Science.gov

Sample records for compressible air flow

  1. Improving the performance of a compression ignition engine by directing flow of inlet air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemper, Carlton

    1946-01-01

    The object of this report is to present the results of tests performed by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to determine the effect on engine performance of directing the flow of the inlet air to a 5-inch by 7-inch cylinder, solid injection, compression ignition engine, After a few preliminary tests, comparative runs were made at a speed of 1500 r.p.m. with and without directed air flow. It was found that directing the flow of the inlet air toward the fuel injection valve gave steadier engine operation, and an appreciable increase in power, and decreased fuel consumption. The results indicate the possibility of improving the performance of a given type of combustion chamber without changing its shape and with no change in valve timing. They would also seem to prove that directional turbulence, set up before the inlet valve of a four-stroke cycle engine, continues in the engine cylinder throughout the compression stroke.

  2. Fuel Spray and Flame Formation in a Compression-Ignition Engine Employing Air Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Waldron, C D

    1937-01-01

    The effects of air flow on fuel spray and flame formation in a high-speed compression-ignition engine have been investigated by means of the NACA combustion apparatus. The process was studied by examining high-speed motion pictures taken at the rate of 2,200 frames a second. The combustion chamber was of the flat-disk type used in previous experiments with this apparatus. The air flow was produced by a rectangular displacer mounted on top of the engine piston. Three fuel-injection nozzles were tested: a 0.020-inch single-orifice nozzle, a 6-orifice nozzle, and a slit nozzle. The air velocity within the combustion chamber was estimated to reach a value of 425 feet a second. The results show that in no case was the form of the fuel spray completely destroyed by the air jet although in some cases the direction of the spray was changed and the spray envelope was carried away by the moving air. The distribution of the fuel in the combustion chamber of a compression-ignition engine can be regulated to some extent by the design of the combustion chamber, by the design of the fuel-injection nozzle, and by the use of air flow.

  3. Integrated LTCC Pressure/Flow/Temperature Multisensor for Compressed Air Diagnostics†

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Yannick; Maeder, Thomas; Boutinard-Rouelle, Grégoire; Barras, Aurélie; Craquelin, Nicolas; Ryser, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We present a multisensor designed for industrial compressed air diagnostics and combining the measurement of pressure, flow, and temperature, integrated with the corresponding signal conditioning electronics in a single low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) package. The developed sensor may be soldered onto an integrated electro-fluidic platform by using standard surface mount device (SMD) technology, e.g., as a standard electronic component would be on a printed circuit board, obviating the need for both wires and tubes and thus paving the road towards low-cost integrated electro-fluidic systems. Several performance aspects of this device are presented and discussed, together with electronics design issues. PMID:22163518

  4. Turbulence in Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lecture notes for the AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel (FDP) Special Course on 'Turbulence in Compressible Flows' have been assembled in this report. The following topics were covered: Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers, Compressible Turbulent Free Shear Layers, Turbulent Combustion, DNS/LES and RANS Simulations of Compressible Turbulent Flows, and Case Studies of Applications of Turbulence Models in Aerospace.

  5. Considerations of Air Flow in Combustion Chambers of High-Speed Compression-Ignition Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanogle, J A; Moore, C S

    1932-01-01

    The air flow in combustion chambers is divided into three fundamental classes - induced, forced, and residual. A generalized resume is given of the present status of air flow investigations and of the work done at this and other laboratories to determine the direction and velocity of air movement in auxiliary and integral combustion chambers. The effects of air flow on engine performance are mentioned to show that although air flow improves the combustion efficiency, considerable induction, friction, and thermal losses must be guarded against.

  6. Compressible Flow Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.

    2006-01-01

    The Compressible Flow Toolbox is primarily a MATLAB-language implementation of a set of algorithms that solve approximately 280 linear and nonlinear classical equations for compressible flow. The toolbox is useful for analysis of one-dimensional steady flow with either constant entropy, friction, heat transfer, or Mach number greater than 1. The toolbox also contains algorithms for comparing and validating the equation-solving algorithms against solutions previously published in open literature. The classical equations solved by the Compressible Flow Toolbox are as follows: The isentropic-flow equations, The Fanno flow equations (pertaining to flow of an ideal gas in a pipe with friction), The Rayleigh flow equations (pertaining to frictionless flow of an ideal gas, with heat transfer, in a pipe of constant cross section), The normal-shock equations, The oblique-shock equations, and The expansion equations.

  7. Performance of a Compression-ignition Engine with a Precombustion Chamber Having High-Velocity Air Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanogle, J A; Moore, C S

    1931-01-01

    Presented here are the results of performance tests made with a single-cylinder, four stroke cycle, compression-ignition engine. These tests were made on a precombustion chamber type of cylinder head designed to have air velocity and tangential air flow in both the chamber and cylinder. The performance was investigated for variable load and engine speed, type of fuel spray, valve opening pressure, injection period and, for the spherical chamber, position of the injection spray relative to the air flow. The pressure variations between the pear-shaped precombustion chamber and the cylinder for motoring and full load conditions were determined with a Farnboro electric indicator. The combustion chamber designs tested gave good mixing of a single compact fuel spray with the air, but did not control the ensuing combustion sufficiently. Relative to each other, the velocity of air flow was too high, the spray dispersion by injection too great, and the metering effect of the cylinder head passage insufficient. The correct relation of these factors is of the utmost importance for engine performance.

  8. Piston reciprocating compressed air engine

    SciTech Connect

    Cestero, L.G.

    1987-03-24

    A compressed air engine is described comprising: (a). a reservoir of compressed air, (b). two power cylinders each containing a reciprocating piston connected to a crankshaft and flywheel, (c). a transfer cylinder which communicates with each power cylinder and the reservoir, and contains a reciprocating piston connected to the crankshaft, (d). valve means controlled by rotation of the crankshaft for supplying compressed air from the reservoir to each power cylinder and for exhausting compressed air from each power cylinder to the transfer cylinder, (e). valve means controlled by rotation of the crankshaft for supplying from the transfer cylinder to the reservoir compressed air supplied to the transfer cylinder on the exhaust strokes of the pistons of the power cylinders, and (f). an externally powered fan for assisting the exhaust of compressed air from each power cylinder to the transfer cylinder and from there to the compressed air reservoir.

  9. Considerations on the effect of wind-tunnel walls on oscillating air forces for two-dimensional subsonic compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runyan, Harry L; Watkins, Charles E

    1953-01-01

    This report treats the effect of wind-tunnel walls on the oscillating two-dimensional air forces in a compressible medium. The walls are simulated by the usual method of placing images at appropriate distances above and below the wing. An important result shown is that, for certain conditions of wing frequency, tunnel height, and Mach number, the tunnel and wing may form a resonant system so that the forces on the wing are greatly changed from the condition of no tunnel walls. It is pointed out that similar conditions exist for three-dimensional flow in circular and rectangular tunnels and apparently, within certain Mach number ranges, in tunnels of nonuniform cross section or even in open tunnels or jets.

  10. Computer program for compressible flow network analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilton, M. E.; Murtaugh, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Program solves problem of an arbitrarily connected one dimensional compressible flow network with pumping in the channels and momentum balancing at flow junctions. Program includes pressure drop calculations for impingement flow and flow through pin fin arrangements, as currently found in many air cooled turbine bucket and vane cooling configurations.

  11. Compressed air energy storage system

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, F.W.; Kartsounes, G.T.

    1981-07-28

    An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustible fuel. Preferably the internal combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air compression and power generation.

  12. Compressed air energy storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ahrens, Frederick W.; Kartsounes, George T.

    1981-01-01

    An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustible fuel. Preferably the internal combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air compression and power generation.

  13. Compressed air energy storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ahrens, F.W.; Kartsounes, G.T.

    An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air compression and power generation.

  14. 29 CFR 1917.154 - Compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compressed air. 1917.154 Section 1917.154 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.154 Compressed air. Employees shall be... this part during cleaning with compressed air. Compressed air used for cleaning shall not exceed...

  15. 29 CFR 1917.154 - Compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compressed air. 1917.154 Section 1917.154 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.154 Compressed air. Employees shall be... this part during cleaning with compressed air. Compressed air used for cleaning shall not exceed...

  16. 29 CFR 1917.154 - Compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compressed air. 1917.154 Section 1917.154 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.154 Compressed air. Employees shall be... this part during cleaning with compressed air. Compressed air used for cleaning shall not exceed...

  17. 29 CFR 1917.154 - Compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compressed air. 1917.154 Section 1917.154 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.154 Compressed air. Employees shall be... this part during cleaning with compressed air. Compressed air used for cleaning shall not exceed...

  18. 29 CFR 1917.154 - Compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compressed air. 1917.154 Section 1917.154 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.154 Compressed air. Employees shall be... this part during cleaning with compressed air. Compressed air used for cleaning shall not exceed...

  19. 30 CFR 75.1730 - Compressed air; general; compressed air systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compressed air; general; compressed air systems... Compressed air; general; compressed air systems. (a) All pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed... Safety and Health district office. (b) Compressors and compressed-air receivers shall be equipped...

  20. 30 CFR 75.1730 - Compressed air; general; compressed air systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compressed air; general; compressed air systems... Compressed air; general; compressed air systems. (a) All pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed... Safety and Health district office. (b) Compressors and compressed-air receivers shall be equipped...

  1. 30 CFR 75.1730 - Compressed air; general; compressed air systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compressed air; general; compressed air systems... Compressed air; general; compressed air systems. (a) All pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed... Safety and Health district office. (b) Compressors and compressed-air receivers shall be equipped...

  2. 30 CFR 75.1730 - Compressed air; general; compressed air systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compressed air; general; compressed air systems... Compressed air; general; compressed air systems. (a) All pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed... Safety and Health district office. (b) Compressors and compressed-air receivers shall be equipped...

  3. 30 CFR 75.1730 - Compressed air; general; compressed air systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compressed air; general; compressed air systems... Compressed air; general; compressed air systems. (a) All pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed... Safety and Health district office. (b) Compressors and compressed-air receivers shall be equipped...

  4. Chapter 22: Compressed Air Evaluation Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, N.

    2014-11-01

    Compressed-air systems are used widely throughout industry for many operations, including pneumatic tools, packaging and automation equipment, conveyors, and other industrial process operations. Compressed-air systems are defined as a group of subsystems composed of air compressors, air treatment equipment, controls, piping, pneumatic tools, pneumatically powered machinery, and process applications using compressed air. A compressed-air system has three primary functional subsystems: supply, distribution, and demand. Air compressors are the primary energy consumers in a compressed-air system and are the primary focus of this protocol. The two compressed-air energy efficiency measures specifically addressed in this protocol are: high-efficiency/variable speed drive (VSD) compressor replacing modulating compressor; compressed-air leak survey and repairs. This protocol provides direction on how to reliably verify savings from these two measures using a consistent approach for each.

  5. Compression Shocks of Detached Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggink

    1947-01-01

    It is known that compression shocks which lead from supersonic to subsonic velocity cause the flow to separate on impact on a rigid wall. Such shocks appear at bodies with circular symmetry or wing profiles on locally exceeding sonic velocity, and in Laval nozzles with too high a back pressure. The form of the compression shocks observed therein is investigated.

  6. COMPRESSIBLE FLOW, ENTRAINMENT, AND MEGAPLUME

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is generally believed that low Mach number, i.e., low-velocity, flow may be assumed to be incompressible flow. Under steady-state conditions, an exact equation of continuity may then be used to show that such flow is non-divergent. However, a rigorous, compressible fluid-dynam...

  7. Operational procedure for computer program for design point characteristics of a compressed-air generator with through-flow combustor for V/STOL applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, R. P.

    1971-01-01

    The computer program described in this report calculates the design-point characteristics of a compressed-air generator for use in V/STOL applications such as systems with a tip-turbine-driven lift fan. The program computes the dimensions and mass, as well as the thermodynamic performance of a model air generator configuration which involves a straight through-flow combustor. Physical and thermodynamic characteristics of the air generator components are also given. The program was written in FORTRAN IV language. Provision has been made so that the program will accept input values in either SI units or U.S. customary units. Each air generator design-point calculation requires about 1.5 seconds of 7094 computer time for execution.

  8. Analytical and experimental study on complex compressed air pipe network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Yushou; Cai, Maolin; Shi, Yan

    2015-09-01

    To analyze the working characteristics of complex compressed air networks, numerical methods are widely used which are based on finite element technology or intelligent algorithms. However, the effectiveness of the numerical methods is limited. In this paper, to provide a new method to optimize the design and the air supply strategy of the complex compressed air pipe network, firstly, a novel method to analyze the topology structure of the compressed air flow in the pipe network is initially proposed. A matrix is used to describe the topology structure of the compressed air flow. Moreover, based on the analysis of the pressure loss of the pipe network, the relationship between the pressure and the flow of the compressed air is derived, and a prediction method of pressure fluctuation and air flow in a segment in a complex pipe network is proposed. Finally, to inspect the effectiveness of the method, an experiment with a complex network is designed. The pressure and the flow of airflow in the network are measured and studied. The results of the study show that, the predicted results with the proposed method have a good consistency with the experimental results, and that verifies the air flow prediction method of the complex pipe network. This research proposes a new method to analyze the compressed air network and a prediction method of pressure fluctuation and air flow in a segment, which can predicate the fluctuation of the pressure according to the flow of compressed air, and predicate the fluctuation of the flow according to the pressure in a segment of a complex pipe network.

  9. 29 CFR 1926.803 - Compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compressed air. 1926.803 Section 1926.803 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Underground Construction, Caissons, Cofferdams and Compressed Air § 1926.803 Compressed...

  10. Industrial Compressed Air System Energy Efficiency Guidebook.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-12-01

    Energy efficient design, operation and maintenance of compressed air systems in industrial plants can provide substantial reductions in electric power and other operational costs. This guidebook will help identify cost effective, energy efficiency opportunities in compressed air system design, re-design, operation and maintenance. The guidebook provides: (1) a broad overview of industrial compressed air systems, (2) methods for estimating compressed air consumption and projected air savings, (3) a description of applicable, generic energy conservation measures, and, (4) a review of some compressed air system demonstration projects that have taken place over the last two years. The primary audience for this guidebook includes plant maintenance supervisors, plant engineers, plant managers and others interested in energy management of industrial compressed air systems.

  11. Seneca Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) Project

    SciTech Connect

    2012-11-30

    This document provides specifications for the process air compressor for a compressed air storage project, requests a budgetary quote, and provides supporting information, including compressor data, site specific data, water analysis, and Seneca CAES value drivers.

  12. Flow quality measurements in compressible subsonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stainback, P. Calvin; Johnson, Charles B.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose is to re-examine the heat transfer from a hot-wire probe in the compressible subsonic flow regime; describe the three-wire hot-wire probe calibration and data reduction techniques used to measure the velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuation; and present flow quality results obtained in the Langley 0.3 meter Transonic Cryogenic Wind Tunnel and in flight with the NASA JetStar from the same three-wire hot-wire probe.

  13. Recoil Experiments Using a Compressed Air Cannon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Brett

    2006-01-01

    Ping-Pong vacuum cannons, potato guns, and compressed air cannons are popular and dramatic demonstrations for lecture and lab. Students enjoy them for the spectacle, but they can also be used effectively to teach physics. Recently we have used a student-built compressed air cannon as a laboratory activity to investigate impulse, conservation of…

  14. Turbulence modeling for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    Material prepared for a course on Applications and Fundamentals of Turbulence given at the University of Tennessee Space Institute, January 10 and 11, 1977, is presented. A complete concept of turbulence modeling is described, and examples of progess for its use in computational aerodynimics are given. Modeling concepts, experiments, and computations using the concepts are reviewed in a manner that provides an up-to-date statement on the status of this problem for compressible flows.

  15. Turbulence modeling for high speed compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, Suresh

    1993-01-01

    The following grant objectives were delineated in the proposal to NASA: to offer course work in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and related areas to enable mechanical engineering students at North Carolina A&T State University (N.C. A&TSU) to pursue M.S. studies in CFD, and to enable students and faculty to engage in research in high speed compressible flows. Since no CFD-related activity existed at N.C. A&TSU before the start of the NASA grant period, training of students in the CFD area and initiation of research in high speed compressible flows were proposed as the key aspects of the project. To that end, graduate level courses in CFD, boundary layer theory, and fluid dynamics were offered. This effort included initiating a CFD course for graduate students. Also, research work was performed on studying compressibility effects in high speed flows. Specifically, a modified compressible dissipation model, which included a fourth order turbulent Mach number term, was incorporated into the SPARK code and verified for the air-air mixing layer case. The results obtained for this case were compared with a wide variety of experimental data to discern the trends in the mixing layer growth rates with varying convective Mach numbers. Comparison of the predictions of the study with the results of several analytical models was also carried out. The details of the research study are described in the publication entitled 'Compressibility Effects in Modeling Turbulent High Speed Mixing Layers,' which is attached to this report.

  16. Turbulence modeling for high speed compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Suresh

    1993-08-01

    The following grant objectives were delineated in the proposal to NASA: to offer course work in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and related areas to enable mechanical engineering students at North Carolina A&T State University (N.C. A&TSU) to pursue M.S. studies in CFD, and to enable students and faculty to engage in research in high speed compressible flows. Since no CFD-related activity existed at N.C. A&TSU before the start of the NASA grant period, training of students in the CFD area and initiation of research in high speed compressible flows were proposed as the key aspects of the project. To that end, graduate level courses in CFD, boundary layer theory, and fluid dynamics were offered. This effort included initiating a CFD course for graduate students. Also, research work was performed on studying compressibility effects in high speed flows. Specifically, a modified compressible dissipation model, which included a fourth order turbulent Mach number term, was incorporated into the SPARK code and verified for the air-air mixing layer case. The results obtained for this case were compared with a wide variety of experimental data to discern the trends in the mixing layer growth rates with varying convective Mach numbers. Comparison of the predictions of the study with the results of several analytical models was also carried out. The details of the research study are described in the publication entitled 'Compressibility Effects in Modeling Turbulent High Speed Mixing Layers,' which is attached to this report.

  17. University of Arizona Compressed Air Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Joseph; Muralidharan, Krishna

    2012-12-31

    Boiled down to its essentials, the grant’s purpose was to develop and demonstrate the viability of compressed air energy storage (CAES) for use in renewable energy development. While everyone agrees that energy storage is the key component to enable widespread adoption of renewable energy sources, the development of a viable scalable technology has been missing. The Department of Energy has focused on expanded battery research and improved forecasting, and the utilities have deployed renewable energy resources only to the extent of satisfying Renewable Portfolio Standards. The lack of dispatchability of solar and wind-based electricity generation has drastically increased the cost of operation with these components. It is now clear that energy storage coupled with accurate solar and wind forecasting make up the only combination that can succeed in dispatchable renewable energy resources. Conventional batteries scale linearly in size, so the price becomes a barrier for large systems. Flow batteries scale sub-linearly and promise to be useful if their performance can be shown to provide sufficient support for solar and wind-base electricity generation resources. Compressed air energy storage provides the most desirable answer in terms of scalability and performance in all areas except efficiency. With the support of the DOE, Tucson Electric Power and Science Foundation Arizona, the Arizona Research Institute for Solar Energy (AzRISE) at the University of Arizona has had the opportunity to investigate CAES as a potential energy storage resource.

  18. Krylov methods for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tidriri, M. D.

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the application of Krylov methods to compressible flows, and the effect of implicit boundary conditions on the implicit solution of nonlinear problems. Two defect-correction procedures, namely, approximate factorization (AF) for structured grids and ILU/GMRES for general grids, are considered. Also considered here are Newton-Krylov matrix-free methods that we combined with the use of mixed discretization schemes in the implicitly defined Jacobian and its preconditioner. Numerical experiments that show the performance of our approaches are then presented.

  19. Compressed Air/Vacuum Transportation Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Shyamal

    2011-03-01

    General theory of compressed air/vacuum transportation will be presented. In this transportation, a vehicle (such as an automobile or a rail car) is powered either by compressed air or by air at near vacuum pressure. Four version of such transportation is feasible. In all versions, a ``c-shaped'' plastic or ceramic pipe lies buried a few inches under the ground surface. This pipe carries compressed air or air at near vacuum pressure. In type I transportation, a vehicle draws compressed air (or vacuum) from this buried pipe. Using turbine or reciprocating air cylinder, mechanical power is generated from compressed air (or from vacuum). This mechanical power transferred to the wheels of an automobile (or a rail car) drives the vehicle. In type II-IV transportation techniques, a horizontal force is generated inside the plastic (or ceramic) pipe. A set of vertical and horizontal steel bars is used to transmit this force to the automobile on the road (or to a rail car on rail track). The proposed transportation system has following merits: virtually accident free; highly energy efficient; pollution free and it will not contribute to carbon dioxide emission. Some developmental work on this transportation will be needed before it can be used by the traveling public. The entire transportation system could be computer controlled.

  20. LOW-VELOCITY COMPRESSIBLE FLOW THEORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The widespread application of incompressible flow theory dominates low-velocity fluid dynamics, virtually preventing research into compressible low-velocity flow dynamics. Yet, compressible solutions to simple and well-defined flow problems and a series of contradictions in incom...

  1. 30 CFR 56.13020 - Use of compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use of compressed air. 56.13020 Section 56... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 56.13020 Use of compressed air. At no time shall compressed air be directed toward a...

  2. 30 CFR 56.13020 - Use of compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Use of compressed air. 56.13020 Section 56... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 56.13020 Use of compressed air. At no time shall compressed air be directed toward a...

  3. 30 CFR 57.13020 - Use of compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use of compressed air. 57.13020 Section 57... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 57.13020 Use of compressed air. At no time shall compressed air be directed toward...

  4. 30 CFR 77.412 - Compressed air systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compressed air systems. 77.412 Section 77.412... for Mechanical Equipment § 77.412 Compressed air systems. (a) Compressors and compressed-air receivers... involving the pressure system of compressors, receivers, or compressed-air-powered equipment shall not...

  5. 30 CFR 56.13020 - Use of compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use of compressed air. 56.13020 Section 56... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 56.13020 Use of compressed air. At no time shall compressed air be directed toward a...

  6. General Equation Set Solver for Compressible and Incompressible Turbomachinery Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sondak, Douglas L.; Dorney, Daniel J.

    2002-01-01

    Turbomachines for propulsion applications operate with many different working fluids and flow conditions. The flow may be incompressible, such as in the liquid hydrogen pump in a rocket engine, or supersonic, such as in the turbine which may drive the hydrogen pump. Separate codes have traditionally been used for incompressible and compressible flow solvers. The General Equation Set (GES) method can be used to solve both incompressible and compressible flows, and it is not restricted to perfect gases, as are many compressible-flow turbomachinery solvers. An unsteady GES turbomachinery flow solver has been developed and applied to both air and water flows through turbines. It has been shown to be an excellent alternative to maintaining two separate codes.

  7. Modeling the exit velocity of a compressed air cannon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrbach, Z. J.; Buresh, T. R.; Madsen, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of compressed air cannons in an undergraduate laboratory provides a way to illustrate the connection between diverse physics concepts, such as conservation of momentum, the work-kinetic energy theorem, gas expansion, air drag, and elementary Newtonian mechanics. However, it is not clear whether the expansion of the gas in the cannon is an adiabatic or an isothermal process. We built an air cannon that utilizes a diaphragm valve to release the pressurized gas and found that neither process accurately predicts the exit velocity of our projectile. We discuss a model based on the flow of air through the valve, which is in much better agreement with our data.

  8. Air ejector augmented compressed air energy storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ahrens, Frederick W.; Kartsounes, George T.

    1980-01-01

    Energy is stored in slack demand periods by charging a plurality of underground reservoirs with air to the same peak storage pressure, during peak demand periods throttling the air from one storage reservoir into a gas turbine system at a constant inlet pressure until the air pressure in the reservoir falls to said constant inlet pressure, thereupon permitting air in a second reservoir to flow into said gas turbine system while drawing air from the first reservoir through a variable geometry air ejector and adjusting said variable geometry air ejector, said air flow being essentially at the constant inlet pressure of the gas turbine system.

  9. Air ejector augmented compressed air energy storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ahrens, F.W.; Kartsounes, G.T.

    Energy is stored in slack demand periods by charging a plurality of underground reservoirs with air to the same peak storage pressure, during peak demand periods throttling the air from one storage reservoir into a gas turbine system at a constant inlet pressure until the air presure in the reservoir falls to said constant inlet pressure, thereupon permitting air in a second reservoir to flow into said gas turbine system while drawing air from the first reservoir through a variable geometry air ejector and adjusting said variable geometry air ejector, said air flow being essentially at the constant inlet pressure of the gas turbine system.

  10. Efficiency at Sorting Cards in Compressed Air

    PubMed Central

    Poulton, E. C.; Catton, M. J.; Carpenter, A.

    1964-01-01

    At a site where compressed air was being used in the construction of a tunnel, 34 men sorted cards twice, once at normal atmospheric pressure and once at 3½, 2½, or 2 atmospheres absolute pressure. An additional six men sorted cards twice at normal atmospheric pressure. When the task was carried out for the first time, all the groups of men performing at raised pressure were found to yield a reliably greater proportion of very slow responses than the group of men performing at normal pressure. There was reliably more variability in timing at 3½ and 2½ atmospheres absolute than at normal pressure. At 3½ atmospheres absolute the average performance was also reliably slower. When the task was carried out for the second time, exposure to 3½ atmospheres absolute pressure had no reliable effect. Thus compressed air affected performance only while the task was being learnt; it had little effect after practice. No reliable differences were found related to age, to length of experience in compressed air, or to the duration of the exposure to compressed air, which was never less than 10 minutes at 3½ atmospheres absolute pressure. PMID:14180485

  11. Compressible turbulent flows: Modeling and similarity considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Otto

    1991-01-01

    With the recent revitalization of high speed flow research, compressibility presents a new set of challenging problems to turbulence researchers. Questions arise as to what extent compressibility affects turbulence dynamics, structures, the Reynolds stress-mean velocity (constitutive) relation, and the accompanying processes of heat transfer and mixing. In astrophysical applications, compressible turbulence is believed to play an important role in intergalactic gas cloud dynamics and in accretion disk convection. Understanding and modeling of the compressibility effects in free shear flows, boundary layers, and boundary layer/shock interactions is discussed.

  12. Terminal Air Flow Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denery, Dallas G.; Erzberger, Heinz; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The Center TRACON Automation System (CTAS) will be the basis for air traffic planning and control in the terminal area. The system accepts arriving traffic within an extended terminal area and optimizes the flow based on current traffic and airport conditions. The operational use of CTAS will be presented together with results from current operations.

  13. Time accurate simulations of compressible shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Steinberger, Craig J.; Vidoni, Thomas J.; Madnia, Cyrus K.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this research are to employ direct numerical simulation (DNS) to study the phenomenon of mixing (or lack thereof) in compressible free shear flows and to suggest new means of enhancing mixing in such flows. The shear flow configurations under investigation are those of parallel mixing layers and planar jets under both non-reacting and reacting nonpremixed conditions. During the three-years of this research program, several important issues regarding mixing and chemical reactions in compressible shear flows were investigated.

  14. 41 CFR 50-204.8 - Use of compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use of compressed air. 50-204.8 Section 50-204.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... CONTRACTS General Safety and Health Standards § 50-204.8 Use of compressed air. Compressed air shall not...

  15. 41 CFR 50-204.8 - Use of compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Use of compressed air. 50-204.8 Section 50-204.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public... General Safety and Health Standards § 50-204.8 Use of compressed air. Compressed air shall not be used...

  16. 41 CFR 50-204.8 - Use of compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Use of compressed air. 50-204.8 Section 50-204.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... CONTRACTS General Safety and Health Standards § 50-204.8 Use of compressed air. Compressed air shall not...

  17. 41 CFR 50-204.8 - Use of compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Use of compressed air. 50-204.8 Section 50-204.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public... General Safety and Health Standards § 50-204.8 Use of compressed air. Compressed air shall not be used...

  18. PDF approach for compressible turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, A. T.; Tsai, Y.-L. P.; Raju, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to develop a probability density function (pdf) turbulence model for compressible reacting flows for use with a CFD flow solver. The probability density function of the species mass fraction and enthalpy are obtained by solving a pdf evolution equation using a Monte Carlo scheme. The pdf solution procedure is coupled with a compressible CFD flow solver which provides the velocity and pressure fields. A modeled pdf equation for compressible flows, capable of capturing shock waves and suitable to the present coupling scheme, is proposed and tested. Convergence of the combined finite-volume Monte Carlo solution procedure is discussed, and an averaging procedure is developed to provide smooth Monte-Carlo solutions to ensure convergence. Two supersonic diffusion flames are studied using the proposed pdf model and the results are compared with experimental data; marked improvements over CFD solutions without pdf are observed. Preliminary applications of pdf to 3D flows are also reported.

  19. Seneca Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) Project

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2012-11-30

    of the designs would perform acceptably. Their general scope of work included development of detailed project construction schedules, capital cost and cash flow estimates for both CAES cycles, and development of detailed operational data, including fuel and compression energy requirements, to support dispatch modeling for the CAES cycles. The Dispatch Modeling Consultant selected for this project was Customized Energy Solutions (CES). Their general scope of work included development of wholesale electric and gas market price forecasts and development of a dispatch model specific to CAES technologies. Parsons Brinkerhoff Energy Storage Services (PBESS) was retained to develop an air storage cavern and well system design for the CAES project. Their general scope of work included development of a cavern design, solution mining plan, and air production well design, cost, and schedule estimates for the project. Detailed Front End Engineering Design (FEED) during Phase 1 of the project determined that CAES plant capital equipment costs were much greater than the $125.6- million originally estimated by EPRI for the project. The initial air storage cavern Design Basis was increased from a single five million cubic foot capacity cavern to three, five million cubic foot caverns with associated air production wells and piping. The result of this change in storage cavern Design Basis increased project capital costs significantly. In addition, the development time required to complete the three cavern system was estimated at approximately six years. This meant that the CAES plant would initially go into service with only one third of the required storage capacity and would not achieve full capability until after approximately five years of commercial operation. The market price forecasting and dispatch modeling completed by CES indicated that the CAES technologies would operate at only 10 to 20% capacity factors and the resulting overall project economics were not favorable for

  20. Comments on compressible flow through butterfly valves

    SciTech Connect

    Blakenship, J.G. )

    1989-01-01

    In the flow analysis of process piping systems, it is desirable to treat control valves in the same way as elbow, reducers, expansions, and other pressure loss elements. In a recently reported research program, the compressible flow characteristics of butterfly valves were investigated. Fisher Controls International, Inc., manufacturer of a wide range of control valves, publishes coefficients that can be used to calculate flow characteristics for the full range of valve movement. This paper describes the use of the manufacturer's data to calculate flow parameters as reported by the researchers who investigated compressible flow through butterfly valves. The manufacturer's data produced consistent results and can be used to predict choked flow and the pressure loss for unchoked flow. 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Tunnel Correction for Compressible Subsonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baranoff, A. V.

    1947-01-01

    This report presents a treatment of the effects of the tunnel walls on the flow velocity and direction in a compressible medium at subsonic speed by an approximate method. Calculations are given for the rotationally symmetric and two- dimensionl problems of the flow past bodies, as well for the downwash effect in the tunnel with circular cross section.

  2. Compressible flow in fluidic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graff, Emilio; Hirsch, Damian; Gharib, Mory

    2013-11-01

    We present qualitative observations on the internal flow characteristics of fluidic oscillator geometries commonly referred to as sweeping jets in active flow control applications. We also discuss the effect of the geometry on the output jet in conditions from startup to supersonic exit velocity. Supported by the Boeing Company.

  3. Computational methods for ideal compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanleer, B.

    1983-01-01

    Conservative dissipative difference schemes for computing one dimensional flow are introduced, and the recognition and representation of flow discontinuities are discussed. Multidimensional methods are outlined. Second order finite volume schemes are introduced. Conversion of difference schemes for a single linear convection equation into schemes for the hyperbolic system of the nonlinear conservation laws of ideal compressible flow is explained. Approximate Riemann solvers are presented. Monotone initial value interpolation; and limiters, switches, and artificial dissipation are considered.

  4. Entropic lattice Boltzmann model for compressible flows.

    PubMed

    Frapolli, N; Chikatamarla, S S; Karlin, I V

    2015-12-01

    We present a lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) that covers the entire range of fluid flows, from low Mach weakly compressible to transonic and supersonic flows. One of the most restrictive limitations of the lattice Boltzmann method, the low Mach number limit, is overcome here by three fundamental changes to the LBM scheme: use of an appropriately chosen multispeed lattice, accurate evaluation of the equilibrium, and the entropic relaxation for the collision. The range of applications is demonstrated through the simulation of a bow shock in front of an airfoil and the simulation of decaying compressible turbulence with shocklets. PMID:26764625

  5. Entropic lattice Boltzmann model for compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frapolli, N.; Chikatamarla, S. S.; Karlin, I. V.

    2015-12-01

    We present a lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) that covers the entire range of fluid flows, from low Mach weakly compressible to transonic and supersonic flows. One of the most restrictive limitations of the lattice Boltzmann method, the low Mach number limit, is overcome here by three fundamental changes to the LBM scheme: use of an appropriately chosen multispeed lattice, accurate evaluation of the equilibrium, and the entropic relaxation for the collision. The range of applications is demonstrated through the simulation of a bow shock in front of an airfoil and the simulation of decaying compressible turbulence with shocklets.

  6. Spectral methods for inviscid, compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.; Salas, M. D.; Zang, T. A.

    1983-01-01

    Report developments in the application of spectral methods to two dimensional compressible flows are reviewed. A brief introduction to spectral methods -- their history and especially their implementation -- is provided. The stress is on those techniques relevant to transonic flow computation. The spectral multigrid iterative methods are discussed with application to the transonic full potential equation. Discontinuous solutions of the Euler equations are considered. The key element is the shock fitting technique which is briefly explained.

  7. Assessment of the market for compressed air services

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a comprehensive and balanced view of the market for engineering and consulting services to improve the energy efficiency of plant compressed air systems. The report is intended for use by Compressed Air Challenge and other industrial energy efficiency program operators in developing strategies to encourage the growth of the compressed air system efficiency and enhance the quality of the services it offers.

  8. Fuel-Free Compressed-Air Energy Storage: Fuel-Free, Ubiquitous Compressed-Air Energy Storage and Power Conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-13

    GRIDS Project: General Compression has developed a transformative, near-isothermal compressed air energy storage system (GCAES) that prevents air from heating up during compression and cooling down during expansion. When integrated with renewable generation, such as a wind farm, intermittent energy can be stored in compressed air in salt caverns or pressurized tanks. When electricity is needed, the process is reversed and the compressed air is expanded to produce electricity. Unlike conventional compressed air energy storage (CAES) projects, no gas is burned to convert the stored high-pressure air back into electricity. The result of this breakthrough is an ultra-efficient, fully shapeable, 100% renewable and carbon-free power product. The GCAES™ system can provide high quality electricity and ancillary services by effectively integrating renewables onto the grid at a cost that is competitive with gas, coal and nuclear generation.

  9. Seneca Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) Project

    SciTech Connect

    2012-11-30

    This report provides a review and an analysis of potential environmental justice areas that could be affected by the New York State Electric & Gas (NYSEG) compress air energy storage (CAES) project and identifies existing environmental burden conditions on the area and evaluates additional burden of any significant adverse environmental impact. The review assesses the socioeconomic and demographic conditions of the area surrounding the proposed CAES facility in Schuyler County, New York. Schuyler County is one of 62 counties in New York. Schuyler County’s 2010 population of 18,343 makes it one of the least populated counties in the State (U.S. Census Bureau, 2010). This report was prepared for WorleyParsons by ERM and describes the study area investigated, methods and criteria used to evaluate this area, and the findings and conclusions from the evaluation.

  10. Direct simulation of compressible reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinsot, Thierry J.

    1989-01-01

    A research program for direct numerical simulations of compressible reacting flows is described. Two main research subjects are proposed: the effect of pressure waves on turbulent combustion and the use of direct simulation methods to validate flamelet models for turbulent combustion. The interest of a compressible code to study turbulent combustion is emphasized through examples of reacting shear layer and combustion instabilities studies. The choice of experimental data to compare with direct simulation results is discussed. A tentative program is given and the computation cases to use are described as well as the code validation runs.

  11. 78. PIPING CHANNEL FOR FUEL LOADING, FUEL TOPPING, COMPRESSED AIR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    78. PIPING CHANNEL FOR FUEL LOADING, FUEL TOPPING, COMPRESSED AIR, GASEOUS NITROGEN, AND HELIUM - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  12. 6. DETAIL OF HIGHPRESSURE COMPRESSED AIR HOSE IN SOUTHWEST CORNER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL OF HIGH-PRESSURE COMPRESSED AIR HOSE IN SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SHIPPING AND RECEIVING ROOM (109) - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Vehicle Support Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  13. Elimination of microorganisms from dental operatory compressed air.

    PubMed

    De Ciccio, A; Chan, E C

    1998-01-01

    Compressed air is used to power high-speed handpieces, as well as to dry and clean surfaces in the oral cavity during patient treatment, in all dental operatories. The compressed air used in the dental operatories located in large institutions such as universities or hospitals is generally obtained from a central source, and is produced by continually running compressors. In operatories located in private practice settings, compressed air is obtained from small on-site air compressors, which may be run less frequently. A survey was made of operatories in the Montreal area to determine the microbial load of the compressed air produced by air compressors. An air sampler was used to collect compressed air and impinge it on a rotating agar medium surface. Compared to the air produced from compressors in constant use, the air collected from compressors that ran intermittently had a very high microbial load. The efficacy of an apparatus designed to sterilize the contaminated air produced by small, on-site compressors was tested. Called a Purilair, this device heats every particle of inflowing compressed air to 250 degrees C and then forces it through a fine-pore ceramic filter. In three private practice operatories, an in-line Purilair effectively sterilized the air being delivered by small compressors. The same result was obtained in the laboratory when lyophilized spores and cells of Bacillus stearothermophilus and conidia of Penicillium notatum and Aspergillus niger were sprayed into the intake line of the apparatus. PMID:9473876

  14. Working characteristics of variable intake valve in compressed air engine.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qihui; Shi, Yan; Cai, Maolin

    2014-01-01

    A new camless compressed air engine is proposed, which can make the compressed air energy reasonably distributed. Through analysis of the camless compressed air engine, a mathematical model of the working processes was set up. Using the software MATLAB/Simulink for simulation, the pressure, temperature, and air mass of the cylinder were obtained. In order to verify the accuracy of the mathematical model, the experiments were conducted. Moreover, performance analysis was introduced to design compressed air engine. Results show that, firstly, the simulation results have good consistency with the experimental results. Secondly, under different intake pressures, the highest output power is obtained when the crank speed reaches 500 rpm, which also provides the maximum output torque. Finally, higher energy utilization efficiency can be obtained at the lower speed, intake pressure, and valve duration angle. This research can refer to the design of the camless valve of compressed air engine. PMID:25379536

  15. Working Characteristics of Variable Intake Valve in Compressed Air Engine

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qihui; Shi, Yan; Cai, Maolin

    2014-01-01

    A new camless compressed air engine is proposed, which can make the compressed air energy reasonably distributed. Through analysis of the camless compressed air engine, a mathematical model of the working processes was set up. Using the software MATLAB/Simulink for simulation, the pressure, temperature, and air mass of the cylinder were obtained. In order to verify the accuracy of the mathematical model, the experiments were conducted. Moreover, performance analysis was introduced to design compressed air engine. Results show that, firstly, the simulation results have good consistency with the experimental results. Secondly, under different intake pressures, the highest output power is obtained when the crank speed reaches 500 rpm, which also provides the maximum output torque. Finally, higher energy utilization efficiency can be obtained at the lower speed, intake pressure, and valve duration angle. This research can refer to the design of the camless valve of compressed air engine. PMID:25379536

  16. Preliminary Investigation of an Underwater Ramjet Powered by Compressed Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mottard, Elmo J.; Shoemaker, Charles J.

    1961-01-01

    Part I contains the results of a preliminary experimental investigation of a particular design of an underwater ramjet or hydroduct powered by compressed air. The hydroduct is a propulsion device in which the energy of an expanding gas imparts additional momentum to a stream of water through mixing. The hydroduct model had a fineness ratio of 5.9, a maximum diameter of 3.2 inches, and a ratio of inlet area to frontal area of 0.32. The model was towed at a depth of 1 inch at forward speeds between 20 and 60 feet per second for airflow rates from 0.1 to 0.3 pound per second. Longitudinal force and pressures at the inlet and in the mixing chamber were determined. The hydroduct produced a positive thrust-minus-drag force at every test speed. The force and pressure coefficients were functions primarily of the ratio of weight airflow to free-stream velocity. The maximum propulsive efficiency based on the net internal thrust and an isothermal expansion of the air was approximately 53 percent at a thrust coefficient of 0.10. The performance of the test model may have been influenced by choking of the exit flow. Part II is a theoretical development of an underwater ramjet using air as "fuel." The basic assumption of the theoretical analysis is that a mixture of water and air can be treated as a compressible gas. More information on the properties of air-water mixtures is required to confirm this assumption or to suggest another approach. A method is suggested from which a more complete theoretical development, with the effects of choking included, may be obtained. An exploratory computation, in which this suggested method was used, indicated that the effect of choked flow on the thrust coefficient was minor.

  17. From sideward flow to nuclear compressibility

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Q.; Danielewicz, P.

    1993-04-01

    The authors use the transport model (BUU) with different optical potentials, combining density and momentum dependence with strong or weak nuclear compressibility, to simulate heavy-ion collisions. Experiment by DIOGENE allows them to show that experimental sideward flow is close to their calculations using optical potential of soft momentum- and density-dependence (Potential I), as well as calculations using optical potential of stiff pure density-dependence (Potential II). On the other hand, the Plastic Ball experiment on sideward flow, mainly due to the instrumental rejection of low transverse momentum particles, allows the authors to tell the differences between Potential I and II, with calculations using Potential I being close to the experimental data. Combining the results above, they see that only potential I with soft nuclear compressibility can describe the experimental data. The uncertainty of NN cross section in the medium leads to the uncertainty in nuclear compressibility, they estimate that the nuclear compressibility K lies between 180 and 235 MeV.

  18. 30 CFR 77.411 - Compressed air and boilers; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compressed air and boilers; general. 77.411... COAL MINES Safeguards for Mechanical Equipment § 77.411 Compressed air and boilers; general. All boilers and pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed, and maintained in accordance with...

  19. 30 CFR 77.411 - Compressed air and boilers; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compressed air and boilers; general. 77.411... COAL MINES Safeguards for Mechanical Equipment § 77.411 Compressed air and boilers; general. All boilers and pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed, and maintained in accordance with...

  20. 30 CFR 77.411 - Compressed air and boilers; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compressed air and boilers; general. 77.411... COAL MINES Safeguards for Mechanical Equipment § 77.411 Compressed air and boilers; general. All boilers and pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed, and maintained in accordance with...

  1. 30 CFR 77.411 - Compressed air and boilers; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compressed air and boilers; general. 77.411... COAL MINES Safeguards for Mechanical Equipment § 77.411 Compressed air and boilers; general. All boilers and pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed, and maintained in accordance with...

  2. 30 CFR 77.411 - Compressed air and boilers; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compressed air and boilers; general. 77.411... COAL MINES Safeguards for Mechanical Equipment § 77.411 Compressed air and boilers; general. All boilers and pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed, and maintained in accordance with...

  3. Modeling Compressibility Effects in High-Speed Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, S.

    2004-01-01

    Man has strived to make objects fly faster, first from subsonic to supersonic and then to hypersonic speeds. Spacecraft and high-speed missiles routinely fly at hypersonic Mach numbers, M greater than 5. In defense applications, aircraft reach hypersonic speeds at high altitude and so may civilian aircraft in the future. Hypersonic flight, while presenting opportunities, has formidable challenges that have spurred vigorous research and development, mainly by NASA and the Air Force in the USA. Although NASP, the premier hypersonic concept of the eighties and early nineties, did not lead to flight demonstration, much basic research and technology development was possible. There is renewed interest in supersonic and hypersonic flight with the HyTech program of the Air Force and the Hyper-X program at NASA being examples of current thrusts in the field. At high-subsonic to supersonic speeds, fluid compressibility becomes increasingly important in the turbulent boundary layers and shear layers associated with the flow around aerospace vehicles. Changes in thermodynamic variables: density, temperature and pressure, interact strongly with the underlying vortical, turbulent flow. The ensuing changes to the flow may be qualitative such as shocks which have no incompressible counterpart, or quantitative such as the reduction of skin friction with Mach number, large heat transfer rates due to viscous heating, and the dramatic reduction of fuel/oxidant mixing at high convective Mach number. The peculiarities of compressible turbulence, so-called compressibility effects, have been reviewed by Fernholz and Finley. Predictions of aerodynamic performance in high-speed applications require accurate computational modeling of these "compressibility effects" on turbulence. During the course of the project we have made fundamental advances in modeling the pressure-strain correlation and developed a code to evaluate alternate turbulence models in the compressible shear layer.

  4. Elliptical instability of compressible flow in ellipsoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, N.; Tilgner, A.

    2014-02-01

    Context. Elliptical instability is due to a parametric resonance of two inertial modes in a fluid velocity field with elliptical streamlines. This flow is a simple model of the motion in a tidally deformed, rotating body. Elliptical instability typically leads to three-dimensional turbulence. The associated turbulent dissipation together with the dissipation of the large scale mode may be important for the synchronization process in stellar and planetary binary systems. Aims: In order to determine the influence of the compressibility on the stability limits of tidal flows in stars or planets, we calculate the growth rates of perturbations in flows with elliptical streamlines within ellipsoidal boundaries of small ellipticity. In addition, the influence of the orbiting frequency of the tidal perturber ΩP and the viscosity of the fluid are taken into account. Methods: We studied the linear stability of the flow to determine the growth rates. We solved the Euler equation and the continuity equation. The viscosity was introduced heuristically in our calculations. We assumed a power law for the radial dependence of the background density. Together with the use of the anelastic approximation, this enabled us to use semi-analytical methods to solve the equations. Results: It is found that the growth rate of a certain mode combination depends on the compressibility. However, the influence of the compressibility is negligible for the growth rate maximized over all possible modes if viscous bulk damping effects can be neglected. The growth rate maximized over all possible modes determines the stability of the flow. The stability limit for the compressible fluid confined to an ellipsoid is the same as for incompressible fluid in an unbounded domain. Depending on the ratio ΩP/ΩF, with ΩF the spin rate of the central object in the frame of the rotating tidal perturber, certain pairs of modes resonate with each other. The size of the bulk damping term depends on the modes

  5. Hollow vortices in weakly compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Vikas; Crowdy, Darren

    2014-11-01

    In a two-dimensional, inviscid and steady fluid flow, hollow vortices are bounded regions of constant pressure with non-zero circulation. It is known that for an infinite row of incompressible hollow vortices, analytical solutions for the flow field and the shape of the hollow vortex boundary can be obtained using conformal mapping methods. In this talk, we show how to derive analytical expressions for a weakly compressible hollow vortex row. This is done by introducing a new method based on the Imai-Lamla formula. We will also touch upon how to extend these results to a von-Karman street of hollow vortices.

  6. Hollow vortices in weakly compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Vikas; Crowdy, Darren

    2015-11-01

    In a two-dimensional, inviscid and steady fluid flow, hollow vortices are bounded regions of constant pressure with non-zero circulation. It is known that for an infinite row of incompressible hollow vortices, analytical solutions for the flow field and the shape of the hollow vortex boundary can be obtained using conformal mapping methods. In this talk, we show how to derive analytical expressions for a weakly compressible hollow vortex row. This is done by introducing a new method based on the Imai-Lamla formula. We will also touch upon how to extend these results to a von-Karman street of hollow vortices.

  7. Multidomain approach for calculating compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambier, L.; Chazzi, W.; Veuillot, J. P.; Viviand, H.

    1982-01-01

    A multidomain approach for calculating compressible flows by using unsteady or pseudo-unsteady methods is presented. This approach is based on a general technique of connecting together two domains in which hyperbolic systems (that may differ) are solved with the aid of compatibility relations associated with these systems. Some examples of this approach's application to calculating transonic flows in ideal fluids are shown, particularly the adjustment of shock waves. The approach is then applied to treating a shock/boundary layer interaction problem in a transonic channel.

  8. Energy storage by compressed air. [using windpowered pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szego, G. C.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility of windpower energy storage by compressed air is considered. The system is comprised of a compressor, a motor, and a pump turbine to store air in caverns or aquifiers. It is proposed that storage of several days worth of compressed air up to 650 pounds per square inch can be used to push the aquifier up closer to the container dome and thus initiate piston action by simply compressing air more and more. More energy can be put into it by pressure increase or pushing back the water in the aquifier. This storage system concept has reheat flexibility and lowest cost effectiveness.

  9. Bi-global Stability Analysis of Compressible Open Cavity Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yiyang; Taira, Kunihiko; Cattafesta, Louis; Ukeiley, Lawrence

    2015-11-01

    The effect of compressibility on stability characteristics of rectangular open cavity flows is numerically examined. In our earlier work with two-dimensional direct numerical simulation of open cavity flows, we found that increasing Mach number destabilizes the flow in the subsonic regime but stabilizes the flow in the transonic regime. To further examine the compressibility effect, linear bi-global stability analysis is performed over the same range of Mach numbers to investigate the influence of three-dimensional instabilities in flows over open cavities with length-to-depth ratios of 2 and 6. We identify dominant eigenmodes for varied Mach numbers and spanwise wavelengths with respect to two-dimensional stable and unstable steady states. Over a range of spanwise wavelengths, we reveal the growth/damp rates and frequencies of the dominant global modes. Based on the insights from the present analysis, we compare our findings from global stability analysis with our companion three-dimensional flow control experiments aimed at reducing pressure fluctuation caused by cavity flow unsteadiness. This work was supported by the US Air Force Office of Scientific Research (Grant FA9550-13-1-0091).

  10. Injectant mole-fraction imaging in compressible mixing flows using planar laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Abbitt, John D., III; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1989-01-01

    A technique is described for imaging the injectant mole-fraction distribution in nonreacting compressible mixing flow fields. Planar fluorescence from iodine, seeded into air, is induced by a broadband argon-ion laser and collected using an intensified charge-injection-device array camera. The technique eliminates the thermodynamic dependence of the iodine fluorescence in the compressible flow field by taking the ratio of two images collected with identical thermodynamic flow conditions but different iodine seeding conditions.

  11. Theoretical and computational dynamics of a compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shih-I; Luo, Shijun

    1991-01-01

    An introduction to the theoretical and computational fluid dynamics of a compressible fluid is presented. The general topics addressed include: thermodynamics and physical properties of compressible fluids; 1D flow of an inviscid compressible fluid; shock waves; fundamental equations of the dynamics of a compressible inviscid non-heat-conducting and radiating fluid, method of small perturbations, linearized theory; 2D subsonic steady potential flow; hodograph and rheograph methods, exact solutions of 2D insentropic steady flow equations, 2D steady transonic and hypersonic flows, method of characteristics, linearized theory of 3D potential flow, nonlinear theory of 3D compressibe flow, anisentropic (rotational) flow of inviscid compressible fluid, electromagnetogasdynamics, multiphase flows, flows of a compressible fluid with transport phenomena.

  12. Unstructured grid methods for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, K.; Peraire, J.; Peiro, J.

    1992-01-01

    The implementation of the finite element method on unstructured triangular grids is described and the development of centered finite element schemes for the solution of the compressible Euler equation on general triangular and tetrahedral grids is discussed. Explicit and implicit Lax-Wendroff type methods and a method based upon the use of explicit multistep timestepping are considered. In the latter case, the convergence behavior of the method is accelerated by the incorporation of a fully unstructured multigrid procedure. The advancing front method for generating unstructured grids of triangles and tetrahedra is described and the application of adaptive mesh techniques to both steady and transient flow analysis is illustrated.

  13. Schwarz-Based Algorithms for Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tidriri, M. D.

    1996-01-01

    We investigate in this paper the application of Schwarz-based algorithms to compressible flows. First we study the combination of these methods with defect-correction procedures. We then study the effect on the Schwarz-based methods of replacing the explicit treatment of the boundary conditions by an implicit one. In the last part of this paper we study the combination of these methods with Newton-Krylov matrix-free methods. Numerical experiments that show the performance of our approaches are then presented.

  14. Compressibility effects on flow friction in a fully developed pipe flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Sreedhara V.; Gee, Ken; Steinle, Frank W.

    1988-01-01

    A method was evolved to account for the effects of compressibility in flows through long circular pipes of uniform diameter. Velocity and density variations across the flow cross section were approximated by profile shapes recommended for a flow past flat plates. The wall of the pipe was assumed to have attained an adiabatic condition. An integral method was used to obtain solutions for the governing equations of flow. The method was then used to analyze the detailed pressure measurements made in a long pipe for flow of air at different flow rate settings. Flow friction values derived from these pressure measurements were compared with the standard incompressible pipe flow data available in existing literature.

  15. Finite scale equations for compressible fluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Margolin, Len G

    2008-01-01

    Finite-scale equations (FSE) describe the evolution of finite volumes of fluid over time. We discuss the FSE for a one-dimensional compressible fluid, whose every point is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations. The FSE contain new momentum and internal energy transport terms. These are similar to terms added in numerical simulation for high-speed flows (e.g. artificial viscosity) and for turbulent flows (e.g. subgrid scale models). These similarities suggest that the FSE may provide new insight as a basis for computational fluid dynamics. Our analysis of the FS continuity equation leads to a physical interpretation of the new transport terms, and indicates the need to carefully distinguish between volume-averaged and mass-averaged velocities in numerical simulation. We make preliminary connections to the other recent work reformulating Navier-Stokes equations.

  16. Lagrangian computation of inviscid compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klopfer, G. H.

    1978-01-01

    A Lagrangian method is developed to solve the Euler equations of gas dynamics. The solution of the equations is obtained by a numerical computation with the well-known Flux-Corrected-Transport (FCT) numerical method. This procedure is modified so that the boundary treatment is accurate and relatively simple. Shock waves and other flow discontinuities are captured monotonically without any type of fitting procedures. The Lagrangian method is employed so that the problem of mesh generation is completely avoided. The method is applicable to all Mach numbers except the low subsonic range where compressibility effects are small. The method is applied to a one-dimensional Riemann problem (shock tube) and to a two-dimensional supersonic channel flow with reflecting shock waves.

  17. Computation of Thermally Perfect Compressible Flow Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, David W.; Tatum, Kenneth E.; Williams, S. Blake

    1996-01-01

    A set of compressible flow relations for a thermally perfect, calorically imperfect gas are derived for a value of c(sub p) (specific heat at constant pressure) expressed as a polynomial function of temperature and developed into a computer program, referred to as the Thermally Perfect Gas (TPG) code. The code is available free from the NASA Langley Software Server at URL http://www.larc.nasa.gov/LSS. The code produces tables of compressible flow properties similar to those found in NACA Report 1135. Unlike the NACA Report 1135 tables which are valid only in the calorically perfect temperature regime the TPG code results are also valid in the thermally perfect, calorically imperfect temperature regime, giving the TPG code a considerably larger range of temperature application. Accuracy of the TPG code in the calorically perfect and in the thermally perfect, calorically imperfect temperature regimes are verified by comparisons with the methods of NACA Report 1135. The advantages of the TPG code compared to the thermally perfect, calorically imperfect method of NACA Report 1135 are its applicability to any type of gas (monatomic, diatomic, triatomic, or polyatomic) or any specified mixture of gases, ease-of-use, and tabulated results.

  18. Schwarz-based algorithms for compressible flows

    SciTech Connect

    Tidriri, M.D.

    1996-12-31

    To compute steady compressible flows one often uses an implicit discretization approach which leads to a large sparse linear system that must be solved at each time step. In the derivation of this system one often uses a defect-correction procedure, in which the left-hand side of the system is discretized with a lower order approximation than that used for the right-hand side. This is due to storage considerations and computational complexity, and also to the fact that the resulting lower order matrix is better conditioned than the higher order matrix. The resulting schemes are only moderately implicit. In the case of structured, body-fitted grids, the linear system can easily be solved using approximate factorization (AF), which is among the most widely used methods for such grids. However, for unstructured grids, such techniques are no longer valid, and the system is solved using direct or iterative techniques. Because of the prohibitive computational costs and large memory requirements for the solution of compressible flows, iterative methods are preferred. In these defect-correction methods, which are implemented in most CFD computer codes, the mismatch in the right and left hand side operators, together with explicit treatment of the boundary conditions, lead to a severely limited CFL number, which results in a slow convergence to steady state aerodynamic solutions. Many authors have tried to replace explicit boundary conditions with implicit ones. Although they clearly demonstrate that high CFL numbers are possible, the reduction in CPU time is not clear cut.

  19. Investigation on wind energy-compressed air power system.

    PubMed

    Jia, Guang-Zheng; Wang, Xuan-Yin; Wu, Gen-Mao

    2004-03-01

    Wind energy is a pollution free and renewable resource widely distributed over China. Aimed at protecting the environment and enlarging application of wind energy, a new approach to application of wind energy by using compressed air power to some extent instead of electricity put forward. This includes: explaining the working principles and characteristics of the wind energy-compressed air power system; discussing the compatibility of wind energy and compressor capacity; presenting the theoretical model and computational simulation of the system. The obtained compressor capacity vs wind power relationship in certain wind velocity range can be helpful in the designing of the wind power-compressed air system. Results of investigations on the application of high-pressure compressed air for pressure reduction led to conclusion that pressure reduction with expander is better than the throttle regulator in energy saving. PMID:14727304

  20. Economic and environmental evaluation of compressed-air cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creutzig, Felix; Papson, Andrew; Schipper, Lee; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2009-10-01

    Climate change and energy security require a reduction in travel demand, a modal shift, and technological innovation in the transport sector. Through a series of press releases and demonstrations, a car using energy stored in compressed air produced by a compressor has been suggested as an environmentally friendly vehicle of the future. We analyze the thermodynamic efficiency of a compressed-air car powered by a pneumatic engine and consider the merits of compressed air versus chemical storage of potential energy. Even under highly optimistic assumptions the compressed-air car is significantly less efficient than a battery electric vehicle and produces more greenhouse gas emissions than a conventional gas-powered car with a coal intensive power mix. However, a pneumatic-combustion hybrid is technologically feasible, inexpensive and could eventually compete with hybrid electric vehicles.

  1. Improving Compressed Air System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry

    SciTech Connect

    2003-11-01

    NREL will produce this sourcebook for DOE's Industrial Technologies Office as part of a series of documents on industrial energy equipment. The sourcebook is a reference for industrial compressed air system users, outlining opportunities to improve system efficiency.

  2. Acceptance Test Report for 241-U compressed air system

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, R.D.

    1994-10-20

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents the results of acceptance testing of a newly upgraded compressed air system at 241-U Farm. The system was installed and the test successfully performed under work package 2W-92-01027.

  3. Application of the Analogy Between Water Flow with a Free Surface and Two-Dimensional Compressible Gas Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlin, W James; Lindner, Norman J; Butterly, Jack G

    1947-01-01

    The theory of the hydraulic analogy -- that is, the analogy between water flow with a free surface and two-dimensional compressible gas flow -- and the limitations and conditions of the analogy are discussed. A test was run using the hydraulic analogy as applied to the flow about circular cylinders of various diameters at subsonic velocities extending into the supercritical range. The apparatus and techniques used in this application are described and criticized. Reasonably satisfactory agreement of pressure distributions and flow fields existed between water and air flow about corresponding bodies. This agreement indicated the possibility of extending experimental compressibility research by new methods.

  4. Design optimization of natural laminar flow bodies in compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodbele, Simha S.

    1992-01-01

    An optimization method has been developed to design axisymmetric body shapes such as fuselages, nacelles, and external fuel tanks with increased transition Reynolds numbers in subsonic compressible flow. The new design method involves a constraint minimization procedure coupled with analysis of the inviscid and viscous flow regions and linear stability analysis of the compressible boundary-layer. In order to reduce the computer time, Granville's transition criterion is used to predict boundary-layer transition and to calculate the gradients of the objective function, and linear stability theory coupled with the e(exp n)-method is used to calculate the objective function at the end of each design iteration. Use of a method to design an axisymmetric body with extensive natural laminar flow is illustrated through the design of a tiptank of a business jet. For the original tiptank, boundary layer transition is predicted to occur at a transition Reynolds number of 6.04 x 10(exp 6). For the designed body shape, a transition Reynolds number of 7.22 x 10(exp 6) is predicted using compressible linear stability theory coupled with the e(exp n)-method.

  5. Characteristics of compressible flow of supercritical kerosene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Feng-Quan; Fan, Xue-Jun; Wang, Jing; Yu, Gong; Li, Jian-Guo

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, compressible flow of aviation kerosene at supercritical conditions has been studied both numerically and experimentally. The thermophysical properties of supercritical kerosene are calculated using a 10-species surrogate based on the principle of extended corresponding states (ECS). Isentropic acceleration of supercritical kerosene to subsonic and supersonic speeds has been analyzed numerically. It has been found that the isentropic relationships of supercritical kerosene are significantly different from those of ideal gases. A two-stage fuel heating and delivery system is used to heat the kerosene up to a temperature of 820K and pressure of 5.5MPa with a maximum mass flow rate of 100 g/s. The characteristics of supercritical kerosene flows in a converging-diverging nozzle (Laval nozzle) have been studied experimentally. The results show that stable supersonic flows of kerosene could be established in the temperature range of 730 K-820K and the measurements in the wall pressure agree with the numerical calculation.

  6. Natural Flow Air Cooled Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanagnostopoulos, Y.; Themelis, P.

    2010-01-01

    Our experimental study aims to investigate the improvement in the electrical performance of a photovoltaic installation on buildings through cooling of the photovoltaic panels with natural air flow. Our experimental study aims to investigate the improvement in the electrical performance of a photovoltaic installation on buildings through cooling of the photovoltaic panels with natural air flow. We performed experiments using a prototype based on three silicon photovoltaic modules placed in series to simulate a typical sloping building roof with photovoltaic installation. In this system the air flows through a channel on the rear side of PV panels. The potential for increasing the heat exchange from the photovoltaic panel to the circulating air by the addition of a thin metal sheet (TMS) in the middle of air channel or metal fins (FIN) along the air duct was examined. The operation of the device was studied with the air duct closed tightly to avoid air circulation (CLOSED) and the air duct open (REF), with the thin metal sheet (TMS) and with metal fins (FIN). In each case the experiments were performed under sunlight and the operating parameters of the experimental device determining the electrical and thermal performance of the system were observed and recorded during a whole day and for several days. We collected the data and form PV panels from the comparative diagrams of the experimental results regarding the temperature of solar cells, the electrical efficiency of the installation, the temperature of the back wall of the air duct and the temperature difference in the entrance and exit of the air duct. The comparative results from the measurements determine the improvement in electrical performance of the photovoltaic cells because of the reduction of their temperature, which is achieved by the naturally circulating air.

  7. A robust and accurate approach to computing compressible multiphase flow: Stratified flow model and AUSM{sup +}-up scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chih-Hao . E-mail: chchang@engineering.ucsb.edu; Liou, Meng-Sing . E-mail: meng-sing.liou@grc.nasa.gov

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a new approach to compute compressible multifluid equations. Firstly, a single-pressure compressible multifluid model based on the stratified flow model is proposed. The stratified flow model, which defines different fluids in separated regions, is shown to be amenable to the finite volume method. We can apply the conservation law to each subregion and obtain a set of balance equations. Secondly, the AUSM{sup +} scheme, which is originally designed for the compressible gas flow, is extended to solve compressible liquid flows. By introducing additional dissipation terms into the numerical flux, the new scheme, called AUSM{sup +}-up, can be applied to both liquid and gas flows. Thirdly, the contribution to the numerical flux due to interactions between different phases is taken into account and solved by the exact Riemann solver. We will show that the proposed approach yields an accurate and robust method for computing compressible multiphase flows involving discontinuities, such as shock waves and fluid interfaces. Several one-dimensional test problems are used to demonstrate the capability of our method, including the Ransom's water faucet problem and the air-water shock tube problem. Finally, several two dimensional problems will show the capability to capture enormous details and complicated wave patterns in flows having large disparities in the fluid density and velocities, such as interactions between water shock wave and air bubble, between air shock wave and water column(s), and underwater explosion.

  8. Subsampling-based compression and flow visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agranovsky, Alexy; Camp, David; Joy, Kenneth I.; Childs, Hank

    2015-01-01

    As computational capabilities increasingly outpace disk speeds on leading supercomputers, scientists will, in turn, be increasingly unable to save their simulation data at its native resolution. One solution to this problem is to compress these data sets as they are generated and visualize the compressed results afterwards. We explore this approach, specifically subsampling velocity data and the resulting errors for particle advection-based flow visualization. We compare three techniques: random selection of subsamples, selection at regular locations corresponding to multi-resolution reduction, and introduce a novel technique for informed selection of subsamples. Furthermore, we explore an adaptive system which exchanges the subsampling budget over parallel tasks, to ensure that subsampling occurs at the highest rate in the areas that need it most. We perform supercomputing runs to measure the effectiveness of the selection and adaptation techniques. Overall, we find that adaptation is very effective, and, among selection techniques, our informed selection provides the most accurate results, followed by the multi-resolution selection, and with the worst accuracy coming from random subsamples.

  9. Summary of selected compressed air energy storage studies

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.; Kannberg, L.D.

    1985-01-01

    A descriptive summarily of research and development in compressed air energy storage technology is presented. Research funded primarily by the Department of Energy is described. Results of studies by other groups and experience at the Huntorf plant in West Germany are included. Feasibility studies performed by General Electric are summarized. The feasibility of air storage in dissolved salt cavities is also demonstrated. (BCS)

  10. 46 CFR 112.50-7 - Compressed air starting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Diesel and Gas Turbine Engine Driven Generator Sets § 112.50-7 Compressed..., and energy storing devices must be in the emergency generator room, except for the main or auxiliary... emergency generator room and a handcranked, diesel-powered air compressor for recharging the air...

  11. 46 CFR 112.50-7 - Compressed air starting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Diesel and Gas Turbine Engine Driven Generator Sets § 112.50-7 Compressed..., and energy storing devices must be in the emergency generator room, except for the main or auxiliary... emergency generator room and a handcranked, diesel-powered air compressor for recharging the air...

  12. 46 CFR 112.50-7 - Compressed air starting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Diesel and Gas Turbine Engine Driven Generator Sets § 112.50-7 Compressed..., and energy storing devices must be in the emergency generator room, except for the main or auxiliary... emergency generator room and a handcranked, diesel-powered air compressor for recharging the air...

  13. 46 CFR 112.50-7 - Compressed air starting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Diesel and Gas Turbine Engine Driven Generator Sets § 112.50-7 Compressed..., and energy storing devices must be in the emergency generator room, except for the main or auxiliary... emergency generator room and a handcranked, diesel-powered air compressor for recharging the air...

  14. Atopy, airway reactivity and compressed air diving in males.

    PubMed

    Tetzlaff, K; Neubauer, B; Reuter, M; Friege, L

    1998-01-01

    A decline in expiratory flow rates in divers has recently been attributed to chronic exposure to hyberbaric air. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to stimuli due to a hyperbaric environment may play a certain role in this context. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of AHR in compressed air divers and to assess the value of bronchial challenges for prediction of fitness to dive. A cross-sectional sample of 59 healthy male volunteers--28 divers and 31 diving candidates (controls)--who had been found fit to dive in a diving medical examination underwent additional allergy screening (skin prick and serum IgE) and a histamine bronchial challenge. Pre- and postchallenge body plethysmography was completed to assess AHR. AHR to histamine was significantly increased among divers and positively related to diving experience whereas divers and controls did not differ significantly with respect to age, anthropometric data, current smoking habits, skin prick reaction, and elevated serum IgE. Our results indicate an increased prevalence of AHR to nonspecific inhalation stimuli in experienced divers. Bronchial challenge tests may be helpful to detect asthmatics in the medical assessment of fitness to dive and for follow-up examinations during a diver's career. PMID:9730792

  15. Planar temperature measurement in compressible flows using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1991-01-01

    A laser-induced iodine fluorescence technique that is suitable for the planar measurement of temperature in cold nonreacting compressible air flows is investigated analytically and demonstrated in a known flow field. The technique is based on the temperature dependence of the broadband fluorescence from iodine excited by the 514-nm line of an argon-ion laser. Temperatures ranging from 165 to 245 K were measured in the calibration flow field. This technique makes complete, spatially resolved surveys of temperature practical in highly three-dimensional, low-temperature compressible flows.

  16. Compressed Air System Optimization: Case Study Food Industry in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widayati, Endang; Nuzahar, Hasril

    2016-01-01

    Compressors and compressed air systems was one of the most important utilities in industries or factories. Approximately 10% of the cost of electricity in the industry was used to produce compressed air. Therefore the potential for energy savings in the compressors and compressed air systems had a big challenge. This field was conducted especially in Indonesia food industry or factory. Compressed air system optimization was a technique approach to determine the optimal conditions for the operation of compressors and compressed air systems that included evaluation of the energy needs, supply adjustment, eliminating or reconfiguring the use and operation of inefficient, changing and complementing some equipment and improving operating efficiencies. This technique gave the significant impact for energy saving and costs. The potential savings based on this study through measurement and optimization e.g. system that lowers the pressure of 7.5 barg to 6.8 barg would reduce energy consumption and running costs approximately 4.2%, switch off the compressor GA110 and GA75 was obtained annual savings of USD 52,947 ≈ 455 714 kWh, running GA75 light load or unloaded then obtained annual savings of USD 31,841≈ 270,685 kWh, install new compressor 2x132 kW and 1x 132 kW VSD obtained annual savings of USD 108,325≈ 928,500 kWh. Furthermore it was needed to conduct study of technical aspect of energy saving potential (Investment Grade Audit) and performed Cost Benefit Analysis. This study was one of best practice solutions how to save energy and improve energy performance in compressors and compressed air system.

  17. Flow characteristics and methods of flow calculation of high-speed compressible flow through pipe orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torizumi, Y.; Hirayama, N.; Maeda, T.

    1983-01-01

    Flow characteristics of a compressible gas flow through an orifice are investigated experimentally at pressure ratios below the regulation values of JIS and ASME. For practical mass flow measurements, a theoretical method of mass flow estimations is extended using one-dimensional flow theory and experimental data. Using the method, the accuracy of mass flow measurements with orifice meters is about + or 1% in the Reynolds number range of turbulent flows and also in supercritical flows. Tables of the product of flow coefficient and expansion factor are obtained by the method at various diameter ratios, pressure ratios, and specific heats.

  18. Compressible flow computer program for gas film seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.; Smith, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    Computer program, AREAX, calculates properties of compressible fluid flow with friction and area change. Program carries out quasi-one-dimensional flow analysis which is valid for laminar and turbulent flows under both subsonic and choked flow conditions. Program was written to be applied to gas film seals.

  19. 29 CFR 1926.803 - Compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reverse flow. The oxygen system inside the chamber shall be of a closed circuit design and be so designed as to automatically shut off the oxygen supply whenever the fire system is activated. (xii) Be in... system that can be activated inside the lock or by the outside lock tender. (xi) Be provided with...

  20. 29 CFR 1926.803 - Compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reverse flow. The oxygen system inside the chamber shall be of a closed circuit design and be so designed as to automatically shut off the oxygen supply whenever the fire system is activated. (xii) Be in... system that can be activated inside the lock or by the outside lock tender. (xi) Be provided with...

  1. 29 CFR 1926.803 - Compressed air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reverse flow. The oxygen system inside the chamber shall be of a closed circuit design and be so designed as to automatically shut off the oxygen supply whenever the fire system is activated. (xii) Be in... system that can be activated inside the lock or by the outside lock tender. (xi) Be provided with...

  2. Low-Reynolds number compressible flow around a triangular airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munday, Phillip; Taira, Kunihiko; Suwa, Tetsuya; Numata, Daiju; Asai, Keisuke

    2013-11-01

    We report on the combined numerical and experimental effort to analyze the nonlinear aerodynamics of a triangular airfoil in low-Reynolds number compressible flow that is representative of wings on future Martian air vehicles. The flow field around this airfoil is examined for a wide range of angles of attack and Mach numbers with three-dimensional direct numerical simulations at Re = 3000 . Companion experiments are conducted in a unique Martian wind tunnel that is placed in a vacuum chamber to simulate the Martian atmosphere. Computational findings are compared with pressure sensitive paint and direct force measurements and are found to be in agreement. The separated flow from the leading edge is found to form a large leading-edge vortex that sits directly above the apex of the airfoil and provides enhanced lift at post stall angles of attack. For higher subsonic flows, the vortical structures elongate in the streamwise direction resulting in reduced lift enhancement. We also observe that the onset of spanwise instability for higher angles of attack is delayed at lower Mach numbers. Currently at Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Nagasaki.

  3. Supersonic Air Flow due to Solid-Liquid Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekle, Stephan; Peters, Ivo R.; Gordillo, José Manuel; van der Meer, Devaraj; Lohse, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    A solid object impacting on liquid creates a liquid jet due to the collapse of the impact cavity. Using visualization experiments with smoke particles and multiscale simulations, we show that in addition, a high-speed air jet is pushed out of the cavity. Despite an impact velocity of only 1m/s, this air jet attains supersonic speeds already when the cavity is slightly larger than 1 mm in diameter. The structure of the air flow closely resembles that of compressible flow through a nozzle—with the key difference that here the “nozzle” is a liquid cavity shrinking rapidly in time.

  4. Compressed air system upgrade results in substantial energy savings

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2002-01-01

    This case study highlights a compressed air system upgrade at BWX Technologies manufacturing plant in Lynchburg, Virginia, which replaced antiquated compressors and dryers and implemented an improved control strategy, resulting in improved energy efficiency and savings in energy and maintenance costs.

  5. 46 CFR 112.50-7 - Compressed air starting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compressed air starting. 112.50-7 Section 112.50-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EMERGENCY LIGHTING AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Diesel and Gas Turbine Engine Driven Generator Sets § 112.50-7...

  6. Clustering of inertial particles in compressible chaotic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Muñuzuri, Vicente

    2015-05-01

    Clustering of inertial particles is analyzed in chaotic compressible flows. A simplified dynamical model for the motion of inertial particles in a compressible flow has been derived. Clustering enhancement has been observed for intermediate Stokes times and characterized in terms of the number of particles with negative finite-time Lyapunov exponents and the Lyapunov dimension of the model attractor. Cluster formation has been observed to depend on the nature of the flow; vortical or shear. The motion of heavy and light particles is analyzed in terms of the compressibility and correlation length of the density field.

  7. Clustering of inertial particles in compressible chaotic flows.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Muñuzuri, Vicente

    2015-05-01

    Clustering of inertial particles is analyzed in chaotic compressible flows. A simplified dynamical model for the motion of inertial particles in a compressible flow has been derived. Clustering enhancement has been observed for intermediate Stokes times and characterized in terms of the number of particles with negative finite-time Lyapunov exponents and the Lyapunov dimension of the model attractor. Cluster formation has been observed to depend on the nature of the flow; vortical or shear. The motion of heavy and light particles is analyzed in terms of the compressibility and correlation length of the density field. PMID:26066228

  8. A PDF closure model for compressible turbulent chemically reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kollmann, W.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research project was the analysis of single point closures based on probability density function (pdf) and characteristic functions and the development of a prediction method for the joint velocity-scalar pdf in turbulent reacting flows. Turbulent flows of boundary layer type and stagnation point flows with and without chemical reactions were be calculated as principal applications. Pdf methods for compressible reacting flows were developed and tested in comparison with available experimental data. The research work carried in this project was concentrated on the closure of pdf equations for incompressible and compressible turbulent flows with and without chemical reactions.

  9. Incipient transition phenomena in compressible flows over a flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erlebacher, G.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1986-01-01

    The full three-dimensional time-dependent compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved by a Fourier-Chebyshev method to study the stability of compressible flows over a flat plate. After the code is validated in the linear regime, it is applied to study the existence of the secondary instability mechanism in the supersonic regime.

  10. Legal and regulatory issues affecting compressed air energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, P.L.

    1981-07-01

    Several regulatory and legal issues that can potentially affect implementation of a compressed air energy storage (CAES) system are discussed. This technology involves the compression of air using base load electric power for storage in an underground storage medium. The air is subsequently released and allowed to pass through a turbine to generate electricity during periods of peak demand. The storage media considered most feasible are a mined hard rock cavern, a solution-mined cavern in a salt deposit, and a porous geologic formation (normally an aquifer) of suitable structure. The issues are discussed in four categories: regulatory issues common to most CAES facilities regardless of storage medium, regulatory issues applicable to particular CAES reservoir media, issues related to possible liability from CAES operations, and issues related to acquisition of appropriate property rights for CAES implementation. The focus is on selected federal regulation. Lesser attention is given to state and local regulation. (WHK)

  11. Finite-volume WENO scheme for viscous compressible multicomponent flows.

    PubMed

    Coralic, Vedran; Colonius, Tim

    2014-10-01

    We develop a shock- and interface-capturing numerical method that is suitable for the simulation of multicomponent flows governed by the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical method is high-order accurate in smooth regions of the flow, discretely conserves the mass of each component, as well as the total momentum and energy, and is oscillation-free, i.e. it does not introduce spurious oscillations at the locations of shockwaves and/or material interfaces. The method is of Godunov-type and utilizes a fifth-order, finite-volume, weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for the spatial reconstruction and a Harten-Lax-van Leer contact (HLLC) approximate Riemann solver to upwind the fluxes. A third-order total variation diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta (RK) algorithm is employed to march the solution in time. The derivation is generalized to three dimensions and nonuniform Cartesian grids. A two-point, fourth-order, Gaussian quadrature rule is utilized to build the spatial averages of the reconstructed variables inside the cells, as well as at cell boundaries. The algorithm is therefore fourth-order accurate in space and third-order accurate in time in smooth regions of the flow. We corroborate the properties of our numerical method by considering several challenging one-, two- and three-dimensional test cases, the most complex of which is the asymmetric collapse of an air bubble submerged in a cylindrical water cavity that is embedded in 10% gelatin. PMID:25110358

  12. Finite-volume WENO scheme for viscous compressible multicomponent flows

    PubMed Central

    Coralic, Vedran; Colonius, Tim

    2014-01-01

    We develop a shock- and interface-capturing numerical method that is suitable for the simulation of multicomponent flows governed by the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical method is high-order accurate in smooth regions of the flow, discretely conserves the mass of each component, as well as the total momentum and energy, and is oscillation-free, i.e. it does not introduce spurious oscillations at the locations of shockwaves and/or material interfaces. The method is of Godunov-type and utilizes a fifth-order, finite-volume, weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for the spatial reconstruction and a Harten-Lax-van Leer contact (HLLC) approximate Riemann solver to upwind the fluxes. A third-order total variation diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta (RK) algorithm is employed to march the solution in time. The derivation is generalized to three dimensions and nonuniform Cartesian grids. A two-point, fourth-order, Gaussian quadrature rule is utilized to build the spatial averages of the reconstructed variables inside the cells, as well as at cell boundaries. The algorithm is therefore fourth-order accurate in space and third-order accurate in time in smooth regions of the flow. We corroborate the properties of our numerical method by considering several challenging one-, two- and three-dimensional test cases, the most complex of which is the asymmetric collapse of an air bubble submerged in a cylindrical water cavity that is embedded in 10% gelatin. PMID:25110358

  13. Moving and adaptive grid methods for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trepanier, Jean-Yves; Camarero, Ricardo

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes adaptive grid methods developed specifically for compressible flow computations. The basic flow solver is a finite-volume implementation of Roe's flux difference splitting scheme or arbitrarily moving unstructured triangular meshes. The grid adaptation is performed according to geometric and flow requirements. Some results are included to illustrate the potential of the methodology.

  14. Reevaluation of compressible-flow Preston tube calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Revised zero-pressure-gradient, adiabatic wall skin-friction-balance data covering a Mach number range from 1.6 to 4.6 led to a reevaluation of existing compressible flow Preston tube calibration equations.

  15. Geothermal well behaviour prediction after air compress stimulation using one-dimensional transient numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusman, W.; Viridi, S.; Rachmat, S.

    2016-01-01

    The non-discharges geothermal wells have been a main problem in geothermal development stages and well discharge stimulation is required to initiate a flow. Air compress stimulation is one of the methods to trigger a fluid flow from the geothermal reservoir. The result of this process can be predicted by using by the Af / Ac method, but sometimes this method shows uncertainty result in several geothermal wells and also this prediction method does not take into account the flowing time of geothermal fluid to discharge after opening the well head. This paper presents a simulation of non-discharges well under air compress stimulation to predict well behavior and time process required. The component of this model consists of geothermal well data during heating-up process such as pressure, temperature and mass flow in the water column and main feed zone level. The one-dimensional transient numerical model is run based on the Single Fluid Volume Element (SFVE) method. According to the simulation result, the geothermal well behavior prediction after air compress stimulation will be valid under two specific circumstances, such as single phase fluid density between 1 - 28 kg/m3 and above 28.5 kg/m3. The first condition shows that successful well discharge and the last condition represent failed well discharge after air compress stimulation (only for two wells data). The comparison of pf values between simulation and field observation shows the different result according to the success discharge well. Time required for flow to occur as observed in well head by using the SFVE method is different with the actual field condition. This model needs to improve by updating more geothermal well data and modified fluid phase condition inside the wellbore.

  16. Compressible flow calculations employing the Galerkin/least-squares method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakib, F.; Hughes, T. J. R.; Johan, Zdenek

    1989-01-01

    A multielement group, domain decomposition algorithm is presented for solving linear nonsymmetric systems arising in the finite-element analysis of compressible flows employing the Galerkin/least-squares method. The iterative strategy employed is based on the generalized minimum residual (GMRES) procedure originally proposed by Saad and Shultz. Two levels of preconditioning are investigated. Applications to problems of high-speed compressible flow illustrate the effectiveness of the scheme.

  17. Rupture of sigmoid colon caused by compressed air.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wan-Bin; Hu, Ji-Lin; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Xian-Xiang; Zhang, Mao-Shen; Liu, Guang-Wei; Zheng, Xue-Feng; Lu, Yun

    2016-03-14

    Compressed air has been generally used since the beginning of the 20(th) century for various applications. However, rupture of the colon caused by compressed air is uncommon. We report a case of pneumatic rupture of the sigmoid colon. The patient was admitted to the emergency room complaining of abdominal pain and distention. His colleague triggered a compressed air nozzle against his anus as a practical joke 2 h previously. On arrival, his pulse rate was 126 beats/min, respiratory rate was 42 breaths/min and blood pressure was 86/54 mmHg. Physical examination revealed peritoneal irritation and the abdomen was markedly distended. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed a large volume of air in the abdominal cavity. Peritoneocentesis was performed to relieve the tension pneumoperitoneum. Emergency laparotomy was done after controlling shock. Laparotomy revealed a 2-cm perforation in the sigmoid colon. The perforation was sutured and temporary ileostomy was performed as well as thorough drainage and irrigation of the abdominopelvic cavity. Reversal of ileostomy was performed successfully after 3 mo. Follow-up was uneventful. We also present a brief literature review. PMID:26973403

  18. Studies of compressible shear flows and turbulent drag reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orszag, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    Compressible shear flows and drag reduction were examined and three methods are addressed: (1) the analytical and numerical aspects of conformal mapping were summarized and a new method for computation of these maps is presented; (2) the computer code SPECFD for solution of the three dimensional time dependent Navier-Stokes equations for compressible flow on the CYBER 203 computer is described; (3) results of two equation turbulence modeling of turbulent flow over wavy walls are presented. A modified Jones-Launder model is used in two dimensional spectral code for flow in general wavy geometries.

  19. Compressed Air System Optimization Improves Production and saves energy at a Satellite Manufacturer

    SciTech Connect

    2002-05-01

    In 2001, a compressed air improvement project was implemented following an audit on the compressed air system at Boeing Satellite Systems (formerly Hughes Space & Communications Company) in Los Angeles, California.

  20. The Effect of Compressibility on the Pressure Reading of a Prandtl Pitot Tube at Subsonic Flow Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walchner, O

    1939-01-01

    Errors arising from yawed flow were also determined up to 20 degrees angle of attack. In axial flow, the Prandtl pitot tube begins at w/a approx. = 0.8 to give an incorrect static pressure reading, while it records the tank pressure correctly, as anticipated, up to sonic velocity. Owing to the compressibility of the air, the Prandtl pitot tube manifests compression shocks when the air speed approaches velocity of sound. This affects the pressure reading of the instrument. Because of the increasing importance of high speed in aviation, this compressibility effect is investigated in detail.

  1. THE BERNOULLI EQUATION AND COMPRESSIBLE FLOW THEORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The incompressible Bernoulli equation is an analytical relationship between pressure, kinetic energy, and potential energy. As perhaps the simplest and most useful statement for describing laminar flow, it buttresses numerous incompressible flow models that have been developed ...

  2. Environmental and regulatory aspects of compressed-air energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Beckwith, M.A.; Mathur, J.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of fuel regulations, environmental protection laws, the National Environmental Policy Act, underground injection regulations, and state regulations on the development of compressed air storage systems and power plants are discussed. It is concluded that environmental regulatory concerns of conventional energy technologies are often different from those associated with new technologies such as compressed air energy storage (CAES). Confusion and uncertainty often results when the current environmental regulatory system is applied to new technologies. Evolution of the regulatory system must accompany and rapidly accommodate technological development if the benefits of such development are to be fully realized in a timely manner. Those responsible for technological development in the energy field must be aware of these disparities and conduct their efforts accordingly.

  3. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR SITE COMPRESSED AIR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Ziegler

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) site compressed air system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

  4. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR SUBSURFACE COMPRESSED AIR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    R. Garrett

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface compressed air system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

  5. Prefeasibility study on compressed air energy storage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmahgary, Y.; Peltola, E.; Sipilae, K.; Vaeaetaeinen, A.

    1991-08-01

    A prefeasibility study on compressed air energy storage (CALS) systems was launched in VTT in the course of the year 1990. The study was undertaken partly in the Laboratory of Electrical and Automation Engineering and partly in the Road, Traffic and Geotechnical Laboratory. Information on existing mines in Finland which could be used as storage caverns were collected (part 2). The costs of excavating rock caverns for compressed air storage and those for forming suitable storage caverns in existing mines were also estimated. This information was used in the first (and present) part of the report to calculate the economics of CAES. In the present part (part 1) of the study, an analysis of the different possible systems was given following a review of literature on CAES. This was followed by an economic analysis which comprised two separate systems. The first consisted of conventional oil fueled gas turbine plants provided with the CALS system. In the second system, wind turbines were used to run the compressors which are used in charging the compressed air storage cavern. The results of the current prefeasibility study confirmed the economic attractiveness of the CAES in the first system. Wind turbines still seem, however, to be too expensive to compete with coal power plants. More accurate and straight-forward results could be obtained only in a more comprehensive study.

  6. Near-wall modelling of compressible turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, Ronald M. C.

    1990-01-01

    Work was carried out to formulate near-wall models for the equations governing the transport of the temperature-variance and its dissipation rate. With these equations properly modeled, a foundation is laid for their extension together with the heat-flux equations to compressible flows. This extension is carried out in a manner similar to that used to extend the incompressible near-wall Reynolds-stress models to compressible flows. The methodology used to accomplish the extension of the near-wall Reynolds-stress models is examined and the actual extension of the models for the Reynolds-stress equations and the near-wall dissipation-rate equation to compressible flows is given. Then the formulation of the near-wall models for the equations governing the transport of the temperature variance and its dissipation rate is discussed. Finally, a sample calculation of a flat plate compressible turbulent boundary-layer flow with adiabatic wall boundary condition and a free-stream Mach number of 2.5 using a two-equation near-wall closure is presented. The results show that the near-wall two-equation closure formulated for compressible flows is quite valid and the calculated properties are in good agreement with measurements. Furthermore, the near-wall behavior of the turbulence statistics and structure parameters is consistent with that found in incompressible flows.

  7. Compressed-air energy storage field test using the aquifer at Pittsfield, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Istvan, J.A.; Pereira, J.C.; Roark, P.; Bakhtiari, H. )

    1990-02-01

    This report describes the design, construction, and operation of a field experiment to examine feasibility of full-scale compressed air energy storage (CAES) within aquifer reservoirs. A summary of data obtained and the conclusions from the field experiment are presented. Two injection/withdrawal wells, two instrument wells, and four logging/sampling wells were drilled and cored. Air was injected in the St. Peter Sandstone to create an air bubble which was cycled with ambient and elevated temperature air in the injection withdrawal pattern contemplated for CAES installations. At its peak content of 111.75 {times} 10{sup 6} scf, the air bubble was 30 ft thick at the I/W well area and reached 18 ft in thickness at a distance of 686 ft from the I/W well. Three post-test core wells were drilled and cored. The caprock, reservoir, and formation water were sampled and analyzed prior to and after exposure to compressed air and associated water. Samples of stored air were collected and analyzed. Items of interest were degree of liquid entrance into flowing well, effects in aquifer of increased air temperature, and changes in oxygen content of air. Prior to plugging and abandoning the well field, an additional well was drilled and cored, outside the air bubble. This work is part of the continuing research by EPRI to investigate the geochemical oxidation process. Reservoir engineering and utilization of geologic media for storing air has many complexities, but it has useable experience from successful natural gas storage. The design, construction, and testing at Pittsfield demonstrates that orientation toward useage of an aquifer air storage facility can be performed successfully. The disappearance of oxygen needs attention for seasonal storage of air but should not dampen enthusiasm for weekly or daily storage cycles.

  8. Accounting For Compressibility In Viscous Flow In Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinle, Frank W.; Gee, Ken; Murthy, Sreedhara V.

    1991-01-01

    Method developed to account for effects of compressibility in viscous flows through long, circular pipes of uniform diameter. Based on approximation of variations in density and velocity across pipe cross section by profile equations developed for boundary-layer flow between flat plates.

  9. Computation techniques for the simulation of turbomachinery compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veuillot, J. P.; Cambier, L.

    Computation techniques for the simulation of turbomachinery compressible flows via the numerical solution of Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are described. In a discussion of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations for turbomachinery flow calculations, attention is given to equations for a rotating system, quasi-three-dimensional formulation, and turbulence modeling. Examples of Navier-Stokes calculations are presented.

  10. An implicit Lagrangian lattice Boltzmann method for the compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Guangwu; Dong, Yinfeng; Liu, Yanhong

    2006-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a new Lagrangian lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for simulating the compressible flows. The new scheme simulates fluid flows based on the displacement distribution functions. The compressible flows, such as shock waves and contact discontinuities are modelled by using Lagrangian LBM. In this model, we select the element in the Lagrangian coordinate to satisfy the basic fluid laws. This model is a simpler version than the corresponding Eulerian coordinates, because the convection term of the Euler equations disappears. The numerical simulations conform to classical results.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Airfoil Vibrations Induced by Compressible Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistauer, Miloslav; Kučera, Václav; Šimánek, Petr

    2010-09-01

    The paper is concerned with the numerical solution of interaction of compressible flow and a vibrating airfoil with two degrees of freedom, which can rotate around an elastic axis and oscillate in the vertical direction. Compressible flow is described by the Euler or Navier-Stokes equations written in the ALE form. This system is discretized by the semi-implicit discontinuous Galerkin finite element method (DGFEM) and coupled with the solution of ordinary differential equations describing the airfoil motion. Computational results showing the flow induced airfoil vibrations are presented.

  12. Thermoacoustic compression based on alternating to direct gas flow conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, D. M.; Wang, K.; Xu, Y.; Shen, Q.; Zhang, X. J.; Qiu, L. M.

    2012-05-01

    We present a remarkable thermoacoustically driven compression effect based on the conversion of gas flow from an alternating state to a direct state. The alternating gas flow is generated by the thermoacoustic effect in thermoacoustic engines, whereas direct gas flow is achieved by means of the flow rectification effect of check valves. A demonstrative thermoacoustic compressor consisting of two standing-wave thermoacoustic engines, two reservoirs, and three check valves is constructed for experimental investigation. With nitrogen as a working gas and an initial pressure of 2.4 MPa in all components, a usable pressure difference of 0.4 MPa is achieved, with the average gas pumping rate reaching 2.85 Nm3/h during the first 3 s of the compression process. The simple mechanical structure and thermally driven nature of the compressor show potential in gas compression, power generation, and refrigeration applications.

  13. A compressible Navier-Stokes code for turbulent flow modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coakley, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    An implicit, finite volume code for solving two dimensional, compressible turbulent flows is described. Second order upwind differencing of the inviscid terms of the equations is used to enhance stability and accuracy. A diagonal form of the implicit algorithm is used to improve efficiency. Several zero and two equation turbulence models are incorporated to study their impact on overall flow modeling accuracy. Applications to external and internal flows are discussed.

  14. Improved fireman's compressed air breathing system pressure vessel development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, H. A.; Morris, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    Prototype high pressure glass filament-wound, aluminum-lined pressurant vessels suitable for use in a fireman's compressed air breathing system were designed, fabricated, and acceptance tested in order to demonstrate the feasibility of producing such high performance, lightweight units. The 4000 psi tanks have a 60 standard cubic foot (SCF) air capacity, and have a 6.5 inch diamter, 19 inch length, 415 inch volume, weigh 13 pounds when empty, and contain 33 percent more air than the current 45 SCF (2250 psi) steel units. The current steel 60 SCF (3000 psi) tanks weigh approximately twice as much as the prototype when empty, and are 2 inches, or 10 percent shorter. The prototype units also have non-rusting aluminum interiors, which removes the hazard of corrosion, the need for internal coatings, and the possibility of rust particles clogging the breathing system.

  15. Smoothness monitors for compressible flow computation

    SciTech Connect

    Sjogreen, B; Yee, H C

    2008-09-02

    In [SY04, YS07] and references cited therein, the authors introduced the concept of employing multiresolution wavelet decomposition of computed flow data as smoothness monitors (flow sensors) to indicate the amount and location of built-in numerical dissipation that can be eliminated or further reduced in shock-capturing schemes. Studies indicated that this approach is able to limit the use of numerical dissipation with improved accuracy compared with standard shock-capturing methods. The studies in [SY04, YS07] were limited to low order multiresolution redundant wavelets with low level supports and low order vanishing moments. The objective of this paper is to expand the previous investigation to include higher order redundant wavelets with larger support and higher order vanishing moments for a wider spectrum of flow type and flow speed applications.

  16. Compressible Turbulent Channel Flows: DNS Results and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, P. G.; Coleman, G. N.; Bradshaw, P.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The present paper addresses some topical issues in modeling compressible turbulent shear flows. The work is based on direct numerical simulation of two supersonic fully developed channel flows between very cold isothermal walls. Detailed decomposition and analysis of terms appearing in the momentum and energy equations are presented. The simulation results are used to provide insights into differences between conventional time-and Favre-averaging of the mean-flow and turbulent quantities. Study of the turbulence energy budget for the two cases shows that the compressibility effects due to turbulent density and pressure fluctuations are insignificant. In particular, the dilatational dissipation and the mean product of the pressure and dilatation fluctuations are very small, contrary to the results of simulations for sheared homogeneous compressible turbulence and to recent proposals for models for general compressible turbulent flows. This provides a possible explanation of why the Van Driest density-weighted transformation is so successful in correlating compressible boundary layer data. Finally, it is found that the DNS data do not support the strong Reynolds analogy. A more general representation of the analogy is analysed and shown to match the DNS data very well.

  17. Compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs: effects of porous media and gas mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldenburg, C. M.; Pan, L.

    2015-12-01

    Although large opportunities exist for compressed air energy storage (CAES) in aquifers and depleted natural gas reservoirs, only two grid-scale CAES facilities exist worldwide, both in salt caverns. As such, experience with CAES in porous media, what we call PM-CAES, is lacking and we have relied on modeling to elucidate PM-CAES processes. PM-CAES operates similarly to cavern CAES. Specifically, working gas (air) is injected through well(s) into the reservoir compressing the cushion gas (existing air in the reservoir). During energy recovery, high-pressure air from the reservoir flows first into a recuperator, then into an expander, and subsequently is mixed with fuel in a combustion turbine to produce electricity, thereby reducing compression costs. Energy storage in porous media is complicated by the solid matrix grains which provide resistance to flow (via permeability in Darcy's law); in the cap rock, low-permeability matrix provides the seal to the reservoir. The solid grains also provide storage capacity for heat that might arise from compression, viscous flow effects, or chemical reactions. The storage of energy in PM-CAES occurs variably across pressure gradients in the formation, while the solid grains of the matrix can release/store heat. Residual liquid (i.e., formation fluids) affects flow and can cause watering out at the production well(s). PG&E is researching a potential 300 MW (for ten hours) PM-CAES facility in a depleted gas reservoir near Lodi, California. Special considerations exist for depleted natural gas reservoirs because of mixing effects which can lead to undesirable residual methane (CH4) entrainment and reactions of oxygen and CH4. One strategy for avoiding extensive mixing of working gas (air) with reservoir CH4 is to inject an initial cushion gas with reduced oxygen concentration providing a buffer between the working gas (air) and the residual CH4 gas. This reduces the potential mixing of the working air with the residual CH4

  18. Simulation of Inviscid Compressible Multi-Phase Flow with Condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelleners, Philip

    2003-01-01

    Condensation of vapours in rapid expansions of compressible gases is investigated. In the case of high temperature gradients the condensation will start at conditions well away from thermodynamic equilibrium of the fluid. In those cases homogeneous condensation is dominant over heterogeneous condensation. The present work is concerned with development of a simulation tool for computation of high speed compressible flows with homogeneous condensation. The resulting ow solver should preferably be accurate and robust to be used for simulation of industrial flows in general geometries.

  19. Computer aided optimal design of compressed air energy storage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrens, F. W.; Sharma, A.; Ragsdell, K. M.

    1980-07-01

    An automated procedure for the design of Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) systems is presented. The procedure relies upon modern nonlinear programming algorithms, decomposition theory, and numerical models of the various system components. Two modern optimization methods are employed; BIAS, a Method of Multipliers code and OPT, a Generalized Reduced Gradient code. The procedure is demonstrated by the design of a CAES facility employing the Media, Illinois Galesville aquifer as the reservoir. The methods employed produced significant reduction in capital and operating cost, and in number of aquifer wells required.

  20. Compressed-air energy-storage technology: Program overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannberg, L. D.

    1981-07-01

    A new technology designed to reduce the consumption of oil in the generation of electric power was developed. The program has two major elements: reservoir stability studies and second generation concepts studies. The reservoir stability studies are aimed at developing stability criteria for long term operation of large underground reservoirs used for compressed air storage. The second generation concepts studies are aimed at developing new concepts that will require little or no petroleum fuels for operation. The program efforts are outlined and major accomplishments towards the objectives of the program are identified.

  1. Lehigh Southwest Cement Company: Compressed Air System Improvement Saves Energy

    SciTech Connect

    2003-10-01

    In 2001, Lehigh Southwest Cement Company improved the compressed air system at its cement plant in Tehachapi, California. Consequently, the system was able to operate more efficiently with less compressor capacity and at a lower system pressure. The project yielded total annual savings of 895,000 kWh and $199,000. The initial project cost was $417,000, but Southern California Edison provided a $90,000 incentive payment to reduce the cost to $327,000. Simple payback was about 20 months.

  2. Compressed air energy storage technology program. Annual report for 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Kannberg, L.D.

    1981-06-01

    All of the major research funded under the Compressed Air Energy Storage Technology Program during the period March 1980 to March 1981 is described. This annual report is divided into two segments: Reservoir Stability Studies and Second-Generation Concepts Studies. The first represents research performed to establish stability criteria for CAES reservoirs while the second reports progress on research performed on second-generation CAES concepts. The report consists of project reports authored by research engineers and scientists from PNL and numerous subcontractors including universities, architect-engineering, and other private firms.

  3. Geothermally Coupled Well-Based Compressed Air Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Casie L.; Bearden, Mark D.; Horner, Jacob A.; Cabe, James E.; Appriou, Delphine; McGrail, B. Peter

    2015-12-20

    Previous work by McGrail et al. (2013, 2015) has evaluated the possibility of pairing compressed air energy storage with geothermal resources in lieu of a fossil-fired power generation component, and suggests that such applications may be cost competitive where geology is favorable to siting both the geothermal and CAES components of such a system. Those studies also note that the collocation of subsurface resources that meet both sets of requirements are difficult to find in areas that also offer infrastructure and near- to mid-term market demand for energy storage. This study examines a novel application for the compressed air storage portion of the project by evaluating the potential to store compressed air in disused wells by amending well casings to serve as subsurface pressure vessels. Because the wells themselves would function in lieu of a geologic storage reservoir for the CAES element of the project, siting could focus on locations with suitable geothermal resources, as long as there was also existing wellfield infrastructure that could be repurposed for air storage. Existing wellfields abound in the United States, and with current low energy prices, many recently productive fields are now shut in. Should energy prices remain stagnant, these idle fields will be prime candidates for decommissioning unless they can be transitioned to other uses, such as redevelopment for energy storage. In addition to the nation’s ubiquitous oil and gas fields, geothermal fields, because of their phased production lifetimes, also may offer many abandoned wellbores that could be used for other purposes, often near currently productive geothermal resources. These existing fields offer an opportunity to decrease exploration and development uncertainty by leveraging data developed during prior field characterization, drilling, and production. They may also offer lower-cost deployment options for hybrid geothermal systems via redevelopment of existing well-field infrastructure

  4. Geothermally Coupled Well-Based Compressed Air Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, C L; Bearden, Mark D; Horner, Jacob A; Appriou, Delphine; McGrail, B Peter

    2015-12-01

    Previous work by McGrail et al. (2013, 2015) has evaluated the possibility of pairing compressed air energy storage with geothermal resources in lieu of a fossil-fired power generation component, and suggests that such applications may be cost competitive where geology is favorable to siting both the geothermal and CAES components of such a system. Those studies also note that the collocation of subsurface resources that meet both sets of requirements are difficult to find in areas that also offer infrastructure and near- to mid-term market demand for energy storage. This study examines a novel application for the compressed air storage portion of the project by evaluating the potential to store compressed air in disused wells by amending well casings to serve as subsurface pressure vessels. Because the wells themselves would function in lieu of a geologic storage reservoir for the CAES element of the project, siting could focus on locations with suitable geothermal resources, as long as there was also existing wellfield infrastructure that could be repurposed for air storage. Existing wellfields abound in the United States, and with current low energy prices, many recently productive fields are now shut in. Should energy prices remain stagnant, these idle fields will be prime candidates for decommissioning unless they can be transitioned to other uses, such as redevelopment for energy storage. In addition to the nation’s ubiquitous oil and gas fields, geothermal fields, because of their phased production lifetimes, also may offer many abandoned wellbores that could be used for other purposes, often near currently productive geothermal resources. These existing fields offer an opportunity to decrease exploration and development uncertainty by leveraging data developed during prior field characterization, drilling, and production. They may also offer lower-cost deployment options for hybrid geothermal systems via redevelopment of existing well-field infrastructure

  5. A tabulation of pipe length to diameter ratios as a function of Mach number and pressure ratios for compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, G. V.; Barringer, S. R.; Gray, C. E.; Leatherman, A. D.

    1975-01-01

    Computer programs and resulting tabulations are presented of pipeline length-to-diameter ratios as a function of Mach number and pressure ratios for compressible flow. The tabulations are applicable to air, nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrogen for compressible isothermal flow with friction and compressible adiabatic flow with friction. Also included are equations for the determination of weight flow. The tabulations presented cover a wider range of Mach numbers for choked, adiabatic flow than available from commonly used engineering literature. Additional information presented, but which is not available from this literature, is unchoked, adiabatic flow over a wide range of Mach numbers, and choked and unchoked, isothermal flow for a wide range of Mach numbers.

  6. Raytheon: Compressed Air System Upgrade Saves Energy and Improves Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-04-01

    In 2003, Raytheon Company upgraded the efficiency of the compressed air system at its Integrated Air Defense Center in Andover, Massachusetts, to save energy and reduce costs. Worn compressors and dryers were replaced, a more sophisticated control strategy was installed, and an aggressive leak detection and repair effort was carried out. The total cost of these improvements was $342,000; however, National Grid, a utility service provider, contributed a $174,000 incentive payment. Total annual energy and maintenance cost savings are estimated at $141,500, and energy savings are nearly 1.6 million kWh. This case study was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy's Industrial Technologies Program.

  7. Compressed air energy storage technology program. Annual report for 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Loscutoff, W.V.

    1980-06-01

    The objectives of the Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) program are to establish stability criteria for large underground reservoirs in salt domes, hard rock, and porous rock used for air storage in utility applications, and to develop second-generation CAES technologies that have minimal or no dependence on petroleum fuels. During the year reported reports have been issued on field studies on CAES on aquifers and in salt, stability, and design criteria for CAES and for pumped hydro-storage caverns, laboratory studies of CAES in porous rock reservoris have continued. Research has continued on combined CAES/Thermal Energy Storage, CAES/Solar systems, coal-fired fluidized bed combustors for CAES, and two-reservoir advanced CAES concepts. (LCL)

  8. The flow of a compressible fluid past a curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Carl

    1943-01-01

    An iteration method is employed to obtain the flow of a compressible fluid past a curved surface. The first approximation which leads to the Prandtl-Glauert rule, is based on the assumption that the flow differs but little from a pure translation. The iteration process then consists in improving this first approximation in order that it will apply to a flow differing from pure translatory motion to a greater degree. The method fails when the Mach number of the undisturbed stream reaches unity but permits a transition from subsonic to supersonic conditions without the appearance of a compression shock. The limiting value at which potential flow no longer exits is indicated by the apparent divergence of the power series representing the velocity of the fluid at the surface of the solid boundary.

  9. Numerical simulation of a compressible homogeneous, turbulent shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiereisen, W. J.; Reynolds, W. C.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1981-03-01

    A direct, low Reynolds number, numerical simulation was performed on a homogeneous turbulent shear flow. The full compressible Navier-Stokes equations were used in a simulation on the ILLIAC IV computer with a 64,000 mesh. The flow fields generated by the code are used as an experimental data base, to examine the behavior of the Reynols stresses in this simple, compressible flow. The variation of the structure of the stresses and their dynamic equations as the character of the flow changed is emphasized. The structure of the tress tensor is more heavily dependent on the shear number and less on the fluctuating Mach number. The pressure-strain correlation tensor in the dynamic uations is directly calculated in this simulation. These correlations are decomposed into several parts, as contrasted with the traditional incompressible decomposition into two parts. The performance of existing models for the conventional terms is examined, and a model is proposed for the 'mean fluctuating' part.

  10. The upper-branch stability of compressible boundary layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gajjar, J. S. B.; Cole, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    The upper-branch linear and nonlinear stability of compressible boundary layer flows is studied using the approach of Smith and Bodonyi (1982) for a similar incompressible problem. Both pressure gradient boundary layers and Blasius flow are considered with and without heat transfer, and the neutral eigenrelations incorporating compressibility effects are obtained explicitly. The compressible nonlinear viscous critical layer equations are derived and solved numerically and the results indicate some solutions with positive phase shift across the critical layer. Various limiting cases are investigated including the case of much larger disturbance amplitudes and this indicates the structure for the strongly nonlinear critical layer of the Benney-Bergeon (1969) type. It is also shown how a match with the inviscid neutral inflexional modes arising from the generalized inflexion point criterion, is achieved.

  11. Computational methods for vortex dominated compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Earll M.

    1987-01-01

    The principal objectives were to: understand the mechanisms by which Euler equation computations model leading edge vortex flows; understand the vortical and shock wave structures that may exist for different wing shapes, angles of incidence, and Mach numbers; and compare calculations with experiments in order to ascertain the limitations and advantages of Euler equation models. The initial approach utilized the cell centered finite volume Jameson scheme. The final calculation utilized a cell vertex finite volume method on an unstructured grid. Both methods used Runge-Kutta four stage schemes for integrating the equations. The principal findings are briefly summarized.

  12. A 3-dimensional mass conserving element for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, G.; Suri, M.

    1985-01-01

    A variety of finite element schemes has been used in the numerical approximation of compressible flows particularly in underwater acoustics. In many instances instabilities have been generated due to the lack of mass conservation. Two- and three-dimensional elements are developed which avoid these problems.

  13. Carbon and energy saving markets in compressed air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipollone, R.

    2015-08-01

    CO2 reduction and fossil fuel saving represent two of the cornerstones of the environmental commitments of all the countries of the world. The first engagement is of a medium to long term type, and unequivocally calls for a new energetic era. The second delays in time the fossil fuel technologies to favour an energetic transition. In order to sustain the two efforts, new immaterial markets have been established in almost all the countries of the world, whose exchanges (purchases and sales) concern CO2 emissions and equivalent fossil fuels that have not been emitted or burned. This paper goes deep inside two aspects not yet exploited: specific CO2 emissions and equivalent fossil fuel burned, as a function of compressed air produced. Reference is made to the current compressor technology, carefully analysing CAGI's (Compressed Air Gas Institute) data and integrating it with the PNUEROP (European Association of manufacturers of compressors, vacuum pumps, pneumatic tools and allied equipment) contribution on the compressor European market. On the base of energy saving estimates that could be put in place, this article also estimates the financial value of the CO2 emissions and fossil fuels avoided.

  14. Analysis of the transient compressible vapor flow in heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Jong Hoon; Faghri, Amir; Chang, Won Soon

    1989-01-01

    The transient compressible one-dimensional vapor flow dynamics in a heat pipe is modeled. The numerical results are obtained by using the implicit non-iterative Beam-Warming finite difference method. The model is tested for simulated heat pipe vapor flow and actual flow in cylindrical heat pipes. A good comparison of the present transient results for the simulated heat pipe vapor flow with the previous results of a two-dimensional numerical model is achieved and the steady state results are in agreement with the existing experimental data. The transient behavior of the vapor flow under subsonic, sonic, and supersonic speeds and high mass flow rates are successfully predicted. The one-dimensional model also describes the vapor flow dynamics in cylindrical heat pipes at high temperatures.

  15. On two-dimensional flows of compressible fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Stefan

    1945-01-01

    This report is devoted to the study of two-dimensional steady motion of a compressible fluid. It is shown that the complete flow pattern around a closed obstacle cannot be obtained by the method of Chaplygin. In order to overcome this difficulty, a formula for the stream-function of a two-dimensional subsonic flow is derived. The formula involves an arbitrary function of a complex variable and yields all possible subsonic flow patterns of certain types. Conditions are given so that the flow pattern in the physical plane will represent a flow around a closed curve. The formula obtained can be employed for the approximate determination of a subsonic flow around an obstacle. The method can be extended to partially supersonic flows.

  16. Embedded function methods for compressible high speed turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Fundamental issues relating to compressible turbulent flow are addressed. The focus has been on developing methods and testing concepts for attached flows rather than trying to force a conventional law of the wall into a zone of backflow. Although the dynamics of the near-wall flow in an attached turbulent boundary layer are relatively well documented, the dynamical features of a zone of reversed turbulent flow are not, nor are they well understood. Incompressibility introduces effects and issues that have been dealt with only marginally in the literature, therefore, the present work has been focussed on attached high-speed flows. The wall function method has been extended up through the supersonic to hypersonic speeds. Algorithms have been successfully introduced into the code that calculates the flow all the way to the wall, and testing is being carried out for progressively more complex flow situations.

  17. Reynolds-constrained large-eddy simulation of compressible flow over a compression ramp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Zuoli; Chen, Liang

    2015-11-01

    A novel large-eddy simulation (LES) method is introduced for numerical simulation of wall-bounded compressible turbulent flows. The subgrid-scale (SGS) model in this method is designed to be composed of two parts depending on the distance to the nearest wall. In the near-wall region, both the mean SGS stress and heat flux are constrained by external Reynolds stress and heat flux to ensure the total target quantities, while the fluctuating SGS stress and heat flux are closed in a traditional fashion but using residual model parameterizations. In the far-wall region, the conventional SGS model is directly employed with necessary smoothing operation in the neighborhood of the constrained-unconstrained interface, which might be different for the stress and heat flux depending on the flow configuration. Compressible flow over a compression ramp is numerically studied using the new LES technique. The results are compared with the available experimental and direct numerical simulation (DNS) data, and those from traditional LES and detached-eddy simulation (DES). It turns out that the Reynolds-constrained large-eddy simulation (RCLES) method can predict the size of the separation bubble, mean flow profile, and friction force, etc. more accurately than traditional LES and DES techniques. Moreover, the RCLES method proves to be much less sensitive to the grid resolution than traditional LES method, and makes pure LES of flows of engineering interest feasible with moderate grids.

  18. Direct simulation of compressible turbulence in a shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, S.; Erlebacher, G.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1991-01-01

    Compressibility effects on the turbulence in homogeneous shear flow are investigated. The growth of the turbulent kinetic energy was found to decrease with increasing Mach number: a phenomenon which is similar to the reduction of turbulent velocity intensities observed in experiments on supersonic free shear layers. An examination of the turbulent energy budget shows that both the compressible dissipation and the pressure-dilatation contribute to the decrease in the growth of kinetic energy. The pressure-dilatation is predominantly negative in homogeneous shear flow, in contrast to its predominantly positive behavior in isotropic turbulence. The different signs of the pressure-dilatation are explained by theoretical consideration of the equations for the pressure variance and density variance. Previously, the following results were obtained for isotropic turbulence: (1) the normalized compressible dissipation is of O(M(sub t)(exp 2)); and (2) there is approximate equipartition between the kinetic and potential energies associated with the fluctuating compressible mode. Both of these results were substantiated in the case of homogeneous shear. The dilatation field is significantly more skewed and intermittent than the vorticity field. Strong compressions seem to be more likely than strong expansions.

  19. Toward the large-eddy simulation of compressible turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erlebacher, G.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Speziale, C. G.; Zang, T. A.

    1990-01-01

    New subgrid-scale models for the large-eddy simulation of compressible turbulent flows are developed and tested based on the Favre-filtered equations of motion for an ideal gas. A compressible generalization of the linear combination of the Smagorinsky model and scale-similarity model, in terms of Favre-filtered fields, is obtained for the subgrid-scale stress tensor. An analogous thermal linear combination model is also developed for the subgrid-scale heat flux vector. The two dimensionless constants associated with these subgrid-scale models are obtained by correlating with the results of direct numerical simulations of compressible isotropic turbulence performed on a 96(exp 3) grid using Fourier collocation methods. Extensive comparisons between the direct and modeled subgrid-scale fields are provided in order to validate the models. A large-eddy simulation of the decay of compressible isotropic turbulence (conducted on a coarse 32(exp 3) grid) is shown to yield results that are in excellent agreement with the fine grid direct simulation. Future applications of these compressible subgrid-scale models to the large-eddy simulation of more complex supersonic flows are discussed briefly.

  20. Dynamic PIV measurement of a compressible flow issuing from an airbag inflator nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Joon; Jang, Young Gil; Kim, Seok; Kim, Chang Soo

    2006-12-01

    Among many equipment for passenger safety, the air bag system is the most fundamental and effective device for an automobile. The inflator housing is a main part of the curtain-type air bag system, which supplies high-pressure gases in pumping up the air bag-curtain which is increasingly being adapted in deluxe cars for protecting passengers from the danger of side clash. However, flow information on the inflator housing is very limited. In this study, we measure the instantaneous velocity fields of a high-speed compressible flow issuing from the exit nozzle of an inflator housing using a dynamic PIV system. From the velocity field data measured at a high frame-rate, we evaluate the variation of the mass flow rate with time. The dynamic PIV system consists of a high-repetition Nd:YLF laser, a high-speed CMOS camera, and a delay generator. The flow images are taken at 4000 fps with synchronization of the trigger signal for inflator ignition. From the instantaneous velocity field data of flow ejecting from the airbag inflator housing at the initial stage, we can see a flow pattern of broken shock wave front and its downward propagation. The flow ejecting from the inflator housing is found to have very high velocity fluctuations, with the maximum velocity at about 700 m/s. The time duration of the high-speed flow is very short, and there is no perceptible flow after 100 ms.

  1. Assessment of chemistry models for compressible reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapointe, Simon; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2014-11-01

    Recent technological advances in propulsion and power devices and renewed interest in the development of next generation supersonic and hypersonic vehicles have increased the need for detailed understanding of turbulence-combustion interactions in compressible reacting flows. In numerical simulations of such flows, accurate modeling of the fuel chemistry is a critical component of capturing the relevant physics. Various chemical models are currently being used in reacting flow simulations. However, the differences between these models and their impacts on the fluid dynamics in the context of compressible flows are not well understood. In the present work, a numerical code is developed to solve the fully coupled compressible conservation equations for reacting flows. The finite volume code is based on the theoretical and numerical framework developed by Oefelein (Prog. Aero. Sci. 42 (2006) 2-37) and employs an all-Mach-number formulation with dual time-stepping and preconditioning. The numerical approach is tested on turbulent premixed flames at high Karlovitz numbers. Different chemical models of varying complexity and computational cost are used and their effects are compared.

  2. A skin friction law for compressible turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnwell, Richard W.; Wahls, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    An algebraic skin friction law is derived for adiabatic, compressible, equilibrium, turbulent boundary layer flow. An outer solution in terms of the Clauser defect stream function is matched to an inner empirical expression composed of compressible laws of the wall and wake. The modified Crocco temperature-velocity relationship and the Clauser eddy viscousity model are used in the outer solution. The skin friction law pertains for all pressure gradients in the incompressible through supersonic range and for small pressure gradients in the hypersonic range. Excellent comparisons with experiment are obtained in the appropriate parameter ranges. The application to numerical computation is discussed.

  3. Compressibility Corrections to Closure Approximations for Turbulent Flow Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L D

    2003-02-01

    We summarize some modifications to the usual closure approximations for statistical models of turbulence that are necessary for use with compressible fluids at all Mach numbers. We concentrate here on the gradient-flu approximation for the turbulent heat flux, on the buoyancy production of turbulence kinetic energy, and on a modification of the Smagorinsky model to include buoyancy. In all cases, there are pressure gradient terms that do not appear in the incompressible models and are usually omitted in compressible-flow models. Omission of these terms allows unphysical rates of entropy change.

  4. Analytical modeling of a hydraulically-compensated compressed-air energy-storage system

    SciTech Connect

    McMonagle, C.A.; Rowe, D.S.

    1982-12-01

    A computer program was developed to calculate the dynamic response of a hydraulically-compensated compressed air energy storage (CAES) system, including the compressor, air pipe, cavern, and hydraulic compensation pipe. The model is theoretically based on the two-fluid model in which the dynamics of each phase are presented by its set of conservation equations for mass and momentum. The conservation equations define the space and time distribution of pressure, void fraction, air saturation, and phase velocities. The phases are coupled by two interface equations. The first defines the rate of generation (or dissolution) of gaseous air in water and can include the effects of supersaturation. The second defines the frictional shear coupling (drag) between the gaseous air and water as they move relative to each other. The relative motion of the air and water is, therefore, calculated and not specified by a slip or drift-velocity correlation. The total CASE system is represented by a nodal arrangement. The conservation equations are written for each nodal volume and are solved numerically. System boundary conditions include the air flow rate, atmospheric pressure at the top of the compensation pipe, and air saturation in the reservoir. Initial conditions are selected for velocity and air saturation. Uniform and constant temperature (60/sup 0/F) is assumed. The analytical model was used to investigate the dynamic response of a proposed system.Investigative calculations considered high and low water levels, and a variety of charging and operating conditions. For all cases investigated, the cavern response to air-charging, was a damped oscillation of pressure and flow. Detailed results are presented. These calculations indicate that the Champagne Effect is unlikely to cause blowout for a properly designed CAES system.

  5. Compressible potential flow around a helicopter rotor in arbitrary motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röttgermann, A.; Uhl, B.; Wagner, S.

    1996-09-01

    To consider compressible transonic flow effects a vortex lattice method for the computation of helicopter rotor flow is coupled with a field panel method. For this purpose Cartesian grids are used which are not adapted to the contour and only discretise the domain of the nonlinear flow. The basis of this procedure is the separation of the full potential equation into the Laplacian operator and the nonlinear terms. Several methods, including the panel-clustering technique are presented to reduce the computational effort of the method. The developed program ROFPM is validated at several experimental test cases of the Caradonna rotor.

  6. A Two-Dimensional Compressible Gas Flow Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-03-17

    F2D is a general purpose, two dimensional, fully compressible thermal-fluids code that models most of the phenomena found in situations of coupled fluid flow and heat transfer. The code solves momentum, continuity, gas-energy, and structure-energy equations using a predictor-correction solution algorithm. The corrector step includes a Poisson pressure equation. The finite difference form of the equation is presented along with a description of input and output. Several example problems are included that demonstrate the applicabilitymore » of the code in problems ranging from free fluid flow, shock tubes and flow in heated porous media.« less

  7. Effects of Air-Fuel Spray and Flame Formation in a Compression-Ignition Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Waldron, C D

    1937-01-01

    High-speed motion pictures were taken at the rate of 2,500 frames per second of the fuel spray and flame formation in the combustion chamber of the NACA combustion apparatus. The compression ratio was 13.2 and the speed 1,500 revolutions per minute. An optical indicator was used to record the time-pressure relationship in the combustion chamber. The air-fuel ratio was varied from 10.4 to 365. The results showed that as the air-fuel ratio was increased definite stratification of the charge occurred in the combustion chamber even though moderate air flow existed. The results also showed the rate of vapor diffusion to be relatively slow.

  8. Compressed-air energy storage: Pittsfield aquifer field test

    SciTech Connect

    Bui, H.V.; Herzog, R.A.; Jacewicz, D.M.; Lange, G.R.; Scarpace, E.R.; Thomas, H.H. )

    1990-02-01

    This report documents the results of a comprehensive investigation into the practical feasibility for Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) in Porous Media. Natural gas porous media storage technology developed from seventy years of experience by the natural gas storage industry is applied to the investigation of CAES in porous media. A major objective of this investigation is the geologic characterization, deliverability prediction, and operations analysis of the Pittsfield CAES aquifer experiment, conducted in Pike County, Illinois during 1981--85 under EPRI/DOE sponsorship. Emphasis has been placed on applying accepted petroleum engineering concepts to the study of deliverability and on the characterization and quantification of oxygen losses which reportedly occurred at Pittsfield. Other objectives are to apply the natural gas underground storage technology and approach to a general study of CAES feasibility in porous media reservoirs, with emphasis on the practical risks and constraints of air storage in aquifer and depleted natural gas reservoirs, the effects of water on CAES operation, corrosion effects, and a review of air dehydration options.

  9. Finite element solver for 3-D compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, K. C.; Reddy, J. N.

    1986-01-01

    The space shuttle main engine (SSME) has extremely complex internal flow structure. The geometry of the flow domain is three-dimensional with complicated topology. The flow is compressible, viscous, and turbulent with large gradients in flow quantities and regions of recirculations. The analysis of the flow field in SSME involves several tedious steps. One is the geometrical modeling of the particular zone of the SSME being studied. Accessing the geometry definition, digitalizing it, and developing surface interpolations suitable for an interior grid generator require considerable amount of manual labor. There are several types of grid generators available with some general-purpose finite element programs. An efficient and robust computational scheme for solving 3D Navier-Stokes equations has to be implemented. Post processing software has to be adapted to visualize and analyze the computed 3D flow field. The progress made in a project to develop software for the analysis of the flow is discussed. The technical approach to the development of the finite element scheme and the relaxation procedure are discussed. The three dimensional finite element code for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is listed.

  10. Compression Shocks in Two-Dimensional Gas Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busemann, A.

    1949-01-01

    The following are arguments on the compression shocks in gas flow start with a simplified representation of the results of the study made by Th. Meyer as published in the Forschungsheft 62 of the VDI, supplemented by several amplifications for the application.In the treatment of compression shocks, the equation of energy, the equation of continuity, the momentum equation, the equation of state of the particular gas, as well as the condition Of the second law of thermodynamics that no decrease of entropy is possible in an isolated system, must be taken into consideration. The result is that, in those cases where the sudden change of state according to the second law of thermodynamics is possible, there always occurs a compression of the gas which is uniquely determined by the other conditions.

  11. Thermophysical behavior of St. Peter sandstone: application to compressed air energy storage in an aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Erikson, R.L.

    1983-12-01

    The long-term stability of a sandstone reservoir is of primary importance to the success of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in aquifers. The purpose of this study was to: develop experimental techniques for the operation of the CAES Porous Media Flow Loop (PMFL), an apparatus designed to study the stability of porous media in subsurface geologic environments, conduct experiments in the PMFL designed to determine the effects of temperature, stress, and humidity on the stability of candidate CAES reservoir materials, provide support for the CAES field demonstration project in Pittsfield, Illinois, by characterizing the thermophysical stability of Pittsfield reservoir sandstone under simulated field conditions.

  12. Proceedings: Second international conference on compressed air energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    These proceedings provide documentation of the Second International Conference on Compressed-Air Energy Storage (CAES). Sponsored by EPRI and hosted by PG E, the conference was held July 7--9, 1992 in San Francisco. CAES topics for papers included: the first US CAES plant in McIntosh, Alabama; CAES turbomachinery and system components; geological considerations for storage in salt, porous-media, and rock formations; advanced CAES cycles; economic screening and evaluation software; environmental assessments; international projects; and US host-utility program results. There were 49 papers presented, with 125 attendees from 83 organization. Presentations included papers from Germany, Israel, Japan, Luxembourg, Norway, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  13. Recent Research in Compression Refrigeration Cycle Air Source Heat Pumps.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Akira; Senshu, Takao

    The most important theme for heat pump air conditioners is the improvement of energy saving and comfort. Recently, cycle components, especially compressores and heat exchangers have been improved greatly in their performance and efficiency. As for compressors, large progress in their efficiencies have been made by detailed analysises such as mechanical losses and by the development of a new type compression mechanism. As for heat exchangers, various high heat transfer surfaces have been developed together with the improvement of the production technologies for them. Further, the effect of the capacity-modulated cycle is evaluated quantitatively through the improvements of static and transient cycle simulation technologies. And in order to realize this cffect, the electrically driven expansion valves heve been marketed. This review introduces the trends of these energy-saving technologies as well as comfort improvement studies.

  14. Compressive Earth observatory: An insight from AIRS/AMSU retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebtehaj, Ardeshir M.; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi; Lerman, Gilad; Bras, Rafael L.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that the global fields of temperature, humidity, and geopotential heights admit a nearly sparse representation in the wavelet domain, offering a viable path forward to explore new paradigms of sparsity-promoting data assimilation and compressive recovery of land surface-atmospheric states from space. We illustrate this idea using retrieval products of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) on board the Aqua satellite. The results reveal that the sparsity of the fields of temperature is relatively pressure independent, while atmospheric humidity and geopotential heights are typically sparser at lower and higher pressure levels, respectively. We provide evidence that these land-atmospheric states can be accurately estimated using a small set of measurements by taking advantage of their sparsity prior.

  15. Unsteady compressible flows in channel with varying walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pořízková, P.; Kozel, K.; Horáček, J.

    2014-03-01

    This study deals with numerical solution of a 2D and 3D unsteady flows of a compressible viscous fluid in 2D and 3D channel for low inlet airflow velocity. The unsteadiness of the flow is caused by a prescribed periodic motion of a part of the channel wall, nearly closing the channel during oscillations. The channels shape is a simplified geometry of the glottal space in the human vocal tract. Goal is numerical simulation of flow in the channels which involves attributes of real flow causing acoustic perturbations. The system of Navier-Stokes equations closed with static pressure expression for ideal gas describes the unsteady laminar flow of compressible viscous fluid. The numerical solution is implemented using the finite volume method and the predictor-corrector MacCormack scheme with artificial viscosity using a grid of quadrilateral cells. The unsteady grid of quadrilateral cells is considered in the form of conservation laws using Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method. The application of developed method for numerical simulations of flow fields in the 2D and 3D channels, acquired from a developed program, are presented for inlet velocity u=4.12 m/s, inlet Reynolds number Re=4481 and the wall motion frequency 100 Hz.

  16. Conjugate Compressible Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, M. F.

    2011-01-01

    A computational approach to modeling transient, compressible fluid flow with heat transfer in long, narrow ducts is presented. The primary application of the model is for analyzing fluid flow and heat transfer in solid propellant rocket motor nozzle joints during motor start-up, but the approach is relevant to a wide range of analyses involving rapid pressurization and filling of ducts. Fluid flow is modeled through solution of the spatially one-dimensional, transient Euler equations. Source terms are included in the governing equations to account for the effects of wall friction and heat transfer. The equation solver is fully-implicit, thus providing greater flexibility than an explicit solver. This approach allows for resolution of pressure wave effects on the flow as well as for fast calculation of the steady-state solution when a quasi-steady approach is sufficient. Solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations with source terms significantly reduces computational run times compared to general purpose computational fluid dynamics packages solving the Navier-Stokes equations with resolved boundary layers. In addition, conjugate heat transfer is more readily implemented using the approach described in this paper than with most general purpose computational fluid dynamics packages. The compressible flow code has been integrated with a transient heat transfer solver to analyze heat transfer between the fluid and surrounding structure. Conjugate fluid flow and heat transfer solutions are presented. The author is unaware of any previous work available in the open literature which uses the same approach described in this paper.

  17. A multiple-scale model for compressible turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, William W.; Shih, Tsan-Hsing

    1993-01-01

    A multiple-scale model for compressible turbulent flows is proposed. It is assumed that turbulent eddy shocklets are formed primarily by the 'collisions' of large energetic eddies. The extra straining of the large eddy, due to their interactions with shocklets, enhances the energy cascade to smaller eddies. Model transport equations are developed for the turbulent kinetic energies and the energy transfer rates of the different scale. The turbulent eddy viscosity is determined by the total turbulent kinetic energy and the rate of energy transfer from the large scale to the small scale, which is different from the energy dissipation rate. The model coefficients in the modeled turbulent transport equations depend on the ratio of the turbulent kinetic energy of the large scale to that of the small scale, which renders the model more adaptive to the characteristics of individual flow. The model is tested against compressible free shear layers. The results agree satisfactorily with measurements.

  18. Tollmien-Schlichting/vortex interactions in compressible boundary layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackaby, Nicholas D.

    1993-01-01

    The weakly nonlinear interaction of oblique Tollmien-Schlichting waves and longitudinal vortices in compressible, high Reynolds number, boundary-layer flow over a flat plate is considered for all ranges of the Mach number. The interaction equations comprise of equations for the vortex which is indirectly forced by the waves via a boundary condition, whereas a vortex term appears in the amplitude equation for the wave pressure. The downstream solution properties of interaction equations are found to depend on the sign of an interaction coefficient. Compressibility is found to have a significant effect on the interaction properties; principally through its impact on the waves and their governing mechanism, the triple-deck structure. It is found that, in general, the flow quantities will grow slowly with increasing downstream co-ordinate; i.e. in general, solutions do not terminate in abrupt, finite-distance 'break-ups'.

  19. Embedded function methods for compressible high speed turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. D. A.

    1994-01-01

    This is the final report on the work performed on the grant 'Embedded Function Methods for Compressible High Speed Turbulent Flow' carried out at Lehigh University during the contract period from September, 1987, to October of 1991. Work has continued at Lehigh on this project on an unfunded basis to the present. The original proposed work had two separate thrusts which were associated with developing embedded function methods in order to obviate the need to expend computational resources on turbulent wall layers in Navier Stokes and boundary-layer calculations. Previous work on the incompressible problem had indicated that this could be done successfully for two-dimensional and three-dimensional incompressible flows. The central objective here was to extend the basic approach to the high speed compressible problem.

  20. Compressible, turbulent flow computation and drag optimization for axisymmetric afterbodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Russell Mark

    A new parallel implicit adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm is developed for the prediction of unsteady behaviour of laminar flames. The scheme is applied to the solution of the system of partial-differential equations governing time-dependent, two- and three-dimensional, compressible laminar flows for reactive thermally perfect gaseous mixtures. A high-resolution finite-volume spatial discretization procedure is used to solve the conservation form of these equations on body-fitted multi-block hexahedral meshes. A local preconditioning technique is used to remove numerical stiffness and maintain solution accuracy for low-Mach-number, nearly incompressible flows. A flexible block-based octree data structure has been developed and is used to facilitate automatic solution-directed mesh adaptation according to physics-based refinement criteria. The data structure also enables an efficient and scalable parallel implementation via domain decomposition. The parallel implicit formulation makes use of a dual-time-stepping like approach with an implicit second-order backward discretization of the physical time, in which a Jacobian-free inexact Newton method with a preconditioned generalized minimal residual (GMRES) algorithm is used to solve the system of nonlinear algebraic equations arising from the temporal and spatial discretization procedures. An additive Schwarz global preconditioner is used in conjunction with block incomplete LU type local preconditioners for each sub-domain. The Schwarz preconditioning and block-based data structure readily allow efficient and scalable parallel implementations of the implicit AMR approach on distributed-memory multi-processor architectures. The scheme was applied to solutions of steady and unsteady laminar diffusion and premixed methane-air combustion and was found to accurately predict key flame characteristics. For a premixed flame under terrestrial gravity, the scheme accurately predicted the frequency of the natural

  1. Solution of Reactive Compressible Flows Using an Adaptive Wavelet Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zikoski, Zachary; Paolucci, Samuel; Powers, Joseph

    2008-11-01

    This work presents numerical simulations of reactive compressible flow, including detailed multicomponent transport, using an adaptive wavelet algorithm. The algorithm allows for dynamic grid adaptation which enhances our ability to fully resolve all physically relevant scales. The thermodynamic properties, equation of state, and multicomponent transport properties are provided by CHEMKIN and TRANSPORT libraries. Results for viscous detonation in a H2:O2:Ar mixture, and other problems in multiple dimensions, are included.

  2. Simulator Of Rain In Flowing Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Richard M.; Cho, Young I.; Shakkottai, Parthasarathy; Back, Lloyd H.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes relatively inexpensive apparatus that creates simulated precipitation from drizzle to heavy rain in flowing air. Small, positive-displacement pump and water-injecting device positioned at low-airspeed end of converging section of wind tunnel 10 in. in diameter. Drops injected by array entrained in flow of air as it accelerates toward narrower outlet, 15 in. downstream. Outlet 5 in. in diameter.

  3. Investigation of Compressibility Effect for Aeropropulsive Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanyam, M. S.; Chen, C. P.

    2005-01-01

    Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) engines operate within a wide range of Mach numbers and altitudes. Fundamental fluid dynamic mechanisms involve complex choking, mass entrainment, stream mixing and wall interactions. The Propulsion Research Center at the University of Alabama in Huntsville is involved in an on- going experimental and numerical modeling study of non-axisymmetric ejector-based combined cycle propulsion systems. This paper attempts to address the modeling issues related to mixing, shear layer/wall interaction in a supersonic Strutjet/ejector flow field. Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solutions incorporating turbulence models are sought and compared to experimental measurements to characterize detailed flow dynamics. The effect of compressibility on fluids mixing and wall interactions were investigated using an existing CFD methodology. The compressibility correction to conventional incompressible two- equation models is found to be necessary for the supersonic mixing aspect of the ejector flows based on 2-D simulation results. 3-D strut-base flows involving flow separations were also investigated.

  4. Compressive high speed flow microscopy with motion contrast (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosworth, Bryan; Stroud, Jasper R.; Tran, Dung N.; Tran, Trac D.; Chin, Sang; Foster, Mark A.

    2016-03-01

    High-speed continuous imaging systems are constrained by analog-to-digital conversion, storage, and transmission. However, real video signals of objects such as microscopic cells and particles require only a few percent or less of the full video bandwidth for high fidelity representation by modern compression algorithms. Compressed Sensing (CS) is a recent influential paradigm in signal processing that builds real-time compression into the acquisition step by computing inner products between the signal of interest and known random waveforms and then applying a nonlinear reconstruction algorithm. Here, we extend the continuous high-rate photonically-enabled compressed sensing (CHiRP-CS) framework to acquire motion contrast video of microscopic flowing objects. We employ chirp processing in optical fiber and high-speed electro-optic modulation to produce ultrashort pulses each with a unique pseudorandom binary sequence (PRBS) spectral pattern with 325 features per pulse at the full laser repetition rate (90 MHz). These PRBS-patterned pulses serve as random structured illumination inside a one-dimensional (1D) spatial disperser. By multiplexing the PRBS patterns with a user-defined repetition period, the difference signal y_i=&phi_i (x_i - x_{i-tau}) can be computed optically with balanced detection, where x is the image signal, phi_i is the PRBS pattern, and tau is the repetition period of the patterns. Two-dimensional (2D) image reconstruction via iterative alternating minimization to find the best locally-sparse representation yields an image of the edges in the flow direction, corresponding to the spatial and temporal 1D derivative. This provides both a favorable representation for image segmentation and a sparser representation for many objects that can improve image compression.

  5. On the linear stability of compressible plane Couette flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duck, Peter W.; Erlebacher, Gordon; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    1991-01-01

    The linear stability of compressible plane Couette flow is investigated. The correct and proper basic velocity and temperature distributions are perturbed by a small amplitude normal mode disturbance. The full small amplitude disturbance equations are solved numerically at finite Reynolds numbers, and the inviscid limit of these equations is then investigated in some detail. It is found that instability can occur, although the stability characteristics of the flow are quite different from unbounded flows. The effects of viscosity are also calculated, asymptotically, and shown to have a stabilizing role in all the cases investigated. Exceptional regimes to the problem occur when the wavespeed of the disturbances approaches the velocity of either of the walls, and these regimes are also analyzed in some detail. Finally, the effect of imposing radiation-type boundary conditions on the upper (moving) wall (in place of impermeability) is investigated, and shown to yield results common to both bounded and unbounded flows.

  6. On the impact of entrapped air in infiltration under ponding conditions. Part a: Preferential air flow path effects on infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizrahi, Guy; Weisbrod, Noam; Furman, Alex

    2015-04-01

    Entrapped air effects on infiltration under ponding conditions could be important for massive infiltration of managed aquifer recharge (MAR) or soil aquifer treatment (SAT) of treated wastewater. Earlier studies found that under ponding conditions, air is being entrapped and compressed until it reaches a pressure which will enable the air to escape (unstable air flow). They also found that entrapped air could reduce infiltration by 70-90%. Most studies have dealt with entrapped air effects when soil surface topography is flat. The objective of this study is to investigate, under ponding conditions, the effects of: (1) irregular surface topography on preferential air flow path development (stable air flow); (2) preferential air flow path on infiltration; and (3) hydraulic head on infiltration when air is trapped. Column experiments were used to investigate these particular effects. A 140 cm deep and 30 cm wide column packed with silica sand was used under two boundary conditions: in the first, air can only escape vertically upward through the soil surface; in the second, air is free to escape through 20 ports installed along the column perimeter. The surface was flooded with 13 liters of water, with ponding depth decreasing with time. Two soil surface conditions were tested: flat surface and irregular surface (high and low surface zones). Additionally, Helle-show experiments were conducted in order to obtain a visual observation of preferential air flow path development. The measurements were carried out using a tension meter, air pressure transducers, TDR and video cameras. It was found that in irregular surfaces, stable air flow through preferential paths was developed in the high altitude zones. Flat surface topography caused unstable air flow through random paths. Comparison between irregular and flat surface topography showed that the entrapped air pressure was lower and the infiltration rate was about 40% higher in the irregular surface topography than in the

  7. Viscous and gravitational fingering in multiphase compositional and compressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, Joachim

    2016-03-01

    Viscous and gravitational fingering refer to flow instabilities in porous media that are triggered by adverse mobility or density ratios, respectively. These instabilities have been studied extensively in the past for (1) single-phase flow (e.g., contaminant transport in groundwater, first-contact-miscible displacement of oil by gas in hydrocarbon production), and (2) multi-phase immiscible and incompressible flow (e.g., water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection in oil reservoirs). Fingering in multiphase compositional and compressible flow has received much less attention, perhaps due to its high computational complexity. However, many important subsurface processes involve multiple phases that exchange species. Examples are carbon sequestration in saline aquifers and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by gas or WAG injection below the minimum miscibility pressure. In multiphase flow, relative permeabilities affect the mobility contrast for a given viscosity ratio. Phase behavior can also change local fluid properties, which can either enhance or mitigate viscous and gravitational instabilities. This work presents a detailed study of fingering behavior in compositional multiphase flow in two and three dimensions and considers the effects of (1) Fickian diffusion, (2) mechanical dispersion, (3) flow rates, (4) domain size and geometry, (5) formation heterogeneities, (6) gravity, and (7) relative permeabilities. Results show that fingering in compositional multiphase flow is profoundly different from miscible conditions and upscaling techniques used for the latter case are unlikely to be generalizable to the former.

  8. Air flow cued spatial learning in mice.

    PubMed

    Bouchekioua, Youcef; Mimura, Masaru; Watanabe, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Spatial learning experiments in rodents typically employ visual cues that are associated with a goal place, even though it is now well established that they have poor visual acuity. We assessed here the possibility of spatial learning in mice based on an air flow cue in a dry version of the Morris water maze task. A miniature fan was placed at each of the four cardinal points of the circular maze, but only one blew air towards the centre of the maze. The three other fans were blowing towards their own box. The mice were able to learn the task only if the spatial relationship between the air flow cue and the position of the goal place was kept constant across trials. A change of this spatial relationship resulted in an increase in the time to find the goal place. We report here the first evidence of spatial learning relying on an air flow cue. PMID:25257773

  9. Long-wave linear stability theory for two-fluid channel flow including compressibility effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segin, Tetyana M.; Kondic, Lou; Tilley, Burt S.

    2006-10-01

    We present the linear stability of the laminar flow of an immiscible system of a compressible gas and incompressible liquid separated by an interface with large surface tension in a thin inclined channel. The flow is driven by an applied pressure drop and gravity. Following the air-water case, which is found in a variety of engineering systems, the ratio of the characteristic values of the gas and liquid densities and viscosities are assumed to be disparate. Under the lubrication approximation, and assuming ideal gas behaviour and isothermal conditions, this approach leads to a coupled non-linear system of partial differential equations describing the evolution of the interface between the gas and the liquid and the streamwise density distribution of the gas. This system also includes the effects of viscosity stratification, inertia, shear and capillarity. A linear stability analysis that allows for physically relevant non-zero pressure-drop base state is then performed. In contrast to the zero-pressure drop case which is amenable to the classical normal-mode approach, this configuration requires numerically solving a boundary-value problem for the gas density and interfacial deviations from the base state in the streamwise coordinate. We find that the effect of the gas compressibility on the interfacial stability in the limit of vanishingly small wavenumber is destabilizing, even for Stokes flow in the liquid. However, for finite wavenumber disturbances, compressibility may have stabilizing effects. In this regime, sufficient shear is required to destabilize the flow.

  10. Three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann model for compressible flows.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chenghai; Hsu, Andrew T

    2003-07-01

    A three-dimensional compressible lattice Boltzmann model is formulated on a cubic lattice. A very large particle-velocity set is incorporated in order to enable a greater variation in the mean velocity. Meanwhile, the support set of the equilibrium distribution has only six directions. Therefore, this model can efficiently handle flows over a wide range of Mach numbers and capture shock waves. Due to the simple form of the equilibrium distribution, the fourth-order velocity tensors are not involved in the formulation. Unlike the standard lattice Boltzmann model, no special treatment is required for the homogeneity of fourth-order velocity tensors on square lattices. The Navier-Stokes equations were recovered, using the Chapman-Enskog method from the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) lattice Boltzmann equation. The second-order discretization error of the fluctuation velocity in the macroscopic conservation equation was eliminated by means of a modified collision invariant. The model is suitable for both viscous and inviscid compressible flows with or without shocks. Since the present scheme deals only with the equilibrium distribution that depends only on fluid density, velocity, and internal energy, boundary conditions on curved wall are easily implemented by an extrapolation of macroscopic variables. To verify the scheme for inviscid flows, we have successfully simulated a three-dimensional shock-wave propagation in a box and a normal shock of Mach number 10 over a wedge. As an application to viscous flows, we have simulated a flat plate boundary layer flow, flow over a cylinder, and a transonic flow over a NACA0012 airfoil cascade. PMID:12935242

  11. Air flow through poppet valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, G W; Nutting, E M

    1920-01-01

    Report discusses the comparative continuous flow characteristics of single and double poppet valves. The experimental data presented affords a direct comparison of valves, single and in pairs of different sizes, tested in a cylinder designed in accordance with current practice in aviation engines.

  12. Viscous compressible flow direct and inverse computation and illustrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. T.; Ntone, F.

    1986-01-01

    An algorithm for laminar and turbulent viscous compressible two dimensional flows is presented. For the application of precise boundary conditions over an arbitrary body surface, a body-fitted coordinate system is used in the physical plane. A thin-layer approximation of tne Navier-Stokes equations is introduced to keep the viscous terms relatively simple. The flow field computation is performed in the transformed plane. A factorized, implicit scheme is used to facilitate the computation. Sample calculations, for Couette flow, developing pipe flow, an isolated airflow, two dimensional compressor cascade flow, and segmental compressor blade design are presented. To a certain extent, the effective use of the direct solver depends on the user's skill in setting up the gridwork, the time step size and the choice of the artificial viscosity. The design feature of the algorithm, an iterative scheme to correct geometry for a specified surface pressure distribution, works well for subsonic flows. A more elaborate correction scheme is required in treating transonic flows where local shock waves may be involved.

  13. Water droplet evaporation in air during compression in a gas turbine engine. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Quandt, E.

    1996-04-01

    A water fog concept is being considered for evaporative cooling of the air as it is compressed in a ship gas turbine engine. The following analysis is presented to clarify the physics associated with liquid droplet evaporation in this situation, to understand the conditions affecting the cooling, and to identify any further information required to achieve such a concept. The vaporization of small liquid drops in a warm ideal gas is controlled by the outward motion of the vapor and the inward flow of heat to cause evaporation. Following the standard analysis of Spalding, as given in `Principles of Combustion` by Kuo, it is assumed that the process is `quasi steady.` This means that the conditions far removed from the drop are constant, and that there are no time varying terms in the Eulerian description of the mass and energy flows.

  14. High-Compression-Ratio; Atkinson-Cycle Engine Using Low-Pressure Direct Injection and Pneumatic-Electronic Valve Actuation Enabled by Ionization Current and Foward-Backward Mass Air Flow Sensor Feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Harold Schock; Farhad Jaberi; Ahmed Naguib; Guoming Zhu; David Hung

    2007-12-31

    This report describes the work completed over a two and one half year effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy. The goal was to demonstrate the technology needed to produce a highly efficient engine enabled by several technologies which were to be developed in the course of the work. The technologies included: (1) A low-pressure direct injection system; (2) A mass air flow sensor which would measure the net airflow into the engine on a per cycle basis; (3) A feedback control system enabled by measuring ionization current signals from the spark plug gap; and (4) An infinitely variable cam actuation system based on a pneumatic-hydraulic valve actuation These developments were supplemented by the use of advanced large eddy simulations as well as evaluations of fuel air mixing using the KIVA and WAVE models. The simulations were accompanied by experimental verification when possible. In this effort a solid base has been established for continued development of the advanced engine concepts originally proposed. Due to problems with the valve actuation system a complete demonstration of the engine concept originally proposed was not possible. Some of the highlights that were accomplished during this effort are: (1) A forward-backward mass air flow sensor has been developed and a patent application for the device has been submitted. We are optimistic that this technology will have a particular application in variable valve timing direct injection systems for IC engines. (2) The biggest effort on this project has involved the development of the pneumatic-hydraulic valve actuation system. This system was originally purchased from Cargine, a Swedish supplier and is in the development stage. To date we have not been able to use the actuators to control the exhaust valves, although the actuators have been successfully employed to control the intake valves. The reason for this is the additional complication associated with variable back pressure on the exhaust valves when

  15. Achieving acoustic cloak by using compressible background flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruo-Yang; Zhao, Qing; Ge, Mo-Lin

    2016-08-01

    We propose a scheme of acoustic spherical cloaking by means of background irrotational flow in compressible fluid. The background flow forms a virtual curved spacetime and directs the sound waves to bypass the cloaked objects. To satisfy the laws of real fluid, we show that spatially distributed mass source and momentum source are necessary to supply. The propagation of sound waves in this system is studied via both geometric acoustics approximation and full wave approach. The analytic solution of sound fields is obtained for plane wave incidence. The results reveal the effect of phase retardation (or lead) in comparison with the ordinary transformation-acoustic cloak. In addition, the ability of cloaking is also evaluated for unideal background flows by analyzing the scattering cross section. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11475088 and 11275024) and the Fund from the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2013YQ030595-3).

  16. Optical phase distortion due to compressible flow over laser turrets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuhs, A. E.; Fuhs, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    Analytical models for optical phase distortion due to compressible flow over a laser turret are developed. Phase distortion is calculated for both blunt and small perturbation turrets. For the blunt turret, the Janzen-Rayleigh technique is used to determine the flow field. Phase distortions of 2.2 wavelengths at 3.8 microns are calculated for the blunt turret. For small perturbation turrets, a versatile analytical model is developed for a turret on a fuselage with circular cross section. With a two dimensional Fourier series representation of the turret, any shape can be considered. Both subsonic and supersonic flows can be calculated. Phase distortions of 1.2 wavelengths at 3.8 microns are calculated for one turret at high subsonic Mach number. In addition to being of value for laser turrets, the methods are applicable to reconnaissance aircraft using photographic equipment and cruise missiles using celestial navigation.

  17. Thermodynamic considerations in the numerical simulation of steady compressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyagaraja, A.

    1980-03-01

    The notion of thermodynamic consistency of a finite difference scheme is introduced in connection with steady compressible flow simulation. This concept requires that the finite difference scheme must lead to solutions which are consistent with the Second Law of Thermodynamics, whatever the grid sizes employed. Thus, in addition to the usual consistency with the conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy, the solutions of the finite difference equations must satisfy thermodynamic restrictions. The scheme proposed by Singhal and Spalding for the computation of plane, isentropic flow is generalized in a thermodynamically consistent way to handle inviscid, adiabatic but nonisentropic plane flow. Numerical solutions are obtained for a model problem using both the original and the extended methods. The results are compared with analytical predictions of shock-expansion theory. The effectiveness and the thermodynamic consistency of the new formulation is demonstrated.

  18. A real-time interferometer technique for compressible flow research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachalo, W. D.; Houser, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    Strengths and shortcomings in the application of interferometric techniques to transonic flow fields are examined and an improved method is elaborated. Such applications have demonstrated the value of interferometry in obtaining data for compressible flow research. With holographic techniques, interferometry may be applied in large scale facilities without the use of expensive optics or elaborate vibration isolation equipment. Results obtained using holographic interferometry and other methods demonstrate that reliable qualitative and quantitative data can be acquired. Nevertheless, the conventional method can be difficult to set up and apply, and it cannot produce real-time data. A new interferometry technique is investigated that promises to be easier to apply and can provide real-time information. This single-beam technique has the necessary insensitivity to vibration for large scale wind tunnel operations. Capabilities of the method and preliminary tests on some laboratory scale flow fluids are described.

  19. Modeling of coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, J.; Kim, H. -M.; Ryu, D. -W.; Synn, J. -H.; Song, W. -K.

    2012-02-01

    We applied coupled nonisothermal, multiphase fluid flow and geomechanical numerical modeling to study the coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in concrete-lined rock caverns. The paper focuses on CAES in lined caverns at relatively shallow depth (e.g., 100 m depth) in which a typical CAES operational pressure of 5 to 8 MPa is significantly higher than both ambient fluid pressure and in situ stress. We simulated a storage operation that included cyclic compression and decompression of air in the cavern, and investigated how pressure, temperature and stress evolve over several months of operation. We analyzed two different lining options, both with a 50 cm thick low permeability concrete lining, but in one case with an internal synthetic seal such as steel or rubber. For our simulated CAES system, the thermodynamic analysis showed that 96.7% of the energy injected during compression could be recovered during subsequent decompression, while 3.3% of the energy was lost by heat conduction to the surrounding media. Our geomechanical analysis showed that tensile effective stresses as high as 8 MPa could develop in the lining as a result of the air pressure exerted on the inner surface of the lining, whereas thermal stresses were relatively smaller and compressive. With the option of an internal synthetic seal, the maximum effective tensile stress was reduced from 8 to 5 MPa, but was still in substantial tension. We performed one simulation in which the tensile tangential stresses resulted in radial cracks and air leakage though the lining. This air leakage, however, was minor (about 0.16% of the air mass loss from one daily compression) in terms of CAES operational efficiency, and did not significantly impact the overall energy balance of the system. However, despite being minor in terms of energy balance, the air leakage resulted in a distinct pressure increase in the surrounding rock that could be

  20. Integration of Wind Turbines with Compressed Air Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsie, I.; Marano, V.; Rizzo, G.; Moran, M.

    2009-08-01

    Some of the major limitations of renewable energy sources are represented by their low power density and intermittent nature, largely depending upon local site and unpredictable weather conditions. These problems concur to increase the unit costs of wind power, so limiting their diffusion. By coupling storage systems with a wind farm, some of the major limitations of wind power, such as a low power density and an unpredictable nature, can be overcome. After an overview on storage systems, the Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) is analyzed, and the state of art on such systems is discussed. A Matlab/Simulink model of a hybrid power plant consisting of a wind farm coupled with CAES is then presented. The model has been successfully validated starting from the operating data of the McIntosh CAES Plant in Alabama. Time-series neural network-based wind speed forecasting are employed to determine the optimal daily operation strategy for the storage system. A detailed economic analysis has been carried out: investment and maintenance costs are estimated based on literature data, while operational costs and revenues are calculated according to energy market prices. As shown in the paper, the knowledge of the expected available energy is a key factor to optimize the management strategies of the proposed hybrid power plant, allowing to obtain environmental and economic benefits.

  1. Pencil: Finite-difference Code for Compressible Hydrodynamic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Dobler, Wolfgang

    2010-10-01

    The Pencil code is a high-order finite-difference code for compressible hydrodynamic flows with magnetic fields. It is highly modular and can easily be adapted to different types of problems. The code runs efficiently under MPI on massively parallel shared- or distributed-memory computers, like e.g. large Beowulf clusters. The Pencil code is primarily designed to deal with weakly compressible turbulent flows. To achieve good parallelization, explicit (as opposed to compact) finite differences are used. Typical scientific targets include driven MHD turbulence in a periodic box, convection in a slab with non-periodic upper and lower boundaries, a convective star embedded in a fully nonperiodic box, accretion disc turbulence in the shearing sheet approximation, self-gravity, non-local radiation transfer, dust particle evolution with feedback on the gas, etc. A range of artificial viscosity and diffusion schemes can be invoked to deal with supersonic flows. For direct simulations regular viscosity and diffusion is being used. The code is written in well-commented Fortran90.

  2. A finite element solver for 3-D compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, K. C.; Reddy, J. N.; Nayani, S.

    1990-01-01

    Computation of the flow field inside a space shuttle main engine (SSME) requires the application of state of the art computational fluid dynamic (CFD) technology. Several computer codes are under development to solve 3-D flow through the hot gas manifold. Some algorithms were designed to solve the unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations, either by implicit or explicit factorization methods, using several hundred or thousands of time steps to reach a steady state solution. A new iterative algorithm is being developed for the solution of the implicit finite element equations without assembling global matrices. It is an efficient iteration scheme based on a modified nonlinear Gauss-Seidel iteration with symmetric sweeps. The algorithm is analyzed for a model equation and is shown to be unconditionally stable. Results from a series of test problems are presented. The finite element code was tested for couette flow, which is flow under a pressure gradient between two parallel plates in relative motion. Another problem that was solved is viscous laminar flow over a flat plate. The general 3-D finite element code was used to compute the flow in an axisymmetric turnaround duct at low Mach numbers.

  3. The treatment of convected vortices in compressible potential flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinhoff, J.; Ramachandran, K.; Suryanarayanan, K.

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for incorporating line vortices into the three dimensional compressible potential flow equation. A modified Biot-Savart law is used to compute a vortical velocity field, which is added to the gradient of the potential to form a total velocity. A rapidly converging approximate factorization (AFZ) scheme is then used to compute a potential such that the modified potential flow equation as well as the appropriate boundary conditions, based on total velocity, are satisfied. As part of a coupled iteration procedure, the positions of the line vortices are computed so that they convect with the total flow. The method is used to compute the field due to a single line vortex convecting past a wing. This represents an approximation of the effect of a canard or other lifting surface ahead of the wing, which sheds a tip vortex. It is seen that the flow field is substantially modified by the passage of the vortex. Unlike Euler equation schemes, which are also used to compute these flows, the solutions exhibit no numerical diffusion: The convected vortices retain their initial upstream width. Euler solutions, on the other hand, involve a vorticity which is numerically convected in an Eulerian frame and, unless extensive adaptive grid refinement is used they result in vortices with spread as they convect. Also, the potential flow method requires approximately two orders of magnitude less computing time and much less computer storage than the Euler methods.

  4. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  5. Simple numerical method for predicting steady compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonlavante, Ernst; Nelson, N. Duane

    1986-01-01

    A numerical method for solving the isenthalpic form of the governing equations for compressible viscous and inviscid flows was developed. The method was based on the concept of flux vector splitting in its implicit form. The method was tested on several demanding inviscid and viscous configurations. Two different forms of the implicit operator were investigated. The time marching to steady state was accelerated by the implementation of the multigrid procedure. Its various forms very effectively increased the rate of convergence of the present scheme. High quality steady state results were obtained in most of the test cases; these required only short computational times due to the relative efficiency of the basic method.

  6. Two-dimensional subsonic compressible flow past elliptic cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Carl

    1938-01-01

    The method of Poggi is used to calculate, for perfect fluids, the effect of compressibility upon the flow on the surface of an elliptic cylinder at zero angle of attack and with no circulation. The result is expressed in a closed form and represents a rigorous determination of the velocity of the fluid at the surface of the obstacle insofar as the second approximation is concerned. Comparison is made with Hooker's treatment of the same problem according to the method of Janzen and Rayleight and it is found that, for thick elliptic cylinders, the two methods agree very well. The labor of computation is considerably reduced by the present solution.

  7. Coherent structures in compressible free-shear-layer flows

    SciTech Connect

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Baty, R.S.; Kennedy, C.A.; Chen, J.H.

    1997-08-01

    Large scale coherent structures are intrinsic fluid mechanical characteristics of all free-shear flows, from incompressible to compressible, and laminar to fully turbulent. These quasi-periodic fluid structures, eddies of size comparable to the thickness of the shear layer, dominate the mixing process at the free-shear interface. As a result, large scale coherent structures greatly influence the operation and efficiency of many important commercial and defense technologies. Large scale coherent structures have been studied here in a research program that combines a synergistic blend of experiment, direct numerical simulation, and analysis. This report summarizes the work completed for this Sandia Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project.

  8. Scalar/Vector potential formulation for compressible viscous unsteady flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morino, L.

    1985-01-01

    A scalar/vector potential formulation for unsteady viscous compressible flows is presented. The scalar/vector potential formulation is based on the classical Helmholtz decomposition of any vector field into the sum of an irrotational and a solenoidal field. The formulation is derived from fundamental principles of mechanics and thermodynamics. The governing equations for the scalar potential and vector potential are obtained, without restrictive assumptions on either the equation of state or the constitutive relations or the stress tensor and the heat flux vector.

  9. Pseudo-compressibility methods for the incompressible flow equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkel, Eli; Arnone, A.

    1993-01-01

    Preconditioning methods to accelerate convergence to a steady state for the incompressible fluid dynamics equations are considered. The analysis relies on the inviscid equations. The preconditioning consists of a matrix multiplying the time derivatives. Thus the steady state of the preconditioned system is the same as the steady state of the original system. The method is compared to other types of pseudo-compressibility. For finite difference methods preconditioning can change and improve the steady state solutions. An application to viscous flow around a cascade with a non-periodic mesh is presented.

  10. Visualization, Extraction and Quantification of Discontinuities in Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samtaney, Ravi; Morris, R. D.; Cheeseman, P.; Sunelyansky, V.; Maluf, D.; Wolf, D.

    2000-01-01

    Scientific visualizations of two-dimensional compressible flow of a gas with discontinuities are presented. The numerical analogue to experimental techniques such as schlieren imaging, shadowgraphs, and interferograms are discussed. Edge detection techniques are utilized to identify the discontinuities. In particular, the zero crossing of the Laplacian of a field (usually density) is recommended for extracting the discontinuities. An algorithm to extract and quantify the discontinuities is presented. To illustrate the methods developed in the report, the example chosen is that of an unsteady interaction of a shock wave with a contact discontinuity.

  11. Efficacy of Micromobile Foot Compression Device in Increasing Lower Limb Venous Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Weatherall, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Background. A novel, micromobile foot compression device (MMC) has been developed to reduce the risk of venous thromboembolism associated with prolonged seated immobility. Objective. To compare the efficacy of the MMC with graduated compression stockings in augmenting lower limb venous blood flow. Patients/Methods. Twenty participants were randomised to wear the MMC or a graduated compression stocking (GCS) on either the left or right leg while seated. Doppler ultrasound measurements of popliteal vein blood flow and leg circumference measurements were made −30 and −10 minutes (baseline) and +30 and +60 minutes following application of the interventions. The primary outcome variable was peak systolic velocity. A mixed linear model was used, with covariates including baseline measurement, randomised side, time, and a time by interaction term. Results. The mean popliteal vein peak systolic velocity at 60 minutes with the MMC was 20.1 cm/s which was significantly higher than with the GCS (difference 14.1 cm/s 95% CI 12.1–16.2), representing a 3.8-fold increase from baseline. Conclusion. The MMC resulted in a marked increase in lower limb venous blood flow which suggests that it may have efficacy in reducing the risk of venous thromboembolism associated with prolonged seated immobility, such as long distance air travel. PMID:24319596

  12. Numerical modeling of a compressible multiphase flow through a nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzielska, Urszula; Rabinovitch, Jason; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2012-11-01

    New thermodynamic cycles developed for more efficient low temperature resource utilization can increase the net power production from geothermal resources and sensible waste heat recovery by 20-40%, compared to the traditional organic Rankine cycle. These improved systems consist of a pump, a liquid heat exchanger, a two-phase turbine, and a condenser. The two-phase turbine is used to extract energy from a high speed multiphase fluid and consists of a nozzle and an axial impulse rotor. In order to model and optimize the fluid flow through this part of the system an analysis of two-phase flow through a specially designed convergent-divergent nozzle has to be conducted. To characterize the flow behavior, a quasi-one-dimensional steady-state model of the multiphase fluid flow through a nozzle has been constructed. A numerical code capturing dense compressible multiphase flow under subsonic and supersonic conditions and the coupling between both liquid and gas phases has been developed. The output of the code delivers data vital for the performance optimization of the two-phase nozzle.

  13. Three dimensional inviscid compressible calculations around axial flow turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourmaux, Antoine; Petot, Bertrand

    1991-12-01

    The application of a three dimensional (3D) method to the prediction of steady inviscid compressible flows in highly loaded stator bladings is presented. The complete set of Euler equations is solved by a finite difference method using a time marching two step Lax-Wendorff algorithm. The treatment of the boundary conditions is based on the use of the characteristic relations. This technique offers a great versatility and allows to prescribe conditions close to the physics of flows encountered in turbomachines. The code was adapted in order to build a 3D design tool able to run in different types of turbine blade geometries. Two types of multidomain structured meshes were tested (H+0+H and H+C). The H+C type of grid was finally choosen for industrial applications. Two applications to turbine nozzles are presented. The first is a low pressure turbine vane with evolutive flow path outer diameter. The results demonstrate the ability to predict flow features that cannot be computed via the classical two dimensional approach. The second is a high pressure inlet guide vane at transonic conditions. The strong radial evolution of pressure distribution and the trailing edge flow pattern are correctly predicted.

  14. Thermodynamic analysis of five compressed-air energy-storage cycles. [Using CAESCAP computer code

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, J. A.

    1983-03-01

    One important aspect of the Compressed-Air Energy-Storage (CAES) Program is the evaluation of alternative CAES plant designs. The thermodynamic performance of the various configurations is particularly critical to the successful demonstration of CAES as an economically feasible energy-storage option. A computer code, the Compressed-Air Energy-Storage Cycle-Analysis Program (CAESCAP), was developed in 1982 at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This code was designed specifically to calculate overall thermodynamic performance of proposed CAES-system configurations. The results of applying this code to the analysis of five CAES plant designs are presented in this report. The designs analyzed were: conventional CAES; adiabatic CAES; hybrid CAES; pressurized fluidized-bed CAES; and direct coupled steam-CAES. Inputs to the code were based on published reports describing each plant cycle. For each cycle analyzed, CAESCAP calculated the thermodynamic station conditions and individual-component efficiencies, as well as overall cycle-performance-parameter values. These data were then used to diagram the availability and energy flow for each of the five cycles. The resulting diagrams graphically illustrate the overall thermodynamic performance inherent in each plant configuration, and enable a more accurate and complete understanding of each design.

  15. A Cartesian grid approach with hierarchical refinement for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, James J.

    1994-01-01

    Many numerical studies of flows that involve complex geometries are limited by the difficulties in generating suitable grids. We present a Cartesian boundary scheme for two-dimensional, compressible flows that is unfettered by the need to generate a computational grid and so it may be used, routinely, even for the most awkward of geometries. In essence, an arbitrary-shaped body is allowed to blank out some region of a background Cartesian mesh and the resultant cut-cells are singled out for special treatment. This is done within a finite-volume framework and so, in principle, any explicit flux-based integration scheme can take advantage of this method for enforcing solid boundary conditions. For best effect, the present Cartesian boundary scheme has been combined with a sophisticated, local mesh refinement scheme, and a number of examples are shown in order to demonstrate the efficacy of the combined algorithm for simulations of shock interaction phenomena.

  16. Aerodynamic force by Lamb vector integrals in compressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mele, Benedetto; Tognaccini, Renato

    2014-05-01

    A new exact expression of the aerodynamic force acting on a body in steady high Reynolds number (laminar and turbulent) compressible flow is proposed. The aerodynamic force is obtained by integration of the Lamb vector field given by the cross product of vorticity times velocity. The result is obtained extending a theory developed for the incompressible case. A decomposition in lift and drag contribution is obtained in the two-dimensional case. The theory links the force generation to local flow properties, in particular to the Lamb vector field and to the kinetic energy. The theoretical results are confirmed analyzing numerical solutions obtained by a standard Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes solver. Results are discussed for the case of a two-dimensional airfoil in subsonic, transonic, and supersonic free stream conditions.

  17. A Theory of Unstaggered Airfoil Cascades in Compressible Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spurr, Robert A.; Allen, H. Julian

    1947-01-01

    By use of the methods of thin airfoil theory, which include effects of compressibility, rela.tio^as are developed which permit the rapid determination of the pressure distribution over an unstaggered cascade of airfoils of a given profile, and the determination of the profile shape necessary to yield a given pressure distribution for small chord gap ratios, For incompressible flow the results of the theory are compared with available examples obtained by the more exact method of conformal transformation. Although the theory is developed for small chord/gap ratios, these comparisons show that it may be extended to chord/gap ratios of order unity, at least for low speed flows. Choking of cascades, a phenomenon of particular importance in compressor design, is considered.

  18. Combined PDF/SPH method for compressible turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, Walter Christian

    A particle method which applies the probability density function (PDF) method to compressible turbulent flows is presented. Solution of the PDF equation is achieved using a Lagrangian/Monte Carlo approach which combines techniques borrowed from the field of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). This combination gives the method a unique ability to extract mean quantities, including the mean pressure gradient, directly from the particles using a grid-free approach. Two algorithms which greatly reduce the computational work for SPH in 1D and 2D have been developed to implement the method; for a simulation with N particles the computational work scales purely as {cal O}(N). The particle method has also been combined with a variance-reduction technique which can significantly reduce statistical error in first and second moments of selected mean flow quantities. When used with a second-order accurate predictor/corrector scheme, the resulting particle method provides a feasible way to obtain accurate PDF solutions to compressible turbulent flow problems. Results are presented for a variety of quasi-1D and 2D flows to demonstrate the method's robustness. These include solutions to both statistically stationary and nonstationary problems, and use both periodic and characteristic-based inflow/outflow boundary conditions. A 2D plane wake simulation also includes comparisons with experimental data and shows good agreement in spite of the simple turbulence model used. Comprehensive studies of numerical errors have also been performed, including a convergence study of the method. Detailed results are presented which confirm the expected behavior of each error.

  19. Operability test procedure for 241-U compressed air system and heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, R.D.

    1994-08-31

    The 241-U-701 compressed air system supplies instrument quality compressed air to Tank Farm 241-U. The supply piping to the 241-U Tank Farm is not included in the modification. Modifications to the 241-U-701 compressed air system include installation of a 15 HP Reciprocating Air Compressor, Ingersoll-Rand Model 10T3NLM-E15; an air dryer, Hankinson, Model DH-45; and miscellaneous system equipment and piping (valves, filters, etc.) to meet the design. A newly installed heat pump allows the compressor to operate within an enclosed relatively dust free atmosphere and keeps the compressor room within a standard acceptable temperature range, which makes possible efficient compressor operation, reduces maintenance, and maximizes compressor operating life. This document is an Operability Test Procedure (OTP) which will further verify (in addition to the Acceptance Test Procedure) that the 241-U-701 compressed air system and heat pump operate within their intended design parameters. The activities defined in this OTP will be performed to ensure the performance of the new compressed air system will be adequate, reliable and efficient. Completion of this OTP and sign off of the OTP Acceptance of Test Results is necessary for turnover of the compressed air system from Engineering to Operations.

  20. The Compressible Flow Past Various Plane Profiles Near Sonic Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goethert, B.; Kawalki, K. H.

    1949-01-01

    In an earlier report UM No.1117 by Gothert,the single-source method was applied to the compressible flow around circles, ellipses, lunes, and around an elongated body of revolution at different Mach numbers and the results compared as far as possible with the calculations by Lamla ad Busemann. Essentially, it was found that with favorable source arrangement the single-source method is in good agreement with the calculations of the same degree of approximation by.Lamla and Busemann. Near sonic velocity the number of steps must be increased considerably in order to sufficiently approximate the adiabatic curve. After exceeding a certain Mach number where local supersonic fields occur already, it was no longer possible, in spite of the substantially increased number of steps, to obtain a systematic solution because the calculation diverged. This result,was interpreted to mean that above this point of divergence the symmetrical type of flow ceases to exist and changes into the unsymmetrical type characterized by compressibility shocks.

  1. Predicting the stability of a compressible periodic parallel jet flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey H.

    1996-01-01

    It is known that mixing enhancement in compressible free shear layer flows with high convective Mach numbers is difficult. One design strategy to get around this is to use multiple nozzles. Extrapolating this design concept in a one dimensional manner, one arrives at an array of parallel rectangular nozzles where the smaller dimension is omega and the longer dimension, b, is taken to be infinite. In this paper, the feasibility of predicting the stability of this type of compressible periodic parallel jet flow is discussed. The problem is treated using Floquet-Bloch theory. Numerical solutions to this eigenvalue problem are presented. For the case presented, the interjet spacing, s, was selected so that s/omega =2.23. Typical plots of the eigenvalue and stability curves are presented. Results obtained for a range of convective Mach numbers from 3 to 5 show growth rates omega(sub i)=kc(sub i)/2 range from 0.25 to 0.29. These results indicate that coherent two-dimensional structures can occur without difficulty in multiple parallel periodic jet nozzles and that shear layer mixing should occur with this type of nozzle design.

  2. A unified planar measurement technique for compressible flows using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1992-01-01

    A unified laser-induced fluorescence technique for conducting planar measurements of temperature, pressure and velocity in nonreacting, highly compressible flows has been developed, validated and demonstrated. Planar fluorescence from iodine, seeded into air, was induced by an argon-ion laser and collected using a liquid-nitrogen cooled CCD camera. In the measurement technique, temperature is determined from the fluorescence induced with the laser operated broad band. Pressure and velocity are determined from the shape and position of the fluorescence excitation spectrum which is measured with the laser operated narrow band. The measurement approach described herein provides a means of obtaining accurate, spatially-complete maps of the primary flow field parameters in a wide variety of cold supersonic and transonic flows.

  3. Radiative interactions in chemically reacting compressible nozzle flows using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, J.; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1994-01-01

    The two-dimensional spatially elliptic Navier-Stokes equations have been used to investigate the radiative interactions in chemically reacting compressible flows of premixed hydrogen and air in an expanding nozzle. The radiative heat transfer term in the energy equation is simulated using the Monte Carlo method (MCM). The nongray model employed is based on the statistical narrow band model with an exponential-tailed inverse intensity distribution. The spectral correlation has been considered in the Monte Carlo formulations. Results obtained demonstrate that the effect of radiation on the flow field is minimal but its effect on the wall heat transfer is significant. Extensive parametric studies are conducted to investigate the effects of equivalence ratio, wall temperature, inlet flow temperature, and the nozzle size on the radiative and conductive wall fluxes.

  4. Optimization study on a single-cylinder compressed air engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qihui; Cai, Maolin; Shi, Yan; Xu, Qiyue

    2015-11-01

    The current research of compressed air engine (CAE) mainly focused on simulations and system integrations. However, energy efficiency and output torque of the CAE is limited, which restricts its application and popularization. In this paper, the working principles of CAE are briefly introduced. To set a foundation for the study on the optimization of the CAE, the basic mathematical model of working processes is set up. A pressure-compensated valve which can reduce the inertia force of the valve is proposed. To verify the mathematical model, the prototype with the newly designed pressure-compensated intake valve is built and the experiment is carried out, simulation and experimental results of the CAE are conducted, and pressures inside the cylinder and output torque of the CAE are obtained. Orthogonal design and grey relation analysis are utilized to optimize structural parameters. The experimental and optimized results show that, first of all, pressure inside the cylinder has the same changing tendency in both simulation curve and experimental curve. Secondly, the highest average output torque is obtained at the highest intake pressure and the lowest rotate speed. Thirdly, the optimization of the single-cylinder CAE can improve the working efficiency from an original 21.95% to 50.1%, an overall increase of 28.15%, and the average output torque increases also increases from 22.047 5 N • m to 22.439 N • m. This research designs a single-cylinder CAE with pressure-compensated intake valve, and proposes a structural parameters design method which improves the single-cylinder CAE performance.

  5. Proceedings: Geotechnology workshop on compressed-air energy storage in porous media sites

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    The extensive experience of the natural gas industry with gas storage in underground porous media is directly applicable to the storage of air for compressed-air energy storage plants. In this workshop, natural gas industry representatives provided utility personnel with a basic understanding of the geology of porous media and strategies for developing air storage reservoirs.

  6. Nitric oxide flow tagging in unseeded air.

    PubMed

    Dam, N; Klein-Douwel, R J; Sijtsema, N M; Meulen, J J

    2001-01-01

    A scheme for molecular tagging velocimetry is presented that can be used in air flows without any kind of seeding. The method is based on the local and instantaneous creation of nitric oxide (NO) molecules from N(2) and O(2) in the waist region of a focused ArF excimer laser beam. This NO distribution is advected by the flow and can be visualized any time later by laser-induced fluorescence in the gamma bands. The creation of NO is confirmed by use of an excitation spectrum. Two examples of the application of the new scheme for air-flow velocimetry are given in which single laser pulses are used for creation and visualization of NO. PMID:18033499

  7. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications. 89.414 Section 89.414 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement...

  8. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications. 89.414 Section 89.414 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement...

  9. Effects of boundary layer and liquid viscosity and compressible air on sloshing characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chang-Fang; Wang, De-Yu; Cai, Zhong-Hua

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, numerical investigations for tank sloshing, based on commercial CFD package FLUENT, are performed to study effects of boundary layer grid, liquid viscosity and compressible air on sloshing pressure, wave height and rising time of impact pressure. Also, sloshing experiments for liquids of different viscosity are carried out to validate the numerical results. Through comparison of numerical and experimental results, a computational model including boundary layer grid can predict the sloshing pressure more accurately. Energy dissipation due to viscous friction leads to reduction of sloshing pressure and wave elevation. Sloshing pressure is also reduced because of cushion effect of compressible air. Due to high viscosity damping effect and compressible air effect, the rising time of impact pressure becomes longer. It is also found that liquid viscosity and compressible air influence distribution of dynamic pressure along the vertical tank wall.

  10. Upgrade of Compressed Air Control System Reduces Energy Costs at Michelin Tire Plant

    SciTech Connect

    2002-01-01

    This case study highlights the upgraded compressed air system at a Michelin tire manufacturing plant in Spartanburg, South Carolina. The controls upgrade project enabled multiple compressor operation without blow-off, and significantly reduced energy costs.

  11. Engineering Task Plan Supporting Rupture of Compressed Air Lines in Contaminated Areas USQ

    SciTech Connect

    JANICEK, G.P.

    2001-11-30

    This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) defines the Tasks and organizational responsibilities for obtaining Tank Farm data relative to pit structures and soil contamination levels for purposes of resolving the rupture of compressed air/gas lines unreviewed safety question.

  12. Consolidated Compressed Air System Reduces Power Consumption and Energy Costs (Augusta Newsprint Company)

    SciTech Connect

    2002-02-01

    Augusta Newsprint Company consolidated two compressed air systems at its facility in Augusta, GA. The results are a more streamlined system, added storage capacity, backflow prevention, and the elimination of unused equipment.

  13. Detailed computational procedure for design of cascade blades with prescribed velocity distributions in compressible potential flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, George R; Cummings, Robert L; Sinnette, John T , Jr

    1952-01-01

    A detailed step-by-step computational outline is presented for the design of two-dimensional cascade blades having a prescribed velocity distribution on the blade in a potential flow of the usual compressible fluid. The outline is based on the assumption that the magnitude of the velocity in the flow of the usual compressible nonviscous fluid is proportional to the magnitude of the velocity in the flow of a compressible nonviscous fluid with linear pressure-volume relation.

  14. Canandaigua Wines: Compressed Air System Upgrade Saves Energy and Improves Performance at a Winery

    SciTech Connect

    2005-03-01

    In June 2004, Canandaigua Wine Company (CWC) completed an upgrade project on the compressed air system at its winery in Lodi, California. Before the project, the winery depended on two compressors to satisfy its production requirements. Anticipating an expansion of its production capacity, the winery commissioned a review of the compressed air system by a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Qualifi ed AIRMaster+ Specialist at Atlas Copco Compressors, Inc.

  15. Implementing a Compressed Air System Leak Management Program at an Automotive Plant (Visteon's Monroe Plant)

    SciTech Connect

    2001-01-01

    The energy team at Visteon’s Monroe plant, formerly owned by Ford Motor Company, implemented an ongoing compressed air system leak management program. The team developed an approach that combined a traditional “find and fix” effort with an innovative implementation and marketing program. As a result of the leak management program, compressed air system consumption was reduced by more than 50% on a per production unit basis.

  16. Compression-ignition Engine Performance at Altitudes and at Various Air Pressures and Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Charles S; Collins, John H

    1937-01-01

    Engine test results are presented for simulated altitude conditions. A displaced-piston combustion chamber on a 5- by 7-inch single cylinder compression-ignition engine operating at 2,000 r.p.m. was used. Inlet air temperature equivalent to standard altitudes up to 14,000 feet were obtained. Comparison between performance at altitude of the unsupercharged compression-ignition engine compared favorably with the carburetor engine. Analysis of the results for which the inlet air temperature, inlet air pressure, and inlet and exhaust pressure were varied indicates that engine performance cannot be reliably corrected on the basis of inlet air density or weight of air charge. Engine power increases with inlet air pressure and decreases with inlet air temperatures very nearly as straight line relations over a wide range of air-fuel ratios. Correction factors are given.

  17. Numerical Solutions of Supersonic and Hypersonic Laminar Compression Corner Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, C. M.; MacCormack, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    An efficient time-splitting, second-order accurate, numerical scheme is used to solve the complete Navier-Stokes equations for supersonic and hypersonic laminar flow over a two-dimensional compression corner. A fine, exponentially stretched mesh spacing is used in the region near the wall for resolving the viscous layer. Good agreement is obtained between the present computed results and experimental measurement for a Mach number of 14.1 and a Reynolds number of 1.04 x 10(exp 5) with wedge angles of 15 deg, 18 deg, and 24 deg. The details of the pressure variation across the boundary layer are given, and a correlation between the leading edge shock and the peaks in surface pressure and heat transfer is observed.

  18. Design of a Variational Multiscale Method for Turbulent Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diosady, Laslo Tibor; Murman, Scott M.

    2013-01-01

    A spectral-element framework is presented for the simulation of subsonic compressible high-Reynolds-number flows. The focus of the work is maximizing the efficiency of the computational schemes to enable unsteady simulations with a large number of spatial and temporal degrees of freedom. A collocation scheme is combined with optimized computational kernels to provide a residual evaluation with computational cost independent of order of accuracy up to 16th order. The optimized residual routines are used to develop a low-memory implicit scheme based on a matrix-free Newton-Krylov method. A preconditioner based on the finite-difference diagonalized ADI scheme is developed which maintains the low memory of the matrix-free implicit solver, while providing improved convergence properties. Emphasis on low memory usage throughout the solver development is leveraged to implement a coupled space-time DG solver which may offer further efficiency gains through adaptivity in both space and time.

  19. Simulation of Interaction of Compressible Flow with Elastic Structures with Applications to Vibrations of Human Vocal Folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistauer, Miloslav; Kosík, Adam; Kučera, Václav; Prokopová, Jaroslav; Horáček, Jaromír

    2011-09-01

    The paper is concerned with the numerical solution of interaction of compressible flow with elastic structures. The aim of this work is the simulation of air flow in human vocal folds during phonation. The compressible Navier-Stokes equations written in the ALE form, equipped with initial and boundary conditions, are discretized by the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method. The deformation of an elastic body, caused by aeroelastc forces, is described by the dynamical elasticity equations. This system is discretized with the aid of the conforming finite element method. The coupling of the flow and elastic structures is carried out via transmission conditions on a common part of the boundary. The developed method is applied to the simulation of flow induced vibrations of vocal folds during phonation. The results of numerical experiments are presented.

  20. Polar-coordinate lattice Boltzmann modeling of compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chuandong; Xu, Aiguo; Zhang, Guangcai; Li, Yingjun; Succi, Sauro

    2014-01-01

    We present a polar coordinate lattice Boltzmann kinetic model for compressible flows. A method to recover the continuum distribution function from the discrete distribution function is indicated. Within the model, a hybrid scheme being similar to, but different from, the operator splitting is proposed. The temporal evolution is calculated analytically, and the convection term is solved via a modified Warming-Beam (MWB) scheme. Within the MWB scheme a suitable switch function is introduced. The current model works not only for subsonic flows but also for supersonic flows. It is validated and verified via the following well-known benchmark tests: (i) the rotational flow, (ii) the stable shock tube problem, (iii) the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability, and (iv) the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. As an original application, we studied the nonequilibrium characteristics of the system around three kinds of interfaces, the shock wave, the rarefaction wave, and the material interface, for two specific cases. In one of the two cases, the material interface is initially perturbed, and consequently the RM instability occurs. It is found that the macroscopic effects due to deviating from thermodynamic equilibrium around the material interface differ significantly from those around the mechanical interfaces. The initial perturbation at the material interface enhances the coupling of molecular motions in different degrees of freedom. The amplitude of deviation from thermodynamic equilibrium around the shock wave is much higher than those around the rarefaction wave and material interface. By comparing each component of the high-order moments and its value in equilibrium, we can draw qualitatively the main behavior of the actual distribution function. These results deepen our understanding of the mechanical and material interfaces from a more fundamental level, which is indicative for constructing macroscopic models and other kinds of kinetic models.

  1. Review of air flow measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams, Jennifer

    2002-12-01

    Airflow measurement techniques are necessary to determine the most basic of indoor air quality questions: ''Is there enough fresh air to provide a healthy environment for the occupants of the building?'' This paper outlines airflow measurement techniques, but it does not make recommendations for techniques that should be used. The airflows that will be discussed are those within a room or zone, those between rooms or zones, such as through doorways (open or closed) or passive vents, those between the building and outdoors, and those through mechanical air distribution systems. Techniques that are highlighted include particle streak velocimetry, hot wire anemometry, fan pressurization (measuring flow at a given pressure), tracer gas, acoustic methods for leak size determination, the Delta Q test to determine duct leakage flows, and flow hood measurements. Because tracer gas techniques are widely used to measure airflow, this topic is broken down into sections as follows: decay, pulse injection, constant injection, constant concentration, passive sampling, and single and multiple gas measurements for multiple zones.

  2. Optical Air Flow Measurements for Flight Tests and Flight Testing Optical Air Flow Meters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jentink, Henk W.; Bogue, Rodney K.

    2005-01-01

    Optical air flow measurements can support the testing of aircraft and can be instrumental to in-flight investigations of the atmosphere or atmospheric phenomena. Furthermore, optical air flow meters potentially contribute as avionics systems to flight safety and as air data systems. The qualification of these instruments for the flight environment is where we encounter the systems in flight testing. An overview is presented of different optical air flow measurement techniques applied in flight and what can be achieved with the techniques for flight test purposes is reviewed. All in-flight optical airflow velocity measurements use light scattering. Light is scattered on both air molecules and aerosols entrained in the air. Basic principles of making optical measurements in flight, some basic optical concepts, electronic concepts, optoelectronic interfaces, and some atmospheric processes associated with natural aerosols are reviewed. Safety aspects in applying the technique are shortly addressed. The different applications of the technique are listed and some typical examples are presented. Recently NASA acquired new data on mountain rotors, mountain induced turbulence, with the ACLAIM system. Rotor position was identified using the lidar system and the potentially hazardous air flow profile was monitored by the ACLAIM system.

  3. Method of analysis for compressible flow through mixed-flow centrifugal impellers of arbitrary design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrick, Joseph T; Ginsburg, Ambrose; Osborn, Walter M

    1952-01-01

    A method is presented for analysis of the compressible flow between the hub and the shroud of mixed-flow impellers of arbitrary design. Axial symmetry was assumed, but the forces in the meridional (hub to shroud) plane, which are derived from tangential pressure gradients, were taken into account. The method was applied to an experimental mixed-flow impeller. The analysis of the flow in the meridional plane of the impeller showed that the rotational forces, the blade curvature, and the hub-shroud profile can introduce severe velocity gradients along the hub and the shroud surfaces. Choked flow at the impeller inlet as determined by the analysis was verified by experimental results.

  4. Compressible turbulent channel flow with impedance boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalo, Carlo; Bodart, Julien; Lele, Sanjiva

    2014-11-01

    We have performed large-eddy simulations of compressible turbulent channel flow at one bulk Reynolds number, Reb = 6900, for bulk Mach numbers Mb = 0.05, 0.2, 0.5, with linear acoustic impedance boundary conditions (IBCs). The IBCs are formulated in the time domain following Fung and Ju (2004) and coupled with a Navier-Stokes solver. The impedance model adopted is a three-parameter Helmholtz oscillator with resonant frequency tuned to the outer layer eddies. The IBC's resistance, R, has been varied in the range, R = 0.01, 0.10, 1.00. Tuned IBCs result in a noticeable drag increase for sufficiently high Mb and/or low R, exceeding 300% for Mb = 0.5 and R = 0.01, and thus represents a promising passive control technique for delaying boundary layer separation and/or enhancing wall heat transfer. Alterations to the turbulent flow structure are confined to the first 15% of the boundary layer thickness where the classical buffer-layer coherent vortical structures are replaced by an array of Kelvin-Helmholtz-like rollers. The non-zero asymptotic value of the Reynolds shear stress gradient at the wall results in the disappearance of the viscous sublayer and very early departure of the mean velocity profiles from the law of the wall.

  5. Compressible turbulent channel flow with impedance boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalo, Carlo; Bodart, Julien; Lele, Sanjiva K.

    2015-03-01

    We have performed large-eddy simulations of isothermal-wall compressible turbulent channel flow with linear acoustic impedance boundary conditions (IBCs) for the wall-normal velocity component and no-slip conditions for the tangential velocity components. Three bulk Mach numbers, Mb = 0.05, 0.2, 0.5, with a fixed bulk Reynolds number, Reb = 6900, have been investigated. For each Mb, nine different combinations of IBC settings were tested, in addition to a reference case with impermeable walls, resulting in a total of 30 simulations. The adopted numerical coupling strategy allows for a spatially and temporally consistent imposition of physically realizable IBCs in a fully explicit compressible Navier-Stokes solver. The IBCs are formulated in the time domain according to Fung and Ju ["Time-domain impedance boundary conditions for computational acoustics and aeroacoustics," Int. J. Comput. Fluid Dyn. 18(6), 503-511 (2004)]. The impedance adopted is a three-parameter damped Helmholtz oscillator with resonant angular frequency, ωr, tuned to the characteristic time scale of the large energy-containing eddies. The tuning condition, which reads ωr = 2πMb (normalized with the speed of sound and channel half-width), reduces the IBCs' free parameters to two: the damping ratio, ζ, and the resistance, R, which have been varied independently with values, ζ = 0.5, 0.7, 0.9, and R = 0.01, 0.10, 1.00, for each Mb. The application of the tuned IBCs results in a drag increase up to 300% for Mb = 0.5 and R = 0.01. It is shown that for tuned IBCs, the resistance, R, acts as the inverse of the wall-permeability and that varying the damping ratio, ζ, has a secondary effect on the flow response. Typical buffer-layer turbulent structures are completely suppressed by the application of tuned IBCs. A new resonance buffer layer is established characterized by large spanwise-coherent Kelvin-Helmholtz rollers, with a well-defined streamwise wavelength λx, traveling downstream with

  6. Improving Compressed Air Energy Efficiency in Automotive Plants - Practical Examples and Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Alkadi, Nasr E; Kissock, Professor Kelly

    2011-01-01

    The automotive industry is the largest industry in the United States in terms of the dollar value of production [1]. U.S. automakers face tremendous pressure from foreign competitors, which have an increasing manufacturing presence in this country. The Big Three North American Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) General Motors, Ford, and Chrysler are reacting to declining sales figures and economic strain by working more efficiently and seeking out opportunities to reduce production costs without negatively affecting the production volume or the quality of the product. Successful, cost-effective investment and implementation of the energy efficiency technologies and practices meet the challenge of maintaining the output of high quality product with reduced production costs. Automotive stamping and assembly plants are typically large users of compressed air with annual compressed air utility bills in the range of $2M per year per plant. This paper focuses on practical methods that the authors have researched, analyzed and implemented to improve compressed air system efficiency in automobile manufacturing facilities. It describes typical compressed air systems in automotive stamping and assembly plants, and compares these systems to best practices. The paper then presents a series of examples, organized using the method of inside-out approach, which strategically identifies the energy savings in the compressed air system by first minimizing end-use demand, then minimizing distribution losses, and finally making improvements to primary energy conversion equipment, the air compressor plant.

  7. Exploring the concept of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns at shallow depth: A modeling study of air tightness and energy balance

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.-M.; Rutqvist, J.; Ryu, D.-W.; Choi, B.-H.; Sunwoo, C.; Song, W.-K.

    2011-07-15

    This paper presents a numerical modeling study of coupled thermodynamic, multiphase fluid flow and heat transport associated with underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns. Specifically, we explored the concept of using concrete lined caverns at a relatively shallow depth for which constructing and operational costs may be reduced if air tightness and stability can be assured. Our analysis showed that the key parameter to assure long-term air tightness in such a system was the permeability of both the concrete lining and the surrounding rock. The analysis also indicated that a concrete lining with a permeability of less than 1×10{sup -18} m{sup 2} would result in an acceptable air leakage rate of less than 1%, with the operational pressure range between 5 and 8 MPa at a depth of 100 m. It was further noted that capillary retention properties and the initial liquid saturation of the lining were very important. Indeed, air leakage could be effectively prevented when the air-entry pressure of the concrete lining is higher than the operational air pressure and when the lining is kept moist at a relatively high liquid saturation. Our subsequent energy-balance analysis demonstrated that the energy loss for a daily compression and decompression cycle is governed by the air-pressure loss, as well as heat loss by conduction to the concrete liner and surrounding rock. For a sufficiently tight system, i.e., for a concrete permeability off less than 1×10{sup -18} m{sup 2}, heat loss by heat conduction tends to become proportionally more important. However, the energy loss by heat conduction can be minimized by keeping the air-injection temperature of compressed air closer to the ambient temperature of the underground storage cavern. In such a case, almost all the heat loss during compression is gained back during subsequent decompression. Finally, our numerical simulation study showed that CAES in shallow rock caverns is feasible from a leakage

  8. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging of compressed air divers in diving accidents.

    PubMed

    Gao, G K; Wu, D; Yang, Y; Yu, T; Xue, J; Wang, X; Jiang, Y P

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the characteristics of the cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of compressed air divers in diving accidents, we conducted an observational case series study. MRI of brain were examined and analysed on seven cases compressed air divers complicated with cerebral arterial gas embolism CAGE. There were some characteristics of cerebral injury: (1) Multiple lesions; (2) larger size; (3) Susceptible to parietal and frontal lobe; (4) Both cortical grey matter and subcortical white matter can be affected; (5) Cerebellum is also the target of air embolism. The MRI of brain is an sensitive method for detecting cerebral lesions in compressed air divers in diving accidents. The MRI should be finished on divers in diving accidents within 5 days. PMID:19341126

  9. A Feasibility Study on Operating Large Scale Compressed Air Energy Storage in Porous Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Pfeiffer, W. T.; Li, D.; Bauer, S.

    2015-12-01

    Compressed air energy storage (CAES) in porous formations has been considered as one promising option of large scale energy storage for decades. This study, hereby, aims at analyzing the feasibility of operating large scale CAES in porous formations and evaluating the performance of underground porous gas reservoirs. To address these issues quantitatively, a hypothetic CAES scenario with a typical anticline structure in northern Germany was numerically simulated. Because of the rapid growth in photovoltaics, the period of extraction in a daily cycle was set to the early morning and the late afternoon in order to bypass the massive solar energy production around noon. The gas turbine scenario was defined referring to the specifications of the Huntorf CAES power plant. The numerical simulations involved two stages, i.e. initial fill and cyclic operation, and both were carried out using the Eclipse E300 simulator (Schlumberger). Pressure loss in the gas wells was post analyzed using an analytical solution. The exergy concept was applied to evaluate the potential energy amount stored in the specific porous formation. The simulation results show that porous formations prove to be a feasible solution of large scale CAES. The initial fill with shut-in periods determines the spatial distribution of the gas phase and helps to achieve higher gas saturation around the wells, and thus higher deliverability. The performance evaluation shows that the overall exergy flow of stored compressed air is also determined by the permeability, which directly affects the deliverability of the gas reservoir and thus the number of wells required.

  10. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Air flow measurement specifications. 89... Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method used... during the test. Overall measurement accuracy must be ± 2 percent of the maximum engine value for...

  11. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method... during the test. Overall measurement accuracy must be ± 2 percent of the maximum engine value for...

  12. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method... during the test. Overall measurement accuracy must be ± 2 percent of the maximum engine value for...

  13. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  14. Compressible seal flow analysis using the finite element method with Galerkin solution technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1974-01-01

    A finite element method with a Galerkin solution (FEMGS) technique is formulated for the solution of nonlinear problems in high-pressure compressible seal flow analyses. An example of a three-dimensional axisymmetric flow having nonlinearities, due to compressibility, area expansion, and convective inertia, is used for illustrating the application of the technique.

  15. Effect of compressibility on the rise velocity of an air bubble in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cihan, Abdullah; Corapcioglu, M. Yavuz

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a theoretical model to analyze the effect of air compressibility on air bubble migration in porous media. The model is obtained by combining the Newton's second law of motion and the ideal gas law assuming that the air phase in the bubble behaves as an ideal gas. Numerical and analytical solutions are presented for various cases of interest. The model results compare favorably with both experimental data and analytical solutions reported in the literature obtained for an incompressible air bubble migration. The results show that travel velocity of a compressible air bubble in porous media strongly depends on the depth of air phase injection. A bubble released from greater depths travels with a slower velocity than a bubble with an equal volume injected at shallower depths. As an air bubble rises up, it expands with decreasing bubble pressure with depth. The volume of a bubble injected at a 1-m depth increases 10% as the bubble reaches the water table. However, bubble volume increases almost twofold when it reaches to the surface from a depth of 10 m. The vertical rise velocity of a compressible bubble approaches that of an incompressible one regardless of the injection depth and volume as it reaches the water table. The compressible bubble velocity does not exceed 18.8 cm/s regardless of the injection depth and bubble volume. The results demonstrate that the effect of air compressibility on the motion of a bubble cannot be neglected except when the air is injected at very shallow depths.

  16. Theoretical analysis of injecting the compressed air through a defensive well into aquifer aimed to separate between polluted and fresh water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boger, M.; Ravina, I.

    2012-12-01

    Injecting a compressed air, through a well, located between the sea or a polluted lake and fresh ground water, creates a "hydraulic barrier" that prevents their mixing. Steady influx of air to a saturated soil produces a pressure gradient from the well and replacement of water by air, hence the interface between air and water increases. After the compression process is stopped, the soil pores are filled with air, so that saturated soil becomes unsaturated with a decreased conductivity. Creating such a barrier, first by the air pressure and second by blocking of the pores, is welcomed at the interface sea-fresh water area, for example. It prevents the loss of fresh water to the sea and it decreases sea water movement into the aquifer. Another positive effect of the air injection is the air flow through unsaturated zone, above the ground water, that decreases polluted water down-seepage from the surface thus defending the fresh ground water against pollution. The regular water well or special drilled one will be used as defensive well. The radius of defensive well can be smaller than the one of the water well. The explanation of the defensive well exploitation in the field for one and multi layer aquifers is presented. Analytical evaluations of the pressure loss and shape of the air-water interfaces in saturated soil are presented for: (a) steady air flow for a one layer aquifer and for a three layer one (leaky aquifer case), (b) transient air flow for a one layer aquifer. It is shown that the shape of air-water interfaces is generally an inverted cone, where the decrease of air pressure in the aquifer with the distance from the well is approximately logarithmic. The necessary pressure to create the effective air flow in the aquifer is only about tens percent higher than static water pressure in the well.

  17. a Reverse Flow Theorem and Acoustic Reciprocity in Compressible Potential Flows in Ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EVERSMAN, W.

    2001-09-01

    A reverse flow theorem for acoustic propagation in compressible potential flow has been obtained directly from the field equations without recourse to energy conservation arguments. A reciprocity theorem for the scattering matrix for the propagation of acoustic modes in a duct with either acoustically rigid walls or acoustically absorbing walls follows. It is found that for a source at a specific end of the duct, suitably scaled reflection matrices in direct and reverse flow have a reciprocal relationship. Scaled transmission matrices obtained for direct flow and reversed flow with simultaneous switching of source location from one end to the other also have a reciprocal relationship. A related reverse flow theorem specialized to one-dimensional acoustic propagation has also been obtained. Reciprocity relationships for the scattering coefficients for propagation are derived, and are found to be similar though much simpler than in the case of multi-mode propagation. In one-dimensional flow, reciprocal relations and power conservation arguments are used to show that scaled power reflection and transmission coefficients are invariant to flow reversal and switching of source location from one end of the duct to the other. Numerical verification of the reciprocal relationships is given in a companion paper.

  18. Local conservative regularizations of compressible magnetohydrodynamic and neutral flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnaswami, Govind S.; Sachdev, Sonakshi; Thyagaraja, A.

    2016-02-01

    Ideal systems like magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and Euler flow may develop singularities in vorticity ( w =∇×v ). Viscosity and resistivity provide dissipative regularizations of the singularities. In this paper, we propose a minimal, local, conservative, nonlinear, dispersive regularization of compressible flow and ideal MHD, in analogy with the KdV regularization of the 1D kinematic wave equation. This work extends and significantly generalizes earlier work on incompressible Euler and ideal MHD. It involves a micro-scale cutoff length λ which is a function of density, unlike in the incompressible case. In MHD, it can be taken to be of order the electron collisionless skin depth c/ωpe. Our regularization preserves the symmetries of the original systems and, with appropriate boundary conditions, leads to associated conservation laws. Energy and enstrophy are subject to a priori bounds determined by initial data in contrast to the unregularized systems. A Hamiltonian and Poisson bracket formulation is developed and applied to generalize the constitutive relation to bound higher moments of vorticity. A "swirl" velocity field is identified, and shown to transport w/ρ and B/ρ, generalizing the Kelvin-Helmholtz and Alfvén theorems. The steady regularized equations are used to model a rotating vortex, MHD pinch, and a plane vortex sheet. The proposed regularization could facilitate numerical simulations of fluid/MHD equations and provide a consistent statistical mechanics of vortices/current filaments in 3D, without blowup of enstrophy. Implications for detailed analyses of fluid and plasma dynamic systems arising from our work are briefly discussed.

  19. Techniques for Compressible Flow Calculations on Multizone Grids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reu, Taekyu

    In order to simulate inviscid/viscous compressible flowfields about 3-D realistic aerodynamic bodies, the combined use of an implicit, upwind biased real gas scheme with 3-D fully conservative patched grid techniques is discussed. An "equivalent" gamma formulation is implemented in order to model real gas effects in Van Leer's flux vector splitting (FVS) and Roe's flux difference splitting (FDS) scheme. A hybrid approximate-factorization (AF)/relaxation algorithm is used as an efficient solver of the Euler, parabolized Navier-Stokes, and thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. Two different approaches, clipping and Ramshaw's rezoning algorithms, for performing a conservative flux calculation are described and compared in terms of numerical efficiency. In order to show the real gas effects in the upwind schemes, two test problems are solved. Also to demonstrate the capability of the patched grid approach, the turbulent flowfield about 3-D analytic forebody is calculated as another test problem. Due to the poor results of the Baldwin-Lomax turbulent model for separated flows, only the attached flowfield is considered in the analytic forebody calculation. Finally, as applications of this approach, the inviscid/viscous flowfields about several aerodynamic bodies are calculated including a generic hypersonic aircraft, a model of the SR-71 aircraft, and F-18 forebody with strakes.

  20. A general method to determine the stability of compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guenther, R. A.; Chang, I. D.

    1982-01-01

    Several problems were studied using two completely different approaches. The initial method was to use the standard linearized perturbation theory by finding the value of the individual small disturbance quantities based on the equations of motion. These were serially eliminated from the equations of motion to derive a single equation that governs the stability of fluid dynamic system. These equations could not be reduced unless the steady state variable depends only on one coordinate. The stability equation based on one dependent variable was found and was examined to determine the stability of a compressible swirling jet. The second method applied a Lagrangian approach to the problem. Since the equations developed were based on different assumptions, the condition of stability was compared only for the Rayleigh problem of a swirling flow, both examples reduce to the Rayleigh criterion. This technique allows including the viscous shear terms which is not possible in the first method. The same problem was then examined to see what effect shear has on stability.

  1. The development of solution algorithms for compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, David Christopher

    Three main topics were examined. The first is the development and comparison of time integration schemes on 2-D unstructured meshes. Both explicit and implicit solution grids are presented. Cell centered and cell vertex finite volume upwind schemes using Roe's approximate Riemann solver are developed. The second topic involves an interactive adaptive remeshing algorithm which uses a frontal grid generator and is compared to a single grid calculation. The final topic examined is the capabilities developed for a structured 3-D code called GASP. The capabilities include: generalized chemistry and thermodynamic modeling, space marching, memory management through the use of binary C I/O, and algebraic and two equation eddy viscosity turbulence modeling. Results are given for Mach 1.7 3-D analytic forebody, a Mach 1.38 axisymmetric nozzle with hydrogen-air combustion, a Mach 14.15 deg ramp, and Mach 0.3 viscous flow over a flat plate.

  2. Decentralized and Tactical Air Traffic Flow Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertsimas, Dimitris; Odoni, Amedeo R.

    1997-01-01

    This project dealt with the following topics: 1. Review and description of the existing air traffic flow management system (ATFM) and identification of aspects with potential for improvement. 2. Identification and review of existing models and simulations dealing with all system segments (enroute, terminal area, ground) 3. Formulation of concepts for overall decentralization of the ATFM system, ranging from moderate decentralization to full decentralization 4. Specification of the modifications to the ATFM system required to accommodate each of the alternative concepts. 5. Identification of issues that need to be addressed with regard to: determination of the way the ATFM system would be operating; types of flow management strategies that would be used; and estimation of the effectiveness of ATFM with regard to reducing delay and re-routing costs. 6. Concept evaluation through identification of criteria and methodologies for accommodating the interests of stakeholders and of approaches to optimization of operational procedures for all segments of the ATFM system.

  3. Combustor air flow control method for fuel cell apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Clingerman, Bruce J.; Mowery, Kenneth D.; Ripley, Eugene V.

    2001-01-01

    A method for controlling the heat output of a combustor in a fuel cell apparatus to a fuel processor where the combustor has dual air inlet streams including atmospheric air and fuel cell cathode effluent containing oxygen depleted air. In all operating modes, an enthalpy balance is provided by regulating the quantity of the air flow stream to the combustor to support fuel cell processor heat requirements. A control provides a quick fast forward change in an air valve orifice cross section in response to a calculated predetermined air flow, the molar constituents of the air stream to the combustor, the pressure drop across the air valve, and a look up table of the orifice cross sectional area and valve steps. A feedback loop fine tunes any error between the measured air flow to the combustor and the predetermined air flow.

  4. Feasibility study of porous media compressed air energy storage in South Carolina, United States of America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, Alexandra-Selene

    Renewable Energy Systems (RES) such as solar and wind, are expected to play a progressively significant role in electricity production as the world begins to move away from an almost total reliance on nonrenewable sources of power. In the US there is increasing investment in RES as the Department of Energy (DOE) expands its wind power network to encompass the use of offshore wind resources in places such as the South Carolina (SC) Atlantic Coastal Plain. Because of their unstable nature, RES cannot be used as reliable grid-scale power sources unless power is somehow stored during excess production and recovered at times of insufficiency. Only two technologies have been cited as capable of storing renewable energy at this scale: Pumped Hydro Storage and Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES). Both CAES power plants in existence today use solution-mined caverns as their storage spaces. This project focuses on exploring the feasibility of employing the CAES method to store excess wind energy in sand aquifers. The numerical multiphase flow code, TOUGH2, was used to build models that approximate subsurface sand formations similar to those found in SC. Although the aquifers of SC have very low dips, less than 10, the aquifers in this study were modeled as flat, or having dips of 00. Cycle efficiency is defined here as the amount of energy recovered compared to the amount of energy injected. Both 2D and 3D simulations have shown that the greatest control on cycle efficiency is the volume of air that can be recovered from the aquifer after injection. Results from 2D simulations showed that using a dual daily peak load schedule instead of a single daily peak load schedule increased cycle efficiency as do the following parameters: increased anisotropy, screening the well in the upper portions of the aquifer, reduced aquifer thickness, and an initial water displacement by the continuous injection of air for at least 60 days. Aquifer permeability of 1x10-12 m2 produced a cycle

  5. Numerical calculation of steady inviscid full potential compressible flow about wind turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    The air flow through a propeller-type wind turbine rotor is characterized by three-dimensional rotating cascade effects about the inner portions of the rotor blades and compressibility effects about the tip regions of the blades. In the case of large rotor diameter and/or increased rotor angular speed, the existence of small supersonic zones terminated by weak shocks is possible. An exact nonlinear mathematical model (called a steady Full Potential Equation - FPE) that accounts for the above phenomena has been rederived. An artificially time dependent version of FPE was iteratively solved by a finite volume technique involving an artificial viscosity and a three-level consecutive mesh refinement. The exact boundary conditions were applied by generating a boundary conforming periodic computation mesh.

  6. Stability and control of compressible flows over a surface with concave-conves curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Bayliss, A.; Parikh, P.; Turkel, E.

    1986-01-01

    The active control of spatially unstable disturbances in a laminar, two-dimensional, compressible boundary layer over a curved surface is numerically simulated. The control is effected by localized time-periodic surface heating. We consider two similar surfaces of different heights with concave-convex curvature. In one, the height is sufficiently large so that the favorable pressure gradient is sufficient to stabilize a particular disturbance. In the other case the pressure gradient induced by the curvature is destabilizing. It is shown that by using active control that the disturbance can be stabilized. The results demonstrate that the curvature induced mean pressure gradient significantly enhances the receptivity of the flow localized time-periodic surface heating and that this is a potentially viable mechanism in air.

  7. Laser ignition of hypersonic air-hydrogen flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brieschenk, S.; Kleine, H.; O'Byrne, S.

    2013-09-01

    An experimental investigation of the behaviour of laser-induced ignition in a hypersonic air-hydrogen flow is presented. A compression-ramp model with port-hole injection, fuelled with hydrogen gas, is used in the study. The experiments were conducted in the T-ADFA shock tunnel using a flow condition with a specific total enthalpy of 2.5 MJ/kg and a freestream velocity of 2 km/s. This study is the first comprehensive laser spark study in a hypersonic flow and demonstrates that laser-induced ignition at the fuel-injection site can be effective in terms of hydroxyl production. A semi-empirical method to estimate the conditions in the laser-heated gas kernel is presented in the paper. This method uses blast-wave theory together with an expansion-wave model to estimate the laser-heated gas conditions. The spatially averaged conditions found with this approach are matched to enthalpy curves generated using a standard chemical equilibrium code (NASA CEA). This allows us to account for differences that are introduced due to the idealised description of the blast wave, the isentropic expansion wave as well as thermochemical effects.

  8. Dynamic Flow Management Problems in Air Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Sarah Stock

    1997-01-01

    In 1995, over six hundred thousand licensed pilots flew nearly thirty-five million flights into over eighteen thousand U.S. airports, logging more than 519 billion passenger miles. Since demand for air travel has increased by more than 50% in the last decade while capacity has stagnated, congestion is a problem of undeniable practical significance. In this thesis, we will develop optimization techniques that reduce the impact of congestion on the national airspace. We start by determining the optimal release times for flights into the airspace and the optimal speed adjustment while airborne taking into account the capacitated airspace. This is called the Air Traffic Flow Management Problem (TFMP). We address the complexity, showing that it is NP-hard. We build an integer programming formulation that is quite strong as some of the proposed inequalities are facet defining for the convex hull of solutions. For practical problems, the solutions of the LP relaxation of the TFMP are very often integral. In essence, we reduce the problem to efficiently solving large scale linear programming problems. Thus, the computation times are reasonably small for large scale, practical problems involving thousands of flights. Next, we address the problem of determining how to reroute aircraft in the airspace system when faced with dynamically changing weather conditions. This is called the Air Traffic Flow Management Rerouting Problem (TFMRP) We present an integrated mathematical programming approach for the TFMRP, which utilizes several methodologies, in order to minimize delay costs. In order to address the high dimensionality, we present an aggregate model, in which we formulate the TFMRP as a multicommodity, integer, dynamic network flow problem with certain side constraints. Using Lagrangian relaxation, we generate aggregate flows that are decomposed into a collection of flight paths using a randomized rounding heuristic. This collection of paths is used in a packing integer

  9. Priority-based error correction using turbo codes for compressed AIRS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkova, I.; Grossberg, M.; Grayver, E.; Olsen, D.; Nalli, N.; Wolf, W.; Zhou, L.; Goldberg, M.

    2006-08-01

    Errors due to wireless transmission can have an arbitrarily large impact on a compressed file. A single bit error appearing in the compressed file can propagate during a decompression procedure and destroy the entire granule. Such a loss is unacceptable since this data is critical for a range of applications, including weather prediction and emergency response planning. The impact of a bit error in the compressed granule is very sensitive to the error's location in the file. There is a natural hierarchy of compressed data in terms of impact on the final retrieval products. For the considered compression scheme, errors in some parts of the data yield no noticeable degradation in the final products. We formulate a priority scheme for the compressed data and present an error correction approach based on minimizing impact on the retrieval products. Forward error correction codes (e.g., turbo, LDPC) allow the tradeoff between error correction strength and file inflation (bandwidth expansion). We propose segmenting the compressed data based on its priority and applying different-strength FEC codes to different segments. In this paper we demonstrate that this approach can achieve negligible product degradation while maintaining an overall 3-to-1 compression ratio on the final file. We apply this to AIRS sounder data to demonstrate viability for the sounder on the next-generation GOES-R platform.

  10. Failure Monitoring and Leakage Detection for Underground Storage of Compressed Air Energy in Lined Rock Caverns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung-Mok; Rutqvist, Jonny; Kim, Hyunwoo; Park, Dohyun; Ryu, Dong-Woo; Park, Eui-Seob

    2016-02-01

    Underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns (LRCs) provides a promising solution for storing energy on a large scale. One of the essential issues facing underground CAES implementation is the risk of air leakage from the storage caverns. Compressed air may leak through an initial defect in the inner containment liner, such as imperfect welds and construction joints, or through structurally damaged points of the liner during CAES operation for repeated compression and decompression cycles. Detection of the air leakage and identification of the leakage location around the underground storage cavern are required. In this study, we analyzed the displacement (or strain) monitoring method to detect the mechanical failure of liners that provides major pathways of air leakage using a previously developed numerical technique simulating the coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical behavior of underground CAES in LRCs. We analyzed the use of pressure monitoring to detect air leakage and characterize the leakage location. From the simulation results, we demonstrated that tangential strain monitoring at the inner face of sealing liners could enable one to detect failure. We also demonstrated that the use of the cross-correlation method between pressure history data measured at various sensors could identify the air leak location. These results may help in the overall design of a monitoring and alarm system for the successful implementation and operation of CAES in LRCs.

  11. A one-dimensional numerical model for predicting pressure and velocity oscillations of a compressed air-pocket in a vertical shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Leon, A.; Apte, S.

    2015-12-01

    The presence of pressurized air pockets in combined sewer systems is argued to produce geyser flows, which is an oscillating jetting of a mixture of gas-liquid flows through vertical shafts. A 1D numerical model is developed for predicting pressure and velocity oscillations of a compressed air-pocket in a vertical shaft which in turn attempts to simulate geyser like flows. The vertical shaft is closed at the bottom and open to ambient pressure at the top. Initially, the lower section of the vertical shaft is filled with compressed air and the upper section with water. The interaction between the pressurized air pocket and the water column in the vertical shaft exhibits an oscillatory motion of the water column that decays over time. The model accounts for steady and unsteady friction to estimate the energy dissipation. The model also includes the falling flow of water around the external perimeter of the pressurized air pocket by assuming that any expansion in the pressurized air pocket would result in the falling volume of water. The acceleration of air-water interface is predicted through a force balance between the pressurized air pocket and the water column combined with the Method of Characteristics that resolves pressure and velocity within the water column. The expansion and compression of the pressurized air pocket is assumed to follow either isothermal process or adiabatic process. Results for both assumptions; isothermal and adiabatic processes, are presented. The performance of the developed 1D numerical model is compared with that of a commercial 3D CFD model. Overall, a good agreement between both models is obtained for pressure and velocity oscillations. The paper will also present a sensitivity analysis of the 3D CFD model.

  12. Reattachment heating upstream of short compression ramps in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estruch-Samper, David

    2016-05-01

    Hypersonic shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions with separation induce unsteady thermal loads of particularly high intensity in flow reattachment regions. Building on earlier semi-empirical correlations, the maximum heat transfer rates upstream of short compression ramp obstacles of angles 15° ⩽ θ ⩽ 135° are here discretised based on time-dependent experimental measurements to develop insight into their transient nature (Me = 8.2-12.3, Re_h= 0.17× 105-0.47× 105). Interactions with an incoming laminar boundary layer experience transition at separation, with heat transfer oscillating between laminar and turbulent levels exceeding slightly those in fully turbulent interactions. Peak heat transfer rates are strongly influenced by the stagnation of the flow upon reattachment close ahead of obstacles and increase with ramp angle all the way up to θ =135°, whereby rates well over two orders of magnitude above the undisturbed laminar levels are intermittently measured (q'_max>10^2q_{u,L}). Bearing in mind the varying degrees of strength in the competing effect between the inviscid and viscous terms—namely the square of the hypersonic similarity parameter (Mθ )^2 for strong interactions and the viscous interaction parameter bar{χ } (primarily a function of Re and M)—the two physical factors that appear to most globally encompass the effects of peak heating for blunt ramps (θ ⩾ 45°) are deflection angle and stagnation heat transfer, so that this may be fundamentally expressed as q'_max∝ {q_{o,2D}} θ ^2 with further parameters in turn influencing the interaction to a lesser extent. The dominant effect of deflection angle is restricted to short obstacle heights, where the rapid expansion at the top edge of the obstacle influences the relaxation region just downstream of reattachment and leads to an upstream displacement of the separation front. The extreme heating rates result from the strengthening of the reattaching shear layer with the increase in

  13. Uncertainty Propagation for Turbulent, Compressible Flow in a Quasi-1D Nozzle Using Stochastic Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Thomas A.; Mathelin, Lionel; Hussaini, M. Yousuff; Bataille, Francoise

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a fully spectral, Polynomial Chaos method for the propagation of uncertainty in numerical simulations of compressible, turbulent flow, as well as a novel stochastic collocation algorithm for the same application. The stochastic collocation method is key to the efficient use of stochastic methods on problems with complex nonlinearities, such as those associated with the turbulence model equations in compressible flow and for CFD schemes requiring solution of a Riemann problem. Both methods are applied to compressible flow in a quasi-one-dimensional nozzle. The stochastic collocation method is roughly an order of magnitude faster than the fully Galerkin Polynomial Chaos method on the inviscid problem.

  14. The least-squares finite element method for low-mach-number compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Sheng-Tao

    1994-01-01

    The present paper reports the development of the Least-Squares Finite Element Method (LSFEM) for simulating compressible viscous flows at low Mach numbers in which the incompressible flows pose as an extreme. Conventional approach requires special treatments for low-speed flows calculations: finite difference and finite volume methods are based on the use of the staggered grid or the preconditioning technique; and, finite element methods rely on the mixed method and the operator-splitting method. In this paper, however, we show that such difficulty does not exist for the LSFEM and no special treatment is needed. The LSFEM always leads to a symmetric, positive-definite matrix through which the compressible flow equations can be effectively solved. Two numerical examples are included to demonstrate the method: first, driven cavity flows at various Reynolds numbers; and, buoyancy-driven flows with significant density variation. Both examples are calculated by using full compressible flow equations.

  15. Effects of saline-water flow rate and air speed on leakage current in RTV coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Hackam, R.

    1995-10-01

    Room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) silicone rubber is increasingly being used to coat porcelain and glass insulators in order to improve their electrical performance in the presence of pollution and moisture. A study of the dependence of leakage current, pulse current count and total charge flowing across the surface of RTV on the flow rate of the saline water and on the compressed air pressure used to create the salt-fog is reported. The fog was directed at the insulating rods either from one or two sides. The RTV was fabricated from polydimethylsiloxane polymer, a filler of alumina trihydrate (ATH), a polymerization catalyst and fumed silica reinforcer, all dispersed in 1,1,1-trichloroethane solvent. The saline water flow rate was varied in the range 0.4 to 2.0 l/min. The compressed air pressure at the input of the fog nozzles was varied from 0.20 to 0.63 MPa. The air speed at the surface of the insulating rods was found to depend linearly on the air pressure measured at the inlet to the nozzles and varied in the range 3 to 14 km/hr. The leakage current increased with increasing flow rate and increasing air speed. This is attributed to the increased loss of hydrophobicity with a larger quantity of saline fog and a larger impact velocities of fog droplets interacting with the surface of the RTV coating.

  16. Analytical skin friction and heat transfer formula for compressible internal flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechant, Lawrence J.; Tattar, Marc J.

    1994-01-01

    An analytic, closed-form friction formula for turbulent, internal, compressible, fully developed flow was derived by extending the incompressible law-of-the-wall relation to compressible cases. The model is capable of analyzing heat transfer as a function of constant surface temperatures and surface roughness as well as analyzing adiabatic conditions. The formula reduces to Prandtl's law of friction for adiabatic, smooth, axisymmetric flow. In addition, the formula reduces to the Colebrook equation for incompressible, adiabatic, axisymmetric flow with various roughnesses. Comparisons with available experiments show that the model averages roughly 12.5 percent error for adiabatic flow and 18.5 percent error for flow involving heat transfer.

  17. Suppression of Cavity-Driven Flow Separation in a Simulated Mixed Compression Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendt, Bruce J.

    2000-01-01

    A test facility designed to simulate a bifurcated subsonic diffuser operating within a mixed compression inlet is described. The subsonic diffuser in this facility modeled a bypass cavity feature often used in mixed compression inlets for engine flow matching and normal shock control. A bypass cavity-driven flow separation was seen to occur in the subsonic diffuser without applied flow control. Flow control in the form of vortex generators and/or a partitioned bypass cavity cover plate were used to eliminate this flow separation, providing a 2% increase in area-averaged total pressure recovery, and a 70% reduction in circumferential distortion intensity.

  18. Changes in air flow patterns using surfactants and thickeners during air sparging: Bench-scale experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Juyoung; Kim, Heonki; Annable, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Air injected into an aquifer during air sparging normally flows upward according to the pressure gradients and buoyancy, and the direction of air flow depends on the natural hydrogeologic setting. In this study, a new method for controlling air flow paths in the saturated zone during air sparging processes is presented. Two hydrodynamic parameters, viscosity and surface tension of the aqueous phase in the aquifer, were altered using appropriate water-soluble reagents distributed before initiating air sparging. Increased viscosity retarded the travel velocity of the air front during air sparging by modifying the viscosity ratio. Using a one-dimensional column packed with water-saturated sand, the velocity of air intrusion into the saturated region under a constant pressure gradient was inversely proportional to the viscosity of the aqueous solution. The air flow direction, and thus the air flux distribution was measured using gaseous flux meters placed at the sand surface during air sparging experiments using both two-, and three-dimensional physical models. Air flow was found to be influenced by the presence of an aqueous patch of high viscosity or suppressed surface tension in the aquifer. Air flow was selective through the low-surface tension (46.5 dyn/cm) region, whereas an aqueous patch of high viscosity (2.77 cP) was as an effective air flow barrier. Formation of a low-surface tension region in the target contaminated zone in the aquifer, before the air sparging process is inaugurated, may induce air flow through the target zone maximizing the contaminant removal efficiency of the injected air. In contrast, a region with high viscosity in the air sparging influence zone may minimize air flow through the region prohibiting the region from de-saturating.

  19. Direct numerical simulation of compressible free shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lele, Sanjiva K.

    1989-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of compressible free shear layers in open domains are conducted. Compact finite-difference schemes of spectral-like accuracy are used for the simulations. Both temporally-growing and spatially-growing mixing layers are studied. The effect of intrinsic compressibility on the evolution of vortices is studied. The use of convective Mach number is validated. Details of vortex roll up and pairing are studied. Acoustic radiation from vortex roll up, pairing and shape oscillations is studied and quantified.

  20. Demonstration of Isothermal Compressed Air Energy Storage to Support Renewable Energy Production

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, Benjamin

    2015-01-02

    This project develops and demonstrates a megawatt (MW)-scale Energy Storage System that employs compressed air as the storage medium. An isothermal compressed air energy storage (ICAESTM) system rated for 1 MW or more will be demonstrated in a full-scale prototype unit. Breakthrough cost-effectiveness will be achieved through the use of proprietary methods for isothermal gas cycling and staged gas expansion implemented using industrially mature, readily-available components.The ICAES approach uses an electrically driven mechanical system to raise air to high pressure for storage in low-cost pressure vessels, pipeline, or lined-rock cavern (LRC). This air is later expanded through the same mechanical system to drive the electric motor as a generator. The approach incorporates two key efficiency-enhancing innovations: (1) isothermal (constant temperature) gas cycling, which is achieved by mixing liquid with air (via spray or foam) to exchange heat with air undergoing compression or expansion; and (2) a novel, staged gas-expansion scheme that allows the drivetrain to operate at constant power while still allowing the stored gas to work over its entire pressure range. The ICAES system will be scalable, non-toxic, and cost-effective, making it suitable for firming renewables and for other grid applications.

  1. Application of the Analogy Between Water Flow with a Free Surface and Two-dimensional Compressible Gas Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlin, W James; Lindner, Norman J; Bitterly, Jack G

    1947-01-01

    The theory of hydraulic analogy, that is, the analogy between water flow with a free surface and two-dimensional compressible gas flow and the limitations and conditions of the analogy are discussed. A test run was made using the hydraulic analogy as applied to the flow about circular cylinders at various diameters at subsonic velocities extending to the super critical range. The apparatus and techniques used in this application are described and criticized. Reasonably satisfactory agreement of pressure distributions and flow fields existed between water and airflow about corresponding bodies. This agreement indicated the possibility of extending experimental compressibility research by new methods.

  2. Numerical Solution of Compressible Steady Flows around the RAE 2822 Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryštůfek, P.; Kozel, K.

    2014-03-01

    The article presents results of a numerical solution of subsonic, transonic and supersonic flows described by the system of Navier-Stokes equations in 2D laminar compressible flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil. Authors used FVM multistage Runge-Kutta method to numerically solve the flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil.

  3. Developments in the simulation of compressible inviscid and viscous flow on supercomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steger, J. L.; Buning, P. G.

    1985-01-01

    In anticipation of future supercomputers, finite difference codes are rapidly being extended to simulate three-dimensional compressible flow about complex configurations. Some of these developments are reviewed. The importance of computational flow visualization and diagnostic methods to three-dimensional flow simulation is also briefly discussed.

  4. Proctor & Gamble: Compressed Air System Upgrade Saves Energy & Improves Production at a Paper Mill

    SciTech Connect

    2004-05-01

    In 2002, Procter & Gamble applied a system-level strategy to optimize a compressed air system at its paper products mill in Mehoopany, Pennsylvania. The project improved production, improved system performance, and saved 7.6 million kWh per year and $309,000 per year in maintenance costs.

  5. 30 CFR 57.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... other unfired pressure vessels. 57.13015 Section 57.13015 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels shall be inspected by inspectors holding a valid National Board Commission and in accordance...

  6. 30 CFR 56.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... other unfired pressure vessels. 56.13015 Section 56.13015 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels... applicable chapters of the National Board Inspection Code, a Manual for Boiler and Pressure Vessel...

  7. 30 CFR 56.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... other unfired pressure vessels. 56.13015 Section 56.13015 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels... applicable chapters of the National Board Inspection Code, a Manual for Boiler and Pressure Vessel...

  8. 30 CFR 57.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... other unfired pressure vessels. 57.13015 Section 57.13015 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels shall be inspected by inspectors holding a valid National Board Commission and in accordance...

  9. Improving Energy Efficiency of Compressed Air System Based onSystem Audit

    SciTech Connect

    Shanghai, Hongbo Qin; McKane, Aimee

    2007-06-01

    Industrial electric motor systems consume more than 600billion kWh annually, accounting for more than 50 percent of China selectricity use. The International Energy Agency estimates thatoptimizing motor systems results in an improvement of 20-25 percent,which is well-supported by experience in both the U.S. and China.Compressed air systems in China use 9.4 percent of all electricity.Compressed air use in China is growing rapidly, as new industrial plantsare built and the production processes of existing plants expand andchange. Most of these systems, whether existing or new, are not optimizedfor energy efficiency. This paper will present a practitioner'sperspective on theemergence of compressed air auditing services inChina, specifically as it pertains to Shanghai and surrounding areas.Both the methodology used and the market development of these compressedair system services will be addressed. Finally, the potential for energysaving opportunities will be described based on highlights from over 50compressed air system energy audits completed by Shanghai EnergyConservation Service Center, both during the United Nations IndustrialDevelopment Organization (UNIDO) China Motor System Energy ConservationProgram, and after this training program was completed.

  10. Compressed Air System Improvement Project Saves Foundry Energy and Increases Production

    SciTech Connect

    2002-05-01

    This case study highlights International Truck and Engine Corporation's optimization project on the compressed air system that serves its foundry, Indianapolis Casting Corporation. Due to the project's implementation, the system's efficiency was greatly improved, allowing the foundry to operate with less compressor capacity, which resulted in reduced energy consumption, significant maintenance savings, and more reliable production.

  11. Electric power generating plant having direct-coupled steam and compressed-air cycles

    DOEpatents

    Drost, M.K.

    1981-01-07

    An electric power generating plant is provided with a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system which is directly coupled to the steam cycle of the generating plant. The CAES system is charged by the steam boiler during off peak hours, and drives a separate generator during peak load hours. The steam boiler load is thereby levelized throughout an operating day.

  12. Electric power generating plant having direct coupled steam and compressed air cycles

    DOEpatents

    Drost, Monte K.

    1982-01-01

    An electric power generating plant is provided with a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system which is directly coupled to the steam cycle of the generating plant. The CAES system is charged by the steam boiler during off peak hours, and drives a separate generator during peak load hours. The steam boiler load is thereby levelized throughout an operating day.

  13. Compressed Air System Upgrade Improves Production at an Automotive Glass Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2003-02-01

    In 2000, The Visteon automotive glass plant improved its compressed air system at its automotive glass plant in Nashville, Tennessee. This improvement allowed Visteon to save $711,000 annually, reduce annual energy consumption by 7.9 million kilowatt-hours, reduce maintenance, improve system performance, and avoid $800,000 in asbestos abatement costs.

  14. Compressed Air System Optimization Project Improves Production at a Metal Forging Plant (Modern Forge, TN, Plant)

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-01

    In 1995, Modern Forge of Tennessee implemented a compressed air system improvement project at its Piney Flats, Tennessee, forging plant. Due to the project’s implementation, the plant was able to operate with fewer compressors and improve its product quality, thus allowing it to increase productivity. The project also resulted in considerable energy and maintenance savings.

  15. 75 FR 63198 - In the Matter of Certain Connecting Devices (“Quick Clamps”) for Use With Modular Compressed Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-14

    ... devices for modular compressed air conditioning units and the FRL units they connect by reason of... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Connecting Devices (``Quick Clamps'') for Use With Modular Compressed Air Conditioning Units, Including Filters, Regulators, and Lubricators (``Frl's'') That Are Part of...

  16. Compressed-Air Energy Storage: Preliminary design and site development program in an aquifer. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCafferty, T. W.; Walke, W. C.; Bonk, J. S.

    1981-07-01

    The behavior and suitability of an aquifer-based compressed air energy storage (CAES) facility were investigated. The project was part of a five-phase program to promote compressed air energy storage and underground pumped hydro in the United States. The background, project organization, and summarization of all project work are provided.

  17. Calculation of external-internal flow fields for mixed-compression inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyu, W. J.; Kawamura, T.; Bencze, D. P.

    1986-01-01

    Supersonic inlet flows with mixed external-internal compressions were computed using a combined implicit-explicit (Beam-Warming-Steger/MacCormack) method for solving the three-dimensional unsteady, compressible Navier-Stokes equations in conservation form. Numerical calculations were made of various flows related to such inlet operations as the shock-wave intersections, subsonic spillage around the cowl lip, and inlet started versus unstarted conditions. Some of the computed results were compared with wind tunnel data.

  18. Calculation of external-internal flow fields for mixed-compression inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyu, W. J.; Kawamura, T.; Bencze, D. P.

    1987-01-01

    Supersonic inlet flows with mixed external-internal compressions were computed using a combined implicit-explicit (Beam-Warming-Steger/MacCormack) method for solving the three-dimensional unsteady, compressible Navier-Stokes equations in conservation form. Numerical calculations were made of various flows related to such inlet operations as the shock-wave intersections, subsonic spillage around the cowl lip, and inlet started versus unstarted conditions. Some of the computed results were compared with wind tunnel data.

  19. Petrologic and petrophysical evaluation of the Dallas Center Structure, Iowa, for compressed air energy storage in the Mount Simon Sandstone.

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, Jason E.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Broome, Scott Thomas; Dewers, Thomas A.; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew

    2013-03-01

    The Iowa Stored Energy Plant Agency selected a geologic structure at Dallas Center, Iowa, for evaluation of subsurface compressed air energy storage. The site was rejected due to lower-than-expected and heterogeneous permeability of the target reservoir, lower-than-desired porosity, and small reservoir volume. In an initial feasibility study, permeability and porosity distributions of flow units for the nearby Redfield gas storage field were applied as analogue values for numerical modeling of the Dallas Center Structure. These reservoir data, coupled with an optimistic reservoir volume, produced favorable results. However, it was determined that the Dallas Center Structure cannot be simplified to four zones of high, uniform permeabilities. Updated modeling using field and core data for the site provided unfavorable results for air fill-up. This report presents Sandia National Laboratories' petrologic and petrophysical analysis of the Dallas Center Structure that aids in understanding why the site was not suitable for gas storage.

  20. Aerothermodynamics of compressible flow past a flat plate in the slip-flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chi-Yang; Dai, Yi; Li, Genong; Hu, Yitao; Lai, Ming-Chia

    2015-11-01

    Compressible flow past a flat plate in the slip-flow regime features a very simple geometry and flow field, but it retains the most relevant and interesting physics in high-speed rarefied gas dynamics. In the slip-flow regime, the aerothermodynamic issues, especially the recovery factors and the convection heat transfer correlation, are the focus of this presentation. We first present the detailed similarity equations, especially the transformed Maxwell's slip and jump boundary conditions, and the equations for the Chapman-Rubesin parameter as well as how we incorporate the variable gas properties and the constitutive scaling model for the Knudsen layer in the similarity equations. The similarity solutions are compared with results published by E. R. van Driest [NACA Technical Note 2597, 1952]. We point out that van Driest's solutions were computed by using no-slip and no-jump boundary conditions. The recovery factor and Nusselt number of the plate are shown as functions of the Reynolds number and the Mach number. Finally, the similarity solutions are also compared with simulations of a two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model solving the full Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations with slip and jump boundary conditions.

  1. Two stroke homogenous charge compression ignition engine with pulsed air supplier

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John M.

    2003-08-05

    A two stroke homogenous charge compression ignition engine includes a volume pulsed air supplier, such as a piston driven pump, for efficient scavenging. The usage of a homogenous charge tends to decrease emissions. The use of a volume pulsed air supplier in conjunction with conventional poppet type intake and exhaust valves results in a relatively efficient scavenging mode for the engine. The engine preferably includes features that permit valving event timing, air pulse event timing and injection event timing to be varied relative to engine crankshaft angle. The principle use of the invention lies in improving diesel engines.

  2. Formation of the compression zone in a plasma flow generated by a magnetoplasma compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Solyakov, D. G. Petrov, Yu. V.; Garkusha, I. E.; Chebotarev, V. V.; Ladygina, M. S.; Cherednichenko, T. N.; Morgal’, Ya. I.; Kulik, N. V.; Stal’tsov, V. V.; Eliseev, D. V.

    2013-12-15

    Processes occurring in a plasma flow generated by a magnetoplasma compressor (MPC) during the formation of the compression zone are discussed. The paper presents results of measurements of the spatial distribution of the electric current in the plasma flow, the temporal and spatial (along the flow) distributions of the plasma density, and the profiles of the velocity of individual flow layers along the system axis. The spatial distribution of the electromagnetic force in the flow is analyzed. It is shown that the plasma flow is decelerated when approaching the compression zone and reaccelerated after passing it. In this case, the plasma flow velocity decreases from ν = (2–3) × 10{sup 7} cm/s at the MPC output to ν < 10{sup 6} cm/s in the region of maximum compression and then again increases to 10{sup 7} cm/s at a distance of 15–17 cm from the MPC output. In some MPC operating modes, a displacement of the magnetic field from the compression zone and the formation of toroidal electric current vortices in the plasma flow after passing the compression zone were detected.

  3. Potential hazards of compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs.

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Paul W.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2011-09-01

    This report is a preliminary assessment of the ignition and explosion potential in a depleted hydrocarbon reservoir from air cycling associated with compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media. The study identifies issues associated with this phenomenon as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered. Compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media has been proposed to help supplement renewable energy sources (e.g., wind and solar) by providing a means to store energy when excess energy is available, and to provide an energy source during non-productive or low productivity renewable energy time periods. Presently, salt caverns represent the only proven underground storage used for CAES. Depleted natural gas reservoirs represent another potential underground storage vessel for CAES because they have demonstrated their container function and may have the requisite porosity and permeability; however reservoirs have yet to be demonstrated as a functional/operational storage media for compressed air. Specifically, air introduced into a depleted natural gas reservoir presents a situation where an ignition and explosion potential may exist. This report presents the results of an initial study identifying issues associated with this phenomena as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered.

  4. Femtosecond laser flow tagging in non-air flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yibin; Calvert, Nathan

    2015-11-01

    The Femtosecond Laser Electronic Excitation Tagging (FLEET) [Michael, J. B. et al., Applied optics, 50(26), 2011] method is studied in nitrogen-containing gaseous flows. The underlying mechanism behind the FLEET process is the dissociation of molecular nitrogen into atomic nitrogen, which produces long-lived florescence as the nitrogen atoms recombine. Spectra and images of the resulting tagged line provide insight into the effects of different atmospheric gases on the FLEET process. The ionization cross-section, conductivity and energy states of the gaseous particles are each brought into consideration. These experiments demonstrate the feasibility for long-lived flow tagging on the order of hundreds of microseconds in non-air environments. Of particular interest are the enhancement of the FLEET signal with the addition of argon gas, and the non-monotonic quenching effect of oxygen on the length, duration and intensity of the resulting signal and spectra. FLEET is characterized in number of different atmospheric gases, including that simulating Mar's atmospheric composition.

  5. A Study on the Air flow outside Ambient Vaporizer Fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, G.; Lee, T.; Jeong, H.; Chung, H.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we interpreted Fog's Fluid that appear in the Ambient Vaporizer and predict the point of change Air to Fog. We interpreted using Analysis working fluid was applied to LNG and Air. We predict air flow when there is chill of LNG in the air Temperature and that makes fog. Also, we interpreted based on Summer and Winter criteria in the air temperature respectively. Finally, we can check the speed of the fog when fog excreted.

  6. Some Effects of Compressibility on the Flow Through Fans and Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perl, W.; Epstein, H. T.

    1946-01-01

    The laws of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy are applied to the compressible flow through a two-dimensional cascade of airfoils. A fundamental relation between the ultimate upstream and downstream flow angles, the inlet Mach number, and the pressure ratio across the cascade is derived. Comparison with the corresponding relation for incompressible flow shows large differences. The fundamental relation reveals two ranges of flow angles and inlet Mach numbers, for which no ideal pressure ratio exists. One of these nonideal operating ranges is analogous to a similar type in incompressible flow. The other is characteristic only of compressible flow. The effect of variable axial-flow area is treated. Some implications of the basic conservation laws in the case of nonideal flow through cascades are discussed.

  7. A blowup criterion for viscous, compressible, and heat-conductive magnetohydrodynamic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Lili; Wang, Yongfu

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we proved a blowup criterion for the two-dimensional (2D) viscous, compressible, and heat-conducting magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows for Cauchy problem, which depends only on the divergence of the velocity vector field, as well as for the case of bounded domain with Dirichlet boundary conditions. This result indicates that the nature of the blowup for compressible models of viscous media in 2D space is similar to the barotropic compressible Navier-Stokes equations and does not depend on further sophistication of the MHD model. More precisely, taking into account the magnetic effects and heat conductivity does not introduce any new features in the blowup mechanism of full MHD flows, especially, which is independent of the temperature and the magnetic field. The results also imply the global regularity of the strong solution to compressible MHD flows, provided that velocity divergence remains bounded.

  8. Quasi-one-dimensional compressible flow across face seals and narrow slots. 2: Computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.; Smith, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    A computer program is presented for compressible fluid flow with friction across face seals and through narrow slots. The computer program carries out a quasi-one-dimensional flow analysis which is valid for laminar and turbulent flows under both subsonic and choked flow conditions for parallel surfaces. The program is written in FORTRAN IV. The input and output variables are in either the International System of Units (SI) or the U.S. customary system.

  9. Quasi-one-dimensional compressible flow across face seals and narrow slots. 1: Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.; Ludwig, L. P.; Johnson, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis is presented for compressible fluid flow across shaft face seals and narrow slots. The analysis includes fluid inertia, viscous friction, and entrance losses. Subsonic and choked flow conditions can be predicted and analyzed. The model is valid for both laminar and turbulent flows. Results agree with experiment and with solutions which are more limited in applicability. Results show that a parallel film can have a positive film stiffness under choked flow conditions.

  10. Three-dimensional plastic flow of anisotropic layer compressed by flat dies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimova, Ljudmila A.

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional flow of anisotropic plastic layer compressed by parallel rough flat dies is considered. Ideal plastic material model with Hill anisotropic yield criterion modification of Mises isotropic model is used with associated plastic flow rule. General solution of a thin layer plastic flow problem with Prandtl linear velocity and shear stress variation in layer thickness direction is presented. Effects of contact friction force vector module and direction on the layer pressure on the dies and the layer plastic flow are considered.

  11. Engineering and economic evaluation of integrated gasification compressed air storage with humidification (IGCASH). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ghaly, O.; McCone, A.; Nakhamkin, M.; Patel, M.

    1993-11-01

    Integrated Gasification Compressed Air Storage with Humidification (IGCASH) is concept for an intermediate-load, cycling-duty plant with the environmental advantages of coal gasification and the reliability benefits of continuous operation of the hot gasification and turbomachinery equipment. The IGCASH concept integrates a quench-type coal gasification system with an advanced compressed air storage system in which the compression heat is recovered and stored in water which is used to humidify and preheat the air and fuel gas sent to the turbine. Bechtel under contract to EPRI (RP 2834-3) performed an engineering and economic evaluation to verify the feasibility of IGCASH as an option for intermediate-load power generation from coal. A baseline design was developed for a conceptual 400 MW generic IGCASH plant using currently available technology, including the Texaco full-quench gasification process, Westinghouse turbomachinery, and solution-mined salt-dome cavern for air storage. Three alternatives to the baseline design were also developed to assess the effects of storage water temperature and next-generation turbomachinery on plant performance and economics. The IGCASH concept compared favorably with conventional pulverized coal fired steam (PCFS) power generation. The IGCASH baseline design showed a significantly lower heat rate and yielded a lower cost of electricity than a comparable PCFS plant operating on the same duty cycle.

  12. Compressed-air work is entering the field of high pressures.

    PubMed

    Le Péchon, J Cl; Gourdon, G

    2010-01-01

    Since 1850, compressed-air work has been used to prevent shafts or tunnels under construction from flooding. Until the 1980s, workers were digging in compressed-air environments. Since the introduction of tunnel boring machines (TBMs), very little digging under pressure is needed. However, the wearing out of cutter-head tools requires inspection and repair. Compressed-air workers enter the pressurized working chamber only occasionally to perform such repairs. Pressures between 3.5 and 4.5 bar, that stand outside a reasonable range for air breathing, were reached by 2002. Offshore deep diving technology had to be adapted to TBM work. Several sites have used mixed gases: in Japan for deep shaft sinking (4.8 bar), in The Netherlands at Western Scheldt Tunnels (6.9 bar), in Russia for St. Petersburg Metro (5.8 bar) and in the United States at Seattle (5.8 bar). Several tunnel projects are in progress that may involve higher pressures: Hallandsås (Sweden) interventions in heliox saturation up to 13 bar, and Lake Mead (U.S.) interventions to about 12 bar (2010). Research on TBMs and grouting technologies tries to reduce the requirements for hyperbaric works. Adapted international rules, expertise and services for saturation work, shuttles and trained personnel matching industrial requirements are the challenges. PMID:20737925

  13. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter. 1065.225 Section 1065.225 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225...

  14. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter. 1065.225 Section 1065.225 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225...

  15. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter. 1065.225 Section 1065.225 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225...

  16. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter. 1065.225 Section 1065.225 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225...

  17. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter. 1065.225 Section 1065.225 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225...

  18. Modeling of Compressible Flow with Friction and Heat Transfer Using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Alak; Majumdar, Alok

    2007-01-01

    The present paper describes the verification and validation of a quasi one-dimensional pressure based finite volume algorithm, implemented in Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP), for predicting compressible flow with friction, heat transfer and area change. The numerical predictions were compared with two classical solutions of compressible flow, i.e. Fanno and Rayleigh flow. Fanno flow provides an analytical solution of compressible flow in a long slender pipe where incoming subsonic flow can be choked due to friction. On the other hand, Raleigh flow provides analytical solution of frictionless compressible flow with heat transfer where incoming subsonic flow can be choked at the outlet boundary with heat addition to the control volume. Nonuniform grid distribution improves the accuracy of numerical prediction. A benchmark numerical solution of compressible flow in a converging-diverging nozzle with friction and heat transfer has been developed to verify GFSSP's numerical predictions. The numerical predictions compare favorably in all cases.

  19. Particle displacement tracking applied to air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1991-01-01

    Electronic Particle Image Velocimeter (PIV) techniques offer many advantages over conventional photographic PIV methods such as fast turn around times and simplified data reduction. A new all electronic PIV technique was developed which can measure high speed gas velocities. The Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT) technique employs a single cw laser, small seed particles (1 micron), and a single intensified, gated CCD array frame camera to provide a simple and fast method of obtaining two-dimensional velocity vector maps with unambiguous direction determination. Use of a single CCD camera eliminates registration difficulties encountered when multiple cameras are used to obtain velocity magnitude and direction information. An 80386 PC equipped with a large memory buffer frame-grabber board provides all of the data acquisition and data reduction operations. No array processors of other numerical processing hardware are required. Full video resolution (640x480 pixel) is maintained in the acquired images, providing high resolution video frames of the recorded particle images. The time between data acquisition to display of the velocity vector map is less than 40 sec. The new electronic PDT technique is demonstrated on an air nozzle flow with velocities less than 150 m/s.

  20. Integrated turbine-compressor provides air flow for cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferri, A.

    1970-01-01

    Modified supersonic turbine cycle provides cooling air to surrounding structures. Simplified mechanical design assures correct balance of air flow, allows direct issue of cool air to the structure, and assists in matching turbine work output to work input required by the compressor.

  1. Research on Air Flow Measurement and Optimization of Control Algorithm in Air Disinfection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bing-jie, Li; Jia-hong, Zhao; Xu, Wang; Amuer, Mohamode; Zhi-liang, Wang

    2013-01-01

    As the air flow control system has the characteristics of delay and uncertainty, this research designed and achieved a practical air flow control system by using the hydrodynamic theory and the modern control theory. Firstly, the mathematical model of the air flow distribution of the system is analyzed from the hydrodynamics perspective. Then the model of the system is transformed into a lumped parameter state space expression by using the Galerkin method. Finally, the air flow is distributed more evenly through the estimation of the system state and optimal control. The simulation results show that this algorithm has good robustness and anti-interference ability

  2. Effect of Compressibility on the Flow past a Two-dimensional Bump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, W F; Daley, Bernard N

    1952-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted to determine experimentally the effects of compressibility on the flow past a bump and to compare the experimentally determined results with theory. Pressure measurements and Schlieren photographs were made of the flow past two bumps having thickness-chord ratios of 0.10 and 0.30 at Mach numbers between 0.20 and 0.84

  3. An old integration scheme for compressible flows revisited, refurbished and put to work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moretti, G.

    1978-01-01

    A scheme for integrating the Euler equations of compressible flow in any hyperbolic case is presented. The scheme relies on the concept of characteristics but is strictly a finite difference scheme. Improvements in accuracy and physical consistence due to the scheme are discussed and results of its application to complex flows are shown.

  4. The influence of external compression on muscle blood flow during exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Styf, J. )

    1990-01-01

    Intramuscular pressures and muscle blood flow were measured in the anterior tibial muscle during dynamic concentric exercise in 14 subjects. Pressures were recorded by the microcapillary infusion method and muscle blood flow by the 133-Xenon clearance technique. Muscle blood flow during constant exercise decreased from 34.5 (SD = 10.3) to 10.6 (SD = 4.9) ml/100 g/min (P less than 0.001) when muscle relaxation pressure was increased from 13.5 (SD = 2.7) to 39.9 (SD = 9.0) mm Hg by external compression. Muscle relaxation pressure during exercise is the intramuscular pressure between contractions. External compression of the lower limb during exercise impedes muscle blood flow by increasing muscle relaxation pressure. The experimental model seems suitable to study the influence of external compression by knee braces on intramuscular pressure during exercise.

  5. Three-dimensional freezing of flowing water in a tube cooled by air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, M.; Komatsu, Y.; Beer, H.

    2015-05-01

    The 3-D freezing of flowing water in a copper tube cooled by air flow is investigated by means of a numerical analysis. The air flows normal to the tube axis. Several parameters as inlet water mean velocity w m , inlet water temperature T iℓ t , air flow temperature T a and air flow velocity u a are selected in the calculations to adapt it to a winter season actually encountered. The numerical results present the development of the ice layer mean thickness and its 3-D morphologies as well as the critical ice layer thickness in the tube choked by the ice layer.

  6. Air-flow regulation system for a coal gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1984-01-01

    An improved air-flow regulator for a fixed-bed coal gasifier is provided which allows close air-flow regulation from a compressor source even though the pressure variations are too rapid for a single primary control loop to respond. The improved system includes a primary controller to control a valve in the main (large) air supply line to regulate large slow changes in flow. A secondary controller is used to control a smaller, faster acting valve in a secondary (small) air supply line parallel to the main line valve to regulate rapid cyclic deviations in air flow. A low-pass filter with a time constant of from 20 to 50 seconds couples the output of the secondary controller to the input of the primary controller so that the primary controller only responds to slow changes in the air-flow rate, the faster, cyclic deviations in flow rate sensed and corrected by the secondary controller loop do not reach the primary controller due to the high frequency rejection provided by the filter. This control arrangement provides at least a factor of 5 improvement in air-flow regulation for a coal gasifier in which air is supplied by a reciprocating compressor through a surge tank.

  7. Sara Lee: Improved Compressed Air System Increases Efficiency and Saves Energy at an Industrial Bakery

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-07-01

    This case study was prepared for the Industrial Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); it describes the energy and costs savings resulting from improving the compressed air system of a large Sara Lee bakery in Sacramento, California. The compressed air system supports many operations of the bread-making machines, and it had been performing poorly. A specialist from Draw Professional Services, a DOE Allied Partner, evaluated the system, and his suggestions included repairing a controller, fixing leaks, and replacing a compressor with a new one fitted with an energy-saving variable-speed drive. As a result, the bakery has reduced its energy use by 471,000 kilowatt-hours annually and is saving $50,000 per year in operating and maintenance costs.

  8. The effect of compressed air foam on the detection of hydrocarbon fuels in fire debris samples.

    PubMed

    Coulson, S A; Morgan-Smith, R K; Noble, D

    2000-01-01

    In 1998/99 the New Zealand Fire Service implemented compressed air foam delivery systems for the suppression of fires in rural areas. This study investigated whether the introduction of the foam to the seat of the fire created any problems in subsequent analyses of fire debris samples. No significant interferences from the foam were found when the samples were analysed by direct headspace using activated carbon strips. The only foam component detected was limonene. PMID:11094822

  9. [Medical aspects of the environmental sanitation of workplaces in compressed air work in Japan].

    PubMed

    Mano, Y; Shibayama, M

    1987-01-01

    Actual follow-up investigations were made for a period of 5 yr and 10 months since February 1980 on 55 places of caisson and shield work. The maximum bottom pressure in caisson work was 3.6 kg/cm2 (4.6 ATA) and that of shield work was 1.6 kg/cm2. The number of exposures of workers was 23,737 in caisson work and 75,244 in shield work. The items of geomedical measurements were temperature (degrees C), humidity, dust, illumination, noise, oxygen, carbonic acid gas and others. In compressed air work, it is most important to prevent decompression sickness (bends) from the view of occupational health. The incidence of bends has decreased in recent years because of strict control by regulations. Environmental hygiene, however, has seldom been discussed in this field and little geomedical control has been made on compressed air work. In view of this situation, we have, therefore, studied, observed, and measured the hygienic factors of this work during the past five years. This investigation is without doubt the first of its kind in Japan and the areas covered most of the regions where compressed air works have been made in the past. From these results, it can be concluded as follows: The working temperature was controlled, but humidity was too high (nearly 90%). Illumination was insufficient. Dust was a problem, but high humidity played an important role in decreasing the volume. The environment was noisy. It is therefore natural that environmental studies should be continued and hygienic consideration be further emphasized in compressed air work. PMID:3613254

  10. Pressure Regulators as Valves for Saving Compressed Air and their Influence on System Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvořák, Lukáš; Fojtášek, Kamil

    2015-05-01

    Pressure regulators in the field of pneumatic mechanisms can be used as valves for saving compressed air. For example it can be used to reduce the pressure when the piston rod is retracting unloaded and thus it is possible to save some energy. However the problem is that saving valve can significantly affect the dynamics of the pneumatic system. The lower pressure in the piston rod chamber causes extension of time for retraction of the piston rod. This article compare the air consumption experimentally determined and calculated, measured curves of pressure in cylinder chambers and piston speed when saving valve is set up differently.

  11. Simultaneous measurements of temperature and density in air flows using UV laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, D. G.; Mckenzie, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    The simultaneous measurement of temperature and density using laser-induced fluorescence of oxygen in combination with Q-branch Raman scattering of nitrogen and oxygen is demonstrated in a low-speed air flow. The lowest density and temperature measured in the experiment correspond to the freestream values at Mach 5 in the Ames 3.5-Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel for stagnation conditions of 100 atm and 1000 K. The experimental results demonstrate the viability of the optical technique for measurements that support the study of compressible turbulence and the validation of numerical codes in supersonic and hypersonic wind tunnel flows.

  12. Increasing the Air Charge and Scavenging the Clearance Volume of a Compression-Ignition Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanogle, J A; Hicks, C W; Foster, H H

    1934-01-01

    The object of the investigation presented in this report was to determine the effects of increasing the air charge and scavenging the clearance volume of a 4-stroke-cycle compression-ignition engine having a vertical-disk form combustion chamber. Boosting the inlet-air pressure with normal valve timing increased the indicated engine power in proportion to the additional air inducted and resulted in smoother engine operation with less combustion shock. Scavenging the clearance volume by using a valve overlap of 145 degrees and an inlet-air boost pressure of approximately 2 1/2 inches of mercury produced a net increase in performance for clear exhaust operation of 33 percent over that obtained with normal valve timing and the same boost pressure. The improved combustion characteristics result in lower specific fuel consumption, and a clearer exhaust.

  13. Compression-Driven Mass Flow in Bulk Solid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhi Gang; Beamish, John

    2016-07-01

    Mass flow has been observed in solid 4He coexisting with superfluid confined in Vycor, but its physical mechanism remains an open question. Here we report observations of flow in experiments in which Vycor has been eliminated, allowing us to study the intrinsic flow in solid 4He without the complications introduced by the presence of superfluid and the associated solid-liquid interfaces. By growing crystals with 3He concentration as low as x3=5 ×10-12, we also avoided the low temperature flow suppression observed in previous experiments and found that the flow rate continued to increase down to at least 28 mK without saturation. In addition, 3He concentrations of 120 ppb, which suppressed most of the low temperature flow in previous experiments, had no effect in our samples. The larger 3He concentrations needed to block the bulk solid flow suggest that the mass flow involves a larger area, such as disordered liquid layer on solid surface and grain boundaries.

  14. Compression-Driven Mass Flow in Bulk Solid ^{4}He.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhi Gang; Beamish, John

    2016-07-01

    Mass flow has been observed in solid ^{4}He coexisting with superfluid confined in Vycor, but its physical mechanism remains an open question. Here we report observations of flow in experiments in which Vycor has been eliminated, allowing us to study the intrinsic flow in solid ^{4}He without the complications introduced by the presence of superfluid and the associated solid-liquid interfaces. By growing crystals with ^{3}He concentration as low as x_{3}=5×10^{-12}, we also avoided the low temperature flow suppression observed in previous experiments and found that the flow rate continued to increase down to at least 28 mK without saturation. In addition, ^{3}He concentrations of 120 ppb, which suppressed most of the low temperature flow in previous experiments, had no effect in our samples. The larger ^{3}He concentrations needed to block the bulk solid flow suggest that the mass flow involves a larger area, such as disordered liquid layer on solid surface and grain boundaries. PMID:27447513

  15. Three-dimensional nonlinear ideal MHD equilibria with field-aligned incompressible and compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moawad, S. M.; Ibrahim, D. A.

    2016-08-01

    The equilibrium properties of three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are investigated. Incompressible and compressible flows are considered. The governing equations are taken in a steady state such that the magnetic field is parallel to the plasma flow. Equations of stationary equilibrium for both of incompressible and compressible MHD flows are derived and described in a mathematical mode. For incompressible MHD flows, Alfvénic and non-Alfvénic flows with constant and variable magnetofluid density are investigated. For Alfvénic incompressible flows, the general three-dimensional solutions are determined with the aid of two potential functions of the velocity field. For non-Alfvénic incompressible flows, the stationary equilibrium equations are reduced to two differential constraints on the potential functions, flow velocity, magnetofluid density, and the static pressure. Some examples which may be of some relevance to axisymmetric confinement systems are presented. For compressible MHD flows, equations of the stationary equilibrium are derived with the aid of a single potential function of the velocity field. The existence of three-dimensional solutions for these MHD flows is investigated. Several classes of three-dimensional exact solutions for several cases of nonlinear equilibrium equations are presented.

  16. On solving the compressible Navier-Stokes equations for unsteady flows at very low Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pletcher, R. H.; Chen, K.-H.

    1993-01-01

    The properties of a preconditioned, coupled, strongly implicit finite difference scheme for solving the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in primitive variables are investigated for two unsteady flows at low speeds, namely the impulsively started driven cavity and the startup of pipe flow. For the shear-driven cavity flow, the computational effort was observed to be nearly independent of Mach number, especially at the low end of the range considered. This Mach number independence was also observed for steady pipe flow calculations; however, rather different conclusions were drawn for the unsteady calculations. In the pressure-driven pipe startup problem, the compressibility of the fluid began to significantly influence the physics of the flow development at quite low Mach numbers. The present scheme was observed to produce the expected characteristics of completely incompressible flow when the Mach number was set at very low values. Good agreement with incompressible results available in the literature was observed.

  17. On steady solutions to vacuumless Newtonian models of compressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łasica, Michał

    2014-11-01

    We prove the existence of weak solutions to the steady compressible Navier-Stokes system in the barotropic case for a class of pressure laws that are singular at vacuum. We consider the problem in a bounded domain in R2 with slip boundary conditions. Due to the appropriate construction of approximate solutions used in the proof, the obtained density is bounded away from 0 (and infinity). Owing to a classical result, this implies that the density and gradient of velocity are at least Hölder continuous, which does not generally hold for the classical isentropic model of a perfect gas in the presence of vacuum.

  18. Spatial three-dimensional secondary instability compressible boundary-layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Hady, Nabil M.

    1989-01-01

    Three-dimensional linear secondary instability theory is extended for compressible and high Mach number boundary layer flows. The small but finite amplitude compressible Tollmien-Schlichting wave effect on the growth of 3-D perturbations is investigated. The focus is on principal parametric resonance responsible for the strong growth of subharmonic in low disturbance environment. The effect of increasing Mach number on the onset, growth, the shape of eigenfunctions of the subharmonic is assessed, and the resulting vortical structure is examined.

  19. Numerical Solution of Inviscid Compressible Steady Flows around the RAE 2822 Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryštůfek, P.; Kozel, K.

    2015-05-01

    The article presents results of a numerical solution of subsonic, transonic and supersonic flows described by the system of Euler equations in 2D compressible flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil. Authors used FVM multistage Runge-Kutta method to numerically solve the flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil. The results are compared with the solution using the software Ansys Fluent 15.0.7.

  20. An Assessment of Artificial Compressibility and Pressure Projection Methods for Incompressible Flow Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, C.; Smith, Charles A. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Performance of the two commonly used numerical procedures, one based on artificial compressibility method and the other pressure projection method, are compared. These formulations are selected primarily because they are designed for three-dimensional applications. The computational procedures are compared by obtaining steady state solutions of a wake vortex and unsteady solutions of a curved duct flow. For steady computations, artificial compressibility was very efficient in terms of computing time and robustness. For an unsteady flow which requires small physical time step, pressure projection method was found to be computationally more efficient than an artificial compressibility method. This comparison is intended to give some basis for selecting a method or a flow solution code for large three-dimensional applications where computing resources become a critical issue.

  1. TF34 engine compression system computer study. [simulation of flow stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosny, W. M.; Steenken, W. G.

    1979-01-01

    The stability of the fan and the compressor components was examined individually using linearized and time dependent, one dimensional stability analysis techniques. The stability of the fan core integrated compression system was investigated using a two dimensional compression system model. The analytical equations on which this model was based satisfied the mass, axial momentum, radial momentum, and energy conservation equations for flow through a finite control volume. The results gave an accurate simulation of the flow through the compression system. The speed lines of the components were reproduced; the points of instability were accurately predicted; the locations where the instability was initiated in the fan and the core were indicated; and the variation of the bypass ratio during flow throttling was calculated. The validity of the analytical techniques was then established by comparing these results with test data and with results obtained from the steady state cycle deck.

  2. A priori evaluation of the Pantano and Sarkar model in compressible homogeneous shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlifi, Hechmi; Abdallah, J.; Aïcha, H.; Taïeb, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a Reynolds stress closure, including the Pantano and Sarkar model of the mean part of the pressure-strain correlation is used for the computation of compressible homogeneous at high-speed shear flow. Several studies concerning the compressible homogeneous shear flow show that the changes of the turbulence structures are principally due to the structural compressibility effects which significantly affect the pressure field and then the pressure-strain correlation. Eventually, this term appears as the main term responsible for the changes in the magnitude of the Reynolds stress anisotropies. The structure of the gradient Mach number is similar to that of turbulence, therefore this parameter may be appropriate to study the changes in turbulence structures that arise from structural compressibility effects. Thus, the incompressible model of the pressure strain correlation and its corrected form by using the turbulent Mach turbulent only, fail to correctly evaluate the compressibility effects at high shear flow. An extension of the widely used incompressible Launder, Reece and Rodi model on compressible homogeneous shear flow is the major aim of the present work. From this extension, the standard coefficients C become a function of the extra compressibility parameters (the turbulent Mach number M and the gradient Mach number M) through the Pantano and Sarkar model. Application of the model on compressible homogeneous shear flow by considering various initial conditions shows reasonable agreement with the DNS results of Simone et al. and Sarkar. The observed trend of the dramatic increase in the normal Reynolds stress anisotropies, the significant decrease in the Reynolds shear stress anisotropy and the increase of the turbulent kinetic energy amplification rate with increasing the gradient Mach number are well predicted by the model. The ability of the model to predict the equilibrium states for the flow in cases A to A from DNS results of Sarkar is

  3. Effect of spinal cord compression on local vascular blood flow and perfusion capacity.

    PubMed

    Alshareef, Mohammed; Krishna, Vibhor; Ferdous, Jahid; Alshareef, Ahmed; Kindy, Mark; Kolachalama, Vijaya B; Shazly, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) can induce prolonged spinal cord compression that may result in a reduction of local tissue perfusion, progressive ischemia, and potentially irreversible tissue necrosis. Due to the combination of risk factors and the varied presentation of symptoms, the appropriate method and time course for clinical intervention following SCI are not always evident. In this study, a three-dimensional finite element fluid-structure interaction model of the cervical spinal cord was developed to examine how traditionally sub-clinical compressive mechanical loads impact spinal arterial blood flow. The spinal cord and surrounding dura mater were modeled as linear elastic, isotropic, and incompressible solids, while blood was modeled as a single-phased, incompressible Newtonian fluid. Simulation results indicate that anterior, posterior, and anteroposterior compressions of the cervical spinal cord have significantly different ischemic potentials, with prediction that the posterior component of loading elevates patient risk due to the concomitant reduction of blood flow in the arterial branches. Conversely, anterior loading compromises flow through the anterior spinal artery but minimally impacts branch flow rates. The findings of this study provide novel insight into how sub-clinical spinal cord compression could give rise to certain disease states, and suggest a need to monitor spinal artery perfusion following even mild compressive loading. PMID:25268384

  4. Effect of Spinal Cord Compression on Local Vascular Blood Flow and Perfusion Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Alshareef, Mohammed; Krishna, Vibhor; Ferdous, Jahid; Alshareef, Ahmed; Kindy, Mark; Kolachalama, Vijaya B.; Shazly, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) can induce prolonged spinal cord compression that may result in a reduction of local tissue perfusion, progressive ischemia, and potentially irreversible tissue necrosis. Due to the combination of risk factors and the varied presentation of symptoms, the appropriate method and time course for clinical intervention following SCI are not always evident. In this study, a three-dimensional finite element fluid-structure interaction model of the cervical spinal cord was developed to examine how traditionally sub-clinical compressive mechanical loads impact spinal arterial blood flow. The spinal cord and surrounding dura mater were modeled as linear elastic, isotropic, and incompressible solids, while blood was modeled as a single-phased, incompressible Newtonian fluid. Simulation results indicate that anterior, posterior, and anteroposterior compressions of the cervical spinal cord have significantly different ischemic potentials, with prediction that the posterior component of loading elevates patient risk due to the concomitant reduction of blood flow in the arterial branches. Conversely, anterior loading compromises flow through the anterior spinal artery but minimally impacts branch flow rates. The findings of this study provide novel insight into how sub-clinical spinal cord compression could give rise to certain disease states, and suggest a need to monitor spinal artery perfusion following even mild compressive loading. PMID:25268384

  5. Evaluation of thermal energy storage materials for advanced compressed air energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zaloudek, F.R.; Wheeler, K.R.; Marksberry, L.

    1983-03-01

    Advanced Compressed-Air Energy Storage (ACAS) plants have the near-term potential to reduce the fuel consumption of compressed-air plants from 33 to 100%, depending upon their design. Fuel is saved by storing some or all of the heat of compression as sensible heat which is subsequently used to reheat the compressed air prior to expansion in the turbine generator. The thermal storage media required for this application must be low cost and durable. The objective of this project was to screen thermal store materials based on their thermal cycle durability, particulate formation and corrosion resistant characteristics. The materials investigated were iron oxide pellets, Denstone pebbles, cast-iron balls, and Dresser basalt rock. The study specifically addressed the problems of particle formation and thermal ratcheting of the materials during thermal cycling and the chemical attack on the materials by the high temperature and moist environment in an ACAS heat storage bed. The results indicate that from the durability standpoint Denstone, cast iron containing 27% or more chromium, and crushed Dresser basalt would possibly stand up to ACAS conditions. If costs are considered in addition to durability and performance, the crushed Dresser basalt would probably be the most desirable heat storage material for adiabatic and hybrid ACAS plants, and more in-depth longer term thermal cycling and materials testing of Dresser basalt is recommended. Also recommended is the redesign and costing analysis of both the hybrid and adiabatic ACAS facilities based upon the use of Dresser basalt as the thermal store material.

  6. A Geophysical Flow Experiment in a Compressible Critical Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegseth, John; Garcia, Laudelino

    1996-01-01

    The first objective of this experiment is to build an experimental system in which, in analogy to a geophysical system, a compressible fluid in a spherical annulus becomes radially stratified in density through an A.C. electric field. When this density gradient is demonstrated, the system will be augmented so that the fluid can be driven by heating and rotation and tested in preparation for a microgravity experiment. This apparatus consists of a spherical capacitor filled with critical fluid in a temperature controlled environment. To make the fluid critical, the apparatus will be operated near the critical pressure, critical density, and critical temperature of the fluid. This will result in a highly compressible fluid because of the properties of the fluid near its critical point. A high voltage A.C. source applied across the capacitor will create a spherically symmetric central force because of the dielectric properties of the fluid in an electric field gradient. This central force will induce a spherically symmetric density gradient that is analogous to a geophysical fluid system. To generate such a density gradient the system must be small (approx. 1 inch diameter). This small cell will also be capable of driving the critical fluid by heating and rotation. Since a spherically symmetric density gradient can only be made in microgravity, another small cell, of the same geometry, will be built that uses incompressible fluid. The driving of the fluid by rotation and heating in these small cells will be developed. The resulting instabilities from the driving in these two systems will then be studied. The second objective is to study the pattern forming instabilities (bifurcations) resulting from the well controlled experimental conditions in the critical fluid cell. This experiment will come close to producing conditions that are geophysically similar and will be studied as the driving parameters are changed.

  7. Compressed air energy storage preliminary design and site development program in an aquifer. Turbomachinery design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, P. A.; Bonk, J. S.; Kobett, W. F.; Kosanovich, N. S.; Long, L. J.; Marinacci, D. J.

    1981-07-01

    Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) is a means of storing electrical energy generated by utility baseload power plants during off-peak hours. This stored energy will be used during periods of high demand. Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system uses off-peak power from an electrical grid to operate an electric dynamo. This is used as a motor to drive a compressor train that charges atmospheric air at elevated pressure into an underground aquifer. During high electrical demand periods, the pressurized air is withdrawn from the aquifer and channeled to combustors where it is heated and then expanded through a combustion turbine. The turbine drives the electric dynamo, being operated as a generator, to supply power back to the grid. Since the CAES turbine train is divorced from the compressor during power generation, the net output power is about three times that of a normal combustion turbine. Although the fuel consumption rate is nearly the same, the heat rate is much lower.

  8. An experimental investigation of compressible three-dimensional boundary layer flow in annular diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Om, Deepak; Childs, Morris E.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental study is described in which detailed wall pressure measurements have been obtained for compressible three-dimensional unseparated boundary layer flow in annular diffusers with and without normal shock waves. Detailed mean flow-field data were also obtained for the diffuser flow without a shock wave. Two diffuser flows with shock waves were investigated. In one case, the normal shock existed over the complete annulus whereas in the second case, the shock existed over a part of the annulus. The data obtained can be used to validate computational codes for predicting such flow fields. The details of the flow field without the shock wave show flow reversal in the circumferential direction on both inner and outer surfaces. However, there is a lag in the flow reversal between the inner nad the outer surfaces. This is an interesting feature of this flow and should be a good test for the computational codes.

  9. A flux-split algorithm applied to conservative models for multicomponent compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquina, Antonio; Mulet, Pep

    2003-02-01

    In this paper we consider a conservative extension of the Euler equations for gas dynamics to describe a two-component compressible flow in Cartesian coordinates. It is well known that classical shock-capturing schemes applied to conservative models are oscillatory near the interface between the two gases. Several authors have addressed this problem proposing either a primitive consistent algorithm [J. Comput. Phys. 112 (1994) 31] or Lagrangian ingredients (Ghost Fluid Method by Fedkiw et al. [J. Comput. Phys. 152 (1999) 452] and [J. Comput. Phys. 169 (2001) 594]). We solve directly this conservative model by a flux-split algorithm, due to the first author (see [J. Comput. Phys. 125 (1996) 42]), together with a high-order (WENO5) flux reconstruction [J. Comput. Phys. 115 (1994) 200; 83 (1989) 32]. This algorithm seems to reduce the oscillations near the interfaces in a way that does not affect the physics of the experiments. We validate our algorithm with the numerical simulation of the interaction of a Mach 1.22 shock wave impinging a helium bubble in air, under the same conditions studied by Haas and Sturtevant [J. Fluid Mech. 181 (1987) 41] and successfully simulated by Quirk and Karni [J. Fluid Mech. 318 (1996) 129].

  10. Nonlinear stability of non-stationary cross-flow vortices in compressible boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajjar, J. S. B.

    1995-05-01

    The nonlinear evolution of long wavelength non-stationary cross-flow vortices in a compressible boundary layer is investigated and the work extends that of Gajjar (1994) to flows involving multiple critical layers. The basic flow profile considered in this paper is that appropriate for a fully three-dimensional boundary layer with O(1) Mach number and with wall heating or cooling. The governing equations for the evolution of the cross-flow vortex are obtained and some special cases are discussed. One special case includes linear theory where exact analytic expressions for the growth rate of the vortices are obtained. Another special case is a generalization of the Bassom & Gajjar (1988) results for neutral waves to compressible flows. The viscous correction to the growth rate is derived and it is shown how the unsteady nonlinear critical layer structure merges with that for a Haberman type of viscous critical layer.

  11. A quantitative theory for the mean velocity distribution of compressible ramp flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Wei-Tao; Wu, Bin; Zou, Hong-Yue; Li, Xin-Liang; Hussain, Fazle; She, Zhen-Su

    2013-11-01

    The flow induced by a compression ramp is of practical importance as a typical flow in the intake of a scramjet engine, yet no quantitative theory is available. This study proposes a quantitative theory for the mean velocity profile (MVP) of the compression ramp flow, based on a multi-layer description of turbulent boundary layers. Application of the theory on the direct numerical simulation (DNS) data shows that the mixing length function in the boundary layer after the reattachment point has a five-layer structure. A formula is given for the streamwise MVP, in very good agreement with the DNS data. Variation of the parameters in the formula with the spatial position is measured and discussed. These results further support the validity of the Structural Ensemble Dynamics approach to a wide class of wall-bounded flows, and a new modeling strategy for engineering computation of complex supersonic flows.

  12. A Computational Method for Compressible Flows with Condensation in Power Plant Condensers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Fumio; Harada, Iwao

    A computational method for compressible flows with condensation was developed. Condensation was formulated by two thermodynamic equations of state for pressure and energy. These equations of state were simultaneously solved with the Euler equation and heat transfer equations. A finite volume method based on an approximate Riemann solver was adopted to solve the Euler equation. The computational method was applied to compressible flows in a condenser and a turbine exhaust hood. The flow regime changed widely from subsonic flow to transonic flow during a small decrease of cooling water temperature. Subcooling temperature from the annulus of the turbine blades to the condensate in the hot well was investigated. Results showed the subcooling temperature could be reduced by using an advanced steam guide which was designed to improve diffuser performance under widely changing conditions.

  13. Nonlinear stability of non-stationary cross-flow vortices in compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gajjar, J. S. B.

    1995-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of long wavelength non-stationary cross-flow vortices in a compressible boundary layer is investigated and the work extends that of Gajjar (1994) to flows involving multiple critical layers. The basic flow profile considered in this paper is that appropriate for a fully three-dimensional boundary layer with O(1) Mach number and with wall heating or cooling. The governing equations for the evolution of the cross-flow vortex are obtained and some special cases are discussed. One special case includes linear theory where exact analytic expressions for the growth rate of the vortices are obtained. Another special case is a generalization of the Bassom & Gajjar (1988) results for neutral waves to compressible flows. The viscous correction to the growth rate is derived and it is shown how the unsteady nonlinear critical layer structure merges with that for a Haberman type of viscous critical layer.

  14. Calculation of compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils by a finite element/finite difference method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Stuart L.; Meade, Andrew J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented of a finite element/finite difference method (semidiscrete Galerkin method) used to calculate compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils, in which the group finite element scheme is applied to the Dorodnitsyn formulation of the boundary layer equations. The semidiscrete Galerkin (SDG) method promises to be fast, accurate and computationally efficient. The SDG method can also be applied to any smoothly connected airfoil shape without modification and possesses the potential capability of calculating boundary layer solutions beyond flow separation. Results are presented for low speed laminar flow past a circular cylinder and past a NACA 0012 airfoil at zero angle of attack at a Mach number of 0.5. Also shown are results for compressible flow past a flat plate for a Mach number range of 0 to 10 and results for incompressible turbulent flow past a flat plate. All numerical solutions assume an attached boundary layer.

  15. Ford Van Dyke: Compressed Air Management Program Leads to Improvements that Reduce Energy Consumption at an Automotive Transmission Plant

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-25

    Staff at the Ford Van Dyke Transmission Plant in Sterling Heights, Michigan, have increased the efficiency of the plant’s compressed air system to enhance its performance while saving energy and improving production.

  16. Site specific comparison of H2, CH4 and compressed air energy storage in porous formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmann Pfeiffer, Wolf; Wang, Bo; Bauer, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The supply of energy from renewable sources like wind or solar power is subject to fluctuations determined by the climatic and weather conditions, and shortage periods can be expected on the order of days to weeks. Energy storage is thus required if renewable energy dominates the total energy production and has to compensate the shortages. Porous formations in the subsurface could provide large storage capacities for various energy carriers, such as hydrogen (H2), synthetic methane (CH4) or compressed air (CAES). All three energy storage options have similar requirements regarding the storage site characteristics and consequently compete for suitable subsurface structures. The aim of this work is to compare the individual storage methods for an individual storage site regarding the storage capacity as well as the achievable delivery rates. This objective is pursued using numerical simulation of the individual storage operations. In a first step, a synthetic anticline with a radius of 4 km, a drop of 900 m and a formation thickness of 20 m is used to compare the individual storage methods. The storage operations are carried out using -depending on the energy carrier- 5 to 13 wells placed in the top of the structure. A homogeneous parameter distribution is assumed with permeability, porosity and residual water saturation being 500 mD, 0.35 and 0.2, respectively. N2 is used as a cushion gas in the H2 storage simulations. In case of compressed air energy storage, a high discharge rate of 400 kg/s equating to 28.8 mio. m³/d at surface conditions is required to produce 320 MW of power. Using 13 wells the storage is capable of supplying the specified gas flow rate for a period of 31 hours. Two cases using 5 and 9 wells were simulated for both the H2 and the CH4 storage operation. The target withdrawal rates of 1 mio. sm³/d are maintained for the whole extraction period of one week in all simulations. However, the power output differs with the 5 well scenario producing

  17. Equations and simulations for multiphase compressible gas-dust flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oran, Elaine; Houim, Ryan

    2014-11-01

    Dust-gas multiphase flows are important in physical scenarios such as dust explosions in coal mines, asteroid impact disturbing lunar regolith, and soft aircraft landings dispersing desert or beach sand. In these cases, the gas flow regime can range from highly subsonic and nearly incompressible to supersonic and shock-laden flow, the grain packing can range from fully packed to completely dispersed, and both the gas and the dust can range from chemically inert to highly exothermic. To cover the necessary parameter range in a single model, we solve coupled sets of Navier-Stokes equations describing the background gas and the dust. As an example, a reactive-dust explosion that results in a type of shock-flame complex is described and discussed. Sponsored by the University of Maryland through Minta Martin Endowment Funds in the Department of Aerospace Engineering, and through the Glenn L. Martin Institute Chaired Professorship at the A. James Clark School of Engineering.

  18. BEM-based numerical study of three-dimensional compressible bubble dynamics in stokes flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramova, O. A.; Akhatov, I. Sh.; Gumerov, N. A.; Itkulova, Yu. A.

    2014-09-01

    The dynamics of compressible gas bubbles in a viscous shear flow and an acoustic field at low Reynolds numbers is studied. The numerical approach is based on the boundary element method (BEM), which is effective as applied to the three-dimensional simulation of bubble deformation. However, the application of the conventional BEM to compressible bubble dynamics faces difficulties caused by the degeneration of the resulting algebraic system. Additional relations based on the Lorentz reciprocity principle are used to cope with this problem. Test computations of the dynamics of a single bubble and bubble clusters in acoustic fields and shear flows are presented.

  19. Position paper -- Tank ventilation system design air flow rates

    SciTech Connect

    Goolsby, G.K.

    1995-01-04

    The purpose of this paper is to document a project position on required ventilation system design air flow rates for the waste storage tanks currently being designed by project W-236A, the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF). The Title 1 design primary tank heat removal system consists of two systems: a primary tank vapor space ventilation system; and an annulus ventilation system. At the conclusion of Title 1 design, air flow rates for the primary and annulus ventilation systems were 960 scfm and 4,400 scfm, respectively, per tank. These design flow rates were capable of removing 1,250,000 Btu/hr from each tank. However, recently completed and ongoing studies have resulted in a design change to reduce the extreme case heat load to 700,000 Btu/hr. This revision of the extreme case heat load, coupled with results of scale model evaporative testing performed by WHC Thermal Hydraulics, allow for a reduction of the design air flow rates for both primary and annulus ventilation systems. Based on the preceding discussion, ICF Kaiser Hanford Co. concludes that the design should incorporate the following design air flow rates: Primary ventilation system--500 scfm maximum and Annulus ventilation system--1,100 scfm maximum. In addition, the minimum air flow rates in the primary and annulus ventilation systems will be investigated during Title 2 design. The results of the Title 2 investigation will determine the range of available temperature control using variable air flows to both ventilation systems.

  20. Porous media experience applicable to field evaluation for compressed air energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Gutknecht, P.J.

    1980-06-01

    A survey is presented of porous media field experience that may aid in the development of a compressed air energy storage field demonstration. Work done at PNL and experience of other groups and related industries is reviewed. An overall view of porous media experience in the underground storage of fluids is presented. CAES experience consists of site evaluation and selection processes used by groups in California, Kansas, and Indiana. Reservoir design and field evaluation of example sites are reported. The studies raised questions about compatibility with depleted oil and gas reservoirs, storage space rights, and compressed air regulations. Related experience embraces technologies of natural gas, thermal energy, and geothermal and hydrogen storage. Natural gas storage technology lends the most toward compressed air storage development, keeping in mind the respective differences between stored fluids, physical conditions, and cycling frequencies. Both fluids are injected under pressure into an aquifer to form a storage bubble confined between a suitable caprock structure and partially displaced ground water. State-of-the-art information is summarized as the necessary foundation material for field planning. Preliminary design criteria are given as recommendations for basic reservoir characteristics. These include geometric dimensions and storage matrix properties such as permeability. Suggested ranges are given for injection air temperature and reservoir pressure. The second step in developmental research is numerical modeling. Results have aided preliminary design by analyzing injection effects upon reservoir pressure, temperature and humidity profiles. Results are reported from laboratory experiments on candidate sandstones and caprocks. Conclusions are drawn, but further verification must be done in the field.

  1. On higher eigenstates of Goertler instability in compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goglia, G. L.; Verma, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of secondary instabilities of Goertler vortices with respect to their growth and amplification was investigated. Instability of viscous flow along a concave surface is in the form of counterrotating streamwise vortices commonly known as Goertler vortices. The effects of suction on higher modes of Goertler vortices are also considered.

  2. Gas turbine engine adapted for use in combination with an apparatus for separating a portion of oxygen from compressed air

    DOEpatents

    Bland, Robert J.; Horazak, Dennis A.

    2012-03-06

    A gas turbine engine is provided comprising an outer shell, a compressor assembly, at least one combustor assembly, a turbine assembly and duct structure. The outer shell includes a compressor section, a combustor section, an intermediate section and a turbine section. The intermediate section includes at least one first opening and at least one second opening. The compressor assembly is located in the compressor section to define with the compressor section a compressor apparatus to compress air. The at least one combustor assembly is coupled to the combustor section to define with the combustor section a combustor apparatus. The turbine assembly is located in the turbine section to define with the turbine section a turbine apparatus. The duct structure is coupled to the intermediate section to receive at least a portion of the compressed air from the compressor apparatus through the at least one first opening in the intermediate section, pass the compressed air to an apparatus for separating a portion of oxygen from the compressed air to produced vitiated compressed air and return the vitiated compressed air to the intermediate section via the at least one second opening in the intermediate section.

  3. Response analysis of a laminar premixed M-flame to flow perturbations using a linearized compressible Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, M.; Schuller, T.; Sipp, D.; Schmid, P. J.

    2015-04-01

    The response of a laminar premixed methane-air flame subjected to flow perturbations around a steady state is examined experimentally and using a linearized compressible Navier-Stokes solver with a one-step chemistry mechanism to describe combustion. The unperturbed flame takes an M-shape stabilized both by a central bluff body and by the external rim of a cylindrical nozzle. This base flow is computed by a nonlinear direct simulation of the steady reacting flow, and the flame topology is shown to qualitatively correspond to experiments conducted under comparable conditions. The flame is then subjected to acoustic disturbances produced at different locations in the numerical domain, and its response is examined using the linearized solver. This linear numerical model then allows the componentwise investigation of the effects of flow disturbances on unsteady combustion and the feedback from the flame on the unsteady flow field. It is shown that a wrinkled reaction layer produces hydrodynamic disturbances in the fresh reactant flow field that superimpose on the acoustic field. This phenomenon, observed in several experiments, is fully interpreted here. The additional perturbations convected by the mean flow stem from the feedback of the perturbed flame sheet dynamics onto the flow field by a mechanism similar to that of a perturbed vortex sheet. The different regimes where this mechanism prevails are investigated by examining the phase and group velocities of flow disturbances along an axis oriented along the main direction of the flow in the fresh reactant flow field. It is shown that this mechanism dominates the low-frequency response of the wrinkled shape taken by the flame and, in particular, that it fully determines the dynamics of the flame tip from where the bulk of noise is radiated.

  4. Response analysis of a laminar premixed M-flame to flow perturbations using a linearized compressible Navier-Stokes solver

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, M.; Schuller, T.; Sipp, D.; Schmid, P. J.

    2015-04-15

    The response of a laminar premixed methane-air flame subjected to flow perturbations around a steady state is examined experimentally and using a linearized compressible Navier-Stokes solver with a one-step chemistry mechanism to describe combustion. The unperturbed flame takes an M-shape stabilized both by a central bluff body and by the external rim of a cylindrical nozzle. This base flow is computed by a nonlinear direct simulation of the steady reacting flow, and the flame topology is shown to qualitatively correspond to experiments conducted under comparable conditions. The flame is then subjected to acoustic disturbances produced at different locations in the numerical domain, and its response is examined using the linearized solver. This linear numerical model then allows the componentwise investigation of the effects of flow disturbances on unsteady combustion and the feedback from the flame on the unsteady flow field. It is shown that a wrinkled reaction layer produces hydrodynamic disturbances in the fresh reactant flow field that superimpose on the acoustic field. This phenomenon, observed in several experiments, is fully interpreted here. The additional perturbations convected by the mean flow stem from the feedback of the perturbed flame sheet dynamics onto the flow field by a mechanism similar to that of a perturbed vortex sheet. The different regimes where this mechanism prevails are investigated by examining the phase and group velocities of flow disturbances along an axis oriented along the main direction of the flow in the fresh reactant flow field. It is shown that this mechanism dominates the low-frequency response of the wrinkled shape taken by the flame and, in particular, that it fully determines the dynamics of the flame tip from where the bulk of noise is radiated.

  5. Spectral Element Method for the Simulation of Unsteady Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diosady, Laslo Tibor; Murman, Scott M.

    2013-01-01

    This work uses a discontinuous-Galerkin spectral-element method (DGSEM) to solve the compressible Navier-Stokes equations [1{3]. The inviscid ux is computed using the approximate Riemann solver of Roe [4]. The viscous fluxes are computed using the second form of Bassi and Rebay (BR2) [5] in a manner consistent with the spectral-element approximation. The method of lines with the classical 4th-order explicit Runge-Kutta scheme is used for time integration. Results for polynomial orders up to p = 15 (16th order) are presented. The code is parallelized using the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The computations presented in this work are performed using the Sandy Bridge nodes of the NASA Pleiades supercomputer at NASA Ames Research Center. Each Sandy Bridge node consists of 2 eight-core Intel Xeon E5-2670 processors with a clock speed of 2.6Ghz and 2GB per core memory. On a Sandy Bridge node the Tau Benchmark [6] runs in a time of 7.6s.

  6. Compressible Flows on Adaptive and Unstrucured Meshes with FLUIDITY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R.; Piggott, M.; Wilson, C.; Kramer, S.

    2011-09-01

    Fluidity is an open source, general purpose, multi-phase CFD code capable of solving numerically the Navier-Stokes and accompanying field equations on arbitrary unstructured finite element meshes in one, two and three dimensions. It uses a moving finite element/control volume method which allows arbitrary movement of the mesh in time dependent problems. It has a wide range of finite element/control volume element choices including mixed formulations. Here, continuous Galerkin (CG) and control volumes (CV) solutions of the compressible Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations are presented for the stratified tests cases of the rising thermal bubble and inertia gravity waves. Results show good agreement with previously published literature and novel result presented here is the ability to dynamically adapt the mesh to increase resolution in the region of interest, thus reducing the number of degrees of freedom in the problem without decreasing the accuracy of the result. Finally, results from the case of a fully three dimensional rising thermal bubble are presented.

  7. Compressive strength, plastic flow properties, and surface frictional effects of 1100, 3003 and 6061 aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkerton, G.W.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this study is to find aluminum alloys that are effective for use as wire vacuum seals in the 800MeV particle accelerator located at the Louis Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) in Los Alamos, NM. Three alloys, Al 1100, Al 3003, and Al 6061, are investigated under uniaxial compression to determine stresses for a given height reduction from 0 to 70 percent, and to find plastic flow and surface interaction effects. Right-circular cylindrical specimens are compressed on-end (cylindrically) and radially (for modeling as compressed wire). Aluminum 1100 and 3003 alloys are compared for length to diameter ratios of 1 and 2 for both compression types, and are then compared to results of radial compression of annealed small diameter Al 1100 wire currently used at LAMPE. The specimens are also compressed between three different platen surfaces, polished steel, etched steel, and aluminum 6061-T6, to determine effects of friction. The Al 3003 alloy exhibits 20 to 25% lower stresses at all height reductions than Al 1100 for both cylindrical and radial compression.

  8. Effect of air flow on tubular solar still efficiency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An experimental work was reported to estimate the increase in distillate yield for a compound parabolic concentrator-concentric tubular solar still (CPC-CTSS). The CPC dramatically increases the heating of the saline water. A novel idea was proposed to study the characteristic features of CPC for desalination to produce a large quantity of distillate yield. A rectangular basin of dimension 2 m × 0.025 m × 0.02 m was fabricated of copper and was placed at the focus of the CPC. This basin is covered by two cylindrical glass tubes of length 2 m with two different diameters of 0.02 m and 0.03 m. The experimental study was operated with two modes: without and with air flow between inner and outer tubes. The rate of air flow was fixed throughout the experiment at 4.5 m/s. On the basis of performance results, the water collection rate was 1445 ml/day without air flow and 2020 ml/day with air flow and the efficiencies were 16.2% and 18.9%, respectively. Findings The experimental study was operated with two modes: without and with air flow between inner and outer tubes. The rate of air flow was fixed throughout the experiment at 4.5 m/s. Conclusions On the basis of performance results, the water collection rate was 1445 ml/day without air flow and 2020 ml/day with air flow and the efficiencies were 16.2% and 18.9%, respectively. PMID:23587020

  9. Acoustic radiation from lifting airfoils in compressible subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, Hafiz M.; Subramaniam, Shankar; Scott, James R.

    1990-01-01

    The far field acoustic radiation from a lifting airfoil in a three-dimensional gust is studied. The acoustic pressure is calculated using the Kirchhoff method, instead of using the classical acoustic analogy approach due to Lighthill. The pressure on the Kirchhoff surface is calculated using an existing numerical solution of the unsteady flow field. The far field acoustic pressure is calculated in terms of these values using Kirchhoff's formula. The method is validated against existing semi-analytical results for a flat plate. The method is then used to study the problem of an airfoil in a harmonic three-dimensional gust, for a wide range of Mach numbers. The effect of variation of the airfoil thickness and angle of attack on the acoustic far field is studied. The changes in the mechanism of sound generation and propagation due to the presence of steady loading and nonuniform mean flow are also studied.

  10. Acoustic radiation from lifting airfoils in compressible subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, Hafiz M.; Subramaniam, Shankar; Scott, James R.

    1990-01-01

    The far field acoustic radiation from a lifting airfoil in a three-dimensional gust is studied. The acoustic pressure is calculated using the Kirchhoff method, instead of using the classical acoustic analogy approach due to Lighthill. The pressure on the Kirchhoff surface is calculated using an existing numerical solution of the unsteady flow field. The far field acoustic pressure is calculated in terms of these values using Kirchhoff's formula. The method is validated against existing semi-analytical results for a flat plate. The method is then used to study the problem of an airfoil in a harmonic three-dimensional gust, for a wide range of Mach numbers. The effect of variation of the airfoil thickness and angle of attack on the acoustic far field is studied. The changes in the mechanism of sound generation and propagation due to the presence of steady loading and non-uniform mean flow are also studied.

  11. Unsteady compressible potential flow around lifting bodies - General theory.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morino, L.

    1973-01-01

    The general theory of potential aerodynamic flow around a lifting body having arbitrary shape and motion is presented. By using the Green's function method, an integral representation for the velocity potential is obtained for both supersonic and subsonic flow. This representation reduces properly to the lifting surface theories as well as to other classical mathematical formulas. Under small perturbation assumption, the potential at any point P in the field depends only upon the values of the potential and its normal derivative on the surface of the body. Hence, if the point P approaches the surface of the body, the representation reduces to an integrodifferential equation relating the potential and its normal derivative on the surface of the body.

  12. Cut-element based immersed boundary method for moving geometries in compressible liquid flows with cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Örley, Felix; Pasquariello, Vito; Hickel, Stefan; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2015-02-01

    The conservative immersed interface method for representing complex immersed solid boundaries or phase interfaces on Cartesian grids is improved and extended to allow for the simulation of weakly compressible fluid flows through moving geometries. We demonstrate that an approximation of moving interfaces by a level-set field results in unphysical oscillations in the vicinity of sharp corners when dealing with weakly compressible fluids such as water. By introducing an exact reconstruction of the cut-cell properties directly based on a surface triangulation of the immersed boundary, we are able to recover the correct flow evolution free of numerical artifacts. The new method is based on cut-elements. It provides sub-cell resolution of the geometry and handles flows through narrow closing or opening gaps in a straightforward manner. We validate our method with canonical flows around oscillating cylinders. We demonstrate that the method allows for an accurate prediction of flows around moving obstacles in weakly compressible liquid flows with cavitation effects. In particular, we show that the cavitating flow through a closing fuel injector control valve, which is an example for a complex application with interaction of stationary and moving parts, can be predicted by the method.

  13. Nonequilibrium thermohydrodynamic effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in compressible flows.

    PubMed

    Lai, Huilin; Xu, Aiguo; Zhang, Guangcai; Gan, Yanbiao; Ying, Yangjun; Succi, Sauro

    2016-08-01

    The effects of compressibility on Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) are investigated by inspecting the interplay between thermodynamic and hydrodynamic nonequilibrium phenomena (TNE, HNE, respectively) via a discrete Boltzmann model. Two effective approaches are presented, one tracking the evolution of the local TNE effects and the other focusing on the evolution of the mean temperature of the fluid, to track the complex interfaces separating the bubble and the spike regions of the flow. It is found that both the compressibility effects and the global TNE intensity show opposite trends in the initial and the later stages of the RTI. Compressibility delays the initial stage of RTI and accelerates the later stage. Meanwhile, the TNE characteristics are generally enhanced by the compressibility, especially in the later stage. The global or mean thermodynamic nonequilibrium indicators provide physical criteria to discriminate between the two stages of the RTI. PMID:27627391

  14. Nonequilibrium thermohydrodynamic effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Huilin; Xu, Aiguo; Zhang, Guangcai; Gan, Yanbiao; Ying, Yangjun; Succi, Sauro

    2016-08-01

    The effects of compressibility on Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) are investigated by inspecting the interplay between thermodynamic and hydrodynamic nonequilibrium phenomena (TNE, HNE, respectively) via a discrete Boltzmann model. Two effective approaches are presented, one tracking the evolution of the local TNE effects and the other focusing on the evolution of the mean temperature of the fluid, to track the complex interfaces separating the bubble and the spike regions of the flow. It is found that both the compressibility effects and the global TNE intensity show opposite trends in the initial and the later stages of the RTI. Compressibility delays the initial stage of RTI and accelerates the later stage. Meanwhile, the TNE characteristics are generally enhanced by the compressibility, especially in the later stage. The global or mean thermodynamic nonequilibrium indicators provide physical criteria to discriminate between the two stages of the RTI.

  15. Parametric studies influencing condensation evolution in compressible steam flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshti Amiri, H.; Kermani, M. J.; Piroozi, A. A.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the effect of operational and geometrical parameters on the location of condensation onset and the rate of condensations are considered. These parameters are expansion rate of different geometry, inlet stagnation condition and the waves. To do so, a numerical method is presented to solve the two-dimensional two-phase steam flow over a series of geometries (such as nozzles, expansion corners and steam turbine blade-to-blade passages) by means of equilibrium thermodynamics model.

  16. On the rational design of compressible flow ejectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortwerth, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    A fluid mechanics review of chemical laser ejectors is presented. The characteristics of ejectors with single and multiple driver nozzles are discussed. Methods to compute an optimized performance map in which secondary Mach number and performance are computed versus mass ratio, to compute the flow distortion at each optimized condition, and to determine the thrust area for the design point to match diffuser impedence are examined.

  17. Multidimensional, compressible viscous flow on a moving Voronoi mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, D. J.; Springel, V.; Marcus, R.; Vogelsberger, M.; Hernquist, L.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous formulations of finite-volume schemes for the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations exist, but in the majority of cases they have been developed for structured and stationary meshes. In many applications, more flexible mesh geometries that can dynamically adjust to the problem at hand and move with the flow in a (quasi-)Lagrangian fashion would, however, be highly desirable, as this can allow a significant reduction of advection errors and an accurate realization of curved and moving boundary conditions. Here we describe a novel formulation of viscous continuum hydrodynamics that solves the equations of motion on a Voronoi mesh created by a set of mesh-generating points. The points can move in an arbitrary manner, but the most natural motion is that given by the fluid velocity itself, such that the mesh dynamically adjusts to the flow. Owing to the mathematical properties of the Voronoi tessellation, pathological mesh-twisting effects are avoided. Our implementation considers the full Navier-Stokes equations and has been realized in the arepo code both in two and three dimensions. We propose a new approach to compute accurate viscous fluxes for a dynamic Voronoi mesh, and use this to formulate a finite-volume solver of the Navier-Stokes equations. Through a number of test problems, including circular Couette flow and flow past a cylindrical obstacle, we show that our new scheme combines good accuracy with geometric flexibility, and hence promises to be competitive with other highly refined Eulerian methods. This will in particular allow astrophysical applications of the arepo code where physical viscosity is important, such as in the hot plasma in galaxy clusters, or for viscous accretion disc models.

  18. Numerical study of Reynolds stress in compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandromme, D.; Hamin, H.

    1985-01-01

    A second order closure has been implemented in an implicit Navier-Stokes solver to study the behavior of the Reynolds stresses under the influence of severe pressure gradients. In the boundary layer zone, the strongly sheared character of the mean flow dominates the turbulence generation mechanisms. However, the pressure gradients also play a very important role for these processes, but at different locations within the boundary layer.

  19. Collective Interaction of a Compressible Periodic Parallel Jet Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    1997-01-01

    A linear instability model for multiple spatially periodic supersonic rectangular jets is solved using Floquet-Bloch theory. The disturbance environment is investigated using a two dimensional perturbation of a mean flow. For all cases large temporal growth rates are found. This work is motivated by an increase in mixing found in experimental measurements of spatially periodic supersonic rectangular jets with phase-locked screech. The results obtained in this paper suggests that phase-locked screech or edge tones may produce correlated spatially periodic jet flow downstream of the nozzles which creates a large span wise multi-nozzle region where a disturbance can propagate. The large temporal growth rates for eddies obtained by model calculation herein are related to the increased mixing since eddies are the primary mechanism that transfer energy from the mean flow to the large turbulent structures. Calculations of growth rates are presented for a range of Mach numbers and nozzle spacings corresponding to experimental test conditions where screech synchronized phase locking was observed. The model may be of significant scientific and engineering value in the quest to understand and construct supersonic mixer-ejector nozzles which provide increased mixing and reduced noise.

  20. Incompressible-compressible flows with a transient discontinuous interface using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, S. J.; Stansby, P. K.; Rogers, B. D.

    2016-03-01

    A new two-phase incompressible-compressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method has been developed where the interface is discontinuous in density. This is applied to water-air problems with a large density difference. The incompressible phase requires surface pressure from the compressible phase and the compressible phase requires surface velocity from the incompressible phase. Compressible SPH is used for the air phase (with the isothermal stiffened ideal gas equation of state for low Mach numbers) and divergence-free (projection based) incompressible SPH is used for the water phase, with the addition of Fickian shifting to produce sufficiently homogeneous particle distributions to enable stable, accurate, converged solutions without noise in the pressure field. Shifting is a purely numerical particle regularisation device. The interface remains a true material discontinuity at a high density ratio with continuous pressure and velocity at the interface. This approach with the physics of compressibility and incompressibility represented is novel within SPH and is validated against semi-analytical results for a two-phase elongating and oscillating water drop, analytical results for low amplitude inviscid standing waves, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, and a dam break problem with high interface distortion and impact on a vertical wall where experimental and other numerical results are available.

  1. Symmetries of the Euler compressible flow equations for general equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Zachary M.; Ramsey, Scott D.; Baty, Roy S.

    2015-10-15

    The Euler compressible flow equations exhibit different Lie symmetries depending on the equation of state (EOS) of the medium in which the flow occurs. This means that, in general, different types of similarity solution will be available in different flow media. We present a comprehensive classification of all EOS’s to which the Euler equations apply, based on the Lie symmetries admitted by the corresponding flow equations, restricting to the case of 1-D planar, cylindrical, or spherical geometry. The results are conveniently summarized in tables. This analysis also clarifies past work by Axford and Ovsiannikov on symmetry classification.

  2. Numerical simulation of a compressible homogeneous, turbulent shear flow. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiereisen, W. J.; Reynolds, W. C.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    A direct, low Reynolds number, numerical simulation was performed on a homogeneous turbulent shear flow. The full compressible Navier-Stokes equations were used in a simulation on the ILLIAC IV computer with a 64,000 mesh. The flow fields generated by the code are used as an experimental data base, to examine the behavior of the Reynols stresses in this simple, compressible flow. The variation of the structure of the stresses and their dynamic equations as the character of the flow changed is emphasized. The structure of the tress tensor is more heavily dependent on the shear number and less on the fluctuating Mach number. The pressure-strain correlation tensor in the dynamic uations is directly calculated in this simulation. These correlations are decomposed into several parts, as contrasted with the traditional incompressible decomposition into two parts. The performance of existing models for the conventional terms is examined, and a model is proposed for the 'mean fluctuating' part.

  3. Progress in turbulence modeling for complex flow fields including effects of compressibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, D. C.; Rubesin, M. W.

    1980-01-01

    Two second-order-closure turbulence models were devised that are suitable for predicting properties of complex turbulent flow fields in both incompressible and compressible fluids. One model is of the "two-equation" variety in which closure is accomplished by introducing an eddy viscosity which depends on both a turbulent mixing energy and a dissipation rate per unit energy, that is, a specific dissipation rate. The other model is a "Reynolds stress equation" (RSE) formulation in which all components of the Reynolds stress tensor and turbulent heat-flux vector are computed directly and are scaled by the specific dissipation rate. Computations based on these models are compared with measurements for the following flow fields: (a) low speed, high Reynolds number channel flows with plane strain or uniform shear; (b) equilibrium turbulent boundary layers with and without pressure gradients or effects of compressibility; and (c) flow over a convex surface with and without a pressure gradient.

  4. High-speed compressible flow and other advection-dominated problems of fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zienkiewicz, O. C.; Lohner, R.; Morgan, K.; Peraire, J.

    1985-01-01

    Finite element methods are described for modeling high speed compressible flows with strong advection, problems important to aerodynamics. The situations are characterized by high pressure and temperature gradients, transients and the appearance of discontinuities, factors which require mesh refinement during computations. Techniques are developed for temporal and spatial discretization of a model problem. Several observations are made regarding the explicit and implicit features of the calculations, the use of the Lax-Wendroff scheme to produce a mass-matrix for obtaining accurate results for transients, methods of performing stability analyses, and simplification techniques. Examples are provided of solving the nonlinear shallow-water equations and describing compressible flows, particularly transonic flows. Domain splitting is defined for improving the calculations at each time step and in different parts of the flow regime while simultaneously advancing the calculations towards a solution.

  5. Improving Energy Efficiency in Pharmaceutical ManufacturingOperations -- Part I: Motors, Drives and Compressed Air Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Galitsky, Christina; Chang, Sheng-chien; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet,Eric

    2006-04-01

    In Part I of this two-part series, we focus on efficient use of motors, drives and pumps, both for process equipment and compressed air systems. Pharmaceutical manufacturing plants in the U.S. spend nearly $1 billion each year for the fuel and electricity they need to keep their facilities running (Figure 1, below). That total that can increase dramatically when fuel supplies tighten and oil prices rise, as they did last year. Improving energy efficiency should be a strategic goal for any plant manager or manufacturing professional working in the drug industry today. Not only can energy efficiency reduce overall manufacturing costs, it usually reduces environmental emissions, establishing a strong foundation for a corporate greenhouse-gas-management program. For most pharmaceutical manufacturing plants, Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) is typically the largest consumer of energy, as shown in Table 1 below. This two-part series will examine energy use within pharmaceutical facilities, summarize best practices and examine potential savings and return on investment. In this first article, we will focus on efficient use of motors, drives and pumps, both for process equipment and compressed air systems. Part 2, to be published in May, will focus on overall HVAC systems, building management and boilers.

  6. Global smooth flows for compressible Navier-Stokes-Maxwell equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiang; Cao, Hongmei

    2016-08-01

    Umeda et al. (Jpn J Appl Math 1:435-457, 1984) considered a rather general class of symmetric hyperbolic-parabolic systems: A0zt+sum_{j=1}nAjz_{xj}+Lz=sum_{j,k=1}nB^{jk}z_{xjxk} and showed optimal decay rates with certain dissipative assumptions. In their results, the dissipation matrices {L} and {B^{jk}(j,k=1,ldots,n)} are both assumed to be real symmetric. So far there are no general results in case that {L} and {B^{jk}} are not necessarily symmetric, which is left open now. In this paper, we investigate compressible Navier-Stokes-Maxwell (N-S-M) equations arising in plasmas physics, which is a concrete example of hyperbolic-parabolic composite systems with non-symmetric dissipation. It is observed that the Cauchy problem for N-S-M equations admits the dissipative mechanism of regularity-loss type. Consequently, extra higher regularity is usually needed to obtain the optimal decay rate of {L1({mathbb{R}}^3)}-{L^2({mathbb{R}}^3)} type, in comparison with that for the global-in-time existence of smooth solutions. In this paper, we obtain the minimal decay regularity of global smooth solutions to N-S-M equations, with aid of {L^p({mathbb{R}}^n)}-{Lq({mathbb{R}}^n)}-{Lr({mathbb{R}}^n)} estimates. It is worth noting that the relation between decay derivative orders and the regularity index of initial data is firstly found in the optimal decay estimates.

  7. On the use of residue theory for treating the subsonic flow of a compressible fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Carl

    1942-01-01

    A new mathematical technique, due to Milne-Thomson, is used to obtain an improved form of the method of Poggi for calculating the effect of compressibility on the subsonic flow past an obstacle. By means of this new method, the difficult surface integrals of the original Poggi method can be replaced by line integrals. These line integrals are then solved by the use of residue theory. In this way an equation is obtained giving the second-order effect of compressibility on the velocity of the fluid. The method is practicable for obtaining the higher-order effects of compressibility on the velocity field. As an illustration of the general result, the flow past an elliptic cylinder is discussed.

  8. Modeling Particle-Laden Compressible Flows Using Lattice-Boltzmann Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Orlando; Thomas, John; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2012-11-01

    Combing the three-dimensional compressible Lattice-Boltzmann model with a fluid-particle interaction model, a robust computational framework for predicting fluid/solid momentum transfer within a particle-laden compressible flow field is developed. This tool is used to examine the effects of a moving shock front on the time-evolution of the displacement, velocity, and acceleration vectors of a single spherical particle initially at rest. These results are compared to analytical solutions obtained from the Navier-Stokes equations for compressible flows and a relationship between Mach number and drag coefficient is developed. Next, momentum transport through a system of particles is examined and the effects of particle-particle interactions on shock front propagation/attenuation are discussed. These results are used to understand fluid/solid momentum transfer within detonation shock waves.

  9. Numerical solution of compressible viscous flows at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccormack, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    A new numerical method which was used to reduce the computation time required in fluid dynamics to solve the Navier-Stokes equations at flight Reynolds numbers is described. The method is the implicit analogue of the explicit finite different method. It uses this as its first stage, while the second stage removes the restrictive stability condition by recasting the difference equations in an implicit form. The resulting matrix equations to be solved are either upper or lower block bidiagonal equations. The new method makes it possible and practical to calculate many important three dimensional, high Reynolds number flow fields on computers.

  10. Conservative model and numerical simulations of compressible two-phase pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belozerov, A.; Romenski, E.; Lebedeva, N.

    2016-06-01

    The two-phase two-pressure model for transient one-dimensional compressible pipe flow is considered. Governing equations of the model form a hyperbolic system of conservation laws. The Runge-Kutta-WENO method providing accuracy of the 3rd order in time and 5th order in space is implemented. Numerical results for several test problems are presented.

  11. Investigation of surface topography effects on metal flow under lubricated hot compression of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurk, Justin Irvin

    An investigation was conducted to study the effects of die surface topography, specifically surface roughness and lay, on metal flow and the friction factor under lubricated hot compression. 6061-T6 aluminum rings and square bar stock specimens were compressed on H-13 tool steel platens machined with a unidirectional lay pattern to six different roughnesses between a R 0 10 and 240 muin. A lab based hydraulic press mounted with an experimental die set was used for all testing. Repeated trials were conducted using high temperature vegetable oil and boron nitride lubricants. Metal flow was quantified as a function of surface roughness, lay orientation, and die temperature. Approximate plane strain cigar test specimens were compressed at platen temperatures of 300 °F and 400 °F and at orientations of 0°, 45°, and 90° between the longitudinal axis and unidirectional platen surface lay. The friction factor was assessed using the ring compression test under varying platen roughness conditions and die temperatures between 250 °F and 400 °F. Results indicate metal flow is optimized at low platen roughnesses and orientations parallel to the surface lay of the platen. Die temperature was not found to influence metal flow within the temperature range investigated. The friction factor was observed to be minimized at lower die temperatures and platen roughnesses.

  12. Evaluation of compressible-flow Preston tube calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental and analytical study has been made of the accuracy of various Preston tube calibration equations to determine local skin friction in two-dimensional supersonic and low-hypersonic flows. Experimental Preston tube calibration data from the present and previous studies were used to evaluate the calibration equations. The maximum value of the calibration parameters of the present data is more than an order of magnitude larger than that previously obtained; thereby, the evaluation of the various calibration equations is facilitated. The Preston tube technique was found to be very inaccurate in the low range of the calibration parameters. Above this range, there was a steady increase in accuracy with increasing values of the calibration parameters. No critical maximum tube diameter was found even with tubes about twice as large as the theoretical maximum allowable diameter. Of the two forms of the calibration equation previously existing, the logarithmic laws gave more accurate results than the power laws over an extended range of the calibration parameters in supersonic adiabatic flow.

  13. Computational and experimental study of spin coater air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoguang; Liang, Faqiu; Haji-Sheikh, A.; Ghariban, N.

    1998-06-01

    An extensive 2- and 3-D analysis of air flow in a POLARISTM 2200 Microlithography Cluster spin coater was conducted using FLUENTTM Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software. To supplement this analysis, direct measurement of air flow velocity was also performed using a DantecTM Hot Wire Anemometer. Velocity measurements were made along two major planes across the entire flow field in the spin coater at various operating conditions. It was found that the flow velocity at the spin coater inlet is much lower than previously assumed and quite nonuniform. Based on this observation, a pressure boundary condition rather than a velocity boundary condition was used for subsequent CFD analysis. A comparison between calculated results and experimental data shows that the 3D model accurately predicts the air flow field in the spin coater. An added advantage of this approach is that the CFD model can be easily generated from the mechanical design database and used to analyze the effect of design changes. The modeled and measured results show that the flow pattern in the spin bowl is affected by interactions between the spinning wafer, exhaust flow, and the gap between the spin head and surrounding baffle. Different operating conditions such as spin speed, inlet pressure, and exhaust pressure were found to generate substantially different flow patterns. It was also found that backflow of air could be generated under certain conditions.

  14. Low-noise flow valve for air ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, E. A.

    1970-01-01

    Valve assembly controls air flow from feeder into main duct, with minimum of turbulence, friction, pressure differential, and noise. Valve consists of damper, deflector, and spring. Streamlining of damper and deflector merges flow smoothly, while spring keeps damper and deflector in contact and eliminates valve chatter and damping vibrations.

  15. Compressed Air System Optimization Project Saves Energy and Improves Production at a Citation Forging Plant

    SciTech Connect

    2003-05-01

    In the 1990s, a subsidiary of the Citation Corporation, Interstate Forging, implemented a compressed air system improvement project at its Milwaukee, Wisconsin, forging plant. This improvement enabled the plant to maintain an adequate and stable pressure level using fewer compressors, which led to improved product quality and lower production downtime. The project also yielded annual energy savings of 820,000 kWh and $45,000. With a total project cost of $67,000, the plant achieved a simple payback of just 1.5 years.

  16. Citation Corporation: Compressed Air System Optimization Project Saves Energy and Improves Production at Forging Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2003-05-01

    In the 1990s, a subsidiary of the Citation Corporation, Interstate Forging, implemented a compressed air system improvement project at its Milwaukee, Wisconsin, forging plant. This improvement enabled the plant to maintain an adequate and stable pressure level using fewer compressors, which led to improved product quality and lower production downtime. The project also yielded annual energy savings of 820,000 kWh and$45,000. With a total project cost of$67,000, the plant achieved a simple payback of just 1.5 years.

  17. Weyerhaeuser: Compressed Air System Improvement Saves Energy and Improves Production at a Sawmill

    SciTech Connect

    2004-11-01

    In 2000, Weyerhaeuser Company, a U.S. Department of Energy Allied Partner in the Industrial Technologies Program, increased the efficiency of the compressed air system at its sawmill facility in Coburg, Oregon. This improved the system's performance and will save about 1.3 million kWh annually. Total project costs were $55,000; because annual energy cost savings were also $55,000, the simple payback period was only 1 year. Subsequent improvements at six other company plants and mills are yielding 6.8 million kWh in energy savings and reducing annual energy costs by $250,000.

  18. Techni-Cast: Foundry Saves Energy with Compressed Air System Retrofit

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2004-03-01

    In 2002, Techni-Cast improved its compressed air system at its foundry in Southgate, California. The project allowed the foundry to reduce its compressor capacity by 50%, which greatly reduced the foundry's energy and maintenance costs. The annual energy and maintenance savings from the project implementation are 242,000 kWh and $24,200, and the project's cost was $38,000. Because the plant received a $10,000 incentive payment from the California Public Utilities Commission, the total project cost was reduced to $28,000, yielding a 14-month simple payback.

  19. Lehigh Southwest Cement Company: Compressed Air System Improvement Saves Energy at a Lehigh Southwest Cement Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2003-10-01

    In 2001, Lehigh Southwest Cement Company improved the compressed air system at its cement plant in Tehachapi, California. Consequently, the system was able to operate more efficiently with less compressor capacity and at a lower system pressure. The project yielded total annual savings of 895,000 kWh and $199,000. The initial project cost was $417,000, but Southern California Edison provided a $90,000 incentive payment to reduce the cost to $327,000. Simple payback was about 20 months.

  20. Techni-Cast: Foundry Saves Energy with Compressed Air System Retrofit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2001-03-01

    In 2002, Techni-Cast improved its compressed air system at its foundry in Southgate, California. The project allowed the foundry to reduce its compressor capacity by 50%, which greatly reduced the foundry's energy and maintenance costs. The annual energy and maintenance savings from the project implementation are 242,000 kWh and $24,200, and the projects cost was $38,000. Because the plant received a $10,000 incentive payment from the California Public Utilities Commission, the total project cost was reduced to $28,000, yielding a 14-month simple payback.

  1. Geotechnical issues and guidelines for storage of compressed air in excavated hard rock caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.; Fossum, A.F.

    1982-04-01

    The results of a literature survey on the stability of excavated hard rock caverns are presented. The objective of the study was to develop geotechnical criteria for the design of compressed air energy storage (CAES) caverns in hard rock formations. These criteria involve geologic, hydrological, geochemical, geothermal, and in situ stress state characteristics of generic rock masses. Their relevance to CAES caverns, and the identification of required research areas, are identified throughout the text. This literature survey and analysis strongly suggests that the chief geotechnical issues for the development and operation of CAES caverns in hard rock are impermeability for containment, stability for sound openings, and hydrostatic balance.

  2. Low power, constant-flow air pump systems

    SciTech Connect

    Polito, M.D.; Albert, B.

    1994-01-01

    A rugged, yet small and lightweight constant-flow air pump system has been designed. Flow control is achieved using a novel approach which is three times more power efficient than previous designs. The resultant savings in battery size and weight makes these pumps ideal for sampling air on balloon platforms. The pump package includes meteorological sensors and an onboard computer that stores time and sensor data and turns the constant-flow pump circuit on/off. Some applications of these systems are also presented in this report.

  3. Visualization of the air flow behind the automotive benchmark vent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pech, Ondrej; Jedelsky, Jan; Caletka, Petr; Jicha, Miroslav

    2015-05-01

    Passenger comfort in cars depends on appropriate function of the cabin HVAC system. A great attention is therefore paid to the effective function of automotive vents and proper formation of the flow behind the ventilation outlet. The article deals with the visualization of air flow from the automotive benchmark vent. The visualization was made for two different shapes of the inlet channel connected to the benchmark vent. The smoke visualization with the laser knife was used. The influence of the shape of the inlet channel to the airflow direction, its enlargement and position of air flow axis were investigated.

  4. Evaporation of stationary alcohol layer in minichannel under air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Ilya; Orlova, Evgenija; Feoktistov, Dmitriy

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents experimental investigation of effect of the gas flow rate moving parallel to the stationary liquid layer on the evaporation rate under the conditions of formation of a stable plane "liquid-gas" interface. The average evaporation flow rate of liquid layer (ethanol) by the gas flow (air) has been calculated using two independent methods. Obtained results have been compared with previously published data.

  5. 76 FR 13661 - In the Matter of Certain Connecting Devices (“Quick Clamps”) for Use With Modular Compressed Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... air conditioning units and the FRL units they connect by reason of infringement of certain claims of... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Connecting Devices (``Quick Clamps'') for Use With Modular Compressed Air Conditioning Units, Including Filters, Regulators, and Lubricators (``FRL's'') That Are Part of...

  6. An efficient new automobile air-conditioning system based on CO{sub 2} vapor compression

    SciTech Connect

    Pettersen, J.

    1994-12-31

    A new, efficient, and environmentally safe automobile air-conditioning system based on carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) vapor compression has been developed. Although working pressures and component design are different, the basic principles are similar to those of current chlorofluorocarbon/hydrofluorocarbon (CFC/HFC) units. With the construction and testing of a laboratory prototype, it has been documented that the new system is highly competitive with current CFC-12 and HFC-134a units in terms of efficiency, capacity, cost, weight, and dimensions. The CO{sub 2} concept thus offers a solution to the environmental problem associated with automobile air conditioning and eliminates all uncertainties with respect to possible unforeseen effects from new refrigerant compounds. Further advantages of the natural fluid CO{sub 2} as a refrigerant are: no need for recycling or recovery, low cost of fluid, excellent availability, well-known properties, and more compact machinery and components.

  7. The potential strategic, operating and environmental benefits of TVA's compressed air energy storage (CAES) program

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, D.T.; Brewer, J.E. )

    1992-01-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority is currently looking at compressed air energy storage (CAES), a new but mature technology, as a new capacity option. The technology is mature because all pieces/components have been in existence and use for over 50 years. The compressors are standard components for the gas industry, and the turbo expander and motor generator are standard components in the utility business. The newness of the CAES technology is due to the integration of these components and the use of underground storage of air in porous media or possibly in abandoned mines. Although the integration of these components is new to the Untied States, they have been demonstrated in Germany for over 10 years in the 290 MWe CAES unit located in a salt cavern near Huntorf, Germany. The CAES unit has been very successful, operating with a 99% start-up reliability, and has been operated remotely.

  8. Quantitative Analysis of Major Phytochemicals in Orthodox tea (Camellia sinensis), Oxidized under Compressed Air Environment.

    PubMed

    Panda, Brajesh Kumar; Datta, Ashis Kumar

    2016-04-01

    This study describes major changes in phytochemical composition of orthodox tea (Camellia sinensis var. Assamica) oxidized under compressed air (CA). The experiments for oxidation were conducted under air pressure (101, 202, and 303 kPa) for 150 min. Relative change in the concentrations of caffeine, catechins, theaflavins (TF), and thearubigins (TR) were analyzed. Effect of CA pressure was found to be nonsignificant in regulating caffeine concentration during oxidation. But degradation in different catechins as well as formation of different TF was significantly affected by CA pressure. At high CA pressure, TF showed highest peak value. TR was found to have slower rate of formation during initial phase of oxidation than TF. Even though the rate of TR formation was significantly influenced by CA, a portion of catechins remained unoxidized at end of oxidation. Except caffeine, the percent change in rate of formation or degradation were more prominent at 202 kPa. PMID:26970442

  9. Ford Van Dyke: Compressed Air Management Program Leads to Improvements that Reduce Energy Consumption at an Automotive Transmission Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-05-01

    Staff at the Ford Van Dyke Transmission Plant in Sterling Heights, Michigan, have increased the efficiency of the plant's compressed air system to enhance its performance while saving energy and improving production. After plant staff identified opportunities for system improvements, a qualified instructor from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Allied Partner, Scales Air Compressor Corporation, helped to clarify several of them. The resulting improvement measures are yielding energy savings for compressed air of more than 1 million kWh; energy and maintenance cost savings total $165,000. The total cost of planned upgrades and other measures was $336,000, for a 2-year simple payback.

  10. Compression-Induced Fusion of Glassy Core Polymer Micelles at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Chang; Won, You-Yeon

    The surface mechanical and morphological properties of glassy core polymer micelles at the air-water interface were investigated. Asymmetric PS-PEG and PtBMA-PEG block copolymers with PEG weight fractions larger than 0.5 were formulated in the form of aqueous micelles and spread onto water. Compressed films of PS-PEG and PtBMA-PEG micelles reach high dynamic surface pressures. On the detailed level, however, PS-PEG and PtBMA-PEG micelles exhibit different surface pressure-area profiles. The PtBMA-PEG isotherm shows a transition to a plateau around a surface pressure of 24 mN/m, which is attributed to the PtBMA block as it forms a continuous film; this interpretation is supported by the fact that the surface pressure at the plateau transition is identical to the value of the spreading coefficient for PtBMA. This presents evidence that the core domains of PtBMA-PEG micelles melt and merge into a film when the micellar monolayer is laterally compressed. Such behavior was not observed with PS-PEG micelles. We suspect that under lateral compression, PtBMA-PEG micelles undergo fusion into a continuous film because PtBMA has the natural tendency to spread on the water surface, whereas PS-PEG micelles does not because the dewetting tendency of PS preventing formation of a uniform layer.

  11. Fluid-structure interactions in compressible cavity flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya M.; Beresh, Steven J.; Hunter, Patrick S.; Spillers, Russell W.; Henfling, John F.; Mayes, Randall L.

    2015-06-01

    Experiments were performed to understand the complex fluid-structure interactions that occur during aircraft internal store carriage. A cylindrical store was installed in a rectangular cavity having a length-to-depth ratio of 3.33 and a length-to-width ratio of 1. The Mach number ranged from 0.6 to 2.5 and the incoming boundary layer was turbulent. Fast-response pressure measurements provided aeroacoustic loading in the cavity, while triaxial accelerometers provided simultaneous store response. Despite occupying only 6% of the cavity volume, the store significantly altered the cavity acoustics. The store responded to the cavity flow at its natural structural frequencies, and it exhibited a directionally dependent response to cavity resonance. Specifically, cavity tones excited the store in the streamwise and wall-normal directions consistently, whereas a spanwise response was observed only occasionally. The streamwise and wall-normal responses were attributed to the longitudinal pressure waves and shear layer vortices known to occur during cavity resonance. Although the spanwise response to cavity tones was limited, broadband pressure fluctuations resulted in significant spanwise accelerations at store natural frequencies. The largest vibrations occurred when a cavity tone matched a structural natural frequency, although energy was transferred more efficiently to natural frequencies having predominantly streamwise and wall-normal motions.

  12. Compressible flow of a multiphase fluid between two vessels:

    SciTech Connect

    Chenoweth, D.R. ); Paolucci, S. . Dept. of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering)

    1990-06-01

    The transfer of a multiphase fluid from a high pressure vessel to one initially at lower pressure is investigated. The fluid is composed of two phases which do not undergo any change. The phases consist of an ideal gas, and solid particles (or liquid droplets) having constant density. The mixture is assumed to be stagnant and always perfectly mixed as well as at thermal equilibrium in each constant volume vessel. The fluid also remains homogeneous and at equilibrium while flowing between vessels. The transport properties of the mixture are taken to be zero. One important finding is that the expanding mixture or pseduo-fluid behaves similar to a polytropic Abel-Noble gas. The mixture thermodymanic properties, the end state in each vessel at pressure equilibrium, the critical parameters, and time dependent results are given for the adiabatic and isothermal limiting cases. The results include both initially sonic and initially subsonic transfer. No mathematical restriction is placed on the particle concentration, although some limiting results are given for small particle volume fraction. The mass transferred at adiabatic pressure equilibrium can be significantly less than that when thermal equilibrium is also reached. Furthermore, the adiabatic pressure equilibrium level may not be the same as that obtained at thermal equilibrium, even when all initial temperatures are the same. Finally, it is shown that the transfer times can be very slow compared to those of a pure gas due to the large reduction possible in the mixture sound speed. 18 refs.

  13. Lift Enhancement Using Pulsed Blowing At Compressible Flow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hites, Michael; Nagib, Hassan; Sytsma, Brian; Wygnanski, Israel; Seifert, Avi; Bachar, Tomer

    1997-11-01

    Oscillatory wall-jets were introduced through spanwise slots along a NACA 0015 airfoil to establish lift augmentation by the unsteady forcing of the wall layer. Pressure coefficients, lift coefficients, and wake velocity profiles were measured for experiments where the oscillatory blowing momentum coefficient was held constant at various frequencies up to M=0.4. At high angles of attack, it was observed that lift coefficient increased by as much as 80% due to the pulsed blowing and that supercritical flow was detected near the leading edge. Measurements at low angles of attack with the flap set at 20^o (an aft loaded airfoil near cruise conditions) showed that low amplitude pulsed forcing from the flap provided a 27% increasing in lift while steady blowing from the flap reduced lift by as much as 15% even at blowing coefficients as high as 3.5%. Wake profiles showed that not only was the lift enhanced due to the oscillatory blowing, but the drag was reduced, demonstrating the effectiveness of pulsed blowing as a tool to increase lift and reduce drag, especially when compared to the relative ineffectiveness of steady blowing under similar conditions.

  14. Fluid-structure interactions in compressible cavity flows

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; Hunter, Patrick S.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Henfling, John F.; Mayes, Randall L.

    2015-06-08

    Experiments were performed to understand the complex fluid-structure interactions that occur during aircraft internal store carriage. A cylindrical store was installed in a rectangular cavity having a length-to-depth ratio of 3.33 and a length-to-width ratio of 1. The Mach number ranged from 0.6 to 2.5 and the incoming boundary layer was turbulent. Fast-response pressure measurements provided aeroacoustic loading in the cavity, while triaxial accelerometers provided simultaneous store response. Despite occupying only 6% of the cavity volume, the store significantly altered the cavity acoustics. The store responded to the cavity flow at its natural structural frequencies, and it exhibited a directionally dependent response to cavity resonance. Specifically, cavity tones excited the store in the streamwise and wall-normal directions consistently, whereas a spanwise response was observed only occasionally. Also, the streamwise and wall-normal responses were attributed to the longitudinal pressure waves and shear layer vortices known to occur during cavity resonance. Although the spanwise response to cavity tones was limited, broadband pressure fluctuations resulted in significant spanwise accelerations at store natural frequencies. As a result, the largest vibrations occurred when a cavity tone matched a structural natural frequency, although energy was transferred more efficiently to natural frequencies having predominantly streamwise and wall-normal motions.

  15. Fluid-structure interactions in compressible cavity flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; Hunter, Patrick S.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Henfling, John F.; Mayes, Randall L.

    2015-06-08

    Experiments were performed to understand the complex fluid-structure interactions that occur during aircraft internal store carriage. A cylindrical store was installed in a rectangular cavity having a length-to-depth ratio of 3.33 and a length-to-width ratio of 1. The Mach number ranged from 0.6 to 2.5 and the incoming boundary layer was turbulent. Fast-response pressure measurements provided aeroacoustic loading in the cavity, while triaxial accelerometers provided simultaneous store response. Despite occupying only 6% of the cavity volume, the store significantly altered the cavity acoustics. The store responded to the cavity flow at its natural structural frequencies, and it exhibited a directionallymore » dependent response to cavity resonance. Specifically, cavity tones excited the store in the streamwise and wall-normal directions consistently, whereas a spanwise response was observed only occasionally. Also, the streamwise and wall-normal responses were attributed to the longitudinal pressure waves and shear layer vortices known to occur during cavity resonance. Although the spanwise response to cavity tones was limited, broadband pressure fluctuations resulted in significant spanwise accelerations at store natural frequencies. As a result, the largest vibrations occurred when a cavity tone matched a structural natural frequency, although energy was transferred more efficiently to natural frequencies having predominantly streamwise and wall-normal motions.« less

  16. Destratification of an impounding reservoir using compressed air??case of Mudi reservoir, Blantyre, Malawi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipofya, V. H.; Matapa, E. J.

    This paper reviews the operational and cost effectiveness of a compressed air destratification system that was installed in the Mudi reservoir for destratifying the reservoir. Mudi reservoir is a raw water source for the Blantyre Water Board. It has a capacity of 1,400,000 cubic metres. The reservoir is 15.3 m deep at top water level. In the absence of any artificial circulation of air, the reservoir stratifies into two layers. There is a warm epilimnion in the top 3 m of the reservoir, with temperatures ranging from 23 to 26 °C. There is prolific algal growth in this layer. The bottom layer has much lower temperatures, and is oxygen deficient. Under such anaerobic conditions, ammonia, sulphides, iron and manganese are released from the sediments of the reservoir. As a result of nutrient inflow from the catchments, coupled with tropical ambient temperatures, the reservoir is most times infested with blue-green algae. This results into water treatment problems in respect of taste and odour and iron and manganese soluble salts. To abate such problems, air is artificially circulated in the reservoir, near the intake tower, through a perforated pipe that is connected to an electrically driven compressor. This causes artificial circulation of water in the hypolimnion region of the reservoir. As a result of this circulation, a hostile environment that inhibits the propagation of algae is created. Dissolved oxygen and temperature profiles are practically uniform from top to bottom of reservoir. Concentrations of iron and manganese soluble salts are much reduced at any of the draw-off points available for the water treatment process. The paper concludes by highlighting the significant cost savings in water treatment that are accrued from the use of compressed air destratification in impounding water storage reservoirs for the control of algae and other chemical pollutants.

  17. Annular fuel and air co-flow premixer

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, Christian Xavier; Melton, Patrick Benedict; York, William David

    2013-10-15

    Disclosed is a premixer for a combustor including an annular outer shell and an annular inner shell. The inner shell defines an inner flow channel inside of the inner shell and is located to define an outer flow channel between the outer shell and the inner shell. A fuel discharge annulus is located between the outer flow channel and the inner flow channel and is configured to inject a fuel flow into a mixing area in a direction substantially parallel to an outer airflow through the outer flow channel and an inner flow through the inner flow channel. Further disclosed are a combustor including a plurality of premixers and a method of premixing air and fuel in a combustor.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Compression Corners and Hypersonic Inlet Flows Using the RPLUS2D Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Shaw, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    A two-dimensional computational code, PRLUS2D, which was developed for the reactive propulsive flows of ramjets and scramjets, was validated for two-dimensional shock-wave/turbulent-boundary-layer interactions. The problem of compression corners at supersonic speeds was solved using the RPLUS2D code. To validate the RPLUS2D code for hypersonic speeds, it was applied to a realistic hypersonic inlet geometry. Both the Baldwin-Lomax and the Chien two-equation turbulence models were used. Computational results showed that the RPLUS2D code compared very well with experimentally obtained data for supersonic compression corner flows, except in the case of large separated flows resulting from the interactions between the shock wave and turbulent boundary layer. The computational results compared well with the experiment results in a hypersonic NASA P8 inlet case, with the Chien two-equation turbulence model performing better than the Baldwin-Lomax model.

  19. Evaluation of Subgrid-Scale Models for Large Eddy Simulation of Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaisdell, Gregory A.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this project was to evaluate and develop subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulence models for large eddy simulations (LES) of compressible flows. During the first phase of the project results from LES using the dynamic SGS model were compared to those of direct numerical simulations (DNS) of compressible homogeneous turbulence. The second phase of the project involved implementing the dynamic SGS model in a NASA code for simulating supersonic flow over a flat-plate. The model has been successfully coded and a series of simulations has been completed. One of the major findings of the work is that numerical errors associated with the finite differencing scheme used in the code can overwhelm the SGS model and adversely affect the LES results. Attached to this overview are three submitted papers: 'Evaluation of the Dynamic Model for Simulations of Compressible Decaying Isotropic Turbulence'; 'The effect of the formulation of nonlinear terms on aliasing errors in spectral methods'; and 'Large-Eddy Simulation of a Spatially Evolving Compressible Boundary Layer Flow'.

  20. Numerical steady flow solutions of the lower leg venous circulation: effects of external compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullana, J.-M.; Flaud, P.

    2007-06-01

    We present a numerical model used to compute steady flow solutions of the venous circulation of the leg. The network topology is based on clinical data and the flow is assumed to be steady, incompressible, and one-dimensional. We develop a non Newtonian approach to a one-dimensional flow because the blood viscosity depends on the velocity profile, and we demonstrate theoretically the pertinence of a phenomenological law of equivalent viscosity. Clinical experiments observe hemodynamical variables (i.e. venous pressure, venous area, blood velocity) only at the accessible places. In contrast the numerical model results are not limited to particular locations but can be evaluated on every point of the network. It provides important help to the definition of a clinical protocol. The model was designed to quantify a compression level of elastic compression stockings and to plan clinical studies. We validate the numerical approach using a published clinical trial, where the diameter of superficial and deep veins were measured at different compression pressures. We show also that the viscosity variations in a bed-rest position as a consequence of the application of a European Class II compression stockings. These variations could prevent the hyper-coagulability and the stasis of the blood.

  1. Computation of flow and heat transfer in rotating cavities with peripheral flow of cooling air.

    PubMed

    Kiliç, M

    2001-05-01

    Numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations have been used to model the flow and the heat transfer that occurs in the internal cooling-air systems of gas turbines. Computations are performed to study the effect of gap ratio, Reynolds number and the mass flow rate on the flow and the heat transfer structure inside isothermal and heated rotating cavities with peripheral flow of cooling air. Computations are compared with some of the recent experimental work on flow and heat transfer in rotating-cavities. The agreement between the computed and the available experimental data is reasonably good. PMID:11460668

  2. Study of compressible flow through a rectangular-to-semiannular transition duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Jeffry; Okiishi, Theodore H.; Wendt, Bruce J.; Reichert, Bruce A.

    1995-01-01

    Detailed flow field measurements are presented for compressible flow through a diffusing rectangular-to-semiannular transition duct. Comparisons are made with published computational results for flow through the duct. Three-dimensional velocity vectors and total pressures were measured at the exit plane of the diffuser model. The inlet flow was also measured. These measurements are made using calibrated five-hole probes. Surface oil flow visualization and surface static pressure data were also taken. The study was conducted with an inlet Mach number of 0.786. The diffuser Reynolds based on the inlet centerline velocity and the exit diameter of the diffuser was 3,200,000. Comparison of the measured data with previously published computational results are made. Data demonstrating the ability of vortex generators to reduce flow separation and circumferential distortion is also presented.

  3. Factors that influence the tribocharging of pulverulent materials in compressed-air devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S.; Medles, K.; Mihalcioiu, A.; Beleca, R.; Dragan, C.; Dascalescu, L.

    2008-12-01

    Tribocharging of pulverulent materials in compressed-air devices is a typical multi-factorial process. This paper aims at demonstrating the interest of using the design of experiments methodology in association with virtual instrumentation for quantifying the effects of various process varaibles and of their interactions, as a prerequisite for the development of new tribocharging devices for industrial applications. The study is focused on the tribocharging of PVC powders in compressed-air devices similar to those employed in electrostatic painting. A classical 2 full-factorial design (3 factors at two levels) was employed for conducting the experiments. The response function was the charge/mass ratio of the material collected in a modified Faraday cage, at the exit of the tribocharging device. The charge/mass ratio was found to increase with the injection pressure and the vortex pressure in the tribocharging device, and to decrease with the increasing of the feed rate. In the present study an in-house design of experiments software was employed for statistical analysis of experimental data and validation of the experimental model.

  4. Tolerance of Mach 2.50 axisymmetric mixed-compression inlets to upstream flow variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choby, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of the tolerances of two Mach 2.50 axisymmetric mixed-compression inlets to upstream flow variations was conducted. Tolerances of each inlet to angle of attack as a function of decreasing free-stream Mach number were obtained. A local region of overcompression was formed on the leeward side of the inlet at maximum angle of attack before unstart. This region of overcompression corresponded to local subsonic flow conditions ahead of the geometric throat. A uniform Mach number gradient of 0.10 at the cowl lip plane did not affect the inlet's pressure recovery, mass flow ratio, or diffuser exit total-pressure distortion.

  5. Compressible seal flow analysis using the finite element method with Galerkin solution technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1974-01-01

    High pressure gas sealing involves not only balancing the viscous force with the pressure gradient force but also accounting for fluid inertia--especially for choked flow. The conventional finite element method which uses a Rayleigh-Ritz solution technique is not convenient for nonlinear problems. For these problems, a finite element method with a Galerkin solution technique (FEMGST) was formulated. One example, a three-dimensional axisymmetric flow formulation has nonlinearities due to compressibility, area expansion, and convective inertia. Solutions agree with classical results in the limiting cases. The development of the choked flow velocity profile is shown.

  6. On the compressible Hart-McClure and Sellars mean flow motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maicke, Brian A.; Saad, Tony; Majdalani, Joseph

    2012-09-01

    We consider the compressible flow analogue of the solution known colloquially as the Hart-McClure profile. This potential motion is used to describe the mean flow in the original energy-based combustion instability framework. In this study, we employ the axisymmetric compressible form of the potential equation for steady, inviscid, irrotational flow assuming uniform injection of a calorically perfect gas in a porous, right-cylindrical chamber. This equation is expanded to order {M}_w^4 using a Rayleigh-Janzen sequence in powers of {M}_w^2 , where Mw is the wall Mach number. At leading order, we readily recover the original Hart-McClure profile and, at {M}_w^2 , a closed-form representation of the compressible correction. By way of confirmation, the same solution is re-constructed using a novel application of the vorticity-streamfunction technique. In view of the favorable convergence properties of the Rayleigh-Janzen expansion, the resulting approximation can be relied upon from the headwall down to the sonic point and slightly beyond in a long porous tube or nozzleless chamber. As a windfall, the compressible Sellars motion that arises in the reverse flow problem driven by wall suction is deduced. Based on the simple closed-form expressions that prescribe this motion, the principal flow attributes are quantified parametrically and compared to existing incompressible and one-dimensional theories. In this effort, the local Mach number and pressure are calculated and shown to provide an improved formulation when gauged against one-dimensional theory. Our results are also compared to the two-dimensional axisymmetric solution obtained by Majdalani ["On steady rotational high speed flows: The compressible Taylor-Culick profile," Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 463, 131-162 (2007), 10.1098/rspa.2006.1755]. After rescaling the axial coordinate by the critical length Ls, a parametrically-free form is obtained that is essentially independent of the Mach number. This behavior

  7. Spool Valve for Switching Air Flows Between Two Beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, W. Clark

    2005-01-01

    U.S. Patent 6,142,151 describes a dual-bed ventilation system for a space suit, with emphasis on a multiport spool valve that switches air flows between two chemical beds that adsorb carbon dioxide and water vapor. The valve is used to alternately make the air flow through one bed while exposing the other bed to the outer-space environment to regenerate that bed through vacuum desorption of CO2 and H2O. Oxygen flowing from a supply tank is routed through a pair of periodically switched solenoid valves to drive the spool valve in a reciprocating motion. The spool valve equalizes the pressures of air in the beds and the volumes of air flowing into and out of the beds during the alternations between the adsorption and desorption phases, in such a manner that the volume of air that must be vented to outer space is half of what it would be in the absence of pressure equalization. Oxygen that has been used to actuate the spool valve in its reciprocating motion is released into the ventilation loop to replenish air lost to vacuum during the previous desorption phase of the operating cycle.

  8. Equipment for Measuring Air Flow, Air Temperature, Relative Humidity, and Carbon Dioxide in Schools. Technical Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Bruce W.

    Information on equipment and techniques that school facility personnel may use to evaluate IAQ conditions are discussed. Focus is placed on the IAQ parameters of air flow, air temperature, relative humidity, as well as carbon dioxide and the equipment used to measure these factors. Reasons for measurement and for when the measurement of these…

  9. Cross-flow versus counterflow air-stripping towers

    SciTech Connect

    Little, J.C.; Marinas, B.J.

    1997-07-01

    Mass-transfer and pressure-drop packing performance correlations are used together with tower design equations and detailed cost models to compare the effectiveness of cross-flow and counterflow air stripping towers over a wide range of contaminant volatility. Cross-flow towers are shown to offer a significant economic advantage over counterflow towers when stripping low volatility organic contaminants primarily due to savings in energy costs. These savings increase as contaminant volatility decreases and as water flow rate increases. A further advantage of the cross-flow configuration is that it extends the feasible operating range for air stripping as cross-flow towers can accommodate higher air-to-water flow ratios than conventional counterflow towers. Finally it is shown that the optimized least-cost design for both counterflow and cross-flow towers varies with Henry`s law constant, water flow rate, and percent removal, but that the optimum is virtually insensitive to other cost and operating variables. This greatly simplifies the tower design procedure.

  10. Natural laminar flow hits smoother air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    Natural laminar flow (NLF) may be attained in aircraft with lower cost, weight, and maintenance penalties than active flow laminarization by means of a slot suction system. A high performance general aviation jet aircraft possessing a moderate degree of NLF over wing, fuselage, empennage and engine nacelles will accrue a 24 percent reduction in total aircraft drag in the cruise regime. NASA-Langley has conducted NLF research centered on the use of novel airfoil profiles as well as composite and milled aluminum alloy construction methods which minimize three-dimensional aerodynamic surface roughness and waviness. It is noted that higher flight altitudes intrinsically reduce unit Reynolds numbers, thereby minimizing turbulence for a given cruise speed.

  11. Development of discrete gas kinetic scheme for simulation of 3D viscous incompressible and compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L. M.; Shu, C.; Wang, Y.; Sun, Y.

    2016-08-01

    The sphere function-based gas kinetic scheme (GKS), which was presented by Shu and his coworkers [23] for simulation of inviscid compressible flows, is extended to simulate 3D viscous incompressible and compressible flows in this work. Firstly, we use certain discrete points to represent the spherical surface in the phase velocity space. Then, integrals along the spherical surface for conservation forms of moments, which are needed to recover 3D Navier-Stokes equations, are approximated by integral quadrature. The basic requirement is that these conservation forms of moments can be exactly satisfied by weighted summation of distribution functions at discrete points. It was found that the integral quadrature by eight discrete points on the spherical surface, which forms the D3Q8 discrete velocity model, can exactly match the integral. In this way, the conservative variables and numerical fluxes can be computed by weighted summation of distribution functions at eight discrete points. That is, the application of complicated formulations resultant from integrals can be replaced by a simple solution process. Several numerical examples including laminar flat plate boundary layer, 3D lid-driven cavity flow, steady flow through a 90° bending square duct, transonic flow around DPW-W1 wing and supersonic flow around NACA0012 airfoil are chosen to validate the proposed scheme. Numerical results demonstrate that the present scheme can provide reasonable numerical results for 3D viscous flows.

  12. Study of Compressive Strength of sic in Impact Experiments with Divergent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, V.; Frage, N.; Zaretsky, E.

    2009-12-01

    The axisymmetric divergent flow was generated in SiC samples by impact of convex copper flyer plates (radius of curvature ranging from 88 to 550 mm) having velocities from 550 to 700 m/s. The sample-window (sapphire) interface velocities or the velocities of the free surface of the nickel witness plate were continuously monitored by VISAR. The maximum shear stress achieved under different confining stress just prior to the sample failure is associated with the compressive failure threshold of the SiC. Both the compressive failure threshold of SiC and the parameters of its inelastic deformation were found by matching the results of the AUTODYN-2D numerical simulation with the experimentally obtained waveforms. The compressive failure threshold of SiC is characterized by a transition from brittle-like behavior below the confining stress of 1.4-1.5 GPa to the ductile-like one at higher confining stress.

  13. Compressible turbulence with slow-mode waves observed in the bursty bulk flow of plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tieyan; Cao, Jinbin; Fu, Huishan; Meng, Xuejie; Dunlop, M.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report the evidence of compressible turbulence with slow-mode waves in a bursty bulk flow of plasma sheet. This compressible turbulence is characterized by a multiscale (1-60 s) anticorrelation between plasma density and magnetic field strength. Besides, the magnetic compressibility spectrum stays nearly constant at all the measured frequencies. Furthermore, the turbulence energy distributions are anisotropic with k⊥ > k//, and the dispersion relation is consistent with slow-mode prediction. The fluctuations of density and magnetic field have similar double slope spectrum and kurtosis. These results suggest that the slow waves are involved in the intermittent turbulence cascade from MHD to ion kinetic scales, which may have significant implications for the energy transfer in the plasma sheet.

  14. Suppression mechanism of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in compressible fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Mona; Girimaji, Sharath S.

    2016-04-01

    The transformative influence of compressibility on the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) at the interface between two fluid streams of different velocities is explicated. When the velocity difference is small (subsonic), shear effects dominate the interface flow dynamics causing monotonic roll-up of vorticity and mixing between the two streams leading to the KHI. We find that at supersonic speed differentials, compressibility forces the dominance of dilatational (acoustic) rather than shear dynamics at the interface. Within this dilatational interface layer, traveling pressure waves cause the velocity perturbations to become oscillatory. We demonstrate that the oscillatory fluid motion reverses vortex roll-up and segregates the two streams leading to KHI suppression. Analysis and illustrations of the compressibility-induced suppression mechanism are presented.

  15. PDF modeling of chemically reacting flows in a compression-ignition engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj Mohan, Vivek Raja; Haworth, Daniel; Li, Jian

    2013-11-01

    A transported probability density function (PDF) model is used to simulate the in-cylinder combustion processes in a compression-ignition heavy-duty engine. The flow inside the cylinder in a compression-ignition engine is chemically reacting and highly turbulent. Therefore, the turbulent fluctuations in composition and temperature will influence the mean reaction rates. These turbulence-chemistry interactions (TCI) play an important role in predicting the combustion processes accurately. Recent results from in-cylinder combustion simulations for a compression-ignition engine are compared with measured data for several operating conditions. The PDF model, which takes into account for TCI, predicts the combustion processes more accurately compared to a model which neglects TCI. Marked differences are observed in predicting the flame structure and the pressure and heat-release traces as well as in predicting the emission characteristics.

  16. Explicit formulations of gas-kinetic flux solver for simulation of incompressible and compressible viscous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Shu, C.; Teo, C. J.; Wang, Y.; Yang, L. M.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a gas-kinetic flux solver (GKFS) is presented for the simulation of incompressible and compressible viscous flows. In this solver, the finite volume method is applied to discretize the Navier-Stokes equations. The inviscid and viscous fluxes at the interface are obtained simultaneously via the gas-kinetic scheme, which locally reconstruct the solution for the continuous Boltzmann equation. Different from the conventional gas-kinetic BGK scheme [1], a simple way is presented in this work to evaluate the non-equilibrium distribution function, which is calculated by the difference of equilibrium distribution functions at the cell interface and its surrounding points. As a consequence, explicit formulations for computing the conservative flow variables and fluxes are simply derived. In particular, three specific schemes are proposed and validated via several incompressible and compressible test examples. Numerical results show that all three schemes can provide accurate numerical results for incompressible flows. On the other hand, Scheme III is much more stable and consistent in simulation of compressible flows.

  17. Nonaffine deformation under compression and decompression of a flow-stabilized solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Carlos P.; Riehn, Robert; Daniels, Karen E.

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the particle-scale transition from elastic deformation to plastic flow is central to making predictions about the bulk material properties and response of disordered materials. To address this issue, we perform experiments on flow-stabilized solids composed of micron-scale spheres within a microfluidic channel, in a regime where particle inertia is negligible. Each solid heap exists within a stress field imposed by the flow, and we track the positions of particles in response to single impulses of fluid-driven compression or decompression. We find that the resulting deformation field is well-decomposed into an affine field, with a constant strain profile throughout the solid, and a non-affine field. The magnitude of this non-affine response decays with the distance from the free surface in the long-time limit, suggesting that the distance from jamming plays a significant role in controlling the length scale of plastic flow. Finally, we observe that compressive pulses create more rearrangements than decompressive pulses, an effect that we quantify using the D\\text{min}2 statistic for non-affine motion. Unexpectedly, the time scale for the compression response is shorter than for decompression at the same strain (but unequal pressure), providing insight into the coupling between deformation and cage-breaking.

  18. Ensemble Averaged Probability Density Function (APDF) for Compressible Turbulent Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a concept of the averaged probability density function (APDF) for studying compressible turbulent reacting flows. The APDF is defined as an ensemble average of the fine grained probability density function (FG-PDF) with a mass density weighting. It can be used to exactly deduce the mass density weighted, ensemble averaged turbulent mean variables. The transport equation for APDF can be derived in two ways. One is the traditional way that starts from the transport equation of FG-PDF, in which the compressible Navier- Stokes equations are embedded. The resulting transport equation of APDF is then in a traditional form that contains conditional means of all terms from the right hand side of the Navier-Stokes equations except for the chemical reaction term. These conditional means are new unknown quantities that need to be modeled. Another way of deriving the transport equation of APDF is to start directly from the ensemble averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The resulting transport equation of APDF derived from this approach appears in a closed form without any need for additional modeling. The methodology of ensemble averaging presented in this paper can be extended to other averaging procedures: for example, the Reynolds time averaging for statistically steady flow and the Reynolds spatial averaging for statistically homogeneous flow. It can also be extended to a time or spatial filtering procedure to construct the filtered density function (FDF) for the large eddy simulation (LES) of compressible turbulent reacting flows.

  19. Turbulence models and Reynolds analogy for two-dimensional supersonic compression ramp flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chi R.; Bidek, Maleina C.

    1994-01-01

    Results of the application of turbulence models and the Reynolds analogy to the Navier-Stokes computations of Mach 2.9 two-dimensional compression ramp flows are presented. The Baldwin-Lomax eddy viscosity model and the kappa-epsilon turbulence transport equations for the turbulent momentum flux modeling in the Navier-Stokes equations are studied. The Reynolds analogy for the turbulent heat flux modeling in the energy equation was also studied. The Navier-Stokes equations and the energy equation were numerically solved for the flow properties. The Reynolds shear stress, the skin friction factor, and the surface heat transfer rate were calculated and compared with their measurements. It was concluded that with a hybrid kappa-epsilon turbulence model for turbulence modeling, the present computations predicted the skin friction factors of the 8 deg and 16 deg compression ramp flows and with the turbulent Prandtl number Pr(sub t) = 0.93 and the ratio of the turbulent thermal and momentum transport coefficients mu(sub q)/mu(sub t) = 2/Prt, the present computations also predicted the surface heat transfer rates beneath the boundary layer flow of the 16 compression ramp.

  20. Optical Air Flow Measurements in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogue, Rodney K.; Jentink, Henk W.

    2004-01-01

    This document has been written to assist the flight-test engineer and researcher in using optical flow measurements in flight applications. The emphasis is on describing tradeoffs in system design to provide desired measurement performance as currently understood. Optical system components are discussed with examples that illustrate the issues. The document concludes with descriptions of optical measurement systems designed for a variety of applications including aeronautics research, airspeed measurement, and turbulence hazard detection. Theoretical discussion is minimized, but numerous references are provided to supply ample opportunity for the reader to understand the theoretical underpinning of optical concepts.

  1. Computer program for calculating laminar, transitional, and turbulent boundary layers for a compressible axisymmetric flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, J. A.; Gregg, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    A finite-difference program is described for calculating the viscous compressible boundary layer flow over either planar or axisymmetric surfaces. The flow may be initially laminar and progress through a transitional zone to fully turbulent flow, or it may remain laminar, depending on the imposed boundary conditions, laws of viscosity, and numerical solution of the momentum and energy equations. The flow may also be forced into a turbulent flow at a chosen spot by the data input. The input may contain the factors of arbitrary Reynolds number, free-stream Mach number, free-stream turbulence, wall heating or cooling, longitudinal wall curvature, wall suction or blowing, and wall roughness. The solution may start from an initial Falkner-Skan similarity profile, an approximate equilibrium turbulent profile, or an initial arbitrary input profile.

  2. A Study of Hypersonic Compression-Corner Flow at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetlutsky, V. N.; Ganimedov, V. L.

    2002-07-01

    To numerically solve the problem for the ramp flow at high Reynolds number, it is justified to use the classical Prandtl model and to part the flow into an inviscid region and a thin boundary layer. This model is based on a rigorous asymptotic theory and describes the flow the more accurately, the higher the Reynolds number is. Since a flow separation in a compression corner may occur, the present work deals with unsteady boundary-layer equations. The approximation error in discretization of boundary-layer equations is always smaller than the value of viscid terms since the Reynolds number can be eliminated from the equations by a suitable substitution of variables. Besides, the requirement for the sufficient number of points in the cross-flow direction can be fulfilled in the case of middle-class computers since the solution is being built in a narrow near-wall region.

  3. Effects of cord compression on fetal blood flow distribution and O/sub 2/ delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Itskovitz, J.; LaGamma, E.F.; Rudolph, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    The authors used the radionuclide microsphere technique in nine fetal lambs to examine the effect of partial cord compression on distribution of cardiac output and O/sub 2/ delivery to fetal organs and venous flow patterns. With a 50% reduction in umbilical blood flow the fraction of fetal cardiac output distributed to the brain, heart, carcass, kidneys, and gastrointestinal tract increased. Pulmonary blood flow fell. O/sub 2/ delivery to the brain and myocardium was maintained but was reduced to peripheral, renal, and gastrointestinal circulations. Hepatic blood flow decreased and O/sub 2/ delivery fell by 75%. The proportion of umbilical venous blood passing through the ductus venosus increased from 43.9 to 71.8%. The preferential distribution of ductus venosus blood flow through the foramen ovale was enhanced and the proportion of O/sub 2/ delivery to upper body organs derived from the ductus venosus increased. Abdominal inferior vena caval blood flow increased, and it was also preferentially distributed through the foramen ovale and constituted the major fraction of the arterial blood supply to the upper body organs. Thus cord compression modified the distribution of cardiac output and the patterns of venous returns in the fetus. This pattern of circulatory response differs from that observed with other causes of reduced O/sub 2/ delivery.

  4. Air flow management in an internal combustion engine through the use of electronically controlled air jets

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, M.R.

    1988-12-27

    This patent describes a means for producing an air/fuel mixture in the valve pocket and means for directing the air/fuel mixture past the intake valve into the combustion chamber, the improvement comprising a device for generating a swirling flow of the air/fuel mixture in the combustion chamber to thereby obtain greater combustion stability. The device has a nozzle positioned within the valve pocket and directed at an acute angle toward the intake valve comprising at least one opening for receiving air, connected to a first pathway, and at least one opening for expelling air, connected, to a second pathway joined to the first pathway and extending to the expulsion opening. The device also includes a means for controlling the flow of air through the pathway and out the expulsion opening comprising: (i) a stopper having sides complementary in shape to the pair of opposed arcuate walls movable from an open position allowing air through the pathway to a closed position, wherein the sides of the stopper are in a sealed relationship with the opposed arcaute sides of the junction thereby preventing the flow of air through the second pathway and out of the expulsion opening; and (ii) an electronic computer which determines the size and duration of the pathway opening.

  5. Finite volume - space-time discontinuous Galerkin method for the solution of compressible turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Česenek, Jan

    2016-03-01

    In this article we deal with numerical simulation of the non-stationary compressible turbulent flow. Compressible turbulent flow is described by the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. This RANS system is equipped with two-equation k-omega turbulence model. These two systems of equations are solved separately. Discretization of the RANS system is carried out by the space-time discontinuous Galerkin method which is based on piecewise polynomial discontinuous approximation of the sought solution in space and in time. Discretization of the two-equation k-omega turbulence model is carried out by the implicit finite volume method, which is based on piecewise constant approximation of the sought solution. We present some numerical experiments to demonstrate the applicability of the method using own-developed code.

  6. A Parallel Implicit Adaptive Mesh Refinement Algorithm for Predicting Unsteady Fully-Compressible Reactive Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Northrup, Scott A.

    A new parallel implicit adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm is developed for the prediction of unsteady behaviour of laminar flames. The scheme is applied to the solution of the system of partial-differential equations governing time-dependent, two- and three-dimensional, compressible laminar flows for reactive thermally perfect gaseous mixtures. A high-resolution finite-volume spatial discretization procedure is used to solve the conservation form of these equations on body-fitted multi-block hexahedral meshes. A local preconditioning technique is used to remove numerical stiffness and maintain solution accuracy for low-Mach-number, nearly incompressible flows. A flexible block-based octree data structure has been developed and is used to facilitate automatic solution-directed mesh adaptation according to physics-based refinement criteria. The data structure also enables an efficient and scalable parallel implementation via domain decomposition. The parallel implicit formulation makes use of a dual-time-stepping like approach with an implicit second-order backward discretization of the physical time, in which a Jacobian-free inexact Newton method with a preconditioned generalized minimal residual (GMRES) algorithm is used to solve the system of nonlinear algebraic equations arising from the temporal and spatial discretization procedures. An additive Schwarz global preconditioner is used in conjunction with block incomplete LU type local preconditioners for each sub-domain. The Schwarz preconditioning and block-based data structure readily allow efficient and scalable parallel implementations of the implicit AMR approach on distributed-memory multi-processor architectures. The scheme was applied to solutions of steady and unsteady laminar diffusion and premixed methane-air combustion and was found to accurately predict key flame characteristics. For a premixed flame under terrestrial gravity, the scheme accurately predicted the frequency of the natural

  7. Airway blood flow response to dry air hyperventilation in sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, G.H.; Baile, E.M.; Pare, P.D.

    1986-03-01

    Airway blood flow (Qaw) may be important in conditioning inspired air. To determine the effect of eucapneic dry air hyperventilation (hv) on Qaw in sheep the authors studied 7 anesthetized open-chest sheep after 25 min. of warm dry air hv. During each period of hv the authors have recorded vascular pressures, cardiac output (CO), and tracheal mucosal and inspired air temperature. Using a modification of the reference flow technique radiolabelled microspheres were injected into the left atrium to make separate measurements after humid air and dry air hv. In 4 animals a snare around the left main pulmonary artery was used following microsphere injection to prevent recirculation (entry into L lung of microspheres from the pulmonary artery). Qaw to the trachea and L lung as measured and Qaw for the R lung was estimated. After the final injection the sheep were killed and bronchi (Br) and lungs removed. Qaw (trachea plus L lung plus R lung) in 4 sheep increased from a mean of 30.8 to 67.0 ml/min. Airway mucosal temp. decreased from 39/sup 0/ to 33/sup 0/C. The authors conclude that dry air hv cools airway mucosa and increases Qaw in sheep.

  8. Compressible flow across narrow passages: Comparison of theory and experiment for face seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. P.; Wisander, D. W.; Hady, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    Computer calculation for determining compressible flow across radial face seals were compared with measured results obtained in a seal simulator rig at pressure ratios to 0.9 (ambient pressure/sealed pressure). In general, the measured and calculated leakages across the seal dam agreed within 3 percent. The resultant loss coefficient, dependent upon the pressure ratio, ranged from 0.47 to 0.68. The calculated pressures were within 2.5 N/cu um of the measured values.

  9. Time decay rates for the equations of the compressible heat-conductive flow through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qing; Tan, Zhong; Wu, Guochun

    2015-11-01

    We consider the time decay rates of smooth solutions to the Cauchy problem for the equations of the compressible heat-conductive flow through porous media. We prove the global existence and uniqueness of the solutions by the standard energy method. Moreover, we establish the optimal decay rates of the solution as well as its higher-order spatial derivatives. And the damping effect on the time decay rates of the solution is studied in detail.

  10. Technical and economic assessment of fluidized bed augmented compressed air energy storage system. Volume III. Preconceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Giramonti, A.J.; Lessard, R.D.; Merrick, D.; Hobson, M.J.

    1981-09-01

    A technical and economic assessment of fluidized bed combustion augmented compressed air energy storage systems is presented. The results of this assessment effort are presented in three volumes. Volume III - Preconceptual Design contains the system analysis which led to the identification of a preferred component configuration for a fluidized bed combustion augmented compressed air energy storage system, the results of the effort which transformed the preferred configuration into preconceptual power plant design, and an introductory evaluation of the performance of the power plant system during part-load operation and while load following.

  11. On the effect of boundary layer growth on the stability of compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Hady, N. M.

    1981-01-01

    The method of multiple scales is used to describe a formally correct method based on the nonparallel linear stability theory, that examines the two and three dimensional stability of compressible boundary layer flows. The method is applied to the supersonic flat plate layer at Mach number 4.5. The theoretical growth rates are in good agreement with experimental results. The method is also applied to the infinite-span swept wing transonic boundary layer with suction to evaluate the effect of the nonparallel flow on the development of crossflow disturbances.

  12. The obstacle block as a device to measure turbulent skin friction in compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elfstrom, G. M.; Kostopoulos, C.; Peake, D. J.; Fisher, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    The obstacle block, developed as an alternative to the Preston tube for indirectly measuring skin friction on smooth surfaces in incompressible flows, is examined as a device for compressible flows as well. The block, which is congruent with a surface static pressure orifice, has a geometry which is easily specified and thus has a universal calibration. Data from two independent studies are used to establish such a calibration using 'wall' variables, valid for Mach numbers up to about 3. Various aspects concerning practical application of the device are examined, such as sensitivity to yaw and the minimum permissible axial spacing between blocks. Several examples showing the utility of the device are given.

  13. Exploring the origins of turbulence in multiphase flow using compressed sensing MRI.

    PubMed

    Tayler, Alexander B; Holland, Daniel J; Sederman, Andrew J; Gladden, Lynn F

    2012-06-29

    Ultrafast magnetic resonance imaging, employing spiral reciprocal space sampling and compressed sensing image reconstruction, is used to acquire velocity maps of the liquid phase in gas-liquid multiphase flows. Velocity maps were acquired at a rate of 188 frames per second. The method enables quantitative characterization of the wake dynamics of single bubbles and bubble swarms. To illustrate this, we use the new technique to demonstrate the role of bubble wake vorticity in driving bubble secondary motions, and in governing the structure of turbulence in multiphase flows. PMID:23004990

  14. Exploring the Origins of Turbulence in Multiphase Flow Using Compressed Sensing MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayler, Alexander B.; Holland, Daniel J.; Sederman, Andrew J.; Gladden, Lynn F.

    2012-06-01

    Ultrafast magnetic resonance imaging, employing spiral reciprocal space sampling and compressed sensing image reconstruction, is used to acquire velocity maps of the liquid phase in gas-liquid multiphase flows. Velocity maps were acquired at a rate of 188 frames per second. The method enables quantitative characterization of the wake dynamics of single bubbles and bubble swarms. To illustrate this, we use the new technique to demonstrate the role of bubble wake vorticity in driving bubble secondary motions, and in governing the structure of turbulence in multiphase flows.

  15. A modified dodge algorithm for the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations and compressible duct flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    A revised version of a split-velocity method for numerical calculation of compressible duct flow was developed. The revision incorporates balancing of mass flow rates on each marching step in order to maintain front-to-back continuity during the calculation. The (checkerboard) zebra algorithm is applied to solution of the three-dimensional continuity equation in conservative form. A second-order A-stable linear multistep method is employed in effecting a marching solution of the parabolized momentum equations. A checkerboard successive overrelaxation iteration is used to solve the resulting implicit nonlinear systems of finite-difference equations which govern stepwise transition.

  16. Finite-difference solution for turbulent swirling compressible flow in axisymmetric ducts with struts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, O. L.

    1974-01-01

    A finite-difference procedure for computing the turbulent, swirling, compressible flow in axisymmetric ducts is described. Arbitrary distributions of heat and mass transfer at the boundaries can be treated, and the effects of struts, inlet guide vanes, and flow straightening vanes can be calculated. The calculation procedure is programmed in FORTRAN 4 and has operated successfully on the UNIVAC 1108, IBM 360, and CDC 6600 computers. The analysis which forms the basis of the procedure, a detailed description of the computer program, and the input/output formats are presented. The results of sample calculations performed with the computer program are compared with experimental data.

  17. Relevance of postmortem radiology to the diagnosis of fatal cerebral gas embolism from compressed air diving

    PubMed Central

    Cole, A J; Griffiths, D; Lavender, S; Summers, P; Rich, K

    2006-01-01

    Aims To test the hypothesis that artefact caused by postmortem off‐gassing is at least partly responsible for the presence of gas within the vascular system and tissues of the cadaver following death associated with compressed air diving. Methods Controlled experiment sacrificing sheep after a period of simulated diving in a hyperbaric chamber and carrying out sequential postmortem computed tomography (CT) on the cadavers. Results All the subject sheep developed significant quantities of gas in the vascular system within 24 hours, as demonstrated by CT and necropsy, while the control animals did not. Conclusions The presence of gas in the vascular system of human cadavers following diving associated fatalities is to be expected, and is not necessarily connected with gas embolism following pulmonary barotrauma, as has previously been claimed. PMID:16489175

  18. Compressed air demand-type firefighter's breathing system, volume 1. [design analysis and performance tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    The commercial availability of lightweight high pressure compressed air vessels has resulted in a lightweight firefighter's breathing apparatus. The improved apparatus, and details of its design and development are described. The apparatus includes a compact harness assembly, a backplate mounted pressure reducer assembly, a lightweight bubble-type facemask with a mask mounted demand breathing regulator. Incorporated in the breathing regulator is exhalation valve, a purge valve and a whistle-type low pressure warning that sounds only during inhalation. The pressure reducer assembly includes two pressure reducers, an automatic transfer valve and a signaling device for the low pressure warning. Twenty systems were fabricated, tested, refined through an alternating development and test sequence, and extensively examined in a field evaluation program. Photographs of the apparatus are included.

  19. Compressed air energy storage system reservoir size for a wind energy baseload power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallo, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    Wind generated electricity can be transformed from an intermittent to a baseload resource using an oversized wind farm in conjunction with a compressed air energy storage (CAES) system. The size of the storage reservoir for the CAES system (solution mined salt cavern or porous media) as a function of the wind speed autocorrelation time (C) has been examined using a Monte Carlo simulation for a wind class 4 (wind power density 450 W m{sup -2} at 50 m hub height) wind regime with a Weibull k factor of 2.5. For values of C typically found for winds over the US Great Plains, the storage reservoir must have a 60 to 80 hour capacity. Since underground reservoirs account for only a small fraction of total system cost, this larger storage reservoir has a negligible effect on the cost of energy from the wind energy baseload system. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Compressed air energy storage (CAES) environmental control concerns and program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Beckwith, M.A.; Boehm, D.W.

    1980-06-01

    This report assesses the required environmental research and recommends a program plan to assist DOD's Environmental Control Technology Division (ECT) in performing its mission of ensuring that the procedures, processes, systems, and strategies necessary to minimize any adverse environmental impacts of compressed air energy storage (CAES) are developed in a timely manner so as not to delay implementation of the technology. To do so, CAES technology and the expected major environmental concerns of the technology are described. Second, ongoing or planned research in related programs and the applicability of results from these programs to CAES environmental research are discussed. Third, the additional research and development required to provide the necessary environmental data base and resolve concerns in CAES are outlined. Finally, a program plan to carry out this research and development effort is presented.

  1. Combined compressed air storage-low BTU coal gasification power plant

    DOEpatents

    Kartsounes, George T.; Sather, Norman F.

    1979-01-01

    An electrical generating power plant includes a Compressed Air Energy Storage System (CAES) fueled with low BTU coal gas generated in a continuously operating high pressure coal gasifier system. This system is used in coordination with a continuously operating main power generating plant to store excess power generated during off-peak hours from the power generating plant, and to return the stored energy as peak power to the power generating plant when needed. The excess coal gas which is produced by the coal gasifier during off-peak hours is stored in a coal gas reservoir. During peak hours the stored coal gas is combined with the output of the coal gasifier to fuel the gas turbines and ultimately supply electrical power to the base power plant.

  2. Two-dimensional compressible flow in centrifugal compressors with straight blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanitz, John D; Ellis, Gaylord O

    1950-01-01

    Six numerical examples are presented for steady, two-dimensional, compressible, nonviscous flow in centrifugal compressors with thin straight blades, the center lines of which generate the surface of a right circular cone when rotated about the axis of the compressor. A seventh example is presented for incompressible flow. The solutions were obtained in a region of the compressors, including the impeller tip, that was considered to be unaffected by the diffuser vanes or by the impeller-inlet configuration. Each solution applies to radial and mixed flow compressors with various cone angles but with the same angle between blades on the conic flow surface. The solution also apply to radial and mixed flow turbines with the rotation and the flow direction reversed. The effects of variations in the following parameters were investigated: (1) flow rate, (2) impeller-tip speed, (3) variation of passage height with radius, and (4) angle between blades on conic flow surface. The numerical results are presented in plots of the streamlines and constant Mach number lines. Correlation equations are developed whereby the flow conditions in any impeller with straight blades can be determined (in the region investigated by this analysis) for all operating conditions.

  3. Progress Towards a Cartesian Cut-Cell Method for Viscous Compressible Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Marsha; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    We present preliminary development of an approach for simulating high Reynolds number steady compressible flow in two space dimensions using a Cartesian cut-cell finite volume method. We consider both laminar and turbulent flow with both low and high cell Reynolds numbers near the wall. The approach solves the full Navier-Stokes equations in all cells, and uses a wall model to address the resolution requirements near boundaries and to mitigate mesh irregularities in cut cells. We present a quadratic wall model for low cell Reynolds numbers. At high cell Reynolds numbers, the quadratic is replaced with a newly developed analytic wall model stemming from solution of a limiting form of the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model which features a forward evaluation for flow velocity and exactly matches characteristics of the SA turbulence model in the field. We develop multigrid operators which attain convergence rates similar to inviscid multigrid. Investigations focus on preliminary verification and validation of the method. Flows over flat plates and compressible airfoils show good agreement with both theoretical results and experimental data. Mesh convergence studies on sub- and transonic airfoil flows show convergence of surface pressures with wall spacings as large as approx.0.1% chord. With the current analytic wall model, one or two additional refinements near the wall are required to obtain mesh converged values of skin friction.

  4. Effect of swaging on the 1000 C compressive slow plastic flow characteristics of the directionally solidified eutectic alloy gamma/gamma prime-alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Wirth, G.

    1983-01-01

    Swaging between 750 and 1050 C has been investigated as a means to introduce work into the directionally solidified eutectic alloy gamma/gamma prime-alpha (Ni-32.3 wt percent Mo-6.3 wt percent Al) and increase the elevated temperature creep strength. The 1000 C slow plastic compressive flow stress-strain rate properties in air of as-grown, annealed, and worked nominally 10 and 25 percent materials have been determined. Swaging did not improve the slow plastic behavior. In fact large reductions tended to degrade the strength and produced a change in the deformation mechanism from uniform flow to one involving intense slip band formation. Comparison of 1000 C tensile and compressive strength-strain rate data reveals that deformation is independent of the stress state.

  5. Evolutionary Concepts for Decentralized Air Traffic Flow Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Milton; Kolitz, Stephan; Milner, Joseph; Odoni, Amedeo

    1997-01-01

    Alternative concepts for modifying the policies and procedures under which the air traffic flow management system operates are described, and an approach to the evaluation of those concepts is discussed. Here, air traffic flow management includes all activities related to the management of the flow of aircraft and related system resources from 'block to block.' The alternative concepts represent stages in the evolution from the current system, in which air traffic management decision making is largely centralized within the FAA, to a more decentralized approach wherein the airlines and other airspace users collaborate in air traffic management decision making with the FAA. The emphasis in the discussion is on a viable medium-term partially decentralized scenario representing a phase of this evolution that is consistent with the decision-making approaches embodied in proposed Free Flight concepts for air traffic management. System-level metrics for analyzing and evaluating the various alternatives are defined, and a simulation testbed developed to generate values for those metrics is described. The fundamental issue of modeling airline behavior in decentralized environments is also raised, and an example of such a model, which deals with the preservation of flight bank integrity in hub airports, is presented.

  6. New experimental correlations to characterize compressible flow losses at 90-degree T-junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Garcia, J.; Viedma, A.

    2009-01-15

    New experimental correlations to characterize energy losses in adiabatic compressible flow at 90-degree T-junctions and their expanded uncertainties are presented. These new correlations are based on a new linking between branches coefficient definition, K, and show a logarithmic relationship with mass flow rate ratio between branches, q, and the extrapolated Mach number in the common branch, M{sub 3}{sup *}, for all the different flow types studied. The extrapolated properties up to the junction are calculated, from measurement sections, subtracting the frictional losses using the Fanno fluid flow model. These two parameters or global correlations, K = K(M{sub 3}{sup *},q), can be easily implemented as boundary conditions into 1-D global simulation codes. (author)

  7. WIND: Computer program for calculation of three dimensional potential compressible flow about wind turbine rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program is presented which numerically solves an exact, full potential equation (FPE) for three dimensional, steady, inviscid flow through an isolated wind turbine rotor. The program automatically generates a three dimensional, boundary conforming grid and iteratively solves the FPE while fully accounting for both the rotating cascade and Coriolis effects. The numerical techniques incorporated involve rotated, type dependent finite differencing, a finite volume method, artificial viscosity in conservative form, and a successive line overrelaxation combined with the sequential grid refinement procedure to accelerate the iterative convergence rate. Consequently, the WIND program is capable of accurately analyzing incompressible and compressible flows, including those that are locally transonic and terminated by weak shocks. The program can also be used to analyze the flow around isolated aircraft propellers and helicopter rotors in hover as long as the total relative Mach number of the oncoming flow is subsonic.

  8. Cross-coupling effects in chemically non-equilibrium viscous compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustova, E. V.; Giordano, D.

    2011-01-01

    A closed self-consistent description of a one-temperature non-equilibrium reacting flow is presented on the basis of the kinetic theory methods. A general case including internal degrees of freedom, dissociation-recombination and exchange reactions, and arbitrary values of affinities of chemical reactions is considered. Chemical-reaction rates and mean normal stress in viscous compressible flows are studied and a symmetric cross coupling between these terms is found. It is shown that the rate of each chemical reaction and the mean normal stress depend on velocity divergence and affinities of all chemical reactions; the law of mass action is violated in viscous flows. The results obtained in the frame of linear irreversible thermodynamics can be deduced from the proposed model for the particular case of small affinities. The reciprocal Onsager-Casimir relations are verified, the symmetry of kinetic coefficients is demonstrated, and the entropy production in a viscous flow is studied.

  9. Calculation of a laminar flow of a compressible gas in plane curvilinear ducts with heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabovskii, V. I.; Zhestkov, G. B.

    1983-04-01

    A laminar flow (Re = 1000 or less) of a compressible heated gas in a plane duct having the shape of an elbow with a curved section and two long straight sections is analyzed, with emphasis on the interaction between the thermal and gas-dynamic characteristics of the flow in the curved section. The flow is described by a complete system of Navier-Stokes equations, and these are solved using a modified version of the well known integration methods. Attention is given to the formation of closed separation zones at the duct walls, their deformation with changes in flow conditions, and pressure loss. The regions of the maximum and minimum heat fluxes are identified, and the relationship between these and the separation zones is examined.

  10. Glow Discharge Characteristics in Transverse Supersonic Air Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timerkaev, B. A.; Zalyaliev, B. R.; Saifutdinov, A. I.

    2014-11-01

    A low pressure glow discharge in a transverse supersonic gas flow of air at pressures of the order 1 torr has been experimentally studied for the case where the flow only partially fills the inter electrode gap. It is shown that the space region with supersonic gas flow has a higher concentration of gas particles and, therefore, works as a charged particle generator. The near electrode regions of glow discharge are concentrated specifically in this region. This structure of glow discharge is promising for plasma deposition of coatings under ultralow pressures

  11. Split-flow regeneration in absorptive air separation

    DOEpatents

    Weimer, Robert F.

    1987-01-01

    A chemical absorptive separation of air in multiple stage of absorption and desorption is performed with partial recycle of absorbent between stages of desorption necessary to match equilibrium conditions in the various stages of absorption. This allows reduced absorbent flow, reduced energy demand and reduced capital costs.

  12. The Wells turbine in an oscillating air flow

    SciTech Connect

    Raghunathan, S.; Ombaka,

    1984-08-01

    An experimental study of the performance of a 0.2 m diameter Wells self rectifying air turbine with NACA 0021 blades is presented. Experiments were conducted in an oscillating flowrig. The effects of Reynolds number and Strouhal number on the performance of the turbine were investigated. Finally comparison between the results with the predictions from uni-directional flow tests are made.

  13. Split-flow regeneration in absorptive air separation

    DOEpatents

    Weimer, R.F.

    1987-11-24

    A chemical absorptive separation of air in multiple stage of absorption and desorption is performed with partial recycle of absorbent between stages of desorption necessary to match equilibrium conditions in the various stages of absorption. This allows reduced absorbent flow, reduced energy demand and reduced capital costs. 4 figs.

  14. 30 CFR 57.22213 - Air flow (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air flow (III mines). 57.22213 Section 57.22213 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards...

  15. 30 CFR 57.22213 - Air flow (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air flow (III mines). 57.22213 Section 57.22213 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards...

  16. 30 CFR 57.22213 - Air flow (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Air flow (III mines). 57.22213 Section 57.22213 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards...

  17. 30 CFR 57.22213 - Air flow (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air flow (III mines). 57.22213 Section 57.22213 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards...

  18. 30 CFR 57.22213 - Air flow (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air flow (III mines). 57.22213 Section 57.22213 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards...

  19. Linear stability, transient energy growth, and the role of viscosity stratification in compressible plane Couette flow.

    PubMed

    Malik, M; Dey, J; Alam, Meheboob

    2008-03-01

    Linear stability and the nonmodal transient energy growth in compressible plane Couette flow are investigated for two prototype mean flows: (a) the uniform shear flow with constant viscosity, and (b) the nonuniform shear flow with stratified viscosity. Both mean flows are linearly unstable for a range of supersonic Mach numbers (M). For a given M , the critical Reynolds number (Re) is significantly smaller for the uniform shear flow than its nonuniform shear counterpart; for a given Re, the dominant instability (over all streamwise wave numbers, alpha ) of each mean flow belongs to different modes for a range of supersonic M . An analysis of perturbation energy reveals that the instability is primarily caused by an excess transfer of energy from mean flow to perturbations. It is shown that the energy transfer from mean flow occurs close to the moving top wall for "mode I" instability, whereas it occurs in the bulk of the flow domain for "mode II." For the nonmodal transient growth analysis, it is shown that the maximum temporal amplification of perturbation energy, G(max), and the corresponding time scale are significantly larger for the uniform shear case compared to those for its nonuniform counterpart. For alpha=0 , the linear stability operator can be partitioned into L ~ L+Re(2) L(p), and the Re-dependent operator L(p) is shown to have a negligibly small contribution to perturbation energy which is responsible for the validity of the well-known quadratic-scaling law in uniform shear flow: G(t/Re) ~ Re(2). In contrast, the dominance of L(p) is responsible for the invalidity of this scaling law in nonuniform shear flow. An inviscid reduced model, based on Ellingsen-Palm-type solution, has been shown to capture all salient features of transient energy growth of full viscous problem. For both modal and nonmodal instability, it is shown that the viscosity stratification of the underlying mean flow would lead to a delayed transition in compressible Couette flow

  20. A stagnation pressure probe for droplet-laden air flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, S. N. B.; Leonardo, M.; Ehresman, C. M.

    1985-01-01

    It is often of interest in a droplet-laden gas flow to obtain the stagnation pressure of both the gas phase and the mixture. A flow-decelerating probe (TPF), with separate, purged ports for the gas phase and the mixture and with a bleed for accumulating liquid at the closed end, has been developed. Measurements obtained utilizing the TPF in a nearly isothermal air-water droplet mixture flow in a smooth circular pipe under various conditions of flow velocity, pressure, liquid concentration and droplet size are presented and compared with data obtained under identical conditions with a conventional, gas phase stagnation pressure probe (CSP). The data obtained with the CSP and TPF probes are analyzed to determine the applicability of the two probes in relation to the multi-phase characteristics of the flow and the geometry of the probe.