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Sample records for compressed fcc crystals

  1. Folding in FCC metal single crystals under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lychagin, D. V.; Alfyorova, E. A.

    2015-10-01

    Results of the analysis of folding during compression deformation of metals with fcc lattice are presented. Single crystals with orientations at angles of the standard stereographic triangle and different crystallographic orientations of lateral faces have been studied. It has been found that the major factor affecting the folding intensity is the slip plane shear with respect to lateral faces. Such a shear results in face bending and the formation of fold systems in maximum curvature regions. It has been shown that, among all considered orientations, the maximum susceptibility to the formation of different folds is inherent in single crystals with bar 1 compression axis orientation. For this orientation, the development of shear and rotational components during folding is traced by interference microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods. It has been found that an excess dislocation density is accumulated when shear is activated in the folding region, which results in an increase in fold misorientation. The activation of this process in fcc metals is promoted by an increase in the homologous deformation temperature and stacking fault energy.

  2. Phonon instabilities in uniaxially compressed fcc metals as seen in molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimminau, Giles; Erhart, Paul; Bringa, Eduardo M.; Remington, Bruce; Wark, Justin S.

    2010-03-01

    We show that the generation of stacking faults in perfect face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystals, uniaxially compressed along [001], is due to transverse-acoustic phonon instabilities. The position in reciprocal space where the instability first manifests itself is not a point of high symmetry in the Brillouin zone. This model provides a useful explanation for the magnitude of the elastic limit, in addition to the affects of box size, temperature, and compression on the time scale for the generation of stacking faults. We observe this phenomenon in both simulations that use the Lennard-Jones potential and embedded atom potentials. Not only does this work provide fundamental insight into the microscopic response of the material but it also describes certain behavior seen in previous molecular dynamics simulations of single-crystal fcc metals shock compressed along the principal axis.

  3. Atomistically-informed Dislocation Dynamics in fcc Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, E; Marian, J; Arsenlis, T; Victoria, M; Perlado, J M

    2006-09-06

    We develop a nodal dislocation dynamics (DD) model to simulate plastic processes in fcc crystals. The model explicitly accounts for all slip systems and Burgers vectors observed in fcc systems, including stacking faults and partial dislocations. We derive simple conservation rules that describe all partial dislocation interactions rigorously and allow us to model and quantify cross-slip processes, the structure and strength of dislocation junctions and the formation of fcc-specific structures such as stacking fault tetrahedra. The DD framework is built upon isotropic non-singular linear elasticity, and supports itself on information transmitted from the atomistic scale. In this fashion, connection between the meso and micro scales is attained self-consistently with core parameters fitted to atomistic data. We perform a series of targeted simulations to demonstrate the capabilities of the model, including dislocation reactions and dissociations and dislocation junction strength. Additionally we map the four-dimensional stress space relevant for cross-slip and relate our findings to the plastic behavior of monocrystalline fcc metals.

  4. Germanium FCC structure from a colloidal crystal template

    SciTech Connect

    Miguez, H.; Meseguer, F.; Lopez, C.; Holgado, M.; Andreasen, G.; Mifsud, A.; Fornes, V.

    2000-05-16

    Here, the authors show a method to fabricate a macroporous structure in which the pores, essentially identical, arrange regularly in a face-centered cubic (FCC) lattice. The result is a network of air spheres in a germanium medium. This structure presents the highest dielectric contrast ({epsilon}{sub Ge}/{epsilon}{sub air} = 16) ever achieved in the optical regime in such periodic structures, which could result in important applications in photonics. The authors employ solid silica colloidal crystals (opals) as templates within which a cyclic germanium growth process is carried out. Thus, the three-dimensional periodicity of the host is inherited by the guest. Afterward, the silica is removed and a germanium opal replica is obtained.

  5. Atomistic simulation of the fcc-hcp transition in single-crystal Al under uniaxial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Shao, J. L.; Duan, S. Q.; Liang, J. Q.

    2010-03-01

    The dynamic behavior of the single-crystal Al under [001] uniaxial strain is simulated by classic molecular dynamics. The fcc-hcp structural transition is successfully observed when the loading pressure reaches about 90 GPa, and the reverse transition is also found with hysteresis. The mechanism and morphology evolution of both the forward and backward transitions are analyzed in detail. It is found in the process of the structural transition that the (010)fcc or (100)fcc planes transit into (0001)hcp planes, and the twins of the hcp phase along the (112)-plane appear, whose boundaries finally become along the (110)-plane. Besides, we find the twinning (along the (110)fcc planes) in the hcp phase prior to the back transition (hcp-fcc). Our simulations show the coexistence of fcc and hcp phases over a wide range of pressures, and finally, the phase transition is evaluated by using the radial distribution functions.

  6. Local compressibilities in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín Pendás, A.; Costales, Aurora; Blanco, M. A.; Recio, J. M.; Luaña, Víctor

    2000-12-01

    An application of the atoms in molecules theory to the partitioning of static thermodynamic properties in condensed systems is presented. Attention is focused on the definition and the behavior of atomic compressibilities. Inverses of bulk moduli are found to be simple weighted averages of atomic compressibilities. Two kinds of systems are investigated as examples: four related oxide spinels and the alkali halide family. Our analyses show that the puzzling constancy of the bulk moduli of these spinels is a consequence of the value of the compressibility of an oxide ion. A functional dependence between ionic bulk moduli and ionic volume is also proposed.

  7. Multilayer Relaxation and Surface Energies of FCC and BCC Metals Using Equivalent Crystal Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Agustin M.; Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John

    1993-01-01

    The multilayer relaxation of fcc and bcc metal surfaces is calculated using equivalent crystal theory. The results for changes in interplanar spacings of planes close to the surface and the ensuing surface energies are discussed in reference to other theoretical results and compared to available experimental data. The calculation includes high-index surfaces for which no other theoretical results are known.

  8. 3D crack tip fields for FCC single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Cuitino, A.M.; Ortiz, M.

    1995-12-31

    Cracks in single crystals are of concern in a number of structural and non-structural applications, ranging form single-crystal turbine blades and rotors to metal interconnect lines in microcircuits. In this paper we present 3D numerical simulations of the crack-tip fields of a Cu single crystal, including stress, strain and slip activity patterns. The orientation of the crack tip is along the crystallographic orientation (101), while the crack plane is (010). A material model based on dislocation mechanics is used in these simulations. This model correctly predicts the observed behavior of Cu, including the basic hardening characteristics of single crystals, orientation dependence and stage I-II-III structure of the stress-strain curves, the observed levels of latent hardening and their variation with orientation and deformation in the primary system and slip activities and dislocation densities. We use the FEM within the context of finite deformation plasticity. In the figure below, we show the finite element mesh composed by 12-noded tetrahedrons with 6-noded triangular faces. The model simulates half of a beam, which is subjected to a concentrated load at 1/8 of total length from the support. Detailed results of the stress, deformation and slip activity are presented at different radii from crack tip and at different depths from the surface. In general, the results show a strong difference in the slip activity pattern form the interior to the exterior, while smaller differences are encountered in the stress and strain fields.

  9. Subsurface Stress Fields in FCC Single Crystal Anisotropic Contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arakere, Nagaraj K.; Knudsen, Erik; Swanson, Gregory R.; Duke, Gregory; Ham-Battista, Gilda

    2004-01-01

    Single crystal superalloy turbine blades used in high pressure turbomachinery are subject to conditions of high temperature, triaxial steady and alternating stresses, fretting stresses in the blade attachment and damper contact locations, and exposure to high-pressure hydrogen. The blades are also subjected to extreme variations in temperature during start-up and shutdown transients. The most prevalent high cycle fatigue (HCF) failure modes observed in these blades during operation include crystallographic crack initiation/propagation on octahedral planes, and non-crystallographic initiation with crystallographic growth. Numerous cases of crack initiation and crack propagation at the blade leading edge tip, blade attachment regions, and damper contact locations have been documented. Understanding crack initiation/propagation under mixed-mode loading conditions is critical for establishing a systematic procedure for evaluating HCF life of single crystal turbine blades. This paper presents analytical and numerical techniques for evaluating two and three dimensional subsurface stress fields in anisotropic contacts. The subsurface stress results are required for evaluating contact fatigue life at damper contacts and dovetail attachment regions in single crystal nickel-base superalloy turbine blades. An analytical procedure is presented for evaluating the subsurface stresses in the elastic half-space, based on the adaptation of a stress function method outlined by Lekhnitskii. Numerical results are presented for cylindrical and spherical anisotropic contacts, using finite element analysis (FEA). Effects of crystal orientation on stress response and fatigue life are examined. Obtaining accurate subsurface stress results for anisotropic single crystal contact problems require extremely refined three-dimensional (3-D) finite element grids, especially in the edge of contact region. Obtaining resolved shear stresses (RSS) on the principal slip planes also involves

  10. Flow-induced alignment of (100) fcc thin film colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Joy, Midhun; Muangnapoh, Tanyakorn; Snyder, Mark A; Gilchrist, James F

    2015-09-28

    The realization of structural diversity in colloidal crystals obtained by self-assembly techniques remains constrained by thermodynamic considerations and current limits on our ability to alter structure over large scales using imposed fields and confinement. In this work, a convective-based procedure to fabricate multi-layer colloidal crystal films with extensive square-like symmetry is enabled by periodic substrate motion imposed during the continuous assembly. The formation of film-spanning domains of (100) fcc symmetry as a result of added vibration is robust across a range of micron-scale monosized spherical colloidal suspensions (e.g., polystyrene, silica) as well as substrate surface chemistries (e.g., hydrophobic, hydrophilic). The generation of extensive single crystalline (100) fcc domains as large as 15 mm(2) and covering nearly 40% of the colloidal crystalline film is possible by simply tuning coating conditions and multi-layer film thickness. Preferential orientation of the square-packed domains with respect to the direction of deposition is attributed to domain generation based upon a shear-related mechanism. Visualization during assembly gives clues toward the mechanism of this flow-driven self-assembly method. PMID:26238223

  11. Quantum calculation of disordered length in fcc single crystals using channelling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Assy, M. K.

    2006-04-01

    Lattices of face-centred cubic crystals (fcc), due to irradiation processes, may become disordered in stable configurations like the dumb-bell configuration (DBC) or body-centred interstitial (BCI). In this work, a quantum mechanical treatment for the calculation of transmission coefficients of channelled positrons from their bound states in the normal lattice regions into the allowed bound states in the disordered regions is given as a function of the length of the disordered regions. In order to obtain more reliable results, higher anharmonic terms in the planar channelling potential are considered in the calculations by using first-order perturbation theory where new bound states have been found. The calculations were executed in the energy range 10 200 MeV of the incident positron on a copper single crystal in the planar direction (100).

  12. Ideal compressive strength of fcc Co, Ni, and Ni-rich alloys along the <001 > direction: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breidi, A.; Fries, S. G.; Ruban, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    We perform density functional theory based first-principles calculations to identify promising alloying elements (X ) capable of enhancing the compressive uniaxial theoretical (ideal) strength of the fcc Ni-matrix along the <001 > direction. The alloying element belongs to a wide range of 3 d ,4 d , and 5 d series with nominal composition of 6.25 at. %. Additionally, a full elastic study is carried to investigate the ideal strength of fcc Ni and fcc Co. Our results indicate that the most desirable alloying elements are those with half d -band filling, namely, Os, Ir, Re, and Ru.

  13. Transition saddle points and associated defects for a triaxially stretched FCC crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delph, T. J.; Zimmerman, J. A.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate the use of a single-ended method for locating saddle points on the potential energy surface for a triaxially stretched FCC crystal governed by a Lennard-Jones potential. Single-ended methods require no prior knowledge of the defected state and are shown to have powerful advantages in this application, principally because the nature of the associated defects can be quite complicated and hence extremely difficult to predict ab initio. We find that while classical spherical cavitation occurs for high stretch values, for lower values the defect mode transitions to a non-spherical pattern without any apparent symmetries. This non-spherical mode plays the primary role in harmonic transition state theory predictions that are used to examine how instabilities vary with applied loading rate. Such a defect mode would be difficult to determine using double-ended methods for finding saddle points.

  14. Crystal Dynamics of (delta) fcc Pu-Ga by High Resolution Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J; Krisch, M; Farber, D; Occelli, F; Xu, R; Chiang, T C; Clatterbuck, D; Schwartz, A J; Wall, M; Boro, C

    2004-09-28

    We have used a microbeam on large grain sample concept to carry out an inelastic x-ray scattering experiment to map the full phonon dispersion curves of an fcc {delta}-phase Pu-Ga alloy. This approach obviates experimental difficulties with conventional inelastic neutron scattering due to the high absorption cross section of the common {sup 239}Pu isotope and the non-availability of large (mm size) single crystal materials for Pu and its alloys. A classical Born von-Karman force constant model was used to model the experimental results, and no less than 4th nearest neighbor interactions had to be included to account for the observation. Several unusual features including, a large elastic anisotropy, a small shear elastic modulus, (C{sub 11}-C{sub 12})/2, a Kohn-like anomaly in the T{sub 1}[011] branch, and a pronounced softening of the T[111] branch towards the L point in the Brillouin are found. These features can be related to the phase transitions of plutonium and to strong coupling between the crystal structure and the 5f valence instabilities. Our results represent the first full phonon dispersions ever obtained for any Pu-bearing material, thus ending a 40-year quest for this fundamental data. The phonon data also provide a critical test for theoretical treatments of highly correlated 5f electron systems as exemplified by recent dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) calculations for {delta}-plutonium.

  15. Nanostructuring and ductility of crystals under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magomedov, M. N.

    2016-05-01

    Nanostructuring of crystals into domains under uniform compression, the ductility of a solid nanostructure under pressure, and the bimodal distribution of domain size are explained based on the dependence of the surface energy and surface pressure on the shape, size, and density of a nanocrystal.

  16. Investigation of Three-Dimensional Stress Fields and Slip Systems for FCC Single Crystal Superalloy Notched Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arakere, Nagaraj K.; Magnan, Shannon; Ebrahimi, Fereshteh; Ferroro, Luis

    2004-01-01

    Metals and their alloys, except for a few intermetallics, are inherently ductile, i.e. plastic deformation precedes fracture in these materials. Therefore, resistance to fracture is directly related to the development of the plastic zone at the crack tip. Recent studies indicate that the fracture toughness of single crystals depends on the crystallographic orientation of the notch as well as the loading direction. In general, the dependence of crack propagation resistance on crystallographic orientation arises from the anisotropy of (i) elastic constants, (ii) plastic deformation (or slip), and (iii) the weakest fracture planes (e.g. cleavage planes). Because of the triaxial stress state at the notch tips, many slip systems that otherwise would not be activated during uniaxial testing, become operational. The plastic zone formation in single crystals has been tackled theoretically by Rice and his co-workers and only limited experimental work has been conducted in this area. The study of the stresses and strains in the vicinity of a FCC single crystal notch tip is of relatively recent origin. We present experimental and numerical investigation of 3D stress fields and evolution of slip sector boundaries near notches in FCC single crystal tension test specimens, and demonstrate that a 3D linear elastic finite element model that includes the effect of material anisotropy is shown to predict active slip planes and sectors accurately. The slip sector boundaries are shown to have complex curved shapes with several slip systems active simultaneously near the notch. Results are presented for surface and mid-plane of the specimens. The results demonstrate that accounting for 3D elastic anisotropy is very important for accurate prediction of slip activation near FCC single crystal notches loaded in tension. Results from the study will help establish guidelines for fatigue damage near single crystal notches.

  17. Shock Compression of Ammonium Perchlorate Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Y. M.; Yuan, Gang; Feng, Ruqiang

    1997-07-01

    The shock response of ammonium perchlorate (AP) single crystals has been examined for uniaxial strain compression along the [210] and [001] directions. Quartz gauge and VISAR measurements have provided the wave profiles at the impact surface and after propagation through thin samples (1-3 mm thickness) for peak stresses ranging between 10 and 65 kbar. A two wave structure due to elastic-plastic deformation was observed for both orientations. The measured HEL values for the [210] and [001] orientations were about 4.3 and 3.5 kbar, respectively. Data for the two orientations reveal small stress relaxation effects and small differences due to crystal orientation effects. We have chosen to fit both sets of results with a simple elastic-perfectly plastic model used for isotropic materials. Reasonable agreement between the calculations and experimental results was obtained. Over the stress range examined to date, no evidence of chemical decomposition was observed for the time durations in our experiments.

  18. Fabrication of FCC-SiO2 colloidal crystals using the vertical convective self-assemble method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castañeda-Uribe, O. A.; Salcedo-Reyes, J. C.; Méndez-Pinzón, H. A.; Pedroza-Rodríguez, A. M.

    2014-05-01

    In order to determine the optimal conditions for the growth of high-quality 250 nm-SiO2 colloidal crystals by the vertical convective self-assemble method, the Design of Experiments (DoE) methodology is applied. The influence of the evaporation temperature, the volume fraction, and the pH of the colloidal suspension is studied by means of an analysis of variance (ANOVA) in a 33 factorial design. Characteristics of the stacking lattice of the resulting colloidal crystals are determined by scanning electron microscopy and angle-resolved transmittance spectroscopy. Quantitative results from the statistical test show that the temperature is the most critical factor influencing the quality of the colloidal crystal, obtaining highly ordered structures with FCC stacking lattice at a growth temperature of 40°C.

  19. Fabrication of FCC-SiO{sub 2} colloidal crystals using the vertical convective self-assemble method

    SciTech Connect

    Castañeda-Uribe, O. A.; Salcedo-Reyes, J. C.; Méndez-Pinzón, H. A.; Pedroza-Rodríguez, A. M.

    2014-05-15

    In order to determine the optimal conditions for the growth of high-quality 250 nm-SiO{sub 2} colloidal crystals by the vertical convective self-assemble method, the Design of Experiments (DoE) methodology is applied. The influence of the evaporation temperature, the volume fraction, and the pH of the colloidal suspension is studied by means of an analysis of variance (ANOVA) in a 3{sup 3} factorial design. Characteristics of the stacking lattice of the resulting colloidal crystals are determined by scanning electron microscopy and angle-resolved transmittance spectroscopy. Quantitative results from the statistical test show that the temperature is the most critical factor influencing the quality of the colloidal crystal, obtaining highly ordered structures with FCC stacking lattice at a growth temperature of 40°C.

  20. Temperature Dependence of the Mechanical Properties of Equiatomic Solid Solution Alloys with FCC Crystal Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zhenggang; Bei, Hongbin; Pharr, George M.; George, Easo P.

    2014-10-03

    We found that compared to decades-old theories of strengthening in dilute solid solutions, the mechanical behavior of concentrated solid solutions is relatively poorly understood. A special subset of these materials includes alloys in which the constituent elements are present in equal atomic proportions, including the high-entropy alloys of recent interest. A unique characteristic of equiatomic alloys is the absence of “solvent” and “solute” atoms, resulting in a breakdown of the textbook picture of dislocations moving through a solvent lattice and encountering discrete solute obstacles. Likewise, to clarify the mechanical behavior of this interesting new class of materials, we investigate here a family of equiatomic binary, ternary and quaternary alloys based on the elements Fe, Ni, Co, Cr and Mn that were previously shown to be single-phase face-centered cubic (fcc) solid solutions. The alloys were arc-melted, drop-cast, homogenized, cold-rolled and recrystallized to produce equiaxed microstructures with comparable grain sizes. Tensile tests were performed at an engineering strain rate of 10-3 s-1 at temperatures in the range 77–673 K. Unalloyed fcc Ni was processed similarly and tested for comparison. The flow stresses depend to varying degrees on temperature, with some (e.g. NiCoCr, NiCoCrMn and FeNiCoCr) exhibiting yield and ultimate strengths that increase strongly with decreasing temperature, while others (e.g. NiCo and Ni) exhibit very weak temperature dependencies. Moreover, to better understand this behavior, the temperature dependencies of the yield strength and strain hardening were analyzed separately. Lattice friction appears to be the predominant component of the temperature-dependent yield stress, possibly because the Peierls barrier height decreases with increasing temperature due to a thermally induced increase of dislocation width. In the early stages of plastic flow (5–13% strain, depending on material), the

  1. Temperature Dependence of the Mechanical Properties of Equiatomic Solid Solution Alloys with FCC Crystal Structures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wu, Zhenggang; Bei, Hongbin; Pharr, George M.; George, Easo P.

    2014-10-03

    We found that compared to decades-old theories of strengthening in dilute solid solutions, the mechanical behavior of concentrated solid solutions is relatively poorly understood. A special subset of these materials includes alloys in which the constituent elements are present in equal atomic proportions, including the high-entropy alloys of recent interest. A unique characteristic of equiatomic alloys is the absence of “solvent” and “solute” atoms, resulting in a breakdown of the textbook picture of dislocations moving through a solvent lattice and encountering discrete solute obstacles. Likewise, to clarify the mechanical behavior of this interesting new class of materials, we investigate heremore » a family of equiatomic binary, ternary and quaternary alloys based on the elements Fe, Ni, Co, Cr and Mn that were previously shown to be single-phase face-centered cubic (fcc) solid solutions. The alloys were arc-melted, drop-cast, homogenized, cold-rolled and recrystallized to produce equiaxed microstructures with comparable grain sizes. Tensile tests were performed at an engineering strain rate of 10-3 s-1 at temperatures in the range 77–673 K. Unalloyed fcc Ni was processed similarly and tested for comparison. The flow stresses depend to varying degrees on temperature, with some (e.g. NiCoCr, NiCoCrMn and FeNiCoCr) exhibiting yield and ultimate strengths that increase strongly with decreasing temperature, while others (e.g. NiCo and Ni) exhibit very weak temperature dependencies. Moreover, to better understand this behavior, the temperature dependencies of the yield strength and strain hardening were analyzed separately. Lattice friction appears to be the predominant component of the temperature-dependent yield stress, possibly because the Peierls barrier height decreases with increasing temperature due to a thermally induced increase of dislocation width. In the early stages of plastic flow (5–13% strain, depending on material), the temperature

  2. Nucleation of liquid droplets and voids in a stretched Lennard-Jones fcc crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Baidakov, Vladimir G. Tipeev, Azat O.

    2015-09-28

    The method of molecular dynamics simulation has been used to investigate the phase decay of a metastable Lennard-Jones face-centered cubic crystal at positive and negative pressures. It is shown that at high degrees of metastability, crystal decay proceeds through the spontaneous formation and growth of new-phase nuclei. It has been found that there exists a certain boundary temperature. Below this temperature, the crystal phase disintegrates as the result of formation of voids, and above, as a result of formation of liquid droplets. The boundary temperature corresponds to the temperature of cessation of a crystal–liquid phase equilibrium when the melting line comes in contact with the spinodal of the stretched liquid. The results of the simulations are interpreted in the framework of classical nucleation theory. The thermodynamics of phase transitions in solids has been examined with allowance for the elastic energy of stresses arising owing to the difference in the densities of the initial and the forming phases. As a result of the action of elastic forces, at negative pressures, the boundary of the limiting superheating (stretching) of a crystal approaches the spinodal, on which the isothermal bulk modulus of dilatation becomes equal to zero. At the boundary of the limiting superheating (stretching), the shape of liquid droplets and voids is close to the spherical one.

  3. Crystal dynamics of δ fcc Pu-Ga alloy by high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Joe; Krisch, M.; Farber, D. L.; Occelli, F.; Xu, R.; Chiang, T.-C.; Clatterbuck, D.; Schwartz, A. J.; Wall, M.; Boro, C.

    2005-08-01

    We have used a microbeam on large grain sample concept to carry out inelastic x-ray scattering experiments to measure the phonon dispersion curves of a fcc δ -phase Pu-Ga alloy along the main symmetry directions of the cubic lattice. This approach obviates experimental difficulties with conventional inelastic neutron scattering due to the high absorption cross section of the common Pu239 isotope and the nonavailability of large (millimeter size) single crystal materials for Pu and its alloys. A classical Born-von Kármán force constant model was used to model the experimental results, and up to fourth nearest neighbor interactions had to be included to obtain sufficient agreement. Several unusual features including, a large elastic anisotropy, a small shear elastic modulus (C11-C12)/2 , a positive kink in the T1[0ξξ] branch, and a pronounced bending (toward lower energy) of the T[ξξξ] branch near the L point in the Brillouin zone are found. These features are discussed in light of the various phase transformations of δ plutonium. The phonon dispersion data also provide a critical test and benchmark for theoretical treatments of highly correlated 5f electron systems.

  4. Dislocation-kinetic analysis of FCC and BCC crystal spallation under shock-wave loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malygin, G. A.; Ogarkov, S. L.; Andriyash, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    Within the dislocation-kinetic model of the formation and propagation of shock waves in crystals under their intense shock-wave loading, the crystal spallation mechanism at micro- and macrolevels has been discussed taking into account published empirical data. It has been shown that the spallation time t f for Cu, Ni, α-Fe, and Ta crystals in the time interval of 10-6-10-9 s at the macroscopic level changes with variations in the wave pressure σ as , where = is the plastic strain rate according to the Swegle-Grady relation; K f , K σ, and ɛ f = K f K σ ≈ 3-5% are the pressure-independent spallation coefficients and strain, respectively; and E is the Young's modulus. At the microlevel, the dislocation-kinetic calculation of plastic zones around pore nuclei as stress concentrators and plastic strain localization regions at the shock wave front has been performed. It has been shown that the pore coalescence and spall fracture formation result from the superposition of shear stresses and plastic deformations in interpore spacings when the latter decrease to a size of the order of two pore sizes.

  5. The Effect of Lattice Disorder on the Channeling Potential in fcc Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Assy, M. K.

    The axial and planar potential for α-particles in copper single crystal disordered by dumb-bell configuration (DBC) or body-centered interstitial (BCI) is calculated according to the continuum potential approximation by using Moliere potential and Biersack's universal potential and compared with the channeling potential of the normal lattice. The calculations showed that the axial potential for DBC or BCI are the same, but the planar potential has different estimations for each kind of lattice disorder. The point of minimum potential in the disordered lattice has been determined for both axial and planar channel.

  6. Shock compression of [001] single crystal silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, S.; Hahn, E. N.; Kad, B.; Remington, B. A.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    Silicon is ubiquitous in our advanced technological society, yet our current understanding of change to its mechanical response at extreme pressures and strain-rates is far from complete. This is due to its brittleness, making recovery experiments difficult. High-power, short-duration, laser-driven, shock compression and recovery experiments on [001] silicon (using impedance-matched momentum traps) unveiled remarkable structural changes observed by transmission electron microscopy. As laser energy increases, corresponding to an increase in peak shock pressure, the following plastic responses are are observed: surface cleavage along {111} planes, dislocations and stacking faults; bands of amorphized material initially forming on crystallographic orientations consistent with dislocation slip; and coarse regions of amorphized material. Molecular dynamics simulations approach equivalent length and time scales to laser experiments and reveal the evolution of shock-induced partial dislocations and their crucial role in the preliminary stages of amorphization. Application of coupled hydrostatic and shear stresses produce amorphization below the hydrostatically determined critical melting pressure under dynamic shock compression.

  7. Shock compression of [001] single crystal silicon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhao, S.; Remington, B.; Hahn, E. N.; Kad, B.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2016-03-14

    Silicon is ubiquitous in our advanced technological society, yet our current understanding of change to its mechanical response at extreme pressures and strain-rates is far from complete. This is due to its brittleness, making recovery experiments difficult. High-power, short-duration, laser-driven, shock compression and recovery experiments on [001] silicon (using impedance-matched momentum traps) unveiled remarkable structural changes observed by transmission electron microscopy. As laser energy increases, corresponding to an increase in peak shock pressure, the following plastic responses are are observed: surface cleavage along {111} planes, dislocations and stacking faults; bands of amorphized material initially forming on crystallographic orientations consistent withmore » dislocation slip; and coarse regions of amorphized material. Molecular dynamics simulations approach equivalent length and time scales to laser experiments and reveal the evolution of shock-induced partial dislocations and their crucial role in the preliminary stages of amorphization. Furthermore, application of coupled hydrostatic and shear stresses produce amorphization below the hydrostatically determined critical melting pressure under dynamic shock compression.« less

  8. Highly compressed ammonia forms an ionic crystal.

    PubMed

    Pickard, Chris J; Needs, R J

    2008-10-01

    Ammonia is an important compound with many uses, such as in the manufacture of fertilizers, explosives and pharmaceuticals. As an archetypal hydrogen-bonded system, the properties of ammonia under pressure are of fundamental interest, and compressed ammonia has a significant role in planetary physics. We predict new high-pressure crystalline phases of ammonia (NH(3)) through a computational search based on first-principles density-functional-theory calculations. Ammonia is known to form hydrogen-bonded solids, but we predict that at higher pressures it will form ammonium amide ionic solids consisting of alternate layers of NH(4)(+) and NH(2)(-) ions. These ionic phases are predicted to be stable over a wide range of pressures readily obtainable in laboratory experiments. The occurrence of ionic phases is rationalized in terms of the relative ease of forming ammonium and amide ions from ammonia molecules, and the volume reduction on doing so. We also predict that the ionic bonding cannot be sustained under extreme compression and that, at pressures beyond the reach of current static-loading experiments, ammonia will return to hydrogen-bonded structures consisting of neutral NH(3) molecules. PMID:18724375

  9. Epitaxial growth of fcc-Co{sub x}Ni{sub 100-x} thin films on MgO(110) single-crystal substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtake, Mitsuru; Nukaga, Yuri; Sato, Yoichi; Futamoto, Masaaki; Kirino, Fumiyoshi

    2009-12-15

    Co{sub x}Ni{sub 100-x} (x=100, 80, 20, 0 at. %) epitaxial thin films were prepared on MgO(110) single-crystal substrates heated at 300 deg. C by ultrahigh vacuum molecular beam epitaxy. The growth mechanism is discussed based on lattice strain and crystallographic defects. CoNi(110) single-crystal films with a fcc structure are obtained for all compositions. Co{sub x}Ni{sub 100-x} film growth follows the Volmer-Weber mode. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that the out-of-plane and the in-plane lattice spacings of the Co{sub x}Ni{sub 100-x} films are in agreement within +-0.5% with the values of the respective bulk Co{sub x}Ni{sub 100-x} crystals, suggesting that the strain in the film is very small. High-resolution cross-sectional transmission microscopy shows that an atomically sharp boundary is formed between a Co(110){sub fcc} film and a MgO(110) substrate, where periodical misfit dislocations are preferentially introduced in the film at the Co/MgO interface. The presence of such periodical misfit dislocations relieves the strain caused by the lattice mismatch between the film and the substrate.

  10. Alignment and Stiffening of Liquid Crystal Elastomers under Dynamic Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Aditya; Patra, Prabir; Ajayan, Pulickel; Chapman, Walter; Verduzco, Rafael

    2013-03-01

    Biological tissues have the remarkable ability to remodel and repair in response to disease, injury, and mechanical stresses, a phenomenon known ``functional adaptation'' or ``remodeling''. Herein, we report similar behavior in polydomain liquid crystal elastomers. Liquid crystal elastomers dramatically increase in stiffness by up to 90 % under low-amplitude, repetitive (dynamic) compression. By studying a systematic series of materials, we demonstrate that the stiffness increase is directly influenced by the liquid crystal content of the elastomers, the presence of a nematic liquid crystal phase and the use of a dynamic as opposed to static deformation. Through a combination of rheological measurements, polarizing optical microscopy and 2-D X-ray diffraction, we demonstrate that self-stiffening arises due to rotations of the nematic director in response to dynamic compression, and show that the behavior is consistent with the theory for nematic rubber elasticity. Previous work with liquid crystal elastomers has focused primarily on `soft elastic' deformations at large strains, but our findings indicate rich behavior at previously overlooked low-strain, dynamic deformations.

  11. MOFs under pressure: the reversible compression of a single crystal.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Kevin J; Beavers, Christine M; Clearfield, Abraham

    2013-01-30

    The structural change and resilience of a single crystal of a metal-organic framework (MOF), Zn(HO(3)PC(4)H(8)PO(3)H)·2H(2)O (ZAG-4), was investigated under high pressures (0-9.9 GPa) using in situ single crystal X-ray diffraction. Although the unit cell volume decreases over 27%, the quality of the single crystal is retained and the unit cell parameters revert to their original values after pressure has been removed. This framework is considerably compressible with a bulk modulus calculated at ∼11.7 GPa. The b-axis also exhibits both positive and negative linear compressibility. Within the applied pressures investigated, there was no discernible failure or amorphization point for this compound. The alkyl chains in the structure provide a spring-like cushion to stabilize the compression of the system allowing for large distortions in the metal coordination environment, without destruction of the material. This intriguing observation only adds to the current speculation as to whether or not MOFs may find a role as a new class of piezofunctional solid-state materials for application as highly sensitive pressure sensors, shock absorbing materials, pressure switches, or smart body armor. PMID:23320490

  12. Resonance compression of an acoustic beam in a crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshits, V. I.; Bessonov, D. A.; Lyubimov, V. N.

    2016-04-01

    The resonance excitation of an intense acoustic beam in a crystal is described for a special geometry of pump-wave reflection from the crystal surface. The resonance appears in the vicinity of the total internal reflection angle under the condition that the wave field in a compressed reflected beam propagating almost parallel to the surface is close to the volume eigenmode satisfying the free boundary condition. Criteria for the existence of such modes are considered in detail. Conversion conditions are analyzed under which a "parasitic" reflected wave of the same branch as the incident wave is absent and entire energy from the incident wave falls within a narrow intense acoustic beam of another branch. It is shown that, when the surface is chosen parallel to the crystal symmetry plane, the conversion criterion is reduced to the sole condition on the elastic moduli of the medium. Analysis is performed by analytic and numerical methods for skew cuts of monoclinic, rhombic, trigonal, and hexagonal crystals, when the boundary is the symmetry plane, while the sagittal plane has no symmetry. A number of crystals are found in which resonance excitation is very close to conversion.

  13. Shock compression experiments on Lithium Deuteride single crystals.

    SciTech Connect

    Knudson, Marcus D.; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Lemke, Raymond W.

    2014-10-01

    S hock compression exper iments in the few hundred GPa (multi - Mabr) regime were performed on Lithium Deuteride (LiD) single crystals . This study utilized the high velocity flyer plate capability of the Sandia Z Machine to perform impact experiments at flyer plate velocities in the range of 17 - 32 km/s. Measurements included pressure, density, and temperature between %7E200 - 600 GPa along the Principal Hugoniot - the locus of end states achievable through compression by large amplitude shock waves - as well as pressure and density of re - shock states up to %7E900 GPa . The experimental measurements are compared with recent density functional theory calculations as well as a new tabular equation of state developed at Los Alamos National Labs.

  14. Dependence of Initial Grain Orientation on the Evolution of Anisotropy in FCC and BCC Metals Using Crystal Plasticity and Texture Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Daniel Selvakumar

    Abundant experimental analyses and theoretical computational analyses that had been performed on metals to understand anisotropy and its evolution and its dependence on initial orientation of grains have failed to provide theories that can be used in macro-scale plasticity. Ductile metals fracture after going through a large amount of plastic deformation, during which the anisotropy of the material changes significantly. Processed metal sheets or slabs possess anisotropy due to textures produced by metal forming processes (such as drawing, bending and press braking). Metals that were initially isotropic possess anisotropy after undergoing forming processes, i.e., through texture formation due to large amount of plastic deformation before fracture. It is therefore essential to consider the effect of anisotropy to predict the characteristics of fracture and plastic flow performances in the simulation of ductile fracture and plastic flow of materials. Crystal plasticity simulations carried out on grains at the meso-scale level with different initial orientations (ensembles) help to derive the evolution of anisotropy at the macro-scale level and its dependence on initial orientation of grains. This paper investigates the evolution of anisotropy in BCC and FCC metals and its dependence on grain orientation using crystal plasticity simulations and texture analysis to reveal the mechanics behind the evolution of anisotropy. A comparison of anisotropy evolution between BCC and FCC metals is made through the simulation, which can be used to propose the theory of anisotropy evolution in macro-scale plasticity. Keywords: ensembles; grains; initial orientation; anisotropy; evolution of anisotropy; crystal plasticity; textures; homogeneity; isotropy; inelastic; equivalent strain.

  15. Impact sensitivity and crystal lattice compressibility/free space.

    PubMed

    Politzer, Peter; Murray, Jane S

    2014-05-01

    There is considerable evidence, which we discuss, indicating that compressibility and available free space in the crystal lattice are among the factors that govern the sensitivity of an explosive compound. Expanding and extending earlier work, we demonstrate, for 25 explosives, that there is an overall general tendency for greater impact sensitivity as the estimated free space per molecule increases. More specific relationships can be discerned by looking at subgroups of the compounds. The nitramine sensitivities, most of which are quite high, increase nearly linearly but only very gradually with free space. The nitroaromatics cover a wide range of sensitivities but all have an approximately similar intermediate level of free space. The remaining types of compounds show a reasonable sensitivity-free space relationship with one outlier: FOX-7 (1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethylene). PMID:24756553

  16. Rarefaction shock waves in shock-compressed diamond <110> crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perriot, Romain; Lin, You; Zhakhovsky, Vasily; White, Carter; Oleynik, Ivan

    2013-03-01

    Piston-driven shock compression of diamond <110> crystal was simulated by molecular dynamics using the REBO potential. At piston velocities between 2 and 5 km/s and corresponding pressures 117 GPA < P < 278 GPa, diamond sample undergoes a polymorphic phase transition, characterized by the coexistence of two elastically compressed phases, low-pressure phase A and high-pressure phase B. This phase transition results in the splitting of the shock wave into two elastic shock waves, composed of pure phase A and a mixture of phases A and B. Upon removal of the piston, a release wave is observed at the rear of the sample, turning into a rarefaction shock wave where the material undergoes the reverse phase transition from coexisting phases to the original low-pressure phase. For strong plastic waves induced by larger piston velocities the release wave propagates as a rarefaction wave without any phase transition corresponding to the adiabatic expansion along the plastic branch of the Hugoniot.

  17. Observation of soliton compression in silicon photonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Redondo, A.; Husko, C.; Eades, D.; Zhang, Y.; Li, J.; Krauss, T.F.; Eggleton, B.J.

    2014-01-01

    Solitons are nonlinear waves present in diverse physical systems including plasmas, water surfaces and optics. In silicon, the presence of two photon absorption and accompanying free carriers strongly perturb the canonical dynamics of optical solitons. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of soliton-effect pulse compression of picosecond pulses in silicon, despite two photon absorption and free carriers. Here we achieve compression of 3.7 ps pulses to 1.6 ps with <10 pJ energy. We demonstrate a ~1-ps free-carrier-induced pulse acceleration and show that picosecond input pulses are critical to these observations. These experiments are enabled by a dispersion-engineered slow-light photonic crystal waveguide and an ultra-sensitive frequency-resolved electrical gating technique to detect the ultralow energies in the nanostructured device. Strong agreement with a nonlinear Schrödinger model confirms the measurements. These results further our understanding of nonlinear waves in silicon and open the way to soliton-based functionalities in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor-compatible platforms. PMID:24423977

  18. Coarse-grained density and compressibility of nonideal crystals: General theory and an application to cluster crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häring, J. M.; Walz, C.; Szamel, G.; Fuchs, M.

    2015-11-01

    The isothermal compressibility of a general crystal is analyzed within classical density functional theory. Our approach can be used for homogeneous and unstrained crystals containing an arbitrarily high density of local defects. We start by coarse-graining the microscopic particle density and then obtain the long-wavelength limits of the correlation functions of elasticity theory and the thermodynamic derivatives. We explicitly show that the long-wavelength limit of the microscopic density correlation function differs from the isothermal compressibility. We apply our theory to crystals consisting of soft particles which can multiply occupy lattice sites ("cluster crystals"). The multiple occupancy results in a strong local disorder over an extended range of temperatures. We determine the cluster crystals' isothermal compressibility, the fluctuations of the lattice occupation numbers and their correlation functions, and the dispersion relations. We also discuss their low-temperature phase diagram.

  19. FCC main fractionator revamps

    SciTech Connect

    Golden, S.W.; Martin, G.R.; Sloley, A.W. )

    1993-03-01

    Structured packing use in fluid catalytic cracker (FCC) main fractionators significantly impacts unit pressure profile. Unit pressure balance links the FCC main fractionator, reactor, regenerator, air compressor and wet gas compressor. Unit pressure balance should be viewed as a design variable when evaluating FCC unit revamps. Depending upon limitations of the particular FCC unit, capacity increases of 12.5% to 22.5% have been achieved without modifications to major rotating equipment, by revamping FCC main fractionators with structured packing. An examination of three FCC main fractionator revamps show improvements to pressure profiles and unit capacity. The three revamps described included a wet gas compressor volume limit; an air blower limitation; and a wet gas compressor motor limitation.

  20. Development of a numerical procedure for mixed mode K-solutions and fatigue crack growth in FCC single crystal superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Srikant

    2005-11-01

    Fatigue-induced failures in aircraft gas turbine and rocket engine turbopump blades and vanes are a pervasive problem. Turbine blades and vanes represent perhaps the most demanding structural applications due to the combination of high operating temperature, corrosive environment, high monotonic and cyclic stresses, long expected component lifetimes and the enormous consequence of structural failure. Single crystal nickel-base superalloy turbine blades are being utilized in rocket engine turbopumps and jet engines because of their superior creep, stress rupture, melt resistance, and thermomechanical fatigue capabilities over polycrystalline alloys. These materials have orthotropic properties making the position of the crystal lattice relative to the part geometry a significant factor in the overall analysis. Computation of stress intensity factors (SIFs) and the ability to model fatigue crack growth rate at single crystal cracks subject to mixed-mode loading conditions are important parts of developing a mechanistically based life prediction for these complex alloys. A general numerical procedure has been developed to calculate SIFs for a crack in a general anisotropic linear elastic material subject to mixed-mode loading conditions, using three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). The procedure does not require an a priori assumption of plane stress or plane strain conditions. The SIFs KI, KII, and KIII are shown to be a complex function of the coupled 3D crack tip displacement field. A comprehensive study of variation of SIFs as a function of crystallographic orientation, crack length, and mode-mixity ratios is presented, based on the 3D elastic orthotropic finite element modeling of tensile and Brazilian Disc (BD) specimens in specific crystal orientations. Variation of SIF through the thickness of the specimens is also analyzed. The resolved shear stress intensity coefficient or effective SIF, Krss, can be computed as a function of crack tip SIFs and the

  1. Compression of Single-Crystal Orthopyroxene to 60GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, G. J.; Dera, P. K.; Holl, C. M.; Dorfman, S. M.; Duffy, T. S.

    2010-12-01

    Orthopyroxene ((Mg,Fe)SiO3) is one of the dominant phases in Earth’s upper mantle - it makes up ~20% of the upper mantle by volume. At high pressures and temperatures, this phase undergoes several well-characterized phase transitions. However, when compressed at low temperature and high-pressure, orthopyroxene is predicted to exhibit metastable behavior(1). Previous researchers have found orthoenstatite (Mg endmember of orthopyroxene) persists up to ~10 GPa, and diffraction(2-3), Raman(4), and elasticity(5) experiments suggest a phase transition above this pressure to an as-yet unidentified structure. While earlier diffraction data has surprisingly only been evaluated for structural information to ~9 GPa(2), changes in high-pressure Raman spectra to ~70 GPa indicate that several more high-pressure phase transitions in orthopyroxene are likely, including at least one change in Si-coordination(6). We have recently conducted exploratory experiments to further elucidate the high-pressure behavior of orthopyroxene. Compressing a single crystal of Fe-rich orthopyroxene (Fe0.66Mg0.24Ca0.05SiO3) using a diamond anvil cell, we observe phase transitions at ~10, 14, and 30 GPa, with the new phases having monoclinic, orthorhombic, and orthorhombic symmetries, respectively. While the first two transitions do not show a significant change in volume, the phase transition at ~30 GPa shows a large decrease in volume, which is consistent with a change in Si coordination number to mixed 4- and 6-fold coordination. References: [1] S. Jahn, American Mineralogist 93, 528-532 (2008). [2] R. J. Angel, J. M. Jackson, American Mineralogist 87, 558-561 (2002). [3] R. J. Angel, D. A. Hugh-Jones, Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth 99, 19,777-19,783 (1994). [4] G. Serghiou, Journal of Raman Spectroscopy 34, 587-590 (2003). [5] J. Kung et al., Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 147, 27-44 (2004). [6] G. Serghiou, A. Chopelas, R. Boehler, Journal of Physics: Condensed

  2. The possibility to measure the magnetic moments of short-lived particles (charm and beauty baryons) at LHC and FCC energies using the phenomenon of spin rotation in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshevsky, V. G.

    2016-06-01

    The use of spin rotation effect in bent crystals for measuring the magnetic moment of short-lived particles in the range of LHC and FCC energies is considered. It is shown that the estimated number of produced baryons that are captured into a bent crystal grows as ∼γ 3 / 2 with increasing particle energy. Hence it may be concluded that the experimental measurement of magnetic moments of short-lived particles using the spin rotation effect is feasible at LHC and higher energies (for LHC energies, e.g., the running time required for measuring the magnetic moment of Λc+ is 2 ÷ 16 hours).

  3. The possibility to measure the magnetic moments of short-lived particles (charm and beauty baryons) at LHC and FCC energies using the phenomenon of spin rotation in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshevsky, V. G.

    2016-06-01

    The use of spin rotation effect in bent crystals for measuring the magnetic moment of short-lived particles in the range of LHC and FCC energies is considered. It is shown that the estimated number of produced baryons that are captured into a bent crystal grows as ∼γ 3 / 2 with increasing particle energy. Hence it may be concluded that the experimental measurement of magnetic moments of short-lived particles using the spin rotation effect is feasible at LHC and higher energies (for LHC energies, e.g., the running time required for measuring the magnetic moment of Λc+is 2 ÷ 16 hours).

  4. Improving the intensity and efficiency of compressed echo in rare-earth-ion-doped crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiu-Rong, Ma; Yu-Qing, Liang; Song, Wang; Shuang-Gen, Zhang; Yun-Long, Shan

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the intensity and efficiency of a compressed echo, which is important in arbitrary waveform generation (AWG). A new model of compressed echo is proposed based on the optical Bloch equations, which exposes much more detailed parameters than the conventional model, such as the time delay of the chirp lasers, the nature of the rare-earth-ion-doped crystal, etc. According to the novel model of compressed echo, we find that reducing the time delay of the chirp lasers and scanning the lasers around the center frequency of the inhomogeneously broadened spectrum, while utilizing a crystal with larger coherence time and excitation lifetime can improve the compressed echo’s intensity and efficiency. The theoretical analysis is validated by numerical simulations. Project supported by Special Funds for Scientific and Technological Innovation Projects in Tianjin, China (Grant No. 10FDZDGX00400) and the Tianjin Research Program of Application Foundation and Advanced Technology, China (Grant No. 15JCQNJC01100).

  5. Avalanches, plasticity, and ordering in colloidal crystals under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, D.; Reichhardt, C. J. Olson; Reichhardt, C.

    2016-06-01

    Using numerical simulations we examine colloids with a long-range Coulomb interaction confined in a two-dimensional trough potential undergoing dynamical compression. As the depth of the confining well is increased, the colloids move via elastic distortions interspersed with intermittent bursts or avalanches of plastic motion. In these avalanches, the colloids rearrange to minimize their colloid-colloid repulsive interaction energy by adopting an average lattice constant that is isotropic despite the anisotropic nature of the compression. The avalanches take the form of shear banding events that decrease or increase the structural order of the system. At larger compression, the avalanches are associated with a reduction of the number of rows of colloids that fit within the confining potential, and between avalanches the colloids can exhibit partially crystalline or anisotropic ordering. The colloid velocity distributions during the avalanches have a non-Gaussian form with power-law tails and exponents that are consistent with those found for the velocity distributions of gliding dislocations. We observe similar behavior when we subsequently decompress the system, and find a partially hysteretic response reflecting the irreversibility of the plastic events.

  6. Avalanches, plasticity, and ordering in colloidal crystals under compression.

    PubMed

    McDermott, D; Reichhardt, C J Olson; Reichhardt, C

    2016-06-01

    Using numerical simulations we examine colloids with a long-range Coulomb interaction confined in a two-dimensional trough potential undergoing dynamical compression. As the depth of the confining well is increased, the colloids move via elastic distortions interspersed with intermittent bursts or avalanches of plastic motion. In these avalanches, the colloids rearrange to minimize their colloid-colloid repulsive interaction energy by adopting an average lattice constant that is isotropic despite the anisotropic nature of the compression. The avalanches take the form of shear banding events that decrease or increase the structural order of the system. At larger compression, the avalanches are associated with a reduction of the number of rows of colloids that fit within the confining potential, and between avalanches the colloids can exhibit partially crystalline or anisotropic ordering. The colloid velocity distributions during the avalanches have a non-Gaussian form with power-law tails and exponents that are consistent with those found for the velocity distributions of gliding dislocations. We observe similar behavior when we subsequently decompress the system, and find a partially hysteretic response reflecting the irreversibility of the plastic events. PMID:27415320

  7. Self-Consistent Theory of Elastic Properties of Strongly Anharmonic Crystals I:. General Treatment and Comparison with Computer Simulations and Experiment for Fcc Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubov, V. I.; Sanchez, J. F.; Tretiakov, N. P.; Yusef, A. E.

    Based on the correlative method of an unsymmetrized self-consistent field,16-23 we have derived expressions for elastic constant tensors of strongly anharmonic crystals of cubic symmetry. Each isothermal elastic constant consists of four terms. The first one is the zeroth approximation containing the main anharmonicity (up to the fourth order). The second term is the quantum correction. It is important at temperatures below the De-bye characteristic temperature. Finally, the third and fourth terms are the perturbation theory corrections which take into account the influence of the correlations in atomic displacements from the lattice points and that of the high-order anharmonicity respectively. These corrections appear to be small up to the melting temperatures. It is sufficient for a personal computer to perform all our calculations with just a little computer time. A comparison with certain Monte Carlo simulations and with experimental data for Ar and Kr is made. For the most part, our results are between. The quasi-harmonic approximation fails at high temperatures, confirming once again the crucial role of strong anharmonicity.

  8. Along-track scanning using a liquid crystal compressive hyperspectral imager.

    PubMed

    Oiknine, Yaniv; August, Isaac; Stern, Adrian

    2016-04-18

    In various applications, such as remote sensing and quality inspection, hyperspectral (HS) imaging is performed by spatially scanning an object. In this work, we present a new compressive hyperspectral imaging method that performs along-track scanning. The method relies on the compressive sensing miniature ultra-spectral imaging (CS-MUSI) system, which uses a single liquid crystal (LC) cell for spectral encoding and provides a more efficient way of HS data acquisition, compared to classical spatial scanning based systems. The experimental results show that a compression ratio of about 1:10 can be reached. Owing to the inherent compression, the captured data is preprepared for efficient storage and transmission. PMID:27137283

  9. The FCC and Broadcasting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    This report outlines the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) regulatory authority over the licensing and operation of commercial, educational, and public broadcasting in the United States. Also described are rules and regulations governing the program content and advertising, in relation to the fairness doctrine, free speech, and public…

  10. Electrical impedance of FCC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Y. S.

    1972-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of FCC are investigated in the context of multiple transmission lines theory. Analytical expressions for the coefficients of capacitance of conductors in a single cable are obtained. Numerical values calculated with these expressions are in good agreement with experimental data. Crosstalk, attenuation constants and phase angles of the current and voltage in flat conductor cable are also calculated.

  11. A Study of the Crystallization, Melting, and Foaming Behaviors of Polylactic Acid in Compressed CO2

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Wentao; Ko, Yoorim; Zhu, Wenli; Wong, Anson; Park, Chul B.

    2009-01-01

    The crystallization and melting behaviors of linear polylactic acid (PLA) treated by compressed CO2 was investigated. The isothermal crystallization test indicated that while PLA exhibited very low crystallization kinetics under atmospheric pressure, CO2 exposure significantly increased PLA’s crystallization rate; a high crystallinity of 16.5% was achieved after CO2 treatment for only 1 min at 100 °C and 6.89 MPa. One melting peak could be found in the DSC curve, and this exhibited a slight dependency on treatment times, temperatures, and pressures. PLA samples tended to foam during the gas release process, and a foaming window as a function of time and temperature was established. Based on the foaming window, crystallinity, and cell morphology, it was found that foaming clearly reduced the needed time for PLA’s crystallization equilibrium. PMID:20054476

  12. Strain-induced folding on [ 1 1 bar 1 bar ]-copper single crystals under uniaxial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lychagin, D. V.; Tarasov, S. Yu; Chumaevskii, A. V.; Alfyorova, E. A.

    2016-05-01

    Using uniaxial compression we studied the mechanical instability by folded structure formation on initially smooth and plain faces of copper single crystals with deformation axis orientation along [ 1 1 bar 1 bar ]. These folded structures can be found within several zones on the crystal's faces after compression test. We classified the folds based upon their scale, localization, state of the interfold boundaries, presence and amount of the slip bands in the folds. Subsurface crystalline lattice reorientation by deformation banding has been found to be the reason for folded structures generation. We suggest that folds generated on the [ 1 1 bar 1 bar ]-single crystals under compression are the inherent surface relief components which denote the deformation processes occurring both in the subsurface and in the bulk of the sample. In view of that, they can be used for analyzing the deformation under compression along with other surface structural components. The main specificity behind the folded structure generation mechanism which differs them from other orientations is slipping by parallel octahedral planes in some specific local areas.

  13. FCC catalyst selection

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, G.D.L. ); McElhiney, G. )

    1989-09-01

    This paper discusses a commonly used technique for comparing FCC catalytic selectivities based on the ASTM microactivity test (MAT) procedure, ASTM D-3907-80. In its original form the ASTM test provides only very limited information on selectivity. However, extension of the ASTM MAT procedure by using additional product analyses gives a microselectivity test capable of providing detailed yield structure information. This modified MAT procedure thus provides a cost-effective and rapid means of comparing many catalysts.

  14. Transient x-ray diffraction used to diagnose shock compressed Si crystals on the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantar, D.H.; Chandler, E.A.; Colvin, J.D.; Lee, R.; Remington, B.A.; Weber, S.V.; Wiley, L.G.; Hauer, A.; Wark, J.S.; Loveridge, A.; Failor, B.H.; Meyers, M.A.; Ravichandran, G.

    1999-01-01

    Transient x-ray diffraction is used to record time-resolved information about the shock compression of materials. This technique has been applied on Nova shock experiments driven using a hohlraum x-ray drive. Data were recorded from the shock release at the free surface of a Si crystal, as well as from Si at an embedded ablator/Si interface. Modeling has been done to simulate the diffraction data incorporating the strained crystal rocking curves and Bragg diffraction efficiencies. Examples of the data and post-processed simulations are presented. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. High pressure nano-crystalline microstructure of shock compressed single crystal iron

    SciTech Connect

    Hawreliak, J; Kalantar, D; Stolken, J; Remington, B; Lorenzana, H; Wark, J

    2007-12-11

    We discuss the first grain size measurements made during shock compression using in situ x-ray diffraction. Our experiments have shown unambiguously that single crystal iron shock loaded above 13 GPa along the [100] direction will transform from the ambient {alpha}-phase (BCC) to a highly ordered polycrystalline {epsilon}-phase (HCP). Here, we present a detailed shape analysis of the diffraction peaks using a modified Warren-Averbach method to quantify the microstructure of shock compressed high pressure iron. The {epsilon}-phase was determined through this method to have grain sizes between of 2 and 15 nm, in reasonable agreement with results from large scale MD simulations. We conclude that single crystal iron becomes nano-crystalline in shock transforming from the {alpha} to {epsilon} phase.

  16. The hierarchical characterization of deformation heterogeneities in compressed metal single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magid, Karen Ruth

    Plastic deformation is an inherently heterogeneous process whose understanding is still incomplete after more than 50 years of study. The traditional methods of analysis look at both bulk material deformation and properties and the microscale features which comprise the inherent deformation processes. A large amount of information occurring on the mesoscale, from 1 to 100 microns, has not been analyzed. Here we present the results from an x-ray diffraction technique with submicron spatial resolution used to analyze compressed metal single crystals. The mesoscopic structure of the inhomogeneous macroscopic deformation pattern was explored with selected area diffraction, using a focused synchrotron radiation polychromatic beam with a resolution of 1-3 mum. Single crystals of copper, molybdenum, and zinc were oriented for single slip tested to ˜2-14% strain in nearly uniaxial compression, using a specifically designed 6 degree of freedom compressive test device. The macroscopic strain field was monitored during the test by optical image correlation methods that mapped the strain field with a spatial resolution of about 100 mum. The copper and molybdenum crystals deformed unexpectedly, exhibiting significant amounts of secondary slip activity alongside the primary slip. Areas of interest from adjacent faces were identified from the image correlation and mapped for their orientation, excess defect density, and shear stress. The mesoscopic defect structure in the copper specimens consisted of broad, somewhat irregular primary bands that lay nominally parallel to (111), in an almost periodic distribution with a period of about 30 mum. These primary bands were dominant even in the region of conjugate strain. There were also broad conjugate defect bands, almost precisely perpendicular to the primary bands that tended to bridge primary bands and terminate at them. In addition, a tantalum bicrystal, previously compressed and characterized using electron back

  17. Ultrafast pulse compression, stretching-and-recompression using cholesteric liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yikun; Wu, You; Chen, Chun-Wei; Zhou, Jianying; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Khoo, Iam Choon

    2016-05-16

    We have experimentally demonstrated the feasibility of direct compression, or stretching and recompression of laser pulses in a very wide temporal time scale spanning 10's fs to ~1 ps time with sub-mm thick cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) cells. The mechanisms at work here are the strong dispersion at the photonic band-edges and nonlinear phase modulation associated with the non-resonant ultrafast molecular electronic optical nonlinearity. The observed pulse compression limit, spectral characteristics and intensity dependence of the compression are in good agreement with theoretical expectations and simulations based on a coupled-mode propagation model. Owing to the large degree of freedom to engineer the wavelength locations of CLC photonic bandgap and band-edges, these self-action all-optical processes can be realized with ultrafast lasers pulses in a very wide spectral region from the visible to near infrared, with potential applications in compact ultrafast photonic modulation devices/platforms. PMID:27409869

  18. Analysis of compression behavior of a [011] Ta single crystal with orientation imaging microscopy and crystal plasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B L; Campbell, G H; King, W E; Lassila, D H; Stolken, J S; Sun, S; Swartz, A J

    1999-02-03

    High-purity tantalum single crystal cylinders oriented with [011] parallel to the cylinder axis were deformed 10, 20, and 30 percent in compression. The engineering stress-strain curve exhibited an up-turn at strains greater than {approximately}20% while the samples took on an ellipsoidal shape during testing, elongated along the [100] direction with almost no dimensional change along [0{bar 1}1]. Two orthogonal planes were selected for characterization using Orientation Imaging Microscopy (OIM): one plane containing [100] and [011] (longitudinal) and the other in the plane containing [0{bar 1}1] and [011] (transverse). OIM revealed patterns of alternating crystal rotations that develop as a function of strain and exhibit evolving length scales. The spacing and magnitude of these alternating misorientations increases in number density and decreases in spacing with increasing strain. Classical crystal plasticity calculations were performed to simulate the effects of compression deformation with and without the presence of friction. The calculated stress-strain response, local lattice reorientations, and specimen shape are compared with experiment.

  19. Shock Compression of Beryllium Single Crystals: Time-Dependent, Anisotropic Elastic-Plastic Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winey, J.; Gupta, Y.

    2013-06-01

    To gain insight into inelastic deformation mechanisms in shocked Be single crystals, wave propagation simulations were performed for crystals shocked along the c-axis, a-axis, and other crystal directions to peak stresses reaching 7 GPa. The simulations utilized a time-dependent, anisotropic material model that incorporated dislocation dynamics and deformation twinning based descriptions of inelastic deformation. The simulation results showed good qualitative agreement with the measured wave profiles, including features arising from wave mode coupling due to the highly anisotropic inelastic response of Be. The measured wave profiles can be understood in terms of dislocation slip along basal, prismatic, and pyramidal planes, together with deformation twinning. Our results provide insight into the complex nature of inelastic deformation in shocked Be, and are also expected to be valuable for understanding the anisotropic inelastic response of analogous hcp metals subjected to shock compression. Work supported by ARL and DOE/NNSA.

  20. Magnetic anisotropy of vicinal (001) fcc Co films: Role of crystal splitting and structure relaxation in the step-decoration effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinal, M.; Umerski, A.

    2006-05-01

    The uniaxial in-plane magnetic anisotropy (UIP-MA) constant is calculated for a single step on the (001) surface of fcc Co(N) films. The calculations are done for both an undecorated step and the step decorated with one or more, up to seven, Cu wires. Our objective is to explain the mechanisms by which the decoration decreases the UIP-MA constant, which is the effect observed experimentally for ultrathin Co films deposited on vicinal (001) Cu surfaces and can lead to reorientation of magnetization within the film plane. Theoretical calculations performed with a realistic tight-binding model show that the step decoration changes the UIP-MA constant significantly only if the splitting between the on-site energies of various d -orbitals is included for atoms located near the step edge. The local relaxation of atomic structure around the step is also shown to have a significant effect on the shift of the UIP-MA constant. The influence of these two relevant factors is analyzed further by examining individual contributions to the UIP-MA constant from atoms around the step. The magnitude of the obtained UIP-MA shift agrees well with experimental data. It is also found that an additional shift due to possible charge transfer between Cu and Co atoms is very small.

  1. 1100 to 1500 K Slow Plastic Compressive Behavior of NiAl-xCr Single Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Darolia, Ram

    2003-01-01

    The compressive properties of near <001> and <111> oriented NiAl-2Cr single crystals and near <011> oriented NiAl-6Cr samples have been measured between 1100 and 1500 K. The 2Cr addition produced significant solid solution strengthening in NiAl, and the <111> and <001> single crystals possessed similar strengths. The 6Cr crystals were not stronger than the 2Cr versions. At 1100 and 1200 K plastic flow in all three Cr-modified materials was highly dependent on stress with exponents > 10. The <011> oriented 6Cr alloy exhibited a stress exponent of about 8 at 1400 and 1500 K; whereas both <001> and <111> NiAl-2Cr crystals possessed stress exponents near 3 which is indicative of a viscous dislocation glide creep mechanism. While the Cottrell-Jaswon solute drag model predicted creep rates within a factor of 3 at 1500 K for <001>-oriented NiAl-2Cr; this mechanism greatly over predicted creep rates for other orientations and at 1400 K for <001> crystals.

  2. Miniature Compressive Ultra-spectral Imaging System Utilizing a Single Liquid Crystal Phase Retarder

    PubMed Central

    August, Isaac; Oiknine, Yaniv; AbuLeil, Marwan; Abdulhalim, Ibrahim; Stern, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic imaging has been proved to be an effective tool for many applications in a variety of fields, such as biology, medicine, agriculture, remote sensing and industrial process inspection. However, due to the demand for high spectral and spatial resolution it became extremely challenging to design and implement such systems in a miniaturized and cost effective manner. Using a Compressive Sensing (CS) setup based on a single variable Liquid Crystal (LC) retarder and a sensor array, we present an innovative Miniature Ultra-Spectral Imaging (MUSI) system. The LC retarder acts as a compact wide band spectral modulator. Within the framework of CS, a sequence of spectrally modulated images is used to recover ultra-spectral image cubes. Using the presented compressive MUSI system, we demonstrate the reconstruction of gigapixel spatio-spectral image cubes from spectral scanning shots numbering an order of magnitude less than would be required using conventional systems. PMID:27004447

  3. Miniature Compressive Ultra-spectral Imaging System Utilizing a Single Liquid Crystal Phase Retarder.

    PubMed

    August, Isaac; Oiknine, Yaniv; AbuLeil, Marwan; Abdulhalim, Ibrahim; Stern, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic imaging has been proved to be an effective tool for many applications in a variety of fields, such as biology, medicine, agriculture, remote sensing and industrial process inspection. However, due to the demand for high spectral and spatial resolution it became extremely challenging to design and implement such systems in a miniaturized and cost effective manner. Using a Compressive Sensing (CS) setup based on a single variable Liquid Crystal (LC) retarder and a sensor array, we present an innovative Miniature Ultra-Spectral Imaging (MUSI) system. The LC retarder acts as a compact wide band spectral modulator. Within the framework of CS, a sequence of spectrally modulated images is used to recover ultra-spectral image cubes. Using the presented compressive MUSI system, we demonstrate the reconstruction of gigapixel spatio-spectral image cubes from spectral scanning shots numbering an order of magnitude less than would be required using conventional systems. PMID:27004447

  4. Nanosecond homogeneous nucleation and crystal growth in shock-compressed SiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuan; Jester, Shai; Qi, Tingting; Reed, Evan

    Understanding the kinetics of shock-compressed SiO2 is of great importance for mitigating optical damage for high-intensity lasers and for understanding meteoroid impacts. Experimental work has placed some thermodynamic bounds on the formation of high-pressure phases of this material, but the formation kinetics and underlying microscopic mechanisms are yet to be elucidated. Here, by employing multiscale molecular dynamics studies of shock-compressed fused silica and quartz, we find that silica transforms into a poor glass former that subsequently exhibits ultrafast crystallization within a few nanoseconds. We also find that, as a result of the formation of such an intermediate disordered phase, the transition between silica polymorphs obeys a homogeneous reconstructive nucleation and grain growth model. Moreover, we construct a quantitative model of nucleation and grain growth, and compare its predictions with stishovite grain sizes observed in laser-induced damage and meteoroid impact events.

  5. Nanosecond homogeneous nucleation and crystal growth in shock-compressed SiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuan; Jester, Shai B.; Qi, Tingting; Reed, Evan J.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the kinetics of shock-compressed SiO2 is of great importance for mitigating optical damage for high-intensity lasers and for understanding meteoroid impacts. Experimental work has placed some thermodynamic bounds on the formation of high-pressure phases of this material, but the formation kinetics and underlying microscopic mechanisms are yet to be elucidated. Here, by employing multiscale molecular dynamics studies of shock-compressed fused silica and quartz, we find that silica transforms into a poor glass former that subsequently exhibits ultrafast crystallization within a few nanoseconds. We also find that, as a result of the formation of such an intermediate disordered phase, the transition between silica polymorphs obeys a homogeneous reconstructive nucleation and grain growth model. Moreover, we construct a quantitative model of nucleation and grain growth, and compare its predictions with stishovite grain sizes observed in laser-induced damage and meteoroid impact events.

  6. Miniature Compressive Ultra-spectral Imaging System Utilizing a Single Liquid Crystal Phase Retarder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    August, Isaac; Oiknine, Yaniv; Abuleil, Marwan; Abdulhalim, Ibrahim; Stern, Adrian

    2016-03-01

    Spectroscopic imaging has been proved to be an effective tool for many applications in a variety of fields, such as biology, medicine, agriculture, remote sensing and industrial process inspection. However, due to the demand for high spectral and spatial resolution it became extremely challenging to design and implement such systems in a miniaturized and cost effective manner. Using a Compressive Sensing (CS) setup based on a single variable Liquid Crystal (LC) retarder and a sensor array, we present an innovative Miniature Ultra-Spectral Imaging (MUSI) system. The LC retarder acts as a compact wide band spectral modulator. Within the framework of CS, a sequence of spectrally modulated images is used to recover ultra-spectral image cubes. Using the presented compressive MUSI system, we demonstrate the reconstruction of gigapixel spatio-spectral image cubes from spectral scanning shots numbering an order of magnitude less than would be required using conventional systems.

  7. Commercial FCC License Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swearer, Harvey F.

    Jobs in radio arts, from serviceman to station engineer, are easier to get if one has a recommendation of the U.S. Government in the form of a license from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). This study guide for FCC radiotelephone licenses is designed to thoroughly prepare the applicant for any radiotelephone exam and to serve as a…

  8. Increasing FCC regenerator catalyst level

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.F. )

    1993-11-01

    A Peruvian FCC unit's operations were improved by increasing the regenerator's catalyst level. This increase resulted in lower stack losses, an improved temperature profile, increased catalyst activity and a lower catalyst consumption rate. A more stable operation saved this Peruvian refiner over $131,000 per year in catalyst alone. These concepts and data may be suitable for your FCC unit as well.

  9. Experiments with phase transitions at very high pressure. [compressed solidifed gases, semiconductors, superconductors, and molecular crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spain, I. L.

    1983-01-01

    Diamond cells were constructed for use to 1 Mbar. A refrigerator for cooling diamond cells was adapted for studies between 15 and 300 K. A cryostat for superconductivity studies between 1.5 to 300 K was constructed. Optical equipment was constructed for fluorescence, transmission, and reflectance studies. X-ray equipment was adapted for use with diamond cells. Experimental techniques were developed for X-ray diffraction studies using synchrotron radiation. AC susceptibility techniques were developed for detecting superconducting transitions. The following materials were studied: compressed solidified gases (Xe, Ar), semiconductors (Ge, Si, GaAs), superconductors (Nb3Ge, Nb3Si, Nb3As, CuCl), molecular crystals (I).

  10. Electromechanical properties of high coupling single crystals under large electric drive and uniaxial compression.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ahmed

    2005-10-01

    This work investigates the 33-mode electromechanical response of relaxor-ferroelectric lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) single crystals when driven with large fields approximately 0.4 MV/m under a combined direct current (DC) field and mechanical bias similar to those used in the design of sound projectors. It demonstrates that the remarkable small signal length extensional coupling (k33 > 0.90) and other electromechanical properties of morphotropic PMN-PT single crystals prevail under large drive. The observed k33 roll-off at 42 MPa compressive stress is analyzed in terms of the recent structural data and the high-order Devonshire theory of possible ferroelectric-ferroelectric transition trajectories. PMID:16382615

  11. Technique for compressing light intensity ranges utilizing a specifically designed liquid crystal notch filter

    DOEpatents

    Rushford, Michael C.

    1988-01-01

    A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten metal in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. To accomplish this, the assembly utilizes the combination of interference filter and a liquid crystal notch filter. The latter which preferably includes a cholesteric liquid crystal arrangement is configured to pass light at all wavelengths, except a relatively narrow wavelength band which defines the filter's notch, and includes means for causing the notch to vary to at least a limited extent with the intensity of light at its light incidence surface.

  12. Negative linear compressibility in a crystal of α-BiB3O6.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lei; Jiang, Xingxing; Luo, Siyang; Gong, Pifu; Li, Wei; Wu, Xiang; Li, Yanchun; Li, Xiaodong; Chen, Chuangtian; Lin, Zheshuai

    2015-01-01

    Negative linear compressibility (NLC), a rare and important mechanical effect with many application potentials, in a crystal of α-BiB3O6 (BIBO) is comprehensively investigated using first-principles calculations and high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments. The results indicate that the BIBO crystal exhibits the second largest NLC among all known inorganic materials over a broad pressure range. This unusual NLC behaviour is due to the rotation and displacement of the rigid [BO3] and [BO4] building units that result in hinge motion in an umbrella-like topology. More importantly, the parallel-polar lone-pair electrons on the Bi(3+) cations act as "umbrella stands" to withstand the B-O hinges, thus significantly enhancing the NLC effect. BIBO presents a unique example of a "collapsible umbrella" mechanism for achieving NLC, which could be applied to other framework materials with lone-pair electrons. PMID:26305262

  13. Negative linear compressibility in a crystal of α-BiB3O6

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Lei; Jiang, Xingxing; Luo, Siyang; Gong, Pifu; Li, Wei; Wu, Xiang; Li, Yanchun; Li, Xiaodong; Chen, Chuangtian; Lin, Zheshuai

    2015-01-01

    Negative linear compressibility (NLC), a rare and important mechanical effect with many application potentials, in a crystal of α-BiB3O6 (BIBO) is comprehensively investigated using first-principles calculations and high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments. The results indicate that the BIBO crystal exhibits the second largest NLC among all known inorganic materials over a broad pressure range. This unusual NLC behaviour is due to the rotation and displacement of the rigid [BO3] and [BO4] building units that result in hinge motion in an umbrella-like topology. More importantly, the parallel-polar lone-pair electrons on the Bi3+ cations act as “umbrella stands” to withstand the B-O hinges, thus significantly enhancing the NLC effect. BIBO presents a unique example of a “collapsible umbrella” mechanism for achieving NLC, which could be applied to other framework materials with lone-pair electrons. PMID:26305262

  14. Combined soliton pulse compression and plasma-related frequency upconversion in gas-filled photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Chang, W; Hölzer, P; Travers, J C; Russell, P St J

    2013-08-15

    We numerically investigate self-frequency blueshifting of a fundamental soliton in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. Because of the changing underlying soliton parameters, the blueshift gives rise to adiabatic soliton compression. Based on these features, we propose a device that enables frequency shifting over an octave and pulse compression from 30 fs down to 2.3 fs. PMID:24104627

  15. Tensile and compression testing of single-crystal gamma Ti-55.5Al

    SciTech Connect

    Zupan, M.; LaVan, D.; Hemker, K.J.

    1997-12-31

    Gamma based titanium aluminides are considered to be promising high temperature application alloys because of their exceptional high temperature mechanical properties and good oxidation resistance. Moreover, with a density less than half of current nickel based super alloys, the increased power to weight ratio that can be realized by using titanium aluminides is very attractive to the automotive and aircraft industries. Here the orientation and temperature dependence of the flow strength of {gamma}-TiAl is being measured to promote a fundamental understanding of the deformation mechanisms that are active in this alloy. High quality single crystals of {gamma}-Ti-55.5 Al have been grown using an optical float zone furnace, which allows for crystal seeding and provides a containerless growth environment. These crystals have been oriented using back reflection Laue and TEM and cut into microsample tensile specimens by electric discharge machining. The microsample testing technique developed at Johns Hopkins is being utilized to measure the orientation, temperature and tension/compression dependence of the flow strength of TiAl. An outline of the microsample testing techniques that have been developed for this study and preliminary results follow in this paper.

  16. Two techniques for temporal pulse compression in gas-filled hollow-core kagomé photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Mak, K F; Travers, J C; Joly, N Y; Abdolvand, A; Russell, P St J

    2013-09-15

    We demonstrate temporal pulse compression in gas-filled kagomé hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) using two different approaches: fiber-mirror compression based on self-phase modulation under normal dispersion, and soliton effect self-compression under anomalous dispersion with a decreasing pressure gradient. In the first, efficient compression to near-transform-limited pulses from 103 to 10.6 fs was achieved at output energies of 10.3 μJ. In the second, compression from 24 to 6.8 fs was achieved at output energies of 6.6 μJ, also with near-transform-limited pulse shapes. The results illustrate the potential of kagomé-PCF for postprocessing the output of fiber lasers. We also show that, using a negative pressure gradient, ultrashort pulses can be delivered directly into vacuum. PMID:24104822

  17. Status and availability of FCC hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romriell, G. K.

    1973-01-01

    The source availability of FCC and/or FCC connectors was surveyed. The results for the following areas are presented: (1) cost of FCC versus standard round cable, (2) qualification status, (3) size of wire available in FCC, (4) availability of hermetic connectors for FCC, (5) conversion from flat cable to round cable and visa versa, (6) availability of shielded flat cable for RF usage, (7) termination techniques, and (8) repair techniques.

  18. Long-time behavior of solution for the compressible nematic liquid crystal flows in R3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jincheng; Tao, Qiang; Yao, Zheng-an

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate the global existence and long-time behavior of classical solution for the compressible nematic liquid crystal flows in three-dimensional whole space. First of all, the global existence of classical solution is established under the condition that the initial data are close to the constant equilibrium state in HN (R3) (N ≥ 3)-framework. Then, one establishes algebraic time decay for the classical solution by weighted energy method. Finally, the algebraic decay rate of classical solution in Lp (R3)-norm with 2 ≤ p ≤ ∞ and optimal decay rate of their spatial derivative in L2 (R3)-norm are obtained if the initial perturbation belong to L1 (R3) additionally.

  19. Molecular Dynamics Modelling of Laser-Pulse Compression of a Ta single crystal with dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruestes, Carlos; Remington, Tane; Bringa, Eduardo; Meyers, Marc; Remington, Bruce

    2013-06-01

    The nanoindentation of a defect-free Ta [001] single crystal is studied by Molecular Dynamics simulations. The potential by, an EFS potential, and a recent EAM potential by are tested and their results analyzed in terms of dislocation slip planes. Dislocations emitted from the indented zone interact forming prismatic loops. The Ta dislocated structure is then subjected to shock compression induced by a piston hitting the sample at various speeds. The shock-induced dislocation generation and motion mechanisms are studied in order to compare to on-going experiments. This research was funded by ANPCyT PRH, PICT2008-1325, PICT2009-0092, SecTyP UNCuyo 06/M035 and UC Research Lab grants.

  20. Crystal-structure properties and the molecular nature of hydrostatically compressed realgar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejny, Clivia; Sagl, Raffaela; Többens, Daniel M.; Miletich, Ronald; Wildner, Manfred; Nasdala, Lutz; Ullrich, Angela; Balic-Zunic, Tonci

    2012-05-01

    The structure of realgar, As4S4, and its evolution with pressure have been investigated employing in situ X-ray diffraction, optical absorption and vibrational spectroscopy on single-crystal samples in diamond-anvil cells. Compression under true hydrostatic conditions up to 5.40 GPa reveals equation-of-state parameters of V 0 = 799.4(2.4) Å3 and K 0 = 10.5(0.4) GPa with K_0^' = 8.7. The remarkably high compressibility can be attributed to a denser packing of the As4S4 molecules with shortening of the intermolecular bonds of up to 12 %, while the As4S4 molecules remain intact showing rigid-unit behaviour. From ambient pressure to 4.5 GPa, Raman spectra exhibit a strong blue shift of the Raman bands of the lattice-phonon regime of 24 cm-1, whereas frequencies from intramolecular As-S stretching modes show negligible or no shifts at all. On pressurisation, realgar shows a continuous and reversible colour change from bright orange over deep red to black. Optical absorption spectroscopy shows a shift of the absorption edge from 2.30 to 1.81 eV up to 4.5 GPa, and DFT calculations show a corresponding reduction in the band gap. Synchrotron-based measurements on polycrystalline samples up to 45.5 GPa are indexed according to the monoclinic structure of realgar.

  1. Nucleation of fcc Ta when heating thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Janish, Matthew T.; Mook, William M.; Carter, C. Barry

    2014-10-25

    Thin tantalum films have been studied during in-situ heating in a transmission electron microscope. Diffraction patterns from the as-deposited films were typical of amorphous materials. Crystalline grains were observed to form when the specimen was annealed in-situ at 450°C. Particular attention was addressed to the formation and growth of grains with the face-centered cubic (fcc) crystal structure. As a result, these observations are discussed in relation to prior work on the formation of fcc Ta by deformation and during thin film deposition.

  2. Compression of ultra-short light pulses using the graded refractive index one-dimensional photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiri, R.; Bananej, A.; Safari, E.

    2016-09-01

    The one-dimensional photonic crystals (1D PCs) containing a graded refractive index layer have been theoretically utilized to compress the positively chirped ultra-short pulses of light. Two types of simple and graded index multi-layer structures consisting alternating layers of TiO2 and SiO2 with the same total thicknesses and periodicity have been investigated and compared. For the graded structure, three different refractive index distributions including linear, exponential and parabolic profiles have been considered. The results revealed that replacing one of the homogeneous layers of the unit cells in simple photonic crystal with a graded material having parabolic refractive index profile efficiently improves compression behavior of the structure. The compress factors of as much as 47% and 78% depending on the pulse's initial chirp rate obtained with parabolic profile of such the structures.

  3. Surface and crystalline analysis of aluminum oxide single crystal treated by quasistationary compression plasma flow

    SciTech Connect

    Maletic, S.; Popovic, D.M.; Cubrovic, V.; Zekic, A.A.; Dojcilovic, J.

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of treatment of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0001) surface by CPF are analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oriented low-dimensional structures are occurred for the treated Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dimension of these ripples are 1 {mu}m and the distance between them is about 10 {mu}m. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ripple-shaped structures contain a higher percentage of oxygen than the surroundings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results could promote CPF as a tool for producing organized oxygen-rich structures. -- Abstract: Material such as aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is important in electronics industry. On the other hand, plasma is one of the most efficient and sophisticated tools for materials processing. In this work a treatment of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0001) surface by quasistationary compression plasma flow (CPF) is analyzed in detail. Offline metrology was performed using dielectric measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Oriented low-dimensional periodic structures are occurred for the plasma treated Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystal. In the paper is reported that these oriented ripple-shaped structures contain a higher percentage of oxygen than the surrounding crystal surface. This could be the framework for usage of CPF as a tool in manufacturing of surfaces containing the highly organized oxygen-rich structures.

  4. Consider topped crude for FCC

    SciTech Connect

    Louder, K.E.; Juno, E.J.; Kulapaditharom, L.

    1985-09-01

    A case study is presented that illustrates the mechanics for evaluating use of topped crude to load the FCC for more profit. Declining product demands combined with high crude costs has shut down many refineries and left others operting well below design capacity. The study illustrates the step-by-step requirements to debottleneck an existing Kellogg Orthoflow Model B FCC to process topped crude mixed with gas oils. This study was limited to the catalytic converter defined as the reactor, regenerator, air blower, and wet gas compressor. The scope was to examine the ability to process topped crude and to consider modernizing the FCC to employ riser cracking and complete CO combustion regeneration.

  5. Use desalting for FCC feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.R.

    1996-08-01

    The heart of profitability in a modern refinery is the fluid catalytic cracking unit (FCCU). As a major process unit, the FCCU generates substantial profits from small improvements. One such improvement, desalting FCC feedstocks, increases refinery profits by over $25,000 per day after a two-month payout period. Desalting improves FCC feedstocks in three distinct ways: (1) reducing feed sodium content, (2) eliminating entrained water or slugs of water, and (3) reducing particulates and contaminants in both the water and hydrocarbon. Each of these improvements reduces or eliminates several problems in the typical FCCU. The paper discusses each of these mechanisms, the cost of desalting, and a typical case.

  6. FCC-ee: Energy Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Koratzinos, M.; Blondel, A.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Zimmermann, F.

    2015-06-02

    The FCC-ee aims to improve on electroweak precision measurements, with goals of 100 ke V on the Z mass and width, and a fraction of MeV on the W mass. Compared to LEP, this implies a much improved knowledge of the center-of-mass energy when operating at the Z peak and WW threshold. This can be achieved by making systematic use of resonant depolarization. A number of issues have been identified, due in particular to the long polarization times. However the smaller emittance and energy spread of FCC-ee with respect to LEP should help achieve a much improved performance.

  7. Controlled FCC/on-top binding of H/Pt(111) using surface stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuttleworth, I. G.

    2016-08-01

    The preferred binding site of H/Pt(111) has been shown to be change from the on-top to FCC as the Pt(111) surface goes approximately from a state of compressive to tensile strain. A chemical analysis of the system has shown that for both FCC and on-top bound cases the H ssbnd Pt s and H ssbnd Pt d interactions have a similar importance in determining the preferred binding position. It has been seen that FCC-bound H forms a distinct state below the Pt d-band, whereas the on-top bound H does not.

  8. High-pressure Brillouin study on plastic crystals of neopentane and adamantane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Shigeo; Horibe, Yasuhiro; Kume, Tetsuji

    2013-06-01

    Spherical top molecules neopentane and adamantane with Td symmetry crystallize face centered cubic (fcc) plastic crystals in which molecules are rather freely rotating at fcc lattice points. In the case of fcc plastic crystalline methane, the value of elastic anisotropy A is above 5 which is large than A ~ 2.5 of rare gas solids without molecular rotation, and shows strong pressure dependence because of the enhancement of the molecular rotation-translation (R-T) coupling by compression. Therefore, the purpose of the present study is to carry out the high-pressure Brillouin measurements for the fcc plastic crystals of neopentane and adamantane up to 0.75 and 0.5 GPa, respectively, and to clarify the dependence of the R-T coupling on pressure and molecular weight. The obtained value of A of fcc neopentane is 6.1 at 0.18 GPa and steeply increase up to 12.8 at 0.72 GPa. This remarkably large A values and its strong pressure dependence indicate that the R-T coupling effect in the plastic phase of neopentane is obviously large in comparison with methane. On the other hand, the plastic crystal of adamantane shows almost constant (A = 2.5) which is nearly the same as the rare gas solids, suggesting no R-T coupling effect.

  9. Real time synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements to determine material strength of shocked single crystals following compression and release

    SciTech Connect

    Turneaure, Stefan J.; Gupta, Y.M.

    2009-09-15

    We present a method to use real time, synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements to determine the strength of shocked single crystals following compression and release during uniaxial strain loading. Aluminum and copper single crystals shocked along [111] were examined to peak stresses ranging from 2 to 6 GPa. Synchrotron x rays were used to probe the longitudinal lattice strains near the rear free surface (16 and 5 {micro}m depths for Al and Cu, respectively) of the metal crystals following shock compression and release. The 111 diffraction peaks showed broadening indicating a heterogeneous microstructure in the released state. The diffraction peaks also shifted to lower Bragg angles relative to the ambient Bragg angle; the magnitude of the shift increased with increasing impact stress. The Bragg angle shifts and appropriate averaging procedures were used to determine the macroscopic or continuum strength following compression and release. For both crystals, the strengths upon release increased with increasing impact stress and provide a quantitative measure of the strain hardening that occurs in Al(111) and Cu(111) during the shock and release process. Our results for Al(111) are in reasonable agreement with a previous determination based solely on continuum measurements. Two points are noteworthy about the developments presented here: Synchrotron x rays are needed because they provide the resolution required for analyzing the data in the released state; the method presented here can be extended to the shocked state but will require additional measurements.

  10. FCC, CATV, ETV, and ITFS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Louis; Woods, Robert A.

    Actions taken in 1970 by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) are reviewed and discussed in this paper. These actions include amendment of educational broadcast rules for the first time in 17 years, decisions in the area of educational programing, a decision regarding the ultra high frequency (UHF)-land mobile dilemma, and a promise to…

  11. 47 CFR 95.117 - Where to contact the FCC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.117 Where to contact the FCC. Additional GMRS information...) FCC World Wide Web homepage: http://www.fcc.gov/wtb/prs. (c) In writing, to the FCC, Attention:...

  12. Crystal structure of HgGa{sub 2}Se{sub 4} under compression

    SciTech Connect

    Gomis, Oscar; Vilaplana, Rosario; Manjón, Francisco Javier; Santamaría-Pérez, David [Departamento de Química Física I, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, MALTA Consolider Team, Avenida Complutense s Departamento de Física Aplicada-ICMUV, MALTA Consolider Team, Universidad de Valencia, Edificio de Investigación, C Errandonea, Daniel [Departamento de Física Aplicada-ICMUV, MALTA Consolider Team, Universidad de Valencia, Edificio de Investigación, C and others

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ► Single crystals of HgGa{sub 2}Se{sub 4} with defect-chalcopyrite structure were synthesized. ► HgGa{sub 2}Se{sub 4} exhibits a phase transition to a disordered rock salt structure at 17 GPa. ► HgGa{sub 2}Se{sub 4} undergoes a phase transition below 2.1 GPa to a disordered zinc blende. - Abstract: We report on high-pressure x-ray diffraction measurements up to 17.2 GPa in mercury digallium selenide (HgGa{sub 2}Se{sub 4}). The equation of state and the axial compressibilities for the low-pressure tetragonal phase have been determined and compared to related compounds. HgGa{sub 2}Se{sub 4} exhibits a phase transition on upstroke toward a disordered rock-salt structure beyond 17 GPa, while on downstroke it undergoes a phase transition below 2.1 GPa to a phase that could be assigned to a metastable zinc-blende structure with a total cation-vacancy disorder. Thermal annealing at low- and high-pressure shows that kinetics plays an important role on pressure-driven transitions.

  13. Dynamic mechanical response of magnesium single crystal under compression loading: Experiments, model, and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qizhen

    2011-05-01

    Magnesium single crystal samples are compressed at room temperature under quasistatic (˜0.001 s-1) loading in a universal testing machine and dynamic (430, 1000, and 1200 s-1) loading in a split Hopkinson pressure bar system. Stress-strain curves show that (a) the fracture strain slightly increases with the strain rate; and (b) the maximum strength and strain hardening rate increase significantly when the testing changes from quasistatic to dynamic, although they do not vary much when the strain rate for dynamic testing varies in the range of 430-1200 s-1. The operation of the secondary pyramidal slip system is the dominating deformation mechanism, which leads to a fracture surface with an angle of ˜42° with respect to the loading axial direction. A theoretical material model based on Johnson-Cook law is also derived. The model includes the strain hardening and strain rate hardening terms, and provides the stress-strain relations matching with the experimental results. Finite element simulations for the strain rates used in the experiments predict the mechanical responses of the material that agree well with the experimental data.

  14. Strain Rate Dependency of Coarse Crystal Marble Under Uniaxial Compression: Strength, Deformation and Strain Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanrong; Huang, Da; Li, Xi'an

    2014-07-01

    Strain rate during testing, uniaxial or triaxial, has important influence on the measured mechanical properties of rocks. Uniaxial compression tests were performed at nine pre-specified static-to-quasistatic strain rates (ranging from 1 × 10-5 to 1 × 10-1 s-1) on coarse crystal marble. The aim is to gain deep insight into the influence of strain rate on characteristic stresses, deformation properties and conversion of strain energy of such rock. It is found that the strain rate of 5 × 10-3 s-1 is the threshold to delineate the failure modes the tested coarse marble behaves in. At a strain rate less than this threshold, single-plane shear and conjugate X-shaped shear are the main failure modes, while beyond this threshold, extensile and splitting failures are dominant. The stress for crack initiation, the critical stress for dilation, the peak stress, and Young's modulus are all found to increase with strain rate, with an exception that the above stresses and modulus appear relatively low compared to the strain rate in the range of between 1 × 10-4 and 5 × 10-3 s-1. The pre-peak absorbed strain energy, damage strain energy and elastic strain energy are found to increase with strain rate. In addition, the elastic strain energy stored before peak point favors brittle failure of the specimen, as the more stored elastic energy in the specimen, the stronger the fragmenting.

  15. Global Existence and Large Time Behavior of Strong Solutions to the 2-D Compressible Nematic Liquid Crystal Flows with Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Teng

    2016-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the strong solutions to the Cauchy problem of a simplified Ericksen-Leslie system of compressible nematic liquid crystals in two or three dimensions with vacuum as far field density. For strong solutions, some a priori decay rate (in large time) for the pressure, the spatial gradient of velocity field and the second spatial gradient of liquid crystal director field are obtained provided that the initial total energy is suitably small. Furthermore, with the help of the key decay rates, we establish the global existence and uniqueness of strong solutions (which may be of possibly large oscillations) in two spatial dimensions.

  16. Elevated temperature tension, compression and creep-rupture behavior of (001)-oriented single crystal superalloy PWA 1480

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan G.; Miner, Robert V.

    1987-01-01

    Tensile and compressive flow behavior at various temperatures and strain rates, and tensile creep rupture behavior at 850 and 1050 C and various stresses were studied for (001)-oriented single crystals of the Ni-base superalloy PWA 1480. At temperatures up to 760 C, the flow stress is insensitive to strain rate and of greater magnitude in tension than in compression. At temperatures of 800 C and above, the flow stress decreases continuously with decreasing strain rate and the tension/compression anisotropy diminishes. The second stage creep rate and rupture time exhibited power law relationships with the applied stress for both 850 and 1050 C, however with different stress dependencies. The stress exponent for the steady state creep rate was about 7 at 1050 C, but much higher at 850 C, about 12. Directional coarsening of the gamma' phase occurred during creep at 1050 C, but not at 850 C.

  17. An Elliptical Crystal Spectrometer Suitable for EXAFS Studies of Laser Compressed Materials and for High Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ridgeley, A; Goodman, D; Hall, T A

    1995-01-01

    Using an x-ray spectrometer with an elliptically curved crystal it is possible to study absorption spectra from a target placed at one focus of the ellipse using a backlighting source placed at the other focus. This principle has been used to develop a spectrometer for EXAFS studies of laser compressed materials. The backlighting source is placed at one focus of the ellipse and the laser compressed EXAFS sample at the other. Using this technique a small area of the EXAFS target can be probed, thereby minimizing any spatial variations in the compressed plasma due to nonuniformities in the laser beams. Also, the dispersive nature of the crystal ensures that it acts as a bandpass filter, so that the EXAFS sample is not probed by other x-ray wavelengths which may cause unwanted heating. Another advantage is that compressed and uncompressed EXAFS spectra can be compared on a single shot. The optical properties of the spectrometer are discussed analytically and using a computer ray-tracing program. The development and alignment of the elliptical spectrometer are discussed, and its performance using both x-ray film and a CCD detector is evaluated. The use of the elliptical spectrometer as a high-resolution x-ray instrument is presented. PMID:21307480

  18. Single crystal plastic behavior of a single-phase, face-center-cubic-structured, equiatomic FeNiCrCo alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wu, Zhenggang; Gao, Y. F.; Bei, Hongbin

    2015-07-25

    To understand the fundamental deformation mechanisms of compositionally complex alloys, single crystals of a multi-component equiatomic FeNiCoCr alloy with face-centered cubic (FCC) structure were grown for mechanical studies. Similarly to typical FCC pure metals, slip trace analyses indicate that dislocation slips take place on (1 1 1) planes along [11¯0] directions. The critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) obeys the Schmid law at both 77 and 293 K, and tension–compression asymmetry is not observed. Although this material slips in a normal FCC manner both at 293 and 77 K, compared to typical FCC metals the CRSS’s strong temperature dependence is abnormal.

  19. A methodology to study crystal plasticity inside a compression test sample based on image correlation and EBSD

    SciTech Connect

    Rehrl, C.; Kleber, S.; Antretter, T.; Pippan, R.

    2011-08-15

    Modified compression tests in a coarse-grained austenitic stainless steel have been carried out in order to examine the crystal plasticity behavior for large plastic deformations. The measurements of local in-plane strains provide deeper insight into the deformation process on the local scale. These measurements are performed by digital image correlation technique (DIC) in combination with local crystal orientation measurements by using the electron backscatter diffraction technique (EBSD). Split test samples are prepared to track the strong microstructural changes during deformation, which is done incrementally in 10% steps up to 60% total macroscopic strain. The clear correlation of local strains with crystal orientation changes - e.g. in the case of mechanical twinning - permits to identify the acting deformation mechanisms. Such, experimentally determined local strain maps can be used for verification of crystal plasticity finite element method simulations (CPFEM). - Research Highlights: {yields} Method to study large strain crystal plasticity inside an austenitic FeCrNi-alloy. {yields} Correlation of local strain analyses with crystal orientation measurements. {yields} Deformation mechanism changes locally from dislocation glide to mechanical twinning. {yields} Suitable to study grain-grain interactions, slip system activation and grain boundary effects. {yields} Provide essential data for crystal plasticity FEM studies.

  20. Advances in FCC reactor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Schnaith, M.W.; Gilbert, A.T.; Lomas, D.A.; Myers, D.N.

    1995-09-01

    The riser termination device and the feed distribution system are the key elements that enable FCC reactor technology to achieve the high performance demanded in the 1990s and beyond. UOP`s development efforts have combined cold flow modeling and commercial optimization testing to produce new technology in both areas. A key differentiation of the UOP feed-catalyst contacting system is the use of a catalyst acceleration zone to moderate density and achieve plug flow before feed injection. Commercial data confirm the benefit and importance of elevated feed injection and proper catalyst environment in this three-phase system. A new high-performance Optimix feed nozzle has been developed and cold-flow tested and is currently undergoing commercial demonstration. New riser disengagement technology with prestripping has been extended to internal riser FCC units. The new disengager design will achieve at least 98% hydrocarbon containment. Cold-flow modeling has confirmed catalyst separation efficiency, and the design has been accepted for two FCC reactor revamps scheduled for mid-1995 and for 1996.

  1. Effects of compression direction on the plasticity and rheology of hydrolytically weakened synthetic quartz crystals at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, M.F.; Kirby, S.H.; Ord, A.; Christie, J.M.

    1984-06-10

    A hydrothermally grown synthetic quartz crystal with 370 +- 60 ppm hydroxyl impurity was cut into right rectangular prisms in eight crystallographic orientations. We compressed the prisms under constant axial force corresponding to a uniaxial stress of 140.0 +- 0.5 MPa, and temperatures of 510/sup 0/ and 750/sup 0/C. All but one of the samples sustained permanent axial strains of 2--3%. We established the operating slip systems from specimen shape change, slip bands and dislocation etch pits on polished surfaces, crystallographic orientation changes, stress optical features in thin sections, and transmission electron microscopy. The observed creep behavior and plasticity divided the samples into three groups: (1) Crystals compressed at 45/sup 0/ to (0001) and (2110) and those compressed perpendicular(0111) and perpendicular(0111) deformed principally by slip parallel to (0001). Creep rates were relatively high and were not strongly sensitive to test temperature. Dislocation arrays approximately parallel to (2110) are common. Dislocation loops are elongate parallel to (0001), indicating that the edge segments were more mobile than the screw segements. (2) The second groups of samples were loaded normal to (0001) in three orientation: perpendicular(2110), perpendicular(0110), and at 45/sup 0/ to (1100). These samples deformed primarily by 0 )1010) slip with some evidence for secondary slip on the other systems. They were more creep resistant than the first group and displayed a much higher sensitivity of creep rate to test temperature.

  2. Lattice compression of Si crystals and crystallographic position of As impurities measured with x-ray standing wave spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera-Gomez, A. |; Rousseau, P.M.; Woicik, J.C.; Kendelewicz, T.; Plummer, J.; Spicer, W.E.

    1999-02-01

    In an earlier letter [Appl. Phys. Lett. {bold 68}, 3090 (1996)] we reported results about heavily arsenic doped silicon crystals, where we unambiguously showed, based on x-ray standing wave spectroscopy (XSW) and other techniques, that electrically deactivated As remains essentially substitutional. In this article we present the analysis methodology that led us to said conclusion, and show how from further analysis it is possible to extract the compression or expansion of thin epitaxial layers. We report the evolution of the compression of highly As doped Si epitaxial layers as deactivation takes place. The XSW measurements required a very small thickness of the doped layer and a perfect registry between the substrate and the surface layer. We found larger values for compression than previously reported, which may be explained by the absence of structural defects on our samples that relax the interface stress. Our results show a saturation on the compression as the electron concentration increases. We also report an estimation of the small displacement from perfect substitutional positions suffered by deactivated As. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Deformation mechanisms of olivine single crystals compressed at 300 MPa and 800-1100°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, Patrick; Demouchy, Sylvie; Mussi, Alexandre; Tommasi, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    Rheology of mantle rocks at lithospheric temperatures remains poorly constrained, since most experimental studies on creep mechanisms of olivine single crystals ((MgFe)2SiO4, Pbnm) and polycrystalline olivine aggregates were performed at high-temperatures (T >> 1200oC). In this study, we have performed deformation experiments on oriented single crystals of San Carlos olivine and polycrystalline olivine aggregate at temperatures relevant of the uppermost mantle (ranging from 800o to 1090oC) in tri-axial compression. The experiments were carried out at a confining pressure of 300 MPa in a high-resolution gas-medium mechanical testing apparatus at various constant strain rates (from 7 × 10-6 s-1 to 1 × 10-4 s-1). Mechanical tests yield differential stresses ranging from 88 to 1076 MPa. All samples were deformed at constant displacement rate and for finite strains ranging from 4 to 23 %, to provide insight into possible effects of hardening, softening or stick-and-slip. The single crystals were compressed along several crystallographic directions to test the possibility of activating different slip systems (e.g. [100](001), [001](100), [001](010) and [100](010)). We will present the characterization of the dislocation microstructures performed in the TEM.

  4. Refractometry of uniaxially compressed triglycine sulphate crystals doped with L-valine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadnyk, V. Yo.; Kiryk, Yu. I.

    2012-05-01

    The temperature and spectral dependences of the refractive indices n i of triglycine sulphate (TGS) crystals doped with L-valine have been investigated. Doping is found to weaken the temperature dependence of n i of TGS crystals. The electronic polarizabilities α i , refractions R i , and parameters of UV oscillators (λ0 i , B 1 i ) of mechanically distorted doped TGS crystals have been calculated. The temperature coefficients of the shift of the phase-transition point, ∂ T c /∂σ m , are found to be somewhat smaller than those for pure TGS crystals, which is confirmed by the increase in the hardness of TGS crystals after doping.

  5. Tuning avalanche criticality: Acoustic emission during the martensitic transformation of a compressed Ni-Mn-Ga single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, R.; Baró, J.; Heczko, O.; Schultz, L.; Fähler, S.; Vives, E.; Mañosa, L.; Planes, A.

    2012-12-01

    The propagation of a phase front during a thermally induced martensitic transition is discontinuous due to pinning at various defects, an effect which results in acoustic emission. Here we analyze the consequences of an applied compressive stress exemplarily on a Ni50.4Mn27.9Ga21.7 single crystal. Our experiments show that the distribution of the energies of the acoustic emission events follows a power law for more than three decades. This indicates that the transition exhibits avalanche criticality. The exponent characterizing the distribution of energies depends on the applied stress, and decreases from 1.9±0.1 at zero stress to 1.5±0.2 at stress above 3MPa. This decrease could be attributed to the reduced multiplicity of variants possible under uniaxial compression.

  6. An electron microscopy study of dislocation structures in Mg single crystals compressed along [0 0 0 1] at room temperature

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kumar, K. S.; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Geng, J.; Mishra, R. K.

    2016-01-09

    We compressed Mg single crystals along [0 0 0 1] at room temperature to various stress levels (40, 80, 120, 160 and 320 MPa) and the evolution of dislocation structure with stress increment was investigated by TEM slip is confirmed to be the dominant deformation mode; the predominance of edge dislocation debris lying along the <1 0more » $$\\bar{1}$$ 0> implies that screw dislocations are more mobile than their edge counterpart. The edge dislocation may dissociate into and dislocations, and the latter can extend further on the basal plane and bound a basal-stacking fault.« less

  7. Role of distortion in the hcp vs fcc competition in rare-gas solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainyukova, N. V.

    2011-05-01

    As a prototype of an initial or intermediate structure between hcp and fcc lattices we consider a distorted bcc crystal. We calculate the temperature and pressure dependences of the lattice parameters for the heavier rare gas solids Ar, Kr, Xe in a quasiharmonic approximation with Aziz potentials, and confirm earlier predictions that the hcp structure predominates over fcc in the bulk within wide ranges of P and T. The situation is different for confined clusters with up to 105 atoms, where, owing to the specific surface energetics and terminations, structures with five-fold symmetry made up of fcc fragments are dominant. As a next step we consider the free relaxation of differently distorted bcc clusters, and show that two types (monoclinic and orthorhombic) of initial distortion are a driving force for the final hcp vs fcc configurations. Possible energy relationships between the initial and final structures are obtained and analyzed.

  8. Shock wave compression and release of hexagonal-close-packed metal single crystals: Inelastic deformation of c-axis magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winey, J. M.; Renganathan, P.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2015-03-01

    To understand inelastic deformation mechanisms for shocked hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) metals, shock compression and release wave profiles, previously unavailable for hcp single crystals, were measured for c-axis magnesium crystals. The results show that the elastic-inelastic loading response is strongly time-dependent. Measured release wave profiles showed distinct peaked features, which are unusual for inelastic deformation during unloading of shocked metals. Numerical simulations show that pyramidal slip provides a reasonably good description of the inelastic loading response. However, { 10 1 ¯ 2 } twinning is needed to explain the unloading response. The results and analysis presented here provide insight into the relative roles of dislocation slip and deformation twinning in the response of shocked hcp metals.

  9. New FCC Goal in Ownership Regulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rappaport, Josh

    By first describing the historical stance of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) toward ownership of broadcast facilities and then describing the FCC's most recent policy statements, this report compares the differing viewpoints and recognizes that the new value or goal that seems to have been established conflicts with the past emphasis…

  10. The FCC and the Electric Church.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Michael F.

    This newsletter focuses on the relationship between the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and religious broadcasters. It traces the history of that relationship and discusses some of the pressures put on both. It includes a discussion of a recent avalanche of mail at the FCC supporting the church on the airways. It also summarizes some of…

  11. Three-Dimensional Crystal Plasticity Finite Element Simulation of Hot Compressive Deformation Behaviors of 7075 Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei-Ting; Lin, Y. C.; Li, Ling; Shen, Lu-Ming; Wen, Dong-Xu

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional crystal plasticity finite element (CPFE) method is used to investigate the hot compressive deformation behaviors of 7075 aluminum alloy. Based on the grain morphology and crystallographic texture of 7075 aluminum alloy, the microstructure-based representative volume element (RVE) model was established by the pole figure inversion approach. In order to study the macroscopic stress-strain response and microstructural evolution, the CPFE simulations are performed on the established microstructure-based RVE model. It is found that the simulated stress-strain curves and deformation texture well agree with the measured results of 7075 aluminum alloy. With the increasing deformation degree, the remained initial weak Goss texture component tends to be strong and stable, which may result in the steady flow stress. The grain orientation and grain misorientation have significant effects on the deformation heterogeneity during hot compressive deformation. In the rolling-normal plane, the continuity of strain and misorientation can maintain across the low-angle grain boundaries, while the discontinuity of strain and misorientation is observed at the high-angle grain boundaries. The simulated results demonstrate that the developed CPFE model can well describe the hot compressive deformation behaviors of 7075 aluminum alloy under elevated temperatures.

  12. High quality sub-two cycle pulses from compression of supercontinuum generated in all-normal dispersion photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Heidt, Alexander M; Rothhardt, Jan; Hartung, Alexander; Bartelt, Hartmut; Rohwer, Erich G; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2011-07-18

    We demonstrate nonlinear pulse compression based on recently introduced highly coherent broadband supercontinuum (SC) generation in all-normal dispersion photonic crystal fiber (ANDi PCF). The special temporal properties of the octave-spanning SC spectra generated with 15 fs, 1.7 nJ pulses from a Ti:Sapphire oscillator in a 1.7 mm fiber piece allow the compression to 5.0 fs high quality pulses by linear chirp compensation with a compact chirped mirror compressor. This is the shortest pulse duration achieved to date from the external recompression of SC pulses generated in PCF. Numerical simulations in excellent agreement with the experimental results are used to discuss the scalability of the concept to the single-cycle regime employing active phase shaping. We show that previously reported limits to few-cycle pulse generation from compression of SC spectra generated in conventional PCF possessing one or more zero dispersion wavelengths do not apply for ANDi PCF. PMID:21934748

  13. Ultrafast visualization of crystallization and grain growth in shock-compressed SiO2

    PubMed Central

    Gleason, A. E.; Bolme, C. A.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Galtier, E.; Milathianaki, D.; Hawreliak, J.; Kraus, R. G.; Eggert, J. H.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Collins, G. W.; Sandberg, R.; Yang, W.; Mao, W. L.

    2015-01-01

    Pressure- and temperature-induced phase transitions have been studied for more than a century but very little is known about the non-equilibrium processes by which the atoms rearrange. Shock compression generates a nearly instantaneous propagating high-pressure/temperature condition while in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) probes the time-dependent atomic arrangement. Here we present in situ pump–probe XRD measurements on shock-compressed fused silica, revealing an amorphous to crystalline high-pressure stishovite phase transition. Using the size broadening of the diffraction peaks, the growth of nanocrystalline stishovite grains is resolved on the nanosecond timescale just after shock compression. At applied pressures above 18 GPa the nuclueation of stishovite appears to be kinetically limited to 1.4±0.4 ns. The functional form of this grain growth suggests homogeneous nucleation and attachment as the growth mechanism. These are the first observations of crystalline grain growth in the shock front between low- and high-pressure states via XRD. PMID:26337754

  14. Ultrafast visualization of crystallization and grain growth in shock-compressed SiO2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gleason, A. E.; Bolme, C. A.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Galtier, E.; Milathianaki, D.; Hawreliak, J.; Kraus, R. G.; Eggert, J. H.; Fratanduono, D. E.; et al

    2015-09-04

    Pressure- and temperature-induced phase transitions have been studied for more than a century but very little is known about the non-equilibrium processes by which the atoms rearrange. Shock compression generates a nearly instantaneous propagating high-pressure/temperature condition while in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) probes the time-dependent atomic arrangement. Here we present in situ pump–probe XRD measurements on shock-compressed fused silica, revealing an amorphous to crystalline high-pressure stishovite phase transition. Using the size broadening of the diffraction peaks, the growth of nanocrystalline stishovite grains is resolved on the nanosecond timescale just after shock compression. At applied pressures above 18 GPa the nuclueationmore » of stishovite appears to be kinetically limited to 1.4±0.4 ns. The functional form of this grain growth suggests homogeneous nucleation and attachment as the growth mechanism. As a result, these are the first observations of crystalline grain growth in the shock front between low- and high-pressure states via XRD.« less

  15. Ultrafast visualization of crystallization and grain growth in shock-compressed SiO2.

    PubMed

    Gleason, A E; Bolme, C A; Lee, H J; Nagler, B; Galtier, E; Milathianaki, D; Hawreliak, J; Kraus, R G; Eggert, J H; Fratanduono, D E; Collins, G W; Sandberg, R; Yang, W; Mao, W L

    2015-01-01

    Pressure- and temperature-induced phase transitions have been studied for more than a century but very little is known about the non-equilibrium processes by which the atoms rearrange. Shock compression generates a nearly instantaneous propagating high-pressure/temperature condition while in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) probes the time-dependent atomic arrangement. Here we present in situ pump-probe XRD measurements on shock-compressed fused silica, revealing an amorphous to crystalline high-pressure stishovite phase transition. Using the size broadening of the diffraction peaks, the growth of nanocrystalline stishovite grains is resolved on the nanosecond timescale just after shock compression. At applied pressures above 18 GPa the nuclueation of stishovite appears to be kinetically limited to 1.4±0.4 ns. The functional form of this grain growth suggests homogeneous nucleation and attachment as the growth mechanism. These are the first observations of crystalline grain growth in the shock front between low- and high-pressure states via XRD. PMID:26337754

  16. Electronic Structure of Crystalline Buckyballs: fcc-C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali-Asadabadi, Saeid; Ghasemikhah, E.; Ouahrani, T.; Nourozi, B.; Bayat-Bayatani, M.; Javanbakht, S.; Aliabad, H. A. Rahnamaye; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Nematollahi, J.; Yazdani-Kachoei, M.

    2016-01-01

    The electronic properties of pristine fcc-C60 are calculated by utilizing a variety of density functional theory (DFT) approaches including the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof generalized gradient approximation (PBE-GGA), PBE-GGA+DFT-D3(vdW), Engel and Vosko GGA (EV-GGA), GGA plus Hubbard U parameter (GGA+U), hybrids Becke-Perdew-Wang hybrid functional (B3PW91), Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr hybrid functional (B3LYP), the PBE exchange-correlation functional (PBE0), and Tran and Blaha regular and non-regular modified Becke and Johnson (TB-mBJ) potential within a DFT frame work using augmented plane waves plus local orbital method. The comparison of the calculated results with the experimental values shows that the non-regular TB-mBJ method reproduces a correct experimental direct band gap of 2.12 eV at X symmetry for this compound. The effectiveness of this theoretical approach in the reproduction of the experimental band gap is due to the proper treatment of the electrons in the interstitial region of the crystal. Our results show that the C60 clusters are weakly interacting with each other in the fcc crystal. This study also reveals that the five-fold degeneracies of the isolated C60 molecule due to its icosahedral symmetry are completely lifted at an X symmetry point by the crystal field.

  17. Recrystallization of plane strain compressed Al-1 wt.% Mn alloy single crystals of typical unstable orientations.

    PubMed

    Bijak, M; Paul, H; Driver, J H

    2010-03-01

    A systematic study of crystal lattice reorientation in early stages of recrystallization has been carried out to correlate the orientations of recrystallization nuclei with the deformation microtexture and with slip systems. Microstructure and texture of Al-1 wt.% Mn single crystals of unstable initial orientations of {112}111, {100}001 and {001}110 have been examined by high-resolution field-emission gun scanning electron microscope local orientation measurements. All single crystals were channel-die deformed at room temperature and then annealed for a short time. It was shown that often observed presence of the 112 directions as rotation axes in the formation of new nuclei orientation directly suggested a close link with the deformation process. PMID:20500369

  18. 47 CFR 2.926 - FCC identifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... representative may receive a grantee code electronically via the Internet at https://gullfoss2.fcc.gov/prod/oet... which has not been granted equipment authorization where such grant is required prior to...

  19. 47 CFR 2.926 - FCC identifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... electronically via the Internet at http://www.fcc.gov/eas. The code may be obtained at any time prior to... marketing. Labelling of such equipment may include model or type numbers, but shall not include a...

  20. 47 CFR 2.926 - FCC identifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... electronically via the Internet at http://www.fcc.gov/eas. The code may be obtained at any time prior to... marketing. Labelling of such equipment may include model or type numbers, but shall not include a...

  1. 47 CFR 2.926 - FCC identifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... electronically via the Internet at http://www.fcc.gov/eas. The code may be obtained at any time prior to... marketing. Labelling of such equipment may include model or type numbers, but shall not include a...

  2. 47 CFR 2.926 - FCC identifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... representative may receive a grantee code electronically via the Internet at https://gullfoss2.fcc.gov/prod/oet... which has not been granted equipment authorization where such grant is required prior to...

  3. Apparatus and method for determining microscale interactions based on compressive sensors such as crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    McAdams, Harley; AlQuraishi, Mohammed

    2015-04-21

    Techniques for determining values for a metric of microscale interactions include determining a mesoscale metric for a plurality of mesoscale interaction types, wherein a value of the mesoscale metric for each mesoscale interaction type is based on a corresponding function of values of the microscale metric for the plurality of the microscale interaction types. A plurality of observations that indicate the values of the mesoscale metric are determined for the plurality of mesoscale interaction types. Values of the microscale metric are determined for the plurality of microscale interaction types based on the plurality of observations and the corresponding functions and compressed sensing.

  4. Ferromagnetic properties of fcc Gd thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, T. P. Passamani, E. C.; Larica, C.; Nascimento, V. P.; Takeuchi, A. Y.

    2015-05-28

    Magnetic properties of sputtered Gd thin films grown on Si (100) substrates kept at two different temperatures were investigated using X-ray diffraction, ac magnetic susceptibility, and dc magnetization measurements. The obtained Gd thin films have a mixture of hcp and fcc structures, but with their fractions depending on the substrate temperature T{sub S} and film thickness x. Gd fcc samples were obtained when T{sub S} = 763 K and x = 10 nm, while the hcp structure was stabilized for lower T{sub S} (300 K) and thicker film (20 nm). The fcc structure is formed on the Ta buffer layer, while the hcp phase grows on the fcc Gd layer as a consequence of the lattice relaxation process. Spin reorientation phenomenon, commonly found in bulk Gd species, was also observed in the hcp Gd thin film. This phenomenon is assumed to cause the magnetization anomalous increase observed below 50 K in stressed Gd films. Magnetic properties of fcc Gd thin films are: Curie temperature above 300 K, saturation magnetization value of about 175 emu/cm{sup 3}, and coercive field of about 100 Oe at 300 K; features that allow us to classify Gd thin films, with fcc structure, as a soft ferromagnetic material.

  5. Economically recover olefins from FCC offgases

    SciTech Connect

    Netzer, D.

    1997-04-01

    The concept of ethylene and propylene recovery from fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) offgases is not new; however, its application has been infrequent. For typical catalytic cracking of atmospheric and vacuum gas oils, ethylene yields range from 2.0 to 3.5 lb/bbl of FCC feed. The ethylene typically amounts to 8 to 18 vol% of FCC offgas and is normally routed to the fuel gas system. Variations in ethylene concentrations are affected by the FCC feed composition and cracking severity. This ethylene yield is anywhere from 0.7% to 1.1% of the FCC feed, as opposed to 26% to 36% for naphtha or gas oil cracking in conventional olefin plants. Due to high FCC unit feedrates (typically 25,000 to 85,000 bpsd for most North American refineries) even with a low ethylene yield, the olefins production can be significant. Here, two approaches to olefins recovery are addressed. In the first, ethylene is recovered as a dilute gas at a concentration of about 15 vol% and serves as raw material for ethylbenzene and, subsequently, styrene. In the second approach, ethylene is recovered as a pure polymer-grade liquid. Propylene recovery is identical for both approaches. The concept for producing polymer-grade liquid ethylene is described in detail in terms of process technology, cost estimates and economic parameters.

  6. The Strength of Single Crystal Copper under Uniaxial Shock Compression at Mbar pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, W; Higginbotham, A; Kimminau, G; Barbrel, B; Bringa, E; Hawreliak, J; Koenig, M; McBarron, W; Meyers, M; Nagler, B; Ozaki, N; Park, N; Remington, B; Rothman, S; Vinko, S M; Whitcher, T; Wark, J

    2009-05-21

    In situ x-ray diffraction has been used to measure the shear strain (and thus strength) of single crystal copper shocked to Mbar pressures along the [001] and [111] axes. These direct shear strain measurements indicate shear strengths at these ultra-high strain rates (of order 10{sup 9} s{sup -1}) of a few GPa, which are both broadly in agreement with the extrapolation of lower strain-rate data and with non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

  7. Multilayered polycrystallization in single-crystal YSZ by laser-shock compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Yasuhiko; Kitagawa, Yoneyoshi; Mori, Yoshitaka; Hioki, Tatsumi; Azuma, Hirozumi; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi; Komeda, Osamu; Ishii, Katsuhiro; Hanayama, Ryohei; Sekine, Takashi; Sunahara, Atsushi; Kajino, Tsutomu; Nishi, Teppei; Kondo, Takuya; Fujine, Manabu; Sato, Nakahiro; Kurita, Takashi; Kawashima, Toshiyuki; Kan, Hirofumi; Miura, Eisuke; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2015-08-01

    A single shot of an ultra-intense laser with 0.8 J of energy and a pulse width of 110 fs (peak intensity of 1.15× {{10}17} W cm-2) is divided into two beams and the two beams counter-irradiated onto a 0.5 mm-thick single crystal yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), changing the YSZ into a multilayered polycrystalline state. The laser-driven shock wave of the intensity ˜ 7.6× {{10}12} Pa penetrated the crystal as deep as 96 μ m, causing formation of a four-layered structure (the first layer from the surface to 12 μ m, the second from 12 to 28 μ m, the third from 28 to 96 μ m, and the fourth from 96 to 130 μ m, respectively). The grain size of the first layer was 1 μ m, while that of the second layer was broken into a few tens nanometers. The grain size of the third layer was a few hundred nanometers to a few ten micrometers. The area deeper than 96 μ m remained as a single crystal. The plasma heat wave might remelt the first layer, resulting in the grain size becoming larger than that of the second layer. The surface polycrystallization seems to maintain the residual stresses frozen in the film thickness direction. Our experimentally observed spatial profile of the grain size can be explained by this shock and heat waves model.

  8. On-chip frame memory reduction using a high-compression-ratio codec in the overdrives of liquid-crystal displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Min, Kyeong-Yuk; Chong, Jong-Wha

    2010-11-01

    Overdrive is commonly used to reduce the liquid-crystal response time and motion blur in liquid-crystal displays (LCDs). However, overdrive requires a large frame memory in order to store the previous frame for reference. In this paper, a high-compression-ratio codec is presented to compress the image data stored in the on-chip frame memory so that only 1 Mbit of on-chip memory is required in the LCD overdrives of mobile devices. The proposed algorithm further compresses the color bitmaps and representative values (RVs) resulting from the block truncation coding (BTC). The color bitmaps are represented by a luminance bitmap, which is further reduced and reconstructed using median filter interpolation in the decoder, while the RVs are compressed using adaptive quantization coding (AQC). Interpolation and AQC can provide three-level compression, which leads to 16 combinations. Using a rate-distortion analysis, we select the three optimal schemes to compress the image data for video graphics array (VGA), wide-VGA LCD, and standard-definitionTV applications. Our simulation results demonstrate that the proposed schemes outperform interpolation BTC both in PSNR (by 1.479 to 2.205 dB) and in subjective visual quality.

  9. Phase stability, ordering, and magnetism of single-phase fcc Fe-Au alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Joonhee M.; Barabash, Sergey V.; Belashchenko, Kirill D.

    2013-03-01

    Motivated by experimental evidence of L10 ordering in single-phase fcc Fe-Au nanoparticles, we study the structural thermodynamics of Fe-Au alloys. First, separate cluster expansions for fcc and bcc lattices are constructed for fully optimized ferromagnetic structures using density functional theory calculations. The optimized structures were assigned to fcc or bcc lattice by a structural filter. Although the lowest formation enthalpy at 50% Au is reached in the bcc lattice, the fcc lattice is preferred for the random alloy. Dynamical stability of specific orderings strongly depends on the magnetic configuration. To analyze the ordering tendencies of the fcc alloy, we restrict uniform lattice relaxations and separate the contributions of chemical interaction and local relaxations. By using the effective tetrahedron model (Ruban et al., Phys. Rev. B 67, 214302 (2003)) and explicit calculations for ordered and special quasi-random structures, we find that the local relaxation energies depend weakly on the magnetization. Although the L10 ordering is the ground state at 50% Au on the ideal lattice, local relaxations make it unfavorable compared to the random alloy. Moderate compression due to the size effect tends to slightly stabilize the L10 ordering.

  10. Shock compression modeling of metallic single crystals: comparison of finite difference, steady wave, and analytical solutions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lloyd, Jeffrey T.; Clayton, John D.; Austin, Ryan A.; McDowell, David L.

    2015-07-10

    Background: The shock response of metallic single crystals can be captured using a micro-mechanical description of the thermoelastic-viscoplastic material response; however, using a such a description within the context of traditional numerical methods may introduce a physical artifacts. Advantages and disadvantages of complex material descriptions, in particular the viscoplastic response, must be framed within approximations introduced by numerical methods. Methods: Three methods of modeling the shock response of metallic single crystals are summarized: finite difference simulations, steady wave simulations, and algebraic solutions of the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions. For the former two numerical techniques, a dislocation density based framework describes themore » rate- and temperature-dependent shear strength on each slip system. For the latter analytical technique, a simple (two-parameter) rate- and temperature-independent linear hardening description is necessarily invoked to enable simultaneous solution of the governing equations. For all models, the same nonlinear thermoelastic energy potential incorporating elastic constants of up to order 3 is applied. Results: Solutions are compared for plate impact of highly symmetric orientations (all three methods) and low symmetry orientations (numerical methods only) of aluminum single crystals shocked to 5 GPa (weak shock regime) and 25 GPa (overdriven regime). Conclusions: For weak shocks, results of the two numerical methods are very similar, regardless of crystallographic orientation. For strong shocks, artificial viscosity affects the finite difference solution, and effects of transverse waves for the lower symmetry orientations not captured by the steady wave method become important. The analytical solution, which can only be applied to highly symmetric orientations, provides reasonable accuracy with regards to prediction of most variables in the final shocked state but, by construction, does not provide

  11. Shock compression modeling of metallic single crystals: comparison of finite difference, steady wave, and analytical solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, Jeffrey T.; Clayton, John D.; Austin, Ryan A.; McDowell, David L.

    2015-07-10

    Background: The shock response of metallic single crystals can be captured using a micro-mechanical description of the thermoelastic-viscoplastic material response; however, using a such a description within the context of traditional numerical methods may introduce a physical artifacts. Advantages and disadvantages of complex material descriptions, in particular the viscoplastic response, must be framed within approximations introduced by numerical methods. Methods: Three methods of modeling the shock response of metallic single crystals are summarized: finite difference simulations, steady wave simulations, and algebraic solutions of the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions. For the former two numerical techniques, a dislocation density based framework describes the rate- and temperature-dependent shear strength on each slip system. For the latter analytical technique, a simple (two-parameter) rate- and temperature-independent linear hardening description is necessarily invoked to enable simultaneous solution of the governing equations. For all models, the same nonlinear thermoelastic energy potential incorporating elastic constants of up to order 3 is applied. Results: Solutions are compared for plate impact of highly symmetric orientations (all three methods) and low symmetry orientations (numerical methods only) of aluminum single crystals shocked to 5 GPa (weak shock regime) and 25 GPa (overdriven regime). Conclusions: For weak shocks, results of the two numerical methods are very similar, regardless of crystallographic orientation. For strong shocks, artificial viscosity affects the finite difference solution, and effects of transverse waves for the lower symmetry orientations not captured by the steady wave method become important. The analytical solution, which can only be applied to highly symmetric orientations, provides reasonable accuracy with regards to prediction of most variables in the final shocked state but, by construction, does not provide insight

  12. Modelling off Hugoniot Loading Using Ramp Compression in Single Crystal Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Hawreliak, J; Remington, B A; Lorenzana, H; Bringa, E; Wark, J

    2010-11-29

    The application of a ramp load to a sample is a method by which the thermodynamic variables of the high pressure state can be controlled. The faster the loading rate, the higher the entropy and higher the temperature. This paper describes moleculer dynamics (MD) simulations with 25 million atoms which investigate ramp loading of single crystal copper. The simulations followed the propagation of a 300ps ramp load to 3Mbar along the [100] direction copper. The simulations were long enough to allow the wave front to steepen into a shock, at which point the simulated copper sample shock melted.

  13. Temporal pulse compression in a xenon-filled Kagome-type hollow-core photonic crystal fiber at high average power.

    PubMed

    Heckl, O H; Saraceno, C J; Baer, C R E; Südmeyer, T; Wang, Y Y; Cheng, Y; Benabid, F; Keller, U

    2011-09-26

    In this study we demonstrate the suitability of Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fibers (HC-PCF) for multiwatt average power pulse compression. We spectrally broadened picosecond pulses from a SESAM mode-locked thin disk laser in a xenon gas filled Kagome-type HC-PCF and compressed these pulses to below 250 fs with a hypocycloid-core fiber and 470 fs with a single cell core defect fiber. The compressed average output power of 7.2 W and 10.2 W at a pulse repetition rate of approximately 10 MHz corresponds to pulse energies of 0.7 µJ and 1 µJ and to peak powers of 1.6 MW and 1.7 MW, respectively. Further optimization of the fiber parameters should enable pulse compression to below 50 fs duration at substantially higher pulse energies. PMID:21996856

  14. CuAl{sub 2} revisited: Composition, crystal structure, chemical bonding, compressibility and Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Grin, Yuri . E-mail: grin@cpfs.mpg.de; Wagner, Frank R.; Armbruester, Marc; Kohout, Miroslav; Leithe-Jasper, Andreas; Schwarz, Ulrich; Wedig, Ulrich; Georg von Schnering, Hans

    2006-06-15

    The structure of CuAl{sub 2} is usually described as a framework of base condensed tetragonal antiprisms [CuAl{sub 8/4}]. The appropriate symmetry governed periodic nodal surface (PNS) divides the space of the structure into two labyrinths. All atoms are located in one labyrinth, whereas the second labyrinth seems to be 'empty'. The bonding of the CuAl{sub 2} structure was analyzed by the electron localization function (ELF), crystal orbital Hamiltonian population (COHP) analysis and Raman spectroscopy. From the ELF representation it is seen, that the 'empty' labyrinth is in fact the place of important covalent interactions. ELF, COHP in combination with high-pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy show that the CuAl{sub 2} structure is described best as a network built of interpenetrating graphite-like nets of three-bonded aluminum atoms with the copper atoms inside the tetragonal-antiprismatic cavities. - Graphical abstract: Atomic interactions in the crystal structure of the intermetallic compound CuAl{sub 2}: Three-bonded aluminum atoms form interpenetrating graphite-like nets. The copper atoms are located in the channels of aluminum network by means of three-center bonds. The bonding model is in agreement with the result of polarized Raman spectroscopy and high-pressure X-ray powder diffraction.

  15. Superconductivity in compressed sulfur hydride: Dependences on pressure, composition, and crystal structure from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akashi, Ryosuke

    The recent discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in sulfur hydride under extreme pressure has broken the long-standing record of superconducting transition temperature (Tc) in the Hg-cuprate. According to the isotope effect measurement and theoretical calculations, the superconducting transition is mainly ascribed to the conventional phonon-mediated pairing interaction. It is, however, not enough for understanding the high-Tc superconductivity in the sulfur hydride. To elucidate various possible effects on Tc with accuracy, we have analyzed Tc with first-principles methods without any empirical parameters. First, for various pressures and theoretically proposed crystal structures, we calculated Tc with the density functional theory for superconductors (SCDFT) to examine which structure(s) can explain experimentally measured Tc data [Akashi et al., PRB 91, 224513 (2015)]. We next solved the Eliashberg equations without introducing the renormalized Coulomb parameter mu*, which is the Green-function-based counterpart of the SCDFT, and evaluated the effects of rapidly varying electron density of states, atomic zero-point motion, and phonon anharmonic corrections on Tc [Sano et al., in preparation]. In the talk, we review these results and discuss the dominant factors for the Tc and their relation to the experimental results. We also report some crystal structures that we recently found with first-principles calculations, which could have a key role for the pressure-induced transformation to the high-Tc phase.

  16. Dynamic range compression/expansion of light beams by photorefractive crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Li-Jen (Inventor); Liu, Hua-Kuang (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus is provided which greatly reduces the intensity of bright portions of an image while only moderately reducing the brightness of dimmer portions of the image, to thereby compress the range of light intensities to facilitate detection of the image. The apparatus includes a light detector device formed by a chip of photorefractive material. A 2-D array of light beams from an object to be detected passes through a beam splitter to form two arrays of light beams. The two arrays are directed at different angles against a surface of the chip of photorefractive material, the two arrays of light beams forming coincident images on the surface. One of the 2-D arrays of beams emerging from an opposite surface of the chip has a lower range of intensities, to facilitate detection of the object despite very bright spots in its image. The other array of light beams emerging from the chip has a greater range of intensities than the unprocessed image of the object.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of shock compression of metals: Iron and iron-sulfur solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belashchenko, D. K.; Ostrovskii, O. I.

    2011-06-01

    The embedded atom model potential suggested earlier was improved to correctly describe iron at high pressures and temperatures. Correction was introduced using the shock compression data. The properties of body- and face-centered cubic (BCC and FCC) lattices and liquid iron at compression degrees up to 50% of the normal volume and temperatures up to 10000 K were calculated. At degrees of compression 0.7-0.6 and 0 K, the FCC lattice is thermodynamically stable. The temperature of fusion increases to ≈9700 K at compression to 50% of initial volume (pressure 585 GPa). The pressure of pure iron at 5000 K and density 12.5 g/cm3 is ≈250 GPa and is substantially lower than in the center of the Earth according to the geophysical data (360 GPa). An embedded atom model potential for a 10 at % solution of sulfur in iron which allows the properties of the melt in the center of the Earth to be described correctly is suggested; the viscosity of the melt under these conditions is not high (0.0156 Pa s); these results are close to those obtained in ab initio calculations. The possibility of partial Earth core crystallization is shown.

  18. Six-bit all-optical quantization using photonic crystal fiber with soliton self-frequency shift and pre-chirp spectral compression techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhe; Yuan, Jin-Hui; Li, Sha; Xie, Song-Lin; Yan, Bin-Bin; Sang, Xin-Zhu; Yu, Chong-Xiu

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we propose an optical quantization scheme for all-optical analog-to-digital conversion that facilitates photonics integration. A segment of 10-m photonic crystal fiber with a high nonlinear coefficient of 62.8 W-1/km is utilized to realize large scale soliton self-frequency shift relevant to the power of the sampled optical signal. Furthermore, a 100-m dispersion-increasing fiber is used as the spectral compression module for further resolution enhancement. Simulation results show that 317-nm maximum wavelength shift is realized with 1550-nm initial wavelength and 6-bit quantization resolution is obtained with a subsequent spectral compression process.

  19. Catalytic reforming of heart cut fcc naphthas

    SciTech Connect

    Gerritsen, L.A.

    1985-03-01

    The anticipated lead phasedown in the USA and the growing demand for unleaded gasoline will require a higher gasoline pool octane number. One of the possibilities to achieve this increase of pool octane will be catalytic reforming of FCC naphtha. In this paper we evaluate the effects of FCC naphtha reforming on the reformer operation and gasoline pool volume for various lead phasedown scenarios. High-stability reforming catalysts, like TPR-8/CK-522 TRILOBE catalyst, will be required to maintain acceptable cycle lengths at the more severe reformer operating conditions. The properties and octane distribution of FCC naphtha are discussed, as well as its hydrotreating with high-active NiMo catalysts.

  20. Elastic-plastic and phase transition of zinc oxide single crystal under shock compression

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xun; Mashimo, Tsutomu Li, Wei; Zhou, Xianming; Sekine, Toshimori

    2015-03-07

    The Hugoniot data for zinc oxide (ZnO) single crystals were measured up to 80 GPa along both the 〈112{sup ¯}0〉 (a-axis) and 〈0001〉 (c-axis) directions using a velocity interferometer system for any reflector and inclined-mirror method combined with a powder gun and two-stage light gas gun. The Hugoniot-elastic limits of ZnO were determined to be 10.5 and 11.5 GPa along the a- and c-axes, respectively. The wurtzite (B4) to rocksalt (B1) phase transition pressures along the a- and c-axes are 12.3 and 14.4 GPa, respectively. Shock velocity (U{sub s}) versus particle velocity (U{sub p}) relation of the final phase is given by the following relationship: U{sub s} (km/s) = 2.76 + 1.51U{sub p} (km/s). Based on the Debye-Grüneisen model and Birch-Murnaghan equation of state (EOS), we discuss the EOS of the B1 phase ZnO. The bulk modulus (K{sub 0}) and its pressure derivative (K{sub 0}′) are estimated to be K{sub 0} = 174 GPa and K{sub 0}′ = 3.9, respectively.

  1. Design and fabrication of hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for high-power ultrashort pulse transportation and pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Y; Peng, Xiang; Alharbi, M; Dutin, C Fourcade; Bradley, T D; Gérôme, F; Mielke, Michael; Booth, Timothy; Benabid, F

    2012-08-01

    We report on the recent design and fabrication of kagome-type hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for the purpose of high-power ultrashort pulse transportation. The fabricated seven-cell three-ring hypocycloid-shaped large core fiber exhibits an up-to-date lowest attenuation (among all kagome fibers) of 40 dB/km over a broadband transmission centered at 1500 nm. We show that the large core size, low attenuation, broadband transmission, single-mode guidance, and low dispersion make it an ideal host for high-power laser beam transportation. By filling the fiber with helium gas, a 74 μJ, 850 fs, and 40 kHz repetition rate ultrashort pulse at 1550 nm has been faithfully delivered at the fiber output with little propagation pulse distortion. Compression of a 105 μJ laser pulse from 850 fs down to 300 fs has been achieved by operating the fiber in ambient air. PMID:22859102

  2. A Microstructure-Based Model to Characterize Micromechanical Parameters Controlling Compressive and Tensile Failure in Crystallized Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazerani, T.; Zhao, J.

    2014-03-01

    A discrete element model is proposed to examine rock strength and failure. The model is implemented by UDEC which is developed for this purpose. The material is represented as a collection of irregular-sized deformable particles interacting at their cohesive boundaries. The interface between two adjacent particles is viewed as a flexible contact whose stress-displacement law is assumed to control the material fracture and fragmentation process. To reproduce rock anisotropy, an innovative orthotropic cohesive law is developed for contact which allows the interfacial shear and tensile behaviours to be different from each other. The model is applied to a crystallized igneous rock and the individual and interactional effects of the microstructural parameters on the material compressive and tensile failure response are examined. A new methodical calibration process is also established. It is shown that the model successfully reproduces the rock mechanical behaviour quantitatively and qualitatively. Ultimately, the model is used to understand how and under what circumstances micro-tensile and micro-shear cracking mechanisms control the material failure at different loading paths.

  3. Shock wave compression of hexagonal-close-packed metal single crystals: Time-dependent, anisotropic elastic-plastic response of beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winey, J. M.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2014-07-01

    Understanding and modeling the response of hcp metals to high stress impulsive loading is challenging because the lower crystal symmetry, compared to cubic metals, results in a significantly more complex material response. To gain insight into the inelastic deformation of hcp metals subjected to high dynamic stresses, shock wave compression of single crystals provides a useful approach because different inelastic deformation mechanisms can be examined selectively by shock compression along different crystal orientations. As a representative example, we report, here, on wave propagation simulations for beryllium (Be) single crystals shocked along the c-axis, a-axis, and several low-symmetry directions to peak stresses reaching 7 GPa. The simulations utilized a time-dependent, anisotropic material model that incorporated dislocation dynamics, deformation twinning, and shear cracking based descriptions of inelastic deformation. The simulation results showed good overall agreement with measured wave profiles for all the different crystal orientations examined [Pope and Johnson, J. Appl. Phys. 46, 720 (1975)], including features arising from wave mode coupling due to the highly anisotropic inelastic response of Be. This good agreement demonstrates that the measured profiles can be understood in terms of dislocation slip along basal, prismatic, and pyramidal planes, together with deformation twinning along { 10 1 ¯ 2 } planes. Our results show that the response of shocked Be single crystals involves the simultaneous operation of multiple, distinct inelastic deformation mechanisms for all orientations except the c-axis. For shocked c-axis Be, the measured wave profiles do not provide good discrimination between pyramidal slip and other inelastic deformation mechanisms, such as shear cracking. The findings presented here provide insight into the complex inelastic deformation response of shocked Be single crystals and are expected to be useful for other hcp crystals. More

  4. Shock wave compression of hexagonal-close-packed metal single crystals: Time-dependent, anisotropic elastic-plastic response of beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Winey, J. M.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2014-07-21

    Understanding and modeling the response of hcp metals to high stress impulsive loading is challenging because the lower crystal symmetry, compared to cubic metals, results in a significantly more complex material response. To gain insight into the inelastic deformation of hcp metals subjected to high dynamic stresses, shock wave compression of single crystals provides a useful approach because different inelastic deformation mechanisms can be examined selectively by shock compression along different crystal orientations. As a representative example, we report, here, on wave propagation simulations for beryllium (Be) single crystals shocked along the c-axis, a-axis, and several low-symmetry directions to peak stresses reaching 7 GPa. The simulations utilized a time-dependent, anisotropic material model that incorporated dislocation dynamics, deformation twinning, and shear cracking based descriptions of inelastic deformation. The simulation results showed good overall agreement with measured wave profiles for all the different crystal orientations examined [Pope and Johnson, J. Appl. Phys. 46, 720 (1975)], including features arising from wave mode coupling due to the highly anisotropic inelastic response of Be. This good agreement demonstrates that the measured profiles can be understood in terms of dislocation slip along basal, prismatic, and pyramidal planes, together with deformation twinning along (101{sup ¯}2) planes. Our results show that the response of shocked Be single crystals involves the simultaneous operation of multiple, distinct inelastic deformation mechanisms for all orientations except the c-axis. For shocked c-axis Be, the measured wave profiles do not provide good discrimination between pyramidal slip and other inelastic deformation mechanisms, such as shear cracking. The findings presented here provide insight into the complex inelastic deformation response of shocked Be single crystals and are expected to be useful for other hcp crystals

  5. Dynamical Bragg diffraction of optical pulses in photonic crystals in the Laue geometry: Diffraction-induced splitting, selective compression, and focusing of pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Skorynin, A. A. Bushuev, V. A.; Mantsyzov, B. I.

    2012-07-15

    A theory for the dynamical Bragg diffraction of a spatially confined laser pulse in a linear photonic crystal with a significant modulation of the refractive index in the Laue geometry has been developed. The diffraction-induced splitting of a spatially confined pulse into the Borrmann and anti-Borrmann pulses localized in different regions of the photonic crystal and characterized by different dispersion laws is predicted. The selective compression or focusing of one of these pulses with the simultaneous broadening or defocusing of the other pulse is shown to be possible.

  6. Deeply etherify FCC light cracked Naphtha (LCN)

    SciTech Connect

    Trotta, R.

    1996-03-01

    Drastic changes in refinery operations and economics resulting from implementation of environmentally driven U.S. legislation such as the Complex Model in 1998, as well as possible changes beyond that will necessitate several changes. An effective method of adjusting to these process challenges is by deep etherification of the entire FCC light cracked naphtha (LCN) stream, which is the FCC product fraction containing C{sub 5}, C{sub 6} and C{sub 7} hydrocarbons having a typical 1 atm boiling range of 95{degrees}F to 212{degrees}F. Deep etherification technology (DET) can solve five or six problems at once. All U.S. refineries which have an FCC unit have an LCN stream (or possibly a separate LCN stream). Snaprogetti`s LCN DET technology is essentially an upgrade of an otherwise already finished product-which in today`s processing and operations environment, would be sent directly to the gasoline pool. The technology is simply an add-on and does not substantially change refinery operations. As the LCN DET does not require changes in the FCC and catalytic reformer, DET does not cause disturbances to the refinery`s operation.

  7. Crystal structure of hydrous wadsleyite with 2.8% H[subscript 2]O and compressibility to 60 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Yu; Amyth, Joseph R.; Hushur, Anwar; Manghnani, Murli H.; lonappan, Dayana; Dera, Przemyslaw; Frost, Daniel J.

    2010-11-18

    Hydrous wadsleyite ({beta}-Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) with 2.8 wt% water content has been synthesized at 15 GPa and 1250 C in a multi-anvil press. The unit-cell parameters are: a = 5.6686(8), b = 11.569(1), c = 8.2449(9) {angstrom}, {beta} = 90.14(1){sup o}, and V = 540.7(1) {angstrom}{sup 3}, and the space group is I2/m. The structure was refined in space groups Imma and I2/m. The room-pressure structure differs from that of anhydrous wadsleyite principally in the increased cation distances around O1, the non-silicate oxygen. The compression of a single crystal of this wadsleyite was measured up to 61.3(7) GPa at room temperature in a diamond anvil cell with neon as pressure medium by X-ray diffraction at Sector 13 at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. The experimental pressure range was far beyond the wadsleyite-ringwoodite phase-transition pressure at 525 km depth (17.5 GPa), while a third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state (EoS) [V{sub 0} = 542.7(8) {angstrom}{sup 3}, K{sub T0} = 137(5) GPa, K{prime} = 4.6(3)] still fits the data well. In comparison, the second-order fit gives V{sub 0} = 542.7(8) {angstrom}{sup 3}, K{sub T} = 147(2) GPa. The relation between isothermal bulk modulus of hydrous wadsleyite K{sub T0} and water content C{sub H{sub 2}O} is: K{sub T0} = 171(1)-12(1) C{sub H{sub 2}O} (up to 2.8 wt% water). The axial-compressibility {beta}{sub c} is larger than both {beta}{sub a} and {beta}{sub b}, consistent with previous studies and analogous to the largest coefficient of thermal expansion along the c-axis.

  8. Inside the FCC: A Guide for Information Seekers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Duc, Don R., Ed.; Krasnow, Erwin G., Ed.

    1975-01-01

    To aid the public in obtaining information and documents from the files of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) this guide, written with assistance from the FCC staff, explains which office to approach and in what form to make the request. Ways to obtain informaion by visiting the FCC are explained along with methods for obtaining…

  9. Formation of fivefold axes in the FCC-metal nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myasnichenko, Vladimir S.; Starostenkov, Mikhail D.

    2012-11-01

    Formation of atomistic structures of metallic Cu, Au, Ag clusters and bimetallic Cu-Au clusters was studied with the help of molecular dynamics using the many-body tight-binding interatomic potential. The simulation of the crystallization process of clusters with the number of atoms ranging from 300 to 1092 was carried out. The most stable configurations of atoms in the system, corresponding to the minimum of potential energy, was found during super-fast cooling from 1000 K. Atoms corresponding to fcc, hcp, and Ih phases were identified by the method of common neighbor analysis. Incomplete icosahedral core can be discovered at the intersection of one of the Ih axes with the surface of monometallic cluster. The decahedron-shaped structure of bimetallic Cu-Au cluster with seven completed icosahedral cores was obtained. The principles of the construction of small bimetallic clusters with icosahedral symmetry and increased fractal dimensionality were offered.

  10. 78 FR 69415 - Proposed Changes to FCC Form 499-A, FCC Form 499-Q, and Accompanying Instructions.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ..., in FR Doc. 2013-26482, on page 66358 make the following corrections: 1. On page 66358, in the... COMMISSION Proposed Changes to FCC Form 499-A, FCC Form 499-Q, and Accompanying Instructions. AGENCY: Federal... quarterly Telecommunications Reporting Worksheet, FCC Form 499-Q (Form 499-Q) and accompanying...

  11. Regeneration of Hydrotreating and FCC Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    CM Wai; JG Frye; JL Fulton; LE Bowman; LJ Silva; MA Gerber

    1999-09-30

    Hydrotreating, hydrocracking, and fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts are important components of petroleum refining processes. Hydrotreating and hydrocracking catalysts are used to improve the yield of high-quality light oil fractions from heavier crude oil and petroleum feedstocks containing high levels of impurities. FCC catalysts improve the yield of higher octane gasoline from crude oil. Residuum hydrotreating and cracking catalysts are susceptible to irreversible deactivation caused by adsorption of sulfur and by metals impurities, such as vanadium and nickel. The gradual buildup of these impurities in a hydrotreating catalyst eventually plugs the pores and deactivates it. Nickel and vanadium adversely affect the behavior of cracking catalysts, reducing product yield and quality. Replacing deactivated catalysts represents a significant cost in petroleum refining. Equally important are the costs and potential liabilities associated with treating and disposing spent catalysts. For example, recent US Environmental Protection Agency rulings have listed spent hydrotreating and hydrorefining catalysts as hazardous wastes. FCC catalysts, though more easily disposed of as road-base or as filler in asphalt and cement, are still an economic concern mainly because of the large volumes of spent catalysts generated. New processes are being considered to increase the useful life of catalysts or for meeting more stringent disposal requirements for spent catalysts containing metals. This report discusses a collaborative effort between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Phillips Petroleum, Inc., to identify promising chemical processes for removing metals adhered to spent hydrodesulfurization (HDS, a type of hydrotreating catalyst) and FCC catalysts. This study, conducted by PNNL, was funded by the US Department of Energy's Bartlesville Project Office. Fresh and spent catalysts were provided by Phillips Petroleum. The FCC catalyst was a rare-earth exchanged

  12. Solidification and fcc- to metastable hcp- phase transition in krypton under modulating dynamic pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing-Yin; Yoo, Choong-Shik; Kim, Minseob; Liermann, Hanns-Peter; Cynn, Hyunchae; Jenei, Zsolt; Evans, William

    2014-03-01

    We describe high-pressure kinetic studies of the solidification, melting and fcc-hcp transitions of Krypton under dynamic loading conditions, using a dynamic-diamond anvil cell (d-DAC) coupled with time-resolved x-ray diffraction. The time-resolved diffraction patterns and dynamic pressure responses show compression-rate dependencies associated with both the decay and growth time constants of the liquid-solid and solid-liquid transitions. According to the Avrami equation, both the solidified and melting processes are spontaneous nucleation and a rod-like (1-D) growth. Furthermore, under dynamic loading conditions, Kr-hcp forms from fcc close to the melting line. The nucleation time of fcc and hcp are very fast, with little dependence of compression rates or shorter than the time resolutions. The threshold pressure for the formation of Kr-hcp is ~ 0.8 GPa at the dynamic loadings of 0.004-13 GPa/s. This work was carried out at DESY. This work was performed under the auspices of DOE by LLNL under contracts(W-7405-Eng-48 and DE-AC52-07NA27344) and funded by the LDRD(11-ERD-046). The work at WSU was funded by NSF-DMR(1203834), DTRA(HDTRA1-12-01-0020).

  13. FCC process options for reformulated gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Chapin, L.E.; Letzsch, W.S.; Martin, T.W.

    1995-12-31

    In addition to certain process modifications, the main focus for RFG in the United States has been the addition of oxygenates, primarily MTBE, and to a lesser extent TAME and ETBE. As FCC-derived isobutylene is the primary feedstock source for MTBE, much interest has been shown in increasing its yield. At the same time, increasing the C3-C5 olefin yield is highly desirable as these olefins can be further processed into alkylate and/or oxygenates for gasoline blending. The incremental volumetric yield associated with these products will help offset the RFG pool volumetric loss due to distillation, benzene, aromatics and sulfur specifications. The paper discusses catalyst and process choices for the future. Three catalytic cracking technologies are described which can be applied to existing FCC units. These are DCC (deep catalytic cracking), MGG (more gasoline and gas), and MIO (maximum iso olefin).

  14. Computer simulation of FCC riser reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S. L.; Golchert, B.; Lottes, S. A.; Petrick, M.; Zhou, C. Q.

    1999-04-20

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, ICRKFLO, was developed to simulate the multiphase reacting flow system in a fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) riser reactor. The code solve flow properties based on fundamental conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy for gas, liquid, and solid phases. Useful phenomenological models were developed to represent the controlling FCC processes, including droplet dispersion and evaporation, particle-solid interactions, and interfacial heat transfer between gas, droplets, and particles. Techniques were also developed to facilitate numerical calculations. These techniques include a hybrid flow-kinetic treatment to include detailed kinetic calculations, a time-integral approach to overcome numerical stiffness problems of chemical reactions, and a sectional coupling and blocked-cell technique for handling complex geometry. The copyrighted ICRKFLO software has been validated with experimental data from pilot- and commercial-scale FCC units. The code can be used to evaluate the impacts of design and operating conditions on the production of gasoline and other oil products.

  15. Two-mode Ginzburg-Landau theory of crystalline anisotropy for fcc-liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kuo-An; Lin, Shang-Chun; Karma, Alain

    2016-02-01

    We develop a Ginzburg-Landau (GL) theory for fcc crystal-melt systems at equilibrium by employing two sets of order parameters that correspond to amplitudes of density waves of principal reciprocal lattice vectors and amplitudes of density waves of a second set of reciprocal lattice vectors. The choice of the second set of reciprocal lattice vectors is constrained by the condition that this set must form closed triangles with the principal reciprocal lattice vectors in reciprocal space to make the fcc-liquid transition first order. The capillary anisotropy of fcc-liquid interfaces is investigated by GL theory with amplitudes of <111 > and <200 > density waves. Furthermore, we explore the dependence of the anisotropy of the excess free energy of the solid-liquid interface on density waves of higher-order reciprocal lattice vectors such as <311 > by extending the two-mode GL theory with an additional mode. The anisotropy calculated using GL theory with input parameters from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for fcc Ni is compared to that measured in MD simulations.

  16. In-situ neutron diffraction of LaCoO3 perovskite under uniaxial compression. I. Crystal structure analysis and texture development

    SciTech Connect

    Aman, Amjad; Chen, Yan; Lugovy, Mykola; Orlovskaya, Nina; Reece, Michael John; Ma, Dong; Stoica, Alexandru Dan; An, Ke

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of texture formation, changes in crystal structure and stress accommodation mechanisms are studied in R3c rhombohedral LaCoO3 perovskite during in-situ uniaxial compression experiment by neutron diffraction. The neutron diffraction revealed the complex crystallographic changes causing the texture formation and significant straining along certain crystallographic directions during in-situ compression, which are responsible for the appearance of hysteresis and non-linear ferroelastic deformation in LaCoO3 perovskite. The irreversible strain after the first loading was connected with the appearance of non-recoverable changes in the intensity ratio of certain crystallographic peaks, causing non-reversible texture formation. However in the second loading/unloading cycle the hysteresis loop was closed and no irreversible strain appears after deformation. The significant texture formation is responsible for increase in the Young s modulus of LaCoO3 at high compressive loads, where the reported values of Young s modulus increase from 76 GPa measured at the very beginning of the loading to 194 GPa at 900 MPa applied compressive stress measured at the beginning of the unloading curve.

  17. Air-guided photonic-crystal-fiber pulse-compression delivery of multimegawatt femtosecond laser output for nonlinear-optical imaging and neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanin, Aleksandr A.; Fedotov, Il'ya V.; Sidorov-Biryukov, Dmitrii A.; Doronina-Amitonova, Lyubov V.; Ivashkina, Olga I.; Zots, Marina A.; Sun, Chi-Kuang; Ömer Ilday, F.; Fedotov, Andrei B.; Anokhin, Konstantin V.; Zheltikov, Aleksei M.

    2012-03-01

    Large-core hollow photonic-crystal fibers (PCFs) are shown to enable a fiber-format air-guided delivery of ultrashort infrared laser pulses for neurosurgery and nonlinear-optical imaging. With an appropriate dispersion precompensation, an anomalously dispersive 15-μm-core hollow PCF compresses 510-fs, 1070-nm light pulses to a pulse width of about 110 fs, providing a peak power in excess of 5 MW. The compressed PCF output is employed to induce a local photodisruption of corpus callosum tissues in mouse brain and is used to generate the third harmonic in brain tissues, which is captured by the PCF and delivered to a detector through the PCF cladding.

  18. Computational study of dislocation based mechanisms in FCC materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellakara, Ranga Nikhil

    Understanding the relationships between microstructures and properties of materials is a key to developing new materials with more suitable qualities or employing the appropriate materials in special uses. In the present world of material research, the main focus is on microstructural control to cost-effectively enhance properties and meet performance specifications. This present work is directed towards improving the fundamental understanding of the microscale deformation mechanisms and mechanical behavior of metallic alloys, particularly focusing on face centered cubic (FCC) structured metals through a unique computational methodology called three-dimensional dislocation dynamics (3D-DD). In these simulations, the equations of motion for dislocations are mathematically solved to determine the evolution and interaction of dislocations. Microstructure details and stress-strain curves are a direct observation in the simulation and can be used to validate experimental results. The effect of initial dislocation microstructure on the yield strength has been studied. It has been shown that dislocation density based crystal plasticity formulations only work when dislocation densities/numbers are sufficiently large so that a statistically accurate description of the microstructure can be obtainable. The evolution of the flow stress for grain sizes ranging from 0.5 to 10 mum under uniaxial tension was simulated using an improvised model by integrating dislocation pile-up mechanism at grain boundaries has been performed. This study showed that for a same initial dislocation density, the Hall--Petch relationship holds well at small grain sizes (0.5--2 mum), beyond which the yield strength remains constant as the grain size increases. Various dislocation-particle interaction mechanisms have been introduced and investigations were made on their effect on the uniaxial tensile properties. These studies suggested that increase in particle volume fraction and decrease in particle

  19. Structural and elastic properties of fcc/fcc metallic multilayers: A molecular-dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tȩcza, Grzegorz W.

    1992-12-01

    Interplanar and intraplanar spacings as well as the elastic constants of fcc/fcc metallic multilayers stacked along [001] were determined via variable-cell molecular-dynamics simulation in (HtN) and (EhN) ensembles at room temperature. Qualitative differences in the structural and elastic properties of the multilayers, simulated using various 12-6 Lennard-Jones potentials, were observed. The anomalous behavior of the elastic constants and the biaxial modulus was linked to the modulation wavelength dependence of various structural parameters. The importance of the fluctuation contributions for the calculation of the full elastic constants is demonstrated.

  20. Variation in electromagnetic radiation during plastic deformation under tension and compression of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ranjana; Lal, S. P.; Misra, Ashok

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents some significant variations in the intermittent electromagnetic radiation (EMR) during plastic deformation under tension and compression of some metals with selected crystal structure, viz. zinc, hexagonal closed packed (hcp), copper, face-centred cubic (fcc: stacking fault energy 0.08 J/m2), aluminium (fcc: stacking fault energy 0.2 J/m2) and 0.18 % carbon steel, body-centred cubic (bcc). The intermittent EMR signals starting near yielding are either oscillatory or exponential under both modes of deformation except a very few intermediate signals, random in nature, in zinc under compression. The number and amplitude of EMR signals exhibit marked variations under tension and compression. The smooth correlation between elastic strain energy release rate and average EMR energy release rate suggests a novel technique to determine the fracture toughness of metals. The first EMR emission amplitude and EMR energy release rate occurring near the yield increase, but maximum EMR energy burst frequency decreases almost linearly with increase in Debye temperature of the metals under tension while all EMR parameters decrease nonlinearly under compression. These results can be developed into a new technique to evaluate dislocation velocity. The EMR amplitude and energy release rate of the first EMR emission vary parabolically showing a maxima with increase in electronic heat constant of the metals under tension while they first sharply decrease and then become asymptotic during compression. However, the variation in EMR maximum energy burst frequency is apparently similar under both modes of deformation. These results strongly suggest that the mechanism of EMR emission during plastic deformation of metals involves not only the interaction of conduction electrons with the lattice periodic potential as presented in the previous theoretical models but also the interaction of conduction electrons with phonons. However, during crack propagation and fracture

  1. Orientation and temperature dependence of some mechanical properties of the single-crystal nickel-base superalloy Rene N4. 3: Tension-compression anisotropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, R. V.; Gaab, T. P.; Gayda, J.; Hemker, K. J.

    1985-01-01

    Single crystal superalloy specimens with various crystallographic directions along their axes were tested in compression at room temperature, 650, 760, 870, and 980 deg C. These results are compared with the tensile behavior studied previously. The alloy, Rene N4, was developed for gas turbine engine blades and has the nominal composition 3.7 Al, 4.2 Ti, 4 Ta, 0.5 Nb, 6 W, 1.5 Mo 9 Cr. 7.5 Co, balance Ni, in weight percent. Slip trace analysis showed that primary cube slip occurred even at room temperature for the 111 specimens. With increasing test temperature more orientations exhibited primary cube slip, until at 870 deg C only the 100 and 011 specimens exhibited normal octahedral slip. The yield strength for octahedral slip was numerically analysed using a model proposed by Lall, Chin, and Pope to explain deviations from Schmid's Law in the yielding behavior of a single phase Gamma prime alloy, Ni3(Al, Nb). The Schmid's Law deviations in Rene N4 were found to be largely due to a tension-compression anisotropy. A second effect, which increases trength for orientations away from 001, was found to be small in Rene N4. Analysis of recently published data on the single crystal superalloy PWA 1480 yielded the same result.

  2. In-situ neutron diffraction of LaCoO3 perovskite under uniaxial compression. I. Crystal structure analysis and texture development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aman, Amjad; Chen, Yan; Lugovy, Mykola; Orlovskaya, Nina; Reece, Michael J.; Ma, Dong; Stoica, Alexandru D.; An, Ke

    2014-07-01

    The dynamics of texture formation, changes in crystal structure, and stress accommodation mechanisms have been studied in perovskite-type R3¯c rhombohedral LaCoO3 during uniaxial compression using in-situ neutron diffraction. The in-situ neutron diffraction revealed the complex crystallographic changes causing the texture formation and significant straining along certain crystallographic directions during compression, which are responsible for the appearance of hysteresis and non-linear ferroelastic deformation in the LaCoO3 perovskite. The irreversible strain after the first loading was connected with the appearance of non-recoverable changes in the intensity ratio of certain crystallographic peaks, causing non-reversible texture formation. However, in the second loading/unloading cycle, the hysteresis loop was closed and no further irrecoverable strain appeared after deformation. The significant texture formation is responsible for an increase in the Young's modulus of LaCoO3 at high compressive stresses, ranging from 76 GPa at the very beginning of the loading to 194 GPa at 900 MPa at the beginning of the unloading curve.

  3. In-situ neutron diffraction of LaCoO₃ perovskite under uniaxial compression. I. Crystal structure analysis and texture development

    SciTech Connect

    Aman, Amjad; Orlovskaya, Nina; Chen, Yan; Lugovy, Mykola; Reece, Michael J.; Ma, Dong; Stoica, Alexandru D.; An, Ke

    2014-07-07

    The dynamics of texture formation, changes in crystal structure, and stress accommodation mechanisms have been studied in perovskite-type R3⁻c rhombohedral LaCoO₃ during uniaxial compression using in-situ neutron diffraction. The in-situ neutron diffraction revealed the complex crystallographic changes causing the texture formation and significant straining along certain crystallographic directions during compression, which are responsible for the appearance of hysteresis and non-linear ferroelastic deformation in the LaCoO₃ perovskite. The irreversible strain after the first loading was connected with the appearance of non-recoverable changes in the intensity ratio of certain crystallographic peaks, causing non-reversible texture formation. However, in the second loading/unloading cycle, the hysteresis loop was closed and no further irrecoverable strain appeared after deformation. The significant texture formation is responsible for an increase in the Young's modulus of LaCoO₃ at high compressive stresses, ranging from 76 GPa at the very beginning of the loading to 194 GPa at 900 MPa at the beginning of the unloading curve.

  4. Ground state searches in fcc intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Wolverton, C.; de Fontaine, D. ); Ceder, G. ); Dreysse, H. . Lab. de Physique du Solide)

    1991-12-01

    A cluster expansion is used to predict the fcc ground states, i.e., the stable phases at zero Kelvin as a function of composition, for alloy systems. The intermetallic structures are not assumed, but derived regorously by minimizing the configurational energy subject to linear constraints. This ground state search includes pair and multiplet interactions which spatially extend to fourth nearest neighbor. A large number of these concentration-independent interactions are computed by the method of direct configurational averaging using a linearized-muffin-tin orbital Hamiltonian cast into tight binding form (TB-LMTO). The interactions, derived without the use of any adjustable or experimentally obtained parameters, are compared to those calculated via the generalized perturbation method extention of the coherent potential approximation within the context of a KKR Hamiltonian (KKR-CPA-GPM). Agreement with the KKR-CPA-GPM results is quite excellent, as is the comparison of the ground state results with the fcc-based portions of the experimentally-determined phase diagrams under consideration.

  5. 47 CFR 95.117 - Where to contact the FCC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Where to contact the FCC. 95.117 Section 95.117 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.117 Where to contact the FCC. Additional GMRS information may be obtained from any...

  6. Guide to Understanding Broadcast License Applications and Other FCC Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Ralph M.

    In order to encourage more citizen action and public awareness in broadcasting, this guide enumerates the step-by-step procedures that citizens must take to deal with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). The guide exhaustively reviews the policy areas where current FCC television and radio licenses are vulnerable to public scrutiny. It…

  7. 47 CFR 76.1714 - FCC rules and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false FCC rules and regulations. 76.1714 Section 76.1714 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Documents to be Maintained for Inspection § 76.1714 FCC rules and regulations. (a) The operator of a...

  8. 47 CFR 76.1714 - FCC rules and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false FCC rules and regulations. 76.1714 Section 76.1714 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Documents to be Maintained for Inspection § 76.1714 FCC rules and regulations. (a) The operator of a...

  9. 47 CFR 76.1714 - FCC rules and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false FCC rules and regulations. 76.1714 Section 76.1714 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Documents to be Maintained for Inspection § 76.1714 FCC rules and regulations. (a) The operator of a...

  10. 47 CFR 76.1714 - FCC rules and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FCC rules and regulations. 76.1714 Section 76.1714 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Documents to be Maintained for Inspection § 76.1714 FCC rules and regulations. (a) The operator of a...

  11. 47 CFR 76.1714 - FCC rules and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false FCC rules and regulations. 76.1714 Section 76.1714 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Documents to be Maintained for Inspection § 76.1714 FCC rules and regulations. (a) The operator of a...

  12. Ab initio continuum model for the influence of local stress on cross-slip of screw dislocations in fcc metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, Benjamín R.; Ghoniem, Nasr; Po, Giacomo

    2012-09-01

    We develop a model of cross-slip in face-centered cubic (fcc) metals based on an extension of the Peierls-Nabarro representation of the dislocation core. The dissociated core is described by a group of parametric fractional Volterra dislocations, subject to their mutual elastic interaction and a lattice-restoring force. The elastic interaction between them is computed from a nonsingular expression, while the lattice force is derived from the γ surface obtained directly from ab initio calculations. Using a network-based formulation of dislocation dynamics, the dislocation core structure is not restricted to be planar, and the activation energy is determined for a path where the core has three-dimensional equilibrium configurations. We show that the activation energy for cross-slip in Cu is 1.9eV when the core is represented by only two Shockley partials, while this value converges to 1.43eV when the core is distributed over a bundle of 20 Volterra partial fractional dislocations. The results of the model compare favorably with the experimental value of 1.15±0.37eV [J. Bonneville and B. Escaig, Acta Metall.AMETAR0001-616010.1016/0001-6160(79)90170-6 27, 1477 (1979)]. We also show that the cross-slip activation energy decreases significantly when the core is in a particular local stress field. Results are given for a representative uniform “Escaig” stress and for the nonuniform stress field at the head of a dislocation pileup. A local homogeneous stress field is found to result in a significant reduction of the cross-slip energy. Additionally, for a nonhomogeneous stress field at the head of a five-dislocation pileup compressed against a Lomer-Cottrell junction, the cross-slip energy is found to decrease to 0.62eV. The relatively low values of the activation energy in local stress fields predicted by the proposed model suggest that cross-slip events are energetically more favorable in strained fcc crystals.

  13. Ultrafast visualization of crystallization and grain growth in shock-compressed SiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, A. E.; Bolme, C. A.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Galtier, E.; Milathianaki, D.; Hawreliak, J.; Kraus, R. G.; Eggert, J. H.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Collins, G. W.; Sandberg, R.; Yang, W.; Mao, W. L.

    2015-09-04

    Pressure- and temperature-induced phase transitions have been studied for more than a century but very little is known about the non-equilibrium processes by which the atoms rearrange. Shock compression generates a nearly instantaneous propagating high-pressure/temperature condition while in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) probes the time-dependent atomic arrangement. Here we present in situ pump–probe XRD measurements on shock-compressed fused silica, revealing an amorphous to crystalline high-pressure stishovite phase transition. Using the size broadening of the diffraction peaks, the growth of nanocrystalline stishovite grains is resolved on the nanosecond timescale just after shock compression. At applied pressures above 18 GPa the nuclueation of stishovite appears to be kinetically limited to 1.4±0.4 ns. The functional form of this grain growth suggests homogeneous nucleation and attachment as the growth mechanism. As a result, these are the first observations of crystalline grain growth in the shock front between low- and high-pressure states via XRD.

  14. 78 FR 66357 - Proposed Changes to FCC Form 499-A, FCC Form 499-Q, and Accompanying Instructions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ...In this document the Federal Communications Commission's Wireline Competition Bureau (Bureau) seeks comment on proposed revisions to the annual Telecommunications Reporting Worksheet, FCC Form 499-A (Form 499-A) and accompanying instructions (Form 499-A Instructions) to be used in 2014 to report 2013 revenues, and the quarterly Telecommunications Reporting Worksheet, FCC Form 499-Q (Form......

  15. 77 FR 74010 - Proposed Changes to FCC Form 499-A, FCC Form 499-Q, and Accompanying Instructions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-12

    ... 2013 to report 2012 revenues, and the quarterly Telecommunications Reporting Worksheet, FCC Form 499-Q (Form 499-Q) and accompanying instructions (Form 499-Q Instructions) to be used in 2013 to report... 2013 to report 2012 revenues, and (2) the quarterly Telecommunications Reporting Worksheet, FCC...

  16. Crack Tip Dislocation Nucleation in FCC Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knap, J.; Sieradzki, K.

    1999-02-01

    We present results of molecular dynamic simulations aimed at examining crack tip dislocation emission in fcc solids. The results are analyzed in terms of recent continuum formulations of this problem. In mode II, Au, Pd, and Pt displayed a new unanticipated mechanism of crack tip dislocation emission involving the creation of a pair of Shockley partials on a slip plane one plane below the crack plane. In mode I, for all the materials examined, Rice's continuum formulation [J. Mech. Phys. Solids 40, 239 (1992)] underestimated the stress intensity for dislocation emission by almost a factor of 2. Surface stress corrections to the emission criterion brought the agreement between continuum predictions and simulations to within 20%.

  17. Microstructure and mechanical properties of bulk highly faulted fcc/hcp nanostructured cobalt microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, Aliou Hamady; Dirras, Guy; Schoenstein, Frederic; Tétard, Florent; Jouini, Noureddine

    2014-05-01

    Nanostructured cobalt powders with an average particle size of 50 nm were synthesized using a polyol method and subsequently consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS). SPS experiments performed at 650 °C with sintering times ranging from 5 to 45 min under a pressure of 100 MPa, yielded to dense bulk nanostructured cobalt (relative density greater than 97%). X-ray diffraction patterns of the as-prepared powders showed only a face centered cubic (fcc) crystalline phase, whereas the consolidated samples exhibited a mixture of both fcc and hexagonal close packed (hcp) phases. Transmission electron microscopy observations revealed a lamellar substructure with a high density of nanotwins and stacking faults in every grain of the sintered samples. Room temperature compression tests, carried out at a strain rate of 10{sup −3} s{sup −1}, yielded to highest strain to fracture values of up to 5% for sample of holding time of 15 min, which exhibited a yield strength of 1440 MPa, an ultimate strength as high as 1740 MPa and a Young's modulus of 205 GPa. The modulus of elasticity obtained from the nanoindentation tests, ranges from 181 to 218 GPa. The lowest modulus value of 181 GPa was obtained for the sample with the highest sintering time (45 min), which could be related to mass density loss as a consequence of trapped gases releasing. - Highlights: • Co nanopowder (50 nm) was prepared by reduction in polyol medium. • SPS was used to process bulk nanostructured Co specimens. • Microstructures were made of intricate fcc/hcp, along with nanotwins and SFs. • High strengths and moderate compressive ductility were obtained. • Deformation mechanisms related to complex interplay of different length scales.

  18. Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of the CoCrFeMnNi High Entropy Alloy Under High Strain Rate Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingfeng; Fu, Ao; Huang, Xiaoxia; Liu, Bin; Liu, Yong; Li, Zezhou; Zan, Xiang

    2016-07-01

    The equiatomic CoCrFeMnNi high entropy alloy, which crystallizes in the face-centered cubic (FCC) crystal structure, was prepared by the spark plasma sintering technique. Dynamic compressive tests of the CoCrFeMnNi high entropy alloy were deformed at varying strain rates ranging from 1 × 103 to 3 × 103 s-1 using a split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. The dynamic yield strength of the CoCrFeMnNi high entropy alloy increases with increasing strain rate. The Zerilli-Armstrong (Z-A) plastic model was applied to model the dynamic flow behavior of the CoCrFeMnNi high entropy alloy, and the constitutive relationship was obtained. Serration behavior during plastic deformation was observed in the stress-strain curves. The mechanism for serration behavior of the alloy deformed at high strain rate is proposed.

  19. Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of the CoCrFeMnNi High Entropy Alloy Under High Strain Rate Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingfeng; Fu, Ao; Huang, Xiaoxia; Liu, Bin; Liu, Yong; Li, Zezhou; Zan, Xiang

    2016-05-01

    The equiatomic CoCrFeMnNi high entropy alloy, which crystallizes in the face-centered cubic (FCC) crystal structure, was prepared by the spark plasma sintering technique. Dynamic compressive tests of the CoCrFeMnNi high entropy alloy were deformed at varying strain rates ranging from 1 × 103 to 3 × 103 s-1 using a split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. The dynamic yield strength of the CoCrFeMnNi high entropy alloy increases with increasing strain rate. The Zerilli-Armstrong (Z-A) plastic model was applied to model the dynamic flow behavior of the CoCrFeMnNi high entropy alloy, and the constitutive relationship was obtained. Serration behavior during plastic deformation was observed in the stress-strain curves. The mechanism for serration behavior of the alloy deformed at high strain rate is proposed.

  20. Prediction of elastic and vibrational stability for Sc, Ti, Y, Zr, Tc, Ru, Hf, Re, and Os in the fcc structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Coss, Romeo; Cifuentes-Quintal, Eduardo; Aguayo, Aaron; Murrieta, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    The discovery of a metastable phase for a given material is interesting because corresponds to a new bonding and new properties are expected. The calculation of the total-energy along the Bain path is frequently used as a method to find tetragonal metastable states. However, a local minimum in the tetragonal distortion is not a definitive proof of a metastable state, and the elastic and vibrational stability needs to be evaluated. In a previous work, using the elastic stability criteria for a cubic structure, we have shown that the transition metals with hcp ground state; Ti, Zr, and Hf have a fcc metastable phase. That result is interesting since the fcc crystal structure does not appear in the current pressure-temperature phase diagram of these metals, and support the experimental observations of fcc Ti and Zr in thin films. In the present work, we extend the stability study of the fcc structure to the non-magnetic transition metals with hcp ground state; Sc, Ti, Y, Zr, Tc, Ru, Hf, Re, and Os. We find that all the metals involved in this study have a metastable fcc structure, since the phonon band structure shows only positive frequencies. Finally, substrates on which the fcc structure of these metals could be growth epitaxially are predicted.

  1. Thermodynamic stability and structural properties of cluster crystals formed by amphiphilic dendrimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Dominic A.; Mladek, Bianca M.; Likos, Christos N.; Blaak, Ronald

    2016-05-01

    We pursue the goal of finding real-world examples of macromolecular aggregates that form cluster crystals, which have been predicted on the basis of coarse-grained, ultrasoft pair potentials belonging to a particular mathematical class [B. M. Mladek et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 46, 045701 (2006)]. For this purpose, we examine in detail the phase behavior and structural properties of model amphiphilic dendrimers of the second generation by means of monomer-resolved computer simulations. On augmenting the density of these systems, a fluid comprised of clusters that contain several overlapping and penetrating macromolecules is spontaneously formed. Upon further compression of the system, a transition to multi-occupancy crystals takes place, the thermodynamic stability of which is demonstrated by means of free-energy calculations, and where the FCC is preferred over the BCC-phase. Contrary to predictions for coarse-grained theoretical models in which the particles interact exclusively by effective pair potentials, the internal degrees of freedom of these molecules cause the lattice constant to be density-dependent. Furthermore, the mechanical stability of monodisperse BCC and FCC cluster crystals is restricted to a bounded region in the plane of cluster occupation number versus density. The structural properties of the dendrimers in the dense crystals, including their overall sizes and the distribution of monomers are also thoroughly analyzed.

  2. Deformation twinning in small-sized face-centred cubic single crystals: Experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Z. Y.; Huang, M. X.

    2015-12-01

    Small-sized crystals generally show deformation behaviour distinct from their bulk counterparts. In addition to dislocation slip, deformation twinning in small-sized face-centred cubic (FCC) single crystals has been reported to follow a different mechanism which involves coherent emission of partial dislocations on successive { 111 } planes from free surface. The present work employed a twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel with a low stacking fault energy to systematically investigate the twin evolution in small-sized FCC single crystals. Micrometre-sized single crystal pillars of TWIP steel were fabricated by focus ion beam and then strained to different levels by compression experiments. Detailed transmission electron microscopy characterization was carried out to obtain a quantitative evaluation of the deformation twins, which contribute to most of the plastic strain. Emissions of partial dislocations from free surface (surface sources) and pre-existing perfect dislocations inside the pillar (inner sources) are found as the essential processes for the formation of deformation twins. Accordingly, a physically-based model, which integrates source introduction methods and source activation criterions for partial dislocation emission, is developed to quantitatively predict the twin evolution. The model is able to reproduce the experimental twin evolution, in terms of the total twin formation, the twin morphology and the occurrence of twinning burst.

  3. Thermodynamic stability and structural properties of cluster crystals formed by amphiphilic dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Dominic A; Mladek, Bianca M; Likos, Christos N; Blaak, Ronald

    2016-05-28

    We pursue the goal of finding real-world examples of macromolecular aggregates that form cluster crystals, which have been predicted on the basis of coarse-grained, ultrasoft pair potentials belonging to a particular mathematical class [B. M. Mladek et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 46, 045701 (2006)]. For this purpose, we examine in detail the phase behavior and structural properties of model amphiphilic dendrimers of the second generation by means of monomer-resolved computer simulations. On augmenting the density of these systems, a fluid comprised of clusters that contain several overlapping and penetrating macromolecules is spontaneously formed. Upon further compression of the system, a transition to multi-occupancy crystals takes place, the thermodynamic stability of which is demonstrated by means of free-energy calculations, and where the FCC is preferred over the BCC-phase. Contrary to predictions for coarse-grained theoretical models in which the particles interact exclusively by effective pair potentials, the internal degrees of freedom of these molecules cause the lattice constant to be density-dependent. Furthermore, the mechanical stability of monodisperse BCC and FCC cluster crystals is restricted to a bounded region in the plane of cluster occupation number versus density. The structural properties of the dendrimers in the dense crystals, including their overall sizes and the distribution of monomers are also thoroughly analyzed. PMID:27250325

  4. Epitaxial growth of fcc Cr on Au(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, S.M.; Berman, L.E.; Batterman, B.W.; Brodsky, M.B.; Hamaker, H.C.

    1988-04-15

    Synchrotron x-ray diffraction and anomalous dispersion measurements of 25A Cr layers epitaxially grown on (100) Au surfaces indicate the presence of fcc Cr domains, while extended x-ray absorption fine-structure spectra are consistent with the usual bcc phase of Cr. Together these data suggest that the fcc phase is a major fraction of the larger epitaxial Cr domains, but that most Cr atoms are in a bcc environment with much smaller domain sizes. This unusual, epitaxially stabilized fcc Cr structure may be related to previously reported low-temperature resistance anomalies.

  5. High-pressure behavior of fcc phase FeHx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, E. C.; Chidester, B.; Fischer, R. A.; Prakapenka, V.; Bi, W.; Alp, E. E.; Campbell, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's core is composed of iron with the inclusion of light elements to compensate for the difference between seismically obtained densities and the density of pure Fe at relevant pressure and temperature conditions. As the most abundant and lightest element in the solar system, hydrogen is a plausible contributor to this core density deficit. Nearly stoichiometric iron hydride (FeHx) has been shown to result from the reaction of Fe and hydrous silicates, and is stable up to at least 80 GPa [1]. Iron hydride formation at Earth's surface is unlikely because the equilibrium hydrogen solubility in iron at atmospheric conditions is prohibitively low, yet as hydrogen solubility increases with pressure, so does the likelihood of FeHx formation within the Earth's interior [2]. Recent experimental and ab initio attempts disagree on the equation of state parameters needed to describe the compressional behavior of FeHx [3-5]. The work presented here combines synchrotron x-ray diffraction of laser-heated diamond anvil cell compressed samples with high-pressure, ambient temperature nuclear resonant inelastic scattering (NRIXS) and synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy (SMS) to better constrain the behavior of the fcc phase of FeHx at elevated pressures and temperatures. By pairing P-V-T data for iron hydride with the sound velocity information available through high-pressure NRIXS studies, we can better understand the degree to which hydrogen may contribute to the density deficit of Earth's iron core. [1] Antonov et al. (1998) J. Alloys Compd. 264, 214-222 [2] Fukai and Akimoto (1983) Proc. Japan Acad. 59, 158-162 [3] Pépin et al. (2014) Phys. Rev. Lett. 265504, 1-5 [4] Hirao (2004) Geophys. Res. Lett. 31, L06616 [5] Badding et al. (1991) Science. 253, 421-424

  6. Detection of the Impact of Ice Crystal Accretion in an Aircraft Engine Compression System During Dynamic Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Simon, Donald L.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2014-01-01

    The accretion of ice in the compression system of commercial gas turbine engines operating in high ice water content conditions is a safety issue being studied by the aviation community. While most of the research focuses on the underlying physics of ice accretion and the meteorological conditions in which accretion can occur, a systems-level perspective on the topic lends itself to potential near-term operational improvements. Here a detection algorithm is developed which has the capability to detect the impact of ice accretion in the Low Pressure Compressor of an aircraft engine during steady flight as well as during changes in altitude. Unfortunately, the algorithm as implemented was not able to distinguish throttle changes from ice accretion and thus more work remains to be done.

  7. Studies of dynamic properties of shock compressed single crystals by in situ dynamic x-ray diffraction and sample recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, Marc A.; Schneider, M. S.; Jarmakani, H.; Kad, B.; Remington, B. A.; Kalantar, D. H.; McNaney, J.; Cao, B.; Belak, J.; E Bringa, G. Collins; Paisley, D.; Holian, B.; Lomdahl, P.; Boehly, T. R; Wark, J.

    2007-05-05

    Laser compression provides pressures ranging from a few to hundreds of GPa at pulse durations of the order of nanoseconds or fractions thereof. The short duration ensures a rapid decay of the pulse and quenching of shocked sample in times that are orders of magnitude lower than in conventional explosively driven plate impact experiments. Systematic experiments carried out in specimens well suited for transmission electron microscopy characterization are revealing that laser compression, by virtue of a much more rapid cooling, enables the retention of a deformation structure closer to the one existing during shock. The smaller pulse length decreases the propensity for localization. Copper and copper aluminum (2 and 6 wt% Al) with orientations [001] and [ ] were subjected to high intensity laser pulses with energy levels of 70 to 300 J delivered in a pulse duration of approximately 3 ns. Systematic differences of the defect substructure were observed as a function of pressure and stacking fault energy. The changes in the mechanical properties for each condition were compared using micro- and nano-hardness measurements and correlated well with observations of the defect substructure. Three regimes of plastic deformation were identified and their transitions modeled: dislocation cells, stacking faults, and twins. An existing constitutive description of the slip to twinning transition, based on the critical shear stress, was expanded to incorporate the effect of stacking-fault energy. A new physically-based criterion accounting for stacking fault energy was developed that describes the transition from perfect loop to partial loop homogeneous nucleation, and consequently from cells to stacking faults. These calculations predict transitions that are in qualitative agreement with the effect of SFE.

  8. Reformulated gasoline will change FCC operations and catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, G.M.; Wear, C.C.; Suarez, W.; Young, G.W. )

    1990-07-02

    Operation of fluid catalytic cracking units (FCCUs) will be significantly affected by new regulations that will in all probability require gasoline to be produced with lower aromatics and olefins contents, lower vapor pressure, and a minimum oxygen content. This paper reports on a study conducted to better define the basic relationship between operating variables, including catalyst and naphtha quality, in the context of reformulated gasoline. The study helped to define specific operating strategies, potential problem areas, and opportunities for improved FCC unit and catalyst technologies. FCC feedstock quality can have a significant influence on the composition of FCC naphtha. However, even extremely paraffinic or aromatic feeds can yield substantial levels of both olefins and aromatics in FCC naphtha, particularly when compared to the levels proposed in a reformulated gasoline pool.

  9. Cluster expansion of fcc Pd-V intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    de Fontaine, D.; Wolverton, C.; Ceder, G. ); Dreysse, H. . Lab. de Physique du Solide)

    1991-06-01

    A cluster expansion is used to compute fcc ground states from first principles for the Pd-V system. Intermetallic structures are not assumed but derived rigorously by minimizing the configurational energy subject to linear constraints. A large number of concentration-independent interactions are calculated by the method of direct configurational averaging. Agreement with the fcc-based portion of the experimentally-determined Pd-V phase diagram is quite satisfactory. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Compressibility of molten “green glass” and crystal-liquid density crossovers in low-Ti lunar magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. R.; Agee, C. B.

    1997-05-01

    Density measurements of molten Apollo 15 "green glass" have been performed in the pressure range 0.5-3.5 GPa using the floating and sinking spheres technique in piston-cylinder and multi-anvil devices. A density crossover with equilibrium orthopyroxene is predicted for green glass at 3.5 GPa, or ˜800 km depth in the lunar interior. Equilibrium olivine should be neutrally buoyant in molten green glass at a pressure slightly greater (5 GPa) than the lunar core value of ˜4.7 GPa. At the olivine-orthopyroxene cotectic (˜2.0 GPa), molten green glass is less dense than both crystalline phases. Thus, the results are consistent with models that propose generation and buoyant rise of green glass magma from the depth of the olivine-orthopyroxene cotectic in the lunar interior. Molten green glass has a compression curve slope of 0.093 g/cc/GPa, along the liquids, in the pressure range investigated. The values of the Birch-Murnaghan isothermal bulk modulus ( K) and the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus ( K') at 1645°C are described by the relationship K (GPa) =19.5/(1 - (0.25-0.063 K')). Combining this relationship with a calculated isothermal bulk modulus value of 18 GPa, derived from 1-atm ultrasonic measurements, gives K' = 5.3 for molten green glass.

  11. Selection of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) Flat Collector Circuit (FCC) insulation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emerson, Dawn

    1994-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: function of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) Flat Collector Circuit (FCC); requirements of the FCC which affect the selection of the insulation material; data to support the selection of the FCC insulation material; development history; modified design; coverlay testing; effects on modified design on FCC; arc tracking tests performed on FCC; and arc tracking test results.

  12. Influence of the slip conditions on the stress corrosion cracking microprocesses in fcc materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chambreuil-Paret, A.; Chateau, J.P.; Magnin, T.

    1997-11-01

    The aim of the present paper is to carefully analyze the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) microprocesses of f.c.c. single crystals, not only for the influence of the tensile axis orientation but also for the influence of the cracking direction (imposed or not). 316L (in MgCl{sub 2}) and copper (in nitrites) single crystals of well defined tensile axis will be strained using the slow strain rate technique. The authors focus on the influence of the relative orientations of the cracking direction and the slip planes on the crystallography of fracture. The effect of slip conditions on the corrosion-deformation interactions leading to fracture are then emphasized, which gives major information relevant to the micromodelling of SCC.

  13. Evaluation of the effect of hot-compressed water treatment on enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic nanofibrils with different lignin content using a quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Akio; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Endo, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Hot-compressed water (HCW) treatment is known to not only improve enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency of lignocellulosic biomass but to also generate insoluble lignin droplets, which retard enzymatic hydrolysis. In this study, the inhibitory effect of the lignin droplets was evaluated by monitoring the initial enzyme adsorption and degradation of lignocellulosic nanofibrils (LCNFs) using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Lignin content was adjusted by the sodium chlorite-acetic acid method and divided into samples with high (24.9 wt%) and low (5.6 wt%) lignin content, which were then subjected to HCW treatment at various temperatures. The changes in lignin content were small with increasing HCW temperature, whereas hemicellulose content decreased, regardless of the initial lignin content. The formation of lignin droplets and pseudo-lignin-like products was confirmed in both LCNFs by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and was predominant in LCNFs with high lignin content treated at 200°C. QCM data showed that the enzyme adsorption amount in both LCNFs after HCW treatment was increased and was greater in LCNFs with low lignin content. Initial enzymatic degradation was substantially slowed in LCNFs with high lignin content, particularly after HCW treatment at temperatures higher than 180°C. These QCM results suggest that the steric hindrance of the deposited lignin is the primary mechanism by which the initial enzymatic hydrolysis is delayed. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1441-1447. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26694223

  14. Elastic compliances and stiffnesses of the fcc Lennard-Jones solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesnel, D. J.; Rimai, D. S.; Demejo, L. P.

    1993-09-01

    The isothermal elastic compliances, stiffnesses, and bulk moduli of a Lennard-Jones solid organized into an fcc crystal structure (256 atoms in 43 unit cells) have been calculated as a function of testing temperature (expressed as the mean kinetic energy per atom). Tests conducted in pure shear were used to determine S44 and C44=G100, where 100 refers to crystallographic directions. Tests imposing axial elongation with fixed lateral dimensions established C11 and C12. Axial deformation with zero lateral pressure (a tension test) was used to determine S11, S12, E100 and ν100. This provided an independent set of results for comparison with the dilatational stiffnesses C11 and C12. The bulk modulus K was obtained by independent triaxial tension testing. The stiffnesses, compliances, and moduli were determined by regression analysis and digital filtering applied to combinations of the stress-tensor and strain-tensor data stored at each iteration during the constant-rate deformation experiments. While the cubic fcc Lennard-Jones solid expectedly obeys the Cauchy relations for central-force potentials, it is not isotropic, allowing ν to take on values other than 1/4 as originally proposed by Poisson. The present calculations show ν100=0.347 for the fcc Lennard-Jones solid with a Young's modulus of E100=61.1ɛ/σ3, an initial (as indicated by superscript 0) shear modulus of G0100=57.2ɛ/σ3, and an initial bulk modulus of K0=71.2ɛ/σ3 at zero temperature. The moduli all decreased with increasing temperature. Reuss, Voigt, and Hashin and Shtrikman [J. Mech. Phys. Solids 10, 335 (1962)] bounds on the isotropic elastic properties of polycrystalline aggregates of Lennard-Jones material were also determined. Computed values of the moduli are in reasonable agreement with experimental results for solid argon and crystalline polyethylene.

  15. Atomic structure of [110] tilt grain boundaries in FCC materials

    SciTech Connect

    Merkle, K.L.; Thompson, L.J.

    1997-04-01

    High-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) has been used to study the atomic-scale structure and localized relaxations at grain boundaries (GBs) in Au, Al, and MgO. The [110] tilt GBs play an important role in polycrystalline fcc metals since among all of the possible GB geometries this series of misorientations as a whole contains the lowest energies, including among others the two lowest energy GBs, the (111) and (113) twins. Therefore, studies of the atomic-scale structure of [110] tilt GBs in fcc metals and systematic investigations of their dependence on misorientation and GB plane is of considerable importance to materials science. [110] tilt GBs in ceramic oxides of the fcc structure are also of considerable interest, since in this misorientation range polar GBs exist, i.e. GBs in which crystallographic planes that are made up of complete layers of cations or anions can join to form a GB.

  16. Magnetic Properties of Diluted Fcc System Nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhen

    Starting from Ni and Mg nitrates, about 20 samples of Ni_{rm p}Mg _{rm 1-p}O (0.06 <=q p <=q 0.86) were prepared and X-ray diffraction studies showed the samples to have the NaCl structure with the lattice constant fitting the equation a(p) = 4.2115 - 0.0340p A. Temperature dependent dc magnetic susceptibility (chi ) studies of the samples were carried out between 1.8K and 600K using a SQUID magnetometer and the Neel temperature T_{rm N} were determined from the peak in partial(chiT)/ partialT. The variation of t = T _{rm N}(p)/T _{rm N}(1) versus p is compared with that in Co_{rm p}Mg _{rm 1-p}O. For both systems, the variations for p > 0.31 are found to fit the predicted values for a simple cubic Heisenberg antiferromagnet and a theoretical basis for this anomalous results is advanced. The experimental percolation threshold p_{rm c} = 0.15 +/- 0.01. For p_ {rm c} <=q p <=q 0.33, chi below T_{rm N} shows irreversible behavior for the zero-field-cooled and field -cooled cases, suggestive of spin-glass-like behavior, also observed in other diluted fcc antiferromagnets such as Co_{rm p}Mg _{rm 1-p}O and Eu _{rm p}Sr_ {rm 1-p}Te. It is suggested that the differences in the t vs p variations for p < 0.33 in Ni_{rm p} Mg_{rm 1-p}O, Co_{rm p}Mg _{rm 1-p}O and Eu _{rm p}Sr_ {rm 1-p}Te may be related to the differences in the ratio of the next-nearest-neighbor to nearest-neighbor exchange constants in these systems. A higher order correction to Curie-Weiss law was applied for sample with 0.19 <=q p <=q 0.59 which explains why 1/ chi curve versus T bends downward with decreasing temperatures. For the sample Ni_{0.33} Mg_{0.67}O, the magnetization M versus magnetic field H (0 to 0.2T) are measured with temperature ranging from 5.2K to 13.4K at intervals of 0.2K. The magnitude of the non-linear susceptibility, a_3, is determined from the M versus H data at different temperatures. The divergence of a _3 around 9.4 +/- 0.6K indicates spin-glass behavior in this system.

  17. Impact of magnetic fluctuations on lattice excitations in fcc nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körmann, Fritz; Ma, Pui-Wai; Dudarev, Sergei L.; Neugebauer, Jörg

    2016-02-01

    The spin-space averaging formalism is applied to compute atomic forces and phonon spectra for magnetically excited states of fcc nickel. Transverse and longitudinal magnetic fluctuations are taken into account by a combination of magnetic special quasi random structures and constrained spin-density-functional theory. It turns out that for fcc Ni interatomic force constants and phonon spectra are almost unaffected by both kinds of spin fluctuations. Given the computational expense to simulate coupled magnetic and atomic fluctuations, this insight facilitates computational modeling of magnetic alloys such as Ni-based superalloys.

  18. Bulk Nanostructured FCC Steels With Enhanced Radiation Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xinghang; Hartwig, K. Ted; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2012-10-27

    The objective of this project is to increase radiation tolerance in austenitic steels through optimization of grain size and grain boundary (GB) characteristics. The focus will be on nanocrystalline austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys with an fcc crystal structure. The long-term goal is to design and develop bulk nanostructured austenitic steels with enhanced void swelling resistance and substantial ductility, and to enhance their creep resistance at elevated temperatures via GB engineering. The combination of grain refinement and grain boundary engineering approaches allows us to tailor the material strength, ductility, and resistance to swelling by 1) changing the sink strength for point defects, 2) by increasing the nucleation barriers for bubble formation at GBs, and 3) by changing the precipitate distributions at boundaries. Compared to ferritic/martensitic steels, austenitic stainless steels (SS) possess good creep and fatigue resistance at elevated temperatures, and better toughness at low temperature. However, a major disadvantage of austenitic SS is that they are vulnerable to significant void swelling in nuclear reactors, especially at the temperatures and doses anticipated in the Advanced Burner Reactor. The lack of resistance to void swelling in austenitic alloys led to the switch to ferritic/martensitic steels as the preferred material for the fast reactor cladding application. Recently a type of austenitic stainless steel, HT-UPS, was developed at ORNL, and is expected to show enhanced void swelling resistance through the trapping of point defects at nanometersized carbides. Reducing the grain size and increasing the fraction of low energy grain boundaries should reduce the available radiation-produced point defects (due to the increased sink area of the grain boundaries), should make bubble nucleation at the boundaries less likely (by reducing the fraction of high-energy boundaries), and improve the strength and ductility under radiation by producing a higher

  19. Isentropic Compression of Argon

    SciTech Connect

    H. Oona; J.C. Solem; L.R. Veeser, C.A. Ekdahl; P.J. Rodriquez; S.M. Younger; W. Lewis; W.D. Turley

    1997-08-01

    We are studying the transition of argon from an insulator to a conductor by compressing the frozen gas isentropically to pressures at which neighboring atomic orbitals overlap sufficiently to allow some electron motion between atoms. Argon and the other rare gases have closed electron shells and therefore remain montomic, even when they solidify. Their simple structure makes it likely that any measured change in conductivity is due to changes in the atomic structure, not in molecular configuration. As the crystal is compressed the band gap closes, allowing increased conductivity. We have begun research to determine the conductivity at high pressures, and it is our intention to determine the compression at which the crystal becomes a metal.

  20. A Guide to Federal Regulation; Understanding the FCC Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable Television Information Center, Washington, DC.

    While it is apparent that the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has given a great deal of thought to the regulation of cable systems, the basic success or failure of cable as a communications service will depend on local development. Relatively little guidance has been provided to local franchising authorities for selecting among applicants,…

  1. Statement on CATV from the FCC to the Senate Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    In this statement to the Senate, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) describes in detail their specific policies relevant to cable television (CATV) regulation under four general areas. The rules for the first of these, television broadcast signal carriage, are outlined in terms of three classifications which would divide all signals:…

  2. 47 CFR 73.1226 - Availability to FCC of station logs and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Availability to FCC of station logs and records... Availability to FCC of station logs and records. The following shall be made available to any authorized representative of the FCC upon request: (a) Station records and logs shall be made available for inspection...

  3. 47 CFR 73.1226 - Availability to FCC of station logs and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Availability to FCC of station logs and records... Availability to FCC of station logs and records. The following shall be made available to any authorized representative of the FCC upon request: (a) Station records and logs shall be made available for inspection...

  4. 47 CFR 73.1226 - Availability to FCC of station logs and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Availability to FCC of station logs and records... Availability to FCC of station logs and records. The following shall be made available to any authorized representative of the FCC upon request: (a) Station records and logs shall be made available for inspection...

  5. 47 CFR 73.1226 - Availability to FCC of station logs and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Availability to FCC of station logs and records... Availability to FCC of station logs and records. The following shall be made available to any authorized representative of the FCC upon request: (a) Station records and logs shall be made available for inspection...

  6. 47 CFR 73.1226 - Availability to FCC of station logs and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Availability to FCC of station logs and records... Availability to FCC of station logs and records. The following shall be made available to any authorized representative of the FCC upon request: (a) Station records and logs shall be made available for inspection...

  7. Imaging phonons in a fcc Pu-Ga alloy by thermal diffuse x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Joe; Wall, M.; Schwartz, A. J.; Xu, R.; Holt, M.; Hong, Hawoong; Zschack, P.; Chiang, T.-C.

    2004-05-01

    X-ray thermal diffuse scattering intensity patterns from phonons in a fcc δ-Pu-Ga alloy have been recorded using an 18 keV undulator x-ray beam with a beam diameter of 25 μm. The results are consistent with patterns calculated using the Born-von Karman force constant model of lattice dynamics, and support the pronounced softening of the transverse acoustic branch along the [111] direction observed from inelastic x-ray scattering measurements. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using a "large-grain, small beam" approach to study lattice properties, such as phonon dispersion curves, of materials not readily available in the form of large single crystals.

  8. Microstructural Characterization of Dislocation Networks During Harper-Dorn Creep of fcc, bcc, and hcp Metals and Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Przystupa, Marek A.

    2007-12-13

    temperatures, (2) time invariant and (3) identical to the distributions obtained previously for Harper-Dorn creep. This has never been shown before and confirms our theoretical expectations that evolution of the dislocation networks during annealing and H-D creep is governed by the same growth law. Obtained results were also used to predict H-D steady creep rates from annealing kinetics data using equations of the dislocation network theory. For the three considered stresses the theory predicts systematically smaller creep rates by the average factor of 4.5. Considering that the creep rates have been predicted from the annealing data alone and without any adjustable parameters, this results shout be considered as outstanding. In case of hcp zinc the samples were pre-deformed in compression at constant stress of 4 MPa at temperature of 573 K and subsequently annealed at the same temperature. During annealing samples readily recrystallized, but it was possible to obtain information on the link length distributions from several unrecrystallized grains. The results showed that the scaled link length distributions were time invariant and similar to those of the aluminum. The annealing studies on bcc tin were also curtailed by the concurrent recrystallization. It was only possible to obtain link length distribution for samples deformed in compression at constant load of 2 MPa at 423 K after unloading. The link length distribution was also in this case similar to that of the aluminum and zinc. These results suggest that the scaled link length distribution is universal and the same for the three considered crystal structures. This supports theoretical findings of these studies that appropriately scaled dislocation link length distribution should both universal and time invariant. We have also investigated the possibility of using alternative methods of estimating local dislocation densities from etch pits which could give more precise estimates of the dislocation link-lengths. The two

  9. Optical emission, shock-induced opacity, temperatures, and melting of Gd3Ga5O12 single crystals shock-compressed from 41 to 290 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xianming; Nellis, William J.; Li, Jiabo; Li, Jun; Zhao, Wanguang; Liu, Xun; Cao, Xiuxia; Liu, Qiancheng; Xue, Tao; Wu, Qiang; Mashimo, T.

    2015-08-01

    Strong oxides at high shock pressures have broad crossovers from elastic solids at ambient to failure by plastic deformation, to heterogeneous deformation to weak solids, to fluid-like solids that equilibrate thermally in a few ns, to melting and, at sufficiently high shock pressures and temperatures, to metallic fluid oxides. This sequence of crossovers in single-crystal cubic Gd3Ga5O12 (Gd-Ga Garnet-GGG) has been diagnosed by fast emission spectroscopy using a 16-channel optical pyrometer in the spectral range 400-800 nm with bandwidths per channel of 10 nm, a writing time of ˜1000 ns and time resolution of 3 ns. Spectra were measured at shock pressures from 40 to 290 GPa (100 GPa = 1 Mbar) with corresponding gray-body temperatures from 3000 to 8000 K. Experimental lifetimes were a few 100 ns. Below 130 GPa, emission is heterogeneous and measured temperatures are indicative of melting temperatures in grain boundary regions rather than bulk temperatures. At 130 GPa and 2200 K, GGG equilibrates thermally and homogeneously in a thin opaque shock front. This crossover has a characteristic spectral signature in going from partially transmitting shock-heated material behind the shock front to an opaque shock front. Opacity is caused by optical scattering and absorption of light generated by fast compression. GGG melts at ˜5000 K in a two-phase region at shock pressures in the range 200 GPa to 217 GPa. Hugoniot equation-of-state data were measured by a Doppler Pin SystemDPS with ps time resolution and are generally consistent with previous data. Extrapolation of previous electrical conductivity measurements indicates that GGG becomes a poor metal at a shock pressure above ˜400 GPa. Because the shock impedance of GGG is higher than that of Al2O3 used previously to make metallic fluid H (MFH), the use of GGG to make MFH will achieve higher pressures and lower temperatures than use of Al2O3. However, maximum dynamic pressures at which emission temperatures of fluid

  10. Influence of compressive stress and electric field on the stability of [ 011 ] poled and [ 0 1 xAF 1 ] oriented 31-mode PZN-0.055PT single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitmann, Adam A.; Stace, Joseph A.; Lim, Leong-Chew; Amin, Ahmed H.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of compressive stress, in the presence of an electrical field along the [ 011 ] direction, on the phase transition stability of [ 0 1 ¯ 1 ] oriented and [ 011 ] poled relaxor (1-x)Pb(Zn1/3Nb2/3)O3-xPbTiO3 (PZN-PT) single crystals in the transverse length extensional 31-mode geometry is investigated. The thermal, electrical, and mechanical stability range for operation lacking elastic instabilities is identified and compared with conventional 33 and 32-mode geometries with the near morphotropic composition of x ˜ 0.055. It is found that the 31-mode geometry retains the stable, room temperature ferroelectric rhombohedral (R) symmetry up to and exceeding compressive stresses, along the [ 0 1 ¯ 1 ] direction, of 90 MPa under zero field conditions. Under zero stress conditions, a phase transformation from the stable rhombohedral symmetry to the low symmetry ferroelectric orthorhombic (O) phase occurs in the presence of an electric field of 0.85 MV/m. Stabilization of the R-O phase transformation against electric field drive occurs as a function of compressive prestress, similar to the 33-mode geometry. And, under sufficiently large compressive stress, an R-T (or R-MA-T) transformation is identified and discussed.

  11. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.; Bradley, Jonathan N.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%.

  12. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-07-07

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique are disclosed. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%. 21 figs.

  13. Strategies for catalytic octane enhancement in an FCC unit

    SciTech Connect

    Creighton, J.E.; Edwards, G.C.; Rajagopalan, K.; Peters, A.W.; Young, G.W. )

    1987-08-01

    Gasoline quality is largely determined by motor and research octane numbers. There is good correlation between octane number and the structure of the C{sub 5} to C{sub 12} hydrocarbons typically present in gasoline. For paraffins, octane number decreases as molecular weight increases with degree of branching. The same is true of olefins. Catalytic strategies for making high octane gasolines include decreasing the amount of higher molecular weight, less branched paraffins, isomerizing paraffins to a more highly branched product, and producing more olefins or aromatics. A number of catalytic processes in current use make use of these strategies, including reforming, isomerization, dimerization, alkylation and fluid catalytic cracking (FCC). The subject of this paper is to discuss the catalytic strategies available to produce octane number in the FCC unit.

  14. Interaction of hydrogen with transition metal fcc(111) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löautber, R.; Hennig, D.

    1997-02-01

    The interaction of atomic hydrogen with the fcc(111) surfaces of Pd and Rh was investigated theoretically with an ab initio method, to find out the differences and similiarities between these neighboring metals. At the Rh surface the hcp site of the threefold-coordinated adsorption sites is preferred, while at Pd almost no difference between the hcp and fcc sites was found. For Pd, the occupation of subsurface positions was calculated to be more stable than bulklike positions. The energy gain caused by hydrogen absorption in subsurface positions is only about 100 meV lower than for hydrogen adsorption at the surface. In contrast, for Rh, significant differences between adsorption and absorption were calculated. The diffusion barrier for hydrogen diffusion from surface to subsurface positions was calculated and compared to the diffusion barrier in bulk. The hydrogen-induced work-function changes for the considered 4d transition-metal surfaces were positive for coverage θ=1.

  15. Magneto-optic constants of hcp and fcc Co films

    SciTech Connect

    Osgood, R.M. III,; Riggs, K.T.; Johnson, A.E.; Mattson, J.E.; Sowers, C.H.; Bader, S.D.

    1997-08-01

    We tabulate the wavelength dependence of the complex magneto-optic constants for epitaxial fcc (001) and hcp (1{bar 1}00) Co films with the magnetization along two different in-plane crystallographic directions. The magneto-optic constants of epitaxial hcp Co films are strongly dependent on crystallographic direction for the same sample, while those of epitaxial fcc Co films are not, as anticipated from the trends in the magnetic anisotropy due to the spin-orbit interaction. Our results for (i) the anisotropic magneto-optic constants, (ii) the magnetic anisotropy, and (iii) the indices of refraction, are compared to other studies of Co. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Maximizing the FCC`s potential for RFG production

    SciTech Connect

    Chapin, L.E.

    1996-12-31

    The Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) unit has traditionally been the dominant conversion process in U.S. refineries. It has served as a major source of high octane naphtha for blending into the gasoline pool. With the passage of the Clean Air Act, U.S. refiners are reformulating their gasoline blends utilizing increasing volumes of {open_quotes}clean burning{close_quotes} alkylate and ethers. Both of these premium products use light olefins including propylene as feedstocks. Environmental trends in other major world markets will force much of the world FCC operating capacity to follow the same path. The intent of this paper is to quantify the impact of deep catalytic cracking on the gasoline pool and overall profitability of a refinery dedicated to producing reformulated gasoline.

  17. Dislocation dissociation in some f.c.c. metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esterling, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    The dissociation of a perfect screw dislocation into a stacking fault in an f.c.c. lattice is modeled by the modified lattice statics. The interatomic potentials are obtained from the work of Esterling and Swaroop and differ substantially from those empirical potentials usually employed in defect simulations. The calculated stacking fault widths for aluminum, copper, and silver are in good agreement with weak beam microscopy results.

  18. Effect of Compression on the Molecular Arrangement of Itraconazole-Soluplus Solid Dispersions: Induction of Liquid Crystals or Exacerbation of Phase Separation?

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhishek; Bharati, Avanish; Frederiks, Pauline; Verkinderen, Olivier; Goderis, Bart; Cardinaels, Ruth; Moldenaers, Paula; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2016-06-01

    Predensification and compression are unit operations imperative to the manufacture of tablets and capsules. Such stress-inducing steps can cause destabilization of solid dispersions which can alter their molecular arrangement and ultimately affect dissolution rate and bioavailability. In this study, itraconazole-Soluplus solid dispersions with 50% (w/w) drug loading prepared by hot-melt extrusion (HME) were investigated. Compression was performed at both pharmaceutically relevant and extreme compression pressures and dwell times. The starting materials, powder, and compressed solid dispersions were analyzed using modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SWAXS), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), and broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS). MDSC analysis revealed that compression promotes phase separation of solid dispersions as indicated by an increase in glass transition width, occurrence of a peak in the nonreversing heat flow signal, and an increase in the net heat of fusion indicating crystallinity in the systems. SWAXS analysis ruled out the presence of mesophases. BDS measurements elucidated an increase in the Soluplus-rich regions of the solid dispersion upon compression. FTIR indicated changes in the spatiotemporal architecture of the solid dispersions mediated via disruption in hydrogen bonding and ultimately altered dynamics. These changes can have significant consequences on the final stability and performance of the solid dispersions. PMID:27092396

  19. Attrition Resistant Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts Based on FCC Supports

    SciTech Connect

    Adeyiga, Adeyinka

    2010-02-05

    Commercial spent fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts provided by Engelhard and Albemarle were used as supports for Fe-based catalysts with the goal of improving the attrition resistance of typical F-T catalysts. Catalysts with the Ruhrchemie composition (100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 spent FCC on mass basis) were prepared by wet impregnation. XRD and XANES analysis showed the presence of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} in calcined catalysts. FeC{sub x} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} were present in the activated catalysts. The metal composition of the catalysts was analyzed by ICP-MS. F-T activity of the catalysts activated in situ in CO at the same conditions as used prior to the attrition tests was measured using a fixed bed reactor at T = 573 K, P = 1.38 MPa and H{sub 2}:CO ratio of 0.67. Cu and K promoted Fe supported over Engelhard provided spent FCC catalyst shows relatively good attrition resistance (8.2 wt% fines lost), high CO conversion (81%) and C{sub 5}+ hydrocarbons selectivity (18.3%).

  20. Emerging technology for the reduction of sulfur in FCC fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Wormsbecher, R.F.; Weatherbee, G.D.; Kim, G.; Dougan, T.J. )

    1993-01-01

    Passage of the Clean Air Act of 1990 and new regulations issued in California will set new limits on the sulfur content of gasoline. Because most of the sulfur in the gasoline pool comes from FCC naphtha, there is a strong incentive to reduce the sulfur content of this stream in the most cost efficient manner. This work introduces emerging catalytic technology for the direct reduction of the sulfur content of FCC gasolines, called the GSR[trademark] (Gasoline Sulfur Reduction) technology. Studies of this new technology were carried out using the Davison Circulating Riser pilot unit. The GSR technology is shown to reduce the sulfur in FCC naphtha by 15%, with two feedstocks. It is shown that this technology is selective to sulfur species in the middle of the gasoline boiling range, and converts these species to H[sub 2]S, while preserving most of the base catalyst selectivities. Various other catalytic scenarios for minimizing the gasoline sulfur content are also given.

  1. (Al, B)-ZSM-11 FCC additive performance

    SciTech Connect

    Hsing, L.H.; O`Young, C.L.

    1996-10-01

    ZSM-5 additive has been used extensively in the petroleum refining industry to enhance the light olefins production from the FCCU operation. In this paper, an FCC additive, (Al, B)-ZSM-11 was evaluated for its performance on a circulated FCC pilot unit. This additive was prepared by partially replacing the frame-work aluminum with boron, which in turn, will alternate its acid characteristics and performance as an FCC additive in promoting light olefin production. The (Al, B)-ZSM-11 additive increased C3=, C4=, and C5= yields, but was less effective in increasing C3=, C4= yields, particularly I-C4= than ZSM-5 additive. The (Al, B)-ZSM-11 additive increased branched C5= and decreased linear C5= yields resulting from skeletal isomerization. C5= and FC naphtha yields with (Al, B)-ZSM-11 additive are higher than those obtained with ZSM-5 additive indicating lower cracking of FC naphtha and C%= to lower olefins with (Al, B)-ZSM-11 additive than ZSM-5. The product selectivity difference between ZSM-5 and (Al, B)-ZSM-11 additives can be correlated with their respective acidity.

  2. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.; Bradley, Jonathan N.

    1998-01-01

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique. The method applies to data compressed with lossy algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty in value by one unit. Indices which are adjacent in value are manipulated to encode auxiliary data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compressions known also as entropy coding, to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the compression entropy coding, known also as entropy coding is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage in the manner taught by the method.

  3. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-03-10

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique is disclosed. The method applies to data compressed with lossy algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty in value by one unit. Indices which are adjacent in value are manipulated to encode auxiliary data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compressions known also as entropy coding, to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the compression entropy coding, known also as entropy coding is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage in the manner taught by the method. 11 figs.

  4. Formation of bcc and fcc during the coalescence of free and supported Fe and Ni clusters.

    PubMed

    Li, Guojian; Wang, Qiang; Sui, Xudong; Wang, Kai; Wu, Chun; He, Jicheng

    2015-09-01

    The formation of bcc and fcc during the coalescence of free and supported Fe and Ni clusters has been studied by molecular dynamics simulation using an embedded atom method. Structural evolution of the clusters, coalesced under varying temperature, Ni content and substrate conditions, was explored by interatomic energy, snapshots, pair distribution functions and bond order parameters. The results show that the formation of bcc and fcc is strongly related to Ni content, substrate and coalescence temperature. Free clusters coalesced at 1200 K form bcc at lower Ni contents with fcc forming at higher Ni concentrations and no observable coexistence of bcc and fcc. Differences in coalescence at 1000 K result from the coexistence of bcc and fcc within the Ni range of 50-70%. Free clusters supported on disordered Ni substrates were shown to transform from spherical morphology to islands of supported clusters with preferred epitaxial orientation. The Ni content required to form bcc and fcc coexistence on supported clusters at 1000 K decreased to 30-50% Ni. Free clusters possessing bcc and fcc generally stacked along the bcc (110) and fcc (111) facets, whereas supported clusters stacked along the (111) bcc and (100) fcc planes. Structural transformation was induced by clusters containing greater numbers of atoms. Spread over the substrate enhanced interatomic energy, order substrates affect the epitaxial growth direction and increase the melting points of the supported clusters. This study can be used to predict the nature of fcc and bcc formation in Fe-Ni films. PMID:26234423

  5. Compressive Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Se Hoon

    Compressive holography estimates images from incomplete data by using sparsity priors. Compressive holography combines digital holography and compressive sensing. Digital holography consists of computational image estimation from data captured by an electronic focal plane array. Compressive sensing enables accurate data reconstruction by prior knowledge on desired signal. Computational and optical co-design optimally supports compressive holography in the joint computational and optical domain. This dissertation explores two examples of compressive holography: estimation of 3D tomographic images from 2D data and estimation of images from under sampled apertures. Compressive holography achieves single shot holographic tomography using decompressive inference. In general, 3D image reconstruction suffers from underdetermined measurements with a 2D detector. Specifically, single shot holographic tomography shows the uniqueness problem in the axial direction because the inversion is ill-posed. Compressive sensing alleviates the ill-posed problem by enforcing some sparsity constraints. Holographic tomography is applied for video-rate microscopic imaging and diffuse object imaging. In diffuse object imaging, sparsity priors are not valid in coherent image basis due to speckle. So incoherent image estimation is designed to hold the sparsity in incoherent image basis by support of multiple speckle realizations. High pixel count holography achieves high resolution and wide field-of-view imaging. Coherent aperture synthesis can be one method to increase the aperture size of a detector. Scanning-based synthetic aperture confronts a multivariable global optimization problem due to time-space measurement errors. A hierarchical estimation strategy divides the global problem into multiple local problems with support of computational and optical co-design. Compressive sparse aperture holography can be another method. Compressive sparse sampling collects most of significant field

  6. Plastic crystal phases of simple water models.

    PubMed

    Aragones, J L; Vega, C

    2009-06-28

    We report the appearance of two plastic crystal phases of water at high pressure and temperature using computer simulations. In one of them the oxygen atoms form a body centered cubic structure (bcc) and in the other they form a face centered cubic structure (fcc). In both cases the water molecules were able to rotate almost freely. We have found that the bcc plastic crystal transformed into a fcc plastic crystal via a Martensitic phase transition when heated at constant pressure. We have performed the characterization and localization in the phase diagram of these plastic crystal phases for the SPC/E, TIP4P, and TIP4P/2005 water potential models. For TIP4P/2005 model free energy calculations were carried out for the bcc plastic crystal and fcc plastic crystal using a new method (which is a slight variation of the Einstein crystal method) proposed for these types of solid. The initial coexistence points for the SPC/E and TIP4P models were obtained using Hamiltonian Gibbs-Duhem integration. For all of these models these two plastic crystal phases appear in the high pressure and temperature region of the phase diagram. It would be of interest to study if such plastic crystal phases do indeed exist for real water. This would shed some light on the question of whether these models can describe satisfactorily the high pressure part of the phase diagram of water, and if not, where and why they fail. PMID:19566163

  7. A general kinetic-flow coupling model for FCC riser flow simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S. L.

    1998-05-18

    A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code has been developed for fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) riser flow simulation. Depending on the application of interest, a specific kinetic model is needed for the FCC flow simulation. This paper describes a method to determine a kinetic model based on limited pilot-scale test data. The kinetic model can then be used with the CFD code as a tool to investigate optimum operating condition ranges for a specific FCC unit.

  8. Phase transition from fcc to bcc structure of the Cu-clusters during nanocrystallization of Fe85.2Si1B9P4Cu0.8 soft magnetic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishijima, Masahiko; Matsuura, Makoto; Takenaka, Kana; Takeuchi, Akira; Ofuchi, Hironori; Makino, Akihiro

    2014-05-01

    A role of Cu on the nanocrystallization of an Fe85.2Si1B9P4Cu0.8 alloy was investigated by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The Cu K-edge XAFS results show that local structure around Cu is disordered for the as-quenched sample whereas it changes to fcc-like structure at 613 K. The fcc Cu-clusters are, however, thermodynamically unstable and begin to transform into bcc structure at 638 K. An explicit bcc structure is observed for the sample annealed at 693 K for 600 s in which TEM observation shows that precipitated bcc-Fe crystallites with ˜12 nm are homogeneously distributed. The bcc structure of the Cu-clusters transforms into the fcc-type again at 973 K, which can be explained by the TEM observations; Cu segregates at grain boundaries between bcc-Fe crystallites and Fe3(B,P) compounds. Combining the XAFS results with the TEM observations, the structure transition of the Cu-clusters from fcc to bcc is highly correlated with the preliminary precipitation of the bcc-Fe which takes place prior to the onset of the first crystallization temperature, Tx1 = 707 K. Thermodynamic analysis suggests that an interfacial energy density γ between an fcc-Cu cluster and bcc-Fe matrix dominates at a certain case over the structural energy between fcc and bcc Cu, ΔGfcc - bcc, which causes phase transition of the Cu clusters from fcc to bcc structure.

  9. Polarization Issues in the $e\\pm$ FCC

    SciTech Connect

    Gianfelice-Wendt, E.

    2015-08-10

    After the Higgs boson discovery at LHC, the international physics community is considering the next energy frontier circular collider (FCC). A pp collider of 100 km with a center of mass energy of about 100 TeV is believed to have the necessary discovery potential. The same tunnel could host first a e+e- collider with beam energy ranging between 45 and 175 GeV. In this paper preliminary considerations on the possibility of self-polarization for the e± beams are presented.

  10. Deformation twinning mechanisms in FCC and HCP metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian; Tome, Carlos N; Beyerlein, Irene J; Misra, Amit; Mara, N

    2011-01-31

    We report the recent work on twinning and detwinning in fcc and hcp metals based on the in situ and ex situ TEM observations and molecular dynamics simulations. Three aspects are discussed in this paper. (1) Detwinning in single-phase Cu with respect to growth twins, (2) deformation twinning in Ag-Cu composites, and (3) deformation twinning mechanisms in hcp metals. The main conclusion is that atomic structures of interfaces (twin boundaries, two-phases interface, and grain boundaries) play a crucial role in nucleating and propagating of deformation twins.

  11. Moessbauer spectroscopy evidence of a spinodal mechanism for the thermal decomposition of fcc FeCu

    SciTech Connect

    Crespo, P. |; Barro, M.J.; Hernando, A.; Escorial, A.G.; Menendez, N.; Tornero, J.D.; Barandiaran, J.M.

    1998-07-24

    Moessbauer spectroscopy shows the existence of compositional fluctuations, where different Fe environments coexist, during decomposition upon heat treatment of metastable f.c.c. FeCu solid solution. The presence of isolated Fe atoms in the Cu matrix, f.c.c. Fe{sub rich}Cu, f.c.c. FeCu{sub rich} and b.c.c. Fe has been detected in early decomposition stages. At later decomposition stages, low temperature Moessbauer spectroscopy indicates the presence of a broad distribution of Curie temperatures, coexisting with isolated Fe atoms in the Cu matrix, f.c.c. Fe and b.c.c. Fe.

  12. Compressible halftoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Peter G.; Liu, Changmeng

    2003-01-01

    We present a technique for converting continuous gray-scale images to halftone (black and white) images that lend themselves to lossless data compression with compression factor of three or better. Our method involves using novel halftone mask structures which consist of non-repeated threshold values. We have versions of both dispersed-dot and clustered-dot masks, which produce acceptable images for a variety of printers. Using the masks as a sort key allows us to reversibly rearrange the image pixels and partition them into groups with a highly skewed distribution allowing Huffman compression coding techniques to be applied. This gives compression ratios in the range 3:1 to 10:1.

  13. The effect of feedstock additives on FCC catalyst deactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.; Koon, C.L.; McGhee, B.

    1995-12-31

    Fluid catalytic cracking is a major petroleum refining process and because of this the deactivation of FCC catalysts by coke deposition has been the subject of considerable investigation during the past 50 years. Nevertheless, a lack of understanding of the fundamental understanding of processes leading to coke formation still exists. Basic studies using Zeolites have usually involved excessively high levels of coke deposits compared to normal FCC operation. The present study addresses coke formation at realistic levels of 0.5 to 1.0% w/w using a standard MAT reactor in which concentrations of 1% and 10% of various additives were added to the n-hexadecane feedstock. These additives included, quinoline, phenanthrene, benzofuran, thianaphthene and indene. The coke formed was characterised by mass spectrometry and was significantly aliphatic in nature, the amount formed increasing in the order quinoline, phenanthrene, thianaphthene, benzofuran, indene. Quinoline acts primarily as a poison, whereas the other additives tend to promote coke formation in n-hexadecane cracking.

  14. Diversity of Voice? The FCC's Bright-Line "Anti-Monopoly" Rule.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddock, David D.; Polsby, Daniel D.

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has long had rules that prohibit anyone from owning more than one television station in any given location. Two of the stated purposes behind the FCC's anti-monopoly rules are to foster diversity of programming for the sake of First Amendment interests, and to promote programming among media outlets in…

  15. 47 CFR 11.21 - State and Local Area plans and FCC Mapbook.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false State and Local Area plans and FCC Mapbook. 11.21 Section 11.21 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) General § 11.21 State and Local Area plans and FCC Mapbook. EAS plans contain guidelines...

  16. 47 CFR 11.21 - State and Local Area plans and FCC Mapbook.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false State and Local Area plans and FCC Mapbook. 11.21 Section 11.21 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) General § 11.21 State and Local Area plans and FCC Mapbook. EAS plans contain guidelines...

  17. 47 CFR 0.409 - Commission policy on private printing of FCC forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Commission policy on private printing of FCC forms. 0.409 Section 0.409 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION General Information General § 0.409 Commission policy on private printing of FCC forms. The Commission has established a policy regarding...

  18. The Impact of Public Affairs Programming Regulation: A Study of the FCC's Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlin, Bill F.

    1979-01-01

    Explores the effectiveness of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) public affairs program regulation through analysis of annual reports for 75 television stations, examining amount of time for public issues programing, amount of local affairs programing, total prime time programing, and whether FCC standards are met. (CWM)

  19. 47 CFR 97.27 - FCC modification of station license grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false FCC modification of station license grant. 97.27 Section 97.27 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.27 FCC modification of station...

  20. 47 CFR 97.27 - FCC modification of station license grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false FCC modification of station license grant. 97.27 Section 97.27 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.27 FCC modification of station...

  1. 47 CFR 97.27 - FCC modification of station license grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false FCC modification of station license grant. 97.27 Section 97.27 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.27 FCC modification of station...

  2. 47 CFR 97.27 - FCC modification of station license grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FCC modification of station license grant. 97.27 Section 97.27 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.27 FCC modification of station...

  3. 47 CFR 97.27 - FCC modification of station license grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false FCC modification of station license grant. 97.27 Section 97.27 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.27 FCC modification of station...

  4. 47 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 95 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY.... A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 95—Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC In...

  5. 47 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 95 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY.... A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 95—Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC In...

  6. 47 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 95 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY.... A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 95—Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC In...

  7. 47 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 95 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY.... A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 95—Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC In...

  8. 47 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 95 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY.... A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 95—Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC In...

  9. 47 CFR 0.409 - Commission policy on private printing of FCC forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Commission policy on private printing of FCC forms. 0.409 Section 0.409 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION General Information General § 0.409 Commission policy on private printing of FCC forms. The Commission has established a policy regarding...

  10. On Campus Web-Monitoring Rules, Colleges and the FCC Have a Bad Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartle, Terry W.

    2006-01-01

    A regulation issued by the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) requires facilities-based Internet services providers who operate their own equipment, including colleges, to make their Internet systems compliant with a statute known as the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (Calea) by April 2007. However, the FCC does not…