 29 adhesives were screened to select the most suitable. Compound specimens were precracked and used as minature fracture mechanics specimens and tested in both 3-point static bending and impact. The results are in good agreement with those of conventional specimens. Recommendations for the most appropriate commercial adhesive for hot cell operations are given.

  9. Chemotherapeutic compounds and Acanthamoebae from eye infections.

    PubMed Central

    Nagington, J; Richards, J E

    1976-01-01

    The amoebicidal and amoebistatic action in vitro of 24 compounds was tested on two strains of Acanthamoeba, A. polyphaga and A. castellanii, isolated from eye infections in this country. For comparison, the Ryan strain of A. castellanii and Naegleria gruberi L-1 were also examined. Nine compounds showed sufficient activity to merit further consideration, ie, acriflavine, proflavine, hydroxystilbamidine isethionate, paromomycin, miconazole, amphoterin, neomycin, polymyxin, and the last two combined in Neosporin. PMID:185240

  10. Green Tea Polyphenolic Compounds and Human Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. S. Barbosa; Décio Sabbatini

    2007-01-01

    :  Polyphenols are a structurally diverse group of compounds that occur widely throughout the plant kingdom. Polyphenolic compounds\\u000a are ubiquitous in all plant organs and are, therefore, an integral part of the human diet. Recent interest in food phenolics\\u000a has increased greatly because of the antioxidant and free radical-scavenging abilities associated with some phenolics and\\u000a their potential effects on human health.

  11. Excitonic effects in oxyhalide scintillating host compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shwetha, G.; Kanchana, V.; Valsakumar, M. C.

    2014-10-01

    Ab-initio calculations based on density functional theory have been performed to study the electronic, optical, mechanical, and vibrational properties of scintillator host compounds YOX (X = F, Cl, Br, and I). Semiempirical dispersion correction schemes are used to find the effect of van der Waals forces on these layered compounds and we found this effect to be negligible except for YOBr. Calculations of phonons and elastic constants showed that all the compounds studied here are both dynamically and mechanically stable. YOF and YOI are found to be indirect band gap insulators while YOCl and YOBr are direct band gap insulators. The band gap is found to decrease as we move from fluorine to iodine, while the calculated refractive index shows the opposite trend. As the band gap decreases on going down the periodic table from YOF to YOI, the luminescence increases. The excitonic binding energy calculated, within the effective mass approximation, is found to be more for YOF than the remaining compounds, suggesting that the excitonic effect to be more in YOF than the other compounds. The optical properties are calculated within the Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) and compared with results obtained within the random phase approximation. The TDDFT calculations, using the newly developed bootstrap exchange-correlation kernel, showed significant excitonic effects in all the compounds studied here.

  12. Antinociceptive effects of tetrahydrophthalimides and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Costa, Bianca B C; Corrêa, Rogério; De Souza, Marcia M; Pretto, Juliana B; Ardenghi, Juliana V; De Campos-Buzzi, Fátima; Cechinel Filho, Valdir

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the antinociceptive effects of tetrahydrophthalimides and related compounds in mice. Twenty compounds were obtained by the reaction of cis-1,2,3,6-tetrahydrophthalic anhydride with appropriate amines, dehydration, and addition to the imidic double bond. They were analyzed in the writhing test at 10 mg/kg given intraperitoneally. The most active compound 2-benzyl-5-morpholin-4-yl-hexahydroisoindole-1,3-dione (19) was studied on formalin, capsaicin, glutamate and hot plate models. The antinociceptive activity demonstrated by some studied compounds is promising, and some of them were more active than acetylsalicylic acid and paracetamol used as reference drugs in writhing tests in mice. Compound 19 was about 5-fold more potent than the reference drugs, being also effective by oral route and against the inflammatory response in the formalin test. The results suggest that compound 19 could be used as a model to obtain new and more potent antinociceptive agents. It exhibits an interesting antinociceptive profile, and does not interact with opioid systems. PMID:17542485

  13. Carbonyl Compounds Generated from Electronic Cigarettes

    PubMed Central

    Bekki, Kanae; Uchiyama, Shigehisa; Ohta, Kazushi; Inaba, Yohei; Nakagome, Hideki; Kunugita, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are advertised as being safer than tobacco cigarettes products as the chemical compounds inhaled from e-cigarettes are believed to be fewer and less toxic than those from tobacco cigarettes. Therefore, continuous careful monitoring and risk management of e-cigarettes should be implemented, with the aim of protecting and promoting public health worldwide. Moreover, basic scientific data are required for the regulation of e-cigarette. To date, there have been reports of many hazardous chemical compounds generated from e-cigarettes, particularly carbonyl compounds such as formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, and glyoxal, which are often found in e-cigarette aerosols. These carbonyl compounds are incidentally generated by the oxidation of e-liquid (liquid in e-cigarette; glycerol and glycols) when the liquid comes in contact with the heated nichrome wire. The compositions and concentrations of these compounds vary depending on the type of e-liquid and the battery voltage. In some cases, extremely high concentrations of these carbonyl compounds are generated, and may contribute to various health effects. Suppliers, risk management organizations, and users of e-cigarettes should be aware of this phenomenon. PMID:25353061

  14. Carbonyl compounds generated from electronic cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Bekki, Kanae; Uchiyama, Shigehisa; Ohta, Kazushi; Inaba, Yohei; Nakagome, Hideki; Kunugita, Naoki

    2014-11-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are advertised as being safer than tobacco cigarettes products as the chemical compounds inhaled from e-cigarettes are believed to be fewer and less toxic than those from tobacco cigarettes. Therefore, continuous careful monitoring and risk management of e-cigarettes should be implemented, with the aim of protecting and promoting public health worldwide. Moreover, basic scientific data are required for the regulation of e-cigarette. To date, there have been reports of many hazardous chemical compounds generated from e-cigarettes, particularly carbonyl compounds such as formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, and glyoxal, which are often found in e-cigarette aerosols. These carbonyl compounds are incidentally generated by the oxidation of e-liquid (liquid in e-cigarette; glycerol and glycols) when the liquid comes in contact with the heated nichrome wire. The compositions and concentrations of these compounds vary depending on the type of e-liquid and the battery voltage. In some cases, extremely high concentrations of these carbonyl compounds are generated, and may contribute to various health effects. Suppliers, risk management organizations, and users of e-cigarettes should be aware of this phenomenon. PMID:25353061

  15. Selection criteria for drug-like compounds.

    PubMed

    Muegge, Ingo

    2003-05-01

    The fast identification of quality lead compounds in the pharmaceutical industry through a combination of high throughput synthesis and screening has become more challenging in recent years. Although the number of available compounds for high throughput screening (HTS) has dramatically increased, large-scale random combinatorial libraries have contributed proportionally less to identify novel leads for drug discovery projects. Therefore, the concept of 'drug-likeness' of compound selections has become a focus in recent years. In parallel, the low success rate of converting lead compounds into drugs often due to unfavorable pharmacokinetic parameters has sparked a renewed interest in understanding more clearly what makes a compound drug-like. Various approaches have been devised to address the drug-likeness of molecules employing retrospective analyses of known drug collections as well as attempting to capture 'chemical wisdom' in algorithms. For example, simple property counting schemes, machine learning methods, regression models, and clustering methods have been employed to distinguish between drugs and non-drugs. Here we review computational techniques to address the drug-likeness of compound selections and offer an outlook for the further development of the field. PMID:12647312

  16. Excitonic effects in oxyhalide scintillating host compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Shwetha, G.; Kanchana, V., E-mail: kanchana@iith.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Hyderabad, Ordnance Factory Estate, Yeddumailaram 502 205, Telangana (India); Valsakumar, M. C. [School of Engineering Sciences and Technology (SEST), University of Hyderabad, Prof. C. R. Rao Road, Gachibowli, Hyderabad 500 046, Telangana (India)

    2014-10-07

    Ab-initio calculations based on density functional theory have been performed to study the electronic, optical, mechanical, and vibrational properties of scintillator host compounds YOX (X?=?F, Cl, Br, and I). Semiempirical dispersion correction schemes are used to find the effect of van der Waals forces on these layered compounds and we found this effect to be negligible except for YOBr. Calculations of phonons and elastic constants showed that all the compounds studied here are both dynamically and mechanically stable. YOF and YOI are found to be indirect band gap insulators while YOCl and YOBr are direct band gap insulators. The band gap is found to decrease as we move from fluorine to iodine, while the calculated refractive index shows the opposite trend. As the band gap decreases on going down the periodic table from YOF to YOI, the luminescence increases. The excitonic binding energy calculated, within the effective mass approximation, is found to be more for YOF than the remaining compounds, suggesting that the excitonic effect to be more in YOF than the other compounds. The optical properties are calculated within the Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) and compared with results obtained within the random phase approximation. The TDDFT calculations, using the newly developed bootstrap exchange-correlation kernel, showed significant excitonic effects in all the compounds studied here.

  17. 40 CFR 180.145 - Fluorine compounds; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fluorine compounds; tolerances for residues... Specific Tolerances § 180.145 Fluorine compounds; tolerances for residues...combined residues of the insecticidal fluorine compounds cryolite and synthetic...

  18. 40 CFR 180.145 - Fluorine compounds; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fluorine compounds; tolerances for residues... Specific Tolerances § 180.145 Fluorine compounds; tolerances for residues...combined residues of the insecticidal fluorine compounds cryolite and synthetic...

  19. 40 CFR 180.145 - Fluorine compounds; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fluorine compounds; tolerances for residues... Specific Tolerances § 180.145 Fluorine compounds; tolerances for residues...combined residues of the insecticidal fluorine compounds cryolite and synthetic...

  20. 40 CFR 721.5980 - Dialkyl phosphorodithioate phosphate compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... false Dialkyl phosphorodithioate phosphate compounds. 721.5980 Section 721...721.5980 Dialkyl phosphorodithioate phosphate compounds. (a) Chemical substance...generically as dialkyl phosphorodithioate phosphate compounds (P-90-1642...

  1. 40 CFR 721.5980 - Dialkyl phosphorodithioate phosphate compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... false Dialkyl phosphorodithioate phosphate compounds. 721.5980 Section 721...721.5980 Dialkyl phosphorodithioate phosphate compounds. (a) Chemical substance...generically as dialkyl phosphorodithioate phosphate compounds (P-90-1642...

  2. 40 CFR 721.5980 - Dialkyl phosphorodithioate phosphate compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... false Dialkyl phosphorodithioate phosphate compounds. 721.5980 Section 721...721.5980 Dialkyl phosphorodithioate phosphate compounds. (a) Chemical substance...generically as dialkyl phosphorodithioate phosphate compounds (P-90-1642...

  3. 40 CFR 721.5980 - Dialkyl phosphorodithioate phosphate compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... false Dialkyl phosphorodithioate phosphate compounds. 721.5980 Section 721...721.5980 Dialkyl phosphorodithioate phosphate compounds. (a) Chemical substance...generically as dialkyl phosphorodithioate phosphate compounds (P-90-1642...

  4. Polymers containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications

    DOEpatents

    Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

    2013-04-23

    Polymers comprising residues of cage compound monomers having at least one polyalkoxy silyl substituent are provided. The cage compound monomers are selected from borane cage compound monomers comprising at least 7 cage atoms and/or carborane cage compound monomers comprising 7 to 11 cage compound monomers. Such polymers can further comprise one or more reactive matrices and/or co-monomers covalently bound with the cage compound monomer residues. Articles of manufacture comprising such polymers are also disclosed.

  5. Biodegradation of Aromatic Compounds by Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Eduardo; Ferrández, Abel; Prieto, María A.; García, José L.

    2001-01-01

    Although Escherichia coli has long been recognized as the best-understood living organism, little was known about its abilities to use aromatic compounds as sole carbon and energy sources. This review gives an extensive overview of the current knowledge of the catabolism of aromatic compounds by E. coli. After giving a general overview of the aromatic compounds that E. coli strains encounter and mineralize in the different habitats that they colonize, we provide an up-to-date status report on the genes and proteins involved in the catabolism of such compounds, namely, several aromatic acids (phenylacetic acid, 3- and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, phenylpropionic acid, 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid, and 3-hydroxycinnamic acid) and amines (phenylethylamine, tyramine, and dopamine). Other enzymatic activities acting on aromatic compounds in E. coli are also reviewed and evaluated. The review also reflects the present impact of genomic research and how the analysis of the whole E. coli genome reveals novel aromatic catabolic functions. Moreover, evolutionary considerations derived from sequence comparisons between the aromatic catabolic clusters of E. coli and homologous clusters from an increasing number of bacteria are also discussed. The recent progress in the understanding of the fundamentals that govern the degradation of aromatic compounds in E. coli makes this bacterium a very useful model system to decipher biochemical, genetic, evolutionary, and ecological aspects of the catabolism of such compounds. In the last part of the review, we discuss strategies and concepts to metabolically engineer E. coli to suit specific needs for biodegradation and biotransformation of aromatics and we provide several examples based on selected studies. Finally, conclusions derived from this review may serve as a lead for future research and applications. PMID:11729263

  6. Aberration-corrected electron microscopy of nanoparticles and intermetallic compounds

    E-print Network

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Aberration-corrected electron microscopy of nanoparticles and intermetallic compounds M. Heggen for applications in energy-related catalysis, as well as novel intermetallic compounds, will be presented

  7. Spectroscopic and calorimetric investigation of short and intermediate-range structures and energetics of amorphous SiCO, SiCN, and SiBCN polymer-derived ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widgeon, Scarlett J.

    Polymer-derived ceramics (PDCs) are a new class of amorphous ceramics in the Si-B-C-N system that are synthesized by the pyrolysis of silicon-based organic polymers. PDCs are lightweight and are resistant to creep, crystallization, and oxidation at temperatures near 1800 K making them ideal for a variety of high temperature applications. In spite of being X-ray amorphous, these materials display structural heterogeneity at the nanometer length scale. Their structure and resulting properties can be drastically altered by the utilization of preceramic polymers with differing chemistry and architectures. Fundamental understanding of the atomic structure is critical in deciphering the structure-property relationships and ultimately in controlling their properties for specific engineering applications. The short-range atomic structure has been extensively investigated using a variety of techniques, however, the structures at length scales beyond next-nearest neighbors remained highly controversial. Here we report the results of a spectroscopic and calorimetric study of short and intermediate -range structure and energetic of SiOC and SiBCN PDCs derived from a wide variety of precursors. SiOC PDCs with different carbon contents were synthesized from polysiloxane precurors and their structures were studied using high-resolution 13C and 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The results suggest that these PDCs consists of a continuous mass fractal backbone of corner-shared SiC xO4-x tetrahedral units with "voids" occupied by sp 2-hybridized graphitic carbon. The oxygen-rich SiCxO 4-x units are located at the interior of this backbone with a mass fractal dimension of ~ 2.5, while the carbon-rich units occupy the two-dimensional interface between the backbone and the free carbon nanodomains. Such fractal topology is expected to give rise to unusual mechanical and transport properties characteristic of fractal percolation networks. For example, elastic moduli and transport properties such as electrical conductivity and viscosity may show power-law dependence on composition near and above the percolation threshold of the SiOC network or that of the free-carbon phase. Si(B)CN PDCs with different carbon contents were synthesized by pyrolysis of poly(boro)silylcarbodiimides and poly(boro)silazane precursors and their structure and energetics were studied using multi-nuclear, one- and two- dimensional NMR spectroscopy and oxide melt solution calorimetry. The structure of the polysilylcarbodiimide-derived SiCN PDCs at lower carbon content and pyrolysis temperatures (800 oC) consists of amorphous nanodomains of sp2 carbon and silicon nitride with an interfacial bonding between N, C and Si atoms that is stabilized by the presence of hydrogen. The interfacial Si-C and N-C bonds are destroyed with concomitant hydrogen loss upon increasing the pyrolysis temperature to 1100 oC. Calorimetry results demonstrate that the mixed bonding in the interfacial regions play a key role in the thermodynamic stabilization of these PDCs. The size of the carbon domains increases with increasing carbon content until a continuous amorphous carbon matrix is formed with 55-60 wt % C. The polyborosilylcarbodiimide-derived SiBCN ceramics contain carbon and silicon nitride nanodomains with the BN domains being present predominantly at the interface. In contrast, the structure of the polyborosilazane-derived ceramics consists of significant amount of mixed bonding in the nearest-neighbor coordination environments of Si and B atoms leading to the formation of SiC xN4-x tetrahedral units and BCN2 triangular units. The interfacial region between the SiCN and C nanodomains is occupied by the BCN phase. These results demonstrate that the chemistry of the polymeric precursors exerts major influence on the microstructure and bonding in their derived ceramics.

  8. Nature of phenolic compounds in coffee melanoidins.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Carina; Ribeiro, Miguel; Cruz, Ana C S; Domingues, M Rosário M; Coimbra, Manuel A; Bunzel, Mirko; Nunes, Fernando M

    2014-08-01

    Phenolic compounds are incorporated into coffee melanoidins during roasting mainly in condensed form (42-62 mmol/100 g) and also in ester-linked form (1.1-1.6 mmol/100 g), with incorporation levels depending on the green coffee chlorogenic acid content. The phenolic compounds are incorporated in different coffee melanoidin populations, but mainly in those soluble in 75% ethanol (82%), a significant correlation between the amount of phenolic compounds and the amount of protein and color characteristics of the different melanoidin populations being observed. The incorporation of phenolic compounds into coffee melanoidins is a significant pathway of chlorogenic acid degradation during roasting, representing 23% of the chlorogenic acids lost. These account for the nearly 26% of the material not accounted for by polysaccharides and proteins present in coffee melanodins. The cleavage mechanism and the efficiency of alkaline fusion used to release condensed phenolics from coffee melanoidins suggest that the phenolic compounds can be linked to the polymeric material by aryl-ether, stilbene type, and/or biphenyl linkages. PMID:24998624

  9. Process for production of a borohydride compound

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Millar, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

    2014-08-19

    A process for production of a borohydride compound M(BH.sub.4).sub.y. The process has three steps. The first step combines a compound of formula (R.sup.1O).sub.yM with aluminum, hydrogen and a metallic catalyst containing at least one metal selected from the group consisting of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, vanadium, tantalum and iron to produce a compound of formula M(AlH.sub.3OR.sup.1).sub.y, wherein R.sup.1 is phenyl or phenyl substituted by at least one alkyl or alkoxy group; M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg; and y is one or two; wherein the catalyst is present at a level of at least 200 ppm based on weight of aluminum. The second step combines the compound of formula M(AlH.sub.3OR.sup.1).sub.y with a borate, boroxine or borazine compound to produce M(BH.sub.4).sub.y and a byproduct mixture containing alkali metal and aluminum aryloxides. The third step separates M(BH.sub.4).sub.y from the byproduct mixture.

  10. Atmospheric transformation of volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henley, Michael V.; Bradley, William R.; Wyatt, Sheryl E.; Graziano, G. M.; Wells, J. R.

    2000-07-01

    To be able to understand and predict the concentration of a target compound in the atmosphere one must understand the atmospheric chemistry involved. The transformation of volatile organic compounds in the troposphere is predominantly driven by the interaction with the hydroxyl and nitrate radicals. The hydroxyl radical exists in daylight conditions and its reaction rate constant with an organic compound is typically very fast. The nitrate radical drives the nighttime chemistry. These radicals can scavenge hydrogen from an organic molecule generating secondary products that are often overlooked in detection schemes. Secondary products can be more stable and serve as a better target compound in detection schemes. The gas phase reaction of the hydroxyl radical (OH) with cyclohexanol (COL) has been studied. The rate coefficient was determined to be (19.0 +/- 4.8) X 10-12 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 (at 297 +/- 3 K and 1 atmosphere total pressure) using the relative rate technique with pentanal, decane, and tridecane as the reference compounds. Assuming an average OH concentration of 1 X 106 molecules cm-3, an atmospheric lifetime of 15 h is calculated for cyclohexanol. Products of the OH + COL reaction were determined to more clearly define cyclohexanol's atmospheric degradation mechanism. The observed products were: cyclohexanone, hexanedial, 3- hydroxycyclohexanone, and 4-hydroxycyclohexanone. Consideration of the potential reaction pathways suggest that each of these products is formed via hydrogen abstraction at a different site on the cyclohexanol ring.

  11. Reduced sulfur compound oxidation by Thiobacillus caldus.

    PubMed Central

    Hallberg, K B; Dopson, M; Lindström, E B

    1996-01-01

    The oxidation of reduced inorganic sulfur compounds was studied by using resting cells of the moderate thermophile Thiobacillus caldus strain KU. The oxygen consumption rate and total oxygen consumed were determined for the reduced sulfur compounds thiosulfate, tetrathionate, sulfur, sulfide, and sulfite in the absence and in the presence of inhibitors and uncouplers. The uncouplers 2,4-dinitrophenol and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl-hydrazone had no affect on the oxidation of thiosulfate, suggesting that thiosulfate is metabolized periplasmically. In contrast, the uncouplers completely inhibited the oxidation of tetrathionate, sulfide, sulfur, and sulfite, indicating that these compounds are metabolized in the cytoplasm of T. caldus KU. N-Ethylmaleimide inhibited the oxidation of tetrathionate and thiosulfate at the stage of elemental sulfur, while 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide stopped the oxidation of thiosulfate, tetrathionate, and elemental sulfur at the stage of sulfite. The following intermediates in the oxidation of the sulfur compounds were found by using uncouplers and inhibitors: thiosulfate was oxidized to tetrathionate, elemental sulfur was formed during the oxidation of tetrathionate and sulfide, and sulfite was found as an intermediate of tetrathionate and sulfur metabolism. On the basis of these data we propose a model for the metabolism of the reduced inorganic sulfur compounds by T. caldus KU. PMID:8550443

  12. The Chemistry of Nitroxyl-Releasing Compounds

    PubMed Central

    DuMond, Jenna F.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Nitroxyl (HNO) demonstrates a diverse and unique biological profile compared to nitric oxide, a redox-related compound. Although numerous studies support the use of HNO as a therapeutic agent, the inherent chemical reactivity of HNO requires the use of donor molecules. Two general chemical strategies currently exist for HNO generation from nitrogen-containing molecules: (i) the disproportionation of hydroxylamine derivatives containing good leaving groups attached to the nitrogen atom and (ii) the decomposition of nitroso compounds (X-N=O, where X represents a good leaving group). This review summarizes the synthesis and structure, the HNO-releasing mechanisms, kinetics and by-product formation, and alternative reactions of six major groups of HNO donors: Angeli's salt, Piloty's acid and its derivatives, cyanamide, diazenium diolate-derived compounds, acyl nitroso compounds, and acyloxy nitroso compounds. A large body of work exists defining these six groups of HNO donors and the overall chemistry of each donor requires consideration in light of its ability to produce HNO. The increasing interest in HNO biology and the potential of HNO-based therapeutics presents exciting opportunities to further develop HNO donors as both research tools and potential treatments. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 1637–1648. PMID:21235345

  13. Bio-inspired hemispherical compound eye camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jianliang; Song, Young Min; Xie, Yizhu; Malyarchuk, Viktor; Jung, Inhwa; Choi, Ki-Joong; Liu, Zhuangjian; Park, Hyunsung; Lu, Chaofeng; Kim, Rak-Hwan; Li, Rui; Crozier, Kenneth B.; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A.

    2014-03-01

    Compound eyes in arthropods demonstrate distinct imaging characteristics from human eyes, with wide angle field of view, low aberrations, high acuity to motion and infinite depth of field. Artificial imaging systems with similar geometries and properties are of great interest for many applications. However, the challenges in building such systems with hemispherical, compound apposition layouts cannot be met through established planar sensor technologies and conventional optics. We present our recent progress in combining optics, materials, mechanics and integration schemes to build fully functional artificial compound eye cameras. Nearly full hemispherical shapes (about 160 degrees) with densely packed artificial ommatidia were realized. The number of ommatidia (180) is comparable to those of the eyes of fire ants and bark beetles. The devices combine elastomeric compound optical elements with deformable arrays of thin silicon photodetectors, which were fabricated in the planar geometries and then integrated and elastically transformed to hemispherical shapes. Imaging results and quantitative ray-tracing-based simulations illustrate key features of operation. These general strategies seem to be applicable to other compound eye devices, such as those inspired by moths and lacewings (refracting superposition eyes), lobster and shrimp (reflecting superposition eyes), and houseflies (neural superposition eyes).

  14. Determination of arsenic compounds in earthworms

    SciTech Connect

    Geiszinger, A.; Goessler, W.; Kuehnelt, D.; Kosmus, W. [Karl-Franzens-Univ., Graz (Austria). Inst. for Analytical Chemistry] [Karl-Franzens-Univ., Graz (Austria). Inst. for Analytical Chemistry; Francesconi, K. [Odense Univ. (Denmark). Inst. of Biology] [Odense Univ. (Denmark). Inst. of Biology

    1998-08-01

    Earthworms and soil collected from six sites in Styria, Austria, were investigated for total arsenic concentrations by ICP-MS and for arsenic compounds by HPLC-ICP-MS. Total arsenic concentrations ranged from 3.2 to 17.9 mg/kg dry weight in the worms and from 5.0 to 79.7 mg/kg dry weight in the soil samples. There was no strict correlation between the total arsenic concentrations in the worms and soil. Arsenic compounds were extracted from soil and a freeze-dried earthworm sample with a methanol/water mixture (9:1, v/v). The extracts were evaporated to dryness, redissolved in water, and chromatographed on an anion- and a cation-exchange column. Arsenic compounds were identified by comparison of the retention times with known standards. Only traces of arsenic acid could be extracted from the soil with the methanol/water (9:1, v/v) mixture. The major arsenic compounds detected in the extracts of the earthworms were arsenous acid and arsenic acid. Arsenobetaine was present as a minor constituent, and traces of dimethylarsinic acid were also detected. Two dimethylarsinoyltribosides were also identified in the extracts by co-chromatography with standard compounds. This is the first report of the presence of dimethylarsinoylribosides in a terrestrial organism. Two other minor arsenic species were present in the extract, but their retention times did not match with the retention times of the available standards.

  15. Bioactive Compounds from the Fern Lepisorus contortus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian-Hong; Kondratyuk, Tamara P.; Jermihov, Katherine C.; Marler, Laura E.; Qiu, Xi; Choi, Yongsoo; Cao, Hongmei; Yu, Rui; Sturdy, Megan; Huang, Rong; Liu, Ying; Wang, Li-Qin; Mesecar, Andrew D.; van Breemen, Richard B.; Pezzuto, John M.; Fong, Harry H. S.; Chen, Ye-Gao; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2011-01-01

    Phytochemical investigation of the whole plant of Lepisorus contortus (Christ) Ching led to the isolation of five new phenylethanoid glycosides (1–5), each containing a caffeoyl group, a new flavonoid glycoside (10), as well as 14 known compounds (6–9 and 11–15, syringic acid, vanillic acid, phloretic acid, diplopterol, and ?-sitosterol). This is the first report of phenylethanoid glycosides from the family Polypodiaceae. Compounds 1–15 were evaluated for their cancer chemopreventive potential based on their ability to inhibit tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?)-induced NF-?B activity, nitric oxide (NO) production, aromatase, quinone reductase 2 (QR-2), and COX-1/-2 activities. Quercetin-3-O-?-D-glucoside (15) demonstrated inhibition against QR2 with an IC50 value of 6.7 µM, which confirmed kaempferol/quercetin glycosides as the active compounds to inhibit QR2. The compound also demonstrated NF-?B activity with an IC50 value of 33.6 µM. In addition, compounds 1, 2, 4 and 6 showed aromatase activity with IC50 values of 30.7, 32.3, 26.8, and 35.3 µM, respectively. PMID:21261296

  16. Odour-impact compounds of Gorgonzola cheese.

    PubMed

    Moio, L; Piombino, P; Addeo, F

    2000-05-01

    Volatile concentrates were obtained by vacuum distillation from both natural and creamy Gorgonzola cheese and isolated by continuous liquid-liquid extraction. Both were analysed by high resolution gas chromatography (HRGC), HRGC-mass spectrometry and HRGC-olfactometry. A total of 63 components were identified in the neutral extract of the natural type (21 esters, 13 ketones, 14 alcohols, 5 aldehydes, 1 sulphur compound, 7 aromatic compounds and 2 terpenes) and 52 in the creamy type (17 esters, 12 ketones, 10 alcohols, 5 aldehydes, 1 sulphur compound, 5 aromatic compounds and 2 terpenes). Ketones, whose major components were 2-nonanone and 2-heptanone, were the predominant constituents of the neutral fraction. By olfactometric analysis of the neutral extracts, 23 odour-impact compounds were found in the natural and 21 in the creamy Gorgonzola cheese. 1-Octen-3-ol, ethyl hexanoate, 2-nonanone, 2-heptanone, 2-heptanol, ethyl butanoate, 2-nonanol and 4-methylanisole were the key odorants of the natural cheese, whereas 2-heptanone, 2-heptanol, ethyl butanoate, 3-methyl thiopropanal and an unidentified constituent with a fruity odour were characteristic of the creamy Gorgonzola cheese. On the basis of high odour unity values, 2-nonanone, 1-octen-3-ol, 2-heptanol, ethyl hexanoate, methylanisole and 2-heptanone were the most important odorants of natural and creamy Gorgonzola cheese aroma. PMID:10840681

  17. Processing Novel and Lexicalized Finnish Compound Words

    PubMed Central

    Bertram, Raymond; Hyönä, Jukka

    2011-01-01

    Participants read sentences in which novel and lexicalized two-constituent compound words appeared while their eye movements were measured. The frequency of the first constituent of the compounds was also varied factorially and the frequency of the lexicalized compounds was equated over the two conditions. The sentence frames prior to the target word were matched across conditions. Both lexicality and first constituent frequency had large and significant effects on gaze durations on the target word; moreover the constituent frequency effect was significantly larger for the novel words. These results indicate that first constituent frequency has an effect in two stages: in the initial encoding of the compound and in the construction of meaning for the novel compound. The difference between this pattern of results and those for English prefixed words (Pollatsek, Slattery, & Juhasz, 2008) is apparently due to differences in the construction of meaning stage. A general model of the relationship of the processing of polymorphemic words to how they are fixated is presented. PMID:22518273

  18. Air sparging of organic compounds in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, P.M. [Groundwater Technology, Inc., Tampa, FL (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Soils and aquifers containing organic compounds have been traditionally treated by excavation and disposal of the soil and/or pumping and treating the groundwater. These remedial options are often not practical or cost effective solutions. A more favorable alternative for removal of the adsorbed/dissolved organic compounds would be an in situ technology. Air sparging will remove volatile organic compounds from both the adsorbed and dissolved phases in the saturated zone. This technology effectively creates a crude air stripper below the aquifer where the soil acts as the ``packing``. The air stream that contacts dissolved/adsorbed phase organics in the aquifer induces volatilization. A case history illustrates the effectiveness of air sparging as a remedial technology for addressing organic compounds in soil and groundwater. The site is an operating heavy equipment manufacturing facility in central Florida. The soil and groundwater below a large building at the facility was found to contain primarily diesel type petroleum hydrocarbons during removal of underground storage tanks. The organic compounds identified in the groundwater were Benzene, Xylenes, Ethylbenzene and Toluenes (BTEX), Methyl tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE) and naphthalenes in concentrations related to diesel fuel.

  19. Reflectance spectroscopy of organic compounds: 1. Alkanes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.N.; Curchin, J.M.; Hoefen, T.M.; Swayze, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Reflectance spectra of the organic compounds comprising the alkane series are presented from the ultraviolet to midinfrared, 0.35 to 15.5 /??m. Alkanes are hydrocarbon molecules containing only single carbon-carbon bonds, and are found naturally on the Earth and in the atmospheres of the giant planets and Saturn's moon, Titan. This paper presents the spectral properties of the alkanes as the first in a series of papers to build a spectral database of organic compounds for use in remote sensing studies. Applications range from mapping the environment on the Earth, to the search for organic molecules and life in the solar system and throughout the. universe. We show that the spectral reflectance properties of organic compounds are rich, with major diagnostic spectral features throughout the spectral range studied. Little to no spectral change was observed as a function of temperature and only small shifts and changes in the width of absorption bands were observed between liquids and solids, making remote detection of spectral properties throughout the solar system simpler. Some high molecular weight organic compounds contain single-bonded carbon chains and have spectra similar to alkanes even ' when they fall into other families. Small spectral differences are often present allowing discrimination among some compounds, further illustrating the need to catalog spectral properties for accurate remote sensing identification with spectroscopy.

  20. Diazo compounds in continuous-flow technology.

    PubMed

    Müller, Simon T R; Wirth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Diazo compounds are very versatile reagents in organic chemistry and meet the challenge of selective assembly of structurally complex molecules. Their leaving group is dinitrogen; therefore, they are very clean and atom-efficient reagents. However, diazo compounds are potentially explosive and extremely difficult to handle on an industrial scale. In this review, it is discussed how continuous flow technology can help to make these powerful reagents accessible on large scale. Microstructured devices can improve heat transfer greatly and help with the handling of dangerous reagents safely. The in?situ formation and subsequent consumption of diazo compounds are discussed along with advances in handling diazomethane and ethyl diazoacetate. The potential large-scale applications of a given methodology is emphasized. PMID:25488620

  1. Volatile compounds in shergottite and nakhlite meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, James L.; Aggrey, Kwesi E.; Muenow, David W.

    1990-01-01

    Since discovery of apparent carbonate carbon in Nakhla, significant evidence has accumulated for occurrence of volatile compounds in shergotties and nakhlites. Results are presented from a study of volatile compounds in three shergottites, one nakhlite, and three eucrite control samples. Shergotties ALHA77005, EETA79001, and Shergotty, and the nakhlite Nakhla, all contain oxidized sulfur (sulfate) of preterrestrial origin; sulfur oxidation is most complete in EETA79001/Lith-C. Significant bulk carbonate was confirmed in Nakhla and trace carbonate was substantiated for EETA79001, all of which appears to be preterrestrial in origin. Chlorine covaries with oxidized sulfur, whereas carbonate and sulfate are inversely related. These volatile compounds were probably formed in a highly oxidizing, aqueous environment sometime in the late stage histories of the rocks that are now represented as meteorites. They are consistent with the hypothesis that shergottite and nakhlite meteorites originated on Mars and that Mars has supported aqueous geochemistry during its history.

  2. Energetic Compounds for Future Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenas, A.; Jacob, G.; Longevialle, Y.; Pérut, C.

    2004-10-01

    The need for new rocket propellants to improve or replace those in use today has led during the past ten years to studies of various, ancient or relatively new, energetic ingredients. The most often mentioned compounds for solid propellants are ADN (ammonium dinitramide), the nitramines RDX and HMX, HNIW (hexanitro hexaaza isowurtzitane), HNF (hydrazinum nitroformate), GAP (glycidyl azide polymer), and high nitrogen compounds. ADN, HNF, HAN (hydroxylammonium nitrate) are mentioned as possible ingredients in liquid mono and bi propellants for the future. A review of the work being conducted in the development and testing of the candidate propellants as well as an analysis of the general constraints of the industrial use and handling of these propellants and of their basic ingredients allows for a first tentative selection of the most promising ingredients. The possible synthesis routes, main characteristics, production and cost perspectives of these compounds are summarized and discussed.

  3. Biological and nonbiological modifications of organophosphorus compounds*

    PubMed Central

    Dauterman, W. C.

    1971-01-01

    The general types of biological reaction that are most prominent in the modification of organophosphorus compounds involve the mixed-function oxidases, hydrolases, or transferases. In certain cases, more than one of these reactions may be involved at the same site on the pesticide molecule. Examples of various organophosphorus pesticides that are altered by oxidation, hydrolysis, alkyl- or aryl-group transfer, reduction, and conjugation are discussed. The increase or decrease in toxicity of a pesticide that can result from biological modification is emphasized. Non-biological transformations of organophosphorus compounds involve the effect ou the compounds of such factors as light, air, temperature, and solvent. These factors are discussed with special emphasis on desulfuration, rearrangement, and oxidation. PMID:4938021

  4. Toxic organic compounds from energy production

    SciTech Connect

    Hites, R.A.

    1991-09-20

    The US Department of Energy's Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) has supported work in our laboratory since 1977. The general theme of this program has been the identification of potentially toxic organic compounds associated with various combustion effluents, following the fates of these compounds in the environment, and improving the analytical methodology for making these measurements. The projects currently investigation include: an improved sampler for semi-volatile compounds in the atmosphere; the wet and dry deposition of dioxins and furans from the atmosphere; the photodegradation and mobile sources of dioxins and furans; and the bioaccumulation of PAH by tree bark. These projects are all responsive to OHER's interest in the pathways and mechanisms by which energy-related agents move through and are modified by the atmosphere''. The projects on gas chromatographic and liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry are both responsive to OHER's interest in new and more sensitive technologies for chemical measurements''. 35 refs., 9 figs.

  5. Catalyst for Oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, George M. (Inventor); Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia P. (Inventor); Kielin, Erik J. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Schyryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor); DAmbrosia, Christine M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for oxidizing volatile organic compounds to carbon dioxide and water with the minimal addition of energy. A mixture of the volatile organic compound and an oxidizing agent (e.g. ambient air containing the volatile organic compound) is exposed to a catalyst which includes a noble metal dispersed on a metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state. Especially good results are obtained when the noble metal is platinum, and the metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state is tin oxide. A promoter (i.e., a small amount of an oxide of a transition series metal) may be used in association with the tin oxide to provide very beneficial results.

  6. Heme compounds in dinosaur trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, M H; Marshall, M; Carron, K; Bohle, D S; Busse, S C; Arnold, E V; Barnard, D; Horner, J R; Starkey, J R

    1997-06-10

    Six independent lines of evidence point to the existence of heme-containing compounds and/or hemoglobin breakdown products in extracts of trabecular tissues of the large theropod dinosaur Tyrannosaurus rex. These include signatures from nuclear magnetic resonance and electron spin resonance that indicate the presence of a paramagnetic compound consistent with heme. In addition, UV/visible spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography data are consistent with the Soret absorbance characteristic of this molecule. Resonance Raman profiles are also consistent with a modified heme structure. Finally, when dinosaurian tissues were extracted for protein fragments and were used to immunize rats, the resulting antisera reacted positively with purified avian and mammalian hemoglobins. The most parsimonious explanation of this evidence is the presence of blood-derived hemoglobin compounds preserved in the dinosaurian tissues. PMID:9177210

  7. New crystal structure maps for intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Yoshihisa; Morinaga, Masahiko; Saito, Jun-ichi; Takagi, Yasuharu

    1997-09-01

    New crystal structure maps have been proposed on the basis of the 0953-8984/9/38/008/img6 molecular orbital calculations of electronic structures. Two electronic parameters have been introduced and employed as new parameters for the classification of crystal structures. One is the bond order and the other is the d-orbital energy level of elements. Both of them change following the position of elements in the periodic table. With these parameters crystal structure maps have been constructed for aluminides, silicides, and some transition-metal-based compounds. There is a clear separation of the crystal structures on the maps. These maps are found to be applicable to the prediction of crystal structures not only for binary compounds but also for ternary compounds. The possibilities of structural modification of 0953-8984/9/38/008/img7 and 0953-8984/9/38/008/img8 by alloying are also discussed with the aid of these maps.

  8. Chemosensors for detection of nitroaromatic compounds (explosives)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyryanov, G. V.; Kopchuk, D. S.; Kovalev, I. S.; Nosova, E. V.; Rusinov, V. L.; Chupakhin, O. N.

    2014-09-01

    The key types of low-molecular-mass chemosensors for the detection of nitroaromatic compounds representing energetic substances (explosives) are analyzed. The coordination and chemical properties of these chemosensors and structural features of their complexes with nitroaromatic compounds are considered. The causes and methods for attaining high selectivity of recognition are demonstrated. The primary attention is paid to the use of low-molecular-mass chemosensors for visual detection of explosives of this class by colorimetric and photometric methods. Examples of using photo- and chemiluminescence for this purpose are described. A separate section is devoted to electrochemical methods of detection of nitroaromatic compounds. Data published from 2000 to 2014 are mainly covered. The bibliography includes 245 references.

  9. Analyzing method on biogenic volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, J. H.; Wang, M. X.; Hu, F.; Greenberg, J. P.; Guenther, A. B.

    2002-02-01

    In order to analyze biogenic volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere, an automated gas chromatography is developed and employed at the laboratory of National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) during January to July, 2000. A small refrigerator was used so as to remove water in the air sample from gas line, and get accurate concentrations of volatile organic compounds. At 5degreesC, good water removing efficiency can be obtained at controlled flow rate. Air samples were collected around the building of Mesa Lab. of NCAR and analyzed by this gas chromatography system. This paper reports this gas chromatography system and results of air samples. The experimental results show that this gas chromatography system has a good reproducibility and stability, and main interesting volatile organic compounds such as isoprene, monoterpenes have an evident diurnal variation.

  10. Antiviral effect of cationic compounds on bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Ly-Chatain, Mai H.; Moussaoui, Saliha; Vera, Annabelle; Rigobello, Véronique; Demarigny, Yann

    2013-01-01

    The antiviral activity of several cationic compounds – cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), chitosan, nisin, and lysozyme – was investigated on the bacteriophage c2 (DNA head and non-contractile tail) infecting Lactococcus strains and the bacteriophage MS2 (F-specific RNA) infecting E. coli. Firstly, these activities were evaluated in a phosphate buffer pH 7 – 10 mM. The CTAB had a virucidal effect on the Lactococcus bacteriophages, but not on the MS2. After 1 min of contact with 0.125 mM CTAB, the c2 population was reduced from 6 to 1.5 log(pfu)/mL and completely deactivated at 1 mM. On the contrary, chitosan inhibited the MS2 more than it did the bacteriophages c2. No antiviral effect was observed for the nisin or the lysozyme on bacteriophages after 1 min of treatment. A 1 and 2.5 log reduction was respectively observed for nisin and lysozyme when the treatment time increased (5 or 10 min). These results showed that the antiviral effect depended both on the virus and structure of the antimicrobial compounds. The antiviral activity of these compounds was also evaluated in different physico-chemical conditions and in complex matrices. The antiviral activity of CTAB was impaired in acid pH and with an increase of the ionic strength. These results might be explained by the electrostatic interactions between cationic compounds and negatively charged particles such as bacteriophages or other compounds in a matrix. Milk proved to be protective suggesting the components of food could interfere with antimicrobial compounds. PMID:23487495

  11. Respiratory carcinogenicity assessment of soluble nickel compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Oller, Adriana R

    2002-01-01

    The many chemical forms of nickel differ in physicochemical properties and biological effects. Health assessments for each main category of nickel species are needed. The carcinogenicity assessment of water-soluble nickel compounds has proven particularly difficult. Epidemiologic evidence indicates an association between inhalation exposures to nickel refinery dust containing soluble nickel compounds and increased risk of respiratory cancers. However, the nature of this association is unclear because of limitations of the exposure data, inconsistent results across cohorts, and the presence of mixed exposures to water-insoluble nickel compounds and other confounders that are known or suspected carcinogens. Moreover, well-conducted animal inhalation studies, where exposures were solely to soluble nickel, failed to demonstrate a carcinogenic potential. Similar negative results were seen in animal oral studies. A model exists that relates respiratory carcinogenic potential to the bioavailability of nickel ion at nuclear sites within respiratory target cells. This model helps reconcile human, animal, and mechanistic data for soluble nickel compounds. For inhalation exposures, the predicted lack of bioavailability of nickel ion at target sites suggests that water-soluble nickel compounds, by themselves, will not be complete human carcinogens. However, if inhaled at concentrations high enough to induce chronic lung inflammation, these compounds may enhance carcinogenic risks associated with inhalation exposure to other substances. Overall, the weight of evidence indicates that inhalation exposure to soluble nickel alone will not cause cancer; moreover, if exposures are kept below levels that cause chronic respiratory toxicity, any possible tumor-enhancing effects (particularly in smokers) would be avoided. PMID:12426143

  12. Olfaction in Parkin heterozygotes and compound heterozygotes

    PubMed Central

    Alcalay, R.N.; Siderowf, A.; Ottman, R.; Caccappolo, E.; Mejia-Santana, H.; Tang, M.-X.; Rosado, L.; Louis, E.; Ruiz, D.; Waters, C.; Fahn, S.; Cote, L.; Frucht, S.; Ford, B.; Orbe-Reilly, M.; Ross, B.; Verbitsky, M.; Kisselev, S.; Comella, C.; Colcher, A.; Jennings, D.; Nance, M.; Bressman, S.; Scott, W.K.; Tanner, C.; Mickel, S.; Rezak, M.; Novak, K.E.; Friedman, J.H.; Pfeiffer, R.; Marsh, L.; Hiner, B.; Clark, L.N.

    2011-01-01

    Background: While Parkinson disease (PD) is consistently associated with impaired olfaction, one study reported better olfaction among Parkin mutation carriers than noncarriers. Whether olfaction differs between Parkin mutation heterozygotes and carriers of 2 Parkin mutations (compound heterozygotes) is unknown. Objective: To assess the relationship between Parkin genotype and olfaction in PD probands and their unaffected relatives. Methods: We administered the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) to 44 probands in the Consortium on Risk for Early-Onset Parkinson Disease study with PD onset ?50 years (10 Parkin mutation heterozygotes, 9 compound heterozygotes, 25 noncarriers) and 80 of their family members (18 heterozygotes, 2 compound heterozygotes, 60 noncarriers). In the probands, linear regression was used to assess the association between UPSIT score (outcome) and Parkin genotype (predictor), adjusting for covariates. Among family members without PD, we compared UPSIT performance in heterozygotes vs noncarriers using generalized estimating equations, adjusting for family membership, age, gender, and smoking. Results: Among probands with PD, compound heterozygotes had higher UPSIT scores (31.9) than heterozygotes (20.1) or noncarriers (19.9) (p < 0.001). These differences persisted after adjustment for age, gender, disease duration, and smoking. Among relatives without PD, UPSIT performance was similar in heterozygotes (32.5) vs noncarriers (32.4), and better than in heterozygotes with PD (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Olfaction is significantly reduced among Parkin mutation heterozygotes with PD but not among their heterozygous relatives without PD. Compound heterozygotes with PD have olfaction within the normal range. Further research is required to assess whether these findings reflect different neuropathology in Parkin mutation heterozygotes and compound heterozygotes. PMID:21205674

  13. Global Exposure Modelling of Semivolatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmo, F.; Lammel, G.; Maier-Reimer, E.

    2008-12-01

    Organic compounds which are persistent and toxic as the agrochemicals ?-hexachlorocyclohexane (?-HCH, lindane) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) pose a hazard for the ecosystems. These compounds are semivolatile, hence multicompartmental substances and subject to long-range transport (LRT) in atmosphere and ocean. Being lipophilic, they accumulate in exposed organism tissues and biomagnify along food chains. The multicompartmental global fate and LRT of DDT and lindane in the atmosphere and ocean have been studied using application data for 1980, on a decadal scale using a model based on the coupling of atmosphere and (for the first time for these compounds) ocean General Circulation Models (ECHAM5 and MPI-OM). The model system encompasses furthermore 2D terrestrial compartments (soil and vegetation) and sea ice, a fully dynamic atmospheric aerosol (HAM) module and an ocean biogeochemistry module (HAMOCC5). Large mass fractions of the compounds are found in soil. Lindane is also found in comparable amount in ocean. DDT has the longest residence time in almost all compartments. The sea ice compartment locally almost inhibits volatilization from the sea. The air/sea exchange is also affected , up to a reduction of 35 % for DDT by partitioning to the organic phases (suspended and dissolved particulate matter) in the global oceans. Partitioning enhances vertical transport in the sea. Ocean dynamics are found to be more significant for vertical transport than sinking associated with particulate matter. LRT in the global environment is determined by the fast atmospheric circulation. Net meridional transport taking place in the ocean is locally effective mostly via western boundary currents, upon applications at mid- latitudes. The pathways of the long-lived semivolatile organic compounds studied include a sequence of several cycles of volatilisation, transport in the atmosphere, deposition and transport in the ocean (multihopping substances). Multihopping is more significant for DDT than for lindane. It enhances the LRT potential for both compounds.

  14. Dietary derived compounds in cancer chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Rzeski, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    Cancer chemoprevention is defined as the application of natural or synthetic agents to suppress or reverse cancer development and progression. In this field especially diet derived compounds have recently attracted researchers’ attention as potential therapeutics generally exerting low toxicity compared with regular drugs. This review presents a survey of recent findings concerning the most promising dietary chemopreventive agents such as green tea polyphenols (i.e. catechins), long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, carotenoids, glucosinolates/isothiocyanates, vitamins (i.e. vitamin D and folate) and minerals (i.e. calcium and selenium). Molecular targets involved in intrinsic pathways affected by these natural compounds are also shortly discussed. PMID:23788916

  15. Dry etching method for compound semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Shul, R.J.; Constantine, C.

    1997-04-29

    A dry etching method is disclosed. According to the present invention, a gaseous plasma comprising, at least in part, boron trichloride, methane, and hydrogen may be used for dry etching of a compound semiconductor material containing layers including aluminum, or indium, or both. Material layers of a compound semiconductor alloy such as AlGaInP or the like may be anisotropically etched for forming electronic devices including field-effect transistors and heterojunction bipolar transistors and for forming photonic devices including vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, edge-emitting lasers, and reflectance modulators. 1 fig.

  16. Beta cell device using icosahedral boride compounds

    DOEpatents

    Aselage, Terrence L. (62 Avenida Del Sol, Cedar Crest, NM 87008); Emin, David (1502 Harvard Ct., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87106-3712)

    2002-01-01

    A beta cell for converting beta-particle energies into electrical energy having a semiconductor junction that incorporates an icosahedral boride compound selected from B.sub.12 As.sub.2, B.sub.12 P.sub.2, elemental boron having an .alpha.-rhombohedral structure, elemental boron having a .beta.-rhombohedral structure, and boron carbides of the chemical formula B.sub.12-x C.sub.3-x, where 0.15compound self-heals, resisting degradation from radiation damage.

  17. Inelastic neutron scattering in valence fluctuation compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Jon M Lawrence

    2011-02-15

    The valence fluctuation compounds are rare earth intermetallics where hybridization of the nearly-localized 4f electrons with the conduction electrons leads to incorporation of the 4f's into the itinerant states. This hybridization slows down the conduction electrons and hence gives them a heavy effective mass, justifying application of the term 'heavy Fermion' (HF) to these materials. During the project period, we grew large single crystals of several such compounds and measured their properties using both standard thermodynamic probes and state-of-the-art inelastic neutron scattering. We obtained three main results. For the intermediate valence compounds CePd{sub 3} and YbAl{sub 3}, we showed that the scattering of neutrons by the fluctuations of the 4f magnetic moment does not have the momentum dependence expected for the itinerant heavy mass state; rather, the scattering is more typical of a localized spin fluctuation. We believe that incoherent scattering localizes the excitation. For the heavy Fermion compound Ce(Ni{sub 0.935}Pd{sub 0.065}){sub 2}Ge{sub 2}, which sits at a T = 0 critical point for transformation into an antiferromagnetic (AF) phase, we showed that the scattering from the AF fluctuations does not exhibit any of the divergences that are expected at a phase transition. We speculate that alloy disorder profoundly suppresses the growth of the fluctuating AF regions, leading to short range clusters rather than regions of infinite size. Finally, we explored the applicability of key concepts used to describe the behavior of rare earth heavy Fermions to uranium based HF compounds where the 5f electrons are itinerant as opposed to localized. We found that scaling laws relating the spin fluctuation energy measured in neutron scattering to the low temperature specific heat and susceptibility are valid for the uranium compounds, once corrections are made for AF fluctuations; however, the degeneracy of the high temperature moment is smaller than expected for rare-earth-like Hund's rule behavior, essentially because the orbital moment is suppressed for itinerant 5f electrons. We also found that the standard local-moment-based theory of the temperature dependence of the specific heat, susceptibility and neutron scattering fails badly for URu{sub 2}Zn{sub 20} and UCo{sub 2}Zn{sub 20}, even though the theory is phenomenally successful for the closely related rare earth compound YbFe{sub 2}Zn{sub 20}. Both these results highlight the distinction between the itineracy of the 5f's and the localization of the 4f's. It is our hope that these results are sufficiently significant as to stimulate deeper investigation of these compounds.

  18. Volatile compound formation during argan kernel roasting.

    PubMed

    El Monfalouti, Hanae; Charrouf, Zoubida; Giordano, Manuela; Guillaume, Dominique; Kartah, Badreddine; Harhar, Hicham; Gharby, Saïd; Denhez, Clément; Zeppa, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Virgin edible argan oil is prepared by cold-pressing argan kernels previously roasted at 110 degrees C for up to 25 minutes. The concentration of 40 volatile compounds in virgin edible argan oil was determined as a function of argan kernel roasting time. Most of the volatile compounds begin to be formed after 15 to 25 minutes of roasting. This suggests that a strictly controlled roasting time should allow the modulation of argan oil taste and thus satisfy different types of consumers. This could be of major importance considering the present booming use of edible argan oil. PMID:23472454

  19. The analysis of dioxins and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Eric J

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, polychlorinated biphenyls, and other related compounds requires complex sample preparation and analytical procedures using highly sensitive and selective state-of-the-art instrumentation to meet very stringent data quality objectives. The analytical procedures (extraction, sample preparation), instrumentation (chromatographic separation and detection by mass spectrometry) and screening techniques for the determination of dioxins, furans, dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls and related compounds with a focus on new approaches and alternate techniques to standard regulatory methods are reviewed. PMID:19672939

  20. Anti-babesial compounds from Curcuma zedoaria.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Ken; Nomura, Shinkichi; Subeki; Matsuura, Hideyuki; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Yamato, Osamu; Maede, Yoshimitsu; Katakura, Ken; Suzuki, Mamoru; Trimurningsih; Chairul; Yoshihara, Teruhiko

    2005-05-01

    Anti-babesial activity was confirmed in an extract of the bark of Curcuma zedoaria. The active ingredients were isolated, and their chemical structures were determined to be zedoalactones A, B, and C based on spectral data. Zedoalactone C is a hitherto unreported compound. The IC50 vales of these active compounds against Babesia gibsoni were compared with a standard drug, diminazene aceturate. The IC50 value of diminazene aceturate was 0.6 microg/mL, while those of zedoalactones A, B, and C were 16.5, 1.6 and 4.2 microg/mL, respectively. PMID:15977324

  1. Cyclopropanation using flow-generated diazo compounds

    E-print Network

    Roda, Nuria M.; Tran, Duc N.; Battilocchio, Claudio; Labes, Ricardo; Ingham, Richard J.; Hawkins, Joel M.; Ley, Steven V.

    2015-01-17

    , cyclopropanation of olefins using stabilised electrophilic diazo compounds has been well studied. In par- ticular, transition-metal catalysis for the coupling of olefins and diazo compounds are amongst the most well developed methods for cyclopropane preparation.6... to the preparation of poly functional cyclopropanes. Results and discussion The study commenced with the use of the readily prepared hydrazone 1a as model substrate for the reaction.8 We soon found that in AcOEt as solvent, a consistent and clean stream of diazo...

  2. Natural compounds for pest and weed control.

    PubMed

    Petroski, Richard J; Stanley, David W

    2009-09-23

    The control of insect pests and invasive weeds has become more species-selective because of activity-guided isolation, structure elucidation, and total synthesis of naturally produced substances with important biological activities. Examples of isolated compounds include insect pheromones, antifeedants, and prostaglandins, as well as growth regulators for plants and insects. Synthetic analogues of natural substances have been prepared to explore the relationships between chemical structure and observed biological activity. Recent scientific advances have resulted from better methods for the chemical synthesis of target compounds and better analytical methods. The capability of analytical instrumentation continues to advance rapidly, enabling new insights. PMID:19719128

  3. Photochemistry and Photophysics of Coordination Compounds: Copper

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicola Armaroli; Gianluca Accorsi; François Cardinali; Andrea Listorti

    Cu(I) complexes and clusters are the largest class of compounds of relevant photochemical and photophysical\\u000a interest based on a relatively abundant metal element. Interestingly, Nature has given an essential\\u000a role to copper compounds in some biological systems, relying on their kinetic lability and versatile coordination\\u000a environment. Some basic properties of Cu(I) and Cu(II) such as their coordination geometries and electronic\\u000a levels

  4. Organic photosensitive devices using subphthalocyanine compounds

    DOEpatents

    Rand, Barry (Princeton, NJ); Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Mutolo, Kristin L. (Hollywood, CA); Mayo, Elizabeth (Alhambra, CA); Thompson, Mark E. (Anaheim Hills, CA)

    2011-07-05

    An organic photosensitive optoelectronic device, having a donor-acceptor heterojunction of a donor-like material and an acceptor-like material and methods of making such devices is provided. At least one of the donor-like material and the acceptor-like material includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound; and/or the device optionally has at least one of a blocking layer or a charge transport layer, where the blocking layer and/or the charge transport layer includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound.

  5. Process for producing phenolic compounds from lignins

    DOEpatents

    Agblevor, F.A.

    1998-09-15

    A process is described for the production of low molecular weight phenolic compounds from lignins through the pyrolysis of the lignins in the presence of a strong base. In a preferred embodiment, potassium hydroxide is present in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 5% by weight, the pyrolysis temperature is from about 400 C to about 600 C at atmospheric pressure, and the time period for substantial completion of the reaction is from about 1--3 minutes. Examples of low molecular weight phenolic compounds produced include methoxyphenols, non-methoxylated phenols, and mixtures thereof. 16 figs.

  6. Process for producing phenolic compounds from lignins

    DOEpatents

    Agblevor, Foster A. (Lakewood, CO)

    1998-01-01

    A process for the production of low molecular weight phenolic compounds from lignins through the pyrolysis of the lignins in the presence of a strong base. In a preferred embodiment, potassium hydroxide is present in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 5% by weight, the pyrolysis temperature is from about 400.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C. at atmospheric pressure, and the time period for substantial completion of the reaction is from about 1-3 minutes. Examples of low molecular weight phenolic compounds produced include methoxyphenols, non-methoxylated phenols, and mixtures thereof.

  7. Uncertainty and Compound Lotteries: Calibration1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoram Halevy; Emre Ozdenoren

    Acknowledgments,to be added. Abstract The Ellsberg experiments,provide an intuitive illustration that the Savage approach, which reduces subjective uncertainty to risk, is not rich enough to capture many,decision makers’preferences. Recent experimental,evidence suggests that decision makers,reduce uncertainty,to compound,risk. This work presents a theoretical model,of decision making,in which preferences are de…ned on both Savage subjective acts and compound,objective lotteries. Preferences are two-stage probabilistically

  8. Phenolic compounds from the fruit of Garcinia dulcis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Deachathai; W. Mahabusarakam; S. Phongpaichit

    2005-01-01

    Dulcinoside (1), dulcisisoflavone (2), dulcisxanthone A (3) and sphaerobioside acetate (6) together with 22 known compounds were isolated from the green fruit of G. dulcis. Dulcisflavan (4), dulcisxanthone B (5) and isonormangostin (7) together with 22 known compounds were isolated from the ripe fruit. Compounds 6 and 7 were synthetic known compounds. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic methods. The

  9. Compositions containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications

    DOEpatents

    Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

    2014-11-11

    Compositions comprising a polymer-containing matrix and a filler comprising a cage compound selected from borane cage compounds, carborane cage compounds, metal complexes thereof, residues thereof, mixtures thereof, and/or agglomerations thereof, where the cage compound is not covalently bound to the matrix polymer. Methods of making and applications for using such compositions are also disclosed.

  10. Compositions containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications

    DOEpatents

    Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

    2013-05-28

    Compositions comprising a polymer-containing matrix and a filler comprising a cage compound selected from borane cage compounds, carborane cage compounds, metal complexes thereof, residues thereof, mixtures thereof, and/or agglomerations thereof, where the cage compound is not covalently bound to the matrix polymer. Methods of making and applications for using such compositions are also disclosed.

  11. Method for halogenating or radiohalogenating a chemical compound

    DOEpatents

    Kabalka, George W.

    2006-05-09

    A method for obtaining a halogenated organic compound, whereby an organotrifluoroborate compound is reacted with a halide ion in the presence of an oxidizing agent to produce the corresponding halogenated organic compound. The method may be used for producing radiohalogenated organic compounds.

  12. Ingestion of plant secondary compounds causes diuresis in desert herbivores

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denise M. Dearing; Antonio M. Mangione; William H. Karasov

    2002-01-01

    Plant secondary compounds are recognized deterrents and toxins to a variety of herbivores. The effect of secondary compounds on water balance of herbivores is virtually unexplored, yet secondary compounds could potentially cause a decrease in an animal's ability to maintain water balance. We investigated the effects of secondary compounds, alpha-pinene and creosote resin, on water balance in three species of

  13. Boron-containing amino carboxylic acid compounds and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Kabalka, George W. (Knoxville, TN); Srivastava, Rajiv R. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-03-14

    Novel compounds which are useful for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are disclosed. The compounds comprise a stable boron-containing group and an aminocycloalkane carboxylic acid group or a boronated acyclic hydrocarbon-linked amino carboxylic acid. Methods for synthesis of the compounds and for use of the compounds in BNCT are disclosed.

  14. Compound Nouns and Category Structure in Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Eve V.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    In two experiments 96 children and eight adults were tested for comprehension of the modifier-head relation in compounds such as apple-knife or were asked to label objects with compounds. Results show that by age three children reliably interpret novel compounds and made use of novel compounds to subcategorize. (RH)

  15. Nitrated Secondary Organic Tracer Compounds in Biomass Burning Smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, Y.; Böge, O.; Gräfe, R.; Herrmann, H.

    2010-12-01

    Natural and human-initiated biomass burning releases large amounts of gases and particles into the atmosphere, impacting climate, environment and affecting public health. Several hundreds of compounds are emitted from biomass burning and these compounds largely originate from the pyrolysis of biopolymers such as lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose. Some of compounds are known to be specific to biomass burning and widely recognized as tracer compounds that can be used to identify the presence of biomass burning PM. Detailed chemical analysis of biomass burning influenced PM samples often reveals the presence compounds that correlated well with levoglucosan, a known biomass burning tracer compound. In particular, nitrated aromatic compounds correlated very well with levoglucosan, indicating that biomass burning as a source for this class of compounds. In the present study, we present evidence for the presence of biomass burning originating secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) compounds in biomass burning influenced ambient PM. These BSOA compounds are typically nitrated aromatic compounds that are produced in the oxidation of precursor compounds in the presence of NOx. The precursor identification was performed from a series of aerosol chamber experiments. m-Cresol, which is emitted from biomass burning at significant levels, is found to be a major precursor compounds for nitrated BSOA compounds found in the ambient PM. We estimate that the total concentrations of these compounds in the ambient PM are comparable to biogenic SOA compounds in winter months, indicating the BSOA contributes important amounts to the regional organic aerosol loading.

  16. Measurement of volatile organic compounds inside automobiles†

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marion J Fedoruk; Brent D Kerger

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the types and concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the passenger cabin of selected sedan automobiles under static (parked, unventilated) and specified conditions of operation (i.e., driving the vehicle using air conditioning alone, vent mode alone, or driver's window half open). Data were collected on five different passenger sedan vehicles

  17. Benzoxaboroles – Old compounds with new applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Agnieszka Adamczyk-Wo?niak; Micha? K. Cyra?ski; Anna ?ubrowska; Andrzej Sporzy?ski

    2009-01-01

    This comprehensive review covers the structure, methods of synthesis, properties and fields of application of benzoxaboroles – derivatives of phenylboronic acids. Some of the title compounds were described over 50years ago, however most of them have been investigated only recently due to their exceptional properties and wide applications. In addition to their usage as building blocks and protecting groups in

  18. Compound Poisson approximation in total variation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. D. Barbour; Sergey Utev

    1999-01-01

    Poisson approximation in total variation can be successfully established in a wide variety of contexts, involving sums of weakly dependent random variables which usually take the value 0, and occasionally the value 1. If the random variables can take other positive integer values, or if there is stronger dependence between them, compound Poisson approximation may be more suitable. Stein's method,

  19. Azodicarboxylates: synthesis and functionalization of organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhirov, A. M.; Aksenov, A. V.

    2014-06-01

    The data on transformations of dialkyl azodicarboxylates and their analogues involving various substrates are generalized. Nucleophilic addition and oxidation, pericyclic reactions and reactions occurring under the Mitsunobu reaction conditions are considered. Ample opportunities for application of these compounds in fine organic synthesis are shown. The bibliography includes 245 references. Dedicated to Academician B A Trofimov on the occasion of his 75th birthday.

  20. Separation of Acids, Bases, and Neutral Compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Megumi Fujita; Helen M. Mah; Paulo W. M. Sgarbi; Manjinder S. Lall; Tai Wei Ly; Lois M. Browne

    2003-01-01

    Separation of Acids, Bases, and Neutral Compounds requires the following software, which is available for free download from the Internet: Netscape Navigator, version 4.75 or higher, or Microsoft Internet Explorer, version 5.0 or higher; Chime plug-in, version compatible with your OS and browser (available from MDL); and Flash player, version 5 or higher (available from Macromedia).