Science.gov

Sample records for compressed work week

  1. Plant Operation: Work Week, Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nation's Schools and Colleges, 1975

    1975-01-01

    A four-day work week for maintenance workers in the Jefferson County Public Schools in Lakewood, Colorado, reduces absenteeism and increases productivity; a basic manual for physical plant directors is reviewed. (Author/MLF)

  2. A 4-Day Work Week That Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Kenneth; Timmerman, Linda

    1980-01-01

    Describes Navarro College's (Corsicana, TX) program to reduce kilowatt hour consumption through alternative energy sources and energy costs through transition to a four-day/40-hour work week. Presents results of studies of employee performance levels, community response, and the cost effectiveness of the program. Lists benefits for the student,…

  3. A 4-Day Work Week That Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Kenneth; Timmerman, Linda

    1980-01-01

    Describes Navarro College's (Corsicana, TX) program to reduce kilowatt hour consumption through alternative energy sources and energy costs through transition to a four-day/40-hour work week. Presents results of studies of employee performance levels, community response, and the cost effectiveness of the program. Lists benefits for the student,

  4. 2009 Summer 4-Day Work Week Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geneivive, David V.; DeRose, Diego; Ligas, Maria

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the final evaluation of a condensed work schedule, the Summer 2009 4-Day Work Week (S4-DWW), adopted by The School Board of Broward County, Florida. The goal for the program was to close the entire district for 1 day each week to reduce utility costs. Except for a few cases, district schools and offices were closed on Fridays…

  5. 2009 Summer 4-Day Work Week Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geneivive, David V.; DeRose, Diego; Ligas, Maria

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the final evaluation of a condensed work schedule, the Summer 2009 4-Day Work Week (S4-DWW), adopted by The School Board of Broward County, Florida. The goal for the program was to close the entire district for 1 day each week to reduce utility costs. Except for a few cases, district schools and offices were closed on Fridays

  6. Training for fitness: reconsidering the 80-hour work week.

    PubMed

    Caldicott, Catherine V; Holsapple, James W

    2008-01-01

    The medical literature is replete with articles about the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's 2003 resident duty hour restrictions. Most of these papers describe creative and thoughtful responses to the new system. However, others express concern that the "80-hour work week" could hamper continuity of care and educational activities. Nevertheless, if fatigue impairs resident learning and medical care quality, then work hour restrictions seem worthwhile. We add our voices to the critics' for additional reasons. Data support that fatigue occurs even with reasonable work schedules, and residents do not reliably use time off from work to rest. Regulated work schedules can interfere with adequate rehearsal of the physical and mental stamina required in certain specialties, yet patients have a right to expect their physicians to be trained in the particular demands of those specialties. Similarly, residents have a right to a realistic understanding of authentic clinical practice. Further, while self-sacrifice need not be routine, trainees should feel that occasional self-sacrifice is appropriate and acceptable for a physician. We reject uniform, arbitrary duty hour limits for all specialties. Rather, we propose that a subspecialty-based system can foster the development of the endurance, skills, and reasoning that patients and colleagues expect. PMID:18192772

  7. Working Characteristics of Variable Intake Valve in Compressed Air Engine

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qihui; Shi, Yan; Cai, Maolin

    2014-01-01

    A new camless compressed air engine is proposed, which can make the compressed air energy reasonably distributed. Through analysis of the camless compressed air engine, a mathematical model of the working processes was set up. Using the software MATLAB/Simulink for simulation, the pressure, temperature, and air mass of the cylinder were obtained. In order to verify the accuracy of the mathematical model, the experiments were conducted. Moreover, performance analysis was introduced to design compressed air engine. Results show that, firstly, the simulation results have good consistency with the experimental results. Secondly, under different intake pressures, the highest output power is obtained when the crank speed reaches 500 rpm, which also provides the maximum output torque. Finally, higher energy utilization efficiency can be obtained at the lower speed, intake pressure, and valve duration angle. This research can refer to the design of the camless valve of compressed air engine. PMID:25379536

  8. Working characteristics of variable intake valve in compressed air engine.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qihui; Shi, Yan; Cai, Maolin

    2014-01-01

    A new camless compressed air engine is proposed, which can make the compressed air energy reasonably distributed. Through analysis of the camless compressed air engine, a mathematical model of the working processes was set up. Using the software MATLAB/Simulink for simulation, the pressure, temperature, and air mass of the cylinder were obtained. In order to verify the accuracy of the mathematical model, the experiments were conducted. Moreover, performance analysis was introduced to design compressed air engine. Results show that, firstly, the simulation results have good consistency with the experimental results. Secondly, under different intake pressures, the highest output power is obtained when the crank speed reaches 500 rpm, which also provides the maximum output torque. Finally, higher energy utilization efficiency can be obtained at the lower speed, intake pressure, and valve duration angle. This research can refer to the design of the camless valve of compressed air engine. PMID:25379536

  9. 5 CFR 610.407 - Premium pay for holiday work for employees on compressed work schedules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Premium pay for holiday work for employees on compressed work schedules. 610.407 Section 610.407 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS HOURS OF DUTY Flexible and Compressed Work Schedules § 610.407...

  10. 5 CFR 610.407 - Premium pay for holiday work for employees on compressed work schedules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Premium pay for holiday work for employees on compressed work schedules. 610.407 Section 610.407 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS HOURS OF DUTY Flexible and Compressed Work Schedules § 610.407...

  11. Birth of the Four-Day Work Week.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellyer, Lyle

    Indian Hills Community College, faced with rising utility bills dues to inadequate insulation in the campus's older buildings, now utilizes a four-day week during the winter quarter as an energy conservation measure. Planning for the implementation of the four-day week, which began in 1976, was coordinated by an overall energy committee made up of…

  12. Effect of 3 Weeks Use of Compression Garments on Stride and Impact Shock during a Fatiguing Run.

    PubMed

    Lucas-Cuevas, A G; Priego-Quesada, J I; Aparicio, I; Giménez, J V; Llana-Belloch, S; Pérez-Soriano, P

    2015-09-01

    Excessive and prolonged exposure to impact acceleration during running is associated with increased injury rate. Acute use of compressive garments has been speculated to improve attenuation. However, it is unknown how longer interventions of compressive garments influence attenuation in running. 40 runners trained with compressive and placebo stockings for 3 weeks. Perception of comfort, stride parameters (rate, length) and impact acceleration (head and tibial peak acceleration, magnitude, acceleration rate and attenuation) were measured every 5 min during a fatigue run (30 min at 80% of the individual's maximal aerobic speed). Compressive stockings reduced tibial peak acceleration and magnitude compared to placebo stockings at every minute (p<0.05) except for the initial measurement (p>0.05). Moreover, compressive stockings led to a lower rate of increase in tibial peak acceleration (14%, p<0.005) and magnitude (16%, p<0.001) as a result of the development of fatigue compared to placebo stockings (24% and 26% increase, p=0.014 and p=0.003, respectively). Similar perception of comfort was reported for both garments. Training with compressive stockings for 3 weeks reduced impact acceleration and the rate of increase in acceleration compared to placebo stockings. These findings suggest that compressive stockings may play a protective role by reducing impact accelerations during running. PMID:26090880

  13. 5 CFR 610.406 - Holiday for employees on compressed work schedules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS HOURS OF DUTY Flexible and Compressed Work Schedules § 610.406 Holiday for employees on compressed work schedules. (a) If a full-time employee is relieved or prevented from working on a day designated... number of hours of the compressed work schedule on that day. (b) If a part-time employee is relieved...

  14. Giving 110%: A Portrait of a Michigan Teacher's Work Week. Policy Report Number 22

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burian-Fitzgerald, Marisa; Harris, Debbi

    2004-01-01

    The vast majority of Michigan's teachers work above and beyond their required work week; the average teacher works more than 45 hours per week. The time teachers spend outside regular school hours is often ignored by critics who deride the "short hours and long vacations" enjoyed by teachers. When discussing compensation policies and changes to…

  15. 29 CFR 1926.913 - Blasting in excavation work under compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blasting in excavation work under compressed air. 1926.913... Use of Explosives § 1926.913 Blasting in excavation work under compressed air. (a) Detonators and... use in wet holes shall be water-resistant and shall be Fume Class 1. (g) When tunnel excavation...

  16. 29 CFR 1926.913 - Blasting in excavation work under compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blasting in excavation work under compressed air. 1926.913... Use of Explosives § 1926.913 Blasting in excavation work under compressed air. (a) Detonators and... connecting wires are connected up. (b) When detonators or explosives are brought into an air lock,...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.913 - Blasting in excavation work under compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blasting in excavation work under compressed air. 1926.913... Use of Explosives § 1926.913 Blasting in excavation work under compressed air. (a) Detonators and... connecting wires are connected up. (b) When detonators or explosives are brought into an air lock,...

  18. Target compressions by working fluids driven with solid liner implosions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, P.-R.; Lewis, R. A.; Smith, G. A.; Dailey, J. M.; Chakrabarti, S.; Higman, K. I.; Bell, D.; Degnan, J. H.; Hussey, T. W.; Mullins, B. W.

    1994-01-01

    Compression by a spherical solid liner of a gold target surrounded by a hydrogen plasma is simulated. Two-dimensional simulations that treat only a subset of the physics included in the one-dimensional code were performed in an attempt to assess multidimensional effects. A one-dimensional numerical code has been developed to study the effects of thermal radiation and conduction. Results of pressure, density, and energy deposited for different initial plasma conditions are presented and discussed. Results from both one- and two-dimensional codes show that the average target density at peak compression is 39-43 g/cu cm, using the SHIVA Star facility at 90 kV discharge.

  19. Working fluids selection for fishing boats waste heat powered organic Rankine-vapor compression ice maker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Xianbiao; Wang, Lingbao; Li, Huashan

    2014-10-01

    To utilize waste heat from fishing boats, an organic Rankine cycle/vapor compression cycle system was employed for ice making and a thermodynamic model was developed. Six working fluids were selected and compared in order to identify suitable working fluids which may yield high system efficiencies. The calculated results show that R600a is most suitable working fluid through comprehensive comparison of efficiency, size parameter, pressure ratio, coefficient of performance, system pressure and safety.

  20. Modeling of absorption/compression cycles using working pair carbon dioxide/acetone

    SciTech Connect

    Groll, E.A.

    1997-12-31

    Vapor-compression cycles with solution circuits (VCCSC) that are part of the absorption/compression cycle technology have been known in the literature for about 100 years. The first theoretical investigators were carried out by Altenkirch in 1950 and indicated a large energy savings potential. Based on this potential and the additional need to replace the ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), research activities regarding the VCCSC have increased rapidly since 1980 and several different experimental plants have been built. In most of these investigations the working pair ammonia/water was used. The results presented here were obtained by utilizing the working pair CO{sub 2}/acetone, which was introduced by the author in 1992. Steady-state simulation models for two different vapor-compression cycles with solution circuits have been developed. The results obtained with the computer programs were verified with experimental results from an earlier investigation. Additional simulation results are presented and discussed for two different refrigeration applications.

  1. [Medical aspects of the environmental sanitation of workplaces in compressed air work in Japan].

    PubMed

    Mano, Y; Shibayama, M

    1987-01-01

    Actual follow-up investigations were made for a period of 5 yr and 10 months since February 1980 on 55 places of caisson and shield work. The maximum bottom pressure in caisson work was 3.6 kg/cm2 (4.6 ATA) and that of shield work was 1.6 kg/cm2. The number of exposures of workers was 23,737 in caisson work and 75,244 in shield work. The items of geomedical measurements were temperature (degrees C), humidity, dust, illumination, noise, oxygen, carbonic acid gas and others. In compressed air work, it is most important to prevent decompression sickness (bends) from the view of occupational health. The incidence of bends has decreased in recent years because of strict control by regulations. Environmental hygiene, however, has seldom been discussed in this field and little geomedical control has been made on compressed air work. In view of this situation, we have, therefore, studied, observed, and measured the hygienic factors of this work during the past five years. This investigation is without doubt the first of its kind in Japan and the areas covered most of the regions where compressed air works have been made in the past. From these results, it can be concluded as follows: The working temperature was controlled, but humidity was too high (nearly 90%). Illumination was insufficient. Dust was a problem, but high humidity played an important role in decreasing the volume. The environment was noisy. It is therefore natural that environmental studies should be continued and hygienic consideration be further emphasized in compressed air work. PMID:3613254

  2. Implementation of Compressed Work Schedules: Participation and Job Redesign as Critical Factors for Employee Acceptance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latack, Janina C.; Foster, Lawrence W.

    1985-01-01

    Analyzes the effects of an implementation of a three-day/thirty-eight hour (3/38) work schedule among information systems personnel (N=84). Data showed that 18 months after implementation, 3/38 employees still strongly favor the compressed schedule. Data also suggest substantial organizational payoffs including reductions in sick time, overtime,…

  3. The 80-hour Work Week for Residents: Views from Obstetric and Gynecology Program Directors

    PubMed Central

    Janoo, Jabin; Hashmi, Mahreen; Seybold, Dara J.; Shapiro, Robert; Calhoun, Byron C.; Bush, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    In 2003, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education mandated an 80-hour work week restriction for residency programs. We examined program directors’ views on how this mandate affects the education of Obstetrics and Gynecology residents. A 25 question survey was administered via Survey Monkey to Obstetrics and Gynecology program directors in the United States over three months in 2011. Fifty program directors (response rate of 28%) completed it with more men (62%) than women (38%) respondents. Overall, only 28% (14/50) responded that the program had improved, with significantly fewer men (5/14; 16.1%) than women (47.4% 9/19; p<0.0169) directors reporting this. There was little perceived improvement in any of the six core ACGME performance objectives and in the CREOG scores, with the improvement ranging from 8% to 12%. In fact, while we observed the percentage of women directors reporting improvement in patient care and interpersonal and communication skills significantly higher compared with their male counterparts, the majority of women still reported either no improvement or a decline in these areas. Though our sample size was small, we found some significant difference between the views of male and female program directors. Both groups nonetheless responded with the majority with a decline or no change rather than a perceived improvement in any of the educational endeavors studied. PMID:25643470

  4. How to increase the burden on trauma centers: implement the 80-hour work week.

    PubMed

    Schroeppel, Thomas J; Sharpe, John P; Magnotti, Louis J; Weinberg, Jordan A; Croce, Martin A; Fabian, Timothy C

    2014-07-01

    The 80-hour week was implemented in 2003 to improve outcomes and limit errors. We hypothesize that there has been no change in outcomes postimplementation of the restrictions. Outcomes were queried from the trauma registry from 1997 to 2002 (PRE) and 2004 to 2009 (POST). Primary outcomes were mortality, intensive care unit length of stay (ICU LOS), and length of stay (LOS). Patients were stratified based on demographics, blood pressure, heart rate, and injury severity (Injury Severity Score, Glasgow Coma Score, base deficit). Outcomes were then compared PRE with POST. A total of 41,770 patients were admitted during the study period. The mean age was 38 years with most being male (73%) and blunt mechanism (78%). Although patients admitted in the POST period had a slightly higher blood pressure, they were older and had higher injury severity. ICU LOS, LOS, self-pay, and mortality were higher in the POST period. After adjusted analysis, admission in the POST period was no longer a predictor of mortality (odds ratio, 1.02; confidence interval, 0.92 to 1.14). Whereas patients were more slightly more injured in the POST period, the adjusted analysis shows no difference in mortality and both a longer LOS and ICU LOS. Whether the increase is the result of more severe injury in the POST period or less efficient disposition remains to be elucidated. This study adds to the mounting evidence that the implementation of the limits on work hours does not lead to better outcomes. PMID:24987896

  5. On the work distribution for the adiabatic compression of a diluteclassical gas

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.; Jarzynski, Christopher

    2006-02-23

    We consider the adiabatic and quasi-static compression of adilute classical gas, confined in a piston and initially equilibratedwith a heat bath. We find that the work performed during this process isdescribed statistically by a gamma distribution. We use this result toshow that the model satisfies the non-equilibrium work and fluctuationtheorems, but not the fluctation-dissipation relation. We discuss therare but dominant realizations that contribute most to the exponentialaverage of the work, and relate our results to potentially universal workdistributions.

  6. Employment and the Reduction of the Work Week: A Comparison of Seven European Macro-economic Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Ginneken, Wouter

    1984-01-01

    Analyzes the impact of a reduced work week on employment, productivity, wages, investment, economic growth, inflation, and government deficits. Concludes that reducing working hours would have greater effect if accompanied by wage reductions and limitation of overtime, but would not affect underlying causes of unemployment. (SK)

  7. Capitol Hill Recognizes National School Psychology Week and the Work of School Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Communique, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In honor of National School Psychology Week, the NASP Government and Professional Relations (GPR) and Communications committees and NASP staff joined forces on a campaign to help elected officials on Capitol Hill learn about the positive contributions of school psychologists and how their services impact student mental health and learning. This

  8. Capitol Hill Recognizes National School Psychology Week and the Work of School Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Communique, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In honor of National School Psychology Week, the NASP Government and Professional Relations (GPR) and Communications committees and NASP staff joined forces on a campaign to help elected officials on Capitol Hill learn about the positive contributions of school psychologists and how their services impact student mental health and learning. This…

  9. The Time Divide in Cross-National Perspective: The Work Week, Education and Institutions that Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frase, Peter; Gornick, Janet C.

    2013-01-01

    Prior empirical studies have found that American workers report longer hours than do workers in other highly industrialized countries, and that the highly educated report the longest hours relative to other educational levels. This paper analyzes disparities in working hours by education levels in 17 high- and middle-income countries to assess…

  10. Sleep restriction for the duration of a work week impairs multitasking performance.

    PubMed

    Haavisto, Marja-Leena; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Hublin, Christer; Härmä, Mikko; Mutanen, Pertti; Müller, Kiti; Virkkala, Jussi; Sallinen, Mikael

    2010-09-01

    It is important to develop shift schedules that minimise the chance for sleep-related human error in safety-critical domains. Experimental data on the effects of sleep restriction (SR) play a key role in this development work. In order to provide such data, we conducted an experiment in which cognitively demanding and long-duration task performance, simulating task performance at work, was measured under SR and following recovery. Twenty healthy male volunteers, aged 19-29 years, participated in the study. Thirteen of them had first two baseline days (8-h sleep opportunity per day), then five SR days (4-h sleep) and finally two recovery days (8-h sleep). Seven controls were allowed to sleep for 8 h each night. On each experimental day, multitask performance was tested in 50-min sessions, physiological sleepiness was evaluated during multitask performance using electroencephalogram (EEG)/electrooculogram (EOG) recordings, and psychomotor vigilance task performance and Karolinska Sleepiness Scale were recorded. Sleep-wake rhythm was monitored throughout the experiment. The multitask performance progressively deteriorated as a result of prolongation of the SR and the time spent on the task. The effect was significant at group level, but individual differences were large: performance was not markedly deteriorated in all participants. Similar changes were observed also in EEG/EOG-defined sleepiness. The recovery process of performance and sleepiness from the SR continued over the two recovery sleep opportunities. In all, our findings emphasise the importance of shift systems that do not restrict sleep for several consecutive days. PMID:20408942

  11. Local Increase of Sleep Slow Wave Activity after Three Weeks of Working Memory Training in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Pugin, Fiona; Metz, Andreas J.; Wolf, Martin; Achermann, Peter; Jenni, Oskar G.; Huber, Reto

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Evidence is accumulating that electroencephalographic (EEG) sleep slow wave activity (SWA), the key characteristic of deep sleep, is regulated not only globally, but also locally. Several studies have shown local learning- and use-dependent changes in SWA. In vitro and in vivo animal experiments and studies in humans indicate that these local changes in SWA reflect synaptic plasticity. During maturation, when synaptic changes are most prominent, learning is of utmost importance. Thus, in this study, we aimed to examine whether intensive working memory training for 3 w would lead to a local increase of sleep SWA using high-density EEG recordings in children and young adolescents. Setting: Sleep laboratory at the University Children's Hospital Zurich. Participants: Fourteen healthy subjects between 10 and 16 y. Interventions: Three weeks of intensive working memory training. Measurements and Results: After intensive working memory training, sleep SWA was increased in a small left frontoparietal cluster (11.06 1.24%, mean standard error of the mean). In addition, the local increase correlated positively with increased working memory performance assessed immediately (r = 0.66) and 2 to 5 mo (r = 0.68) after the training. Conclusions: The increase in slow wave activity (SWA) correlates with cognitive training-induced plasticity in a region known to be involved in working memory performance. Thus, in future, the mapping of sleep SWA may be used to longitudinally monitor the effects of working memory training in children and adolescents with working memory deficiencies. Citation: Pugin F, Metz AJ, Wolf M, Achermann P, Jenni OG, Huber R. Local increase of sleep slow wave activity after three weeks of working memory training in children and adolescents. SLEEP 2015;38(4):607614. PMID:25669190

  12. The 88-Hour Family: Effects of the 80-Hour Work Week on Marriage and Childbirth in a Surgical Residency

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Arden M; Jones, Kevin B

    2007-01-01

    The restriction of the resident physician work week to 80 hours has had dramatic affects on resident education and life-style. While effects on mood, psychological distress, and burn-out have been studied, the resultant changes in tangible quality of life have received little attention. birth rate was considered a measurable, relevant outcome. The resident marital and parental status by duty month was collected from a single orthopaedic surgical residency program for the four academic years preceding and following the implementation of the 80-hour work week. the number of births to residents during these periods were also tallied. The relative prevalence of positive marital status changed very little between residents in the two time durations from 66 to 71 percent, but parental status increased from 27 to 43 percent. The number of births per married resident duty year also increased from 0.23 pre-restrictions to 0.32 post-restrictions. While the individual decisions involved in generating these observed changes are complex and difficult to entirely decipher, it is thought that an increased perception of life-control within the work-hour restrictions may have prompted the dramatic changes in birth rate among resident families. PMID:17907445

  13. Self-Reported Recovery from 2-Week 12-Hour Shift Work Schedules: A 14-Day Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Merkus, Suzanne L.; Holte, Kari Anne; Huysmans, Maaike A.; van de Ven, Peter M.; van Mechelen, Willem; van der Beek, Allard J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recovery from fatigue is important in maintaining night workers' health. This study compared the course of self-reported recovery after 2-week 12-hour schedules consisting of either night shifts or swing shifts (i.e., 7 night shifts followed by 7 day shifts) to such schedules consisting of only day work. Methods Sixty-one male offshore employees—20 night workers, 16 swing shift workers, and 25 day workers—rated six questions on fatigue (sleep quality, feeling rested, physical and mental fatigue, and energy levels; scale 1–11) for 14 days after an offshore tour. After the two night-work schedules, differences on the 1st day (main effects) and differences during the follow-up (interaction effects) were compared to day work with generalized estimating equations analysis. Results After adjustment for confounders, significant main effects were found for sleep quality for night workers (1.41, 95% confidence interval 1.05–1.89) and swing shift workers (1.42, 95% confidence interval 1.03–1.94) when compared to day workers; their interaction terms were not statistically significant. For the remaining fatigue outcomes, no statistically significant main or interaction effects were found. Conclusion After 2-week 12-hour night and swing shifts, only the course for sleep quality differed from that of day work. Sleep quality was poorer for night and swing shift workers on the 1st day off and remained poorer for the 14-day follow-up. This showed that while working at night had no effect on feeling rested, tiredness, and energy levels, it had a relatively long-lasting effect on sleep quality. PMID:26929834

  14. Effects of 6 weeks of aerobic exercise combined with conjugated linoleic acid on the physical working capacity at fatigue threshold.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Nathaniel D M; Buckner, Samuel L; Baker, Robert B; Bergstrom, Haley C; Cochrane, Kristen C; Weir, Joseph P; Housh, Terry J; Cramer, Joel T

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) supplementation in conjunction with 6 weeks of aerobic exercise training on the physical working capacity at the fatigue threshold (PWCFT), timed sit-ups, and the standing long jump. Thirty-three untrained to moderately trained men (mean ± SD; age = 21.6 ± 2.8 years) participated in this double-blind, placebo-controlled study and were randomly assigned to either a CLA (Clarinol A-80; n = 17) or placebo (PLA; sunflower oil; n = 16) group. Before and after 6 weeks of aerobic training (50% VO2peak for 30 minutes, twice per week) and supplementation (8 ml CLA or PLA per day), each subject completed an incremental cycle ergometer test to exhaustion to determine the PWCFT, maximal number of sit-ups in 1 minute, and the standing long jump. There were no differences (all p ≥ 0.23) between the CLA and PLA groups for the analysis of covariance-adjusted posttest mean values for PWCFT, sit-ups, or standing long jump. The PWCFT increased from pre- to posttraining in the CLA (p = 0.003) and PLA (p = 0.003) groups. There were no differences (p > 0.05) from pre- to posttraining for sit-ups and standing long jump in either the CLA or PLA groups. There was no effect of CLA on the training-induced increases in PWCFT, nor were there any effects of CLA or aerobic training on the maximum number of sit-ups or standing long jump. Thus, CLA had no ergogenic benefits on this model of aerobic training-induced improvements in neuromuscular fatigue, or on field tests of muscle endurance and power. PMID:24796987

  15. Leptin level lowers in proportion to the amount of aerobic work after four weeks of training in obesity.

    PubMed

    Salvadori, A; Fanari, P; Brunani, A; Marzullo, P; Codecasa, F; Tovaglieri, I; Cornacchia, M; Palmulli, P; Longhini, E

    2015-03-01

    Leptin values are higher in obesity. Physical exercise reduces fat mass (FM) and decreases leptin levels. Intensity of physical training seems to play a role in reducing circulating leptin. In 16 obese subjects (8 men and 8 women, age 38.6±3.9 years, BMI 35.9±1.8 kg/m(2)), leptin was sampled before and after 4 weeks of controlled training. Eight subjects (4 men and 4 women) performed an aerobic training schedule (Group A), the remainders an aerobic training program with a bout of work beyond the anaerobic threshold (AT) (Group B). Training determined a reduction in leptin levels in both groups, which was significant in Group A (12.2 vs. 27.8 μg/l, p<0.05), even when related to the change in FM (0.372 vs. 0.762 μg/l/kg, p<0.05). FM decreased significantly in Group B when compared to Group A (-7.4 vs. -2.6 kg, respectively, p<0.001). While in Group A the slight loss of FM was aggregated to a significant decrease in leptin levels, the opposite occurred in Group B. In Group A, leptin lowering was proportional to the amount of total work performed (p<0.001, R(2)=0.89). In obesity, a reduction is observed in leptin levels after short-term training, which is seemingly dissociated from concomitant decrease of FM. Aerobic training alone appears to be linked to a greater leptin reduction, which is well correlated with the amount of work performed. PMID:25502942

  16. An old integration scheme for compressible flows revisited, refurbished and put to work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moretti, G.

    1978-01-01

    A scheme for integrating the Euler equations of compressible flow in any hyperbolic case is presented. The scheme relies on the concept of characteristics but is strictly a finite difference scheme. Improvements in accuracy and physical consistence due to the scheme are discussed and results of its application to complex flows are shown.

  17. 45 CFR 286.90 - How many hours per week must an adult or minor head-of-household participate in work-related...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How many hours per week must an adult or minor head-of-household participate in work-related activities to count in the numerator of the work... numerator of the work participation rate? During the month, an adult or minor head-of-household...

  18. Methyltransferases do not work by compression, cratic, or desolvation effects, but by electrostatic preorganization

    PubMed Central

    Lameira, Jeronimo; Ram Prasad, B; Chu, Zhen T.; Warshel, Arieh

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine to dopamine and related catechols. The search for the origin of COMT catalysis has led to different proposals and hypothesis, including the entropic, the NAC and the compression proposals as well as the more reasonable electrostatic idea. Thus it is important to understand the catalytic power of this enzyme and to examine the validity of different proposals and in particularly the repeated recent implication of the compression idea. The corresponding analysis should be done by well-defined physically based analysis that involves computations rather than circular interpretations of experimental results. Thus we explore here the origin of the catalytic efficiency of COMT by using the empirical valence bond and the linear response approximation approaches. The results demonstrate that the catalytic effect of COMT is mainly due to electrostatic preorganization effects. It is also shown that the compression, NAC and entropic proposals do not account for the catalytic effect. PMID:25388538

  19. 45 CFR 286.90 - How many hours per week must an adult or minor head-of-household participate in work-related...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How many hours per week must an adult or minor... must an adult or minor head-of-household participate in work-related activities to count in the numerator of the work participation rate? During the month, an adult or minor head-of-household...

  20. 45 CFR 286.90 - How many hours per week must an adult or minor head-of-household participate in work-related...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true How many hours per week must an adult or minor head... must an adult or minor head-of-household participate in work-related activities to count in the numerator of the work participation rate? During the month, an adult or minor head-of-household...

  1. 45 CFR 286.90 - How many hours per week must an adult or minor head-of-household participate in work-related...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true How many hours per week must an adult or minor head... must an adult or minor head-of-household participate in work-related activities to count in the numerator of the work participation rate? During the month, an adult or minor head-of-household...

  2. 45 CFR 286.90 - How many hours per week must an adult or minor head-of-household participate in work-related...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How many hours per week must an adult or minor... must an adult or minor head-of-household participate in work-related activities to count in the numerator of the work participation rate? During the month, an adult or minor head-of-household...

  3. Examining the Transition to a Four-Day School Week and Investigating Post-Change Faculty/Staff Work-Life Balance: A Community College Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardinale, Nelly

    2013-01-01

    This single descriptive embedded case study examined the process of implementing a four-day work/school week at a community college and investigated post-change faculty/staff work-life balance. All of the students attending this college live at home. The change was implemented due to state funding shortfalls, increasing college utility expenses…

  4. Examining the Transition to a Four-Day School Week and Investigating Post-Change Faculty/Staff Work-Life Balance: A Community College Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardinale, Nelly

    2013-01-01

    This single descriptive embedded case study examined the process of implementing a four-day work/school week at a community college and investigated post-change faculty/staff work-life balance. All of the students attending this college live at home. The change was implemented due to state funding shortfalls, increasing college utility expenses

  5. A week in the life of full-time office workers: work day and weekend light exposure in summer and winter.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Stephanie J; Molina, Thomas A; Burgess, Helen J

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the light exposure in full-time office workers, who spend much of their workdays indoors. We examined the 24-h light exposure patterns of 14 full-time office workers during a week in summer, and assessed their dim light melatonin onset (DLMO, a marker of circadian timing) at the end of the working week. Six workers repeated the study in winter. Season had little impact on the workers' schedules, as the timing of sleep, commute, and work did not vary by more than 30 min in the summer and winter. In both seasons, workers received significantly more morning light on workdays than weekends, due to earlier wake times and the morning commute. Evening light in the two hours before bedtime was consistently dim. The timing of the DLMO did not vary between season, and by the end of the working week, the workers slept at a normal circadian phase. PMID:25172304

  6. A Week in the Life of Full-Time Office Workers: Work Day and Weekend Light Exposure in Summer and Winter

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, Stephanie J.; Molina, Thomas A.; Burgess, Helen J.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the light exposure in full-time office workers, who spend much of their workdays indoors. We examined the 24-hour light exposure patterns of 14 full-time office workers during a week in summer, and assessed their dim light melatonin onset (DLMO, a marker of circadian timing) at the end of the working week. Six workers repeated the study in winter. Season had little impact on the workers' schedules, as the timing of sleep, commute, and work did not vary by more than 30 minutes in the summer and winter. In both seasons, workers received significantly more morning light on workdays than weekends, due to earlier wake times and the morning commute. Evening light in the two hours before bedtime was consistently dim. The timing of the DLMO did not vary between season, and by the end of the working week, the workers slept at a normal circadian phase. PMID:25172304

  7. Human Structure in Six and One-Half Weeks: One Approach to Providing Foundational Anatomical Competency in an Era of Compressed Medical School Anatomy Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halliday, Nancy; O'Donoghue, Daniel; Klump, Kathryn E.; Thompson, Britta

    2015-01-01

    The University of Oklahoma College of Medicine reduced gross anatomy from a full semester, 130-hour course to a six and one-half week, 105-hour course as part of a new integrated systems-based pre-clinical curriculum. In addition to the reduction in contact hours, content from embryology, histology, and radiology were added into the course. The

  8. Human Structure in Six and One-Half Weeks: One Approach to Providing Foundational Anatomical Competency in an Era of Compressed Medical School Anatomy Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halliday, Nancy; O'Donoghue, Daniel; Klump, Kathryn E.; Thompson, Britta

    2015-01-01

    The University of Oklahoma College of Medicine reduced gross anatomy from a full semester, 130-hour course to a six and one-half week, 105-hour course as part of a new integrated systems-based pre-clinical curriculum. In addition to the reduction in contact hours, content from embryology, histology, and radiology were added into the course. The…

  9. A Poll about Children and Weight: Crunch Time during the American Work and School Week--3 P.M. to Bed. Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Childhood obesity is a major public health challenge today, with complex roots interwoven into nearly every facet of American life. This poll addresses one narrow slice of this web: the challenges that families face during the "crunch time" of the work and school week, between 3 p.m. and the time children go to bed. Compared to the school day,…

  10. A Poll about Children and Weight: Crunch Time during the American Work and School Week--3 P.M. to Bed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Childhood obesity is a major public health challenge today, with complex roots interwoven into nearly every facet of American life. This poll addresses one narrow slice of this web: the challenges that families face during the "crunch time" of the work and school week, between 3 pm and the time children go to bed. Compared to the school day, this…

  11. Compression in Visual Working Memory: Using Statistical Regularities to Form More Efficient Memory Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Timothy F.; Konkle, Talia; Alvarez, George A.

    2009-01-01

    The information that individuals can hold in working memory is quite limited, but researchers have typically studied this capacity using simple objects or letter strings with no associations between them. However, in the real world there are strong associations and regularities in the input. In an information theoretic sense, regularities…

  12. Compression in Visual Working Memory: Using Statistical Regularities to Form More Efficient Memory Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Timothy F.; Konkle, Talia; Alvarez, George A.

    2009-01-01

    The information that individuals can hold in working memory is quite limited, but researchers have typically studied this capacity using simple objects or letter strings with no associations between them. However, in the real world there are strong associations and regularities in the input. In an information theoretic sense, regularities

  13. The dynamical mechanical properties of tungsten under compression at working temperature range of divertors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, C. C.; Song, Y. T.; Peng, X. B.; Wei, Y. P.; Mao, X.; Li, W. X.; Qian, X. Y.

    2016-02-01

    In the divertor structure of ITER and EAST with mono-block module, tungsten plays not only a role of armor material but also a role of structural material, because electromagnetic (EM) impact will be exerted on tungsten components in VDEs or CQ. The EM loads can reach to 100 MN, which would cause high strain rates. In addition, directly exposed to high-temperature plasma, the temperature regime of divertor components is complex. Aiming at studying dynamical response of tungsten divertors under EM loads, an experiment on tungsten employed in EAST divertors was performed using a Kolsky bar system. The testing strain rates and temperatures is derived from actual working conditions, which makes the constitutive equation concluded by using John-Cook model and testing data very accurate and practical. The work would give a guidance to estimate the dynamical response, fatigue life and damage evolution of tungsten divertor components under EM impact loads.

  14. Staying engaged during the week: the effect of off-job activities on next day work engagement.

    PubMed

    ten Brummelhuis, Lieke L; Bakker, Arnold B

    2012-10-01

    Although studies on employee recovery accumulate at a stunning pace, the commonly used theory (Effort-Recovery model) that explains how recovery occurs has not been explicitly tested. We aimed to unravel the recovery process by examining whether off-job activities enhance next morning vigor to the extent that they enable employees to relax and detach from work. In addition, we investigated whether adequate recovery also helps employees to work with more enthusiasm and vigor on the next workday. On five consecutive days, a total of 74 employees (356 data points) reported the hours they spent on various off-job activities, their feelings of psychological detachment, and feelings of relaxation before going to sleep. Feelings of vigor were reported on the next morning, and day-levels of work engagement were reported after work. As predicted, leisure activities (social, low-effort, and physical activities) increased next morning vigor through enhanced psychological detachment and relaxation. High-duty off-job activities (work and household tasks) reduced vigor because these activities diminished psychological detachment and relaxation. Moreover, off-job activities significantly affected next day work engagement. Our results support the assumption that recovery occurs when employees engage in off-job activities that allow for relaxation and psychological detachment. The findings also underscore the significance of recovery after work: Adequate recovery not only enhances vigor in the morning, but also helps employees to stay engaged during the next workday. PMID:22799771

  15. Human Structure in Six and One-Half Weeks: One Approach to Providing Foundational Anatomical Competency in an Era of Compressed Medical School Anatomy curricula

    PubMed Central

    Halliday, Nancy; O'Donoghue, Daniel; Klump, Kathryn E; Thompson, Britta

    2015-01-01

    The University of Oklahoma College of Medicine reduced gross anatomy from a full semester, 130-hour course to a six and one-half week, 105-hour course as part of a new integrated systems-based pre-clinical curriculum. In addition to the reduction in contact hours, content from embryology, histology, and radiology were added into the course. The new curriculum incorporated best practices in the area of regular assessments, feedback, clinical application, multiple teaching modalities, and professionalism. A comparison of the components of the traditional and integrated curriculum, along with end of course evaluations and student performance revealed that the new curriculum was just as effective, if not more effective. This article also provides important lessons learned. Anat Sci Educ 8: 149157. 2014 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Association of Anatomists. PMID:24996159

  16. Working Hours Flexibility. Background Paper No. 30.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staines, Graham L.

    Flexible work schedules offer the promise of a low-cost option for helping people manage work and family responsibilities. Alternative work schedules include part-time work, job sharing, work sharing, shiftwork, compressed work week, flexitime, and flexiplace. Flexitime is the most prevalent full-time flexible schedule and is second in prevalence…

  17. Age and individual differences in prospective memory during a "Virtual Week": the roles of working memory, vigilance, task regularity, and cue focality.

    PubMed

    Rose, Nathan S; Rendell, Peter G; McDaniel, Mark A; Aberle, Ingo; Kliegel, Matthias

    2010-09-01

    Young (ages 18-22 years) and older (ages 61-87 years) adults (N = 106) played the Virtual Week board game, which involves simulating common prospective memory (PM) tasks of everyday life (e.g., taking medication), and performed working memory (WM) and vigilance tasks. The Virtual Week game includes regular (repeated) and irregular (nonrepeated) PM tasks with cues that are either more or less focal to other ongoing activities. Age differences in PM were reduced for repeated tasks, and performance improved over the course of the week, suggesting retrieval was more spontaneous or habitual. Correlations with WM within each age group were reduced for PM tasks that had more regular or focal cues. WM (but not vigilance) ability was a strong predictor of irregular PM tasks with less focal cues. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that habitual and focally cued PM tasks are less demanding of attentional resources (specifically, WM), whereas tasks that are more demanding of controlled attentional processes produce larger age differences, which may be attributable to individual differences in WM. PMID:20853967

  18. Chronic (3-Weeks) Treatment of Estrogen (17β-Estradiol) Enhances Working and Reference Memory in Ovariectomized Rats: Role of Acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Uzum, Gulay; Bahcekapili, Nesrin; Baltaci, Abdulkerim Kasim; Mogulkoc, Rasim; Ziylan, Yusuf Ziya

    2016-06-01

    Recently there has been a growing interest in the effects of estrogen on cognitive functions. In this study, we aimed to examine 17β-estradiol treatment on working and reference memory in ovariectomized rats. We also examined the changes in the acetylcholine (ACh) levels in the brain areas associated with learning and memory. The study was performed on Sprague-Dawley type 3-month-old female rats. The rats were divided into four groups as control, ovariectomy (OVX), and OVX and estrogen treatment (10 µg/day i.p. 17β-estradiol) groups for 3 (OVX + E3) and 21 days OVX + E21). The rats were trained on eight arm radial maze task with eight arms baited to assess spatial memory, in addition four arms baited to assess both working and reference memory performances. The electron microscope images of the ACh vesicles in the frontal cortex, temporal cortex and hippocampus areas of the brain which are important regions for learning and memory were screened. Results showed that long term 17β-estradiol treatment has positive effects on both reference memory and working memory and that ACh vesicles increased in the examined brain areas, especially in hippocampus. Our results suggest that 3 weeks 17β-estradiol treatment may have an ameliorative effect on the memory through the central cholinergic system. PMID:26879199

  19. Effects of recovery sleep after one work week of mild sleep restriction on interleukin-6 and cortisol secretion and daytime sleepiness and performance

    PubMed Central

    Pejovic, Slobodanka; Basta, Maria; Kritikou, Ilia; Shaffer, Michele L.; Tsaoussoglou, Marina; Stiffler, David; Stefanakis, Zacharias; Bixler, Edward O.; Chrousos, George P.

    2013-01-01

    One workweek of mild sleep restriction adversely impacts sleepiness, performance, and proinflammatory cytokines. Many individuals try to overcome these adverse effects by extending their sleep on weekends. To assess whether extended recovery sleep reverses the effects of mild sleep restriction on sleepiness/alertness, inflammation, and stress hormones, 30 healthy young men and women (mean age ± SD, 24.7 ± 3.5 yr; mean body mass index ± SD, 23.6 ± 2.4 kg/m2) participated in a sleep laboratory experiment of 13 nights [4 baseline nights (8 h/night), followed by 6 sleep restriction nights (6 h/night) and 3 recovery nights (10 h/night)]. Twenty-four-hour profiles of circulating IL-6 and cortisol, objective and subjective daytime sleepiness (Multiple Sleep Latency Test and Stanford Sleepiness Scale), and performance (Psychomotor Vigilance Task) were assessed on days 4 (baseline), 10 (after 1 wk of sleep restriction), and 13 (after 2 nights of recovery sleep). Serial 24-h IL-6 plasma levels increased significantly during sleep restriction and returned to baseline after recovery sleep. Serial 24-h cortisol levels during restriction did not change compared with baseline, but after recovery they were significantly lower. Subjective and objective sleepiness increased significantly after restriction and returned to baseline after recovery. In contrast, performance deteriorated significantly after restriction and did not improve after recovery. Extended recovery sleep over the weekend reverses the impact of one work week of mild sleep restriction on daytime sleepiness, fatigue, and IL-6 levels, reduces cortisol levels, but does not correct performance deficits. The long-term effects of a repeated sleep restriction/sleep recovery weekly cycle in humans remain unknown. PMID:23941878

  20. Data Compression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bookstein, Abraham; Storer, James A.

    1992-01-01

    Introduces this issue, which contains papers from the 1991 Data Compression Conference, and defines data compression. The two primary functions of data compression are described, i.e., storage and communications; types of data using compression technology are discussed; compression methods are explained; and current areas of research are…

  1. The Effects of the Compressed Workweek: A Review of the Evidence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawkins, Peter; Tulsi, Narmon

    1990-01-01

    A literature review showed substantial growth in the use of compressed work weeks. Employees benefited from increased leisure but suffered from increased fatigue and work disruption. Organizations might experience enhanced morale and less absenteeism as well as work coordination and communication problems. (SK)

  2. Collaborative work on evaluation of ovarian toxicity. 4) Two- or four-week repeated dose study of 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide in female rats.

    PubMed

    Ito, Atsushi; Mafune, Naomi; Kimura, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    To determine the optimal administration period for evaluation of ovarian toxicity of 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD), VCD was intraperitoneally administered to female Sprague-Dawley rats at 0 (Control), 5, 20 and 80 mg/kg once a day for 2 or 4 weeks (2- or 4-week study). To identify small follicles, serial sections of the ovaries were stained with routine hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry. In the 4-week study, decrease in small follicles was observed in the ovaries at 20 and 80 mg/kg. In the 2-week study, the same change was also observed at 80 mg/kg. Identification of small follicles using PCNA-stained slides was easier than that using HE-stained slides. In conclusion, histopathological findings in the ovaries are important for evaluation of female reproductive toxicity of VCD, and ovarian toxicity of VCD can be detected by administration for 2 weeks at an appropriate dose level. Furthermore, PCNA immunohistochemistry is effective for evaluation of small follicle destruction in chemical-induced ovarian toxicity. PMID:19265289

  3. Electrical stimulation for chronic non-specific low back pain in a working-age population: a 12-week double blinded randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-invasive electrotherapy is commonly used for treatment of chronic low back pain. Evidence for efficacy of most electrotherapy modalities is weak or lacking. This study aims to execute a high-quality, double-blinded randomized controlled clinical trial comparing 1) H-Wave® Device stimulation plus usual care with 2) transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) plus usual care, and 3) Sham electrotherapy plus usual care to determine comparative efficacy for treatment of chronic non-specific low back pain patients. Methods/Design Patients- Chronic non-specific low back pain patients between ages of 18–65 years, with pain of at least 3 months duration and minimal current 5/10 VAS pain. Patients will have no significant signs or symptoms of lumbosacral nerve impingement, malignancy, spinal stenosis, or mood disorders. Study design- Double blind RCT with 3 arms and 38 subjects per arm. Randomization by permuted blocks of random length, stratified by Workers Compensation claim (yes vs. no), and use of opioids. The null hypothesis of this study is that there are no statistically significant differences in functional improvement between treatment types during and at the end of a 12-week week treatment period. Data collection- Subjective data will be collected using Filemaker Pro™ database management collection tools. Objective data will be obtained through functional assessments. Data will be collected at enrollment and at 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks for each participant by a blinded assessor. Interventions- H-Wave® device stimulation (Intervention A) plus usual care, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) (Intervention B) plus usual care, and sham electrotherapy plus usual care (control). Each treatment arm will have identical numbers of visits (4) and researcher contact time (approximately 15 hours). Outcomes- Primary outcome measure: Oswestry Disability Index. Secondary measures include: Rowland Morris Instrument, VAS pain score, functional evaluation including strength when pushing and pulling, pain free range of motion in flexion and extension. Outcome measures assessed at baseline, 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Treatment failure will be defined if patient terminates assigned treatment arm for non-efficacy or undergoes invasive procedure or other excluded cointerventions. Data will be analyzed using intention-to-treat analysis and adjusted for covariates related to LBP (e.g. age) as needed. Discussion Study strengths include complex randomization, treatment group allocation concealment, double blinding, controlling for co-interventions, rigorous inclusion criteria, assessment of compliance, plans for limiting dropout, identical assessment methods and timing for each treatment arm, and planned intention-to-treat analyses. PMID:23537462

  4. Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Annette M.

    2003-01-01

    Draws upon Maria Montessori's writings to examine work as a universal human tendency throughout life. Discusses the work of adaptation of the infant, work of "psycho-muscular organism" for the preschooler, work of the imagination for the elementary child, community work of the adolescent, and work of the adult. Asserts that Montessorians' role is…

  5. Compressing Aviation Data in XML Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Hemil; Lau, Derek; Kulkarni, Deepak

    2003-01-01

    Design, operations and maintenance activities in aviation involve analysis of variety of aviation data. This data is typically in disparate formats making it difficult to use with different software packages. Use of a self-describing and extensible standard called XML provides a solution to this interoperability problem. XML provides a standardized language for describing the contents of an information stream, performing the same kind of definitional role for Web content as a database schema performs for relational databases. XML data can be easily customized for display using Extensible Style Sheets (XSL). While self-describing nature of XML makes it easy to reuse, it also increases the size of data significantly. Therefore, transfemng a dataset in XML form can decrease throughput and increase data transfer time significantly. It also increases storage requirements significantly. A natural solution to the problem is to compress the data using suitable algorithm and transfer it in the compressed form. We found that XML-specific compressors such as Xmill and XMLPPM generally outperform traditional compressors. However, optimal use of Xmill requires of discovery of optimal options to use while running Xmill. This, in turn, depends on the nature of data used. Manual disc0ver.y of optimal setting can require an engineer to experiment for weeks. We have devised an XML compression advisory tool that can analyze sample data files and recommend what compression tool would work the best for this data and what are the optimal settings to be used with a XML compression tool.

  6. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-07-07

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique are disclosed. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%. 21 figs.

  7. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.; Bradley, Jonathan N.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%.

  8. Part-Time Work and Other Flexible Options. ERIC Digest No. 192.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Bettina Lankard

    Options for flexible work schedules such as job sharing, compressed work weeks, reduced hours, work at home, and flextime have provided employees with the means to realize a better balance between work and family and engage simultaneously in more than one endeavor (for example, school and work or two careers). The same options can also lead to…

  9. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-03-10

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique is disclosed. The method applies to data compressed with lossy algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty in value by one unit. Indices which are adjacent in value are manipulated to encode auxiliary data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compressions known also as entropy coding, to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the compression entropy coding, known also as entropy coding is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage in the manner taught by the method. 11 figs.

  10. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.; Bradley, Jonathan N.

    1998-01-01

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique. The method applies to data compressed with lossy algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty in value by one unit. Indices which are adjacent in value are manipulated to encode auxiliary data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compressions known also as entropy coding, to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the compression entropy coding, known also as entropy coding is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage in the manner taught by the method.

  11. 29 CFR 794.142 - Special compensation when overtime in excess of 12 daily or 56 weekly hours is worked in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... schedule: Hours M T W T F S S Tot. Worked 14 9 10 15 12 8 0 68 Number of overtime hours in excess of 56 in..., however compensated (whether by a salary for a fixed or variable number of hours, by commissions,...

  12. 29 CFR 794.141 - Workweeks when hours worked do not exceed 12 in any day or 56 in the week; compensation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... minimum wage.” (H. Rept. No. 1366, pp. 12-13, 43, and S. Rept. No. 1487, p. 32, 89th Cong., second sess... less than one and one-half times the minimum wage rate applicable to him under section 6”, as provided... first 40 hours of work must be paid for at a rate not less than the minimum hourly wage rate...

  13. 29 CFR 794.141 - Workweeks when hours worked do not exceed 12 in any day or 56 in the week; compensation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... minimum wage.” (H. Rept. No. 1366, pp. 12-13, 43, and S. Rept. No. 1487, p. 32, 89th Cong., second sess... less than one and one-half times the minimum wage rate applicable to him under section 6”, as provided... first 40 hours of work must be paid for at a rate not less than the minimum hourly wage rate...

  14. 29 CFR 794.141 - Workweeks when hours worked do not exceed 12 in any day or 56 in the week; compensation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... minimum wage.” (H. Rept. No. 1366, pp. 12-13, 43, and S. Rept. No. 1487, p. 32, 89th Cong., second sess... less than one and one-half times the minimum wage rate applicable to him under section 6”, as provided... first 40 hours of work must be paid for at a rate not less than the minimum hourly wage rate...

  15. 29 CFR 794.141 - Workweeks when hours worked do not exceed 12 in any day or 56 in the week; compensation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... minimum wage.” (H. Rept. No. 1366, pp. 12-13, 43, and S. Rept. No. 1487, p. 32, 89th Cong., second sess... less than one and one-half times the minimum wage rate applicable to him under section 6”, as provided... first 40 hours of work must be paid for at a rate not less than the minimum hourly wage rate...

  16. 29 CFR 794.141 - Workweeks when hours worked do not exceed 12 in any day or 56 in the week; compensation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... minimum wage.” (H. Rept. No. 1366, pp. 12-13, 43, and S. Rept. No. 1487, p. 32, 89th Cong., second sess... less than one and one-half times the minimum wage rate applicable to him under section 6”, as provided... first 40 hours of work must be paid for at a rate not less than the minimum hourly wage rate...

  17. Modeling Compressed Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Israel, Daniel M.

    2012-07-13

    From ICE to ICF, the effect of mean compression or expansion is important for predicting the state of the turbulence. When developing combustion models, we would like to know the mix state of the reacting species. This involves density and concentration fluctuations. To date, research has focused on the effect of compression on the turbulent kinetic energy. The current work provides constraints to help development and calibration for models of species mixing effects in compressed turbulence. The Cambon, et al., re-scaling has been extended to buoyancy driven turbulence, including the fluctuating density, concentration, and temperature equations. The new scalings give us helpful constraints for developing and validating RANS turbulence models.

  18. Compressive Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Se Hoon

    Compressive holography estimates images from incomplete data by using sparsity priors. Compressive holography combines digital holography and compressive sensing. Digital holography consists of computational image estimation from data captured by an electronic focal plane array. Compressive sensing enables accurate data reconstruction by prior knowledge on desired signal. Computational and optical co-design optimally supports compressive holography in the joint computational and optical domain. This dissertation explores two examples of compressive holography: estimation of 3D tomographic images from 2D data and estimation of images from under sampled apertures. Compressive holography achieves single shot holographic tomography using decompressive inference. In general, 3D image reconstruction suffers from underdetermined measurements with a 2D detector. Specifically, single shot holographic tomography shows the uniqueness problem in the axial direction because the inversion is ill-posed. Compressive sensing alleviates the ill-posed problem by enforcing some sparsity constraints. Holographic tomography is applied for video-rate microscopic imaging and diffuse object imaging. In diffuse object imaging, sparsity priors are not valid in coherent image basis due to speckle. So incoherent image estimation is designed to hold the sparsity in incoherent image basis by support of multiple speckle realizations. High pixel count holography achieves high resolution and wide field-of-view imaging. Coherent aperture synthesis can be one method to increase the aperture size of a detector. Scanning-based synthetic aperture confronts a multivariable global optimization problem due to time-space measurement errors. A hierarchical estimation strategy divides the global problem into multiple local problems with support of computational and optical co-design. Compressive sparse aperture holography can be another method. Compressive sparse sampling collects most of significant field information with a small fill factor because object scattered fields are locally redundant. Incoherent image estimation is adopted for the expanded modulation transfer function and compressive reconstruction.

  19. Space-time compressive imaging.

    PubMed

    Treeaporn, Vicha; Ashok, Amit; Neifeld, Mark A

    2012-02-01

    Compressive imaging systems typically exploit the spatial correlation of the scene to facilitate a lower dimensional measurement relative to a conventional imaging system. In natural time-varying scenes there is a high degree of temporal correlation that may also be exploited to further reduce the number of measurements. In this work we analyze space-time compressive imaging using Karhunen-Loève (KL) projections for the read-noise-limited measurement case. Based on a comprehensive simulation study, we show that a KL-based space-time compressive imager offers higher compression relative to space-only compressive imaging. For a relative noise strength of 10% and reconstruction error of 10%, we find that space-time compressive imaging with 8×8×16 spatiotemporal blocks yields about 292× compression compared to a conventional imager, while space-only compressive imaging provides only 32× compression. Additionally, under high read-noise conditions, a space-time compressive imaging system yields lower reconstruction error than a conventional imaging system due to the multiplexing advantage. We also discuss three electro-optic space-time compressive imaging architecture classes, including charge-domain processing by a smart focal plane array (FPA). Space-time compressive imaging using a smart FPA provides an alternative method to capture the nonredundant portions of time-varying scenes. PMID:22307131

  20. Multichannel Compression

    PubMed Central

    Bor, Stephanie; Souza, Pamela; Wright, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To clarify if large numbers of wide dynamic range compression channels provide advantages for vowel identification and to measure its acoustic effects. Methods Eight vowels produced by 12 talkers in the /hVd/ context were compressed using 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 channels. Formant contrast indices (mean formant peak minus mean formant trough; maximum formant peak minus minimum formant trough) were developed to quantify spectral changes. Twenty listeners with mild to moderately severe sensorineural hearing loss identified the compressed vowels in an 8-alternative forced-choice procedure. Results Formant contrast measures revealed significant spectral flattening for 6 of the 8 vowels as channel number increased. A significant decrease in vowel identification performance was also observed as spectral contrast decreased. Conclusions Increasing the number of wide dynamic range compression channels may not be beneficial for all speech signals, and individual vowel identification performance can vary greatly for listeners with similar hearing loss. PMID:18664702

  1. Video Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Optivision developed two PC-compatible boards and associated software under a Goddard Space Flight Center Small Business Innovation Research grant for NASA applications in areas such as telerobotics, telesciences and spaceborne experimentation. From this technology, the company used its own funds to develop commercial products, the OPTIVideo MPEG Encoder and Decoder, which are used for realtime video compression and decompression. They are used in commercial applications including interactive video databases and video transmission. The encoder converts video source material to a compressed digital form that can be stored or transmitted, and the decoder decompresses bit streams to provide high quality playback.

  2. Transient response of compressed electrorheological fluid.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu; Zhang, Minliang; Meng, Yonggang; Wen, Shizhu

    2005-10-01

    Transient behaviors of a compressed electrorheological (ER) fluid based on zeolite and silicone oil have been experimentally investigated. The ER fluid is purely compressed between two parallel plates. Compressive speed and voltage amplitude effects on the transient process and randomly applied on/off voltages have been studied. Through normalizing compressive stress of the ER fluid, the characteristic compressive strain and the response time constant corresponding to the rise of compressive stress have been fitted with exponential equations. Results show that the rising time of the transient compressive stress is greatly affected by the compressive speed and the compressive strain position applying voltages, while the amplitude of the applied voltage has little effect on the rising time. The obtained transient compressive strain for the compressive stress to rise to its stable value is much smaller than that working in the transient process of ER fluids under shearing. The decay time and decay strain of compressive stress are much less than for stress rising. The half decay compressive strain is as small as 0.0003 in the experiment. Results show that the response time of compressed ER fluids is quick enough for the usual working conditions of squeezing ER dampers. PMID:15935367

  3. Compressed Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Erlich, Yaniv; Gordon, Assaf; Brand, Michael; Hannon, Gregory J.; Mitra, Partha P.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past three decades we have steadily increased our knowledge on the genetic basis of many severe disorders. Nevertheless, there are still great challenges in applying this knowledge routinely in the clinic, mainly due to the relatively tedious and expensive process of genotyping. Since the genetic variations that underlie the disorders are relatively rare in the population, they can be thought of as a sparse signal. Using methods and ideas from compressed sensing and group testing, we have developed a cost-effective genotyping protocol to detect carriers for severe genetic disorders. In particular, we have adapted our scheme to a recently developed class of high throughput DNA sequencing technologies. The mathematical framework presented here has some important distinctions from the ’traditional’ compressed sensing and group testing frameworks in order to address biological and technical constraints of our setting. PMID:21451737

  4. Astronomical Data Compression: Algorithms and Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, R.; Pence, W.; White, R.; Gaudet, S.

    2010-12-01

    Digital data is the lifeblood of astronomy. Data compression deals with its efficient representation and transport. As focal planes become more crowded and observing cadences more rapid, ever increasing pressure will be applied to realize near-optimum performance. A typical observational workflow comprises many network links and storage nodes, multiplying the advantage of compression dramatically. Recent work on astronomical data compression has focused on the FITS tile compression convention (http://heasarc.gsfcnasa.gov/fitsio/fpack). This birds-of-a-feather session began a broader discussion of compression-aware astronomical data handling architectures, including compression techniques and algorithms appropriate to binary and ASCII catalogs as well as to imaging data.

  5. Astronomical context coder for image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pata, Petr; Schindler, Jaromir

    2015-10-01

    Recent lossless still image compression formats are powerful tools for compression of all kind of common images (pictures, text, schemes, etc.). Generally, the performance of a compression algorithm depends on its ability to anticipate the image function of the processed image. In other words, a compression algorithm to be successful, it has to take perfectly the advantage of coded image properties. Astronomical data form a special class of images and they have, among general image properties, also some specific characteristics which are unique. If a new coder is able to correctly use the knowledge of these special properties it should lead to its superior performance on this specific class of images at least in terms of the compression ratio. In this work, the novel lossless astronomical image data compression method will be presented. The achievable compression ratio of this new coder will be compared to theoretical lossless compression limit and also to the recent compression standards of the astronomy and general multimedia.

  6. Kindergarten Weekly Homework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newark Unified School Dist., CA.

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: The kindergarten staff at H. A. Snow School has devised a series of homework idea sheets, to accompany the readiness program that is taught weekly in the kindergarten classrooms. Beginning in early October, we introduce an alphabet letter each Monday. During the week, all subject areas are focused…

  7. Compressed convolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsner, Franz; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the concept of compressed convolution, a technique to convolve a given data set with a large number of non-orthogonal kernels. In typical applications our technique drastically reduces the effective number of computations. The new method is applicable to convolutions with symmetric and asymmetric kernels and can be easily controlled for an optimal trade-off between speed and accuracy. It is based on linear compression of the collection of kernels into a small number of coefficients in an optimal eigenbasis. The final result can then be decompressed in constant time for each desired convolved output. The method is fully general and suitable for a wide variety of problems. We give explicit examples in the context of simulation challenges for upcoming multi-kilo-detector cosmic microwave background (CMB) missions. For a CMB experiment with detectors with similar beam properties, we demonstrate that the algorithm can decrease the costs of beam convolution by two to three orders of magnitude with negligible loss of accuracy. Likewise, it has the potential to allow the reduction of disk space required to store signal simulations by a similar amount. Applications in other areas of astrophysics and beyond are optimal searches for a large number of templates in noisy data, e.g. from a parametrized family of gravitational wave templates; or calculating convolutions with highly overcomplete wavelet dictionaries, e.g. in methods designed to uncover sparse signal representations.

  8. MotorWeek

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, PBS's MotorWeek, television's original automotive magazine, visited Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center "to learn what it really takes to make clean power sources a viable reality."

  9. MotorWeek

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-04-19

    In 2008, PBS's MotorWeek, television's original automotive magazine, visited Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center "to learn what it really takes to make clean power sources a viable reality."

  10. Changing Hours of Work: A Review and Analysis of the Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glueck, William F.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the positive and negative effects of compressed work weeks and flextime on employee performance, satisfaction, absenteeism and tardiness, and turnover, as well as their effect on the quality of work done and the frequency of accidents. (IRT)

  11. Measurement and control for mechanical compressive stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qing; Ye, Guang; Pan, Lan; Wu, Xiushan

    2001-12-01

    At present, the indirect method is applied to measuring and controlling mechanical compressive stress, which is the measurement and control of rotating torque of screw with torque transducer during screw revolving. Because the friction coefficient between every screw-cap and washer, of screw-thread is different, the compressive stress of every screw may is different when the machinery is equipped. Therefore, the accurate measurement and control of mechanical compressive stress is realized by the direct measurement of mechanical compressive stress. The author introduces the research of contrast between compressive stress and rotating torque in the paper. The structure and work principle of a special washer type transducer is discussed emphatically. The special instrument cooperates with the washer type transducer for measuring and controlling mechanical compressive stress. The control tactics based on the rate of compressive stress is put to realize accurate control of mechanical compressive stress.

  12. Compressive sensing exploiting wavelet-domain dependencies for ECG compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polania, Luisa F.; Carrillo, Rafael E.; Blanco-Velasco, Manuel; Barner, Kenneth E.

    2012-06-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) is an emerging signal processing paradigm that enables sub-Nyquist sampling of sparse signals. Extensive previous work has exploited the sparse representation of ECG signals in compression applications. In this paper, we propose the use of wavelet domain dependencies to further reduce the number of samples in compressive sensing-based ECG compression while decreasing the computational complexity. R wave events manifest themselves as chains of large coefficients propagating across scales to form a connected subtree of the wavelet coefficient tree. We show that the incorporation of this connectedness as additional prior information into a modified version of the CoSaMP algorithm can significantly reduce the required number of samples to achieve good quality in the reconstruction. This approach also allows more control over the ECG signal reconstruction, in particular, the QRS complex, which is typically distorted when prior information is not included in the recovery. The compression algorithm was tested upon records selected from the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm leads to high compression ratios associated with low distortion levels relative to state-of-the-art compression algorithms.

  13. 76 FR 28623 - Small Business Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ... United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-12307 Filed... Documents#0;#0; #0; #0;Title 3-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 8673 of May 12, 2011 Small Business Week... to work hard enough, you can succeed in our country. This week, we honor and celebrate...

  14. 30 CFR 75.364 - Weekly examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Weekly examination. 75.364 Section 75.364... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation 75.364 Weekly examination. (a) Worked-out... bleeder system. (b) Hazardous conditions. At least every 7 days, an examination for hazardous...

  15. COMPRESSION WAVES AND PHASE PLOTS: SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Orlikowski, D; Minich, R

    2011-08-01

    Compression wave analysis started nearly 50 years ago with Fowles. Coperthwaite and Williams gave a method that helps identify simple and steady waves. We have been developing a method that gives describes the non-isentropic character of compression waves, in general. One result of that work is a simple analysis tool. Our method helps clearly identify when a compression wave is a simple wave, a steady wave (shock), and when the compression wave is in transition. This affects the analysis of compression wave experiments and the resulting extraction of the high-pressure equation of state.

  16. Psychophysical rating of image compression techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Charles S.; Hitchner, Lewis E.; Watson, Andrew B.

    1989-01-01

    Image compression schemes abound with little work which compares their bit-rate performance based on subjective fidelity measures. Statistical measures of image fidelity, such as squared error measures, do not necessarily correspond to subjective measures of image fidelity. Most previous comparisons of compression techniques have been based on these statistical measures. A psychophysical method has been used to estimate, for a number of compression techniques, a threshold bit-rate yielding a criterion level of performance in discriminating original and compressed images. The compression techniques studied include block truncation, Laplacian pyramid, block discrete cosine transform, with and without a human visual system scaling, and cortex transform coders.

  17. Scalable ECG Compression for Long-Term Home Health Care.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Simske, Steven; Blakley, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Most current Holter devices monitor the ECG for 24 to 72 hours. However, for the accurate diagnosis of many cardiac diseases, especially for the wide variety of asymptomatic cases, continuous ECG monitoring for weeks or even months may be required. In this paper, we focus on the issue of ECG compression during long-term monitoring of the patient. The patient may be at home, at work, or even on a trip. A scalable compression scheme is proposed which ensures optimal signal quality given the limited physical storage on the wearable device. When necessary, the signal quality is progressively and gently degraded in order to adapt to environmental and the patient's conditions. Details of the proposed scheme are described and sample results are presented. PMID:17282196

  18. Compression of echocardiographic scan line data using wavelet packet transform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hang, X.; Greenberg, N. L.; Qin, J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    An efficient compression strategy is indispensable for digital echocardiography. Previous work has suggested improved results utilizing wavelet transforms in the compression of 2D echocardiographic images. Set partitioning in hierarchical trees (SPIHT) was modified to compress echocardiographic scanline data based on the wavelet packet transform. A compression ratio of at least 94:1 resulted in preserved image quality.

  19. Swahili 12 Weeks Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This 12-weeks course in basic Swahili comprises 55 lesson units in five volumes. The general course format consists of (1) perception drills for comprehension, oral production, and association using "situational picture" illustrations; (2) dialogs in English and Swahili, with cartoon guides; (3) sequenced pattern and recombination drills, and (4)…

  20. Phun Week: Understanding Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Limson, Mel; Matyas, Marsha Lakes

    2009-01-01

    Topics such as sports, exercise, health, and nutrition can make the science of physiology relevant and engaging for students. In addition, many lessons on these topics, such as those on the cardiovascular, respiratory, and digestive systems, align with national and state life science education standards. Physiology Understanding Week (PhUn…

  1. A Week of Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colasacco, Jenne

    2011-01-01

    Even the most effective teachers have room to grow, but it's not always easy for principals to give adequate guidance through short observations. High school principal Jenne Colasacco decided to bring more depth to her observations by observing each of her teachers during one class for an entire week. The new observation structure, which included…

  2. Groundmother Earth Week Outreach

    Louis Leader Charge demonstrated hydrologic data collection equipment for middle school and high school students at the St. Francis Indian School in St. Francis, SD, on the Rosebud Indian Reservation on April 20, 2015 for UNCI MAKA (Grandmother Earth) week. Louis also provided an overview of USGS ac...

  3. A Week for Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comstock, Diane

    2008-01-01

    Space Week focuses on concepts that enable students to make concrete observations in the early grades (K-2) and move to concepts that help students develop their internet research and writing skills in middle and upper grades (Grades 3-5), and culminates with the development of science investigation design skills (Grade 6). To help launch your…

  4. Phun Week: Understanding Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Limson, Mel; Matyas, Marsha Lakes

    2009-01-01

    Topics such as sports, exercise, health, and nutrition can make the science of physiology relevant and engaging for students. In addition, many lessons on these topics, such as those on the cardiovascular, respiratory, and digestive systems, align with national and state life science education standards. Physiology Understanding Week (PhUn

  5. FRESCO: Referential compression of highly similar sequences.

    PubMed

    Wandelt, Sebastian; Leser, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    In many applications, sets of similar texts or sequences are of high importance. Prominent examples are revision histories of documents or genomic sequences. Modern high-throughput sequencing technologies are able to generate DNA sequences at an ever-increasing rate. In parallel to the decreasing experimental time and cost necessary to produce DNA sequences, computational requirements for analysis and storage of the sequences are steeply increasing. Compression is a key technology to deal with this challenge. Recently, referential compression schemes, storing only the differences between a to-be-compressed input and a known reference sequence, gained a lot of interest in this field. In this paper, we propose a general open-source framework to compress large amounts of biological sequence data called Framework for REferential Sequence COmpression (FRESCO). Our basic compression algorithm is shown to be one to two orders of magnitudes faster than comparable related work, while achieving similar compression ratios. We also propose several techniques to further increase compression ratios, while still retaining the advantage in speed: 1) selecting a good reference sequence; and 2) rewriting a reference sequence to allow for better compression. In addition,we propose a new way of further boosting the compression ratios by applying referential compression to already referentially compressed files (second-order compression). This technique allows for compression ratios way beyond state of the art, for instance,4,000:1 and higher for human genomes. We evaluate our algorithms on a large data set from three different species (more than 1,000 genomes, more than 3 TB) and on a collection of versions of Wikipedia pages. Our results show that real-time compression of highly similar sequences at high compression ratios is possible on modern hardware. PMID:24524158

  6. Efficient Lossy Compression for Compressive Sensing Acquisition of Images in Compressive Sensing Imaging Systems

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangwei; Lan, Xuguang; Yang, Meng; Xue, Jianru; Zheng, Nanning

    2014-01-01

    Compressive Sensing Imaging (CSI) is a new framework for image acquisition, which enables the simultaneous acquisition and compression of a scene. Since the characteristics of Compressive Sensing (CS) acquisition are very different from traditional image acquisition, the general image compression solution may not work well. In this paper, we propose an efficient lossy compression solution for CS acquisition of images by considering the distinctive features of the CSI. First, we design an adaptive compressive sensing acquisition method for images according to the sampling rate, which could achieve better CS reconstruction quality for the acquired image. Second, we develop a universal quantization for the obtained CS measurements from CS acquisition without knowing any a priori information about the captured image. Finally, we apply these two methods in the CSI system for efficient lossy compression of CS acquisition. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed solution improves the rate-distortion performance by 0.4∼2 dB comparing with current state-of-the-art, while maintaining a low computational complexity. PMID:25490597

  7. Compressing DNA sequence databases with coil

    PubMed Central

    White, W Timothy J; Hendy, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Background Publicly available DNA sequence databases such as GenBank are large, and are growing at an exponential rate. The sheer volume of data being dealt with presents serious storage and data communications problems. Currently, sequence data is usually kept in large "flat files," which are then compressed using standard Lempel-Ziv (gzip) compression – an approach which rarely achieves good compression ratios. While much research has been done on compressing individual DNA sequences, surprisingly little has focused on the compression of entire databases of such sequences. In this study we introduce the sequence database compression software coil. Results We have designed and implemented a portable software package, coil, for compressing and decompressing DNA sequence databases based on the idea of edit-tree coding. coil is geared towards achieving high compression ratios at the expense of execution time and memory usage during compression – the compression time represents a "one-off investment" whose cost is quickly amortised if the resulting compressed file is transmitted many times. Decompression requires little memory and is extremely fast. We demonstrate a 5% improvement in compression ratio over state-of-the-art general-purpose compression tools for a large GenBank database file containing Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) data. Finally, coil can efficiently encode incremental additions to a sequence database. Conclusion coil presents a compelling alternative to conventional compression of flat files for the storage and distribution of DNA sequence databases having a narrow distribution of sequence lengths, such as EST data. Increasing compression levels for databases having a wide distribution of sequence lengths is a direction for future work. PMID:18489794

  8. Turbulence in Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lecture notes for the AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel (FDP) Special Course on 'Turbulence in Compressible Flows' have been assembled in this report. The following topics were covered: Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers, Compressible Turbulent Free Shear Layers, Turbulent Combustion, DNS/LES and RANS Simulations of Compressible Turbulent Flows, and Case Studies of Applications of Turbulence Models in Aerospace.

  9. Extended testing of compression distillation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bambenek, R. A.; Nuccio, P. P.

    1972-01-01

    During the past eight years, the NASA Manned Spacecraft Center has supported the development of an integrated water and waste management system which includes the compression distillation process for recovering useable water from urine, urinal flush water, humidity condensate, commode flush water, and concentrated wash water. This paper describes the design of the compression distillation unit, developed for this system, and the testing performed to demonstrate its reliability and performance. In addition, this paper summarizes the work performed on pretreatment and post-treatment processes, to assure the recovery of sterile potable water from urine and treated urinal flush water.

  10. Data compression using Chebyshev transform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Andrew F. (Inventor); Hawkins, III, S. Edward (Inventor); Nguyen, Lillian (Inventor); Monaco, Christopher A. (Inventor); Seagrave, Gordon G. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention is a method, system, and computer program product for implementation of a capable, general purpose compression algorithm that can be engaged on the fly. This invention has particular practical application with time-series data, and more particularly, time-series data obtained form a spacecraft, or similar situations where cost, size and/or power limitations are prevalent, although it is not limited to such applications. It is also particularly applicable to the compression of serial data streams and works in one, two, or three dimensions. The original input data is approximated by Chebyshev polynomials, achieving very high compression ratios on serial data streams with minimal loss of scientific information.

  11. Microbunching and RF Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-05-23

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  12. Compressed gas manifold

    DOEpatents

    Hildebrand, Richard J.; Wozniak, John J.

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas storage cell interconnecting manifold including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and a port for connecting the compressed gas storage cells to a motor vehicle power source and to a refueling adapter. The manifold is mechanically and pneumatically connected to a compressed gas storage cell by a bolt including a gas passage therein.

  13. Elective Delivery Before 39 Weeks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Delivery, and Postpartum Care Elective Delivery Before 39 Weeks • What is a “medically indicated” delivery? • What is ... the baby grow and develop during the last weeks of pregnancy? • What are the risks for babies ...

  14. Compressible turbulent mixing: Effects of compressibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Qionglin

    2016-04-01

    We studied by numerical simulations the effects of compressibility on passive scalar transport in stationary compressible turbulence. The turbulent Mach number varied from zero to unity. The difference in driven forcing was the magnitude ratio of compressive to solenoidal modes. In the inertial range, the scalar spectrum followed the k-5 /3 scaling and suffered negligible influence from the compressibility. The growth of the Mach number showed (1) a first reduction and second enhancement in the transfer of scalar flux; (2) an increase in the skewness and flatness of the scalar derivative and a decrease in the mixed skewness and flatness of the velocity-scalar derivatives; (3) a first stronger and second weaker intermittency of scalar relative to that of velocity; and (4) an increase in the intermittency parameter which measures the intermittency of scalar in the dissipative range. Furthermore, the growth of the compressive mode of forcing indicated (1) a decrease in the intermittency parameter and (2) less efficiency in enhancing scalar mixing. The visualization of scalar dissipation showed that, in the solenoidal-forced flow, the field was filled with the small-scale, highly convoluted structures, while in the compressive-forced flow, the field was exhibited as the regions dominated by the large-scale motions of rarefaction and compression.

  15. Compressively sensed complex networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Ray, Jaideep; Pinar, Ali

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this project is to develop low dimension parametric (deterministic) models of complex networks, to use compressive sensing (CS) and multiscale analysis to do so and to exploit the structure of complex networks (some are self-similar under coarsening). CS provides a new way of sampling and reconstructing networks. The approach is based on multiresolution decomposition of the adjacency matrix and its efficient sampling. It requires preprocessing of the adjacency matrix to make it 'blocky' which is the biggest (combinatorial) algorithm challenge. Current CS reconstruction algorithm makes no use of the structure of a graph, its very general (and so not very efficient/customized). Other model-based CS techniques exist, but not yet adapted to networks. Obvious starting point for future work is to increase the efficiency of reconstruction.

  16. Compressed hyperspectral sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsagkatakis, Grigorios; Tsakalides, Panagiotis

    2015-03-01

    Acquisition of high dimensional Hyperspectral Imaging (HSI) data using limited dimensionality imaging sensors has led to restricted capabilities designs that hinder the proliferation of HSI. To overcome this limitation, novel HSI architectures strive to minimize the strict requirements of HSI by introducing computation into the acquisition process. A framework that allows the integration of acquisition with computation is the recently proposed framework of Compressed Sensing (CS). In this work, we propose a novel HSI architecture that exploits the sampling and recovery capabilities of CS to achieve a dramatic reduction in HSI acquisition requirements. In the proposed architecture, signals from multiple spectral bands are multiplexed before getting recorded by the imaging sensor. Reconstruction of the full hyperspectral cube is achieved by exploiting a dictionary of elementary spectral profiles in a unified minimization framework. Simulation results suggest that high quality recovery is possible from a single or a small number of multiplexed frames.

  17. An overview of semantic compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalz, Mark S.

    2010-08-01

    We live in such perceptually rich natural and manmade environments that detection and recognition of objects is mediated cerebrally by attentional filtering, in order to separate objects of interest from background clutter. In computer models of the human visual system, attentional filtering is often restricted to early processing, where areas of interest (AOIs) are delineated around anomalies of interest, then the pixels within each AOI's subtense are isolated for later processing. In contrast, the human visual system concurrently detects many targets at multiple levels (e.g., retinal center-surround filters, ganglion layer feature detectors, post-retinal spatial filtering, and cortical detection / filtering of features and objects, to name but a few processes). Intracranial attentional filtering appears to play multiple roles, including clutter filtration at all levels of processing - thus, we process individual retinal cell responses, early filtering response, and so forth, on up to the filtering of objects at high levels of semantic complexity. Computationally, image compression techniques have progressed from emphasizing pixels, to considering regions of pixels as foci of computational interest. In more recent research, object-based compression has been investigated with varying rate-distortion performance and computational efficiency. Codecs have been developed for a wide variety of applications, although the majority of compression and decompression transforms continue to concentrate on region- and pixel-based processing, in part because of computational convenience. It is interesting to note that a growing body of research has emphasized the detection and representation of small features in relationship to their surrounding environment, which has occasionally been called semantic compression. In this paper, we overview different types of semantic compression approaches, with particular interest in high-level compression algorithms. Various algorithms and approaches are considered, ranging from low-level semantic compression for text and database compaction, to high-level semantic analysis of images or video in which objects of interest have been detected, segmented, and represented compactly to facilitate indexing. In particular, we overview previous work in semantic pattern recognition, and how this has been applied to object-based compression. Discussion centers on lossless versus lossy transformations, quality of service in lossy compression, and computational efficiency.

  18. Prelude to compressed baryonic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczek, Frank

    Why study compressed baryonic matter, or more generally strongly interacting matter at high densities and temperatures? Most obviously, because it's an important piece of Nature. The whole universe, in the early moments of the big bang, was filled with the stuff. Today, highly compressed baryonic matter occurs in neutron stars and during crucial moments in the development of supernovae. Also, working to understand compressed baryonic matter gives us new perspectives on ordinary baryonic matter, i.e. the matter in atomic nuclei. But perhaps the best answer is a variation on the one George Mallory gave, when asked why he sought to scale Mount Everest: Because, as a prominent feature in the landscape of physics, it's there. Compressed baryonic matter is a material we can produce in novel, challenging experiments that probe new extremes of temperature and density. On the theoretical side, it is a mathematically well-defined domain with a wealth of novel, challenging problems, as well as wide-ranging connections. Its challenges have already inspired a lot of very clever work, and revealed some wonderful surprises, as documented in this volume.

  19. Compression for leg wounds.

    PubMed

    Partsch, H; Mortimer, P

    2015-08-01

    The main points in this scholarly review on the use of compression therapy in leg ulcers are the different modes of action of this treatment and the tools that are available including their practical applicability and use for self management. Due to its effect of counteracting gravity, compression is also suggested for ulcers with aetiologies that are not usually thought to require compression. The clinical evidence reported in ulcer-healing studies are discussed and some considerations are made relating to the cost-effectiveness of this management. In general, the failures of compression therapy are not caused by poor compression material but due to poor knowledge and application techniques of the care providers. Future studies comparing different compression devices should also report details concerning the compression material used and the pressure exerted. PMID:26094638

  20. Compressive imaging sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitsianis, N. P.; Brady, D. J.; Portnoy, A.; Sun, X.; Suleski, T.; Fiddy, M. A.; Feldman, M. R.; TeKolste, R. D.

    2006-05-01

    This paper describes a compressive sensing strategy developed under the Compressive Optical MONTAGE Photography Initiative. Multiplex and multi-channel measurements are generally necessary for compressive sensing. In a compressive imaging system described here, static focal plane coding is used with multiple image apertures for non-degenerate multiplexing and multiple channel sampling. According to classical analysis, one might expect the number of pixels in a reconstructed image to equal the total number of pixels across the sampling channels, but we demonstrate that the system can achieve up to 50% compression with conventional benchmarking images. In general, the compression rate depends on the compression potential of an image with respect to the coding and decoding schemes employed in the system.

  1. The New CCSDS Image Compression Recommendation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Pen-Shu; Armbruster, Philippe; Kiely, Aaron B.; Masschelein, Bart; Moury, Gilles; Schafer, Christoph

    2004-01-01

    The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) data compression working group has recently adopted a recommendation for image data compression, with a final release expected in 2005. The algorithm adopted in the recommendation consists a two dimensional discrete wavelet transform of the image, followed by progressive bit-plane coding of the transformed data. The algorithm can provide both lossless and lossy compression, and allows a user to directly control the compressed data volume or the fidelity with which the wavelet-transformed data can be reconstructed. The algorithm is suitable for both frame-based image data and scan-based sensor data, and has applications for near-earth and deep-space missions. The standard will be accompanied by free software sources on a future web site. An ASIC implementation of the compressor is currently under development. This paper describes the compression algorithm along with the requirements that drove the selection of the algorithm.

  2. Solar Week: Learning from Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, D.; Hauck, K.

    2003-12-01

    Solar Week is a week-long set of games and activities allowing students to interact directly with solar science and solar scientists. Solar Week was developed as a spin-off of the highly successful Yohkoh Public Outreach Project (YPOP). While YPOP provided access to solar images, movies and activities, the main goal of Solar Week was to enhance the participation of women, who are under-represented in the physical sciences. Solar Week achieves this by providing young women, primarily in grades 6-8, with access to role models in the sciences. The scientists participating in Solar Week are women from a variety of backgrounds and with a variety of scientific expertise. In this paper, our aim is to provide some insight into developing activity-based space science for the web and to discuss the lessons-learned from tailoring to a specific group of participants.

  3. Adaptive compressive sensing camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Charles; Hsu, Ming K.; Cha, Jae; Iwamura, Tomo; Landa, Joseph; Nguyen, Charles; Szu, Harold

    2013-05-01

    We have embedded Adaptive Compressive Sensing (ACS) algorithm on Charge-Coupled-Device (CCD) camera based on the simplest concept that each pixel is a charge bucket, and the charges comes from Einstein photoelectric conversion effect. Applying the manufactory design principle, we only allow altering each working component at a minimum one step. We then simulated what would be such a camera can do for real world persistent surveillance taking into account of diurnal, all weather, and seasonal variations. The data storage has saved immensely, and the order of magnitude of saving is inversely proportional to target angular speed. We did design two new components of CCD camera. Due to the matured CMOS (Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) technology, the on-chip Sample and Hold (SAH) circuitry can be designed for a dual Photon Detector (PD) analog circuitry for changedetection that predicts skipping or going forward at a sufficient sampling frame rate. For an admitted frame, there is a purely random sparse matrix [Φ] which is implemented at each bucket pixel level the charge transport bias voltage toward its neighborhood buckets or not, and if not, it goes to the ground drainage. Since the snapshot image is not a video, we could not apply the usual MPEG video compression and Hoffman entropy codec as well as powerful WaveNet Wrapper on sensor level. We shall compare (i) Pre-Processing FFT and a threshold of significant Fourier mode components and inverse FFT to check PSNR; (ii) Post-Processing image recovery will be selectively done by CDT&D adaptive version of linear programming at L1 minimization and L2 similarity. For (ii) we need to determine in new frames selection by SAH circuitry (i) the degree of information (d.o.i) K(t) dictates the purely random linear sparse combination of measurement data a la [Φ]M,N M(t) = K(t) Log N(t).

  4. Compressive optical imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuehao

    Compared to the classic Nyquist sampling theorem, Compressed Sensing or Compressive Sampling (CS) was proposed as a more efficient alternative for sampling sparse signals. In this dissertation, we discuss the implementation of the CS theory in building a variety of optical imaging systems. CS-based Imaging Systems (CSISs) exploit the sparsity of optical images in their transformed domains by imposing incoherent CS measurement patterns on them. The amplitudes and locations of sparse frequency components of optical images in their transformed domains can be reconstructed from the CS measurement results by solving an l1-regularized minimization problem. In this work, we review the theoretical background of the CS theory and present two hardware implementation schemes for CSISs, including a single pixel detector based scheme and an array detector based scheme. The first implementation scheme is suitable for acquiring Two-Dimensional (2D) spatial information of the imaging scene. We demonstrate the feasibility of this implementation scheme by developing a single pixel camera, a multispectral imaging system, and an optical sectioning microscope for fluorescence microscopy. The array detector based scheme is suitable for hyperspectral imaging applications, wherein both the spatial and spectral information of the imaging scene are of interest. We demonstrate the feasibility of this scheme by developing a Digital Micromirror Device-based Snapshot Spectral Imaging (DMD-SSI) system, which implements CS measurement processes on the Three-Dimensional (3D) spatial/spectral information of the imaging scene. Tens of spectral images can be reconstructed from the DMD-SSI system simultaneously without any mechanical or temporal scanning processes.

  5. Comparison of Artificial Compressibility Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Housman, Jeffrey; Kwak, Dochan

    2003-01-01

    Various artificial compressibility methods for calculating three-dimensional, steady and unsteady, laminar and turbulent, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are compared in this work. Each method is described in detail along with appropriate physical and numerical boundary conditions. Analysis of well-posedness and numerical solutions to test problems for each method are provided. A comparison based on convergence behavior, accuracy, stability and robustness is used to establish the relative positive and negative characteristics of each method.

  6. Hyperspectral imaging using compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez I., Gabriel Eduardo; Manian, Vidya B.

    2012-06-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) has attracted a lot of attention in recent years as a promising signal processing technique that exploits a signal's sparsity to reduce its size. It allows for simple compression that does not require a lot of additional computational power, and would allow physical implementation at the sensor using spatial light multiplexers using Texas Instruments (TI) digital micro-mirror device (DMD). The DMD can be used as a random measurement matrix, reflecting the image off the DMD is the equivalent of an inner product between the images individual pixels and the measurement matrix. CS however is asymmetrical, meaning that the signals recovery or reconstruction from the measurements does require a higher level of computation. This makes the prospect of working with the compressed version of the signal in implementations such as detection or classification much more efficient. If an initial analysis shows nothing of interest, the signal need not be reconstructed. Many hyper-spectral image applications are precisely focused on these areas, and would greatly benefit from a compression technique like CS that could help minimize the light sensor down to a single pixel, lowering costs associated with the cameras while reducing the large amounts of data generated by all the bands. The present paper will show an implementation of CS using a single pixel hyper-spectral sensor, and compare the reconstructed images to those obtained through the use of a regular sensor.

  7. Parallel image compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reif, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A parallel compression algorithm for the 16,384 processor MPP machine was developed. The serial version of the algorithm can be viewed as a combination of on-line dynamic lossless test compression techniques (which employ simple learning strategies) and vector quantization. These concepts are described. How these concepts are combined to form a new strategy for performing dynamic on-line lossy compression is discussed. Finally, the implementation of this algorithm in a massively parallel fashion on the MPP is discussed.

  8. Does Work Experience Actually Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, John

    2012-01-01

    As unemployment levels rise, so education and training move into the policy spotlight. For the government, this is a very uncomfortable place to be right now. A number of large companies have withdrawn from the flagship Work Programme--under which jobseekers are invited to take up unpaid work placements of between two and eight weeks--amid…

  9. Does Work Experience Actually Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, John

    2012-01-01

    As unemployment levels rise, so education and training move into the policy spotlight. For the government, this is a very uncomfortable place to be right now. A number of large companies have withdrawn from the flagship Work Programme--under which jobseekers are invited to take up unpaid work placements of between two and eight weeks--amid

  10. Compressed Gas Safety for Experimental Fusion Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2004-09-01

    Experimental fusion facilities present a variety of hazards to the operators and staff. There are unique or specialized hazards, including magnetic fields, cryogens, radio frequency emissions, and vacuum reservoirs. There are also more general industrial hazards, such as a wide variety of electrical power, pressurized air, and cooling water systems in use, there are crane and hoist loads, working at height, and handling compressed gas cylinders. This paper outlines the projectile hazard assoicated with compressed gas cylinders and mthods of treatment to provide for compressed gas safety. This information should be of interest to personnel at both magnetic and inertial fusion experiments.

  11. A static architecture for compressive target tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Phillip K.; Townsend, Daniel; Wehrwein, Scott; Vera, Esteban M.; Stenner, Michael D.; Gehm, Michael E.

    2012-06-01

    Traditional approaches to persistent surveillance generate prodigious amounts of data, stressing storage, communication, and analysis systems. As such, they are well suited for compressed sensing (CS) concepts. Existing demonstrations of compressive target tracking have utilized time-sequences of random patterns, an approach that is sub-optimal for real world dynamic scenes. We have been investigating an alternative architecture that we term SCOUT-the Static Computational Optical Undersampled Tracker-which uses a pair of static masks and a defocused detector to acquire a small number of measurements in parallel. We will report on our working prototypes that have demonstrated successful target tracking at 16x compression.

  12. Compression of digital holographic data: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufaux, Frederic; Xing, Yafei; Pesquet-Popescu, Beatrice; Schelkens, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Holography has the potential to become the ultimate 3D experience. Nevertheless, in order to achieve practical working systems, major scientific and technological challenges have to be tackled. In particular, as digital holographic data represents a huge amount of information, the development of efficient compression techniques is a key component. This problem has gained significant attention by the research community during the last 10 years. Given that holograms have very different signal properties when compared to natural images and video sequences, existing compression techniques (e.g. JPEG or MPEG) remain suboptimal, calling for innovative compression solutions. In this paper, we will review and analyze past and on-going work for the compression of digital holographic data.

  13. 3D MHD Simulations of Spheromak Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuber, James E.; Woodruff, Simon; O'Bryan, John; Romero-Talamas, Carlos A.; Darpa Spheromak Team

    2015-11-01

    The adiabatic compression of compact tori could lead to a compact and hence low cost fusion energy system. The critical scientific issues in spheromak compression relate both to confinement properties and to the stability of the configuration undergoing compression. We present results from the NIMROD code modified with the addition of magnetic field coils that allow us to examine the role of rotation on the stability and confinement of the spheromak (extending prior work for the FRC). We present results from a scan in initial rotation, from 0 to 100km/s. We show that strong rotational shear (10km/s over 1cm) occurs. We compare the simulation results with analytic scaling relations for adiabatic compression. Work performed under DARPA grant N66001-14-1-4044.

  14. Adaptive compression coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiopoulos, Panos; Ward, Rabab K.; Morse, Daryl J.

    1991-08-01

    A compression technique which preserves edges in compressed pictures is developed. The proposed compression algorithm adapts itself to the local nature of the image. Smooth regions are represented by their averages and edges are preserved using quad trees. Textured regions are encoded using BTC (block truncation coding) and a modification of BTC using look-up tables. A threshold using a range which is the difference between the maximum and the minimum grey levels in a 4 x 4 pixel quadrant is used. At the recommended value of the threshold (equal to 18), the quality of the compressed texture regions is very high, the same as that of AMBTC (absolute moment block truncation coding), but the edge preservation quality is far superior to that of AMBTC. Compression levels below 0.5-0.8 b/pixel may be achieved.

  15. 26. Central compression lock, north span facing north. Compression lock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Central compression lock, north span facing north. Compression lock locks two spans together at highest point. There are three compression locks. - Henry Ford Bridge, Spanning Cerritos Channel, Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. [Treatment of fractures of a mandible by means of onteeth compression-distraction apparatus].

    PubMed

    Mishchenko, O N

    2013-01-01

    The present work describes the elaboration of onteeth compression-distraction apparatus and the treatment method for mandible fractures within dentition using onteeth compression-distraction apparatus. The conclusions are made regarding advantage of onteeth compression-distraction apparatus over intermaxillary and wire fixation of the bone fragments, as well as over helical onteeth compression-distraction apparatus. PMID:24013145

  17. Adult Learners' Week in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, John

    2002-01-01

    Promotional materials and activities for Australia's Adult Learners Week, which are shaped by a variety of stakeholders , include media strategies and a website. Activities are evaluated using a market research company and website and telephone hotline statistics. (SK)

  18. Real-time imagery compression method research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Maotang; Guo, Jingbo; Zhao, Jinping; Liu, Yuzhong

    2003-11-01

    A very useful Real-Time Ocean Surveying System (RTOSS) has been developing. Because of the real-time transmission and the huge synthesize aperture radar (SAR) imagery data and video imagery data and because of the restricted communication channel and the limited transmitting power condition the image data compression methods have to be developed. The compressed SAR imagery data and video imagery data have to satisfy two conditions: One is the excellent quality reconstruction; another is that the system can work on the real-time operating condition. It is contradictory for the excellent quality reconstruction with the real time system operation. In order to satisfy the real-time operating condition, the wavelet-based SAR imagery and improved H.263-based video imagery compression algorithms have been developed, which is of a high compression multiples and tiny compression distortion. In this paper, several typical SAR imagery compression algorithms are introduced and their performances and practical feasibility are compared. Secondly, the developed compression software that adopts improved H.263-based video imagery methods will be introduced. Finally, some experiment results will be given.

  19. Compression techniques in tele-radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tianyu; Xiong, Zixiang; Yun, David Y.

    1999-10-01

    This paper describes a prototype telemedicine system for remote 3D radiation treatment planning. Due to voluminous medical image data and image streams generated in interactive frame rate involved in the application, the importance of deploying adjustable lossy to lossless compression techniques is emphasized in order to achieve acceptable performance via various kinds of communication networks. In particular, the compression of the data substantially reduces the transmission time and therefore allows large-scale radiation distribution simulation and interactive volume visualization using remote supercomputing resources in a timely fashion. The compression algorithms currently used in the software we developed are JPEG and H.263 lossy methods and Lempel-Ziv (LZ77) lossless methods. Both objective and subjective assessment of the effect of lossy compression methods on the volume data are conducted. Favorable results are obtained showing that substantial compression ratio is achievable within distortion tolerance. From our experience, we conclude that 30dB (PSNR) is about the lower bound to achieve acceptable quality when applying lossy compression to anatomy volume data (e.g. CT). For computer simulated data, much higher PSNR (up to 100dB) is expectable. This work not only introduces such novel approach for delivering medical services that will have significant impact on the existing cooperative image-based services, but also provides a platform for the physicians to assess the effects of lossy compression techniques on the diagnostic and aesthetic appearance of medical imaging.

  20. Aerodynamics inside a rapid compression machine

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Gaurav; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2006-04-15

    The aerodynamics inside a rapid compression machine after the end of compression is investigated using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of acetone. To study the effect of reaction chamber configuration on the resulting aerodynamics and temperature field, experiments are conducted and compared using a creviced piston and a flat piston under varying conditions. Results show that the flat piston design leads to significant mixing of the cold vortex with the hot core region, which causes alternate hot and cold regions inside the combustion chamber. At higher pressures, the effect of the vortex is reduced. The creviced piston head configuration is demonstrated to result in drastic reduction of the effect of the vortex. Experimental conditions are also simulated using the Star-CD computational fluid dynamics package. Computed results closely match with experimental observation. Numerical results indicate that with a flat piston design, gas velocity after compression is very high and the core region shrinks quickly due to rapid entrainment of cold gases. Whereas, for a creviced piston head design, gas velocity after compression is significantly lower and the core region remains unaffected for a long duration. As a consequence, for the flat piston, adiabatic core assumption can significantly overpredict the maximum temperature after the end of compression. For the creviced piston, the adiabatic core assumption is found to be valid even up to 100 ms after compression. This work therefore experimentally and numerically substantiates the importance of piston head design for achieving a homogeneous core region inside a rapid compression machine. (author)

  1. Vascular compression syndromes.

    PubMed

    Czihal, Michael; Banafsche, Ramin; Hoffmann, Ulrich; Koeppel, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Dealing with vascular compression syndromes is one of the most challenging tasks in Vascular Medicine practice. This heterogeneous group of disorders is characterised by external compression of primarily healthy arteries and/or veins as well as accompanying nerval structures, carrying the risk of subsequent structural vessel wall and nerve damage. Vascular compression syndromes may severely impair health-related quality of life in affected individuals who are typically young and otherwise healthy. The diagnostic approach has not been standardised for any of the vascular compression syndromes. Moreover, some degree of positional external compression of blood vessels such as the subclavian and popliteal vessels or the celiac trunk can be found in a significant proportion of healthy individuals. This implies important difficulties in differentiating physiological from pathological findings of clinical examination and diagnostic imaging with provocative manoeuvres. The level of evidence on which treatment decisions regarding surgical decompression with or without revascularisation can be relied on is generally poor, mostly coming from retrospective single centre studies. Proper patient selection is critical in order to avoid overtreatment in patients without a clear association between vascular compression and clinical symptoms. With a focus on the thoracic outlet-syndrome, the median arcuate ligament syndrome and the popliteal entrapment syndrome, the present article gives a selective literature review on compression syndromes from an interdisciplinary vascular point of view. PMID:26515219

  2. Evidence-Based Compression

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Rhys J.; Woodcock, John P.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the currently published scientific evidence for the venous flow effects of mechanical devices, particularly intermittent pneumatic compression, and the relation to prevention of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Summary Background Data: While intermittent pneumatic compression is an established method of DVT prophylaxis, the variety of systems that are available can use very different compression techniques and sequences. In order for appropriate choices to be made to provide the optimum protection for patients, the general performance of systems, and physiological effects of particular properties, must be analyzed objectively. Methods: Medline was searched from 1970 to 2002, and all relevant papers were searched for further appropriate references. Papers were selected for inclusion when they addressed specifically the questions posed in this review. Results: All the major types of intermittent compression systems are successful in emptying deep veins of the lower limb and preventing stasis in a variety of subject groups. Compression stockings appear to function more by preventing distension of veins. Rapid inflation, high pressures, and graded sequential intermittent compression systems will have particular augmentation profiles, but there is no evidence that such features improve the prophylactic ability of the system. Conclusions: The most important factors in selecting a mechanical prophylactic system, particularly during and after surgery, are patient compliance and the appropriateness of the site of compression. There is no evidence that the peak venous velocity produced by a system is a valid measure of medical performance. PMID:14745323

  3. EEG data compression techniques.

    PubMed

    Antoniol, G; Tonella, P

    1997-02-01

    In this paper, electroencephalograph (EEG) and Holter EEG data compression techniques which allow perfect reconstruction of the recorded waveform from the compressed one are presented and discussed. Data compression permits one to achieve significant reduction in the space required to store signals and in transmission time. The Huffman coding technique in conjunction with derivative computation reaches high compression ratios (on average 49% on Holter and 58% on EEG signals) with low computational complexity. By exploiting this result a simple and fast encoder/decoder scheme capable of real-time performance on a PC was implemented. This simple technique is compared with other predictive transformations, vector quantization, discrete cosine transform (DCT), and repetition count compression methods. Finally, it is shown that the adoption of a collapsed Huffman tree for the encoding/decoding operations allows one to choose the maximum codeword length without significantly affecting the compression ratio. Therefore, low cost commercial microcontrollers and storage devices can be effectively used to store long Holter EEG's in a compressed format. PMID:9214790

  4. Saugus Iron Works Forge

    The Saugus Iron Works forge, which used a large hammer to compress the iron. Forging strenghened the iron, which, right out of the blast furnace, was brittle. The Saugus River, which powered the forge, can be seen in the background....

  5. Compressive Optical Image Encryption

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Sheng Li, Jiao; Yang Pan, Yang; Li, Rong

    2015-01-01

    An optical image encryption technique based on compressive sensing using fully optical means has been proposed. An object image is first encrypted to a white-sense stationary noise pattern using a double random phase encoding (DRPE) method in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Then, the encrypted image is highly compressed to a signal using single-pixel compressive holographic imaging in the optical domain. At the receiving terminal, the encrypted image is reconstructed well via compressive sensing theory, and the original image can be decrypted with three reconstructed holograms and the correct keys. The numerical simulations show that the method is effective and suitable for optical image security transmission in future all-optical networks because of the ability of completely optical implementation and substantially smaller hologram data volume. PMID:25992946

  6. Compressible Astrophysics Simulation Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-07-18

    This is an astrophysics simulation code involving a radiation diffusion module developed at LLNL coupled to compressible hydrodynamics and adaptive mesh infrastructure developed at LBNL. One intended application is to neutrino diffusion in core collapse supernovae.

  7. Vertebral Compression Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... find treatments and a cure, education, awareness, and mutual support. Compression fractures are a common, painful problem ... for people with osteoporosis can often provide useful information about how to stand, sit and move in ...

  8. Image Data Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunt, Murat

    1988-03-01

    Image data compression is one of the oldest but still very active area of research in image processing. The digital representation of an image requires a very large number of bits. The goal of image data compression is to reduce this number, as much as possible, and reconstruct a faithful duplicate of the original picture. Early efforts in image coding, solely guided by information theory, led to a plethora of methods. The compression ratio reached a plateau around 10:1 a couple of years ago. Recent progress in the study of the brain mechanism of vision and scene analysis has opened new vistas in picture coding. Directional sensitivity of the neurones in the visual pathway combined with the separate processing of contours and textures has led to a new class of coding methods capable of achieving compression ratios as high as 100:1.

  9. Compressive laser ranging.

    PubMed

    Babbitt, Wm Randall; Barber, Zeb W; Renner, Christoffer

    2011-12-15

    Compressive sampling has been previously proposed as a technique for sampling radar returns and determining sparse range profiles with a reduced number of measurements compared to conventional techniques. By employing modulation on both transmission and reception, compressive sensing in ranging is extended to the direct measurement of range profiles without intermediate measurement of the return waveform. This compressive ranging approach enables the use of pseudorandom binary transmit waveforms and return modulation, along with low-bandwidth optical detectors to yield high-resolution ranging information. A proof-of-concept experiment is presented. With currently available compact, off-the-shelf electronics and photonics, such as high data rate binary pattern generators and high-bandwidth digital optical modulators, compressive laser ranging can readily achieve subcentimeter resolution in a compact, lightweight package. PMID:22179886

  10. Compressive optical image encryption.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Sheng Li, Jiao; Yang Pan, Yang; Li, Rong

    2015-01-01

    An optical image encryption technique based on compressive sensing using fully optical means has been proposed. An object image is first encrypted to a white-sense stationary noise pattern using a double random phase encoding (DRPE) method in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Then, the encrypted image is highly compressed to a signal using single-pixel compressive holographic imaging in the optical domain. At the receiving terminal, the encrypted image is reconstructed well via compressive sensing theory, and the original image can be decrypted with three reconstructed holograms and the correct keys. The numerical simulations show that the method is effective and suitable for optical image security transmission in future all-optical networks because of the ability of completely optical implementation and substantially smaller hologram data volume. PMID:25992946

  11. Compressibility Effects in Aeronautical Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stack, John

    1941-01-01

    Compressible-flow research, while a relatively new field in aeronautics, is very old, dating back almost to the development of the first firearm. Over the last hundred years, researches have been conducted in the ballistics field, but these results have been of practically no use in aeronautical engineering because the phenomena that have been studied have been the more or less steady supersonic condition of flow. Some work that has been done in connection with steam turbines, particularly nozzle studies, has been of value, In general, however, understanding of compressible-flow phenomena has been very incomplete and permitted no real basis for the solution of aeronautical engineering problems in which.the flow is likely to be unsteady because regions of both subsonic and supersonic speeds may occur. In the early phases of the development of the airplane, speeds were so low that the effects of compressibility could be justifiably ignored. During the last war and immediately after, however, propellers exhibited losses in efficiency as the tip speeds approached the speed of sound, and the first experiments of an aeronautical nature were therefore conducted with propellers. Results of these experiments indicated serious losses of efficiency, but aeronautical engineers were not seriously concerned at the time became it was generally possible. to design propellers with quite low tip. speeds. With the development of new engines having increased power and rotational speeds, however, the problems became of increasing importance.

  12. Smoothing DCT Compression Artifacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, A. J., Jr.; Horng, R.; Statler, Irving C. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Image compression based on quantizing the image in the discrete cosine transform (DCT) domain can generate blocky artifacts in the output image. It is possible to reduce these artifacts and RMS error by adjusting measures of block edginess and image roughness, while restricting the DCT coefficient values to values that would have been quantized to those of the compressed image. We also introduce a DCT coefficient amplitude adjustment that reduces RMS error.

  13. Alternative Compression Garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M. B.; Lee, S. M. C.; Ribeiro, L. C.; Brown, A. K.; Westby, C. M.; Platts, S. H.

    2011-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance after spaceflight is still an issue for astronauts as no in-flight countermeasure has been 100% effective. Future anti-gravity suits (AGS) may be similar to the Shuttle era inflatable AGS or may be a mechanical compression device like the Russian Kentavr. We have evaluated the above garments as well as elastic, gradient compression garments of varying magnitude and determined that breast-high elastic compression garments may be a suitable replacement to the current AGS. This new garment should be more comfortable than the AGS, easy to don and doff, and as effective a countermeasure to orthostatic intolerance. Furthermore, these new compression garments could be worn for several days after space flight as necessary if symptoms persisted. We conducted two studies to evaluate elastic, gradient compression garments. The purpose of these studies was to evaluate the comfort and efficacy of an alternative compression garment (ACG) immediately after actual space flight and 6 degree head-down tilt bed rest as a model of space flight, and to determine if they would impact recovery if worn for up to three days after bed rest.

  14. Image compression technique

    DOEpatents

    Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

    1997-03-25

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace`s equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image. 16 figs.

  15. Image compression technique

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Chi-Yung; Petrich, Loren I.

    1997-01-01

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace's equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image.

  16. Intelligent bandwith compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, D. Y.; Bullock, B. L.; Olin, K. E.; Kandt, R. K.; Olsen, J. D.

    1980-02-01

    The feasibility of a 1000:1 bandwidth compression ratio for image transmission has been demonstrated using image-analysis algorithms and a rule-based controller. Such a high compression ratio was achieved by first analyzing scene content using auto-cueing and feature-extraction algorithms, and then transmitting only the pertinent information consistent with mission requirements. A rule-based controller directs the flow of analysis and performs priority allocations on the extracted scene content. The reconstructed bandwidth-compressed image consists of an edge map of the scene background, with primary and secondary target windows embedded in the edge map. The bandwidth-compressed images are updated at a basic rate of 1 frame per second, with the high-priority target window updated at 7.5 frames per second. The scene-analysis algorithms used in this system together with the adaptive priority controller are described. Results of simulated 1000:1 band width-compressed images are presented. A video tape simulation of the Intelligent Bandwidth Compression system has been produced using a sequence of video input from the data base.

  17. Compressed Media: A New Dimension of Compressed Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartjen, Raymond H.

    Through the use of the Information Mapping and Information Blocking format, this paper discusses various means of increasing the information availability rate through compressed media. Techniques reviewed include: compressed speech, compressed media for individualization of instruction, compressed speech and remedial reading, speech compression…

  18. Micromechanics of composite laminate compression failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, E. Gail; Bradley, Walter L.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this annual progress report is to summarize the work effort and results accomplished from July 1987 through July 1988 on NASA Research Grant NAG1-659 entitled Micromechanics of Composite Laminate Compressive Failure. The report contains: (1) the objective of the proposed research, (2) the summary of accomplishments, (3) a more extensive review of compression literature, (4) the planned material (and corresponding properties) received to date, (5) the results for three possible specimen geometries, experimental procedures planned, and current status of the experiments, and (6) the work planned for the next contract year.

  19. Changes in nerve function and nerve fibre structure induced by acute, graded compression.

    PubMed Central

    Rydevik, B; Nordborg, C

    1980-01-01

    Rabbit tibial nerves were subjected to direct, acute graded compression by means of an inflatable compression chamber. The acute and long term effects of 50, 200 and 400 mmHg applied for two hours on nerve function and nerve fibre structure were investigated. A pressure of 50 mmHg applied for two hours induced only minimal or no acute deterioration of maximal conduction velocity and nerve fibre structure. Conduction velocity was gradually reduced during compression at 200-400 mmHg pressure for two hours and in those cases the recovery of nerve conduction after pressure release was incomplete. Ultrastructural analysis revealed pronounced, early nerve fibre damage in these nerves. Three weeks after compression, nerves compressed at 50 mmHg for two hours had normal afferent and motor conduction velocity, although there were morphological signs of slight nerve fibre damage. Nerves compressed at 200 mmHg for two hours exhibited reduction of conduction velocity only at the level of compression, in contrast to the nerves compressed at 400 mmHg for two hours in which conduction velocity was reduced both at the level of compression and distal to the compressed segment. Morphologically, the nerves compressed at 200-400 mmHg for two hours showed varying degrees of demyelination and axonal degeneration three weeks after compression. Images PMID:7217952

  20. 29 CFR 3.4 - Submission of weekly statements and the preservation and inspection of weekly payroll records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Submission of weekly statements and the preservation and inspection of weekly payroll records. 3.4 Section 3.4 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor CONTRACTORS AND SUBCONTRACTORS ON PUBLIC BUILDING OR PUBLIC WORK FINANCED IN WHOLE OR IN PART BY LOANS OR GRANTS FROM THE...

  1. Lossless compression of instrumentation data. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stearns, S.D.

    1995-11-01

    This is our final report on Sandia National Laboratories Laboratory- Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project 3517.070. Its purpose has been to investigate lossless compression of digital waveform and image data, particularly the types of instrumentation data generated and processed at Sandia Labs. The three-year project period ran from October 1992 through September 1995. This report begins with a descriptive overview of data compression, with and without loss, followed by a summary of the activities on the Sandia project, including research at several universities and the development of waveform compression software. Persons who participated in the project are also listed. The next part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles of lossless compression. Two basic compression stages, decorrelation and entropy coding, are described and discussed. An example of seismic data compression is included. Finally, there is a bibliography of published research. Taken together, the published papers contain the details of most of the work and accomplishments on the project. This final report is primarily an overview, without the technical details and results found in the publications listed in the bibliography.

  2. Anelastic Versus Fully Compressible Turbulent Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoeven, Jan; Wiesehöfer, Thomas; Stellmach, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    Numerical simulations of turbulent convection in an ideal gas, using either the anelastic approximation'widely used for modeling dynamos in gas giants'or the fully compressible equations, are compared. Theoretically, the anelastic approximation is expected to hold in weakly superadiabatic systems with ɛ = ΔT/Tr ≪ 1, where ΔT denotes the superadiabatic temperature drop over the convective layer and Tr the bottom temperature. Using direct numerical simulations in a plane layer geometry, a detailed comparison of anelastic and fully compressible convection is carried out. With decreasing superadiabaticity ɛ, the fully compressible results are found to converge linearly to the anelastic solution with larger density contrasts generally improving the match. We conclude that in many solar and planetary applications, where the superadiabaticity is expected to be vanishingly small, results obtained with the anelastic approximation are in fact more accurate than fully compressible computations, which typically fail to reach small ɛ for numerical reasons. On the other hand, if the astrophysical system studied contains ɛ ~ O(1) regions, such as the solar photosphere, fully compressible simulations have the advantage of capturing the full physics. Interestingly, even in weakly superadiabatic regions, like the bulk of the solar convection zone, the errors introduced by using artificially large values for ɛ for efficiency reasons remain moderate. If quantitative errors of the order of 10% are acceptable in such low ɛ regions, our work suggests that fully compressible simulations can indeed be computationally more efficient than their anelastic counterparts.

  3. Compression-sensitive magnetic resonance elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Sebastian; Beyer, Frauke; Guo, Jing; Papazoglou, Sebastian; Tzschaetzsch, Heiko; Braun, Juergen; Sack, Ingolf

    2013-08-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) quantifies the shear modulus of biological tissue to detect disease. Complementary to the shear elastic properties of tissue, the compression modulus may be a clinically useful biomarker because it is sensitive to tissue pressure and poromechanical interactions. In this work, we analyze the capability of MRE to measure volumetric strain and the dynamic bulk modulus (P-wave modulus) at a harmonic drive frequency commonly used in shear-wave-based MRE. Gel phantoms with various densities were created by introducing CO2-filled cavities to establish a compressible effective medium. The dependence of the effective medium's bulk modulus on phantom density was investigated via static compression tests, which confirmed theoretical predictions. The P-wave modulus of three compressible phantoms was calculated from volumetric strain measured by 3D wave-field MRE at 50 Hz drive frequency. The results demonstrate the MRE-derived volumetric strain and P-wave modulus to be sensitive to the compression properties of effective media. Since the reconstruction of the P-wave modulus requires third-order derivatives, noise remains critical, and P-wave moduli are systematically underestimated. Focusing on relative changes in the effective bulk modulus of tissue, compression-sensitive MRE may be useful for the noninvasive detection of diseases involving pathological pressure alterations such as hepatic hypertension or hydrocephalus.

  4. Transverse Compression of Tendons.

    PubMed

    Samuel Salisbury, S T; Paul Buckley, C; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-04-01

    A study was made of the deformation of tendons when compressed transverse to the fiber-aligned axis. Bovine digital extensor tendons were compression tested between flat rigid plates. The methods included: in situ image-based measurement of tendon cross-sectional shapes, after preconditioning but immediately prior to testing; multiple constant-load creep/recovery tests applied to each tendon at increasing loads; and measurements of the resulting tendon displacements in both transverse directions. In these tests, friction resisted axial stretch of the tendon during compression, giving approximately plane-strain conditions. This, together with the assumption of a form of anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model proposed previously for tendon, justified modeling the isochronal response of tendon as that of an isotropic, slightly compressible, neo-Hookean solid. Inverse analysis, using finite-element (FE) simulations of the experiments and 10 s isochronal creep displacement data, gave values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of this solid of 0.31 MPa and 0.49, respectively, for an idealized tendon shape and averaged data for all the tendons and E = 0.14 and 0.10 MPa for two specific tendons using their actual measured geometry. The compression load versus displacement curves, as measured and as simulated, showed varying degrees of stiffening with increasing load. This can be attributed mostly to geometrical changes in tendon cross section under load, varying according to the initial 3D shape of the tendon. PMID:26833218

  5. Intelligent bandwidth compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, D. Y.; Bullock, B. L.; Olin, K. E.; Kandt, R. K.; Olsen, J. D.

    1980-02-01

    The feasibility of a 1000:1 bandwidth compression ratio for image transmission has been demonstrated using image-analysis algorithms and a rule-based controller. Such a high compression ratio was achieved by first analyzing scene content using auto-cueing and feature-extraction algorithms, and then transmitting only the pertinent information consistent with mission requirements. A rule-based controller directs the flow of analysis and performs priority allocations on the extracted scene content. The reconstructed bandwidth-compressed image consists of an edge map of the scene background, with primary and secondary target windows embedded in the edge map. The bandwidth-compressed images are updated at a basic rate of 1 frame per second, with the high-priority target window updated at 7.5 frames per second. The scene-analysis algorithms used in this system together with the adaptive priority controller are described. Results of simulated 1000:1 bandwidth-compressed images are presented.

  6. High-performance compression of astronomical images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Astronomical images have some rather unusual characteristics that make many existing image compression techniques either ineffective or inapplicable. A typical image consists of a nearly flat background sprinkled with point sources and occasional extended sources. The images are often noisy, so that lossless compression does not work very well; furthermore, the images are usually subjected to stringent quantitative analysis, so any lossy compression method must be proven not to discard useful information, but must instead discard only the noise. Finally, the images can be extremely large. For example, the Space Telescope Science Institute has digitized photographic plates covering the entire sky, generating 1500 images each having 14000 x 14000 16-bit pixels. Several astronomical groups are now constructing cameras with mosaics of large CCD's (each 2048 x 2048 or larger); these instruments will be used in projects that generate data at a rate exceeding 100 MBytes every 5 minutes for many years. An effective technique for image compression may be based on the H-transform (Fritze et al. 1977). The method that we have developed can be used for either lossless or lossy compression. The digitized sky survey images can be compressed by at least a factor of 10 with no noticeable losses in the astrometric and photometric properties of the compressed images. The method has been designed to be computationally efficient: compression or decompression of a 512 x 512 image requires only 4 seconds on a Sun SPARCstation 1. The algorithm uses only integer arithmetic, so it is completely reversible in its lossless mode, and it could easily be implemented in hardware for space applications.

  7. Compressibility variations of JPEG2000 compressed computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Pambrun, Jean-François; Noumeir, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Compression is increasingly used in medical applications to enable efficient and universally accessible electronic health records. However, lossy compression introduces artifacts that can alter diagnostic accuracy, interfere with image processing algorithms and cause liability issues in cases of diagnostic errors. Compression guidelines were introduced to mitigate these issues and foster the use of modern compression algorithms with diagnostic imaging. However, these guidelines are usually defined as maximum compression ratios for each imaging protocol and do not take compressibility variations due to image content into account. In this paper we have evaluated the compressibility of thousands of computed tomography slices of an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom acquired with different parameters. We have shown that exposure, slice thickness and reconstruction filters have a significant impact on compressibility suggesting that guidelines based solely on compression ratios may be inadequate. PMID:24110452

  8. Isentropic Compression of Argon

    SciTech Connect

    H. Oona; J.C. Solem; L.R. Veeser, C.A. Ekdahl; P.J. Rodriquez; S.M. Younger; W. Lewis; W.D. Turley

    1997-08-01

    We are studying the transition of argon from an insulator to a conductor by compressing the frozen gas isentropically to pressures at which neighboring atomic orbitals overlap sufficiently to allow some electron motion between atoms. Argon and the other rare gases have closed electron shells and therefore remain montomic, even when they solidify. Their simple structure makes it likely that any measured change in conductivity is due to changes in the atomic structure, not in molecular configuration. As the crystal is compressed the band gap closes, allowing increased conductivity. We have begun research to determine the conductivity at high pressures, and it is our intention to determine the compression at which the crystal becomes a metal.

  9. Compressible Flow Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.

    2006-01-01

    The Compressible Flow Toolbox is primarily a MATLAB-language implementation of a set of algorithms that solve approximately 280 linear and nonlinear classical equations for compressible flow. The toolbox is useful for analysis of one-dimensional steady flow with either constant entropy, friction, heat transfer, or Mach number greater than 1. The toolbox also contains algorithms for comparing and validating the equation-solving algorithms against solutions previously published in open literature. The classical equations solved by the Compressible Flow Toolbox are as follows: The isentropic-flow equations, The Fanno flow equations (pertaining to flow of an ideal gas in a pipe with friction), The Rayleigh flow equations (pertaining to frictionless flow of an ideal gas, with heat transfer, in a pipe of constant cross section), The normal-shock equations, The oblique-shock equations, and The expansion equations.

  10. The compressible mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandromme, Dany; Haminh, Hieu

    1991-01-01

    The capability of turbulence modeling correctly to handle natural unsteadiness appearing in compressible turbulent flows is investigated. Physical aspects linked to the unsteadiness problem and the role of various flow parameters are analyzed. It is found that unsteady turbulent flows can be simulated by dividing these motions into an 'organized' part for which equations of motion are solved and a remaining 'incoherent' part represented by a turbulence model. Two-equation turbulence models and second-order turbulence models can yield reasonable results. For specific compressible unsteady turbulent flow, graphic presentations of different quantities may reveal complementary physical features. Strong compression zones are observed in rapid flow parts but shocklets do not yet occur.

  11. Envera Variable Compression Ratio Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Mendler

    2011-03-15

    Aggressive engine downsizing, variable compression ratio and use of the Atkinson cycle are being combined to improve fuel economy by up to 40 percent relative to port fuel injected gasoline engines, while maintaining full engine power. Approach Engine downsizing is viewed by US and foreign automobile manufacturers as one of the best options for improving fuel economy. While this strategy has already demonstrated a degree of success, downsizing and fuel economy gains are currently limited. With new variable compression ratio technology however, the degree of engine downsizing and fuel economy improvement can be greatly increased. A small variable compression ratio (VCR) engine has the potential to return significantly higher vehicle fuel economy while also providing high power. Affordability and potential for near term commercialization are key attributes of the Envera VCR engine. VCR Technology To meet torque and power requirements, a smaller engine needs to do more work per stroke. This is typically accomplished by boosting the incoming charge with either a turbo or supercharger so that more energy is present in the cylinder per stroke to do the work. With current production engines the degree of engine boosting (which correlates to downsizing) is limited by detonation (combustion knock) at high boost levels. Additionally, the turbo or supercharger needs to be responsive and efficient while providing the needed boost. VCR technology eliminates the limitation of engine knock at high load levels by reducing compression ratio to {approx}9:1 (or whatever level is appropriate) when high boost pressures are needed. By reducing the compression ratio during high load demand periods there is increased volume in the cylinder at top dead center (TDC) which allows more charge (or energy) to be present in the cylinder without increasing the peak pressure. Cylinder pressure is thus kept below the level at which the engine would begin to knock. When loads on the engine are low the compression ratio can be raised (to as much as 18:1) providing high engine efficiency. It is important to recognize that for a well designed VCR engine cylinder pressure does not need to be higher than found in current production turbocharged engines. As such, there is no need for a stronger crankcase, bearings and other load bearing parts within the VCR engine. The Envera VCR mechanism uses an eccentric carrier approach to adjust engine compression ratio. The crankshaft main bearings are mounted in this eccentric carrier or 'crankshaft cradle' and pivoting the eccentric carrier 30 degrees adjusts compression ratio from 9:1 to 18:1. The eccentric carrier is made up of a casting that provides rigid support for the main bearings, and removable upper bearing caps. Oil feed to the main bearings transits through the bearing cap fastener sockets. The eccentric carrier design was chosen for its low cost and rigid support of the main bearings. A control shaft and connecting links are used to pivot the eccentric carrier. The control shaft mechanism features compression ratio lock-up at minimum and maximum compression ratio settings. The control shaft method of pivoting the eccentric carrier was selected due to its lock-up capability. The control shaft can be rotated by a hydraulic actuator or an electric motor. The engine shown in Figures 3 and 4 has a hydraulic actuator that was developed under the current program. In-line 4-cylinder engines are significantly less expensive than V engines because an entire cylinder head can be eliminated. The cost savings from eliminating cylinders and an entire cylinder head will notably offset the added cost of the VCR and supercharging. Replacing V6 and V8 engines with in-line VCR 4-cylinder engines will provide high fuel economy at low cost. Numerous enabling technologies exist which have the potential to increase engine efficiency. The greatest efficiency gains are realized when the right combination of advanced and new technologies are packaged together to provide the greatest gains at the least cost. Aggressive engine downsizing with variable compression ratio and use of the extended Atkinson cycle can provide large fuel economy gains that are exceptionally cost effective. Analysis indicates that a 2.2L supercharged Envera VCR engine can match the torque of a larger V8 engine at 2000 rpm. The VCR engine's high torque value at low engine speed is beneficial for maintaining the driving feel and responsiveness of the larger V8 engine. The Envera VCR engine will attain high efficiency at {approx}100 Nm primarily due to the combination of engine down-sizing and use of the Atkinson cycle. Qualitatively the fuel economy gain realized from down-sizing from a V8 to an Atkinson-cycle I-4 is about twice as large as the benefits from down-sizing from a V8 to a Turbo V6 when evaluated at 100 Nm 2000 rpm.

  12. Astronomy Week in Madeira, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augusto, P.; Sobrinho, J. L.

    2012-05-01

    The outreach programme Semanas da Astronomia (Astronomy Weeks) is held in late spring or summer on the island of Madeira, Portugal. This programme has been attracting enough interest to be mentioned in the regional press/TV/radio every year and is now, without doubt, the astronomical highlight of the year on Madeira. We believe that this programme is a good case study for showing how to attract the general public to astronomy in a small (population 250 000, area 900 km2) and fairly isolated place such as Madeira. Our Astronomy Weeks have been different each year and have so far included exhibitions, courses, talks, a forum, documentaries, observing sessions (some with blackouts), music and an astro party. These efforts may contribute towards putting Madeira on the map with respect to observational astronomy, and have also contributed to the planned installation of two observatories in the island.

  13. Orbiting dynamic compression laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, T. J.; Vreeland, T., Jr.; Kasiraj, P.; Frisch, B.

    1984-01-01

    In order to examine the feasibility of carrying out dynamic compression experiments on a space station, the possibility of using explosive gun launchers is studied. The question of whether powders of a refractory metal (molybdenum) and a metallic glass could be well considered by dynamic compression is examined. In both cases extremely good bonds are obtained between grains of metal and metallic glass at 180 and 80 kb, respectively. When the oxide surface is reduced and the dynamic consolidation is carried out in vacuum, in the case of molybdenum, tensile tests of the recovered samples demonstrated beneficial ultimate tensile strengths.

  14. Isentropic compression of argon

    SciTech Connect

    Veeser, L.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Oona, H.

    1997-06-01

    The compression was done in an MC-1 flux compression (explosive) generator, in order to study the transition from an insulator to a conductor. Since conductivity signals were observed in all the experiments (except when the probe is removed), both the Teflon and the argon are becoming conductive. The conductivity could not be determined (Teflon insulation properties unknown), but it could be bounded as being {sigma}=1/{rho}{le}8({Omega}cm){sub -1}, because when the Teflon breaks down, the dielectric constant is reduced. The Teflon insulator problem remains, and other ways to better insulate the probe or to measure the conductivity without a probe is being sought.

  15. Image data compression investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myrie, Carlos

    1989-01-01

    NASA continuous communications systems growth has increased the demand for image transmission and storage. Research and analysis was conducted on various lossy and lossless advanced data compression techniques or approaches used to improve the efficiency of transmission and storage of high volume stellite image data such as pulse code modulation (PCM), differential PCM (DPCM), transform coding, hybrid coding, interframe coding, and adaptive technique. In this presentation, the fundamentals of image data compression utilizing two techniques which are pulse code modulation (PCM) and differential PCM (DPCM) are presented along with an application utilizing these two coding techniques.

  16. Compression by replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamino, Roberto C.; Neirotti, Juan P.; Saad, David

    2014-03-01

    A recently introduced inference method based on system replication and an online message passing algorithm is employed to complete a previously suggested compression scheme based on a nonlinear perceptron. The algorithm is shown to approach the information theoretical bounds for compression as the number of replicated systems increases, offering superior performance compared to basic message passing algorithms. In addition, the suggested method does not require fine-tuning of parameters or other complementing heuristic techniques, such as the introduction of inertia terms, to improve convergence rates to nontrivial results.

  17. Compressive strength of continuous fiber unidirectional composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Ronald H.

    Dow and Rosen's work in 1965 formed an intellectual framework for compressive strength of unidirectional composites. Compressive strength was explained in terms of micro-buckling, in which filaments are beams on an elastic foundation. They made simplifying assumptions, with a two dimensional idealization and linearized material properties. This study builds on their model, recognizing that the shear mode of instability drives unidirectional compressive strength. As a necessary corollary, the predictive methods developed in this study emphasize correct representation of composite shear stiffness. Non-linear effects related to matrix material properties, fiber misalignment, three dimensional representation, and thermal prestrains are taken into account. Four work streams comprise this study: first, development of a closed form analytical model; second, empirical methods development and model validation; third, creation and validation of a unit cell finite element model; and fourth, a patent application that leverages knowledge gained from the first three work streams. The analytical model characterizes the non-linearity of the matrix both with respect to shear and compressive loading. This improvement on existing analyses clearly shows why fiber modulus affects composite shear instability. Accounting for fiber misalignment in the model and experimental characterization of the fiber misalignment continuum are important contributions of this study. A simple method of compressive strength measurement of a small diameter monofilament glass-resin composite is developed. Sample definition and preparation are original, and necessary technologies are easily assessable to other researchers in this field. This study shows that glass fiber composites have the potential for high compressive strength. This potential is reached with excellent fiber alignment and suitable matrix characteristics, and results are consistent with model predictions. The unit cell three dimensional finite element model introduces a boundary condition that only allows compressive and shear deformation, thus recognizing the actual deformation mechanism of a compressed unidirectional composite. A new approach for representing the resin matrix is employed, giving improved correlation to empirical measurements noted in the literature. A method of accounting for realistic composite imperfections is introduced. The patent application work was fed by results from the first three areas. A new engineering structure is created in which buckling is beneficial. Post buckled behavior favorably affects other structural components in an overload situation. The first three work streams form a coherent unit and are mutually supportive. The analytical model predictions are corroborated by the experimental measurements. Finite element model predictions are consistent with the analytical model predictions.

  18. Watermark Compression in Medical Image Watermarking Using Lempel-Ziv-Welch (LZW) Lossless Compression Technique.

    PubMed

    Badshah, Gran; Liew, Siau-Chuin; Zain, Jasni Mohd; Ali, Mushtaq

    2016-04-01

    In teleradiology, image contents may be altered due to noisy communication channels and hacker manipulation. Medical image data is very sensitive and can not tolerate any illegal change. Illegally changed image-based analysis could result in wrong medical decision. Digital watermarking technique can be used to authenticate images and detect as well as recover illegal changes made to teleradiology images. Watermarking of medical images with heavy payload watermarks causes image perceptual degradation. The image perceptual degradation directly affects medical diagnosis. To maintain the image perceptual and diagnostic qualities standard during watermarking, the watermark should be lossless compressed. This paper focuses on watermarking of ultrasound medical images with Lempel-Ziv-Welch (LZW) lossless-compressed watermarks. The watermark lossless compression reduces watermark payload without data loss. In this research work, watermark is the combination of defined region of interest (ROI) and image watermarking secret key. The performance of the LZW compression technique was compared with other conventional compression methods based on compression ratio. LZW was found better and used for watermark lossless compression in ultrasound medical images watermarking. Tabulated results show the watermark bits reduction, image watermarking with effective tamper detection and lossless recovery. PMID:26429361

  19. Structure and Properties of Silica Glass Densified in Cold Compression and Hot Compression

    PubMed Central

    Guerette, Michael; Ackerson, Michael R.; Thomas, Jay; Yuan, Fenglin; Bruce Watson, E.; Walker, David; Huang, Liping

    2015-01-01

    Silica glass has been shown in numerous studies to possess significant capacity for permanent densification under pressure at different temperatures to form high density amorphous (HDA) silica. However, it is unknown to what extent the processes leading to irreversible densification of silica glass in cold-compression at room temperature and in hot-compression (e.g., near glass transition temperature) are common in nature. In this work, a hot-compression technique was used to quench silica glass from high temperature (1100 °C) and high pressure (up to 8 GPa) conditions, which leads to density increase of ~25% and Young’s modulus increase of ~71% relative to that of pristine silica glass at ambient conditions. Our experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide solid evidences that the intermediate-range order of the hot-compressed HDA silica is distinct from that of the counterpart cold-compressed at room temperature. This explains the much higher thermal and mechanical stability of the former than the latter upon heating and compression as revealed in our in-situ Brillouin light scattering (BLS) experiments. Our studies demonstrate the limitation of the resulting density as a structural indicator of polyamorphism, and point out the importance of temperature during compression in order to fundamentally understand HDA silica. PMID:26469314

  20. Structure and Properties of Silica Glass Densified in Cold Compression and Hot Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerette, Michael; Ackerson, Michael R.; Thomas, Jay; Yuan, Fenglin; Bruce Watson, E.; Walker, David; Huang, Liping

    2015-10-01

    Silica glass has been shown in numerous studies to possess significant capacity for permanent densification under pressure at different temperatures to form high density amorphous (HDA) silica. However, it is unknown to what extent the processes leading to irreversible densification of silica glass in cold-compression at room temperature and in hot-compression (e.g., near glass transition temperature) are common in nature. In this work, a hot-compression technique was used to quench silica glass from high temperature (1100 °C) and high pressure (up to 8 GPa) conditions, which leads to density increase of ~25% and Young’s modulus increase of ~71% relative to that of pristine silica glass at ambient conditions. Our experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide solid evidences that the intermediate-range order of the hot-compressed HDA silica is distinct from that of the counterpart cold-compressed at room temperature. This explains the much higher thermal and mechanical stability of the former than the latter upon heating and compression as revealed in our in-situ Brillouin light scattering (BLS) experiments. Our studies demonstrate the limitation of the resulting density as a structural indicator of polyamorphism, and point out the importance of temperature during compression in order to fundamentally understand HDA silica.

  1. Comparative analysis of infrared images degraded by lossy compression techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toussaint, W. A.; Weber, Reed A.

    2015-09-01

    This work addresses image degradation introduced by lossy compression techniques and the effects of such degradation on signal detection statistics for applications in fast-framing (<100 Hz) IR image analysis. As future space systems make use of increasingly higher pixel count IR focal plane arrays, data generation rates are anticipated to become too copious for continuous download. The prevailing solution to this issue has been to compress image data prior to downlink. While this solution is application independent for lossless compression, the expected benefits of lossy compression, including higher compression ratio, necessitate several application specific trades in order to characterize preservation of critical information within the data. Current analyses via standard statistical image processing techniques following tunably lossy compression algorithms (JPEG2000, JPEG-LS) allow for detection statistics nearly identical to analyses following standard lossless compression techniques, such as Rice and PNG, even at degradation levels offering a greater than twofold increase in compression ratio. Ongoing efforts focus on repeating the analysis for other tunably lossy compression techniques while also assessing the relative computational burden of each algorithm. Current results suggest that lossy compression techniques can preserve critical information in fast-framing IR data while either significantly reducing downlink bandwidth requirements or significantly increasing the usable focal plane array window size.

  2. [Lossless compression of hyperspectral image for space-borne application].

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Jin, Long-xu; Li, Guo-ning

    2012-08-01

    In order to resolve the difficulty in hardware implementation, lower compression ratio and time consuming for the whole hyperspectral image lossless compression algorithm based on the prediction, transform, vector quantization and their combination, a hyperspectral image lossless compression algorithm for space-borne application was proposed in the present paper. Firstly, intra-band prediction is used only for the first image along the spectral line using a median predictor. And inter- band prediction is applied to other band images. A two-step and bidirectional prediction algorithm is proposed for the inter-band prediction. In the first step prediction, a bidirectional and second order predictor proposed is used to obtain a prediction reference value. And a improved LUT prediction algorithm proposed is used to obtain four values of LUT prediction. Then the final prediction is obtained through comparison between them and the prediction reference. Finally, the verification experiments for the compression algorithm proposed using compression system test equipment of XX-X space hyperspectral camera were carried out. The experiment results showed that compression system can be fast and stable work. The average compression ratio reached 3.05 bpp. Compared with traditional approaches, the proposed method could improve the average compression ratio by 0.14-2.94 bpp. They effectively improve the lossless compression ratio and solve the difficulty of hardware implementation of the whole wavelet-based compression scheme. PMID:23156795

  3. Nonlinear Frequency Compression

    PubMed Central

    Scollie, Susan; Glista, Danielle; Seelisch, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Frequency lowering technologies offer an alternative amplification solution for severe to profound high frequency hearing losses. While frequency lowering technologies may improve audibility of high frequency sounds, the very nature of this processing can affect the perceived sound quality. This article reports the results from two studies that investigated the impact of a nonlinear frequency compression (NFC) algorithm on perceived sound quality. In the first study, the cutoff frequency and compression ratio parameters of the NFC algorithm were varied, and their effect on the speech quality was measured subjectively with 12 normal hearing adults, 12 normal hearing children, 13 hearing impaired adults, and 9 hearing impaired children. In the second study, 12 normal hearing and 8 hearing impaired adult listeners rated the quality of speech in quiet, speech in noise, and music after processing with a different set of NFC parameters. Results showed that the cutoff frequency parameter had more impact on sound quality ratings than the compression ratio, and that the hearing impaired adults were more tolerant to increased frequency compression than normal hearing adults. No statistically significant differences were found in the sound quality ratings of speech-in-noise and music stimuli processed through various NFC settings by hearing impaired listeners. These findings suggest that there may be an acceptable range of NFC settings for hearing impaired individuals where sound quality is not adversely affected. These results may assist an Audiologist in clinical NFC hearing aid fittings for achieving a balance between high frequency audibility and sound quality. PMID:23539261

  4. Compression: Rent or own

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, C.

    1997-07-01

    Historically, the decision to purchase or rent compression has been set as a corporate philosophy. As companies decentralize, there seems to be a shift away from corporate philosophy toward individual profit centers. This has led the decision to rent versus purchase to be looked at on a regional or project-by-project basis.

  5. Improved compression molding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heier, W. C.

    1967-01-01

    Modified compression molding process produces plastic molding compounds that are strong, homogeneous, free of residual stresses, and have improved ablative characteristics. The conventional method is modified by applying a vacuum to the mold during the molding cycle, using a volatile sink, and exercising precise control of the mold closure limits.

  6. The Compressed Video Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, John

    In the fall semester 1995, Southern Arkansas University- Magnolia (SAU-M) began a two semester trial delivering college classes via a compressed video link between SAU-M and its sister school Southern Arkansas University Tech (SAU-T) in Camden. As soon as the University began broadcasting and receiving classes, it was discovered that using the…

  7. Compress Your Files

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branzburg, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    File compression enables data to be squeezed together, greatly reducing file size. Why would someone want to do this? Reducing file size enables the sending and receiving of files over the Internet more quickly, the ability to store more files on the hard drive, and the ability pack many related files into one archive (for example, all files…

  8. Focus on Compression Stockings

    MedlinePlus

    ... soap. Do not use Woolite™ detergent. Use warm water and wash by hand or in the gentle cycle in the washing machine. After rinsing the compression stocking completely, remove excess water by rolling it in a ... the dryer on the deli- cate cycle at a cool temperature. It may be convenient ...

  9. Mosaic image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Kapil A.; Reeves, Stanley J.

    2005-02-01

    Most consumer-level digital cameras use a color filter array to capture color mosaic data followed by demosaicking to obtain full-color images. However, many sophisticated demosaicking algorithms are too complex to implement on-board a camera. To use these algorithms, one must transfer the mosaic data from the camera to a computer without introducing compression losses that could generate artifacts in the demosaicked image. The memory required for losslessly stored mosaic images severely restricts the number of images that can be stored in the camera. Therefore, we need an algorithm to compress the original mosaic data losslessly so that it can later be transferred intact for demosaicking. We propose a new lossless compression technique for mosaic images in this paper. Ordinary image compression methods do not apply to mosaic images because of their non-canonical color sampling structure. Because standard compression methods such as JPEG, JPEG2000, etc. are already available in most digital cameras, we have chosen to build our algorithms using a standard method as a key part of the system. The algorithm begins by separating the mosaic image into 3 color (RGB) components. This is followed by an interpolation or down-sampling operation--depending on the particular variation of the algorithm--that makes all three components the same size. Using the three color components, we form a color image that is coded with JPEG. After appropriately reformatting the data, we calculate the residual between the original image and the coded image and then entropy-code the residual values corresponding to the mosaic data.

  10. Preprototype Vapor Compression Distillation Subsystem development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. D.; Ellis, G. S.; Schubert, F. H.

    1981-01-01

    Vapor Compression Distillation (VCD) has evolved as the most promising approach to reclaim potable water from wastewater for future long-term manned space missions. Life Systems, Inc. (LSI), working with NASA, has developed a preprototype Vapor Compression Distillation Subsystem (VCDS) which processes wastewater at 1.4 kg/h. The preprototype unit weighs 143 kg, occupies a volume of 0.47 cu m, and will reclaim 96 percent of the available wastewater. This unit has been tested by LSI and is scheduled for further testing at NASA-JSC. This paper presents the preprototype VCDS design, configuration, performance data, test results and flight system projections.

  11. Unsteady Aerodynamics - Subsonic Compressible Inviscid Case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, A. V.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a new analytical treatment of Unsteady Aerodynamics - the linear theory covering the subsonic compressible (inviscid) case - drawing on some recent work in Operator Theory and Functional Analysis. The specific new results are: (a) An existence and uniqueness proof for the Laplace transform version of the Possio integral equation as well as a new closed form solution approximation thereof. (b) A new representation for the time-domain solution of the subsonic compressible aerodynamic equations emphasizing in particular the role of the initial conditions.

  12. Compression failure of angle-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peel, Larry D.; Hyer, Michael W.; Shuart, Mark J.

    1991-01-01

    The present work deals with modes and mechanisms of failure in compression of angle-ply laminates. Experimental results were obtained from 42 angle-ply IM7/8551-7a specimens with a lay-up of ((plus or minus theta)/(plus or minus theta)) sub 6s where theta, the off-axis angle, ranged from 0 degrees to 90 degrees. The results showed four failure modes, these modes being a function of off-axis angle. Failure modes include fiber compression, inplane transverse tension, inplane shear, and inplane transverse compression. Excessive interlaminar shear strain was also considered as an important mode of failure. At low off-axis angles, experimentally observed values were considerably lower than published strengths. It was determined that laminate imperfections in the form of layer waviness could be a major factor in reducing compression strength. Previously developed linear buckling and geometrically nonlinear theories were used, with modifications and enhancements, to examine the influence of layer waviness on compression response. The wavy layer is described by a wave amplitude and a wave length. Linear elastic stress-strain response is assumed. The geometrically nonlinear theory, in conjunction with the maximum stress failure criterion, was used to predict compression failure and failure modes for the angle-ply laminates. A range of wave length and amplitudes were used. It was found that for 0 less than or equal to theta less than or equal to 15 degrees failure was most likely due to fiber compression. For 15 degrees less than theta less than or equal to 35 degrees, failure was most likely due to inplane transverse tension. For 35 degrees less than theta less than or equal to 70 degrees, failure was most likely due to inplane shear. For theta less than 70 degrees, failure was most likely due to inplane transverse compression. The fiber compression and transverse tension failure modes depended more heavily on wave length than on wave amplitude. Thus using a single parameter, such as a ratio of wave amplitude to wave length, to describe waviness in a laminate would be inaccurate. Throughout, results for AS4/3502, studied previously, are included for comparison. At low off-axis angles, the AS4/3502 material system was found to be less sensitive to layer waviness than IM7/8551-7a. Analytical predictions were also obtained for laminates with waviness in only some of the layers. For this type of waviness, laminate compression strength could also be considered a function of which layers in the laminate were wavy, and where those wavy layers were. Overall, the geometrically nonlinear model correlates well with experimental results.

  13. Microseismic source imaging in a compressed domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera Rodriguez, Ismael; Sacchi, Mauricio D.

    2014-08-01

    Microseismic monitoring is an essential tool for the characterization of hydraulic fractures. Fast estimation of the parameters that define a microseismic event is relevant to understand and control fracture development. The amount of data contained in the microseismic records however, poses a challenge for fast continuous detection and evaluation of the microseismic source parameters. Work inspired by the emerging field of Compressive Sensing has showed that it is possible to evaluate source parameters in a compressed domain, thereby reducing processing time. This technique performs well in scenarios where the amplitudes of the signal are above the noise level, as is often the case in microseismic monitoring using downhole tools. This paper extends the idea of the compressed domain processing to scenarios of microseismic monitoring using surface arrays, where the signal amplitudes are commonly at the same level as, or below, the noise amplitudes. To achieve this, we resort to the use of an imaging operator, which has previously been found to produce better results in detection and location of microseismic events from surface arrays. The operator in our method is formed by full-waveform elastodynamic Green's functions that are band-limited by a source time function and represented in the frequency domain. Where full-waveform Green's functions are not available, ray tracing can also be used to compute the required Green's functions. Additionally, we introduce the concept of the compressed inverse, which derives directly from the compression of the migration operator using a random matrix. The described methodology reduces processing time at a cost of introducing distortions into the results. However, the amount of distortion can be managed by controlling the level of compression applied to the operator. Numerical experiments using synthetic and real data demonstrate the reductions in processing time that can be achieved and exemplify the process of selecting the compression rate that produces a tolerable amount of distortion into the results.

  14. Sympathetically cooled and compressed positron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelenkovi?, B. M.; Newbury, A. S.; Bollinger, J. J.; Itano, W. M.; Mitchell, T. B.

    2003-06-01

    We report sympathetic cooling and compression of a few thousand positrons by laser-cooled 9Be+ ions in a Penning ion trap. The observed centrifugal separation of the two species implies approximate rigid rotation of the positrons and 9Be+ ions, and a positron density comparable to the 9Be+ ion density of ?4109 cm-3. We use the sharpness of the separation to place a 5-K upper limit on the positron temperature of motion parallel to the magnetic field. The positron lifetime is greater than two weeks in our room-temperature Penning trap.

  15. Compression behavior of single-layer graphenes.

    PubMed

    Frank, Otakar; Tsoukleri, Georgia; Parthenios, John; Papagelis, Konstantinos; Riaz, Ibtsam; Jalil, Rashid; Novoselov, Kostya S; Galiotis, Costas

    2010-06-22

    Central to most applications involving monolayer graphenes is its mechanical response under various stress states. To date most of the work reported is of theoretical nature and refers to tension and compression loading of model graphenes. Most of the experimental work is indeed limited to the bending of single flakes in air and the stretching of flakes up to typically approximately 1% using plastic substrates. Recently we have shown that by employing a cantilever beam we can subject single graphenes to various degrees of axial compression. Here we extend this work much further by measuring in detail both stress uptake and compression buckling strain in single flakes of different geometries. In all cases the mechanical response is monitored by simultaneous Raman measurements through the shift of either the G or 2D phonons of graphene. Despite the infinitely small thickness of the monolayers, the results show that graphenes embedded in plastic beams exhibit remarkable compression buckling strains. For large length (l)-to-width (w) ratios (> or =0.2) the buckling strain is of the order of -0.5% to -0.6%. However, for l/w < 0.2 no failure is observed for strains even higher than -1%. Calculations based on classical Euler analysis show that the buckling strain enhancement provided by the polymer lateral support is more than 6 orders of magnitude compared to that of suspended graphene in air. PMID:20496881

  16. PDF approach for compressible turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, A. T.; Tsai, Y.-L. P.; Raju, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to develop a probability density function (pdf) turbulence model for compressible reacting flows for use with a CFD flow solver. The probability density function of the species mass fraction and enthalpy are obtained by solving a pdf evolution equation using a Monte Carlo scheme. The pdf solution procedure is coupled with a compressible CFD flow solver which provides the velocity and pressure fields. A modeled pdf equation for compressible flows, capable of capturing shock waves and suitable to the present coupling scheme, is proposed and tested. Convergence of the combined finite-volume Monte Carlo solution procedure is discussed, and an averaging procedure is developed to provide smooth Monte-Carlo solutions to ensure convergence. Two supersonic diffusion flames are studied using the proposed pdf model and the results are compared with experimental data; marked improvements over CFD solutions without pdf are observed. Preliminary applications of pdf to 3D flows are also reported.

  17. Electromyographic signal compression based on preprocessing techniques.

    PubMed

    Melo, Wheidima C; Filho, Eddie B L; Júnior, Waldir S S

    2012-01-01

    Recently, electromyographic records have been rearranged into two-dimensional arrays and encoded with image compressors, in the same way as image data. However, as a consequence of this reshaping, the correlation among signal segments is generally lost, which reduces the compression efficiency. In the present work, new preprocessing techniques for encoding electromyographic signals as two-dimensional matrices are presented, namely percentage difference sorting and relative complexity sorting, which have the potential to favor the exploitation of the intersegment dependencies. The experiments were carried out with real isometric records acquired in laboratory, that were first preprocessed and then compressed with a JPEG2000 encoder, showing that the proposed framework is effective and outperforms even state-of-the-art schemes present in the literature, in terms of PRD × Compression Ratio. PMID:23367151

  18. Compressed Sensing for Reconstructing Sparse Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudinger, Kenneth; Joynt, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Compressed sensing techniques have been successfully applied to quantum state tomography, enabling the efficient determination of states that are nearly pure, i.e, of low rank. We show how compressed sensing may be used even when the states to be reconstructed are full rank. Instead, the necessary requirement is that the states be sparse in some known basis (e.g. the Pauli basis). Physical systems at high temperatures in thermal equilibrium are important examples of such states. Using this method, we are able to demonstrate that, like for classical signals, compressed sensing for quantum states exhibits the Donoho-Tanner phase transition. This method will be useful for the determination of the Hamiltonians of artificially constructed quantum systems whose purpose is to simulate condensed-matter models, as it requires many fewer measurements than demanded by standard tomographic procedures. This work was supported in part by ARO, DOD (W911NF-09-1-0439) and NSF (CCR-0635355).

  19. Multireturn compressed gated range imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsagkatakis, Grigorios; Woiselle, Arnaud; Tzagkarakis, George; Bousquet, Marc; Starck, Jean-Luc; Tsakalides, Panagiotis

    2015-03-01

    Active range imaging (RI) systems utilize actively controlled light sources emitting laser pulses that are subsequently recorded by an imaging system and used for depth profile estimation. Classical RI systems are limited by their need for a large number of frames required to obtain high resolution depth information. In this work, we propose an RI approach motivated by the recently proposed compressed sensing framework to dramatically reduce the number of necessary frames. Compressed gated range sensing employs a random gating mechanism along with state-of-the-art reconstruction algorithms for the estimation of the timing of the reflected pulses and the inference of distances. In addition to efficiency, the proposed scheme is also able to identify multiple reflected pulses that can be introduced by semi-transparent elements in the scene such as clouds, smoke, and foliage. Simulations under highly realistic conditions demonstrate that the proposed architecture is capable of accurately recovering the depth profile of a scene from as few as 10 frames at 100 depth bins resolution, even under very challenging conditions. The results further indicate that the proposed architecture is able to extract multiple reflected pulses with a minimal increase in the number of frames, in situations where state-of-the-art methods fail to accurately estimate the correct depth signals.

  20. Longwave infrared compressive hyperspectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Julia R.; Kirby, Michael; Cosofret, Bogdan R.

    2015-06-01

    Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) is developing a longwave infrared (LWIR) compressive sensing hyperspectral imager (CS HSI) based on a single pixel architecture for standoff vapor phase plume detection. The sensor employs novel use of a high throughput stationary interferometer and a digital micromirror device (DMD) converted for LWIR operation in place of the traditional cooled LWIR focal plane array. The CS HSI represents a substantial cost reduction over the state of the art in LWIR HSI instruments. Radiometric improvements for using the DMD in the LWIR spectral range have been identified and implemented. In addition, CS measurement and sparsity bases specifically tailored to the CS HSI instrument and chemical plume imaging have been developed and validated using LWIR hyperspectral image streams of chemical plumes. These bases enable comparable statistics to detection based on uncompressed data. In this paper, we present a system model predicting the overall performance of the CS HSI system. Results from a breadboard build and test validating the system model are reported. In addition, the measurement and sparsity basis work demonstrating the plume detection on compressed hyperspectral images is presented.

  1. Coded aperture compressive temporal imaging.

    PubMed

    Llull, Patrick; Liao, Xuejun; Yuan, Xin; Yang, Jianbo; Kittle, David; Carin, Lawrence; Sapiro, Guillermo; Brady, David J

    2013-05-01

    We use mechanical translation of a coded aperture for code division multiple access compression of video. We discuss the compressed video's temporal resolution and present experimental results for reconstructions of > 10 frames of temporal data per coded snapshot. PMID:23669910

  2. Data Compression for Helioseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löptien, Björn

    2015-10-01

    Efficient data compression will play an important role for several upcoming and planned space missions involving helioseismology, such as Solar Orbiter. Solar Orbiter, to be launched in October 2018, will be the next space mission involving helioseismology. The main characteristic of Solar Orbiter lies in its orbit. The spacecraft will have an inclined solar orbit, reaching a solar latitude of up to 33 deg. This will allow, for the first time, probing the solar poles using local helioseismology. In addition, combined observations of Solar Orbiter and another helioseismic instrument will be used to study the deep interior of the Sun using stereoscopic helioseismology. The Doppler velocity and continuum intensity images of the Sun required for helioseismology will be provided by the Polarimetric and Helioseismic Imager (PHI). Major constraints for helioseismology with Solar Orbiter are the low telemetry and the (probably) short observing time. In addition, helioseismology of the solar poles requires observations close to the solar limb, even from the inclined orbit of Solar Orbiter. This gives rise to systematic errors. In this thesis, I derived a first estimate of the impact of lossy data compression on helioseismology. I put special emphasis on the Solar Orbiter mission, but my results are applicable to other planned missions as well. First, I studied the performance of PHI for helioseismology. Based on simulations of solar surface convection and a model of the PHI instrument, I generated a six-hour time-series of synthetic Doppler velocity images with the same properties as expected for PHI. Here, I focused on the impact of the point spread function, the spacecraft jitter, and of the photon noise level. The derived power spectra of solar oscillations suggest that PHI will be suitable for helioseismology. The low telemetry of Solar Orbiter requires extensive compression of the helioseismic data obtained by PHI. I evaluated the influence of data compression using data provided by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). HMI is an instrument onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), launched in 2010. It provides full disk images with high cadence of the continuum intensity, the Doppler-velocity and the full magnetic field vector. Using HMI Doppler-velocity maps, I showed that the signal-to-noise ratio of supergranulation in time-distance helioseismology is robust regarding lossy data compression. In addition, I proved that the accuracy and precision of probing differential rotation with local correlation tracking of granulation is not severely affected by extensive lossy data compression. This indicates that the low telemetry of Solar Orbiter may not be a major challenge for helioseismology.

  3. Design Point for a Spheromak Compression Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, Simon; Romero-Talamas, Carlos A.; O'Bryan, John; Stuber, James; Darpa Spheromak Team

    2015-11-01

    Two principal issues for the spheromak concept remain to be addressed experimentally: formation efficiency and confinement scaling. We are therefore developing a design point for a spheromak experiment that will be heated by adiabatic compression, utilizing the CORSICA and NIMROD codes as well as analytic modeling with target parameters R_initial =0.3m, R_final =0.1m, T_initial =0.2keV, T_final =1.8keV, n_initial =1019m-3 and n_final = 1021m-3, with radial convergence of C =3. This low convergence differentiates the concept from MTF with C =10 or more, since the plasma will be held in equilibrium throughout compression. We present results from CORSICA showing the placement of coils and passive structure to ensure stability during compression, and design of the capacitor bank needed to both form the target plasma and compress it. We specify target parameters for the compression in terms of plasma beta, formation efficiency and energy confinement. Work performed under DARPA grant N66001-14-1-4044.

  4. Ultrafast compression: past, present, and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Michael

    2015-06-01

    In the nearly 20 years since the first sub-ps time resolution compression wave measurements, ultrafast compression experiments have progressed from simple demonstrations to robust discoveries of extreme phenomena spanning material plasticity, solid-solid phase transitions, and shock induced chemistry. At strain rates above 109 s-1, many usual assumptions about material response no longer apply - virtually every system investigated on sub-ns time scales exhibits phenomena which are unfamiliar to conventional intuition about compression waves. This diverse of range of phenomena reflects the fundamental complexity of dynamic material behavior, but it has also been a significant impediment to a full understanding of material compression. Nonetheless, ultrafast experiments afford a number of practical advantages, primarily related to scale. Using an inexpensive table-top laser, it is possible to obtain information on materials at extreme conditions with a low laser pulse energy and a high data rate. In this talk, I will briefly review the history of ultrafast compression, significant results, and future opportunities. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. The New CCSDS Image Compression Recommendation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Pen-Shu; Armbruster, Philippe; Kiely, Aaron; Masschelein, Bart; Moury, Gilles; Schaefer, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) data compression working group has recently adopted a recommendation for image data compression, with a final release expected in 2005. The algorithm adopted in the recommendation consists of a two-dimensional discrete wavelet transform of the image, followed by progressive bit-plane coding of the transformed data. The algorithm can provide both lossless and lossy compression, and allows a user to directly control the compressed data volume or the fidelity with which the wavelet-transformed data can be reconstructed. The algorithm is suitable for both frame-based image data and scan-based sensor data, and has applications for near-Earth and deep-space missions. The standard will be accompanied by free software sources on a future web site. An Application-Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) implementation of the compressor is currently under development. This paper describes the compression algorithm along with the requirements that drove the selection of the algorithm. Performance results and comparisons with other compressors are given for a test set of space images.

  6. Compressed Air/Vacuum Transportation Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Shyamal

    2011-03-01

    General theory of compressed air/vacuum transportation will be presented. In this transportation, a vehicle (such as an automobile or a rail car) is powered either by compressed air or by air at near vacuum pressure. Four version of such transportation is feasible. In all versions, a ``c-shaped'' plastic or ceramic pipe lies buried a few inches under the ground surface. This pipe carries compressed air or air at near vacuum pressure. In type I transportation, a vehicle draws compressed air (or vacuum) from this buried pipe. Using turbine or reciprocating air cylinder, mechanical power is generated from compressed air (or from vacuum). This mechanical power transferred to the wheels of an automobile (or a rail car) drives the vehicle. In type II-IV transportation techniques, a horizontal force is generated inside the plastic (or ceramic) pipe. A set of vertical and horizontal steel bars is used to transmit this force to the automobile on the road (or to a rail car on rail track). The proposed transportation system has following merits: virtually accident free; highly energy efficient; pollution free and it will not contribute to carbon dioxide emission. Some developmental work on this transportation will be needed before it can be used by the traveling public. The entire transportation system could be computer controlled.

  7. Multimode Data-Compression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Wai-Chi

    1996-01-01

    Data-compression system developed to satisfy need for high-speed, high-performance compression of data from sources as diverse as medical images, high-definition television images, audio signals, readouts from scientific instruments, and binary data files. Maximum data-transmission capability of communication channel or storage capacity of storage device multiplied by approximately compression ratio. Various combinations of lossless and lossy compression chosen to suit various data streams.

  8. Progressive transmission and compression images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiely, A. B.

    1996-01-01

    We describe an image data compression strategy featuring progressive transmission. The method exploits subband coding and arithmetic coding for compression. We analyze the Laplacian probability density, which closely approximates the statistics of individual subbands, to determine a strategy for ordering the compressed subband data in a way that improves rate-distortion performance. Results are presented for a test image.

  9. Predictive Encoding in Text Compression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raita, Timo; Teuhola, Jukka

    1989-01-01

    Presents three text compression methods of increasing power and evaluates each based on the trade-off between compression gain and processing time. The advantages of using hash coding for speed and optimal arithmetic coding to successor information for compression gain are discussed. (26 references) (Author/CLB)

  10. Digital cinema video compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husak, Walter

    2003-05-01

    The Motion Picture Industry began a transition from film based distribution and projection to digital distribution and projection several years ago. Digital delivery and presentation offers the prospect to increase the quality of the theatrical experience for the audience, reduce distribution costs to the distributors, and create new business opportunities for the theater owners and the studios. Digital Cinema also presents an opportunity to provide increased flexibility and security of the movies for the content owners and the theater operators. Distribution of content via electronic means to theaters is unlike any of the traditional applications for video compression. The transition from film-based media to electronic media represents a paradigm shift in video compression techniques and applications that will be discussed in this paper.

  11. Vented compression molding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccree, J. O.; Erwin, L.

    1982-01-01

    A new process, vented compression molding, is developed for molding low density particulates, such as ablative materials used in the Space Shuttle. This process is a modification of standard compression molding that uses a perforated surface as the molding surface. An excess of material is used to fill the mold cavity and this material is forced through the openings in the surface of the mold as the mold closes. This process creates frictional forces, which can be determined approximately by Mohr-Coulomb yield criterion, generating the pressure that compacts the material. The pressure in the mold is shown to be governed by the geometry of the openings and the mechanical properties of the particulate, and not by the displacement or the volume of the mold. It is determined that this uncoupling of the pressure-displacement relationship allows uniform material distribution and compaction without requiring large-scale flow of the particulates.

  12. Compressive spectral polarization imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Chen; Arguello, Henry; Arce, Gonzalo R.; Lorenz, Virginia O.

    2014-05-01

    We present a compressive spectral polarization imager driven by a rotating prism and a colored detector with a micropolarizer array. The prism which shears the scene along one spatial axis according to its wavelength components is successively rotated to different angles as measurement shots are taken. With 0°, 45°, 90°, 135° linear micropolarizers randomly distributed, the micropolarizer array is matched to the detector thus the the first three Stokes parameters of the scene are compressively sensed. The four dimensional (4D) data cube is thus projected onto the two dimensional (2D) FPA. Multiple snapshots are obtained for scenes with detailed spatial and spectral content. The 4D spectral-polarization data cube is reconstructed from the 2D measurements via nonlinear optimization with sparsity constraints. Polarization state planes (degree of linear polarization and angle of polarization) for each spectral slice of the hypercube are presented.

  13. Advances in data compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davisson, L. D.; Gray, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    A rigorous real-variables treatment of general data compression and encoding problems, centered on formulation and proof of relevant existence theorems and a unified formulation of source coding (both noiseless and with a fidelity criterion) in inaccurately or incompletely specified statistical environments. Difficulties in modeling of sources with unknown or imperfectly known statistical descriptions are analyzed and source codes (SC) are classified (variable-rate noiseless SC, fixed-rate noiseless SC) and analyzed, along with types of code sequences (weighted-universal, maximin-universal, strongly or weakly minimax-universal). Universal coding on video data, variable-rate coding with distortion, and distortion-rate functions are discussed. Design strategies for universal coding algorithms are suggested, but the article is not oriented to specific methods of synthesizing data compression systems.

  14. Dickinson High School. Career Awareness. Nine Week Mini-Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boespflug, LeRoy R.

    This guide contains supportive materials for a nine-week mini-unit developed for and utilized within the framework of the tenth-grade required Career Awareness Class of Dickinson High School, North Dakota. The first section on work and the work ethic presents a career development glossary for career education and two essays on identifying the…

  15. Cerebral compression by myeloma.

    PubMed Central

    Stark, R J; Henson, R A

    1981-01-01

    A patient presented with right hemiparesis, dysphasia and a large, palpable, left frontoparietal mass arising from the calvarial diploe. A diagnosis of multiple myeloma was made on radiological and biochemical grounds, together with bone marrow examination. Few cases of cerebral compression by a massive plasmacytoma have been reported, but in some surgical management produced clinical deterioration. The present case was treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy, with satisfactory results. Images PMID:7310424

  16. Basic cluster compression algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbert, E. E.; Lee, J.

    1980-01-01

    Feature extraction and data compression of LANDSAT data is accomplished by BCCA program which reduces costs associated with transmitting, storing, distributing, and interpreting multispectral image data. Algorithm uses spatially local clustering to extract features from image data to describe spectral characteristics of data set. Approach requires only simple repetitive computations, and parallel processing can be used for very high data rates. Program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on SEL 32/55.

  17. Compression of electromyographic signals using image compression techniques.

    PubMed

    Costa, Marcus Vinícius Chaffim; Berger, Pedro de Azevedo; da Rocha, Adson Ferreira; de Carvalho, João Luiz Azevedo; Nascimento, Francisco Assis de Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    Despite the growing interest in the transmission and storage of electromyographic signals for long periods of time, few studies have addressed the compression of such signals. In this article we present an algorithm for compression of electromyographic signals based on the JPEG2000 coding system. Although the JPEG2000 codec was originally designed for compression of still images, we show that it can also be used to compress EMG signals for both isotonic and isometric contractions. For EMG signals acquired during isometric contractions, the proposed algorithm provided compression factors ranging from 75 to 90%, with an average PRD ranging from 3.75% to 13.7%. For isotonic EMG signals, the algorithm provided compression factors ranging from 75 to 90%, with an average PRD ranging from 3.4% to 7%. The compression results using the JPEG2000 algorithm were compared to those using other algorithms based on the wavelet transform. PMID:19163324

  18. The Four Day School Week. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Can four-day school weeks help districts save money? How do districts overcome the barriers of moving to a four-day week? What is the effect of a four-day week on students, staff and the community? This paper enumerates the benefits for students and teachers of four-day school weeks. Recommendations for implementation of a four-day week are also…

  19. A comparative study of lossless compression algorithms on MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottipati, Srikanth; Goddard, Jamal; Grossberg, Michael; Gladkova, Irina

    2007-09-01

    This paper reports a comparative study of lossless compression algorithms for MODIS data. MODIS, The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, is a 36 band Visible and IR multispectral imager aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites, having spatial resolution ranging from 0.250 to 1 kilometer and spectral resolution ranging from 0.405 -0.420 to 4.482-4.549 microns. MODIS data rates are 10.6 Mbps (peak daytime); and 6.1 Mbps (orbital average). Faced with such an enormous volume of data on a current generation imager, this study provides a comparison of current compression algorithms as a baseline for future work. The Hierarchical Data Format (HDF) is standard format selected for data archiving and distribution within the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). Currently this system handles over one terabyte of data daily, and this volume continues to increase over time. With growing satellite Earth science multispectral imager volume data compression, it becomes increasingly important to evaluate which compression algorithms are most appropriate for data management in transmission and archiving. This comparative compression study uses a wide range standard implementations of the leading lossless compression algorithms. Examples include image compression algorithms such as PNG and JPEG2000, and widely-used file compression formats such as BZIP2 and 7z. This study includes a comparison with the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) most recent recommended compression standard. by a significant margin.

  20. Learning random networks for compression of still and moving images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelenbe, Erol; Sungur, Mert; Cramer, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    Image compression for both still and moving images is an extremely important area of investigation, with numerous applications to videoconferencing, interactive education, home entertainment, and potential applications to earth observations, medical imaging, digital libraries, and many other areas. We describe work on a neural network methodology to compress/decompress still and moving images. We use the 'point-process' type neural network model which is closer to biophysical reality than standard models, and yet is mathematically much more tractable. We currently achieve compression ratios of the order of 120:1 for moving grey-level images, based on a combination of motion detection and compression. The observed signal-to-noise ratio varies from values above 25 to more than 35. The method is computationally fast so that compression and decompression can be carried out in real-time. It uses the adaptive capabilities of a set of neural networks so as to select varying compression ratios in real-time as a function of quality achieved. It also uses a motion detector which will avoid retransmitting portions of the image which have varied little from the previous frame. Further improvements can be achieved by using on-line learning during compression, and by appropriate compensation of nonlinearities in the compression/decompression scheme. We expect to go well beyond the 250:1 compression level for color images with good quality levels.

  1. Extracting Constitutive Stress-Strain Behavior of Microscopic Phases by Micropillar Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J. J.; Walters, Jennifer; Wang, Mingyue; Chawla, N.; Rohatgi, Aashish

    2013-02-01

    The manuscript describes how micropillar compression technique can be used to perform uniaxial compression tests within individual grains so as to generate local-scale constitutive behavior which, otherwise cannot be ascertained from the conventional macroscale compression test techniques. The manuscript uses steel and magnesium alloys as an example. A portion of the magnesium work was performed at PNNL.

  2. Compression of Semesters or Intensity of Study: What is it that Increases Student Success?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spurling, Steven

    This study examined the relationship between intensity of study (defined as more hours per week of class within a subject matter area) and student success. The researcher identified two possible methods for increasing the intensity of study: (1) Compression Hypothesis--shortening the length of terms and increasing the amount of time per week spent…

  3. Curriculum Characteristics of Time-Compressed Course in a U.S. Higher Education Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyun, Eunsook; Kretovics, Mark; Crowe, Alicia

    2006-01-01

    The study explored characteristics of the curriculum practice of higher education faculty in the context of time-compressed (e.g., 5-6 weeks) courses as compared with regular term (15-16 weeks) courses. The researchers used open-ended questions on a web-based survey at a large doctoral-extensive university in a Midwestern state in the United…

  4. Fast Compressive Tracking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kaihua; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Ming-Hsuan

    2014-10-01

    It is a challenging task to develop effective and efficient appearance models for robust object tracking due to factors such as pose variation, illumination change, occlusion, and motion blur. Existing online tracking algorithms often update models with samples from observations in recent frames. Despite much success has been demonstrated, numerous issues remain to be addressed. First, while these adaptive appearance models are data-dependent, there does not exist sufficient amount of data for online algorithms to learn at the outset. Second, online tracking algorithms often encounter the drift problems. As a result of self-taught learning, misaligned samples are likely to be added and degrade the appearance models. In this paper, we propose a simple yet effective and efficient tracking algorithm with an appearance model based on features extracted from a multiscale image feature space with data-independent basis. The proposed appearance model employs non-adaptive random projections that preserve the structure of the image feature space of objects. A very sparse measurement matrix is constructed to efficiently extract the features for the appearance model. We compress sample images of the foreground target and the background using the same sparse measurement matrix. The tracking task is formulated as a binary classification via a naive Bayes classifier with online update in the compressed domain. A coarse-to-fine search strategy is adopted to further reduce the computational complexity in the detection procedure. The proposed compressive tracking algorithm runs in real-time and performs favorably against state-of-the-art methods on challenging sequences in terms of efficiency, accuracy and robustness. PMID:26352631

  5. International magnetic pulse compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirbie, H. C.; Newton, M. A.; Siemens, P. D.

    1991-04-01

    Although pulsed-power engineering traditionally has been practiced by a fairly small, close community in the areas of defense and energy research, it is becoming more common in high-power, high-energy commercial pursuits such as material processing and lasers. This paper is a synopsis of the Feb. 12-14, 1990 workshop on magnetic switching as it applies primarily to pulse compression (power transformation). During the course of the Workshop at Granlibakken, a great deal of information was amassed and a keen insight into both the problems and opportunities as to the use of this switching approach was developed. The segmented workshop format proved ideal for identifying key aspects affecting optimum performance in a variety of applications. Individual groups of experts addressed network and system modeling, magnetic materials, power conditioning, core cooling and dielectrics, and finally circuits and application. At the end, they came together to consolidate their input and formulate the workshop's conclusions, identifying roadblocks or suggesting research projects, particularly as they apply to magnetic switching's trump card - its high-average-power-handling capability (at least on a burst-mode basis). The workshop was especially productive both in the quality and quantity of information transfer in an environment conducive to a free and open exchange of ideas. We will not delve into the organization proper of this meeting, rather we wish to commend to the interested reader this volume, which provides the definitive and most up-to-date compilation on the subject of magnetic pulse compression from underlying principles to current state of the art as well as the prognosis for the future of magnetic pulse compression as a consensus of the workshop's organizers and participants.

  6. International magnetic pulse compression

    SciTech Connect

    Kirbie, H.C.; Newton, M.A.; Siemens, P.D.

    1991-04-01

    Although pulsed-power engineering traditionally has been practiced by a fairly small, close community in the areas of defense and energy research, it is becoming more common in high-power, high-energy commercial pursuits such as material processing and lasers. This paper is a synopsis of the Feb. 12--14, 1990 workshop on magnetic switching as it applies primarily to pulse compression (power transformation). During the course of the Workshop at Granlibakken, a great deal of information was amassed and a keen insight into both the problems and opportunities as to the use of this switching approach was developed. The segmented workshop format proved ideal for identifying key aspects affecting optimum performance in a variety of applications. Individual groups of experts addressed network and system modeling, magnetic materials, power conditioning, core cooling and dielectrics, and finally circuits and application. At the end, they came together to consolidate their input and formulate the workshop's conclusions, identifying roadblocks or suggesting research projects, particularly as they apply to magnetic switching's trump card -- its high-average-power-handling capability (at least on a burst-mode basis). The workshop was especially productive both in the quality and quantity of information transfer in an environment conducive to a free and open exchange of ideas. We will not delve into the organization proper of this meeting, rather we wish to commend to the interested reader this volume, which provides the definitive and most up-to-date compilation on the subject of magnetic pulse compression from underlying principles to current state of the art as well as the prognosis for the future of magnetic pulse compression as a consensus of the workshop's organizers and participants.

  7. [Evaluation of irreversible compressed images in computed radiography using physical image quality measures].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Haruyuki; Tsai, Du-Yih; Lee, Yongbum; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Miyazaki, Masanori; Kuramochi, Yoshio; Kojima, Katsuyuki

    2009-12-20

    Joint photographic experts group(JPEG)and JPEG2000 are widely used as image compression algorithms in medical image database systems. Compressed images have been mainly evaluated by visual assessment on acceptable compression levels in clinical studies. However, to the best of our knowledge, little work has been done to clarify image properties based on physical analysis. In this work, investigations were made to clarify image properties based on physical analysis and to discuss the major causes of degradation related to compression ratios. The physical properties of JPEG2000-compressed and JPEG-compressed images in computed radiography(CR)were compared by measuring the characteristic curve, modulation transfer function(MTF), noise power spectrum(NPS), peak signal-to-noise ratio(PSNR), contrast-to-noise ratio(CNR), and noise equivalent quanta(NEQ). In the MTF measurement, the MTFs of JPEG at high compression ratio showed pronounced degradation at all frequencies. The NPS values of JPEG2000 tend to decrease considerably compared to that of the JPEG at all frequencies with the increase of compression ratio. Furthermore, JPEG2000 images showed higher PSNR, CNR, and NEQ values than JPEG images in the same compression ratio. In these signal-to-noise ratio measurements, good reproducibility of JPEG2000 images was achieved. Overall, JPEG2000 compressed images were far superior to JPEG compressed images. In the physical properties measured, these physical analyses are useful to comprehend physical properties for each irreversible compressed image related to compression ratios in CR. PMID:20124739

  8. SeqCompress: an algorithm for biological sequence compression.

    PubMed

    Sardaraz, Muhammad; Tahir, Muhammad; Ikram, Ataul Aziz; Bajwa, Hassan

    2014-10-01

    The growth of Next Generation Sequencing technologies presents significant research challenges, specifically to design bioinformatics tools that handle massive amount of data efficiently. Biological sequence data storage cost has become a noticeable proportion of total cost in the generation and analysis. Particularly increase in DNA sequencing rate is significantly outstripping the rate of increase in disk storage capacity, which may go beyond the limit of storage capacity. It is essential to develop algorithms that handle large data sets via better memory management. This article presents a DNA sequence compression algorithm SeqCompress that copes with the space complexity of biological sequences. The algorithm is based on lossless data compression and uses statistical model as well as arithmetic coding to compress DNA sequences. The proposed algorithm is compared with recent specialized compression tools for biological sequences. Experimental results show that proposed algorithm has better compression gain as compared to other existing algorithms. PMID:25173568

  9. Comparative data compression techniques and multi-compression results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, M. R.; Ibrahimy, M. I.; Motakabber, S. M. A.; Ferdaus, M. M.; Khan, M. N. H.

    2013-12-01

    Data compression is very necessary in business data processing, because of the cost savings that it offers and the large volume of data manipulated in many business applications. It is a method or system for transmitting a digital image (i.e., an array of pixels) from a digital data source to a digital data receiver. More the size of the data be smaller, it provides better transmission speed and saves time. In this communication, we always want to transmit data efficiently and noise freely. This paper will provide some compression techniques for lossless text type data compression and comparative result of multiple and single compression, that will help to find out better compression output and to develop compression algorithms.

  10. Image Compression Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Rice algorithm is a "lossless" compression algorithm; it takes an image or other data that has been broken down into short strings of digital data, then processes each string mathematically to reduce the amount of memory required to store or transmit them. It is particularly useful in medical, scientific or engineering applications where all data must be preserved. Originally developed at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the technology is marketed by Advanced Hardware Architectures, a company started by a former employee of the NASA Microelectronics Research Center.

  11. Compression machine cavity control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floersch, R. H.

    1982-06-01

    A system design that uses closed loop control of the hydraulic system of a compression transfer press (used to make filled elastomer parts) has resulted in improved accuracy and repeatability in the speed and pressure control segments during the critical forming stages before part cure. The design uses a microprocessor to supply set points and timing functions to the control system. The cascade control system consists of a specially designed outer loop controller that feeds set point information to the inner loop valve controller. Presented are the final hardware and software architectures for this design, as well as a report on system performance.

  12. Sampling video compression system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsumoto, Y.; Lum, H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A system for transmitting video signal of compressed bandwidth is described. The transmitting station is provided with circuitry for dividing a picture to be transmitted into a plurality of blocks containing a checkerboard pattern of picture elements. Video signals along corresponding diagonal rows of picture elements in the respective blocks are regularly sampled. A transmitter responsive to the output of the sampling circuitry is included for transmitting the sampled video signals of one frame at a reduced bandwidth over a communication channel. The receiving station is provided with a frame memory for temporarily storing transmitted video signals of one frame at the original high bandwidth frequency.

  13. Avalanches in Wood Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkinen, T.; Miksic, A.; Ovaska, M.; Alava, Mikko J.

    2015-07-01

    Wood is a multiscale material exhibiting a complex viscoplastic response. We study avalanches in small wood samples in compression. "Woodquakes" measured by acoustic emission are surprisingly similar to earthquakes and crackling noise in rocks and laboratory tests on brittle materials. Both the distributions of event energies and of waiting (silent) times follow power laws. The stress-strain response exhibits clear signatures of localization of deformation to "weak spots" or softwood layers, as identified using digital image correlation. Even though material structure-dependent localization takes place, the avalanche behavior remains scale-free.

  14. Avalanches in Wood Compression.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, T; Miksic, A; Ovaska, M; Alava, Mikko J

    2015-07-31

    Wood is a multiscale material exhibiting a complex viscoplastic response. We study avalanches in small wood samples in compression. "Woodquakes" measured by acoustic emission are surprisingly similar to earthquakes and crackling noise in rocks and laboratory tests on brittle materials. Both the distributions of event energies and of waiting (silent) times follow power laws. The stress-strain response exhibits clear signatures of localization of deformation to "weak spots" or softwood layers, as identified using digital image correlation. Even though material structure-dependent localization takes place, the avalanche behavior remains scale-free. PMID:26274428

  15. Ultrasound beamforming using compressed data.

    PubMed

    Li, Yen-Feng; Li, Pai-Chi

    2012-05-01

    The rapid advancements in electronics technologies have made software-based beamformers for ultrasound array imaging feasible, thus facilitating the rapid development of high-performance and potentially low-cost systems. However, one challenge to realizing a fully software-based system is transferring data from the analog front end to the software back end at rates of up to a few gigabits per second. This study investigated the use of data compression to reduce the data transfer requirements and optimize the associated trade-off with beamforming quality. JPEG and JPEG2000 compression techniques were adopted. The acoustic data of a line phantom were acquired with a 128-channel array transducer at a center frequency of 3.5 MHz, and the acoustic data of a cyst phantom were acquired with a 64-channel array transducer at a center frequency of 3.33 MHz. The receive-channel data associated with each transmit event are separated into 8 × 8 blocks and several tiles before JPEG and JPEG2000 data compression is applied, respectively. In one scheme, the compression was applied to raw RF data, while in another only the amplitude of baseband data was compressed. The maximum compression ratio of RF data compression to produce an average error of lower than 5 dB was 15 with JPEG compression and 20 with JPEG2000 compression. The image quality is higher with baseband amplitude data compression than with RF data compression; although the maximum overall compression ratio (compared with the original RF data size), which was limited by the data size of uncompressed phase data, was lower than 12, the average error in this case was lower than 1 dB when the compression ratio was lower than 8. PMID:22434817

  16. Blind compressive sensing dynamic MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lingala, Sajan Goud; Jacob, Mathews

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel blind compressive sensing (BCS) frame work to recover dynamic magnetic resonance images from undersampled measurements. This scheme models the dynamic signal as a sparse linear combination of temporal basis functions, chosen from a large dictionary. In contrast to classical compressed sensing, the BCS scheme simultaneously estimates the dictionary and the sparse coefficients from the undersampled measurements. Apart from the sparsity of the coefficients, the key difference of the BCS scheme with current low rank methods is the non-orthogonal nature of the dictionary basis functions. Since the number of degrees of freedom of the BCS model is smaller than that of the low-rank methods, it provides improved reconstructions at high acceleration rates. We formulate the reconstruction as a constrained optimization problem; the objective function is the linear combination of a data consistency term and sparsity promoting ℓ1 prior of the coefficients. The Frobenius norm dictionary constraint is used to avoid scale ambiguity. We introduce a simple and efficient majorize-minimize algorithm, which decouples the original criterion into three simpler sub problems. An alternating minimization strategy is used, where we cycle through the minimization of three simpler problems. This algorithm is seen to be considerably faster than approaches that alternates between sparse coding and dictionary estimation, as well as the extension of K-SVD dictionary learning scheme. The use of the ℓ1 penalty and Frobenius norm dictionary constraint enables the attenuation of insignificant basis functions compared to the ℓ0 norm and column norm constraint assumed in most dictionary learning algorithms; this is especially important since the number of basis functions that can be reliably estimated is restricted by the available measurements. We also observe that the proposed scheme is more robust to local minima compared to K-SVD method, which relies on greedy sparse coding. Our phase transition experiments demonstrate that the BCS scheme provides much better recovery rates than classical Fourier-based CS schemes, while being only marginally worse than the dictionary aware setting. Since the overhead in additionally estimating the dictionary is low, this method can be very useful in dynamic MRI applications, where the signal is not sparse in known dictionaries. We demonstrate the utility of the BCS scheme in accelerating contrast enhanced dynamic data. We observe superior reconstruction performance with the BCS scheme in comparison to existing low rank and compressed sensing schemes. PMID:23542951

  17. Digital mammography, cancer screening: Factors important for image compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Laurence P.; Blaine, G. James; Doi, Kunio; Yaffe, Martin J.; Shtern, Faina; Brown, G. Stephen; Winfield, Daniel L.; Kallergi, Maria

    1993-01-01

    The use of digital mammography for breast cancer screening poses several novel problems such as development of digital sensors, computer assisted diagnosis (CAD) methods for image noise suppression, enhancement, and pattern recognition, compression algorithms for image storage, transmission, and remote diagnosis. X-ray digital mammography using novel direct digital detection schemes or film digitizers results in large data sets and, therefore, image compression methods will play a significant role in the image processing and analysis by CAD techniques. In view of the extensive compression required, the relative merit of 'virtually lossless' versus lossy methods should be determined. A brief overview is presented here of the developments of digital sensors, CAD, and compression methods currently proposed and tested for mammography. The objective of the NCI/NASA Working Group on Digital Mammography is to stimulate the interest of the image processing and compression scientific community for this medical application and identify possible dual use technologies within the NASA centers.

  18. Designing a measure of Complexity Compression in registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Krichbaum, Kathleen E; Peden-McAlpine, Cynthia; Diemert, Carol; Koenig, Patty; Mueller, Christine; Savik, Kay

    2011-02-01

    Researchers in Minnesota have described and validated the phenomenon of Complexity Compression in qualitative studies of registered nurses. Analysis of themes from this research led to the design of a survey to assess nurses' agreement with variables that contribute to their experience of Complexity Compression. The survey was administered to a random sample of 199 registered nurses in Minnesota. Exploratory factor analysis was used to evaluate the attributes of Complexity Compression and its underlying structure. Three factors emerged that explained 51.4% of the variance in responses: work of nursing, systems, and personal factors. Internal consistency of the factors ranged from .79 to .89. Validity of the survey for assessment of Complexity Compression in hospital-based nurses was supported. The construct of Complexity Compression and its contributing factors will be tested in future studies with nurses in a variety of health care settings. PMID:20962333

  19. Compression of Martian atmosphere for production of oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, D. C.; Cutler, A. H.; Nolan, P. E.

    1991-01-01

    The compression of CO2 from the Martian atmosphere for production of O2 via an electrochemical cell is addressed. Design specifications call for an oxygen production rate of 10 kg per day and for compression of 50 times that mass of CO2. Those specifications require a compression rate of over 770 cfm at standard Martian temperature and pressure (SMTP). Much of the CO2 being compressed represents waste, unless it can be recycled. Recycling can reduce the volume of gas that must be compressed to 40 cfm at SMTP. That volume reduction represents significant mass savings in the compressor, heating equipment, filters, and energy source. Successful recycle of the gas requires separation of CO (produced in the electrochemical cell) from CO2, N2, and Ar found in the Martian atmosphere. That aspect was the focus of this work.

  20. Band gap engineering of MoS2 upon compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Suárez, Miquel; Neri, Igor; Rurali, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is a promising candidate for 2D nanoelectronic devices, which shows a direct band-gap for monolayer structure. In this work we study the electronic structure of MoS2 upon both compressive and tensile strains with first-principles density-functional calculations for different number of layers. The results show that the band-gap can be engineered for experimentally attainable strains (i.e., ±0.15). However, compressive strain can result in bucking that can prevent the use of large compressive strain. We then studied the stability of the compression, calculating the critical strain that results in the on-set of buckling for free-standing nanoribbons of different lengths. The results demonstrate that short structures, or few-layer MoS2, show semi-conductor to metal transition upon compressive strain without bucking.

  1. Optimal color coding for compression of true color images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musatenko, Yurij S.; Kurashov, Vitalij N.

    1998-11-01

    In the paper we present the method that improves lossy compression of the true color or other multispectral images. The essence of the method is to project initial color planes into Karhunen-Loeve (KL) basis that gives completely decorrelated representation for the image and to compress basis functions instead of the planes. To do that the new fast algorithm of true KL basis construction with low memory consumption is suggested and our recently proposed scheme for finding optimal losses of Kl functions while compression is used. Compare to standard JPEG compression of the CMYK images the method provides the PSNR gain from 0.2 to 2 dB for the convenient compression ratios. Experimental results are obtained for high resolution CMYK images. It is demonstrated that presented scheme could work on common hardware.

  2. Educators' Guide to Ally Week

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN), 2010

    2010-01-01

    An ally is an individual who speaks out and stands up for a person or group that is targeted and/or discriminated against. An ally works to end oppression by supporting and advocating for people who are stigmatized, or treated unfairly because of who they are. In this context, Allies are referred to as people who do not identify as LGBT (lesbian,…

  3. Bilateral contusion-compression model of incomplete traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Forgione, Nicole; Karadimas, Spyridon K; Foltz, Warren D; Satkunendrarajah, Kajana; Lip, Alyssa; Fehlings, Michael G

    2014-11-01

    Despite the increasing incidence and prevalence of cervical spinal cord injury (cSCI), we lack clinically relevant animal models that can be used to study the pathomechanisms of this injury and test new therapies. Here, we characterize a moderate cervical contusion-compression model in rats that is similar to incomplete traumatic cSCI in humans. We characterized the effects of 18-g clip-compression injury at cervical level C6 over an 8-week recovery period. Using Luxol fast blue/hematoxylin-eosin staining in combination with quantitative stereology, we determined that 18-g injury results in loss of gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), as well as in cavity formation. Magnetization transfer and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging were used to analyze lesion dynamics in vivo. This analysis demonstrated that both techniques are able to differentiate between the injury epicenter, subpial rim, and WM distal to the injury. Neurobehavioral assessment of locomotor function using Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scoring and CatWalk revealed limited recovery from clip-compression injury at C6. Testing of forelimb function using grip strength demonstrated significant forelimb dysfunction, similar to the loss of upper-limb motor function observed in human cSCI. Sensory-evoked potentials recorded from the forelimb and Hoffman reflex recorded from the hindlimb confirmed the fore- and hindlimb deficits observed in our neurobehavioral analysis. Here, we have characterized a clip-compression model of incomplete cSCI that closely models this condition in humans. This work directly addresses the current lack of clinically relevant models of cSCI and will thus contribute to improved success in the translation of putative therapies into the clinic. PMID:24949719

  4. Turbulence modeling for high speed compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, Suresh

    1993-01-01

    The following grant objectives were delineated in the proposal to NASA: to offer course work in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and related areas to enable mechanical engineering students at North Carolina A&T State University (N.C. A&TSU) to pursue M.S. studies in CFD, and to enable students and faculty to engage in research in high speed compressible flows. Since no CFD-related activity existed at N.C. A&TSU before the start of the NASA grant period, training of students in the CFD area and initiation of research in high speed compressible flows were proposed as the key aspects of the project. To that end, graduate level courses in CFD, boundary layer theory, and fluid dynamics were offered. This effort included initiating a CFD course for graduate students. Also, research work was performed on studying compressibility effects in high speed flows. Specifically, a modified compressible dissipation model, which included a fourth order turbulent Mach number term, was incorporated into the SPARK code and verified for the air-air mixing layer case. The results obtained for this case were compared with a wide variety of experimental data to discern the trends in the mixing layer growth rates with varying convective Mach numbers. Comparison of the predictions of the study with the results of several analytical models was also carried out. The details of the research study are described in the publication entitled 'Compressibility Effects in Modeling Turbulent High Speed Mixing Layers,' which is attached to this report.

  5. GPA/GPSA/OSU-Okmulgee natural gas compression technician training program

    SciTech Connect

    Doede, S.

    1999-07-01

    Approximately one year ago, OSU-Okmulgee and the Gas Processors Association began discussions about the possibility of developing a natural Gas Technician Training Program for GPA members. Following a presentation to the Membership and Services Committee, Chairman John Ehlers solicited and obtained the approval of the GPA Executive Committee to sponsor the program. Participation in the program was also made available to GPSA members. The purpose of the program is to upgrade the technical competency and professional level of incoming natural gas compression technicians. It educates students to analytically diagnose, service and maintain gas compression equipment and systems using industry recommended procedures, special tools and service information. It also provides course content, which will enable successful graduates to advance in position after additional experience, and to understand new systems, technologies and components as they are introduced. The two-year Associate-In-Applied Science Degree program includes six successive college semesters. Nearly one-half of the time is designated for technical/academic education at Oklahoma State University-Okmulgee with the balance of time allocated for on-the-job internship experiences at sponsoring GPA/GPSA members. Each block of technical education and general education course work is followed by an immediate work experience time period designated to reinforce the technical and general education. These time periods are approximately seven and one-half weeks in length each. It is essential for the success of the students and the program that the students' education at OSU-Okmulgee and work experiences at GPA/GPSA member facilities be closely aligned for maximum student learning and retention. In addition to technical classes on gas compression equipment and components, the courses offered in math, speech, technical writing, psychology and ethics for example, prepare students to be able to communicate well, get along with others and be responsible and productive employees.

  6. Perceptually Lossless Wavelet Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Yang, Gloria Y.; Solomon, Joshua A.; Villasenor, John

    1996-01-01

    The Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) decomposes an image into bands that vary in spatial frequency and orientation. It is widely used for image compression. Measures of the visibility of DWT quantization errors are required to achieve optimal compression. Uniform quantization of a single band of coefficients results in an artifact that is the sum of a lattice of random amplitude basis functions of the corresponding DWT synthesis filter, which we call DWT uniform quantization noise. We measured visual detection thresholds for samples of DWT uniform quantization noise in Y, Cb, and Cr color channels. The spatial frequency of a wavelet is r 2(exp -1), where r is display visual resolution in pixels/degree, and L is the wavelet level. Amplitude thresholds increase rapidly with spatial frequency. Thresholds also increase from Y to Cr to Cb, and with orientation from low-pass to horizontal/vertical to diagonal. We propose a mathematical model for DWT noise detection thresholds that is a function of level, orientation, and display visual resolution. This allows calculation of a 'perceptually lossless' quantization matrix for which all errors are in theory below the visual threshold. The model may also be used as the basis for adaptive quantization schemes.

  7. COMPRESSION SEAL AND SEALING MATERIAL THEREFOR

    DOEpatents

    Branin, T.G.

    1962-05-29

    This patent relates to compression seal and more particularly to a seaiing material therefor. The sealing surface is a coating consisting of alternate layers of gold and of a non-gold metal having similar plastic flow properties under pressure as gold. The coating is substantially free from oxidation effects when exposed to ambient atmosphere and does not become brittle when worked, as in a valve. (AEC)

  8. In Vivo Remodeling of Intervertebral Discs in Response to Short- and Long-Term Dynamic Compression

    PubMed Central

    Wuertz, Karin; Godburn, Karolyn; MacLean, Jeffrey J.; Barbir, Ana; Donnelly, Justin Stinnett; Roughley, Peter J.; Alini, Mauro; Iatridis, James C.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated how dynamic compression induced changes in gene expression, tissue composition, and structural properties of the intervertebral disc using a rat tail model. We hypothesized that daily exposure to dynamic compression for short durations would result in anabolic remodeling with increased matrix protein expression and proteoglycan content, and that increased daily load exposure time and experiment duration would retain these changes but also accumulate changes representative of mild degeneration. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 100) were instrumented with an Ilizarov-type device and divided into three dynamic compression (2 week-1.5 h/day, 2 week-8 h/day, 8 week-8 h/day at 1 MPa and 1 Hz) and two sham (2 week, 8 week) groups. Dynamic compression resulted in anabolic remodeling with increased matrix mRNA expression, minimal changes in catabolic genes or disc structure and stiffness, and increased glysosaminoglycans (GAG) content in the nucleus pulposus. Some accumulation of mild degeneration with 8 week-8 h included loss of annulus fibrosus GAG and disc height although 8-week shams also had loss of disc height, water content, and minor structural alterations. We conclude that dynamic compression is consistent with a notion of “healthy” loading that is able to maintain or promote matrix biosynthesis without substantially disrupting disc structural integrity. A slow accumulation of changes similar to human disc degeneration occurred when dynamic compression was applied for excessive durations, but this degenerative shift was mild when compared to static compression, bending, or other interventions that create greater structural disruption. PMID:19274755

  9. Compressive sensing in medical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Graff, Christian G.; Sidky, Emil Y.

    2015-01-01

    The promise of compressive sensing, exploitation of compressibility to achieve high quality image reconstructions with less data, has attracted a great deal of attention in the medical imaging community. At the Compressed Sensing Incubator meeting held in April 2014 at OSA Headquarters in Washington, DC, presentations were given summarizing some of the research efforts ongoing in compressive sensing for x-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging systems. This article provides an expanded version of these presentations. Sparsity-exploiting reconstruction algorithms that have gained popularity in the medical imaging community are studied, and examples of clinical applications that could benefit from compressive sensing ideas are provided. The current and potential future impact of compressive sensing on the medical imaging field is discussed. PMID:25968400

  10. Recent progress in compressible turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shiyi; Xia, Zhenhua; Wang, Jianchun; Yang, Yantao

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we review some recent studies on compressible turbulence conducted by the authors' group, which include fundamental studies on compressible isotropic turbulence (CIT) and applied studies on developing a constrained large eddy simulation (CLES) for wall-bounded turbulence. In the first part, we begin with a newly proposed hybrid compact-weighted essentially nonoscillatory (WENO) scheme for a CIT simulation that has been used to construct a systematic database of CIT. Using this database various fundamental properties of compressible turbulence have been examined, including the statistics and scaling of compressible modes, the shocklet-turbulence interaction, the effect of local compressibility on small scales, the kinetic energy cascade, and some preliminary results from a Lagrangian point of view. In the second part, the idea and formulas of the CLES are reviewed, followed by the validations of CLES and some applications in compressible engineering problems.

  11. libpolycomp: Compression/decompression library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasi, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Libpolycomp compresses and decompresses one-dimensional streams of numbers by means of several algorithms. It is well-suited for time-ordered data acquired by astronomical instruments or simulations. One of the algorithms, called "polynomial compression", combines two widely-used ideas (namely, polynomial approximation and filtering of Fourier series) to achieve substantial compression ratios for datasets characterized by smoothness and lack of noise. Notable examples are the ephemerides of astronomical objects and the pointing information of astronomical telescopes. Other algorithms implemented in this C library are well known and already widely used, e.g., RLE, quantization, deflate (via libz) and Burrows-Wheeler transform (via libbzip2). Libpolycomp can compress the timelines acquired by the Planck/LFI instrument with an overall compression ratio of ~9, while other widely known programs (gzip, bzip2) reach compression ratios less than 1.5.

  12. New Regenerative Cycle for Vapor Compression Refrigeration

    SciTech Connect

    Mark J. Bergander

    2005-08-29

    The main objective of this project is to confirm on a well-instrumented prototype the theoretically derived claims of higher efficiency and coefficient of performance for geothermal heat pumps based on a new regenerative thermodynamic cycle as comparing to existing technology. In order to demonstrate the improved performance of the prototype, it will be compared to published parameters of commercially available geothermal heat pumps manufactured by US and foreign companies. Other objectives are to optimize the design parameters and to determine the economic viability of the new technology. Background (as stated in the proposal): The proposed technology closely relates to EERE mission by improving energy efficiency, bringing clean, reliable and affordable heating and cooling to the residential and commercial buildings and reducing greenhouse gases emission. It can provide the same amount of heating and cooling with considerably less use of electrical energy and consequently has a potential of reducing our nations dependence on foreign oil. The theoretical basis for the proposed thermodynamic cycle was previously developed and was originally called a dynamic equilibrium method. This theory considers the dynamic equations of state of the working fluid and proposes the methods for modification of T-S trajectories of adiabatic transformation by changing dynamic properties of gas, such as flow rate, speed and acceleration. The substance of this proposal is a thermodynamic cycle characterized by the regenerative use of the potential energy of two-phase flow expansion, which in traditional systems is lost in expansion valves. The essential new features of the process are: (1) The application of two-step throttling of the working fluid and two-step compression of its vapor phase. (2) Use of a compressor as the initial step compression and a jet device as a second step, where throttling and compression are combined. (3) Controlled ratio of a working fluid at the first and second step of compression. In the proposed system, the compressor compresses the vapor only to 50-60% of the final pressure, while the additional compression is provided by a jet device using internal potential energy of the working fluid flow. Therefore, the amount of mechanical energy required by a compressor is significantly reduced, resulting in the increase of efficiency (either COP or EER). The novelty of the cycle is in the equipment and in the way the multi-staging is accomplished. The anticipated result will be a new refrigeration system that requires less energy to accomplish a cooling task. The application of this technology will be for more efficient designs of: (1) Industrial chillers, (2) Refrigeration plants, (3) Heat pumps, (4) Gas Liquefaction plants, (5) Cryogenic systems.

  13. Understanding Infidelity: An Interview with Gerald Weeks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Travis

    2011-01-01

    In this interview, Gerald Weeks shares his expertise on the topic of infidelity and couples counseling. Dr. Weeks defines infidelity, presents assessment strategies for treating the issue of infidelity, and discusses an intersystemic model for infidelity treatment when counseling couples. Dr. Weeks also provides insight into common mistakes made…

  14. Understanding Infidelity: An Interview with Gerald Weeks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Travis

    2011-01-01

    In this interview, Gerald Weeks shares his expertise on the topic of infidelity and couples counseling. Dr. Weeks defines infidelity, presents assessment strategies for treating the issue of infidelity, and discusses an intersystemic model for infidelity treatment when counseling couples. Dr. Weeks also provides insight into common mistakes made

  15. Four-Day Week Schedule. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Gary E.

    2007-01-01

    What does research say about the four-day week as an alternative school schedule? More than 100 districts in at least 12 states currently use a four-day week alternative schedule. Most are located in rural areas, serve less than 1000 students, and made the move to a shorter school week with longer instructional days for financial reasons. Although…

  16. Bilateral hip arthroplasty: is 1-week staging the optimum strategy?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Seventy-nine patients underwent bilateral hip arthroplasty staged either at 1 week (Group 1) or after greater intervals (as suggested by the patients, mean 44 weeks, range 16-88 weeks) (Group 2), over a five year period at one Institution. Sixty-eight patients (29 bilateral hip resurfacings and 39 total hip replacements) completed questionnaires regarding their post-operative recovery, complications and overall satisfaction with the staging of their surgery. There was no significant age or ASA grade difference between the patient groups. Complication rates in the two groups were similar and overall satisfaction rates were 84% in Group 1 (n = 32) and 89% in Group 2 (n = 36). Cumulative hospital lengths of stay were significantly longer in Group 1 patients (11.9 days vs 9.1 days)(p < 0.01); this was true for both hip resurfacing and total hip arthroplasty patients, however resurfacing patients stays were significantly shorter in both groups (p < 0.01). Postoperative pain resolved earlier in Group 1 patients at a mean of 20.9 weeks compared with a cumulative 28.9 weeks (15.8 and 13.1 weeks) for Group 2 patients (p = 0.03). The mean time to return to part-time work was 16.4 weeks for Group 1, and a cumulative 17.2 weeks (8.8 and 8.4 weeks) for Group 2. The time to return to full-time work was significantly shorter for Group 1 patients (21.0 weeks, compared with a cumulative 29.7 weeks for Group 2)(p < 0.05). The time to return to both full and part-time work was significantly shorter in total hip replacement patients with 1-week staging compared with delayed staging (22.0 vs 35.8 weeks (p = 0.02), and 13.8 vs 19.3 weeks (p = 0.03) respectively). Hip resurfacing patients in Group 2 had significantly shorter durations of postoperative pain and were able to return to part-time and full time work sooner than total hip arthroplasty patients. There was a general trend towards a faster recovery and resumption of normal activities following the second operation in Group 2 patients, compared with the first operation. Bilateral hip arthroplasty staged at a 1-week interval resulted in an earlier resolution of hip pain, and an earlier return to full-time work (particularly following total hip replacement surgery), with high levels of patient satisfaction and no increased risk in complications; however the hospital length of stay was significantly longer. The decision for the timing of staged bilateral surgery should be made in conjunction with the patient, making adjustments to accommodate their occupational needs and functional demands. PMID:21054889

  17. The quest for 'diagnostically lossless' medical image compression: a comparative study of objective quality metrics for compressed medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalik-Urbaniak, Ilona; Brunet, Dominique; Wang, Jiheng; Koff, David; Smolarski-Koff, Nadine; Vrscay, Edward R.; Wallace, Bill; Wang, Zhou

    2014-03-01

    Our study, involving a collaboration with radiologists (DK,NSK) as well as a leading international developer of medical imaging software (AGFA), is primarily concerned with improved methods of assessing the diagnostic quality of compressed medical images and the investigation of compression artifacts resulting from JPEG and JPEG2000. In this work, we compare the performances of the Structural Similarity quality measure (SSIM), MSE/PSNR, compression ratio CR and JPEG quality factor Q, based on experimental data collected in two experiments involving radiologists. An ROC and Kolmogorov-Smirnov analysis indicates that compression ratio is not always a good indicator of visual quality. Moreover, SSIM demonstrates the best performance, i.e., it provides the closest match to the radiologists' assessments. We also show that a weighted Youden index1 and curve tting method can provide SSIM and MSE thresholds for acceptable compression ratios.

  18. Wavelet transform for still color image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truchetet, Frederic; Joanne, Benjamin; Laligant, Olivier

    1997-04-01

    We consider here the compression of still color image with very low distortion from the human eye point of view. The basic idea in this work is to take into account the variations of human eye/brain spatial resolution with color. The most natural way for an image processing researcher to perform such a scheme is to use a multiresolution analysis of the image to be coded before quantization and coding. Previous experiences connected with still grey value image compression/decompression scheme design have shown that the wavelet transform, Mallats algorithm is a very efficient method for this purpose, particularly if real time implementation is under consideration. Hence we present in this paper a wavelet transform algorithm for color image and we show how and with what performances the transformed image can be altered and reduced. We show that a quasi lossless compression/decompression scheme can be easily obtained with compression ratio up to 1:10. The results obtained after a large series of testes based on psychovisual estimations rather than on pure PSNR evaluation are in good accordance with the assumed properties of the human visual perceptive system.

  19. Shock compression of precompressed deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, M R; Crowhurst, J C; Zaug, J M; Bastea, S; Goncharov, A F; Militzer, B

    2011-07-31

    Here we report quasi-isentropic dynamic compression and thermodynamic characterization of solid, precompressed deuterium over an ultrafast time scale (< 100 ps) and a microscopic length scale (< 1 {micro}m). We further report a fast transition in shock wave compressed solid deuterium that is consistent with the ramp to shock transition, with a time scale of less than 10 ps. These results suggest that high-density dynamic compression of hydrogen may be possible on microscopic length scales.

  20. Compression of intensity interferometry signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribak, Erez N.; Shulamy, Yaron

    2016-02-01

    Correlations between photon currents from separate light-collectors provide information on the shape of the source. When the light-collectors are well separated, for example in space, transmission of these currents to a central correlator is limited by band-width. We study the possibility of compression of the photon fluxes and find that traditional compression methods have a similar chance of achieving this goal compared to compressed sensing.

  1. Adiabatic compressibility of globular proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gavish, B; Gratton, E; Hardy, C J

    1983-01-01

    The adiabatic compressibility of several globular proteins has been measured by using an ultrasonic technique in the frequency range 0.5 to 10 MHz. The contributions to the measured compressibility from the protein matrix and from surface processes involving ionization of side chains and solvation effects are discussed. The internal protein compressibility is very low, indicating the existence of "dynamic domains" which are tentatively assigned to secondary structure elements. PMID:6572366

  2. Compression in Molecular Simulation Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anand; Zhu, Xingquan; Tu, Yi-Cheng; Pandit, Sagar

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a compression framework, for molecular dynamics (MD) simulation data, which yields significant performance by combining the strength of principal component analysis (PCA) and discrete cosine transform (DCT). Though it is a lossy compression technique, the effect on analytics performed on decompressed data is very minimal. Compression ratio up to 13 is achieved with acceptable errors in results of analytical functions.

  3. Reconstruction-Free Action Inference from Compressive Imagers.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Kuldeep; Turaga, Pavan

    2016-04-01

    Persistent surveillance from camera networks, such as at parking lots, UAVs, etc., often results in large amounts of video data, resulting in significant challenges for inference in terms of storage, communication and computation. Compressive cameras have emerged as a potential solution to deal with the data deluge issues in such applications. However, inference tasks such as action recognition require high quality features which implies reconstructing the original video data. Much work in compressive sensing (CS) theory is geared towards solving the reconstruction problem, where state-of-the-art methods are computationally intensive and provide low-quality results at high compression rates. Thus, reconstruction-free methods for inference are much desired. In this paper, we propose reconstruction-free methods for action recognition from compressive cameras at high compression ratios of 100 and above. Recognizing actions directly from CS measurements requires features which are mostly nonlinear and thus not easily applicable. This leads us to search for such properties that are preserved in compressive measurements. To this end, we propose the use of spatio-temporal smashed filters, which are compressive domain versions of pixel-domain matched filters. We conduct experiments on publicly available databases and show that one can obtain recognition rates that are comparable to the oracle method in uncompressed setup, even for high compression ratios. PMID:26353363

  4. Compressive and classical hyperspectral systems: a fundamental comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, Adi; August, Isaac Y.; Stern, Adrian

    2015-05-01

    Hyperspectral imagery involves capturing and processing a tremendous amount of data, which sets severe system resource requirements. This has motivated the application of compressive sensing for different spectroscopic and spectroscopic imager systems. Several new compressive hyperspectral architectures have been designed to stretch the common limitations of classical systems. However, the application of the compressive sensing framework involves design of system architectures that differ significantly from the conventional ones. Since compressive sensing differs essentially from conventional sensing, it cannot be implemented for hyperspectral imaging by simply modifying one of the components of a conventional hyperspectral system, rather it requires a complete new design. In this work we present a comparison between four compressive hyperspectral architectures to conventional architectures. The compressive hyperspectral sensing compared are: Coded Aperture Snapshot Spectral Imaging (CASSI), Compressive HS Imaging by Separable Spatial And Spectral Operators (CHISSS), (Liquid-crystal Compressive spectral Imager) LiCSI and (Spectral Single-Pixel) SSP systems. Those methods are compared to conventional spatial/spectral scanning hyperspectral such as pushbroom, whiskbroom and color filter techniques. A fundamental comparison between these architectures is presented in terms of optical system volume and radiometric efficiency.

  5. Data compression for sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Post-Sanger sequencing methods produce tons of data, and there is a general agreement that the challenge to store and process them must be addressed with data compression. In this review we first answer the question “why compression” in a quantitative manner. Then we also answer the questions “what” and “how”, by sketching the fundamental compression ideas, describing the main sequencing data types and formats, and comparing the specialized compression algorithms and tools. Finally, we go back to the question “why compression” and give other, perhaps surprising answers, demonstrating the pervasiveness of data compression techniques in computational biology. PMID:24252160

  6. Compressive sensing of sparse tensors.

    PubMed

    Friedland, Shmuel; Li, Qun; Schonfeld, Dan

    2014-10-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) has triggered an enormous research activity since its first appearance. CS exploits the signal's sparsity or compressibility in a particular domain and integrates data compression and acquisition, thus allowing exact reconstruction through relatively few nonadaptive linear measurements. While conventional CS theory relies on data representation in the form of vectors, many data types in various applications, such as color imaging, video sequences, and multisensor networks, are intrinsically represented by higher order tensors. Application of CS to higher order data representation is typically performed by conversion of the data to very long vectors that must be measured using very large sampling matrices, thus imposing a huge computational and memory burden. In this paper, we propose generalized tensor compressive sensing (GTCS)-a unified framework for CS of higher order tensors, which preserves the intrinsic structure of tensor data with reduced computational complexity at reconstruction. GTCS offers an efficient means for representation of multidimensional data by providing simultaneous acquisition and compression from all tensor modes. In addition, we propound two reconstruction procedures, a serial method and a parallelizable method. We then compare the performance of the proposed method with Kronecker compressive sensing (KCS) and multiway compressive sensing (MWCS). We demonstrate experimentally that GTCS outperforms KCS and MWCS in terms of both reconstruction accuracy (within a range of compression ratios) and processing speed. The major disadvantage of our methods (and of MWCS as well) is that the compression ratios may be worse than that offered by KCS. PMID:25137727

  7. Spectroscopic insight for tablet compression.

    PubMed

    Lakio, S; Ylinärä, H; Antikainen, O; Räikkönen, H; Yliruusi, J

    2015-02-01

    Tablet compression process has been studied over the years from various perspectives. However what exactly happens to material during compression is still unknown. In this study a novel compression die which enables real-time spectroscopic measurements during the compression of material is represented. Both near infrared and Raman spectroscope probes can be attached to the die. In this study the usage of the die is demonstrated by using Raman spectroscopy. Eicosane, d-glucose anhydrate, α-lactose monohydrate and xylitol were used in the study because their compression behavior and bonding properties during compression were assumed to be different. The intensity of the Raman signal changed during compression with all of the materials. However, the intensity changes were different within the materials. The biggest differences were within the xylitol spectra. It was noticed that some peaks disappeared with higher compression pressures indicating that the pressure affected variously on different bonds in xylitol structure. These reversible changes were supposed to relate the changes in conformation and crystal structure. As a conclusion, the die was found to be a significant addition for studying compression process in real-time. It can help to reveal Process induced transformations (PITs) occurring during powder compaction. PMID:25448072

  8. Magnetic compression laser driving circuit

    DOEpatents

    Ball, Don G.; Birx, Dan; Cook, Edward G.

    1993-01-01

    A magnetic compression laser driving circuit is disclosed. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit compresses voltage pulses in the range of 1.5 microseconds at 20 Kilovolts of amplitude to pulses in the range of 40 nanoseconds and 60 Kilovolts of amplitude. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit includes a multi-stage magnetic switch where the last stage includes a switch having at least two turns which has larger saturated inductance with less core material so that the efficiency of the circuit and hence the laser is increased.

  9. Magnetic compression laser driving circuit

    DOEpatents

    Ball, D.G.; Birx, D.; Cook, E.G.

    1993-01-05

    A magnetic compression laser driving circuit is disclosed. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit compresses voltage pulses in the range of 1.5 microseconds at 20 kilovolts of amplitude to pulses in the range of 40 nanoseconds and 60 kilovolts of amplitude. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit includes a multi-stage magnetic switch where the last stage includes a switch having at least two turns which has larger saturated inductance with less core material so that the efficiency of the circuit and hence the laser is increased.

  10. Analyzing High Resolution Geoscience Data using Parallelism and Compression (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, J.; Yin, J.

    2013-12-01

    Today's high-resolution climate datasets impose challenges in both storage space and I/O overhead. We explore parallel I/O and compression to address these challenges. The Parallel Analysis of GeOscience Data (pagaoda) toolkit is both an API for data-parallel analysis of geoscience climate data as well as a set of data-parallel processing tools based on this API. The API and the tools were designed first to support geodesic semi-structured NetCDF data, however they are generic enough to work with regularly gridded data as well. The command line tools are designed to mimic the NetCDF Operators but support both parallel IO and a combination of data and task parallelism. For large datasets, the single greatest performance bottleneck is IO. We describe multiple techniques we use to reduce the overhead of IO operations, namely the pseudo non-blocking interface of the parallel NetCDF library and compression. The techniques described can be applied generically to other applications using MPI-IO. We cover the current status of pagoda, compression techniques, and feature current performance information for high resolution data. Compression is promising for reducing storage space and I/O overhead. However, traditional compression algorithms, such as the LZW class compression, are designed mainly for text. These compression algorithms introduce high computation overhead and are not able to achieve high a compression ratio. We design compression algorithms specially customized for scientific data. Compared with traditional compression algorithms, our compression algorithm achieves a significantly higher compression ratio and introduces lower computation overhead. A naive architecture for incorporating compression is to first decompress data then perform computation on the decompressed data. Although this approach can reduce storage space, it hurts application performance. In our architecture, we pipeline the retrieval of compressed data from I/O devices, decompression of the data, and the computation on the decompressed data. Data decompression is overlapped with I/O operations. As a result, our architecture improves application performance by a factor close to the compression ratio for I/O bounded applications and can improve performance even for CPU bounded applications.

  11. Robustness of the aerosol weekly cycle over Southeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenshan; Gong, Daoyi; Zhou, Zhiyang; Guo, Yuanxi

    2012-12-01

    A 7-day cycle is a special time-scale that corresponds with the weekly working schedule. However, there is no consensus on the existence of the weekly cycle of aerosol loading, which is closely related to human activities. In the present study, we analyzed the surface concentration of PM10 (Particulate Matter with a diameter of less than 10 μm) and other physically linked variables over Southeastern China under calm weather conditions to detect signs of the aerosol loading weekly cycle. Results show that the weekly cycle of PM10 is distinct; the maximum occurs on Thursday and the minimum occurs on Saturday and Sunday. The range of this cycle is over 8 μg m-3, approximately 8% of the daily average. The existence of the PM10 weekly cycle was supported by the pronounced amplitude of the 7-day cycle compared with those of 6-day and 8-day cycles and by significant results from the Monte-Carlo test. There are also distinct weekly cycles in the directly linked variables of adjusted horizontal visibility, sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2); the patterns of these cycles are corresponding with that of PM10. The changes of total cloud cover and relative humidity on the weekly time-scale were analyzed, and the relationship with PM10 was discussed. It is likely that the cloud cover weekly cycle is conducted by the change of PM10 through the semi-direct aerosol effect. We also found that precipitation and wind might weaken the PM10 weekly cycle by scavenging the heavy aerosol loading.

  12. Compression, restoration, resampling, ‘compressive sensing’: fast transforms in digital imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroslavsky, L. P.

    2015-07-01

    Transform image processing methods are methods that work in domains of image transforms, such as discrete fourier, discrete cosine, wavelet and alike. They are the basic tools in image compression, image restoration, image resampling and geometrical transformations and can be traced back to the early 1970s. The paper presents a review of these methods with emphasis on their comparison and relationships, from the very first steps of transform image compression methods to adaptive and local adaptive transform domain filters for image restoration, to methods of precise image resampling and image reconstruction from sparse samples and up to the ‘compressive sensing’ approach that has gained popularity in the last few years. The review has a tutorial character and purpose.

  13. Population attribute compression

    DOEpatents

    White, James M.; Faber, Vance; Saltzman, Jeffrey S.

    1995-01-01

    An image population having a large number of attributes is processed to form a display population with a predetermined smaller number of attributes that represent the larger number of attributes. In a particular application, the color values in an image are compressed for storage in a discrete look-up table (LUT). Color space containing the LUT color values is successively subdivided into smaller volumes until a plurality of volumes are formed, each having no more than a preselected maximum number of color values. Image pixel color values can then be rapidly placed in a volume with only a relatively few LUT values from which a nearest neighbor is selected. Image color values are assigned 8 bit pointers to their closest LUT value whereby data processing requires only the 8 bit pointer value to provide 24 bit color values from the LUT.

  14. Edge compression manifold apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Renzi, Ronald F. (Tracy, CA)

    2007-02-27

    A manifold for connecting external capillaries to the inlet and/or outlet ports of a microfluidic device for high pressure applications is provided. The fluid connector for coupling at least one fluid conduit to a corresponding port of a substrate that includes: (i) a manifold comprising one or more channels extending therethrough wherein each channel is at least partially threaded, (ii) one or more threaded ferrules each defining a bore extending therethrough with each ferrule supporting a fluid conduit wherein each ferrule is threaded into a channel of the manifold, (iii) a substrate having one or more ports on its upper surface wherein the substrate is positioned below the manifold so that the one or more ports is aligned with the one or more channels of the manifold, and (iv) device to apply an axial compressive force to the substrate to couple the one or more ports of the substrate to a corresponding proximal end of a fluid conduit.

  15. Edge compression manifold apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Renzi, Ronald F.

    2004-12-21

    A manifold for connecting external capillaries to the inlet and/or outlet ports of a microfluidic device for high pressure applications is provided. The fluid connector for coupling at least one fluid conduit to a corresponding port of a substrate that includes: (i) a manifold comprising one or more channels extending therethrough wherein each channel is at least partially threaded, (ii) one or more threaded ferrules each defining a bore extending therethrough with each ferrule supporting a fluid conduit wherein each ferrule is threaded into a channel of the manifold, (iii) a substrate having one or more ports on its upper surface wherein the substrate is positioned below the manifold so that the one or more ports is aligned with the one or more channels of the manifold, and (iv) device to apply an axial compressive force to the substrate to couple the one or more ports of the substrate to a corresponding proximal end of a fluid conduit.

  16. Vapor compression distillation module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuccio, P. P.

    1975-01-01

    A Vapor Compression Distillation (VCD) module was developed and evaluated as part of a Space Station Prototype (SSP) environmental control and life support system. The VCD module includes the waste tankage, pumps, post-treatment cells, automatic controls and fault detection instrumentation. Development problems were encountered with two components: the liquid pumps, and the waste tank and quantity gauge. Peristaltic pumps were selected instead of gear pumps, and a sub-program of materials and design optimization was undertaken leading to a projected life greater than 10,000 hours of continuous operation. A bladder tank was designed and built to contain the waste liquids and deliver it to the processor. A detrimental pressure pattern imposed upon the bladder by a force-operated quantity gauge was corrected by rearranging the force application, and design goals were achieved. System testing has demonstrated that all performance goals have been fulfilled.

  17. Gas compression apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terp, L. S. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Apparatus for transferring gas from a first container to a second container of higher pressure was devised. A free-piston compressor having a driving piston and cylinder, and a smaller diameter driven piston and cylinder, comprise the apparatus. A rod member connecting the driving and driven pistons functions for mutual reciprocation in the respective cylinders. A conduit may be provided for supplying gas to the driven cylinder from the first container. Also provided is apparatus for introducing gas to the driving piston, to compress gas by the driven piston for transfer to the second higher pressure container. The system is useful in transferring spacecraft cabin oxygen into higher pressure containers for use in extravehicular activities.

  18. Compressed quantum simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, B.

    2014-12-04

    Here, I summarize the results presented in B. Kraus, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 250503 (2011). Recently, it has been shown that certain circuits, the so-called match gate circuits, can be compressed to an exponentially smaller universal quantum computation. We use this result to demonstrate that the simulation of a 1-D Ising chain consisting of n qubits can be performed on a universal quantum computer running on only log(n) qubits. We show how the adiabatic evolution can be simulated on this exponentially smaller system and how the magnetization can be measured. Since the Ising model displays a quantum phase transition, this result implies that a quantum phase transition of a very large system can be observed with current technology.

  19. Compressive Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoye; Yao, Yuan; Liu, Han; Guibas, Leonidas

    2014-01-01

    Modern data acquisition routinely produces massive amounts of network data. Though many methods and models have been proposed to analyze such data, the research of network data is largely disconnected with the classical theory of statistical learning and signal processing. In this paper, we present a new framework for modeling network data, which connects two seemingly different areas: network data analysis and compressed sensing. From a nonparametric perspective, we model an observed network using a large dictionary. In particular, we consider the network clique detection problem and show connections between our formulation with a new algebraic tool, namely Randon basis pursuit in homogeneous spaces. Such a connection allows us to identify rigorous recovery conditions for clique detection problems. Though this paper is mainly conceptual, we also develop practical approximation algorithms for solving empirical problems and demonstrate their usefulness on real-world datasets. PMID:25620806

  20. Free compressible jet investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gregorio, Fabrizio

    2014-03-01

    The nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) effect on a supersonic turbulent jet was investigated. A dedicated convergent/divergent nozzle together with a flow feeding system was designed and manufactured. A nozzle Mach exit of M j = 1.5 was selected in order to obtain a convective Mach number of M c = 0.6. The flow was investigated for over-expanded, correctly expanded and under-expanded jet conditions. Mach number, total temperature and flow velocity measurements were carried out in order to characterise the jet behaviour. The inlet conditions of the jet flow were monitored in order to calculate the nozzle exit speed of sound and evaluate the mean Mach number distribution starting from the flow velocity data. A detailed analysis of the Mach results obtained by a static Pitot probe and by a particle image velocimetry measurement system was carried out. The mean flow velocity was investigated, and the axial Mach decay and the spreading rate were associated with the flow structures and with the compressibility effects. Aerodynamics of the different jet conditions was evaluated, and the shock cells structures were detected and discussed correlating the jet structure to the flow fluctuation and local turbulence. The longitudinal and radial distribution of the total temperature was investigated, and the temperature profiles were analysed and discussed. The total temperature behaviour was correlated to the turbulent phenomena and to the NPR jet conditions. Self-similarity condition was encountered and discussed for the over-expanded jet. Compressibility effects on the local turbulence, on the turbulent kinetic energy and on the Reynolds tensor were discussed.

  1. Compression and compression fatigue testing of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, T. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of moisture and temperature on the fatigue and fracture response of composite laminates under compression loads were investigated. The structural laminates studied were an intermediate stiffness graphite-epoxy composite (a typical angle ply laimna liminate had a typical fan blade laminate). Full and half penetration slits and impact delaminations were the defects examined. Results are presented which show the effects of moisture on the fracture and fatigue strength at room temperature, 394 K (250 F), and 422 K (300 F). Static tests results show the effects of defect size and type on the compression-fracture strength under moisture and thermal environments. The cyclic tests results compare the fatigue lives and residual compression strength under compression only and under tension-compression fatigue loading.

  2. Data Compression Techniques for Advanced Space Transportation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, William G.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced space transportation systems, including vehicle state of health systems, will produce large amounts of data which must be stored on board the vehicle and or transmitted to the ground and stored. The cost of storage or transmission of the data could be reduced if the number of bits required to represent the data is reduced by the use of data compression techniques. Most of the work done in this study was rather generic and could apply to many data compression systems, but the first application area to be considered was launch vehicle state of health telemetry systems. Both lossless and lossy compression techniques were considered in this study.

  3. Application of compressed sensing to the simulation of atomic systems

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Xavier; Sanders, Jacob N.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    Compressed sensing is a method that allows a significant reduction in the number of samples required for accurate measurements in many applications in experimental sciences and engineering. In this work, we show that compressed sensing can also be used to speed up numerical simulations. We apply compressed sensing to extract information from the real-time simulation of atomic and molecular systems, including electronic and nuclear dynamics. We find that, compared to the standard discrete Fourier transform approach, for the calculation of vibrational and optical spectra the total propagation time, and hence the computational cost, can be reduced by approximately a factor of five. PMID:22891294

  4. Survey of Header Compression Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishac, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    This report provides a summary of several different header compression techniques. The different techniques included are: (1) Van Jacobson's header compression (RFC 1144); (2) SCPS (Space Communications Protocol Standards) header compression (SCPS-TP, SCPS-NP); (3) Robust header compression (ROHC); and (4) The header compression techniques in RFC2507 and RFC2508. The methodology for compression and error correction for these schemes are described in the remainder of this document. All of the header compression schemes support compression over simplex links, provided that the end receiver has some means of sending data back to the sender. However, if that return path does not exist, then neither Van Jacobson's nor SCPS can be used, since both rely on TCP (Transmission Control Protocol). In addition, under link conditions of low delay and low error, all of the schemes perform as expected. However, based on the methodology of the schemes, each scheme is likely to behave differently as conditions degrade. Van Jacobson's header compression relies heavily on the TCP retransmission timer and would suffer an increase in loss propagation should the link possess a high delay and/or bit error rate (BER). The SCPS header compression scheme protects against high delay environments by avoiding delta encoding between packets. Thus, loss propagation is avoided. However, SCPS is still affected by an increased BER (bit-error-rate) since the lack of delta encoding results in larger header sizes. Next, the schemes found in RFC2507 and RFC2508 perform well for non-TCP connections in poor conditions. RFC2507 performance with TCP connections is improved by various techniques over Van Jacobson's, but still suffers a performance hit with poor link properties. Also, RFC2507 offers the ability to send TCP data without delta encoding, similar to what SCPS offers. ROHC is similar to the previous two schemes, but adds additional CRCs (cyclic redundancy check) into headers and improves compression schemes which provide better tolerances in conditions with a high BER.

  5. Dynamic CT perfusion image data compression for efficient parallel processing.

    PubMed

    Barros, Renan Sales; Olabarriaga, Silvia Delgado; Borst, Jordi; van Walderveen, Marianne A A; Posthuma, Jorrit S; Streekstra, Geert J; van Herk, Marcel; Majoie, Charles B L M; Marquering, Henk A

    2016-03-01

    The increasing size of medical imaging data, in particular time series such as CT perfusion (CTP), requires new and fast approaches to deliver timely results for acute care. Cloud architectures based on graphics processing units (GPUs) can provide the processing capacity required for delivering fast results. However, the size of CTP datasets makes transfers to cloud infrastructures time-consuming and therefore not suitable in acute situations. To reduce this transfer time, this work proposes a fast and lossless compression algorithm for CTP data. The algorithm exploits redundancies in the temporal dimension and keeps random read-only access to the image elements directly from the compressed data on the GPU. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work to present a GPU-ready method for medical image compression with random access to the image elements from the compressed data. PMID:26105146

  6. Compressible turbulent mixing: Effects of compressibility and Schmidt number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Qionglin

    2015-11-01

    Effects of compressibility and Schmidt number on passive scalar in compressible turbulence were studied. On the effect of compressibility, the scalar spectrum followed the k- 5 / 3 inertial-range scaling and suffered negligible influence from compressibility. The transfer of scalar flux was reduced by the transition from incompressible to compressible flows, however, was enhanced by the growth of Mach number. The intermittency parameter was increased by the growth of Mach number, and was decreased by the growth of the compressive mode of driven forcing. The dependency of the mixing timescale on compressibility showed that for the driven forcing, the compressive mode was less efficient in enhancing scalar mixing. On the effect of Schmidt number (Sc), in the inertial-convective range the scalar spectrum obeyed the k- 5 / 3 scaling. For Sc >> 1, a k-1 power law appeared in the viscous-convective range, while for Sc << 1, a k- 17 / 3 power law was identified in the inertial-diffusive range. The transfer of scalar flux grew over Sc. In the Sc >> 1 flow the scalar field rolled up and mixed sufficiently, while in the Sc << 1 flow that only had the large-scale, cloudlike structures. In Sc >> 1 and Sc << 1 flows, the spectral densities of scalar advection and dissipation followed the k- 5 / 3 scaling, indicating that in compressible turbulence the processes of advection and dissipation might deferring to the Kolmogorov picture. Finally, the comparison with incompressible results showed that the scalar in compressible turbulence lacked a conspicuous bump structure in its spectrum, and was more intermittent in the dissipative range.

  7. Information optimal compressive sensing: static measurement design.

    PubMed

    Ashok, Amit; Huang, Liang-Chih; Neifeld, Mark A

    2013-05-01

    The compressive sensing paradigm exploits the inherent sparsity/compressibility of signals to reduce the number of measurements required for reliable reconstruction/recovery. In many applications additional prior information beyond signal sparsity, such as structure in sparsity, is available, and current efforts are mainly limited to exploiting that information exclusively in the signal reconstruction problem. In this work, we describe an information-theoretic framework that incorporates the additional prior information as well as appropriate measurement constraints in the design of compressive measurements. Using a Gaussian binomial mixture prior we design and analyze the performance of optimized projections relative to random projections under two specific design constraints and different operating measurement signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) regimes. We find that the information-optimized designs yield significant, in some cases nearly an order of magnitude, improvements in the reconstruction performance with respect to the random projections. These improvements are especially notable in the low measurement SNR regime where the energy-efficient design of optimized projections is most advantageous. In such cases, the optimized projection design departs significantly from random projections in terms of their incoherence with the representation basis. In fact, we find that the maximizing incoherence of projections with the representation basis is not necessarily optimal in the presence of additional prior information and finite measurement noise/error. We also apply the information-optimized projections to the compressive image formation problem for natural scenes, and the improved visual quality of reconstructed images with respect to random projections and other compressive measurement design affirms the overall effectiveness of the information-theoretic design framework. PMID:23695314

  8. Biomedical sensor design using analog compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balouchestani, Mohammadreza; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2015-05-01

    The main drawback of current healthcare systems is the location-specific nature of the system due to the use of fixed/wired biomedical sensors. Since biomedical sensors are usually driven by a battery, power consumption is the most important factor determining the life of a biomedical sensor. They are also restricted by size, cost, and transmission capacity. Therefore, it is important to reduce the load of sampling by merging the sampling and compression steps to reduce the storage usage, transmission times, and power consumption in order to expand the current healthcare systems to Wireless Healthcare Systems (WHSs). In this work, we present an implementation of a low-power biomedical sensor using analog Compressed Sensing (CS) framework for sparse biomedical signals that addresses both the energy and telemetry bandwidth constraints of wearable and wireless Body-Area Networks (BANs). This architecture enables continuous data acquisition and compression of biomedical signals that are suitable for a variety of diagnostic and treatment purposes. At the transmitter side, an analog-CS framework is applied at the sensing step before Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) in order to generate the compressed version of the input analog bio-signal. At the receiver side, a reconstruction algorithm based on Restricted Isometry Property (RIP) condition is applied in order to reconstruct the original bio-signals form the compressed bio-signals with high probability and enough accuracy. We examine the proposed algorithm with healthy and neuropathy surface Electromyography (sEMG) signals. The proposed algorithm achieves a good level for Average Recognition Rate (ARR) at 93% and reconstruction accuracy at 98.9%. In addition, The proposed architecture reduces total computation time from 32 to 11.5 seconds at sampling-rate=29 % of Nyquist rate, Percentage Residual Difference (PRD)=26 %, Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE)=3 %.

  9. Aerosol and cloud relations and weekly cycles over Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtidis, K.; Georgoulias, A.; Alexandri, G.

    2012-04-01

    In this work, the aerosol and cloud relationships and weekly cycle patterns over Central Europe are examined using level-2 aerosol data from the TERRA MODIS satellite instrument to compile a decadal (2000-2010) 0.1 x 0.1 degree resolution gridded dataset as well as and total cloud cover (TCC) TERRA MODIS data and coarser resolution ISCCP TCC data. Aerosols and TCC were found to be positively correlated for all seasons, the slope of the correlation being slightly higher for low AOD values. A co-examination of AOD, TCC and NCAR/NCEP sea level pressure shows that the positive AOD-TCC correlation holds separately in all pressure bins, thus indicating that the correlation is not a synoptic artefact. A study of the weekly cycle of AOD shows that the main part of the positive (i.e. with midweek peak) weekly cycle plume extends over the central part of Central Europe, with the weekly cycle index (WCI) levels gradually decreasing until the weekly cycle becomes negative (i.e. with weekend peak) when moving away. No clear connection between the WCI patterns and topography was found while there is an apparent correlation between positive weekly cycles in summer and population density. A clear Monday minimum appears over regions with high positive WCI. Monday shifts to Tuesday when moving to the East, indicating aerosol transport from the dominating westerly wind flow. The WCI values and the average percent departures (APDs) for the day of weekly maximum and minimum were examined for 22 selected stations from previous ground-based weekly cycle studies. The weekly cycle is positive and statistically significant for only a few stations situated in France, Germany, Czech Republic and Belgium. A comparison with 1 x 1 degree level-3 MODIS TERRA data shows that in most cases level-3 data can give an indication of the local aerosol weekly cycle strength and phase. The satellite derived day of the weekly maximum and minimum is, generally, in line with results from ground-based studies. The seasonal examination of the WCI patterns show that the positive signal over Central Europe is strongest during summer. More interestingly, the amplitude and phasing of the AOD weekly variability agrees with the TCC one, both for MODIS and ISCCP.

  10. Breaking the Mold. An "Education Week" Occasional Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Week, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Eight articles, published in various issues of "Education Week" starting in March 1994 and ending July 1995, track the work of eight educational reform design teams: (1) "Back to the Future" (Lynn Olson)--the virtues and values of the past in a modern context; (2) "A Welcome Change" (Ann Bradley)--instruction school management, and social services…

  11. 75 FR 52211 - Minority Enterprise Development Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... the two hundred and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-21294 Filed 8-24-10; 8:45 am... Development Week, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Since our Nation's... tireless work ethic has defined the character of our country. During Minority Enterprise Development...

  12. 77 FR 64019 - National School Lunch Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-25742 Filed 10-16-12; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295-F3 .... During National School Lunch Week, we recognize all those whose dedicated work and care make good... young people. Through efforts like First Lady Michelle Obama's Let's Move! initiative, we are...

  13. 75 FR 48853 - National Health Center Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ... of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010... component of our health care system, providing underserved communities access to coordinated primary and preventive care. During National Health Center Week, we recognize the important work of community...

  14. ABC's "Person of the Week": American Values in Television News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Stephanie Greco; Bailey, Martha

    1998-01-01

    Contributes to scholarship on values and ideologies in the media by analyzing five years of ABC's "Person of the Week" segments to identify prominent types of people and values endorsed by mainstream news media. Finds that individuals most frequently selected for ABC's honor lived in the United States; worked in politics and entertainment; and…

  15. Effect of Compression Ratio, Pressure, Temperature, and Humidity on Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, H C; James, W S; Anderson, G V; Brinkerhoff, V W

    1919-01-01

    Among other factors which affect the horsepower of an airplane engine are the atmospheric pressure, and consequently the altitude at which the engine is working, and the compression ratio, or cylinder volume divided by clearance volume. The tests upon which this report is based were selected from a large number of runs made during the intercomparison of various gasolines to determine the variation of horsepower with altitude at three different compression ratios. The test results and conclusions are presented in this report.

  16. Application specific compression : final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Melgaard, David Kennett; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Myers, Daniel S.; Harrison, Carol D.; Lee, David S.; Lewis, Phillip J.; Carlson, Jeffrey J.

    2008-12-01

    With the continuing development of more capable data gathering sensors, comes an increased demand on the bandwidth for transmitting larger quantities of data. To help counteract that trend, a study was undertaken to determine appropriate lossy data compression strategies for minimizing their impact on target detection and characterization. The survey of current compression techniques led us to the conclusion that wavelet compression was well suited for this purpose. Wavelet analysis essentially applies a low-pass and high-pass filter to the data, converting the data into the related coefficients that maintain spatial information as well as frequency information. Wavelet compression is achieved by zeroing the coefficients that pertain to the noise in the signal, i.e. the high frequency, low amplitude portion. This approach is well suited for our goal because it reduces the noise in the signal with only minimal impact on the larger, lower frequency target signatures. The resulting coefficients can then be encoded using lossless techniques with higher compression levels because of the lower entropy and significant number of zeros. No significant signal degradation or difficulties in target characterization or detection were observed or measured when wavelet compression was applied to simulated and real data, even when over 80% of the coefficients were zeroed. While the exact level of compression will be data set dependent, for the data sets we studied, compression factors over 10 were found to be satisfactory where conventional lossless techniques achieved levels of less than 3.

  17. Data compression by wavelet transforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahshahani, M.

    1992-01-01

    A wavelet transform algorithm is applied to image compression. It is observed that the algorithm does not suffer from the blockiness characteristic of the DCT-based algorithms at compression ratios exceeding 25:1, but the edges do not appear as sharp as they do with the latter method. Some suggestions for the improved performance of the wavelet transform method are presented.

  18. Pressure Oscillations in Adiabatic Compression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Roland

    2011-01-01

    After finding Moloney and McGarvey's modified adiabatic compression apparatus, I decided to insert this experiment into my physical chemistry laboratory at the last minute, replacing a problematic experiment. With insufficient time to build the apparatus, we placed a bottle between two thick textbooks and compressed it with a third textbook forced…

  19. Compression Shocks of Detached Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggink

    1947-01-01

    It is known that compression shocks which lead from supersonic to subsonic velocity cause the flow to separate on impact on a rigid wall. Such shocks appear at bodies with circular symmetry or wing profiles on locally exceeding sonic velocity, and in Laval nozzles with too high a back pressure. The form of the compression shocks observed therein is investigated.

  20. Evacuated-displacement compression molding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heir, W. C.

    1980-01-01

    Compression-molding process conprises: loading molding compound; evacuation; applying pressure to shape softened compound; further compressing while using compound as hydraulic fluid; and applying heat and pressure for cure. Major advantage of method is that it prevents increase in cavity volume (sporadic or general) throughout transformation phase of molding.

  1. Streaming Compression of Hexahedral Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Isenburg, M; Courbet, C

    2010-02-03

    We describe a method for streaming compression of hexahedral meshes. Given an interleaved stream of vertices and hexahedral our coder incrementally compresses the mesh in the presented order. Our coder is extremely memory efficient when the input stream documents when vertices are referenced for the last time (i.e. when it contains topological finalization tags). Our coder then continuously releases and reuses data structures that no longer contribute to compressing the remainder of the stream. This means in practice that our coder has only a small fraction of the whole mesh in memory at any time. We can therefore compress very large meshes - even meshes that do not file in memory. Compared to traditional, non-streaming approaches that load the entire mesh and globally reorder it during compression, our algorithm trades a less compact compressed representation for significant gains in speed, memory, and I/O efficiency. For example, on the 456k hexahedra 'blade' mesh, our coder is twice as fast and uses 88 times less memory (only 3.1 MB) with the compressed file increasing about 3% in size. We also present the first scheme for predictive compression of properties associated with hexahedral cells.

  2. Managing venous leg ulcers using compression therapy and dressings.

    PubMed

    Powell, Gail; Wicks, Gill; Will, Katrin

    Patient comfort and satisfaction with both compression therapy and wound care are critical to the success of venous leg ulcer treatment. This study observed 22 patients with venous leg ulcers treated over 12 weeks with two-layer compression hosiery and a range of wound dressings. The mean duration of the ulcers was 10.5 months and 48% had a history of recurrent ulcers. Half the ulcers healed within 12 weeks; there was an increase in the proportion of patients reporting 'no impairment' to their mobility, but it was not significant. The ease of donning the two-layer hosiery was rated as excellent or good at 86% of control visits and the ease of doffing at 78%. In 95% of cases the clinicians said they would use the same combination of products again and 73% of patients were satisfied with it. PMID:26266566

  3. Lossless compression algorithm for multispectral imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkova, Irina; Grossberg, Michael; Gottipati, Srikanth

    2008-08-01

    Multispectral imaging is becoming an increasingly important tool for monitoring the earth and its environment from space borne and airborne platforms. Multispectral imaging data consists of visible and IR measurements from a scene across space and spectrum. Growing data rates resulting from faster scanning and finer spatial and spectral resolution makes compression an increasingly critical tool to reduce data volume for transmission and archiving. Research for NOAA NESDIS has been directed to finding for the characteristics of satellite atmospheric Earth science Imager sensor data what level of Lossless compression ratio can be obtained as well as appropriate types of mathematics and approaches that can lead to approaching this data's entropy level. Conventional lossless do not achieve the theoretical limits for lossless compression on imager data as estimated from the Shannon entropy. In a previous paper, the authors introduce a lossless compression algorithm developed for MODIS as a proxy for future NOAA-NESDIS satellite based Earth science multispectral imagers such as GOES-R. The algorithm is based on capturing spectral correlations using spectral prediction, and spatial correlations with a linear transform encoder. In decompression, the algorithm uses a statistically computed look up table to iteratively predict each channel from a channel decompressed in the previous iteration. In this paper we present a new approach which fundamentally differs from our prior work. In this new approach, instead of having a single predictor for each pair of bands we introduce a piecewise spatially varying predictor which significantly improves the compression results. Our new algorithm also now optimizes the sequence of channels we use for prediction. Our results are evaluated by comparison with a state of the art wavelet based image compression scheme, Jpeg2000. We present results on the 14 channel subset of the MODIS imager, which serves as a proxy for the GOES-R imager. We will also show results of the algorithm for on NOAA AVHRR data and data from SEVIRI. The algorithm is designed to be adapted to the wide range of multispectral imagers and should facilitate distribution of data throughout globally. This compression research is managed by Roger Heymann, PE of OSD NOAA NESDIS Engineering, in collaboration with the NOAA NESDIS STAR Research Office through Mitch Goldberg, Tim Schmit, Walter Wolf.

  4. Digital compression algorithms for HDTV transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adkins, Kenneth C.; Shalkhauser, Mary JO; Bibyk, Steven B.

    1990-01-01

    Digital compression of video images is a possible avenue for high definition television (HDTV) transmission. Compression needs to be optimized while picture quality remains high. Two techniques for compression the digital images are explained and comparisons are drawn between the human vision system and artificial compression techniques. Suggestions for improving compression algorithms through the use of neural and analog circuitry are given.

  5. Vortex Stabilized Compressed Fusion Grade Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2015-03-01

    Inertial confinement fusion schemes comprise of highly compressed dense plasmas. Some involve short pulses of powerful beams (lasers, particles) applied to solid pellets, while others utilize plasma focus to obtain dense pinch plasmas. Although compression factor >1000 has been achieved for starting pressures in the Torr range, the latter is limited by instabilities for initial gas density above 10 Torr. One alternative approach could be shooting electron beams through very dense, atmospheric pressure, vortex stabilized plasma. Large azimuthal magnetic generated by an electron beam can compress and heat the plasma to fusion viable parameters. This configuration is stable against sausage, kink, or beam - plasma instabilities. Based on experimental evidence beam propagation through the plasma is not be an issue. A second possibility is to tangentially squeeze a quasi-neutral plasma focus flow by a surrounding gas vortex. Based on currently available electron beams, the first scheme viability as an electrical power generating reactor does not seem to be promising. But using a plasma cathode electron beam that was developed a while ago, for which DOE has a patent U.S. Patent 4,942,339, could result in net generation of electricity. Calculations will be presented. Work supported by Work supported under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH1-886 with the US Department of Energy.

  6. Chronic sciatic nerve compression induces fibrosis in dorsal root ganglia

    PubMed Central

    LI, QINWEN; CHEN, JIANGHAI; CHEN, YANHUA; CONG, XIAOBIN; CHEN, ZHENBING

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, pathological alterations in neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were investigated in a rat model of chronic sciatic nerve compression. The rat model of chronic sciatic nerve compression was established by placing a 1 cm Silastic tube around the right sciatic nerve. Histological examination was performed via Masson's trichrome staining. DRG injury was assessed using Fluoro Ruby (FR) or Fluoro Gold (FG). The expression levels of target genes were examined using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. At 3 weeks post-compression, collagen fiber accumulation was observed in the ipsilateral area and, at 8 weeks, excessive collagen formation with muscle atrophy was observed. The collagen volume fraction gradually and significantly increased following sciatic nerve compression. In the model rats, the numbers of FR-labeled DRG neurons were significantly higher, relative to the sham-operated group, however, the numbers of FG-labeled neurons were similar. In the ipsilateral DRG neurons of the model group, the levels of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) were elevated and, surrounding the neurons, the levels of collagen type I were increased, compared with those in the contralateral DRG. In the ipsilateral DRG, chronic nerve compression was associated with significantly higher levels of phosphorylated (p)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, and significantly lower levels of p-c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p-p38, compared with those in the contralateral DRGs. Chronic sciatic nerve compression likely induced DRG pathology by upregulating the expression levels of TGF-β1, CTGF and collagen type I, with involvement of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. PMID:26820076

  7. Detecting double compression of audio signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Rui; Shi, Yun Q.; Huang, Jiwu

    2010-01-01

    MP3 is the most popular audio format nowadays in our daily life, for example music downloaded from the Internet and file saved in the digital recorder are often in MP3 format. However, low bitrate MP3s are often transcoded to high bitrate since high bitrate ones are of high commercial value. Also audio recording in digital recorder can be doctored easily by pervasive audio editing software. This paper presents two methods for the detection of double MP3 compression. The methods are essential for finding out fake-quality MP3 and audio forensics. The proposed methods use support vector machine classifiers with feature vectors formed by the distributions of the first digits of the quantized MDCT (modified discrete cosine transform) coefficients. Extensive experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods. To the best of our knowledge, this piece of work is the first one to detect double compression of audio signal.

  8. Nanoparticle-stabilized colloids in compressible hydrofluoroalkanes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Libo; da Rocha, Sandro R P

    2011-09-01

    In this work, we show that nanoparticles (NPs) dispersed in compressible hydrofluoroalkanes (HFAs) at small volume fractions are capable of stabilizing micrometer-sized particle colloids, which otherwise flocculate due to strong van der Waals forces. Water-soluble, biodegradable NPs with a chitosan (CS) core, grafted with highly HFA-philic moieties, can be readily dispersed in the low dielectric HFAs and are capable of imparting stability to a wide range of therapeutic particles having different chemistries (polar or hydrophobic; small and large molecular weight, including peptides and proteins) and morphologies (micronized crystals or amorphous). These NP systems thus serve as a broadly applicable platform for the noninvasive delivery of therapeutics to and through the lungs using propellant-based, portable inhalers, and are also of potential relevance in other industries where HFAs are employed as solvents or propellants. This concept may also be applicable to other compressible solvents. PMID:21774500

  9. Compressive line sensing underwater imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, B.; Dalgleish, F. R.; Vuorenkoski, A. K.; Caimi, F. M.; Britton, W.

    2013-05-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) theory has drawn great interest and led to new imaging techniques in many different fields. In recent years, the FAU/HBOI OVOL has conducted extensive research to study the CS based active electro-optical imaging system in the scattering medium such as the underwater environment. The unique features of such system in comparison with the traditional underwater electro-optical imaging system are discussed. Building upon the knowledge from the previous work on a frame based CS underwater laser imager concept, more advantageous for hover-capable platforms such as the Hovering Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (HAUV), a compressive line sensing underwater imaging (CLSUI) system that is more compatible with the conventional underwater platforms where images are formed in whiskbroom fashion, is proposed in this paper. Simulation results are discussed.

  10. Compressed-domain video parsing using energy histograms of the lower-frequency DCT coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Oliver K.; Lay, Jose A.; Guan, Ling

    1999-12-01

    As an increasing amount of audio-visual data is stored, distribute, and used in the compressed form, compressed- domain techniques will be favorable. However, as conventional features may not be accessible in the compressed domain, exploration of new compressed domain features will become mandatory. Studies have shown that the DC coefficients of a DCT-compressed video can be used to detect shot transitions for relatively simple video sequences.In this work, the use of the energy histogram of the lower frequency DCT coefficients as features for video parsing was examined. The experimental results show an improvement over those obtained by the DC coefficients alone.

  11. Compressive Sensing for Quantum Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howland, Gregory A.

    This thesis describes the application of compressive sensing to several challenging problems in quantum imaging with practical and fundamental implications. Compressive sensing is a measurement technique that compresses a signal during measurement such that it can be dramatically undersampled. Compressive sensing has been shown to be an extremely efficient measurement technique for imaging, particularly when detector arrays are not available. The thesis first reviews compressive sensing through the lens of quantum imaging and quantum measurement. Four important applications and their corresponding experiments are then described in detail. The first application is a compressive sensing, photon-counting lidar system. A novel depth mapping technique that uses standard, linear compressive sensing is described. Depth maps up to 256 x 256 pixel transverse resolution are recovered with depth resolution less than 2.54 cm. The first three-dimensional, photon counting video is recorded at 32 x 32 pixel resolution and 14 frames-per-second. The second application is the use of compressive sensing for complementary imaging---simultaneously imaging the transverse-position and transverse-momentum distributions of optical photons. This is accomplished by taking random, partial projections of position followed by imaging the momentum distribution on a cooled CCD camera. The projections are shown to not significantly perturb the photons' momenta while allowing high resolution position images to be reconstructed using compressive sensing. A variety of objects and their diffraction patterns are imaged including the double slit, triple slit, alphanumeric characters, and the University of Rochester logo. The third application is the use of compressive sensing to characterize spatial entanglement of photon pairs produced by spontaneous parametric downconversion. The technique gives a theoretical speedup N2/log N for N-dimensional entanglement over the standard raster scanning technique. Entanglement imaging is demonstrated at 1024 dimensions-per-photon with channel capacities exceeding 8.4 bits-per-photon. In practice, the measurement time is reduced from 310 days for the standard technique to 8 hours for the compressive technique. An entropic steering inequality is violated to witness entanglement. The final application is a compressive wavefront sensor that unites compressive sensing with weak measurement. We show how a twisted-nematic spatial light modulator can be be used to weakly couple an optical field's position and polarization degrees of freedom. The complex nature of the weak value is used to directly measure random projections of the real and imaginary parts of the optical field, where polarization serves as an ancillary meter. We obtain 256 x 256 pixel wavefronts from only 10,000 random projections. Photon-counting detectors provide sub-picowatt sensitivity.

  12. Adaptively Compressed Exchange Operator.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin

    2016-05-10

    The Fock exchange operator plays a central role in modern quantum chemistry. The large computational cost associated with the Fock exchange operator hinders Hartree-Fock calculations and Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations with hybrid exchange-correlation functionals, even for systems consisting of hundreds of atoms. We develop the adaptively compressed exchange operator (ACE) formulation, which greatly reduces the computational cost associated with the Fock exchange operator without loss of accuracy. The ACE formulation is not dependent on the size of the band gap, and thus can be applied to insulating and semiconducting systems, as well as metallic systems. In an iterative framework for solving Hartree-Fock-like systems, such as that observed in planewave-based methods, the ACE formulation only requires moderate modification of the code. The ACE formulation can also be advantageous for other types of basis sets, especially when the storage cost of the exchange operator is expensive. Numerical results indicate that the ACE formulation can become advantageous, even for small systems with tens of atoms. In particular, the cost of each self-consistent field iteration for the electron density in the ACE formulation is only marginally larger than that of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) calculation, and thus offers orders-of-magnitude acceleration for Hartree-Fock-like calculations. PMID:27045571

  13. [Compression of interference hyperspectral image based on FHALS-NTD].

    PubMed

    Du, Li-Min; Li, Jin; Jin, Guang; Gao, Hui-Bin; Jin, Long-Xu; Zhang, Ke

    2012-11-01

    A hyperspectral interference image compression algorithm based on fast hierarchical alternating least squares nonnegative tensor Tucker decomposition (FHALS-NTD) is proposed. Firstly, the interference hyperspectral image is decomposed by 3-D OPD lifting-based discrete wavelet transform (3D OPT-LDWT) in the OPD direction. Then, the 3D DWT sub-bands decomposed are used as a three order nonnegative tensor, which is decomposed by the proposed FHALS-NTD algorithm to obtain 8 core tensors and 24 unknown component matrices. Finally, to obtain the final compressed bit-stream, each unknown component matrices element is quantized, and each core tensor is encoded by the proposed bit-plane coding of significant coefficients. The experimental results showed that the proposed compression algorithm could be used for reliable and stable work and has good compressive property. In the compression ratio range from 32 : 1 to 4 : 1, the average peak signal to noise ratio of proposed compression algorithm is higher than 40 dB. Compared with traditional approaches, the proposed method could improve the average PSNR by 1.23 dB. This effectively improves the compression performance of hyperspectral interference image. PMID:23387199

  14. Lossless compression of pseudocolor images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnavut, Ziya; Leavitt, David; Abdulazizoglu, Meral

    1998-10-01

    In a pseudo-color (color-mapped) image pixel values represent indices that point to color values in a look-up table. Well-known linear predictive schemes, such as JPEG and CALIC, perform poorly when used with pseudo-color images, while universal compressors, such as Gzip, Pkzip and Compress, yield better compression gain. Recently, Burrows and Wheeler introduced the Block Sorting Lossless Data Compression Algorithm (BWA). The BWA algorithm received considerable attention. It achieves compression rates as good as context-based methods, such as PPM, but at execution speeds closer to Ziv-Lempel techniques. The BWA algorithm is mainly composed of a block-sorting transformation which is known as Burrows-Wheeler Transformation (BWT), followed by Move-To-Front coding. In this paper, we introduce a new block transformation, Linear Order Transformation (LOT). We delineate its relationship to BWT and show that LOT is faster than BWT transformation. We then show that when MTF coder is employed after the LOT, the compression gain obtained is better than the well-known compression techniques, such as GIF, JPEG, CALLIC, Gzip, LZW (Unix Compress) and the BWA for pseudo-color images.

  15. Best compression: Reciprocating or rotary?

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, C.

    1997-07-01

    A compressor is a device used to increase the pressure of a compressible fluid. The inlet pressure can vary from a deep vacuum to a high positive pressure. The discharge pressure can range from subatmospheric levels to tens of thousands of pounds per square inch. Compressors come in numerous forms, but for oilfield applications there are two primary types, reciprocating and rotary. Both reciprocating and rotary compressors are grouped in the intermittent mode of compression. Intermittent is cyclic in nature, in that a specific quantity of gas is ingested by the compressor, acted upon and discharged before the cycle is repeated. Reciprocating compression is the most common form of compression used for oilfield applications. Rotary screw compressors have a long history but are relative newcomers to oilfield applications. The rotary screw compressor-technically a helical rotor compressor-dates back to 1878. That was when the first rotary screw was manufactured for the purpose of compressing air. Today thousands of rotary screw compression packages are being used throughout the world to compress natural gas.

  16. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  17. Vertebral Compression Exacerbates Osteoporotic Pain in an Ovariectomy-Induced Osteoporosis Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Miyako; Orita, Sumihisa; Miyagi, Masayuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Kamoda, Hiroto; Eguchi, Yawara; Arai, Gen; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Go; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Kawarai, Yuya; Yoshino, Kensuke; Ozawa, Tomoyuki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Kawakami, Mamoru; Ohtori, Seiji; Inoue, Gen

    2013-09-10

    Study Design. Basic pain study using osteoporotic rodent models.Objective. To examine alterations in distribution of pain-related neuropeptides following compressive force on osteoporotic vertebrae and their chronic pain-related properties.Summary of Background Data. We previously reported significantly increased production of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a marker of inflammatory pain, in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of vertebrae in osteoporosis-model ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Here, we hypothesized that longitudinal compressive force on vertebrae can affect osteoporotic pain properties, which has not been examined yet.Methods. OVX rats were used as the osteoporosis model. Female Sprague Dawley rats were prepared and Fluoro-Gold (FG) neurotracer was applied to the periosteal surface of the Co5 vertebra. After FG-labeling, the animals were divided into 4 groups: Control, Control + compression, OVX, and OVX + compression. The Control groups were not ovariectomized. In the compression groups, K-wires were stabbed transversely through Co4 and Co6 with Co5 compressed longitudinally by rubber bands bridged between the two. One, 2, 4, and 8 weeks after surgery, bilateral S1 to S3 DRGs were excised for immunofluorescence assays. Expression of CGRP and activating transcription factor 3 (ATF-3), a marker of neuronal injury, were compared among the 4 groups.Results. Sustained upregulation of CGRP in DRG neurons was observed following compression of the Co5 vertebra, and Co5 compression caused significant increase in CGRP production in DRG neurons, while a greater level of ATF-3 upregulation was observed in DRGs in OVX rats following dynamic vertebral compression 8 weeks after surgery, implying potential neuropathic pain.Conclusion: There was sustained upregulation of CGRP and ATF3 in DRGs in osteoporotic model rats compared with controls, and levels were further enhanced by dynamic vertebral compression. These findings imply that dynamic compression stress on vertebrae can exacerbate osteoporotic pain by inducing both inflammatory and neuropathic pain mediators. PMID:24026152

  18. Lossy Compression of ACS images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2004-01-01

    A method of compressing images stored as floating point arrays was proposed several years ago by White and Greenfield. With the increased image sizes encountered in the last few years and the consequent need to distribute large data volumes, the value of applying such a procedure has become more evident. Methods such as this which offer significant compression ratios are lossy and there is always some concern that statistically important information might be discarded. Several astronomical images have been analyzed and, in the examples tested, compression ratios of about six were obtained with no significant information loss.

  19. Compressive adaptive computational ghost imaging

    PubMed Central

    Aβmann, Marc; Bayer, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Compressive sensing is considered a huge breakthrough in signal acquisition. It allows recording an image consisting of N2 pixels using much fewer than N2 measurements if it can be transformed to a basis where most pixels take on negligibly small values. Standard compressive sensing techniques suffer from the computational overhead needed to reconstruct an image with typical computation times between hours and days and are thus not optimal for applications in physics and spectroscopy. We demonstrate an adaptive compressive sampling technique that performs measurements directly in a sparse basis. It needs much fewer than N2 measurements without any computational overhead, so the result is available instantly. PMID:23529046

  20. Designing experiments through compressed sensing.

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Joseph G.; Ridzal, Denis

    2013-06-01

    In the following paper, we discuss how to design an ensemble of experiments through the use of compressed sensing. Specifically, we show how to conduct a small number of physical experiments and then use compressed sensing to reconstruct a larger set of data. In order to accomplish this, we organize our results into four sections. We begin by extending the theory of compressed sensing to a finite product of Hilbert spaces. Then, we show how these results apply to experiment design. Next, we develop an efficient reconstruction algorithm that allows us to reconstruct experimental data projected onto a finite element basis. Finally, we verify our approach with two computational experiments.

  1. Non-observation RINEX compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezručka, Juraj

    2013-12-01

    RINEX format is a result of an effort to standardize exchanging GNSS related data in human readable receiver independent format. Besides observation data, RINEX is also de facto standard for exchanging navigation message or meteorological data. The paper describes simple compression methods for navigation messages and meteorological data files. Both formats have their specific features, therefore different methods were used. Followed by standard compression the algorithms reduce the file size by more than 20 percent compared to standard compression. Thanks to the properties of weather and regular parameter observations it allows to reduce the file size of meteorological RINEX to a mere fraction of its original size.

  2. Studies on image compression and image reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayood, Khalid; Nori, Sekhar; Araj, A.

    1994-01-01

    During this six month period our works concentrated on three, somewhat different areas. We looked at and developed a number of error concealment schemes for use in a variety of video coding environments. This work is described in an accompanying (draft) Masters thesis. In the thesis we describe application of this techniques to the MPEG video coding scheme. We felt that the unique frame ordering approach used in the MPEG scheme would be a challenge to any error concealment/error recovery technique. We continued with our work in the vector quantization area. We have also developed a new type of vector quantizer, which we call a scan predictive vector quantization. The scan predictive VQ was tested on data processed at Goddard to approximate Landsat 7 HRMSI resolution and compared favorably with existing VQ techniques. A paper describing this work is included. The third area is concerned more with reconstruction than compression. While there is a variety of efficient lossless image compression schemes, they all have a common property that they use past data to encode future data. This is done either via taking differences, context modeling, or by building dictionaries. When encoding large images, this common property becomes a common flaw. When the user wishes to decode just a portion of the image, the requirement that the past history be available forces the decoding of a significantly larger portion of the image than desired by the user. Even with intelligent partitioning of the image dataset, the number of pixels decoded may be four times the number of pixels requested. We have developed an adaptive scanning strategy which can be used with any lossless compression scheme and which lowers the additional number of pixels to be decoded to about 7 percent of the number of pixels requested! A paper describing these results is included.

  3. Low-Complexity Lossless and Near-Lossless Data Compression Technique for Multispectral Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Hua; Klimesh, Matthew A.

    2009-01-01

    This work extends the lossless data compression technique described in Fast Lossless Compression of Multispectral- Image Data, (NPO-42517) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 8 (August 2006), page 26. The original technique was extended to include a near-lossless compression option, allowing substantially smaller compressed file sizes when a small amount of distortion can be tolerated. Near-lossless compression is obtained by including a quantization step prior to encoding of prediction residuals. The original technique uses lossless predictive compression and is designed for use on multispectral imagery. A lossless predictive data compression algorithm compresses a digitized signal one sample at a time as follows: First, a sample value is predicted from previously encoded samples. The difference between the actual sample value and the prediction is called the prediction residual. The prediction residual is encoded into the compressed file. The decompressor can form the same predicted sample and can decode the prediction residual from the compressed file, and so can reconstruct the original sample. A lossless predictive compression algorithm can generally be converted to a near-lossless compression algorithm by quantizing the prediction residuals prior to encoding them. In this case, since the reconstructed sample values will not be identical to the original sample values, the encoder must determine the values that will be reconstructed and use these values for predicting later sample values. The technique described here uses this method, starting with the original technique, to allow near-lossless compression. The extension to allow near-lossless compression adds the ability to achieve much more compression when small amounts of distortion are tolerable, while retaining the low complexity and good overall compression effectiveness of the original algorithm.

  4. 76 FR 22001 - National Park Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... the two hundred and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-9730 Filed 4-19-11; 8:45 am... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8656 of April 15, 2011 National Park Week, 2011 By the President of the.... ``Healthy Parks, Healthy People,'' the focus for this year's National Park Week, highlights the role...

  5. 76 FR 43107 - Captive Nations Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... hundred and thirty-sixth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-18367 Filed 7-18-11; 11:15 am] Billing code... July 19, 2011 Part IV The President Proclamation 8692--Captive Nations Week, 2011 #0; #0; #0... Nations Week, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation There are times in...

  6. 78 FR 44867 - Captive Nations Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty- eighth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc... July 24, 2013 Part VI The President Proclamation 8998--Captive Nations Week, 2013 #0; #0; #0... Nations Week, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation As citizens of...

  7. 77 FR 22177 - National Volunteer Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-9017 Filed 4-11-12; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295-F2-P ... April 12, 2012 Part III The President Proclamation 8797--National Volunteer Week, 2012 Proclamation 8798--Pan American Day and Pan American Week, 2012 Proclamation 8799--National Former Prisoner of...

  8. 78 FR 24323 - National Park Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... the United States of America the two hundred and thirty- seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8961 of April 19, 2013 National Park Week, 2013 By the President of the... be passed on. During National Park Week, we celebrate the wonders entrusted to us by our...

  9. 76 FR 72601 - National Family Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... two hundred and thirty-sixth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-30454 Filed 11-22-11; 11:15 am... November 23, 2011 Part IV The President Proclamation 8756--National Family Week, 2011 Proclamation 8757--National Farm-City Week, 2011 Proclamation 8758--National Child's Day, 2011 Executive Order...

  10. 75 FR 29393 - Small Business Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ... thirty-fourth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-12755 Filed 5-25-10; 8:45 am] Billing code 3195-W0-P ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8525 of May 20, 2010 Small Business Week, 2010 By the President of the United... new private sector jobs. During Small Business Week, we reaffirm our support for America's...

  11. 75 FR 20891 - National Volunteer Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ... United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fourth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-9415 Filed... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8500 of April 16, 2010 National Volunteer Week, 2010 By the President of the... country. This week, we recognize their enduring contributions and encourage more Americans, especially...

  12. 76 FR 20215 - National Volunteer Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... hundred and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-8837 Filed 4-11-11; 8:45 am] Billing code 3195... Week, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation America's story has been... they see a need. During National Volunteer Week, we celebrate the profound impact of volunteers...

  13. 78 FR 24321 - National Volunteer Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... of America the two hundred and thirty- seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013-09867 Filed 4-23-13... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8960 of April 19, 2013 National Volunteer Week, 2013 By the President of the... accept certain obligations to one another. National Volunteer Week is a time to renew that...

  14. 75 FR 42279 - Captive Nations Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-21

    ... and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-17984 Filed 7-20-10; 8:45 am] Billing code 3195-W0... Documents#0;#0; #0; #0;Title 3-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 8541 of July 16, 2010 Captive Nations Week... and requested the President to issue a proclamation designating the third week of July of each year...

  15. 77 FR 42941 - Captive Nations Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... States of America the two hundred and thirty-seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-17948 Filed 7-19... July 20, 2012 Part VI The President Proclamation 8841--Captive Nations Week, 2012 Memorandum of July 11... President ] Proclamation 8841 of July 16, 2012 Captive Nations Week, 2012 By the President of the...

  16. Celebrate Valentine's Day and National Condom Week.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    Valentine's Day and National Condom Week are potential opportunities to publicize the use of condoms in business and social facilities. Readers are encouraged to set up information tables and condom floral arrangements to encourage media involvement and support from local nightclubs as ways to encourage the use of condoms. The National Condom Week Handbook is a resource for additional promotional ideas. PMID:11362175

  17. National Poison Prevention Week Promotional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poison Prevention Week Council, Washington, DC.

    This collection of materials for parents, early childhood workers, the elderly, and anyone in situations requiring safeguards against poisoning, spans the years 1993 and 1994 and is intended to promote National Poison Prevention Week. The materials included are: (1) the 31-page, illustrated report on National Poison Prevention Week for 1993,…

  18. Banned Books Week: Just the Beginning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Helen R.

    2009-01-01

    Founded in 1982, Banned Books Week is celebrated annually during the last week in September and will be observed from September 26-October 3 in 2009. The event acknowledges Americans' right to read the books of their choice regardless of whether the ideas, language, or images are controversial. This annual observance of banned books is a good…

  19. 78 FR 69749 - American Education Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... the two hundred and thirty- eighth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013-28018 Filed 11-19-13; 11:15 am... November 20, 2013 Part II The President Proclamation 9058--American Education Week, 2013 #0; #0; #0... American Education Week, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Education...

  20. 75 FR 71005 - American Education Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-29516 Filed 11-19-10; 8:45 am] Billing code 3195-W1-P ... Education Week, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Education is essential to our success as both a people and a Nation. During American Education Week, we rededicate...

  1. 76 FR 71445 - American Education Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... United States of America the two hundred and thirty-sixth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-29938 Filed... November 17, 2011 Part II The President Proclamation 8753--American Education Week, 2011 #0; #0; #0... American Education Week, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Ensuring...

  2. 75 FR 62307 - Fire Prevention Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ... Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8577 of October 1, 2010 Fire Prevention Week, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation During Fire Prevention Week, we reaffirm the importance of...

  3. 76 FR 63801 - Fire Prevention Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-sixth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-26720... October 13, 2011 Part IV The President Proclamation 8732--Fire Prevention Week, 2011 Proclamation 8733...; #0;Title 3-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 8732 of October 7, 2011 Fire Prevention Week, 2011...

  4. Using the Weekly Newspaper in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Sharon; Kendall, Stuart

    Intended for teachers in all subject areas at the elementary and secondary school levels, this booklet contains a variety of activities involving the use of the weekly newspaper as a teaching aid. Following a list of features of a weekly newspaper that make it suitable for classroom instruction, the activities are presented for elementary and…

  5. 77 FR 31151 - World Trade Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ... hundred and thirty-sixth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-12880 Filed 5-23-12; 11:15 am] Billing code... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8827 of May 21, 2012 World Trade Week, 2012 By the President of the United... demand for goods and services designed and produced by Americans. During World Trade Week, we...

  6. 75 FR 28183 - World Trade Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ... the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fourth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010...#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8521 of May 12, 2010 World Trade Week, 2010 By the President of the United.... World Trade Week is an opportunity for us to reaffirm the importance of trade to our Nation's...

  7. The Role of Transforms in Image Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bairagi, V. K.; Sapkal, A. M.; Gaikwad, M. S.

    2013-06-01

    In today's multimedia wireless communication, major issue is bandwidth needed to satisfy real time transmission of image data. Compression is one of the good solutions to address this issue. Transform based compression algorithms are widely used in the field of compression, because of their de-correlation and other properties, useful in compression. In this paper, comparative study of compression methods is done based on their types. This paper addresses the issue of importance of transform in image compression and selecting particular transform for image compression. A comparative study of performance of a variety of different image transforms is done base on compression ratio, entropy and time factor.

  8. Pseudoaneurysm of the Inferior Epigastric Artery Successfully Treated by Ultrasound-guided Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Takase, Kei Kazama, Takuro; Abe, Kayoko; Chiba, Yoshihiro; Saito, Haruo; Takahashi, Shoki

    2004-09-15

    An 82-year-old woman underwent right hemicolectomy by median laparotomy. Two weeks later, a pulsatile mass was found at the left side of the surgical wound, which was diagnosed as pseudoaneurysm of the inferior epigastric artery by color Doppler US and CT. The pseudoaneurysm was successfully treated by US-guided compression of the neck of the aneurysm for 30 minutes. US-guided compression should be considered the treatment of choice for postsurgical pseudoaneurysm of the inferior epigastric artery.

  9. EEG compression of scalp recordings based on dipole fitting.

    PubMed

    Daou, Hoda; Labeau, Fabrice

    2015-05-01

    A novel technique for electroencephalogram (EEG) compression is proposed in this paper. This technique models the intrinsic dependence inherent between the different EEG channels. It is based on methods borrowed from dipole fitting that is usually used in order to find a solution to the classic problems in EEG analysis: inverse and forward problems. To compress the EEG signals, the forward model based on approximated source dipoles is first used to provide an approximation of the recorded signals. Then, (based on a smoothness factor) appropriate coding techniques are suggested to compress the residuals of the fitting process. Results show that this technique works well for different recordings and for different patients, and is even able to provide near-lossless compression for certain types of recordings. PMID:25122606

  10. Investigation on wind energy-compressed air power system.

    PubMed

    Jia, Guang-Zheng; Wang, Xuan-Yin; Wu, Gen-Mao

    2004-03-01

    Wind energy is a pollution free and renewable resource widely distributed over China. Aimed at protecting the environment and enlarging application of wind energy, a new approach to application of wind energy by using compressed air power to some extent instead of electricity put forward. This includes: explaining the working principles and characteristics of the wind energy-compressed air power system; discussing the compatibility of wind energy and compressor capacity; presenting the theoretical model and computational simulation of the system. The obtained compressor capacity vs wind power relationship in certain wind velocity range can be helpful in the designing of the wind power-compressed air system. Results of investigations on the application of high-pressure compressed air for pressure reduction led to conclusion that pressure reduction with expander is better than the throttle regulator in energy saving. PMID:14727304

  11. CCD noise influence on JPEG2000 compression of astronomical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Páta, Petr

    2011-09-01

    Compression of astronomical images is still current task. In most applications, lossless approaches are used that do no damage to the compressed data. These algorithms, however, have lower compression ratios and are not as effective. It is therefore important to deal with more efficient lossy compression techniques. For them it is necessary to define quality criteria and level of acceptable distortion of image data. The usual multimedia approach is not possible to use for the scientific image data. They are optimized for human vision. This work deals with the influence of noise generated in the CCD structure to the defined quality criteria. It will also be shown the impact of the lossy standard JPEG2000 on quality of image data in astronomy.

  12. CCD noise influence on JPEG2000 compression of astronomical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Páta, Petr

    2012-02-01

    Compression of astronomical images is still current task. In most applications, lossless approaches are used that do no damage to the compressed data. These algorithms, however, have lower compression ratios and are not as effective. It is therefore important to deal with more efficient lossy compression techniques. For them it is necessary to define quality criteria and level of acceptable distortion of image data. The usual multimedia approach is not possible to use for the scientific image data. They are optimized for human vision. This work deals with the influence of noise generated in the CCD structure to the defined quality criteria. It will also be shown the impact of the lossy standard JPEG2000 on quality of image data in astronomy.

  13. Compression of images using differences methods and extreme analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogribny, Wlodzimierz; Drzycimski, Zdzislav; Zielinski, Igor

    1998-11-01

    This work presents algorithmic methods of errors reduction and 2D signals compression in a combined PCM-DM formats. Also methods of defining Delta Modulation (DM) sampling rate and maximum and minimum DM step size in real time, basing on maximum derivative a priori estimate, are presented. This estimate is proposed to be defined by a spectrum of the previous signal realization, which is known. Further data compression in real time is achieved with help of external analysis (EA). EA of pictures is based on the 2D differences in rows or in diagonals. This type of data compression is based only on the definition the extreme signal, and distance between these extremes. The algorithm of rigorous, unrigorous, and unclear extreme defining is universal, and independently for many method of digitizing of pixels is presented. Also methods of errors analysis and their decrease are described. After compression with EA, the image is reconstructed in real time.

  14. Correlation estimation and performance optimization for distributed image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhihai; Cao, Lei; Cheng, Hui

    2006-01-01

    Correlation estimation plays a critical role in resource allocation and rate control for distributed data compression. A Wyner-Ziv encoder for distributed image compression is often considered as a lossy source encoder followed by a lossless Slepian-Wolf encoder. The source encoder consists of spatial transform, quantization, and bit plane extraction. In this work, we find that Gray code, which has been extensively used in digital modulation, is able to significantly improve the correlation between the source data and its side information. Theoretically, we analyze the behavior of Gray code within the context of distributed image compression. Using this theoretical model, we are able to efficiently allocate the bit budget and determine the code rate of the Slepian-Wolf encoder. Our experimental results demonstrate that the Gray code, coupled with accurate correlation estimation and rate control, significantly improves the picture quality, by up to 4 dB, over the existing methods for distributed image compression.

  15. Perceptual image compression for data transmission on the battlefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Jose G.; Smith, Mark J. T.; Hontsch, Ingo; Karam, Lina J.; Namuduri, Kameswara R.; Szu, Harold H.

    1998-07-01

    This paper treats the compression of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery. SAR images are difficult to compress, relative to natural images, because SAR contains an inherent high frequency speckle. Today's state-of-the-art coders are designed to work with natural images, which have a lower frequency content. Thus, their performance on SAR is under par. In this paper we given an overview performance report on the popular compressions techniques, and investigate three approaches to improve the quality of SAR compression at low- bit rates. First, we look at the design of optimal quantizers which we obtain by training on SAR data. Second, we explore the use of perceptual properties of the human visual system to improve subjective coding quality. Third, we consider the use of a model that separates the SAR image into structural and textural components. The paper concludes with a subjective evaluation of the algorithms based on the CCIR recommendation for the assessment of picture quality.

  16. Data compression opportunities in EOSDIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Ben; Berbert, John

    1993-01-01

    The Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is described in terms of its data volume, data rate, and data distribution requirements. Opportunities for data compression in EOSDIS are discussed.

  17. Electrical conductivity of compressed argon

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, R.; Windl, W.; Collins, L.; Kress, J.; Kwon, I.

    1997-10-01

    The authors report calculations of the electrical conductivity of solid argon as a function of compression within the density functional local density approximation formulation for a norm-conserving pseudopotential using both electron-phonon coupling and molecular dynamics techniques.

  18. Comparison of Artificial Compressibility Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Housman, Jeffrey; Kwak, Dochan

    2004-01-01

    Various artificial compressibility methods for calculating the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are compared. Each method is described and numerical solutions to test problems are conducted. A comparison based on convergence behavior, accuracy, and robustness is given.

  19. Compressed gas fuel storage system

    DOEpatents

    Wozniak, John J.; Tiller, Dale B.; Wienhold, Paul D.; Hildebrand, Richard J.

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas vehicle fuel storage system comprised of a plurality of compressed gas pressure cells supported by shock-absorbing foam positioned within a shape-conforming container. The container is dimensioned relative to the compressed gas pressure cells whereby a radial air gap surrounds each compressed gas pressure cell. The radial air gap allows pressure-induced expansion of the pressure cells without resulting in the application of pressure to adjacent pressure cells or physical pressure to the container. The pressure cells are interconnected by a gas control assembly including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and means for connecting the fuel storage system to a vehicle power source and a refueling adapter. The gas control assembly is enclosed by a protective cover attached to the container. The system is attached to the vehicle with straps to enable the chassis to deform as intended in a high-speed collision.

  20. Reversible compression of MR images.

    PubMed

    Midtvik, M; Hovig, I

    1999-09-01

    Methods for reversible coding can be classified according to the organization of the source model as either static, semi-adaptive, or adaptive. Magnetic resonance (MR) images have different statistical characteristics in the foreground and the background and separation is thus a promising path for reversible MR image compression. A new reversible compression method, based on static source models for foreground and background separately, is presented. The method is nonuniversal and uses contextual information to exploit the fact that entropy and bit rate are reduced by increasing the statistical order of the model. This paper establishes a realistic level of expectation regarding the bit rate in reversible MR image compression, in general, and the bit rate using static modeling, in particular. The experimental results show that compression using the new method can give bit rates comparable to the best existing reversible methods. PMID:10571384

  1. Equilibrium states of homogeneous sheared compressible turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riahi, M.; Lili, T.

    2011-06-01

    Equilibrium states of homogeneous compressible turbulence subjected to rapid shear is studied using rapid distortion theory (RDT). The purpose of this study is to determine the numerical solutions of unsteady linearized equations governing double correlations spectra evolution. In this work, RDT code developed by authors solves these equations for compressible homogeneous shear flows. Numerical integration of these equations is carried out using a second-order simple and accurate scheme. The two Mach numbers relevant to homogeneous shear flow are the turbulent Mach number Mt, given by the root mean square turbulent velocity fluctuations divided by the speed of sound, and the gradient Mach number Mg which is the mean shear rate times the transverse integral scale of the turbulence divided by the speed of sound. Validation of this code is performed by comparing RDT results with direct numerical simulation (DNS) of [A. Simone, G.N. Coleman, and C. Cambon, Fluid Mech. 330, 307 (1997)] and [S. Sarkar, J. Fluid Mech. 282, 163 (1995)] for various values of initial gradient Mach number Mg0. It was found that RDT is valid for small values of the non-dimensional times St (St < 3.5). It is important to note that RDT is also valid for large values of St (St > 10) in particular for large values of Mg0. This essential feature justifies the resort to RDT in order to determine equilibrium states in the compressible regime.

  2. Compression ignition characteristics of coal slurry fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Brehob, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    Slow and medium speed compression ignition engines are devices with the potential for conversion to coal fueling. Recent work focuses on coal slurried in a liquid carrier. Engine studies on coal slurry to date have investigated the slurries' wear, thermal efficiency, and injection performance. Previously lacking information on the compression ignition characteristics of coal slurries, specifically, the ignition delay times and conditions for ignition of 45 mass% coal in methanol, oil, and water are compared to methanol and diesel No. 2. The slurries are evaluated using a 900 rpm, direct injection, square piston engine simulator operating for one combustion cycle per experiment. Both 16:1 and 22:1 compression ratios are used with inlet air temperatures from ambient to 250/sup 0/C and 2 atm abs supercharge. The square geometry accommodates windows on two opposite walls of the combustion chamber for complete optical access. High speed Schlieren, shadowgraphic, and direct cinematography show the qualitative features of the motoring and combusting cycles. The pressure and luminosity defined ignition delay times are 0.7 to 10 msec for the conditions of the experiment. All of the test fuels except coal/water slurry ignited at the operating conditions attainable in the engine simulator. The temperature at time of injection required to obtain ignition is approximately 680 K for diesel No. 2 and coal/diesel slurry, 725 K for coal/methanol slurry, and 825 K for neat methanol.

  3. Compressive failure of fibre composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiansky, B.; Fleck, N. A.

    1993-01-01

    A REVIEW OF experimental data and elementary theoretical formulas for compressive failure of polymer matrix fibre composites indicates that the dominant failure mode is by plastic kinking. Initial local fibre misalignment plays a central role in the plastic kinking process. Theoretical analyses and numerical results for compressive kinking are presented, encompassing effects of strain-hardening, kink inclination, and applied shear stress. The assumption of rigid fibres is assessed critically, and the legitimacy of its use for polymer matrix composites is established.

  4. Dynamics of Strongly Compressible Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Towery, Colin; Poludnenko, Alexei; Hamlington, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Strongly compressible turbulence, wherein the turbulent velocity fluctuations directly generate compression effects, plays a critical role in many important scientific and engineering problems of interest today, for instance in the processes of stellar formation and also hypersonic vehicle design. This turbulence is very unusual in comparison to ``normal,'' weakly compressible and incompressible turbulence, which is relatively well understood. Strongly compressible turbulence is characterized by large variations in the thermodynamic state of the fluid in space and time, including excited acoustic modes, strong, localized shock and rarefaction structures, and rapid heating due to viscous dissipation. The exact nature of these thermo-fluid dynamics has yet to be discerned, which greatly limits the ability of current computational engineering models to successfully treat these problems. New direct numerical simulation (DNS) results of strongly compressible isotropic turbulence will be presented along with a framework for characterizing and evaluating compressible turbulence dynamics and a connection will be made between the present diagnostic analysis and the validation of engineering turbulence models.

  5. Hyperelastic Material Properties of Mouse Skin under Compression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuxiang; Marshall, Kara L.; Baba, Yoshichika; Gerling, Gregory J.; Lumpkin, Ellen A.

    2013-01-01

    The skin is a dynamic organ whose complex material properties are capable of withstanding continuous mechanical stress while accommodating insults and organism growth. Moreover, synchronized hair cycles, comprising waves of hair growth, regression and rest, are accompanied by dramatic fluctuations in skin thickness in mice. Whether such structural changes alter skin mechanics is unknown. Mouse models are extensively used to study skin biology and pathophysiology, including aging, UV-induced skin damage and somatosensory signaling. As the skin serves a pivotal role in the transfer function from sensory stimuli to neuronal signaling, we sought to define the mechanical properties of mouse skin over a range of normal physiological states. Skin thickness, stiffness and modulus were quantitatively surveyed in adult, female mice (Mus musculus). These measures were analyzed under uniaxial compression, which is relevant for touch reception and compression injuries, rather than tension, which is typically used to analyze skin mechanics. Compression tests were performed with 105 full-thickness, freshly isolated specimens from the hairy skin of the hind limb. Physiological variables included body weight, hair-cycle stage, maturity level, skin site and individual animal differences. Skin thickness and stiffness were dominated by hair-cycle stage at young (6–10 weeks) and intermediate (13–19 weeks) adult ages but by body weight in mature mice (26–34 weeks). Interestingly, stiffness varied inversely with thickness so that hyperelastic modulus was consistent across hair-cycle stages and body weights. By contrast, the mechanics of hairy skin differs markedly with anatomical location. In particular, skin containing fascial structures such as nerves and blood vessels showed significantly greater modulus than adjacent sites. Collectively, this systematic survey indicates that, although its structure changes dramatically throughout adult life, mouse skin at a given location maintains a constant elastic modulus to compression throughout normal physiological stages. PMID:23825661

  6. Evaluating Pregnant Occupant Restraints: The Effect of Local Uterine Compression on the Risk of Fetal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Duma, Stefan M.; Moorcroft, David M.; Stitzel, Joel D.; Duma, Greg G.

    2004-01-01

    In order to develop effective restraint systems for the pregnant occupant, injury criteria for determining fetal injury risk must be developed. This study presents computer simulations of a 30 week pregnant occupant that illustrate the importance of local uterine compression on the risk of fetal injury. Frontal impact simulations with a range of velocities and belt positions were used to identify the best correlation between local uterine compression and peak strain measured at the uterine-placental interface. It is suggested that future pregnant dummy development and specifically pregnant injury criteria should be based on local uterine compression relative to the placental attachment location. PMID:15319120

  7. Compressive sensing with a spherical microphone array.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Grande, Efren; Xenaki, Angeliki

    2016-02-01

    A wave expansion method is proposed in this work, based on measurements with a spherical microphone array, and formulated in the framework provided by Compressive Sensing. The method promotes sparse solutions via ℓ1-norm minimization, so that the measured data are represented by few basis functions. This results in fine spatial resolution and accuracy. This publication covers the theoretical background of the method, including experimental results that illustrate some of the fundamental differences with the "conventional" least-squares approach. The proposed methodology is relevant for source localization, sound field reconstruction, and sound field analysis. PMID:26936583

  8. Compression strength of composite primary structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric R.

    1992-01-01

    A status report of work performed during the period May 1, 1992 to October 31, 1992 is presented. Research was conducted in three areas: delamination initiation in postbuckled dropped-ply laminates; stiffener crippling initiated by delamination; and pressure pillowing of an orthogonally stiffened cylindrical shell. The geometrically nonlinear response and delamination initiation of compression-loaded dropped-ply laminates is analyzed. A computational model of the stiffener specimens that includes the capability to predict the interlaminar response at the flange free edge in postbuckling is developed. The distribution of the interacting loads between the stiffeners and the shell wall, particularly at the load transfer at the stiffener crossing point, is determined.

  9. Compressed sensing for phase contrast CT

    SciTech Connect

    Gaass, Thomas; Potdevin, Guillaume; Noeel, Peter B.; Tapfer, Arne; Willner, Marian; Herzen, Julia; Bech, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz; Haase, Axel

    2012-07-31

    Modern x-ray techniques opened the possibility to retrieve phase information. Phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) has the potential to significantly improve soft tissue contrast. Radiation dose, however, continues to be an issue when moving from bench to bedside. Dose reduction in this work is achieved by sparsely acquiring PCCT data. To compensate for appearing aliasing artifacts we introduce a compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction framework. We present the feasibility of CS on PCCT with numerical as well as measured phantom data. The results proof that CS compensates for under-sampling artifacts and maintains the superior soft tissue contrast and detail visibility in the reconstructed images.

  10. Compressed-format compared to regular-format in a first-year university physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, Jason J. B.; Harrison, David M.; Honig, Eli

    2015-03-01

    We compare student performance in two sessions of a large first-year university physics course, one with a normal 12-week term and the other with a compressed 6-week term. Student performance is measured by the normalized gain on the Force Concept Inventory. We find that the gains for the regular-format course are better than the gains for the compressed-format course, and while the differences in gains are small they are statistically significant. Not accounted for are the differences in effectiveness of the different instructors in the two versions of the course.

  11. Alternative Work Schedules in Office and Nonoffice Work Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Raymond J.; Barton, H. David

    A rapidly growing change in the workplace is the replacement of a fixed work schedule with a variety of alternative work schedules (AWS), including both flexible and compressed schedules. Experimenting organizations (N=901) evaluated one of four major categories of AWS in office and nonoffice settings, i.e., a flexible 8-hour day;…

  12. Estimating JPEG2000 compression for image forensics using Benford's Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qadir, Ghulam; Zhao, Xi; Ho, Anthony T. S.

    2010-05-01

    With the tremendous growth and usage of digital images nowadays, the integrity and authenticity of digital content is becoming increasingly important, and a growing concern to many government and commercial sectors. Image Forensics, based on a passive statistical analysis of the image data only, is an alternative approach to the active embedding of data associated with Digital Watermarking. Benford's Law was first introduced to analyse the probability distribution of the 1st digit (1-9) numbers of natural data, and has since been applied to Accounting Forensics for detecting fraudulent income tax returns [9]. More recently, Benford's Law has been further applied to image processing and image forensics. For example, Fu et al. [5] proposed a Generalised Benford's Law technique for estimating the Quality Factor (QF) of JPEG compressed images. In our previous work, we proposed a framework incorporating the Generalised Benford's Law to accurately detect unknown JPEG compression rates of watermarked images in semi-fragile watermarking schemes. JPEG2000 (a relatively new image compression standard) offers higher compression rates and better image quality as compared to JPEG compression. In this paper, we propose the novel use of Benford's Law for estimating JPEG2000 compression for image forensics applications. By analysing the DWT coefficients and JPEG2000 compression on 1338 test images, the initial results indicate that the 1st digit probability of DWT coefficients follow the Benford's Law. The unknown JPEG2000 compression rates of the image can also be derived, and proved with the help of a divergence factor, which shows the deviation between the probabilities and Benford's Law. Based on 1338 test images, the mean divergence for DWT coefficients is approximately 0.0016, which is lower than DCT coefficients at 0.0034. However, the mean divergence for JPEG2000 images compression rate at 0.1 is 0.0108, which is much higher than uncompressed DWT coefficients. This result clearly indicates a presence of compression in the image. Moreover, we compare the results of 1st digit probability and divergence among JPEG2000 compression rates at 0.1, 0.3, 0.5 and 0.9. The initial results show that the expected difference among them could be used for further analysis to estimate the unknown JPEG2000 compression rates.

  13. An Evaluation of a Two Week Teaching Trial Using Interactive Video Technology: Perceptions of Students and Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, R. A.; Hansford, B. C.

    This report is concerned with an evaluation of a 2-week teaching trial in 1989 that utilized compressed data--interactive video technology. The trial was a collaborative venture of the University of New England (UNE), TELECOM, the Department of Education, Employment and Training (DEET), and SONY. In general, the University of New England supplied…

  14. Audio representations for data compression and compressed domain processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Scott Nathan

    1999-10-01

    In the world of digital audio processing, one usually has the choice of performing modifications on the raw audio signal or performing data compression on the audio signal. But, performing modifications on a data compressed audio signal has proved difficult in the past. This thesis provides new representations of audio signals that allow for both very low bit rate audio data compression and high quality compressed domain processing and modifications. In this system, two compressed domain processing algorithms are available: time-scale and pitch-scale modifications. Time-scale modifications alter the playback speed of audio without changing the pitch. Similarly, pitch-scale modifications alter the pitch of the audio without changing the playback speed. The algorithms presented in this thesis segment the input audio signal into separate sinusoidal, transients, and noise signals. During attack-transient regions of the audio signal, the audio is modeled by transform coding techniques. During the remaining non-transient regions, the audio is modeled by a mixture of multiresolution sinusoidal modeling and noise modeling. Careful phase matching techniques at the time boundaries between the sines and transients allow for seamless transitions between the two representations. By separating the audio into three individual representations, each can be efficiently and perceptually quantized. In addition, by segmenting the audio into transient and non-transient regions, high quality time-scale modifications that stretch only the non-transient portions are possible.

  15. About-weekly variations in nocturia.

    PubMed

    Cornélissen, Germaine; Axelrod, David E; Halberg, Franz

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess components of variation in nocturia and to determine any putative geomagnetic influence. A 54-year old man with benign prostatic hyperplasia had recorded for about 4 years the number of times he awoke each night to urinate. The data have been reanalyzed for chronomics, the mapping of time structures (chronomes), involving the computation of least squares spectra of the urinary record and of environmental variables recorded during the same 4-year span. In addition to the previously reported monthly variation, other periodicities have been documented, including two separate components with periods of one week and of a near-week. The precise 7-day period may be a mainly exogenous resonance with external influences such as a weekly social schedule, whereas the near-week may be a partial resonance with natural changes in geomagnetics, reflecting in part changes in other non-photic natural environmental factors. PMID:15754853

  16. 29 CFR 1917.154 - Compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compressed air. 1917.154 Section 1917.154 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment 1917.154 Compressed air. Employees shall be... this part during cleaning with compressed air. Compressed air used for cleaning shall not exceed...

  17. 29 CFR 1917.154 - Compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compressed air. 1917.154 Section 1917.154 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment 1917.154 Compressed air. Employees shall be... this part during cleaning with compressed air. Compressed air used for cleaning shall not exceed...

  18. 29 CFR 1917.154 - Compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compressed air. 1917.154 Section 1917.154 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment 1917.154 Compressed air. Employees shall be... this part during cleaning with compressed air. Compressed air used for cleaning shall not exceed...

  19. 29 CFR 1917.154 - Compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compressed air. 1917.154 Section 1917.154 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.154 Compressed air. Employees shall be... this part during cleaning with compressed air. Compressed air used for cleaning shall not exceed...

  20. 29 CFR 1917.154 - Compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compressed air. 1917.154 Section 1917.154 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment 1917.154 Compressed air. Employees shall be... this part during cleaning with compressed air. Compressed air used for cleaning shall not exceed...

  1. Evolution of some Los Alamos flux compression programs

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, C.M.; Goforth, J.H.

    1996-12-31

    When we were approached to give a general discussion of some aspects of the Los Alamos flux compression program, we decided to present historical backgrounds of a few topics that have some relevance to programs that we very much In the forefront of activities going on today. Of some thirty abstracts collected at Los Alamos for this conference, ten of them dealt with electromagnetic acceleration of materials, notably the compression of heavy liners, and five dealt with plasma compression. Both of these topics have been under investigation, off and on, from the time a formal flux compression program was organized at Los Alamos. We decided that a short overview of work done In these areas would be of some interest. Some of the work described below has been discussed in Laboratory reports that, while referenced and available, are not readily accessible. For completeness, some previously published, accessible work Is also discussed but much more briefly. Perhaps the most striking thing about the early work In these two areas is how primitive much of it was when compared to the far more sophisticated, related activities of today. Another feature of these programs, actually for most programs, Is their cyclic nature. Their relevance and/or funding seems to come land go. Eventually, many of the older programs come back into favor. Activities Involving the dense plasma focus (DPF), about which some discussions will be given later, furnish a classic example of this kind, coming Into and then out of periods of heightened interest. We devote the next two sections of this paper to a review of our work In magnetic acceleration of solids and of plasma compression. A final section gives a survey of our work In which thin foils are imploded to produce intense quantities of son x-rays. The authors are well aware of much excellent work done elsewhere In all of these topics, but partly because of space limitations, have confined this discussion to work done at Los Alamos.

  2. Perceptual Image Compression in Telemedicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Eckstein, Miguel; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The next era of space exploration, especially the "Mission to Planet Earth" will generate immense quantities of image data. For example, the Earth Observing System (EOS) is expected to generate in excess of one terabyte/day. NASA confronts a major technical challenge in managing this great flow of imagery: in collection, pre-processing, transmission to earth, archiving, and distribution to scientists at remote locations. Expected requirements in most of these areas clearly exceed current technology. Part of the solution to this problem lies in efficient image compression techniques. For much of this imagery, the ultimate consumer is the human eye. In this case image compression should be designed to match the visual capacities of the human observer. We have developed three techniques for optimizing image compression for the human viewer. The first consists of a formula, developed jointly with IBM and based on psychophysical measurements, that computes a DCT quantization matrix for any specified combination of viewing distance, display resolution, and display brightness. This DCT quantization matrix is used in most recent standards for digital image compression (JPEG, MPEG, CCITT H.261). The second technique optimizes the DCT quantization matrix for each individual image, based on the contents of the image. This is accomplished by means of a model of visual sensitivity to compression artifacts. The third technique extends the first two techniques to the realm of wavelet compression. Together these two techniques will allow systematic perceptual optimization of image compression in NASA imaging systems. Many of the image management challenges faced by NASA are mirrored in the field of telemedicine. Here too there are severe demands for transmission and archiving of large image databases, and the imagery is ultimately used primarily by human observers, such as radiologists. In this presentation I will describe some of our preliminary explorations of the applications of our technology to the special problems of telemedicine.

  3. Impacts of shift work on sleep and circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Boivin, D B; Boudreau, P

    2014-10-01

    Shift work comprises work schedules that extend beyond the typical "nine-to-five" workday, wherein schedules often comprise early work start, compressed work weeks with 12-hour shifts, and night work. According to recent American and European surveys, between 15 and 30% of adult workers are engaged in some type of shift work, with 19% of the European population reportedly working at least 2 hours between 22:00 and 05:00. The 2005 International Classification of Sleep Disorders estimates that a shift work sleep disorder can be found in 2-5% of workers. This disorder is characterized by excessive sleepiness and/or sleep disruption for at least one month in relation with the atypical work schedule. Individual tolerance to shift work remains a complex problem that is affected by the number of consecutive work hours and shifts, the rest periods, and the predictability of work schedules. Sleepiness usually occurs during night shifts and is maximal at the end of the night. Impaired vigilance and performance occur around times of increased sleepiness and can seriously compromise workers' health and safety. Indeed, workers suffering from a shift work sleep-wake disorder can fall asleep involuntarily at work or while driving back home after a night shift. Working on atypical shifts has important socioeconomic impacts as it leads to an increased risk of accidents, workers' impairment and danger to public safety, especially at night. The aim of the present review is to review the circadian and sleep-wake disturbances associated with shift work as well as their medical impacts. PMID:25246026

  4. Inflammatory cascades mediate synapse elimination in spinal cord compression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cervical compressive myelopathy (CCM) is caused by chronic spinal cord compression due to spondylosis, a degenerative disc disease, and ossification of the ligaments. Tip-toe walking Yoshimura (twy) mice are reported to be an ideal animal model for CCM-related neuronal dysfunction, because they develop spontaneous spinal cord compression without any artificial manipulation. Previous histological studies showed that neurons are lost due to apoptosis in CCM, but the mechanism underlying this neurodegeneration was not fully elucidated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the pathophysiology of CCM by evaluating the global gene expression of the compressed spinal cord and comparing the transcriptome analysis with the physical and histological findings in twy mice. Methods Twenty-week-old twy mice were divided into two groups according to the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings: a severe compression (S) group and a mild compression (M) group. The transcriptome was analyzed by microarray and RT-PCR. The cellular pathophysiology was examined by immunohistological analysis and immuno-electron microscopy. Motor function was assessed by Rotarod treadmill latency and stride-length tests. Results Severe cervical calcification caused spinal canal stenosis and low functional capacity in twy mice. The microarray analysis revealed 215 genes that showed significantly different expression levels between the S and the M groups. Pathway analysis revealed that genes expressed at higher levels in the S group were enriched for terms related to the regulation of inflammation in the compressed spinal cord. M1 macrophage-dominant inflammation was present in the S group, and cysteine-rich protein 61 (Cyr61), an inducer of M1 macrophages, was markedly upregulated in these spinal cords. Furthermore, C1q, which initiates the classical complement cascade, was more upregulated in the S group than in the M group. The confocal and electron microscopy observations indicated that classically activated microglia/macrophages had migrated to the compressed spinal cord and eliminated synaptic terminals. Conclusions We revealed the detailed pathophysiology of the inflammatory response in an animal model of chronic spinal cord compression. Our findings suggest that complement-mediated synapse elimination is a central mechanism underlying the neurodegeneration in CCM. PMID:24589419

  5. Improved successive refinement for wavelet-based embedded image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creusere, Charles D.

    1999-10-01

    In this paper we consider a new form of successive coefficient refinement which can be used in conjunction with embedded compression algorithms like Shapiro's EZW (Embedded Zerotree Wavelet) and Said & Pearlman's SPIHT (Set Partitioning in Hierarchical Trees). Using the conventional refinement process, the approximation of a coefficient that was earlier determined to be significantly is refined by transmitting one of two symbols--an `up' symbol if the actual coefficient value is in the top half of the current uncertainty interval or a `down' symbol if it is the bottom half. In the modified scheme developed here, we transmit one of 3 symbols instead--`up', `down', or `exact'. The new `exact' symbol tells the decoder that its current approximation of a wavelet coefficient is `exact' to the level of precision desired. By applying this scheme in earlier work to lossless embedded compression (also called lossy/lossless compression), we achieved significant reductions in encoder and decoder execution times with no adverse impact on compression efficiency. These excellent results for lossless systems have inspired us to adapt this refinement approach to lossy embedded compression. Unfortunately, the results we have achieved thus far for lossy compression are not as good.

  6. SCADA Protocol Anomaly Detection Utilizing Compression (SPADUC) 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon Rueff; Lyle Roybal; Denis Vollmer

    2013-01-01

    There is a significant need to protect the nation’s energy infrastructures from malicious actors using cyber methods. Supervisory, Control, and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems may be vulnerable due to the insufficient security implemented during the design and deployment of these control systems. This is particularly true in older legacy SCADA systems that are still commonly in use. The purpose of INL’s research on the SCADA Protocol Anomaly Detection Utilizing Compression (SPADUC) project was to determine if and how data compression techniques could be used to identify and protect SCADA systems from cyber attacks. Initially, the concept was centered on how to train a compression algorithm to recognize normal control system traffic versus hostile network traffic. Because large portions of the TCP/IP message traffic (called packets) are repetitive, the concept of using compression techniques to differentiate “non-normal” traffic was proposed. In this manner, malicious SCADA traffic could be identified at the packet level prior to completing its payload. Previous research has shown that SCADA network traffic has traits desirable for compression analysis. This work investigated three different approaches to identify malicious SCADA network traffic using compression techniques. The preliminary analyses and results presented herein are clearly able to differentiate normal from malicious network traffic at the packet level at a very high confidence level for the conditions tested. Additionally, the master dictionary approach used in this research appears to initially provide a meaningful way to categorize and compare packets within a communication channel.

  7. A new compression format for fiber tracking datasets.

    PubMed

    Presseau, Caroline; Jodoin, Pierre-Marc; Houde, Jean-Christophe; Descoteaux, Maxime

    2015-04-01

    A single diffusion MRI streamline fiber tracking dataset may contain hundreds of thousands, and often millions of streamlines and can take up to several gigabytes of memory. This amount of data is not only heavy to compute, but also difficult to visualize and hard to store on disk (especially when dealing with a collection of brains). These problems call for a fiber-specific compression format that simplifies its manipulation. As of today, no fiber compression format has yet been adopted and the need for it is now becoming an issue for future connectomics research. In this work, we propose a new compression format, .zfib, for streamline tractography datasets reconstructed from diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI). Tracts contain a large amount of redundant information and are relatively smooth. Hence, they are highly compressible. The proposed method is a processing pipeline containing a linearization, a quantization and an encoding step. Our pipeline is tested and validated under a wide range of DTI and HARDI tractography configurations (step size, streamline number, deterministic and probabilistic tracking) and compression options. Similar to JPEG, the user has one parameter to select: a worst-case maximum tolerance error in millimeter (mm). Overall, we find a compression factor of more than 96% for a maximum error of 0.1mm without any perceptual change or change of diffusion statistics (mean fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity) along bundles. This opens new opportunities for connectomics and tractometry applications. PMID:25592997

  8. Anelastic versus Fully Compressible Turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoeven, Jan; Wiesehöfer, Thomas; Stellmach, Stephan

    2015-05-01

    Numerical simulations of turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in an ideal gas, using either the anelastic approximation or the fully compressible equations, are compared. Theoretically, the anelastic approximation is expected to hold in weakly superadiabatic systems with ɛ ={Δ }T/{{T}r}\\ll 1, where {Δ }T denotes the superadiabatic temperature drop over the convective layer and Tr the bottom temperature. Using direct numerical simulations, a systematic comparison of anelastic and fully compressible convection is carried out. With decreasing superadiabaticity ɛ, the fully compressible results are found to converge linearly to the anelastic solution with larger density contrasts generally improving the match. We conclude that in many solar and planetary applications, where the superadiabaticity is expected to be vanishingly small, results obtained with the anelastic approximation are in fact more accurate than fully compressible computations, which typically fail to reach small ɛ for numerical reasons. On the other hand, if the astrophysical system studied contains ɛ ˜ O(1) regions, such as the solar photosphere, fully compressible simulations have the advantage of capturing the full physics. Interestingly, even in weakly superadiabatic regions, like the bulk of the solar convection zone, the errors introduced by using artificially large values for ɛ for efficiency reasons remain moderate. If quantitative errors of the order of 10% are acceptable in such low ɛ regions, our work suggests that fully compressible simulations can indeed be computationally more efficient than their anelastic counterparts.

  9. Compression of spectral meteorological imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miettinen, Kristo

    1993-01-01

    Data compression is essential to current low-earth-orbit spectral sensors with global coverage, e.g., meteorological sensors. Such sensors routinely produce in excess of 30 Gb of data per orbit (over 4 Mb/s for about 110 min) while typically limited to less than 10 Gb of downlink capacity per orbit (15 minutes at 10 Mb/s). Astro-Space Division develops spaceborne compression systems for compression ratios from as little as three to as much as twenty-to-one for high-fidelity reconstructions. Current hardware production and development at Astro-Space Division focuses on discrete cosine transform (DCT) systems implemented with the GE PFFT chip, a 32x32 2D-DCT engine. Spectral relations in the data are exploited through block mean extraction followed by orthonormal transformation. The transformation produces blocks with spatial correlation that are suitable for further compression with any block-oriented spatial compression system, e.g., Astro-Space Division's Laplacian modeler and analytic encoder of DCT coefficients.

  10. Compression of Probabilistic XML Documents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veldman, Irma; de Keijzer, Ander; van Keulen, Maurice

    Database techniques to store, query and manipulate data that contains uncertainty receives increasing research interest. Such UDBMSs can be classified according to their underlying data model: relational, XML, or RDF. We focus on uncertain XML DBMS with as representative example the Probabilistic XML model (PXML) of [10,9]. The size of a PXML document is obviously a factor in performance. There are PXML-specific techniques to reduce the size, such as a push down mechanism, that produces equivalent but more compact PXML documents. It can only be applied, however, where possibilities are dependent. For normal XML documents there also exist several techniques for compressing a document. Since Probabilistic XML is (a special form of) normal XML, it might benefit from these methods even more. In this paper, we show that existing compression mechanisms can be combined with PXML-specific compression techniques. We also show that best compression rates are obtained with a combination of PXML-specific technique with a rather simple generic DAG-compression technique.

  11. Competitive Parallel Processing For Compression Of Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, Daniel B.; Fender, Antony R. H.

    1990-01-01

    Momentarily-best compression algorithm selected. Proposed competitive-parallel-processing system compresses data for transmission in channel of limited band-width. Likely application for compression lies in high-resolution, stereoscopic color-television broadcasting. Data from information-rich source like color-television camera compressed by several processors, each operating with different algorithm. Referee processor selects momentarily-best compressed output.

  12. Radiator debris removing apparatus and work machine using same

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Kevin L.; Elliott, Dwight E.

    2008-09-02

    A radiator assembly includes a finned radiator core and a debris removing apparatus having a compressed air inlet and at least one compressed air outlet configured to direct compressed air through the radiator core. A work machine such as a wheel loader includes a radiator and a debris removing apparatus coupled with on-board compressed air and having at least one pressurized gas outlet configured to direct a gas toward the face of the radiator.

  13. 30 CFR 75.1730 - Compressed air; general; compressed air systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compressed air; general; compressed air systems... Compressed air; general; compressed air systems. (a) All pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed... Safety and Health district office. (b) Compressors and compressed-air receivers shall be equipped...

  14. 30 CFR 75.1730 - Compressed air; general; compressed air systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compressed air; general; compressed air systems... Compressed air; general; compressed air systems. (a) All pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed... Safety and Health district office. (b) Compressors and compressed-air receivers shall be equipped...

  15. 30 CFR 75.1730 - Compressed air; general; compressed air systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compressed air; general; compressed air systems... Compressed air; general; compressed air systems. (a) All pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed... Safety and Health district office. (b) Compressors and compressed-air receivers shall be equipped...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1730 - Compressed air; general; compressed air systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compressed air; general; compressed air systems... Compressed air; general; compressed air systems. (a) All pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed... Safety and Health district office. (b) Compressors and compressed-air receivers shall be equipped...

  17. 30 CFR 75.1730 - Compressed air; general; compressed air systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compressed air; general; compressed air systems... Compressed air; general; compressed air systems. (a) All pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed... Safety and Health district office. (b) Compressors and compressed-air receivers shall be equipped...

  18. Imaging industry expectations for compressed sensing in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Kevin F.; Kanwischer, Adriana; Peters, Rob

    2015-09-01

    Compressed sensing requires compressible data, incoherent acquisition and a nonlinear reconstruction algorithm to force creation of a compressible image consistent with the acquired data. MRI images are compressible using various transforms (commonly total variation or wavelets). Incoherent acquisition of MRI data by appropriate selection of pseudo-random or non-Cartesian locations in k-space is straightforward. Increasingly, commercial scanners are sold with enough computing power to enable iterative reconstruction in reasonable times. Therefore integration of compressed sensing into commercial MRI products and clinical practice is beginning. MRI frequently requires the tradeoff of spatial resolution, temporal resolution and volume of spatial coverage to obtain reasonable scan times. Compressed sensing improves scan efficiency and reduces the need for this tradeoff. Benefits to the user will include shorter scans, greater patient comfort, better image quality, more contrast types per patient slot, the enabling of previously impractical applications, and higher throughput. Challenges to vendors include deciding which applications to prioritize, guaranteeing diagnostic image quality, maintaining acceptable usability and workflow, and acquisition and reconstruction algorithm details. Application choice depends on which customer needs the vendor wants to address. The changing healthcare environment is putting cost and productivity pressure on healthcare providers. The improved scan efficiency of compressed sensing can help alleviate some of this pressure. Image quality is strongly influenced by image compressibility and acceleration factor, which must be appropriately limited. Usability and workflow concerns include reconstruction time and user interface friendliness and response. Reconstruction times are limited to about one minute for acceptable workflow. The user interface should be designed to optimize workflow and minimize additional customer training. Algorithm concerns include the decision of which algorithms to implement as well as the problem of optimal setting of adjustable parameters. It will take imaging vendors several years to work through these challenges and provide solutions for a wide range of applications.

  19. Gradient Compression Stockings may Prevent Recovery after Bed Rest Deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael B.; Lee, Stuart M.; Westby, Christian M.; Willig, Michael C.; Platts, Steven H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Astronauts continue to wear a compression garment during and immediately after landing to prevent orthostatic intolerance (OI). We recently developed a custom-fitted, 3-piece garment that consists of thigh-high stockings with biker-style shorts that provides continuous, gradient compression: 55 mmHg at the ankle that decreases to approximately 20 mmHg at the top of the leg and 15 mmHg over the abdomen. This garment has been shown to be effective in preventing symptoms of OI during a short stand test after Space Shuttle missions, but symptoms may persist for several days after a long-duration mission in some astronauts. The purpose of this study was to confirm the effectiveness of wearing these elastic, gradient compression garments during orthostatic testing after 2 weeks of 6 degree head-down tilt bed rest as a model of spaceflight and to determine whether they would impact recovery after bed rest. Methods: Eight (5 treatment, 3 control) of 16 subjects have completed this study to-date. All subjects wore the 3-piece garment from waking until tilt testing (3 h) as a simulation of the timeline for astronauts on landing day (BR+0). Control subjects removed the garment after the tilt test. Treatment subjects wore the garment for the remainder of the day and wore lower compression thigh-high only garments on the day after bed rest (BR+1). Blood pressure, heart rate, and stroke volume responses to a 15-min 80 degree head-up tilt test were determined before 2 weeks of 6 degree head-down tilt, and on BR+0 and BR+1. Plasma volume (PV) was measured before each of these test sessions. Data are mean SE. Results: Compression garments prevented signs of OI on BR+0; all subjects in both groups completed the full 15-min test. Heart rate responses to tilt were lower on BR+0 than all other test days. Control subjects demonstrated a marginal PV decrease after bed rest, but showed typical recovery the day after bed rest (BR+0: 2.32 plus or minus 0.15 L to BR+1: 2.79 plus or minus 0.15 L). Treatment subjects did not recover PV the day after bed rest (BR+0: 2.61 plus or minus 0.23 L to BR+1: 2.61 plus or minus 0.23 L). Conclusion: Abdomen-high compression garments, which are effective in preventing post-bed rest orthostatic intolerance, may slow recovery of PV. Modified garments with reduced compression may be necessary to prevent prolonging recovery.

  20. Hybrid Vapor Compression Adsorption System: Thermal Storage Using Hybrid Vapor Compression Adsorption System

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-04

    HEATS Project: UTRC is developing a new climate-control system for EVs that uses a hybrid vapor compression adsorption system with thermal energy storage. The targeted, closed system will use energy during the battery-charging step to recharge the thermal storage, and it will use minimal power to provide cooling or heating to the cabin during a drive cycle. The team will use a unique approach of absorbing a refrigerant on a metal salt, which will create a lightweight, high-energy-density refrigerant. This unique working pair can operate indefinitely as a traditional vapor compression heat pump using electrical energy, if desired. The project will deliver a hot-and-cold battery that provides comfort to the passengers using minimal power, substantially extending the driving range of EVs.

  1. Compression of fingerprint data using the wavelet vector quantization image compression algorithm. 1992 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J.N.; Brislawn, C.M.

    1992-04-11

    This report describes the development of a Wavelet Vector Quantization (WVQ) image compression algorithm for fingerprint raster files. The pertinent work was performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Federal Bureau of Investigation. This document describes a previously-sent package of C-language source code, referred to as LAFPC, that performs the WVQ fingerprint compression and decompression tasks. The particulars of the WVQ algorithm and the associated design procedure are detailed elsewhere; the purpose of this document is to report the results of the design algorithm for the fingerprint application and to delineate the implementation issues that are incorporated in LAFPC. Special attention is paid to the computation of the wavelet transform, the fast search algorithm used for the VQ encoding, and the entropy coding procedure used in the transmission of the source symbols.

  2. Compressed-Domain Video Retargeting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiangyang; Li, Shangwen; Kuo, C-C Jay

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we present a compressed-domain video retargeting solution that operates without compromising the resizing quality. Existing video retargeting methods operate in the spatial (or pixel) domain. Such a solution is not practical if it is implemented in mobile devices due to its large memory requirement. In the proposed solution, each component of the retargeting system is designed to exploit the low-level compressed domain features extracted from the coded bit stream. For example, motion information is obtained directly from motion vectors. An efficient column shape mesh deformation is employed to solve the difficulty of sophisticated quad-shape mesh deformation in the compressed domain. The proposed solution achieves comparable (or slightly better) visual quality performance as compared with several state-of-the-art pixel-domain retargeting methods at lower computational and memory costs, making content-aware video resizing both scalable and practical in real-world applications. PMID:26270919

  3. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Bradley E.; Kabir, Md. E.; Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  4. Sandwich beam compressive test method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    Tests presented show that the sandwich beam in four-point bending could be used to obtain reliable compressive elastic constants for graphite/polyimide laminates although some difficulties were encountered measuring composite compressive strengths. Data were obtained for ultimate stress, ultimate strain, Young's modulus, and Poisson's ratio values in 117K, room temperature, and 589K test environments for the HTS1/PMR-15 material system. A total of 36 compressive tests on various laminates were performed. Also, 24 tensile tests on the same laminate orientations were performed to obtain input to the analytical portion of this program. A portion of the beam test section was analyzed using a linear elastic finite element computer program to predict the stress state in the graphite/polyimide composite. The influence of the honeycomb core of this stress state was analytically determined.

  5. Efficient access of compressed data

    SciTech Connect

    Eggers, S.J.; Shoshani, A.

    1980-06-01

    A compression technique is presented that allows a high degree of compression but requires only logarithmic access time. The technique is a constant suppression scheme, and is most applicable to stable databases whose distribution of constants is fairly clustered. Furthermore, the repeated use of the technique permits the suppression of a multiple number of different constants. Of particular interest is the application of the constant suppression technique to databases the composite key of which is made up of an incomplete cross product of several attribute domains. The scheme for compressing the full cross product composite key is well known. This paper, however, also handles the general, incomplete case by applying the constant suppression technique in conjunction with a composite key suppression scheme.

  6. Compressing images of sparse histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starosolski, Roman

    2005-09-01

    Most single-frame single-band medical images, like CR, CT, and MR, are of a high nominal bit depth, which usually varies from 12 to 16 bits per pixel. The actual number of pixels' intensity levels found in those images may be smaller, than implied by the nominal bit depth, by an order of magnitude or even more. Furthermore, levels are distributed throughout almost all the entire nominal intensity range, i.e., the images have sparse histograms of intensity levels. Image compression algorithms are based on sophisticated assumptions as to characteristics of the images they process. Sparse histogram is clearly different from what is expected by lossless image compression algorithm, both in case of predictive and of transform coding. To improve the compression ratios of such images, a method of histogram packing was recently introduced. The method is found to be effective, however, the research was done for low bit depth images. In this paper, we investigate effects of packing histograms of high bit depth medical images. We analyze an off-line packing method and find it to be highly effective. The off-line packing requires the information, describing how to expand the histogram after decompressing an image, to be encoded along with the compressed image. We present an efficient method of encoding this information. Experiments are performed for CALIC, JPEG2000, and JPEG-LS. The effects of packing histograms on the compression ratios of tested algorithms are, for all the tested algorithms, very similar. The average compression ratio improvement obtained for the CR, CT, and MR images is about 15%, 42%, and 52% respectively.

  7. Post-surgical thoracic pseudomeningocele causing spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Macki, Mohamed; Lo, Sheng-fu L; Bydon, Mohamad; Kaloostian, Paul; Bydon, Ali

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomeningoceles are extradural cerebrospinal fluid collections categorized into three groups: traumatic, congenital, and iatrogenic. Iatrogenic pseudomeningoceles occur after durotomy, usually after cervical or lumbar spine surgery. Although many remain asymptomatic, pseudomeningoceles can compress or herniate the spinal cord and nerve roots. We present a 57-year-old woman who had a thoracic laminectomy and discectomy. Two weeks after surgery, she presented with lower extremity weakness and gait difficulty. Physical examination revealed hyperreflexia and a T11 sensory level. MRI revealed a pseudomeningocele compressing the thoracic spinal cord. The patient underwent surgical drainage of the cyst. On follow-up, she had complete resolution of her symptoms, and MRI did not show a residual lesion. To our knowledge, this is the second documented post-operative pseudomeningocele causing symptomatic spinal cord compression of the thoracic spine. In this article, a review of the literature is presented, including four reported patients with post-traumatic pseudomeningocele causing myelopathic symptoms and 20 patients with iatrogenic pseudomeningocele that resulted in neurological decline due to herniation or compression of neural tissue. Treatment options for these lesions include conservative management, epidural blood patch, lumbar subarachnoid drainage, and lumbo-peritoneal shunt placement. Surgical repair, usually by primary dural closure, remains the definitive treatment modality for iatrogenic symptomatic pseudomeningoceles. PMID:24210805

  8. Impact of lossy compression on diagnostic accuracy of radiographs for periapical lesions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eraso, Francisco E.; Analoui, Mostafa; Watson, Andrew B.; Rebeschini, Regina

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the lossy Joint Photographic Experts Group compression for endodontic pretreatment digital radiographs. STUDY DESIGN: Fifty clinical charge-coupled device-based, digital radiographs depicting periapical areas were selected. Each image was compressed at 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 48, and 64 compression ratios. One root per image was marked for examination. Images were randomized and viewed by four clinical observers under standardized viewing conditions. Each observer read the image set three times, with at least two weeks between each reading. Three pre-selected sites per image (mesial, distal, apical) were scored on a five-scale score confidence scale. A panel of three examiners scored the uncompressed images, with a consensus score for each site. The consensus score was used as the baseline for assessing the impact of lossy compression on the diagnostic values of images. The mean absolute error between consensus and observer scores was computed for each observer, site, and reading session. RESULTS: Balanced one-way analysis of variance for all observers indicated that for compression ratios 48 and 64, there was significant difference between mean absolute error of uncompressed and compressed images (P <.05). After converting the five-scale score to two-level diagnostic values, the diagnostic accuracy was strongly correlated (R (2) = 0.91) with the compression ratio. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that high compression ratios can have a severe impact on the diagnostic quality of the digital radiographs for detection of periapical lesions.

  9. Unusual self-similar spherical compression: theory and implementations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerin-Roze, Jean

    2005-07-01

    We are showing a family of spherical implosions involving high compression rate. It depends on two parameters and we can work all of it out. I Theory What is an ``unusual self-similar compression law''? Such a law is characterized by a classical self-similar law initiated by a convergent shock (cf Lazarus and Richtmyer LA6823MS-1977) followed by centred compression waves. We will explain completely the implosion given by this law. II Implementations We will apply such a law to a DT sphere (m=1.5 mug and ?0=0.003 g/cm3). We will describe the thermodynamical conditions obtained this way. Then we will compare these results to those obtained with a 1D hydrodynamical computational code under different hypotheses regarding outside conditions and gas EOS. We will discuss the agreement between model and computational code under the different hypotheses. III Conclusion Such a flow may be worth using: -It gives an accurate hydrodynamical benchmark with the difficult problem of spherical shock convergence. -It can be used to define laser experiments where very compressed matter is needed (spectroscopy experiments, thermonuclear ignition...). Indeed, it allows to build an optimized compression law for each problem. An interesting extension of this work will be to add a second medium surrounding the gas. By using the characteristic curves, we could obtain the outside conditions (pressure or speed versus time) for this more realistic geometry.

  10. Data compression for satellite images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, P. H.; Wintz, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    An efficient data compression system is presented for satellite pictures and two grey level pictures derived from satellite pictures. The compression techniques take advantages of the correlation between adjacent picture elements. Several source coding methods are investigated. Double delta coding is presented and shown to be the most efficient. Both predictive differential quantizing technique and double delta coding can be significantly improved by applying a background skipping technique. An extension code is constructed. This code requires very little storage space and operates efficiently. Simulation results are presented for various coding schemes and source codes.

  11. Compressing the inert doublet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinov, Nikita; Kozaczuk, Jonathan; Morrissey, David E.; de la Puente, Alejandro

    2016-02-01

    The inert doublet model relies on a discrete symmetry to prevent couplings of the new scalars to Standard Model fermions. This stabilizes the lightest inert state, which can then contribute to the observed dark matter density. In the presence of additional approximate symmetries, the resulting spectrum of exotic scalars can be compressed. Here, we study the phenomenological and cosmological implications of this scenario. We derive new limits on the compressed inert doublet model from LEP, and outline the prospects for exclusion and discovery of this model at dark matter experiments, the LHC, and future colliders.

  12. Compressing the Inert Doublet Model

    SciTech Connect

    Blinov, Nikita; Morrissey, David E.; de la Puente, Alejandro

    2015-10-29

    The Inert Doublet Model relies on a discrete symmetry to prevent couplings of the new scalars to Standard Model fermions. We found that this stabilizes the lightest inert state, which can then contribute to the observed dark matter density. In the presence of additional approximate symmetries, the resulting spectrum of exotic scalars can be compressed. Here, we study the phenomenological and cosmological implications of this scenario. Furthermore, we derive new limits on the compressed Inert Doublet Model from LEP, and outline the prospects for exclusion and discovery of this model at dark matter experiments, the LHC, and future colliders.

  13. Simulating Ramp Compression of Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godwal, B. K.; Gonzàlez-Cataldo, F. J.; Jeanloz, R.

    2014-12-01

    We model ramp compression, shock-free dynamic loading, intended to generate a well-defined equation of state that achieves higher densities and lower temperatures than the corresponding shock Hugoniot. Ramp loading ideally approaches isentropic compression for a fluid sample, so is useful for simulating the states deep inside convecting planets. Our model explicitly evaluates the deviation of ramp from "quasi-isentropic" compression. Motivated by recent ramp-compression experiments to 5 TPa (50 Mbar), we calculate the room-temperature isotherm of diamond using first-principles density functional theory and molecular dynamics, from which we derive a principal isentrope and Hugoniot by way of the Mie-Grüneisen formulation and the Hugoniot conservation relations. We simulate ramp compression by imposing a uniaxial strain that then relaxes to an isotropic state, evaluating the change in internal energy and stress components as the sample relaxes toward isotropic strain at constant volume; temperature is well defined for the resulting hydrostatic state. Finally, we evaluate multiple shock- and ramp-loading steps to compare with single-step loading to a given final compression. Temperatures calculated for single-step ramp compression are less than Hugoniot temperatures only above 500 GPa, the two being close to each other at lower pressures. We obtain temperatures of 5095 K and 6815 K for single-step ramp loading to 600 and 800 GPa, for example, which compares well with values of ~5100 K and ~6300 K estimated from previous experiments [PRL,102, 075503, 2009]. At 800 GPa, diamond is calculated to have a temperature of 500 K along the isentrope; 900 K under multi-shock compression (asymptotic result after 8-10 steps); and 3400 K under 3-step ramp loading (200-400-800 GPa). Asymptotic multi-step shock and ramp loading are indistinguishable from the isentrope, within present uncertainties. Our simulations quantify the manner in which current experiments can simulate the deep interiors of planetary bodies, including super-giant extra-Solar planets.

  14. Structured illumination temporal compressive microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xin; Pang, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    We present a compressive video microscope based on structured illumination with incoherent light source. The source-side illumination coding scheme allows the emission photons being collected by the full aperture of the microscope objective, and thus is suitable for the fluorescence readout mode. A 2-step iterative reconstruction algorithm, termed BWISE, has been developed to address the mismatch between the illumination pattern size and the detector pixel size. Image sequences with a temporal compression ratio of 4:1 were demonstrated. PMID:27231586

  15. STAR WEEK: A Successful Campaign in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Junichi

    2011-06-01

    A campaign of the Star Week, set as August 1 - 7, has been started in 1995 throughout various life-learning facilities. Astronomical facilities including planetariums, science museums, and public observatories has been participating in this campaign, together with amateur astronomers clubs or private observatories. More than 300 astronomical events such as star watching parties were coordinated for general public every year. The Star Week has been grown up to one of the most successful campaigns not only for for astronomy but also for basic sciences in Japan over this 15 years. In this paper, a brief history and the present status of the Star Week are introduced together with the with some statistics.

  16. Vehicle Technologies' Fact of the Week 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Diegel, Susan W; Moore, Sheila A; Boundy, Robert Gary

    2013-02-01

    Each week the U.S. Department of Energy s Vehicle Technology Office (VTO) posts a Fact of the Week on their website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/ . These Facts provide statistical information, usually in the form of charts and tables, on vehicle sales, fuel economy, gasoline prices, and other transportation-related trends. Each Fact is a stand-alone page that includes a graph, text explaining the significance of the data, the supporting information on which the graph was based, and the source of the data. A link to the current week s Fact is available on the VTO homepage, but older Facts are archived and still available at: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/facts/. This report is a compilation of the Facts that were posted during calendar year 2012. The Facts were written and prepared by staff in Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Center for Transportation Analysis.

  17. Vehicle Technologies Fact of the Week 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Williams, Susan E; Moore, Sheila A; Boundy, Robert Gary

    2014-03-01

    Each week the U.S. Department of Energy s Vehicle Technology Office (VTO) posts a Fact of the Week on their website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/ . These Facts provide statistical information, usually in the form of charts and tables, on vehicle sales, fuel economy, gasoline prices, and other transportation-related trends. Each Fact is a stand-alone page that includes a graph, text explaining the significance of the data, the supporting information on which the graph was based, and the source of the data. A link to the current week s Fact is available on the VTO homepage, but older Facts are archived and still available at: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/facts/. This report is a compilation of the Facts that were posted during calendar year 2013. The Facts were written and prepared by staff in Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Center for Transportation Analysis.

  18. Mechanics of the Compression Wood Response: II. On the Location, Action, and Distribution of Compression Wood Formation.

    PubMed

    Archer, R R; Wilson, B F

    1973-04-01

    A new method for simulation of cross-sectional growth provided detailed information on the location of normal wood and compression wood increments in two tilted white pine (Pinus strobus L.) leaders. These data were combined with data on stiffness, slope, and curvature changes over a 16-week period to make the mechanical analysis. The location of compression wood changed from the under side to a flank side and then to the upper side of the leader as the geotropic stimulus decreased, owing to compression wood action. Its location shifted back to a flank side when the direction of movement of the leader reversed. A model for this action, based on elongation strains, was developed and predicted the observed curvature changes with elongation strains of 0.3 to 0.5%, or a maximal compressive stress of 60 to 300 kilograms per square centimeter. After tilting, new wood formation was distributed so as to maintain consistent strain levels along the leaders in bending under gravitational loads. The computed effective elastic moduli were about the same for the two leaders throughout the season. PMID:16658408

  19. Fecal Impaction Causing Pelvic Venous Compression and Edema

    PubMed Central

    Naramore, Sara; Aziz, Faisal; Alexander, Chandran Paul; Methratta, Sosamma; Cilley, Robert; Rocourt, Dorothy

    2015-01-01

    Chronic constipation is a common condition which may result in fecal impaction. A 13-year-old male with chronic constipation and encopresis presented with fecal impaction for three weeks. The impaction caused abdominal pain, distension, encopresis, and decreased oral intake. He was found in severe distress with non-pitting edema of his feet and ankles along with perineal edema. The pedal edema worsened after receiving a fluid bolus, so concern arose for venous compression or a thrombus. A Duplex Ultrasound demonstrated changes in the venous waveforms of the bilateral external iliac and common femoral veins without thrombosis. Manual disimpaction and polyethylene glycol 3350 with electrolytes resolved the pedal and perineal edema. Four months later, he had soft bowel movements without recurrence of the edema. A repeat Duplex Ultrasound was normal. We present a child in whom severe fecal impaction caused pelvic venous compression resulting in bilateral pedal and perineal edema. PMID:26500749

  20. Poster Presentations: Turning a Lab of the Week into a Culminating Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Jennifer L.; Quin~ones, Rosalynn; Sunderland, Deborah P.

    2015-01-01

    An assignment incorporating posters into a second-year analytical chemistry lab is described. Students work in groups and are assigned one of the application-themed weekly laboratories as a topic. Course data acquired for these weekly laboratories are compiled into spreadsheets that the poster group then analyzes to present in an on-campus poster…

  1. 29 CFR 3.3 - Weekly statement with respect to payment of wages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Weekly statement with respect to payment of wages. 3.3 Section 3.3 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor CONTRACTORS AND SUBCONTRACTORS ON PUBLIC BUILDING OR PUBLIC WORK FINANCED IN WHOLE OR IN PART BY LOANS OR GRANTS FROM THE UNITED STATES § 3.3 Weekly...

  2. 29 CFR 3.3 - Weekly statement with respect to payment of wages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Weekly statement with respect to payment of wages. 3.3 Section 3.3 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor CONTRACTORS AND SUBCONTRACTORS ON PUBLIC BUILDING OR PUBLIC WORK FINANCED IN WHOLE OR IN PART BY LOANS OR GRANTS FROM THE UNITED STATES § 3.3 Weekly...

  3. Poster Presentations: Turning a Lab of the Week into a Culminating Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Jennifer L.; Quin~ones, Rosalynn; Sunderland, Deborah P.

    2015-01-01

    An assignment incorporating posters into a second-year analytical chemistry lab is described. Students work in groups and are assigned one of the application-themed weekly laboratories as a topic. Course data acquired for these weekly laboratories are compiled into spreadsheets that the poster group then analyzes to present in an on-campus poster

  4. Effects of 8-Week Training on Aerobic Capacity and Swimming Performance of Boys Aged 12 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarzeczny, Ryszard; Kuberski, Mariusz; Deska, Agnieszka; Zarzeczna, Dorota; Rydz, Katarzyna; Lewandowska, Anna; Balchanowski, Tomasz; Bosiacki, Janusz

    2011-01-01

    Study aim: To assess the effects of 8-week endurance training in swimming on work capacity of boys aged 12 years. Material and methods: The following groups of schoolboys aged 12 years were studied: untrained control (UC; n = 14) and those training swimming for two years. The latter ones were subjected to 8-week training in classical style (CS; n…

  5. 46 CFR 194.15-15 - Chemicals other than compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Scientific Laboratory § 194.15-15 Chemicals other than compressed gases. Chemicals, including those listed in 49 CFR part 172, may be stored in small working quantities in the chemical laboratory. ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chemicals other than compressed gases. 194.15-15...

  6. 46 CFR 194.15-15 - Chemicals other than compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Scientific Laboratory § 194.15-15 Chemicals other than compressed gases. Chemicals, including those listed in 49 CFR part 172, may be stored in small working quantities in the chemical laboratory. ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chemicals other than compressed gases. 194.15-15...

  7. 46 CFR 194.15-15 - Chemicals other than compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Scientific Laboratory § 194.15-15 Chemicals other than compressed gases. Chemicals, including those listed in 49 CFR part 172, may be stored in small working quantities in the chemical laboratory. ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chemicals other than compressed gases. 194.15-15...

  8. 46 CFR 194.15-15 - Chemicals other than compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Scientific Laboratory § 194.15-15 Chemicals other than compressed gases. Chemicals, including those listed in 49 CFR part 172, may be stored in small working quantities in the chemical laboratory. ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chemicals other than compressed gases. 194.15-15...

  9. 46 CFR 194.15-15 - Chemicals other than compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Scientific Laboratory § 194.15-15 Chemicals other than compressed gases. Chemicals, including those listed in 49 CFR part 172, may be stored in small working quantities in the chemical laboratory. ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chemicals other than compressed gases. 194.15-15...

  10. Internal shock interactions in propulsion/airframe integrated three-dimensional sidewall compression scramjet inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott D.; Perkins, John N.

    1992-01-01

    The advantages and design requirements of propulsion/airframe integration for high Mach number flight are studied in terms of the 3D sidewall compression scramjet inlet. The present work addresses in a parametric fashion the inviscid effects of leading edge sweep, sidewall compression, and inflow Mach number on the internal shock structure in terms of inlet compression and mass capture. The source of the Mach number invariance with leading edge sweep for a constant sidewall compression class of inlet is identified, and a previously undocumented spillage phenomenon in a constant effective wedge angle class of inlets is discussed.

  11. Compressing Data by Source Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A.; Tréguier, E.; Schmidt, F.; Moussaoui, S.

    2012-04-01

    We interpret source separation of hyperspectral data as a way of applying lossy compressing. In settings where datacubes can be interpreted as a linear combination of source spectra and their abundances and the number of sources is small, we try to quantify the trade-offs and the benefits of source separation and its implementation with non-negative source factorisation. While various methods to implement non-negative matrix factorisation have been used successfully for factoring hyperspectral images into physically meaningful sources which linearly combine to an approximation of the original image. This is useful for modelling the processes which make up the image. At the same time, the approximation opens up the potential for a significant reduction of the data by keeping only the sources and their corresponding abundances, instead of the original complete data cube. This presentation will try to explore the potential of the idea and also to establish limits of its use. Formally, the setting is as follows: we consider P pixels of a hyperspectral image which are acquired at L frequency bands and which are represented as a PxL data matrix X. Each row of this matrix represents a spectrum at a pixel with spatial index p=1..P; this implies that the original topology may be disregarded. Since we work under the assumption of linear mixing, the p-th spectrum, 1<=p<=P, can be expressed as a linear combination of r, 1<=r<=R, source spectra. Thus, X=AxS+E, E being an error matrix to be minimised, and X, A, and S only have non-negative entries. The rows of matrix S are the estimations of the R source spectra, and each entry of A expresses the contribution of the r-th component to the pixel with spatial index p. There are applications where we may interpret the rows of S as physical sources which can be combined using the columns of A to approximate the original data. If the source signals are few and strong (but not even necessarily meaningful), the data volume that has to be transmitted or looked at can be reduced significantly.

  12. DURATION-1: Exenatide Once Weekly Produces Sustained Glycemic Control and Weight Loss Over 52 Weeks

    PubMed Central

    Buse, John B.; Drucker, Daniel J.; Taylor, Kristin L.; Kim, Terri; Walsh, Brandon; Hu, Hao; Wilhelm, Ken; Trautmann, Michael; Shen, Larry Z.; Porter, Lisa E.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In the Diabetes Therapy Utilization: Researching Changes in A1C, Weight and Other Factors Through Intervention with Exenatide Once Weekly (DURATION-1) study, the safety and efficacy of 30 weeks of treatment with the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist exenatide once weekly (exenatide QW; 2 mg) was compared with exenatide BID in 295 patients with type 2 diabetes. We now report the safety and efficacy of exenatide QW in 1) patients who continued treatment for an additional 22 weeks (52 weeks total) and 2) patients who switched from exenatide BID to exenatide QW after 30 weeks. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In this randomized, multicenter, comparator-controlled, open-label trial, 258 patients entered the 22-week open-ended assessment phase (n = 128 QW-only; n = 130 BID→QW). A1C, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), body weight, blood pressure, fasting lipids, safety, and tolerability were assessed. RESULTS Patients continuing exenatide QW maintained A1C improvements through 52 weeks (least squares mean −2.0% [95% CI −2.1 to −1.8%]). Patients switching from exenatide BID to exenatide QW achieved further A1C improvements; both groups exhibited the same A1C reduction and mean A1C (6.6%) at week 52. At week 52, 71 and 54% of all patients achieved A1C <7.0% and ≤6.5%, respectively. In both treatment arms, FPG was reduced by >40 mg/dl, and body weight was reduced by >4 kg after 52 weeks. Nausea occurred less frequently in this assessment period and was predominantly mild. No major hypoglycemia was observed. CONCLUSION Exenatide QW elicited sustained improvements in glycemic control and body weight through 52 weeks of treatment. Patients switching to exenatide QW experienced further improvements in A1C and FPG, with sustained weight loss. PMID:20215461

  13. Lossless compression of JPEG2000 whole slide images is not required for diagnostic virtual microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kalinski, Thomas; Zwönitzer, Ralf; Grabellus, Florian; Sheu, Sien-Yi; Sel, Saadettin; Hofmann, Harald; Roessner, Albert

    2011-12-01

    The use of lossy compression in medical imaging is controversial, although it is inevitable to reduce large data amounts. In contrast with lossy compression, lossless compression does not impair image quality. In addition to our previous studies, we evaluated virtual 3-dimensional microscopy using JPEG2000 whole slide images of gastric biopsy specimens with or without Helicobacter pylori gastritis using lossless compression (1:1) or lossy compression with different compression levels: 5:1, 10:1, and 20:1. The virtual slides were diagnosed in a blinded manner by 3 pathologists using the updated Sydney classification. The results showed no significant differences in the diagnosis of H pylori between the different levels of compression in virtual microscopy. We assume that lossless compression is not required for diagnostic virtual microscopy. The limits of lossy compression in virtual microscopy without a loss of diagnostic quality still need to be determined. Analogous to the processes in radiology, recommendations for the use of lossy compression in diagnostic virtual microscopy have to be worked out by pathology societies. PMID:22095374

  14. A programmable image compression system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrelle, Paul M.

    1989-01-01

    A programmable image compression system which has the necessary flexibility to address diverse imaging needs is described. It can compress and expand single frame video images (monochrome or color) as well as documents and graphics (black and white or color) for archival or transmission applications. Through software control, the compression mode can be set for lossless or controlled quality coding; the image size and bit depth can be varied; and the image source and destination devices can be readily changed. Despite the large combination of image data types, image sources, and algorithms, the system provides a simple consistent interface to the programmer. This system (OPTIPAC) is based on the TITMS320C25 digital signal processing (DSP) chip and has been implemented as a co-processor board for an IBM PC-AT compatible computer. The underlying philosophy can readily be applied to different hardware platforms. By using multiple DSP chips or incorporating algorithm specific chips, the compression and expansion times can be significantly reduced to meet performance requirements.

  15. Teaching Time-Space Compression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warf, Barney

    2011-01-01

    Time-space compression shows students that geographies are plastic, mutable and forever changing. This paper justifies the need to teach this topic, which is rarely found in undergraduate course syllabi. It addresses the impacts of transportation and communications technologies to explicate its dynamics. In summarizing various conceptual…

  16. Device Assists Cardiac Chest Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichstadt, Frank T.

    1995-01-01

    Portable device facilitates effective and prolonged cardiac resuscitation by chest compression. Developed originally for use in absence of gravitation, also useful in terrestrial environments and situations (confined spaces, water rescue, medical transport) not conducive to standard manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques.

  17. COMPRESSIBLE FLOW, ENTRAINMENT, AND MEGAPLUME

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is generally believed that low Mach number, i.e., low-velocity, flow may be assumed to be incompressible flow. Under steady-state conditions, an exact equation of continuity may then be used to show that such flow is non-divergent. However, a rigorous, compressible fluid-dynam...

  18. Culture: Copying, Compression, and Conventionality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamariz, Mónica; Kirby, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Through cultural transmission, repeated learning by new individuals transforms cultural information, which tends to become increasingly compressible (Kirby, Cornish, & Smith, 2008; Smith, Tamariz, & Kirby, 2013). Existing diffusion chain studies include in their design two processes that could be responsible for this tendency: learning…

  19. Compression fractures of the back

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meirhaeghe J, et al. Efficacy and safety of balloon kyphoplasty compared with non-surgical care for vertebral compression fracture (FREE): a randomised controlled trial. Lancet . 2009;373(9668):1016-24. PMID: 19246088 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19246088 .

  20. Compressive passive millimeter wave imager

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Liao, Shaolin; Elmer, Thomas W; Koehl, Eugene R; Heifetz, Alexander; Raptis, Apostolos C

    2015-01-27

    A compressive scanning approach for millimeter wave imaging and sensing. A Hadamard mask is positioned to receive millimeter waves from an object to be imaged. A subset of the full set of Hadamard acquisitions is sampled. The subset is used to reconstruct an image representing the object.

  1. Lightness compression and hue changes.

    PubMed

    Lillo, Julio; Moreira, Humberto

    2006-11-01

    Two experiments were performed to relate the Bezold-Brücke (B-B) and lightness compression effects. The first used a calibrated screen to present an achromatic luminance staircase. In addition, it reproduced, the methodology and the essential aspects the lightness compression effect discovered by Cataliotti and Gilchrist (1995). That is, observers perceived a truncated grey scale (from white to medium grey) when the staircase was the only stimulation in the near background (Gelb condition), but not when presented on a Mondrian background, because of the high articulation level provided by this background. Experiment 1 design also included two other backgrounds that produced a partial compression effect. In Experiment 2, two chromatic staircases were used. Employing a naming task, changes in hue perception were only observed for the susceptible staircase. The observed changes were of two types. First, for the full staircase presentations, a Gelb background produced maximum lightness compression (more similarity in the lightness of the staircase stimuli) and, also, a minimum B-B effect (fewer differences in hue). Second, only for the Gelb condition, there were changes in the hue of the lowest luminance staircase stimuli depending on the staircase extension. Results are discussed in the framework of the anchoring theory of lightness perception. PMID:17120709

  2. Perceptually lossy compression of documents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beretta, Giordano B.; Bhaskaran, Vasudev; Konstantinides, Konstantinos; Natarajan, Balas R.

    1997-06-01

    The main cost of owning a facsimile machine consists of the telephone charges for the communications, thus short transmission times are a key feature for facsimile machines. Similarly, on a packet-routed service such as the Internet, a low number of packets is essential to avoid operator wait times. Concomitantly, the user expectations have increased considerably. In facsimile, the switch from binary to full color increases the data size by a factor of 24. On the Internet, the switch from plain text American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) encoded files to files marked up in the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) with ample embedded graphics has increased the size of transactions by several orders of magnitude. A common compressing method for raster files in these applications in the Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) method, because efficient implementations are readily available. In this method the implementors design the discrete quantization tables (DQT) and the Huffman tables (HT) to maximize the compression factor while maintaining the introduced artifacts at the threshold of perceptual detectability. Unfortunately the achieved compression rates are unsatisfactory for applications such as color facsimile and World Wide Web (W3) browsing. We present a design methodology for image-independent DQTs that while producing perceptually lossy data, does not impair the reading performance of users. Combined with a text sharpening algorithm that compensates for scanning device limitations, the methodology presented in this paper allows us to achieve compression ratios near 1:100.

  3. Shock compression of synthetic opal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, A.; Okuno, M.; Okudera, H.; Mashimo, T.; Omurzak, E.; Katayama, S.; Koyano, M.

    2010-03-01

    Structural change of synthetic opal by shock-wave compression up to 38.1 GPa has been investigated by using SEM, X-ray diffraction method (XRD), Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies. Obtained information may indicate that the dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole due to high shock and residual temperature are very important factors in the structural evolution of synthetic opal by shock compression. Synthetic opal loses opalescence by 10.9 and 18.4 GPa of shock pressures. At 18.4 GPa, dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole and transformation of network structure may occur simultaneously. The 4-membered ring of TO4 tetrahedrons in as synthetic opal may be relaxed to larger ring such as 6-membered ring by high residual temperature. Therefore, the residual temperature may be significantly high at even 18.4 GPa of shock compression. At 23.9 GPa, opal sample recovered the opalescence. Origin of this opalescence may be its layer structure by shock compression. Finally, sample fuse by very high residual temperature at 38.1 GPa and the structure closes to that of fused SiO2 glass. However, internal silanole groups still remain even at 38.1 GPa.

  4. Image compression in morphometry studies requiring 21 CFR Part 11 compliance: procedure is key with TIFFs and various JPEG compression strengths.

    PubMed

    Tengowski, Mark W

    2004-01-01

    This study aims to compare the integrity and reproducibility of measurements created from uncompressed and compressed digital images in order to implement compliance with 21 CFR Part 11 for image analysis studies executed using 21 CFR Part 58 compliant capture systems. Images of a 400-mesh electron microscope grid and H&E stained rat liver tissue were captured on an upright microscope with digital camera using commercially available analysis software. Digital images were stored as either uncompressed TIFFs or in one of five different levels of JPEG compression. The grid images were analyzed with automatic detection of bright objects while the liver images were segmented using color cube-based morphometry techniques, respectively, using commercially-available image analysis software. When comparing the feature-extracted measurements from the TIFF uncompressed to the JPEG compressed images, the data suggest that JPEG compression does not alter the accuracy or reliability to reproduce individual data point measurements in all but the highest compression levels. There is, however, discordance if the initial measure was obtained with a TIFF format and subsequently saved as one of the JPEG levels, suggesting that the use of compression must precede feature extraction. It is a common practice in software packages to work with TIFF uncompressed images. However, this study suggests that the use of JPEG compression as part of the analysis work flow was an acceptable practice for these images and features. Investigators applying image file compression to other organ images will need to validate the utility of image compression in their work flow. A procedure to digitally acquire and JPEG compress images prior to image analysis has the potential to reduce file archiving demands without compromising reproducibility of data. PMID:15200165

  5. Conductivity enhancement of multiwalled carbon nanotube thin film via thermal compression method

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, the thermal compression method is applied to effectively enhance the electrical conductivity of carbon nanotube thin films (CNTFs). With the assistance of heat and pressure on the CNTFs, the neighbor multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) start to link with each other, and then these separated CNTs are twined into a continuous film while the compression force, duration, and temperature are quite enough for the reaction. Under the compression temperature of 400°C and the compression force of 100 N for 50 min, the sheet resistance can be reduced from 17 to 0.9 k Ω/sq for the CNTFs with a thickness of 230 nm. Moreover, the effects of compression temperature and the duration of thermal compression on the conductivity of CNTF are also discussed in this work. PMID:25232300

  6. The Four-Day School Week.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Kimberly

    1999-01-01

    In New Mexico, 18 out of 89 school districts are on the four-day school week. So are many rural Colorado, Oregon, and Colorado schools. Implemented as a fiscal last resort, this schedule has had unexpected educational benefits for districts. Attendance has improved and student achievement on standardized tests remains stable. (MLH)

  7. Report on the Survival Week Program 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Homero

    The 1974 Survival Week Program was an orientation program designed for entering minority and economically disadvantaged students at the University of Texas at Austin. The major purpose of the program was to assist the participants in acquiring the knowledge and skills for academic, financial, emotional, and social "survival" in a complex

  8. A Nine Week Middle School Keyboarding Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Wade Tracy

    This document is intended for middle school teachers delivering an introductory keyboarding course that is designed to enable students to type at a speed of 25-30 words per minute at the end of the 9-week course. The document begins with a brief discussion of the need for keyboarding skills in view of the increasing importance of computers.…

  9. Sea/River Week Career Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    The aim of these materials is to interest students in jobs related to Alaska's natural resources. They coordinate with the Sea Week curriculum and the Alaska vocational state model curriculum in renewable natural resources in agriculture. Each of the 2-page career profiles includes a brief description of a person's job along with that person's…

  10. Telling the Public--It's Science Week

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auty, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an opportunity to engage the public in demonstrating and explaining some aspects of science. About 10 years ago, the author met Peter Evennett in the ASE Conference exhibition. Peter was a member of the Leeds Philosophical and Literary Society and currently its president. As a contribution to "Science Week" (which dates back…

  11. Star Week- A Successful Campaign in Japan -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, J.

    2006-08-01

    In 1995, we started a campaign of the star week as between August 1 and 7 when it is usually expected that most part of Japan should be good weather after the rainy season during the summer holiday. Several hundreds of astronomical facilities for general public in Japan, including planetariums, museums, and public observatories participated in our campaign, together with make good collaborations for education purpose. More than 200 astronomical events such as star parties were coordinated for general public every year. Japan is one of the worst countries for light pollution. Especially most of children have no experience of seeing Milky Way. Let them see the real stars. Let them feel the universe by inviting them to the related astronomical facilities located all over Japan. For realizing this purpose, it is better to set the special week, similar to the "Bird Week" by arranging various astronomical events in these facilities in order to invite all the general public. This is the motivation of the beginning of the star week. Such outreach program should give opportunity for general public to understand the excitement of the astronomy. In this paper, we will introduce present situation of our campaign, along with some statistics.

  12. 77 FR 68045 - American Education Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-27922 Filed 11-14-12; 8:45 am] Billing code 3295-F3 ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8904 of November 9, 2012 American Education Week, 2012 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation All children deserve access to a world-class education...

  13. 77 FR 62133 - Fire Prevention Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... America the two hundred and thirty-seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-25228 Filed 10-11-12; 8:45... Documents#0;#0; #0; #0;Title 3-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 8881 of October 5, 2012 Fire Prevention Week, 2012 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Every year, fires in...

  14. First Few Weeks on Campus. Prevention Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Every fall, college and university campuses and communities brace for the onslaught of new and returning students. For first-year students, anecdotal evidence suggests that the first six weeks of enrollment are critical to success. Because many students initiate heavy drinking during these early days of college, the potential exists for excessive…

  15. Telling the Public--It's Science Week

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auty, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an opportunity to engage the public in demonstrating and explaining some aspects of science. About 10 years ago, the author met Peter Evennett in the ASE Conference exhibition. Peter was a member of the Leeds Philosophical and Literary Society and currently its president. As a contribution to "Science Week" (which dates back

  16. Activities across Nation Mark National Chemistry Week.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Ernest, Ed.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes national and local activities done during National Chemistry Week including chemistry demonstrations, shopping center exhibits, contests, and museum exhibits. Discusses the supplementary material about chemistry in selected editions of 16 newspapers, "Solution for the Future." Presents many pictures showing those activities. (YP)

  17. 76 FR 29139 - World Trade Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc...#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8677 of May 13, 2011 World Trade Week, 2011 By the President of the United... look beyond our borders to supply the world with innovative and technologically advanced products...

  18. 78 FR 30729 - World Trade Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty- seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8983 of May 17, 2013 World Trade Week, 2013 By the President of the United... and expanding trade that allows us to sell more of our goods and services all around the world....

  19. Adaptive Multi-Rate Compression Effects on Vowel Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ireland, David; Knuepffer, Christina; McBride, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Signal processing on digitally sampled vowel sounds for the detection of pathological voices has been firmly established. This work examines compression artifacts on vowel speech samples that have been compressed using the adaptive multi-rate codec at various bit-rates. Whereas previous work has used the sensitivity of machine learning algorithm to test for accuracy, this work examines the changes in the extracted speech features themselves and thus report new findings on the usefulness of a particular feature. We believe this work will have potential impact for future research on remote monitoring as the identification and exclusion of an ill-defined speech feature that has been hitherto used, will ultimately increase the robustness of the system. PMID:26347863

  20. A PDF closure model for compressible turbulent chemically reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kollmann, W.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research project was the analysis of single point closures based on probability density function (pdf) and characteristic functions and the development of a prediction method for the joint velocity-scalar pdf in turbulent reacting flows. Turbulent flows of boundary layer type and stagnation point flows with and without chemical reactions were be calculated as principal applications. Pdf methods for compressible reacting flows were developed and tested in comparison with available experimental data. The research work carried in this project was concentrated on the closure of pdf equations for incompressible and compressible turbulent flows with and without chemical reactions.

  1. The CCSDS Lossless Data Compression Algorithm for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Pen-Shu; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In the late 80's, when the author started working at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), several scientists there were in the process of formulating the next generation of Earth viewing science instruments, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The instrument would have over thirty spectral bands and would transmit enormous data through the communications channel. This was when the author was assigned the task of investigating lossless compression algorithms for space implementation to compress science data in order to reduce the requirement on bandwidth and storage.

  2. Detection method for height limit based on compression encoding imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jianchuan; Wei, Ping; Ke, Jun

    2015-12-01

    We put forward a new method based on compressed encoding imaging faced with detection for height limit. In the beginning of this paper, we focus on hadamard encoding, and analysis the SNR of hadamard encoding. Then, a new encoding matrix M based on hadamard matrix been put forward. Matrix M is suitable for the sparse image obtained from the detection for height limit, and implement easily on the DMD. Compressed encoding imaging simulation based on measurement matrix M have been done in our work, and demonstrates the feasibility of the design method.

  3. Studies of fiber-matrix adhesion on compression strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, Willard D.; Nairn, John A.; Boll, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    A study was initiated on the effect of the matrix polymer and the fiber matrix bond strength of carbon fiber polymer matrix composites. The work includes tests with micro-composites, single ply composites, laminates, and multi-axial loaded cylinders. The results obtained thus far indicate that weak fiber-matrix adhesion dramatically reduces 0 degree compression strength. Evidence is also presented that the flaws in the carbon fiber that govern compression strength differ from those that determine fiber tensile strength. Examination of post-failure damage in the single ply tests indicates kink banding at the crack tip.

  4. Simulation of Inviscid Compressible Multi-Phase Flow with Condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelleners, Philip

    2003-01-01

    Condensation of vapours in rapid expansions of compressible gases is investigated. In the case of high temperature gradients the condensation will start at conditions well away from thermodynamic equilibrium of the fluid. In those cases homogeneous condensation is dominant over heterogeneous condensation. The present work is concerned with development of a simulation tool for computation of high speed compressible flows with homogeneous condensation. The resulting ow solver should preferably be accurate and robust to be used for simulation of industrial flows in general geometries.

  5. Observation of a secondary compressive lesion after treatment of caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy in a dog.

    PubMed

    Wilson, E R; Aron, D N; Roberts, R E

    1994-11-01

    In a 7-year-old Doberman Pinscher with an atactic gait, neurologic examination revealed tetraparesis, conscious proprioceptive deficits, and rigid ventral flexion of the neck. Radiography and myelography revealed a ventral, extradural, dynamic compressive lesion between C6 and C7. Distraction decompression was performed, using cancellous bone screws and methylmethacrylate. After initial improvement, clinical signs recurred 2 weeks after surgery and progressed until the dog was euthanatized 6 weeks after surgery. Postmortem myelography revealed an extradural compressive lesion adjacent to the implant, between C5 and C6. Secondary compressive lesions induced by surgical or biomechanical alterations of the cervical portion of the spine may be complications of treatment of caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy. PMID:7698941

  6. Analytical and experimental study on complex compressed air pipe network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Yushou; Cai, Maolin; Shi, Yan

    2015-09-01

    To analyze the working characteristics of complex compressed air networks, numerical methods are widely used which are based on finite element technology or intelligent algorithms. However, the effectiveness of the numerical methods is limited. In this paper, to provide a new method to optimize the design and the air supply strategy of the complex compressed air pipe network, firstly, a novel method to analyze the topology structure of the compressed air flow in the pipe network is initially proposed. A matrix is used to describe the topology structure of the compressed air flow. Moreover, based on the analysis of the pressure loss of the pipe network, the relationship between the pressure and the flow of the compressed air is derived, and a prediction method of pressure fluctuation and air flow in a segment in a complex pipe network is proposed. Finally, to inspect the effectiveness of the method, an experiment with a complex network is designed. The pressure and the flow of airflow in the network are measured and studied. The results of the study show that, the predicted results with the proposed method have a good consistency with the experimental results, and that verifies the air flow prediction method of the complex pipe network. This research proposes a new method to analyze the compressed air network and a prediction method of pressure fluctuation and air flow in a segment, which can predicate the fluctuation of the pressure according to the flow of compressed air, and predicate the fluctuation of the flow according to the pressure in a segment of a complex pipe network.

  7. URe{sub 2}-A compressibility study of allotropic phases

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, B. Shekar, N. V. Chandra Sahu, P. Ch.

    2014-04-24

    URe{sub 2} compound exists in two phases- orthorhombic and hexagonal. The hexagonal phase has been prepared using arc melting and annealingat 500°C for one week, whereas the orthorhombic phase was achieved by annealing the arc melted sample at a temperature 150°C for the same period. High pressure x-ray diffraction studies on these two allotropic forms of URe{sub 2} have been carried out up to ∼15GPa using a diamond anvil cell. Normal compression was observed without any kind of phase transformation; although there is a probability of transformation from the metastable hexagonal to itsstable orthorhombicphase under pressure.

  8. Does Shortening the School Week Impact Student Performance? Evidence from the Four-Day School Week

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, D. Mark; Walker, Mary Beth

    2015-01-01

    School districts use a variety of policies to close budget gaps and stave off teacher layoffs and furloughs. More schools are implementing four-day school weeks to reduce overhead and transportation costs. The four-day week requires substantial schedule changes as schools must increase the length of their school day to meet minimum instructional

  9. PERSISTENT EFFECTS OF REPEATED INHALATION OF TOLUENE: 4 WEEKS VS. 13 WEEKS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding and predicting the extent of neurotoxic damage from repeated exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is a problem for many EPA programs. Eighty adult, male Long-Evans rats inhaled toluene (0, 10, 100, or 1000 ppm) 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 4 weeks in a systema...

  10. Does Shortening the School Week Impact Student Performance? Evidence from the Four-Day School Week

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, D. Mark; Walker, Mary Beth

    2015-01-01

    School districts use a variety of policies to close budget gaps and stave off teacher layoffs and furloughs. More schools are implementing four-day school weeks to reduce overhead and transportation costs. The four-day week requires substantial schedule changes as schools must increase the length of their school day to meet minimum instructional…

  11. ADVANCED RECIPROCATING COMPRESSION TECHNOLOGY (ARCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Danny M. Deffenbaugh; Klaus Brun; Ralph E. Harris; J. Pete Harrell; Robert J. Mckee; J. Jeffrey Moore; Steven J. Svedeman; Anthony J. Smalley; Eugene L. Broerman; Robert A Hart; Marybeth G. Nored; Ryan S. Gernentz; Shane P. Siebenaler

    2005-12-01

    The U.S. natural gas pipeline industry is facing the twin challenges of increased flexibility and capacity expansion. To meet these challenges, the industry requires improved choices in gas compression to address new construction and enhancement of the currently installed infrastructure. The current fleet of installed reciprocating compression is primarily slow-speed integral machines. Most new reciprocating compression is and will be large, high-speed separable units. The major challenges with the fleet of slow-speed integral machines are: limited flexibility and a large range in performance. In an attempt to increase flexibility, many operators are choosing to single-act cylinders, which are causing reduced reliability and integrity. While the best performing units in the fleet exhibit thermal efficiencies between 90% and 92%, the low performers are running down to 50% with the mean at about 80%. The major cause for this large disparity is due to installation losses in the pulsation control system. In the better performers, the losses are about evenly split between installation losses and valve losses. The major challenges for high-speed machines are: cylinder nozzle pulsations, mechanical vibrations due to cylinder stretch, short valve life, and low thermal performance. To shift nozzle pulsation to higher orders, nozzles are shortened, and to dampen the amplitudes, orifices are added. The shortened nozzles result in mechanical coupling with the cylinder, thereby, causing increased vibration due to the cylinder stretch mode. Valve life is even shorter than for slow speeds and can be on the order of a few months. The thermal efficiency is 10% to 15% lower than slow-speed equipment with the best performance in the 75% to 80% range. The goal of this advanced reciprocating compression program is to develop the technology for both high speed and low speed compression that will expand unit flexibility, increase thermal efficiency, and increase reliability and integrity. Retrofit technologies that address the challenges of slow-speed integral compression are: (1) optimum turndown using a combination of speed and clearance with single-acting operation as a last resort; (2) if single-acting is required, implement infinite length nozzles to address nozzle pulsation and tunable side branch absorbers for 1x lateral pulsations; and (3) advanced valves, either the semi-active plate valve or the passive rotary valve, to extend valve life to three years with half the pressure drop. This next generation of slow-speed compression should attain 95% efficiency, a three-year valve life, and expanded turndown. New equipment technologies that address the challenges of large-horsepower, high-speed compression are: (1) optimum turndown with unit speed; (2) tapered nozzles to effectively reduce nozzle pulsation with half the pressure drop and minimization of mechanical cylinder stretch induced vibrations; (3) tunable side branch absorber or higher-order filter bottle to address lateral piping pulsations over the entire extended speed range with minimal pressure drop; and (4) semi-active plate valves or passive rotary valves to extend valve life with half the pressure drop. This next generation of large-horsepower, high-speed compression should attain 90% efficiency, a two-year valve life, 50% turndown, and less than 0.75 IPS vibration. This program has generated proof-of-concept technologies with the potential to meet these ambitious goals. Full development of these identified technologies is underway. The GMRC has committed to pursue the most promising enabling technologies for their industry.

  12. Stem compression reversibly reduces phloem transport in Pinus sylvestris trees.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Nils; Tarvainen, Lasse; Lim, Hyungwoo; Tor-Ngern, Pantana; Palmroth, Sari; Oren, Ram; Marshall, John; Näsholm, Torgny

    2015-10-01

    Manipulating tree belowground carbon (C) transport enables investigation of the ecological and physiological roles of tree roots and their associated mycorrhizal fungi, as well as a range of other soil organisms and processes. Girdling remains the most reliable method for manipulating this flux and it has been used in numerous studies. However, girdling is destructive and irreversible. Belowground C transport is mediated by phloem tissue, pressurized through the high osmotic potential resulting from its high content of soluble sugars. We speculated that phloem transport may be reversibly blocked through the application of an external pressure on tree stems. Thus, we here introduce a technique based on compression of the phloem, which interrupts belowground flow of assimilates, but allows trees to recover when the external pressure is removed. Metal clamps were wrapped around the stems and tightened to achieve a pressure theoretically sufficient to collapse the phloem tissue, thereby aiming to block transport. The compression's performance was tested in two field experiments: a (13)C canopy labelling study conducted on small Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees [2-3 m tall, 3-7 cm diameter at breast height (DBH)] and a larger study involving mature pines (∼15 m tall, 15-25 cm DBH) where stem respiration, phloem and root carbohydrate contents, and soil CO2 efflux were measured. The compression's effectiveness was demonstrated by the successful blockage of (13)C transport. Stem compression doubled stem respiration above treatment, reduced soil CO2 efflux by 34% and reduced phloem sucrose content by 50% compared with control trees. Stem respiration and soil CO2 efflux returned to normal within 3 weeks after pressure release, and (13)C labelling revealed recovery of phloem function the following year. Thus, we show that belowground phloem C transport can be reduced by compression, and we also demonstrate that trees recover after treatment, resuming C transport in the phloem. PMID:26377876

  13. The CCDS Data Compression Recommendations: Development and Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Pen-Shu; Moury, Gilles; Armbruster, Philippe; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) has been engaging in recommending data compression standards for space applications. The first effort focused on a lossless scheme that was adopted in 1997. Since then, space missions benefiting from this recommendation range from deep space probes to near Earth observatories. The cost savings result not only from reduced onboard storage and reduced bandwidth, but also in ground archive of mission data. In many instances, this recommendation also enables more science data to be collected for added scientific value. Since 1998, the compression sub-panel of CCSDS has been investigating lossy image compression schemes and is currently working towards a common solution for a single recommendation. The recommendation will fulfill the requirements for remote sensing conducted on space platforms.

  14. Metal hydride hydrogen compression: recent advances and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yartys, Volodymyr A.; Lototskyy, Mykhaylo; Linkov, Vladimir; Grant, David; Stuart, Alastair; Eriksen, Jon; Denys, Roman; Bowman, Robert C.

    2016-04-01

    Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is one of the more important applications of the MHs. The present paper reviews recent advances in the field based on the analysis of the fundamental principles of this technology. The performances when boosting hydrogen pressure, along with two- and three-step compression units, are analyzed. The paper includes also a theoretical modelling of a two-stage compressor aimed at describing the performance of the experimentally studied systems, their optimization and design of more advanced MH compressors. Business developments in the field are reviewed for the Norwegian company HYSTORSYS AS and the South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry. Finally, future prospects are outlined presenting the role of the MH compression in the overall development of the hydrogen-driven energy systems. The work is based on the analysis of the development of the technology in Europe, USA and South Africa.

  15. Compression of Ultrasonic NDT Image by Wavelet Based Local Quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, W.; Li, L. Q.; Tsukada, K.; Hanasaki, K.

    2004-02-01

    Compression on ultrasonic image that is always corrupted by noise will cause `over-smoothness' or much distortion. To solve this problem to meet the need of real time inspection and tele-inspection, a compression method based on Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) that can also suppress the noise without losing much flaw-relevant information, is presented in this work. Exploiting the multi-resolution and interscale correlation property of DWT, a simple way named DWCs classification, is introduced first to classify detail wavelet coefficients (DWCs) as dominated by noise, signal or bi-effected. A better denoising can be realized by selective thresholding DWCs. While in `Local quantization', different quantization strategies are applied to the DWCs according to their classification and the local image property. It allocates the bit rate more efficiently to the DWCs thus achieve a higher compression rate. Meanwhile, the decompressed image shows the effects of noise suppressed and flaw characters preserved.

  16. [Midcarpal fusion using break-away compression screw].

    PubMed

    Maire, N; Facca, S; Gouzou, S; Liverneaux, P

    2012-02-01

    Indication of midcarpal fusion is SNAC or SLAC wrist grade 3. The main complication of circular plate (most common technique) is non-union. In this context, the purpose of our work was to propose the use of break-away compression screws to decrease the rate of non-union. Our series included ten patients. The fusion was fixed using two break-away compression screws (2mm diameter). No bone graft was used. As assessment, subjective (pain, Quick-DASH) and objective (strength, mobility) criteria were reviewed at follow-up. All the criteria were significantly improved after operation except mobility. Among the complications, we noticed one delayed bone-healing with a good outcome and a radiological consolidation. Midcarpal fusion by dorsal approach using break-away compression screws appears to us a technique of interest, not requiring a bone graft, with good cost effectiveness. PMID:22245281

  17. Joint segmentation and reconstruction of hyperspectral data with compressed measurements.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Plemmons, Robert; Kittle, David; Brady, David; Prasad, Sudhakar

    2011-08-01

    This work describes numerical methods for the joint reconstruction and segmentation of spectral images taken by compressive sensing coded aperture snapshot spectral imagers (CASSI). In a snapshot, a CASSI captures a two-dimensional (2D) array of measurements that is an encoded representation of both spectral information and 2D spatial information of a scene, resulting in significant savings in acquisition time and data storage. The reconstruction process decodes the 2D measurements to render a three-dimensional spatio-spectral estimate of the scene and is therefore an indispensable component of the spectral imager. In this study, we seek a particular form of the compressed sensing solution that assumes spectrally homogeneous segments in the two spatial dimensions, and greatly reduces the number of unknowns, often turning the underdetermined reconstruction problem into one that is overdetermined. Numerical tests are reported on both simulated and real data representing compressed measurements. PMID:21833118

  18. Metal hydride hydrogen compression: Recent advances and future prospects

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bowman, Jr., Robert C.; Yartys, Volodymyr A.; Lototskyy, Mykhaylo V.; Linkov, Vladimir; Grant, David; Stuart, Alastair; Eriksen, Jon; Denys, Roman

    2016-03-17

    Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is one of the more important applications of the metal hydrides. The present paper reviews recent advances in the field based on the analysis of the fundamental principles of this technology. The performances when boosting hydrogen pressure, along with two- and three-step compression units are analyzed. The paper includes also a theoretical modeling of a two-stage compressor aimed at both describing the performance of the experimentally studied systems, but, also, on their optimization and design of more advanced MH compressors. Business developments in the field are reviewed for the Norwegian company HYSTORSYS AS andmore » the South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry. Finally, future prospects are outlined presenting the role of the metal hydride compression in the overall development of the hydrogen driven energy systems. Lastly, the work is based on the analysis of the development of the technology in Europe, USA and South Africa.« less

  19. Thermoacoustic compression based on alternating to direct gas flow conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, D. M.; Wang, K.; Xu, Y.; Shen, Q.; Zhang, X. J.; Qiu, L. M.

    2012-05-01

    We present a remarkable thermoacoustically driven compression effect based on the conversion of gas flow from an alternating state to a direct state. The alternating gas flow is generated by the thermoacoustic effect in thermoacoustic engines, whereas direct gas flow is achieved by means of the flow rectification effect of check valves. A demonstrative thermoacoustic compressor consisting of two standing-wave thermoacoustic engines, two reservoirs, and three check valves is constructed for experimental investigation. With nitrogen as a working gas and an initial pressure of 2.4 MPa in all components, a usable pressure difference of 0.4 MPa is achieved, with the average gas pumping rate reaching 2.85 Nm3/h during the first 3 s of the compression process. The simple mechanical structure and thermally driven nature of the compressor show potential in gas compression, power generation, and refrigeration applications.

  20. Extreme data compression for the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zablocki, Alan; Dodelson, Scott

    2016-04-01

    We apply the Karhunen-Loéve methods to cosmic microwave background (CMB) data sets, and show that we can recover the input cosmology and obtain the marginalized likelihoods in Λ cold dark matter cosmologies in under a minute, much faster than Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. This is achieved by forming a linear combination of the power spectra at each multipole l , and solving a system of simultaneous equations such that the Fisher matrix is locally unchanged. Instead of carrying out a full likelihood evaluation over the whole parameter space, we need evaluate the likelihood only for the parameter of interest, with the data compression effectively marginalizing over all other parameters. The weighting vectors contain insight about the physical effects of the parameters on the CMB anisotropy power spectrum Cl . The shape and amplitude of these vectors give an intuitive feel for the physics of the CMB, the sensitivity of the observed spectrum to cosmological parameters, and the relative sensitivity of different experiments to cosmological parameters. We test this method on exact theory Cl as well as on a Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP)-like CMB data set generated from a random realization of a fiducial cosmology, comparing the compression results to those from a full likelihood analysis using CosmoMC. After showing that the method works, we apply it to the temperature power spectrum from the WMAP seven-year data release, and discuss the successes and limitations of our method as applied to a real data set.

  1. A simple method for compressible multifluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Saurel, R.; Abgrall, R.

    1999-12-01

    A simple second order accurate and fully Eulerian numerical method is presented for the simulation of multifluid compressible flows, governed by the stiffened gas equation of state, in hydrodynamic regime. The numerical method relies on a second order Godunov-type scheme, with approximate Riemannn solver for the resolution of conservation equations, and a set of nonconservative equations. It is valid for all mesh points and allows the resolution of interfaces. This method works for an arbitrary number of interfaces, for breakup and coalescence. It allows very high density ratios (up to 1,000). It is able to compute very strong shock waves (pressure ratio up to 10{sup 5}). Contrary to all existing schemes (which consider the interface as a discontinuity) the method considers the interface as a numerical diffusion zone as contact discontinuities are computed in compressible single phase flows, but the variables describing the mixture zone are computed consistently with the density, momentum and energy. Several test problems are presented in one, two and three dimensions. This method allows, for example, the computation of the interaction of a shock wave propagating in a liquid with a gas cylinder, as well as Richtmeyer-Meshkov instabilities, or hypervelocity impact, with realistic initial conditions. The authors illustrate the method with the Rusanov flux. However, the same principle can be applied to a more general class of schemes.

  2. Frequency extrapolation by nonconvex compressive sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Chartrand, Rick; Sidky, Emil Y; Pan, Xiaochaun

    2010-12-03

    Tomographic imaging modalities sample subjects with a discrete, finite set of measurements, while the underlying object function is continuous. Because of this, inversion of the imaging model, even under ideal conditions, necessarily entails approximation. The error incurred by this approximation can be important when there is rapid variation in the object function or when the objects of interest are small. In this work, we investigate this issue with the Fourier transform (FT), which can be taken as the imaging model for magnetic resonance imaging (MRl) or some forms of wave imaging. Compressive sensing has been successful for inverting this data model when only a sparse set of samples are available. We apply the compressive sensing principle to a somewhat related problem of frequency extrapolation, where the object function is represented by a super-resolution grid with many more pixels than FT measurements. The image on the super-resolution grid is obtained through nonconvex minimization. The method fully utilizes the available FT samples, while controlling aliasing and ringing. The algorithm is demonstrated with continuous FT samples of the Shepp-Logan phantom with additional small, high-contrast objects.

  3. Self-calibration and biconvex compressive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Shuyang; Strohmer, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The design of high-precision sensing devises becomes ever more difficult and expensive. At the same time, the need for precise calibration of these devices (ranging from tiny sensors to space telescopes) manifests itself as a major roadblock in many scientific and technological endeavors. To achieve optimal performance of advanced high-performance sensors one must carefully calibrate them, which is often difficult or even impossible to do in practice. In this work we bring together three seemingly unrelated concepts, namely self-calibration, compressive sensing, and biconvex optimization. The idea behind self-calibration is to equip a hardware device with a smart algorithm that can compensate automatically for the lack of calibration. We show how several self-calibration problems can be treated efficiently within the framework of biconvex compressive sensing via a new method called SparseLift. More specifically, we consider a linear system of equations {\\boldsymbol{y}}={\\boldsymbol{D}}{\\boldsymbol{A}}{\\boldsymbol{x}}, where both {\\boldsymbol{x}} and the diagonal matrix {\\boldsymbol{D}} (which models the calibration error) are unknown. By ‘lifting’ this biconvex inverse problem we arrive at a convex optimization problem. By exploiting sparsity in the signal model, we derive explicit theoretical guarantees under which both {\\boldsymbol{x}} and {\\boldsymbol{D}} can be recovered exactly, robustly, and numerically efficiently via linear programming. Applications in array calibration and wireless communications are discussed and numerical simulations are presented, confirming and complementing our theoretical analysis.

  4. Oral 4-week and 13-week toxicity studies of polyvinyl acetate vinyl laurate copolymer in rats.

    PubMed

    Messinger, Horst; Bär, Albert

    2014-10-01

    Polyvinyl acetate vinyl laurate copolymer (PVAcVL) is a useful component of gum base for chewing gum production. The safety of PVAcVL was examined in a 4-week and a 13-week oral toxicity study in rats. Finely powdered PVAcVL was administered with the diet at levels of 1.25%, 2.0% and 5% in the 4-week study and 1.25%, 2.5% and 5% in the 13-week study. There were no treatment related effects on mortality, bodyweight gains feed efficiency, ophthalmoscopic findings, hematological and clinical chemical parameters, neurobehavioral observations as well as gross and histopathological changes of standard organs and tissues. The highest dose tested in the 13-week study (3783 and 4396mg/kgbw/d for males and females, respectively) proved to be a NOAEL. PMID:24932800

  5. Weekly petroleum status report. Data for week ended, October 21, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) provides timely information on the petroleum supply situation in the context of historical information, selected prices, and forecasts. The WPSR is intended to provide up-to-date information to the industry, the press, planners, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments. It is published each Thursday by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and excerpts of the data are available electronically after 9:00 a.m. Wednesday. The data contained in this report are based on company submissions for the week ending 7:00 a.m. the preceding Friday. For some weeks which include holidays, publication of the WPSR is delayed by 1 day. The WPSR is not published during 1 of the last 2 weeks of the year depending upon which day of the week Christmas occurs.

  6. Knee Extension Range of Motion at 4 Weeks Is Related to Knee Extension Loss at 12 Weeks After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Noll, Sarah; Garrison, J. Craig; Bothwell, James; Conway, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is commonly torn, and surgical reconstruction is often required to allow a patient to return to their prior level of activity. Avoiding range of motion (ROM) loss is a common goal, but little research has been done to identify when ROM loss becomes detrimental to a patient’s future function. Purpose: To determine whether there is a relationship between early knee side-to-side extension difference after ACL reconstruction and knee side-to-side extension difference at 12 weeks. The hypothesis was that early (within the first 8 weeks) knee side-to-side extension difference will be predictive of knee side-to-side extension difference seen at 12 weeks. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Knee side-to-side extension difference measures were taken on 74 patients undergoing ACL reconstruction rehabilitation at the initial visit and 4, 8, and 12 weeks postoperatively. Visual analog scores (VAS) and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores were also recorded at these time frames. Results: There was a strong relationship between knee extension ROM at 4 and 12 weeks (r = 0.639, P < .001) and 8 and 12 weeks (r = 0.742, P < .001). When the variables of knee extension ROM at initial visit and 4 and 8 weeks were entered into a regression analysis, the predictor variable explained 61% (R2 = 0.611) of variance for knee extension ROM at 12 weeks, with 4 weeks (R2 = 0.259) explaining the majority of this variance. Conclusion: This study found that a patient’s knee extension at 4 weeks was strongly correlated with knee extension at 12 weeks. Clinical Relevance: This information may be useful for clinicians treating athletic patients who are anxious for return to sport by providing them an initial goal to work toward in hopes of ensuring successful rehabilitation of their knee. PMID:26675061

  7. Cluster compression algorithm: A joint clustering/data compression concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbert, E. E.

    1977-01-01

    The Cluster Compression Algorithm (CCA), which was developed to reduce costs associated with transmitting, storing, distributing, and interpreting LANDSAT multispectral image data is described. The CCA is a preprocessing algorithm that uses feature extraction and data compression to more efficiently represent the information in the image data. The format of the preprocessed data enables simply a look-up table decoding and direct use of the extracted features to reduce user computation for either image reconstruction, or computer interpretation of the image data. Basically, the CCA uses spatially local clustering to extract features from the image data to describe spectral characteristics of the data set. In addition, the features may be used to form a sequence of scalar numbers that define each picture element in terms of the cluster features. This sequence, called the feature map, is then efficiently represented by using source encoding concepts. Various forms of the CCA are defined and experimental results are presented to show trade-offs and characteristics of the various implementations. Examples are provided that demonstrate the application of the cluster compression concept to multi-spectral images from LANDSAT and other sources.

  8. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Profiling General Compression: A River of Wind

    ScienceCinema

    Marcus, David; Ingersoll, Eric

    2012-03-21

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. A few videos were selected for showing during the Summit to attendees. These 'performer videos' highlight innovative research that is ongoing and related to the main topics of the Summit's sessions. Featured in this video are David Marcus, Founder of General Compression, and Eric Ingersoll, CEO of General Compression. General Compression, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has created an advanced air compression process which can store and release more than a weeks worth of the energy generated by wind turbines.

  9. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Profiling General Compression: A River of Wind

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, David; Ingersoll, Eric

    2012-02-29

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. A few videos were selected for showing during the Summit to attendees. These 'performer videos' highlight innovative research that is ongoing and related to the main topics of the Summit's sessions. Featured in this video are David Marcus, Founder of General Compression, and Eric Ingersoll, CEO of General Compression. General Compression, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has created an advanced air compression process which can store and release more than a weeks worth of the energy generated by wind turbines.

  10. Inferences of weekly cycles in summertime rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, John D.; Carbone, Richard E.

    2011-10-01

    In several continental regions a weekly cycle of air pollution aerosols has been observed. It is usually characterized by concentration minima on weekends (Saturday and Sunday) and maxima on weekdays (Tuesday-Friday). Several studies have associated varying aerosol concentrations with precipitation production and attempted to determine whether or not there is a corresponding weekly cycle of precipitation. Results to date have been mixed. Here we examine a 12 year national composited radar data set for evidence of weekly precipitation cycles during the warm season (June-August). Various statistical quantities are calculated and subjected to "bootstrap" testing in order to assess significance. In many parts of the United States, warm season precipitation is relatively infrequent, with a few extreme events contributing to a large percentage of the total 12 year rainfall. For this reason, the statistics are often difficult to interpret. The general area east of the Mississippi River and north of 37°N contains regions where 25%-50% daily rainfall increases are inferred for weekdays (Tuesday-Friday) relative to weekends. The statistics suggest that western Pennsylvania is the largest and most likely contiguous region to have a weekly cycle. Parts of northern Florida and southeastern coastal areas infer a reverse-phase cycle, with less rainfall during the week than on weekends. Spot checks of surface rain gauge data confirm the phase of these radar-observed anomalies in both Pennsylvania and Florida. While there are indications of a weekly cycle in other locations of the United States, the degree of confidence is considerably lower. There is a strong statistical inference of weekday rainfall maxima over a net 8% of the area examined, which is approximately twice the area of cities. Future examination of lofted aerosol content, related condensation/ice nuclei spectra, and knowledge of the convective dynamical regime are needed in order to assess how anthropogenic aerosols may affect rainfall at urban and regional scales. If radar is the primary method of observation, it is also necessary to examine the effects of variable aerosol content on the parametric relationship between rainfall rate and radar reflectivity factor. Polarimetric radar observations could also serve to verify microphysical-dynamical hypotheses regarding precipitation production.

  11. Compressible Turbulent Channel Flows: DNS Results and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, P. G.; Coleman, G. N.; Bradshaw, P.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The present paper addresses some topical issues in modeling compressible turbulent shear flows. The work is based on direct numerical simulation of two supersonic fully developed channel flows between very cold isothermal walls. Detailed decomposition and analysis of terms appearing in the momentum and energy equations are presented. The simulation results are used to provide insights into differences between conventional time-and Favre-averaging of the mean-flow and turbulent quantities. Study of the turbulence energy budget for the two cases shows that the compressibility effects due to turbulent density and pressure fluctuations are insignificant. In particular, the dilatational dissipation and the mean product of the pressure and dilatation fluctuations are very small, contrary to the results of simulations for sheared homogeneous compressible turbulence and to recent proposals for models for general compressible turbulent flows. This provides a possible explanation of why the Van Driest density-weighted transformation is so successful in correlating compressible boundary layer data. Finally, it is found that the DNS data do not support the strong Reynolds analogy. A more general representation of the analogy is analysed and shown to match the DNS data very well.

  12. Near-wall modelling of compressible turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, Ronald M. C.

    1990-01-01

    Work was carried out to extend the near-wall models formulated for the incompressible Reynolds stress equations to compressible flows. The idea of splitting the compressible dissipation function into a solenoidal part that is not sensitive to changes of compressibility indicators and a compressible part that is directly affected by these changes is adopted. This means that all models involving the dissipation rate could be expressed in terms of the solenoidal dissipation rate and an equation governing its transport could be formulated to close the set of compressible Reynolds stress equations. The near-wall modelling of the dissipation rate equation is investigated and its behavior near a wall is studied in detail using k-epsilon closure. It is found that all existing modelled equations give the wrong behavior for the dissipation rate near a wall. Improvements are suggested and the resultant behavior is found to be in good agreement with near-wall data. Furthermore, the present modified k-epsilon closure is used too calculate a flat plate boundary layer and the results are compared with four existing k-epsilon closures. These comparisons show that all closures tested give essentially the same flow properties, except in a region very close to the wall. In this region, the present k-epsilon closure calculations are in better agreement with measurements and direct simulation data; in particular, the behavior of the dissipation rate.

  13. Near-wall modelling of compressible turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, Ronald M. C.

    1990-01-01

    Work was carried out to formulate near-wall models for the equations governing the transport of the temperature-variance and its dissipation rate. With these equations properly modeled, a foundation is laid for their extension together with the heat-flux equations to compressible flows. This extension is carried out in a manner similar to that used to extend the incompressible near-wall Reynolds-stress models to compressible flows. The methodology used to accomplish the extension of the near-wall Reynolds-stress models is examined and the actual extension of the models for the Reynolds-stress equations and the near-wall dissipation-rate equation to compressible flows is given. Then the formulation of the near-wall models for the equations governing the transport of the temperature variance and its dissipation rate is discussed. Finally, a sample calculation of a flat plate compressible turbulent boundary-layer flow with adiabatic wall boundary condition and a free-stream Mach number of 2.5 using a two-equation near-wall closure is presented. The results show that the near-wall two-equation closure formulated for compressible flows is quite valid and the calculated properties are in good agreement with measurements. Furthermore, the near-wall behavior of the turbulence statistics and structure parameters is consistent with that found in incompressible flows.

  14. Space-frequency quantization for image compression with directionlets.

    PubMed

    Velisavljevi?, Vladan; Beferull-Lozano, Baltasar; Vetterli, Martin

    2007-07-01

    The standard separable 2-D wavelet transform (WT) has recently achieved a great success in image processing because it provides a sparse representation of smooth images. However, it fails to efficiently capture 1-D discontinuities, like edges or contours. These features, being elongated and characterized by geometrical regularity along different directions, intersect and generate many large magnitude wavelet coefficients. Since contours are very important elements in the visual perception of images, to provide a good visual quality of compressed images, it is fundamental to preserve good reconstruction of these directional features. In our previous work, we proposed a construction of critically sampled perfect reconstruction transforms with directional vanishing moments imposed in the corresponding basis functions along different directions, called directionlets. In this paper, we show how to design and implement a novel efficient space-frequency quantization (SFQ) compression algorithm using directionlets. Our new compression method outperforms the standard SFQ in a rate-distortion sense, both in terms of mean-square error and visual quality, especially in the low-rate compression regime. We also show that our compression method, does not increase the order of computational complexity as compared to the standard SFQ algorithm. PMID:17605375

  15. General-Purpose Compression for Efficient Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannane, Adam; Williams, Hugh E.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses compression of databases that reduces space requirements and retrieval times; considers compression of documents in text databases based on semistatic modeling with words; and proposes a scheme for general purpose compression that can be applied to all types of data stored in large collections. (Author/LRW)

  16. 29 CFR 1926.803 - Compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compressed air. 1926.803 Section 1926.803 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Underground Construction, Caissons, Cofferdams and Compressed Air § 1926.803 Compressed...

  17. Tomographic Image Compression Using Multidimensional Transforms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villasenor, John D.

    1994-01-01

    Describes a method for compressing tomographic images obtained using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Magnetic Resonance (MR) by applying transform compression using all available dimensions. This takes maximum advantage of redundancy of the data, allowing significant increases in compression efficiency and performance. (13 references) (KRN)

  18. Vehicle Technologies' Fact of the Week 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Diegel, Susan W; Boundy, Robert Gary

    2012-04-01

    Each week the U.S. Department of Energy s Vehicle Technology Program (VTP) posts a Fact of the Week on their website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/. These Facts provide statistical information, usually in the form of charts and tables, on vehicle sales, fuel economy, gasoline prices, and other transportation-related trends. Each Fact is a stand-alone page that includes a graph, text explaining the significance of the data, the supporting information on which the graph was based, and the source of the data. A link to the current Fact is available Monday through Friday on the VTP homepage, but older Facts are archived and still available at: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/facts/. This report is a compilation of the Facts that were posted during calendar year 2011. The Facts were written and prepared by staff in Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Center for Transportation Analysis.

  19. Vehicle Technologies’ Fact of the Week 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Diegel, Susan W.; Moore, Sheila A.; Boundy, Robert Gary

    2014-04-01

    Each week the U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technology Office (VTO) posts a Fact of the Week on their website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/ . These Facts provide statistical information, usually in the form of charts and tables, on vehicle sales, fuel economy, gasoline prices, and other transportation-related trends. Each Fact is a stand-alone page that includes a graph, text explaining the significance of the data, the supporting information on which the graph was based, and the source of the data. A link to the current week’s Fact is available on the VTO homepage, but older Facts are archived and still available at: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/facts/. This report is a compilation of the Facts that were posted during calendar year 2013. The Facts were written and prepared by staff in Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Center for Transportation Analysis.

  20. Longitudinal study of cognition among adolescent marijuana users over three weeks of abstinence

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Karen L.; Winward, Jennifer L.; Schweinsburg, Alecia D.; Medina, Krista Lisdahl; Brown, Sandra A.; Tapert, Susan F.

    2010-01-01

    Background Cognitive deficits that persist up to a month have been detected among adult marijuana users, but decrements and their pattern of recovery are less known in adolescent users. Previously, we reported cognitive deficits among adolescent marijuana users after one month of abstinence (Medina, Hanson, Schweinsburg, Cohen-Zion, Nagel, & Tapert, 2007). In this longitudinal study, we characterized neurocognitive changes among marijuana-using adolescents across the first three weeks of abstinence. Method Participants were adolescent marijuana users with limited alcohol and other drug use (n = 19) and demographically similar non-using controls (n = 21) ages 15–19. Participants completed a brief neuropsychological battery on three occasions, after 3 days, 2 weeks, and 3 weeks of stopping substance use. Abstinence was ascertained by decreasing tetrahydrocannabinol metabolite values on serial urine drug screens. Verbal learning, verbal working memory, attention and vigilance, and time estimation were evaluated. Results Marijuana users demonstrated poorer verbal learning (p<.01), verbal working memory (p<.05), and attention accuracy (p<.01) compared to controls. Improvements in users were seen on word list learning after 2 weeks of abstinence and on verbal working memory after 3 weeks. While attention processing speed was similar between groups, attention accuracy remained deficient in users throughout the 3-week abstinence period. Conclusions This preliminary study detected poorer verbal learning and verbal working memory among adolescent marijuana users that improved during three weeks of abstinence, while attention deficits persisted. These results implicate possible hippocampal, subcortical, and prefrontal cortex abnormalities. PMID:20621421