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Sample records for compressible mixing layer

  1. The compressible mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandromme, Dany; Haminh, Hieu

    1991-01-01

    The capability of turbulence modeling correctly to handle natural unsteadiness appearing in compressible turbulent flows is investigated. Physical aspects linked to the unsteadiness problem and the role of various flow parameters are analyzed. It is found that unsteady turbulent flows can be simulated by dividing these motions into an 'organized' part for which equations of motion are solved and a remaining 'incoherent' part represented by a turbulence model. Two-equation turbulence models and second-order turbulence models can yield reasonable results. For specific compressible unsteady turbulent flow, graphic presentations of different quantities may reveal complementary physical features. Strong compression zones are observed in rapid flow parts but shocklets do not yet occur.

  2. Planar velocity measurements in compressible mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, William David

    1999-10-01

    The efficiency of high-Mach number airbreathing propulsion devices is critically dependent upon the mixing of gases in turbulent shear flows. However, compressibility is known to suppress the growth rates of these mixing layers, posing a problem of both practical and scientific interest. In the present study, particle image velocimetry (PIV) is used to obtain planar, two- component velocity fields for Planar gaseous shear layers at convective Mach numbers Mc of 0.25, 0.63, and 0.76. The experiments are performed in a large-scale blowdown wind tunnel, with high-speed freestream Mach numbers up to 2.25 and shear-layer Reynolds numbers up to 106 . The instantaneous data are analyzed to produce maps of derived quantities such as vorticity, and ensemble averaged to provide turbulence statistics. Specific issues relating to the application of PIV to supersonic flows are addressed. In addition to the fluid- velocity measurements, we present double-pulsed scalar visualizations, permitting inference of the convective velocity of the large-scale structures, and examine the interaction of a weak wave with the mixing layer. The principal change associated with compressibility is seen to be the development of multiple high-gradient regions in the instantaneous velocity field, disrupting the spanwise-coherent `roller' structure usually associated with incompressible layers. As a result, the vorticity peaks reside in multiple thin sheets, segregated in the transverse direction. This suggests a decrease in cross-stream communication and a disconnection of the entrainment processes at the two interfaces. In the compressible case, steep-gradient regions in the instantaneous velocity field often correspond closely with the local sonic line, suggesting a sensitivity to lab-frame disturbances; this could in turn explain the effectiveness of sub-boundary layer mixing enhancement strategies in this flow. Large- ensemble statistics bear out the observation from previous single

  3. Spatial stability of a compressible mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. L.; Grosch, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    Presented are the results of a study of the inviscid spatial stability of a parallel compressible mixing layer. The parameters of this study are the Mach number of the moving stream, the ratio of the temperature of the stationary stream to that of the moving stream, the frequency and the direction of propagation of the disturbance wave. Stability characteristics of the flow as a function of these parameters are given. It is shown that if the Mach number exceeds a critical value there are always two groups of unstable waves. One of these groups is fast with phase speeds greater than 1/2, and the other is slow with speeds less than 1/2. Phase speeds for the neutral and unstable modes are given, as well as growth rates for the unstable modes. It is shown that three dimensional modes have the same general behavior as the two dimensional modes but with higher growth rates over some range of propagation direction. Finally, a group of very low frequency unstable modes was found for sufficiently large Mach numbers. These modes have very low phase speeds but large growth rates.

  4. Linear Stability Regime Analysis of the Compressible Reacting Mixing Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, M. J.; Reynolds, William C.; Mansour, N. N.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Previous investigations have shown that a compressible reacting mixing layer can develop two peaks in the mean density weighted vorticity profile. Linear stability analyses show that at these peaks two distinct 'outer' instability modes appear in addition to the more common central mode, which exists unaccompanied in incompressible nonreacting flows. The present study parametrically analyzes the effects of compressibility, heat release, stoichiometry, and density ratio on the amplification rate and obliquity of each stability mode. The mean profiles used in the spatial stability calculation are generated by self-similar solutions of the compressible boundary layer equations combined with the assumption of infinitely fast chemistry. It is shown that the influence of stoichiometry and density ratio on the peaks of the density weighted vorticity profile determines which modes will dominate. Of particular interest are the conditions where two modes are equally amplified, causing the mixing layer to develop into a 'colayer' structure.

  5. Nonlinear Stability and Structure of Compressible Reacting Mixing Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, M. J.; Mansour, N. N.; Reynolds, W. C.

    2000-01-01

    The parabolized stability equations (PSE) are used to investigate issues of nonlinear flow development and mixing in compressible reacting shear layers. Particular interest is placed on investigating the change in flow structure that occurs when compressibility and heat release are added to the flow. These conditions allow the 'outer' instability modes- one associated with each of the fast and slow streams-to dominate over the 'central', Kelvin-Helmholtz mode that unaccompanied in incompressible nonreacting mixing layers. Analysis of scalar probability density functions in flows with dominant outer modes demonstrates the ineffective, one-sided nature of mixing that accompany these flow structures. Colayer conditions, where two modes have equal growth rate and the mixing layer is formed by two sets of vortices, offer some opportunity for mixing enhancement. Their extent, however, is found to be limited in the mixing layer's parameter space. Extensive validation of the PSE technique also provides a unique perspective on central- mode vortex pairing, further supporting the view that pairing is primarily governed perspective sheds insight on how linear stability theory is able to provide such an accurate prediction of experimentally-observed, fully nonlinear flow phenomenon.

  6. Linear stability of the confined compressible reacting mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, D. S.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    This paper investigates the linear stability of confined mixing layers with special emphasis on the effects of heat release and compressibility. The results show that reflection of supersonic disturbances by the walls makes the confined supersonic mixing layer more unstable than the unconfined free shear layer. Decreasing the distance between the walls makes the flow more unstable. However, subsonic disturbances are relatively unaffected by the walls. Heat release and Mach number hardly change the growth rates of supersonic disturbances. The most unstable supersonic disturbances are two-dimensional in rectangular channel flows, but three-dimensional in partially confined flows. Finally, the reactants are not strongly mixed by supersonic instabilities, which mainly disturb one side of the layer.

  7. The stability of compressible mixing layers in binary gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozusko, F.; Lasseigne, D. G.; Grosch, C. E.; Jackson, T. L.

    1996-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the inviscid two-dimensional spatial stability of a parallel compressible mixing layer in a binary gas. The parameters of this study are the Mach number of the fast stream, the ratio of the velocity of the slow stream to that of the fast stream, the ratio of the temperatures, the composition of the gas in the slow stream and in the fast stream, and the frequency of the disturbance wave. The ratio of the molecular weight of the slow stream to that of the fast stream is found to be an important quantity and is used as an independent variable in presenting the stability characteristics of the flow. It is shown that differing molecular weights have a significant effect on the neutral-mode phase speeds, the phase speeds of the unstable modes, the maximum growth rates and the unstable frequency range of the disturbances. The molecular weight ratio is a reasonable predictor of the stability trends. We have further demonstrated that the normalized growth rate as a function of the convective Mach number is relatively insensitive (Approx. 25%) to changes in the composition of the mixing layer. Thus, the normalized growth rate is a key element when considering the stability of compressible mixing layers, since once the basic stability characteristics for a particular combination of gases is known at zero Mach number, the decrease in growth rates due to compressibility effects at the larger convective Mach numbers is somewhat predictable.

  8. Mixing length in low Reynolds number compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Holley, B. B.

    1975-01-01

    The paper studies the effect of low Reynolds number in high-speed turbulent boundary layers on variations of mixing length. Boundary layers downstream of natural transition on plates, cones and cylinders, and boundary layers on nozzle walls without laminarization-retransition are considered. The problem of whether low Reynolds number amplification of shear stress is a result of transitional flow structure is considered. It is concluded that a knowledge of low Reynolds number boundary layer transition may be relevant to the design of high-speed vehicles.

  9. Study of compressible mixing layers using filtered Rayleigh scattering based visualizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Gregory S.; Samimy, MO; Arnette, Stephen A.

    1992-01-01

    Filtered Rayleigh scattering-based flow visualizations of compressible mixing layers are reported. The lower compressibility case (Mc = 0.51) displays well-defined roller-type spanwise structures and streamwise streaks. The structures of the high compressibility case (Mc = 0.86) are more 3D and oblique.

  10. A study of compressible mixing layers using filtered Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Gregory S.; Samimy, MO; Arnette, Stephen A.

    1992-01-01

    High Reynolds number compressible planar free shear layers were studied using a planar laser visualization technique. Two convective Mach numbers, M(c) = 0.51 and 0.86, were studied in the developing and fully developed regions. The structures in the M(c) = 0.51 case were characterized by 2D core and roller regions, similar to subsonic shear layers. Also for the M(c) = 0.51 case, plan views in the developing region showed the existence of streamwise streaks, possibly indicating the presence of organized streamwise vorticity. The M(c) = 0.86 flow was much less organized than the lower convective Mach number case and highly three dimensional.

  11. Absolute/convective instabilities and the convective Mach number in a compressible mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. L.; Grosch, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    Two aspects of the stability of a compressible mixing layer: Absolute/Convective instability and the convective Mach number were considered. It was shown that, for Mach numbers less than one, the compressible mixing layer is convectively unstable unless there is an appreciable amount of backflow. Also presented was a rigorous derivation of a convective Mach number based on linear stability theory for the flow of a multi-species gas in a mixing layer. The result is compared with the heuristic definitions of others and to selected experimental results.

  12. Development of a Hybrid RANS/LES Method for Compressible Mixing Layer Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Reshotko, Eli

    2001-01-01

    A hybrid method has been developed for simulations of compressible turbulent mixing layers. Such mixing layers dominate the flows in exhaust systems of modem day aircraft and also those of hypersonic vehicles currently under development. The hybrid method uses a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) procedure to calculate wall bounded regions entering a mixing section, and a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) procedure to calculate the mixing dominated regions. A numerical technique was developed to enable the use of the hybrid RANS/LES method on stretched, non-Cartesian grids. The hybrid RANS/LES method is applied to a benchmark compressible mixing layer experiment. Preliminary two-dimensional calculations are used to investigate the effects of axial grid density and boundary conditions. Actual LES calculations, performed in three spatial directions, indicated an initial vortex shedding followed by rapid transition to turbulence, which is in agreement with experimental observations.

  13. Coherent Vortex Simulation of weakly compressible turbulent mixing layers using adaptive multiresolution methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussel, Olivier; Schneider, Kai

    2010-03-01

    An adaptive mulitresolution method based on a second-order finite volume discretization is presented for solving the three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations in Cartesian geometry. The explicit time discretization is of second-order and for flux evaluation a 2-4 Mac Cormack scheme is used. Coherent Vortex Simulations (CVS) are performed by decomposing the flow variables into coherent and incoherent contributions. The coherent part is computed deterministically on a locally refined grid using the adaptive multiresolution method while the influence of the incoherent part is neglected to model turbulent dissipation. The computational efficiency of this approach in terms of memory and CPU time compression is illustrated for turbulent mixing layers in the weakly compressible regime and for Reynolds numbers based on the mixing layer thickness between 50 and 200. Comparisons with direct numerical simulations allow to assess the precision and efficiency of CVS.

  14. Mixing and non-equilibrium chemical reaction in a compressible mixing layer. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberger, Craig J.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of compressibility, chemical reaction exothermicity, and non-equilibrium chemical modeling in a reacting plane mixing layer were investigated by means of two dimensional direct numerical simulations. The chemical reaction was irreversible and second order of the type A + B yields Products + Heat. The general governing fluid equations of a compressible reacting flow field were solved by means of high order finite difference methods. Physical effects were then determined by examining the response of the mixing layer to variation of the relevant non-dimensionalized parameters. The simulations show that increased compressibility generally results in a suppressed mixing, and consequently a reduced chemical reaction conversion rate. Reaction heat release was found to enhance mixing at the initial stages of the layer growth, but had a stabilizing effect at later times. The increased stability manifested itself in the suppression or delay of the formation of large coherent structures within the flow. Calculations were performed for a constant rate chemical kinetics model and an Arrhenius type kinetic prototype. The choice of the model was shown to have an effect on the development of the flow. The Arrhenius model caused a greater temperature increase due to reaction than the constant kinetic model. This had the same effect as increasing the exothermicity of the reaction. Localized flame quenching was also observed when the Zeldovich number was relatively large.

  15. Control of shock wave-boundary layer interactions by bleed in supersonic mixed compression inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukuda, M. K.; Hingst, W. G.; Reshotko, E.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effect of bleed on a shock wave-boundary layer interaction in an axisymmetric mixed-compression supersonic inlet. The inlet was designed for a free-stream Mach number of 2.50 with 60-percent supersonic internal area contraction. The experiment was conducted in the NASA Lewis Research Center 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. The effects of bleed amount and bleed geometry on the boundary layer after a shock wave-boundary layer interaction were studied. The effect of bleed on the transformed form factor is such that the full realizable reduction is obtained by bleeding of a mass flow equal to about one-half of the incident boundary layer mass flow. More bleeding does not yield further reduction. Bleeding upstream or downstream of the shock-induced pressure rise is preferable to bleeding across the shock-induced pressure rise.

  16. The structure of variable property, compressible mixing layers in binary gas mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozusko, F.; Grosch, C. E.; Jackson, T. L.; Kennedy, Christipher A.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    1996-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the structure of a parallel compressible mixing layer in a binary mixture of gases. The gases included in this study are hydrogen (H2), helium (He), nitrogen (N2), oxygen (02), neon (Ne) and argon (Ar). Profiles of the variation of the Lewis and Prandtl numbers across the mixing layer for all thirty combinations of gases are given. It is shown that the Lewis number can vary by as much as a factor of eight and the Prandtl number by a factor of two across the mixing layer. Thus assuming constant values for the Lewis and Prandtl numbers of a binary gas mixture in the shear layer, as is done in many theoretical studies, is a poor approximation. We also present profiles of the velocity, mass fraction, temperature and density for representative binary gas mixtures at zero and supersonic Mach numbers. We show that the shape of these profiles is strongly dependent on which gases are in the mixture as well as on whether the denser gas is in the fast stream or the slow stream.

  17. Inviscid spatial stability of a compressible mixing layer. Part 3: Effect of thermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. L.; Grosch, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive comparative study of the inviscid spatial stability of a parallel compressible mixing layer using various models for the mean flow are reported. The models are: (1) the hyperbolic tangent profile for the mean speed and the Crocco relation for the mean temperature, with the Chapman viscosity-temperature relation and a Prandtl number of one; (2) the Lock profile for the mean speed and the Crocco relation for the mean temperature, with the Chapman viscosity-temperature relation and a Prandtl number of one; and (3) the similarity solution for the coupled velocity and temperature equations using the Sutherland viscosity temperature relation and arbitrary but constant Prandtl number. The purpose was to determine the sensitivity of the stability characteristics of the compressible mixing layer to the assumed thermodynamic properties of the fluid. It is shown that the quantative features of the stability characteristics are quite similiar for all models but that there are quantitative differences resulting from the difference in the thermodynamic models. In particular, it is shown that the stability characteristics are sensitive to the value of the Prandtl number.

  18. Coherent Vortex Simulation (CVS) of compressible turbulent mixing layers using adaptive multiresolution methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Kai; Roussel, Olivier; Farge, Marie

    2007-11-01

    Coherent Vortex Simulation is based on the wavelet decomposition of the flow into coherent and incoherent components. An adaptive multiresolution method using second order finite volumes with explicit time discretization, a 2-4 Mac Cormack scheme, allows an efficient computation of the coherent flow on a dynamically adapted grid. Neglecting the influence of the incoherent background models turbulent dissipation. We present CVS computation of three dimensional compressible time developing mixing layer. We show the speed up in CPU time with respect to DNS and the obtained memory reduction thanks to dynamical octree data structures. The impact of different filtering strategies is discussed and it is found that isotropic wavelet thresholding of the Favre averaged gradient of the momentum yields the most effective results.

  19. A numerical study of a class of TVD schemes for compressible mixing layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandham, N. D.; Yee, H. C.

    1989-01-01

    At high Mach numbers the two-dimensional time-developing mixing layer develops shock waves, positioned around large-scale vortical structures. A suitable numerical method has to be able to capture the inherent instability of the flow, leading to the roll-up of vortices, and also must be able to capture shock waves when they develop. Standard schemes for low speed turbulent flows, for example spectral methods, rely on resolution of all flow-features and cannot handle shock waves, which become too thin at any realistic Reynolds number. The performance of a class of second-order explicit total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes on a compressible mixing layer problem was studied. The basic idea is to capture the physics of the flow correctly, by resolving down to the smallest turbulent length scales, without resorting to turbulence or sub-grid scale modeling, and at the same time capture shock waves without spurious oscillations. The present study indicates that TVD schemes can capture the shocks accurately when they form, but (without resorting to a finer grid) have poor accuracy in computing the vortex growth. The solution accuracy depends on the choice of limiter. However a larger number of grid points are in general required to resolve the correct vortex growth. The low accuracy in computing time-dependent problems containing shock waves as well as vortical structures is partly due to the inherent shock-capturing property of all TVD schemes. In order to capture shock waves without spurious oscillations these schemes reduce to first-order near extrema and indirectly produce clipping phenomena, leading to inaccuracy in the computation of vortex growth. Accurate simulation of unsteady turbulent fluid flows with shock waves will require further development of efficient, uniformly higher than second-order accurate, shock-capturing methods.

  20. Nonlinear interactions in mixing layers and compressible heated round jets. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrah, Yousef Mohd

    1989-01-01

    The nonlinear interactions between a fundamental instability mode and both its harmonics and the changing mean flow are studied using the weakly nonlinear stability theory of Stuart and Watson, and numerical solutions of coupled nonlinear partial differential equations. The first part focuses on incompressible cold (or isothermal; constant temperature throughout) mixing layers, and for these, the first and second Landau constants are calculated as functions of wavenumber and Reynolds number. It is found that the dominant contribution to the Landau constants arises from the mean flow changes and not from the higher harmonics. In order to establish the range of validity of the weakly nonlinear theory, the weakly nonlinear and numerical solutions are compared and the limitation of each is discussed. At small amplitudes and at low-to-moderate Reynolds numbers, the two results compare well in describing the saturation of the fundamental, the distortion of the mean flow, and the initial stages of vorticity roll-up. At larger amplitudes, the interaction between the fundamental, second harmonic, and the mean flow is strongly nonlinear and the numerical solution predicts flow oscillations, whereas the weakly nonlinear theory yields saturation. In the second part, the weakly nonlinear theory is extended to heated (or nonisothermal; mean temperature distribution) subsonic round jets where quadratic and cubic nonlinear interactions are present, and the Landau constants also depend on jet temperature ratio, Mach number and azimuthal mode number. Under exponential growth and nonlinear saturation, it is found that heating and compressibility suppress the growth of instability waves, that the first azimuthal mode is the dominant instability mode, and that the weakly nonlinear solution describes the early stages of the roll-up of an axisymmetric shear layer. The receptivity of a typical jet flow to pulse type input disturbance is also studied by solving the initial value problem

  1. Ignition and structure of a laminar diffusion flame in a compressible mixing layer with finite rate chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, C. E.; Jackson, T. L.

    1991-01-01

    The ignition and structure of a reacting compressible mixing layer is considered using finite rate chemistry lying between two streams of reactants with different freestream speeds and temperatures. Numerical integration of the governing equations show that the structure of the reacting flow can be quite complicated depending on the magnitude of the Zeldovich number. An analysis of both the ignition a diffusion flame regimes is presented using a combination of large Zeldovich number asymptotics and numerics. This allows to analyze the behavior of these regimes as a function of the parameters of the problem.

  2. Calculation of the flow field including boundary layer effects for supersonic mixed compression inlets at angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vadyak, J.; Hoffman, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    The flow field in supersonic mixed compression aircraft inlets at angle of attack is calculated. A zonal modeling technique is employed to obtain the solution which divides the flow field into different computational regions. The computational regions consist of a supersonic core flow, boundary layer flows adjacent to both the forebody/centerbody and cowl contours, and flow in the shock wave boundary layer interaction regions. The zonal modeling analysis is described and some computational results are presented. The governing equations for the supersonic core flow form a hyperbolic system of partial differential equations. The equations for the characteristic surfaces and the compatibility equations applicable along these surfaces are derived. The characteristic surfaces are the stream surfaces, which are surfaces composed of streamlines, and the wave surfaces, which are surfaces tangent to a Mach conoid. The compatibility equations are expressed as directional derivatives along streamlines and bicharacteristics, which are the lines of tangency between a wave surface and a Mach conoid.

  3. Compressible turbulent mixing: Effects of compressibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Qionglin

    2016-04-01

    We studied by numerical simulations the effects of compressibility on passive scalar transport in stationary compressible turbulence. The turbulent Mach number varied from zero to unity. The difference in driven forcing was the magnitude ratio of compressive to solenoidal modes. In the inertial range, the scalar spectrum followed the k-5 /3 scaling and suffered negligible influence from the compressibility. The growth of the Mach number showed (1) a first reduction and second enhancement in the transfer of scalar flux; (2) an increase in the skewness and flatness of the scalar derivative and a decrease in the mixed skewness and flatness of the velocity-scalar derivatives; (3) a first stronger and second weaker intermittency of scalar relative to that of velocity; and (4) an increase in the intermittency parameter which measures the intermittency of scalar in the dissipative range. Furthermore, the growth of the compressive mode of forcing indicated (1) a decrease in the intermittency parameter and (2) less efficiency in enhancing scalar mixing. The visualization of scalar dissipation showed that, in the solenoidal-forced flow, the field was filled with the small-scale, highly convoluted structures, while in the compressive-forced flow, the field was exhibited as the regions dominated by the large-scale motions of rarefaction and compression.

  4. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  5. Boundary layer bleed system study for a full-scale, mixed-compression inlet with 45 percent internal contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, R. J.; Wasserbauer, J. F.; Neumann, H. E.

    1976-01-01

    The results of an experimental bleed development study for a full-scale, Mach 2.5, axisymmetric, mixed-compression inlet were presented. The inlet was designed to satisfy the airflow requirements of the TF30-P-3 turbofan engine. Capabilities for porous bleed on the cowl surface and ram-scoop/flush-slot bleed on the centerbody were provided. A configuration with no bleed on the cowl achieved a minimum stable, diffuser exit, total pressure recovery of 0.894 with a centerbody-bleed mass flow ratio of 0.02. Configurations with cowl bleed had minimum stable recoveries as high as 0.900 but suffered range decrement penalties from the increased bleed mass flow removal. Limited inlet stability and unstart angle-of-attack data are presented.

  6. A computer program for the calculation of the flow field including boundary layer effects for mixed-compression inlets at angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vadyak, J.; Hoffman, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    A computer program was developed which is capable of calculating the flow field in the supersonic portion of a mixed compression aircraft inlet operating at angle of attack. The supersonic core flow is computed using a second-order three dimensional method-of-characteristics algorithm. The bow shock and the internal shock train are treated discretely using a three dimensional shock fitting procedure. The boundary layer flows are computed using a second-order implicit finite difference method. The shock wave-boundary layer interaction is computed using an integral formulation. The general structure of the computer program is discussed, and a brief description of each subroutine is given. All program input parameters are defined, and a brief discussion on interpretation of the output is provided. A number of sample cases, complete with data listings, are provided.

  7. A study of the topology of dissipating motions in direct numerical simulations of time-developing compressible and incompressible mixing layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. H.; Chong, M. S.; Soria, J.; Sondergaard, R.; Perry, A. E.; Rogers, M.; Moser, R.; Cantwell, B. J.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of the geometry of flow patterns in numerically simulated compressible and incompressible mixing layers was carried out using 3-D critical point methodology. Motions characterized by high rates of kinetic energy dissipation and/or high enstrophy were of particular interest. In the approach the partial derivatives of the velocity field are determined at every point in the flow. These are used to construct the invariants of the velocity gradient tensor and the rate-of-strain tensor (P, Q, R, and P(sub s), Q(sub s), R(sub s) respectively). For incompressible flow the first invariant is zero. For the conditions of the compressible simulation, the first invariant is found to be everywhere small, relative to the second and third invariants, and so in both cases the local topology at a point is mainly determined by the second and third invariants. The data at every grid point is used to construct scatter plots of Q versus R and Q(sub s) versus R(sub s). Most points map to a cluster near the origin in Q-R space. However, fine scale motions, that is motions which are characterized by velocity derivatives which scale with the square root of R(sub delta), tend to map to regions which lie far from the origin. Definite trends are observed for motions characterized by high enstrophy and/or high dissipation. The observed trends suggest that, for these motions, the second and third invariants of the velocity gradient and rate-of-strain tensors are strongly correlated. The second and third invariants of the rate-of-strain tensor are related by K(-Q(sub s))(exp 3/2), which is consistent with the above scaling of velocity derivatives. The quantity K appears to depend on Reynolds number with an upper limit K = 2(the square root of 3)/9 corresponding to locally axisymmetric flow. For both the compressible and incompressible mixing layer, regions corresponding to high rates of dissipation are found to be characterized by comparable magnitudes of R(sub ij

  8. Stability of compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, Ali H.

    1989-01-01

    The stability of compressible 2-D and 3-D boundary layers is reviewed. The stability of 2-D compressible flows differs from that of incompressible flows in two important features: There is more than one mode of instability contributing to the growth of disturbances in supersonic laminar boundary layers and the most unstable first mode wave is 3-D. Whereas viscosity has a destabilizing effect on incompressible flows, it is stabilizing for high supersonic Mach numbers. Whereas cooling stabilizes first mode waves, it destabilizes second mode waves. However, second order waves can be stabilized by suction and favorable pressure gradients. The influence of the nonparallelism on the spatial growth rate of disturbances is evaluated. The growth rate depends on the flow variable as well as the distance from the body. Floquet theory is used to investigate the subharmonic secondary instability.

  9. Phase decorrelation, streamwise vortices and acoustic radiation in mixing layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C. M.; Zohar, Y.; Moser, R. D.; Rogers, M. M.; Lele, S. K.; Buell, J. C.

    1988-01-01

    Several direct numerical simulations were performed and analyzed to study various aspects of the early development of mixing layers. Included are the phase jitter of the large-scale eddies, which was studied using a 2-D spatially-evolving mixing layer simulation; the response of a time developing mixing layer to various spanwise disturbances; and the sound radiation from a 2-D compressible time developing mixing layer.

  10. Anelastic Rayleigh–Taylor mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Gauthier, S.

    2016-07-01

    Anelastic Rayleigh–Taylor mixing layers for miscible fluids are investigated with a recently built model (Schneider and Gauthier 2015 J. Eng. Math. 92 55–71). Four Chebyshev–Fourier–Fourier direct numerical simulations are analyzed. They use different values for the compressibility parameters: Atwood number (the dimensionless difference of the heavy and light fluid densities) and stratification (accounts for the vertical variation of density due to gravity). For intermediate Atwood numbers and finite stratification, compressibility effects quickly occurs. As a result only nonlinear behaviours are reached. The influence of the compressibility parameters on the growth speed of the RTI is discussed. The 0.1—Atwood number/0.4—stratification configuration reaches a turbulent regime. This turbulent mixing layer is analyzed with statistical tools such as moments, PDFs, anisotropy indicators and spectra.

  11. Compressible turbulent mixing: Effects of compressibility and Schmidt number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Qionglin

    2015-11-01

    Effects of compressibility and Schmidt number on passive scalar in compressible turbulence were studied. On the effect of compressibility, the scalar spectrum followed the k- 5 / 3 inertial-range scaling and suffered negligible influence from compressibility. The transfer of scalar flux was reduced by the transition from incompressible to compressible flows, however, was enhanced by the growth of Mach number. The intermittency parameter was increased by the growth of Mach number, and was decreased by the growth of the compressive mode of driven forcing. The dependency of the mixing timescale on compressibility showed that for the driven forcing, the compressive mode was less efficient in enhancing scalar mixing. On the effect of Schmidt number (Sc), in the inertial-convective range the scalar spectrum obeyed the k- 5 / 3 scaling. For Sc >> 1, a k-1 power law appeared in the viscous-convective range, while for Sc << 1, a k- 17 / 3 power law was identified in the inertial-diffusive range. The transfer of scalar flux grew over Sc. In the Sc >> 1 flow the scalar field rolled up and mixed sufficiently, while in the Sc << 1 flow that only had the large-scale, cloudlike structures. In Sc >> 1 and Sc << 1 flows, the spectral densities of scalar advection and dissipation followed the k- 5 / 3 scaling, indicating that in compressible turbulence the processes of advection and dissipation might deferring to the Kolmogorov picture. Finally, the comparison with incompressible results showed that the scalar in compressible turbulence lacked a conspicuous bump structure in its spectrum, and was more intermittent in the dissipative range.

  12. Compressibility of Quantum Mixed-State Signals

    SciTech Connect

    Koashi, Masato; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2001-07-02

    We present a formula that determines the optimal number of qubits per message that allows asymptotically faithful compression of the quantum information carried by an ensemble of mixed states. The set of mixed states determines a decomposition of the Hilbert space into the redundant part and the irreducible part. After removing the redundancy, the optimal compression rate is shown to be given by the von Neumann entropy of the reduced ensemble.

  13. Calculation methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Harris, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Calculation procedures for non-reacting compressible two- and three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers were reviewed. Integral, transformation and correlation methods, as well as finite difference solutions of the complete boundary layer equations summarized. Alternative numerical solution procedures were examined, and both mean field and mean turbulence field closure models were considered. Physics and related calculation problems peculiar to compressible turbulent boundary layers are described. A catalog of available solution procedures of the finite difference, finite element, and method of weighted residuals genre is included. Influence of compressibility, low Reynolds number, wall blowing, and pressure gradient upon mean field closure constants are reported.

  14. 3M Coban 2 Layer Compression Therapy: Intelligent Compression Dynamics to Suit Different Patient Needs

    PubMed Central

    Bernatchez, Stéphanie F.; Tucker, Joseph; Schnobrich, Ellen; Parks, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    Problem Chronic venous insufficiency can lead to recalcitrant leg ulcers. Compression has been shown to be effective in healing these ulcers, but most products are difficult to apply and uncomfortable for patients, leading to inconsistent/ineffective clinical application and poor compliance. In addition, compression presents risks for patients with an ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI) <0.8 because of the possibility of further compromising the arterial circulation. The ABPI is the ratio of systolic leg blood pressure (taken at ankle) to systolic arm blood pressure (taken above elbow, at brachial artery). This is measured to assess a patient's lower extremity arterial perfusion before initiating compression therapy.1 Solution Using materials science, two-layer compression systems with controlled compression and a low profile were developed. These materials allow for a more consistent bandage application with better control of the applied compression, and their low profile is compatible with most footwear, increasing patient acceptance and compliance with therapy. The original 3M™ Coban™ 2 Layer Compression System is suited for patients with an ABPI ≥0.8; 3M™ Coban™ 2 Layer Lite Compression System can be used on patients with ABPI ≥0.5. New Technology Both compression systems are composed of two layers that combine to create an inelastic sleeve conforming to the limb contour to provide a consistent proper pressure profile to reduce edema. In addition, they slip significantly less than other compression products and improve patient daily living activities and physical symptoms. Indications for Use Both compression systems are indicated for patients with venous leg ulcers, lymphedema, and other conditions where compression therapy is appropriate. Caution As with any compression system, caution must be used when mixed venous and arterial disease is present to not induce any damage. These products are not indicated when the ABPI is <0.5. PMID:24527315

  15. Some design considerations for supersonic cruise mixed compression inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowditch, D. N.

    1973-01-01

    A mixed compression inlet designed for supersonic cruise has very demanding requirements for high total pressure recovery and low bleed and cowl drag. However, since the optimum inlet for supersonic cruise performance may have other undesirable characteristics, it is necessary to establish trade-offs between inlet performance and other inlet characteristics. Some of these trade-offs between the amount of internal compression, aerodynamic performance and angle-of-attack tolerance are reviewed. Techniques for analysis of boundary layer control and subsonic diffuser flow are discussed.

  16. Goertler instability of compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Hady, N. M.; Verma, A. K.

    1984-01-01

    The instability of the laminar compressible boundary-layer flows along concave surfaces is investigated. The linearized disturbance equations for the three-dimensional, counter-rotating, longitudinal-type vortices in two-dimensional boundary layers are presented in an orthogonal curvilinear system of coordinates. The basic approximation of the disturbance equations, which includes the effect of the growth of the boundary layer, is considered and solved numerically.

  17. Scalar mixing in the supersonic shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemens, N. T.; Mungal, M. G.; Hanson, R. K.; Paul, P. H.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in a two-stream planar mixing layer facility at convective Mach numbers of 0.28 and 0.62. Mie scattering from condensed alcohol droplets and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of nitric oxide were used for flow visualization in both the side and plan views. The PLIF signals were approximately proportional to mixture fraction and were used to generate statistical quantities. Visualizations using both the Mie scattering and PLIF indicate the structure is essentially two-dimensional at Mc = 0.28 and three-dimensional at Mc = 0.62. Perspective renderings of side view images show the structures are streamwise ramped at Mc = 0.28 and cross-stream ramped at Mc = 0.62. This difference appears to be associated with decreasing streamwise structure spacings at the higher Mc condition. The statistical analysis suggests that with increasing compressibility, the scalar fluctuations are smaller, and the fraction of mixed fluid is higher.

  18. Calculation methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers, 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Harris, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Equations and closure methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers are discussed. Flow phenomena peculiar to calculation of these boundary layers were considered, along with calculations of three dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers. Procedures for ascertaining nonsimilar two and three dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers were appended, including finite difference, finite element, and mass-weighted residual methods.

  19. Compressible turbulent mixing: Effects of Schmidt number.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qionglin

    2015-05-01

    We investigated by numerical simulations the effects of Schmidt number on passive scalar transport in forced compressible turbulence. The range of Schmidt number (Sc) was 1/25∼25. In the inertial-convective range the scalar spectrum seemed to obey the k(-5/3) power law. For Sc≫1, there appeared a k(-1) power law in the viscous-convective range, while for Sc≪1, a k(-17/3) power law was identified in the inertial-diffusive range. The scaling constant computed by the mixed third-order structure function of the velocity-scalar increment showed that it grew over Sc, and the effect of compressibility made it smaller than the 4/3 value from incompressible turbulence. At small amplitudes, the probability distribution function (PDF) of scalar fluctuations collapsed to the Gaussian distribution whereas, at large amplitudes, it decayed more quickly than Gaussian. At large scales, the PDF of scalar increment behaved similarly to that of scalar fluctuation. In contrast, at small scales it resembled the PDF of scalar gradient. Furthermore, the scalar dissipation occurring at large magnitudes was found to grow with Sc. Due to low molecular diffusivity, in the Sc≫1 flow the scalar field rolled up and got mixed sufficiently. However, in the Sc≪1 flow the scalar field lost the small-scale structures by high molecular diffusivity and retained only the large-scale, cloudlike structures. The spectral analysis found that the spectral densities of scalar advection and dissipation in both Sc≫1 and Sc≪1 flows probably followed the k(-5/3) scaling. This indicated that in compressible turbulence the processes of advection and dissipation except that of scalar-dilatation coupling might deferring to the Kolmogorov picture. It then showed that at high wave numbers, the magnitudes of spectral coherency in both Sc≫1 and Sc≪1 flows decayed faster than the theoretical prediction of k(-2/3) for incompressible flows. Finally, the comparison with incompressible results showed that

  20. Compressible turbulent mixing: Effects of Schmidt number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Qionglin

    2015-05-01

    We investigated by numerical simulations the effects of Schmidt number on passive scalar transport in forced compressible turbulence. The range of Schmidt number (Sc) was 1/25 ˜25 . In the inertial-convective range the scalar spectrum seemed to obey the k-5 /3 power law. For Sc≫1 , there appeared a k-1 power law in the viscous-convective range, while for Sc≪1 , a k-17 /3 power law was identified in the inertial-diffusive range. The scaling constant computed by the mixed third-order structure function of the velocity-scalar increment showed that it grew over Sc, and the effect of compressibility made it smaller than the 4/3 value from incompressible turbulence. At small amplitudes, the probability distribution function (PDF) of scalar fluctuations collapsed to the Gaussian distribution whereas, at large amplitudes, it decayed more quickly than Gaussian. At large scales, the PDF of scalar increment behaved similarly to that of scalar fluctuation. In contrast, at small scales it resembled the PDF of scalar gradient. Furthermore, the scalar dissipation occurring at large magnitudes was found to grow with Sc. Due to low molecular diffusivity, in the Sc≫1 flow the scalar field rolled up and got mixed sufficiently. However, in the Sc≪1 flow the scalar field lost the small-scale structures by high molecular diffusivity and retained only the large-scale, cloudlike structures. The spectral analysis found that the spectral densities of scalar advection and dissipation in both Sc≫1 and Sc≪1 flows probably followed the k-5 /3 scaling. This indicated that in compressible turbulence the processes of advection and dissipation except that of scalar-dilatation coupling might deferring to the Kolmogorov picture. It then showed that at high wave numbers, the magnitudes of spectral coherency in both Sc≫1 and Sc≪1 flows decayed faster than the theoretical prediction of k-2 /3 for incompressible flows. Finally, the comparison with incompressible results showed that the

  1. Geometric invariance of compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Wei-Tao; Wu, Bin; She, Zhen-Su; Hussain, Fazle

    2015-11-01

    A symmetry based approach is applied to analyze the mean velocity and temperature fields of compressible, flat plate turbulent boundary layers (CTBL). A Reynolds stress length scale and a turbulent heat flux length scale are identified to possess the same defect scaling law in the CTBL bulk, which is solely owing to the constraint of the wall to the geometry of the wall-attached eddies, but invariant to compressibility and wall heat transfer. This invariance is called the geometric invariance of CTBL eddies and is likely the origin of the Mach number invariance of Morkovin's hypothesis, as well as the similarity of energy and momentum transports. A closure for the turbulent transport by using the invariant lengths is attainted to predict the mean velocity and temperature profiles in the CTBL bulk- superior to the van Driest transformation and the Reynolds analogy based relations for its sound physics and higher accuracy. Additionally, our approach offers a new understanding of turbulent Prandtl number.

  2. Scalar entrainment in the mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandham, N. D.; Mungal, M. G.; Broadwell, J. E.; Reynolds, W. C.

    1988-01-01

    New definitions of entrainment and mixing based on the passive scalar field in the plane mixing layer are proposed. The definitions distinguish clearly between three fluid states: (1) unmixed fluid, (2) fluid engulfed in the mixing layer, trapped between two scalar contours, and (3) mixed fluid. The difference betwen (2) and (3) is the amount of fluid which has been engulfed during the pairing process, but has not yet mixed. Trends are identified from direct numerical simulations and extensions to high Reynolds number mixing layers are made in terms of the Broadwell-Breidenthal mixing model. In the limit of high Peclet number (Pe = ReSc) it is speculated that engulfed fluid rises in steps associated with pairings, introducing unmixed fluid into the large scale structures, where it is eventually mixed at the Kolmogorov scale. From this viewpoint, pairing is a prerequisite for mixing in the turbulent plane mixing layer.

  3. Turbulence models for compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, P. G.; Bradshaw, P.; Coakley, T. J.

    1994-01-01

    It is shown that to satisfy the general accepted compressible law of the wall derived from the Van Driest transformation, turbulence modeling coefficients must actually be functions of density gradients. The transformed velocity profiles obtained by using standard turbulence model constants have too small a value of the effective von Karman constant kappa in the log-law region (inner layer). Thus, if the model is otherwise accurate, the wake component is overpredicted and the predicted skin friction is lower than the expected value.

  4. Turbulent shear stresses in compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laderman, A. J.; Demetriades, A.

    1979-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometer measurements of turbulent shear stresses in a Mach 3 compressible boundary layer were performed in order to investigate the effects of heat transfer on turbulence. Measurements were obtained by an x-probe in a flat plate, zero pressure gradient, two dimensional boundary layer in a wind tunnel with wall to freestream temperature ratios of 0.94 and 0.71. The measured shear stress distributions are found to be in good agreement with previous results, supporting the contention that the shear stress distribution is essentially independent of Mach number and heat transfer for Mach numbers from incompressible to hypersonic and wall to freestream temperature ratios of 0.4 to 1.0. It is also found that corrections for frequency response limitations of the electronic equipment are necessary to determine the correct shear stress distribution, particularly at the walls.

  5. Coherent structures in compressible free-shear-layer flows

    SciTech Connect

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Baty, R.S.; Kennedy, C.A.; Chen, J.H.

    1997-08-01

    Large scale coherent structures are intrinsic fluid mechanical characteristics of all free-shear flows, from incompressible to compressible, and laminar to fully turbulent. These quasi-periodic fluid structures, eddies of size comparable to the thickness of the shear layer, dominate the mixing process at the free-shear interface. As a result, large scale coherent structures greatly influence the operation and efficiency of many important commercial and defense technologies. Large scale coherent structures have been studied here in a research program that combines a synergistic blend of experiment, direct numerical simulation, and analysis. This report summarizes the work completed for this Sandia Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project.

  6. Experiments on the enhancement of compressible mixing via streamwise vorticity. II - Vortex strength assessment and seed particle dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naughton, J. W.; Cattafesta, L. N.; Settles, G. S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of streamwise vorticity on compressible axisymmetric mixing layers is examined using vortex strength assessment and seed particle dynamics analysis. Experimental results indicate that the particles faithfully represent the dynamics of the turbulent swirling flow. A comparison of the previously determined mixing layer growth rates with the present vortex strength data reveals that the increase of turbulent mixing up to 60 percent scales with the degree of swirl. The mixing enhancement appears to be independent of the compressibility level of the mixing layer.

  7. Experiments on shear layer mixing at hypervelocity conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Erdos, J.; Tamango, J.; Bakos, R.; Trucco, R. )

    1992-01-01

    Utilization of an expansion tube to acquire turbulent, compressible free shear layer data with gases of direct relevance to hypersonic combustion systems (nitrogen, hydrogen, and oxygen) is demonstrated. Visualizations of the free shear layer by laser holographic interferometry and schlieren imaging show a distinctly asymmetric growth rate that is highly preferential toward the lower speed (secondary stream) side. For the nitrogen/nitrogen case, for which the convective velocity was lowest and convective Mach number highest, the growth rate on the primary side was virtually zero until the mixing layer reached the opposite (secondary) wall. 11 refs.

  8. Analysis of unsteady compressible viscous layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, G. D.; Verdon, J. M.; Kousen, K. A.

    1990-01-01

    The development of an analysis to predict the unsteady compressible flows in blade boundary layers and wakes is presented. The equations that govern the flows in these regions are transformed using an unsteady turbulent generalization of the Levy-Lees transformation. The transformed equations are solved using a finite difference technique in which the solution proceeds by marching in time and in the streamwise direction. Both laminar and turbulent flows are studied, the latter using algebraic turbulence and transition models. Laminar solutions for a flat plate are shown to approach classical asymptotic results for both high and low frequency unsteady motions. Turbulent flat-plate results are in qualitative agreement with previous predictions and measurements. Finally, the numerical technique is also applied to the stator and rotor of a low-speed turbine stage to determine unsteady effects on surface heating. The results compare reasonably well with measured heat transfer data and indicate that nonlinear effects have minimal impact on the mean and unsteady components of the flow.

  9. CUMULUS CLOUD VENTING OF MIXED LAYER OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Observations are presented which substantiate the hypothesis that significant vertical exchange of ozone and aerosols (and possibly other compounds) occurs between the mixed layer and the free troposphere during cumulus cloud convective activity. The experiments conducted in July...

  10. Lidar observation of marine mixed layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamagishi, Susumu; Yamanouchi, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Masayuki

    1992-01-01

    Marine mixed layer is known to play an important role in the transportation of pollution exiting ship funnels. The application of a diffusion model is critically dependent upon a reliable estimate of a lid. However, the processes that form lids are not well understood, though considerable progress toward marine boundary layer has been achieved. This report describes observations of the marine mixed layer from the course Ise-wan to Nii-jima with the intention of gaining a better understanding of their structure by a shipboard lidar. These observations were made in the summer of 1991. One interesting feature of the observations was that the multiple layers of aerosols, which is rarely numerically modeled, was encountered. No attempt is yet made to present a systematic analysis of all the data collected. Instead we focus on observations that seem to be directly relevant to the structure of the mixed layer.

  11. Computation of turbulent high speed mixing layers using a two-equation turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, J. R.; Sekar, B.

    1991-01-01

    A two-equation turbulence model was extended to be applicable for compressible flows. A compressibility correction based on modelling the dilational terms in the Reynolds stress equations were included in the model. The model is used in conjunction with the SPARK code for the computation of high speed mixing layers. The observed trend of decreasing growth rate with increasing convective Mach number in compressible mixing layers is well predicted by the model. The predictions agree well with the experimental data and the results from a compressible Reynolds stress model. The present model appears to be well suited for the study of compressible free shear flows. Preliminary results obtained for the reacting mixing layers are included.

  12. Effects of Oxide Layer Composition and Radial Compression on Nickel Release in Nitinol Stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Stacey J. L.; Dreher, Maureen L.; Zheng, Jiwen; Chen, Lynn; Madamba, Daniel; Miyashiro, Katie; Trépanier, Christine; Nagaraja, Srinidhi

    2015-09-01

    There is a public health need to understand the effects of surface layer thickness and composition on corrosion in nickel-containing medical devices. To address this knowledge gap, five groups of Nitinol stents were manufactured by various processing methods that altered the titanium oxide layer. The following surfaces were created: >3500 nm thick mixed thermal oxide (OT), ~420 nm thick mixed thermal oxide (SP), ~130 nm thick mixed thermal oxide (AF), ~4 nm thick native oxide (MP), and an ~4 nm thick passivated oxide (EP). Radially compressed and not compressed devices were evaluated for nickel (Ni) ion release in a 60-day immersion test. The results indicated that OT stents released the most Ni, followed by stents in the SP and AF groups. For OT and SP stents, which exhibited the thickest oxide layers, radial compression significantly increased Ni release when compared to non-compressed stents. This result was not observed in AF, MP, SP stents indicating that the increased Ni release may be explained by cracking of the thicker oxide layers during crimping. Strong correlations were observed between oxide layer thickness and cumulative Ni release. These findings elucidate the importance of oxide layer thickness and composition on uniform corrosion of laser-cut Nitinol stents.

  13. Lidar observations of mixed layer dynamics - Tests of parameterized entrainment models of mixed layer growth rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boers, R.; Eloranta, E. W.; Coulter, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Ground based lidar measurements of the atmospheric mixed layer depth, the entrainment zone depth and the wind speed and wind direction were used to test various parameterized entrainment models of mixed layer growth rate. Six case studies under clear air convective conditions over flat terrain in central Illinois are presented. It is shown that surface heating alone accounts for a major portion of the rise of the mixed layer on all days. A new set of entrainment model constants was determined which optimized height predictions for the dataset. Under convective conditions, the shape of the mixed layer height prediction curves closely resembled the observed shapes. Under conditions when significant wind shear was present, the shape of the height prediction curve departed from the data suggesting deficiencies in the parameterization of shear production. Development of small cumulus clouds on top of the layer is shown to affect mixed layer depths in the afternoon growth phase.

  14. Wave phenomena in a high Reynolds number compressible boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Maestrello, L.; Parikh, P.; Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    Growth of unstable disturbances in a high Reynolds number compressible boundary layer is numerically simulated. Localized periodic surface heating and cooling as a means of active control of these disturbances is studied. It is shown that compressibility in itself stabilizes the flow but at a lower Mach number, significant nonlinear distortions are produced. Phase cancellation is shown to be an effective mechanism for active boundary layer control.

  15. Compression behavior of single-layer graphenes.

    PubMed

    Frank, Otakar; Tsoukleri, Georgia; Parthenios, John; Papagelis, Konstantinos; Riaz, Ibtsam; Jalil, Rashid; Novoselov, Kostya S; Galiotis, Costas

    2010-06-22

    Central to most applications involving monolayer graphenes is its mechanical response under various stress states. To date most of the work reported is of theoretical nature and refers to tension and compression loading of model graphenes. Most of the experimental work is indeed limited to the bending of single flakes in air and the stretching of flakes up to typically approximately 1% using plastic substrates. Recently we have shown that by employing a cantilever beam we can subject single graphenes to various degrees of axial compression. Here we extend this work much further by measuring in detail both stress uptake and compression buckling strain in single flakes of different geometries. In all cases the mechanical response is monitored by simultaneous Raman measurements through the shift of either the G or 2D phonons of graphene. Despite the infinitely small thickness of the monolayers, the results show that graphenes embedded in plastic beams exhibit remarkable compression buckling strains. For large length (l)-to-width (w) ratios (> or =0.2) the buckling strain is of the order of -0.5% to -0.6%. However, for l/w < 0.2 no failure is observed for strains even higher than -1%. Calculations based on classical Euler analysis show that the buckling strain enhancement provided by the polymer lateral support is more than 6 orders of magnitude compared to that of suspended graphene in air. PMID:20496881

  16. The upper-branch stability of compressible boundary layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gajjar, J. S. B.; Cole, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    The upper-branch linear and nonlinear stability of compressible boundary layer flows is studied using the approach of Smith and Bodonyi (1982) for a similar incompressible problem. Both pressure gradient boundary layers and Blasius flow are considered with and without heat transfer, and the neutral eigenrelations incorporating compressibility effects are obtained explicitly. The compressible nonlinear viscous critical layer equations are derived and solved numerically and the results indicate some solutions with positive phase shift across the critical layer. Various limiting cases are investigated including the case of much larger disturbance amplitudes and this indicates the structure for the strongly nonlinear critical layer of the Benney-Bergeon (1969) type. It is also shown how a match with the inviscid neutral inflexional modes arising from the generalized inflexion point criterion, is achieved.

  17. Efficient Quantum Compression for Ensembles of Identically Prepared Mixed States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuxiang; Chiribella, Giulio; Ebler, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    We present one-shot compression protocols that optimally encode ensembles of N identically prepared mixed states into O (log N ) qubits. In contrast to the case of pure-state ensembles, we find that the number of encoding qubits drops down discontinuously as soon as a nonzero error is tolerated and the spectrum of the states is known with sufficient precision. For qubit ensembles, this feature leads to a 25% saving of memory space. Our compression protocols can be implemented efficiently on a quantum computer.

  18. Scalar transport in plane mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanormelingen, J.; Van den Bulck, E.

    This paper describes the application of the Eulerian, single-point, single-time joint-scalar probability density function (PDF) equation for predicting the scalar transport in mixing layer with a high-speed and a low-speed stream. A finite-volume procedure is applied to obtain the velocity field with the k-ɛ closure being used to describe turbulent transport. The scalar field is represented through the modelled evolution equation for the scalar PDF and is solved using a Monte Carlo simulation. The PDF equation employs gradient transport modelling to represent the turbulent diffusion, and the molecular mixing term is modelled by the LMSE closure. There is no source term for chemical reaction as only an inert mixing layer is considered here. The experimental shear layer data published by Batt is used to validate the computational results despite the fact that comparisons between experiments and computational results are difficult because of the high sensitivity of the shear layer to initial conditions and free stream turbulence phenomena. However, the bimodal shape of the RMS scalar fluctuation as was measured by Batt can be reproduced with this model, whereas standard gradient diffusion calculations do not predict the dip in this profile. In this work for the first time an explanation is given for this phenomenon and the importance of a micromixing model is stressed. Also it is shown that the prediction of the PDF shape by the LMSE model is very satisfactory.

  19. Wave phenomena in a high Reynolds number compressible boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Maestrello, L.; Parikh, P.; Turkel, E.

    1987-01-01

    The behavior of spatially unstable waves in a high Reynolds number compressible laminar boundary layer is investigated by solution of the laminar two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations (solved to fourth-order accuracy) over a flat plate with a fluctuating disturbance generated at the inflow. A significant nonlinear distortion is produced, in qualitative agreement with experimental data. It is shown that increasing compressibility can significantly stabilize the flow over a flat plate, and that the mechanism of phase cancellation is a viable mechanism for the control of growing disturbances.

  20. Lagrangian analysis of a convective mixed layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Asaro, Eric A.; Winters, Kraig B.; Lien, Ren-Chieh

    2002-05-01

    We characterize and quantify the transport of heat (Boussinesq density) in a highly idealized entraining convective mixed layer based on simulations of Lagrangian measurements in a two-dimensional model. The primary objectives are to assess and explore the merits and difficulties in estimating the heat budget from perfect and imperfect Lagrangian floats. A significant advantage of Lagrangian measurements is that the time derivative of temperature along these trajectories gives a direct measure of the diffusive heat flux. Using simulated perfect Lagrangian floats, estimates of the surface buoyancy flux, the depth of the mixed layer, vertical profiles of advective and diffusive heat flux, and the overall rate of cooling are shown to agree accurately with the known results extracted from the Eulerian simulations. The Lagrangian nature of the data is exploited to reveal the structure of the flow within the convective layer and to quantify the heat fluxes associated with the different types of eddies. Phase plots of Lagrangian trajectories in density-depth space reveal three distinct classes of motions: (1) plumes, which develop in the cold, heavy near-surface thermal boundary layer and plunge into the mixed layer interior carrying heavy water downward; (2) interior turbulence, comprising random motions between the base of the thermal boundary layer and the base of the surface mixed layer; and (3) entrainment of interior water into plumes below the thermal boundary layer, i.e., a transition from class 2 to class 1. Plumes dominate the heat transport. Simulations were also made using slightly buoyant floats; these are not perfectly Lagrangian. Buoyancy concentrates the floats near the surface resulting in an oversampling of the stronger plumes. Making the same heat budget calculations as with the perfect floats results in a nonzero estimated Lagrangian heating rate in the interior and a curved profile of vertical heat flux that is up to 3 times too large. The local time

  1. A dedicated compression device for high resolution X-ray tomography of compressed gas diffusion layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tötzke, C.; Manke, I.; Gaiselmann, G.; Bohner, J.; Müller, B. R.; Kupsch, A.; Hentschel, M. P.; Schmidt, V.; Banhart, J.; Lehnert, W.

    2015-04-01

    We present an experimental approach to study the three-dimensional microstructure of gas diffusion layer (GDL) materials under realistic compression conditions. A dedicated compression device was designed that allows for synchrotron-tomographic investigation of circular samples under well-defined compression conditions. The tomographic data provide the experimental basis for stochastic modeling of nonwoven GDL materials. A plain compression tool is used to study the fiber courses in the material at different compression stages. Transport relevant geometrical parameters, such as porosity, pore size, and tortuosity distributions, are exemplarily evaluated for a GDL sample in the uncompressed state and for a compression of 30 vol.%. To mimic the geometry of the flow-field, we employed a compression punch with an integrated channel-rib-profile. It turned out that the GDL material is homogeneously compressed under the ribs, however, much less compressed underneath the channel. GDL fibers extend far into the channel volume where they might interfere with the convective gas transport and the removal of liquid water from the cell.

  2. A dedicated compression device for high resolution X-ray tomography of compressed gas diffusion layers

    SciTech Connect

    Tötzke, C.; Manke, I.; Banhart, J.; Gaiselmann, G.; Schmidt, V.; Bohner, J.; Müller, B. R.; Kupsch, A.; Hentschel, M. P.; Lehnert, W.

    2015-04-15

    We present an experimental approach to study the three-dimensional microstructure of gas diffusion layer (GDL) materials under realistic compression conditions. A dedicated compression device was designed that allows for synchrotron-tomographic investigation of circular samples under well-defined compression conditions. The tomographic data provide the experimental basis for stochastic modeling of nonwoven GDL materials. A plain compression tool is used to study the fiber courses in the material at different compression stages. Transport relevant geometrical parameters, such as porosity, pore size, and tortuosity distributions, are exemplarily evaluated for a GDL sample in the uncompressed state and for a compression of 30 vol.%. To mimic the geometry of the flow-field, we employed a compression punch with an integrated channel-rib-profile. It turned out that the GDL material is homogeneously compressed under the ribs, however, much less compressed underneath the channel. GDL fibers extend far into the channel volume where they might interfere with the convective gas transport and the removal of liquid water from the cell.

  3. Compressive failure of delamination-embedded layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Li-Chun

    1997-11-01

    Various failure mechanisms involving both local and global deformation mechanisms of layered structures, consisting of differently oriented orthotropic laminae, are investigated with a large deformation finite element analysis. The aim of this study is to identify the dominant mode which leads to the structural failure under a given boundary condition and geometrical shape. It is assumed that these structures contain initial interlaminar flaws represented by embedded delaminations. Such flaws can play a significant role in defining overall structural integrity and deformation mechanisms. The energy release rate, mixed-mode stress intensity factors and phase angle are computed to quantify the crack driving force and used to measure likelihood of delamination growth in two-dimensional and three- dimensional composite structures. In the first part, two composite structures with distinguished shapes, consisting of four laminae are considered in two-dimensional analysis. One is a flat panel under compressive load and the other structure is a cylindrical shell subjected to external pressure. In the flat panel model, two buckling modes, a global and a local ligament, are observed under quasi-static loading conditions. The interaction of these two modes produces an unstable post-buckling behavior. It is found that the energy release rate exceeds experimentally estimated fracture toughness values only after buckling occurs. In the cylindrical shell study, lower critical buckling loads are observed for models with longer interlaminar delamination as in the flat panel model. However, unlike the flat panel case, the energy release rate surpasses the critical toughness well before the applied pressure reaches the buckling load of the flawed cylindrical shell. This behavior implies that a shell containing an embedded defect along an interface can fail by delamination growth and therefore has a failure load lower than its critical buckling load. Also for thicker cylindrical

  4. Plane mixing layer vortical structure kinematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboeuf, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the current project was to experimentally investigate the structure and dynamics of the streamwise vorticity in a plane mixing layer. The first part of this research program was intended to clarify whether the observed decrease in mean streamwise vorticity in the far-field of mixing layers is due primarily to the 'smearing' caused by vortex meander or to diffusion. Two-point velocity correlation measurements have been used to show that there is little spanwise meander of the large-scale streamwise vortical structure. The correlation measurements also indicate a large degree of transverse meander of the streamwise vorticity which is not surprising since the streamwise vorticity exists in the inclined braid region between the spanwise vortex core regions. The streamwise convection of the braid region thereby introduces an apparent transverse meander into measurements using stationary probes. These results corroborated with estimated secondary velocity profiles in which the streamwise vorticity produces a signature which was tracked in time.

  5. Cumulus cloud venting of mixed layer ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ching, J. K. S.; Shipley, S. T.; Browell, E. V.; Brewer, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Observations are presented which substantiate the hypothesis that significant vertical exchange of ozone and aerosols occurs between the mixed layer and the free troposphere during cumulus cloud convective activity. The experiments utilized the airborne Ultra-Violet Differential Absorption Lidar (UV-DIAL) system. This system provides simultaneous range resolved ozone concentration and aerosol backscatter profiles with high spatial resolution. Evening transects were obtained in the downwind area where the air mass had been advected. Space-height analyses for the evening flight show the cloud debris as patterns of ozone typically in excess of the ambient free tropospheric background. This ozone excess was approximately the value of the concentration difference between the mixed layer and free troposphere determined from independent vertical soundings made by another aircraft in the afternoon.

  6. Modeling and diagnosing interface mix in layered ICF implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C. R.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Clark, D. S.; Haan, S. W.; Ho, D. D.; Meezan, N. B.; Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Thomas, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    Mixing at the fuel-ablator interface of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion can arise from an unfavorable in-flight Atwood number between the cryogenic DT fuel and the ablator. High-Z dopant is typically added to the ablator to control the Atwood number, but recent high-density carbon (HDC) capsules have been shot at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) without this added dopant. Highly resolved post-shot modeling of these implosions shows that there was significant mixing of ablator material into the dense DT fuel. This mix lowers the fuel density and results in less overall compression, helping to explain the measured ratio of down scattered-to-primary neutrons. Future experimental designs will seek to improve this issue through adding dopant and changing the x-ray spectra with a different hohlraum wall material. To test these changes, we are designing an experimental platform to look at the growth of this mixing layer. This technique uses side-on radiography to measure the spatial extent of an embedded high-Z tracer layer near the interface. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. D.O.E. by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. LIDAR OBSERVATIONS OF MIXED LAYER DYNAMICS: TESTS OF PARAMETERIZED ENTRAINMENT MODELS OF MIXED LAYER GROWTH RATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lidar measurements of the atmospheric boundary layer height, the entrainment zone, wind speed and direction, ancillary temperature profiles and surface flux data were used to test current parameterized entrainment models of mixed layer growth rate. Six case studies under clear ai...

  8. Quasi 1D Modeling of Mixed Compression Supersonic Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Paxson, Daniel E.; Woolwine, Kyle J.

    2012-01-01

    The AeroServoElasticity task under the NASA Supersonics Project is developing dynamic models of the propulsion system and the vehicle in order to conduct research for integrated vehicle dynamic performance. As part of this effort, a nonlinear quasi 1-dimensional model of the 2-dimensional bifurcated mixed compression supersonic inlet is being developed. The model utilizes computational fluid dynamics for both the supersonic and subsonic diffusers. The oblique shocks are modeled utilizing compressible flow equations. This model also implements variable geometry required to control the normal shock position. The model is flexible and can also be utilized to simulate other mixed compression supersonic inlet designs. The model was validated both in time and in the frequency domain against the legacy LArge Perturbation INlet code, which has been previously verified using test data. This legacy code written in FORTRAN is quite extensive and complex in terms of the amount of software and number of subroutines. Further, the legacy code is not suitable for closed loop feedback controls design, and the simulation environment is not amenable to systems integration. Therefore, a solution is to develop an innovative, more simplified, mixed compression inlet model with the same steady state and dynamic performance as the legacy code that also can be used for controls design. The new nonlinear dynamic model is implemented in MATLAB Simulink. This environment allows easier development of linear models for controls design for shock positioning. The new model is also well suited for integration with a propulsion system model to study inlet/propulsion system performance, and integration with an aero-servo-elastic system model to study integrated vehicle ride quality, vehicle stability, and efficiency.

  9. Secondary three-dimensional instability in compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Hady, Nabil M.

    1989-01-01

    Three dimensional linear secondary instability theory is extended for compressible boundary layers on a flat plate in the presence of finite amplitude Tollmien-Schlichting waves. The focus is on principal parametric resonance responsible for strong growth of subharmonics in low disturbance environment.

  10. A mixed transform approach for efficient compression of medical images.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, A; Mikhael, W B

    1996-01-01

    A novel technique is presented to compress medical data employing two or more mutually nonorthogonal transforms. Both lossy and lossless compression implementations are considered. The signal is first resolved into subsignals such that each subsignal is compactly represented in a particular transform domain. An efficient lossy representation of the signal is achieved by superimposing the dominant coefficients corresponding to each subsignal. The residual error, which is the difference between the original signal and the reconstructed signal is properly formulated. Adaptive algorithms in conjunction with an optimization strategy are developed to minimize this error. Both two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) approaches for the technique are developed. It is shown that for a given number of retained coefficients, the discrete cosine transform (DCT)-Walsh mixed transform representation yields a more compact representation than using DCT or Walsh alone. This lossy technique is further extended for the lossless case. The coefficients are quantized and the signal is reconstructed. The resulting reconstructed signal samples are rounded to the nearest integer and the modified residual error is computed. This error is transmitted employing a lossless technique such as the Huffman coding. It is shown that for a given number of retained coefficients, the mixed transforms again produces the smaller rms-modified residual error. The first-order entropy of the error is also smaller for the mixed-transforms technique than for the DCT, thus resulting in smaller length Huffman codes. PMID:18215915

  11. Large-scale structure evolution in axisymmetric, compressible free-shear layers

    SciTech Connect

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Baty, R.S.

    1997-05-01

    This paper is a description of work-in-progress. It describes Sandia`s program to study the basic fluid mechanics of large-scale mixing in unbounded, compressible, turbulent flows, specifically, the turbulent mixing of an axisymmetric compressible helium jet in a parallel, coflowing compressible air freestream. Both jet and freestream velocities are variable over a broad range, providing a wide range mixing layer Reynolds number. Although the convective Mach number, M{sub c}, range is currently limited by the present nozzle design to values of 0.6 and below, straightforward nozzle design changes would permit a wide range of convective Mach number, to well in excess of 1.0. The use of helium allows simulation of a hot jet due to the large density difference, and also aids in obtaining optical flow visualization via schlieren due to the large density gradient in the mixing layer. The work comprises a blend of analysis, experiment, and direct numerical simulation (DNS). There the authors discuss only the analytical and experimental efforts to observe and describe the evolution of the large-scale structures. The DNS work, used to compute local two-point velocity correlation data, will be discussed elsewhere.

  12. Dynamic compressive properties of bovine knee layered tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Masahiro; Hino, Yuki; Todo, Mitsugu

    2015-09-01

    In Japan, the most common articular disease is knee osteoarthritis. Among many treatment methodologies, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have recently received a lot of attention. In this field, cells and scaffolds are important, both ex vivo and in vivo. From the viewpoint of effective treatment, in addition to histological features, the compatibility of mechanical properties is also important. In this study, the dynamic and static compressive properties of bovine articular cartilage-cancellous bone layered tissue were measured using a universal testing machine and a split Hopkinson pressure bar method. The compressive behaviors of bovine articular cartilage-cancellous bone layered tissue were examined. The effects of strain rate on the maximum stress and the slope of stress-strain curves of the bovine articular cartilage-cancellous bone layered tissue were discussed.

  13. Efficiency of shear induced entrainment in convectively mixed layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boers, Reinout

    1988-01-01

    Lidar data of mixed layer height are used to compare the model of process partitioning to that of Eulerian partitioning. It is found that the Eulerian partitioning model more closely follows the data and that the process partitioning model underpredicts the mixed layer depth. The results suggest that shear production and consumption of turbulent kinetic energy at the mixed layer top are local processes.

  14. Surface-cooling effects on compressible boundary-layer instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seddougui, Sharon O.; Bowles, R. I.; Smith, F. T.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of surface cooling on compressible boundary layer instability is discussed theoretically for both viscous and inviscid modes, at high Reynolds numbers. The cooling enhances the surface heat transfer and shear stress, creating a high heat transfer sublayer. This has the effect of distorting and accentuating the viscous Tollmien-Schlichting modes to such an extent that their spatial growth rates become comparable with, and can even exceed, the growth rates of inviscid modes, including those found previously. This is for moderate cooling, and it applies at any Mach number. In addition, the moderate cooling destabilizes otherwise stable viscous or inviscid modes, in particular triggering outward-traveling waves at the edge of the boundary layer in the supersonic regime. Severe cooling is also discussed as it brings compressible dynamics directly into play within the viscous sublayer. All the new cooled modes found involve the heat transfer sublayer quite actively, and they are often multi-structured in form and may be distinct from those observed in previous computational and experimental investigations. The corresponding nonlinear processes are also pointed out with regard to transition in the cooled compressible boundary layer. Finally, comparisons with Lysenko and Maslov's (1984) experiments on surface cooling are presented.

  15. A compressible boundary layer algorithm for use with SINDA '85

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakowski, Barbara; Darling, Douglas; Vandewall, Allan

    1992-01-01

    It is useful to interface a high-speed-flow solution and SINDA to analyze the thermal behavior of systems that include both conduction and high speed flows. When interfacing a high-speed-flow solution to SINDA, it may be necessary to include the viscous effects in the energy equations. Boundary layer effects of interest include heat transfer coefficients (including convection and viscous dissipation) and friction coefficients. To meet this need, a fast, uncoupled, compressible, two-dimensional, boundary layer algorithm was developed that can model flows with and without separation. This algorithm was used as a subroutine with SINDA. Given the core flow properties and the wall heat flux from SINDA, the boundary layer algorithm returns a wall temperature to SINDA and boundary layer algorithm are iterated until they predict the same wall temperature.

  16. Linear and nonlinear PSE for compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Malik, Mujeeb R.; Erlebacher, Gordon; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    1993-01-01

    Compressible stability of growing boundary layers is studied by numerically solving the partial differential equations under a parabolizing approximation. The resulting parabolized stability equations (PSE) account for nonparallel as well as nonlinear effects. Evolution of disturbances in compressible flat-plate boundary layers are studied for freestream Mach numbers ranging from 0 to 4.5. Results indicate that the effect of boundary-layer growth is important for linear disturbances. Nonlinear calculations are performed for various Mach numbers. Two-dimensional nonlinear results using the PSE approach agree well with those from direct numerical simulations using the full Navier-Stokes equations while the required computational time is less by an order of magnitude. Spatial simulation using PSE were carried out for both the fundamental and subharmonic type breakdown for a Mach 1.6 boundary layer. The promising results obtained show that the PSE method is a powerful tool for studying boundary-layer instabilities and for predicting transition over a wide range of Mach numbers.

  17. Mixed Layer Drift Revealed by Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Antony K.; Zhao, Yun-He; Esaias, Wayne E.; Campbell, Janet W.; Moore, Timothy; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For the first time we are able to derive ocean currents using the wavelet algorithm for feature tracking from two different sensors (MODIS and SeaWiFS) on different satellites. Satellite ocean color data provide an important insight to the marine biosphere because of their capability to quantify certain fundamental properties (such as phytoplankton pigment concentration, marine primary production, etc.) on a global basis. The mixed layer drift can be derived because the ocean color signal bears information from a much larger depth (10 to 30 meters) as compared with the sea surface temperature data. Although the drifter data are very limited in the study area, the comparison shows a general agreement between drifter data and satellite tracking results, especially for the cases near the Gulf Stream boundary.

  18. Mixed Layer Heat Budget During Pomme Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordani, H.; Caniaux, G.; Prieur, L.; Gavart, M.; Reverdin, G.

    A simplified 3D oceanic model derived from 1D turbulent mixing model was built in order to evaluate separately the impacts of the different processes of the mixed layer. This model is run from the hydrological networks collected during the POMME ex- periment (NE Atlantic, February to April 2001). Five simulations were performed be- tween Pomme1 (13/02) and Pomme2 (04/04), each one deduced from the previous one by adding one new physical process. The performance of the model to retrieve the final analysed fields increases with the number of the processes. A significant improvement is reached when the ageostrophic circulation (associated with the geostrophic adjust- ment of the large scale structures) is activated. In this case, the vertical heat transport has a clear signature in fronts and in some eddies present in the domain. Therefore, these local strong intensities seems well to be associated to the synoptic structures in permanent geostrophic adjustment. Thus subduction seems to be linked to the evolu- tion of the fronts and eddies.

  19. A constrained two-layer compression technique for ECG waves.

    PubMed

    Byun, Kyungguen; Song, Eunwoo; Shim, Hwan; Lim, Hyungjoon; Kang, Hong-Goo

    2015-08-01

    This paper proposes a constrained two-layer compression technique for electrocardiogram (ECG) waves, of which encoded parameters can be directly used for the diagnosis of arrhythmia. In the first layer, a single ECG beat is represented by one of the registered templates in the codebook. Since the required coding parameter in this layer is only the codebook index of the selected template, its compression ratio (CR) is very high. Note that the distribution of registered templates is also related to the characteristics of ECG waves, thus it can be used as a metric to detect various types of arrhythmias. The residual error between the input and the selected template is encoded by a wavelet-based transform coding in the second layer. The number of wavelet coefficients is constrained by pre-defined maximum distortion to be allowed. The MIT-BIH arrhythmia database is used to evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm. The proposed algorithm shows around 7.18 CR when the reference value of percentage root mean square difference (PRD) is set to ten. PMID:26737691

  20. Electronic compressibility of layer-polarized bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, A. F.; Dean, C. R.; Meric, I.; Sorgenfrei, S.; Ren, H.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Hone, J.; Shepard, K. L.; Kim, P.

    2012-06-01

    We report on a capacitance study of dual gated bilayer graphene. The measured capacitance allows us to probe the electronic compressibility as a function of carrier density, temperature, and applied perpendicular electrical displacement D¯. As a band gap is induced with increasing D¯, the compressibility minimum at charge neutrality becomes deeper but remains finite, suggesting the presence of localized states within the energy gap. Temperature dependent capacitance measurements show that compressibility is sensitive to the intrinsic band gap. For large displacements, an additional peak appears in the compressibility as a function of density, corresponding to the presence of a one-dimensional van Hove singularity (vHs) at the band edge arising from the quartic bilayer graphene band structure. For D¯>0, the additional peak is observed only for electrons, while for D¯<0 the peak appears only for holes. This asymmetry can be understood in terms of the finite interlayer separation and may be useful as a direct probe of the layer polarization.

  1. Finite volume solution of the compressible boundary-layer equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loyd, B.; Murman, E. M.

    1986-01-01

    A box-type finite volume discretization is applied to the integral form of the compressible boundary layer equations. Boundary layer scaling is introduced through the grid construction: streamwise grid lines follow eta = y/h = const., where y is the normal coordinate and h(x) is a scale factor proportional to the boundary layer thickness. With this grid, similarity can be applied explicity to calculate initial conditions. The finite volume method preserves the physical transparency of the integral equations in the discrete approximation. The resulting scheme is accurate, efficient, and conceptually simple. Computations for similar and non-similar flows show excellent agreement with tabulated results, solutions computed with Keller's Box scheme, and experimental data.

  2. Lagrangian mixed layer modeling of the western equatorial Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinoda, Toshiaki; Lukas, Roger

    1995-01-01

    Processes that control the upper ocean thermohaline structure in the western equatorial Pacific are examined using a Lagrangian mixed layer model. The one-dimensional bulk mixed layer model of Garwood (1977) is integrated along the trajectories derived from a nonlinear 1 1/2 layer reduced gravity model forced with actual wind fields. The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) data are used to estimate surface freshwater fluxes for the mixed layer model. The wind stress data which forced the 1 1/2 layer model are used for the mixed layer model. The model was run for the period 1987-1988. This simple model is able to simulate the isothermal layer below the mixed layer in the western Pacific warm pool and its variation. The subduction mechanism hypothesized by Lukas and Lindstrom (1991) is evident in the model results. During periods of strong South Equatorial Current, the warm and salty mixed layer waters in the central Pacific are subducted below the fresh shallow mixed layer in the western Pacific. However, this subduction mechanism is not evident when upwelling Rossby waves reach the western equatorial Pacific or when a prominent deepening of the mixed layer occurs in the western equatorial Pacific or when a prominent deepening of the mixed layer occurs in the western equatorial Pacific due to episodes of strong wind and light precipitation associated with the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Comparison of the results between the Lagrangian mixed layer model and a locally forced Eulerian mixed layer model indicated that horizontal advection of salty waters from the central Pacific strongly affects the upper ocean salinity variation in the western Pacific, and that this advection is necessary to maintain the upper ocean thermohaline structure in this region.

  3. Compressive sensing of sparse radio frequency signals using optical mixing.

    PubMed

    Valley, George C; Sefler, George A; Shaw, T Justin

    2012-11-15

    We demonstrate an optical mixing system for measuring properties of sparse radio frequency (RF) signals using compressive sensing (CS). Two types of sparse RF signals are investigated: (1) a signal that consists of a few 0.4 ns pulses in a 26.8 ns window and (2) a signal that consists of a few sinusoids at different frequencies. The RF is modulated onto the intensity of a repetitively pulsed, wavelength-chirped optical field, and time-wavelength-space mapping is used to map the optical field onto a 118-pixel, one-dimensional spatial light modulator (SLM). The SLM pixels are programmed with a pseudo-random bit sequence (PRBS) to form one row of the CS measurement matrix, and the optical throughput is integrated with a photodiode to obtain one value of the CS measurement vector. Then the PRBS is changed to form the second row of the mixing matrix and a second value of the measurement vector is obtained. This process is performed 118 times so that we can vary the dimensions of the CS measurement matrix from 1×118 to 118×118 (square). We use the penalized ℓ(1) norm method with stopping parameter λ (also called basis pursuit denoising) to recover pulsed or sinusoidal RF signals as a function of the small dimension of the measurement matrix and stopping parameter. For a square matrix, we also find that penalized ℓ(1) norm recovery performs better than conventional recovery using matrix inversion. PMID:23164876

  4. Tollmien-Schlichting/vortex interactions in compressible boundary layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackaby, Nicholas D.

    1993-01-01

    The weakly nonlinear interaction of oblique Tollmien-Schlichting waves and longitudinal vortices in compressible, high Reynolds number, boundary-layer flow over a flat plate is considered for all ranges of the Mach number. The interaction equations comprise of equations for the vortex which is indirectly forced by the waves via a boundary condition, whereas a vortex term appears in the amplitude equation for the wave pressure. The downstream solution properties of interaction equations are found to depend on the sign of an interaction coefficient. Compressibility is found to have a significant effect on the interaction properties; principally through its impact on the waves and their governing mechanism, the triple-deck structure. It is found that, in general, the flow quantities will grow slowly with increasing downstream co-ordinate; i.e. in general, solutions do not terminate in abrupt, finite-distance 'break-ups'.

  5. Instabilities in compressible attachment-line boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Duc, Anne; Sesterhenn, Jörn; Friedrich, Rainer

    2006-04-01

    The hydrodynamic stability of the weakly compressible attachment-line boundary layer, with a sweep Mach number ranging from 0.1 to 1.3, is studied using a temporal compressible direct numerical simulation. A flow impinging non-normally onto an infinitely extended flat plate was computed. This complements the study of Hall et al. [Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 395, 229 (1984)] who investigated the linear stability of an incompressible attachment-line boundary layer under the assumption of Görtler-Hämmerlin perturbation modes. In the present work, the base flow is modeled starting from the incompressible swept Hiemenz flow. Using Rayleigh-Jansen Mach number expansions, we obtain a family of base flows parameterized with the sweep Mach number ranging from 0.1 to 1.3. The Reynolds number of the simulation is higher than the incompressible critical Reynolds number, and the plate is adiabatic. Small purely vortical stochastic perturbations are inserted in the boundary layer and followed in time. For Mach numbers up to 0.3, developed velocity and pressure modes are similar to the ones assumed by Görtler and Hämmerlin. The chordwise dependencies of the temperature mode are presented. When increasing the Mach number, the structure of the modes changes; for high Mach numbers, a significantly slower decay of the eigenfunction with wall-normal distance is observed. Above M =0.5, the perturbations are exponentially decaying. This demonstrates the strong stabilizing effect of compressibility in the moderate Mach regime. Furthermore, for the same base flow, a higher exponential growth rate of the perturbation is obtained, if an isothermal wall boundary condition is applied instead of an adiabatic one.

  6. Linearized analysis for compressible laminar boundary layers by ECVL technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soong, Chyi-Yeou

    1987-04-01

    The effective convective velocity linearization (ECVL) technique of Soong (1984) is applied to simplify the equations for steady two-dimensional compressible laminar boundary-layer flow of a perfect gas with constant Prandtl number and specific heat. The derivation of the linearized momentum equation is explained, and numerical results for zero-pressure-gradient and pressure-gradient flows are presented graphically and compared with experimental measurements and analytical results obtained with other approaches. The accuracy and simplicity of the ECVL method are demonstrated, and its practical applicability is indicated.

  7. The stability of a compressible stratified shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Z.; Pritchett, P. L.

    1989-01-01

    The stability of a shear layer under the effect of gravity is investigated using the compressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, including an effective gravity term to represent the curvature effects of the flow and magnetic field line geometry. A general eigenmode equation is derived for a two-dimensional MHD fluid, and an energy-principle analysis to explain the effect of compressibility on the critical Richardson number is presented. For the case of a hyperbolic tangent shear flow and exponential density profile, it was found that, in the Boussinesq approximation, the compressibility raises the critical Richardson number from 1/4 to as much as 1/2, with the exact value depending on the value of the magnetic field at infinity. Under approximation of a strong asymptotic magnetic field, without invoking the Boussinesq approximation, it is shown both analytically and numerically that the density gradient terms cause the shear instability to be dispersive. The long-wavelength stability boundary for the Richardson number J = 0 is characterized by a normalized phase velocity c =

  8. A symmetry based approach to quantifying the compressible turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bin; Bi, Wei-Tao; She, Zhen-Su; Hussain, Fazle

    2015-11-01

    Developing analytical description of the compressible turbulent boundary layer (CTBL) is of great importance to many technological applications and to the understanding and modeling of compressible turbulence. Here a symmetry-based approach is applied to analyze the CTBL data acquired from DNS, covering a wide range of Reynolds number (Re), Mach number (Ma) and wall temperature. The Reynolds stress length scale displays a four-layer structure in the direction normal to the wall and obeys the dilation group invariance as in the incompressible TBL. A newly-identified turbulent heat flux length scale behaves similarly, which is the classical temperature mixing length weighted by the mean temperature. A significant result is the identification of three physical parameters for each length function to characterize the adiabatic flow: a bulk flow constant, a buffer layer thickness and a boundary layer edge, which vary with Re and Ma. For the diabatic flow, the sublayer thickness and the inner layer scaling exponents vary additionally with the wall temperature. These parameters are modeled empirically, leading to a highly accurate prediction of the mean fields of the CTBL. Thus we reveal that the symmetry principle found in canonical wall-bounded flows holds also for the CTBL, and a quantitative mean field theory is viable with appropriate symmetry considerations.

  9. 49 CFR 173.334 - Organic phosphates mixed with compressed gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Organic phosphates mixed with compressed gas. 173... phosphates mixed with compressed gas. Hexaethyl tetraphosphate, parathion, tetraethyl dithio pyrophosphate, tetraethyl pyrophosphate, or other Division 6.1 organic phosphates (including a compound or mixture), may...

  10. Calculation of compressible adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Alston, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    Difficulties encountered in computing profile shapes in supersonic turbulent boundary layers with large pressure gradients, which result from a disagreement between data and theory, are investigated. Possible reasons given by various authors for this disagreement are discussed. Initial results seem to indicate that conventional reasons do not account for the observed difficulties. However, inclusion of the effect of curvature upon turbulent mixing has brought an improvement in calculations. Possible three-dimensional effects are also examined.

  11. Raman Lidar Retrievals of Mixed Layer Heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Clayton, M.; Turner, D. D.; Newsom, R. K.; Goldsmith, J.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate determination of the atmospheric mixing layer (ML) height is important for modeling the transport of aerosols and aerosol precursors and forecasting air quality. Aerosol and water vapor profiles measured by the DOE ARM SGP and the new TWP (Darwin) ground based Raman lidars provide direct measurements of the vertical structure of ML. We have developed automated algorithms to identify sharp gradients in aerosols and water vapor at the top of the ML and have used these algorithms to derive ML heights for extended periods over the last few years. During the afternoon, these ML heights generally compare favorably with ML heights derived from potential temperature profiles derived from coincident radiosondes. However, retrieving ML heights via lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosol gradients is problematic in the presence of elevated aerosol and water vapor layers which are often observed, especially at night. Consequently, we take advantage of recent modifications to these lidars that permit continuous temperature profiling, and compute ML heights using potential temperature profiles derived from Raman lidar and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) measurements. The resulting ML heights agree well with ML heights derived from radiosondes and provide a more realistic representation of the diurnal ML behavior. We use the Raman lidar aerosol and water vapor profiles and ML heights to derive the fractions of total column precipitable water vapor and aerosol optical thickness within and above the ML and show how the ML heights and these fractions vary with time of day and season. The SGP Raman lidar measurements show that the fraction of the aerosol optical thickness and precipitable water vapor above the ML increases from 30-60% during the day to 60-80% at night. The Darwin Raman lidar measurements reveal a shallow, moist cloud-topped ML with little diurnal variability during the austral summer and deeper ML with more diurnal variability during

  12. Nomogram for the Height of the Daytime Mixed Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyrén, Kenneth; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    A method to construct a nomogram of the daytime mixed-layer-height evolution is presented. The nomogram will be specific for a given location and land surface type and is intended to be an easy tool to achieve a general understanding of mixed-layer behaviour. Also it is a pedagogical graphical one-pager that displays the bulk of data that controls the evolution of the mixed layer. Nomograms from northern, central and southern Europe are presented and discussed. Comparison with data from two sites shows good agreement although the nomograms overestimated the mixing height when it was low.

  13. Aero-optic characteristics of turbulent compressible boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyckham, Christopher Mark

    This dissertation presents a detailed study of the aberrating effect on a plane incident wavefront of light due to its passage through a turbulent, compressible boundary layer. This aberration has important implications for the design of airborne optical systems for imaging, communications, or projection. A Shack-Hartmann sensor and associated data analysis software suite were developed and validated for the high resolution measurement of two dimensional wavefront phase. Significant improvements in wavefront reconstruction were achieved by using the calculated centroid uncertainties to weight the least squares fitting of the phase surface. Using the Shack-Hartmann sensor in a high speed, one dimensional mode, individual structures are observed propagating past the sensor in a transonic flow. The uncertainties on the reconstructed phase in this mode are very high, however. In a two dimensional mode the uncertainties are greatly reduced and a large database of individual, uncorrelated wavefronts was collected, allowing statistics to be calculated such as the rms wavefront height and the Strehl ratio. Data were collected at transonic and hypersonic speeds and with no injection or with helium or nitrogen injection into the boundary layer. In all cases except the hypersonic helium injection case, the time averaged wavefronts reveal no features in the boundary layer which are steady in time. In the hypersonic helium injection case, however, steady, longitudinal features are observed, in agreement with previous observations. When helium is injected for window cooling at high speeds, the results show there may be an opportunity to reduce the resulting distortion by taking advantage of the stable structures that form in the boundary layer by using a low bandwidth adaptive optic system. A new scaling argument is also presented to allow the prediction and comparison of wavefront data for different compressible boundary layer flow conditions. The proposed formula gives

  14. Compressibility Considerations for kappa-omega Turbulence Models in Hypersonic Boundary Layer Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, C. L.

    2009-01-01

    The ability of kappa-omega models to predict compressible turbulent skin friction in hypersonic boundary layers is investigated. Although uncorrected two-equation models can agree well with correlations for hot-wall cases, they tend to perform progressively worse - particularly for cold walls - as the Mach number is increased in the hypersonic regime. Simple algebraic models such as Baldwin-Lomax perform better compared to experiments and correlations in these circumstances. Many of the compressibility corrections described in the literature are summarized here. These include corrections that have only a small influence for kappa-omega models, or that apply only in specific circumstances. The most widely-used general corrections were designed for use with jet or mixing-layer free shear flows. A less well-known dilatation-dissipation correction intended for boundary layer flows is also tested, and is shown to agree reasonably well with the Baldwin-Lomax model at cold-wall conditions. It exhibits a less dramatic influence than the free shear type of correction. There is clearly a need for improved understanding and better overall physical modeling for turbulence models applied to hypersonic boundary layer flows.

  15. Linear stability analysis of three-dimensional compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, Mujeeb R.; Orszag, Steven A.

    1987-01-01

    A compressible stability analysis computer code is developed. The code uses a matrix finite-difference method for local eigenvale solution when a good guess for the eigenvalue is available and is significantly more computationally efficient than the commonly used inital-value approach. The local eigenvalue search procedure also results in eigenfunctions and, at little extra work, group velocities. A globally convergent eigenvalue procedure is also developed that may be used when no guess for the eigenvalue is available. The global problem is formulated in such a way that no unstable spurious modes appear so that the method is suitable for use in a black-box stability code. Sample stability calculations are presented for the boundary layer profiles of an LFC swept wing.

  16. Effect of heat release on the spatial stability of a supersonic reacting mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. L.; Grosch, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    A numerical study of the stability of compressible mixing layers in which a diffusion flame is embedded is described. The mean velocity profile has been approximated by a hyperbolic tangent profile and the limit of infinite activation energy taken, which reduces the diffusion flame to a flame sheet. The addition of combustion in the form of a flame sheet was found to have important, and complex, effects on the flow stability.

  17. A critique of some recent second-order turbulence closure models for compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubesin, M. W.; Crisalli, A. J.; Horstman, C. C.; Acharya, M.; Lanfranco, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    Computations based on two recently developed second-order turbulence closure models are compared with a series of boundary-layer experiments and with predictions of these experiments using an algebraic mixing length model. One of the models employs an eddy viscosity, whereas the other evaluates components of the Reynolds stress tensor. For flat plates, the computations are compared with the van Driest skin-friction transformation to assess the handling of compressibility. For boundary layers in pressure gradients, four experiments at Mach 4 and one at Mach 6.7 are used as the bases for comparison. In general, both models represent mean velocities and skin friction reasonably well, but represent the turbulence shear stress less accurately.

  18. Evolution of density compensated fronts in simulated ocean mixed layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helber, R. W.; Hebert, D. A.; Koch, A.

    2015-12-01

    Observations within the ocean surface mixed layer indicate a tendency for temperature gradients to form that are compensated for their effect on density by salinity gradients. These density compensated fronts tend to occur in the absence of strong surface forcing and thus weak vertical mixing. Observations show that density compensated fronts are quickly erased by surface cooling events. The presence of density compensated gradients in the surface mixed layer, however, are not well represented in regional and global ocean circulation model predictions. In these models, subgrid-scale processes are parameterized with minimal ability to represent double diffusion. Recent advances in parameterizations have been developed to model the re-stratification of the mixed layer by sub-mesoscale eddies. These ageostrophic dynamics can lead to long filaments that are governed by process on length scales from 100 m to 10 km and time scales near a day. The impact of these processes in model physics on density compensated fronts is unclear. To improve our understanding of compensated front evolution in the ocean, three different mixing schemes are tested to evaluate the creation of horizontally density compensated gradients in model simulations. One scheme extracts potential energy of ocean fronts for mixing dependent on horizontal and vertical buoyancy gradients, mixed layer depth, and inertial period. The other two schemes mix temperature and salinity horizontally dependent on the buoyancy gradient. All schemes provide a three dimensional approach to mixing that differentiates the horizontal eddy diffusion of temperature and salinity.

  19. Experimental study of compressibility effects on entrainment and mixing in supersonic planar turbulent bluff-body wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Masaki

    2001-07-01

    Understanding effects of compressibility on the entrainment and mixing properties of supersonic turbulent shear flows is a key to successful development of the next generation of high-speed airbreathing propulsion systems. Previous studies have focused largely on supersonic mixing layers, and have shown dramatic reductions in the entrainment and mixing rates with increasing compressibility which has been widely believed to be a generic effect of compressibility in supersonic turbulent shear flows. The present dissertation reports results from an experimental investigation of entrainment and mixing in supersonic, planar, turbulent, bluff-body wakes to clarify the generic effects of compressibility in turbulent shear flows. The experimental techniques, including conventional pressure measurements, shadowgraph and planar laser Mie scattering (PLMS) visualizations, and particle image velocimetry (PIV), were used to study instantaneous and mean velocity fields, scaling properties, turbulence statistics, and large-scale structure in instantaneous and phase-averaged vorticity fields over a range of relative Mach numbers. These were compared with corresponding results from incompressible wakes and from supersonic mixing layers. Results indicate that the classical vortex street-like large scale structure of incompressible planar turbulent wakes is recovered in supersonic wakes where the local relative Mach number Mr(x) has decreased to sufficiently small values, but no comparable large-scale organized structure is evident where the relative Mach number is large. Moreover, at downstream locations where Mr(x) is large, a reduction in the growth rate of the flow is observed due to compressibility, but this reduction is significantly smaller than that reported from studies of supersonic mixing layers. Results also show that the wake undergoes a self-induced forcing where it passes through reflected expansion waves produced by the wake generator. This local forcing alters the

  20. Experimental investigation of the performance of vortex generators mounted in the supersonic portion of a mixed-compression inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michell, G. A.

    1971-01-01

    Vortex generators were investigated as a means of controlling the throat boundary layer in a Mach 2.5 mixed-compression inlet. With or without throat bleed, the generators were unable to produce the inlet peak recoveries available with good performance bleed. Generators placed on the unbled inlet centerbody ahead of the cowl shock impingement point degraded inlet performance. Generators placed further aft on the unbled centerbody, but ahead of the throat, improved inlet performance at conditions where the terminal shock could cause boundary layer separation. Adding generators to the inlet with throat bleed reduced performance. Bleed aft of the generators degraded the vortex flow field.

  1. EVIDENCE FOR CLOUD VENTING OF MIXED LAYER OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Observations are presented which substantiate the hypothesis that significant vertical exchange of ozone and aerosol pollutants occurs between the mixed layer and the free troposphere during cumulus cloud convective activity. Flight experiments conducted in July 1981, utilized th...

  2. A Hybrid Numerical Method for Turbulent Mixing Layers. Degree awarded by Case Western Reserve Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.

    2001-01-01

    A hybrid method has been developed for simulations of compressible turbulent mixing layers. Such mixing layers dominate the flows in exhaust systems of modern day aircraft and also those of hypersonic vehicles currently under development. The method configurations in which a dominant structural feature provides an unsteady mechanism to drive the turbulent development in the mixing layer. The hybrid method uses a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) procedure to calculate wall bounded regions entering a mixing section, and a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) procedure to calculate the mixing dominated regions. A numerical technique was developed to enable the use of the hybrid RANS-LES method on stretched, non-Cartesian grids. Closure for the RANS equations was obtained using the Cebeci-Smith algebraic turbulence model in conjunction with the wall-function approach of Ota and Goldberg. The wall-function approach enabled a continuous computational grid from the RANS regions to the LES region. The LES equations were closed using the Smagorinsky subgrid scale model. The hybrid RANS-LES method is applied to a benchmark compressible mixing layer experiment. Preliminary two dimensional calculations are used to investigate the effects of axial grid density and boundary conditions. Vortex shedding from the base region of a splitter plate separating the upstream flows was observed to eventually transition to turbulence. The location of the transition, however, was much further downstream than indicated by experiments. Actual LES calculations, performed in three spatial directions, also indicated vortex shedding, but the transition to turbulence was found to occur much closer to the beginning of the mixing section. which is in agreement with experimental observations. These calculations demonstrated that LES simulations must be performed in three dimensions. Comparisons of time-averaged axial velocities and turbulence intensities indicated reasonable agreement with experimental

  3. Numerical study of mixing viscous fluids in T-shaped micro-channels with compressibility effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Junfeng; Matar, Omar; Harrison, Christopher; Sullivan, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    We study numerically the mixing processes of two miscible fluids in T-shaped micro-channels in the presence of compressibility effects. Three mixing modes are considered: `passive' mixing, which relies on the molecular diffusion and chaotic advection; `active' mixing relies on external disturbances, e.g. due to periodic compression; and a combination of these modes. In all cases considered, one of the fluids, fluid `A', is initially present in the dead-end region of the micro-channel. In the `passive' mixing case, the other fluid, fluid `B', flows through the open part of the channel at a constant flow rate. In the `active' case, this fluid is initially at rest but is then set in motion through pressure cycling. The combined case, involves the flow of fluid `B' in the presence of compression-decompression cycles. Numerical simulations are carried out for three different fluids, accounting for their compressibility, and their pressure-dependent e.g. density, viscosity, and diffusivity; a simple mixing rule is used to model the properties of the mixed fluids. Our results indicate that the vortices in the dead-end zone, engendered by the relative motion of the fluids leads to their mixing; the combination of mixing modes is shown to promote mixing efficiency significantly. Schlumberger-Doll Research.

  4. Evolution of a forced stratified mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotter, J.; Fernando, H. J. S.; Kit, E.

    2007-06-01

    Laboratory measurements were carried out in a spatially developing stably stratified shear layer generated downstream of a splitter plate. The instabilities were controlled using a flapper spanning the entire shear layer, with the flapper forced at the fastest growing frequency of the primary [Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH)] instability. The measurements were taken as the KH instabilities roll up, break down, and degenerate into stratified turbulence. Both stratified and homogeneous shear layers were considered, the latter acting as the "baseline" case. The measurements included the streamwise and vertical velocities (made using X-wire hot film probes), which allowed calculation of the mean and rms velocities, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) dissipation, and TKE production. The density and its gradients were measured using miniature conductivity probes. The measurements and flow visualization elicited interesting features of KH evolution, namely that KH billows may be turbulent from the onset, the TKE dissipation is largest at early stages of evolution, the production of TKE is a maximum at the breakdown of billows, the decay of turbulence to fossilized motions and concomitant formation of fine (layered) structure occur rapidly after the breakdown of billows, and episodic rebirth of (zombie) turbulence develops before a final permanently fossilized state is achieved.

  5. Spatially Developing Secondary Instabilities in Compressible Swept Airfoil Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional eigenvalue analysis is used on a massive scale to study spatial instabilities of compressible shear flows with two inhomogeneous directions. The main focus of the study is crossflow dominated swept-wing boundary layers although the methodology can also be applied to study other type of flows, such as the attachment-line flow. Certain unique aspects of formulating a spatial, two-dimensional eigenvalue problem for the secondary instability of finite amplitude crossflow vortices are discussed, namely, fixing the spatial growth direction unambiguously through a non-orthogonal formulation of the linearized disturbance equations. A primary test case used for parameter study corresponds to the low-speed, NLF-0415(b) airfoil configuration as tested in the ASU Unsteady Wind Tunnel, wherein a spanwise periodic array of roughness elements was placed near the leading edge in order to excite stationary crossflow modes with a specified fundamental wavelength. The two classes of flow conditions selected for this analysis include those for which the roughness array spacing corresponds to either the naturally dominant crossflow wavelength, or a subcritical wavelength that serves to reduce the growth of the naturally excited dominant crossflow modes. Numerical predictions are compared with the measured database, both as indirect validation for the spatial instability analysis and to provide a basis for comparison with a higher Reynolds number, supersonic swept-wing configuration. Application of the eigenvalue analysis to the supersonic configuration reveals that a broad spectrum of stationary crossflow modes can sustain sufficiently strong secondary instabilities as to potentially cause transition over this configuration. Implications of this finding for transition control in swept wing boundary layers are examined.

  6. Gradient layer entrainment in a thermohaline system with mixed layer circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Incropera, F.P.; Lents, C.E.; Viskanta, R.

    1986-11-01

    Entrainment of salt-stratified fluid into a bottom mixed layer is investigated under conditions for which mixing is driven by bottom heating and/or an imposed horizontal flow. Entrainment rate measurements and mixed layer flow visualization suggest that entrainment is strongly influenced by a shear mechanism involving both horizontal and vertical fluid velocity components. Under certain conditions, imposition of the horizontal flow inhibits the buoyancy flow and entrainment rates for combined mixing are less than those for pure buoyant mixing. Attempts to correlate entrainment rates in terms of conventional dimensionless parameters were unsuccessful.

  7. Direct numerical simulations of a reacting mixing layer with chemical heat release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, P. A.; Jou, W.-H.; Metcalfe, R. W.; Riley, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    In order to study the coupling between chemical heat release and fluid dynamics, direct numerical simulations of a chemically reacting mixing layer with heat release are performed. The fully compressible equations as well as an approximate set of equations that is asymptotically valid for low-Mach-number flows are treated. These latter equations have the computational advantage that high-frequency acoustic waves have been filtered out, allowing much larger time steps to be taken in the numerical solution procedure. A detailed derivation of these equations along with an outline of the numerical solution technique is given. Simulation results indicate that the rate of chemical product formed, the thickness of the mixing layer, and the amount of mass entrained into the layer all decrease with increasing rates of heat release.

  8. Three-wave mixing mediated femtosecond pulse compression in β-barium borate.

    PubMed

    Grün, A; Austin, Dane R; Cousin, Seth L; Biegert, J

    2015-10-15

    Nonlinear pulse compression mediated by three-wave mixing is demonstrated for ultrashort Ti:sapphire pulses in a type II phase-matched β-barium borate (BBO) crystal using noncollinear geometry. 170 μJ pulses at 800 nm with a pulse duration of 74 fs are compressed at their sum frequency to 32 fs with 55 μJ of pulse energy. Experiments and computer simulations demonstrate the potential of sum-frequency pulse compression to match the group velocities of the interacting waves to crystals that were initially not considered in the context of nonlinear pulse compression. PMID:26469593

  9. Response of a supersonic boundary layer to a compression corner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandromme, D.; Zeman, O.

    1992-01-01

    On the basis of direct numerical simulations of rapidly compressed turbulence, Zeman and Coleman have developed a model to represent rapid directional compression contribution to the pressure dilatation term in the turbulent kinetic energy equation. The model has been implemented in the CFD code for simulation of supersonic compression corner flow with an extended separated region. The computational results have shown a significant improvement with respect to the baseline solution given by the standard k- epsilon turbulence model which does not contain any compressibility corrections.

  10. Geometric Frustration in the Mixed Layer Pnictide Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Enjalran, M.; Scalettar, R.T.; Kauzlarich, S.M.

    2000-06-06

    The authors present results from a Monte Carlo investigation of a simple bilayer model with geometrically frustrated interactions similar to those found in the mixed layer pnictide oxides (Sr{sub 2}Mn{sub 3}Pn{sub 2}O{sub 2}, Pn = As, Sb). The model is composed of two inequivalent square lattices with nearest-neighbor intra- and interlayer interactions. They find a ground state composed of two independent Neel ordered layers when the interlayer exchange is an order of magnitude weaker than the intralayer exchange, as suggested by experiment. Evidence for local orthogonal order between the layers is found, but it occurs in regions of parameter space which are not experimentally realized. Qualitatively similar results were observed in models with a larger number of layers. They conclude that frustration caused by nearest-neighbor interactions in the mixed layer pnictide oxides is not sufficient to explain the long-range orthogonal order that is observed experimentally.

  11. Numerical simulation of the non-Newtonian mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azaiez, Jalel; Homsy, G. M.

    1993-01-01

    This work is a continuing effort to advance our understanding of the effects of polymer additives on the structures of the mixing layer. In anticipation of full nonlinear simulations of the non-Newtonian mixing layer, we examined in a first stage the linear stability of the non-Newtonian mixing layer. The results of this study show that, for a fluid described by the Oldroyd-B model, viscoelasticity reduces the instability of the inviscid mixing layer in a special limit where the ratio (We/Re) is of order 1 where We is the Weissenberg number, a measure of the elasticity of the flow, and Re is the Reynolds number. In the present study, we pursue this project with numerical simulations of the non-Newtonian mixing layer. Our primary objective is to determine the effects of viscoelasticity on the roll-up structure. We also examine the origin of the numerical instabilities usually encountered in the simulations of non-Newtonian fluids.

  12. Direct simulations of chemically reacting turbulent mixing layers, part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Ralph W.; McMurtry, Patrick A.; Jou, Wen-Huei; Riley, James J.; Givi, Peyman

    1988-06-01

    The results of direct numerical simulations of chemically reacting turbulent mixing layers are presented. This is an extension of earlier work to a more detailed study of previous three dimensional simulations of cold reacting flows plus the development, validation, and use of codes to simulate chemically reacting shear layers with heat release. Additional analysis of earlier simulations showed good agreement with self similarity theory and laboratory data. Simulations with a two dimensional code including the effects of heat release showed that the rate of chemical product formation, the thickness of the mixing layer, and the amount of mass entrained into the layer all decrease with increasing rates of heat release. Subsequent three dimensional simulations showed similar behavior, in agreement with laboratory observations. Baroclinic torques and thermal expansion in the mixing layer were found to produce changes in the flame vortex structure that act to diffuse the pairing vortices, resulting in a net reduction in vorticity. Previously unexplained anomalies observed in the mean velocity profiles of reacting jets and mixing layers were shown to result from vorticity generation by baroclinic torques.

  13. Direct simulations of chemically reacting turbulent mixing layers, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalfe, Ralph W.; Mcmurtry, Patrick A.; Jou, Wen-Huei; Riley, James J.; Givi, Peyman

    1988-01-01

    The results of direct numerical simulations of chemically reacting turbulent mixing layers are presented. This is an extension of earlier work to a more detailed study of previous three dimensional simulations of cold reacting flows plus the development, validation, and use of codes to simulate chemically reacting shear layers with heat release. Additional analysis of earlier simulations showed good agreement with self similarity theory and laboratory data. Simulations with a two dimensional code including the effects of heat release showed that the rate of chemical product formation, the thickness of the mixing layer, and the amount of mass entrained into the layer all decrease with increasing rates of heat release. Subsequent three dimensional simulations showed similar behavior, in agreement with laboratory observations. Baroclinic torques and thermal expansion in the mixing layer were found to produce changes in the flame vortex structure that act to diffuse the pairing vortices, resulting in a net reduction in vorticity. Previously unexplained anomalies observed in the mean velocity profiles of reacting jets and mixing layers were shown to result from vorticity generation by baroclinic torques.

  14. Method for producing a compressed body of mix-powder for ceramic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okawa, K.

    1983-01-01

    Under the invented method, a compressed body of mix powder for ceramic is produced by mixing and stirring several raw powder materials with mixing liquid such as water, and, in the process of sending the resulted viscous material pressurized at 5 kg/cm to 7 kg/cm, using 1.5 to 2 times the pressure to filter and dehydrate, adjusting the water content to 10 to 20%.

  15. Simulations of free shear layers using a compressible kappa-epsilon model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, S. T.; Chang, C. T.; Marek, C. J.

    1991-01-01

    A two-dimensional, compressible Navier-Stokes equation with a k-epsilon turbulence model is solved numerically to simulate the flow of a compressible free shear layer. The appropriate form of k and epsilon equations for compressible flow is discussed. Sarkar's modeling is adopted to simulate the compressibility effects in the k and epsilon equations. The numerical results show that the spreading rate of the shear layers decreases with increasing convective Mach number. In addition, favorable comparison was found between the calculated results and experimental data.

  16. Mixing layer resonance under high-speed stream forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomassin, Jean; Mureithi, Njuki; Vo, Huu Duc

    2014-12-01

    In the majority of fluid-structure interaction problems, the biggest challenge lies in the fundamental understanding of the flow physics. Forced mixing layers is an important phenomenon found in many cases of flow-induced vibrations and acoustics. The response of a mixing layer to high-speed stream acoustic forcing is investigated with a theoretical and experimental approach. Two different experiments demonstrating the fluid mechanic phenomenon are presented. The first experiment consists of a circular jet impinging on a vibrating plate. The second experiment demonstrates the mixing layer resonance in the context of a fluidelastic instability causing high-amplitude vibrations in gas turbine high-pressure compressor rotor blades. Both the plate and the adjacent blade vibration induce an acoustic feedback that propagates within the jet and blade tip clearance flow, respectively. The resonance was found to occur when the feedback wavelength matched either the jet-to-plate or the inter-blade distance. In both experimental cases, the resonance condition has been simply modeled by the coincidence of a 1D feedback wave, which propagates upstream at reduced velocity by the high-speed flow. The coupling between the jet induced mixing layer and the feedback wave is assumed to naturally occur when one of the wave crests reaches the separation edge. The objective of this study is to improve the understanding of the coupling mechanism between an emanating shear layer and the acoustic forcing originating within a fast flow stream. The study is based on a simplified analytical model in order to enlarge the current understanding of the mixing layer receptivity to the more specific case of its response to high-speed stream forcing. To identify the mixing layer resonant modes, an analytical resonance condition is proposed. It is found that the mixing layer response becomes spatially resonant for specific source locations downstream in the high-speed flow. The study also provides an

  17. Prediction of dynamic and mixing characteristics of drop-laden mixing layers using DNS and LES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okong'o, N.; Leboissetier, A.; Bellan, J.

    2004-01-01

    Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) have been conducted of a temporal mixing layer laden with evaporating drops, in order to assess the ability of LES to reproduce dynamic and mixing aspects of the DNS which affect combustion, independently of combustion models.

  18. Transient effects in unstable ablation fronts and mixing layers in HEDP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarisse, J.-M.; Gauthier, S.; Dastugue, L.; Vallet, A.; Schneider, N.

    2016-07-01

    We report results obtained for two elementary unstable flow configurations relevant to high energy density physics: the ablation front instability and the Rayleigh–Taylor -instability induced mixing layer. These two flows are characterized by a transience of their perturbation dynamics. In the ablative flow case, this perturbation dynamics transience takes the form of finite-durations of successive linear-perturbation evolution phases until reaching regimes of decaying oscillations. This behaviour is observed in various regimes: weakly or strongly accelerated ablation fronts, irradiation asymmetries or initial external-surface defects, and is a result of the mean-flow unsteadiness and stretching. In the case of the Rayleigh–Taylor-instability induced mixing layer, perturbation dynamics transience manifests itself through the extinction of turbulence and mixing as the flow reaches a stable state made of two stably stratified layers of pure fluids separated by an unstratified mixing layer. A second feature, also due to compressibility, takes the form of an intense acoustic wave production, mainly localized in the heavy fluid. Finally, we point out that a systematic short-term linear-perturbation dynamics analysis should be undertaken within the framework of non-normal stability theory.

  19. Double-diffusive layering and mixing in Patagonian fjords

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Santos, Iván; Garcés-Vargas, José; Schneider, Wolfgang; Ross, Lauren; Parra, Sabrina; Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo

    2014-12-01

    Double-diffusive layering was quantified for the first time in the Chilean Patagonian fjords region (41.5-56°S). Approximately 600 temperature and salinity profiles collected during 1995-2012 were used to study water masses, quantify diffusive layering and compute the vertical diffusivity of heat. Development of 'diffusive-layering' or simply 'layering' was favored by relatively fresh-cold waters overlying salty-warm waters. Fresh waters are frequently derived from glacial melting that influences the fjord either directly or through rivers. Salty waters are associated with Modified Subantarctic (MSAAW) and Subantarctic Water (SAAW). Double-diffusive convection occurred as layering in 40% of the year-round data and as salt fingering in <1% of the time. The most vigorous layering, was found at depths between 20 and 70 m, as quantified by (a) Turner angles, (b) density ratios, and (c) heat diffusivity (with maximum values of 5 × 10-5 m2 s-1). Diffusive-layering events presented a meridional gradient with less layering within the 41-47°S northern region, relative to the southern region between 47° and 56°S. Layering occupied, on average, 27% and 56% of the water column in the northern and southern regions, respectively. Thermohaline staircases were detected with microprofile measurements in Martinez and Baker channels (48°S), showing homogeneous layers (2-4 m thick) below the pycnocline (10-40 m). Also in this area, increased vertical mixing coincided with the increased layering events. High values of Thorpe scale (LT ∼ 7 m), dissipation rate of TKE (ε = 10-5-10-3 W kg-1) and diapycnal eddy diffusivity (Kρ = 10-6-10-3 m-2 s-1) were associated with diffusive layering. Implications of these results are that diffusive layering should be taken into account, together with other mixing processes such as shear instabilities and wind-driven flows, in biological and geochemical studies.

  20. Internal wave energy radiated from a turbulent mixed layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munroe, James R.; Sutherland, Bruce R.

    2014-09-01

    We examine mixed-layer deepening and the generation of internal waves in stratified fluid resulting from turbulence that develops in response to an applied surface stress. In laboratory experiments the stress is applied over the breadth of a finite-length tank by a moving roughened conveyor belt. The turbulence in the shear layer is characterized using particle image velocimetry to measure the kinetic energy density. The internal waves are measured using synthetic schlieren to determine their amplitudes, frequencies, and energy density. We also perform fully nonlinear numerical simulations restricted to two dimensions but in a horizontally periodic domain. These clearly demonstrate that internal waves are generated by transient eddies at the integral length scale of turbulence and which translate with the background shear along the base of the mixed layer. In both experiments and simulations we find that the energy density of the generated waves is 1%-3% of the turbulent kinetic energy density of the turbulent layer.

  1. Internal wave energy radiated from a turbulent mixed layer

    SciTech Connect

    Munroe, James R.; Sutherland, Bruce R.

    2014-09-15

    We examine mixed-layer deepening and the generation of internal waves in stratified fluid resulting from turbulence that develops in response to an applied surface stress. In laboratory experiments the stress is applied over the breadth of a finite-length tank by a moving roughened conveyor belt. The turbulence in the shear layer is characterized using particle image velocimetry to measure the kinetic energy density. The internal waves are measured using synthetic schlieren to determine their amplitudes, frequencies, and energy density. We also perform fully nonlinear numerical simulations restricted to two dimensions but in a horizontally periodic domain. These clearly demonstrate that internal waves are generated by transient eddies at the integral length scale of turbulence and which translate with the background shear along the base of the mixed layer. In both experiments and simulations we find that the energy density of the generated waves is 1%–3% of the turbulent kinetic energy density of the turbulent layer.

  2. Three-dimensional plastic flow of anisotropic layer compressed by flat dies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimova, Ljudmila A.

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional flow of anisotropic plastic layer compressed by parallel rough flat dies is considered. Ideal plastic material model with Hill anisotropic yield criterion modification of Mises isotropic model is used with associated plastic flow rule. General solution of a thin layer plastic flow problem with Prandtl linear velocity and shear stress variation in layer thickness direction is presented. Effects of contact friction force vector module and direction on the layer pressure on the dies and the layer plastic flow are considered.

  3. Mixing layers and coherent structures in vegetated aquatic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisalberti, Marco; Nepf, Heidi M.

    2002-02-01

    To date, flow through submerged aquatic vegetation has largely been viewed as perturbed boundary layer flow, with vegetative drag treated as an extension of bed drag. However, recent studies of terrestrial canopies demonstrate that the flow structure within and just above an unconfined canopy more strongly resembles a mixing layer than a boundary layer. This paper presents laboratory measurements, obtained from a scaled seagrass model, that demonstrate the applicability of the mixing layer analogy to aquatic systems. Specifically, all vertical profiles of mean velocity contained an inflection point, which makes the flow susceptible to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. This instability leads to the generation of large, coherent vortices within the mixing layer (observed in the model at frequencies between 0.01 and 0.11 Hz), which dominate the vertical transport of momentum through the layer. The downstream advection of these vortices is shown to cause the progressive, coherent waving of aquatic vegetation, known as the monami. When the monami is present, the turbulent vertical transport of momentum is enhanced, with turbulent stresses penetrating an additional 30% of the plant height into the canopy.

  4. Injectant mole-fraction imaging in compressible mixing flows using planar laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Abbitt, John D., III; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1989-01-01

    A technique is described for imaging the injectant mole-fraction distribution in nonreacting compressible mixing flow fields. Planar fluorescence from iodine, seeded into air, is induced by a broadband argon-ion laser and collected using an intensified charge-injection-device array camera. The technique eliminates the thermodynamic dependence of the iodine fluorescence in the compressible flow field by taking the ratio of two images collected with identical thermodynamic flow conditions but different iodine seeding conditions.

  5. Calculation of external-internal flow fields for mixed-compression inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyu, W. J.; Kawamura, T.; Bencze, D. P.

    1986-01-01

    Supersonic inlet flows with mixed external-internal compressions were computed using a combined implicit-explicit (Beam-Warming-Steger/MacCormack) method for solving the three-dimensional unsteady, compressible Navier-Stokes equations in conservation form. Numerical calculations were made of various flows related to such inlet operations as the shock-wave intersections, subsonic spillage around the cowl lip, and inlet started versus unstarted conditions. Some of the computed results were compared with wind tunnel data.

  6. Calculation of external-internal flow fields for mixed-compression inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyu, W. J.; Kawamura, T.; Bencze, D. P.

    1987-01-01

    Supersonic inlet flows with mixed external-internal compressions were computed using a combined implicit-explicit (Beam-Warming-Steger/MacCormack) method for solving the three-dimensional unsteady, compressible Navier-Stokes equations in conservation form. Numerical calculations were made of various flows related to such inlet operations as the shock-wave intersections, subsonic spillage around the cowl lip, and inlet started versus unstarted conditions. Some of the computed results were compared with wind tunnel data.

  7. LES of Temporally Evolving Mixing Layers by an Eighth-Order Filter Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadjadj, A; Yee, H. C.; Sjogreen, B.

    2011-01-01

    An eighth-order filter method for a wide range of compressible flow speeds (H.C. Yee and B. Sjogreen, Proceedings of ICOSAHOM09, June 22-26, 2009, Trondheim, Norway) are employed for large eddy simulations (LES) of temporally evolving mixing layers (TML) for different convective Mach numbers (Mc) and Reynolds numbers. The high order filter method is designed for accurate and efficient simulations of shock-free compressible turbulence, turbulence with shocklets and turbulence with strong shocks with minimum tuning of scheme parameters. The value of Mc considered is for the TML range from the quasi-incompressible regime to the highly compressible supersonic regime. The three main characteristics of compressible TML (the self similarity property, compressibility effects and the presence of large-scale structure with shocklets for high Mc) are considered for the LES study. The LES results using the same scheme parameters for all studied cases agree well with experimental results of Barone et al. (2006), and published direct numerical simulations (DNS) work of Rogers & Moser (1994) and Pantano & Sarkar (2002).

  8. Isotopic evidence for nitrification in the Antarctic winter mixed layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Sandi M.; Fawcett, Sarah E.; Thomalla, Sandy J.; Weigand, Mira A.; Reason, Chris J. C.; Sigman, Daniel M.

    2015-04-01

    We report wintertime nitrogen and oxygen isotope ratios (δ15N and δ18O) of seawater nitrate in the Southern Ocean south of Africa. Depth profile and underway surface samples collected in July 2012 extend from the subtropics to just beyond the Antarctic winter sea ice edge. We focus here on the Antarctic region (south of 50.3°S), where application of the Rayleigh model to depth profile δ15N data yields estimates for the isotope effect (the degree of isotope discrimination) of nitrate assimilation (1.6-3.3‰) that are significantly lower than commonly observed in the summertime Antarctic (5-8‰). The δ18O data from the same depth profiles and lateral δ15N variations within the mixed layer, however, imply O and N isotope effects that are more similar to those suggested by summertime data. These findings point to active nitrification (i.e., regeneration of organic matter to nitrate) within the Antarctic winter mixed layer. Nitrite removal from samples reveals a low δ15N for nitrite in the winter mixed layer (-40‰ to -20‰), consistent with nitrification, but does not remove the observation of an anomalously low δ15N for nitrate. The winter data, and the nitrification they reveal, explain the previous observation of an anomalously low δ15N for nitrate in the temperature minimum layer (remnant winter mixed layer) of summertime depth profiles. At the same time, the wintertime data require a low δ15N for the combined organic N and ammonium in the autumn mixed layer that is available for wintertime nitrification, pointing to intense N recycling as a pervasive condition of the Antarctic in late summer.

  9. Turbulent mixing layers in the interstellar medium of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. D.; Shull, J. M.; Begelman, M. C.

    1993-01-01

    We propose that turbulent mixing layers are common in the interstellar medium (ISM). Injection of kinetic energy into the ISM by supernovae and stellar winds, in combination with density and temperature inhomogeneities, results in shear flows. Such flows will become turbulent due to the high Reynolds number (low viscosity) of the ISM plasma. These turbulent boundary layers will be particularly interesting where the shear flow occurs at boundaries of hot (approximately 10(exp 6) K) and cold or warm (10(exp 2) - 10(exp 4) K) gas. Mixing will occur in such layers producing intermediate-temperature gas at T is approximately equal to 10(exp 5.0) - 10(exp 5.5) that radiates strongly in the optical, ultraviolet, and EUV. We have modeled these layers under the assumptions of rapid mixing down to the atomic level and steady flow. By including the effects of non-equilibrium ionization and self-photoionization of the gas as it cools after mixing, we predict the intensities of numerous optical, infrared, and ultraviolet emission lines, as well as absorption column densities of C 4, N 5, Si 4, and O 6.

  10. Mixing Layer Excitation by Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Richard; Little, Jesse

    2012-11-01

    The response of a mixing layer with velocity ratio 0.28 to perturbations near the high-speed side (U2=11 m/s, ReL = 0.26 × 106) of its origin from dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators is studied experimentally. Both alternating current (ac) and nanosecond (ns) pulse driven plasma are investigated in an effort to clarify the mechanisms associated with each technique as well as the more general physics associated with flow control via momentum-based versus thermal actuation. Ac-DBD plasma actuators, which function through electrohydrodynamic effects, are found to generate an increase in mixing layer momentum thickness that is strongly dependent on forcing frequency. Results are qualitatively similar to previous archival literature on the topic employing oscillating flaps. Ns-DBD plasma, which is believed to function through thermal effects, has no measureable influence on the mixing layer profile at similar forcing conditions. In the context of previous archival literature, these results suggest different physical mechanisms govern active control via ac- and ns-DBD plasma actuation and more generally, momentum versus thermal perturbations. Further investigation of these phenomena will be provided through variation of the boundary/mixing layer properties and forcing parameters in the context of spatially and temporally resolved experimental data. Supported by: AFOSR and Raytheon Missile Systems.

  11. An experimental study of scalar mixing in curved shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasso, P. S.; Mungal, M. G.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the work being undertaken to study the scalar mixing in curved shear layers. First, the motivation for this work and its objectives are described. Second, a description of the experimental rig that has been built is given. Third, some preliminary results (flow visualizations) are discussed, and finally, future steps that will be taken to complete the study are outlined.

  12. Disintegration of fluids under supercritical conditions from mixing layer studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okong'o, N.; Bellan, J.

    2003-01-01

    Databases of transitional states obtained from Direct Numerical simulations (DNS) of temporal, supercritical mixing layers for two species systems, O2/H2 and C7H16/N2, are analyzed to elucidate species-specific turbulence aspects and features of fluid disintegration.

  13. Photoionized Mixing Layer Models of the Diffuse Ionized Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binette, Luc; Flores-Fajardo, Nahiely; Raga, Alejandro C.; Drissen, Laurent; Morisset, Christophe

    2009-04-01

    It is generally believed that O stars, confined near the galactic midplane, are somehow able to photoionize a significant fraction of what is termed the "diffuse ionized gas" (DIG) of spiral galaxies, which can extend up to 1-2 kpc above the galactic midplane. The heating of the DIG remains poorly understood, however, as simple photoionization models do not reproduce the observed line ratio correlations well or the DIG temperature. We present turbulent mixing layer (TML) models in which warm photoionized condensations are immersed in a hot supersonic wind. Turbulent dissipation and mixing generate an intermediate region where the gas is accelerated, heated, and mixed. The emission spectrum of such layers is compared with observations of Rand of the DIG in the edge-on spiral NGC 891. We generate two sequence of models that fit the line ratio correlations between [S II]/Hα, [O I]/Hα, [N II]/[S II], and [O III]/Hβ reasonably well. In one sequence of models, the hot wind velocity increases, while in the other, the ionization parameter and layer opacity increase. Despite the success of the mixing layer models, the overall efficiency in reprocessing the stellar UV is much too low, much less than 1%, which compels us to reject the TML model in its present form.

  14. Suppression of Cavity-Driven Flow Separation in a Simulated Mixed Compression Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendt, Bruce J.

    2000-01-01

    A test facility designed to simulate a bifurcated subsonic diffuser operating within a mixed compression inlet is described. The subsonic diffuser in this facility modeled a bypass cavity feature often used in mixed compression inlets for engine flow matching and normal shock control. A bypass cavity-driven flow separation was seen to occur in the subsonic diffuser without applied flow control. Flow control in the form of vortex generators and/or a partitioned bypass cavity cover plate were used to eliminate this flow separation, providing a 2% increase in area-averaged total pressure recovery, and a 70% reduction in circumferential distortion intensity.

  15. Results from computational analysis of a mixed compression supersonic inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, J. D.; Keith, T. G.

    1991-01-01

    A numerical study was performed to simulate the critical flow through a supersonic inlet. This flow field has many phenomena such as shock waves, strong viscous effects, turbulent boundary layer development, boundary layer separations, and mass flow suction through the walls, (bleed). The computational tools used were two full Navier-Stokes (FNS) codes. The supersonic inlet that was analyzed is the Variable Diameter Centerbody, (VDC), inlet. This inlet is a candidate concept for the next generation supersonic involved effort in generating an efficient grid geometry and specifying boundary conditions, particularly in the bleed region and at the outflow boundary. Results for a critical inlet operation compare favorably to Method of Characteristics predictions and experimental data.

  16. Modeling the iron cycling in the mixed layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, L.; Voelker, C.; Schartau, M.; Wolf-Gladrow, D.

    2003-04-01

    We present a comprehensive model of the iron cycling within the mixed layer of the ocean, which predicts the time course of iron concentration and speciation. The speciation of iron within the mixed layer is heavily influenced by photochemistry, organic complexation, colloid formation and aggregation, as well as uptake and release by marine biota. The model is driven by mixed layer dynamics, dust deposition and insolation, as well as coupled to a simple ecosystem model (based on Schartau at al.2001: Deep-Sea Res.II.48,1769-1800) and applied to the site of the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS). Parameters in the model were chosen to reproduce the small number of available speciation measurements resolving a daily cycle. The model clearly reproduces the available Fe concentration at the BATS station but the annual balance of Fe fluxes at BATS is less constrained, due to uncertainties in the model parameters. Hence we discuss the model's sensitivity to parameter uncertainties and which observations might help to better constrain the relevant model parameters. Futher we discuss how the most important model parameters are constrained by the data. The mixed layer cycle in the model strongly influences seasonality of primary production as well as light dependency of photoreductive processes and therefore controlls iron speciation. Futhermore short events within a day (e.g. heavy rain, change of irradiance, intense dust deposition and temporary deepening of the mixed layer) may push processes like colloidal aggregation. For this reason we compare two versions of the model: The first one is forced by monthly averaged climatological variables, the second one by daily climatological variabilities.

  17. Direct simulation of shock-induced mixing layer

    SciTech Connect

    Greenough, J.A.; Bell, J.B.

    1993-03-01

    The interaction of a shock wave with a dense fluid layer in three dimensions is investigated using direct numerical simulations. The underlying numerical method is a second-order Godunov scheme. This is coupled to an implementation of Adaptive Mesh Refinement which is used to manage the hierarchical grid structure. An anomalous shock refraction is formed as the initiating shock wave impinges on a quiescent thin dense gas layer. One of the two resulting centered waves from the refraction, the contact surface, serves as the site for initial deposition of primarily spanwise vorticity and represents the primary mixing layer instability. The other wave, the transmitted shock wave, through repeated interactions with the free-surface, forms a cellular structure within the dense layer. The initial interaction introduces three dimensional perturbations onto the slip surface. These perturbations are selectively enhanced, due to favorable velocity gradients over part of the cellular structures, and form large-scale counter-rotating streamwise vertical structures. The structures characterize the secondary instability of this mixing layer. These vortices are quite unstable and transition to small-scales within a distance spanned by two of the cellular structures behind the initiating shock. The transition location has been verified in physical experiments. The fine-scale structure contains evidence of hairpin vortices. The evolution of a conserved scalar is used to monitor mixing progress. Increases in the rate of mixing are directly tied to intensification events associated with the streamwise vortices. Overall the large-scale streamwise structures provide an efficient mechanism for mixing the light and dense fluids. Analysis of time-series data from the calculation shows evidence of what are termed energetic smallscales. This is the characteristic signature of the hairpin vortices undergoing intensification.

  18. Initial development of a hypersonic free mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, W. D.; Bolton, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    A preliminary experimental investigation to establish some of the characteristics and further the understanding of the initial development of a turbulent free mixing layer for hypersonic speeds has been conducted. Mean profile data at about 6 inches downstream of the exit of a hypersonic nozzle have been obtained in nitrogen for a nominal Mach number of 19.5, total temperature of about 1670 K and Reynolds number range from about 50,000 to 110,000 per foot and have been compared with profiles upstream of the nozzle exit. Static pressure varied across the shear layer for the present tests. The outer 80 percent of the high-velocity portion of the free shear layer can be calculated by a rotational method of characteristics. However, turbulent mixing is evidently important in the low-velocity region, and effects of eddy viscosity and eddy conductivity should be included in a theoretical analysis.

  19. Measurements of Molecular Mixing in a High Schmidt Number Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Mueschke, N J; Schilling, O; Youngs, D L; Andrews, M

    2007-12-03

    Molecular mixing measurements are performed for a high Schmidt number (Sc {approx} 10{sup 3}), small Atwood number (A {approx} 7.5 x 10{sup -4}) buoyancy-driven turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer in a water channel facility. Salt was added to the top stream to create the desired density difference. The degree of molecular mixing was measured as a function of time by monitoring a diffusion-limited chemical reaction between the two fluid streams. The pH of each stream was modified by the addition of acid or alkali such that a local neutralization reaction occurred as the two fluids molecularly mixed. The progress of this neutralization reaction was tracked by the addition of phenolphthalein - a pH-sensitive chemical indicator - to the acidic stream. Accurately calibrated backlit optical techniques were used to measure the average concentration of the colored chemical indicator. Comparisons of chemical product formation for pre-transitional buoyancy- and shear-driven mixing layers are given. It is also shown that experiments performed at different equivalence ratios (acid/alkali concentration) can be combined to obtain a mathematical relationship between the colored product formed and the density variance. This relationship was used to obtain high-fidelity, quantitative measures of the degree of molecular mixing which are independent of probe resolution constraints. The dependence of such mixing parameters on the Schmidt and Reynolds numbers is examined by comparing the current Sc {approx} 10{sup 3} measurements with Sc = 0.7 gas-phase and Pr = 7 liquid-phase measurements. This comparison indicates that the Schmidt number has a large effect on the bulk quantity of mixed fluid at small Reynolds numbers Re{sub h} < 10{sup 3}. At late times, all mixing parameters indicated a greater degree of molecular mixing and a decreased Schmidt number dependence. Implications for the development and quantitative assessment of turbulent transport and mixing models appropriate for

  20. The Saharan atmospheric boundary layer: Turbulence, stratification and mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Carreras, Luis; Parker, Douglas J.; Marsham, John H.; Rosenberg, Philip D.; Marenco, Franco; Mcquaid, James B.

    2013-04-01

    High-resolution large-eddy model simulations, combined with aircraft and radiosonde observations from the Fennec observational campaign are used to describe the vertical structure of the Saharan atmospheric boundary layer (SABL). The SABL, probably the deepest dry convective boundary layer on Earth, is crucial in controlling the vertical redistribution and long-range transport of dust, heat, water and momentum in the Sahara, with significant implications for the large-scale Saharan heat low and West African monsoon systems. The daytime SABL has a unique structure, with an actively growing convective region driven by high sensible heating at the surface, capped by a weak (≤1K) temperature inversion and a deep, near-neutrally stratified Saharan residual layer (SRL) above it, which is mostly well mixed in humidity and temperature and reaches a height of ~500hPa. Large-eddy model (LEM) simulations were initialized with radiosonde data and driven by surface heat flux observations from Fennec supersite-1 at Bordj Bardji Mokhtar (BBM), southern Algeria. Aircraft observations are used to validate the processes of interest identified in the model, as well as providing unprecedented detail of the turbulent characteristics of the SABL. Regular radiosondes from BBM during June 2011 are used to generate a climatology of the day-time SABL structure, providing further evidence that the processes identified with the LEM are recurrent features of the real SABL. The model is shown to reproduce the typical SABL structure from observations, and different tracers are used to illustrate the penetration of the convective boundary layer into the residual layer above as well as mixing processes internal to the residual layer. Despite the homogeneous surface fluxes and tracer initialization, the large characteristic length-scale of the turbulent eddies leads to large horizontal changes in boundary layer depth (which control the formation of clouds) and significant heterogeneity in tracer

  1. Autumnal Mixed-Phase Cloudy Boundary Layers in the Arctic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, James O.

    1998-06-01

    Two mixed-phase cloudy boundary layer events observed over the Arctic ice pack in autumn are extensively analyzed. The local dynamic and thermodynamic structure of the boundary layers is determined from aircraft measurements including analysis of turbulence, longwave radiative transfer, and cloud microphysics. The large-scale forcing is determined from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction reanalysis fields while mesoscale forcing is estimated from 40-km aircraft box patterns. The two cases differed somewhat in their local static stability, surface characteristics, and large-scale forcing. One case was characterized by a stably stratified cloudy boundary layer over a heterogeneous surface containing numerous open leads. The other case occurred over a fairly homogenous surface of multiyear ice and consisted of a surface-based stable layer surmounted by a low-level jet and a cloud-topped mixed layer. An important large-scale factor in the development of low clouds appears to have been water vapor advection. Low clouds formed irrespective of the sign of the large-scale vertical velocity. Observed flux profiles indicate that both cloudy boundary layers are cooled through turbulent eddies except at cloud top where entrainment of warm moist air aloft occurs. Maximum turbulent kinetic energy occurs near cloud top where turbulent motions are driven by strong radiative cooling (>70 K day1) and in the vicinity of the low-level jet where turbulence is shear induced. The presence of both liquid and ice in the cloud layers appears to be a nearly steady-state feature at temperatures between 13° and 20°C. Results of a simple condensed water budget indicate that these colloidally unstable mixed-phase clouds may be maintained through strong cloud-top radiative cooling. The isobaric cooling rate required to maintain the presence of both liquid and ice in a stratiform cloud is quite sensitive to variations in the highly uncertain concentration of ice-forming nuclei.

  2. Ion mixing of III-V compound semiconductor layered structures

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, W.; Pappert, S.A.; Zhu, B.; Clawson, A.R.; Yu, P.K.L.; Lau, S.S. ); Poker, D.B.; White, C.W. ); Schwarz, S.A. )

    1992-03-15

    Compositional disordering of III-V compound superlattice structures has received considerable attention recently due to its potential application for photonic devices. The conventional method to induce compositional disorder in a layered structure is to implant a moderate dose of impurity ions ({similar to}10{sup 15}/cm{sup 2}) into the structure at room temperature, followed by a high-temperature annealing step (this process is referred to as IA here). Ion irradiation at room temperature alone does not cause any significant intermixing of layers. The subsequent high-temperature annealing step tends to restrict device processing flexibility. Ion mixing (IM) is capable of enhancing compositional disordering of layers at a rate which increases exponentially with the ion irradiation temperature. As a processing technique to planarize devices, ion mixing appears to be an attractive technology. In this work, we investigate compositional disordering in the AlGaAs/GaAs and the InGaAs/InP systems using ion mixing. We found that the ion mixing behavior of these two systems shows a thermally activated regime as well as an athermal regime, similar to that observed for metal-metal and metal-semiconductor systems. Ion mixing is observed to induce compositional disordering at significantly lower temperatures than that for the IA process. We have compared the two processes in terms of five parameters: (1) irradiation temperature, (2) dose dependence, (3) dose rate dependence, (4) annealing, and (5) ion dependence (including electrical effects and mass dependence). We found that the IM process is more efficient in utilizing the defects generated by ion irradiation to cause disordering. Both the physical mechanism of ion mixing and possible device implications will be discussed.

  3. Kubo-Anderson Mixing in the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, H.; de Leeuw, G.; Brink, A. Maassen Van Den

    A novel ab initio analysis of the Reynolds stress is presented in order to model non-local turbulence transport. The theory involves a sample path space and a stochastic hypothesis. A scaling relation maps the path space onto the boundary layer. Analytical sampling rates are shown to model mixing by exchange. Nonlocal mixing involves a scaling exponent ɛ≈0.58 (ɛ→∞ in the diffusion limit). The resulting transport equation represents a nondiffusive (Kubo-Anderson or kangaroo) type stochastic process.

  4. Streamwise vortex meander in a plane mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboeuf, Richard L.; Mehta, Rabindra D.

    1993-01-01

    The present experimental study was conducted in order to determine the existence of streamwise vortex meander in a mixing layer, and if present, its significance on the measured properties. The dependence of the velocity cross-correlation on the fixed probe location was shown to be a good indicator of the stationarity of the streamwise vortex location. The cross-correlation measurements obtained here indicate that spanwise meander is negligible, although transverse apparent meander (normal to the plane of the mixing layer) was indicated. The transverse meander, exemplified by the elliptical shape of the mean streamwise vorticity contours, was expected, since the streamwise vorticity in the braid region is essentially inclined, with respect to the streamwise direction. These conclusions were supported by results of estimated spanwise profiles of the transverse velocity component. The balance of evidence suggests that the measured mean streamwise vorticity decay is representative of the decay of the vorticity rather than an artifact of meander.

  5. Dynamics of coherent structures in a plane mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, Fazle; Moser, R. D.; Colonius, T.; Moin, P.; Rogers, M. M.

    1988-01-01

    An incompressible, time developing 3-D mixing layer with idealized initial conditions was simulated numerically. Consistent with the suggestions from experimental measurements, the braid region between the dominant spanwise vortices or rolls develops longitudinal vortices or ribs, which are aligned upstream and downstream of a roll and produce spanwise distortion of the rolls. The process by which this distortion occurs is explained by studying a variety of quantities of dynamic importance (e.g., production of enstrophy, vortex stretching). Other quantities of interest (dissipation, helicity density) are also computed and discussed. The currently available simulation only allows the study of the early evolution (before pairing) of the mixing layer. New simulations in progress will relieve this restriction.

  6. Vortical structure in a forced plane mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboeuf, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this phase of an ongoing study is to obtain detailed three dimensional phase-averaged measurements of forced mixing layer vorticity development and evolution. Acoustic forcing is being used to phase-lock the initial development and subsequent pairing of the span wise vortical structures. Phase averaged measurements of the three velocity components will permit the study of three dimensional vorticity distributions without invoking Taylor's hypothesis which is known to introduce uncertainty. Currently two sine waves, one at the fundamental roll-up frequency and the second, its subharmonic, are being used to force the initial roll-up and first pairing of the span wise rollers. The two dimensional measurements described in this report were obtained in order to determine the best operating conditions for the detailed three dimensional study of the mixing layer undergoing pairing via various pairing mechanisms.

  7. Application of large eddy interaction model to a mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, S. N. B.

    1989-01-01

    The large eddy interaction model (LEIM) is a statistical model of turbulence based on the interaction of selected eddies with the mean flow and all of the eddies in a turbulent shear flow. It can be utilized as the starting point for obtaining physical structures in the flow. The possible application of the LEIM to a mixing layer formed between two parallel, incompressible flows with a small temperature difference is developed by invoking a detailed similarity between the spectra of velocity and temperature.

  8. Dependence of Boundary Layer Mixing On Lateral Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, D.

    Ocean circulation models often show strong mixing in association with lateral bound- ary layers. Such mixing is generally considered to be artifactual rather than real. Fur- thermore, the severity of the problem is boundary condition dependent. For example, an inconsistency between geostrophy and insulating boundary conditions on tempera- ture and salinity cause many modelers to opt for the no slip, rather than slip boundary condtion on the tangential component of momentum. As modellers increasingly move into the eddy revealing regime, biharmonic, rather than harmonic dissipative operators are likely to become more common. Biharmonic operators, however, require specifi- cation of additional boundary conditions. For example, there are several `natural ex- tensions' to each of the slip and no slip conditions. Here, these various possiblities are considered in the context of a simple model. Particular attention is payed to how mixing (and the associated overturning cell) is affected by the choice of boundary condition.

  9. Seasonal variability of mixed layer depth in Indonesian Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radjawane, Ivonne M.; Nurdjaman, Susanna; Apriansyah

    2015-09-01

    This research is conducted to analyzed seasonal variation of mixed layer depth (MLD) in Indonesian Seas using monthly temperature average data from World Ocean Atlas (WOA) 2009 with the 0.25 degree grid resolution and wind data from NCEP. The results of this study indicate that seasonal variation of MLD are closely related to seasonal monsoonal wind pattern prevail in Indonesia region especially at south of west Java, central of Banda Sea and Sulawesi Sea. The MLD is deeper during Southeast (SE) Monsoon. The stronger wind blowing over ocean surface caused stronger ocean dynamics and stronger mixing process that effect deeper mixing region. In contrary, during SE Monsoon, the location of strong upwelling such as in the coastal area of east Java and from eastern Banda Sea till Arafura Sea showed the MLD is shallower compare during the Northwest (NW) Monsoon.

  10. Thermal mixing layer downstream of half-heated turbulence grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larue, J. C.; Libby, P. A.

    1981-04-01

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented concerning the temperature in the thermal mixing layer downstream of a partially heated turbulence grid. Temperatures were measured by platinum wire thermometers located upstream and downstream of a turbulence grid consisting of 18 horizontal and 18 vertical heating rods, with the uppermost nine horizontal rods heated to a temperature about 200 C above ambient. Experimental results are presented for the mean temperature distribution, the distribution of relative temperature intensity, the distributions of the skewness and kurtosis of the temperature fluctuations, probability density functions for the temperature, the skewness of the temperature derivative and the thickness of the thermal interface in the thermal mixing layer, and are compared with previous experimental results where available. As in previous investigations, the measured intensity of the temperature fluctuations in the center of the mixing layer is found to disagree with that predicted by the analysis of Libby (1975) by 40%, and it is concluded that experiments simultaneously yielding the velocity and temperature characteristics are required to explain the discrepancy.

  11. Thermodynamic-biological-optical coupling in the oceanic mixed layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonot, Jean-Yves; Dollinger, Eric; Le Treut, Hervé

    1988-07-01

    In order to quantitatively investigate the role of phytoplanktonic blooms in the open ocean on sea surface temperature (SST) prediction, the mixed layer model of Gaspar (1985, 1988) is coupled to a primary production model adapted from Agoumi (1985), allowing an interactive prediction of the upper ocean turbidity, over two seasonal cycles at Ocean Weather Station (OWS) R (Romeo). (In this paper we use "turbidity" for total optical content, thus including mineral and phytoplanktpnic content.) The validity of Gaspar's model, originally tested at OWS P (Papa), is first demonstrated for OWS R in its only thermodynamic version. Agoumi's (1985) model, developed for multiyear simulations over the English Channel, is then adapted to the case of the open ocean upper layers. It is shown how turbulent mixing is an important factor regulating primary production and nutrient fluxes, in order to obtain spring and autumn phytoplanktonic blooms and winter decay. Finally, it is shown how the typical spring and autumn errors in SST prediction from the mixed-layer model can be changed in sign in the thermodynamic-biological-optical coupled version of the model. These results confirm that the phytoplanktonic seasonal cycle has a significant impact on sea surface temperature simulation. It is therefore reasonable to consider taking this factor into account in future upper ocean simulation experiments, and some recommendations are suggested for further studies.

  12. Irreversible Entropy Production in Two-Phase Mixing Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okongo, Nora

    2003-01-01

    This report presents a study of dissipation (irreversible production of entropy) in three-dimensional, temporal mixing layers laden with evaporating liquid drops. The purpose of the study is to examine the effects of evaporating drops on the development of turbulent features in flows. Direct numerical simulations were performed to analyze transitional states of three mixing layers: one without drops, and two that included drops at different initial mass loadings. Without drops, the dissipation is essentially due to viscous effects. It was found that in the presence of drops, the largest contribution to dissipation was made by heating and evaporation of the drops, and that at large length scales, this contribution is positive (signifying that the drops reduce turbulence), while at small scales, this contribution is negative (the drops increase turbulence). The second largest contribution to dissipation was found to be associated with the chemical potential, which leads to an increase in turbulence at large scales and a decrease in turbulence at small scales. The next smaller contribution was found to be that of viscosity. The fact that viscosity effects are only third in order of magnitude in the dissipation is in sharp contrast to the situation for the mixing layer without the drops. The next smaller contribution - that of the drag and momentum of the vapor from the drops - was found to be negative at lower mass loading but to become positive at higher mass loading.

  13. DNS and LES of a Shear-Free Mixing Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knaepen, B.; Debliquy, O.; Carati, D.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this work is twofold. First, given the computational resources available today, it is possible to reach, using DNS, higher Reynolds numbers than in Briggs et al.. In the present study, the microscale Reynolds numbers reached in the low- and high-energy homogeneous regions are, respectively, 32 and 69. The results reported earlier can thus be complemented and their robustness in the presence of increased turbulence studied. The second aim of this work is to perform a detailed and documented LES of the shear-free mixing layer. In that respect, the creation of a DNS database at higher Reynolds number is necessary in order to make meaningful LES assessments. From the point of view of LES, the shear-free mixing-layer is interesting since it allows one to test how traditional LES models perform in the presence of an inhomogeneity without having to deal with difficult numerical issues. Indeed, as argued in Briggs et al., it is possible to use a spectral code to study the shear-free mixing layer and one can thus focus on the accuracy of the modelling while avoiding contamination of the results by commutation errors etc. This paper is organized as follows. First we detail the initialization procedure used in the simulation. Since the flow is not statistically stationary, this initialization procedure has a fairly strong influence on the evolution. Although we will focus here on the shear-free mixing layer, the method proposed in the present work can easily be used for other flows with one inhomogeneous direction. The next section of the article is devoted to the description of the DNS. All the relevant parameters are listed and comparison with the Veeravalli & Warhaft experiment is performed. The section on the LES of the shear-free mixing layer follows. A detailed comparison between the filtered DNS data and the LES predictions is presented. It is shown that simple eddy viscosity models perform very well for the present test case, most probably because the

  14. Direct simulation of high-speed mixing layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukunda, H. S.; Sekar, B.; Carpenter, M. H.; Drummond, J. Philip; Kumar, Ajay

    1992-01-01

    A computational study of a nonreacting high-speed mixing layer is performed. A higher order algorithm with sufficient grid points is used to resolve all relevant scales. In all cases, a temporal free-stream disturbance is introduced. The resulting flow is time-sampled to generate a statistical cross section of the flow properties. The studies are conducted at two convective Mach numbers, three free-stream turbulence intensities, three Reynolds numbers, and two types of initial profiles-hyperbolic tangent (tanh) and boundary layer. The boundary-layer profile leads to more realistic predictions of the transition processes. The predicted transition Reynolds number of 0.18 x 10(exp 6) compares well with experimental data. Normalized vortex spacings for the boundary-layer case are about 3.5 and compare favorably with the 1.5 to 2.5 found in experimental measurements. The tanh profile produces spacings of about 10. The growth rate of the layer is shown to be moderately affected by the initial disturbance field, but comparison with experimental data shows moderate agreement. For the boundary-layer case, it is shown that noise at the Strouhal number of 0.007 is selectively amplified and shows little Reynolds number dependence.

  15. Effects of boundary layer and liquid viscosity and compressible air on sloshing characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chang-Fang; Wang, De-Yu; Cai, Zhong-Hua

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, numerical investigations for tank sloshing, based on commercial CFD package FLUENT, are performed to study effects of boundary layer grid, liquid viscosity and compressible air on sloshing pressure, wave height and rising time of impact pressure. Also, sloshing experiments for liquids of different viscosity are carried out to validate the numerical results. Through comparison of numerical and experimental results, a computational model including boundary layer grid can predict the sloshing pressure more accurately. Energy dissipation due to viscous friction leads to reduction of sloshing pressure and wave elevation. Sloshing pressure is also reduced because of cushion effect of compressible air. Due to high viscosity damping effect and compressible air effect, the rising time of impact pressure becomes longer. It is also found that liquid viscosity and compressible air influence distribution of dynamic pressure along the vertical tank wall.

  16. Assessment of Mixed Layer Mesoscale Parameterization in Eddy Resolving Simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayson, C. A.; Luneva, M. V.; Dubovikov, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    In eddy resolving simulations we test a mixed layer mesoscale parameterization, developed recently by Canuto and Dubovikov (2011). The parameterization yields the horizontal and vertical mesoscale fluxes in terms of coarse-resolution fields and eddy kinetic energy. An expression for the later in terms of mean fields has been found too to get a closed parameterization in terms of the mean fields only. In 40 numerical experiments we simulated the two types of flows: idealized flows driven by baroclinic instabilities only, and more realistic flows, driven by wind and surface fluxes as well as by inflow-outflow in shallow and narrow straits. The diagnosed quasi-instantaneous horizontal and vertical mesoscale buoyancy fluxes (averaged over 1o - 2o and 10 days) demonstrate a strong scatter typical for turbulent flows, however, the fluxes are highly correlated with the parameterization. After averaged over 3-4 months, diffusivities diagnosed from the eddy resolving simulations, are quite consistent with the parameterization for a broad range of parameters. Diagnosed vertical mesoscale fluxes restratify mixed layer and are in a good agreement with the parameterization unless vertical turbulent mixing in the upper layer becomes strong enough to compare with mesoscale advection. In the later case, numerical simulations demonstrate that the deviation of the fluxes from the parameterization is controlled by the dimensionless parameter γ, estimating the ratio of vertical diffusion term to a mesoscale advection. The empirical dependence of vertical flux on γ is found. An analysis using a modified omega-equation reveals that the effects of the vertical mixing of vorticity is responsible for the two-three fold amplification of vertical mesoscale flux. Possible physical mechanisms, responsible for the amplification of vertical mesoscale flux are discussed.

  17. Design and calibration of the mixing layer and wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James H.; Mehta, Rabindra D.

    1989-01-01

    A detailed account of the design, assembly and calibration of a wind tunnel specifically designed for free-shear layer research is contained. The construction of this new facility was motivated by a strong interest in the study of plane mixing layers with varying initial and operating conditions. The Mixing Layer Wind tunnel is located in the Fluid Mechanics Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center. The tunnel consists of two separate legs which are driven independently by centrifugal blowers connected to variable speed motors. The blower/motor combinations are sized such that one is smaller than the other, giving maximum flow speeds of about 20 and 40 m/s, respectively. The blower speeds can either be set manually or via the Microvax II computer. The two streams are allowed to merge in the test section at the sharp trailing edge of a slowly tapering splitter plate. The test section is 36 cm in the cross-stream direction, 91 cm in the spanwise direction and 366 cm in length. One test section side-wall is slotted for probe access and adjustable so that the streamwise pressure gradient may be controlled. The wind tunnel is also equipped with a computer controlled, three-dimensional traversing system which is used to investigate the flow fields with pressure and hot-wire instrumentation. The wind tunnel calibration results show that the mean flow in the test section is uniform to within plus or minus 0.25 pct and the flow angularity is less than 0.25 deg. The total streamwise free-stream turbulence intensity level is approximately 0.15 pct. Currently the wind tunnel is being used in experiments designed to study the three-dimensional structure of plane mixing layers and wakes.

  18. Spatial three-dimensional secondary instability compressible boundary-layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Hady, Nabil M.

    1989-01-01

    Three-dimensional linear secondary instability theory is extended for compressible and high Mach number boundary layer flows. The small but finite amplitude compressible Tollmien-Schlichting wave effect on the growth of 3-D perturbations is investigated. The focus is on principal parametric resonance responsible for the strong growth of subharmonic in low disturbance environment. The effect of increasing Mach number on the onset, growth, the shape of eigenfunctions of the subharmonic is assessed, and the resulting vortical structure is examined.

  19. Arctic Cloud-driven Mixed Layers and Surface Coupling State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shupe, M.; Persson, O. P.; Solomon, A.; de Boer, G.

    2013-12-01

    Arctic low-level clouds interact with the atmosphere and underlying surface via many inter-related processes. The balance of cloud radiative warming and cooling effects imparts a strong control on the net surface energy budget. Cloud-driven atmospheric circulations can impact surface turbulent heat fluxes and influence the vertical mixing of atmospheric state parameters and aerosols. Large-scale advection of heat and moisture provides the background context within which these local interactions unfold. Importantly, these radiative, dynamical, and advective processes also contribute to a complex web of self-sustaining cloud processes that can promote cloud maintenance over long periods of time. We examine many of these processes, with a specific focus on the dynamical linkages between Arctic clouds and the surface that influence low-level atmospheric structure and mixing. Comprehensive, ground-based observations from meteorological towers, remote-sensors, and radiosondes are used to simultaneously characterize surface fluxes, atmospheric structure, cloud properties, in-cloud motions, and the depth of the cloud-driven mixed layer in multiple Arctic environments. Relationships among these parameters are explored to elucidate the properties of the system that determine the degree of vertical atmospheric mixing and the coupling state between cloud and surface. The influence of temperature and moisture inversions on this system is also explored. Transitions in the coupling state are utilized to illustrate the relative roles of different processes. Cases from a coastal Arctic site at Barrow, Alaska and a station embedded in the Arctic sea-ice pack are used to contrast conditional influences related to season and surface type. It is found that over sea-ice, where surface turbulent fluxes are weak, the coupling of cloud-level processes to the surface layer is largely due to proximity of the cloud-driven mixed layer to the surface, which appears to be primarily influenced by

  20. Nonlinear stability of non-stationary cross-flow vortices in compressible boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajjar, J. S. B.

    1995-05-01

    The nonlinear evolution of long wavelength non-stationary cross-flow vortices in a compressible boundary layer is investigated and the work extends that of Gajjar (1994) to flows involving multiple critical layers. The basic flow profile considered in this paper is that appropriate for a fully three-dimensional boundary layer with O(1) Mach number and with wall heating or cooling. The governing equations for the evolution of the cross-flow vortex are obtained and some special cases are discussed. One special case includes linear theory where exact analytic expressions for the growth rate of the vortices are obtained. Another special case is a generalization of the Bassom & Gajjar (1988) results for neutral waves to compressible flows. The viscous correction to the growth rate is derived and it is shown how the unsteady nonlinear critical layer structure merges with that for a Haberman type of viscous critical layer.

  1. Nonlinear stability of non-stationary cross-flow vortices in compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gajjar, J. S. B.

    1995-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of long wavelength non-stationary cross-flow vortices in a compressible boundary layer is investigated and the work extends that of Gajjar (1994) to flows involving multiple critical layers. The basic flow profile considered in this paper is that appropriate for a fully three-dimensional boundary layer with O(1) Mach number and with wall heating or cooling. The governing equations for the evolution of the cross-flow vortex are obtained and some special cases are discussed. One special case includes linear theory where exact analytic expressions for the growth rate of the vortices are obtained. Another special case is a generalization of the Bassom & Gajjar (1988) results for neutral waves to compressible flows. The viscous correction to the growth rate is derived and it is shown how the unsteady nonlinear critical layer structure merges with that for a Haberman type of viscous critical layer.

  2. Processing and properties of ceramic composites with three-dimensional architectures of thin compressive layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fair, Geoff Eric

    Threshold strength behavior and flaw insensitivity have recently been observed in laminar ceramic composites containing thick stress-free layers and thin layers in residual compression (due to thermal expansion mismatch). The threshold strength behavior is due to a crack tip shielding effect in which the stress intensity factor cracks initiating in the thick layers and propagating through the thin layers is reduced by the compressive stresses. Consequently, a well-defined level of stress (the threshold strength) is required to cause the cracks to propagate entirely through the compressive layers to cause failure of the specimens regardless of the initial flaw size. The threshold strength behavior is only observed in one loading orientation relative to the layers. The current work describes the processing procedures and fracture behavior of ceramic composites with three-dimensional architectures of thin compressive layers which are expected to exhibit threshold strength behavior in any tensile loading orientation and possess higher threshold strengths than laminates of similar architectural dimensions. Processing of the composites consists of producing spherical agglomerates, coating these agglomerates with a thin layer of material which upon heat treatment develops a residual compressive stress, and consolidating the coated agglomerates into bars suitable for mechanical testing. Finite element modeling of the residual stresses in the composite architecture is used to explain fracture behavior of the composites which is shown to depend on the architectural variables. Fractography of failed specimens is instrumental in elucidating the processing flaws within the architectures, one of the most pervasive of which is inter-agglomerate voids due to incomplete consolidation; additional processing steps are developed to remove these flaws and produce flaw-free composites suitable for a study of a flaw-insensitivity through the introduction of controlled flaws. Mechanical

  3. DNSs of Multicomponent Gaseous and Drop-Laden Mixing Layers Achieving Transition to Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Selle, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    A paper describes direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of three-dimensional mixing-layer flows undergoing transition to turbulence; the mixing layers may or may not be laden with evaporating liquid drops.

  4. A comparison of hydrographically and optically derived mixed layer depths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zawada, D.G.; Zaneveld, J.R.V.; Boss, E.; Gardner, W.D.; Richardson, M.J.; Mishonov, A.V.

    2005-01-01

    Efforts to understand and model the dynamics of the upper ocean would be significantly advanced given the ability to rapidly determine mixed layer depths (MLDs) over large regions. Remote sensing technologies are an ideal choice for achieving this goal. This study addresses the feasibility of estimating MLDs from optical properties. These properties are strongly influenced by suspended particle concentrations, which generally reach a maximum at pycnoclines. The premise therefore is to use a gradient in beam attenuation at 660 nm (c660) as a proxy for the depth of a particle-scattering layer. Using a global data set collected during World Ocean Circulation Experiment cruises from 1988-1997, six algorithms were employed to compute MLDs from either density or temperature profiles. Given the absence of published optically based MLD algorithms, two new methods were developed that use c660 profiles to estimate the MLD. Intercomparison of the six hydrographically based algorithms revealed some significant disparities among the resulting MLD values. Comparisons between the hydrographical and optical approaches indicated a first-order agreement between the MLDs based on the depths of gradient maxima for density and c660. When comparing various hydrographically based algorithms, other investigators reported that inherent fluctuations of the mixed layer depth limit the accuracy of its determination to 20 m. Using this benchmark, we found a ???70% agreement between the best hydrographical-optical algorithm pairings. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Evaluation of some compression aids in tableting of roller compacted swellable core drug layer.

    PubMed

    Golchert, D; Bines, E; Carmody, A

    2013-09-10

    Swellable core technology (SCT) represents a broadly applicable oral osmotic drug delivery platform for the controlled release of drugs. SCT tablets control drug delivery by using osmosis to regulate the influx of water into the tablet's core. The tablet consists of two layers; drug layer and sweller layer, with a semi-permeable membrane coating and delivery port located in the drug layer side of the tablet. The key component of SCT formulations is polyethylene oxide (PEO), which is typically wet granulated with organic solvents to prevent rapid gel hydration observed during contact with aqueous environments. However, the use of organic solvents has their own environmental and cost considerations which make this form of processing undesirable. To overcome this issue, dry granulation can be employed. However, PEO is a very plastic material and problems may be encountered during the tableting process, when work hardening occurs upon double compression. The addition of compression aids to the drug layer will help to increase the roll force when generating ribbons - reducing fines and segregation potential - while also reducing work hardening effects which impact tablet friability. The five compression aids used in this study were microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), xylitol, di-calcium phosphate (anhydrous), lactose monohydrate and starch. The work undertaken here studies the compression properties of the drug layer blends with different levels of the five compression aids as part of the formulation. Roller compaction properties are also varied to provide granules with differing solid fractions. The results of this study indicate that addition of microcrystalline cellulose in the formulation in levels between 10% and 30% significantly improve the tablet hardness at lower tablet compression forces. Further work is required to investigate the impact on dissolution. PMID:23796839

  6. Effect of Different Mixing and Placement Methods on the Compressive Strength of Calcium-Enriched Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Sahebi, Safoora; Sadatshojaee, Nooshin; Jafari, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this experimental laboratory study was to evaluate the effect of different mixing and placement techniques on compressive strength (CS) of calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement. Methods and Materials: CEM powder was mixed with its liquid either by hand mixing or amalgamator mixing. The mixture was loaded to cylindrical acrylic molds with 6.0±0.1 mm height and 4.0±1 mm diameter. Half of the specimens in each group were selected randomly and ultrasonic energy was applied to them for 30 sec. All samples were incubated for 7 days at 37°C. The CS test was performed by means of a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed by the two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey’s post hoc tests. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: The maximum CS was seen in the amalgamator-mixed samples that did not receive ultrasonic agitation. The CS value of amalgamator-mixed samples was significantly higher than manually-mixed ones (P=0.003). Ultrasonic vibration did not change the CS of specimens. Conclusion: According to the results, mixing with amalgamator increases the CS of CEM cement, while ultrasonic vibration had no positive effect. PMID:25834593

  7. Stability of compressible boundary layers over a smooth backward-facing step

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragab, S. A.; Nayfeh, A. H.; Krishna, R. C.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation is conducted into the determination of the credibility of interacting boundary layers in predicting compressible subsonic flows over smooth surface imperfections. The case of smooth backward-facing steps is considered. The predicted mean flows are compared with those obtained using a Navier-Stokes solver. Moreover, the linear 2-D compressible stability characteristics of both mean flows are compared. The results show that the interacting boundary-layer formulation produces accurate mean flows that yield accurate linear stability characteristics, such as growth rates and amplification factors.

  8. Stability of compressible boundary layers over a smooth backward-facing step

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragab, S. A.; Nayfeh, A. H.; Krishna, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation is conducted into the determination of the credibility of interacting boundary layers in predicting compressible subsonic flows over smooth surface imperfections. The case of smooth backward-facing steps is considered. The predicted mean flows are compared with those obtained using a Navier-Stokes solver. Moreover, the linear 2-D compressible stability characteristics of both mean flows are compared. The results show that the interacting boundary-layer formulation produces accurate mean flows that yield accurate linear stability characteristics, such as growth rates and amplification factors.

  9. Water Vapor Turbulence Profiles in Stationary Continental Convective Mixed Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D. D.; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Berg, Larry K.; Schween, Jan

    2014-10-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Raman lidar at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in north-central Oklahoma has collected water vapor mixing ratio (q) profile data more than 90% of the time since October 2004. Three hundred (300) cases were identified where the convective boundary layer was quasi-stationary and well-mixed for a 2-hour period, and q mean, variance, third order moment, and skewness profiles were derived from the 10-s, 75-m resolution data. These cases span the entire calendar year, and demonstrate that the q variance profiles at the mixed layer (ML) top changes seasonally, but is more related to the gradient of q across the interfacial layer. The q variance at the top of the ML shows only weak correlations (r < 0.3) with sensible heat flux, Deardorff convective velocity scale, and turbulence kinetic energy measured at the surface. The median q skewness profile is most negative at 0.85 zi, zero at approximately zi, and positive above zi, where zi is the depth of the convective ML. The spread in the q skewness profiles is smallest between 0.95 zi and zi. The q skewness at altitudes between 0.6 zi and 1.2 zi is correlated with the magnitude of the q variance at zi, with increasingly negative values of skewness observed lower down in the ML as the variance at zi increases, suggesting that in cases with larger variance at zi there is deeper penetration of the warm, dry free tropospheric air into the ML.

  10. Vertical and horizontal mixing in the tropical tropopause layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glanville, Anne Alexandra

    Nearly all air enters the stratosphere through a single layer in the tropics. The tropical tropopause layer (TTL) is a transition region between the troposphere and stratosphere and its roles include regulating stratospheric chemistry and surface climate. Multiscale dynamics existing in the TTL range from transient convection to the hemispheric wave-driven circulation and the relative influences of these processes still remain unclear. This study pays special attention to vertical and horizontal mixing which are associated with breaking gravity waves and Rossby waves, respectively. Our study quantifies the roles of these dynamics by taking advantage of the conservative nature of water vapor in the lower stratosphere. Unable to change concentration in the lowermost stratosphere after passing through the cold point, water vapor becomes a tracer for total transport and its signal is known as the tape recorder. This tape recorder is studied using observations, reanalysis data, a chemistry-climate model (CCM), and simple idealized modeling. Modifying past methods, we are able to capture the seasonal cycle of effective transport in the TTL and we introduce seasonally-dependent dynamics to a one-dimensional model and perform a parameter-sweep to test all possible dynamical combinations. Simulating with unrealistic annual mean transports results in bimodality where either vertical advection or vertical mixing dominate. The solutions that depend on amplified vertical advection disappear when seasonally-dependent transports are used. Overall, all datasets show that vertical mixing is as important to TTL transport as vertical advection itself even during boreal winter when advection peaks. The reanalysis and CCM have increased effective transport compared to observations, however, they rely on different dynamics. The reanalysis has amplified vertical mixing while the CCM has amplified vertical advection. This hints at the possible influence of spurious diffusion from data

  11. Large-eddy simulation of a turbulent mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, N. N.; Ferziger, J. H.; Reynolds, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    The three dimensional, time dependent (incompressible) vorticity equations were used to simulate numerically the decay of isotropic box turbulence and time developing mixing layers. The vorticity equations were spatially filtered to define the large scale turbulence field, and the subgrid scale turbulence was modeled. A general method was developed to show numerical conservation of momentum, vorticity, and energy. The terms that arise from filtering the equations were treated (for both periodic boundary conditions and no stress boundary conditions) in a fast and accurate way by using fast Fourier transforms. Use of vorticity as the principal variable is shown to produce results equivalent to those obtained by use of the primitive variable equations.

  12. Diurnal Variation in Radon Concentration and Mixing-Layer Depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Toshio

    Variation of 222Rn, its short-lived daughters and 212Pb concentrations in the atmosphere, and conditions of the lower atmosphere were observed simultaneously at Kamisaibara Village in Japan. The variation of 222Rn concentration and the ratio of the concentrations of 212Pb and the short-lived daughters of 222Rn during nighttime is explained by sodar echoes and temperature profiles obtained by an instrumented tethered balloon. Depths of the convective mixing layer estimated using the 222Rn concentration, using the surface sensible heat flux, and obtained by low-level sondes are compared and found to be in approximate agreement.

  13. Large-eddy simulation of a spatially-evolving turbulent mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuano, Francesco; Catalano, Pietro; Mastellone, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Large-eddy simulations of a spatially-evolving turbulent mixing layer have been performed. The flow conditions correspond to those of a documented experimental campaign (Delville, Appl. Sci. Res. 1994). The flow evolves downstream of a splitter plate separating two fully turbulent boundary layers, with Reθ = 2900 on the high-speed side and Reθ = 1200 on the low-speed side. The computational domain starts at the trailing edge of the splitter plate, where experimental mean velocity profiles are prescribed; white-noise perturbations are superimposed to mimic turbulent fluctuations. The fully compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved by means of a finite-volume method implemented into the in-house code SPARK-LES. The results are mainly checked in terms of the streamwise evolution of the vorticity thickness and averaged velocity profiles. The combined effects of inflow perturbations, numerical accuracy and subgrid-scale model are discussed. It is found that excessive levels of dissipation may damp inlet fluctuations and delay the virtual origin of the turbulent mixing layer. On the other hand, non-dissipative, high-resolution computations provide results that are in much better agreement with experimental data.

  14. Weakly nonlinear models for turbulent mixing in a plane mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, William W.; Morris, Philip J.

    1992-01-01

    New closure models for turbulent free shear flows are presented in this paper. They are based on a weakly nonlinear theory with a description of the dominant large-scale structures as instability waves. Two models are presented that describe the evolution of the free shear flows in terms of the time-averaged mean flow and the dominant large-scale turbulent structure. The local characteristics of the large-scale motions are described using linear theory. Their amplitude is determined from an energy integral analysis. The models have been applied to the study of an incompressible mixing layer. For both models, predictions of the mean flow developed are made. In the second model, predictions of the time-dependent motion of the large-scale structures in the mixing layer are made. The predictions show good agreement with experimental observations.

  15. Mix Degradation in DT Filled Capsules When Shock and Compression Yields are Resolved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, D. C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Mack, J. M.; Young, C. S.; Kyrala, G. A.; Cooley, J. H.; Welser-Sherrill, L.; Langenbrunner, J. R.; Evans, S. C.; Sedillo, T. J.; Horsfield, C. J.; Drew, D. W.; Miller, E. K.; Glebov, V. Yu.

    2007-11-01

    1100μm dia. DT(5atm) + 3He (0,1,or 5 atm) filled glass capsules were directly driven on the Omega laser to measure yield, X-ray images, and especially the burn time history. The 600ps square pulse increases time separation between the ``shock'' yield (before the reflected shock reaches the incoming shell) and later ``compression'' yield. Matching the timing and amount of this early ``shock'' yield in the implosions fixes the electron conduction flux limiter. The Scannapieco and Cheng mix model results are compared with measured yield, burn temperatures and histories, and gated X-ray images. The experiment shows degradation of both the shock and compression yield, but relatively more degradation of the compression yield than explained by the model. The first gated images, which occur when the reflected shock reaches the incoming shell, show significant mixing has already occurred. But the lack of X-ray emission 60ps earlier suggests no mixing then. Work supported by US DOE/NNSA, performed by LANL, operated by LANS LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LA-UR-07-4929.

  16. Decoupling and Multicriticality in the Mixed Phase of Layered Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Jose P.

    2000-03-01

    The mixed phase of extremely type-II layered superconductors is studied theoretically through an analysis of the corresponding layered XY model with uniform frustration. The latter is carried out by a partial duality transformation to a neutral layered Coulomb gas ensemble (CGE). The CGE is dilute in the weak-coupling limit at high perpendicular fields, in which case we obtain a second-order melting transition that separates a coupled phase at low temperatures composed of 2D vortex lattices from a decoupled vortex-liquid phase at high temperatures. This indicates that neither the Friedel scenario nor the ``line-liquid'' phase are likely in clean layered superconductors. It is also argued on the basis of the CGE description that the above second-order melting line converts itself into a first-order decoupling transition at perpendicular fields that lie below the dimensional cross-over scale. Comparison with available results from Monte Carlo simulation of the frustrated XY model and from experiments in high-temperature superconductors is made where possible.

  17. A mixing layer theory for flow resistance in shallow streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katul, Gabriel; Wiberg, Patricia; Albertson, John; Hornberger, George

    2002-11-01

    A variety of surface roughness characterizations have emerged from nineteenth and twentieth century studies of channel hydraulics. When the water depth h is much larger than the characteristic roughness height ks, roughness formulations such as Manning's n and the friction factor f can be explicitly related to the momentum roughness height zo in the log-law formulation for turbulent boundary layers, thereby unifying roughness definitions for a given surface. However, when h is comparable to (or even smaller than) ks, the log-law need not be valid. Using a newly proposed mixing layer analogy for the inflectional velocity profile within and just above the roughness layer, a model for the flow resistance in shallow flows is developed. The key model parameter is the characteristic length scale describing the depth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz wave instability. It is shown that the new theory, originally developed for canopy turbulence, recovers much of the earlier roughness results for flume experiments and shallow gravel streams. This study is the first to provide such a unifying framework between canopy atmospheric turbulence and shallow gravel stream roughness characterization. The broader implication of this study is to support the merger of a wealth of surface roughness characterizations independently developed in nineteenth and twentieth century hydraulics and atmospheric sciences and to establish a connection between roughness formulations across traditionally distinct boundary layer types.

  18. Part 1 of a Computational Study of a Drop-Laden Mixing Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okong'o, Nora A.; Bellan, Josette

    2004-01-01

    This first of three reports on a computational study of a drop-laden temporal mixing layer presents the results of direct numerical simulations (DNS) of well-resolved flow fields and the derivation of the large-eddy simulation (LES) equations that would govern the larger scales of a turbulent flow field. The mixing layer consisted of two counterflowing gas streams, one of which was initially laden with evaporating liquid drops. The gas phase was composed of two perfect gas species, the carrier gas and the vapor emanating from the drops, and was computed in an Eulerian reference frame, whereas each drop was tracked individually in a Lagrangian manner. The flow perturbations that were initially imposed on the layer caused mixing and eventual transition to turbulence. The DNS database obtained included transitional states for layers with various liquid mass loadings. For the DNS, the gas-phase equations were the compressible Navier-Stokes equations for conservation of momentum and additional conservation equations for total energy and species mass. These equations included source terms representing the effect of the drops on the mass, momentum, and energy of the gas phase. From the DNS equations, the expression for the irreversible entropy production (dissipation) was derived and used to determine the dissipation due to the source terms. The LES equations were derived by spatially filtering the DNS set and the magnitudes of the terms were computed at transitional states, leading to a hierarchy of terms to guide simplification of the LES equations. It was concluded that effort should be devoted to the accurate modeling of both the subgridscale fluxes and the filtered source terms, which were the dominant unclosed terms appearing in the LES equations.

  19. Goertler instability in compressible boundary layers along curved surfaces with suction and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Hady, N.; Verma, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    The Goertler instability of the laminar compressible boundary layer flows along concave surfaces is investigated. The linearized disturbance equations for the three-dimensional, counter-rotating streamwise vortices in two-dimensional boundary layers are presented in an orthogonal curvilinear coordinate. The basic approximation of the disturbance equations, that includes the effect of the growth of the boundary layer, is considered and solved numerically. The effect of compressibility on critical stability limits, growth rates, and amplitude ratios of the vortices is evaluated for a range of Mach numbers for 0 to 5. The effect of wall cooling and suction of the boundary layer on the development of Goertler vortices is investigated for different Mach numbers.

  20. Calculation of compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils by a finite element/finite difference method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Stuart L.; Meade, Andrew J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented of a finite element/finite difference method (semidiscrete Galerkin method) used to calculate compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils, in which the group finite element scheme is applied to the Dorodnitsyn formulation of the boundary layer equations. The semidiscrete Galerkin (SDG) method promises to be fast, accurate and computationally efficient. The SDG method can also be applied to any smoothly connected airfoil shape without modification and possesses the potential capability of calculating boundary layer solutions beyond flow separation. Results are presented for low speed laminar flow past a circular cylinder and past a NACA 0012 airfoil at zero angle of attack at a Mach number of 0.5. Also shown are results for compressible flow past a flat plate for a Mach number range of 0 to 10 and results for incompressible turbulent flow past a flat plate. All numerical solutions assume an attached boundary layer.

  1. A compressible near-wall turbulence model for boundary layer calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Zhang, H. S.; Lai, Y. G.

    1992-01-01

    A compressible near-wall two-equation model is derived by relaxing the assumption of dynamical field similarity between compressible and incompressible flows. This requires justifications for extending the incompressible models to compressible flows and the formulation of the turbulent kinetic energy equation in a form similar to its incompressible counterpart. As a result, the compressible dissipation function has to be split into a solenoidal part, which is not sensitive to changes of compressibility indicators, and a dilational part, which is directly affected by these changes. This approach isolates terms with explicit dependence on compressibility so that they can be modeled accordingly. An equation that governs the transport of the solenoidal dissipation rate with additional terms that are explicitly dependent on the compressibility effects is derived similarly. A model with an explicit dependence on the turbulent Mach number is proposed for the dilational dissipation rate. Thus formulated, all near-wall incompressible flow models could be expressed in terms of the solenoidal dissipation rate and straight-forwardly extended to compressible flows. Therefore, the incompressible equations are recovered correctly in the limit of constant density. The two-equation model and the assumption of constant turbulent Prandtl number are used to calculate compressible boundary layers on a flat plate with different wall thermal boundary conditions and free-stream Mach numbers. The calculated results, including the near-wall distributions of turbulence statistics and their limiting behavior, are in good agreement with measurements. In particular, the near-wall asymptotic properties are found to be consistent with incompressible behavior; thus suggesting that turbulent flows in the viscous sublayer are not much affected by compressibility effects.

  2. Heat Transfer in the Turbulent Boundary Layer of a Compressible Gas at High Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankl, F.

    1942-01-01

    The Reynolds law of heat transfer from a wall to a turbulent stream is extended to the case of flow of a compressible gas at high speeds. The analysis is based on the modern theory of the turbulent boundary layer with laminar sublayer. The investigation is carried out for the case of a plate situated in a parallel stream. The results are obtained independently of the velocity distribution in the turbulent boundar layer.

  3. Direct simulations of chemically reacting turbulent mixing layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, J. J.; Metcalfe, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    The report presents the results of direct numerical simulations of chemically reacting turbulent mixing layers. The work consists of two parts: (1) the development and testing of a spectral numerical computer code that treats the diffusion reaction equations; and (2) the simulation of a series of cases of chemical reactions occurring on mixing layers. The reaction considered is a binary, irreversible reaction with no heat release. The reacting species are nonpremixed. The results of the numerical tests indicate that the high accuracy of the spectral methods observed for rigid body rotation are also obtained when diffusion, reaction, and more complex flows are considered. In the simulations, the effects of vortex rollup and smaller scale turbulence on the overall reaction rates are investigated. The simulation results are found to be in approximate agreement with similarity theory. Comparisons of simulation results with certain modeling hypotheses indicate limitations in these hypotheses. The nondimensional product thickness computed from the simulations is compared with laboratory values and is found to be in reasonable agreement, especially since there are no adjustable constants in the method.

  4. Estimating mixed layer nitrate in the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhoff, T.; Friedrich, T.; Hartman, S. E.; Oschlies, A.; Wallace, D. W. R.; Körtzinger, A.

    2009-09-01

    Here we present an equation for the estimation of nitrate in surface waters of the North Atlantic Ocean (40° N to 52° N, 10° W to 60° W). The equation was derived by multiple linear regression (MLR) from nitrate, sea surface temperature (SST) observational data and model mixed layer depth (MLD) data. The observational data were taken from merchant vessels that have crossed the North Atlantic on a regular basis in 2002/2003 and from 2005 to present. It is important to find a robust and realistic esitmate of MLD because the deepening of the mixed layer is crucial for nitrate supply to the surface. We compared model data from two models (FOAM and Mercator) with MLD derived from float data (using various criteria). The Mercator model gives a MLD estimate that is close to the MLD derived from floats. MLR was established using SST, MLD from Mercator, time and latitude as predictors. Additionally a neural network was trained with the same dataset and the results were validated against both model data as a "ground truth" and an independent observational dataset. This validation produced RMS errors of the same order for MLR and the neural network approach. We conclude that it is possible to estimate nitrate concentrations with an uncertainty of ±1.5 μmol L-1 in the North Atlantic.

  5. Estimating mixed layer nitrate in the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhoff, T.; Friedrich, T.; Hartman, S. E.; Oschlies, A.; Wallace, D. W. R.; Körtzinger, A.

    2010-03-01

    Here we present an equation for the estimation of nitrate in surface waters of the North Atlantic Ocean (40° N to 52° N, 10° W to 60° W). The equation was derived by multiple linear regression (MLR) from nitrate, sea surface temperature (SST) observational data and model mixed layer depth (MLD) data. The observational data were taken from merchant vessels that have crossed the North Atlantic on a regular basis in 2002/2003 and from 2005 to the present. It is important to find a robust and realistic estimate of MLD because the deepening of the mixed layer is crucial for nitrate supply to the surface. We compared model data from two models (FOAM and Mercator) with MLD derived from float data (using various criteria). The Mercator model gives a MLD estimate that is close to the MLD derived from floats. MLR was established using SST, MLD from Mercator, time and latitude as predictors. Additionally a neural network was trained with the same dataset and the results were validated against both model data as a "ground truth" and an independent observational dataset. This validation produced RMS errors of the same order for MLR and the neural network approach. We conclude that it is possible to estimate nitrate concentrations with an uncertainty of ±1.4 μmol L-1 in the North Atlantic.

  6. An analysis of the stability of the compressible Ekman boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spall, J. R.; Wood, H. G., III

    1984-12-01

    The linear stability problem for the compressible Ekman boundary layer common to rotating fluids is formulated and the stability properties determined numerically. Three classes of unstable waves are identified (called class A, B, and C), their properties are described. The class C waves have only recently been reported in the literature and are present only in compressible Ekman boundary layers. Most of the calculations presented here are for uranium hexafluoride gas; however, critical Reynolds numbers are also computed for air and ammonia gas. Compressibility is generally found to decrease the critical Reynolds number for each class of wave. A comparison of results for the three different gases shows the stability to be largely unaffected by changes in the gas properties. Maximum growth rate calculations for each wave show the class A and B waves to be the dominant instabilities.

  7. An analysis of the stability of the compressible Ekman boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spall, J. R.; Wood, H. G., III

    1984-01-01

    The linear stability problem for the compressible Ekman boundary layer common to rotating fluids is formulated and the stability properties determined numerically. Three classes of unstable waves are identified (called class A, B, and C), their properties are described. The class C waves have only recently been reported in the literature and are present only in compressible Ekman boundary layers. Most of the calculations presented here are for uranium hexafluoride gas; however, critical Reynolds numbers are also computed for air and ammonia gas. Compressibility is generally found to decrease the critical Reynolds number for each class of wave. A comparison of results for the three different gases shows the stability to be largely unaffected by changes in the gas properties. Maximum growth rate calculations for each wave show the class A and B waves to be the dominant instabilities.

  8. Dynamic negative compressibility of few-layer graphene, h-BN, and MoS2.

    PubMed

    Barboza, Ana Paula M; Chacham, Helio; Oliveira, Camilla K; Fernandes, Thales F D; Ferreira, Erlon H Martins; Archanjo, Braulio S; Batista, Ronaldo J C; de Oliveira, Alan B; Neves, Bernardo R A

    2012-05-01

    We report a novel mechanical response of few-layer graphene, h-BN, and MoS(2) to the simultaneous compression and shear by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. The response is characterized by the vertical expansion of these two-dimensional (2D) layered materials upon compression. Such effect is proportional to the applied load, leading to vertical strain values (opposite to the applied force) of up to 150%. The effect is null in the absence of shear, increases with tip velocity, and is anisotropic. It also has similar magnitudes in these solid lubricant materials (few-layer graphene, h-BN, and MoS(2)), but it is absent in single-layer graphene and in few-layer mica and Bi(2)Se(3). We propose a physical mechanism for the effect where the combined compressive and shear stresses from the tip induce dynamical wrinkling on the upper material layers, leading to the observed flake thickening. The new effect (and, therefore, the proposed wrinkling) is reversible in the three materials where it is observed. PMID:22468807

  9. Secondary instability of compressible boundary layer to subharmonic three-dimensional disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El Hady, Nabil M.

    1989-01-01

    Three-dimensional linear secondary instability theory is extended for compressible boundary layers on a flat plate in the presence of finite amplitude Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) waves. The focus is on principal parametric resonance responsible for the strong growth of harmonics in a low disturbance environment.

  10. Secondary instability of compressible boundary layer to subharmonic three-dimensional disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Hady, Nabil M.

    1988-01-01

    Three-dimensional linear secondary instability theory is extended for compressible boundary layers on a flat plate in the presence of finite amplitude Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) waves. The focus is on principal parametric resonance responsible for the strong growth of harmonics in a low disturbance environment.

  11. On collision processes in a compressed layer, involving waterdrops and solid particles and a moving object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykhovskii, I. A.; Kovalev, P. I.

    Supersonic heterogeneous gas flows colliding with blunt-nosed objects are examined by studying the effects of water droplets colliding with similar objects. Various optical techniques are applied to the study of the effects to capitalize on the advantages and efficiency of each. The patterns of disturbance are visualized and described qualitatively to isolate the mechanisms of interaction in compressed layers.

  12. Comparison of several methods for predicting separation in a compressible turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhart, P. M.; Bober, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    Several methods for predicting the separation point for a compressible turbulent boundary layer were applied to the flow over a bump on a wind-tunnel wall. Measured pressure distributions were used as input. Two integral boundary-layer methods, three finite-difference boundary-layer methods, and three simple methods were applied at five free-stream Mach numbers ranging from 0.354 to 0.7325. Each of the boundary-layer methods failed to explicitly predict separation. However, by relaxing the theoretical separation criteria, several boundary-layer methods were made to yield reasonable separation predictions, but none of the methods accurately predicted the important boundary-layer parameters at separation. Only one of the simple methods consistently predicted separation with reasonable accuracy in a manner consistent with the theory. The other methods either indicated several possible separation locations or only sometimes predicted separation.

  13. CVS Filtering of 3D Turbulent Mixing Layers Using Orthogonal Wavelets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Kai; Farge, Marie; Pellegrino, Giulio; Rogers, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Coherent Vortex Simulation (CVS) filtering has been applied to Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) data of forced and unforced time-developing turbulent mixing layers. CVS filtering splits the turbulent flow into two orthogonal parts, one corresponding to coherent vortices and the other to incoherent background flow. We have shown that the coherent vortices can be represented by few wavelet modes and that these modes are sufficient to reproduce the vorticity probability distribution function (PDF) and the energy spectrum over the entire inertial range. The remaining incoherent background flow is homogeneous, has small amplitude, and is uncorrelated. These results are compared with those obtained for the same compression rate using large eddy simulation (LES) filtering. In contrast to the incoherent background flow of CVS filtering, the LES subgrid scales have a much larger amplitude and are correlated, which makes their statistical modeling more difficult.

  14. Compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs: effects of porous media and gas mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldenburg, C. M.; Pan, L.

    2015-12-01

    Although large opportunities exist for compressed air energy storage (CAES) in aquifers and depleted natural gas reservoirs, only two grid-scale CAES facilities exist worldwide, both in salt caverns. As such, experience with CAES in porous media, what we call PM-CAES, is lacking and we have relied on modeling to elucidate PM-CAES processes. PM-CAES operates similarly to cavern CAES. Specifically, working gas (air) is injected through well(s) into the reservoir compressing the cushion gas (existing air in the reservoir). During energy recovery, high-pressure air from the reservoir flows first into a recuperator, then into an expander, and subsequently is mixed with fuel in a combustion turbine to produce electricity, thereby reducing compression costs. Energy storage in porous media is complicated by the solid matrix grains which provide resistance to flow (via permeability in Darcy's law); in the cap rock, low-permeability matrix provides the seal to the reservoir. The solid grains also provide storage capacity for heat that might arise from compression, viscous flow effects, or chemical reactions. The storage of energy in PM-CAES occurs variably across pressure gradients in the formation, while the solid grains of the matrix can release/store heat. Residual liquid (i.e., formation fluids) affects flow and can cause watering out at the production well(s). PG&E is researching a potential 300 MW (for ten hours) PM-CAES facility in a depleted gas reservoir near Lodi, California. Special considerations exist for depleted natural gas reservoirs because of mixing effects which can lead to undesirable residual methane (CH4) entrainment and reactions of oxygen and CH4. One strategy for avoiding extensive mixing of working gas (air) with reservoir CH4 is to inject an initial cushion gas with reduced oxygen concentration providing a buffer between the working gas (air) and the residual CH4 gas. This reduces the potential mixing of the working air with the residual CH4

  15. Passive scalar entrainment and mixing in a forced, spatially-developing mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, P. S.; Reynolds, W. C.; Mansour, N. N.

    1987-01-01

    Numerical simulations are performed for the forced, spatially-developing plane mixing layer in two and three dimensions. Transport of a passive scalar field is included in the computation. This, together with the allowance for spatial development in the simulations, affords the opportunity for study of the asymmetric entrainment of irrotational fluid into the layer. The inclusion of a passive scalar field provides a means for simulating the effect of this entrainment asymmetry on the generation of 'products' from a 'fast' chemical reaction. Further, the three-dimensional simulations provide useful insight into the effect of streamwise structures on these entrainment and 'fast' reaction processes. Results from a two-dimensional simulation indicate 1.22 parts high-speed fluid are entrained for every one part low-speed fluid. Inclusion of streamwise vortices at the inlet plane of a three-dimensional simulation indicate a further increase in asymmetric entrainment - 1.44:1. Results from a final three-dimensional simulation are presented. In this case, a random velocity perturbation is imposed at the inlet plane. The results indicate the 'natural' development of the large spanwise structures characteristic of the mixing layer.

  16. Growth of Goertler vortices in compressible boundary layers along curved surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Hady, N. M.; Verma, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation of the growth of the three-dimensional, counter-rotating, longitudinal type vortices is considered in two-dimensional laminar compressible boundary-layer flow. The basic approximation of the disturbance equations that includes the terms due to boundary layer growth is considered and solved numerically. These terms are shown to have large local effects near the neutral stability region. The study shows that the instability of the boundary layer with respect to the three-dimensional vortices sets in at higher Goertler number as Mach number increases. Also the maximum amplitude ratio of the vortices is reduced by about 20 percent as Mach number increases from 0 to 5.

  17. The stability of the laminar boundary layer in a compressible fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lees, Lester

    1947-01-01

    Report is a continuation of a theoretical investigation of the stability of the laminar boundary layer in a compressible fluid. An approximate estimate for the minimum critical Reynolds number, or stability limit, is obtained in terms of the distribution of the kinematic viscosity and the product of the mean density and mean vorticity across the boundary layer. The extension of the results of the stability analysis to laminar boundary-layer gas flows with a pressure gradient in the direction of the free stream is discussed. (author)

  18. On the effect of boundary layer growth on the stability of compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Hady, N. M.

    1981-01-01

    The method of multiple scales is used to describe a formally correct method based on the nonparallel linear stability theory, that examines the two and three dimensional stability of compressible boundary layer flows. The method is applied to the supersonic flat plate layer at Mach number 4.5. The theoretical growth rates are in good agreement with experimental results. The method is also applied to the infinite-span swept wing transonic boundary layer with suction to evaluate the effect of the nonparallel flow on the development of crossflow disturbances.

  19. Development of a Hybrid RANS/LES Method for Turbulent Mixing Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Reshotko, Eli

    2001-01-01

    and LES equations to be solved with a single solution scheme and computational grid. The hybrid RANS-LES method has been applied to a benchmark compressible mixing layer experiment in which two isolated supersonic streams, separated by a splitter plate, provide the flows to a constant-area mixing section. Although the configuration is largely two dimensional in nature, three-dimensional calculations were found to be necessary to enable disturbances to develop in three spatial directions and to transition to turbulence. The flow in the initial part of the mixing section consists of a periodic vortex shedding downstream of the splitter plate trailing edge. This organized vortex shedding then rapidly transitions to a turbulent structure, which is very similar to the flow development observed in the experiments. Although the qualitative nature of the large-scale turbulent development in the entire mixing section is captured well by the LES part of the current hybrid method, further efforts are planned to directly calculate a greater portion of the turbulence spectrum and to limit the subgrid scale modeling to only the very small scales. This will be accomplished by the use of higher accuracy solution schemes and more powerful computers, measured both in speed and memory capabilities.

  20. Explicit mixed strain-displacement finite elements for compressible and quasi-incompressible elasticity and plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervera, M.; Lafontaine, N.; Rossi, R.; Chiumenti, M.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an explicit mixed finite element formulation to address compressible and quasi-incompressible problems in elasticity and plasticity. This implies that the numerical solution only involves diagonal systems of equations. The formulation uses independent and equal interpolation of displacements and strains, stabilized by variational subscales. A displacement sub-scale is introduced in order to stabilize the mean-stress field. Compared to the standard irreducible formulation, the proposed mixed formulation yields improved strain and stress fields. The paper investigates the effect of this enhancement on the accuracy in problems involving strain softening and localization leading to failure, using low order finite elements with linear continuous strain and displacement fields (P1P1 triangles in 2D and tetrahedra in 3D) in conjunction with associative frictional Mohr-Coulomb and Drucker-Prager plastic models. The performance of the strain/displacement formulation under compressible and nearly incompressible deformation patterns is assessed and compared to analytical solutions for plane stress and plane strain situations. Benchmark numerical examples show the capacity of the mixed formulation to predict correctly failure mechanisms with localized patterns of strain, virtually free from any dependence of the mesh directional bias. No auxiliary crack tracking technique is necessary.

  1. Explicit mixed strain-displacement finite elements for compressible and quasi-incompressible elasticity and plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervera, M.; Lafontaine, N.; Rossi, R.; Chiumenti, M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an explicit mixed finite element formulation to address compressible and quasi-incompressible problems in elasticity and plasticity. This implies that the numerical solution only involves diagonal systems of equations. The formulation uses independent and equal interpolation of displacements and strains, stabilized by variational subscales. A displacement sub-scale is introduced in order to stabilize the mean-stress field. Compared to the standard irreducible formulation, the proposed mixed formulation yields improved strain and stress fields. The paper investigates the effect of this enhancement on the accuracy in problems involving strain softening and localization leading to failure, using low order finite elements with linear continuous strain and displacement fields ( P1 P1 triangles in 2D and tetrahedra in 3D) in conjunction with associative frictional Mohr-Coulomb and Drucker-Prager plastic models. The performance of the strain/displacement formulation under compressible and nearly incompressible deformation patterns is assessed and compared to analytical solutions for plane stress and plane strain situations. Benchmark numerical examples show the capacity of the mixed formulation to predict correctly failure mechanisms with localized patterns of strain, virtually free from any dependence of the mesh directional bias. No auxiliary crack tracking technique is necessary.

  2. Compression response of thick layer composite laminates with through-the-thickness reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Smith, Barry T.; Maiden, Janice

    1992-01-01

    Compression and compression-after-impact (CAI) tests were conducted on seven different AS4-3501-6 (0/90) 0.64-cm thick composite laminates. Four of the seven laminates had through-the-thickness (TTT) reinforcement fibers. Two TTT reinforcement methods, stitching and integral weaving, and two reinforcement fibers, Kevlar and carbon, were used. The remaining three laminates were made without TTT reinforcements and were tested to establish a baseline for comparison with the laminates having TTT reinforcement. Six of the seven laminates consisted of nine thick layers whereas the seventh material was composed of 46 thin plies. The use of thick-layer material has the potential for reducing structural part cost because of the reduced part count (layers of material). The compression strengths of the TTT reinforced laminates were approximately one half those of the materials without TTT reinforcements. However, the CAI strengths of the TTT reinforced materials were approximately twice those of materials without TTT reinforcements. The improvement in CAI strength is due to an increase in interlaminar strength produced by the TTT reinforcement. Stitched laminates had slightly higher compression and CAI strengths than the integrally woven laminates.

  3. Indentation and overall compression behavior of multilayered thin-film composites. Effect of undulating layer geometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jamison, Ryan D.; Shen, Y. -L.

    2015-03-19

    Two finite element models are used to investigate the behavior of aluminum/silicon carbide thin-film layered composites with imperfect internal geometry when subjected to various loadings. In both models, undulating layers are represented by regular waveforms with various amplitudes, wavelengths, and phase offsets. First, uniaxial compressive loading of the composite is considered. The modulus and stress/strain response of the composite is sensitive to both loading direction and frequency of the undulation. Second, the nanoindentation response of the composite is investigated. The derived hardness and modulus are shown to be sensitive to the presence of undulating layers and the relative size ofmore » the indenter to the undulation. Undulating layers create bands of tensile and compressive stress in the indentation direction that are significantly different from the flat layers. The amount of equivalent plastic strain in the Al layers is increased by the presence of undulating layers. The correlations between the two forms of loading, and the implications to composite property measurement are carefully examined in this study.« less

  4. Indentation and overall compression behavior of multilayered thin-film composites. Effect of undulating layer geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Jamison, Ryan D.; Shen, Y. -L.

    2015-03-19

    Two finite element models are used to investigate the behavior of aluminum/silicon carbide thin-film layered composites with imperfect internal geometry when subjected to various loadings. In both models, undulating layers are represented by regular waveforms with various amplitudes, wavelengths, and phase offsets. First, uniaxial compressive loading of the composite is considered. The modulus and stress/strain response of the composite is sensitive to both loading direction and frequency of the undulation. Second, the nanoindentation response of the composite is investigated. The derived hardness and modulus are shown to be sensitive to the presence of undulating layers and the relative size of the indenter to the undulation. Undulating layers create bands of tensile and compressive stress in the indentation direction that are significantly different from the flat layers. The amount of equivalent plastic strain in the Al layers is increased by the presence of undulating layers. The correlations between the two forms of loading, and the implications to composite property measurement are carefully examined in this study.

  5. Estimation of atmospheric mixing layer height from radiosonde data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Wang, K. C.

    2014-06-01

    Mixing layer height (h) is an important parameter for understanding the transport process in the troposphere, air pollution, weather and climate change. Many methods have been proposed to determine h by identifying the turning point of the radiosonde profile. However, substantial differences have been observed in the existing methods (e.g. the potential temperature (θ), relative humidity (RH), specific humidity (q) and atmospheric refractivity (N) methods). These differences are associated with the inconsistency of the temperature and humidity profiles in a boundary layer that is not well mixed, the changing measurability of the specific humidity and refractivity with height, the measurement error of humidity instruments within clouds, and the general existence of clouds. This study proposes a method to integrate the information of temperature, humidity and cloud to generate a consistent estimate of h. We apply this method to high vertical resolution (~ 30 m) radiosonde data that were collected at 79 stations over North America during the period from 1998 to 2008. The data are obtained from the Stratospheric Processes and their Role in Climate Data Center (SPARC). The results show good agreement with those from N method as the information of temperature and humidity contained in N; however, cloud effects that are included in our method increased the reliability of our estimated h. From 1988 to 2008, the climatological h over North America was 1675 ± 303 m with a strong east-west gradient: higher values (generally greater than 1800 m) occurred over the Midwest US, and lower values (usually less than 1400 m) occurred over Alaska and the US West Coast.

  6. Estimation of atmospheric mixing layer height from radiosonde data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Wang, K. C.

    2014-02-01

    Mixing layer height (h) is an important parameter for understanding the transport process in the troposphere, air pollution, weather and climate change. Many methods have been proposed to determine h by identifying the turning point of the radiosonde profile. However, substantial differences have been observed in the existing methods (e.g., the potential temperature (θ), relative humidity (RH), specific humidity (q) and atmospheric refractivity (N) methods). These differences are associated with the inconsistency of the temperature and humidity profiles in a boundary layer that is not well mixed, the changing measurability of the specific humidity and refractivity with height, the measurement error of humidity instruments within clouds, and the general existence of clouds. This study proposes a method to integrate the information of temperature, humidity and cloud to generate a consistent estimate of h. We apply this method to high vertical resolution (~ 30 m) radiosonde data that were collected at 79 stations over North America during the period from 1998 to 2008; the data are obtained from the Stratospheric Processes and their Role in Climate Data Center (SPARC). The results show good agreement with those from N method as the information of temperature and humidity contained in N; however cloud effects that are included in our method increased the reliability of h. Furthermore, our results agree well with the independent h that was determined from lidar observations. From 1988 to 2008, the climatological h over North America was 1675± 303 m with a strong east-west gradient: higher values (generally greater than 1800 m) occurred over the Midwest US, and lower values (usually less than 1400 m) occurred over Alaska and the US west coast.

  7. Model of Mixing Layer With Multicomponent Evaporating Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Le Clercq, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    A mathematical model of a three-dimensional mixing layer laden with evaporating fuel drops composed of many chemical species has been derived. The study is motivated by the fact that typical real petroleum fuels contain hundreds of chemical species. Previously, for the sake of computational efficiency, spray studies were performed using either models based on a single representative species or models based on surrogate fuels of at most 15 species. The present multicomponent model makes it possible to perform more realistic simulations by accounting for hundreds of chemical species in a computationally efficient manner. The model is used to perform Direct Numerical Simulations in continuing studies directed toward understanding the behavior of liquid petroleum fuel sprays. The model includes governing equations formulated in an Eulerian and a Lagrangian reference frame for the gas and the drops, respectively. This representation is consistent with the expected volumetrically small loading of the drops in gas (of the order of 10 3), although the mass loading can be substantial because of the high ratio (of the order of 103) between the densities of liquid and gas. The drops are treated as point sources of mass, momentum, and energy; this representation is consistent with the drop size being smaller than the Kolmogorov scale. Unsteady drag, added-mass effects, Basset history forces, and collisions between the drops are neglected, and the gas is assumed calorically perfect. The model incorporates the concept of continuous thermodynamics, according to which the chemical composition of a fuel is described probabilistically, by use of a distribution function. Distribution functions generally depend on many parameters. However, for mixtures of homologous species, the distribution can be approximated with acceptable accuracy as a sole function of the molecular weight. The mixing layer is initially laden with drops in its lower stream, and the drops are colder than the gas

  8. Direct numerical simulations of supercritical fluid mixing layers applied to heptane nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Richard S.; Harstad, Kenneth G.; Bellan, Josette

    2001-06-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are conducted of a model hydrocarbon nitrogen mixing layer under supercritical conditions. The temporally developing mixing layer configuration is studied using heptane and nitrogen supercritical fluid streams at a pressure of 60 atm as a model system related to practical hydrocarbon-fuel/air systems. An entirely self-consistent cubic Peng Robinson equation of state is used to describe all thermodynamic mixture variables, including the pressure, internal energy, enthalpy, heat capacity, and speed of sound along with additional terms associated with the generalized heat and mass transport vectors. The Peng Robinson formulation is based on pure-species reference states accurate to better than 1% relative error through comparisons with highly accurate state equations over the range of variables used in this study (600 [less-than-or-eq, slant] T [less-than-or-eq, slant] 1100 K, 40 [less-than-or-eq, slant] p [less-than-or-eq, slant] 80 atm) and is augmented by an accurate curve fit to the internal energy so as not to require iterative solutions. The DNS results of two-dimensional and three-dimensional layers elucidate the unique thermodynamic and mixing features associated with supercritical conditions. Departures from the perfect gas and ideal mixture conditions are quantified by the compression factor and by the mass diffusion factor, both of which show reductions from the unity value. It is found that the qualitative aspects of the mixing layer may be different according to the specification of the thermal diffusion factors whose value is generally unknown, and the reason for this difference is identified by examining the second-order statistics: the constant Bearman Kirkwood (BK) thermal diffusion factor excites fluctuations that the constant Irwing Kirkwood (IK) one does not, and thus enhances overall mixing. Combined with the effect of the mass diffusion factor, constant positive large BK thermal diffusion factors retard

  9. Tolerance of Mach 2.50 axisymmetric mixed-compression inlets to upstream flow variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choby, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of the tolerances of two Mach 2.50 axisymmetric mixed-compression inlets to upstream flow variations was conducted. Tolerances of each inlet to angle of attack as a function of decreasing free-stream Mach number were obtained. A local region of overcompression was formed on the leeward side of the inlet at maximum angle of attack before unstart. This region of overcompression corresponded to local subsonic flow conditions ahead of the geometric throat. A uniform Mach number gradient of 0.10 at the cowl lip plane did not affect the inlet's pressure recovery, mass flow ratio, or diffuser exit total-pressure distortion.

  10. Tactical application of an atmospheric mixed-layer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, R. M.

    1982-12-01

    Modern Naval weapon and sensor systems are strongly influenced by the marine environment. Foremost among the atmospheric effects is ducting of electromagnetic energy by refractive layers in the atmosphere. To assess the effect of ducting on electromagnetic emissions, the Navy developed the Integrated Refractive Effects Prediction System (IREPS). Research at Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) has led to development of a state-of-the-art model which can be used to predict changes to the refractive profile of the lower atmosphere. The model uses radiosonde data and surface meteorological observations to predict changes in refractive conditions and low level cloud/fog formation over 18 to 30 hour periods. The model shows some skill in forecasting duct regions when subsidence rates can be specified to within +/-.0015 m/s. This thesis shows the applicability of the NPS marine atmospheric mixed layer model to fleet tactics. Atmospheric refractive effects on specific emitters can be predicted when model predictions are used in conjunction with IREPS.

  11. Computation of three-dimensional mixed convective boundary layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gadepalli, Prashandt; Rahman, Muhammad M.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents the numerical solution of heat and mass transfer during cross-flow (orthogonal) mixed convection. In this class of flow, a buoyancy-driven transport in the vertical direction and a forced convective flow in the horizontal direction results in a three-dimensional boundary layer structure adjacent to the plate. The rates of heat and mass transfer are determined by a combined influence of the two transport processes. The equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, energy, and species concentration were solved along with appropriate boundary conditions to determine the distributions of velocity components, temperature, and concentration across the thickness of the boundary layer at different locations on the plate. Results were expressed in dimensionless form using Reynolds number, Richardson number for heat transfer, Richardson number for mass transfer, Prandtl number, and Schmidt number as parameters. It was found that the transport is dominated by buoyancy at smaller vertical locations and at larger distances away from the forced convection leading edge. Effects of forced convection appeared to be very strong at smaller horizontal distances from the leading edge. The cross stream forced convection enhanced the rate of heat and mass transfer by a very significant amount.

  12. Seaglider observations of surface mixed layer physics and biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damerell, Gillian; Heywood, Karen; Thompson, Andrew; Henson, Stephanie; Rumyantseva, Anya

    2013-04-01

    The Ocean Surface Mixing, Ocean Sub-mesoscale Interaction Study (OSMOSIS) aims to develop new, physically-based parameterisations of processes that deepen and shoal the ocean surface boundary layer. As part of this project, 2 Seagliders were deployed in September 2012 at the Porcupine Abyssal Plain (PAP) site in the North Atlantic, to measure the structure and evolution of the ocean surface boundary layer over the seasonal cycle. The gliders measured temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, dive-averaged currents, chlorophyll fluorescence, CDOM fluorescence and PAR. We present results from the first 6 months of the Seaglider deployments, examining particular case studies of deepening/shoaling events and their impact on the biogeochemistry. Shoaling events appear to be more abrupt than deepening events. We also discuss the water masses found in the area, in particular, the occurrences of Mediterranean Water observed at a depth of approximately 800 m. As a contribution to the GROOM project, we assess the advantages and challenges of maintaining a continuous glider-based multidisciplinary observing system at the PAP site, with 2 gliders being turned around approximately every 4 months.

  13. Online Detection of Mixed Layer Depth for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, S.; Estlin, T.; Castano, R.; Woodward, G.; Gierach, M. M.; Thompson, A. F.; Schaffer, S.

    2015-12-01

    The accurate determination of the mixed layer depth (MLD) plays a crucial role in studying ocean dynamics and climate change. Various methods to estimate MLD have been proposed [1, 2]. However there is no current consensus on the best model, which leads to large uncertainty in the estimation. The variability, coupled with the complexity of physical, chemical and biological processes involved and the uncertainty and instabilities of the upper ocean surface, makes estimating MLD a challenging task. MLD varies significantly, even across a small spatial area (< 10km), and this depth is fluctuating, even over a short period of time (< 24 hrs), depending on the season. This abstract describes our proposed online algorithm for detecting mixed layer depth that would operate onboard an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV). Using an online method permits a more adaptive approach to estimating MLD. Our proposed algorithm is based on an ensemble approach, which includes data mining techniques for real-time peak and change detection, learned seasonal variability profile, combined with MLD estimation criteria in [1]. In this study, we analyze measurements using glider data collected from the OSMOSIS (Ocean Surface Mixing, Ocean Submesoscale Interaction Study) project, concatenated into a year-long time series [3]. The glider data consists of nine full-depth moorings, which were deployed in a 15 km by 15 km box at the Porcupine Abyssal Plain in the northeast Atlantic, centered at 16.2°W, 48.7°N. Our algorithm utilizes direct measurements of salinity, temperature, depth and time and the design is based on the spatial and temporal variability of MLD learned. We will present our initial work on tracking the MLD based on real-time simulations using the OSMOSIS glider data and discussed for the case of deploying on a single AUV. Using an online algorithm for estimating MLD in-situ enables the system to rapidly adapt to the variability in a real-world environment and also allows for

  14. Wall Effect on the Convective-Absolute Boundary for the Compressible Shear Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinet, Jean-Christophe; Dussauge, Jean-Paul; Casalis, Grégoire

    The linear stability of inviscid compressible shear layers is studied. When the layer develops at the vicinity of a wall, the two parallel flows can have a velocity of the same sign or of opposite signs. This situation is examined in order to obtain first hints on the stability of separated flows in the compressible regime. The shear layer is described by a hyperbolic tangent profile for the velocity component and the Crocco relation for the temperature profile. Gravity effects and the superficial tension are neglected. By examining the temporal growth rate at the saddle point in the wave-number space, the flow is characterized as being either absolutely unstable or convectively unstable. This study principally shows the effect of the wall on the convective-absolute transition in compressible shear flow. Results are presented, showing the amount of the backflow necessary to have this type of transition for a range of primary flow Mach numbers M1 up to 3.0. The boundary of the convective-absolute transition is defined as a function of the velocity ratio, the temperature ratio and the Mach number. Unstable solutions are calculated for both streamwise and oblique disturbances in the shear layer.

  15. Method of analysis for compressible flow through mixed-flow centrifugal impellers of arbitrary design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrick, Joseph T; Ginsburg, Ambrose; Osborn, Walter M

    1952-01-01

    A method is presented for analysis of the compressible flow between the hub and the shroud of mixed-flow impellers of arbitrary design. Axial symmetry was assumed, but the forces in the meridional (hub to shroud) plane, which are derived from tangential pressure gradients, were taken into account. The method was applied to an experimental mixed-flow impeller. The analysis of the flow in the meridional plane of the impeller showed that the rotational forces, the blade curvature, and the hub-shroud profile can introduce severe velocity gradients along the hub and the shroud surfaces. Choked flow at the impeller inlet as determined by the analysis was verified by experimental results.

  16. Particle transport and flow modulation in particle-laden mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Xiao-Ling

    Shear flows provide a means to rapidly mix and disperse discrete solid particles and droplets in natural and industrial processes. Moderate mass loadings of particles in a gas mixing layer may also alter the gas shear flow. While the modeling of single-phase shear flows has undergone several decades of development and validation, the consideration of the corresponding problem in two- phase shear flows has just began. This dissertation represents a systematic effort to use a tool known as direct numerical simulations (DNS) to advance our understanding of particle transport and flow modulation in a gas mixing layer laden with solid particles. In DNS, almost all dynamically important flow scales are directly resolved. Previously, DNS of three-dimensional (3D) particle-laden shear flows have not been possible due to their high computational cost. Therefore, we first set out to develop and validate a computationally efficient and numerically accurate DNS methodology for particle-laden mixing layer. The method relies on a Fourier vorticity-based formulation together with a divergence-free decomposition. While almost all previous numerical studies adopted the trajectory approach for the dispersed phase in the context of DNS, a continuum approach has been developed and shown to reduce the computational time by a factor of 15 for the simulations of 3D particle-laden mixing layers. The validity and interpretation of the continuum approach were illustrated analytically with a stagnation point flow model. Detailed comparisons showed that the continuum approach and the trajectory approach yielded very similar results. Since the particulate field is compressible, numerical diffusion must be applied to remove local singularities. A dynamic-diffusion model has been developed as an optimum numerical diffusion model to ensure spectral resolution of particulate continuum fields. The numerical method was then used to study the interactions of finite-inertia particles with 3D flow

  17. Comparative Study of Three High Order Schemes for LES of Temporally Evolving Mixing Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Helen M. C.; Sjogreen, Biorn Axel; Hadjadj, C.

    2012-01-01

    Three high order shock-capturing schemes are compared for large eddy simulations (LES) of temporally evolving mixing layers (TML) for different convective Mach numbers (Mc) ranging from the quasi-incompressible regime to highly compressible supersonic regime. The considered high order schemes are fifth-order WENO (WENO5), seventh-order WENO (WENO7) and the associated eighth-order central spatial base scheme with the dissipative portion of WENO7 as a nonlinear post-processing filter step (WENO7fi). This high order nonlinear filter method (H.C. Yee and B. Sjogreen, Proceedings of ICOSAHOM09, June 22-26, 2009, Trondheim, Norway) is designed for accurate and efficient simulations of shock-free compressible turbulence, turbulence with shocklets and turbulence with strong shocks with minimum tuning of scheme parameters. The LES results by WENO7fi using the same scheme parameter agree well with experimental results of Barone et al. (2006), and published direct numerical simulations (DNS) work of Rogers & Moser (1994) and Pantano & Sarkar (2002), whereas results by WENO5 and WENO7 compare poorly with experimental data and DNS computations.

  18. Mechanics of Boundary Layer Transition. Part 5: Boundary Layer Stability theory in incompressible and compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, L. M.

    1967-01-01

    The fundamentals of stability theory, its chief results, and the physical mechanisms at work are presented. The stability theory of the laminar boundary determines whether a small disturbance introduced into the boundary layer will amplify or damp. If the disturbance damps, the boundary layer remains laminar. If the disturbance amplifies, and by a sufficient amount, then transition to turbulence eventually takes place. The stability theory establishes those states of the boundary layer which are most likely to lead to transition, identifys those frequencies which are the most dangerous, and indicates how the external parameters can best be changed to avoid transition.

  19. Skin friction and velocity profile family for compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, P. G.; Bradshaw, P.; Coakley, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents a general approach to constructing mean velocity profiles for compressible turbulent boundary layers with isothermal or adiabatic walls. The theory is based on a density-weighted transformation that allows the extension of the incompressible similarity laws of the wall to the compressible regions. The velocity profile family is compared to a range of experimental data, and excellent agreement is obtained. A self-consistent skin friction law, which satisfies the proposed velocity profile family, is derived and compared with the well-known Van Driest II theory for boundary layers in zero pressure gradient. The results are found to be at least as good as those obtained by using the Van Driest II transformation.

  20. Dynamic study of compressed electron layer driven by linearly polarized laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng-chao, Wang

    2016-05-01

    The dynamics of the compressed electron layer (CEL) are investigated when a linearly polarized (LP) laser pulse irradiates a plasma target. The turbulent motion of the CEL is investigated by a simple model, which is verified by particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. It is found that the compressed layer disperses in a few cycles of the laser duration, because the CEL comes back with a large velocity in the opposite direction of the laser incident. A larger wavelength laser can be used to tailor the proton beam by reducing the turbulence of the CEL in the region of the LP laser acceleration. Project supported by the Shanghai Provincial Special Foundation for Outstanding Young Teachers in University, China (Grant No. yyy10043).

  1. Efficient computation of the stability of three-dimensional compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, M. R.; Orszag, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    Methods for the computer analysis of the stability of three-dimensional compressible boundary layers are discussed and the user-oriented Compressible Stability Analysis (COSAL) computer code is described. The COSAL code uses a matrix finite-difference method for local eigenvalue solution when a good guess for the eigenvalue is available and is significantly more computationally efficient than the commonly used initial-value approach. The local eigenvalue search procedure also results in eigenfunctions and, at little extra work, group velocities. A globally convergent eigenvalue procedure is also developed which may be used when no guess for the eigenvalue is available. The global problem is formulated in such a way that no unstable spurious modes appear so that the method is suitable for use in a black-box stability code. Sample stability calculations are presented for the boundary layer profiles of an LFC swept wing.

  2. Compressible Laminar Boundary Layer over a Yawed Infinite Cylinder with Heat Transfer and Arbitrary Prandtl Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reshotko, Eli; Beckwith, Ivan E

    1958-01-01

    The equations are presented for the development of the compressible laminar boundary layer over a yawed infinite cylinder. For compressible flow with a pressure gradient the chordwise and spanwise flows are not independent. Using the Stewartson transformation and a linear viscosity-temperature relation yields a set of three simultaneous ordinary differential equations in a form yielding similar solutions. These equations are solved for stagnation-line flow for surface temperatures from zero to twice the free-stream stagnation temperature and for a wide range of yaw angle and free-stream Mach number. The results indicate that the effect of yaw on the heat-transfer coefficient at the stagnation line depends markedly on the free-stream Mach number. An unusual result of the solutions is that for large yaw angles and stream Mach numbers the chordwise velocity within the boundary layer exceeds the local external chordwise velocity, even for a highly cooled wall.

  3. Influence of hydrophobic treatment on the structure of compressed gas diffusion layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tötzke, C.; Gaiselmann, G.; Osenberg, M.; Arlt, T.; Markötter, H.; Hilger, A.; Kupsch, A.; Müller, B. R.; Schmidt, V.; Lehnert, W.; Manke, I.

    2016-08-01

    Carbon fiber based felt materials are widely used as gas diffusion layer (GDL) in fuel cells. Their transport properties can be adjusted by adding hydrophobic agents such as polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). We present a synchrotron X-ray tomographic study on the felt material Freudenberg H2315 with different PTFE finishing. In this study, we analyze changes in microstructure and shape of GDLs at increasing degree of compression which are related to their specific PTFE load. A dedicated compression device mimicking the channel-land pattern of the flowfield is used to reproduce the inhomogeneous compression found in a fuel cell. Transport relevant geometrical parameters such as porosity, pore size distribution and geometric tortuosity are calculated and consequences for media transport discussed. PTFE finishing results in a marked change of shape of compressed GDLs: surface is smoothed and the invasion of GDL fibers into the flow field channel strongly mitigated. Furthermore, the PTFE impacts the microstructure of the compressed GDL. The number of available wide transport paths is significantly increased as compared to the untreated material. These changes improve the transport capacity liquid water through the GDL and promote the discharge of liquid water droplets from the cell.

  4. Parameterization of large-scale turbulent diffusion in the presence of both well-mixed and weakly mixed patchy layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, M. K.; Hocking, W. K.; Tarasick, D. W.

    2016-06-01

    Vertical diffusion and mixing of tracers in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) are not uniform, but primarily occur due to patches of turbulence that are intermittent in time and space. The effective diffusivity of regions of patchy turbulence is related to statistical parameters describing the morphology of turbulent events, such as lifetime, number, width, depth and local diffusivity (i.e., diffusivity within the turbulent patch) of the patches. While this has been recognized in the literature, the primary focus has been on well-mixed layers, with few exceptions. In such cases the local diffusivity is irrelevant, but this is not true for weakly and partially mixed layers. Here, we use both theory and numerical simulations to consider the impact of intermediate and weakly mixed layers, in addition to well-mixed layers. Previous approaches have considered only one dimension (vertical), and only a small number of layers (often one at each time step), and have examined mixing of constituents. We consider a two-dimensional case, with multiple layers (10 and more, up to hundreds and even thousands), having well-defined, non-infinite, lengths and depths. We then provide new formulas to describe cases involving well-mixed layers which supersede earlier expressions. In addition, we look in detail at layers that are not well mixed, and, as an interesting variation on previous models, our procedure is based on tracking the dispersion of individual particles, which is quite different to the earlier approaches which looked at mixing of constituents. We develop an expression which allows determination of the degree of mixing, and show that layers used in some previous models were in fact not well mixed and so produced erroneous results. We then develop a generalized model based on two dimensional random-walk theory employing Rayleigh distributions which allows us to develop a universal formula for diffusion rates for multiple two-dimensional layers with

  5. The behaviour of a compressible turbulent boundary layer under incipient separation conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muck, K. C.; Smits, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of a turbulent boundary-layer/shock-wave interaction. The interaction was generated by a two-dimensional compression corner, and the flow was on the point of separating. Measurements were made using both normal and inclined hot wires, and the data include measurements of the longitudinal mass-flow fluctuation intensity and the mass-weighted Reynolds shear stress.

  6. Higher-order accurate Osher schemes with application to compressible boundary layer stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandervegt, J. J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Two fourth order accurate Osher schemes are presented which maintain higher order accuracy on nonuniform grids. They use either a conservative finite difference or finite volume discretization. Both methods are successfully used for direct numerical simulations of flat plate boundary layer instability at different Mach numbers. Results of growth rates of Tollmien-Schlichting waves compare well with direct simulations of incompressible flow and for compressible flow with results obtained by solving the parabolic stability equations.

  7. Further considerations on modeling the sea breeze with a mixed-layer model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthes, R. A.; Keyser, D.; Deardorff, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    Mixed-layer models have been used to simulate low-level flows under a variety of situations, including flow over complex terrain and in the vicinity of coastal zones. The advantage of mixed-layer models compared to multilevel models is their simplicity and minimal computational requirements. A disadvantage is that the atmosphere above the mixed layer is not modeled explicitly and approximations pertaining to this layer become necessary. This paper examines five approximations for treating this upper layer for a simple sea-breeze circulation. Approximating the flow immediately above the mixed-layer height h by the mixed-layer velocity and using this velocity to advect potential temperature above h gives a better simulation of the sea breeze than the approximation used by Anthes et al. (1980), which neglected horizontal advection at this level.

  8. Comments on Crocco's solution and the independence principle for compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckwith, I. E.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of the present note is to show that on a flat plate where both the wall temperature and mean wall pressure are constant, neither of the limitations of parallel flow or of unity for the turbulent Prandtl number are required in order for the Crocco solution to apply to the turbulent boundary-layer flow. It is shown herein that this result is subject to restrictions on the magnitude of pressure fluctuations. The same analysis is generalized to show that the compressible turbulent boundary layer on an isothermal swept flat plate is independent of the spanwise flow if the molecular Prandtl number is unity.

  9. Surface-cooling effects on compressible boundary-layer instability, and on upstream influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seddougui, S. O.; Bowles, R. I.; Smith, F. T.

    1991-01-01

    The influence of surface cooling on compressible boundary-layer instability is discussed theoretically for both viscous and inviscid modes, at high Reynolds numbers, with related questions on upstream influence being considered in an Appendix. The cooling enhances the surface heat transfer and velocity gradient, crating a high-heat-transfer sublayer. This has the effect of distorting and accentuating the viscous Tollmien-Schlichting modes to such an extent that their spatial growth rates becomes comparable with, and can even exceed, the growth rates of inviscid modes, including those found previously. This is for moderate cooling, and it applies at any Mach number. In addition, the moderate cooling destabilizes otherwise stable viscous or inviscid modes, in particular triggering outward-traveling waves at the edge of the boundary layer in the supersonic regime. Severe cooling is also discussed as it brings compressible dynamics directly into play within the viscous sublayer. All the new cooled modes found involve the heat-transfer sublayer quite actively, and they are often multistructured in form and may be distinct from those observed in previous computational and experimental investigations. The corresponding nonlinear processes are also pointed out with regard to transition in the cooled compressible boundary layer. Finally, comparisons with Lysenko and Maslov's (1984) experiments on surface cooling are presented.

  10. Compressible Boundary Layer Predictions at High Reynolds Number using Hybrid LES/RANS Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Jung-Il; Edwards, Jack R.; Baurle, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Simulations of compressible boundary layer flow at three different Reynolds numbers (Re(sub delta) = 5.59x10(exp 4), 1.78x10(exp 5), and 1.58x10(exp 6) are performed using a hybrid large-eddy/Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes method. Variations in the recycling/rescaling method, the higher-order extension, the choice of primitive variables, the RANS/LES transition parameters, and the mesh resolution are considered in order to assess the model. The results indicate that the present model can provide good predictions of the mean flow properties and second-moment statistics of the boundary layers considered. Normalized Reynolds stresses in the outer layer are found to be independent of Reynolds number, similar to incompressible turbulent boundary layers.

  11. A Survey of Measurements and Measuring Techniques in Rapidly Distorted Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernholz, H. H.; Finley, P. J.; Dussauge, J. P.; Smits, A. J.; Reshotko, E. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    A wide range of recent work on compressible turbulent boundary layers is described. Special attention was paid to flows with rapid changes in pressure including flows with shock waves, curved walls, and expansions. The application of rapid distortion theory to flows transversing expansion and shock waves is reviewed. This is followed by an account of experiments aimed at elucidating the large scale structures present in supersonic boundary layers. The current status of laser-Doppler and hot-wire anemometry in supersonic flow is discussed, and a new interferometric technique for the determination of wall-stress is described. The use of small pressure transducers to deduce information about the structure of zero pressure-gradient and severely perturbed boundary layers is investigated. Finally, there is an extension of the data presentation of AGARDographs 223, 253 and 263 to cover rapidly distorted boundary layers.

  12. Chaos in a spatially-developing plane mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broze, J. G.; Hussain, Fazle; Buell, J. C.

    1988-01-01

    A spatially-developing plane mixing layer was analyzed for chaotic behavior. A direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations in a 2-D domain infinite in y and having inflow-outflow boundary conditions in x was used for data. Spectra, correlation dimension and the largest Lyapunov exponent were computed as functions of downstream distance x. When forced at a single (fundamental) frequency with maximum amplitude, the flow is periodic at the inflow but becomes aperiodic with increasing x. The aperiodic behavior is caused by the presence of a noisy subharmonic caused by the feedback between the necessarily nonphysical inflow and outflow boundary conditions. In order to overshadow this noise the flow was also studied with the same fundamental forcing and added random forcing of amplitude upsilon prime sub R/delta U = 0.01 at the inlet. Results were qualitatively the same in both cases: for small x, spectral peaks were sharp and dimension was nearly 1, but as x increased a narrowband spectral peak grew, spectra decayed exponentially at high frequencies and dimension increased to greater than 3. Based on these results, the flow appears to exhibit deterministic chaos. However, at no location was the largest Lyapunov exponent found to be significantly greater than zero.

  13. In situ laser sensing of mixed layer turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalgleish, Fraser; Hou, Weilin; Vuorenkoski, Anni; Nootz, Gero; Ouyang, Bing

    2013-06-01

    This paper will discuss and compare some recent oceanic test results from the Bahamas Optical Turbulence Exercise (BOTEX) cruise, where vertical profiling was conducted with both time-resolved laser backscatter measurements being acquired via a subsurface light detection and ranging (lidar) profiling instrument, and laser beam forward deflection measurements were acquired from a matrix of continuous wave (cw) laser beams (i.e. structured lighting) being imaged in the forward direction with a high speed camera over a one-way path, with both transmitter and camera firmly fixed on a rigid frame. From the latter, it was observed that when within a natural turbulent layer, the laser beams were being deflected from their still water location at the image plane, which was 8.8 meters distance from the laser dot matrix transmitter. As well as suggesting that the turbulent structures being encountered were predominately larger than the beam diameter, the magnitude of the deflection has been confirmed to correlate with the temperature dissipation rate. The profiling lidar measurements which were conducted in similar conditions, also used a narrow collimated laser beam in order to resolve small-scale spatial structure, but with the added attribute that sub-nanosecond short pulse temporal profile could potentially resolve small-scale vertical structure. In the clear waters of the Tongue of the Ocean in the Bahamas, it was hypothesized that the backscatter anomalies due to the effect of refractive index discontinuities (i.e. mixed layer turbulence) would be observable. The processed lidar data presented herein indicates that higher backscatter levels were observed in the regions of the water column which corresponded to higher turbulent mixing which occurs at the first and second themoclines. At the same test stations that the laser beam matrix and lidar measurements were conducted, turbulence measurements were made with two non-optical instruments, the Vertical Microstructure

  14. Mixed layer variability and chlorophyll a biomass in the Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narvekar, J.; Prasanna Kumar, S.

    2014-07-01

    The mixed layer is the most variable and dynamically active part of the marine environment that couples the underlying ocean to the atmosphere and plays an important role in determining the oceanic primary productivity. We examined the basin-scale processes controlling the seasonal variability of mixed layer depth in the Bay of Bengal and its association with chlorophyll using a suite of in situ as well as remote sensing data. A coupling between mixed layer depth and chlorophyll was seen during spring intermonsoon and summer monsoon, but for different reasons. In spring intermonsoon the temperature-dominated stratification and associated shallow mixed layer makes the upper waters of the Bay of Bengal nutrient depleted and oligotrophic. In summer, although the salinity-dominated stratification in the northern Bay of Bengal shallows the mixed layer, the nutrient input from adjoining rivers enhance the surface chlorophyll. This enhancement is confined only to the surface layer and with increase in depth, the chlorophyll biomass decreases rapidly due to reduction in sunlight by suspended sediment. In the south, advection of high salinity waters from the Arabian Sea and westward propagating Rossby waves from the eastern Bay of Bengal led to the formation of deep mixed layer. In contrast, in the Indo-Sri Lanka region, the shallow mixed layer and nutrient enrichment driven by upwelling and Ekman pumping resulted in chlorophyll enhancement. The mismatch between the nitrate and chlorophyll indicated the inadequacy of present data to fully unravel its coupling to mixed layer processes.

  15. Mixed layer formation and restratification in presence of mesoscale and submesoscale turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couvelard, X.; Dumas, F.; Garnier, V.; Ponte, A. L.; Talandier, C.; Treguier, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent realistic high resolution modeling studies show a net increase of submesoscale activity in fall and winter when the mixed layer depth is at its maximum. This submesoscale activity increase is associated with a reduced deepening of the mixed layer. Both phenomena can be related to the development of mixed layer instabilities, which convert available potential energy into submesoscale eddy kinetic energy and contribute to a fast restratification by slumping the horizontal density gradient in the mixed layer. In the present work, the mixed layer formation and restratification were studied by uniformly cooling a fully turbulent zonal jet in a periodic channel at different resolutions, from eddy resolving (10 km) to submesoscale permitting (2 km). The effect of the submesoscale activity, highlighted by these different horizontal resolutions, was quantified in terms of mixed layer depth, restratification rate and buoyancy fluxes. Contrary to many idealized studies focusing on the restratification phase only, this study addresses a continuous event of mixed layer formation followed by its complete restratification. The robustness of the present results was established by ensemble simulations. The results show that, at higher resolution, when submesoscale starts to be resolved, the mixed layer formed during the surface cooling is significantly shallower and the total restratification is almost three times faster. Such differences between coarse and fine resolution models are consistent with the submesoscale upward buoyancy flux, which balances the convection during the formation phase and accelerates the restratification once the surface cooling is stopped. This submesoscale buoyancy flux is active even below the mixed layer. Our simulations show that mesoscale dynamics also cause restratification, but on longer time scales. Finally, the spatial distribution of the mixed layer depth is highly heterogeneous in the presence of submesoscale activity, prompting the

  16. Calculation of the flow field in supersonic mixed-compression inlets at angle of attack using the three-dimensional method of characteristics with discrete shock wave fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vadyak, J.; Hoffman, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of molecular transport is included in the computation by treating viscous and thermal diffusion terms in the governing partial differential equations as correction terms in the method of characteristics scheme. The development of a production type computer program is reported which is capable of calculating the flow field in a variety of axisymmetric mixed-compression aircraft inlets. The results agreed well with those produced by the two-dimensional method characteristics when axisymmetric flow fields are computed. For three-dimensional flow fields, the results agree well with experimental data except in regions of high viscous interaction and boundary layer removal.

  17. Development of a Three-Dimensional PSE Code for Compressible Flows: Stability of Three-Dimensional Compressible Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.; Jeyasingham, Samarasingham

    1999-01-01

    A program is developed to investigate the linear stability of three-dimensional compressible boundary layer flows over bodies of revolutions. The problem is formulated as a two dimensional (2D) eigenvalue problem incorporating the meanflow variations in the normal and azimuthal directions. Normal mode solutions are sought in the whole plane rather than in a line normal to the wall as is done in the classical one dimensional (1D) stability theory. The stability characteristics of a supersonic boundary layer over a sharp cone with 50 half-angle at 2 degrees angle of attack is investigated. The 1D eigenvalue computations showed that the most amplified disturbances occur around x(sub 2) = 90 degrees and the azimuthal mode number for the most amplified disturbances range between m = -30 to -40. The frequencies of the most amplified waves are smaller in the middle region where the crossflow dominates the instability than the most amplified frequencies near the windward and leeward planes. The 2D eigenvalue computations showed that due to the variations in the azimuthal direction, the eigenmodes are clustered into isolated confined regions. For some eigenvalues, the eigenfunctions are clustered in two regions. Due to the nonparallel effect in the azimuthal direction, the eigenmodes are clustered into isolated confined regions. For some eigenvalues, the eigenfunctions are clustered in two regions. Due to the nonparallel effect in the azimuthal direction, the most amplified disturbances are shifted to 120 degrees compared to 90 degrees for the parallel theory. It is also observed that the nonparallel amplification rates are smaller than that is obtained from the parallel theory.

  18. Inhomogeneous relaxation of a molecular layer on an insulator due to compressive stress.

    PubMed

    Bocquet, F; Nony, L; Mannsfeld, S C B; Oison, V; Pawlak, R; Porte, L; Loppacher, Ch

    2012-05-18

    We discuss the inhomogeneous stress relaxation of a monolayer of hexahydroxytriphenylene (HHTP) which adopts the rare line-on-line (LOL) coincidence on KCl(001) and forms moiré patterns. The fact that the hexagonal HHTP layer is uniaxially compressed along the LOL makes this system an ideal candidate to discuss the influence of inhomogeneous stress relaxation. Our work is a combination of noncontact atomic force microscopy experiments, density functional theory and potential energy calculations, and a thorough interpretation by means of the Frenkel-Kontorova model. We show that the assumption of a homogeneous molecular layer is not valid for this organic-inorganic heteroepitaxial system since the best calculated energy configuration correlates with the experimental data only if inhomogeneous relaxations of the layer are taken into account. PMID:23003159

  19. Inhomogeneous Relaxation of a Molecular Layer on an Insulator due to Compressive Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocquet, F.; Nony, L.; Mannsfeld, S. C. B.; Oison, V.; Pawlak, R.; Porte, L.; Loppacher, Ch.

    2012-05-01

    We discuss the inhomogeneous stress relaxation of a monolayer of hexahydroxytriphenylene (HHTP) which adopts the rare line-on-line (LOL) coincidence on KCl(001) and forms moiré patterns. The fact that the hexagonal HHTP layer is uniaxially compressed along the LOL makes this system an ideal candidate to discuss the influence of inhomogeneous stress relaxation. Our work is a combination of noncontact atomic force microscopy experiments, density functional theory and potential energy calculations, and a thorough interpretation by means of the Frenkel-Kontorova model. We show that the assumption of a homogeneous molecular layer is not valid for this organic-inorganic heteroepitaxial system since the best calculated energy configuration correlates with the experimental data only if inhomogeneous relaxations of the layer are taken into account.

  20. Experimental investigation of terminal shock sensors in mixed-compression inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sajben, Miklos; Donovan, John F.; Morris, Martin J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes experimental investigations of devices designed for the nonintrusive detection of terminal shock location in mixed-compression inlets at high supersonic flight speeds. Systems based on sensing wall pressures by an array of wall-mounted transducers were selected for detailed study. Pressure signals were processed by three different methods: (1) interpretation of instantaneous pressure distributions, (2) detection of the turbulent intensity amplification occurring at the shock, and (3) determination of the upstream limit to which a search-tone, introduced at the downstream end of the channel, can propagate. The first two of these methods were tested in real time. The third method appeared feasible for weak shocks only; at high shock strengths, propagation upstream of the source could not be detected.

  1. Processing mixed-waste compressed-gas cylinders at the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.I.; Conley, T.B.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.

    1998-05-01

    Until recently, several thousand kilograms of compressed gases were stored at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, because these cylinders could not be taken off-site in their state of configuration for disposal. Restrictions on the storage of old compressed-gas cylinders compelled the Waste Management Organization of Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES) to dispose of these materials. Furthermore, a milestone in the ORR Site Treatment Plan required repackaging and shipment off-site of 21 cylinders by September 30, 1997. A pilot project, coordinated by the Chemical Technology Division (CTD) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was undertaken to evaluate and recontainerize or neutralize these cylinders, which are mixed waste, to meet that milestone. Because the radiological component was considered to be confined to the exterior of the cylinder, the contents (once removed from the cylinder) could be handled as hazardous waste, and the cylinder could be handled as low-level waste (LLW). This pilot project to process 21 cylinders was important because of its potential impact. The successful completion of the project provides a newly demonstrated technology which can now be used to process the thousands of additional cylinders in inventory across the DOE complex. In this paper, many of the various aspects of implementing this project, including hurdles encountered and the lessons learned in overcoming them, are reported.

  2. Nature of Mixed-Layer Clays and Mechanisms of their Formation and Alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srodon, Jan

    Mixed-layer clay minerals are intermediate products of reactions involving pure end-member clays. They come from natural environments ranging from surface to low-grade metamorphic and hydrothermal conditions. Most often mixed layering is essentially two component, but more complicated interstratifications have also been documented. Variable tendency to form regular 1:1 interstratifications has been observed and explanations of this phenomenon have been proposed. Mixed-layer clays are either di- or trioctahedral; di/trioctahedral interstratifications are rare. Most mixed-layer clays contain smectite or vermiculte as a swelling component. Exceptions are all trioctahedral: serpentine/chlorite in low-temperature environments, and mica/chlorite and talc/chlorite at high temperatures. Solid state transformation and dissolution/crystallization are the two mechanisms responsible for the formation of different mixed-layer clays. In general, the weathering reactions that produce mixed layering are reversals of the corresponding high-temperature reactions, but the reaction paths are quite different. Weathering reactions alter smectite into kaolinite via mixed-layer kaolinite/smectite. Illite, chlorite, and micas react into mixed-layer clays involving vermiculite layer, then into vermiculite, and finally smectite. Interstratifications of smectite and glauconite, serpentine and chlorite, and smectite and talc are characteristic of early diagenesis and indicative of sedimentary environments. Three reactions involving mixed-layer clays-smectite to illite, smectite to chlorite, and serpentine/chlorite to chlorite-proceed gradually during burial diagenesis and are used for reconstructing maximum burial conditions, illite/smectite being the most useful tool. Rectorite, tosudite, talc/chlorite, and mica/chlorite are mixed-layer minerals indicative of temperatures higher than diagenetic, characteristic of low-temperature metamorphism or hydrothermal alteration.

  3. An analytical study of the effects of surface roughness on a compressible turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Z. H.

    1983-12-01

    A previous study on the effect of surface roughness on the turbulent boundary layer, using a FORTRAN code, ITRACT, solved for the characteristics of a laminar, transitional and turbulent boundary layer on smooth surfaces. The present study investigates the influence of surface roughness on a compressible turbulent boundary layer and then extends the usefulness of ITRACT by including in it the optional capability of rough-surface boundary-layer calculations. Surface roughness was represented by distributed sources and sinks in the appropriate governing equations. The most important term is a sink term in the mean momentum equation, representing the form drag due to the roughness element. Governing boundary-layer equations for continuity, momentum, and energy were derived in a form to account for blockage effects due to roughness elements. The modified governing equations were then transformed using Probstein-Elliott and Levy-Lees transformations. The resulting equations, with appropriate boundary conditions, were solved by finite-difference techniques to determine the nondimensional velocity components and temperature at a finite number of nodes in the boundary-layer flow field.

  4. Inter-Layer Prediction of Color in High Dynamic Range Image Scalable Compression.

    PubMed

    Le Pendu, Mikael; Guillemot, Christine; Thoreau, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a color inter-layer prediction (ILP) method for scalable coding of high dynamic range (HDR) video content with a low dynamic range (LDR) base layer. Relying on the assumption of hue preservation between the colors of an HDR image and its LDR tone mapped version, we derived equations for predicting the chromatic components of the HDR layer given the decoded LDR layer. Two color representations are studied. In a first encoding scheme, the HDR image is represented in the classical Y'CbCr format. In addition, a second scheme is proposed using a colorspace based on the CIE u'v' uniform chromaticity scale diagram. In each case, different prediction equations are derived based on a color model ensuring the hue preservation. Our experiments highlight several advantages of using a CIE u'v'-based colorspace for the compression of HDR content, especially in a scalable context. In addition, our ILP scheme using this color representation improves on the state-of-the-art ILP method, which directly predicts the HDR layer u'v' components by computing the LDR layers u'v' values of each pixel. PMID:27244738

  5. A defect stream function, law of the wall/wake method for compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnwell, Richard W.; Dejarnette, Fred R.; Wahls, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    The application of the defect stream function to the solution of the two-dimensional, compressible boundary layer is examined. A law of the wall/law of the wake formulation for the inner part of the boundary layer is presented which greatly simplifies the computational task near the wall and eliminates the need for an eddy viscosity model in this region. The eddy viscosity model in the outer region is arbitrary. The modified Crocco temperature-velocity relationship is used as a simplification of the differential energy equation. Formulations for both equilibrium and nonequilibrium boundary layers are presented including a constrained zero-order form which significantly reduces the computational workload while retaining the significant physics of the flow. A formulation for primitive variables is also presented. Results are given for the constrained zero-order and second-order equilibrium formulations and are compared with experimental data. A compressible wake function valid near the wall has been developed from the present results.

  6. Parametrics on 2D Navier-Stokes analysis of a Mach 2.68 bifurcated rectangular mixed-compression inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizukami, M.; Saunders, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    The supersonic diffuser of a Mach 2.68 bifurcated, rectangular, mixed-compression inlet was analyzed using a two-dimensional (2D) Navier-Stokes flow solver. Parametric studies were performed on turbulence models, computational grids and bleed models. The computer flowfield was substantially different from the original inviscid design, due to interactions of shocks, boundary layers, and bleed. Good agreement with experimental data was obtained in many aspects. Many of the discrepancies were thought to originate primarily from 3D effects. Therefore, a balance should be struck between expending resources on a high fidelity 2D simulation, and the inherent limitations of 2D analysis. The solutions were fairly insensitive to turbulence models, grids and bleed models. Overall, the k-e turbulence model, and the bleed models based on unchoked bleed hole discharge coefficients or uniform velocity are recommended. The 2D Navier-Stokes methods appear to be a useful tool for the design and analysis of supersonic inlets, by providing a higher fidelity simulation of the inlet flowfield than inviscid methods, in a reasonable turnaround time.

  7. Calculation of eddy viscosity in a compressible turbulent boundary layer with mass injection and chemical reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omori, S.; Gross, K. W.

    1973-01-01

    The turbulent kinetic energy equation is coupled with boundary layer equations to solve the characteristics of compressible turbulent boundary layers with mass injection and combustion. The Reynolds stress is related to the turbulent kinetic energy using the Prandtl-Wieghardt formulation. When a lean mixture of hydrogen and nitrogen is injected through a porous plate into the subsonic turbulent boundary layer of air flow and ignited by external means, the turbulent kinetic energy increases twice as much as that of noncombusting flow with the same mass injection rate of nitrogen. The magnitudes of eddy viscosity between combusting and noncombusting flows with injection, however, are almost the same due to temperature effects, while the distributions are different. The velocity profiles are significantly affected by combustion. If pure hydrogen as a transpiration coolant is injected into a rocket nozzle boundary layer flow of combustion products, the temperature drops significantly across the boundary layer due to the high heat capacity of hydrogen. At a certain distance from the wall hydrogen reacts with the combustion products, liberating an extensive amount of heat.

  8. Wind, mixed-layer depth and Chl-a variability in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gille, S. T.; Carranza, M. M.; Franks, P. J. S.; Girton, J. B.; Johnson, K. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Southern Ocean, contains some of the ocean's deepest mixed layers and is under the constant influence of strong winds and buoyancy forcing. Phytoplankton growth is hypothesized to be co-limited by iron and light. Because deep mixed layers can transport phytoplankton below the depth of the euphotic zone, light levels depend on mixed-layer depth. We use satellite winds from multiple wind sensors, combined with Argo data, to show that deep mixed layers are generally correlated with strong winds over the Southern Ocean. These deep mixed layers correspond to cold sea surface temperatures. This might also be expected to lead to nutrient upwelling and high chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), as measured by satellite ocean color sensors. However, Chl-a is less strongly correlated with wind speed than SST is, particularly at the mesoscale, and in summer Chl-a is not well correlated with mixed-layer depth. Using new in situ observations of subsurface Chl-a from sensors on southern elephant seals, EM-APEX floats, and bio-optical Argo floats, we find that Chl-a typically has a subsurface maximum in spring, summer, and fall. As a result satellite-sensed Chl-a is an inadequate measure of total biomass within the mixed layer. Satellite Chl-a and integrated Chl-a over the euphotic zone are negatively correlated with MLD from fall through spring, and uncorrelated during the summer. However, integrated Chl-a within the mixed layer shows significant positive correlations with MLD in all seasons. The fact that the deep Chl-a maximum sits at the base of the MLD, closer to the nutrient (or iron) maximum than the light maximum, suggests nutrient limitation plays a greater role than light limitation in governing productivity, and that wind and buoyancy forcing likely govern the mixing processes at the base of the mixed layer that control phytoplankton growth.

  9. Effect of compression on water transport in gas diffusion layer of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell using lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Dong Hyup; Kim, Hansang

    2015-10-01

    The effect of the compression ratio on the dynamic behavior of liquid water transport in a gas diffusion layer (GDL) is studied both experimentally and numerically. We experimentally study the emergence and growth of liquid droplets in a channel at various compression ratios by adopting a direct visualization device. The results of the experiment show that water breakthrough occurs at the channel for a low compression ratio, whereas it is observed at the channel/rib interface for a high compression ratio. To determine the mechanism of water transport in the GDL, a multiphase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is developed for a simplified porous structure of the GDL. The observation of lattice Boltzmann (LB) simulation shows that the compression ratio significantly affects the water transport in the GDL. The results indicate that the lower compression ratio reduces the water saturation in the GDL. The simulation and experimental result are similar.

  10. The behavior of a compressible turbulent boundary layer in a shock-wave-induced adverse pressure gradient. Ph.D. Thesis - Washington Univ., Seattle, Aug. 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, W. C.

    1973-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of the mean- and fluctuating-flow properties of a compressible turbulent boundary layer in a shock-wave-induced adverse pressure gradient are presented. The turbulent boundary layer developed on the wall of an axially symmetric nozzle and test section whose nominal free-stream Mach number and boundary-layer thickness Reynolds number were 4 and 100,000, respectively. The adverse pressure gradient was induced by an externally generated conical shock wave. Mean and time-averaged fluctuating-flow data, including the complete experimental Reynolds stress tensor and experimental turbulent mass- and heat-transfer rates are presented for the boundary layer and external flow, upstream, within and downstream of the pressure gradient. The mean-flow data include distributions of total temperature throughout the region of interest. The turbulent mixing properties of the flow were determined experimentally with a hot-wire anemometer. The calibration of the wires and the interpretation of the data are discussed. From the results of the investigation, it is concluded that the shock-wave - boundary-layer interaction significantly alters the turbulent mixing characteristics of the boundary layer.

  11. Numerical simulation of topographically forced mesoscale variability in a well-mixed marine layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eddington, Lee W.; O'Brien, J. J.; Stuart, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    A simple nonlinear numerical model of a well-mixed marine layer is employed to examine topographically forced mesoscale variability off coastal California. This model is utilized to simulate a persistent wind maximum observed near Point Conception during northwesterly winds. The model solves for the two horizontal components of the marine-layer height and the marine-layer wind.

  12. Atomic layer deposition of metal oxide patterns on nonwoven fiber mats using localized physical compression.

    PubMed

    Sweet, William J; Oldham, Christopher J; Parsons, Gregory N

    2014-06-25

    Patterning is an essential part of many industrial processes from printing to semiconductor manufacturing. In this work, we demonstrate a new method to pattern and selectively coat nonwoven textiles by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using compressive mask patterning. A physical mask combined with mechanical compression allows lateral definition and fidelity of the ALD coating to be controlled. We produce features of several sizes on different nonwoven fiber materials and demonstrate the ability to limit diffusion effects to within <200 μm of the pattern edge. Lateral and vertical penetration of reactive growth species into nonwoven mats is investigated by plan-view and cross-sectional imaging. Vertical growth is also analyzed by imaging coating depth into fiber mat stacks. We develop a fully quantitative transport model that describes well the effect of fiber structure and mechanical compression on the extent of coating under the physical mask. This method could be implemented for high-volume patterning for applications including flexible electronics. PMID:24850237

  13. Deformation of PEM fuel cell gas diffusion layers under compressive loading: An analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzifard, Vahid; Bahrami, Majid

    2014-10-01

    In the PEM fuel cell stack, the fibrous porous gas diffusion layer (GDL) provides mechanical support for the membrane assembly against the compressive loads imposed by bipolar plates. In this study, a new mechanistic model is developed using fundamental beam theory that can accurately predict the mechanical deflection of GDL under compressive loads. The present analytical model is built on a unit cell approach, which assumes a simplified geometry for the complex and random GDL microstructure. The model includes salient microstructural parameters and properties of the fibrous porous medium including: carbon fiber diameter, fiber elastic modulus, pore size distribution, and porosity. Carbon fiber bending is proved to be the main deformation mechanism at the unit cell level. A comprehensive optical measurement study with statistical analysis is performed to determine the geometrical parameters of the model for a number of commercially available GDL samples. A comparison between the present model and our experimental stress-strain data shows a good agreement for the linear deformation region, where the compressive pressure is higher than 1 MPa.

  14. Synthesis of a predicted layered LiB via cold compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolmogorov, A. N.; Hajinazar, S.; Angyal, C.; Kuznetsov, V. L.; Jephcoat, A. P.

    2015-10-01

    We have discovered stoichiometric LiB with hexagonal boron layers by compressing known LiB0.9 with linear boron chains. The s p to s p2 rebonding occurred at room temperature and pressures above 21 GPa. The study was motivated by a long-standing prediction that LiB in the stable layered configuration could be a close analog to the MgB2 superconductor. Apparent stacking disorder in LiB and a stoichiometry shift in LiBy (down to y ≈0.75 ) made material characterization a challenge. Ab initio modeling allowed us to establish the pressure-dependent composition of LiBy and predict related stable structures overlooked in previous studies. Synchrotron powder diffraction data on quenched samples in the diamond anvil cell indicate that LiB remains metastable at ambient pressure.

  15. The Compressible Laminar Boundary Layer with Heat Transfer and Arbitrary Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Clarence B; Reshotko, Eli

    1956-01-01

    An approximate method for the calculation of the compressible laminar boundary layer with heat transfer and arbitrary pressure gradient, based on Thwaites' correlation concept, is presented. With the definition of dimensionless shear and heat-transfer parameters and an assumed correlation of these parameters in terms of a momentum parameter, a complete system of relations for calculating skin friction and heat transfer results. Knowledge of velocity or temperature profiles is not necessary in using this calculation method. When the method is applied to a convergent-divergent, axially symmetric rocket nozzle, it shows that high rates of heat transfer are obtained at the initial stagnation point and at the throat of the nozzle. Also indicated are negative displacement thicknesses in the convergent portion of the nozzle; these occur because of the high density within the lower portions of the cooled boundary layer. (author)

  16. Accelerating decomposition of light field video for compressive multi-layer display.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xuan; Geng, Zheng; Li, Tuotuo; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Zhaoxing

    2015-12-28

    Compressive light field display based on multi-layer LCDs is becoming a popular solution for 3D display. Decomposing light field into layer images is the most challenging task. Iterative algorithm is an effective solver for this high-dimensional decomposition problem. Existing algorithms, however, iterate from random initial values. As such, significant computation time is required due to the deviation between random initial estimate and target values. Real-time 3D display at video rate is difficult based on existing algorithms. In this paper, we present a new algorithm to provide better initial values and accelerate decomposition of light field video. We utilize internal coherence of single light field frame to transfer the ignorance-to-target to a much lower resolution level. In addition, we explored external coherence for further accelerating light field video and achieved 5.91 times speed improvement. We built a prototype and developed parallel algorithm based on CUDA. PMID:26832058

  17. Similar solutions for the compressible laminar boundary layer with heat transfer and pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Clarence B; Reshotko, Eli

    1956-01-01

    Stewartson's transformation is applied to the laminar compressible boundary-layer equations and the requirement of similarity is introduced, resulting in a set of ordinary nonlinear differential equations previously quoted by Stewartson, but unsolved. The requirements of the system are Prandtl number of 1.0, linear viscosity-temperature relation across the boundary layer, an isothermal surface, and the particular distributions of free-stream velocity consistent with similar solutions. This system admits axial pressure gradients of arbitrary magnitude, heat flux normal to the surface, and arbitrary Mach numbers. The system of differential equations is transformed to integral system, with the velocity ratio as the independent variable. For this system, solutions are found by digital computation for pressure gradients varying from that causing separation to the infinitely favorable gradient and for wall temperatures from absolute zero to twice the free-stream stagnation temperature. Some solutions for separated flows are also presented.

  18. [Particle dispersion by ordered motion in mixing layers]. [Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Troutt, T.R.

    1989-12-31

    Multiphase mixing in turbulent flows is a key element in many practical energy conversion, chemical mixing and pollutant dispersal problems. Numerous important technological and environmental processes could be better addressed with improvements in understanding in this area. Progress in developing understanding of this field, however, has traditionally been difficult because of the complexities involved with the turbulent flows employed to provide the mixing mechanisms. To address this problem from a new perspective several years ago this research group initiated an ongoing investigation concerning the potential connections between organized turbulent vortex structures and the particle dispersion process. This report details activities during this reporting period.

  19. Structure, surface interactions, and compressibility of bacterial S-layers through scanning force microscopy and the surface force apparatus.

    PubMed

    Martín-Molina, Alberto; Moreno-Flores, Susana; Perez, Eric; Pum, Dietmar; Sleytr, Uwe B; Toca-Herrera, José L

    2006-03-01

    Two-dimensional crystalline bacterial surface layers (S-layers) are found in a broad range of bacteria and archaea as the outermost cell envelope component. The self-assembling properties of the S-layers permit them to recrystallize on solid substrates. Beyond their biological interest as S-layers, they are currently used in nanotechnology to build supramolecular structures. Here, the structure of S-layers and the interactions between them are studied through surface force techniques. Scanning force microscopy has been used to study the structure of recrystallized S-layers from Bacillus sphaericus on mica at different 1:1 electrolyte concentrations. They give evidence of the two-dimensional organization of the proteins and reveal small corrugations of the S-layers formed on mica. The lattice parameters of the S-layers were a=b=14 nm, gamma=90 degrees and did not depend on the electrolyte concentration. The interaction forces between recrystallized S-layers on mica were studied with the surface force apparatus as a function of electrolyte concentration. Force measurements show that electrostatic and steric interactions are dominant at long distances. When the S-layers are compressed they exhibit elastic behavior. No adhesion between recrystallized layers takes place. We report for the first time, to our knowledge, the value of the compressibility modulus of the S-layer (0.6 MPa). The compressibility modulus is independent on the electrolyte concentration, although loads of 20 mN m-1 damage the layer locally. Control experiments with denatured S-proteins show similar elastic properties under compression but they exhibit adhesion forces between proteins, which were not observed in recrystallized S-layers. PMID:16361337

  20. The Closure of the Ocean Mixed Layer Temperature Budget using Level-Coordinate Model Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Seung-Bum; Fukumori, Ichiro; Lee, Tong

    2005-01-01

    Entrainment is an important element of the mixed layer mass, heat, and temperature budgets. Conventional procedures to estimate entrainment heat advection often do not permit the closure of heat and temperature budgets because of inaccuracies in its formulation. In this study a rigorous approach to evaluate the effect of entrainment using the output of a general circulation model (GCM) that does not have an explicit prognostic mixed layer model is described. The integral elements of the evaluation are 1) the rigorous estimates of the temperature difference between mixed layer water and entrained water at each horizontal grid point, 2) the formulation of the temperature difference such that the budget closes over a volume greater than one horizontal grid point, and 3) the apparent warming of the mixed layer during the mixed layer shoaling to account for the weak vertical temperature gradient within the mixed layer. This evaluation of entrainment heat advection is compared with the estimates by other commonly used ad hoc formulations by applying them in three regions: the north-central Pacific, the Kuroshio Extension, and the Nino-3 areas in the tropical Pacific. In all three areas the imbalance in the mixed layer temperature budget by the ad hoc estimates is significant, reaching a maximum of about 4 K yr(exp -1).

  1. Solution-Processed Small Molecular Organic Light-Emitting Devices with a Mixed Single Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaokui; Naka, Shigeki; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the characteristics of solution-processed mixed-single-layer organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) by mixing an electron injection material, a hole transport material, and a dopant material based on 5,6,11,12-tetraphenylnaphthacene (rubrene). The mixed-single-layer OLEDs showed better performance by optimizing the solution concentration and mixing ratio of organic materials. The performance was further improved by mixing chloroform (95 wt %) and toluene (5 wt %) as a solvent. The maximum luminance and power efficiency obtained were 12,400 cd/m2 and 1.1 lm/W, respectively. The mixed-single-layer OLEDs by solution process can be expected as an alternative route to the fabrication of small-molecular OLEDs with reduced cost of devices and avoiding the complexities of the co-evaporation of multiple organic materials in the vacuum deposition process.

  2. Comparison of Several Numerical Methods for Simulation of Compressible Shear Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Christopher A.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    1997-01-01

    An investigation is conducted on several numerical schemes for use in the computation of two-dimensional, spatially evolving, laminar variable-density compressible shear layers. Schemes with various temporal accuracies and arbitrary spatial accuracy for both inviscid and viscous terms are presented and analyzed. All integration schemes use explicit or compact finite-difference derivative operators. Three classes of schemes are considered: an extension of MacCormack's original second-order temporally accurate method, a new third-order variant of the schemes proposed by Rusanov and by Kutier, Lomax, and Warming (RKLW), and third- and fourth-order Runge-Kutta schemes. In each scheme, stability and formal accuracy are considered for the interior operators on the convection-diffusion equation U(sub t) + aU(sub x) = alpha U(sub xx). Accuracy is also verified on the nonlinear problem, U(sub t) + F(sub x) = 0. Numerical treatments of various orders of accuracy are chosen and evaluated for asymptotic stability. Formally accurate boundary conditions are derived for several sixth- and eighth-order central-difference schemes. Damping of high wave-number data is accomplished with explicit filters of arbitrary order. Several schemes are used to compute variable-density compressible shear layers, where regions of large gradients exist.

  3. A near-wall four-equation turbulence model for compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sommer, T. P.; So, R. M. C.; Zhang, H. S.

    1992-01-01

    A near-wall four-equation turbulence model is developed for the calculation of high-speed compressible turbulent boundary layers. The four equations used are the k-epsilon equations and the theta(exp 2)-epsilon(sub theta) equations. These equations are used to define the turbulent diffusivities for momentum and heat fluxes, thus allowing the assumption of dynamic similarity between momentum and heat transport to be relaxed. The Favre-averaged equations of motion are solved in conjunction with the four transport equations. Calculations are compared with measurements and with another model's predictions where the assumption of the constant turbulent Prandtl number is invoked. Compressible flat plate turbulent boundary layers with both adiabatic and constant temperature wall boundary conditions are considered. Results for the range of low Mach numbers and temperature ratios investigated are essentially the same as those obtained using an identical near-wall k-epsilon model. In general, the numerical predictions are in very good agreement with measurements and there are significant improvements in the predictions of mean flow properties at high Mach numbers.

  4. An experimental study of forced streamwise vortical structures in a plane mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Rabindra D.; Bell, James H.

    1989-01-01

    Streamwise structures have been shown to ride among the primary spanwise vortices in past flow visualization investigations of plane mixing layers. More recently, quantitative measurements were obtained which showed the origin and evolution of streamwise vortices within a mixing layer. In the present study, the effects of perturbing the mixing layer using two different mechanisms are investigated. A serration on the splitter plate trailing edge was found to have a relatively small effect, confined to the near-field development of the streamwise structures. The installation of cylindrical pegs in the high-speed side boundary layer, however, not only generated a regular array of vortex pairs, but also affected the mean development of the mixing layer far downstream. In both cases, the mean streamwise vorticity was found to decay rapidly with increasing downstream distance.

  5. An experimental study of forced streamwise vortical structures in a plane mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Rabindra D.; Bell, James H.

    Streamwise structures have been shown to ride among the primary spanwise vortices in past flow visualization investigations of plane mixing layers. More recently, quantitative measurements were obtained which showed the origin and evolution of streamwise vortices within a mixing layer. In the present study, the effects of perturbing the mixing layer using two different mechanisms are investigated. A serration on the splitter plate trailing edge was found to have a relatively small effect, confined to the near-field development of the streamwise structures. The installation of cylindrical pegs in the high-speed side boundary layer, however, not only generated a regular array of vortex pairs, but also affected the mean development of the mixing layer far downstream. In both cases, the mean streamwise vorticity was found to decay rapidly with increasing downstream distance.

  6. A numerical study of the effects of heat diffusion through the base of the mixed layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posmentier, E. S.

    1980-01-01

    In the present paper, a simple numerical model is used to study the warming of the mixed layer during the early summer. It is shown that the springtime temperature increase in the layer below the mixed layer (for example, in the cold pool on a continental shelf) has a maximum value which occurs for a limiting value of the surface heat flux. This is a result of the positive feedback at large Richardson numbers between stability and vertical diffusion of heat. The springtime temperature increase in the mixed layer increases nonlinearly with surface heat flux, because of the same positive feedback. The effects of interseasonal fluctuations of the surface heat flux on the spring and summer mixed layer and deeper temperature increases can be as great as the effect of interseasonal fluctuations of the average heat flux.

  7. Ordered mixed-layer structures in the Mighei carbonaceous chondrite matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackinnon, I. D. R.

    1982-01-01

    High resolution transmission electron microscopy of the Mighei carbonaceous chondrite matrix has revealed the presence of a new mixed layer structure material. This mixed-layer material consists of an ordered arrangement of serpentine-type (S) and brucite-type (B) layers in the sequence SBBSBB. Electron diffraction and imaging techniques show that the basal periodicity is approximately 17 A. Discrete crystals of SBB-type material are typically curved, of small size (less than 1 micron) and show structural variations similar to the serpentine group minerals. Mixed-layer material also occurs in association with planar serpentine. Characteristics of SBB-type material are not consistent with known terrestrial mixed-layer clay minerals. Evidence for formation by a condensation event or by subsequent alteration of pre-existing material is not yet apparent.

  8. Comparison of High-Order and Low-Order Methods for Large-Eddy Simulation of a Compressible Shear Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankbadi, M. R.; Georgiadis, N. J.; DeBonis, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work is to compare a high-order solver with a low-order solver for performing large-eddy simulations (LES) of a compressible mixing layer. The high-order method is the Wave-Resolving LES (WRLES) solver employing a Dispersion Relation Preserving (DRP) scheme. The low-order solver is the Wind-US code, which employs the second-order Roe Physical scheme. Both solvers are used to perform LES of the turbulent mixing between two supersonic streams at a convective Mach number of 0.46. The high-order and low-order methods are evaluated at two different levels of grid resolution. For a fine grid resolution, the low-order method produces a very similar solution to the high-order method. At this fine resolution the effects of numerical scheme, subgrid scale modeling, and filtering were found to be negligible. Both methods predict turbulent stresses that are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. However, when the grid resolution is coarsened, the difference between the two solvers becomes apparent. The low-order method deviates from experimental results when the resolution is no longer adequate. The high-order DRP solution shows minimal grid dependence. The effects of subgrid scale modeling and spatial filtering were found to be negligible at both resolutions. For the high-order solver on the fine mesh, a parametric study of the spanwise width was conducted to determine its effect on solution accuracy. An insufficient spanwise width was found to impose an artificial spanwise mode and limit the resolved spanwise modes. We estimate that the spanwise depth needs to be 2.5 times larger than the largest coherent structures to capture the largest spanwise mode and accurately predict turbulent mixing.

  9. Comparison of High-Order and Low-Order Methods for Large-Eddy Simulation of a Compressible Shear Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankbadi, Mina R.; Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; DeBonis, James R.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work is to compare a high-order solver with a low-order solver for performing Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) of a compressible mixing layer. The high-order method is the Wave-Resolving LES (WRLES) solver employing a Dispersion Relation Preserving (DRP) scheme. The low-order solver is the Wind-US code, which employs the second-order Roe Physical scheme. Both solvers are used to perform LES of the turbulent mixing between two supersonic streams at a convective Mach number of 0.46. The high-order and low-order methods are evaluated at two different levels of grid resolution. For a fine grid resolution, the low-order method produces a very similar solution to the highorder method. At this fine resolution the effects of numerical scheme, subgrid scale modeling, and filtering were found to be negligible. Both methods predict turbulent stresses that are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. However, when the grid resolution is coarsened, the difference between the two solvers becomes apparent. The low-order method deviates from experimental results when the resolution is no longer adequate. The high-order DRP solution shows minimal grid dependence. The effects of subgrid scale modeling and spatial filtering were found to be negligible at both resolutions. For the high-order solver on the fine mesh, a parametric study of the spanwise width was conducted to determine its effect on solution accuracy. An insufficient spanwise width was found to impose an artificial spanwise mode and limit the resolved spanwise modes. We estimate that the spanwise depth needs to be 2.5 times larger than the largest coherent structures to capture the largest spanwise mode and accurately predict turbulent mixing.

  10. Enhancement of Exciton Emission in Lead Halide-Based Layered Perovskites by Cation Mixing.

    PubMed

    Era, Masanao; Komatsu, Yumeko; Sakamoto, Naotaka

    2016-04-01

    Spin-coated films of a lead halide, PbX: X = I and Br, layered perovskites having cyclohexenylethyl ammonium molecule as an organic layer, which were mixed with other metal halide-based layered perovskites consisting of various divalent metal halides (for example, Ca2, Cdl2, FeI2, SnBr2 and so on), were prepared. The results of X-ray diffraction measurements exhibited that solid solution formation between PbX-based layered perovskite and other divalent metal halide-based layered perovskites was observed up to very high molar concentration of 50 molar% in the mixed film samples when divalent cations having ionic radius close to that of Pb2+ were employed. In the solid solution films, the exciton emission was much enhanced at room temperature. Exciton emission intensity of Pbl-based layered perovskite mixed with Cal-based layered perovskite (20 molar%) is about 5 times large that of the pristine Pbl-based layered perovskite, and that of PbBr-based layered perovskite mixed with SnBr-based layered perovskite (20 molar%) was also about 5 times large that of the pristine PbBr-based layered perovskite at room temperature. PMID:27451628

  11. Determination of the Mixing Layer Height Over two Sites, Using Pilot Balloons During the MILAGRO Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohrnschimmel, H.; Alonso, A. L.; Ángeles, F.; Sosa, G.; Varela, J.; Cárdenas, B.

    2007-12-01

    Among the mechanisms that affect air quality there is a variety of meteorological processes. An important process in this context are the changes in the mixing layer height during a day and over the year. The mixing layer height is the portion of the atmosphere close to the surface layer where air pollutants get diluted, without leaving this layer. Therefore, it is important to describe the variations in the height of the mixing layer, i.e. the vertical dilution of air pollution, since this is a process mitigating naturally the impact of emissions. There exist different methods to obtain information on the mixing layer height, among them radio soundings, the application of vertical wind profilers, and launching pilot balloons. In this study, pilot balloons have been used simultaneously over two sites of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area during the MILAGRO campaign in March 2006. The objective was to determine the vertical wind profiles and derive information on the mixing layer height. Daily, four pilot balloons were launched, at 9:00, 12:00, 15:00, and 18:00 hours, over Tenango del Aire (a rural area in the Southeast of Mexico City), and over Ciudad Universitaria, in the Southern metropolitan area. At some occasions, night time measurements have been carried out at 21:00 and 24:00. A variability of the diurnal evolution of the mixing layer was observed along March, which could be related to surface temperature. The diurnal evolution showed a sudden growth of the mixing layer between 9:00 and 12:00 hours. Data intercomparisons were carried out for pilot balloons versus radio soundings during a few days at a third site, Tula, in the North of Mexico City. Both intercomparisons showed that pilot balloons are an effective method to obtain information about the development of the mixing layer.

  12. Problem of the thermodynamic status of the mixed-layer minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zen, E.-A.

    1962-01-01

    Minerals that show mixed layering, particularly with the component layers in random sequence, pose problems because they may behave thermodynamically as single phases or as polyphase aggregates. Two operational criteria are proposed for their distinction. The first scheme requires two samples of mixed-layer material which differ only in the proportions of the layers. If each of these two samples are allowed to equilibrate with the same suitably chosen monitoring solution, then the intensive parameters of the solution will be invariant if the mixed-layer sample is a polyphase aggregate, but not otherwise. The second scheme makes use of the fact that portions of many titration curves of clay minerals show constancy of the chemical activities of the components in the equilibrating solutions, suggesting phase separation. If such phase separation occurs for a mixed-layer material, then, knowing the number of independent components in the system, it should be possible to decide on the number of phases the mixed-layer material represents. Knowledge of the phase status of mixed-layer material is essential to the study of the equilibrium relations of mineral assemblages involving such material, because a given mixed-layer mineral will be plotted and treated differently on a phase diagram, depending on whether it is a single phase or a polyphase aggregate. Extension of the titration technique to minerals other than the mixed-layer type is possible. In particular, this method may be used to determine if cryptoperthites and peristerites are polyphase aggregates. In general, for any high-order phase separation, the method may be used to decide just at what point in this continuous process the system must be regarded operationally as a polyphase aggregate. ?? 1962.

  13. The radiation of sound by the instability waves of a compressible plane turbulent shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, C. K. W.; Morris, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of acoustic radiation generated by instability waves of a compressible plane turbulent shear layer is solved. The solution provided is valid up to the acoustic far-field region. It represents a significant improvement over the solution obtained by classical hydrodynamic-stability theory which is essentially a local solution with the acoustic radiation suppressed. The basic instability-wave solution which is valid in the shear layer and the near-field region is constructed in terms of an asymptotic expansion using the method of multiple scales. This solution accounts for the effects of the slightly divergent mean flow. It is shown that the multiple-scales asymptotic expansion is not uniformly valid far from the shear layer. Continuation of this solution into the entire upper half-plane is described. The extended solution enables the near- and far-field pressure fluctuations associated with the instability wave to be determined. Numerical results show that the directivity pattern of acoustic radiation into the stationary medium peaks at 20 degrees to the axis of the shear layer in the downstream direction for supersonic flows. This agrees qualitatively with the observed noise-directivity patterns of supersonic jets.

  14. The mesoscale stability of entrainment into cloud-topped mixed layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiedler, B. H.

    1984-01-01

    The Lilly-type models for stratocumulus-capped mixed layers are shown to allow for a mesoscale instability in which mesoscale fluctuations of buoyancy and humidity are reinforced in phase by entrainment. In a model of an AMTEX mixed layer, this mesoscale instability has a maximum growth rate of about 0.00002 per sec at wavelengths 30 times the depth of the mixed layer. The instability is able to account for the existence and broad scale of the stratiform cloud patterns known as mesoscale cellular convection.

  15. ICF Implosions, Space-Charge Electric Fields, and Their Impact on Mix and Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, Dana; Chacon, Luis; Simakov, Andrei

    2013-10-01

    The single-fluid, quasi-neutral, radiation hydrodynamics codes, used to design the NIF targets, predict thermonuclear ignition for the conditions that have been achieved experimentally. A logical conclusion is that the physics model used in these codes is missing one, or more, key phenomena. Two key model-experiment inconsistencies on NIF are: 1) a lower implosion velocity than predicted by the design codes, and 2) transport of pusher material deep into the hot spot. We hypothesize that both of these model-experiment inconsistencies may be a result of a large, space-charge, electric field residing on the distinct interfaces in a NIF target. Large space-charge fields have been experimentally observed in Omega experiments. Given our hypothesis, this presentation will: 1) Develop a more complete physics picture of initiation, sustainment, and dissipation of a current-driven plasma sheath / double-layer at the Fuel-Pusher interface of an ablating plastic shell implosion on Omega, 2) Characterize the mix that can result from a double-layer field at the Fuel-Pusher interface, prior to the onset of fluid instabilities, and 3) Quantify the impact of the double-layer induced surface tension at the Fuel-Pusher interface on the peak observed implosion velocity in Omega.

  16. Low Velocity Difference Thermal Shear Layer Mixing Rate Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Robert H.; Culver, Harry C. M.; Weissbein, Dave; Georgiadis, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Current CFD modeling techniques are known to do a poor job of predicting the mixing rate and persistence of slot film flow in co-annular flowing ducts with relatively small velocity differences but large thermal gradients. A co-annular test was devised to empirically determine the mixing rate of slot film flow in a constant area circular duct (D approx. 1ft, L approx. 10ft). The axial rate of wall heat-up is a sensitive measure of the mixing rate of the two flows. The inflow conditions were varied to simulate a variety of conditions characteristic of moderate by-pass ratio engines. A series of air temperature measurements near the duct wall provided a straightforward means to measure the axial temperature distribution and thus infer the mixing rate. This data provides a characterization of the slot film mixing rates encountered in typical jet engine environments. The experimental geometry and entrance conditions, along with the sensitivity of the results as the entrance conditions vary, make this a good test for turbulence models in a regime important to modern air-breathing propulsion research and development.

  17. [Particle dispersion by order motion in mixing layers

    SciTech Connect

    Troutt, T.R.

    1993-09-01

    Multiphase mixing in turbulent flows is a key element in many energy conversion and chemical processes. There is considerable need for improving the design and control of these processes. Free turbulent shear flows are the primary agents for particle mixing in these systems. Previous studies by this research group have shown that, if particle coupling effects are neglected, the organized vortex structures generated by these shear flows control the character of the particle mixing process. A coordinated experimental and numerical study is proposed to investigate the coupled effects of droplet mass and energy transfer on the turbulent multiphase mixing process in free shear flows. This study has important implications concerning the design of reacting flow systems. Experimental visualizations of the multiphase flow will be carried out using laser-sheet lighting and high speed photography. Local measurements of droplet size, velocity and concentration diagnostics, will be made with laser anemometry and phase Doppler diagnostics. Complementary analytical and numerical analyses will be carried out to assess the effect of coupling on vortex structure, stability and growth. The results of the proposed research will provide basic understanding concerning the coupled effects of particle concentration on the rate of multiphase mixing in turbulent flows. Information of this nature is essential to the improved designs of engineering systems with particulate or droplet flows.

  18. Computer program for solving laminar, transitional, or turbulent compressible boundary-layer equations for two-dimensional and axisymmetric flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. E.; Blanchard, D. K.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical algorithm and computer program are presented for solving the laminar, transitional, or turbulent two dimensional or axisymmetric compressible boundary-layer equations for perfect-gas flows. The governing equations are solved by an iterative three-point implicit finite-difference procedure. The software, program VGBLP, is a modification of the approach presented in NASA TR R-368 and NASA TM X-2458, respectively. The major modifications are: (1) replacement of the fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration technique with a finite-difference procedure for numerically solving the equations required to initiate the parabolic marching procedure; (2) introduction of the Blottner variable-grid scheme; (3) implementation of an iteration scheme allowing the coupled system of equations to be converged to a specified accuracy level; and (4) inclusion of an iteration scheme for variable-entropy calculations. These modifications to the approach presented in NASA TR R-368 and NASA TM X-2458 yield a software package with high computational efficiency and flexibility. Turbulence-closure options include either two-layer eddy-viscosity or mixing-length models. Eddy conductivity is modeled as a function of eddy viscosity through a static turbulent Prandtl number formulation. Several options are provided for specifying the static turbulent Prandtl number. The transitional boundary layer is treated through a streamwise intermittency function which modifies the turbulence-closure model. This model is based on the probability distribution of turbulent spots and ranges from zero to unity for laminar and turbulent flow, respectively. Several test cases are presented as guides for potential users of the software.

  19. Performance improvement of rubrene-based organic light emitting devices with a mixed single layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaokui; Naka, Shigeki; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2010-09-01

    We have investigated the performance of organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) with a rubrene-doped mixed single layer by using 4,4'-bis[N-(1-napthyl)-N-phenyl- amion] biphenyl ( α-NPD) as hole transport layer. Comparing to a conventional heterostructure OLED, equal luminance vs. current density characteristics were obtained. In addition, maximum power efficiency was threefold improved, and the achieved value was 5.90 lm/W by optimizing a mixing ratio of hole and electron transport materials. By evaluating the temperature dependence of the J - V characteristics for electron-injection dominated device, the electron injection from Al/LiF to mixed organic layer is attributed to Schottky thermal emission model. And the barrier height of the electron injection from Al/LiF into mixed single layer was obtained to be 0.62 eV, which is lower than Al/Alq3 interface. Meanwhile, the mixed single-layer device exhibited superior operational durability at a half-luminance of 2,250 h under a constant current operation mode. The reliability was improved with a factor of two compared to the heterostructure device due to the improvement of stability in mixed organic molecules and removal of the heterojunction interface in the mixed single-layer device.

  20. Seasonal mixed-layer dynamics in an eddy-resolving ocean circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Andreas; Ridgway, Ken R.

    2013-07-01

    Mean and seasonal mixed-layer depths (MLDs) derived from an eddy-resolving ocean general circulation model with a horizontal resolution of (1/10)° are validated with climatological observations. Associated heat budgets on seasonal timescales are analyzed for six boundary current regions with high eddy kinetic energy (Somali Current, Agulhas Current region, Kuroshio, East Australian Current, Gulf Stream, and Brazil-Malvinas/Falkland Confluence). In all of these regions and on seasonal timescales, (a) horizontal advection significantly contributes to the mixed-layer heat budget (MLHB) on eddy scales and locally exceeds ±5°C/month; (b) lateral mixing (calculated as a residual term) is similar in size to surface net heat flux, horizontal advection, and vertical entrainment in defining the mixed-layer temperature; (c) seasonal vertical entrainment has a cooling effect on mixed-layer temperature throughout the year in the regions investigated; and (d) a phase lag between MLD and changes in mixed-layer heat content exists such that local cooling (warming) in the mixed layer precedes maxima (minima) in MLD by 1-3 months. A rather complex picture emerges where the MLHB in ocean boundary currents on larger spatial scales is determined by net surface heat fluxes and entrainment, whereas local, eddy-related advection and stirring modulate the large-scale signals.

  1. Internal waves in a compressible two-layer model atmosphere: Hamiltonian description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruban, V. P.

    2010-11-01

    We consider slow, compared to the speed of sound, motions of an ideal compressible fluid (gas) in a gravitational field in the presence of two isentropic layers with a small specific-entropy difference between them. Assuming the flow to be potential in each of the layers ( v 1, 2 = ▿ϕ1, 2) and neglecting the acoustic degrees of freedom (div( bar ρ ( z)▿ϕ1, 2) ≈ 0, where bar ρ ( z) is the average equilibrium density), we derive the equations of motion for the boundary in terms of the shape of the surface z = η( x, y, t) itself and the difference between the boundary values of the two velocity field potentials: ψ( x, y, t) = ψ1 - ψ2. We prove the Hamilto nian structure of the derived equations specified by a Lagrangian of the form ℒ = ∫ bar ρ (η)η t ψ dxdy - ℋ{η, ψ}. The system under consideration is the simplest theoretical model for studying internal waves in a sharply stratified atmosphere in which the decrease in equilibrium gas density due to gas compressibility with increasing height is essentially taken into account. For plane flows, we make a generalization to the case where each of the layers has its own constant potential vorticity. We investigate a system with a model dependence bar ρ ( z) ∝ e -2α z with which the Hamiltonian ℋ{η, ψ} can be represented explicitly. We consider a long-wavelength dynamic regime with dispersion corrections and derive an approximate nonlinear equation of the form u t + auu x - b[- hat partial _x^2 + α2]1/2 u x = 0 (Smith's equation) for the slow evolution of a traveling wave.

  2. A comparative study of several compressibility corrections to turbulence models applied to high-speed shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viegas, John R.; Rubesin, Morris W.

    1991-01-01

    Several recently published compressibility corrections to the standard k-epsilon turbulence model are used with the Navier-Stokes equations to compute the mixing region of a large variety of high speed flows. These corrections, specifically developed to address the weakness of higher order turbulence models to accurately predict the spread rate of compressible free shear flows, are applied to two stream flows of the same gas mixing under a large variety of free stream conditions. Results are presented for two types of flows: unconfined streams with either (1) matched total temperatures and static pressures, or (2) matched static temperatures and pressures, and a confined stream.

  3. Effects of Initial Conditions on Compressible Mixing in Supernova-Relevant Laboratory Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, A R; Edwards, M; Greenough, J

    2004-04-30

    In core-collapse supernovae, strong blast waves drive interfaces susceptible to Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM), and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities. In addition, perturbation growth can result from material expansion in large-scale velocity gradients behind the shock front. Laser-driven experiments are designed to produce a strongly shocked interface whose evolution is a scaled version of the unstable hydrogen-helium interface in core-collapse supernovae such as SN 1987A. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop an understanding of the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities and the resulting transition to turbulence on supernovae observables that remain as yet unexplained. In this paper, we summarize recent results from our computational study of unstable systems driven by high Mach number shock and blast waves. For planar multimode systems, compressibility effects preclude the emergence of a regime of self-similar instability growth independent of the initial conditions (IC's) by allowing for memory of the initial conditions to be retained in the mix-width at all times. With higher-dimensional blast waves, divergence restores the properties necessary for establishment of the self-similar state, but achieving it requires very high initial characteristic mode number and high Mach number for the incident blast wave. Initial conditions predicted by some recent stellar calculations are incompatible with self-similarity.

  4. Impact of compression on gas transport in non-woven gas diffusion layers of high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froning, Dieter; Yu, Junliang; Gaiselmann, Gerd; Reimer, Uwe; Manke, Ingo; Schmidt, Volker; Lehnert, Werner

    2016-06-01

    Gas transport in non-woven gas diffusion layers of a high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell was calculated with the Lattice Boltzmann method. The underlying micro structure was taken from two sources. A real micro structure was analyzed in the synchrotron under the impact of a compression mask mimicking the channel/rib structure of a flow field. Furthermore a stochastic geometry model based on synchrotron X-ray tomography studies was applied. The effect of compression is included in the stochastic model. Gas transport in these micro structures was simulated and the impact of compression was analyzed. Fiber bundles overlaying the micro structure were identified which affect the homogeneity of the gas flow. There are significant deviations between the impact of compression on effective material properties for this type of gas diffusion layers and the Kozeny-Carman equation.

  5. Spanwise domain effects on the evolution of the plane turbulent mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullan, W. A.

    2015-07-01

    Large Eddy Simulation is used to simulate a series of plane mixing layers. The influence of the spanwise domain on the development of the mixing layer, and the evolution of the coherent structures, are considered. The mixing layers originate from laminar conditions, and an idealised inflow condition is found to produce accurate flow predictions when the spanwise computational domain extent is sufficient to avoid confinement effects. Spanwise domain confinement of the flow occurs when the ratio of spanwise domain extent to local momentum thickness reaches a value of ten. Flow confinement results in changes to both the growth mechanism of the turbulent coherent structures, and the nature of the interactions that occur between them. The results demonstrate that simulations of the two-dimensional mixing layer flow requires a three-dimensional computational domain in order that the flow will evolve in a manner that is free from restraints imposed by the spanwise domain.

  6. Area production in supercritical, transitional mixing layers for reactive flow applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, J.; Okong'o, N.

    2002-01-01

    An investigation of surface area production is conducted for supercritical mixing layers; the results are relevant to flame area evolution and fluid disintegration. In this study, the surface is chosen perpendicular to the mass fraction gradient.

  7. Detailed characteristics of drop-laden mixing layers: LES predictions compared to DNS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okong'o, N.; Leboissetier, A.; Bellan, J.

    2004-01-01

    Results have been compared from Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of a temporal mixing layer laden with evaporating drops, to assess the ability of LES to reproduce detailed characteristics of DNS.

  8. Changes in mixed layer depth and spring bloom in the Kuroshio extension under global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruosi; Xie, Shang-Ping; Xu, Lixiao; Liu, Qinyu

    2016-04-01

    The mixed layer is deep in January-April in the Kuroshio Extension region. This paper investigates the response in this region of mixed layer depth (MLD) and the spring bloom initiation to global warming using the output of 15 models from CMIP5. The models indicate that in the late 21st century the mixed layer will shoal, and the MLD reduction will be most pronounced in spring at about 33°N on the southern edge of the present deep-MLD region. The advection of temperature change in the upper 100 m by the mean eastward flow explains the spatial pattern of MLD shoaling in the models. Associated with the shoaling mixed layer, the onset of spring bloom inception is projected to advance due to the strengthened stratification in the warming climate.

  9. Coherent structures in a turbulent mixing layer - A comparison between direct numerical simulations and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalfe, R. W.; Menon, S.; Hussain, A. K. M. F.

    1985-01-01

    An eduction scheme has been developed in an attempt to determine the characteristics of large-scale vortical structures in a turbulent mixing layer. This analysis scheme has been applied to a set of experimental data taken in a new, larger mixing layer facility designed to minimize boundary and resonance effects. A similar scheme has been developed to apply to the results of a direct numerical simulation of a temporally growing mixing layer. A comparison of the two approaches shows important similarities in the coherent structures. The numerical simulations indicate that low levels of coherent forcing can dramatically change the evolution of the mixing layer. In the absence of such forcing, the numerical simulations and experiments show a lack of regularity in the transverse position, spacing, amplitude, shape and spanwise coherence of the large-scale vortical structures.

  10. The upper mixed layer during coastal upwelling events on the northern portugal shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juncheng, Zuo; Hong, Sheng; Peliz, Alvaro; Miguel, Santos A.

    2003-10-01

    The upper mixed layer (UML) depth obtained from temperature is very slose to that from density: the maximum is about 15m. This indicates that temperature is a good indicator of mixed layer during measurements. When the surface heat flux is balanced by a cross-shore heat flux, the surface mixed layer depth obtained from the WM model (Weatherly and Martin, 1978), h PRT, is roughly the same as observed. The mixed layer depth calculated from the PWP model (Price, Weller and Pinkel, 1986) is close to the depth obtained from thermistor chain temperature data. The results show that both the WM model and PWP model can provide a good estimate of stratification in the study area during the cruise. The value of log (h/u 3) is about 9.5 in the study area, which shows that the study area is strongly stratified in summer. Observations on the northern Portugal shelf reveal high variability in stability, giving rise to semi-diurnal, semi-monthly and diurnal oscillations, and long term variations. The fortnightly oscillations are highlighted by post-springs and post-neaps. The stirring of spring tide is reinforced by strong wind mixing which brings about complete vertical homogeneity everywhere. The semi-diurnal periodic stratification is very pronounced because the major axis of the tidal ellipse is orientated acrossshore, even though the tidal current is weak in this area, the maximum stratification is observed around the middle, of ebb, and the water at this time is much warmer. The diurnal oscillation results from the upper ocean response to heating and wind mixing when solar heating warms and stabilizes the upper ocean. There is a clear relationship between upper mixed layer depth and wind-stress magnitude at subtidal frequencies. Stronger winds result in a deeper surface mixed layer. Typically, the surface mixed layer depth lags the wind stress by 6 12 h.

  11. Numerical investigation of sensitivity of the Black Sea mixed layer to vertical turbulent diffusion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvaratskhelia, Diana; Demetrashvili, Demuri

    2015-04-01

    The upper mixed-layer of seas and oceans is one of the important water areas, the thermodynamic state of which defines many important physical, chemical or biological processes in the sea- atmosphere environment. The same can be note concerning the Black Sea turbulent mixed layer, which represents the object of our investigation. It is well known that the depth of the mixed layer is generaly determined by measurements of water properties: temperature and sigma-t (density) but here the depth of the mixed layer and its variability are investigated by using of the basin-scale numerical model of the Black Sea dynamics of M. Nodia Institute of Geophysics (BSM-IG, Tbilisi, Georgia). The main object of this study is to investigate the Black Sea upper mixed-layer generation and its evolution in connection with the nonstationarity atmospheric circulation and thermohaline action in the inner-annual time scale. Besides, how the temperature and salinity fields of the Black Sea upper layer are substantially reacted by the vertical diffusion coefficient are the centre of our attention. Therefore, the coefficient of vertical turbulent diffusion for heat and salt are tested as constant equal to 10 cm2s-1 and it was parameterized by modified Oboukhov's formula. The results of the numerical investigations show that: in wintertime for any choosing of this vertical diffusion coefficient the intense wind-driven turbulence promotes mixing aproximetly till 16-26 m in deep layers of the Black Sea. Except for that, cold fluxes through the surface and precipitation-evapuration system play aditionally role on the mixed layer forming as well. During the transitive spring season (in difference from the cold season), when the depth of the mixed layer is aproxometly 2-4 m., the role of vertical turbulent viscosity insignificantly grows. In the warm season (summer), when the mixed layer does not observe in the upper layer of the Black Sea, the role of the vertical diffusion coefficient is more

  12. Heterostructures and infrared emitters with compressed InAsSb layers

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.R.; Biefeld, R.M.

    1995-03-01

    An overview is presented of strained InAsSb heterostructures and infrared emitters. InAsSb/InGaAs strained-layer superlattices (SLS) and InAsSb quantum wells were characterized using magneto-photoluminescence and compared with unstrained InAsSb and InAs alloys. In heterostructures with biaxially compressed InAsSb, large quantum confinement energies were observed, and the holes exhibited a decrease in effective mass, approaching that of the electrons. This study demonstrates that the electrons and holes in the InAsSb heterostructures are confined in the InAsSb layers, and the band offsets are type I. A large increase in the Auger-1 threshold energy should accompany the strain-induced change in valence-band symmetry of the InAsSb layers. Correspondingly, the InAsSb heterostructures display high radiative efficiencies and increased activation energies for nonradiative recombination compared with the unstrained alloys. LEDs and L-mrs with InAsSb heterostructure active regions are described. InAsSb/InGaAs SLS LEDs operating at 300K at wavelengths {le} 5 pm have been demonstrated. Optically pumped InAsSb/InGaAs SLS lasers, with InPSb cladding, had a maximum operating temperature of 100K.

  13. Effects of heat release on the large-scale structure in turbulent mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurtry, P. A.; Riley, J. J.; Metcalfe, R. W.

    1989-02-01

    The effects of chemical heat release on the large-scale structure in a chemically reacting turbulent mixing layer have been studied using three-dimensional time-dependent simulations. Moderate heat release is found to slow the development of the large-scale structures and to shift their wavelengths to larger scales. The results suggest that previously unexplained anomalies observed in the mean velocity profiles of reacting jets and mixing layers may be the result of vorticity generation by baroclinic torques.

  14. Lidar Characterization of Boundary Layer Transport and Mixing for Estimating Urban-Scale Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardesty, R. Michael; Brewer, W. Alan; Sandberg, Scott P.; Weickmann, Ann M.; Shepson, Paul B.; Cambaliza, Maria; Heimburger, Alexie; Davis, Kenneth J.; Lauvaux, Thomas; Miles, Natasha L.; Sarmiento, Daniel P.; Deng, A. J.; Gaudet, Brian; Karion, Anna; Sweeney, Colm; Whetstone, James

    2016-06-01

    A compact commercial Doppler lidar has been deployed in Indianapolis for two years to measure wind profiles and mixing layer properties as part of project to improve greenhouse measurements from large area sources. The lidar uses vertical velocity variance and aerosol structure to measure mixing layer depth. Comparisons with aircraft and the NOAA HRDL lidar generally indicate good performance, although sensitivity might be an issue under low aerosol conditions.

  15. Si + ion beam mixing of tin layers on crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massouras, G.; Roger, J. A.; Romana, L.; Fuchs, G.

    1989-02-01

    Sn layers 64 nm thick deposited onto crystalline Si were irradiated at room temperature using 100 keV Si + ions, with fluences φ ranging from 1 × 10 15 to 9 × 10 16 ions cm -2. RBS analyses show that Si atoms move from the bulk towards the surface as the fluence increases, and are found at the very surface for φ = 4 × 10 16 Si + cm -2. Then a saturation is reached. Sn and Si profiles determined using a Fortran programme, and the calibration of depth scale is obtained from cross-sectional TEM observations. The average composition of the intermixed layer is given as a function of φ. Different layers of various crystallinity are found below the surface and their nature is discussed.

  16. Oceanic upper mixed layer depth determination by the use of satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Xiao-Hai; Schubel, J. R.; Pritchard, D. W.

    1990-01-01

    A method has been developed to determine the oceanic daily mean mixed layer depth from satellite observations and a mixed layer thermal inertia (MLTI) model. The algorithms were developed to use remotely-sensed values of sea surface temperature, albedo, and surface wind speeds to calculate the thermal inertia and to predict changes in subsurface diurnal mixed layer depth. The MLTI model, based on a mixed layer model of the upper ocean, has been used to simulate the diurnal mixing process and thermal inertia distribution in the Sargasso Sea around 34 deg N, 70 deg W. Sea surface temperature and albedo have been obtained from the NOAA7-AVHRR images. Surface wind speeds have been derived from the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) aboard Nimbus 7. Image processing was performed for images gathered between June and July 1982. The daily mean mixed layer depths predicted by the MLTI model agree well with data gathered at the LOTUS mooring located in the Sargasso Sea. This suggests that vertical mixing is the dominant physical process that controls the thermal inertia distribution in the midocean, far from major current systems, and that remote sensing is a promising tool to study such upper ocean processes.

  17. Mechanisms by which heat release affects the flow field in a chemically reacting, turbulent mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, J. J.; Metcalfe, R. W.; McMurtry, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanisms by which heat release affects the fluid dynamics in a turbulent reacting mixing layer are studied by direct numerical simulation. In agreement with previous laboratory experiments, the heat release is observed to lower the rate at which the mixing layer grows and to reduce the rate at which chemical products are formed. The baroclinic torque and thermal expansion in the mixing layer are shown to produce changes in the flame vortex structure that act to produce more diffuse vortices than in the constant density case, resulting in lower rotation rates of fluid elements. Previously unexplained anomalies observed in the mean velocity profiles of reacting jets and mixing layers are shown to result from vorticity generation by baroclinic torques. The density reductions also lower the generation rates of turbulent kinetic energy and the turbulent shear stresses, resulting in less turbulent mixing of fluid elements. Calculations of the energy in the various wave numbers show that the heat release has a stabilizing effect on the growth rates of individual modes. A linear stability analysis of a simlified model problem confirms this, showing that low density fluid in the mixing region will result in a shift of the frequency of the unstable modes to lower wave numbers (longer wavelengths). The growth rates of the unstable modes decrease, contributing to the slower growth of the mixing layer.

  18. Implicit large eddy simulation of a scalar mixing layer in fractal grid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Tomoaki; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Nagata, Kouji; Ito, Yasumasa; Hayase, Toshiyuki

    2016-07-01

    A scalar mixing layer in fractal grid turbulence is simulated by the implicit large eddy simulation (ILES) using low-pass filtering as an implicit subgrid-scale model. The square-type fractal grid with three fractal iterations is used for generating turbulence. The streamwise evolutions of the streamwise velocity statistics obtained in the ILES are in good agreement with the experimental results. The ILES results are used for investigating the development of the scalar mixing layer behind the fractal grid. The results show that the vertical development of the scalar mixing layer strongly depends on the spanwise location. Near the fractal grid, the scalar mixing layer rapidly develops just behind the largest grid bars owing to the vertical turbulent transport. The scalar mixing layer near the fractal grid also develops outside the largest grid bars because the scalar is transported between the outside and back of the largest grid bars by the spanwise turbulent transport. In the downstream region, the scalar mixing layer develops more rapidly near the grid centerline by the vertical turbulent transport and by the spanwise one which transports the scalar between the back of the largest grid bars and both the centerline and outer edge of the fractal grid. Then, the mean scalar profile becomes close to be homogeneous in the spanwise direction.

  19. Elastic Langmuir layers and membranes subjected to unidirectional compression: wrinkling and collapse.

    PubMed

    Danov, Krassimir D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Stoyanov, Simeon D

    2010-01-01

    We apply the two-dimensional elastic continuum model to describe the wrinkling of elastic Langmuir layers (membranes) subjected to unidirectional compression. The effects of the dilatational, shear, and bending elasticities are taken into account. Among the numerous solutions of the generalized Laplace equation, corresponding to different membrane tensions, we determine the membrane shape as the profile that minimizes the energy of the system. In the case of small deformations, the problem can be linearized. Its solution predicts a wavelike shape of the compressed membrane. At negligibly small bending elasticity, the energy of the system is minimal for a sinusoidal profile, whose amplitude and wavelength tend to zero. In the opposite limiting case, where the effect of bending elasticity prevails over the effect of gravity, the membrane has a half-wave profile. When the two effects are comparable, the membrane shape exhibits multiple periodic wrinkles (ripples). An expression is derived for calculating the bending elasticity (rigidity) from the wavelength, and reasonable values are obtained from available experimental data. To determine the membrane shape at larger out-of-plane deformations, we solved numerically the respective nonlinear problem. Depending on the values of the physical parameters, the theory predicts various shapes: nonharmonic oscillations, toothed profiles, and profiles with two characteristic wavelengths. The results can be used for determining the bending elastic modulus of Langmuir films (membranes) as well as for the interpretation of buckling and collapse of monolayers. PMID:19928973

  20. Motion of particles with inertia in a compressible free shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samimy, M.; Lele, S. K.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of the inertia of a particle on its flow-tracking accuracy and particle dispersion are studied using direct numerical simulations of 2D compressible free shear layers in convective Mach number (Mc) range of 0.2 to 0.6. The results show that particle response is well characterized by tau, the ratio of particle response time to the flow time scales (Stokes' number). The slip between particle and fluid imposes a fundamental limit on the accuracy of optical measurements such as LDV and PIV. The error is found to grow like tau up to tau = 1 and taper off at higher tau. For tau = 0.2 the error is about 2 percent. In the flow visualizations based on Mie scattering, particles with tau more than 0.05 are found to grossly misrepresent the flow features. These errors are quantified by calculating the dispersion of particles relative to the fluid. Overall, the effect of compressibility does not seem to be significant on the motion of particles in the range of Mc considered here.

  1. Compression and dilation of the membrane-cortex layer generates rapid changes in cell shape

    PubMed Central

    Elston, Timothy C.; Jacobson, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Rapid changes in cellular morphology require a cell body that is highly flexible yet retains sufficient strength to maintain structural integrity. We present a mechanism that meets both of these requirements. We demonstrate that compression (folding) and subsequent dilation (unfolding) of the coupled plasma membrane–cortex layer generates rapid shape transformations in rounded cells. Two- and three-dimensional live-cell images showed that the cyclic process of membrane-cortex compression and dilation resulted in a traveling wave of cortical actin density. We also demonstrate that the membrane-cortex traveling wave led to amoeboid-like cell migration. The compression–dilation hypothesis offers a mechanism for large-scale cell shape transformations that is complementary to blebbing, where the plasma membrane detaches from the actin cortex and is initially unsupported when the bleb extends as a result of cytosolic pressure. Our findings provide insight into the mechanisms that drive the rapid morphological changes that occur in many physiological contexts, such as amoeboid migration and cytokinesis. PMID:23295349

  2. Current layer cascade in collisionless electron-magnetohydrodynamic reconnection and electron compressibility effects

    SciTech Connect

    Del Sarto, D.; Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F.

    2005-01-01

    The nonlinear phase of a magnetic field line reconnection instability in a collisionless two-dimensional cold plasma is investigated in the Hall dominated regime, described by the electron-magnetohydrodynamic equations, which corresponds to the frequency range of whistler waves. It is found that the regular pattern of current density layers that forms in the initial nonlinear phase of the reconnection instability is destroyed by the onset of a Kelvin-Helmholtz-type instability and the formation of current jets that develop into vortex rings. These processes can be interpreted in terms of a Hasegawa-Mima-type regime inside the magnetic island and lead to the creation of magnetic vortices. It is shown that electron compressibility, which is related to charge separation, tends to stabilize these processes.

  3. Computer program for calculating laminar, transitional, and turbulent boundary layers for a compressible axisymmetric flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, J. A.; Gregg, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    A finite-difference program is described for calculating the viscous compressible boundary layer flow over either planar or axisymmetric surfaces. The flow may be initially laminar and progress through a transitional zone to fully turbulent flow, or it may remain laminar, depending on the imposed boundary conditions, laws of viscosity, and numerical solution of the momentum and energy equations. The flow may also be forced into a turbulent flow at a chosen spot by the data input. The input may contain the factors of arbitrary Reynolds number, free-stream Mach number, free-stream turbulence, wall heating or cooling, longitudinal wall curvature, wall suction or blowing, and wall roughness. The solution may start from an initial Falkner-Skan similarity profile, an approximate equilibrium turbulent profile, or an initial arbitrary input profile.

  4. An experimental investigation of compressible three-dimensional boundary layer flow in annular diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Om, Deepak; Childs, Morris E.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental study is described in which detailed wall pressure measurements have been obtained for compressible three-dimensional unseparated boundary layer flow in annular diffusers with and without normal shock waves. Detailed mean flow-field data were also obtained for the diffuser flow without a shock wave. Two diffuser flows with shock waves were investigated. In one case, the normal shock existed over the complete annulus whereas in the second case, the shock existed over a part of the annulus. The data obtained can be used to validate computational codes for predicting such flow fields. The details of the flow field without the shock wave show flow reversal in the circumferential direction on both inner and outer surfaces. However, there is a lag in the flow reversal between the inner nad the outer surfaces. This is an interesting feature of this flow and should be a good test for the computational codes.

  5. Atmospheric marine boundary layer mixing rates in the California coastal region. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Schacher, G.E.; Fairall, C.W.; Davidson, K.L.

    1980-05-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School has conducted five research cruises in California coastal waters for which sufficient data was obtained to allow boundary layer mixing rates to be determined. These data have been processed to determine the mixing rates. The rates have been correlated with meteorological conditions and geographical location and average values for use in air pollution models have been determined. A simplified method for calculating the mixing rate from mean meteorological parameters is presented.

  6. Mixing-Height Time Series from Operational Ceilometer Aerosol-Layer Heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotteraner, Christoph; Piringer, Martin

    2016-07-01

    A new method is described to derive mixing-height time series directly from aerosol-layer height data available from a Vaisala CL51 ceilometer. As complete as possible mixing-height time series are calculated by avoiding outliers, filling data gaps by linear interpolation, and smoothing. In addition, large aerosol-layer heights at night that can be interpreted as residual layers are not assigned as mixing heights. The resulting mixing-height time series, converted to an appropriate data format, can be used as input for dispersion calculations. Two case examples demonstrate in detail how the method works. The mixing heights calculated using ceilometer data are compared with values determined from radiosounding data at Vienna by applying the parcel, Heffter, and Richardson methods. The results of the parcel method, obtained from radiosonde profiles at noon, show the best fit to the ceilometer-derived mixing heights. For midnight radiosoundings, larger deviations between mixing heights from the ceilometer and those deduced from the potential temperature profiles of the soundings are found. We use data from two Vaisala CL51 ceilometers, operating in the Vienna area at an urban and rural site, respectively, during an overlapping period of about 1 year. In addition to the case studies, the calculated mixing-height time series are also statistically evaluated and compared, demonstrating that the ceilometer-based mixing height follows an expected daily and seasonal course.

  7. Adding confidence levels and error bars to mixing layer heights detected by ceilometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münkel, Christoph; Schäfer, Klaus; Emeis, Stefan

    2011-11-01

    Eye-safe lidar ceilometers are reliable tools for unattended boundary layer structure monitoring around the clock. A single lens optical design enables precise assessment of inversion layers and nocturnal stable layers below 200 m. This design has been chosen for the Vaisala Ceilometers CL31 and CL51. Based on the gradient method, an automatic algorithm for online retrieval of boundary layer depth and additional residual structures has been developed. This robust all weather algorithm is part of the Vaisala boundary layer reporting and analysis tool BL-VIEW. The data averaging intervals used depend on range and signal noise; detection thresholds vary with signal amplitude. All layer heights reported are accomponied by a quality index. In most cases the lowest of these layers is a good measure for the mixing layer height. The continuous knowledge of this atmospheric parameter is supporting the understanding of processes directing air quality. The utility of mixing layer height values for air quality forecast can be further increased by additionally utilizing unaveraged profiles for gradient minima detection. Based on their variation from the result of the BL-VIEW algorithm, confidence levels and error bars can be calculated. Results are presented from campaigns at three different sites. Validation with mixing layer height values derived from co-located radiosoundings confirm the applicability of this novel method.

  8. Calculation of three-dimensional compressible laminar and turbulent boundary flows. Three-dimensional compressible boundary layers of reacting gases over realistic configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, R. M.; Bonnett, W. S.; Nardo, C. T.; Abbett, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    A three-dimensional boundary-layer code was developed for particular application to realistic hypersonic aircraft. It is very general and can be applied to a wide variety of boundary-layer flows. Laminar, transitional, and fully turbulent flows of compressible, reacting gases are efficiently calculated by use of the code. A body-oriented orthogonal coordinate system is used for the calculation and the user has complete freedom in specifying the coordinate system within the restrictions that one coordinate must be normal to the surface and the three coordinates must be mutually orthogonal.

  9. Discrete element simulation of charging and mixed layer formation in the ironmaking blast furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Tamoghna; Saxén, Henrik

    2015-11-01

    The burden distribution in the ironmaking blast furnace plays an important role for the operation as it affects the gas flow distribution, heat and mass transfer, and chemical reactions in the shaft. This work studies certain aspects of burden distribution by small-scale experiments and numerical simulation by the discrete element method (DEM). Particular attention is focused on the complex layer-formation process and the problems associated with estimating the burden layer distribution by burden profile measurements. The formation of mixed layers is studied, and a computational method for estimating the extent of the mixed layer, as well as its voidage, is proposed and applied on the results of the DEM simulations. In studying a charging program and its resulting burden distribution, the mixed layers of coke and pellets were found to show lower voidage than the individual burden layers. The dynamic evolution of the mixed layer during the charging process is also analyzed. The results of the study can be used to gain deeper insight into the complex charging process of the blast furnace, which is useful in the design of new charging programs and for mathematical models that do not consider the full behavior of the particles in the burden layers.

  10. Protected Sulfur Cathode with Mixed Conductive Coating Layer for Lithium Sulfur Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jun; Wen, Zhaoyin; Wang, Qingsong; Gu, Sui; Huang, Xiao; Chen, Chunhua

    2016-08-01

    A mixed conductive coating layer composed of lithium ion conductive ceramic powder, carbon and binder was introduced on the surface of a sulfur electrode. This coating layer is designed to suppress the migration of lithium polysulfides from the sulfur electrode, and improve the cycling capacity of a lithium sulfur battery. The protected sulfur cathode with a mixed conductive coating layer delivered an initial specific capacity of 1236 mAh g-1 at 0.5C and maintained a capacity of 842 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles. In particular, a soft package battery with protected cathode exhibits improved cycling capacity and excellent rate performance.

  11. The effect of boundary-layer turbulence on mixing in heated jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strykowski, P. J.; Russ, S.

    1992-05-01

    The mixing properties of a heated axisymmetric jet at a density ratio of 0.55 were examined for initially laminar and turbulent separated boundary layers. Initially laminar jets displayed large intermittent spread rates with half-angles up to 45° and a corresponding rapid decay of the streamwise velocity and temperature on the jet axis. When the boundary layer was disturbed upstream of the nozzle exit, creating an initially turbulent separated layer, the jet mixing was significantly reduced. Flow visualization revealed that the turbulent conditions eliminated the intermittent nature of the jet spreading, producing constant spreading rates at half-angles near 10°.

  12. The effect of boundary-layer turbulence on mixing in heated jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strykowski, P. J.; Russ, S.

    1992-05-01

    The mixing properties of a heated axisymmetric jet at a density ratio of 0.55 were examined for initially laminar and turbulent separated boundary layers. Initially laminar jets displayed large intermittent spread rates with half-angles up to 45 deg and a corresponding rapid decay af the streamwise velocity and temperature on the jet axis. When the boundary layer was disturbed upstream of the nozzle exit, creating an initially turbulent separated layer, the jet mixing was significantly reduced. Flow visualization revealed that the turbulent conditions eliminated the intermittent nature of the jet spreading, producing constant spreading rates at half-angles near 10 deg.

  13. Estimating diffusivity from the mixed layer heat and salt balances in the North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, Meghan F.; Pelland, Noel A.; Emerson, Steven R.; Crawford, William R.

    2015-11-01

    Data from two National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) surface moorings in the North Pacific, in combination with data from satellite, Argo floats and glider (when available), are used to evaluate the residual diffusive flux of heat across the base of the mixed layer from the surface mixed layer heat budget. The diffusion coefficient (i.e., diffusivity) is then computed by dividing the diffusive flux by the temperature gradient in the 20 m transition layer just below the base of the mixed layer. At Station Papa in the NE Pacific subpolar gyre, this diffusivity is 1 × 10-4 m2/s during summer, increasing to ˜3 × 10-4 m2/s during fall. During late winter and early spring, diffusivity has large errors. At other times, diffusivity computed from the mixed layer salt budget at Papa correlate with those from the heat budget, giving confidence that the results are robust for all seasons except late winter-early spring and can be used for other tracers. In comparison, at the Kuroshio Extension Observatory (KEO) in the NW Pacific subtropical recirculation gyre, somewhat larger diffusivities are found based upon the mixed layer heat budget: ˜ 3 × 10-4 m2/s during the warm season and more than an order of magnitude larger during the winter, although again, wintertime errors are large. These larger values at KEO appear to be due to the increased turbulence associated with the summertime typhoons, and weaker wintertime stratification.

  14. Estimating diffusivity from the mixed layer heat and salt balances in the North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, M. F.; Pelland, N.; Emerson, S. R.; Crawford, W. R.

    2015-12-01

    Data from two National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) surface moorings in the North Pacific, in combination with data from satellite, Argo floats and glider (when available), are used to evaluate the residual diffusive flux of heat across the base of the mixed layer from the surface mixed layer heat budget. The diffusion coefficient (i.e., diffusivity) is then computed by dividing the diffusive flux by the temperature gradient in the 20-m transition layer just below the base of the mixed layer. At Station Papa in the NE Pacific subpolar gyre, this diffusivity is 1×10-4 m2/s during summer, increasing to ~3×10-4 m2/s during fall. During late winter and early spring, diffusivity has large errors. At other times, diffusivity computed from the mixed layer salt budget at Papa correlate with those from the heat budget, giving confidence that the results are robust for all seasons except late winter-early spring and can be used for other tracers. In comparison, at the Kuroshio Extension Observatory (KEO) in the NW Pacific subtropical recirculation gyre, somewhat larger diffusivity are found based upon the mixed layer heat budget: ~ 3×10-4 m2/s during the warm season and more than an order of magnitude larger during the winter, although again, wintertime errors are large. These larger values at KEO appear to be due to the increased turbulence associated with the summertime typhoons, and weaker wintertime stratification.

  15. Nonlinear evolution of subsonic and supersonic disturbances on a compressible free shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leib, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of a nonlinear-nonequilibrium-viscous critical layer on the spatial evolution of subsonic and supersonic instability modes on a compressible free shear layer is considered. It is shown that the instability wave amplitude is governed by an integrodifferential equation with cubic-type nonlinearity. Numerical and asymptotic solutions to this equation show that the amplitude either ends in a singularity at a finite downstream distance or reaches an equilibrium value, depending on the Prandtl number, viscosity law, viscous parameter and a real parameter which is determined by the linear inviscid stability theory. A necessary condition for the existence of the equilibrium solution is derived, and whether or not this condition is met is determined numerically for a wide range of physical parameters including both subsonic and supersonic disturbances. it is found that no equilibrium solution exists for the subsonic modes unless the temperature ratio of the low-to-high-speed streams exceeds a critical value, while equilibrium solutions for the most rapidly growing supersonic mode exist over most of the parameter range examined.

  16. Acoustic receptivity of compressible boundary layers: Receptivity by way of surface-temperature variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan

    1994-01-01

    The Goldstein-Ruban theory has been extended within the framework of Zavol'skii et al. to study the acoustic receptivity of compressible boundary layers. We consider the receptivity produced in a region of localized, small-amplitude variation in the surface temperature and compare it with the receptivity that is induced through a similar mechanism by a variation in the suction velocity at the surface. It is found that the orientation of the acoustic wave can have a significant impact on the receptivity process, with the maximum receptivity at a given sound-pressure level being produced by upstream oriented acoustic waves. At sufficiently low Mach numbers, the variation of receptivity with the acoustic-wave orientation can be predicted analytically and is the same for both surface suction and surface heating. However, as a result of the acoustic refraction across the mean boundary layer, the above dependence can become rather complex and, also, dependent on the type of surface nonuniformity. The results also suggest that the receptivity caused by temperature nonuniformities may turn out to be more significant than that produced by the mean-flow perturbations associated with strip suction.

  17. Mixed-mode toughness of human cortical bone containing a longitudinal crack in far-field compression.

    PubMed

    Olvera, Diana; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Ritchie, Robert O

    2012-01-01

    Bone is generally loaded under multiaxial conditions in vivo; as it invariably contains microcracks, this leads to complex mixed-mode stress-states involving combinations of tension, compression and shear. In previous work on the mixed-mode loading of human cortical bone (using an asymmetric bend test geometry), we found that the bone toughness was lower when loaded in far-field shear than in tension (opposite to the trend in most brittle materials), although only for the transverse orientation. This is a consequence of the competition between preferred mechanical vs. microstructural crack-path directions, the former dictated by the direction of the maximum mechanical "driving force" (which changes with the mode-mixity), and the latter by the "weakest" microstructural path (which in human bone is along the osteonal interfaces or cement lines). As most microcracks are oriented longitudinally, we investigate here the corresponding mixed-mode toughness of human cortical bone in the longitudinal (proximal-distal) orientation using a "double cleavage drilled compression" test geometry, which provides a physiologically-relevant loading condition for bone in that it characterizes the toughness of a longitudinal crack loaded in far-field compression. In contrast to the transverse toughness, results show that the longitudinal toughness, measured using the strain-energy release rate, is significantly higher in shear (mode II) than in tension (mode I). This is consistent, however, with the individual criteria of preferred mechanical vs. microstructural crack paths being commensurate in this orientation. PMID:22115793

  18. MAPLE preparation and characterization of mixed arylenevinylene based oligomers:C60 layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanculescu, A.; Socol, G.; Vacareanu, L.; Socol, M.; Rasoga, O.; Breazu, C.; Girtan, M.; Stanculescu, F.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents some studies about the preparation by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) of mixed layers based on two arylenevinylene oligomers, 1,4-bis [4-(N,N‧-diphenylamino)phenylvinyl] benzene (L78) and 3,3‧-bis(N-hexylcarbazole)vinylbenzene (L13) as donor and buckminsterfullerene (C60) as acceptor, blended in three different weight ratios: 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3. The optical, morphological, structural and electrical properties of these mixed layers have been investigated emphasizing the effect of the layer composition and of the significant degree of disorder. I-V characteristics have revealed typically solar cell behaviour for the heterostructures prepared with mixed layers containing L78 (L13) and fullerene blended in a weight ratio of 1:2. The solar cell structure glass/ITO/L13:C60/Al has shown the best parameters.

  19. Sea ice and the ocean mixed layer over the Antarctic shelf seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petty, A.; Holland, P.; Feltham, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    An ocean mixed layer model has been incorporated into the Los Alamos sea ice model CICE, to investigate regional variations in the surface-driven formation of Antarctic shelf sea waters. The model captures well the expected sea ice thickness distribution and produces deep (>500 m) mixed layers in the Weddell and Ross shelf seas each winter. By deconstructing the surface power input to the mixed layer, we have shown that the salt/fresh water flux from sea ice growth/melt dominates the evolution of the mixed layer in all shelf sea regions, with a smaller contribution from the mixed layer-surface heat flux. The Weddell and Ross shelf seas have the highest annual ice growth, with a large fraction exported northwards each year, whereas the Bellingshausen shelf sea experiences the highest annual ice melt, driven by the advection of ice from the northeast. Forcing the model with ERA-Interim (1980-2011) and hadGEM2-ES (1980-2099) atmospheric data allows us to look at the impact of atmospheric trends on the sea ice and ocean mixed layer. Both simulations show a shallowing of the wintertime mixed layer in the Amundsen & Bellingshausen seas, potentially increasing the access of warm CDW to ice shelves in both regions. The ERA-I hindcast simulation shows a significant freshening in the Ross and salinification in the Weddell due to surface driven trends (primarily through changes in the sea ice). The Ross freshening is smaller than observed however, highlighting the important role of ice shelf melt in the Amundsen Sea.

  20. Measurement of effective bulk and contact resistance of gas diffusion layer under inhomogeneous compression - Part II: Thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Chowdhury, Prabudhya; Vikram, Ajit; Phillips, Ryan K.; Hoorfar, Mina

    2016-07-01

    The gas diffusion layer (GDL) is a thin porous layer sandwiched between a bipolar plate (BPP) and a catalyst coated membrane in a fuel cell. Besides providing passage for water and gas transport from and to the catalyst layer, it is responsible for electron and heat transfer from and to the BPP. In this paper, a method has been developed to measure the GDL bulk thermal conductivity and the contact resistance at the GDL/BPP interface under inhomogeneous compression occurring in an actual fuel cell assembly. Toray carbon paper GDL TGP-H-060 was tested under a range of compression pressure of 0.34 to 1.71 MPa. The results showed that the thermal contact resistance decreases non-linearly (from 3.8 × 10-4 to 1.17 × 10-4 Km2 W-1) with increasing pressure due to increase in microscopic contact area between the GDL and BPP; while the effective bulk thermal conductivity increases (from 0.56 to 1.42 Wm-1 K-1) with increasing the compression pressure. The thermal contact resistance was found to be greater (by a factor of 1.6-2.8) than the effective bulk thermal resistance for all compression pressure ranges applied here. This measurement technique can be used to identify optimum GDL based on minimum bulk and contact resistances measured under inhomogeneous compression.

  1. Analysis of mixed-layer clay mineral structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, W.F.

    1953-01-01

    Among the enormously abundant natural occurrences of clay minerals, many examples are encountered in which no single specific crystallization scheme extends through a single ultimate grain. The characterization of such assemblages becomes an analysis of the distribution of matter within such grains, rather than the simple identification of mineral species. It having become established that the particular coordination complex typified by mica is a common component of many natural subcrystalline assemblages, the opportunity is afforded to analyze scattering from random associations of these complexes with other structural units. Successful analyses have been made of mixed hydration states of montmorillonite, of montmorillonite with mica, of vermiculite with mica, and of montmorillonite with chlorite, all of which are variants of the mica complex, and of halloysite with hydrated halloysite.

  2. Saturn's Polar Cyclones: Idealized 2-layer Experiments of Vorticity Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, M. E.; Emanuel, K.; Flierl, G.

    2013-12-01

    The Cassini mission has provided unprecedented high-resolution observations of Saturn's atmosphere. Among many discoveries, a massive warm-core cyclonic vortex has been observed on each pole. The South Polar Vortex (SPV), specifically, has the highest measured temperatures on Saturn, a double eyewall, deep eye and a rapid cyclonic jet with the second highest windspeeds observed on the planet. However, in part because Saturn lacks the thermal disequilibrium mechanism understood to be the energy source for tropical cyclones, scientists have yet to explain the storms' dynamics and energy source. Interestingly, numerous small, vortical (in the case of at least the SPV), and potentially convective systems are embedded within the large-scale flow of both polar vortices. We explore one potential mechanism of vortex maintenance: up-scale, poleward vorticity flux due to vortical hot towers (VHTs). Large GCMs cannot yet resolve local deep convection in the weather layer. Using a two-layer shallow water model on a polar β-plane, we represent deep convection with heton-like vortex pairs and allow them to move freely. We present results from a forced-dissipative system where the forcing is only at the convective scale, and show the effect of this 'convection' on a polar cyclone.

  3. A three-dimensional, compressible, laminar boundary-layer method for general fuselages. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Yong-Sun

    1990-01-01

    This user's manual contains a complete description of the computer programs developed to calculate three-dimensional, compressible, laminar boundary layers for perfect gas flow on general fuselage shapes. These programs include the 3-D boundary layer program (3DBLC), the body-oriented coordinate program (BCC), and the streamline coordinate program (SCC). Subroutine description, input, output and sample case are discussed. The complete FORTRAN listings of the computer programs are given.

  4. Effect of nonzero surface admittance on receptivity and stability of compressible boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan

    1994-01-01

    The effect of small-amplitude short-scale variations in surface admittance on the acoustic receptivity and stability of two-dimensional compressible boundary layers is examined. In the linearized limit, the two problems are shown to be related both physically and mathematically. This connection between the two problems is used, in conjunction with some previously reported receptivity results, to infer the modification of stability properties due to surface permeability. Numerical calculations are carried out for a self-similar flat-plate boundary layer at subsonic and low supersonic speeds. Variations in mean suction velocity at the perforated admittance surface can also induce receptivity to an acoustic wave. For a subsonic boundary layer, the dependence of admittance-induced receptivity on the acoustic-wave orientation is significantly different from that of the receptivity produced via mean suction variation. The admittance-induced receptivity is generally independent of the angle of acoustic incidence, except in a relatively narrow range of upstream-traveling waves for which the receptivity becomes weaker. However, this range of angles is precisely that for which the suction-induced receptivity tends to be large. At supersonic Mach numbers, the admittance-induced receptivity to slow acoustic models is relatively weaker than that in the case of the fast acoustic modes. We also find that purely real values for the surface admittance tend to have a destabilizing effect on the evolution of an instability wave over a slightly permeable surface. The limits on the validity of the linearized approximation are also assessed in one specific case.

  5. Microstructures of mixed group III-nitride epitaxial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westmeyer, Andrew Nathan

    InGaN and AlGaN epitaxial layers were deposited by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on sapphire substrates with GaN buffer layers. For the growth of InGaN at a given temperature, the trimethylgallium flow rate has the greatest influence on the In incorporation, whereas the trimethylindium flow rate has little influence. These effects are attributed to the suppression of In desorption by increasing the growth rate and the saturation of the surface with In adatoms, respectively. If the growth temperature is increased by 2.4°C, then the In content is lowered by 1% for the investigated temperature range of 785--845°C. For the growth of AlGaN, the solid fraction of Al has a sub-linear dependence on the gas composition. This was attributed to the composition pulling effect, in which incoming species are rejected in order to reduce the strain with the underlying buffer layer. A strain analysis was performed on all samples by X-ray diffraction in order to determine the composition and degree of relaxation. These values were compared to those obtained by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. By this method the varied reported values for elastic constants were evaluated to ascertain which set provided the best correlation. Transmission electron microscopy was performed. Plan-view images of InGaN contain domains differing in the direction of the modulations. Zone-axis diffraction patterns reveal sidebands adjacent to several Bragg reflections. These observations can be explained by diffraction effects resulting from periodic composition modulations, which are an intermediate stage in the process of phase separation. Since Young's modulus for the nitrides is isotropic in the (0001) plane, no particular direction is favored for the modulations based on strain energy considerations. In the case of AlGaN, periodic composition modulations are observed not in the growth plane (0001) but in the growth direction [0001]. Satellites in diffraction patterns are aligned in this

  6. Evaluation of the parameterization for cloud top-down mixing in the boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Hong, Song-You; Dudhia, Jimy

    2015-04-01

    An enhanced turbulent mixing due to radiative cooling at cloud or fog top located in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) is parameterized by adopting the top-down diffusivity profile and the cloud top entrainment. The algorithm is first implemented to YSU PBL scheme to be evaluated for idealized cases and then applied for the regional and global real case simulations. Since the modified algorithm consider the mixing height as near surface cloud top, its enhanced mixing effect appears more distinctly especially for the stabilized nocturnal boundary layer. As a result, in the idealized radiation fog case study, it is found that near-surface air temperature decreases due to both radiative cooling at fog top and boundary layer mixing of the new algorithm. Also, the moisture is diffused more effectively to the above the boundary layer, which leads to the rapid dispersion of the fog in the modified algorithm. As a result, the new algorithm simulates the warm and dried near-surface and the cool and moistened boundary layer top in the following daytime. It is also found that the modified algorithm affects the cloud structure frequently occurring at the ocean boundary layer top in the regional and global simulation results.

  7. Do large structures control their own growth in a mixing layer? - An assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Upender K.

    1988-01-01

    Two different two-dimensional free shear layers, the T-layer developing in time from an initial tangential velocity discontinuity separating the two half-spaces, and the S-layer which develops downstream of the origin where two uniform streams of unequal velocity are brought into tangential contact, are compared. Calculations are performed in order to determine to what extent the perturbations induced upstream by large concentrations of vorticity found downstream hasten or retard the subharmonic instability that leads to the formations of these large structures. The results show that the elliptic influence, or the feedback, in a mixing layer is relatively small for small velocity ratios.

  8. Sea ice and the ocean mixed layer over the Antarctic shelf seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petty, A. A.; Holland, P. R.; Feltham, D. L.

    2014-04-01

    An ocean mixed-layer model has been incorporated into the Los Alamos sea ice model CICE to investigate regional variations in the surface-driven formation of Antarctic shelf waters. This model captures well the expected sea ice thickness distribution, and produces deep (> 500 m) mixed layers in the Weddell and Ross shelf seas each winter. This results in the complete destratification of the water column in deep southern coastal regions leading to high-salinity shelf water (HSSW) formation, and also in some shallower regions (no HSSW formation) of these seas. Shallower mixed layers are produced in the Amundsen and Bellingshausen seas. By deconstructing the surface processes driving the mixed-layer depth evolution, we show that the net salt flux from sea ice growth/melt dominates the evolution of the mixed layer in all regions, with a smaller contribution from the surface heat flux and a negligible input from wind stress. The Weddell and Ross shelf seas receive an annual surplus of mixing energy at the surface; the Amundsen shelf sea energy input in autumn/winter is balanced by energy extraction in spring/summer; and the Bellingshausen shelf sea experiences an annual surface energy deficit, through both a low energy input in autumn/winter and the highest energy loss in spring/summer. An analysis of the sea ice mass balance demonstrates the contrasting mean ice growth, melt and export in each region. The Weddell and Ross shelf seas have the highest annual ice growth, with a large fraction exported northwards each year, whereas the Bellingshausen shelf sea experiences the highest annual ice melt, driven by the advection of ice from the northeast. A linear regression analysis is performed to determine the link between the autumn/winter mixed-layer deepening and several atmospheric variables. The Weddell and Ross shelf seas show stronger spatial correlations (temporal mean - intra-regional variability) between the autumn/winter mixed-layer deepening and several

  9. Does the vertical profile of ethane contain more insight into mixing layer height than carbon monoxide?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herndon, Scott; Yacovitch, Tara; Pusede, Sally; Diskin, Glenn; DiGangi, Joshua; Sachse, Glenn; Crawford, James

    2015-04-01

    To improve the interpretation of satellite data measurements near the surface, the DISCOVER-AQ project embarked on a four year campaign to produce an integrated dataset of airborne and surface based measurements at various locations in North America. One of the key metrics when pursuing the the goal of measuring the surface air quality from space is the mixing layer height. The measurement phase in 2014 included the novel 1-Hz Aerodyne Research, Inc. fast Ethane Spectrometer to distinguish the methane emissions from thermogenic (oil&gas) and biogenic sources in the Denver-Julesberg basin. A second potential use of ethane as a determinant of mixing layer height is revealed in the analysis of 213 vertical profiles collected at 7 points during 21 flights. The findings are evaluated relative to other in-situ metrics, such as carbon monoxide and remote sensing attributions of mixing layer height.

  10. The "limiting line" in mixed subsonic and supersonic flow of compressible fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsien, Hsue-Shen

    1944-01-01

    It is well known that the vorticity for any fluid element is constant if the fluid is non-viscous and the change of state of the fluid is isentropic. When a solid body is placed in a uniform stream, the flow far ahead of the body is irrotational. Then if the flow is further assumed to be isentropic, the vorticity will be zero over the whole filed of flow. In other words, the flow is irrotational. For such flow over a solid body, it is shown by Theodorsen that the solid body experiences no resistance. If the fluid has a small viscosity, its effect will be limited in the boundary layer over the solid body and the body will have a drag due to the skin friction. This type of essentially isentropic irrotational flow is generally observed for a streamlined body placed in a uniform stream, if the velocity of the stream is kept below the so-called "critical speed." At the critical speed or rather at a certain value of the ratio of the velocity of the undisturbed flow and the corresponding velocity of sound, shock waves appear. This phenomenon is called the "compressibility bubble." Along a shock wave, the change of state of the fluid is no longer isentropic, although still adiabatic. This results in an increase in entropy of the fluid and generally introduces vorticity in an originally irrotational flow. The increase in entropy of the fluid is, of course, the consequence of changing part of the mechanical energy into heat energy. In other words, the part of fluid affected by the shock wave has a reduced mechanical energy. Therefore, with the appearance of shock waves, the wake of the streamline body is very much widened, and the drag increases drastically. Furthermore, the accompanying change in the pressure distribution over the body changes the aerodynamic moment acting on it and in the case of an airfoil decreases the lift force. All these consequences of the breakdown of isentropic irrotational flow are generally undesirable in applied aerodynamics. Its occurrence

  11. Investigations of Subsonic Compressible Boundary Layer Flows using Hybrid Large Eddy Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Sara Jo

    The objective of this thesis is to investigate the spatially developing turbulent compressible boundary layer on a flat plate using the Spalart-Allmaras Detached Eddy Simulation (SA-DES) model [22] and the Nichols-Nelson hybrid Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes/Large Eddy Simulation (RANS/LES) model [13] which have been implemented into the Wind-US 3.0 computational fluid dynamics code [30]; both of the hybrid approaches involve RANS modeling in the near-wall region and LES treatment in the outer region. Generation of unsteady turbulent inflow data is achieved via the prescribed energy spectrum method. The studies illustrated dependence on Reynolds number based on momentum thickness, Reθ, ranging from 3018 to 19430, and dependence on Mach number, M = 0.5 and M = 0.9. The SA-DES model predicted mean flow profiles to a satisfactory degree, and the Nichols-Nelson hybrid RANS/LES model adequately predicted density field fluctuations; the aero-thermal effects captured by the Nichols-Nelson model can be useful for near-field aero optics applications.

  12. Measurement of effective bulk and contact resistance of gas diffusion layer under inhomogeneous compression - Part I: Electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikram, Ajit; Chowdhury, Prabudhya Roy; Phillips, Ryan K.; Hoorfar, Mina

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes a measurement technique developed for the determination of the effective electrical bulk resistance of the gas diffusion layer (GDL) and the contact resistance distribution at the interface of the GDL and the bipolar plate (BPP). The novelty of this study is the measurement and separation of the bulk and contact resistance under inhomogeneous compression, occurring in an actual fuel cell assembly due to the presence of the channels and ribs on the bipolar plates. The measurement of the electrical contact resistance, contributing to nearly two-third of the ohmic losses in the fuel cell assembly, shows a non-linear distribution along the GDL/BPP interface. The effective bulk resistance of the GDL under inhomogeneous compression showed a decrease of nearly 40% compared to that estimated for homogeneous compression at different compression pressures. Such a decrease in the effective bulk resistance under inhomogeneous compression could be due to the non-uniform distribution of pressure under the ribs and the channels. This measurement technique can be used to identify optimum GDL, BPP and channel-rib structures based on minimum bulk and contact resistances measured under inhomogeneous compression.

  13. One-dimensional mixing layer model for a shear Hele-Shaw flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovtunenko, P. V.

    2016-06-01

    A shear flow of a viscosity-stratified fluid in a Hele-Shaw cell is considered. The long-wave approximation is applied to the governing equations. To describe the evolution of the mixing layer, a special flow with a three-layered structure is considered. A one-dimensional model is derived by averaging the motion equations over the cell width, taking into account the flow structure. For a stationary flow, solutions of motion equations are constructed. The influence of viscosity on the mixing layer evolution is investigated by performing a numerical experiment for a flow with different viscosities in the layers and for a flow with always zero viscosity. It is shown that viscosity has a significant influence on the flow evolution.

  14. COSAL: A black-box compressible stability analysis code for transition prediction in three-dimensional boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    A fast computer code COSAL for transition prediction in three dimensional boundary layers using compressible stability analysis is described. The compressible stability eigenvalue problem is solved using a finite difference method, and the code is a black box in the sense that no guess of the eigenvalue is required from the user. Several optimization procedures were incorporated into COSAL to calculate integrated growth rates (N factor) for transition correlation for swept and tapered laminar flow control wings using the well known e to the Nth power method. A user's guide to the program is provided.

  15. Mixing layer growth and background air-quality measurements over the Colorado oil-shale area

    SciTech Connect

    Laulainen, N.S.; Whiteman, C.D.; Davis, W.E.; Thorp, J.M.

    1981-06-01

    The daily growth of convective boundary layers over the complex terrain of the oil shale areas of Colorado is a prominent feature of the meteorology of the region. The development of these layers was investigated using airsondes, rawinsondes, and aircraft. The deep growth of the layers in August, to heights in excess of 5500-m MSL on clear or partly cloudy days, is expected to have important implications for the dispersal of pollutants released in the region as the oil shale resource undergoes future development. Aircraft observations show that the present background air quality is good over the region and that pollutants, when present, become well mixed throughout the depth of the convective boundary layer. The layer therefore represents an important natural means of dilution for pollutants introduced into the atmosphere. Work is proceeding to incorporate the time-dependent convective boundary layer growth into air pollution models for the region.

  16. HST STIS Observations of the Mixing Layer in the Cat’s Eye Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xuan; Guerrero, Martín A.; Toalá, Jesús A.; Chu, You-Hua; Gruendl, Robert A.

    2016-05-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) are expected to have a ∼105 K interface layer between the ≥slant 106 K inner hot bubble and the ∼104 K optical nebular shell. The PN structure and evolution, and the X-ray emission, depend critically on the efficiency of the mixing of material at this interface layer. However, neither its location nor its spatial extent have ever been determined. Using high-spatial resolution HST STIS spectroscopic observations of the N v λ λ 1239,1243 lines in the Cat’s Eye Nebula (NGC 6543), we have detected this interface layer and determined its location, extent, and physical properties for the first time in a PN. We confirm that this interface layer, as revealed by the spatial distribution of the N v λ1239 line emission, is located between the hot bubble and the optical nebular shell. We estimate a thickness of 1.5× {10}16 cm and an electron density of ∼200 cm‑3 for the mixing layer. With a thermal pressure of ∼2 × 10‑8 dyn cm‑2, the mixing layer is in pressure equilibrium with the hot bubble and ionized nebular rim of NGC 6543. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. The observations are associated with program #12509.

  17. Role of convection in winter mixed layer formation in the Gulf of Maine, February 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mupparapu, Prashant; Brown, Wendell S.

    2002-12-01

    Moored hourly observations of temperature and salinity from the Wilkinson Basin in the western Gulf of Maine, augmented with gulf-wide hydrography surveys, document the winter mixed layer evolution between 4 and 18 February, 1987. Wind stresses and air-sea heat fluxes were estimated from the Gulf of Maine (44005) National Data Buoy Center buoy winds and temperatures using bulk formulae. During the study period, a pair of strong cooling episodes due to offshore (southeastward) winds bracketed an even stronger cooling event due to a strong northeasterly storm. The 0-165 m water column cooled during the study period. Heat budgets based on the observations show that local air-sea heat loss could only explain cooling in the upper 35-60 m of the Wilkinson water column. Lateral advection must have caused the deeper cooling. The Price, Weller and Pinkel [PWP] one-dimensional bulk mixed layer model [, 1986], forced with observed surface fluxes, exhibited a mixed layer that deepened from about 60 m to 120 m during the initial stages of the nor'easter in general accordance with observation. Diagnostic PWP model experiments showed that convective overturning was required to produce the observed mixed layer depth of 120 m. Direct wind mixing alone could deepen the model mixed layer to only about 80 m. However, the model property profiles produced by a 10-day PWP model run differed significantly from observations, which reflected advection effects. Observed hydrographic property distributions combined with horizontal velocity estimates from a Dartmouth linear, three-dimensional, finite-element circulation model of the Gulf (FUNDY5) help to explain differences between the PWP model and observations in terms of lateral advection in the upper 65 m. The observed cooling between 65 m and 165 m must be related to advection.

  18. Nonlinear Amplification and Decay of Phase-mixed Waves in Compressing Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Schmit, Paul F.; Dodin, I. Y.; Rocks, J.; Fisch, N. J.

    2012-09-25

    Through particle-in-cell simulations, we show that plasma waves carrying trapped electrons can be amplified manyfold via compressing plasma perpendicularly to the wave vector. These simulations are the first ab initio demonstration of the conservation of nonlinear action for such waves, which contains a term independent of the field amplitude. In agreement with the theory, the maximum of amplification gain is determined by the total initial energy of the trapped-particle average motion but otherwise is insensitive to the particle distribution. Further compression destroys the wave; electrons are then untrapped at suprathermal energies and form a residual beam. As compression continues, the bump-on-tail instability is triggered each time one of the discrete modes comes in resonance with this beam. Hence, periodic bursts of the electrostatic energy are produced until a wide quasilinear plateau is formed.

  19. Mixed layer warming-deepening in the Mediterranean Sea and its effect on the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivetti, Irene; Boero, Ferdinando; Fraschetti, Simonetta; Zambianchi, Enrico; Lionello, Piero

    2015-04-01

    This work aims at investigating the evolution of the ocean mixed layer in the Mediterranean Sea and linking it to the occurrence of mass mortalities of benthic invertebrates. The temporal evolution of selected parameters describing the mixed layer and the seasonal thermocline is provided for the whole Mediterranean Sea for spring, summer and autumn and for the period 1945-2011. For this analysis all temperature profiles collected in the basin with bottles, Mechanical Bathy-Thermographs (MBT), eXpendable Bathy-Thermographs (XBT), and Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) have been used (166,990). These data have been extracted from three public sources: the MEDAR-MEDATLAS, the World Ocean Database 2013 and the MFS-VOS program. Five different methods for estimating the mixed layer depth are compared using temperature profiles collected at the DYFAMED station in the Ligurian Sea and one method, the so-called three-segment method, has been selected for a systematic analysis of the evolution of the uppermost part of the whole Mediterranean Sea. This method approximates the upper water column with three segments representing mixed layer, thermocline and deep layer and has shown to be the most suitable method for capturing the mixed layer depth for most shapes of temperature profiles. Mass mortalities events of benthic invertebrates have been identified by an extensive search of all data bases in ISI Web of Knowledge considering studies published from 1945 to 2011. Studies reporting the geographical coordinates, the timing of the events, the species involved and the depth at which signs of stress occurred have been considered. Results show a general increase of thickness and temperature of the mixed layer, deepening and cooling of the thermocline base in summer and autumn. Possible impacts of these changes are mass mortalities events of benthic invertebrates that have been documented since 1983 mainly in summer and autumn. It is also shown that most mass mortalities

  20. Multiscale Variability of the Atmospheric Mixed Layer over the Western Pacific Warm Pool.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Richard H.; Ciesielski, Paul E.; Cotturone, Jennifer A.

    2001-09-01

    Sounding data from Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) have provided a first opportunity to document the variability of the atmospheric mixed layer over the western Pacific warm pool on timescales ranging from diurnal to intraseasonal. Six-hourly sounding data from four sites-the atoll Kapingamarangi and R/Vs Moana Wave, Shiyan 3, and Xiangyanghong 5-are used to determine the mixed layer depth and its thermodynamic properties. Almost three-quarters of the soundings at these four sites exhibited well-mixed structures: nearly constant profiles of potential temperature and specific humidity capped by a 150-m-deep entrainment zone. The majority of the remaining soundings were modified by precipitation and their associated downdrafts. It is estimated that approximately 40%-50% of the total soundings in COARE were influenced by precipitation downdrafts.The mean mixed layer depth at the four sites was 512 m with large variations on multiple timescales. Mean depths decreased across the warm pool from west to east, consistent with the west-to-east increase in precipitation averaged over the 4-month Intensive Observing Period. Significant modulation of the mixed layer occurred on the timescale of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO): the mean depth was 562 m during the undisturbed, light-wind period prior to the strong westerly wind burst (WWB) associated with the December MJO; it decreased to 466 m during the heavy-rain period of the WWB, reflecting numerous, recovering precipitation downdraft wakes; and then increased to 629 m during the late stages of the WWB when precipitation had ended. Dry intrusions over the warm pool caused the mixed layer to deepen at times to 800 m and more. Since the surface buoyancy flux typically did not increase at these times, the deepening is linked to a suppression of shallow cumulus clouds by the dry air (reduced between-cloud subsidence) as well as a general reduction in the overall

  1. Effect of afterburner lights and inlet unstarts on a mixed compression inlet turbofan engine operating at Mach 2.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, R. J.; Batterton, P. G.; Daniele, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    Data are presented to show the response of an uncontrolled inlet to afterburner lightoff disturbances when a mixed-compression inlet is coupled to a turbofan engine. The results show a significant upstream shock excursion when the afterburner lights which is a result of the direct communication between the afterburner region and the inlet by means of the fan duct and fan stages. In addition results of a waveform analysis on the inlet pressure response to the afterburner light is presented. Inlet unstarts and their effect on operation of the propulsion system is also discussed.

  2. Digital-computer normal shock position and restart control of a Mach 2.5 axisymmetric mixed-compression inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neiner, G. H.; Cole, G. L.; Arpasi, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    Digital computer control of a mixed-compression inlet is discussed. The inlet was terminated with a choked orifice at the compressor face station to dynamically simulate a turbojet engine. Inlet diffuser exit airflow disturbances were used. A digital version of a previously tested analog control system was used for both normal shock and restart control. Digital computer algorithms were derived using z-transform and finite difference methods. Using a sample rate of 1000 samples per second, the digital normal shock and restart controls essentially duplicated the inlet analog computer control results. At a sample rate of 100 samples per second, the control system performed adequately but was less stable.

  3. Estimation of the mixing layer height over a high altitude site in Central Himalayan region by using Doppler lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, K. K.; Phanikumar, D. V.; Newsom, Rob K.; Kumar, Niranjan; Ratnam, Venkat; Naja, M.; Singh, Narendra

    2014-03-01

    A Doppler lidar was installed at Manora Peak, Nainital (29.4 N; 79.2 E, 1958 amsl) to estimate mixing layer height for the first time by using vertical velocity variance as basic measurement parameter for the period September-November 2011. Mixing layer height is found to be located ~0.57 +/- 0.1and 0.45 +/- 0.05km AGL during day and nighttime, respectively. The estimation of mixing layer height shows good correlation (R>0.8) between different instruments and with different methods. Our results show that wavelet co-variance transform is a robust method for mixing layer height estimation.

  4. Lidar Descriptions of Mixing-Layer Thickness Characteristics in a Complex Terrain/Coastal Environment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, James L.; Smith, Ted B.

    1991-05-01

    Airborne lidar and supplementary measurements made during a major study of air chemistry in southern California (SCCCAMP 1985) provided a rare opportunity to examine atmospheric boundary-layer structure in a coastal area with complex terrain. This structure results from a combination of daytime heating or convection in the boundary layer (CBL), the intrusion of a marine layer into the inland areas, the thermal internal boundary layer (TIBL) formed within the marine onshore flow, inland growth of the TIBL, interactions of the CBL and the TIBL, and airflow interactions with terrain features.Measurements showed offshore mixing-layer thicknesses during SCCCAMP to be quite uniform spatially and day to day at 100-200 m. Movement of this layer onshore occurred readily with terrain that sloped gradually upward (e.g., to 300 m MSL at 50 km inland), but was effectively blocked by a 400-500 m high coastal ridge. In the higher terrain beyond the coastal ridge, aerosol layers aloft were often created as a result of deep convection and of a combination of onshore flow and heated, upslope airflow activity. Such aerosol layers can extend far offshore when embedded in reverse circulations aloft.The forward boundary of the marine layer was quite sharp, resembling a miniature cold front. Within the marine layer the onshore flow initiates a TIBL at the coastline, which increases in depth with distance inland due to roughness and convective influences. A coherent marine layer with imbedded TIBL was maintained for inland distances of 20-50 km, depending on terrain. Intense heating occurred inland prior to the arrival and undercutting by the marine front. The resulting, effective mixing layer increased in thickness from a few hundred meters to nearly two kilometers in a very short distance.Comparisons of a representative, physically based TIBL and convective mixing-layer models with observed data indicate that they generally do a credible job of estimating the depth of the marine layer

  5. [Mineralogy and genesis of mixed-layer clay minerals in the Jiujiang net-like red soil].

    PubMed

    Yin, Ke; Hong, Han-Lie; Li, Rong-Biao; Han, Wen; Wu, Yu; Gao, Wen-Peng; Jia, Jin-Sheng

    2012-10-01

    Mineralogy and genesis were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) to understand the mineralogy and its genesis significance of mixed-layer clay minerals in Jiujiang red soil section. XRD and FTIR results show that the net-like red soil sediments are composed of illite, kaolinite, minor smectite and mixed-layer illite-smectite and minor mixed-layer kaolinite-smectite. HRTEM observation indicates that some smectite layers have transformed into kaolinite layers in net-like red soil. Mixed-layer illite-smectite is a transition phase of illite transforming into smectite, and mixed-layer kaolinite-smectite is a transitional product relative to kaolinite and smectite. The occurrence of two mixed-layer clay species suggests that the weathering sequence of clay minerals in net-like red soil traversed from illite to mixed-layer illite-smectite to smectite to mixed-layer kaolinite-smectite to kaolinite, which indicates that net-like red soil formed under a warm and humid climate with strengthening of weathering. PMID:23285883

  6. Dynamics of ocean surface mixed layer variability in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Andreas; Oke, Peter R.

    2015-06-01

    We present a new methodology that allows quantifying the impact of individual terms of the temperature and salinity conservation within the mixed layer on mixed layer depth (MLD). The method is applied to output from an ocean general circulation model in the Indian Ocean to investigate variability and changes in MLD. On seasonal timescales and for most areas of the Indian Ocean variability of MLD is tightly linked to all thermohaline budget terms. In the Indian Ocean at approximately 20°S the MLD covaries with surface heat and freshwater fluxes on intraseasonal and interannual timescales. The geography of the region includes the Leeuwin Current, plus the tropical eastern Indian Ocean for interannual surface freshwater fluxes. The range of seasonal amplitudes of MLD variability varies with individual budget terms but is typically within 1 m/month to 100 m/month. The ocean footprints of an intraseasonal tropical cyclone, tropical and midlatitude seasonal temperature and salinity budgets and interannual variability associated with the Indian Ocean Dipole Mode are analyzed. The results reveal close relationships of the thermohaline budgets within the mixed layer with the variability of the MLD. The associated tendencies of changes in MLD are consistent with Argo and satellite-based observations of tendencies within the mixed layer and sea-surface temperature and salinity.

  7. Significant mixed layer nitrification in a natural iron-fertilized bloom of the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fripiat, F.; Elskens, M.; Trull, T. W.; Blain, S.; Cavagna, A.-J.; Fernandez, C.; Fonseca-Batista, D.; Planchon, F.; Raimbault, P.; Roukaerts, A.; Dehairs, F.

    2015-11-01

    Nitrification, the microbially mediated oxidation of ammonium into nitrate, is generally expected to be low in the Southern Ocean mixed layer. This paradigm assumes that nitrate is mainly provided through vertical mixing and assimilated during the vegetative season, supporting the concept that nitrate uptake is equivalent to the new primary production (i.e., primary production which is potentially available for export). Here we show that nitrification is significant (~40-80% of the seasonal nitrate uptake) in the naturally iron-fertilized bloom over the southeast Kerguelen Plateau. Hence, a large fraction of the nitrate-based primary production is regenerated, instead of being exported. It appears that nitrate assimilation (light dependent) and nitrification (partly light inhibited) are spatially separated between the upper and lower parts, respectively, of the deep surface mixed layers. These deep mixed layers, extending well below the euphotic layer, allow nitrifiers to compete with phytoplankton for the assimilation of ammonium. The high contributions of nitrification to nitrate uptake are in agreement with both low export efficiency (i.e., the percentage of primary production that is exported) and low seasonal nitrate drawdown despite high nitrate assimilation.

  8. GROUND-LEVEL CONCENTRATIONS DUE TO FUMIGATION INTO AN ENTRAINING MIXED LAYER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory measurements on fumigation into a convectively mixed layer indicate how the near surface concentration behaves with time. For two categories of entrainment rate, slow and fast, the experiments indicate how the ensemble-averaged concentration near the surface reaches a ...

  9. Uncertainty Assessments of 2D and Axisymmetric Hypersonic Shock Wave - Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction Simulations at Compression Corners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Berry, Scott A.; VanNorman, John W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is one of a series of five papers in a special session organized by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program that addresses uncertainty assessments for CFD simulations in hypersonic flow. Simulations of a shock emanating from a compression corner and interacting with a fully developed turbulent boundary layer are evaluated herein. Mission relevant conditions at Mach 7 and Mach 14 are defined for a pre-compression ramp of a scramjet powered vehicle. Three compression angles are defined, the smallest to avoid separation losses and the largest to force a separated flow engaging more complicated flow physics. The Baldwin-Lomax and the Cebeci-Smith algebraic models, the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras model with the Catrix-Aupoix compressibility modification and two-equation models including Menter SST, Wilcox k-omega 98, and Wilcox k-omega 06 turbulence models are evaluated. Each model is fully defined herein to preclude any ambiguity regarding model implementation. Comparisons are made to existing experimental data and Van Driest theory to provide preliminary assessment of model form uncertainty. A set of coarse grained uncertainty metrics are defined to capture essential differences among turbulence models. Except for the inability of algebraic models to converge for some separated flows there is no clearly superior model as judged by these metrics. A preliminary metric for the numerical component of uncertainty in shock-turbulent-boundary-layer interactions at compression corners sufficiently steep to cause separation is defined as 55%. This value is a median of differences with experimental data averaged for peak pressure and heating and for extent of separation captured in new, grid-converged solutions presented here. This value is consistent with existing results in a literature review of hypersonic shock-turbulent-boundary-layer interactions by Roy and Blottner and with more recent computations of MacLean.

  10. Parametric investigation on mixing in a micromixer with two-layer crossing channels.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Shakhawat; Kim, Kwang-Yong

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a parametric investigation on flow and mixing in a chaotic micromixer consisting of two-layer crossing channels proposed by Xia et al. (Lab Chip 5: 748-755, 2005). The flow and mixing performance were numerically analyzed using commercially available software ANSYS CFX-15.0, which solves the Navier-Stokes and mass conservation equations with a diffusion-convection model in a Reynolds number range from 0.2 to 40. A mixing index based on the variance of the mass fraction of the mixture was employed to evaluate the mixing performance of the micromixer. The flow structure in the channel was also investigated to identify the relationship with mixing performance. The mixing performance and pressure-drop were evaluated with two dimensionless geometric parameters, i.e., ratios of the sub-channel width to the main channel width and the channels depth to the main channel width. The results revealed that the mixing index at the exit of the micromixer increases with increase in the channel depth-to-width ratio, but decreases with increase in the sub-channel width to main channel width ratio. And, it was found that the mixing index could be increased up to 0.90 with variations of the geometric parameters at Re = 0.2, and the pressure drop was very sensitive to the geometric parameters. PMID:27390635

  11. Anharmonic phonons in few-layer MoS2: Raman spectroscopy of ultralow energy compression and shear modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukhicha, Mohamed; Calandra, Matteo; Measson, Marie-Aude; Lancry, Ophelie; Shukla, Abhay

    2013-05-01

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is a promising material for making two-dimensional crystals and flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices at the nanoscale. MoS2 flakes can show high mobilities and have even been integrated in nanocircuits. A fundamental requirement for such use is efficient thermal transport. Electronic transport generates heat which needs to be evacuated, more crucially so in nanostructures. Anharmonic phonon-phonon scattering is the dominant intrinsic limitation to thermal transport in insulators. Here, using appropriate samples, ultralow energy Raman spectroscopy and first-principles calculations, we provide a full experimental and theoretical description of compression and shear modes of few-layer (FL) MoS2. We demonstrate that the compression modes are strongly anharmonic with a marked enhancement of phonon-phonon scattering as the number of layers is reduced, most likely a general feature of nanolayered materials with weak interlayer coupling.

  12. Mixing layer dynamics in separated flow over an estuarine sill with variable stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talke, S. A.; Horner-Devine, A. R.; Chickadel, C. C.

    2010-09-01

    We investigate the generation of a mixing layer in the separated flow behind an estuarine sill (height H ˜ 4 m) in the Snohomish River, Washington as part of a larger investigation of coherent structures using remote and in situ sensing. During increasing ebb flows the depth d and stratification decrease and a region of sheared flow characterized by elevated production of turbulent kinetic energy develops. Profiles of velocity and acoustic backscatter exhibit coherent fluctuations of order 0.1 Hz and are used to define the boundaries of the mixing layer. Variations in the mixing layer width and its embedded coherent structures are caused by changes to both the normalized sill height H/d and to a bulk Richardson number Rih defined using the depth of flow over the sill. Entrainment ET and the mixing layer expansion angle increase as stratification and the bulk Richardson number decrease; this relationship is parameterized as ET = 0.07Rih-0.5 and is valid for approximately 0.1 < Rih < 2.8. Available comparisons with literature for inertially dominated conditions (Rih < 0.1) are consistent with our data and validate our approach, though lateral gradients may introduce an upwards bias of approximately 20%. As the ratio H/d increases over the ebb, the free surface boundary pushes the mixing layer trajectory downward, reduces its expansion angle, and produces asymmetry in the acoustic backscatter (coherent structures). Three-dimensional divergence, as imaged by infrared video and transecting data, becomes more prominent for H/d > 0.8 due to blocking of flow by the sill.

  13. Buoyant production and consumption of turbulence kinetic energy in cloud-topped mixed layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that studies of the entraining planetary boundary layer (PBL) have generally emphasized the role of buoyancy fluxes in driving entrainment. The buoyancy flux is proportional to the rate of conversion of the potential energy of the mean flow into the kinetic energy of the turbulence. It is not unusual for conversion to proceed in both directions simultaneously. This occurs, for instance, in both clear and cloudy convective mixed layers which are capped by inversions. A partitioning of the net conversion into positive parts, generating turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), and negative parts (TKE-consuming), would make it possible to include the positive part in the gross production rate, and closure would be achieved. Three different approaches to partitioning have been proposed. The present investigation is concerned with a comparison of the three partitioning theories. Particular attention is given to the cloud-topped mixed layer because in this case the differences between two partitioning approaches are most apparent.

  14. Trace-Gas Mixing in Isolated Urban Boundary Layers: Results from the 2001 Phoenix Sunrise Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, Carl M.; Doran, J C.; Shaw, William J.; Springston, Stephen R.; Spicer, Chet W.

    2006-01-01

    Measurements made from surface sites, from the 50-m and 140-m levels (the 16th and 39th floors) of a skyscraper and from an instrumented aircraft are used to characterize early morning profiles of CO, NOy and O3 within the mid-morning summertime convective atmospheric boundary layer (CABL) over Phoenix, Arizona. Although mixing was anticipated to produce uniform values of these species throughout the CABL, this was found not to be the case. Background air advected into the upper levels of the boundary layer and entrained air from above appears to be the most likely cause for the lack of well-mixed trace gases. The results show that surface measurements may provide only limited information on concentrations of trace gas species higher in the boundary layer.

  15. Compressible turbulent flows: Modeling and similarity considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Otto

    1991-01-01

    With the recent revitalization of high speed flow research, compressibility presents a new set of challenging problems to turbulence researchers. Questions arise as to what extent compressibility affects turbulence dynamics, structures, the Reynolds stress-mean velocity (constitutive) relation, and the accompanying processes of heat transfer and mixing. In astrophysical applications, compressible turbulence is believed to play an important role in intergalactic gas cloud dynamics and in accretion disk convection. Understanding and modeling of the compressibility effects in free shear flows, boundary layers, and boundary layer/shock interactions is discussed.

  16. A three-dimensional, compressible, laminar boundary-layer method for general fuselages. Volume 1: Numerical method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Yong-Sun

    1990-01-01

    A procedure for calculating 3-D, compressible laminar boundary layer flow on general fuselage shapes is described. The boundary layer solutions can be obtained in either nonorthogonal 'body oriented' coordinates or orthogonal streamline coordinates. The numerical procedure is 'second order' accurate, efficient and independent of the cross flow velocity direction. Numerical results are presented for several test cases, including a sharp cone, an ellipsoid of revolution, and a general aircraft fuselage at angle of attack. Comparisons are made between numerical results obtained using nonorthogonal curvilinear 'body oriented' coordinates and streamline coordinates.

  17. Semi-discrete Galerkin solution of the compressible boundary-layer equations with viscous-inviscid interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Brad A.; Meade, Andrew J., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A semi-discrete Galerkin (SDG) method is under development to model attached, turbulent, and compressible boundary layers for transonic airfoil analysis problems. For the boundary-layer formulation the method models the spatial variable normal to the surface with linear finite elements and the time-like variable with finite differences. A Dorodnitsyn transformed system of equations is used to bound the infinite spatial domain thereby providing high resolution near the wall and permitting the use of a uniform finite element grid which automatically follows boundary-layer growth. The second-order accurate Crank-Nicholson scheme is applied along with a linearization method to take advantage of the parabolic nature of the boundary-layer equations and generate a non-iterative marching routine. The SDG code can be applied to any smoothly-connected airfoil shape without modification and can be coupled to any inviscid flow solver. In this analysis, a direct viscous-inviscid interaction is accomplished between the Euler and boundary-layer codes through the application of a transpiration velocity boundary condition. Results are presented for compressible turbulent flow past RAE 2822 and NACA 0012 airfoils at various freestream Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers, and angles of attack.

  18. The influence of the mixed host emitting layer based on the TCTA and TPBi in blue phosphorescent OLED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhong-Lin; Tian, Wei; Kou, Zhi-Qi; Cheng, Shuang; Li, Yi-Hang

    2016-08-01

    The performance of the blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) can be improved by changing the proportion and structure of the host materials in the emitting layer. A series of devices with the mixed host (TCTAx: TPBi1-x) single emitting layer is fabricated and the best performance appears when x is 1/2. Then, the highest luminance and power efficiency reach 7189 (cd/m2) at 10.5 V and 41.7 lm/W at 2.75 V respectively after changing the position of the single host (TCTA or TPBi) emitting layer and the mixed host (TCTA1/2: TPBi1/2) emitting layer in the multiple emitting layers device. The power efficiency is almost 37% improved in device with the optimized mixed host multiple emitting layers than that of device with the mixed host single emitting layer, the former device shows great potential to realize the high efficiency blue PHOLEDs.

  19. Processing of mixed-waste compressed-gas cylinders on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.I.; Conley, T.B.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.

    1998-01-01

    To comply with restrictions on the storage of old compressed gas cylinders, the environmental management organization of Lockheed Martin Energy Systems must dispose of several thousand kilograms of compressed gases stored on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) because the cylinders cannot be taken off-site for disposal in their current configuration. In the ORR Site Treatment Plan, a milestone is cited that requires repackaging and shipment off-site of 21 cylinders by September 30, 1997. A project was undertaken to first evaluate and then either recontainerize or neutralize these cylinders using a transportable compressed gas recontainerization skid (TCGRS), which was developed by Integrated Environmental Services of Atlanta. The transportable system can: (1) sample, analyze, and identify at the site the chemical and radiological content of each cylinder, even those with inoperable valves; (2) breach cylinders, when necessary, to release their contents into a containment chamber; and (3) either neutralize the gas or liquid contents within the containment chamber or transfer the gas or liquids to a new cylinder. The old cylinders and cylinder fragments were disposed of and the gases neutralized or transferred to new cylinders for transportation off-site for disposal. The entire operation to process the 21 cylinders took place in only 5 days once the system was approved for operation. The system performed as expected and can now be used to process the potentially thousands of more cylinders located across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex that have not yet been declared surplus.

  20. Shear, Stability and Mixing within the Ice-Shelf-Ocean Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    Ocean-forced basal melting has been implicated in the widespread thinning of Antarctic ice shelves that has been causally linked with acceleration in the outflow of grounded ice. What determines the distribution and rates of basal melting and freezing beneath an ice shelf and how these respond to changes in the ocean temperature or circulation are therefore key questions. Recent years have seen major progress in our ability to observe basal melting and the ocean conditions that drive it, but data on the latter remain sparse, limiting our understanding of the key processes of ice-ocean heat transfer. In particular, we have no observations of current profiles through the buoyancy- and frictionally-controlled flows along the ice shelf base that drive mixing through the ice-ocean boundary layer. This presentation represents an attempt to address this gap in our knowledge through application of a very simple model of such boundary flows that considers only the spatial dimension perpendicular to the boundary. Initial results obtained with an unrealistic assumuption of constant eddy viscosity/diffusivity are nevertheless informative. For the buoyancy-driven flow two possible regimes exist: a weakly-stratified, geostrophic cross-slope current with an embedded Ekman layer, somewhat analogous to a conventional density current on a slope; or a strongly-stratified upslope jet with weak cross-slope flow, more analogous to an inverted katabatic wind. The latter is most appropriate when the ice-ocean interface is very steep, while for the gentle slopes typical of ice shelves the buoyant Ekman regime prevails. Introduction of a variable eddy viscosity/diffusivity derived from a local turbulence closure scheme modifies the current structure and stratification. There is a sharp step in properties across the surface layer, where the viscosity/diffusivity is low, weak gradients across the outer part of the boundary layer, where shear-driven mixing is strong, and a relatively strong

  1. Stratus: An interactive steady state mixed layer model for personal computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinn, Thomas A.; Schubert, Wayne H.

    1990-01-01

    A steady-state, horizontally homogeneous, cloud-topped marine boundary layer model based primarily on the work of Lilly (1968) and Schubert et al., (1979) is presented. The conservative thermodynamic variables are equivalent potential temperature, theta(sub e), and total water mixing ratio, q + l. Some of the differences between this and Lilly's (1968) model are: radiation is allowed to penetrate into the boundary layer; cloud top values of longwave radiation, equivalent potential temperature, and water vapor mixing ratio are linear functions of height derived from climatological data at California coastal stations; and the closure assumption assumes a weighted average of Lilly's (1968) maximum and minimum entrainment theories. This model was programmed in FORTRAN and will run interactively on an IBM-compatible personal computer. The program allows the user to specify the geographical location, the wind speed, the sea-surface temperature, the large scale horizontal divergence, and the initial guess for cloud top height. Output includes the steady state values of cloud top and cloud base height, mixed layer equivalent potential temperature and total water mixing ratio, and the associated convective and radiative fluxes.

  2. Methylmercury production below the mixed layer in the North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Joel D.; Popp, Brian N.; Drazen, Jeffrey C.; Anela Choy, C.; Johnson, Marcus W.

    2013-10-01

    Mercury enters marine food webs in the form of microbially generated monomethylmercury. Microbial methylation of inorganic mercury, generating monomethylmercury, is widespread in low-oxygen coastal sediments. The degree to which microbes also methylate mercury in the open ocean has remained uncertain, however. Here, we present measurements of the stable isotopic composition of mercury in nine species of marine fish that feed at different depths in the central North Pacific Subtropical Gyre. We document a systematic decline in δ202Hg, Δ199Hg and Δ201Hg values with the depth at which fish feed. We show that these mercury isotope trends can be explained only if monomethylmercury is produced below the surface mixed layer, including in the underlying oxygen minimum zone, that is, between 50 and more than 400m depth. Specifically, we estimate that about 20-40% of the monomethylmercury detected below the surface mixed layer originates from the surface and enters deeper waters either attached to sinking particles, or in zooplankton and micronekton that migrate to depth. We suggest that the remaining monomethylmercury found at depth is produced below the surface mixed layer by methylating microbes that live on sinking particles. We suggest that microbial production of monomethylmercury below the surface mixed later contributes significantly to anthropogenic mercury uptake into marine food webs.

  3. Fixed-point observation of mixed layer evolution in seasonally ice-free Chukchi Sea: Turbulent mixing due to gale winds and internal gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Y.; Inoue, J.; Nishino, S.

    2015-12-01

    A fixed-point observation using the R/V Mirai was conducted in the ice-free northern Chukchi Sea of the Arctic Ocean during September of 2013. During the program the authors performed repeated microstructure measurements to reveal the temporal evolution of the surface mixed layer and mixing processes in the upper water column. The shelf region was initially characterized by a distinct two-layer system comprising a warmer/ fresher top layer and a colder/saltier bottom layer. During the two-week observation period, the top-layer water showed two types of mixing processes: near-surface turbulence due to strong wind forcing and subsurface mixing due to internal gravity waves. In the first week, when the top layer was stratified with fresh sea ice meltwater, turbulent energy related to internal waves propagated through the subsurface stratification, resulting in a mechanical overturning near the pycnocline, followed by enhanced mixing there. In the second week, gale winds directly stirred up the upper water and then established a deeper homogenous layer. The combination of internal wave mixing and wind-driven turbulence may contribute to releasing the oceanic heat into the atmosphere, consequently promoting the preconditioning of surface water freezing.

  4. Digital integrated control of a Mach 2.5 mixed-compression supersonic inlet and an augmented mixed-flow turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batterton, P. G.; Arpasi, D. J.; Baumbick, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A digitally implemented integrated inlet-engine control system was designed and tested on a mixed-compression, axisymmetric, Mach 2.5, supersonic inlet with 45 percent internal supersonic area contraction and a TF30-P-3 augmented turbofan engine. The control matched engine airflow to available inlet airflow. By monitoring inlet terminal shock position and over-board bypass door command, the control adjusted engine speed so that in steady state, the shock would be at the desired location and the overboard bypass doors would be closed. During engine-induced transients, such as augmentor light-off and cutoff, the inlet operating point was momentarily changed to a more supercritical point to minimize unstarts. The digital control also provided automatic inlet restart. A variable inlet throat bleed control, based on throat Mach number, provided additional inlet stability margin.

  5. Sea ice and the ocean mixed layer over the Antarctic shelf seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petty, A. A.; Holland, P. R.; Feltham, D. L.

    2013-08-01

    An ocean mixed layer model has been incorporated into the Los Alamos sea ice model CICE to investigate regional variations in the surface-driven formation of Antarctic shelf waters. This model captures well the expected sea ice thickness distribution, and produces deep (> 500 m) mixed layers in the Weddell and Ross shelf seas each winter. This results in the complete destratification of the water column in deep southern coastal regions (leading to HSSW formation) and also in some shallower regions (no HSSW formation) of these seas. Shallower mixed layers are produced in the Amundsen and Bellingshausen seas. By deconstructing the surface power input to the mixed layer, we show that the freshwater flux from sea ice growth/melt dominates the evolution of the mixed layer in all seas, with a smaller contribution from the surface heat flux. The Weddell and Ross shelf seas receive an annual surplus of energy at the surface, the Amundsen shelf sea energy input in autumn/winter is balanced by energy extraction in spring/summer, and the Bellingshausen shelf sea experiences an annual surface energy deficit, through both a low energy input in autumn/winter and the highest energy loss in spring/summer. An analysis of the sea ice mass balance demonstrates the contrasting mean ice growth, melt and export in each region. The Weddell and Ross shelf seas have the highest annual ice growth, with a large fraction exported northwards each year, whereas the Bellingshausen shelf sea experiences the highest annual ice melt, driven by the advection of ice from the northeast. A linear regression analysis is performed to determine the temporal and spatial correlations between the autumn/winter mixed layer power input and several atmospheric variables. The temporal mean Weddell and Ross autumn/winter power input shows stronger spatial correlation to several atmospheric variables compared to the Amundsen and Bellingshausen. In contrast the spatial mean autumn/winter power input shows stronger

  6. Aerosol black carbon characteristics over Central India: Temporal variation and its dependence on mixed layer height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompalli, Sobhan Kumar; Babu, S. Suresh; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Manoj, M. R.; Kumar, N. V. P. Kiran; Shaeb, K. Hareef Baba; Joshi, Ashok Kumar

    2014-10-01

    In a first of its kind study over the Indian region, concurrent and extensive measurements of black carbon (BC) concentration and atmospheric boundary layer parameters are used to quantify the role of atmospheric boundary layer in producing temporal changes in BC. During this study, 18 months (2011-12) data of continuous measurements of BC aerosols, made over a semi-urban location, Nagpur, in Central India are used along with concurrent measurements of vertical profiles of atmospheric thermodynamics, made using weekly ascents of GPS aided Radiosonde for a period of 1 year. From the balloon data, mixed layer heights and ventilation coefficients are estimated, and the monthly and seasonal changes in BC mass concentration are examined in the light of the boundary layer changes. Seasonally, the BC mass concentration was highest (~ 4573 ± 1293 ng m- 3) in winter (December-February), and lowest (~ 1588 ± 897 ng m- 3) in monsoon (June-September), while remained moderate (~ 3137 ± 1446 ng m- 3) in pre-monsoon (March-May), and post-monsoon (~ 3634 ± 813 ng m- 3) (October-November) seasons. During the dry seasons, when the rainfall is scanty or insignificantly small, the seasonal variations in BC concentrations have a strong inverse relationship with mixed layer height and ventilation coefficient. However, the lowest BC concentrations do not occur during the season when the mixed layer height (MLH) is highest or the ventilation coefficient is the highest; rather it occurs when the rainfall is strong (during summer monsoon season) and airmass changes to primarily of marine origin.

  7. Mixed-layer kaolinite-montmorillonite from the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schultz, L.G.; Shepard, A.O.; Blackmon, P.D.; Starkey, H.C.

    1971-01-01

    Clay beds 1-2 m thick and interbedded with marine limestones probably of early Eocene age are composed of nearly pure mixed-layer kaolinite-montmorillonite. Particle size studies, electron micrographs, X-ray diffraction studies, chemical analyses, cation exchange experiments, DTA, and TGA indicate that clays from three different localities contain roughly equal proportions of randomly interlayered kaolinite and montmorillonite layers. The montmorillonite structural formulas average K0??2Na0??2Ca0??2Mg0??2(Al2??5Fe1??03+Mg0??5)(Al0??75Si7??25)O20+(OH)4-, with a deficiency of structural (OH) in either the montmorillonite or kaolinite layers. Nonexchangeable K+ indicates that a few layers are mica-like. Crystals are mostly round plates 1 10 to 1 20 ?? across. The feature most diagnostic of the mixed-layer character is an X-ray reflection near 8 A?? after heating at 300 ??C. The clays are inferred to have developed by weathering of volcanic ash and subsequent erosion and deposition in protected nearshore basins. ?? 1971.

  8. Effects of polytetrafluoroethylene treatment and compression on gas diffusion layer microstructure using high-resolution X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajeh-Hosseini-Dalasm, Navvab; Sasabe, Takashi; Tokumasu, Takashi; Pasaogullari, Ugur

    2014-11-01

    The microstructure of a TGP-H-120 Toray paper gas diffusion layer (GDL) was investigated using high resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT) technique, with a resolution of 1.8 μm and a field of view (FOV) of ∼1.8 × 1.8 mm. The images obtained from the tomography scans were further post processed, and image thresholding and binarization methodologies are presented. The validity of Otsu's thresholding method was examined. Detailed information on bulk porosity and porosity distribution of the GDL at various Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) treatments and uniform/non-uniform compression pressures was provided. A sample holder was designed to investigate the effects of non-uniform compression pressure, which enabled regulating compression pressure between 0, and 3 MPa at a gas channel/current collector rib configuration. The results show the heterogeneous and anisotropic microstructure of the GDL, non-uniform distribution of PTFE, and significant microstructural change under uniform/non-uniform compression. These findings provide useful inputs for numerical models to include the effects of microstructural changes in the study of transport phenomena within the GDL and to increase the accuracy and predictability of cell performance.

  9. Turbulent Friction in the Boundary Layer of a Flat Plate in a Two-Dimensional Compressible Flow at High Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankl, F.; Voishel, V.

    1943-01-01

    In the present report an investigation is made on a flat plate in a two-dimensional compressible flow of the effect of compressibility and heating on the turbulent frictional drag coefficient in the boundary layer of an airfoil or wing radiator. The analysis is based on the Prandtl-Karman theory of the turbulent boundary later and the Stodola-Crocco, theorem on the linear relation between the total energy of the flow and its velocity. Formulas are obtained for the velocity distribution and the frictional drag law in a turbulent boundary later with the compressibility effect and heat transfer taken into account. It is found that with increase of compressibility and temperature at full retardation of the flow (the temperature when the velocity of the flow at a given point is reduced to zero in case of an adiabatic process in the gas) at a constant R (sub x), the frictional drag coefficient C (sub f) decreased, both of these factors acting in the same sense.

  10. Engineering of an MBR supernatant fouling layer by fine particles addition: a possible way to control cake compressibility.

    PubMed

    Teychene, Benoît; Guigui, Christelle; Cabassud, Corinne

    2011-02-01

    For membrane bioreactors (MBR) applied to wastewater treatment membrane fouling is still the prevalent issue. The main limiting phenomena related to fouling is a sudden jump of the transmembrane pressure (TMP) often attributed to the collapse of the fouling layer. Among existing techniques to avoid or to delay this collapse, the addition of active particles membrane fouling reducers (polymer, resins, powdered activated carbon (PAC), zeolithe...) showed promising results. Thus the main objective of this work is to determine if fouling can be reduced by inclusion of inert particles (500 nm and inert compared to other fouling reducers) and which is the impact on filtration performances of the structuring of the fouling. Those particles were chosen for their different surface properties and their capability to form well structured layer. Results, obtained at constant pressure in dead end mode, show that the presence of particles changes foulant deposition and induces non-compressible fouling (in the range of 0.5-1 bar) and higher rejection values compared to filtration done on supernatant alone. Indeed dead end filtration tests show that whatever interactions between biofluid and particles, the addition of particles leads to better filtration performances (in terms of rejection, and fouling layer compressibility). Moreover results confirm the important role played by macromolecular compounds, during supernatant filtration, creating highly compressible and reversible fouling. In conclusion, this study done at lab-scale suggests the potential benefit to engineer fouling structure to control or to delay the collapse of the fouling layer. Finally this study offers the opportunities to enlarge the choice of membrane fouling reducers by taking into consideration their ability to form more consistent fouling (i.e. rigid, structured fouling). PMID:21232780

  11. A theoretical study of mixing downstream of transverse injection into a supersonic boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.; Zelazny, S. W.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical and analytical study was made of mixing downstream of transverse hydrogen injection, from single and multiple orifices, into a Mach 4 air boundary layer over a flat plate. Numerical solutions to the governing three-dimensional, elliptic boundary layer equations were obtained using a general purpose computer program. Founded upon a finite element solution algorithm. A prototype three-dimensional turbulent transport model was developed using mixing length theory in the wall region and the mass defect concept in the outer region. Excellent agreement between the computed flow field and experimental data for a jet/freestream dynamic pressure ratio of unity was obtained in the centerplane region of the single-jet configuration. Poorer agreement off centerplane suggests an inadequacy of the extrapolated two-dimensional turbulence model. Considerable improvement in off-centerplane computational agreement occured for a multi-jet configuration, using the same turbulent transport model.

  12. Simulation of mixed-host emitting layer based organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riku, C.; Kee, Y. Y.; Ong, T. S.; Yap, S. S.; Tou, T. Y.

    2015-04-01

    `SimOLED' simulator is used in this work to investigate the efficiency of the mixed-host organic light emitting devices (MH-OLEDs). Tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum(3) (Alq3) and N,N-diphenyl-N,N-Bis(3-methylphenyl)-1,1-diphenyl-4,4-diamine (TPD) are used as the electron transport layer (ETL) material and hole transport layer (HTL) material respectively, and the indium-doped tin oxide (ITO) and aluminum (Al) as anode and cathode. Three MH-OLEDs, A, B and C with the same structure of ITO / HTM (15 nm) / Mixed host (70 nm) / ETM (10 nm) /Al, are stimulated with ratios TPD:Alq3 of 3:5, 5:5, and 5:3 respectively. The Poole-Frenkel model for electron and hole mobilities is employed to compute the current density-applied voltage-luminance characteristics, distribution of the electric field, carrier concentrations and recombination rate.

  13. Aiding flows non-unique similarity solutions of mixed-convection boundary-layer equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridha, A.; Curie, Marie

    1996-05-01

    The similarity equations for mixed-convection boundary-layer flow past a wedge having one of its surfaces parallel to the horizontal are derived for the latter surface. Both cases of prescribed wall temperature and heat flux are considered. It is shown that non-unique solutions exist for aiding (α > 0) as well as opposing flows (α < 0); α being the buoyancy parameter. In some situations there are four simultaneous solutions. Dual solutions for two previously studied mixed-convection boundary-layer flows are shown to exist for α > 0 in addition to those already reported in the literature for α < 0. Namely, these correspond to vertical flat plate and vertical cylinder problems.

  14. Variability in a mixed layer ocean model driven by stochastic atmospheric forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, M.A.; Penland, C.

    1996-10-01

    A stochastic model of atmospheric surface conditions, developed from 30 years of data at Ocean Weather Station P in the northeast Pacific, is used to drive a mixed layer model of the upper ocean. The spectral characteristics of anomalies in the four atmospheric variables: air and dewpoint temperature, wind speed and solar radiation, and many ocean features, including the seasonal cycle are reasonably well reproduced in a 500-year model simulation. However, the ocean model slightly underestimates the range of the mean and standard deviation of both temperature and mixed layer depth over the course of the year. The spectrum of the monthly SST anomalies from the model simulation are in close agreement with observations, especially when atmospheric forcing associated with El Nino is included. The spectral characteristics of the midlatitude SST anomalies is consistent with stochastic climate theory proposed by Frankignoul and Hasselmann (1977) for periods up to {approximately}6 months. 72 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Mixed-layered bismuth-oxygen-iodine materials for capture and waste disposal of radioactive iodine

    DOEpatents

    Krumhansl, James L; Nenoff, Tina M

    2013-02-26

    Materials and methods of synthesizing mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine materials, which can be synthesized in the presence of aqueous radioactive iodine species found in caustic solutions (e.g. NaOH or KOH). This technology provides a one-step process for both iodine sequestration and storage from nuclear fuel cycles. It results in materials that will be durable for repository conditions much like those found in Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and estimated for Yucca Mountain (YMP). By controlled reactant concentrations, optimized compositions of these mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine inorganic materials are produced that have both a high iodine weight percentage and a low solubility in groundwater environments.

  16. Mixed-layered bismuth--oxygen--iodine materials for capture and waste disposal of radioactive iodine

    DOEpatents

    Krumhansl, James L; Nenoff, Tina M

    2015-01-06

    Materials and methods of synthesizing mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine materials, which can be synthesized in the presence of aqueous radioactive iodine species found in caustic solutions (e.g. NaOH or KOH). This technology provides a one-step process for both iodine sequestration and storage from nuclear fuel cycles. It results in materials that will be durable for repository conditions much like those found in Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and estimated for Yucca Mountain (YMP). By controlled reactant concentrations, optimized compositions of these mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine inorganic materials are produced that have both a high iodine weight percentage and a low solubility in groundwater environments.

  17. Asymptotic solution of the turbulent mixing layer for velocity ratio close to unity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higuera, F. J.; Jimenez, J.; Linan, A.

    1996-01-01

    The equations describing the first two terms of an asymptotic expansion of the solution of the planar turbulent mixing layer for values of the velocity ratio close to one are obtained. The first term of this expansion is the solution of the well-known time-evolving problem and the second, which includes the effects of the increase of the turbulence scales in the stream-wise direction, obeys a linear system of equations. Numerical solutions of these equations for a two-dimensional reacting mixing layer show that the correction to the time-evolving solution may explain the asymmetry of the entrainment and the differences in product generation observed in flip experiments.

  18. Mass transfer in “metal layer-silicon substrate” systems under the action of compression plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uglov, V. V.; Kudaktsin, R. S.; Petukhou, Yu. A.; Kvasov, N. T.; Punko, A. V.; Astashynski, V. M.; Kuzmitski, A. M.

    2012-07-01

    Redistribution of components in surface layers of “metal-on-silicon” system under the action of compression plasma flows (CPF) with energy density 3-16 J/cm2 are studied experimentally by SEM, AES. Mechanisms of heat and mass transfer are simulated by numerical solving of heat and mass transfer equations. The suggested model of mass transfer takes into account convective motion in the melt surface layer and temperature dependence of substance parameters. It provides dependence of metal penetration depth and its concentration on CPF energy density and convection velocity. Results of simulations are in accordance with experimental data; therefore, the proposed model enables to choose appropriate treatment modes for the formation of metal-doped silicon layers with controlled thickness and elemental composition.

  19. A general method for calculating three-dimensional compressible laminar and turbulent boundary layers on arbitrary wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, T.; Kaups, K.; Ramsey, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The method described utilizes a nonorthogonal coordinate system for boundary-layer calculations. It includes a geometry program that represents the wing analytically, and a velocity program that computes the external velocity components from a given experimental pressure distribution when the external velocity distribution is not computed theoretically. The boundary layer method is general, however, and can also be used for an external velocity distribution computed theoretically. Several test cases were computed by this method and the results were checked with other numerical calculations and with experiments when available. A typical computation time (CPU) on an IBM 370/165 computer for one surface of a wing which roughly consist of 30 spanwise stations and 25 streamwise stations, with 30 points across the boundary layer is less than 30 seconds for an incompressible flow and a little more for a compressible flow.

  20. Helicity in Supercritical O2/H2 and C7H16/N2 Mixing Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okongo, Nora; Bellan, Josette

    2004-01-01

    This report describes a study of databases produced by direct numerical simulation of mixing layers developing between opposing flows of two fluids under supercritical conditions, the purpose of the study being to elucidate chemical-species-specific aspects of turbulence, with emphasis on helicity. The simulations were performed for two different fluid pairs -- O2/H2 and C7H16/N2 -- at similar values of reduced pressure.

  1. An experimental study of curved mixing layers: Flow visualization using volume rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasso, Paris S.; Mungal, M. G.

    1991-01-01

    The existence and importance of large-scale spanwise vortical structures for 2-D straight mixing layers has been well documented in the last decade. Computer models and simulations have sought to reproduce these vortical structures associated with the Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability mode which is due to the shear per se. Secondary streamwise vortical structures for the same flows were also seen experimentally and have recently been given importance in computational efforts. Curved mixing layers can be characterized as stable (the high-speed stream is placed on the outside of the longitudinal bend), leading to a suppression of the Taylor-Gortler (T-G) instability, and unstable (high-speed stream on the inside of the bend), leading to an enhancement of the T-G instability. The T-G instability is associated with the centripetal acceleration that the curvature imparts. Thus, curvature superimposed on 2-D shear layer flows provides a way for studying the importance of streamwise vorticity, its competition with spanwise vorticity, and changes to entrainment and mixing. Furthermore, the outcome of the competition of a relatively enhanced or suppressed T-G instability with the K-H instability offers the possibility of achieving passive mixing enhancement. As a first step in understanding the competition between the K-H and the T-G instabilities and the resulting changes to the structure of the flow, highly resolved visualizations of the flow structure for the stable and the unstable configurations are provided. The straight layer is also visualized for comparison with earlier works.

  2. The influence of nitrogen co-deposition in mixed layers on deuterium retention and thermal desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Založnik, Anže; Markelj, Sabina; Čadež, Iztok; Pelicon, Primož; Vavpetič, Primož; Porosnicu, Corneliu; Lungu, Cristian P.

    2015-12-01

    The influence of nitrogen co-deposition in ITER relevant mixed layers on retention and release dynamics of deuterium was studied in situ by Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) and thermodesorption spectroscopy. W:Al and W:Be mixed layers deposited by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) method were used in order to verify the possibility of Al being used as proxy material for Be in experiments regarding D uptake. Samples were exposed to neutral deuterium atom beam with fluence of 3.24 × 1019 D/cm2 (flux 4.5 × 1014 D/cm2s) at 390 K and NRA with 3He ions was used for depth profile analysis of deuterium content after the exposure. For the investigation of deuterium release dynamics the samples were linearly heated to around 1000 K and during this process NRA spectra at single energy were collected every minute. Complementary to NRA a quadrupole mass spectrometer was used, following masses 2, 3 and 4 in the background vacuum. The numeric simulation of deuterium thermal desorption was performed and desorption energies of desorption sites were calculated. Same experiments were performed with mixed material samples produced by TVA in the presence of nitrogen atmosphere. Nitrogen co-deposition in the mixed layers was found to have an important influence on deuterium retention. The concentration of deuterium in the sample increased by a factor of 4.8 in the presence of nitrogen in the W:Al and by a factor of 1.8 in the W:Be layer compared to the nitrogen-free sample.

  3. Mixed Layer Formation and Restratification in the Presence of Mesoscale and Submesoscale Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couvelard, X.; Tréguier, A. M.; Dumas, F.; Garnier, V.; Ponte, A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent realistic high resolution modeling studies show a net increase of submesoscale activity in fall and winter when the Mixed Layer Depth (hereafter MLD) is at its maximum. This submesoscale activity is associated with the shallowing of the MLD when compared to similar model configurations at lower resolution. Both phenomena can be related to the development of Mixed Layer Instabilities (MLIs), which by slumping the horizontal density gradient in the mixed layer convert Available Potential Energy into submesoscale Eddy Kinetic Energy and contribute to a fast restratification. While parameterizations of the shallowing of the mixed layer by MLIs have been proposed they are based on idealized configurations and are not yet fully tested in realistically forced simulations. In the present work, the ML formation and restratification is studied by uniformly cooling a fully turbulent zonal jet in a periodic channel at different resolutions (eddy resolving (10km) to submesoscale permitting (2km)). The effect of horizontal resolution is quantified in terms of MLD, restratification rate, buoyancy fluxes, and conversion of Available Potential Energy in Eddy Kinetic Energy. At the highest resolution when submesoscale is active the MLD formed during the surface cooling is shallower by about 30% and the total restratification almost three times faster. Such differences between low and high resolution models are explained by the submesoscale vertical buoyancy flux which compensates the convection during the formation phase and accelerates the restratification once the surface cooling stops. These findings are robust and the uncertainties are quantified by ensemble experiments. The most common parameterization of MLIs has been implemented and tested in our coarse resolution configuration, leading as expected to a slightly faster restratification, but the shallowing of the MLD is not represented, suggesting a caveat in such parameterization in presence of strong convection.

  4. DNS of spark ignition and edge flame propagation in turbulent droplet-laden mixing layers

    SciTech Connect

    Neophytou, A.; Mastorakos, E.; Cant, R.S.

    2010-06-15

    A parametric study of forced ignition at the mixing layer between air and air carrying fine monosized fuel droplets is done through one-step chemistry direct numerical simulations to determine the influence of the size and volatility of the droplets, the spark location, the droplet-air mixing layer initial thickness and the turbulence intensity on the ignition success and the subsequent flame propagation. The propagation is analyzed in terms of edge flame displacement speed, which has not been studied before for turbulent edge spray flames. Spark ignition successfully resulted in a tribrachial flame if enough fuel vapour was available at the spark location, which occurred when the local droplet number density was high. Ignition was achieved even when the spark was offset from the spray, on the air side, due to the diffusion of heat from the spark, provided droplets evaporated rapidly. Large kernels were obtained by sparking close to the spray, since fuel was more readily available. At long times after the spark, for all flames studied, the probability density function of the displacement speed was wide, with a mean value in the range 0.55-0.75S{sub L}, with S{sub L} the laminar burning velocity of a stoichiometric gaseous premixed flame. This value is close to the mean displacement speed in turbulent edge flames with gaseous fuel. The displacement speed was negatively correlated with curvature. The detrimental effect of curvature was attenuated with a large initial kernel and by increasing the thickness of the mixing layer. The mixing layer was thicker when evaporation was slow and the turbulence intensity higher. However, high turbulence intensity also distorted the kernel which could lead to high values of curvature. The edge flame reaction component increased when the maximum temperature coincided with the stoichiometric contour. The results are consistent with the limited available experimental evidence and provide insights into the processes associated with

  5. A self-excited wire method for control of the evolution of a turbulent mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandsburger, U.; Ding, C.

    1993-01-01

    A new technique for the control of the evolution of a turbulent two-stream (planar) mixing layer is presented. A (music) wire strung across the flow and placed in the zone near the trailing edge of the splitter plate is employed to excite the flow. The vibrating wire triggers the shedding of multiple vortical structures in the near field, and eventually locks the large coherent structures to the excitation frequency in the far field.

  6. Near-inertial kinetic energy budget of the mixed layer and shear evolution in the transition layer in the Arabian Sea during the monsoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, Sudip; Tandon, Amit; Rudnick, Daniel L.; Thomas Farrar, J.

    2015-09-01

    We present the horizontal kinetic energy (KE) balance of near-inertial currents in the mixed layer and explain shear evolution in the transition layer using observations from a mooring at 15.26° N in the Arabian Sea during the southwest monsoon. The highly sheared and stratified transition layer at the mixed-layer base varies between 5 m and 35 m and correlates negatively with the wind stress. Results from the mixed layer near-inertial KE (NIKE) balance suggest that wind energy at times can energize the transition layer and at other times is fully utilized within the mixed layer. A simple two layer model is utilized to study the shear evolution in the transition layer and shown to match well with observations. The shear production in this model arises from alignment of wind stress and shear. Although the winds are unidirectional during the monsoon, the shear in the transition layer is predominantly near-inertial. The near-inertial shear bursts in the observations show the same phasing and magnitude at near-inertial frequencies as the wind-shear alignment term.

  7. Interannual variability of the mixed layer winter convection and spiciness generation in the Eastern Subtropical North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodziejczyk, Nicolas; Reverdin, Gilles; Lazar, Alban

    2014-05-01

    The Argo data set is used to study the winter conditions in the north-eastern subtropical-tropical Atlantic during 2006-2012. During winter 2010, the mixed layer depth is abnormally shallow and a strong negative anomaly of density compensated salinity ('spiciness') is generated in the permanent pycnocline. This is primary explained by unusual weak buoyancy flux during the late winter in the subtropical north-eastern Atlantic (NEA). These conditions contrast with the 5 other studied winters, that show deeper mixed layer and positive spiciness anomalies in the permanent pycnocline. Particularly deep mixed layer and strong spiciness anomalies are observed during late winter 2012. The conditions during winter 2010 are likely explained by historically low North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and high Tropical North Atlantic index (TNA). Interannual variability of the eastern subtropical mixed layer is investigated using a simple 1-D bulk model including a mean thermohaline (temperature and salinity) linear profiles, and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) conservation in the upper ocean layer, and interannual air-sea buoyancy forcing during the fall-winters 2006-2012. The mixed layer depth and the thermohaline ('spiciness') anomalies generated in a strongly compensated layer at the base of the mixed layer and in the permanent pycnocline are associated with the convective mixing driven by the atmospheric buoyancy flux during the boreal winter season.

  8. Shear rheology of mixed protein adsorption layers vs their structure studied by surface force measurements.

    PubMed

    Danov, Krassimir D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Radulova, Gergana M; Basheva, Elka S; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Pelan, Eddie G

    2015-08-01

    The hydrophobins are proteins that form the most rigid adsorption layers at liquid interfaces in comparison with all other investigated proteins. The mixing of hydrophobin HFBII with other conventional proteins is expected to reduce the surface shear elasticity and viscosity, E(sh) and η(sh), proportional to the fraction of the conventional protein. However, the experiments show that the effect of mixing can be rather different depending on the nature of the additive. If the additive is a globular protein, like β-lactoglobulin and ovalbumin, the surface rigidity is preserved, and even enhanced. The experiments with separate foam films indicate that this is due to the formation of a bilayer structure at the air/water interface. The more hydrophobic HFBII forms the upper layer adjacent to the air phase, whereas the conventional globular protein forms the lower layer that faces the water phase. Thus, the elastic network formed by the adsorbed hydrophobin remains intact, and even reinforced by the adjacent layer of globular protein. In contrast, the addition of the disordered protein β-casein leads to softening of the HFBII adsorption layer. Similar (an even stronger) effect is produced by the nonionic surfactant Tween 20. This can be explained with the penetration of the hydrophobic tails of β-casein and Tween 20 between the HFBII molecules at the interface, which breaks the integrity of the hydrophobin interfacial elastic network. The analyzed experimental data for the surface shear rheology of various protein adsorption layers comply with a viscoelastic thixotropic model, which allows one to determine E(sh) and η(sh) from the measured storage and loss moduli, G' and G″. The results could contribute for quantitative characterization and deeper understanding of the factors that control the surface rigidity of protein adsorption layers with potential application for the creation of stable foams and emulsions with fine bubbles or droplets. PMID:24828304

  9. Mixed convection boundary layer flow over a horizontal elliptic cylinder with constant heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed, Tariq; Ahmad, Hussain; Ghaffari, Abuzar

    2015-12-01

    Mixed convection boundary layer flow of a viscous fluid over a horizontal elliptic cylinder with a constant heat flux is investigated numerically. The governing partial differential equations are transformed to non-dimensional form and then are solved by an efficient implicit finite different scheme known as Keller-box method. The solutions are expressed in the form of skin friction and Nusselt number, which are plotted against the eccentric angle. The effect of pertinent parameters such as mixed convection parameter, aspect ratio (ratio of lengths of minor axis to major axis), and Prandtl number on skin friction and Nusselt number are illustrated through graphs for both blunt and slender orientations. The increase in the value of mixed convection parameter results in increase in skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number for blunt as well as slender orientations.

  10. An assumed pdf approach for the calculation of supersonic mixing layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baurle, R. A.; Drummond, J. P.; Hassan, H. A.

    1992-01-01

    In an effort to predict the effect that turbulent mixing has on the extent of combustion, a one-equation turbulence model is added to an existing Navier-Stokes solver with finite-rate chemistry. To average the chemical-source terms appearing in the species-continuity equations, an assumed pdf approach is also used. This code was used to analyze the mixing and combustion caused by the mixing layer formed by supersonic coaxial H2-air streams. The chemistry model employed allows for the formation of H2O2 and HO2. Comparisons are made with recent measurements using laser Raman diagnostics. Comparisons include temperature and its rms, and concentrations of H2, O2, N2, H2O, and OH. In general, good agreement with experiment was noted.

  11. Initial condition effects on large scale structure in numerical simulations of plane mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullan, W. A.; Garrett, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, Large Eddy Simulations are performed on the spatially developing plane turbulent mixing layer. The simulated mixing layers originate from initially laminar conditions. The focus of this research is on the effect of the nature of the imposed fluctuations on the large-scale spanwise and streamwise structures in the flow. Two simulations are performed; one with low-level three-dimensional inflow fluctuations obtained from pseudo-random numbers, the other with physically correlated fluctuations of the same magnitude obtained from an inflow generation technique. Where white-noise fluctuations provide the inflow disturbances, no spatially stationary streamwise vortex structure is observed, and the large-scale spanwise turbulent vortical structures grow continuously and linearly. These structures are observed to have a three-dimensional internal geometry with branches and dislocations. Where physically correlated provide the inflow disturbances a "streaky" streamwise structure that is spatially stationary is observed, with the large-scale turbulent vortical structures growing with the square-root of time. These large-scale structures are quasi-two-dimensional, on top of which the secondary structure rides. The simulation results are discussed in the context of the varying interpretations of mixing layer growth that have been postulated. Recommendations are made concerning the data required from experiments in order to produce accurate numerical simulation recreations of real flows.

  12. Simulation of mixed convection flow in a room with a two-layer turbulence model.

    PubMed

    Xu, W; Chen, Q

    2000-12-01

    Most indoor airflows are mixed convection. In order to simulate mixed convection accurately and efficiently, this paper uses a two-layer turbulence model. The two-layer model combines a one-equation model for near wall flow together with the standard k-epsilon model for outer-wall flow. The model has been used to predict the mixed convection by displacement ventilation in an office. The computed results agree well with the corresponding airflow pattern and the distributions of air temperature, air velocity, air velocity fluctuation, and tracer-gas concentration. The model can predict correctly heat transfer from a wall where the standard k-epsilon model and re-normalization group (RNG) k-epsilon model with wall functions often fails. The computing cost required by the two-layer model is comparable to that of the standard k-epsilon model and RNG k-epsilon model and is significantly less than that by a low-Reynolds number model. PMID:11089334

  13. The effects of temporal variability of mixed layer depth on primary productivity around Bermuda

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bissett, W. Paul; Meyers, Mark B.; Walsh, John J.; Mueller-Karger, Frank E.

    1994-01-01

    Temporal variations in primary production and surface chlorophyll concentrations, as measured by ship and satellite around Bermuda, were simulated with a numerical model. In the upper 450 m of the water column, population dynamics of a size-fractionated phytoplankton community were forced by daily changes of wind, light, grazing stress, and nutrient availability. The temporal variations of production and chlorophyll were driven by changes in nutrient introduction to the euphotic zone due to both high- and low-frequency changes of the mixed layer depth within 32 deg-34 deg N, 62 deg-64 deg W between 1979 and 1984. Results from the model derived from high-frequency (case 1) changes in the mixed layer depth showed variations in primary production and peak chlorophyll concentrations when compared with results from the model derived from low-frequency (case 2) mixed layer depth changes. Incorporation of size-fractionated plankton state variables in the model led to greater seasonal resolution of measured primary production and vertical chlorophyll profiles. The findings of this study highlight the possible inadequacy of estimating primary production in the sea from data of low-frequency temporal resolution and oversimplified biological simulations.

  14. Experiments on the Southern Oscillation with CAM3 coupled to a Mixed Layer Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier, E.; Sokolov, A. P.

    2010-12-01

    Recent modeling studies suggest that the atmospheric component plays a dominant role in the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon. In particular, simulations in which an Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) is coupled to a mixed-layer ocean model can produce ‘ENSO-like’ variability with associated patterns in SST, precipitation, or atmospheric circulation similar to that of ENSO, and referred to as 'Atmospheric Walker Mode' (AWM). In the absence of Bjerknes feedback (no ocean dynamics), the AWM relies on ocean-to-atmosphere latent heat flux and cloud forcing feedback. To study the AWM, we perform a number of experiments using the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) version 3 coupled to a mixed-layer ocean, including varying the model resolution and the depth of the mixed layer. We investigate the possible climate change impacts on the AWM by carrying out a number of equilibrium climate change simulations for a doubled CO2 with different values of the model's climate sensitivity. Results show that both the magnitude and the periodicity of the simulated AWM are rather different. This study provides further insight into the ENSO response to increasing greenhouse gas—induced radiative forcing.

  15. Turbulence in Supercritical O2/H2 and C7H16/N2 Mixing Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth; Okong'o, Nora

    2003-01-01

    This report presents a study of numerical simulations of mixing layers developing between opposing flows of paired fluids under supercritical conditions, the purpose of the study being to elucidate chemical-species-specific aspects of turbulence. The simulations were performed for two different fluid pairs O2/H2 and C7H16/N2 at similar reduced initial pressures (reduced pressure is defined as pressure divided by critical pressure). Thermodynamically, O2/H2 behaves more nearly like an ideal mixture and has greater solubility, relative to C7H16/N2, which departs strongly from ideality. Because of a specified smaller initial density stratification, the C7H16/N2 layers exhibited greater levels of growth, global molecular mixing, and turbulence. However, smaller density gradients at the transitional state for the O2/H2 system were interpreted as indicating that locally, this system exhibits enhanced mixing as a consequence of its greater solubility and closer approach to ideality. These thermodynamic features were shown to affect entropy dissipation, which was found to be larger for O2/H2 and concentrated in high-density-gradient-magnitude regions that are distortions of the initial density-stratification boundary. In C7H16/N2, the regions of largest dissipation were found to lie in high-density-gradient-magnitude regions that result from mixing of the two fluids.

  16. Boundary Layer CO2 mixing ratio measurements by an airborne pulsed IPDA lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, A. K.; Mao, J.; Abshire, J. B.; Allan, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    Since the primary signature of CO2 fluxes at the surface occurs in the planetary boundary layer (PBL), remote sensing measurements of CO2 that can resolve the CO2 absorption in the PBL separate from the total column are more sensitive to fluxes than those that can only measure a total column. The NASA Goddard CO2 sounder is a pulsed, range-resolved lidar that samples multiple (presently 30) wavelengths across the 1572.335 nm CO2 absorption line. The range resolution and line shape measurement enable CO2 mixing ratio measurements to be made in two or more altitude layers including the PBL via lidar cloud-slicing and multi-layer retrievals techniques. The pulsed lidar approach allows range-resolved backscatter of scattering from ground and cloud tops. Post flight data analysis can be used split the vertical CO2 column into layers (lidar cloud-slicing) and solve for the CO2 mixing ratio in each layer. We have demonstrated lidar cloud slicing with lidar measurements from a flight over Iowa, USA in August 2011 during the corn-growing season, remotely measuring a ≈15 ppm drawdown in the PBL CO2. We will present results using an improved lidar cloud slicing retrieval algorithm as well as preliminary measurements from the upcoming ASCENDS 2014 flight campaign. The CO2 absorption line is also more pressure broadened at lower altitudes. Analyzing the line shape also allows solving for some vertical resolution in the CO2 distribution. By allowing the retrieval process to independently vary the column concentrations in two or more altitude layers, one can perform a best-fit retrieval to obtain the CO2 mixing ratios in each of the layers. Analysis of airborne lidar measurements (in 2011) over Iowa, USA and Four Corners, New Mexico, USA show that for altitudes above 8 km, the CO2 sounder can detect and measure enhanced or diminished CO2 mixing ratios in the PBL even in the absence of clouds. We will present these results as well as preliminary measurements from the upcoming

  17. Assessment of surface turbulent fluxes using geostationary satellite surface skin temperatures and a mixed layer planetary boundary layer scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diak, George R.; Stewart, Tod R.

    1989-01-01

    A method is presented for evaluating the fluxes of sensible and latent heating at the land surface, using satellite-measured surface temperature changes in a composite surface layer-mixed layer representation of the planetary boundary layer. The basic prognostic model is tested by comparison with synoptic station information at sites where surface evaporation climatology is well known. The remote sensing version of the model, using satellite-measured surface temperature changes, is then used to quantify the sharp spatial gradient in surface heating/evaporation across the central United States. An error analysis indicates that perhaps five levels of evaporation are recognizable by these methods and that the chief cause of error is the interaction of errors in the measurement of surface temperature change with errors in the assigment of surface roughness character. Finally, two new potential methods for remote sensing of the land-surface energy balance are suggested which will relay on space-borne instrumentation planned for the 1990s.

  18. Time accurate simulations of compressible shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Steinberger, Craig J.; Vidoni, Thomas J.; Madnia, Cyrus K.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this research are to employ direct numerical simulation (DNS) to study the phenomenon of mixing (or lack thereof) in compressible free shear flows and to suggest new means of enhancing mixing in such flows. The shear flow configurations under investigation are those of parallel mixing layers and planar jets under both non-reacting and reacting nonpremixed conditions. During the three-years of this research program, several important issues regarding mixing and chemical reactions in compressible shear flows were investigated.

  19. Vertical velocity variance in the mixed layer from radar wind profilers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eng, K.; Coulter, R.L.; Brutsaert, W.

    2003-01-01

    Vertical velocity variance data were derived from remotely sensed mixed layer turbulence measurements at the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) facility in Butler County, Kansas. These measurements and associated data were provided by a collection of instruments that included two 915 MHz wind profilers, two radio acoustic sounding systems, and two eddy correlation devices. The data from these devices were available through the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE) database operated by Argonne National Laboratory. A signal processing procedure outlined by Angevine et al. was adapted and further built upon to derive vertical velocity variance, w_pm???2, from 915 MHz wind profiler measurements in the mixed layer. The proposed procedure consisted of the application of a height-dependent signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) filter, removal of outliers plus and minus two standard deviations about the mean on the spectral width squared, and removal of the effects of beam broadening and vertical shearing of horizontal winds. The scatter associated with w_pm???2 was mainly affected by the choice of SNR filter cutoff values. Several different sets of cutoff values were considered, and the optimal one was selected which reduced the overall scatter on w_pm???2 and yet retained a sufficient number of data points to average. A similarity relationship of w_pm???2 versus height was established for the mixed layer on the basis of the available data. A strong link between the SNR and growth/decay phases of turbulence was identified. Thus, the mid to late afternoon hours, when strong surface heating occurred, were observed to produce the highest quality signals.

  20. Vertical velocity variance in the mixed layer from radar wind profilers.

    SciTech Connect

    Eng, K.; Coulter, R. L.; Brutsaert, W.; Environmental Research; Cornell Univ.

    2003-11-01

    Vertical velocity variance data were derived from remotely sensed mixed layer turbulence measurements at the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) facility in Butler County, Kansas. These measurements and associated data were provided by a collection of instruments that included two 915 MHz wind profilers, two radio acoustic sounding systems, and two eddy correlation devices. The data from these devices were available through the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE) database operated by Argonne National Laboratory. A signal processing procedure outlined by Angevine et al. was adapted and further built upon to derive vertical velocity variance, {omega}'{sup 2}, from 915 MHz wind profiler measurements in the mixed layer. The proposed procedure consisted of the application of a height-dependent signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) filter, removal of outliers plus and minus two standard deviations about the mean on the spectral width squared, and removal of the effects of beam broadening and vertical shearing of horizontal winds. The scatter associated with {omega}'{sup 2} was mainly affected by the choice of SNR filter cutoff values. Several different sets of cutoff values were considered, and the optimal one was selected which reduced the overall scatter on {omega}'{sup 2} and yet retained a sufficient number of data points to average. A similarity relationship of {omega}'{sup 2} versus height was established for the mixed layer on the basis of the available data. A strong link between the SNR and growth/decay phases of turbulence was identified. Thus, the mid to late afternoon hours, when strong surface heating occurred, were observed to produce the highest quality signals.

  1. Artificial Fluid Properties for Large-Eddy Simulation of Compressible Turbulent Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, A W

    2007-01-08

    An alternative methodology is described for Large-Eddy Simulation of flows involving shocks, turbulence and mixing. In lieu of filtering the governing equations, it is postulated that the large-scale behavior of an ''LES'' fluid, i.e., a fluid with artificial properties, will be similar to that of a real fluid, provided the artificial properties obey certain constraints. The artificial properties consist of modifications to the shear viscosity, bulk viscosity, thermal conductivity and species diffusivity of a fluid. The modified transport coefficients are designed to damp out high wavenumber modes, close to the resolution limit, without corrupting lower modes. Requisite behavior of the artificial properties is discussed and results are shown for a variety of test problems, each designed to exercise different aspects of the models. When combined with a 10th-order compact scheme, the overall method exhibits excellent resolution characteristics for turbulent mixing, while capturing shocks and material interfaces in crisp fashion.

  2. Onset of hydrodynamic mix in high-velocity, highly compressed inertial confinement fusion implosions.

    PubMed

    Ma, T; Patel, P K; Izumi, N; Springer, P T; Key, M H; Atherton, L J; Benedetti, L R; Bradley, D K; Callahan, D A; Celliers, P M; Cerjan, C J; Clark, D S; Dewald, E L; Dixit, S N; Döppner, T; Edgell, D H; Epstein, R; Glenn, S; Grim, G; Haan, S W; Hammel, B A; Hicks, D; Hsing, W W; Jones, O S; Khan, S F; Kilkenny, J D; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G A; Landen, O L; Le Pape, S; MacGowan, B J; Mackinnon, A J; MacPhee, A G; Meezan, N B; Moody, J D; Pak, A; Parham, T; Park, H-S; Ralph, J E; Regan, S P; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Ross, J S; Spears, B K; Smalyuk, V; Suter, L J; Tommasini, R; Town, R P; Weber, S V; Lindl, J D; Edwards, M J; Glenzer, S H; Moses, E I

    2013-08-23

    Deuterium-tritium inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility have demonstrated yields ranging from 0.8 to 7×10(14), and record fuel areal densities of 0.7 to 1.3 g/cm2. These implosions use hohlraums irradiated with shaped laser pulses of 1.5-1.9 MJ energy. The laser peak power and duration at peak power were varied, as were the capsule ablator dopant concentrations and shell thicknesses. We quantify the level of hydrodynamic instability mix of the ablator into the hot spot from the measured elevated absolute x-ray emission of the hot spot. We observe that DT neutron yield and ion temperature decrease abruptly as the hot spot mix mass increases above several hundred ng. The comparison with radiation-hydrodynamic modeling indicates that low mode asymmetries and increased ablator surface perturbations may be responsible for the current performance. PMID:24010449

  3. Artificial fluid properties for large-eddy simulation of compressible turbulent mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Andrew W.

    2007-05-01

    An alternative methodology is described for large-eddy simulation (LES) of flows involving shocks, turbulence, and mixing. In lieu of filtering the governing equations, it is postulated that the large-scale behavior of a LES fluid, i.e., a fluid with artificial properties, will be similar to that of a real fluid, provided the artificial properties obey certain constraints. The artificial properties consist of modifications to the shear viscosity, bulk viscosity, thermal conductivity, and species diffusivity of a fluid. The modified transport coefficients are designed to damp out high wavenumber modes, close to the resolution limit, without corrupting lower modes. Requisite behavior of the artificial properties is discussed and results are shown for a variety of test problems, each designed to exercise different aspects of the models. When combined with a tenth-order compact scheme, the overall method exhibits excellent resolution characteristics for turbulent mixing, while capturing shocks and material interfaces in a crisp fashion.

  4. Terminal-shock and restart control of a Mach 2.5, mixed compression inlet coupled to a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, R. J.; Batterton, P. G.; Daniele, C. J.

    1974-01-01

    Results of an experimental program conducted on a mixed-compression inlet coupled to a turbofan engine are presented. Open-loop frequency response data are presented that show the response of shock position (as measured by an average inlet static pressure) to sinusoidal airflow disturbances produced at the compressor face station. Also presented are results showing the effect of different passive terminations (a choke plate or a long duct) on the characteristics of the inlet. Transfer functions obtained by using experimental data are presented and compared to the experimental data. Closed-loop frequency response of shock position (with a proportional-plus-integral controller) is presented. In addition, transient data are presented that show the unstart-restart characteristics of the inlet.

  5. On the effect of finite-time correlations on the turbulent mixing in smooth chaotic compressible velocity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainsaar, Siim; Kalda, Jaan

    2015-11-01

    For incompressible flows, most theoretical studies about turbulent mixing have used the Kraichnan model where the velocity field has zero correlation time. Most of their predictions are derived through (the ratios of) two sets of parameters: Lyapunov exponents (LEs), and their ``diffusivities'' (defined as the asymptotic values of tVar (Λ) ; Λ is a finite-time LE for time t). However, for compressible flows, there is a serious mismatch between the theoretical predictions for these parameters, and both simulations and experiments. We present a simple theoretical model that derives the LEs and their ``diffusivities'' from basic statistics of the velocity gradient tensor Δv . For finite correlation times, there is a breakdown of universality: the ratios of these parameters do not depend only on the flow compressibility and the correlation time, but also on the determinant of Δv - a parameter discussed very sparsely, so far. Our model is in a good agreement with previously unexplained studies regarding the role of finite time correlations [G. Boffetta et al., 2004]. Our mapping from the statistics of Δv to the LEs and their ``diffusivities'' extends a wide range of existing analytical ``Kraichnanian'' results to real time-correlated flows. The research was supported by the European Union Regional Development Fund (Centre of Excellence TK124: ``Centre for Nonlinear Studies'').

  6. Simultaneous Concentration and Velocity Field Measurements in a Shock-accelerated Mixing Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, Daniel; Oakley, Jason; Weber, Chris; Rothamer, David; Navarro, Jose; Bonazza, Riccardo

    2013-11-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is experimentally investigated at the Wisconsin Shock Tube Laboratory. Simultaneous concentration and velocity field measurements from the mixing layer of experimental RMI images are obtained through the application of the Advection-Corrected Correlation Image Velocimetry (ACCIV) technique. A statistically repeatable broadband initial condition is created by first setting up a gravitationally stable stagnation plane of helium +acetone over argon and then injecting the gases horizontally at the interface to create a shear layer. The shear layer is then accelerated by a Mach 2.2 planar shock wave that causes the growth of any perturbations present at the interface, and time-separated image pair data of the mixing layer are obtained using planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF). The image pair is corrected to show relative acetone concentration, and is then used as input to the ACCIV algorithm to obtain velocity field results. These velocity field measurements are compared with those obtained from numerical simulations. Turbulent kinetic energy spectra are compared with particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) and simulation results to validate regions of applicability. We wish to thank the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration for supporting this work.

  7. Computing the reconnection rate in turbulent kinetic layers by using electron mixing to identify topology

    SciTech Connect

    Daughton, W.; Nakamura, T. K. M.; Karimabadi, H.; Roytershteyn, V.; Loring, B.

    2014-05-15

    Three-dimensional kinetic simulations of magnetic reconnection for parameter regimes relevant to the magnetopause current layer feature the development of turbulence, driven by the magnetic and velocity shear, and dominated by coherent structures including flux ropes, current sheets, and flow vortices. Here, we propose a new approach for computing the global reconnection rate in the presence of this complexity. The mixing of electrons originating from separate sides of the magnetopause layer is used as a proxy to rapidly identify the magnetic topology and track the evolution of magnetic flux. The details of this method are illustrated for an asymmetric current layer relevant to the subsolar magnetopause and for a flow shear dominated layer relevant to the lower latitude magnetopause. While the three-dimensional reconnection rates show a number of interesting differences relative to the corresponding two-dimensional simulations, the time scale for the energy conversion remains very similar. These results suggest that the mixing of field lines between topologies is more easily influenced by kinetic turbulence than the physics responsible for the energy conversion.

  8. Formation of mixed organic layers by stepwise electrochemical reduction of diazonium compounds.

    PubMed

    Santos, Luis; Ghilane, Jalal; Lacroix, Jean Christophe

    2012-03-28

    This work describes the formation of a mixed organic layer covalently attached to a carbon electrode. The strategy adopted is based on two successive electrochemical reductions of diazonium salts. First, bithiophene phenyl (BTB) diazonium salt is reduced using host/guest complexation in a water/cyclodextrin (β-CD) solution. The resulting layer consists of grafted BTB oligomers and cyclodextrin that can be removed from the surface. The electrochemical response of several outer-sphere redox probes on such BTB/CD electrodes is close to that of a diode, thanks to the easily p-dopable oligo(BTB) moieties. When CD is removed from the surface, pinholes are created and this diode like behavior is lost. Following this, nitrophenyl (NP) diazonium is reduced to graft a second component. Electrochemical study shows that upon grafting NP insulating moieties, the diode-like behavior of the layer is restored which demonstrates that NP is grafted predominately in the empty spaces generated by β-CD desorption. As a result, a mixed BTB/NP organic layer covalently attached to a carbon electrode is obtained using a stepwise electrochemical reduction of two diazonium compounds. PMID:22385504

  9. Properties of mixed alkanethiol-dendrimer layers and their applications in biosensing.

    PubMed

    Svobodová, L; Snejdárková, M; Tóth, K; Gyurcsanyi, R E; Hianik, T

    2004-06-01

    We studied the properties of mixed alkanethiol-dendrimer layers on a gold support and their application in biosensing. We showed that properties of glucose sensor can be modified using a different ratio of 1-hexadecanethiol (HDT) and poly(amidoamine) dendrimer of first generation (G1). The cyclic voltammetry in the presence of the redox couple, Fe(CN)(6)(3-)/Fe(CN)(6)(4-), was used for estimating how effectively the layer blocks the redox probe's access to the electrode surface. A scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) was used to image the resulting distribution of the organic compounds. We found that with increasing content of dendrimers, the integrity of the layers was improved. PMID:15110289

  10. Counterintuitive effect of fall mixed layer deepening on eukaryotic new production in the Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawcett, S. E.; Lomas, M. W.; Ward, B. B.; Sigman, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Sargasso Sea is characterized by a short period of deep vertical mixing in the late winter and early spring, followed by strong thermal stratification during the summer. Stratification persists into the fall, impeding the upward flux of nitrate from depth so that recycled forms of nitrogen (N) such as ammonium are thought to support most primary production. We collected particles from surface waters during March, July, October, and December, used flow cytometry to separate the prokaryotic and eukaryotic phytoplankton, and analyzed their respective 15N/14N. In all months, the 15N/14N of the prokaryotic genera, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, was low, indicative of reliance on recycled N throughout the year. In July, the 15N/14N of eukaryotic phytoplankton was variable but consistently higher than that of the prokaryotes, reflecting eukaryotic consumption of subsurface nitrate. Two eukaryotic profiles from October and December were similar to those from July. In three other fall profiles, the eukaryotes had a 15N/14N similar to that of the prokaryotes, suggesting a switch toward greater reliance on recycled N. This change in the dominant N source supporting eukaryotic production appears to be driven by the density structure of the upper water column. The very shallow low-density surface "mixed layer" (≤20 m) that develops in early-to-mid summer does not contribute to stratification at the base of the euphotic zone, and subsurface nitrate can mix up into the lower euphotic zone, facilitating continued production. The deepening of the mixed layer into the fall, typically taken as an indication of weaker overall stratification, actually strengthens the isolation of the euphotic zone as a whole, reducing the upward supply of nitrate to the photosynthetically active layer. The same counterintuitive dynamic explains the latitudinal patterns in a set of three October depth profiles. Two northern stations (32°N and 27°N) were characterized by a thick, low

  11. Iron supply to the Southern Ocean mixed layer from below; the ocean model effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schourup-Kristensen, Vibe; Hauck, Judith; Losch, Martin; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter A.; Völker, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    In the iron limited Southern Ocean, the biogeochemical results of commonly used ocean general circulation biogeochemical models differ greatly dependent on the ocean model used. This is largely due to the difficulties in reproducing a realistic mixed layer depth (MLD), which leads to different degrees of light limitation and nutrient supply from below. Regarding the iron sources to the Southern Ocean, research has traditionally focused on the input from dust and the sediment, but recent studies have highlighted the importance of the vertical supply to the mixed layer from the nutrient rich deeper water. This latter supply mechanism may also be affected by the large inter-model differences in the MLD and thereby influence the total net primary production and export production in the models. We have performed a model study in which the biogeochemical model REcoM2 was coupled to two different ocean models, the Finite Element Sea-ice Ocean Model (FESOM) and the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm). The effect of the ocean mixed layer on the magnitude of the iron sources from below in the two models was analyzed, as was the effect on the export and net primary production. Our results revealed a remarkable difference in terms of mode and magnitude of transport dependent on the mixed layer depth in the two models; the mean iron supply from below in the Southern Ocean was on average four times higher in MITgcm than in FESOM. The dominant pathway was entrainment in MITgcm, whereas diffusion dominated in FESOM. We discuss how the difference in the depth and seasonal amplitude of the mixed layer between the models has a major effect on the vertical iron profile and thereby also on the iron fluxes. A further effect of the difference in supply is that the fraction of exported net primary production is higher in MITgcm than in FESOM, showing that the choice of ocean model has a significant impact on the modeled carbon cycle in the Southern Ocean, with possible implications for

  12. Controls on the Southern Ocean mixed layer salinity budget in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Sally; Goosse, Hugues

    2013-04-01

    Global-scale changes in upper ocean salinity, driven by changes in freshwater forcing, are both predicted by climate models as a feature of the climatic response to anthropogenic climate change and reported by a number of recent observation-based studies. In the extrapolar regions, such change has been predominantly attributed to changes in the hydrological cycle. However, in the high latitudes, changes in sea ice coverage may also provide a significant source of freshwater forcing. Variations in mixed layer properties have wide-reaching influence, affecting, for example, oceanic heat storage and the rates of exchange between the atmosphere and deeper ocean. It has further been suggested that heat supplied by the deep ocean may have a significant influence on the cryosphere, indicating that a good understanding of the behaviour of the Southern Ocean mixed layer is crucial to describing the climate of this region. Our aims in this work are to assess the dominant mechanisms that drive salinity variability in the Southern Ocean mixed layer using model data and to further examine the relationship between mixed layer and sea ice variability. In this study, the evolution of the upper Southern Ocean hydrographic structure in response to the RCP4.5 forcing scenario is analyzed using model data drawn from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 archive. A robust freshening trend is evident, associated with an increase in stratification and decoupling of the upper ocean as the mixed layer gains buoyancy at a faster rate than the underlying ocean. The magnitudes of the individual terms of the salinity budget are evaluated, and significant discrepancy noted amongst the models analysed here. Motivated by the important role of entrainment suggested by this analysis, we examine the relationship between the weakening entrainment rate, decreasing sea ice coverage and increases in heat storage at depth that are evident in the model data. Our analysis suggests that the

  13. Shear effects in the evaporatively driven cloud-top mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellado, Juan Pedro

    2013-11-01

    A stably stratified shear layer destabilized locally by moist convection is studied using direct numerical simulations as a model to investigate the role of evaporative cooling at the top of stratocumulus clouds in the presence of vertical mean shear. Velocity and time scales are obtained from the study of the vertical structure. It is found that, overlapping with the background shear layer that has been often documented in the cloud-free cases, with a thickness (1 / 3) (Δu) 2 / Δb , where Δu and Δb are the velocity and buoyancy increments across the cloud top, the system develops a turbulence layer that is dominated by free convection inside the cloud and by shear production inside the relatively thin overlap region. As turbulence intensifies, the turbulence layer encroaches upwards into the background shear layer and defines thereby the entrainment velocity. This encroachment is well characterized by the penetration length formed with the in-cloud convective velocity and the buoyancy frequency inside the background shear layer. Consistently, the turbulence intensity inside the overlap region follows a mixed scaling combining the background mean shear and the in-cloud convective velocity.

  14. Analysis of the linear stability of compressible boundary layers using the PSE. [parabolic stability equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertolotti, F. P.; Herbert, TH.

    1991-01-01

    The application of linearized parabolic stability equations (PSE) to compressible flow is considered. The effect of mean-flow nonparallelism is found to be weak on 2D waves and strong on 3D waves. Results for a single choice of free-stream parameters that corresponds to the atmospheric conditions at 15,000 m above sea level are presented.

  15. Bulk Mixing and Decoupling of the Nocturnal Stable Boundary Layer Characterized Using a Ubiquitous Natural Tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, A. G.; Chambers, S.; Griffiths, A.

    2013-12-01

    Vertical mixing of the nocturnal stable boundary layer (SBL) over a complex land surface is investigated for a range of stabilities, using a decoupling index () based on the 2-50 m bulk gradient of the ubiquitous natural trace gas radon-222. The relationship between and the bulk Richardson number () exhibits three broad regions: (1) a well-mixed region () in weakly stable conditions (); (2) a steeply increasing region () for "transitional" stabilities (); and (3) a decoupled region (-1.0) in very stable conditions (). exhibits a large variability within individual bins, however, due to a range of competing processes influencing bulk mixing under different conditions. To explore these processes in - space, we perform a bivariate analysis of the bulk thermodynamic gradients, various indicators of external influences, and key turbulence quantities at 10 and 50 m. Strong and consistent patterns are found, and five distinct regions in - space are identified and associated with archetypal stable boundary-layer regimes. Results demonstrate that the introduction of a scalar decoupling index yields valuable information about turbulent mixing in the SBL that cannot be gained directly from a single bulk thermodynamic stability parameter. A significant part of the high variability observed in turbulence statistics during very stable conditions is attributable to changes in the degree of decoupling of the SBL from the residual layer above. When examined in - space, it is seen that very different turbulence regimes can occur for the same value of , depending on the particular combination of values for the bulk temperature gradient and wind shear, together with external factors. Extremely low turbulent variances and fluxes are found at 50 m height when and (fully decoupled). These "quiescent" cases tend to occur when geostrophic forcing is very weak and subsidence is present, but are not associated with the largest bulk temperature gradients. Humidity and net radiation data

  16. A prospective randomised trial of four-layer versus short stretch compression bandages for the treatment of venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Scriven, J M; Taylor, L E; Wood, A J; Bell, P R; Naylor, A R; London, N J

    1998-05-01

    This trial was undertaken to examine the safety and efficacy of four-layer compared with short stretch compression bandages for the treatment of venous leg ulcers within the confines of a prospective, randomised, ethically approved trial. Fifty-three patients were recruited from a dedicated venous ulcer assessment clinic and their individual ulcerated limbs were randomised to receive either a four-layer bandage (FLB)(n = 32) or a short stretch bandage (SSB)(n = 32). The endpoint was a completely healed ulcer. However, if after 12 weeks of compression therapy no healing had been achieved, that limb was withdrawn from the study and deemed to have failed to heal with the prescribed bandage. Leg volume was measured using the multiple disc model at the first bandaging visit, 4 weeks later, and on ulcer healing. Complications arising during the study were recorded. Data from all limbs were analysed on an intention to treat basis; thus the three limbs not completing the protocol were included in the analysis. Of the 53 patients, 50 completed the protocol. At 1 year the healing rate was FLB 55% and SSB 57% (chi 2 = 0.0, df = 1, P = 1.0). Limbs in the FLB arm of the study sustained one minor complication, whereas SSB limbs sustained four significant complications. Leg volumes reduced significantly after 4 weeks of compression, but subsequent volume changes were insignificant. Ulcer healing rates were not influenced by the presence of deep venous reflux, post-thrombotic deep vein changes nor by ulcer duration. Although larger ulcers took longer to heal, the overall healing rates for large (> 10 cm2) and small (10 cm2 or less) ulcers were comparable. Four-layer and short stretch bandages were equally efficacious in healing venous ulcers independent of pattern of venous reflux, ulcer area or duration. FLB limbs sustained fewer complications than SSB. PMID:9682649

  17. Structural Composition and Turbulent Mixing Mechanisms of a Subsonic Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechlars, Patrick; Sandberg, Richard; Aerodynamics; Flight Mechanics Group-Southampton Team

    2015-11-01

    Turbulent mixing is a key mechanism for redistributing energy in a wide range of flows. The effect of this mixing on the flow is similar to that of viscous diffusion and the process is therefore often described as turbulent diffusion. Turbulence models based on the Boussinesq approximation rely on the accuracy of the model's description of the mixing to capture the correct energy redistribution. In this presentation the basic mechanism is illustrated using a subsonic turbulent boundary layer (TBL) as a case study, and the direct influence of turbulence on the mean flow is quantified. Through a characteristic analysis the structures involved in the mixing mechanism are identified and further analyzed. The key structures for the mixing in a TBL are large clusters of smaller turbulent structures that are known as large scale motions (LSMs). While the smaller structures are located in the near-wall region they mainly align in the stream-wise direction and pack densely, which affects production and dissipation. Within the LSMs the single vortices reach towards the outer regions and develop an arbitrary alignment as soon as their distance to the wall is sufficiently large. The discussed mechanisms are not limited to TBLs and a comparison to a jet flow is provided in the talk. The authors acknowledge EPSRC for supporting this project under the grand number EP/I003754/1.

  18. Characteristics and Evolution of Passive Tracers in the Oceanic Mixed Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Katherine; Hamlington, Peter; Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    2015-11-01

    Ocean tracers such as CO2 and plankton reside primarily in the mixed layer where air-sea gas exchange occurs and light is plentiful for photosynthesis. There can be substantial heterogeneity in the distributions of these tracers due to turbulent mixing, particularly in the submesoscale range where partly geostrophic eddies and small-scale 3D turbulence are both active. In this talk, LES spanning scales from 20km down to 5m are used to examine the role of turbulent mixing on nonreactive passive ocean tracers. The simulations include the effects of both wave-driven Langmuir turbulence and submesoscale eddies, and tracers with different initial and boundary conditions are examined. Tracer properties are characterized using spatial fields, statistics, multiscale fluxes, and spectra, and results show that passive tracer mixing depends on air-sea flux rate, release depth, and flow regime. The results indicate that while submesoscale eddies transport buoyancy upward to extract potential energy, the same is not true of passive tracers, whose entrainment is instead suppressed. Early in the evolution of some tracers, counter-gradient transport occurs co-located with regions of negative potential vorticity, suggesting that symmetric instabilities may act to oppose turbulent mixing.

  19. Observation and modeling of mixing-layer development in HED blast-wave-driven shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Stefano, Carlos

    2013-10-01

    This talk describes work exploring the sensitivity to initial conditions of hydrodynamic mixing-layer growth due to shear flow in the high-energy-density regime. This work features an approach in two parts, experimental and theoretical. First, an experiment, conducted at the OMEGA-60 laser facility, seeks to measure the development of such a mixing layer. This is accomplished by placing a layer of low-density (initially of either 0.05 or 0.1 g/cm3, to vary the system's Atwood number) carbon foam against a layer of higher-density (initially 1.4 g/cm3) polyamide-imide that has been machined to a nominally-flat surface at its interface with the foam. Inherent roughness of this surface's finish is precisely measured and varied from piece to piece. Ten simultaneous OMEGA beams, comprising a 4.5 kJ, 1-ns pulse focused to a roughly 1-mm-diameter spot, irradiate a thin polycarbonate ablator, driving a blast wave into the foam, parallel to its interface with the polyamide-imide. The ablator is framed by a gold washer, such that the blast wave is driven only into the foam, and not into the polyamide-imide. The subsequent forward motion of the shocked foam creates the desired shear effect, and the system is imaged by X-ray radiography 35 ns after the beginning of the driving laser pulse. Second, a simulation is performed, intending to replicate the flow observed in the experiment as closely as possible. Using the resulting simulated flow parameters, an analytical model can be used to predict the evolution of the mixing layer, as well as track the motion of the fluid in the experiment prior to the snapshot seen in the radiograph. The ability of the model to predict growth of the mixing layer under the various conditions observed in the experiment is then examined. This work is funded by the Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in NNSA-ASC via grant DEFC52- 08NA28616, by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE

  20. Diffusivity in turbulent fluid containing two dominant scales, and compressible shear layer according to a kinetic theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, P. M.

    1976-01-01

    The solution of the two nonequilibrium-degree kinetic equation was first determined for the effective length scale and turbulence energy for a spatially homogeneous turbulence field with two characteristic length scales, where the source for one family of eddies exists. This solution was applied to the evaluation of the eddy diffusivity in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine. The result was compared with another existing solution. This was carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining an effective length-scale equation within the context of the kinetic theory. A formulation and partial solution of the compressible plane shear layer are also presented.

  1. Comparison of Four Mixed Layer Mesoscale Parameterizations and the Equation for an Arbitrary Tracer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Dubovikov, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we discuss two issues, the inter-comparison of four mixed layer mesoscale parameterizations and the search for the eddy induced velocity for an arbitrary tracer. It must be stressed that our analysis is limited to mixed layer mesoscales since we do not treat sub-mesoscales and small turbulent mixing. As for the first item, since three of the four parameterizations are expressed in terms of a stream function and a residual flux of the RMT formalism (residual mean theory), while the fourth is expressed in terms of vertical and horizontal fluxes, we needed a formalism to connect the two formulations. The standard RMT representation developed for the deep ocean cannot be extended to the mixed layer since its stream function does not vanish at the ocean's surface. We develop a new RMT representation that satisfies the surface boundary condition. As for the general form of the eddy induced velocity for an arbitrary tracer, thus far, it has been assumed that there is only the one that originates from the curl of the stream function. This is because it was assumed that the tracer residual flux is purely diffusive. On the other hand, we show that in the case of an arbitrary tracer, the residual flux has also a skew component that gives rise to an additional bolus velocity. Therefore, instead of only one bolus velocity, there are now two, one coming from the curl of the stream function and other from the skew part of the residual flux. In the buoyancy case, only one bolus velocity contributes to the mean buoyancy equation since the residual flux is indeed only diffusive.

  2. 2D dynamical arrest transition in a mixed nanoparticle-phospholipid layer studied in real and momentum spaces.

    PubMed

    Orsi, Davide; Guzmán, Eduardo; Liggieri, Libero; Ravera, Francesca; Ruta, Beatrice; Chushkin, Yuriy; Rimoldi, Tiziano; Cristofolini, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the interfacial dynamics of a 2D self-organized mixed layer made of silica nanoparticles interacting with phospholipid (DPPC) monolayers at the air/water interface. This system has biological relevance, allowing investigation of toxicological effects of nanoparticles on model membranes and lung surfactants. It might also provide bio-inspired technological solutions, exploiting the self-organization of DPPC to produce a non-trivial 2D structuration of nanoparticles. The characterization of interfacial dynamics yields information on the effects of NPs on the mechanical properties, important to improve performances of systems such as colloidosomes, foams, creams. For this, we combine micro-tracking in real-space with measurement in momentum-space via x-ray photon-correlation spectroscopy and Digital Fourier Microscopy. Using these complementary techniques, we extend the spatial range of investigation beyond the limits of each one. We find a dynamical transition from Brownian diffusion to an arrested state driven by compression, characterized by intermittent rearrangements, compatible with a repulsive glass phase. The rearrangement and relaxation of the monolayer structure results dramatically hindered by the presence of NPs, which is relevant to explain some the mechanical features observed for the dynamic surface pressure response of these systems and which can be relevant for the respiratory physiology and for future drug-delivery composite systems. PMID:26658474

  3. 2D dynamical arrest transition in a mixed nanoparticle-phospholipid layer studied in real and momentum spaces

    PubMed Central

    Orsi, Davide; Guzmán, Eduardo; Liggieri, Libero; Ravera, Francesca; Ruta, Beatrice; Chushkin, Yuriy; Rimoldi, Tiziano; Cristofolini, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the interfacial dynamics of a 2D self-organized mixed layer made of silica nanoparticles interacting with phospholipid (DPPC) monolayers at the air/water interface. This system has biological relevance, allowing investigation of toxicological effects of nanoparticles on model membranes and lung surfactants. It might also provide bio-inspired technological solutions, exploiting the self-organization of DPPC to produce a non-trivial 2D structuration of nanoparticles. The characterization of interfacial dynamics yields information on the effects of NPs on the mechanical properties, important to improve performances of systems such as colloidosomes, foams, creams. For this, we combine micro-tracking in real-space with measurement in momentum-space via x-ray photon-correlation spectroscopy and Digital Fourier Microscopy. Using these complementary techniques, we extend the spatial range of investigation beyond the limits of each one. We find a dynamical transition from Brownian diffusion to an arrested state driven by compression, characterized by intermittent rearrangements, compatible with a repulsive glass phase. The rearrangement and relaxation of the monolayer structure results dramatically hindered by the presence of NPs, which is relevant to explain some the mechanical features observed for the dynamic surface pressure response of these systems and which can be relevant for the respiratory physiology and for future drug-delivery composite systems. PMID:26658474

  4. 2D dynamical arrest transition in a mixed nanoparticle-phospholipid layer studied in real and momentum spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsi, Davide; Guzmán, Eduardo; Liggieri, Libero; Ravera, Francesca; Ruta, Beatrice; Chushkin, Yuriy; Rimoldi, Tiziano; Cristofolini, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the interfacial dynamics of a 2D self-organized mixed layer made of silica nanoparticles interacting with phospholipid (DPPC) monolayers at the air/water interface. This system has biological relevance, allowing investigation of toxicological effects of nanoparticles on model membranes and lung surfactants. It might also provide bio-inspired technological solutions, exploiting the self-organization of DPPC to produce a non-trivial 2D structuration of nanoparticles. The characterization of interfacial dynamics yields information on the effects of NPs on the mechanical properties, important to improve performances of systems such as colloidosomes, foams, creams. For this, we combine micro-tracking in real-space with measurement in momentum-space via x-ray photon-correlation spectroscopy and Digital Fourier Microscopy. Using these complementary techniques, we extend the spatial range of investigation beyond the limits of each one. We find a dynamical transition from Brownian diffusion to an arrested state driven by compression, characterized by intermittent rearrangements, compatible with a repulsive glass phase. The rearrangement and relaxation of the monolayer structure results dramatically hindered by the presence of NPs, which is relevant to explain some the mechanical features observed for the dynamic surface pressure response of these systems and which can be relevant for the respiratory physiology and for future drug-delivery composite systems.

  5. White organic light-emitting diodes with ultra-thin mixed emitting layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, T.; Forget, S.; Chenais, S.; Geffroy, B.; Tondelier, D.; Bonnassieux, Y.; Ishow, E.

    2012-02-01

    White light can be obtained from Organic Light Emitting Diodes by mixing three primary colors, (i.e. red, green and blue) or two complementary colors in the emissive layer. In order to improve the efficiency and stability of the devices, a host-guest system is generally used as an emitting layer. However, the color balance to obtain white light is difficult to control and optimize because the spectrum is very sensitive to doping concentration (especially when a small amount of material is used). We use here an ultra-thin mixed emitting layer (UML) deposited by thermal evaporation to fabricate white organic light emitting diodes (WOLEDs) without co-evaporation. The UML was inserted in the hole-transporting layer consisting of 4, 4'-bis[N-(1-naphtyl)-N-phenylamino]biphenyl (α-NPB) instead of using a conventional doping process. The UML was formed from a single evaporation boat containing a mixture of two dipolar starbust triarylamine molecules (fvin and fcho) presenting very similar structures and thermal properties and emitting in complementary spectral regions (orange and blue respectively) and mixed according to their weight ratio. The composition of the UML specifically allows for fine tuning of the emission color despite its very thin thickness down to 1 nm. Competitive energy transfer processes from fcho and the host interface toward fvin are key parameters to control the relative intensity between red and blue emission. White light with very good CIE 1931 color coordinate (0.34, 0.34) was obtained by simply adjusting the UML film composition.

  6. Calculation of eddy viscosity in a compressible turbulent boundary layer with mass injection and chemical reaction, volume 1. [theoretical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omori, S.

    1973-01-01

    The turbulent kinetic energy equation is coupled with boundary layer equations to solve the characteristics of compressible turbulent boundary layers with mass injection and combustion. The Reynolds stress is related to the turbulent kinetic energy using the Prandtl-Wieghardt formulation. When a lean mixture of hydrogen and nitrogen is injected through a porous plate into the subsonic turbulent boundary layer of air flow and ignited by external means, the turbulent kinetic energy increases twice as much as that of noncombusting flow with the same mass injection rate of nitrogen. The magnitudes of eddy viscosity between combusting and noncombusting flows with injection, however, are almost the same due to temperature effects, while the distributions are different. The velocity profiles are significantly affected by combustion; that is, combustion alters the velocity profile as if the mass injection rate is increased, reducing the skin-friction as a result of a smaller velocity gradient at the wall. If pure hydrogen as a transpiration coolant is injected into a rocket nozzle boundary layer flow of combustion products, the temperature drops significantly across the boundary layer due to the high heat capacity of hydrogen. At a certain distance from the wall, hydrogen reacts with the combustion products, liberating an extensive amount of heat. The resulting large increase in temperature reduces the eddy viscosity in this region.

  7. Ordered stacking of F-actin layers and mixed lipid bilayers: a columnar liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Caillé, A; Artzner, F; Amblard, F

    2013-01-25

    In this Letter, we show how the grooved helical structure of actin microfilaments (F-actin) interacting with mixed fluid lipid bilayers leads to handedness-independent 1D lipid bilayer undulations coupled to longitudinal in-plane ordering of the microfilaments. This longitudinal ordering is forced by the emerging in-plane compression and curvature energy terms of the straight 1D bilayer undulation wave fronts. Thereby, adjacent helices are set into registry along their long axis in their monolayer and π shifted between adjacent monolayers. An ordered composite multilamellar structure emerges by alternate stacking of these lipid bilayers and monolayers of F-actin. This two-dimensionally ordered system has the symmetries of a centered rectangular columnar liquid crystal, the straight 1D wave fronts playing the role of the classical molecular columns. PMID:25166203

  8. Data/model integration for vertical mixing in the stable Arctic boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, S.; ReVelle, D.O.; Kao, C.Y.J.; Bigg, E.K.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a short Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Data on atmospheric trace constituents and the vertical structure of stratus clouds from a 1996 expedition to the central Arctic reveal mechanisms of vertical mixing that have not been observed in mid-latitudes. Time series of the altitude and thickness of summer arctic stratus have been observed using an elastic backscatter lidar aboard an icebreaker. With the ship moored to the pack ice during 14 data collection stations and the lidar staring vertically, the time series represent advected cloud fields. The lidar data reveal a significant amount of vertical undulation in the clouds, strongly suggestive of traveling waves in the buoyantly damped atmosphere that predominates in the high Arctic. Concurrent observations of trace gases associated with the natural sulfur cycle (dimethyl sulfide, SO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and aerosols show evidence of vertical mixing events that coincide with a characteristic signature in the cloud field that may be called dropout or lift out. A segment of a cloud deck appears to be relocated from the otherwise quasicontinuous layer to another altitude a few hundred meters lower or higher. Atmospheric models have been applied to identify the mechanism that cause the dropout phenomenon and connect it dynamically to the surface layer mixing.

  9. Numerical simulation of small-scale mixing processes in the upper ocean and atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhinin, O.; Troitskaya, Yu; Zilitinkevich, S.

    2016-02-01

    The processes of turbulent mixing and momentum and heat exchange occur in the upper ocean at depths up to several dozens of meters and in the atmospheric boundary layer within interval of millimeters to dozens of meters and can not be resolved by known large- scale climate models. Thus small-scale processes need to be parameterized with respect to large scale fields. This parameterization involves the so-called bulk coefficients which relate turbulent fluxes with large-scale fields gradients. The bulk coefficients are dependent on the properties of the small-scale mixing processes which are affected by the upper-ocean stratification and characteristics of surface and internal waves. These dependencies are not well understood at present and need to be clarified. We employ Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) as a research tool which resolves all relevant flow scales and does not require closure assumptions typical of Large-Eddy and Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations (LES and RANS). Thus DNS provides a solid ground for correct parameterization of small-scale mixing processes and also can be used for improving LES and RANS closure models. In particular, we discuss the problems of the interaction between small-scale turbulence and internal gravity waves propagating in the pycnocline in the upper ocean as well as the impact of surface waves on the properties of atmospheric boundary layer over wavy water surface.

  10. Modeling Scalar variance from Direct Numerical Simulations of a turbulent mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravinel, Baptiste; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2010-11-01

    Many studies have focused on analyzing and predicting the mixing of a scalar such as fuel concentration in turbulent flows. However, the subfilter scalar variance in Large Eddy Simulations (LES) still requires additional considerations. The present work aims at obtaining results for the turbulent mixture of a scalar in configurations relevant to reactive flows, i.e. in the presence of mean velocity/scalar gradients. A Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of a turbulent mixing layer has been performed by initially combining two boundary layers. The high order conservative finite difference low Mach number NGA code was used together with the BQuick scheme for the transport of mixture fraction. The self-similar nature of the flow and energy spectra have been considered to analyze the turbulent flow field. High order velocity schemes (4th order) were found to play an important role in capturing accurately the mixing of fuel and air. The scalar variance has been calculated by filtering the solution and has been compared to various models usually used in LES. Following an earlier study by Balarac et al. [Phys. Fluids 20 (2008)], the concept of optimal estimators has been considered to identify the set of parameters most suitable to express the subfilter variance. Finally, the quality of the standard dynamic approach has been assessed.

  11. Vortex-scalar element calculations of a diffusion flame stabilized on a plane mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghoniem, Ahmed F.; Givi, Peyman

    1987-01-01

    The vortex-scalar element method, a scheme which utilizes vortex elements to discretize the region of high vorticity and scalar elements to represent species or temperature fields, is utilized in the numerical simulations of a two-dimensional reacting mixing layer. Computations are performed for a diffusion flame at high Reynolds and Peclet numbers without resorting to turbulence models. In the nonreacting flow, the mean and fluctuation profiles of a conserved scalar show good agreement with experimental measurements. Results for the reacting flow indicate that for temperature independent kinetics, the chemical reaction begins immediately downstream of the splitter plate where mixing starts. Results for the reacting flow with Arrhenius kinetics show an ignition delay, which depends on reactant temperature, before significant chemical reaction occurs. Harmonic forcing changes the structure of the layer, and concomitantly the rates of mixing and reaction, in accordance with experimental results. Strong stretch within the braids in the nonequilibrium kinetics case causes local flame quenching due to the temperature drop associated with the large convective fluxes.

  12. Effects of High-frequency Wind Sampling on Simulated Mixed Layer Depth and Upper Ocean Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Tong; Liu, W. Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Effects of high-frequency wind sampling on a near-global ocean model are studied by forcing the model with a 12 hourly averaged wind product and its 24 hourly subsamples in separate experiments. The differences in mixed layer depth and sea surface temperature resulting from these experiments are examined, and the underlying physical processes are investigated. The 24 hourly subsampling not only reduces the high-frequency variability of the wind but also affects the annual mean wind because of aliasing. While the former effect largely impacts mid- to high-latitude oceans, the latter primarily affects tropical and coastal oceans. At mid- to high-latitude regions the subsampled wind results in a shallower mixed layer and higher sea surface temperature because of reduced vertical mixing associated with weaker high-frequency wind. In tropical and coastal regions, however, the change in upper ocean structure due to the wind subsampling is primarily caused by the difference in advection resulting from aliased annual mean wind, which varies with the subsampling time. The results of the study indicate a need for more frequent sampling of satellite wind measurement and have implications for data assimilation in terms of identifying the nature of model errors.

  13. Estimating uncertainties on a Gulf Stream mixed-layer heat budget from stochastic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayoub, Nadia K.; Lucas, Marc; De Mey, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to explore the robustness of the mixed-layer heat budget as estimated from an eddy-permitting model with respect to uncertainties in atmospheric forcing. We illustrate how statistics from an ensemble can be used in a first step towards the calculation of error bars of any simulated quantity, such as the mixed-layer heat budget. The statistics from an ensemble of 33 simulations are derived in order to infer information on the model errors space and time variability of the main terms of the heat budget. The ensemble is generated by perturbing the wind forcing and the incoming solar radiation as uncertainties on these fields are expected to be a main source of errors for the surface layer representation in the model at monthly to seasonal scales. We focus on the mixed-layer in the Gulf Stream system during the deepening period (Sept.-March). The results indicate that large errors are expected at the Gulf Stream front location and just north of it. The largest errors are found on the zonal and meridional advection and vertical diffusion terms: they can locally reach values that are larger than the terms themselves. We observe a rapid increase with time of the errors for both these terms. The error growth is mainly due to the mesoscale decorrelation. The impact of wind errors on southward Ekman transport and surface turbulence generates uncertainties on the vertical diffusion term just north of the Gulf Stream front. We work with an eddy-permitting configuration similar to those used in ocean reanalysis projects (e.g. SODA, and GLORYS). Our results suggest that for such configurations, at monthly to seasonal time scales, the impact of uncertainties in the atmospheric forcing is weak on the mixed-layer cooling but very large on the zonal and meridional advection and vertical diffusion heat budget terms. In consequence, the estimate of these quantities from ocean reanalyses is not robust with respect to the atmospheric forcing and should be provided with

  14. Computation of three-dimensional compressible boundary layers to fourth-order accuracy on wings and fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, Venkit

    1990-01-01

    A solution method, fourth-order accurate in the body-normal direction and second-order accurate in the stream surface directions, to solve the compressible 3-D boundary layer equations is presented. The transformation used, the discretization details, and the solution procedure are described. Ten validation cases of varying complexity are presented and results of calculation given. The results range from subsonic flow to supersonic flow and involve 2-D or 3-D geometries. Applications to laminar flow past wing and fuselage-type bodies are discussed. An interface procedure is used to solve the surface Euler equations with the inviscid flow pressure field as the input to assure accurate boundary conditions at the boundary layer edge. Complete details of the computer program used and information necessary to run each of the test cases are given in the Appendix.

  15. Parameters of heat exchange and compression in the combustion of powder charges under a water layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melik-Gaikazov, G. V.

    2013-03-01

    The mechanisms of change in the pressure in an oil well in the process of combustion of a powder charge positioned at its bottom were investigated. A model of calculating the working process in a well by the heat exchange of it with the environment and the compressibility of the liquid in the well is proposed. It is shown that about one third of the energy of the powder is expended for the displacement of the liquid from the well. It has been established that the dependence of the maximum pressure in an oil well on the mass of a powder charge is common in character for charges of different types. The dynamic heads of a liquid in a well in the liquid-compression phase and in the phase of reciprocating movement of the liquid after the termination of the combustion of a powder charge were calculated.

  16. Amendment to "Analytical Solution for the Convectively-Mixed Atmospheric Boundary Layer": Inclusion of Subsidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouwersloot, H. G.; de Arellano, J. Vilà-Guerau

    2013-09-01

    In Ouwersloot and Vilà-Guerau de Arellano (Boundary-Layer Meteorol. doi: 10.1007/s10546-013-9816-z , 2013, this issue), the analytical solutions for the boundary-layer height and scalar evolutions are derived for the convective boundary layer, based on the prognostic equations of mixed-layer slab models without taking subsidence into account. Here, we include and quantify the added effect of subsidence if the subsidence velocity scales linearly with height throughout the atmosphere. This enables analytical analyses for a wider range of observational cases. As a demonstration, the sensitivity of the boundary-layer height and the potential temperature jump to subsidence and the free tropospheric stability is graphically presented. The new relations show the importance of the temporal distribution of the surface buoyancy flux in determining the evolution if there is subsidence.

  17. Boundary-layer turbulence modeling and vorticity dynamics: I. A kangaroo-process mixing model of boundary-layer turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, H.; de Leeuw, G.; van den Brink, A. Maassen

    A nonlocal turbulence transport theory is presented by means of a novel analysis of the Reynolds stress, inter alia involving the construct of a sample path space and a stochastic hypothesis. An analytical sampling rate model (satisfying exchange) and a nonlinear scaling relation (mapping the path space onto the boundary layer) lead to an integro-differential equation for the mixing of scalar densities, which represents fully-developed boundary-layer turbulence as a nondiffusive (Kubo-Anderson or kangaroo) type stochastic process. The underlying near-wall behavior (i.e. for y +→0) of fluctuating velocities fully agrees with recent direct numerical simulations. The model involves a scaling exponent ɛ, with ɛ→∞ in the diffusion limit. For the (partly analytical) solution for the mean velocity profile, excellent agreement with the experimental data yields ɛ≈0.58. The significance of ɛ as a turbulence Cantor set dimension (in the logarithmic profile region, i.e. for y +→∞) is discussed.

  18. Intraseasonal mixed-layer heat budget in the equatorial Atlantic during the cold tongue development in 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordani, Hervé; Caniaux, Guy; Voldoire, Aurore

    2013-02-01

    Estimating the mixed-layer heat budget is a key issue for understanding the cold tongue development in the eastern equatorial Atlantic. A high-resolution ocean regional model is used to diagnose the mixed-layer heat budget online during the EGEE-3 experiment from May to August 2006. The heat budget shows the major role of the horizontal advection and turbulent mixing in the mixed-layer temperature balance in the cold tongue. The surface net heat flux and entrainment processes play a minor role. The equatorial cooling is mainly induced by low-frequency advection, which is balanced by high-frequency zonal and meridional advections. The high-frequency advections are organized in patterns along the northern edge of the cold tongue, where they are associated with strong sea surface temperature gradients and well-developed tropical instability waves in the western Atlantic. Special attention is paid to the wind energy flux, which controls horizontal advection and turbulent mixing. We suggest that the wind energy flux drives the vertical velocity, which in turn adjusts the mixed-layer depth, its stratification, and the vertical shear of the horizontal current. Although vertical advection is not essential in providing cold water in the Atlantic cold tongue, it is shown that the vertical velocity plays a central role in preconditioning the mixed layer and maximizes the turbulent mixing.

  19. Effect of Strong Acid Functional Groups on Electrode Rise Potential in Capacitive Mixing by Double Layer Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzell, Marta C.; Raju, Muralikrishna; Watson, Valerie J.; Stack, Andrew G.; van Duin, Adri C. T.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2014-11-03

    We report that the amount of salinity-gradient energy that can be obtained through capacitive mixing based on double layer expansion depends on the extent the electric double layer (EDL) is altered in a low salt concentration (LC) electrolyte (e.g., river water). We show that the electrode-rise potential, which is a measure of the EDL perturbation process, was significantly (P = 10–5) correlated to the concentration of strong acid surface functional groups using five types of activated carbon. Electrodes with the lowest concentration of strong acids (0.05 mmol g–1) had a positive rise potential of 59 ± 4 mV in the LC solution, whereas the carbon with the highest concentration (0.36 mmol g–1) had a negative rise potential (₋31 ± 5 mV). Chemical oxidation of a carbon (YP50) using nitric acid decreased the electrode rise potential from 46 ± 2 mV (unaltered) to ₋6 ± 0.5 mV (oxidized), producing a whole cell potential (53 ± 1.7 mV) that was 4.4 times larger than that obtained with identical electrode materials (from 12 ± 1 mV). Changes in the EDL were linked to the behavior of specific ions in a LC solution using molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The EDL expanded in the LC solution when a carbon surface (pristine graphene) lacked strong acid functional groups, producing a positive-rise potential at the electrode. In contrast, the EDL was compressed for an oxidized surface (graphene oxide), producing a negative-rise electrode potential. In conclusion, these results established the linkage between rise potentials and specific surface functional groups (strong acids) and demonstrated on a molecular scale changes in the EDL using oxidized or pristine carbons.

  20. Effect of Strong Acid Functional Groups on Electrode Rise Potential in Capacitive Mixing by Double Layer Expansion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hatzell, Marta C.; Raju, Muralikrishna; Watson, Valerie J.; Stack, Andrew G.; van Duin, Adri C. T.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2014-11-03

    We report that the amount of salinity-gradient energy that can be obtained through capacitive mixing based on double layer expansion depends on the extent the electric double layer (EDL) is altered in a low salt concentration (LC) electrolyte (e.g., river water). We show that the electrode-rise potential, which is a measure of the EDL perturbation process, was significantly (P = 10–5) correlated to the concentration of strong acid surface functional groups using five types of activated carbon. Electrodes with the lowest concentration of strong acids (0.05 mmol g–1) had a positive rise potential of 59 ± 4 mV in themore » LC solution, whereas the carbon with the highest concentration (0.36 mmol g–1) had a negative rise potential (₋31 ± 5 mV). Chemical oxidation of a carbon (YP50) using nitric acid decreased the electrode rise potential from 46 ± 2 mV (unaltered) to ₋6 ± 0.5 mV (oxidized), producing a whole cell potential (53 ± 1.7 mV) that was 4.4 times larger than that obtained with identical electrode materials (from 12 ± 1 mV). Changes in the EDL were linked to the behavior of specific ions in a LC solution using molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The EDL expanded in the LC solution when a carbon surface (pristine graphene) lacked strong acid functional groups, producing a positive-rise potential at the electrode. In contrast, the EDL was compressed for an oxidized surface (graphene oxide), producing a negative-rise electrode potential. In conclusion, these results established the linkage between rise potentials and specific surface functional groups (strong acids) and demonstrated on a molecular scale changes in the EDL using oxidized or pristine carbons.« less

  1. Evaluation of layered and mixed passive treatment systems for acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Jeen, Sung-Wook; Mattson, Bruce

    2016-11-01

    Laboratory column tests for passive treatment systems for mine drainage from a waste rock storage area were conducted to evaluate suitable reactive mixture, system configuration, effects of influent water chemistry, and required residence time. Five columns containing straw, chicken manure, mushroom compost, and limestone (LS), in either layered or mixed configurations, were set up to simulate the treatment system. The results showed that all of the five columns removed metals of concern (i.e. Al, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Zn) with a residence time of 15 h and greater. Reaction mechanisms responsible for the removal of metals may include sulfate reduction and subsequent sulfide precipitation, precipitation of secondary carbonates and hydroxides, co-precipitation, and sorption on organic substrates and secondary precipitates. The results suggest that the mixed systems containing organic materials and LS perform better than the layered systems, sequentially treated by organic and LS layers, due to the enhanced pH adjustment, which is beneficial to bacterial activity and precipitation of secondary minerals. The column tests provide a basis for the design of a field-scale passive treatment system, such as a reducing and alkalinity producing system or a permeable reactive barrier. PMID:26998668

  2. Sensitivity studies of the Arctic-North Atlantic ice-ocean coupled model to the mixed layer parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iakshina, Dina; Golubeva, Elena

    2014-05-01

    As a result of convective instability in the ocean the formation of mixed layer occur, where the vertical distribution of the main thermodynamic characteristics is close to uniform. The thickness of the mixed layer varies in space and time, making a few tens of meters during the spring-summer heat and capturing the entire active layer up to several hundred meters in the autumn-winter cooling ice-free seas. Mixed layer exchanges momentum, mass, heat and salt with deep ocean via interfacial stresses, entrainment and diffusion. Estimates of mixed layer depth are important to a wide range of ocean research, such as upper-ocean productivity, exchange with the atmosphere, and long-term climate change. In ocean-ice numerical models the proper reproduction of the upper mixed layer state is especially important, since it is closely related to processes of ice formation. Numerical model results can be very sensitive to the mixed layer parameterization. The intensification of mixing in the upper layer in the model experiments may lead to the disappearance of fresh water in the Beaufort Sea, reducing the thickness of the Atlantic water layer, changing Arctic ocean circulation, etc. On the other hand, the restriction of the ocean upper layer mixing in the numerical models leads to reducing of heat loss in the Atlantic layer and excessive heat accumulation it in the Arctic waters. In this paper we investigate the sensitivity of a regional Arctic model to the parameterizations of convective processes in the ocean. We investigated how the different mixing schemes affect the simulated ocean ventilation, water mass properties, and sea ice distributions. The investigation was based on the coupled regional ice-ocean model of the ICMMG SB RAS. Two parameterizations of mixed layer were chosen: standard procedure used in the ICMMG model, based on the Richardson criteria and nonlocal K profile parameterization (KPP). We compare numerical fields of temperature and salinity, current

  3. Imaging of Compressed Pure-CH Shells and CH Shells with Titanium-Doped Layers on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Yaakobi, B.; Goncharov, V. N.; Delettrez, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    1999-11-01

    The compressed shell integrity of spherical targets has been studied using the 60-beam, 30-kJ UV, OMEGA laser system. The emission from the hot core has been imaged through the cold shell at two narrow, x-ray energy bands, absorbing and nonabsorbing by the shell, allowing nonuniformities in the core emission and the cold shell areal density to be measured. Images of the target have been obtained using a pinhole-array with K-edge filters. The x-ray energies used are around 2.8 and 4.5 keV for pure-CH shells, and around 4.5 and 6 keV for titanium-doped layers. Additional images of the shell are obtained with a framed monochromatic x-ray microscope and a time-integrated crystal-spectrometer/pinhole-array combination. We will present measurements of the compressed shell integrity at the stagnation stage of spherical implosions by varying the position of the titanium-doped layer within the shell, by varying the thickness of the CH shell, and by using two different laser pulse shapes. The experimental results will be compared with 2-D (ORCHID) hydrodynamic simulations. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460, the University of Rochester, and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority.

  4. Photoluminescence determination of valence-band symmetry and Auger-1 threshold energy in biaxially compressed InAsSb layers

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.R.; Biefeld, R.M.; Dawson, L.R.

    1994-08-01

    InAsSb/InGaAs strained-layer superlattices (SLSs) and InAsSb quantum wells, both with biaxially compressed InAsSb layers, were characterized using magneto-photoluminescence and compared with unstained InAsSb and InAs alloys. In heterostructures with biaxially compressed InAsSb, the holes exhibited a decrease in effective mass, approaching that of the electrons. Correcting the data for the magneto-exciton binding energy, we obtain electron-hole reduced mass values in the range, {mu}=0.010--0.015, for the InAsSb heterostructures, whereas {mu}=0.026 and {mu}-0.023 for unstrained InAsSb and InAs alloys respectively. In the 2-dimensional limit, a large increase in the Auger-1 threshold energy accompanies this strain-induced change in valence-band symmetry. Correspondingly, the activation energy for nonradiative recombination in the SLSs displayed a marked increase compared with that of the unstrained alloys.

  5. Band gap and refractive index tunability in thallium based layered mixed crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gasanly, N. M.

    2015-07-21

    Compositional variation of the band gap energy and refractive index of TlMeX{sub 2}-type (Me = Ga or In and X = S or Se) layered mixed crystals have been studied by the transmission and reflection measurements in the wavelength range of 400–1100 nm. The analysis of absorption data of TlGa{sub 1-x}In{sub x}Se{sub 2}, TlGa(S{sub 1−x}Se{sub x}){sub 2}, TlGa{sub 1−x}In{sub x}S{sub 2}, and TlIn(Se{sub 1−x}S{sub x}){sub 2} mixed crystals revealed the presence of both optical indirect and direct transitions. It was found that the energy band gaps of mixed crystals decrease at the replacing of gallium atoms by indium and of sulfur atoms by selenium ones. Through the similar replacing of atoms (smaller atoms by larger ones) in the studied mixed crystals, the refractive index shows the quite opposite behavior.

  6. FLOW FIELD IN SUPERSONIC MIXED-COMPRESSION INLETS AT ANGLE OF ATTACK USING THE THREE DIMENSIONAL METHOD OF CHARACTERISTICS WITH DISCRETE SHOCK WAVE FITTING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    This computer program calculates the flow field in the supersonic portion of a mixed-compression aircraft inlet at non-zero angle of attack. This approach is based on the method of characteristics for steady three-dimensional flow. The results of this program agree with those produced by the two-dimensional method of characteristics when axisymmetric flow fields are calculated. Except in regions of high viscous interaction and boundary layer removal, the results agree well with experimental data obtained for threedimensional flow fields. The flow field in a variety of axisymmetric mixed compression inlets can be calculated using this program. The bow shock wave and the internal shock wave system are calculated using a discrete shock wave fitting procedure. The internal flow field can be calculated either with or without the discrete fitting of the internal shock wave system. The influence of molecular transport can be included in the calculation of the external flow about the forebody and in the calculation of the internal flow when internal shock waves are not discretely fitted. The viscous and thermal diffussion effects are included by treating them as correction terms in the method of characteristics procedure. Dynamic viscosity is represented by Sutherland's law and thermal conductivity is represented as a quadratic function of temperature. The thermodynamic model used is that of a thermally and calorically perfect gas. The program assumes that the cowl lip is contained in a constant plane and that the centerbody contour and cowl contour are smooth and have continuous first partial derivatives. This program cannot calculate subsonic flow, the external flow field if the bow shock wave does not exist entirely around the forebody, or the internal flow field if the bow flow field is injected into the annulus. Input to the program consists of parameters to control execution, to define the geometry, and the vehicle orientation. Output consists of a list of parameters

  7. Fractal interfaces and product generation in the two-dimensional mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, Javier; Martel, Carlos

    1991-01-01

    The dependence of product generation on Peclet and Reynolds numbers in a numerically simulated, reacting, two-dimensional, temporally growing mixing layer is related theoretically to the fractal dimension of the passive scalar interfaces. This reaction is verified using product generation measurements and fractal dimensions derived from the box counting technique. A transition from a low initial dimension to a higher one of approximately 5/3 is identified and shown to be associated to the kinematic distortion of the flow field during the first pairing interaction. It is suggested that the structures reponsible for this transition are nondeterministic, nonrandom, inhomogeneous fractals. In the range of Schmidt numbers investigated (0.25-4), only the large scales are involved. No further transitions, either in the spectra of the vorticity field or in the mixing behavior, are found for Reynolds numbers up to 90,000.

  8. Fractal interfaces and product generation in the two dimensional mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, Javier; Martel, Carlos

    1991-01-01

    The dependence of product generation on Peclet and Reynolds numbers in a numerically simulated, reacting, two dimensional, temporally growing mixing layer is related theoretically to the fractal dimension of the passive scalar interfaces. This relation is verified using product generation measurements and dimensions derived from a standard box counting technique. A transition from a low initial dimension to a higher one of approximately 5/3 is identified and shown to be associated to the kinematic distortion on the flow field during the first pairing interaction. It is suggested that the structures responsible for this transition are non-deterministic, non-random, inhomogeneous fractals. Only the large scales are involved. No further transitions, either in the spectra of the vorticity field or in the mixing behavior, are found for Reynolds numbers up to 90,000.

  9. A three-dimensional simulation of transition and early turbulence in a time-developing mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, A. B.; Reynolds, W. C.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    The physics of the transition and early turbulence regimes in the time developing mixing layer was investigated. The sensitivity of the mixing layer to the disturbance field of the initial condition is considered. The growth of the momentum thickness, the mean velocity profile, the turbulence kinetic energy, the Reynolds stresses, the anisotropy tensor, and particle track pictures of computations are all examined in an effort to better understand the physics of these regimes. The amplitude, spectrum shape, and random phases of the initial disturbance field were varied. A scheme of generating discrete orthogonal function expansions on some nonuniform grids was developed. All cases address the early or near field of the mixing layer. The most significant result shows that the secondary instability of the mixing layer is produced by spanwise variations in the straining field of the primary vortex structures.

  10. Mixing layer height and its implications for air pollution over Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Guiqian; Zhang, Jinqiang; Zhu, Xiaowan; Song, Tao; Münkel, Christoph; Hu, Bo; Schäfer, Klaus; Liu, Zirui; Zhang, Junke; Wang, Lili; Xin, Jinyuan; Suppan, Peter; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-03-01

    The mixing layer is an important meteorological factor that affects air pollution. In this study, the atmospheric mixing layer height (MLH) was observed in Beijing from July 2009 to December 2012 using a ceilometer. By comparison with radiosonde data, we found that the ceilometer underestimates the MLH under conditions of neutral stratification caused by strong winds, whereas it overestimates the MLH when sand-dust is crossing. Using meteorological, PM2.5, and PM10 observational data, we screened the observed MLH automatically; the ceilometer observations were fairly consistent with the radiosondes, with a correlation coefficient greater than 0.9. Further analysis indicated that the MLH is low in autumn and winter and high in spring and summer in Beijing. There is a significant correlation between the sensible heat flux and MLH, and the diurnal cycle of the MLH in summer is also affected by the circulation of mountainous plain winds. Using visibility as an index to classify the degree of air pollution, we found that the variation in the sensible heat and buoyancy term in turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) is insignificant when visibility decreases from 10 to 5 km, but the reduction of shear term in TKE is near 70 %. When visibility decreases from 5 to 1 km, the variation of the shear term in TKE is insignificant, but the decrease in the sensible heat and buoyancy term in TKE is approximately 60 %. Although the correlation between the daily variation of the MLH and visibility is very poor, the correlation between them is significantly enhanced when the relative humidity increases beyond 80 %. This indicates that humidity-related physicochemical processes is the primary source of atmospheric particles under heavy pollution and that the dissipation of atmospheric particles mainly depends on the MLH. The presented results of the atmospheric mixing layer provide useful empirical information for improving meteorological and atmospheric chemistry models and the forecasting

  11. Material transport in a convective surface mixed layer under weak wind forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensa, Jean A.; Özgökmen, Tamay M.; Poje, Andrew C.; Imberger, Jörg

    2015-12-01

    Flows in the upper ocean mixed layer are responsible for the transport and dispersion of biogeochemical tracers, phytoplankton and buoyant pollutants, such as hydrocarbons from an oil spill. Material dispersion in mixed layer flows subject to diurnal buoyancy forcing and weak winds (| u10 | = 5m s-1) are investigated using a non-hydrostatic model. Both purely buoyancy-forced and combined wind- and buoyancy-forced flows are sampled using passive tracers, as well as 2D and 3D particles to explore characteristics of horizontal and vertical dispersion. It is found that the surface tracer patterns are determined by the convergence zones created by convection cells within a time scale of just a few hours. For pure convection, the results displayed the classic signature of Rayleigh-Benard cells. When combined with a wind stress, the convective cells become anisotropic in that the along-wind length scale gets much larger than the cross-wind scale. Horizontal relative dispersion computed by sampling the flow fields using both 2D and 3D passive particles is found to be consistent with the Richardson regime. Relative dispersion is an order of magnitude higher and 2D surface releases transition to Richardson regime faster in the wind-forced case. We also show that the buoyancy-forced case results in significantly lower amplitudes of scale-dependent horizontal relative diffusivity, kD(ℓ), than those reported by Okubo (1970), while the wind- and buoyancy-forced case shows a good agreement with Okubo's diffusivity amplitude, and the scaling is consistent with Richardson's 4/3rd law, kD ∼ ℓ4/3. These modeling results provide a framework for measuring material dispersion by mixed layer flows in future observational programs.

  12. Low Frequency Variability in a Stochastic Atmosphere - Ocean Mixed Layer Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    The climate system exhibits low-frequency variability in characteristic spatial structures, but the mechanisms for this variability have remained unclear partly due to observational limitations and partly due to difficulties in analyzing simulations from nonlinear, chaotic models. In addition, recent studies have questioned the necessity of ocean circulations to generate such low-frequency variability. Our research is intended to clarify mechanisms of low-frequency climate variability that can occur purely from atmospheric dynamics coupled to an ocean mixed-layer model. For this purpose, we have built a new stochastic model based on the linearized primitive equations for the atmosphere, a slab mixed-layer model for the ocean, a gray radiation scheme for radiative effects, and a diffusive scheme for vertical turbulent eddy fluxes. Temperature is randomly excited in midlatitudes, and all variables except surface pressure are damped artificially with a 1-day time scale. The atmospheric model alone is shown to produce realistic seasonal mean eddy variances and fluxes in midlatitudes, despite the absence of moisture, clouds, moist convection, topography, and zonal asymmetries in the back- ground state. Because the atmospheric eddy statistics are realistic, it is argued that coupling these eddies to a mixed-layer model will produce more realistic low-frequency variability than the traditional Hasselmann model in which the atmospheric stochastic forcing is imposed by fiat. We have shown that such coupling does indeed generate peaks in the low-frequency power spectrum that otherwise would not occur in the absence of coupling. Now, we are trying to comprehensively analyze the mechanism for these low-frequency peaks, exploiting the fact that the model is purely linear. We further aim to analyze simulations from a comprehensive nonlinear aquaplanet GCM. The results from nonlinear simulations will serve as a baseline for theoretical statistical studies in low frequency

  13. Experimenting with mixing and layered convection in phono-trachytic magmas: Implications on reservoir dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Campos, C. P.; Civetta, L.; Dingwell, D. B.; Perugini, D.; Petrelli, M.; Fehr, T. K.

    2006-12-01

    Abundant geochemical and volcanological data on the Campanian Ignimbrite, (>200 km3, 39 ka) Phlegrean Fields, Italy, support the existence of a layered magmatic reservoir, which evolved via 1) replenishment of the chamber with trachytic magma and 2) short-term pre-eruptive mixing between new trachytic and phono- trachytic resident magmas. We have initiated an experimental program in order to constrain the dynamics of such mingling/mixing events. We used melted natural products from these two magmas of sub-equal but distinct composition, which are thought to have been involved in the origin of this magmatic system as end-members (phono-trachyte = end- member A and trachyte = end-member B). The two were then stirred together and sampled by experiment termination as a time series, ranging from 1-hour up to 1-week. Stirring under constant low flow velocity (0.5 rotations per minute) generated at first homogenization and mixing of the starting compositions. Then separate convection cells and compositional layering for major and minor elements emerged. Calculated density distributions along sections from the experimental glasses, after decoupling, are very similar to density distributions in aqueous systems under double-diffusive convection. In order to test double- diffusive decoupled convection in this system, we performed 87Sr/86Sr-isotopic and Sr- LA-ICP-MS- measurements, using the 25-hour experimental glasses. The effective chemical separation of different convection cells has been confirmed with clearly distinct isotopic signatures for both bottom and top cells. Comparison with natural samples from the Campanian Ignimbrite strengthens the importance of the role of a double-diffusive similar convection as a major differentiation process leading to layering in this system. Our results support the effectiveness of a DDC-driven fractionation for moderately high-silica magmas under high near-liquidus temperatures, before the onset of fractional crystallization.

  14. Tests of a mixed compression axisymmetric inlet with large transonic mass flow at Mach numbers 0.6 to 2.65

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, D. B.; Sorensen, N. E.

    1972-01-01

    A 38.8-cm (15.28-in.) capture diameter model of a mixed-compression axisymmetric inlet system with a translating cowl was designed and tested. The internal contours, designed for Mach number 2.65, provided a throat area of 59 percent of the capture area when the cowl was retracted for transonic operation. Other model features included a boundary-layer removal system, vortex generators, an engine airflow bypass system, cowl support struts, and rotating rakes at the engine face. All tunnel testing was conducted at a tunnel total pressure of about 1 atm (a unit Reynolds number of about 8.53 million/m at Mach number 2.65) at angles of attack from 0 deg to 4 deg. Results for the following were obtained: total-pressure recovery and distortion at the engine face as a function of bleed mass-flow ratio, the effect of bleed and vortex generator configurations on pressure recovery and distortion, inlet tolerance to unstart due to changes in angle of attack or Mach number, surface pressure distributions, boundary-layer profiles, and transonic additive drag. At Mach number 2.65 and with the best bleed configurations, maximum total pressure recovery at the engine face ranged from 91 to 94.5 percent with bleed mass-flow ratios from 4 to 9 percent, respectively, and total-pressure distortion was less than 10 percent. At off-design supersonic Mach numbers above 1.70, maximum total-pressure recoveries and corresponding bleed mass flows were about the same as at Mach number 2.65, with about 10 to 15 percent distortion. In the transonic Mach number range, total pressure recovery was high (above 96 percent) and distortion was low (less than 15 percent) only when the inlet mass-flow ration was reduced 0.02 to 0.06 from the maximum theoretical value (0.590 at Mach number 1.0).

  15. Nonlinear evolution of the first mode supersonic oblique waves in compressible boundary layers. Part 1: Heated/cooled walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gajjar, J. S. B.

    1993-01-01

    The nonlinear stability of an oblique mode propagating in a two-dimensional compressible boundary layer is considered under the long wave-length approximation. The growth rate of the wave is assumed to be small so that the concept of unsteady nonlinear critical layers can be used. It is shown that the spatial/temporal evolution of the mode is governed by a pair of coupled unsteady nonlinear equations for the disturbance vorticity and density. Expressions for the linear growth rate show clearly the effects of wall heating and cooling and in particular how heating destabilizes the boundary layer for these long wavelength inviscid modes at O(1) Mach numbers. A generalized expression for the linear growth rate is obtained and is shown to compare very well for a range of frequencies and wave-angles at moderate Mach numbers with full numerical solutions of the linear stability problem. The numerical solution of the nonlinear unsteady critical layer problem using a novel method based on Fourier decomposition and Chebychev collocation is discussed and some results are presented.

  16. Investigation of supersonic turbulent boundary-layer separation on a compression ramp by an integral method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, D. K.; Czarnecki, K. R.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine the feasibility of using a boundary layer integral method to study the separation of a turbulent boundary layer on a two dimensional ramp at supersonic speeds. The numerical calculations were made for a free stream Mach number of 3, a Reynolds number of 10 million, and over a ramp angle range from 0 deg to 30 deg. For ramp angles where no flow separation was indicated, theoretical calculations were in reasonable agreement with experimental data except for a somewhat belated rise in pressure. For larger ramp angles, where separation was present, the investigation produced results that were not in agreement with experiment or with results calculated by time dependent Navier-Stokes methods. This apparently was true because no provision had been made for a proper shock boundary layer interaction where strong normal pressure gradients are induced within the boundary layer under the shock independent of surface curvature effects.

  17. Seasonal cycle of the mixed-layer heat and freshwater budget in the eastern tropical Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, Willi; Dengler, Marcus; Lüdke, Jan; Schmidtko, Sunke; Schlundt, Michael; Brandt, Peter; Partners, Preface

    2016-04-01

    A new seasonal mixed-layer heat flux climatology is used to explore the mechanisms driving seasonal variability of sea surface temperature and salinity in the eastern tropical Atlantic (ETA) with a focus on the eastern boundary upwelling regions. Until recently, large areas at the continental margins of the ETA were not well covered by publically available hydrographic data hampering a detailed understanding of the involved processes. In a collaborative effort between African and European partners within the EU-funded PREFACE program, a new seasonal climatology for different components of the heat and freshwater budget was compiled for the ETA using all publically available hydrographic data sets and a large trove of previously not-publically available hydrographic measurements from the territorial waters of western African countries, either from national programs or from the FAO supported EAF-Nansen program. The publically available data includes hydrographic data from global data repositories including most recent ARGO floats and glider measurements. This data set was complemented by velocity data from surface drifter and ARGO floats to allow determining horizontal heat and freshwater advection. Monthly means of air-sea heat fluxes were derived from the TropFlux climatology while precipitation rates were derived from monthly mean fields of the Global Precipitation Climatology Project. Finally, microstructure data from individual measurement campaigns allow estimating diapycnal heat and salt fluxes for certain regions during specific months. A detailed analysis of the seasonal cycle of mixed-layer heat and freshwater balance in previously poorly covered regions in the eastern tropical Atlantic upwelling is presented. In both eastern boundary upwelling region, off Senegal/Mauritania and off Angola/Namibia, average net surface heat fluxes warm the mixed layer at a rate between 50 and 80 W/m2 with maxima in the respective summer seasons. Horizontal advection

  18. Parametric representation of heat and moisture fluxes in cloud-topped mixed layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penc, Richard S.; Albrecht, Bruce A.

    1987-01-01

    The Betts (1973, 1978) parametrization of heat and moisture fluxes is tested using measurements made in thin, broken, and solid stratocumulus clouds by the NCAR Electra off the California coast in June 1976. The turbulence data are used to determine updraft-downdraft properties, heat and moisture fluxes, spectra, and cospectra. From the convective properties, vertical mass flux profiles are obtained and examined for consistency. A convective scaling which is appropriate for cloud-topped mixed layers is discussed. The results demonstrate the usefulness of a mass flux formulation in modeling applications for cloud conditions varying between solid and broken.

  19. Characterization of coherent structures in a turbulent mixing layer by digital image analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernal, L. P.; Hernan, M. A.; Sarohia, V.

    1985-01-01

    Digital image analysis has been applied to a shadowgraph motion picture of a helium nitrogen mixing layer in order to characterize the coherent vortex structures in the flow. Both the primary spanwise coherent vortices and secondary streamwise vortices are considered. Pattern recognition algorithms were designed to take advantage of the more pronounced features of the vortices and of their temporal coherence to isolate them and to measure their characteristics. The resulting data base permits a deterministic description of the evolution of primary and seconary vortices.

  20. Mixing layer height and the implications for air pollution over Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, G.; Zhang, J.; Münkel, C.; Song, T.; Hu, B.; Schäfer, K.; Liu, Z.; Xin, J.; Suppan, P.; Wang, Y.

    2015-10-01

    The mixing layer is an important meteorological factor that affects atmospheric pollution. A study of atmospheric pollution in the Beijing area was performed from July 2009 to December 2012, using a ceilometer, to observe and study the atmospheric mixing layer height (MLH). Based on a comparison and validation of multiple types of data, we evaluated the quality of the MLH data as observed by the ceilometer and found that the ceilometer underestimates MLH during neutral stratification caused by strong winds, whereas it overestimates MLH during dust crossing. By combining conventional meteorological data and PM2.5 and PM10 observational data, we screened the observational results for the MLH, and the ceilometer observations were fairly consistent with the meteorological radiosonde profile results. The correlation coefficient is more than 0.9, and the effective rate of acquired data is near 80 %. Further analysis of the variation in the MLH indicates that the MLH in the Beijing area exhibits the feature of being low in autumn and winter and being high in spring and summer. There is a significant correlation between the variation in the MLH and the sensible heat flux, whereas the diurnal variation in the mixing layer during summer is affected by the circulation of mountainous plain winds. By applying visibility as the index for the classification of atmospheric pollution degree, it is found that in comparison with a clear day, the variation of sensible heat and buoyancy term in turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) of a slight haze day is insignificant, but the reduction of shear term in TKE is near 70 % when visibility decreased from 10 to 5 km; in comparison with the slight haze day, the variation of shear term in TKE of medium and heavy haze days is insignificant, but the declination of sensible heat and buoyancy term in TKE are about 60 % when visibility decreased from 5 to 1 km. Although the correlation between the daily variation of MLH and visibility is very poor, the

  1. Implementation of a 3D mixing layer code on parallel computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roe, K.; Thakur, R.; Dang, T.; Bogucz, E.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes our progress and experience in the development of a Computational-Fluid-Dynamics code on parallel computers to simulate three-dimensional spatially-developing mixing layers. In this initial study, the three-dimensional time-dependent Euler equations are solved using a finite-volume explicit time-marching algorithm. The code was first programmed in Fortran 77 for sequential computers. The code was then converted for use on parallel computers using the conventional message-passing technique, while we have not been able to compile the code with the present version of HPF compilers.

  2. Low-frequency variability in a climate model with a mixed-layer ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Gould-Stewart, S.

    1984-11-01

    A mixed-layer ocean model coupled to a global spectral atmospheric circulation model produces a warming in the model equatorial Pacific Ocean similar to the El Nino or Southern Oscillation (SO) response. The mechanism for producing the SO-like response in an ocean with heat storage and without ocean dynamics is investigated. The model is capable of simulating SO-like time scales, but the details of the structure of the warming differ significantly from the observed El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) response. 22 refs.

  3. Mixed convection boundary layer flow over a stretching vertical sheet in a thermally stratified fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishak, Anuar; Nazar, Roslinda; Pop, Ioan

    2014-06-01

    The steady mixed convection boundary layer flow through a stable stratified medium over a stretching vertical sheet is investigated. The velocity of the stretching sheet, the surface temperature and the ambient temperature are assumed to vary linearly with the distance from the leading edge. The transformed ordinary differential equations are solved numerically by the Keller-box method. The results indicate that the thermal stratification significantly affects the surface shear stress as well as the heat transfer rate at the surface. For the opposing flow, solution exists only for small magnitude of the buoyancy parameter.

  4. Numerical study of terrain-induced mesoscale motions in a mixed layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Y.-J.; Ueyoshi, K.; Deardorff, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    Numerical integrations using a potential enstrophy-conserving scheme are presented for the flow within a mixed layer over hilly terrain using the hydrostatic shallow-water equations with a quadratic drag law. The mesoscale area treated is 150 km on a side; cyclic lateral boundary conditions are used. It is found that for the idealized conditions treated (no surface heating, no entrainment and no pressure adjustments aloft), the topography quickly induces a steady state flow pattern by means of surface friction. Unsteadiness does not occur unless a surface-friction Reynolds number is greater than approximately 100. Effects of varying the Rossby number, Froude number and terrain-height parameter are examined.

  5. Transition to Turbulence and Effect of Initial Conditions on 3D Compressible Mixing in Planar Blast-wave-driven Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, A R; Edwards, M J; Greenough, J A

    2004-11-08

    Perturbations on an interface driven by a strong blast wave grow in time due to a combination of Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov, and decompression effects. In this paper, results from three-dimensional numerical simulations of such a system under drive conditions to be attainable on the National Ignition Facility [E. M. Campbell, Laser Part. Beams, 9(2), 209 (1991)] are presented. Using the multi-physics, adaptive mesh refinement, higher order Godunov Eulerian hydrocode, Raptor [L. H. Howell and J.A. Greenough, J. Comp. Phys. 184, 53 (2003)], the late nonlinear instability evolution, including transition to turbulence, is considered for various multimode perturbation spectra. The 3D post-transition state differs from the 2D result, but the process of transition proceeds similarly in both 2D and 3D. The turbulent mixing transition results in a reduction in the growth rate of the mixing layer relative to its pre-transition value and, in the case of the bubble front, relative to the 2D result. The post-transition spike front velocity is approximately the same in 2D and 3D. Implications for hydrodynamic mixing in core-collapse supernova are discussed.

  6. The development of a mixing layer under the action of weak streamwise vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Marvin E.; Mathew, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    The action of weak, streamwise vortices on a plane, incompressible, steady mixing layer is examined in the large Reynolds-number limit. The outer, inviscid region is bounded by a vortex sheet to which the viscous region is confined. It is shown that the local linear analysis becomes invalid at streamwise distances O(epsilon(sup -1)), where epsilon is much less than 1 is the cross flow amplitude, and a new nonlinear analysis is constructed for this region. Numerical solutions of the nonlinear problem show that the vortex sheet undergoes an O(1) change in position and that the solution is ultimately terminated by the appearance of a singularity. The corresponding viscous layer shows downstream thickening, but appears to remain well behaved up to the singular location.

  7. On the evolution of centrifugal instabilities within curved incompressible mixing layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, S. R.; Jackson, T. L.; Hu, F. Q.

    1994-01-01

    It is known that certain configurations which possess curvature are prone to a class of instabilities which their 'flat' counterparts will not support. The main thrust of the study of these centrifugal instabilities has concentrated on curved solid boundaries and their effect on the fluid motion. In this article attention is shifted towards a fluid-fluid interface observed within a curved incompressible mixing layer. Experimental evidence is available to support the conjecture that this situation may be subjected to centrifugal instabilities. The evolution of modes with wavelengths comparable with the layer's thickness is considered and the high Taylor/Gortler number regime is also discussed which characterizes the ultimate fate of the modes.

  8. A Mixed-Valent Molybdenum Monophosphate with a Layer Structure: KMo 3P 2O 14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guesdon, A.; Borel, M. M.; Leclaire, A.; Grandin, A.; Raveau, B.

    1994-03-01

    A new mixed-valent molybdenum monophosphate with a layer structure KMo 3P 2O 14 has been isolated. It crystallizes in the space group P2 1/ m with a = 8.599(2) Å, b = 6.392(2) Å, c = 10.602(1) Å, and β = 111.65(2)°. The layers [Mo 3P 2O 14] ∞ are parallel to (100) and consist of [MoPO 8] ∞ chains running along limitb→ , in which one MoO 6 octahedron alternates with one PO 4 tetrahedron. In fact, four [MoPO 8] ∞ chains share the corners of their polyhedra and the edges of their octahedra, forming [Mo 4P 4O 24] ∞ columns which are linked through MoO 5 bipyramids along limitc→. The K + ions interleaved between these layers are surrounded by eight oxygens, forming bicapped trigonal prisms KO 8. Besides the unusual trigonal bipyramids MoO 5, this structure is also characterized by a tendency to the localization of the electrons, since one octahedral site is occupied by Mo(V), whereas the other octahedral site and the trigonal bipyramid are occupied by Mo(VI). The similarity of this structure with pure octahedral layer structures suggests the possibility of generating various derivatives, and of ion exchange properties.

  9. Mixed layer depth seasonality within the Coral Sea based on Argo data [corrected].

    PubMed

    Jaffrés, Jasmine B D

    2013-01-01

    The worldwide deployment of Argo floats has enabled much more detailed studies of global and regional seas over the last decade. Here, the seasonal variability of the mixed layer depth (MLD) within the Coral Sea was examined with CTD profiles from Argo floats. Multiple threshold values for both temperature and density have been employed to determine the most suitable threshold values for the Coral Sea. A threshold value of 0.04 kg/m(3) for density and 0.2°C for temperature appear the most fitting for this region. Although MLD and isothermal layer depth (ILD) coincide quite well in most cases, the relatively common presence of temporary, non-seasonal barrier layers induces an ILD that is significantly deeper than the MLD. Consequently, an MLD estimation based on density is more appropriate. A distinct seasonality in the MLD is evident throughout the Coral Sea, but is generally more pronounced in higher southern latitudes (20-30°S). Salinity inversions are rare and mainly occur in the south-eastern Coral Sea, while barrier layers are more commonly associated with the north-eastern Coral Sea, a region characterised by high rainfall. The significance of regional currents is evident in the north-western Coral Sea, where temperature and ocean heat content is relatively low due to a northward moving boundary current. Shallow bathymetry, in turn, is linked to the absence of Argo data on the continental shelf and in the central Coral Sea. PMID:23593368

  10. Mixed Layer Depth Seasonality within the Coral Sea Based on Argo Data

    PubMed Central

    Jaffrés, Jasmine B. D.

    2013-01-01

    The worldwide deployment of Argo floats has enabled much more detailed studies of global and regional seas over the last decade. Here, the seasonal variability of the mixed layer depth (MLD) within the Coral Sea was examined with CTD profiles from Argo floats. Multiple threshold values for both temperature and density have been employed to determine the most suitable threshold values for the Coral Sea. A threshold value of 0.04 kg/m3 for density and 0.2°C for temperature appear the most fitting for this region. Although MLD and isothermal layer depth (ILD) coincide quite well in most cases, the relatively common presence of temporary, non-seasonal barrier layers induces an ILD that is significantly deeper than the MLD. Consequently, an MLD estimation based on density is more appropriate. A distinct seasonality in the MLD is evident throughout the Coral Sea, but is generally more pronounced in higher southern latitudes (20–30°S). Salinity inversions are rare and mainly occur in the south-eastern Coral Sea, while barrier layers are more commonly associated with the north-eastern Coral Sea, a region characterised by high rainfall. The significance of regional currents is evident in the north-western Coral Sea, where temperature and ocean heat content is relatively low due to a northward moving boundary current. Shallow bathymetry, in turn, is linked to the absence of Argo data on the continental shelf and in the central Coral Sea. PMID:23593368

  11. Chlorophyll-a Variability in the Southern Ocean Mixed Layer and Euphotic Zone From Elephant Seals and Profiling Floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carranza, M. M.; Gille, S. T.; Franks, P. J. S.; Johnson, K. S.; Girton, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    The Southern Ocean contains some of the ocean's deepest mixed layers. Because deep mixed layers can transport phytoplankton below the euphotic zone, light levels depend on mixed-layer depth (MLD), and phytoplankton growth is hypothesized to be co-limited by iron and light. Estimates of Chl-a fluorescence, particle backscattering and hydrographic profiles collected by southern elephant seals, EM-APEX, and biogeochemical Argo floats are used to evaluate the extent to which MLD influences phytoplankton bloom development and the vertical structure of chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) in the Southern Ocean. We find that surface Chl-a (i.e., mean Chl-a for the upper light penetration depth) is a relatively good proxy of phytoplankton biomass (i.e., depth-integrated Chl-a) within the euphotic zone but gives an inadequate representation of biomass within the mixed layer, particularly in the summer. Although nearly vertically homogeneous Chl-a within the mixed layer prevails in seasonal mean profiles, subsurface Chl-a maxima are not uncommon from spring through fall. Deep Chl-a maxima that correlate with particle backscattering in summer and fall are found near the base of the mixed layer, closer to the nutrient maximum than the light maximum, suggesting that nutrient limitation (i.e., essentially iron) can play a greater role than light limitation in governing productivity.

  12. Turbulence in Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lecture notes for the AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel (FDP) Special Course on 'Turbulence in Compressible Flows' have been assembled in this report. The following topics were covered: Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers, Compressible Turbulent Free Shear Layers, Turbulent Combustion, DNS/LES and RANS Simulations of Compressible Turbulent Flows, and Case Studies of Applications of Turbulence Models in Aerospace.

  13. Direct numerical simulations of the double scalar mixing layer. Part II: Reactive scalars

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, Mikael; de Bruyn Kops, Stephen M.; Cha, Chong M.

    2007-06-15

    The reacting double scalar mixing layer (RDSML) is investigated as a canonical multistream flow and a model problem for simple piloted diffusion flames. In piloted diffusion flames, the reacting fuel and oxidizer streams are initially separated by a central pilot stream at stoichiometric composition. The primary purpose of this pilot is to delay the mixing of the pure streams until a stable flame base can develop. In such multistream systems, the modeling of turbulent scalar mixing is complicated by the multiple feed streams, leading to more complex fine-scale statistics, which remain as yet an unmet modeling challenge compared to the simpler two-feed system. In Part I we described how multimodal mixture fraction probability density functions (PDFs) and conditional scalar dissipation rates can be modeled with a presumed mapping function approach. In this work we present an efficient and robust extension of the modeling to a general multistream reacting flow and compare predictions to three-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the RDSML with a single-step reversible chemistry model and varying levels of extinction. With high extinction levels, the interaction with the pilot stream is described. Additionally, state-of-the-art combustion modeling calculations including conditional moment closure (CMC) and stationary laminar flamelet modeling (SLFM) are performed with the newly developed mixing model. Excellent agreement is found between the DNS and modeling predictions, even where the PDF is essentially a triple-delta shape near the flame base, so long as extinction levels are moderate to low. The suggested approach outlined in this paper is strictly valid only for flows that can be described by a single mixture fraction. For these flows the approach should provide engineers with fine-scale models that are of accuracy comparable to those already available for binary mixing, at only marginally higher complexity and cost. (author)

  14. Opening of an interface flaw in a layered elastic half-plane under compressive loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, J. M.; Fichter, W. B.; Goree, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    A static analysis is given of the problem of an elastic layer perfectly bonded, except for a frictionless interface crack, to a dissimilar elastic half-plane. The free surface of the layer is loaded by a finite pressure distribution directly over the crack. The problem is formulated using the two dimensional linear elasticity equations. Using Fourier transforms, the governing equations are converted to a pair of coupled singular integral equations. The integral equations are reduced to a set of simultaneous algebraic equations by expanding the unknown functions in a series of Jacobi polynomials and then evaluating the singular Cauchy-type integrals. The resulting equations are found to be ill-conditioned and, consequently, are solved in the least-squares sense. Results from the analysis show that, under a normal pressure distribution on the free surface of the layer and depending on the combination of geometric and material parameters, the ends of the crack can open. The resulting stresses at the crack-tips are singular, implying that crack growth is possible. The extent of the opening and the crack-top stress intensity factors depend on the width of the pressure distribution zone, the layer thickness, and the relative material properties of the layer and half-plane.

  15. X-ray continuum as a measure of pressure and fuel–shell mix in compressed isobaric hydrogen implosion cores

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marshall, F. J.; Betti, R.; Nora, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.

    2015-02-01

    Pressure, by definition, characterizes the conditions within an isobaric implosion core at peak compression [Gus’kov et al., Nucl. Fusion 16, 957 (1976); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 5257 (2001)] and is a key parameter in quantifying its near-ignition performance [Lawson, Proc. Phys. Soc. London, B 70, 6 (1957); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010); Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056315 (2014); and Glenzer et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 056318 (2012)]. At high spectral energy, where the x-ray emission from an imploded hydrogen core is optically thin, the emissivity profile can be inferred from the spatially resolved core emission. This emissivity, which can be modeled accurately under hot-core conditions, is dependent almost entirely on the pressure when measured within a restricted spectral range matched to the temperature range anticipated for the emitting volume. In this way, the hot core pressure at the time of peak emission can be inferred from the measured free-free emissivity profile. The pressure and temperature dependences of the x-ray emissivity and the neutron-production rate explain a simple scaling of the total filtered x-ray emission as a constant power of the total neutron yield for implosions of targets of similar design over a broad range of shell implosion isentropes. This scaling behavior has been seen in implosion simulations and is confirmed by measurements of high-isentrope implosions [Sangster et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 056317 (2013)] on the OMEGA laser system [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Attributing the excess emission from less-stable, low-isentrope implosions, above the level expected from this neutron-yield scaling, to the higher emissivity of shell carbon mixed into the implosion’s central hot spot, the hot-spot “fuel–shell” mix mass can be inferred.

  16. X-ray continuum as a measure of pressure and fuel–shell mix in compressed isobaric hydrogen implosion cores

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marshall, F. J.; Betti, R.; Nora, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.

    2015-02-15

    Pressure, by definition, characterizes the conditions within an isobaric implosion core at peak compression [Gus'kov et al., Nucl. Fusion 16, 957 (1976); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 5257 (2001)] and is a key parameter in quantifying its near-ignition performance [Lawson, Proc. Phys. Soc. London, B 70, 6 (1957); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010); Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056315 (2014); and Glenzer et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 056318 (2012)]. At high spectral energy, where the x-ray emission from an imploded hydrogen core is optically thin, the emissivity profile can be inferred from the spatially resolved core emission. This emissivity, which can be modeled accurately under hot-core conditions, is dependent almost entirely on the pressure when measured within a restricted spectral range matched to the temperature range anticipated for the emitting volume. In this way, the hot core pressure at the time of peak emission can be inferred from the measured free-free emissivity profile. The pressure and temperature dependences of the x-ray emissivity and the neutron-production rate explain a simple scaling of the total filtered x-ray emission as a constant power of the total neutron yield for implosions of targets of similar design over a broad range of shell implosion isentropes. This scaling behavior has been seen in implosion simulations and is confirmed by measurements of high-isentrope implosions [Sangster et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 056317 (2013)] on the OMEGA laser system [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Attributing the excess emission from less-stable, low-isentrope implosions, above the level expected from this neutron-yield scaling, to the higher emissivity of shell carbon mixed into the implosion's central hot spot, the hot-spot “fuel–shell” mix mass can be inferred.

  17. Relationship between DMS concentration and the upper mixed layer solar radiation dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belviso, S.; Caniaux, G.

    2009-04-01

    Dimethylsulfide (DMS) is a natural sulfur compound arising from algal dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) but through complex biotic and abiotic processes. It is an important natural source of atmospheric sulfur providing new and/or bigger hygroscopic particles for cloud formation over the ocean. One recent study (Vallina and Simo, Science, 2007) suggests the existence of a close quantitative link, at the global scale but also locally, between DMS and the solar radiation dose (SRD), a measure of available radiation inside the mixed layer. Joint data including CTDs, DMS concentration and solar radiation data, collected all along the year 2001 in the northeastern Atlantic during the POMME experiment are analyzed. Contrary to the observations in the Sargasso Sea and Blanes Bay (Mediterranean Sea) presented by Vallina and Simo (2007), this new data set clearly indicates that SRD and DMS are only weakly correlated, and this whatever the numerous sensitivity tests performed (i.e. the solar irradiance, the optical properties of surface waters, the mixed layer depth criteria). Additionally, the DMS versus SRD relationship appears quite sensitive to the irradiance attenuation law. Hence, it appears that SRD cannot be used to understand DMS dynamics at the scale of the north Atlantic basin.

  18. Mixed mode transition in zero and adverse pressure gradient boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Rikhi; Durbin, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Flow regimes exist where interaction of Klebanoff streaks and the Tollmien-Sclichting waves trigger transition but either mode is individually insufficient. Such interaction between orderly and bypass routes of transition is called Mixed mode transition. In zero pressure gradient boundary layers, mixed mode transition follows three routes depending upon strength of these perturbation modes. At high free-stream turbulence intensity (Tu), bypass transition is dominant and the flow is very weakly sensitive to the TS mode strength. In the presence of a strong TS mode, low Tu triggers secondary instability of the TS wave forming Λ vortices. The Λ vortices are forced response due to the weak streaks rather than resonance mechanism seen in monochromatic excitations. When both of these modes are weak, secondary instability of streaks trigger consequent breakdown to turbulent spots. Three-dimensional visualization of the perturbation fields shows toroidal n = 0 and helical n = 1 modes observed in instability of axisymmetric jets and wakes. In adverese pressure gradient boundary layers, the presence of an inflection point significantly increases the growth rate of TS mode thereby strengthening the secondary instability route and the interaction is more interesting. This work was supported by NSF grant CBET-1228195. Computer time was provided by the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE).

  19. Simulation of mixed-host emitting layer based organic light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Riku, C.; Kee, Y. Y.; Ong, T. S.; Tou, T. Y.; Yap, S. S.

    2015-04-24

    ‘SimOLED’ simulator is used in this work to investigate the efficiency of the mixed-host organic light emitting devices (MH-OLEDs). Tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum(3) (Alq{sub 3}) and N,N-diphenyl-N,N-Bis(3-methylphenyl)-1,1-diphenyl-4,4-diamine (TPD) are used as the electron transport layer (ETL) material and hole transport layer (HTL) material respectively, and the indium-doped tin oxide (ITO) and aluminum (Al) as anode and cathode. Three MH-OLEDs, A, B and C with the same structure of ITO / HTM (15 nm) / Mixed host (70 nm) / ETM (10 nm) /Al, are stimulated with ratios TPD:Alq{sub 3} of 3:5, 5:5, and 5:3 respectively. The Poole-Frenkel model for electron and hole mobilities is employed to compute the current density-applied voltage-luminance characteristics, distribution of the electric field, carrier concentrations and recombination rate.

  20. Global and Koopman modes analysis of sound generation in mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, G.; Alizard, F.; Robinet, J.-C.; Gloerfelt, X.

    2013-12-01

    It is now well established that linear and nonlinear instability waves play a significant role in the noise generation process for a wide variety of shear flows such as jets or mixing layers. In that context, the problem of acoustic radiation generated by spatially growing instability waves of two-dimensional subsonic and supersonic mixing layers are revisited in a global point of view, i.e., without any assumption about the base flow, in both a linear and a nonlinear framework by using global and Koopman mode decompositions. In that respect, a timestepping technique based on disturbance equations is employed to extract the most dynamically relevant coherent structures for both linear and nonlinear regimes. The present analysis proposes thus a general strategy for analysing the near-field coherent structures which are responsible for the acoustic noise in these configurations. In particular, we illustrate the failure of linear global modes to describe the noise generation mechanism associated with the vortex pairing for the subsonic regime whereas they appropriately explain the Mach wave radiation of instability waves in the supersonic regime. By contrast, the Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) analysis captures both the near-field dynamics and the far-field acoustics with a few number of modes for both configurations. In addition, the combination of DMD and linear global modes analyses provides new insight about the influence on the radiated noise of nonlinear interactions and saturation of instability waves as well as their interaction with the mean flow.

  1. Quantifying subtropical North Pacific gyre mixed layer primary productivity from Seaglider observations of diel oxygen cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, David P.; Wilson, Samuel T.; Doney, Scott C.; Karl, David M.

    2015-05-01

    Using autonomous underwater gliders, we quantified diurnal periodicity in dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll, and temperature in the subtropical North Pacific near the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) Station ALOHA during summer 2012. Oxygen optodes provided sufficient stability and precision to quantify diel cycles of average amplitude of 0.6 µmol kg-1. A theoretical diel curve was fit to daily observations to infer an average mixed layer gross primary productivity (GPP) of 1.8 mmol O2 m-3 d-1. Cumulative net community production (NCP) over 110 days was 500 mmol O2 m-2 for the mixed layer, which averaged 57 m in depth. Both GPP and NCP estimates indicated a significant period of below-average productivity at Station ALOHA in 2012, an observation confirmed by 14C productivity incubations and O2/Ar ratios. Given our success in an oligotrophic gyre where biological signals are small, our diel GPP approach holds promise for remote characterization of productivity across the spectrum of marine environments.

  2. Profiling float-based observations of net respiration beneath the mixed layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennon, Tyler D.; Riser, Stephen C.; Mecking, Sabine

    2016-06-01

    We employ profiling floats with dissolved oxygen sensors to observe in situ temporal oxygen evolution below the mixed layer, allowing us to characterize net respiration of organic carbon in eight distinct regions over the globe. Export and export efficiency are generally high in locations with strong seasonal variability and low in locations of weak seasonality. Vertically integrated respiration is weakly, yet significantly, correlated with remote observations of chlorophyll, net primary production, and planktonic community size structure. These correlations suggest that regimes of high net primary production and large phytoplankton fuel elevated respiration at depth. Several regions of float-based observations intersect with sites of other detailed observations (e.g., Hawaii and Sargasso Sea), which allows us to compare our results to independent studies. We find that there is good agreement among export production estimates at highly seasonal locations, and that float-based observations may be biased low at weakly seasonal locations. We posit that the reason for the low-latitude discrepancy is the relative steady state of oxygen concentration caused by weak seasonality and shallow wintertime mixed layer depths.

  3. Mach waves produced in the supersonic jet mixing layer by shock/vortex interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oertel Sen, H.; Seiler, F.; Srulijes, J.; Hruschka, R.

    2016-05-01

    The noise emission of free jets has been extensively investigated for many decades. At subsonic jet velocities, coherent structures of the mixing layer move at subsonic speed and emit sound waves. Free jets blowing at supersonic speeds, however, can emit weak shock waves, called Mach waves. At supersonic speeds, two cases must be distinguished: the structures move either subsonically or supersonically relative to the inside and/or outside speed of sound. In the case of supersonic movement, the Mach waves exist inside as well as outside the jet. At subsonic speeds, no Mach waves appear. Although numerous theories have been established to find the origin of the Mach waves, to the authors' best knowledge, the mechanism of the Mach wave formation has not yet been clearly explained. Recently another theory of Mach waves in supersonic jets was developed, as described herein, which outlines the causes for the Mach wave production and stability as well as their dynamics. The theory's principle is that the Mach waves are initiated by vortices which move downstream at three speeds w, {w}' and {w}'' inside of the mixing layer. These three types of vortices and Mach waves are described in a comprehensive manner by the theory and are called the " w-, {w}'- and {w}''-vortices" and " w-, {w}'- and {w}''-Mach waves," respectively.

  4. Observed and modeled mixed-layer variability on the continental shelf of Sardinia (Western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onken, Reiner

    2016-04-01

    An important task of Military Oceanography is the prediction of mixed-layer properties and their spatial and temporal variability. In the mainframe of the REP14-MED sea trial which was conducted under the lead of CMRE in June 2014 in the waters west of Sardinia, an oceanographic mooring was deployed on the continental shelf which recorded the seawater temperature between the surface and 40-m depth with high resolution for about twelve days; meteorological parameters were collected at the same time on top of the mooring by a meteorological buoy. A series of ROMS model runs was conducted and validated against the observations. Those runs applied different setups for the forcing at the lateral open boundaries and at the surface, different arrangements of the vertical coordinates, and different strategies for the assimilation of data from CTD casts and gliders. The goal was to test the sensitivity of the forecast skill to the different setups and to find a "cheap" setup which predicts the observed temperature and the mixed-layer depth and their temporal variabilities to a satisfactory degree. That setup is supposed to provide also reliable forecasts for the other areas of the model domain.

  5. Southern Ocean zonal asymmetries in mixed layer depth variability in the NEMO GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnewald, Maike; Ferrari, Raffaele; Nurser, George

    2015-04-01

    The mixed layer facilitates the conversation between the ocean and atmosphere. It is a crucial feature for biological and chemical processes, and a key feature for ocean models to capture. Here, we investigate the mixed layer depth both in a coarse (1°), an eddy permitting (1/4°) and an eddy-resolving (1/12°) version of the NEMO general circulation model (GCM). We highlight the model's skill, comparing model data with available observational datasets, with focus on the zonal asymmetry in the Southern Ocean. We find that NEMO is largely in agreement with Argo measurements within observational error. We assess the buoyancy forcing in the respective areas, as well as the role of advection. Using the one-dimensional Price-Weller-Pinkel (PWP) model we show that advective processes are key to the initial deepening through setting the autumn stratification. Heat flux is then key to restratification, particular in the deep regions. We also assess the contribution of the Ekman buoyancy flux.

  6. Variable but persistent coexistence of Prochlorococcus ecotypes along temperature gradients in the ocean's surface mixed layer.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Jeremy W; Lin, Yajuan; Gainer, P Jackson; Post, Anton F; Johnson, Zackary I; Zinser, Erik R

    2016-04-01

    The vast majority of the phytoplankton communities in surface mixed layer of the oligotrophic ocean are numerically dominated by one of two ecotypes of Prochlorococcus, eMIT9312 or eMED4. In this study, we surveyed large latitudinal transects in the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean to determine if these ecotypes discretely partition the surface mixed layer niche, or if populations exist as a continuum along key environmental gradients, particularly temperature. Transitions of dominance occurred at approximately 19-21°C, with the eMED4 ecotype dominating the colder, and eMIT9312 ecotype dominating the warmer regions. Within these zones of regional dominance, however, the minority ecotype was not competed to extinction. Rather, a robust log-linear relationship between ecotype ratio and temperature characterized this stabilized coexistence: for every 2.5°C increase in temperature, the eMIT9312:eMED4 ratio increased by an order of magnitude. This relationship was observed in both quantitative polymerase chain reaction and in pyrosequencing assays. Water column stratification also contributed to the ecotype ratio along the basin-scale transects, but to a lesser extent. Finally, instances where the ratio of the eMED4 and eMIT9312 abundances did not correlate well with temperature were identified. Such occurrences are likely due to changes in water temperatures outpacing changes in community structure. PMID:26743532

  7. Diffusion-flame ignition by shock-wave impingement on a supersonic mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Antonio L.; Huete, Cesar; Williams, Forman A.; Urzay, Javier

    2015-11-01

    Ignition in a supersonic mixing layer interacting with an oblique shock wave is investigated analytically and numerically under conditions such that the post-shock flow remains supersonic. The study requires consideration of the structure of the post-shock ignition kernel that is found to exist around the point of maximum temperature, which may be located either near the edge of the mixing layer or in its interior. The ignition kernel displays a balance between the rates of chemical reaction and of post-shock flow expansion, including the acoustic interactions of the chemical heat release with the shock wave, leading to increased front curvature. The analysis, which adopts a one-step chemistry model with large activation energy, indicates that ignition develops as a fold bifurcation, the turning point in the diagram of the peak perturbation induced by the chemical reaction as a function of the Damköhler number providing the critical conditions for ignition. Subsequent to ignition the lead shock will rapidly be transformed into a thin detonation on the fuel side of the ignition kernel, and, under suitable conditions, a deflagration may extend far downstream, along with the diffusion flame that must separate the rich and lean reaction products.

  8. Mixed layer depth variability in the tropical boundary of the California Current, 1997-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeronimo, Gilberto; Gomez-Valdes, Jose

    2010-05-01

    The variability of the mixed layer depth (MLD) is examined over a decade (1997-2007) for the tropical boundary of the California Current (24-32°N), using conductivity-temperature-depth observations collected by quarterly survey cruises. Results indicate that salinity gradients control MLD rather than temperature gradients. The mean state of the upper ocean indicates that contours of constant MLD are parallel to the coast, with mixed layer thickness decreasing toward the coastal zone. The deepest (˜70 m) thickness is reached in January and the shallowest (˜15 m) occurs in July. The warmer conditions (summer) are reproduced for a simple thermal energy equation. The rest of the seasons are reproduced for a one-dimensional momentum balance for the upper ocean, which includes Ekman dynamics and stratification. This comparison indicates that the variability of MLD is mainly due to wind-driven phenomena except during the heating period. In particular, seasonal and interannual variability of the MLD are correlated with offshore Ekman transport. An abrupt MLD change occurs between January 1998 and January 2000 associated with the strong El Niño-La Niña cycle shift that occurred in this period.

  9. Mach waves produced in the supersonic jet mixing layer by shock/vortex interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oertel Sen, H.; Seiler, F.; Srulijes, J.; Hruschka, R.

    2016-02-01

    The noise emission of free jets has been extensively investigated for many decades. At subsonic jet velocities, coherent structures of the mixing layer move at subsonic speed and emit sound waves. Free jets blowing at supersonic speeds, however, can emit weak shock waves, called Mach waves. At supersonic speeds, two cases must be distinguished: the structures move either subsonically or supersonically relative to the inside and/or outside speed of sound. In the case of supersonic movement, the Mach waves exist inside as well as outside the jet. At subsonic speeds, no Mach waves appear. Although numerous theories have been established to find the origin of the Mach waves, to the authors' best knowledge, the mechanism of the Mach wave formation has not yet been clearly explained. Recently another theory of Mach waves in supersonic jets was developed, as described herein, which outlines the causes for the Mach wave production and stability as well as their dynamics. The theory's principle is that the Mach waves are initiated by vortices which move downstream at three speeds w, {w}' and {w}'' inside of the mixing layer. These three types of vortices and Mach waves are described in a comprehensive manner by the theory and are called the "w-, {w}' - and {w}'' -vortices" and "w-, {w}' - and {w}'' -Mach waves," respectively.

  10. Nonlocal stochastic mixing-length theory and the velocity profile in the turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, H.; de Leeuw, G.; Maassen van den Brink, A.

    1995-02-01

    Turbulence mixing by finite size eddies will be treated by means of a novel formulation of nonlocal K-theory, involving sample paths and a stochastic closure hypothesis, which implies a well defined recipe for the calculation of sampling and transition rates. The connection with the general theory of stochastic processes will be established. The relation with other nonlocal turbulence models (e.g. transilience and spectral diffusivity theory) is also discussed. Using an analytical sampling rate model (satisfying exchange) the theory is applied to the boundary layer (using a scaling hypothesis), which maps boundary layer turbulence mixing of scalar densities onto a nondiffusive (Kubo-Anderson or kangaroo) type stochastic process. The resulting transpport equation for longitudinal momentum P x ≡ ϱ U is solved for a unified description of both the inertial and the viscous sublayer including the crossover. With a scaling exponent ε ≈ 0.58 (while local turbulence would amount to ε → ∞) the velocity profile U+ = ƒ(y +) is found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental data. Inter alia (i) the significance of ε as a turbulence Cantor set dimension, (ii) the value of the integration constant in the logarithmic region (i.e. if y+ → ∞), (iii) linear timescaling, and (iv) finite Reynolds number effects will be investigated. The (analytical) predictions of the theory for near-wall behaviour (i.e. if y+ → 0) of fluctuating quantities also perfectly agree with recent direct numerical simulations.

  11. The 2008 North Atlantic Spring Bloom Experiment II: Autonomous Platforms and Mixed Layer Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. M.; D'Asaro, E. A.; Perry, M.; Fennel, K.; Gray, A.; Rehm, E.; Briggs, N.; Sackmann, B. S.; Gudmundsson, K.

    2008-12-01

    The 2008 North Atlantic Spring Bloom Experiment (NAB08) employed a system of drifting floats, mobile gliders and ship-based measurements to resolve patch-scale physical and biological variability over the 3- month course of an entire bloom. Although both autonomous and ship-based elements were essential to achieving NAB08 goals, the autonomous system provided a novel perspective by employing long-range gliders to repeatedly survey the volume surrounding a drifting Lagrangian float, thus characterizing patch- scale bloom evolution. Integration of physical and biogeochemical sensors (temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll and CDOM fluorescence, light transmission, optical backscatter, spectral light, and nitrate) and development of in situ calibration techniques were required to support this new autonomous approach. Energetic, small-scale eddy activity at the experiment site (southeast of Iceland, near the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study and Marine Light Mixed Layer sites) produced a swift, heterogeneous velocity field that challenged the gliders" operational abilities and drove refinements to the piloting techniques used to maintain float-following surveys. Although intentionally deployed outside of energetic eddies, floats and gliders were rapidly entrained into these features. Floats circulated within eddies near the start and end of the experiment, drifting generally northwest, across the basin, in-between. An eddy sampled late in the deployment provided particularly interesting signatures, with elevated biological signals manifest consistently in one quadrant. As measurements were collected in a parcel-following Lagrangian frame, this suggests energetic small-scale exchange process (such as vertical or lateral mixing) paired with fast-acting biological processes capable of modifying the newly entrained water as it navigates its path around the eddy. Despite this energetic kilometer-scale heterogeneity, broadly distributed platforms appeared to

  12. Average properties of compressible laminar boundary layer on flat plate with unsteady flight velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Franklin K; Ostrach, Simon

    1957-01-01

    The time-average characteristics of boundary layers over a flat plate in nearly quasi-steady flow are determined. The plate may be either insulated or isothermal. The time averages are found without specifying the plate velocity explicitly except that it is positive and has an average value.

  13. Transient Growth Analysis of Compressible Boundary Layers with Parabolized Stability Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2016-01-01

    The linear form of parabolized linear stability equations (PSE) is used in a variational approach to extend the previous body of results for the optimal, non-modal disturbance growth in boundary layer flows. This methodology includes the non-parallel effects associated with the spatial development of boundary layer flows. As noted in literature, the optimal initial disturbances correspond to steady counter-rotating stream-wise vortices, which subsequently lead to the formation of stream-wise-elongated structures, i.e., streaks, via a lift-up effect. The parameter space for optimal growth is extended to the hypersonic Mach number regime without any high enthalpy effects, and the effect of wall cooling is studied with particular emphasis on the role of the initial disturbance location and the value of the span-wise wavenumber that leads to the maximum energy growth up to a specified location. Unlike previous predictions that used a basic state obtained from a self-similar solution to the boundary layer equations, mean flow solutions based on the full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are used in select cases to help account for the viscous-inviscid interaction near the leading edge of the plate and also for the weak shock wave emanating from that region. These differences in the base flow lead to an increasing reduction with Mach number in the magnitude of optimal growth relative to the predictions based on self-similar mean-flow approximation. Finally, the maximum optimal energy gain for the favorable pressure gradient boundary layer near a planar stagnation point is found to be substantially weaker than that in a zero pressure gradient Blasius boundary layer.

  14. Analyses of marginal stability, heat transfer and boundary layer properties for thermal convection in a compressible fluid with infinite Prandtl number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xi; Zhong, Shijie

    2013-07-01

    Thermal and dynamical evolution of planets is controlled by thermal convection in planetary mantles. Mantle compressibility, which measures volume change due to pressure change and its associated energetic effects, can have important effects on planetary mantle convection. However, key issues including marginal stability analysis, thermal boundary properties and heat transfer in compressible mantle convection are not well understood. This paper studies the influence of mantle compressibility on thermal convection in an isoviscous and compressible fluid with infinite Prandtl number, using both marginal stability analysis and numerical modelling. For the marginal stability analysis, a new formulation of the propagator matrix method is implemented to compute the critical Rayleigh number Rac and the corresponding eigenfunctions for compressible convection at different wavelengths (i.e. wavenumber kx) and dissipation number Di which measures the compressibility. Rac from the analysis is in a good agreement with that determined from the numerical experiment using the eigenfunctions as initial perturbations. Our study suggests that if Ra is defined by the surface density, the minimum Rac may occur at non-zero Di. Finite element models are computed for compressible mantle convection at different Ra and Di. Heat flux and thermal boundary layer (TBL) properties including boundary layer thickness and temperature difference are quantified and analysed from the numerical results. Scaling laws of temperature differences across TBLs and of the heat flux are derived analytically for compressible mantle convection and are verified by the numerical results. This study shows that while TBL thicknesses and the heat flux are still scaled with Ra to the -1/3 and 1/3 power, respectively, as those for incompressible convection, they also strongly depend on Di. In particular, compressibility breaks the symmetry for the top and bottom TBLs, and the ratios of thickness and temperature

  15. Preparation and characterization of ultrathin layers of substituted oligo- and poly(p-phenylene)s and mixed layers with octadecanethiol on gold and copper

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, S.; Caseri, W.R.; Suter, U.W.

    1999-09-14

    Substituted poly(p-phenylene)s were adsorbed from solution onto gold and copper and oligo(p-phenylene)s onto gold. The layers were investigated with IR spectroscopy at grazing incidence reflection, XPS, NEXAFS, ToF-SIMS, surface profilometry, AFM, SEM, optical microscopy, ellipsometry, and contact angle measurements to examine their formation and structure. The structure and the properties of the investigated layers depend not only on the chemical structure of the polymer but also on the type of substrate. On gold, the polymers form layers of 15--25 {angstrom} in thickness and the oligomers of ca. 5 {angstrom} in thickness. On copper, thick layers of up to 900 {angstrom} were also observed. The oligomers have a lower affinity to gold than the polymers. Mixed octadecanethiol-polymer layers were prepared by immersion of polymer-coated substrates in an octadecanethiol solution or by exposure of self-assembled monolayers of octadecanethiol to polymer solutions. The structure of the mixed layers depends on the sequence of the exposure of the two components and on the chemical structure of the polymer. In the mixed layers, structures that protrude above the surroundings were frequently detected at the surface.

  16. Efficient white phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes consisting of orange ultrathin and blue mixed host emission layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Ren; Zuo, Liangmei; Xue, Kaiwen; Duan, Yu; Chen, Ping; Cheng, Gang; Zhao, Yi

    2016-08-01

    We have successfully demonstrated highly efficient white phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) by inserting an ultrathin non-doped orange layer within blue mixed host emission layer. The key feature of the novel device is the employment of blue mixed host and orange ultrathin layers, resulting in an extended recombination region and more balanced charge carrier. The maximum efficiencies of 33.8 lm W‑1 and 32.2 cd A‑1 are obtained. Moreover, the resulting white device achieves a slight efficiency roll-off and a high luminance at low operating voltage. Our versatile concept suggests a promising simple method to achieve high performance white OLEDs.

  17. Effect of chemical heat release in a temporally evolving mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higuera, F. J.; Moser, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations of a temporally evolving mixing layer with an exothermic infinitely fast diffusion flame between two unmixed reactants have been carried out in the limit of zero Mach number to study the effect of the heat release on the early stages of the evolution of the flow. Attention has been directed to relatively large values of the oxidizer-to-fuel mass stoichiometric ratio typical of hydrocarbon flames, and initial vorticity distributions thicker than the temperature and species distributions have been chosen to mimic the situation at the outlet of a jet. The results show that, during the stages of the evolution covered by the present simulations, enhancement of combustion occurs by local stretching of the flame without much augmentation of its area. The rate of product generation depends strongly on the initial conditions, which suggests the possibility of controlling the combustion by acting on the flow. Rollup and vortex amalgamation still occur in these reacting flows but are very much affected by the production of new vorticity by baroclinic torques. These torques lead to counter rotating vortex pairs around the flame and, more importantly, in thin layers of light fluid that leave the vicinity of the flame when the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability begins to develop. Propelled by the vortex pairs, these layers wind around, split on reaching high pressure regions, and originate new vortex pairs in a process that ends up building large-scale vortices with a vorticity distribution more complex than for a constant density fluid.

  18. Mixed Layer Depth Trends in the Bay of Biscay over the Period 1975–2010

    PubMed Central

    Costoya, Xurxo; deCastro, Maite; Gómez-Gesteira, Moncho; Santos, Fran

    2014-01-01

    Wintertime trends in mixed layer depth (MLD) were calculated in the Bay of Biscay over the period 1975–2010 using the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) package. The reliability of the SODA database was confirmed correlating its results with those obtained from the experimental Argo database over the period 2003–2010. An iso-thermal layer depth (TLD) and an iso-pycnal layer depth (PLD) were defined using the threshold difference method with ΔT = 0.5°C and Δσθ = 0.125 kg/m3. Wintertime trends of the MLD were calculated using winter extended (December-March) anomalies and annual maxima. Trends calculated for the whole Bay of Biscay using both parameters (TLD and PLD) showed to be dependent on the area. Thus, MLD became deeper in the southeastern corner and shallower in the rest of the area. Air temperature was shown to play a key role in regulating the different spatial behavior of the MLD. Negative air temperature trends localized in the southeastern corner coincide with MLD deepening in this area, while, positive air temperature trends are associated to MLD shoaling in the rest of the bay. Additionally, the temperature trend calculated along the first 700 m of the water column is in good agreement with the different spatial behavior revealed for the MLD trend. PMID:24922066

  19. Nonsimilar solution of compressible laminar boundary layer flows by a semi-discretization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, C.-C.; Liakopoulos, A.

    The finite-element-differential method of Hsu (1980) for steady 2D incompressible laminar boundary-layer flows is applied to more complex boundary-layer flows of ideal gases past submerged bodies. The governing equations are derived and subjected to Illingworth-Stewartson, Falkner-Skan, von Mises, and undimensionalizing transformations; the resulting initial-value problem is solved by the Hsu method and integrated numerically using the technique of Gear (1969) for stiff equations. The method is applied to supersonic flow past a circular cylinder, and the results of heat-transfer-coefficient calculations at various values of the Mach and Prandtl numbers are compared to the experimental data of Beckwith and Cohen (1961) in a graph.

  20. A quiet flow Ludwieg tube for study of transition in compressible boundary layers: Design and feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven P.

    1991-01-01

    Laminar-turbulent transition in high speed boundary layers is a complicated problem which is still poorly understood, partly because of experimental ambiguities caused by operating in noisy wind tunnels. The NASA Langley experience with quiet tunnel design has been used to design a quiet flow tunnel which can be constructed less expensively. Fabrication techniques have been investigated, and inviscid, boundary layer, and stability computer codes have been adapted for use in the nozzle design. Construction of such a facility seems feasible, at a reasonable cost. Two facilities have been proposed: a large one, with a quiet flow region large enough to study the end of transition, and a smaller and less expensive one, capable of studying low Reynolds number issues such as receptivity. Funding for either facility remains to be obtained, although key facility elements have been obtained and are being integrated into the existing Purdue supersonic facilities.