Science.gov

Sample records for compressive shock wave

  1. Rarefaction shock waves in shock-compressed diamond <110> crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perriot, Romain; Lin, You; Zhakhovsky, Vasily; White, Carter; Oleynik, Ivan

    2013-03-01

    Piston-driven shock compression of diamond <110> crystal was simulated by molecular dynamics using the REBO potential. At piston velocities between 2 and 5 km/s and corresponding pressures 117 GPA < P < 278 GPa, diamond sample undergoes a polymorphic phase transition, characterized by the coexistence of two elastically compressed phases, low-pressure phase A and high-pressure phase B. This phase transition results in the splitting of the shock wave into two elastic shock waves, composed of pure phase A and a mixture of phases A and B. Upon removal of the piston, a release wave is observed at the rear of the sample, turning into a rarefaction shock wave where the material undergoes the reverse phase transition from coexisting phases to the original low-pressure phase. For strong plastic waves induced by larger piston velocities the release wave propagates as a rarefaction wave without any phase transition corresponding to the adiabatic expansion along the plastic branch of the Hugoniot.

  2. Compression of High Porosity Aluminum by Strong Shock Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Vildanov, V. G.; Gorshkov, M. M.; Slobodenjukov, V. M.; Borshchevsky, A. O.; Petrovtsev, A. V.

    2006-08-03

    Measuring results on shock compression of porous aluminum with initial density of {rho}00 = 0.6 g/cm3 up to pressures of 170 GPa are presented under shock wave velocity measurement scale of 40 mm. High underground explosion was used as a shock wave source. Obtained results were described in shock wave velocity (D) -- particle velocity (u) coordinates by linear dependence of D = 0.647 + 1.26 u at 4.6 {<=} u {<=} 14.8 km/s.

  3. Shock wave compression of iron-silicate garnet.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, E. K.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1973-01-01

    Shock wave compression data to over 650 kb are presented for single-crystal almandine garnet. The data indicate the initiation of a phase transformation near 200 kb. Total transition to the high-pressure polymorph occurs at approximately 300 kb. The elastic properties of the high-pressure phase are calculated from the metastable Hugoniot data by using the linear shock velocity-particle velocity relationships. The overall results obtained strongly suggest that upper mantle minerals are likely to occur in the ilmenite structure over a substantial part of the lower mantle.

  4. A study on compressive shock wave propagation in metallic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhihua; Zhang, Yifen; Ren, Huilan; Zhao, Longmao

    2010-02-01

    Metallic foam can dissipate a large amount of energy due to its relatively long stress plateau, which makes it widely applicable in the design of structural crashworthiness. However, in some experimental studies, stress enhancement has been observed when the specimens are subjected to intense impact loads, leading to severe damage to the objects being protected. This paper studies this phenomenon on a 2D mass-spring-bar model. With the model, a constitutive relationship of metal foam and corresponding loading and unloading criteria are presented; a nonlinear kinematics equilibrium equation is derived, where an explicit integration algorithm is used to calculate the characteristic of the compressive shock wave propagation within the metallic foam; the effect of heterogeneous distribution of foam microstructures on the shock wave features is also included. The results reveal that under low impact pulses, considerable energy is dissipated during the progressive collapse of foam cells, which then reduces the crush of objects. When the pulse is sufficiently high, on the other hand, stress enhancement may take place, especially in the heterogeneous foams, where high peak stresses usually occur. The characteristics of compressive shock wave propagation in the foam and the magnitude and location of the peak stress produced are strongly dependent on the mechanical properties of the foam material, amplitude and period of the pulse, as well as the homogeneity of the microstructures. This research provides valuable insight into the reliability of the metallic foams used as a protective structure.

  5. Shock formation and the ideal shape of ramp compression waves

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, D C; Kraus, R G; Loomis, E; Hicks, D G; McNaney, J M; Johnson, R P

    2008-05-29

    We derive expressions for shock formation based on the local curvature of the flow characteristics during dynamic compression. Given a specific ramp adiabat, calculated for instance from the equation of state for a substance, the ideal nonlinear shape for an applied ramp loading history can be determined. We discuss the region affected by lateral release, which can be presented in compact form for the ideal loading history. Example calculations are given for representative metals and plastic ablators. Continuum dynamics (hydrocode) simulations were in good agreement with the algebraic forms. Example applications are presented for several classes of laser-loading experiment, identifying conditions where shocks are desired but not formed, and where long duration ramps are desired.

  6. Thermal transport in shock wave-compressed solids using pulsed laser heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Lone, B. M.; Capelle, G.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Veeser, L. R.

    2014-07-01

    A pulsed laser heating method was developed for determining thermal transport properties of solids under shock-wave compression. While the solid is compressed, a laser deposits a known amount of heat onto the sample surface, which is held in the shocked state by a transparent window. The heat from the laser briefly elevates the surface temperature and then diffuses into the interior via one-dimensional heat conduction. The thermal effusivity is determined from the time history of the resulting surface temperature pulse, which is recorded with optical pyrometry. Thermal effusivity is the square root of the product of thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity and is the key thermal transport parameter for relating the surface temperature to the interior temperature of the sample in a dynamic compression experiment. Therefore, this method provides information that is needed to determine the thermodynamic state of the interior of a compressed metal sample from a temperature measurement at the surface. The laser heat method was successfully demonstrated on tin that was shock compressed with explosives to a stress and temperature of ˜25 GPa and ˜1300 K. In this state, tin was observed to have a thermal effusivity of close to twice its ambient value. The implications on determining the interior shock wave temperature of tin are discussed.

  7. Dynamic response of kovar to shock and ramp-wave compression.

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Dolores M.; Hall, Clint Allen; Wise, Jack LeRoy; Jones, Scott Christopher; Asay, James Russell

    2007-08-01

    Complementary gas-gun and electro-magnetic pulse tests conducted in Sandia's Dynamic Integrated Compression Experimental (DICE) Facility have, respectively, probed the behavior of electronic-grade Kovar samples under controlled impact and intermediate-strain-rate ICE (Isentropic Compression Experiment) loading. In all tests, velocity interferometer (VISAR) diagnostics provided time-resolved measurements of sample response for conditions involving one-dimensional (i:e:, uniaxial strain) compression and release. Wave-profile data from the gas-gun impact experiments have been analyzed to assess the Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL), Hugoniot equation of state, spall strength, and high-pressure yield strength of shocked Kovar. The ICE wave-profile data have been interpreted to determine the locus of isentropic stress-strain states generated in Kovar for deformation rates substantially lower than those associated with a shock process. The impact and ICE results have been compared to examine the influence of loading rate on high-pressure strength.

  8. Time-resolved shock compression of porous rutile: Wave dispersion in porous solids

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.U.; Graham, R.A.; Holman, G.T.

    1993-08-01

    Rutile (TiO{sub 2}) samples at 60% of solid density have been shock-loaded from 0.21 to 6.1 GPa with sample thickness of 4 mm and studied with the PVDF piezoelectric polymer stress-rate gauge. The technique uses a copper capsule to contain the sample which has PVDF gauge packages in direct contact with front and rear surfaces. A precise measure is made of the compressive stress wave velocity through the sample, as well as the input and propagated shock stress. Initial density is known from sample preparation, and the amount of shock-compression is calculated from the measurement of shock velocity and input stress. Shock states and re-shock states are measured. Observed data are consistent with previously published high pressure data. It is observed that rutile has a ``crush strength`` near 6 GPa. Propagated stress-pulse rise times vary from 234 to 916 nsec. Propagated stress-pulse rise times of shock-compressed HMX, 2Al + Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 3Ni + Al, and 5Ti + 3Si are presented.

  9. Control of shock wave-boundary layer interactions by bleed in supersonic mixed compression inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukuda, M. K.; Hingst, W. G.; Reshotko, E.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effect of bleed on a shock wave-boundary layer interaction in an axisymmetric mixed-compression supersonic inlet. The inlet was designed for a free-stream Mach number of 2.50 with 60-percent supersonic internal area contraction. The experiment was conducted in the NASA Lewis Research Center 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. The effects of bleed amount and bleed geometry on the boundary layer after a shock wave-boundary layer interaction were studied. The effect of bleed on the transformed form factor is such that the full realizable reduction is obtained by bleeding of a mass flow equal to about one-half of the incident boundary layer mass flow. More bleeding does not yield further reduction. Bleeding upstream or downstream of the shock-induced pressure rise is preferable to bleeding across the shock-induced pressure rise.

  10. Shock-wave compression of silica gel as a model material for comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arasuna, Akane; Okuno, Masayuki; Chen, Liliang; Mashimo, Tsutomu; Okudera, Hiroki; Mizukami, Tomoyuki; Arai, Shoji

    2016-03-01

    A shock-wave compression experiment using synthesized silica gel was investigated as a model for a comet impact event on the Earth's surface. The sample shocked at 20.7 GPa showed considerable structural changes, a release of water molecules, and the dehydration of silanol (Si-OH) that led to the formation of a new Si-O-Si network structure containing larger rings (e.g., six-membered ring of SiO4 tetrahedra). The high aftershock temperature at 20.7 GPa, which could be close to 800 °C, influenced the sample structure. However, some silanols, which were presumed to be the mutually hydrogen-bonded silanol group, remained at pressures >20.7 GPa. This type of silanol along with a small number of water molecules may remain even after shock compression at 30.9 GPa, although the intermediate structure of the sample recovered was similar to that of silica glass.

  11. Shock-wave compression of silica gel as a model material for comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arasuna, Akane; Okuno, Masayuki; Chen, Liliang; Mashimo, Tsutomu; Okudera, Hiroki; Mizukami, Tomoyuki; Arai, Shoji

    2016-07-01

    A shock-wave compression experiment using synthesized silica gel was investigated as a model for a comet impact event on the Earth's surface. The sample shocked at 20.7 GPa showed considerable structural changes, a release of water molecules, and the dehydration of silanol (Si-OH) that led to the formation of a new Si-O-Si network structure containing larger rings (e.g., six-membered ring of SiO4 tetrahedra). The high aftershock temperature at 20.7 GPa, which could be close to 800 °C, influenced the sample structure. However, some silanols, which were presumed to be the mutually hydrogen-bonded silanol group, remained at pressures >20.7 GPa. This type of silanol along with a small number of water molecules may remain even after shock compression at 30.9 GPa, although the intermediate structure of the sample recovered was similar to that of silica glass.

  12. Nonstandard Analysis and Shock Wave Jump Conditions in a One-Dimensional Compressible Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baty, Roy S.; Farassat, Fereidoun; Hargreaves, John

    2007-01-01

    Nonstandard analysis is a relatively new area of mathematics in which infinitesimal numbers can be defined and manipulated rigorously like real numbers. This report presents a fairly comprehensive tutorial on nonstandard analysis for physicists and engineers with many examples applicable to generalized functions. To demonstrate the power of the subject, the problem of shock wave jump conditions is studied for a one-dimensional compressible gas. It is assumed that the shock thickness occurs on an infinitesimal interval and the jump functions in the thermodynamic and fluid dynamic parameters occur smoothly across this interval. To use conservations laws, smooth pre-distributions of the Dirac delta measure are applied whose supports are contained within the shock thickness. Furthermore, smooth pre-distributions of the Heaviside function are applied which vary from zero to one across the shock wave. It is shown that if the equations of motion are expressed in nonconservative form then the relationships between the jump functions for the flow parameters may be found unambiguously. The analysis yields the classical Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions for an inviscid shock wave. Moreover, non-monotonic entropy jump conditions are obtained for both inviscid and viscous flows. The report shows that products of generalized functions may be defined consistently using nonstandard analysis; however, physically meaningful products of generalized functions must be determined from the physics of the problem and not the mathematical form of the governing equations.

  13. Nonstandard Analysis and Shock Wave Jump Conditions in a One-Dimensional Compressible Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Roy S. Baty, F. Farassat, John A. Hargreaves

    2007-05-25

    Nonstandard analysis is a relatively new area of mathematics in which infinitesimal numbers can be defined and manipulated rigorously like real numbers. This report presents a fairly comprehensive tutorial on nonstandard analysis for physicists and engineers with many examples applicable to generalized functions. To demonstrate the power of the subject, the problem of shock wave jump conditions is studied for a one-dimensional compressible gas. It is assumed that the shock thickness occurs on an infinitesimal interval and the jump functions in the thermodynamic and fluid dynamic parameters occur smoothly across this interval. To use conservations laws, smooth pre-distributions of the Dirac delta measure are applied whose supports are contained within the shock thickness. Furthermore, smooth pre-distributions of the Heaviside function are applied which vary from zero to one across the shock wave. It is shown that if the equations of motion are expressed in nonconservative form then the relationships between the jump functions for the flow parameters may be found unambiguously. The analysis yields the classical Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions for an inviscid shock wave. Moreover, non-monotonic entropy jump conditions are obtained for both inviscid and viscous flows. The report shows that products of generalized functions may be defined consistently using nonstandard analysis; however, physically meaningful products of generalized functions must be determined from the physics of the problem and not the mathematical form of the governing equations.

  14. Response of Pt-based Bulk Metallic Glass to Shock Wave Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalone, B. M.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2009-06-01

    Plate impact experiments were performed on platinum based bulk metallic glass (BMG) samples having a nominal composition of Pt57.5Cu14.7Ni5.3P22.5, a material previously reported to support large plastic strains under quasi-static, uniaxial stress loading (J. Schroers, and W. L. Johnson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 255506 (2004)). In the present shock wave experiments, peak longitudinal stresses ranged from 9-30 GPa. Piezoelectric pins and a velocity interferometer were used to measure shock velocities and particle velocity histories. A clear two-wave structure was observed in the particle velocity histories indicating an elastic-plastic response. The elastic wave amplitude was dependent on peak stress and sample thickness, with values ranging from 8.6 - 14.2 GPa. Measured wave profiles were converted to stress-density compression, and a nonlinear elastic model was fit to the measured elastic response. Unlike the quasi-static, uniaxial stress data on the same alloy, the shock wave, uniaxial strain results show a loss of strength above the elastic limit. Reasons for this strength loss are discussed. Work supported by the DOE.

  15. Shock compression of precompressed deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, M R; Crowhurst, J C; Zaug, J M; Bastea, S; Goncharov, A F; Militzer, B

    2011-07-31

    Here we report quasi-isentropic dynamic compression and thermodynamic characterization of solid, precompressed deuterium over an ultrafast time scale (< 100 ps) and a microscopic length scale (< 1 {micro}m). We further report a fast transition in shock wave compressed solid deuterium that is consistent with the ramp to shock transition, with a time scale of less than 10 ps. These results suggest that high-density dynamic compression of hydrogen may be possible on microscopic length scales.

  16. Shock-wave compression and release of aluminum/ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.N.; Hixson, R.S.; Gray, G.T. III )

    1994-11-15

    Several composite materials consisting of ceramic particles embedded in a 6061-T6 aluminum matrix have been studied under conditions of shock-wave compression and release, including spallation. The 6061-T6 matrix represents a material for which high-rate shock-wave response has been extremely well characterized for thermoelastic-plastic deformation. The ceramic particles (alumina and mullite) are also well characterized, particularly in the elastic regime. Experimental tests consist of quasistatic, uniaxial-stress compression of both virgin and shock-recovered samples as well as time-resolved velocity interferometer measurements under conditions of flat-plate impact. The latter tests were performed with lithium fluoride windows for transmitted wave studies and free surfaces for spallation measurement. Theoretical analysis of the data is carried out with a pseudodissipation model originated by Barker [J. Composite Mat. [bold 5], 140 (1971)] for application to elastic deformation of layered composites and generalized here to include thermoelastic-plastic properties of the constituents. For a pseudodissipative model to apply to composite material response, significant geometrical randomization must be present in the composite structure; this is something that all commercially produced composites naturally possess. Randomization produces mechanical energy traps, which convert some fraction of regular, directed motion into random elastic vibrations behind the shock front. Within a few microseconds (depending on the pinned dislocation segment density) this macroscale, continuum vibrational energy is converted to heat by means of the anelastic properties of the metal matrix. The use of pseudodissipation as a means of representing dispersive composite material behavior is thus placed on a more secure physical foundation.

  17. Evolutions of elastic-plastic shock compression waves in different materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanel, G. I.; Zaretsky, E. B.; Razorenov, S. V.; Savinykh, A. S.; Garkushin, G. V.

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of decay of the elastic precursor wave are used to determine the initial plastic strain rate as a function of the stress. Last years we performed large series of such kind experiments with metals and alloys at various temperatures, ceramics and glasses. In course of these measurements we observed several unexpected effects which have not got exhaustive explanations yet. In the presentation, we'll discuss a departure from self-similar development of the wave process which is accompanied with apparent sub-sonic wave propagation, changes of shape of elastic precursor wave as a result of variations in the material structure and the temperature, unexpected peculiarities of reflection of elastic-plastic waves from free surface, effects of internal friction at shock compression of glasses and some other effects. It seems the experimental data contain more information about kinetics of the time-dependent phenomena than we are able to get from their analysis now. Financial support from the Russian Science Foundation via Grant No 14-12-01127 is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Attosecond shock waves.

    PubMed

    Zhokhov, P A; Zheltikov, A M

    2013-05-01

    Shock-wave formation is a generic scenario of wave dynamics known in nonlinear acoustics, fluid dynamics, astrophysics, seismology, and detonation physics. Here, we show that, in nonlinear optics, remarkably short, attosecond shock transients can be generated through a strongly coupled spatial and temporal dynamics of ultrashort light pulses, suggesting a pulse self-compression scenario whereby multigigawatt attosecond optical waveforms can be synthesized. PMID:23683197

  19. Diffraction of a shock wave by a compression corner; regular and single Mach reflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vijayashankar, V. S.; Kutler, P.; Anderson, D.

    1976-01-01

    The two dimensional, time dependent Euler equations which govern the flow field resulting from the injection of a planar shock with a compression corner are solved with initial conditions that result in either regular reflection or single Mach reflection of the incident planar shock. The Euler equations which are hyperbolic are transformed to include the self similarity of the problem. A normalization procedure is employed to align the reflected shock and the Mach stem as computational boundaries to implement the shock fitting procedure. A special floating fitting scheme is developed in conjunction with the method of characteristics to fit the slip surface. The reflected shock, the Mach stem, and the slip surface are all treated as harp discontinuities, thus, resulting in a more accurate description of the inviscid flow field. The resulting numerical solutions are compared with available experimental data and existing first-order, shock-capturing numerical solutions.

  20. Shock wave compression and release of hexagonal-close-packed metal single crystals: Inelastic deformation of c-axis magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winey, J. M.; Renganathan, P.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2015-03-01

    To understand inelastic deformation mechanisms for shocked hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) metals, shock compression and release wave profiles, previously unavailable for hcp single crystals, were measured for c-axis magnesium crystals. The results show that the elastic-inelastic loading response is strongly time-dependent. Measured release wave profiles showed distinct peaked features, which are unusual for inelastic deformation during unloading of shocked metals. Numerical simulations show that pyramidal slip provides a reasonably good description of the inelastic loading response. However, { 10 1 ¯ 2 } twinning is needed to explain the unloading response. The results and analysis presented here provide insight into the relative roles of dislocation slip and deformation twinning in the response of shocked hcp metals.

  1. Breakdown and critical field evaluation for porous PZT 95/5 ferroelectric ceramics under shock wave compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yixuan; Wang, Xingzhe; Zhang, Fuping; He, Hongliang

    2014-08-01

    Bounded charges of PZT 95/5 ferroelectric ceramics with polarization can be rapidly released by shock wave loadings to form a high-power electrical energy output, which motivates pulsed power applications of ferroelectric materials. In the present paper, we first investigated experimentally the depoling current and output electric field, as well as the critical electric fields of breakdown for porous PZT 95/5 ceramics in the normal shock-wave-loaded mode by means of a gas-gun facility. By combining the output electric-field profile by shock loading with the breakdown of the quasi-static electric field, we were able to theoretically evaluate the range of the breakdown field for porous ferroelectric ceramics with different porosities under shock wave compression. Although it is a rough bound-field evaluation on breakdown of shocked porous PZT 95/5 ferroelectric ceramics suggested in the present work, it sounds reasonable and the predictions of critical field-bounds on the breakdown show good agreement with the magnitude of the experimental results. The influences of load resistance, porosity and velocity of shock wave on the lower and upper bounds of critical electric field for poled porous PZT 95/5 ceramics during the discharge process were also discussed.

  2. Al 1s-2p Absorption Spectroscopy of Shock-Wave Heating and Compression in Laser-Driven Planar Foil

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, H.; Regan, S.P.; Radha, P.B.; Epstein, R.; Li, D.; Goncharov, V.N.; Hu, S.X.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Delettrez, J.A.; Jaanimagi, P.A.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Boehly, T.R.; Sangster, T.C.; Yaakobi, B.; Mancini, R.C.

    2009-05-19

    Time-resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy is used to diagnose direct-drive, shock-wave heating and compression of planar targets having nearly Fermi-degenerate plasma conditions (Te ~ 10–40 eV, rho ~ 3–11 g/cm^3) on the OMEGA Laser System [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. A planar plastic foil with a buried Al tracer layer was irradiated with peak intensities of 10^14–10^15 W/cm^2 and probed with the pseudocontinuum M-band emission from a point-source Sm backlighter in the range of 1.4–1.7 keV. The laser ablation process launches 10–70 Mbar shock waves into the CH/Al/CH target. The Al 1s-2p absorption spectra were analyzed using the atomic physic code PRISMSPECT to infer Te and rho in the Al layer, assuming uniform plasma conditions during shock-wave heating, and to determine when the heat front penetrated the Al layer. The drive foils were simulated with the one-dimensional hydrodynamics code LILAC using a flux-limited (f =0.06 and f =0.1) and nonlocal thermal-transport model [V. N. Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)]. The predictions of simulated shock-wave heating and the timing of heat-front penetration are compared to the observations. The experimental results for a wide variety of laser-drive conditions and buried depths have shown that the LILAC predictions using f = 0.06 and the nonlocal model accurately model the shock-wave heating and timing of the heat-front penetration while the shock is transiting the target. The observed discrepancy between the measured and simulated shock-wave heating at late times of the drive can be explained by the reduced radiative heating due to lateral heat flow in the corona.

  3. Excitation of dayside chorus waves due to magnetic field line compression in response to interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen; Li, Wen; Thorne, Richard M.; Bortnik, Jacob; Ma, Qianli; An, Xin; Zhang, Xiao-jia; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Ni, Binbin; Gu, Xudong; Fu, Song; Zhao, Zhengyu

    2015-10-01

    The excitation of magnetospheric whistler-mode chorus in response to interplanetary (IP) shocks is investigated using wave data from the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) spacecraft. As an example, we show a typical chorus wave excitation following an IP shock event that was observed by THEMIS in the postnoon sector near the magnetopause on 3 August 2010. We then analyze characteristic changes during this event and perform a survey of similar events during the period 2008-2014 using the THEMIS and OMNI data set. Our statistical analysis demonstrates that the chorus wave excitation/intensification in response to IP shocks occurs only at high L shells (L > 8) on the dayside. We analyzed the variations of magnetic curvature following the arrival of the IP shock and found that IP shocks lead to more homogeneous background magnetic field configurations in the near-equatorial dayside magnetosphere; and therefore, the threshold of nonlinear chorus wave growth is likely to be reduced, favoring chorus wave generation. Our results provide the observational evidence to support the concept that the geomagnetic field line configuration plays a key role in the excitation of dayside chorus.

  4. A parametric approach to shape field-relevant blast wave profiles in compressed-gas-driven shock tube.

    PubMed

    Sundaramurthy, Aravind; Chandra, Namas

    2014-01-01

    Detonation of a high-explosive produces shock-blast wave, shrapnel, and gaseous products. While direct exposure to blast is a concern near the epicenter, shock-blast can affect subjects, even at farther distances. When a pure shock-blast wave encounters the subject, in the absence of shrapnels, fall, or gaseous products the loading is termed as primary blast loading and is the subject of this paper. The wave profile is characterized by blast overpressure, positive time duration, and impulse and called herein as shock-blast wave parameters (SWPs). These parameters in turn are uniquely determined by the strength of high explosive and the distance of the human subjects from the epicenter. The shape and magnitude of the profile determine the severity of injury to the subjects. As shown in some of our recent works (1-3), the profile not only determines the survival of the subjects (e.g., animals) but also the acute and chronic biomechanical injuries along with the following bio-chemical sequelae. It is extremely important to carefully design and operate the shock tube to produce field-relevant SWPs. Furthermore, it is vital to identify and eliminate the artifacts that are inadvertently introduced in the shock-blast profile that may affect the results. In this work, we examine the relationship between shock tube adjustable parameters (SAPs) and SWPs that can be used to control the blast profile; the results can be easily applied to many of the laboratory shock tubes. Further, replication of shock profile (magnitude and shape) can be related to field explosions and can be a standard in comparing results across different laboratories. Forty experiments are carried out by judiciously varying SAPs such as membrane thickness, breech length (66.68-1209.68 mm), measurement location, and type of driver gas (nitrogen, helium). The effects SAPs have on the resulting shock-blast profiles are shown. Also, the shock-blast profiles of a TNT explosion from ConWep software is compared

  5. A Parametric Approach to Shape Field-Relevant Blast Wave Profiles in Compressed-Gas-Driven Shock Tube

    PubMed Central

    Sundaramurthy, Aravind; Chandra, Namas

    2014-01-01

    Detonation of a high-explosive produces shock-blast wave, shrapnel, and gaseous products. While direct exposure to blast is a concern near the epicenter, shock-blast can affect subjects, even at farther distances. When a pure shock-blast wave encounters the subject, in the absence of shrapnels, fall, or gaseous products the loading is termed as primary blast loading and is the subject of this paper. The wave profile is characterized by blast overpressure, positive time duration, and impulse and called herein as shock-blast wave parameters (SWPs). These parameters in turn are uniquely determined by the strength of high explosive and the distance of the human subjects from the epicenter. The shape and magnitude of the profile determine the severity of injury to the subjects. As shown in some of our recent works (1–3), the profile not only determines the survival of the subjects (e.g., animals) but also the acute and chronic biomechanical injuries along with the following bio-chemical sequelae. It is extremely important to carefully design and operate the shock tube to produce field-relevant SWPs. Furthermore, it is vital to identify and eliminate the artifacts that are inadvertently introduced in the shock-blast profile that may affect the results. In this work, we examine the relationship between shock tube adjustable parameters (SAPs) and SWPs that can be used to control the blast profile; the results can be easily applied to many of the laboratory shock tubes. Further, replication of shock profile (magnitude and shape) can be related to field explosions and can be a standard in comparing results across different laboratories. Forty experiments are carried out by judiciously varying SAPs such as membrane thickness, breech length (66.68–1209.68 mm), measurement location, and type of driver gas (nitrogen, helium). The effects SAPs have on the resulting shock-blast profiles are shown. Also, the shock-blast profiles of a TNT explosion from ConWep software is

  6. Shock compression modeling of metallic single crystals: comparison of finite difference, steady wave, and analytical solutions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lloyd, Jeffrey T.; Clayton, John D.; Austin, Ryan A.; McDowell, David L.

    2015-07-10

    Background: The shock response of metallic single crystals can be captured using a micro-mechanical description of the thermoelastic-viscoplastic material response; however, using a such a description within the context of traditional numerical methods may introduce a physical artifacts. Advantages and disadvantages of complex material descriptions, in particular the viscoplastic response, must be framed within approximations introduced by numerical methods. Methods: Three methods of modeling the shock response of metallic single crystals are summarized: finite difference simulations, steady wave simulations, and algebraic solutions of the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions. For the former two numerical techniques, a dislocation density based framework describes themore » rate- and temperature-dependent shear strength on each slip system. For the latter analytical technique, a simple (two-parameter) rate- and temperature-independent linear hardening description is necessarily invoked to enable simultaneous solution of the governing equations. For all models, the same nonlinear thermoelastic energy potential incorporating elastic constants of up to order 3 is applied. Results: Solutions are compared for plate impact of highly symmetric orientations (all three methods) and low symmetry orientations (numerical methods only) of aluminum single crystals shocked to 5 GPa (weak shock regime) and 25 GPa (overdriven regime). Conclusions: For weak shocks, results of the two numerical methods are very similar, regardless of crystallographic orientation. For strong shocks, artificial viscosity affects the finite difference solution, and effects of transverse waves for the lower symmetry orientations not captured by the steady wave method become important. The analytical solution, which can only be applied to highly symmetric orientations, provides reasonable accuracy with regards to prediction of most variables in the final shocked state but, by construction, does not provide

  7. Shock compression modeling of metallic single crystals: comparison of finite difference, steady wave, and analytical solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, Jeffrey T.; Clayton, John D.; Austin, Ryan A.; McDowell, David L.

    2015-07-10

    Background: The shock response of metallic single crystals can be captured using a micro-mechanical description of the thermoelastic-viscoplastic material response; however, using a such a description within the context of traditional numerical methods may introduce a physical artifacts. Advantages and disadvantages of complex material descriptions, in particular the viscoplastic response, must be framed within approximations introduced by numerical methods. Methods: Three methods of modeling the shock response of metallic single crystals are summarized: finite difference simulations, steady wave simulations, and algebraic solutions of the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions. For the former two numerical techniques, a dislocation density based framework describes the rate- and temperature-dependent shear strength on each slip system. For the latter analytical technique, a simple (two-parameter) rate- and temperature-independent linear hardening description is necessarily invoked to enable simultaneous solution of the governing equations. For all models, the same nonlinear thermoelastic energy potential incorporating elastic constants of up to order 3 is applied. Results: Solutions are compared for plate impact of highly symmetric orientations (all three methods) and low symmetry orientations (numerical methods only) of aluminum single crystals shocked to 5 GPa (weak shock regime) and 25 GPa (overdriven regime). Conclusions: For weak shocks, results of the two numerical methods are very similar, regardless of crystallographic orientation. For strong shocks, artificial viscosity affects the finite difference solution, and effects of transverse waves for the lower symmetry orientations not captured by the steady wave method become important. The analytical solution, which can only be applied to highly symmetric orientations, provides reasonable accuracy with regards to prediction of most variables in the final shocked state but, by construction, does not provide insight

  8. Shock compression of liquid hydrazine

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, B.O.; Chavez, D.J.

    1996-05-01

    Liquid hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) is a propellant used for aerospace propulsion and power systems. Because the propellant modules can be subject to debris impacts during their use, the shock states that can occur in the hydrazine need to be characterized to safely predict its response. Several shock compression experiments have been conducted to investigate the shock detonability of liquid hydrazine; however, the experiments{close_quote} results disagree. Therefore, in this study, we reproduced each experiment numerically to evaluate in detail the shock wave profiles generated in the liquid hydrazine. This paper presents the results of each numerical simulation and compares the results to those obtained in experiment. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Shock compression of liquid hydrazine

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, B.O.; Chavez, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Liquid hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) is a propellant used by the Air Force and NASA for aerospace propulsion and power systems. Because the propellant modules that contain the hydrazine can be subject to debris impacts during their use, the shock states that can occur in the hydrazine need to be characterized to safely predict its response. Several shock compression experiments have been conducted in an attempt to investigate the detonability of liquid hydrazine; however, the experiments results disagree. Therefore, in this study, we reproduced each experiment numerically to evaluate in detail the shock wave profiles generated in the liquid hydrazine. This paper presents the results of each numerical simulation and compares the results to those obtained in experiment. We also present the methodology of our approach, which includes chemical kinetic experiments, chemical equilibrium calculations, and characterization of the equation of state of liquid hydrazine.

  10. Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy of shock-wave heating and compression in laser-driven planar foil

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, H.; Regan, S. P.; Radha, P. B.; Epstein, R.; Li, D.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Delettrez, J. A.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Boehly, T. R.; Sangster, T. C.; Yaakobi, B.; Mancini, R. C.

    2009-05-15

    Time-resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy is used to diagnose direct-drive, shock-wave heating and compression of planar targets having nearly Fermi-degenerate plasma conditions (T{sub e}{approx}10-40 eV, {rho}{approx}3-11 g/cm{sup 3}) on the OMEGA Laser System [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. A planar plastic foil with a buried Al tracer layer was irradiated with peak intensities of 10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} and probed with the pseudocontinuum M-band emission from a point-source Sm backlighter in the range of 1.4-1.7 keV. The laser ablation process launches 10-70 Mbar shock waves into the CH/Al/CH target. The Al 1s-2p absorption spectra were analyzed using the atomic physic code PRISMSPECT to infer T{sub e} and {rho} in the Al layer, assuming uniform plasma conditions during shock-wave heating, and to determine when the heat front penetrated the Al layer. The drive foils were simulated with the one-dimensional hydrodynamics code LILAC using a flux-limited (f=0.06 and f=0.1) and nonlocal thermal-transport model [V. N. Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)]. The predictions of simulated shock-wave heating and the timing of heat-front penetration are compared to the observations. The experimental results for a wide variety of laser-drive conditions and buried depths have shown that the LILAC predictions using f=0.06 and the nonlocal model accurately model the shock-wave heating and timing of the heat-front penetration while the shock is transiting the target. The observed discrepancy between the measured and simulated shock-wave heating at late times of the drive can be explained by the reduced radiative heating due to lateral heat flow in the corona.

  11. Shock waves data for minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.; Johnson, Mary L.

    1994-01-01

    Shock compression of the materials of planetary interiors yields data which upon comparison with density-pressure and density-sound velocity profiles constrain internal composition and temperature. Other important applications of shock wave data and related properties are found in the impact mechanics of terrestrial planets and solid satellites. Shock wave equation of state, shock-induced dynamic yielding and phase transitions, and shock temperature are discussed. In regions where a substantial phase change in the material does not occur, the relationship between the particle velocity, U(sub p), and the shock velocity, U(sub s), is given by U(sub s) = C(sub 0) + S U(sub p), where C(sub 0) is the shock velocity at infinitesimally small particle velocity, or the ambient pressure bulk sound velocity. Numerical values for the shock wave equation of state for minerals and related materials of the solar system are provided.

  12. Compression Shocks of Detached Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggink

    1947-01-01

    It is known that compression shocks which lead from supersonic to subsonic velocity cause the flow to separate on impact on a rigid wall. Such shocks appear at bodies with circular symmetry or wing profiles on locally exceeding sonic velocity, and in Laval nozzles with too high a back pressure. The form of the compression shocks observed therein is investigated.

  13. Measurements of elastic and plastic waves in polycrystalline diamond under shock compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Michael; Fletcher, Luke; Vorberger, Jan; Gauthier, Maxence; Gamboa, Eliseo; Ravasio, Alessandra; Lee, Hae Ja; Galtier, Eric; Chen, Zhijiang; Kraus, Dominik; Barbrel, Ben; Drake, R. Paul; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    Direct measurements of the crystal structure of materials under dynamic compression can be obtained using angularly resolved x-ray scattering at the MEC end station of the LCLS facility. In this experiment the 40 fs LCLS x-ray beam enabled time resolved measurements of elastic and plastic waves in polycrystalline diamond, the behavior of which are important to understand for the early stages of compression in inertial confinement fusion targets and planetary interiors. In this experiment two 527 nm optical lasers focused to 4 ×1014 W/cm2 were used to compress 20 and 40 μm polycrystalline diamond foils. Compression and lattice deformation measurements were made directly from angularly resolved x-ray scattering and compared to DFT simulations. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program under Grant No. 2013155705, DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science under FWP 100182, by DOE/NNSA under grant number DE-NA0001840, and was performed at the MEC instrument of LCLS under contract No. SF00515. The target work was supported by a Laboratory Directed Research and Development grant.

  14. Shock compression of polyvinyl chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogi, Anupam; Mitra, Nilanjan

    2016-04-01

    This study presents shock compression simulation of atactic polyvinyl chloride (PVC) using ab-initio and classical molecular dynamics. The manuscript also identifies the limits of applicability of classical molecular dynamics based shock compression simulation for PVC. The mechanism of bond dissociation under shock loading and its progression is demonstrated in this manuscript using the density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations. The rate of dissociation of different bonds at different shock velocities is also presented in this manuscript.

  15. Interstellar shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckee, C. F.; Hollenbach, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    The structure of interstellar shocks driven by supernova remnants and by expanding H II regions around early-type stars is discussed. Jump conditions are examined, along with shock fronts, post-shock relaxation layers, collisional shocks, collisionless shocks, nonradiative shocks, radiative atomic shocks, and shock models of observed nebulae. Effects of shock waves on interstellar molecules are examined, with reference to the chemistry behind shock fronts, infrared and vibrational-rotational cooling by molecules, and observations of shocked molecules. Some current problems and applications of the study of interstellar shocks are summarized, including the initiation of star formation by radiative shock waves, interstellar masers, the stability of shocks, particle acceleration in shocks, and shocks in galactic nuclei.

  16. COMPRESSION WAVES AND PHASE PLOTS: SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Orlikowski, D; Minich, R

    2011-08-01

    Compression wave analysis started nearly 50 years ago with Fowles. Coperthwaite and Williams gave a method that helps identify simple and steady waves. We have been developing a method that gives describes the non-isentropic character of compression waves, in general. One result of that work is a simple analysis tool. Our method helps clearly identify when a compression wave is a simple wave, a steady wave (shock), and when the compression wave is in transition. This affects the analysis of compression wave experiments and the resulting extraction of the high-pressure equation of state.

  17. Selfsimilar Spherical Compression Waves in Gas Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Schalk, C.

    1982-08-01

    A synopsis of different selfsimilar spherical compression waves is given pointing out their fundamental importance for the gas dynamics of inertial confinement fusion. Strong blast waves, various forms of isentropic compression waves, imploding shock waves and the solution for non-isentropic collapsing hollow spheres are included. A classification is given in terms of six singular points which characterise the different solutions and the relations between them. The presentation closely follows Guderley's original work on imploding shock waves

  18. Spall strength and ejecta production of gold under explosively driven shock wave compression

    SciTech Connect

    La Lone, B. M.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Veeser, L. R.; Holtkamp, D. B.

    2013-12-16

    Explosively driven shock wave experiments were conducted to characterize the spall strength and ejecta production of high-purity cast gold samples. The samples were from 0.75 to 1.84 mm thick and 30 mm in diameter. Peak stresses up to 44 GPa in gold were generated using PBX-9501 high explosive. Sample free surface and ejecta velocities were recorded using photonic Doppler velocimetry techniques. Lithium niobate pins were used to quantify the time dependence of the ejecta density and the total ejected mass. An optical framing camera for time-resolved imaging and a single-image x-ray radiograph were used for additional characterization. Free surface velocities exhibited a range of spall strengths from 1.7 to 2.4 GPa (mean: 2.0 ±0.3 GPa). The pullback signals were faint, minimal ringing was observed in the velocity records, and the spall layer continued to decelerate after first pull back. These results suggest finite tensile strength was present for some time after the initial void formation. Ejecta were observed for every sample with a roughened free surface, and the ejecta density increased with increased surface roughness, which was different in every experiment. The total ejected mass is consistent with the missing mass model.

  19. Shock wave compression of hexagonal-close-packed metal single crystals: Time-dependent, anisotropic elastic-plastic response of beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winey, J. M.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2014-07-01

    Understanding and modeling the response of hcp metals to high stress impulsive loading is challenging because the lower crystal symmetry, compared to cubic metals, results in a significantly more complex material response. To gain insight into the inelastic deformation of hcp metals subjected to high dynamic stresses, shock wave compression of single crystals provides a useful approach because different inelastic deformation mechanisms can be examined selectively by shock compression along different crystal orientations. As a representative example, we report, here, on wave propagation simulations for beryllium (Be) single crystals shocked along the c-axis, a-axis, and several low-symmetry directions to peak stresses reaching 7 GPa. The simulations utilized a time-dependent, anisotropic material model that incorporated dislocation dynamics, deformation twinning, and shear cracking based descriptions of inelastic deformation. The simulation results showed good overall agreement with measured wave profiles for all the different crystal orientations examined [Pope and Johnson, J. Appl. Phys. 46, 720 (1975)], including features arising from wave mode coupling due to the highly anisotropic inelastic response of Be. This good agreement demonstrates that the measured profiles can be understood in terms of dislocation slip along basal, prismatic, and pyramidal planes, together with deformation twinning along { 10 1 ¯ 2 } planes. Our results show that the response of shocked Be single crystals involves the simultaneous operation of multiple, distinct inelastic deformation mechanisms for all orientations except the c-axis. For shocked c-axis Be, the measured wave profiles do not provide good discrimination between pyramidal slip and other inelastic deformation mechanisms, such as shear cracking. The findings presented here provide insight into the complex inelastic deformation response of shocked Be single crystals and are expected to be useful for other hcp crystals. More

  20. Shock wave compression of hexagonal-close-packed metal single crystals: Time-dependent, anisotropic elastic-plastic response of beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Winey, J. M.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2014-07-21

    Understanding and modeling the response of hcp metals to high stress impulsive loading is challenging because the lower crystal symmetry, compared to cubic metals, results in a significantly more complex material response. To gain insight into the inelastic deformation of hcp metals subjected to high dynamic stresses, shock wave compression of single crystals provides a useful approach because different inelastic deformation mechanisms can be examined selectively by shock compression along different crystal orientations. As a representative example, we report, here, on wave propagation simulations for beryllium (Be) single crystals shocked along the c-axis, a-axis, and several low-symmetry directions to peak stresses reaching 7 GPa. The simulations utilized a time-dependent, anisotropic material model that incorporated dislocation dynamics, deformation twinning, and shear cracking based descriptions of inelastic deformation. The simulation results showed good overall agreement with measured wave profiles for all the different crystal orientations examined [Pope and Johnson, J. Appl. Phys. 46, 720 (1975)], including features arising from wave mode coupling due to the highly anisotropic inelastic response of Be. This good agreement demonstrates that the measured profiles can be understood in terms of dislocation slip along basal, prismatic, and pyramidal planes, together with deformation twinning along (101{sup ¯}2) planes. Our results show that the response of shocked Be single crystals involves the simultaneous operation of multiple, distinct inelastic deformation mechanisms for all orientations except the c-axis. For shocked c-axis Be, the measured wave profiles do not provide good discrimination between pyramidal slip and other inelastic deformation mechanisms, such as shear cracking. The findings presented here provide insight into the complex inelastic deformation response of shocked Be single crystals and are expected to be useful for other hcp crystals

  1. Shock compression profiles in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.; Moody, R.L.

    1996-03-01

    An investigation of the shock compression properties of high-strength ceramics has been performed using controlled planar impact techniques. In a typical experimental configuration, a ceramic target disc is held stationary, and it is struck by plates of either a similar ceramic or by plates of a well-characterized metal. All tests were performed using either a single-stage propellant gun or a two-stage light-gas gun. Particle velocity histories were measured with laser velocity interferometry (VISAR) at the interface between the back of the target ceramic and a calibrated VISAR window material. Peak impact stresses achieved in these experiments range from about 3 to 70 GPa. Ceramics tested under shock impact loading include: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, AlN, B{sub 4}C, SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, TiB{sub 2}, WC and ZrO{sub 2}. This report compiles the VISAR wave profiles and experimental impact parameters within a database-useful for response model development, computational model validation studies, and independent assessment of the physics of dynamic deformation on high-strength, brittle solids.

  2. Design and Testing of CO2 Compression Using Supersonic Shock Wave Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, Aaron

    2015-06-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Ramgen and subcontractors in pursuit of the design and construction of a 10 MW supersonic CO2 compressor and supporting facility. The compressor will demonstrate application of Ramgen’s supersonic compression technology at an industrial scale using CO2 in a closed-loop. The report includes details of early feasibility studies, CFD validation and comparison to experimental data, static test experimental results, compressor and facility design and analyses, and development of aerodynamic tools. A summary of Ramgen's ISC Engine program activity is also included. This program will demonstrate the adaptation of Ramgen's supersonic compression and advanced vortex combustion technology to result in a highly efficient and cost effective alternative to traditional gas turbine engines. The build out of a 1.5 MW test facility to support the engine and associated subcomponent test program is summarized.

  3. Dissipative processes under the shock compression of glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savinykh, A. S.; Kanel, G. I.; Cherepanov, I. A.; Razorenov, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    New experimental data on the behavior of the K8 and TF1 glasses under shock-wave loading conditions are obtained. It is found that the propagation of shock waves is close to the self-similar one in the maximum compression stress range 4-12 GPa. Deviations from a general deformation diagram, which are related to viscous dissipation, take place when the final state of compression is approached. The parameter region in which failure waves form in glass is found not to be limited to the elastic compression stress range, as was thought earlier. The failure front velocity increases with the shock compression stress. Outside the region covered by a failure wave, the glasses demonstrate a high tensile dynamic strength (6-7 GPa) in the case of elastic compression, and this strength is still very high after transition through the elastic limit in a compression wave.

  4. FLOW FIELD IN SUPERSONIC MIXED-COMPRESSION INLETS AT ANGLE OF ATTACK USING THE THREE DIMENSIONAL METHOD OF CHARACTERISTICS WITH DISCRETE SHOCK WAVE FITTING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    This computer program calculates the flow field in the supersonic portion of a mixed-compression aircraft inlet at non-zero angle of attack. This approach is based on the method of characteristics for steady three-dimensional flow. The results of this program agree with those produced by the two-dimensional method of characteristics when axisymmetric flow fields are calculated. Except in regions of high viscous interaction and boundary layer removal, the results agree well with experimental data obtained for threedimensional flow fields. The flow field in a variety of axisymmetric mixed compression inlets can be calculated using this program. The bow shock wave and the internal shock wave system are calculated using a discrete shock wave fitting procedure. The internal flow field can be calculated either with or without the discrete fitting of the internal shock wave system. The influence of molecular transport can be included in the calculation of the external flow about the forebody and in the calculation of the internal flow when internal shock waves are not discretely fitted. The viscous and thermal diffussion effects are included by treating them as correction terms in the method of characteristics procedure. Dynamic viscosity is represented by Sutherland's law and thermal conductivity is represented as a quadratic function of temperature. The thermodynamic model used is that of a thermally and calorically perfect gas. The program assumes that the cowl lip is contained in a constant plane and that the centerbody contour and cowl contour are smooth and have continuous first partial derivatives. This program cannot calculate subsonic flow, the external flow field if the bow shock wave does not exist entirely around the forebody, or the internal flow field if the bow flow field is injected into the annulus. Input to the program consists of parameters to control execution, to define the geometry, and the vehicle orientation. Output consists of a list of parameters

  5. Rayleigh-Taylor Shock Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, B J; Cook, A W

    2007-08-30

    Beginning from a state of hydrostatic equilibrium, in which a heavy gas rests atop a light gas in a constant gravitational field, Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the interface will launch a shock wave into the upper fluid. The rising bubbles of lighter fluid act like pistons, compressing the heavier fluid ahead of the fronts and generating shocklets. These shocklets coalesce in multidimensional fashion into a strong normal shock, which increases in strength as it propagates upwards. Large-eddy simulations demonstrate that the shock Mach number increases faster in three dimensions than it does in two dimensions. The generation of shocks via Rayleigh-Taylor instability could have profound implications for astrophysical flows.

  6. Uncertainty Assessments of 2D and Axisymmetric Hypersonic Shock Wave - Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction Simulations at Compression Corners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Berry, Scott A.; VanNorman, John W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is one of a series of five papers in a special session organized by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program that addresses uncertainty assessments for CFD simulations in hypersonic flow. Simulations of a shock emanating from a compression corner and interacting with a fully developed turbulent boundary layer are evaluated herein. Mission relevant conditions at Mach 7 and Mach 14 are defined for a pre-compression ramp of a scramjet powered vehicle. Three compression angles are defined, the smallest to avoid separation losses and the largest to force a separated flow engaging more complicated flow physics. The Baldwin-Lomax and the Cebeci-Smith algebraic models, the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras model with the Catrix-Aupoix compressibility modification and two-equation models including Menter SST, Wilcox k-omega 98, and Wilcox k-omega 06 turbulence models are evaluated. Each model is fully defined herein to preclude any ambiguity regarding model implementation. Comparisons are made to existing experimental data and Van Driest theory to provide preliminary assessment of model form uncertainty. A set of coarse grained uncertainty metrics are defined to capture essential differences among turbulence models. Except for the inability of algebraic models to converge for some separated flows there is no clearly superior model as judged by these metrics. A preliminary metric for the numerical component of uncertainty in shock-turbulent-boundary-layer interactions at compression corners sufficiently steep to cause separation is defined as 55%. This value is a median of differences with experimental data averaged for peak pressure and heating and for extent of separation captured in new, grid-converged solutions presented here. This value is consistent with existing results in a literature review of hypersonic shock-turbulent-boundary-layer interactions by Roy and Blottner and with more recent computations of MacLean.

  7. When shock waves collide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Martinez, D.; Hartigan, P.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Foster, J.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; et al

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed tomore » quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. Furthermore, the experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.« less

  8. When Shock Waves Collide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartigan, P.; Foster, J.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; Martinez, D.; Rosen, P.; Farley, D.; Paguio, R.

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. The experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.

  9. Effect of high-temperature shock-wave compression on few-layer MoS2, WS2 and MoSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasu, K.; Matte, H. S. S. R.; Shirodkar, Sharmila N.; Jayaram, V.; Reddy, K. P. J.; Waghmare, Umesh V.; Rao, C. N. R.

    2013-09-01

    Exposure of few-layer MoS2, WS2 and MoSe2 to high-temperature shock waves causes morphological changes and a significant decrease in the interlayer separation between the (0 0 2) planes, the decrease being greatest in MoSe2. Raman spectra show softening of both the A1g and the E2g1 modes initially, followed by a slightly stiffening. Using first-principles density functional theoretical analysis of the response of few-layer MoS2 to shock waves, we propose that a combination of shear and uniaxial compressive deformation leads to flattening of MoS2 sheets which is responsible for the changes in the vibrational spectra.

  10. Fabrication of graded density impactor via underwater shock wave and quasi-isentropic compression testing at two-stage gas gun facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei; Li, Xiaojie; Hokamoto, Kazuyuki

    2014-12-01

    We show direct evidence that underwater shock wave enables us to bond multithin plates with flat, parallel, and high-strength interfaces, which are key requirements for functionally graded material (also called graded density impactor). This phenomenon is ascribed to the super short duration of the high-speed underwater shock wave, reducing the surface tension, diffusion, evaporation, deposition, and viscous flow of matter. Thin magnesium, aluminum, titanium, copper, and molybdenum foils were welded together and designed with the increase in density. Experimental evidence and numerical simulation show that well bonding between the multilayer structures. Microstructure examinations reveal that the dominant interfacial form shifts from waviness to linearity. Graded density impactor with multilayer structure is proved that can produce quasi-isentropic compression in two-stage gas gun experiment with a designed pressure loading profile, which suggests a feasible method to simulate the conditions we want to study that were previously inaccessible in a precisely controlled laboratory environment.

  11. New Developments in the Physical Chemistry of Shock Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlott, Dana D.

    2011-05-01

    This review discusses new developments in shock compression science with a focus on molecular media. Some basic features of shock and detonation waves, nonlinear excitations that can produce extreme states of high temperature and high pressure, are described. Methods of generating and detecting shock waves are reviewed, especially those using tabletop lasers that can be interfaced with advanced molecular diagnostics. Newer compression methods such as shockless compression and precompression shock that generate states of cold dense molecular matter are discussed. Shock compression creates a metallic form of hydrogen, melts diamond, and makes water a superionic liquid with unique catalytic properties. Our understanding of detonations at the molecular level has improved a great deal as a result of advanced nonequilibrium molecular simulations. Experimental measurements of detailed molecular behavior behind a detonation front might be available soon using femtosecond lasers to produce nanoscale simulated detonation fronts.

  12. Shock compression dynamics under a microscope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlott, Dana

    2015-06-01

    We have developed a tabletop laser flyer launch system1 that solves many of the problems that plagued previous efforts. Using a novel mechanism where a spatially-uniform laser pulse creates a shock in a glass substrate just underneath a metal foil, we can launch tiny (0.7 mm diameter x 100 μm thick) flyers at speeds ranging from 0-5 km/s and the foils are flat, cold and intact. This tabletop launch system, where we often launch 100 flyers per day, provides a platform for a wide variety of time-resolved spectroscopies. The shocked material is viewed by a microscope objective that transmits near-infrared light from a photon Doppler velocimeter to monitor the flyer, and collects the light for spectroscopic and video images. Fluorescent probes, which have been highly developed for the biomedical sciences, have proven especially useful for these experiments. Using emission measurements, we have investigated the fundamental mechanisms of many shock wave effects including: viscoelastic compression of high molecular weight polymers, visualization of shocks in porous media such as sand, where we can observe the behavior of individual grains of sand, shock attenuation by passing the shock through reactive materials that undergo endothermic chemical reactions, and shock initiation of nanoenergetic materials.

  13. Shock and Static Compression of Nitrobenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozu, Naoshi; Arai, Mitsuru; Tamura, Masamitsu; Fujihisa, Hiroshi; Aoki, Katsutoshi; Yoshida, Masatake

    2000-08-01

    The Hugoniot and static compression curve (isotherm) were investigated using explosive plane wave generators and diamond anvil cells, respectively. The obtained Hugoniot from the shock experiments is represented by two linear lines: Us=2.52+1.23 up (0.8shock velocity and the particle velocity in km/s, respectively. A kink exists at around 15 GPa. The line for the higher particle velocities agrees well with the Hugoniot of detonation products calculated by the CHEETAH code. This suggests that nitrobenzene detonates in this range. Under static high pressure over 7 GPa, nitrobenzene undergoes a reaction that is expected to be polymerization. Considering the Hugoniot and the isotherm, it is plausible that shocked nitrobenzene (<15 GPa) is in the liquid state.

  14. Shock Compression of Liquid Hydrazine.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voskoboinikov, I. M.

    1999-06-01

    The possibility of calculation of the parameters of a shock compression of liquid hydrazine within the frameworks of the schemes is shown. When the mass velocities behind shock fronts do not exceed the value equals 3.1 km/s, it may be managed under assumption of the retention of the initial compound (hydrazine) behind a shock front. The detonation velocities of hydrazine solutions with nitromethane and hydrazinenitrate correspond to the destruction of hydrazine up to ammonia and nitrogen that is accompanied by a noticeable energy release. The estimates performed demonstrate a possibility of the detonation of a liquid hydrazine with the velocity equals 8 km/s, during which the heating up of the substance behind a shock front (equals approximately 2000 K) is comparable with those observed during detonation of liquid explosives. The large values of the critical diameter of detonation are expected because of activation energy of hydrazine decomposition equals 53.2 kcal/mol. They are decreased up on addition of a certain amount of liquid explosives. Their more rapid decomposition behind a shock front gives rise to the temperature increase that is sufficient for destruction of hydrazine.

  15. TIMING OF SHOCK WAVES

    DOEpatents

    Tuck, J.L.

    1955-03-01

    This patent relates to means for ascertaining the instant of arrival of a shock wave in an exploslve charge and apparatus utilizing this means to coordinate the timing of two operations involving a short lnterval of time. A pair of spaced electrodes are inserted along the line of an explosive train with a voltage applied there-across which is insufficient to cause discharge. When it is desired to initiate operation of a device at the time the explosive shock wave reaches a particular point on the explosive line, the device having an inherent time delay, the electrodes are located ahead of the point such that the ionization of the area between the electrodes caused by the traveling explosive shock wave sends a signal to initiate operation of the device to cause it to operate at the proper time. The operated device may be photographic equipment consisting of an x-ray illuminating tube.

  16. Isentropic expansion of shock-compressed substances.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhernokletov, M. V.

    2001-06-01

    The below parts of the paper are devoted to experimental results = obtained by the barrier method when researching metals, explosion = products, and polymers. Metals. The method of isentropic expansion was used to research = trancritical states of copper, lead, bismuth, molybdenum, uranium, = tungsten, nickel, tin, chrome, and zinc. To increase entropy under shock = compression and realize trancritical states during expansion, porous = samples were used. The highest degrees of expansion are reached on = isentropes obtained with use of hemispherical generators of shock waves. = The performed tests showed absence of significant jumps of thermodynamic = function or any hydrodynamic anomalies which could be interpeted as = specific plasma phase transformations. The tests data testify to = continuous change of metals properties at expansion from the condensed = state up to the gas state. Isentropes of explosion products (EP). In tests the shock wave = parameters were determined in inert materials-obstacles directly = contacting HE under research. TNT and two TNT-RDX alloys (50/50 and = 25/75) were used as this HE. The experimental data were compared with = data obtained by calculations using various EOS, including the cubic EOS = (P=3DAρ^3). It is shown that the cubic EOS has significant = disagreement with test in the area below 1 GPa. Polymeric materials. Teflon, polystyrene, plexiglas, phenylone, and = stilbene are studied. Analysis of experimental data testifies that = polystyrene, phenylone, and stilbene undergo a series of = physical-chemical transformations with pressure growth in the front of = shock-waves.

  17. Unsteady interaction of shock and detonation waves in gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobeinikov, Viktor P.

    Recent theoretical and experimental investigations of unsteady shock-wave interactions (SWIs) in gases are discussed in chapters contributed by leading Soviet experts. Topics addressed include the thermodynamic and electrophysical parameters of gas flow behind shock waves, the effect of nonequilibrium physicochemical processes on the flow parameters behind a shock wave, shock-tube investigations of unsteady SWI, SWI with a porous compressible medium, and the reflection of shock waves by a plane surface. Consideration is given to the diffraction of a shock wave at a convex corner, unsteady SWIs with curvilinear surfaces, numerical simulations of SWIs with bodies of various shapes, and the unsteady interaction of detonation waves. Diagrams, graphs, and photographs.

  18. Reliable estimation of shock position in shock-capturing compressible hydrodynamics codes

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Eric M

    2008-01-01

    The displacement method for estimating shock position in a shock-capturing compressible hydrodynamics code is introduced. Common estimates use simulation data within the captured shock, but the displacement method uses data behind the shock, making the estimate consistent with and as reliable as estimates of material parameters obtained from averages or fits behind the shock. The displacement method is described in the context of a steady shock in a one-dimensional lagrangian hydrodynamics code, and demonstrated on a piston problem and a spherical blast wave.The displacement method's estimates of shock position are much better than common estimates in such applications.

  19. The behavior of a compressible turbulent boundary layer in a shock-wave-induced adverse pressure gradient. Ph.D. Thesis - Washington Univ., Seattle, Aug. 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, W. C.

    1973-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of the mean- and fluctuating-flow properties of a compressible turbulent boundary layer in a shock-wave-induced adverse pressure gradient are presented. The turbulent boundary layer developed on the wall of an axially symmetric nozzle and test section whose nominal free-stream Mach number and boundary-layer thickness Reynolds number were 4 and 100,000, respectively. The adverse pressure gradient was induced by an externally generated conical shock wave. Mean and time-averaged fluctuating-flow data, including the complete experimental Reynolds stress tensor and experimental turbulent mass- and heat-transfer rates are presented for the boundary layer and external flow, upstream, within and downstream of the pressure gradient. The mean-flow data include distributions of total temperature throughout the region of interest. The turbulent mixing properties of the flow were determined experimentally with a hot-wire anemometer. The calibration of the wires and the interpretation of the data are discussed. From the results of the investigation, it is concluded that the shock-wave - boundary-layer interaction significantly alters the turbulent mixing characteristics of the boundary layer.

  20. Visualization of shock-wave formation processes during shock reflection at obstacles with multiple steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Susumu; Adachi, Takashi

    According to standard textbooks on compressible fluid dynamics, a shock wave is formed by an accumulation of compression waves. However, the process by which an accumulated compression wave grows into a shock wave has never been visualized. In the present paper, the authors tried to visualize this process using a model wedge with multiple steps. This model is useful for generating a series of compression waves and can simulate a compression process that occurs in a shock tube. By estimating the triple-point trajectory angle, we demonstrated visually that an accumulated compression wave grows into a shock wave. Further reflection experiments over a rough-surface wedge confirmed the tendency for the triple point trajectory angle χ to reach the asymptotic value χs in the end.

  1. Exhaust Nozzle Plume and Shock Wave Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.; Elmiligui, Alaa; Cliff, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental research for sonic boom reduction is needed to quantify the interaction of shock waves generated from the aircraft wing or tail surfaces with the exhaust plume. Both the nozzle exhaust plume shape and the tail shock shape may be affected by an interaction that may alter the vehicle sonic boom signature. The plume and shock interaction was studied using Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation on two types of convergent-divergent nozzles and a simple wedge shock generator. The nozzle plume effects on the lower wedge compression region are evaluated for two- and three-dimensional nozzle plumes. Results show that the compression from the wedge deflects the nozzle plume and shocks form on the deflected lower plume boundary. The sonic boom pressure signature of the wedge is modified by the presence of the plume, and the computational predictions show significant (8 to 15 percent) changes in shock amplitude.

  2. Whistler Waves Associated with Weak Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velez, J. C. Ramirez; Blanco-Cano, X.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Russell, C. T.; Kajdic, P.; Jian,, L. K.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the properties of 98 weak interplanetary shocks measured by the dual STEREO spacecraft over approximately 3 years during the past solar minimum. We study the occurrence of whistler waves associated with these shocks, which on average are high beta shocks (0.2 < Beta < 10). We have compared the waves properties upstream and downstream of the shocks. In the upstream region the waves are mainly circularly polarized, and in most of the cases (approx. 75%) they propagate almost parallel to the ambient magnetic field (<30 deg.). In contrast, the propagation angle with respect to the shock normal varies in a broad range of values (20 deg. to 90 deg.), suggesting that they are not phase standing. We find that the whistler waves can extend up to 100,000 km in the upstream region but in most cases (88%) are contained in a distance within 30,000 km from the shock. This corresponds to a larger region with upstream whistlers associated with IP shocks than previously reported in the literature. The maximum amplitudes of the waves are observed next to the shock interface, and they decrease as the distance to the shock increases. In most cases the wave propagation direction becomes more aligned with the magnetic field as the distance to the shock increases. These two facts suggest that most of the waves in the upstream region are Landau damping as they move away from the shock. From the analysis we also conclude that it is likely that the generation mechanism of the upstream whistler waves is taking place at the shock interface. In the downstream region, the waves are irregularly polarized, and the fluctuations are very compressive; that is, the compressive component of the wave clearly dominates over the transverse one. The majority of waves in the downstream region (95%) propagate at oblique angles with respect to the ambient magnetic field (>60 deg.). The wave propagation with respect to the shock-normal direction has no preferred direction and varies similarly to

  3. Turbulence measurements in a compressible boundary layer subjected to a shock-wave-induced adverse pressure gradient.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, W. C.

    1973-01-01

    The rms intensities of fluctuating mass flux and total temperature and their correlation coefficients are given for the case of an adiabatic, Mach 4, axisymmetric shock-wave boundary-layer interaction. Data were obtained upstream, within, and downstream of the interaction by the use of constant temperature hot-wire anemometer. Turbulence spectra and quantitative behavior from oscilloscope traces are shown at selected locations. The measurements indicate that certain frequencies of the turbulence are increased as a result of the interaction and that the mass flux and total temperature fluctuations remain highly correlated over most of the boundary layer throughout the interaction. The present data are also transformed to rms intensities of fluctuating static temperature and velocity and compared with existing data obtained in adiabatic flows.

  4. Selfsimilar spherical compression waves in gas dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer-Ter-Vehn, J.; Schalk, C.

    1982-05-01

    A synopsis of different selfsimilar spherical compression waves is given pointing out their fundamental importance for the gas dynamics of inertial confinement fusion. Strong blast waves, various forms of isentropic collapsing hollow spheres are included. A classification is given in terms of six singular points which characterize the different solutions and the relations between them. The presentation closely follows Guderley's original work on imploding shock waves.

  5. Shock Compression of Ammonium Perchlorate Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Y. M.; Yuan, Gang; Feng, Ruqiang

    1997-07-01

    The shock response of ammonium perchlorate (AP) single crystals has been examined for uniaxial strain compression along the [210] and [001] directions. Quartz gauge and VISAR measurements have provided the wave profiles at the impact surface and after propagation through thin samples (1-3 mm thickness) for peak stresses ranging between 10 and 65 kbar. A two wave structure due to elastic-plastic deformation was observed for both orientations. The measured HEL values for the [210] and [001] orientations were about 4.3 and 3.5 kbar, respectively. Data for the two orientations reveal small stress relaxation effects and small differences due to crystal orientation effects. We have chosen to fit both sets of results with a simple elastic-perfectly plastic model used for isotropic materials. Reasonable agreement between the calculations and experimental results was obtained. Over the stress range examined to date, no evidence of chemical decomposition was observed for the time durations in our experiments.

  6. Shock waves: The Maxwell-Cattaneo case.

    PubMed

    Uribe, F J

    2016-03-01

    Several continuum theories for shock waves give rise to a set of differential equations in which the analysis of the underlying vector field can be done using the tools of the theory of dynamical systems. We illustrate the importance of the divergences associated with the vector field by considering the ideas by Maxwell and Cattaneo and apply them to study shock waves in dilute gases. By comparing the predictions of the Maxwell-Cattaneo equations with shock wave experiments we are lead to the following conclusions: (a) For low compressions (low Mach numbers: M) the results from the Maxwell-Cattaneo equations provide profiles that are in fair agreement with the experiments, (b) as the Mach number is increased we find a range of Mach numbers (1.27≈M_{1}shock wave solutions to the Maxwell-Cattaneo equations cannot be found, and PMID:27078450

  7. Fast Electron Deposition in Laser Shock Compressed Plastic Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, T. A.; Ellwi, S.; Batani, D.; Bernardinello, A.; Masella, V.; Koenig, M.; Benuzzi, A.; Krishnan, J.; Pisani, F.; Djaoui, A.; Norreys, P.; Neely, D.; Rose, S.; Key, M. H.; Fews, P.

    1998-08-01

    We present the first results of fast electron deposition in a laser shock compressed plasma. The interaction of a 3 ps, 15 J laser pulse with solid polyethylene targets is used to produce fast electrons on one side of foil targets and a 2 ns duration laser pulse is used to drive a shock wave into the target from the opposite side. Kα emission from chlorine fluor buried layers is used to measure the electron transport. The hot electron range in the shock compressed plastic is found to be approximately twice as large as the range in the solid density plastic.

  8. NONEQUILIBRIUM FLUCTUATIONS IN SHOCK COMPRESSION OF POLYCRYSTALLINE ALPHA-IRON

    SciTech Connect

    Y. HORIE; K. YANO

    2001-06-01

    We report a numerical study of heterogeneous and nonequilibrium fluctuations in shock compression of {alpha}-iron at the grain level. A quasi-molecular code called DM2 is used to model the interactions of a plane shock wave with grain boundaries and crystal anisotropy over the pressure range of 5-45 GPa. Highly transient eddies that were reported earlier are again observed. We show new features through an elementary statistical analysis. They are (1) a characteristic decay constant for the non-equilibrium fluctuation on the order of 20ns, (2) a resonance phenomenon at an intermediate shock pressure, and (3) a more uniform shock structure for very high pressures.

  9. Radiative Shock Waves In Emerging Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, R. Paul; Doss, F.; Visco, A.

    2011-05-01

    In laboratory experiments we produce radiative shock waves having dense, thin shells. These shocks are similar to shocks emerging from optically thick environments in astrophysics in that they are strongly radiative with optically thick shocked layers and optically thin or intermediate downstream layers through which radiation readily escapes. Examples include shocks breaking out of a Type II supernova (SN) and the radiative reverse shock during the early phases of the SN remnant produced by a red supergiant star. We produce these shocks by driving a low-Z plasma piston (Be) at > 100 km/s into Xe gas at 1.1 atm. pressure. The shocked Xe collapses to > 20 times its initial density. Measurements of structure by radiography and temperature by several methods confirm that the shock wave is strongly radiative. We observe small-scale perturbations in the post-shock layer, modulating the shock and material interfaces. We describe a variation of the Vishniac instability theory of decelerating shocks and an analysis of associated scaling relations to account for the growth of these perturbations, identify how they scale to astrophysical systems such as SN 1993J, and consider possible future experiments. Collaborators in this work have included H.F. Robey, J.P. Hughes, C.C. Kuranz, C.M. Huntington, S.H. Glenzer, T. Doeppner, D.H. Froula, M.J. Grosskopf, and D.C. Marion ________________________________ * Supported by the US DOE NNSA under the Predictive Sci. Academic Alliance Program by grant DE-FC52-08NA28616, the Stewardship Sci. Academic Alliances program by grant DE-FG52-04NA00064, and the Nat. Laser User Facility by grant DE-FG03-00SF22021.

  10. Shock-wave surfing

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, Stuart J; Deiterding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    A phenomenon referred to as shock-wave surfing , in which a body moves in such a way as to follow the shock wave generated by another upstream body, is investigated numerically and theoretically. This process can lead to the downstream body accumulating a significantly higher lateral velocity than would otherwise be possible, and thus is of importance in situations such as meteoroid fragmentation, in which the fragment separation behaviour following disruption is determined to a large extent by aerodynamic effects. The surfing effect is first investigated in the context of interactions between a sphere and a planar oblique shock. Numerical simulations are performed and a simple theoretical model is developed to determine the forces acting on the sphere. A phase-plane description is employed to elucidate features of the system dynamics. The theoretical model is then generalised to the more complex situation of aerodynamic interactions between two spheres, and, through comparisons with further computations, is shown to adequately predict, in particular, the final separation velocity of the surfing sphere in initially touching configurations. Both numerical simulations and theory indicate a strong influence of the body radius ratio on the separation process and predict a critical radius ratio for initially touching fragments that delineates entrainment of the smaller fragment within the larger fragment s shock from expulsion; this critical ratio also results in the most extended surfing. Further, these results show that an earlier prediction for the separation velocity to scale with the square root of the radius ratio does not accurately describe the separation behaviour. The theoretical model is then employed to investigate initial configurations with varying relative sphere positions and initial velocities. A phase-space description is also shown to be useful in elucidating the dynamics of the sphere-sphere system. With regard to meteoroid fragmentation, it is shown

  11. Shock Propagation and Instability Structures in Compressed Silica Aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W M; Molitoris, J D; DeHaven, M R; Gash, A E; Satcher, J H

    2002-05-30

    We have performed a series of experiments examining shock propagation in low density aerogels. High-pressure ({approx}100 kbar) shock waves are produced by detonating high explosives. Radiography is used to obtain a time sequence imaging of the shocks as they enter and traverse the aerogel. We compress the aerogel by impinging shocks waves on either one or both sides of an aerogel slab. The shock wave initially transmitted to the aerogel is very narrow and flat, but disperses and curves as it propagates. Optical images of the shock front reveal the initial formation of a hot dense region that cools and evolves into a well-defined microstructure. Structures observed in the shock front are examined in the framework of hydrodynamic instabilities generated as the shock traverses the low-density aerogel. The primary features of shock propagation are compared to simulations, which also include modeling the detonation of the high explosive, with a 2-D Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian hydrodynamics code The code includes a detailed thermochemical equation of state and rate law kinetics. We will present an analysis of the data from the time resolved imaging diagnostics and form a consistent picture of the shock transmission, propagation and instability structure.

  12. Electrical conductivity and compressibility of sulfur under shock loading

    SciTech Connect

    Postnov, V.I.; Anan'eva, L.A.; Dremin, A.N.; Nabatov, S.S.; Yakushev, V.V.

    1987-01-01

    The authors mathematically and experimentally assess the transition of orthorhombic elementary sulfur from a dielectric to a superconducting regime under the influence of pressure generated by shock wave loading. They also determine its compressibility over a range of 4-38 GPa.

  13. Shock compression and equation of state of C60 fullerite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milyavskiy, Vladimir; Khishchenko, Konstantin; Utkin, Alexander; Yakushev, Vladislav; Zhuk, Andrey; Fortov, Vladimir

    2007-06-01

    Recently, we have experimentally studied shock compressibility of C60 fullerite and sound velocity in shock-compressed fullerite [1]. The Hugoniot of C60 fullerite had a set of peculiarities. Appearance of a rather hard carbon phase was detected at shock pressure ˜ 9 GPa. We assume that it is a 2D-polymerized C60 phase. With increase of shock pressure, destruction of this phase and formation of a graphite-like carbon occurs. With further increase of shock pressure, the graphite- like carbon transforms to a diamond-like phase. If shock pressure is higher than ˜ 33 GPa, shock compressibility of C60 fullerite is determined by the thermodynamic properties of the diamond-like phase. The results of the shock-wave measurements were used for the description of thermodynamic properties of C60 fullerite and products of its transformations in a wide range of pressures and temperatures. A semiempirical equation of state for the simple cubic phase of C60 fullerite is proposed. The EOS we have developed for fullerite C60 provides a consistent representation of the available experimental data. The work was supported by RFBR. [1] Milyavskiy V.V., Utkin A.V., Zhuk A.Z., Yakushev V.V. and Fortov V.E. Diamond and Rel. Mat. 14 (2005) 1920.

  14. Shock-wave properties of soda-lime glass

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.; Chhabildas, L.C.

    1996-11-01

    Planar impact experiments and wave profile measurements provided single and double shock equation of state data to 30 GPa. Both compression wave wave profile structure and release wave data were used to infer time-dependent strength and equation of state properties for soda-lime glass.

  15. Ray Tracing to Predict Optical Behaviour of Shock Compressed Dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tear, Gareth R.; Proud, William G.

    2015-06-01

    In order to investigate the optical response of dielectric materials under shock compression, a characteristics model has been combined with a three dimensional optical ray tracing model. A general biaxial optical model is used along with a first order photoelastic model which couples the characteristics component to the optical component. This optical model is three dimensional and as such can be used to investigate small deviations from the perfect one dimensional shock wave which is typically assumed in plate impact experiments. A detailed description of the model will be presented, and comparison to available literature as well as recent experiments on the optical behaviour of shock compressed a-cut calcite and a-cut sapphire. The authors would like to thank Dr D E Eakins and Dr D J Chapman for fruitful discussions. The Institute of Shock Physics acknowledges the continued support of AWE and Imperial College London.

  16. Raman spectroscopies in shock-compressed materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, S.C.; Moore, D.S.; Shaner, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy, stimulated Raman scattering and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering have been used to measure temperatures and changes in molecular vibrational frequencies for detonating and shocked materials. Inverse Raman and Raman induced Kerr effect spectroscopies have been suggested as diagnostic probes for determining and phenomenology of shock-induced chemical reactions. The practicality, advantages, and disadvantages of using Raman scattering techniques as diagnostic probes of microscopic phenomenology through and immediately behind the shock front of shock-compressed molecular systems are discussed.

  17. Magnetically accelerated foils for shock wave experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, Stephan; Ford, Jessica; Martinez, David; Plechaty, Christopher; Wright, Sandra; Presura, Radu

    2008-04-01

    The interaction of shock waves with inhomogeneous media is important in many astrophysical problems, e.g. the role of shock compression in star formation. Using scaled experiments with inhomogeneous foam targets makes it possible to study relevant physics in the laboratory, to better understand the mechanisms of shock compression and to benchmark astrophysical simulation codes. Experiments with flyer-generated shock waves have been performed on the Z machine in Sandia. The Zebra accelerator at the Nevada Terawatt Facility (NTF) allows for complementary experiments with high repetition rate. First experiments on Zebra demonstrated flyer acceleration to sufficiently high velocities (around 2 km/s) and that laser shadowgraphy can image sound fronts in transparent targets. Based on this, we designed an optimized setup to improve the flyer parameters (higher speed and mass) to create shock waves in transparent media. Once x-ray backlighting with the Leopard laser at NTF is operational, we will switch to foam targets with parameters relevant for laboratory astrophysics.

  18. Modification of the edge wave in shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2012-10-01

    To reduce the bubble cavitation and the consequent vascular injury of shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), a new method was devised to modify the diffraction wave generated at the aperture of a Dornier HM-3 lithotripter. Subsequently, the duration of the tensile wave was shortened significantly (3.2±0.54 μs vs. 5.83±0.56 μs). However, the amplitude and duration of the compressive wave of LSW between these two groups as well as the -6 dB beam width and the amplitude of the tensile wave are almost unchanged. The suppression on bubble cavitation was confirmed using the passive cavitation technique. At the lithotripter focus, while 30 shocks can cause rupture of blood vessel phantom using the HM-3 lithotripter at 20 kV; no rupture could be found after 300 shocks with the edge extender. On the other hand, after 200 shocks the HM-3 lithotripter at 20 kV can achieve a stone fragmentation of 50.4±2.0% on plaster-of-Paris stone phantom, which is comparable to that of using the edge extender (46.8±4.1%, p=0.005). Altogether, the modification on the diffraction wave at the lithotripter aperture can significantly reduce the bubble cavitation activities. As a result, potential for vessel rupture in shock wave lithotripsy is expected.

  19. Shock compression and release in high-strength ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Kipp, M E; Grady, D E

    1989-08-01

    A preliminary investigation of shock compression and release properties has been performed on four ceramics: silicon carbide, titanium diboride, boron carbide and zirconium dioxide. Eight planar impact experiments using thin discs of similar ceramic as impactor and target have been completed. The particle velocity history at the interface between the back of the target ceramic and a lithium fluoride window material was acquired with a laser velocity interferometer (VISAR). These wave profiles indicate that each of these materials responds in a unique way to shock loading. Peak impact stresses in these experiments range between 20 and 50 GPa, leading to pronounced permanent deformation behavior of these materials. Dynamic compression and release stress-strain behavior of the ceramics, formulated with numerical iteration methods, is compared with compressive strength properties determined from the experimental data. The current experiments provide data for these ceramic materials which can be used to evaluate computational material models in wave propagation codes. 23 refs., 25 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Shock compression response of Ti+B reactive powder mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, M.; Gurumurthy, A.; Kennedy, G. B.; Gokhale, A. M.; Thadhani, N. N.

    2014-05-01

    The shock compression response of Ti+2B (1:2 Ti:B stoichiometric ratio) reactive powder mixtures at ~50% theoretical material density (TMD) is investigated for shock pressures up to 5 GPa to investigate the possible shock-induced chemical reactivity of this highly exothermic mixture. The shock adiabat is produced from instrumented parallel-plate gas-gun impact experiments on encapsulated powders using poly-vinylidene fluoride (PVDF) stress gauges to measure the input and propagated stresses and wave speed in the powder. The shock compression regime is probed from crush-up to full density and onward to assess the potential onset of a shock-induced chemical reaction event in the powder mixture. A series of two-dimensional continuum meso-scale simulations on validated simulated microstructures are performed to predict the shock compression response and identify the meso-scale mechanics that are essential for reaction. The suitability of the synthetic microstructural representations is evaluated by comparing the experimental and predicted pressure traces.

  1. Shock compression response of Ti+B reactive powder mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, Manny; Gurumurthy, Ashok; Kennedy, Gregory; Gokhale, Arun; Thadhani, Naresh

    2013-06-01

    The shock compression response of Ti+2B (1:2 Ti:B stoichiometric ratio) reactive powder mixtures at ~50% theoretical material density (TMD) is investigated for shock pressures up to 5 GPa to investigate the possible shock-induced chemical reactivity of this highly exothermic mixture. The shock adiabat is produced from instrumented parallel-plate gas-gun impact experiments on encapsulated powders using poly-vinylidene fluoride (PVDF) stress gauges to measure the input and propagated stress and wave speed in the powder. The shock compression regime is probed from crush-up to full density and onward to assess the potential onset of a shock-induced chemical reaction event in the powder mixture. A series of two-dimensional continuum meso-scale simulations on real and simulated microstructures are performed to predict the shock compression response and identify the meso-scale mechanics that is essential for the so-called ``ballotechnic'' reaction. These meso-scale mechanics are investigated through stereological evolution metrics that track particle interface evolution and their respective field variables. The suitability of the synthetic microstructural representations is evaluated by comparing the experimental and predicted pressure traces. We gratefully acknowledge support and funding from DTRA through Grant No. HDTRA1-10-1-0038 and the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship through the High Performance Computing and Modernization Office (HPCMO).

  2. Shock waves: The Maxwell-Cattaneo case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, F. J.

    2016-03-01

    Several continuum theories for shock waves give rise to a set of differential equations in which the analysis of the underlying vector field can be done using the tools of the theory of dynamical systems. We illustrate the importance of the divergences associated with the vector field by considering the ideas by Maxwell and Cattaneo and apply them to study shock waves in dilute gases. By comparing the predictions of the Maxwell-Cattaneo equations with shock wave experiments we are lead to the following conclusions: (a) For low compressions (low Mach numbers: M ) the results from the Maxwell-Cattaneo equations provide profiles that are in fair agreement with the experiments, (b) as the Mach number is increased we find a range of Mach numbers (1.27 ≈M1shock wave solutions to the Maxwell-Cattaneo equations cannot be found, and (c) for greater Mach numbers (M >M2) shock wave solutions can be found though they differ significantly from experiments.

  3. Density Shock Waves in Confined Microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Alan Cheng Hou; Kanso, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Motile and driven particles confined in microfluidic channels exhibit interesting emergent behavior, from propagating density bands to density shock waves. A deeper understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for these emergent structures is relevant to a number of physical and biomedical applications. Here, we study the formation of density shock waves in the context of an idealized model of microswimmers confined in a narrow channel and subject to a uniform external flow. Interestingly, these density shock waves exhibit a transition from "subsonic" with compression at the back to "supersonic" with compression at the front of the population as the intensity of the external flow increases. This behavior is the result of a nontrivial interplay between hydrodynamic interactions and geometric confinement, and it is confirmed by a novel quasilinear wave model that properly captures the dependence of the shock formation on the external flow. These findings can be used to guide the development of novel mechanisms for controlling the emergent density distribution and the average population speed, with potentially profound implications on various processes in industry and biotechnology, such as the transport and sorting of cells in flow channels.

  4. Density Shock Waves in Confined Microswimmers.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Alan Cheng Hou; Kanso, Eva

    2016-01-29

    Motile and driven particles confined in microfluidic channels exhibit interesting emergent behavior, from propagating density bands to density shock waves. A deeper understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for these emergent structures is relevant to a number of physical and biomedical applications. Here, we study the formation of density shock waves in the context of an idealized model of microswimmers confined in a narrow channel and subject to a uniform external flow. Interestingly, these density shock waves exhibit a transition from "subsonic" with compression at the back to "supersonic" with compression at the front of the population as the intensity of the external flow increases. This behavior is the result of a nontrivial interplay between hydrodynamic interactions and geometric confinement, and it is confirmed by a novel quasilinear wave model that properly captures the dependence of the shock formation on the external flow. These findings can be used to guide the development of novel mechanisms for controlling the emergent density distribution and the average population speed, with potentially profound implications on various processes in industry and biotechnology, such as the transport and sorting of cells in flow channels. PMID:26871357

  5. Shock-wave properties of brittle solids

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.

    1995-10-01

    Extensive experimental investigation in the form of large-amplitude, nonlinear wave-profile measurements which manifest the shock strength and equation-of-state properties of brittle solids has been performed. Brittle materials for which a base of dynamic property data is available include Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, AlN, B{sub 4}C, CaCO{sub 3}, SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, SiO{sub 2} (quartz and glass), TiB{sub 2}, WC and ZrO{sub 2}. Planar impact methods and velocity interferometry diagnostics have been used exclusively to provide the high-resolution shock-profile data. These wave-profile data are providing engineering dynamic strength and equation-of-state properties as well as controlled, shock-induced motion histories for the validation of theoretical and Computational models. Of equal importance, such data are providing a window into the physics of a newly emerging understanding of the compression and deformation behavior of high-strength brittle solids. When considered along with a rich assortment of strength and deformation data in the literature, a systematic assessment of this shock-wave data lends strong support for failure waves and concomitant high-confinement dilatancy as a general mechanism of inelastic deformation in the shock compression of ceramics. Phase transformation in selected brittle solids appears to be a critical state phenomenon strongly controlled by kinetics. The risetime and structure of deformation shock waves in brittle solids are controlled by viscous effects which at present are still poorly understood. The shockwave data also suggest that both crystalline plasticity and brittle fracture may play important and interconnected roles in the dynamic failure process.

  6. Isentropic compressive wave generator and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Barker, L.M.

    An isentropic compressive wave generator and method of making same are disclosed. The wave generator comprises a disk or flat pillow member having component materials of different shock impedances formed in a configuration resulting in a smooth shock impedance gradient over the thickness thereof for interpositioning between an impactor member and a target specimen for producing a shock wave of a smooth predictable rise time. The method of making the pillow member comprises the reduction of the component materials to a powder form and forming the pillow member by sedimentation and compressive techniques.

  7. Microbial Life and Shock Compression - Life or Death?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchell, Mark

    2005-07-01

    Extreme shock compressions represent a threat to organisms that inhabit planetary surfaces such as rocks. For example, a giant impact on a planetary surface can sterilise the surrounding region by passage of the resulting shock wave. Modelling of the limit of the zone of lethality depends on a knowledge of the response of micro-organisms to extreme shock. Similarly high speed ejecta can be launched into space from an impact site and may carry viable micro-organisms if they can survive the shock of the launch. Or potentially a rocky body arriving from space may introduce life to the Earth, provided the putative organisms can survive the shock of the impact (amongst other hazards). The results of a variety of laboratory experiments on shock compression of micro-organisms will be presented and discussed (with some data from the author and some from the literature). Some of the experiments involved firing spore and microbe laden projectiles at speeds of up to 6 or 7 km s-1 into a variety of targets. Other experiments used flying plate techniques to subject layers of spores to extreme shocks. The conclusion is that micro-organisms can survive extreme shock pressures (10's of GPa) in short duration events, albeit with a very small, but measurable, survival rate. These pressures cover the range likely to be found in giant impacts from space for example.

  8. Magnetically accelerated foils for shock wave experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, S.; Ford, J.; Wright, S.; Martinez, D.; Plechaty, C.; Presura, R.

    2009-08-01

    Many astrophysical phenomena involve the interaction of a shock wave with an inhomogeneous background medium. Using scaled experiments with inhomogeneous foam targets makes it possible to study relevant physics in the laboratory to better understand the mechanisms of shock compression and to benchmark astrophysical simulation codes. First experiments on Zebra at the Nevada Terawatt Facility (NTF) have demonstrated flyer acceleration to sufficiently high velocities (up to 5 km/s) and that laser shadowgraphy can image sound fronts in transparent targets. Based on this, we designed an optimized setup to improve the flyer parameters (higher speed and mass) to create shock waves in transparent media. Once x-ray backlighting with the Leopard laser at NTF is operational, we will switch to foam targets with parameters relevant for laboratory astrophysics.

  9. Fluorescent probes for shock compression spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banishev, Alexandr; Christensen, James; Dlott, Dana

    We have demonstrated the capability of using Rhodamine 6G dye as an ultrafast emission probe in high-speed shock compression of condensed matter. The ultimate time response of the probe, which functions as a high-speed pressure sensor, is limited by fundamental photophysical processes such as radiative rates, internal conversion rates and intersystem crossing rates. The time response has been greatly improved by encapsulating the dye in silica nano or microparticles. This probe was used to observed nanosecond viscoelastic shock compression of a polymer (PMMA), and has been used to monitor the response of individual grains of sand to high-speed impact.

  10. Stress relaxation in vanadium under shock and shockless dynamic compression

    SciTech Connect

    Kanel, G. I.; Razorenov, S. V.; Garkushin, G. V.; Savinykh, A. S.; Zaretsky, E. B.

    2015-07-28

    Evolutions of elastic-plastic waves have been recorded in three series of plate impact experiments with annealed vanadium samples under conditions of shockless and combined ramp and shock dynamic compression. The shaping of incident wave profiles was realized using intermediate base plates made of different silicate glasses through which the compression waves were entered into the samples. Measurements of the free surface velocity histories revealed an apparent growth of the Hugoniot elastic limit with decreasing average rate of compression. The growth was explained by “freezing” of the elastic precursor decay in the area of interaction of the incident and reflected waves. A set of obtained data show that the current value of the Hugoniot elastic limit and plastic strain rate is rather associated with the rate of the elastic precursor decay than with the local rate of compression. The study has revealed the contributions of dislocation multiplications in elastic waves. It has been shown that independently of the compression history the material arrives at the minimum point between the elastic and plastic waves with the same density of mobile dislocations.

  11. Compression in radiative shocks: switch and intermediate properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. D.

    1993-05-01

    The degree of compression in radiative shocks (discontinuous jump followed by strong cooling) is crucial to the distribution of the phases of interstellar gas. The influence of the magnetic field, especially its direction, is studied here. In fact plane-parallel radiative shocks are switch type for a wide range of conditions. In such shocks, the magnetic field is turned through a large angle from being quasi-parallel. It is shown here that plane-parallel isothermal shocks are switch type for magnetic fields within an angle 1/A of the shock normal where A is the Alfvén number, with the stringent condition that the Alfvén speed exceeds the sound speed. The switch is usually located within the dense cooling layer rather than the shock front. Super-cooling, in which the downstream temperature drops below the pre-shock value, is often encountered. A super-cooling layer can be switch type even if the Alfvén speed is much less than the sound speed. The degree of compression is then still limited by the magnetic pressure rather than thermal pressure. Applications and predictions pertaining mainly to the interstellar medium are presented. Switch off and intermediate shocks are also studied. Supernova and super-bubble shell structures may then provide evidence for interstellar gas properties. The switch-off shock can be recognised by synchrotron radiation signatures. Also the switch-off temperature jump is shown to be closely related to the value of the ratio of Alfvén to sound speeds. Super-cooled intermediate shocks, existing when the plane-parallel assumption is relaxed, can also occur under an extended range of pre-shock states. Hence the "dimple" shell structures of some remnants do not provide evidence for high Alfvén speeds. Finally, torsional switches are presented as an alternative to intermediate waves in interpreting shell structures.

  12. Historical Background of Ultrahigh Pressure Shock Compression Experiments at LLNL: 1973 to 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W.J.

    2000-10-09

    My purpose is to recount the historical development of ultrahigh pressure shock compression experiments at LLNL, which I experienced in the period 1973 to 2000. I used several experimental techniques: shock-impedance-match experiments using planar shock waves driven by nuclear explosives (NIMs), the Janus Laser, a railgun, and a two-stage light-gas gun.

  13. Some aspects of shock-wave research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, I. I.

    1986-01-01

    The major portion of the paper is devoted to a specific shock-wave research problem, namely, pseudostationary oblique shock-wave reflections in perfect and imperfect gases. Consideration is given to what has been achieved to date by using two- and three-shock theory to predict what type of reflection results when a planar shock wave M(S), in a shock tube, collides with a sharp compressive wedge of angle, theta(W). Expermental (interferometric and other optical) data are presented in (M(S), theta(W))-plots for argon, nitrogen, oxygen, air, carbon-dioxide, Freon-12 and sulfurhexafluoride, in order to check the validity of the analytically predicted regions and transition lines of the four types of reflection. Some disagreements are noted and discussed. The present interferometric isopycnic data are also compared with state-of-the-art computational results from a solution of the inviscid Euler equations using a CRAY I computer. Good agreement was obtained; it would be important, however, to obtain new data by solving the Navier-Stokes equations, as well as the rate equations for imperfect-gas excitations, in order to judge the improvement obtained with real-flow interferograms.

  14. Interaction of a converging spherical shock wave with isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagatwala, Ankit; Lele, Sanjiva K.

    2012-08-01

    Simulations of converging spherical shock waves propagating through a region of compressible isotropic turbulence are carried out. Both converging and reflected phases of the shock are studied. Effect of the reflected phase of the shock is found to be quite different from the expanding shock in the Taylor blast wave-turbulence interaction problem. Vorticity and turbulent kinetic energy are amplified due to passage of the shock. Similar to the latter problem, the vorticity-dilatation term is primarily responsible for the observed behavior. This is confirmed through Eulerian and Lagrangian statistics. Transverse vorticity amplification is compared with linear planar shock-turbulence theory. The smallest eddies, represented by the Kolmogorov scale, decrease in size after passing through the converging shock and this is shown to be related to a decrease in kinematic viscosity and increase in dissipation behind the converging shock. Distortion of the shock due to turbulence is also investigated and quantified. Turbulence also affects maximum compression achieved at the point of shock reflection, when the shock radius is at a minimum. This decrease in compression is quantified by comparing with pure shock simulations.

  15. Quartz structure transformation under a shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vettegren', V. I.; Kuksenko, V. S.; Shcherbakov, I. P.; Mamalimov, R. I.

    2015-12-01

    The structure of a fragment formed after quartz single-crystal fracture under a shock wave has been studied using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) method. The wave is initiated by electrical breakdown of air in a hole within the single crystal. It has been found that a layer ~0.15 μm thick consisting of "diaplectic glass," i.e., quartz with a strongly distorted lattice, is formed on the fragment surface. A layer 2 μm thick with a compressed quartz lattice is located under it.

  16. Shock Wave Formation in the Collapse of a Vapor Nanobubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magaletti, F.; Marino, L.; Casciola, C. M.

    2015-02-01

    In this Letter, the dynamics of a collapsing vapor bubble is addressed by means of a diffuse-interface formulation. The model cleanly captures, through a unified approach, all the critical features of the process, such as phase change, transition to supercritical conditions, thermal conduction, compressibility effects, and shock wave formation and propagation. Rather unexpectedly for pure vapor bubbles, the numerical experiments show that the process consists in the oscillation of the bubble associated with the emission of shock waves in the liquid, and with the periodic disappearance and reappearance of the liquid-vapor interface due to transition to super- or subcritical conditions. The results identify the mechanism of shock wave formation as strongly related to the transition of the vapor to the supercritical state, with a progressive steepening of a focused compression wave evolving into a shock which is eventually reflected as an outward propagating wave in the liquid.

  17. Shock wave formation in the collapse of a vapor nanobubble.

    PubMed

    Magaletti, F; Marino, L; Casciola, C M

    2015-02-13

    In this Letter, the dynamics of a collapsing vapor bubble is addressed by means of a diffuse-interface formulation. The model cleanly captures, through a unified approach, all the critical features of the process, such as phase change, transition to supercritical conditions, thermal conduction, compressibility effects, and shock wave formation and propagation. Rather unexpectedly for pure vapor bubbles, the numerical experiments show that the process consists in the oscillation of the bubble associated with the emission of shock waves in the liquid, and with the periodic disappearance and reappearance of the liquid-vapor interface due to transition to super- or subcritical conditions. The results identify the mechanism of shock wave formation as strongly related to the transition of the vapor to the supercritical state, with a progressive steepening of a focused compression wave evolving into a shock which is eventually reflected as an outward propagating wave in the liquid. PMID:25723223

  18. Numerical calculations of shock-wave/boundary-layer flow interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, P. G.; Liou, W. W.

    1994-08-01

    The paper presents results of calculations for 2-D supersonic turbulent compression corner flows. The results seem to indicate that the newer, improved kappa-epsilon models offer limited advantages over the standard kappa-epsilon model in predicting the shock-wave/boundary-layer flows in the 2-D compression corner over a wide range of corner angles and flow conditions.

  19. International Shock-Wave Database: Current Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levashov, Pavel

    2013-06-01

    Shock-wave and related dynamic material response data serve for calibrating, validating, and improving material models over very broad regions of the pressure-temperature-density phase space. Since the middle of the 20th century vast amount of shock-wave experimental information has been obtained. To systemize it a number of compendiums of shock-wave data has been issued by LLNL, LANL (USA), CEA (France), IPCP and VNIIEF (Russia). In mid-90th the drawbacks of the paper handbooks became obvious, so the first version of the online shock-wave database appeared in 1997 (http://www.ficp.ac.ru/rusbank). It includes approximately 20000 experimental points on shock compression, adiabatic expansion, measurements of sound velocity behind the shock front and free-surface-velocity for more than 650 substances. This is still a useful tool for the shock-wave community, but it has a number of serious disadvantages which can't be easily eliminated: (i) very simple data format for points and references; (ii) minimalistic user interface for data addition; (iii) absence of history of changes; (iv) bad feedback from users. The new International Shock-Wave database (ISWdb) is intended to solve these and some other problems. The ISWdb project objectives are: (i) to develop a database on thermodynamic and mechanical properties of materials under conditions of shock-wave and other dynamic loadings, selected related quantities of interest, and the meta-data that describes the provenance of the measurements and material models; and (ii) to make this database available internationally through the Internet, in an interactive form. The development and operation of the ISWdb is guided by an advisory committee. The database will be installed on two mirrored web-servers, one in Russia and the other in USA (currently only one server is available). The database provides access to original experimental data on shock compression, non-shock dynamic loadings, isentropic expansion, measurements of sound

  20. Rupture-disk-less shock-tube with compression tube driven by free piston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, T.; Ogura, E.; Sato, S.; Funabiki, K.

    A new technique is proposed for a shock tube driven by a freely moving piston. In a conventional free-piston-driven shock tube, a rupture disk is employed between the compression tube and the shock generation tube. In the present method, however, the conventional rupture disk is replaced by a newly developed fast action valve which is activated by the compressed gas generated in the compression tube. The present method enables us to generate high Mach number shock waves of arbitrary strength with good reproducibility. The performance of the new method is demonstrated experimentally. This also enables us to be carefree to scattering of fragments of the rupture disk.

  1. Shock compressed solids on the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, J D; Gold, D M; Kalantar, D H; Mikaelian, K O; Remington, B A; Weber, S V; Wiley, G

    1999-08-03

    Experiments are being developed to shock compress metal foils in the solid state to study the material strength under high compression. The x-ray drive has been characterized and hydrodynamics experiments performed to study growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in Al foils at a peak pressure of about 1.8 Mbar. Pre-imposed modulations with an initial wavelength of lo-50 pm, and amplitude of 0.5 pm show growth. Variation in the growth factors may be a result of shot-shot variation in preheating of the Al sample due to emission from the plasma in the hohlraum target

  2. Planar shock wave sliding over a water layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, V.; Jourdan, G.; Marty, A.; Allou, A.; Parisse, J.-D.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we conduct experiments to study the interaction between a horizontal free water layer and a planar shock wave that is sliding over it. Experiments are performed at atmospheric pressure in a shock tube with a square cross section (200× 200 mm^2) for depths of 10, 20, and 30 mm; a 1500-mm-long water layer; and two incident planar shock waves having Mach numbers of 1.11 and 1.43. We record the pressure histories and high-speed visualizations to study the flow patterns, surface waves, and spray layers behind the shock wave. We observe two different flow patterns with ripples formed at the air-water interface for the weaker shock wave and the dispersion of a droplet mist for the stronger shock wave. From the pressure signals, we extract the delay time between the arrival of the compression wave into water and the shock wave in air at the same location. We show that the delay time evolves with the distance traveled over the water layer, the depth of the water layer, and the Mach number of the shock wave.

  3. Mercury's bow shock and foreshock waves observed by Messenger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Cano, X.; Le, G.; Boardsen, S.; Chi, P.; Slavin, J. A.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.

    2013-09-01

    The region upstream from a planetary bow shock is a natural plasma laboratory containing a variety of wave particle phenomena. The study of foreshocks other than the Earth's is important for extending our understanding of collisionless shocks and foreshock physics since the bow shock strength varies with heliocentric distance from the Sun, and the sizes of the bow shocks are different at different planets. Mercury's bow shock is unique in our solar system as it is produced by moderate Mach number and low plasma beta solar wind blowing over a small magnetized body with a predominately radial interplanetary magnetic field. We use Messenger high resolution (20 samples per second) magnetic field data to study Mercury's bow shock structure, and the characteristics of ultra low frequency waves observed at the foreshock. Bow shock profiles depend on the upstream Mach number, on shock geometry with respect to the upstream magnetic field, and on the plasma beta. Mercury's bow shock is weaker than Earth's with a Mach number MA ˜ 3, and is 10 times smaller. Thus, a more laminar shock is expected and a less complex foreshock may develop. A preliminary study has shown the existence of at least three types of waves: 1) whistler waves at frequencies near 2 Hz; 2) waves with frequencies ~ 0.1 Hz; 3) fluctuations with broad spectral peaks centered at ~ 0.6 Hz. Whistler waves propagate at angles up to 30 degrees, and lower frequency waves are more parallel propagating. We investigate wave properties such as polarization, ellipticity and compressibility. We also discuss wave origin and evolution. While whistler waves may be generated at the bow shock, the origin of lower frequency waves can be attributed to local generation by kinetic ion-ion instabilities. Due to the small scale size of Mercury's foreshock it is possible that waves suffer less steepening than at Earth.

  4. Shock wave interaction with turbulence: Pseudospectral simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.

    1986-12-30

    Shock waves amplify pre-existing turbulence. Shock tube and shock wave boundary layer interaction experiments provide qualitative confirmation. However, shock pressure, temperature, and rapid transit complicate direct measurement. Computational simulations supplement the experimental data base and help isolate the mechanisms responsible. Simulations and experiments, particularly under reflected shock wave conditions, significantly influence material mixing. In these pseudospectral Navier-Stokes simulations the shock wave is treated as either a moving (tracked or fitted) domain boundary. The simulations assist development of code mix models. Shock Mach number and pre-existing turbulence intensity initially emerge as key parameters. 20 refs., 8 figs.

  5. Shock compression of low-density foams

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, N.C.

    1993-07-01

    Shock compression of very low density micro-cellular materials allows entirely new regimes of hot fluid states to be investigated experimentally. Using a two-stage light-gas gun to generate strong shocks, temperatures of several eV are readily achieved at densities of roughly 0.5--1 g/cm{sup 3} in large, uniform volumes. The conditions in these hot, expanded fluids are readily found using the Hugoniot jump conditions. We will briefly describe the basic methodology for sample preparation and experimental measurement of shock velocities. We present data for several materials over a range of initial densities. This paper will explore the applications of these methods for investigations of equations of state and phase diagrams, spectroscopy, and plasma physics. Finally, we discus the need for future work on these and related low-density materials.

  6. Shock compression experiments on Lithium Deuteride single crystals.

    SciTech Connect

    Knudson, Marcus D.; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Lemke, Raymond W.

    2014-10-01

    S hock compression exper iments in the few hundred GPa (multi - Mabr) regime were performed on Lithium Deuteride (LiD) single crystals . This study utilized the high velocity flyer plate capability of the Sandia Z Machine to perform impact experiments at flyer plate velocities in the range of 17 - 32 km/s. Measurements included pressure, density, and temperature between %7E200 - 600 GPa along the Principal Hugoniot - the locus of end states achievable through compression by large amplitude shock waves - as well as pressure and density of re - shock states up to %7E900 GPa . The experimental measurements are compared with recent density functional theory calculations as well as a new tabular equation of state developed at Los Alamos National Labs.

  7. Shock compression of [001] single crystal silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, S.; Hahn, E. N.; Kad, B.; Remington, B. A.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    Silicon is ubiquitous in our advanced technological society, yet our current understanding of change to its mechanical response at extreme pressures and strain-rates is far from complete. This is due to its brittleness, making recovery experiments difficult. High-power, short-duration, laser-driven, shock compression and recovery experiments on [001] silicon (using impedance-matched momentum traps) unveiled remarkable structural changes observed by transmission electron microscopy. As laser energy increases, corresponding to an increase in peak shock pressure, the following plastic responses are are observed: surface cleavage along {111} planes, dislocations and stacking faults; bands of amorphized material initially forming on crystallographic orientations consistent with dislocation slip; and coarse regions of amorphized material. Molecular dynamics simulations approach equivalent length and time scales to laser experiments and reveal the evolution of shock-induced partial dislocations and their crucial role in the preliminary stages of amorphization. Application of coupled hydrostatic and shear stresses produce amorphization below the hydrostatically determined critical melting pressure under dynamic shock compression.

  8. Shock compression of [001] single crystal silicon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhao, S.; Remington, B.; Hahn, E. N.; Kad, B.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2016-03-14

    Silicon is ubiquitous in our advanced technological society, yet our current understanding of change to its mechanical response at extreme pressures and strain-rates is far from complete. This is due to its brittleness, making recovery experiments difficult. High-power, short-duration, laser-driven, shock compression and recovery experiments on [001] silicon (using impedance-matched momentum traps) unveiled remarkable structural changes observed by transmission electron microscopy. As laser energy increases, corresponding to an increase in peak shock pressure, the following plastic responses are are observed: surface cleavage along {111} planes, dislocations and stacking faults; bands of amorphized material initially forming on crystallographic orientations consistent withmore » dislocation slip; and coarse regions of amorphized material. Molecular dynamics simulations approach equivalent length and time scales to laser experiments and reveal the evolution of shock-induced partial dislocations and their crucial role in the preliminary stages of amorphization. Furthermore, application of coupled hydrostatic and shear stresses produce amorphization below the hydrostatically determined critical melting pressure under dynamic shock compression.« less

  9. Belt-snap and towel-snap shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Settles, Gary; Hargather, Michael; Lawson, Michael; Bigger, Rory

    2007-11-01

    Traditional simple means of generating shock waves are examined by high-speed imaging. A leather belt is folded upon itself at mid-length and the ends are grasped firmly in each hand. When pushed together a loop forms, and when quickly pulled apart the loop closes rapidly, producing a sharp ``crack'' similar to the cracking of a whip (Shock Waves 8(1), 1998). The towel-snap mimics whip cracking by causing the towel end to rotate supersonically. We investigated these phenomena using a high-speed digital camera (10k and 30k frames/sec, 4 microsec exposure) and a sensitive schlieren optical system of 1m aperture. Results show that compression of the air between the two rapidly-approaching leather belt bands first causes a spherical shock wave to form near one hand. The compression then runs along the belt length toward the other hand at supersonic speed, producing an oblique shock wave that is responsible for the audible crack. In the towel-snap, shock waves are visible from tip motion in open air as well as from the compression due to snapping the towel against a surface. There are no known useful applications of these simple phenomena, but they do address how weak shock waves can be generated by muscle power alone. Several other related examples are also mentioned.

  10. Analyzing Ramp Compression Wave Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, D. B.

    2007-12-01

    Isentropic compression of a solid to 100's of GPa by a ramped, planar compression wave allows measurement of material properties at high strain and at modest temperature. Introduction of a measurement plane disturbs the flow, requiring special analysis techniques. If the measurement interface is windowed, the unsteady nature of the wave in the window requires special treatment. When the flow is hyperbolic the equations of motion can be integrated backward in space in the sample to a region undisturbed by the interface interactions, fully accounting for the untoward interactions. For more complex materials like hysteretic elastic/plastic solids or phase changing material, hybrid analysis techniques are required.

  11. Optical distortion in the field of a lithotripter shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnell, M. T.; Emmony, D. C.

    1995-10-01

    The schlieren observation of cavitation phenomena produced in the tail of a lithotripter shock wave has indicated the presence of some interesting features. The images produced appear to indicate that cavitation transients in the field of a shock wave propagate nonsymmetrically; this is not the case. The apparent lack of symmetry exhibited by the primary cavitation transients is due to a complex optical lensing effect, which is brought about by the change in refractive index associated with the pressure profile of the shock wave. Objects seen through or immersed in the shock-wave field of an electromagnetic acoustic transducer, such as cavitation, appear highly distorted because of the strong positive and negative lensing effects of the compression and rarefaction cycles of the shock wave. A modification of the schlieren technique called the scale method has been used to model the distortion introduced by the shock wave and consequently explain the cavitation distortion. The technique has also been used to quantitatively analyze and partially reconstruct the lithotripter shock wave. The combination of schlieren and scale imaging gives more information about the refractive index field and therefore the shock-wave structure itself.

  12. Kinematical Compatibility Conditions for Vorticity Across Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baty, Roy

    2015-11-01

    This work develops the general kinematical compatibility conditions for vorticity across arbitrary shock waves in compressible, inviscid fluids. The vorticity compatibility conditions are derived from the curl of the momentum equation using singular distributions defined on two-dimensional shock wave surfaces embedded in three-dimensional flow fields. The singular distributions are represented as generalized differential operators concentrated on moving shock wave surfaces. The derivation of the compatibility conditions for vorticity requires the application of second-order generalized derivatives and elementary tensor algebra. The well-known vorticity jump conditions across a shock wave are then shown to follow from the general kinematical compatibility conditions for vorticity by expressing the flow field velocity in vectorial components normal and tangential to a shock surface.

  13. Compression ignition of hydrogen-containing mixtures in shock tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, S. P.; Gelfand, B. E.; Khomik, S. V.; Agafonov, G. L.

    2010-12-01

    The state of the art of the problem of discrepancy between the values measured in shock tubes and calculated for the delay of ignition of hydrogen-containing systems has been analyzed. It is shown that in the low-temperature region the off-design appearance of reaction sites leads to the propagation of a flame in a mixture heated by a reflected shock wave. The parameter of the time of mixture combustion in a deflagration regime has been introduced and the use of it together with the calculated delay in self-ignition for delimitation and classification of thermal and gas-dynamic phenomena on compression ignition of hydrogen-containing mixtures in shock tubes has been suggested.

  14. Shock Compression of Liquid Helium to 56 GPa (560) Kbar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nellis, W. J.; Holmes, N. C.; Mitchell, A. C.; Trainor, R. J.; Governo, G. K.; Ross, M.; Young, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Shock-wave data are presented for liquid helium which has been compressed to densities up to five times greater than the normal liquid. The helium was heated to temperatures up to 21,000 K, while the maximum pressure attained was 56 GPa. The properties of helium and hydrogen are important for modeling the giant planets Saturn and Jupiter where these elements are the major constituents. Conditions on Saturn are of particular interest because studies have suggested that this planet has an internal energy source which is associated with unmixing and gravitational separation the hydrogen-helium fluid at pressures below 1 TPa. The existence of this phase transition depends very sensitively on the hydrogen and helium equation of state. In the experiments, strong shock waves were generated by the impact of planar projectiles into cryogenic specimen holders.

  15. Shock compression of liquid helium to 56 GPa (560 kbar)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nellis, W. J.; Holmes, N. C.; Mitchell, A. C.; Governo, G. K.; Ross, M.; Young, D. A.; Trainor, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Shock-wave data are presented for liquid helium which has been compressed to densities up to five times greater than the normal liquid. The helium was heated to temperatures up to 21,000 K, while the maximum pressure attained was 56 GPa. The properties of helium and hydrogen are important for modeling the giant planets Saturn and Jupiter where these elements are the major constituents. Conditions on Saturn are of particular interest because studies have suggested that this planet has an internal energy source which is associated with unmixing and gravitational separation of the hydrogen-helium fluid at pressures below 1 TPa. The existence of this phase transition depends very sensitively on the hydrogen and helium equation of state. In the experiments, strong shock waves were generated by the impact of planar projectiles into cryogenic specimen holders.

  16. Model for shock wave chaos.

    PubMed

    Kasimov, Aslan R; Faria, Luiz M; Rosales, Rodolfo R

    2013-03-01

    We propose the following model equation, u(t) + 1/2(u(2)-uu(s))x = f(x,u(s)) that predicts chaotic shock waves, similar to those in detonations in chemically reacting mixtures. The equation is given on the half line, x<0, and the shock is located at x = 0 for any t ≥ 0. Here, u(s)(t) is the shock state and the source term f is taken to mimic the chemical energy release in detonations. This equation retains the essential physics needed to reproduce many properties of detonations in gaseous reactive mixtures: steady traveling wave solutions, instability of such solutions, and the onset of chaos. Our model is the first (to our knowledge) to describe chaos in shock waves by a scalar first-order partial differential equation. The chaos arises in the equation thanks to an interplay between the nonlinearity of the inviscid Burgers equation and a novel forcing term that is nonlocal in nature and has deep physical roots in reactive Euler equations. PMID:23521260

  17. A new shock wave assisted sandalwood oil extraction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunkumar, A. N.; Srinivasa, Y. B.; Ravikumar, G.; Shankaranarayana, K. H.; Rao, K. S.; Jagadeesh, G.

    A new shock wave assisted oil extraction technique from sandalwood has been developed in the Shock Waves Lab, IISc, Bangalore. The fragrant oil extracted from sandalwood finds variety of applications in medicine and perfumery industries. In the present method sandal wood specimens (2.5mm diameter and 25mm in length)are subjected to shock wave loading (over pressure 15 bar)in a constant area shock tube, before extracting the sandal oil using non-destructive oil extraction technique. The results from the study indicates that both the rate of extraction as well as the quantity of oil obtained from sandal wood samples exposed to shock waves are higher (15-40 percent) compared to non-destructive oil extraction technique. The compressive squeezing of the interior oil pockets in the sandalwood specimen due to shock wave loading appears to be the main reason for enhancement in the oil extraction rate. This is confirmed by the presence of warty structures in the cross-section and micro-fissures in the radial direction of the wood samples exposed to shock waves in the scanning electron microscopic investigation. In addition the gas chromatographic studies do not show any change in the q uality of sandal oil extracted from samples exposed to shock waves.

  18. What is a Shock Wave to an Explosive Molecule?

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C M

    2001-06-12

    An explosive molecule is a metastable chemical species that reacts exothermically given the correct stimulus. Impacting an explosive with a shock wave is a ''wake-up call'' or ''trigger'' which compresses and heats the molecule. The energy deposited by the shock wave must be distributed to the vibrational modes of the explosive molecule before chemical reaction can occur. If the shock pressure and temperature are high enough and last long enough, exothermic chemical decomposition can lead to the formation of a detonation wave. For gaseous, liquid, and perfect single crystal solid explosives, after an induction time, chemical reaction begins at or near the rear boundary of the charge. This induction time can be calculated by high pressure, high temperature transition state theory. A ''superdetonation'' wave travels through the preshocked explosive until it overtakes the initial shock wave and then slows to the steady state Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) velocity. In heterogeneous solid explosives, initiation of reaction occurs at ''hot spots'' created by shock compression. If there is a sufficient number of large and hot enough ''hot spots,'' these ignition sites grow creating a pressure pulse that overtakes the leading shock front causing detonation. Since the chemical energy is released well behind the leading shock front of a detonation wave, a mechanism is required for this energy to reinforce the leading shock front and maintain its overall constant velocity. This mechanism is the amplification of pressure wavelets in the reaction zone by the process of de-excitation of the initially highly vibrationally excited reaction product molecules. This process leads to the development of the three-dimensional structure of detonation waves observed for all explosives. In a detonation wave, the leading shock wave front becomes a ''burden'' for the explosive molecule to sustain by its chemical energy release.

  19. Shock wave absorber having apertured plate

    DOEpatents

    Shin, Yong W.; Wiedermann, Arne H.; Ockert, Carl E.

    1985-01-01

    The shock or energy absorber disclosed herein utilizes an apertured plate maintained under the normal level of liquid flowing in a piping system and disposed between the normal liquid flow path and a cavity pressurized with a compressible gas. The degree of openness (or porosity) of the plate is between 0.01 and 0.60. The energy level of a shock wave travelling down the piping system thus is dissipated by some of the liquid being jetted through the apertured plate toward the cavity. The cavity is large compared to the quantity of liquid jetted through the apertured plate, so there is little change in its volume. The porosity of the apertured plate influences the percentage of energy absorbed.

  20. Shock wave absorber having apertured plate

    DOEpatents

    Shin, Y.W.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Ockert, C.E.

    1983-08-26

    The shock or energy absorber disclosed herein utilizes an apertured plate maintained under the normal level of liquid flowing in a piping system and disposed between the normal liquid flow path and a cavity pressurized with a compressible gas. The degree of openness (or porosity) of the plate is between 0.01 and 0.60. The energy level of a shock wave travelling down the piping system thus is dissipated by some of the liquid being jetted through the apertured plate toward the cavity. The cavity is large compared to the quantity of liquid jetted through the apertured plate, so there is little change in its volume. The porosity of the apertured plate influences the percentage of energy absorbed.

  1. Bow shock and magnetosheath waves at Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Behannon, K. W.

    1975-01-01

    Mariner 10 measurements at the Mercury bow shock provide examples where the magnetic field is approximately parallel or perpendicular to the bow shock normal. Upstream of a broad irregular parallel shock, left hand circularly polarized waves are observed which cut off very sharply at approximately 4 Hz. Upstream of a perpendicular shock, right hand circularly polarized waves are observed which persist up to the Nyquist frequency of 12 Ha. Determination of the wave propagation vector as a function of frequency helps conclusively identify the waves as whistler mode waves propagating from the shock. The magnetosheath downstream of the parallel shock is disturbed more than that downstream of the perpendicular shock particularly below 1 Hz. In the latter case regular left hand polarized waves observed slightly above the proton gyrofrequency are identified as ion cyclotron waves with wavelength approximately 300 km which are Doppler shifted up to their observed frequency.

  2. Corrugation of Relativistic Magnetized Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, Martin; Ramos, Oscar; Gremillet, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    As a shock front interacts with turbulence it develops corrugation, which induces outgoing wave modes in the downstream plasma. For a fast shock wave, the incoming wave modes can either be fast magnetosonic waves originating downstream, outrunning the shock, or eigenmodes of the upstream plasma drifting through the shock. Using linear perturbation theory in relativistic MHD, this paper provides a general analysis of the corrugation of relativistic magnetized fast shock waves resulting from their interaction with small amplitude disturbances. Transfer functions characterizing the linear response for each of the outgoing modes are calculated as a function of the magnetization of the upstream medium and as a function of the nature of the incoming wave. Interestingly, if the latter is an eigenmode of the upstream plasma, we find that there exists a resonance at which the (linear) response of the shock becomes large or even diverges. This result may have profound consequences on the phenomenology of astrophysical relativistic magnetized shock waves.

  3. Low Frequency Waves at and Upstream of Collisionless Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, L. B.

    2016-02-01

    This chapter focuses on the range of low frequency electromagnetic modes observed at and upstream of collisionless shocks in the heliosphere. It discusses a specific class of whistler mode wave observed immediately upstream of collisionless shock ramps, called a whistler precursor. Though these modes have been (and are often) observed upstream of quasi-parallel shocks, the authors limit their discussion to those observed upstream of quasi-perpendicular shocks. The chapter discusses the various ion velocity distributions observed at and upstream of collisionless shocks. It also introduces some terminology and relevant instabilities for ion foreshock waves. The chapter discusses the most common ultra-low frequency (ULF) wave types, their properties, and their free energy sources. It discusses modes that are mostly Alfvénic (i.e., mostly transverse but can be compressive) in nature.

  4. Nonstandard Analysis and Jump Conditions for Converging Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baty, Roy S.; Farassat, Fereidoun; Tucker, Don H.

    2008-01-01

    Nonstandard analysis is an area of modern mathematics which studies abstract number systems containing both infinitesimal and infinite numbers. This article applies nonstandard analysis to derive jump conditions for one-dimensional, converging shock waves in a compressible, inviscid, perfect gas. It is assumed that the shock thickness occurs on an infinitesimal interval and the jump functions in the thermodynamic and fluid dynamic parameters occur smoothly across this interval. Predistributions of the Heaviside function and the Dirac delta measure are introduced to model the flow parameters across a shock wave. The equations of motion expressed in nonconservative form are then applied to derive unambiguous relationships between the jump functions for the flow parameters.

  5. Computation of Thermally Perfect Properties of Oblique Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatum, Kenneth E.

    1996-01-01

    A set of compressible flow relations describing flow properties across oblique shock waves, derived for a thermally perfect, calorically imperfect gas, is applied within the existing thermally perfect gas (TPG) computer code. The relations are based upon a value of cp expressed as a polynomial function of temperature. The updated code produces tables of compressible flow properties of oblique shock waves, as well as the original properties of normal shock waves and basic isentropic flow, in a format similar to the tables for normal shock waves found in NACA Rep. 1135. The code results are validated in both the calorically perfect and the calorically imperfect, thermally perfect temperature regimes through comparisons with the theoretical methods of NACA Rep. 1135, and with a state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics code. The advantages of the TPG code for oblique shock wave calculations, as well as for the properties of isentropic flow and normal shock waves, are its ease of use, and its applicability to any type of gas (monatomic, diatomic, triatomic, polyatomic, or any specified mixture thereof).

  6. Computation of Thermally Perfect Oblique Shock Wave Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatum, Kenneth E.

    1997-01-01

    A set of compressible flow relations describing flow properties across oblique shock waves, derived for a thermally perfect, calorically imperfect gas, is applied within the existing thermally perfect gas (TPG) computer code. The relations are based upon the specific heat expressed as a polynomial function of temperature. The updated code produces tables of compressible flow properties of oblique shock waves, as well as the original properties of normal shock waves and basic isentropic flow, in a format similar to the tables for normal shock waves found in NACA Rep. 1135. The code results are validated in both the calorically perfect and the calorically imperfect, thermally perfect temperature regimes through comparisons with the theoretical methods of NACA Rep. 1135. The advantages of the TPG code for oblique shock wave calculations, as well as for the properties of isentropic flow and normal shock waves, are its ease of use and its applicability to any type of gas (monatomic, diatomic, triatomic, polyatomic, or any specified mixture thereof).

  7. Effects of shock structure on temperature field in compressible turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Qionglin; Chen, Shiyi

    2014-11-01

    Effects of shock structure on temperature in compressible turbulence were investigated. The small-scale shocklets and large-scale shock waves were appeared in the flows driven by solenoidal and compressive forcings, i.e. SFT & CFT, respectively. In SFT the temperature had Kolmogorov spectrum and ramp-cliff structures, while in CFT it obeyed Burgers spectrum and was dominated by large-scale rarefaction and compression. The power-law exponents for the p.d.f. of large negative dilatation were -2.5 in SFT and -3.5 in CFT, approximately corresponded to model results. The isentropic approximation of thermodynamic variables showed that in SFT, the isentropic derivation was reinforced when turbulent Mach number increased. At similar turbulent Mach number, the variables in CFT exhibited more anisentropic. It showed that the transport of temperature was increased by the small-scale viscous dissipation and the large-scale pressure-dilatation. The distribution of positive and negative components of pressure-dilatation confirmed the mechanism of negligible pressure-dilatation at small scales. Further, the positive skewness of p.d.f.s of pressure-dilatation implied that the conversion from kinetic to internal energy by compression was more intense than the opposite process by rarefaction.

  8. Inelastic response of silicon to shock compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginbotham, A.; Stubley, P. G.; Comley, A. J.; Eggert, J. H.; Foster, J. M.; Kalantar, D. H.; McGonegle, D.; Patel, S.; Peacock, L. J.; Rothman, S. D.; Smith, R. F.; Suggit, M. J.; Wark, J. S.

    2016-04-01

    The elastic and inelastic response of [001] oriented silicon to laser compression has been a topic of considerable discussion for well over a decade, yet there has been little progress in understanding the basic behaviour of this apparently simple material. We present experimental x-ray diffraction data showing complex elastic strain profiles in laser compressed samples on nanosecond timescales. We also present molecular dynamics and elasticity code modelling which suggests that a pressure induced phase transition is the cause of the previously reported ‘anomalous’ elastic waves. Moreover, this interpretation allows for measurement of the kinetic timescales for transition. This model is also discussed in the wider context of reported deformation of silicon to rapid compression in the literature.

  9. Inelastic response of silicon to shock compression

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Higginbotham, Andrew; Stubley, P. G.; Comley, A. J.; Eggert, J. H.; Foster, J. M.; Kalantar, D. H.; McGonegle, D.; Patel, S.; Peacock, L. J.; Rothman, S. D.; et al

    2016-04-13

    The elastic and inelastic response of [001] oriented silicon to laser compression has been a topic of considerable discussion for well over a decade, yet there has been little progress in understanding the basic behaviour of this apparently simple material. We present experimental x-ray diffraction data showing complex elastic strain profiles in laser compressed samples on nanosecond timescales. We also present molecular dynamics and elasticity code modelling which suggests that a pressure induced phase transition is the cause of the previously reported ‘anomalous’ elastic waves. Moreover, this interpretation allows for measurement of the kinetic timescales for transition. Lastly, this modelmore » is also discussed in the wider context of reported deformation of silicon to rapid compression in the literature.« less

  10. Inelastic response of silicon to shock compression

    PubMed Central

    Higginbotham, A.; Stubley, P. G.; Comley, A. J.; Eggert, J. H.; Foster, J. M.; Kalantar, D. H.; McGonegle, D.; Patel, S.; Peacock, L. J.; Rothman, S. D.; Smith, R. F.; Suggit, M. J.; Wark, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    The elastic and inelastic response of [001] oriented silicon to laser compression has been a topic of considerable discussion for well over a decade, yet there has been little progress in understanding the basic behaviour of this apparently simple material. We present experimental x-ray diffraction data showing complex elastic strain profiles in laser compressed samples on nanosecond timescales. We also present molecular dynamics and elasticity code modelling which suggests that a pressure induced phase transition is the cause of the previously reported ‘anomalous’ elastic waves. Moreover, this interpretation allows for measurement of the kinetic timescales for transition. This model is also discussed in the wider context of reported deformation of silicon to rapid compression in the literature. PMID:27071341

  11. Inelastic response of silicon to shock compression.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, A; Stubley, P G; Comley, A J; Eggert, J H; Foster, J M; Kalantar, D H; McGonegle, D; Patel, S; Peacock, L J; Rothman, S D; Smith, R F; Suggit, M J; Wark, J S

    2016-01-01

    The elastic and inelastic response of [001] oriented silicon to laser compression has been a topic of considerable discussion for well over a decade, yet there has been little progress in understanding the basic behaviour of this apparently simple material. We present experimental x-ray diffraction data showing complex elastic strain profiles in laser compressed samples on nanosecond timescales. We also present molecular dynamics and elasticity code modelling which suggests that a pressure induced phase transition is the cause of the previously reported 'anomalous' elastic waves. Moreover, this interpretation allows for measurement of the kinetic timescales for transition. This model is also discussed in the wider context of reported deformation of silicon to rapid compression in the literature. PMID:27071341

  12. (BARS) -- Bibliographic Retrieval System, Sandia Shock Compression (SSC) database Shock Physics Index (SPHINX). PC/DOS version 4.0

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, W.; Parker, T.J.; Mulholland, K.

    1993-09-01

    The Bibliographic Retrieval System (BARS) is a database management system specially designed to retrieve bibliographic references. Two databases are available, (i) the Sandia Shock Compression (SSC) database which contains over 5600 references to the literature related to stress waves in solids and their applications, and (ii) the Shock Physics Index (SPHINX) which includes over 6200 further references to stress waves in solids, material properties at intermediate and low rates, ballistic and hypervelocity impact, and explosive or shock fabrication methods. There is some overlap in the information in the two data bases.

  13. Fundamental structure of steady plastic shock waves in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, A.; Ravichandran, G.

    2004-02-01

    The propagation of steady plane shock waves in metallic materials is considered. Following the constitutive framework adopted by R. J. Clifton [Shock Waves and the Mechanical Properties of Solids, edited by J. J. Burke and V. Weiss (Syracuse University Press, Syracuse, N.Y., 1971), p. 73] for analyzing elastic-plastic transient waves, an analytical solution of the steady state propagation of plastic shocks is proposed. The problem is formulated in a Lagrangian setting appropriate for large deformations. The material response is characterized by a quasistatic tensile (compression) test (providing the isothermal strain hardening law). In addition the elastic response is determined up to second order elastic constants by ultrasonic measurements. Based on this simple information, it is shown that the shock kinetics can be quite well described for moderate shocks in aluminum with stress amplitude up to 10 GPa. Under the later assumption, the elastic response is assumed to be isentropic, and thermomechanical coupling is neglected. The model material considered here is aluminum, but the analysis is general and can be applied to any viscoplastic material subjected to moderate amplitude shocks. Comparisons with experimental data are made for the shock velocity, the particle velocity and the shock structure. The shock structure is obtained by quadrature of a first order differential equation, which provides analytical results under certain simplifying assumptions. The effects of material parameters and loading conditions on the shock kinetics and shock structure are discussed. The shock width is characterized by assuming an overstress formulation for the viscoplastic response. The effects on the shock structure of strain rate sensitivity are analyzed and the rationale for the J. W. Swegle and D. E. Grady [J. Appl. Phys. 58, 692 (1985)] universal scaling law for homogeneous materials is explored. Finally, the ability to deduce information on the viscoplastic response of

  14. The History of the APS Shock Compression of Condensed Matter Topical Group

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, J W

    2001-05-02

    In order to provide broader scientific recognition and to advance the science of shock compressed condensed matter, a group of American Physical Society (APS) members worked within the Society to make this field an active part of the APS. Individual papers were presented at APS meetings starting in the 1940's and shock wave sessions were organized starting with the 1967 Pasadena meeting. Shock wave topical conferences began in 1979 in Pullman, WA. Signatures were obtained on a petition in 1984 from a balanced cross-section of the shock wave community to form an APS Topical Group (TG). The APS Council officially accepted the formation of the Shock Compression of Condensed Matter (SCCM) TG at its October 1984 meeting. This action firmly aligned the shock wave field with a major physical science organization. Most early topical conferences were sanctioned by the APS while those held after 1992 were official APS meetings. The topical group organizes a shock wave topical conference in odd numbered years while participating in shock wave/high pressure sessions at APS general meetings in even numbered years.

  15. Propagation of shock waves through petroleum suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukuk, K. V.; Makhkamov, S. M.; Azizov, K. K.

    1986-01-01

    Anomalous shock wave propagation through petroleum with a high paraffin content was studied in an attempt to confirm the theoretically predicted breakdown of a forward shock wave into oscillating waves and wave packets as well as individual solitons. Tests were performed in a shock tube at 10, 20, and 50 to 60 C, with pure kerosene as reference and with kerosene + 5, 10, 15, and 20% paraffin. The addition of paraffin was found to radically alter the rheodynamic characteristics of the medium and, along with it, the pattern of shock wave propagation. The integro-differential equation describing a one dimensional hydraulic shock process in viscoelastic fluids is reduced to the Burgers-Korteweg-deVries equation, which is solved numerically for given values of the system parameters. The results indicate that the theory of shock wave propagation through such an anomalous suspension must be modified.

  16. Electron physics in shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    The non-relativistic shocks that we find in the solar wind (no matter if driven by CMEs or encounters with planets) are dominated by ion dynamics. Therefore a detailed treatment of electrons is often neglegted to gain significant reductions in computational effort. With recent super computers and massively parallel codes it is possible to perform self-consistent kinetic simulations using particle in cell code. This allows to study the heating of the electrons as well as the acceleration to superthermal energies. These energetic electrons are interesting for couple of reasons. e.g. as an influence on plasma instabilities or for the generation of plasma waves.

  17. Interplanetary shock waves associated with solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, J. K.; Sakurai, K.

    1974-01-01

    The interaction of the earth's magnetic field with the solar wind is discussed with emphasis on the influence of solar flares. The geomagnetic storms are considerered to be the result of the arrival of shock wave generated by solar flares in interplanetary space. Basic processes in the solar atmosphere and interplanetary space, and hydromagnetic disturbances associated with the solar flares are discussed along with observational and theoretical problems of interplanetary shock waves. The origin of interplanetary shock waves is also discussed.

  18. Oblique interaction of waves with shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morro, A.

    The oblique interaction between plane waves and shocks in materials described by a system of conservation equations is investigated. Two results are found. First, a straightforward geometric-kinematic analysis of the interaction yields a relation for each emergent mode (i.e., the outgoing wave) which determines the relation of propagation once the incident wave is given. Second, the shock may undergo an angular velocity which is ultimately related to the shock acceleration

  19. Vorticity and Wave Motion in a Compressible Protoplanetary Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford S.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The impact of an isolated vortex in a compressible Keplerian disk is examined using higher order numerical solutions of the Euler and entropy-conserving Energy equations. The vortex is stretched by the background shear flow with longer lasting anticyclonic vortices persisting for about 10 vortex revolutions. Simultaneously, the vortex emits transient radial waves consisting mainly of axisymmetrical weak shock waves and a slower, nonaxisymmetric Rossby wave. These waves may contribute to certain transient events in protoplanetary disks. The vortex stretching and waves were found to have little long-term feedback on the baseline 'standard solar nebula' disk structure and confirm the extremely stable structure of non self-gravitating disks.

  20. History of the APS Topical Group on Shock Compression of Condensed Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, J W

    2001-10-19

    In order to provide broader scientific recognition and to advance the science of shock compressed condensed matter, a group of American Physical Society (APS) members worked within the Society to make this field an active part of the APS. Individual papers were presented at APS meetings starting in the 1940's and shock wave sessions were organized starting with the 1967 Pasadena meeting. Shock wave topical conferences began in 1979 in Pullman, WA. Signatures were obtained on a petition in 1984 from a balanced cross-section of the shock wave community to form an APS Topical Group (TG). The APS Council officially accepted the formation of the Shock Compression of Condensed Matter (SCCM) TG at its October 1984 meeting. This action firmly aligned the shock wave field with a major physical science organization. Most early topical conferences were sanctioned by the APS while those held after 1992 were official APS meetings. The topical group organizes a shock wave topical conference in odd numbered years while participating in shock wavehigh pressure sessions at APS general meetings in even numbered years.

  1. Vibrational spectroscopy in shock-compressed liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, S.C.; Moore, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy is being used to study the structure and energy transfer in simple molecular liquids at the high pressures and temperatures characteristic of explosive detonation. Dense fluids to several thousand degrees temperature and several hundred kilobars pressure are obtained using the shock-compression technique. Vibrational frequencies, third-order susceptibility ratios, and linewidths have been measured for N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, mixtures of N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CO, and N{sub 2}O. Frequencies are found to increase with pressure. The transition intensity and line-width data suggest that thermal equilibrium of the vibrational levels is attained in less than a few nanoseconds at these high pressures and temperatures. Vibrational temperatures obtained are compared to those derived from equation-of-state calculations.

  2. Vibrational spectroscopy in shock-compressed liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, S.C.; Moore, D.S.

    1992-03-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy is being used to study the structure and energy transfer in simple molecular liquids at the high pressures and temperatures characteristic of explosive detonation. Dense fluids to several thousand degrees temperature and several hundred kilobars pressure are obtained using the shock-compression technique. Vibrational frequencies, third-order susceptibility ratios, and linewidths have been measured for N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, mixtures of N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CO, and N{sub 2}O. Frequencies are found to increase with pressure. The transition intensity and line-width data suggest that thermal equilibrium of the vibrational levels is attained in less than a few nanoseconds at these high pressures and temperatures. Vibrational temperatures obtained are compared to those derived from equation-of-state calculations.

  3. In Situ Ellipsometry for Shock Compression Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakshi, L.; Eliezer, S.; Appelbaum, G.; Nissim, N.; Perelmutter, L.; Mond, M.

    2009-12-01

    Knowledge about the optical properties of materials at high pressure and high temperature is needed for EOS research. Ellipsometry measures the change in the polarization of a probe beam reflected from a surface. From the change in polarization, the real and imaginary parts of the time dependent complex index of refraction can be extracted. From the measured optical properties, fundamental physical properties of the material, such as emissivity, phase transitions, and electrical conductivity can be extracted. A dynamic ellipsometry measurement system with nanosecond resolution was built in order to measure all four stocks parameters. Gas gun was used to accelerate the impact flyer. Our experiments concentrated on the optical properties of 1020 steel targets with impact pressure range of 40-250 kbar. Although there are intrinsic difficulties with dynamic ellipsometric measurements, distinct changes were observed for 1020 steel under shock compression larger than 130 kbar, the α→ɛ phase transition.

  4. IN SITU ELLIPSOMETRY FOR SHOCK COMPRESSION MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bakshi, L.; Eliezer, S.; Appelbaum, G.; Nissim, N.; Perelmutter, L.; Mond, M.

    2009-12-28

    Knowledge about the optical properties of materials at high pressure and high temperature is needed for EOS research. Ellipsometry measures the change in the polarization of a probe beam reflected from a surface. From the change in polarization, the real and imaginary parts of the time dependent complex index of refraction can be extracted. From the measured optical properties, fundamental physical properties of the material, such as emissivity, phase transitions, and electrical conductivity can be extracted. A dynamic ellipsometry measurement system with nanosecond resolution was built in order to measure all four stocks parameters. Gas gun was used to accelerate the impact flyer. Our experiments concentrated on the optical properties of 1020 steel targets with impact pressure range of 40-250 kbar. Although there are intrinsic difficulties with dynamic ellipsometric measurements, distinct changes were observed for 1020 steel under shock compression larger than 130 kbar, the alpha->epsilon phase transition.

  5. Substorm aurora and magnetic tail dynamics during interplanetary shock compression: THEMIS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Zhou, Xiaoyan

    2012-07-01

    Fast and forward interplanetary shocks compress and squeeze the Earth magnetosphere and cause a series of magnetospheric and ionospheric reactions. In addition to the enhancement of chorus, electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves and magnetospheric hiss, the ionospheric convection is enhanced as well. Shock aurora is generated, which is a phenomenon first an auroral brightness onset near local noon right after the shock impingement then followed by a fast anti-sunward auroral propagation along the oval. It has been found that substorm auroral activity can be significantly intensified by the shock compression when the shock upstream magnetic field was in southward in a certain period of time. This paper will present recent results based on the THEMIS spacecraft and ground-based observations. With multiple spacecraft in the magnetotail, the complex dynamics of the compressed tail is identified and analyzed. Correlations between the tail dynamics and substorm auroral variations will be discussed. *On-leave from Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  6. Shock compression of condensed matter using multimaterial reactive ghost fluid method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki-hong; Yoh, Jack J.

    2008-04-01

    For the flow analysis of reactive compressible media involving energetic materials and deforming metallic boundaries, a HYDRO-SCCM (shock compression of condensed matter) tool is developed for handling multiphysics shock analysis of energetic and inert matters. The highly energetic flows give rise to the strong nonlinear shock waves and the high strain rate deformation of solid boundaries at high pressure and temperature. For handling the large gradients associated with these complex flows in the condensed phase as well as in the reactive gaseous phase, a new Eulerian multifluid method is formulated. The numerical methodology is described in this paper, while the extended applications and the capacity of the tool are discussed in a separate paper [J. J. Yoh and K. H. Kim, "Shock Compression of Condensed Matter using Eulerian Multimaterial Method: Applications to multi-dimensional shocks, deflagration, detonation, and laser ablation," J. Appl. Phys. (accepted)].

  7. The role of divergences for shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, Francisco

    2013-11-01

    Several continuum theories for shock waves give rise to a set of differential equations in which the analysis of the underlying vector field can be done using the tools of the theory of dynamical systems. We illustrate the importance of the divergences associated with the vector field by considering the ideas by Maxwell and Cattaneo and applied them to study shock waves in dilute gases. Different theoretical descriptions for shock waves are mentioned and some of them are compared with experimental data and computer simulations. Our goal is to derive conditions under which the shock wave problem has a solution by analyzing the singularities of the vector field.

  8. Implications of pressure diffusion for shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ram, Ram Bachan

    1989-01-01

    The report deals with the possible implications of pressure diffusion for shocks in one dimensional traveling waves in an ideal gas. From this new hypothesis all aspects of such shocks can be calculated except shock thickness. Unlike conventional shock theory, the concept of entropy is not needed or used. Our analysis shows that temperature rises near a shock, which is of course an experimental fact; however, it also predicts that very close to a shock, density increases faster than pressure. In other words, a shock itself is cold.

  9. Shock compression response of forsterite above 250 GPa

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, Toshimori; Ozaki, Norimasa; Miyanishi, Kohei; Asaumi, Yuto; Kimura, Tomoaki; Albertazzi, Bruno; Sato, Yuya; Sakawa, Youichi; Sano, Takayoshi; Sugita, Seiji; Matsui, Takafumi; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2016-01-01

    Forsterite (Mg2SiO4) is one of the major planetary materials, and its behavior under extreme conditions is important to understand the interior structure of large planets, such as super-Earths, and large-scale planetary impact events. Previous shock compression measurements of forsterite indicate that it may melt below 200 GPa, but these measurements did not go beyond 200 GPa. We report the shock response of forsterite above ~250 GPa, obtained using the laser shock wave technique. We simultaneously measured the Hugoniot and temperature of shocked forsterite and interpreted the results to suggest the following: (i) incongruent crystallization of MgO at 271 to 285 GPa, (ii) phase transition of MgO at 285 to 344 GPa, and (iii) remelting above ~470 to 500 GPa. These exothermic and endothermic reactions are seen to occur under extreme conditions of pressure and temperature. They indicate complex structural and chemical changes in the system MgO-SiO2 at extreme pressures and temperatures and will affect the way we understand the interior processes of large rocky planets as well as material transformation by impacts in the formation of planetary systems. PMID:27493993

  10. Shock compression response of forsterite above 250 GPa.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Toshimori; Ozaki, Norimasa; Miyanishi, Kohei; Asaumi, Yuto; Kimura, Tomoaki; Albertazzi, Bruno; Sato, Yuya; Sakawa, Youichi; Sano, Takayoshi; Sugita, Seiji; Matsui, Takafumi; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2016-08-01

    Forsterite (Mg2SiO4) is one of the major planetary materials, and its behavior under extreme conditions is important to understand the interior structure of large planets, such as super-Earths, and large-scale planetary impact events. Previous shock compression measurements of forsterite indicate that it may melt below 200 GPa, but these measurements did not go beyond 200 GPa. We report the shock response of forsterite above ~250 GPa, obtained using the laser shock wave technique. We simultaneously measured the Hugoniot and temperature of shocked forsterite and interpreted the results to suggest the following: (i) incongruent crystallization of MgO at 271 to 285 GPa, (ii) phase transition of MgO at 285 to 344 GPa, and (iii) remelting above ~470 to 500 GPa. These exothermic and endothermic reactions are seen to occur under extreme conditions of pressure and temperature. They indicate complex structural and chemical changes in the system MgO-SiO2 at extreme pressures and temperatures and will affect the way we understand the interior processes of large rocky planets as well as material transformation by impacts in the formation of planetary systems. PMID:27493993

  11. A computer program for the calculation of the flow field in supersonic mixed-compression inlets at angle of attack using the three-dimensional method of characteristics with discrete shock wave fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vadyak, J.; Hoffman, J. D.; Bishop, A. R.

    1978-01-01

    The calculation procedure is based on the method of characteristics for steady three-dimensional flow. The bow shock wave and the internal shock wave system were computed using a discrete shock wave fitting procedure. The general structure of the computer program is discussed, and a brief description of each subroutine is given. All program input parameters are defined, and a brief discussion on interpretation of the output is provided. A number of sample cases, complete with data deck listings, are presented.

  12. Studies of Shock Wave Interactions with Homogeneous and Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briassulis, G.; Agui, J.; Watkins, C. B.; Andreopoulos, Y.

    1998-01-01

    A nearly homogeneous nearly isotropic compressible turbulent flow interacting with a normal shock wave has been studied experimentally in a large shock tube facility. Spatial resolution of the order of 8 Kolmogorov viscous length scales was achieved in the measurements of turbulence. A variety of turbulence generating grids provide a wide range of turbulence scales. Integral length scales were found to substantially decrease through the interaction with the shock wave in all investigated cases with flow Mach numbers ranging from 0.3 to 0.7 and shock Mach numbers from 1.2 to 1.6. The outcome of the interaction depends strongly on the state of compressibility of the incoming turbulence. The length scales in the lateral direction are amplified at small Mach numbers and attenuated at large Mach numbers. Even at large Mach numbers amplification of lateral length scales has been observed in the case of fine grids. In addition to the interaction with the shock the present work has documented substantial compressibility effects in the incoming homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flow. The decay of Mach number fluctuations was found to follow a power law similar to that describing the decay of incompressible isotropic turbulence. It was found that the decay coefficient and the decay exponent decrease with increasing Mach number while the virtual origin increases with increasing Mach number. A mechanism possibly responsible for these effects appears to be the inherently low growth rate of compressible shear layers emanating from the cylindrical rods of the grid.

  13. Converging shock wave focusing and interaction with a target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitishinskiy, M.; Efimov, S.; Antonov, O.; Yanuka, D.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Bernshtam, V.; Fisher, V.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2016-04-01

    Converging shock waves in liquids can be used efficiently in the research of the extreme state of matter and in various applications. In this paper, the recent results related to the interaction of a shock wave with plasma preliminarily formed in the vicinity of the shock wave convergence are presented. The shock wave is produced by the underwater electrical explosion of a spherical wire array. The plasma is generated prior to the shock wave's arrival by a low-pressure gas discharge inside a quartz capillary placed at the equatorial plane of the array. Analysis of the Stark broadening of Hα and Hβ spectral lines and line-to-continuum ratio, combined with the ratio of the relative intensities of carbon C III/C II and silicon Si III/Si II lines, were used to determine the plasma density and temperature evolution. It was found that during the first ˜200 ns with respect to the beginning of the plasma compression by the shock wave and when the spectral lines are resolved, the plasma density increases from 2 × 1017 cm-3 to 5 × 1017 cm-3, while the temperature remains at the same value of 3-4 eV. Further, following the model of an adiabatically imploding capillary, the plasma density increases >1019 cm-3, leading to the continuum spectra obtained experimentally, and the plasma temperature >30 eV at radii of compression of ≤20 μm. The data obtained indicate that the shock wave generated by the underwater electrical explosion of a spherical wire array retains its uniformity during the main part of its convergence.

  14. SIMULATION OF SHOCK WAVE PROPAGATION AND DAMAGE IN GEOLOGIC MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, I; Vorobiev, O; Antoun, T H

    2004-09-17

    A new thermodynamically consistent material model for large deformation has been developed. It describes quasistatic loading of limestone as well as high-rate phenomena. This constitutive model has been implemented into an Eulerian shock wave code with adaptive mesh refinement. This approach was successfully used to reproduce static triaxial compression tests and to simulate experiments of blast loading and damage of limestone. Results compare favorably with experimentally available wave profiles from spherically-symmetric explosion in rock samples.

  15. Shock Wave Technology and Application: An Update☆

    PubMed Central

    Rassweiler, Jens J.; Knoll, Thomas; Köhrmann, Kai-Uwe; McAteer, James A.; Lingeman, James E.; Cleveland, Robin O.; Bailey, Michael R.; Chaussy, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Context The introduction of new lithotripters has increased problems associated with shock wave application. Recent studies concerning mechanisms of stone disintegration, shock wave focusing, coupling, and application have appeared that may address some of these problems. Objective To present a consensus with respect to the physics and techniques used by urologists, physicists, and representatives of European lithotripter companies. Evidence acquisition We reviewed recent literature (PubMed, Embase, Medline) that focused on the physics of shock waves, theories of stone disintegration, and studies on optimising shock wave application. In addition, we used relevant information from a consensus meeting of the German Society of Shock Wave Lithotripsy. Evidence synthesis Besides established mechanisms describing initial fragmentation (tear and shear forces, spallation, cavitation, quasi-static squeezing), the model of dynamic squeezing offers new insight in stone comminution. Manufacturers have modified sources to either enlarge the focal zone or offer different focal sizes. The efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) can be increased by lowering the pulse rate to 60–80 shock waves/min and by ramping the shock wave energy. With the water cushion, the quality of coupling has become a critical factor that depends on the amount, viscosity, and temperature of the gel. Fluoroscopy time can be reduced by automated localisation or the use of optical and acoustic tracking systems. There is a trend towards larger focal zones and lower shock wave pressures. Conclusions New theories for stone disintegration favour the use of shock wave sources with larger focal zones. Use of slower pulse rates, ramping strategies, and adequate coupling of the shock wave head can significantly increase the efficacy and safety of ESWL. PMID:21354696

  16. Shock wave interaction with laser-generated single bubbles.

    PubMed

    Sankin, G N; Simmons, W N; Zhu, S L; Zhong, P

    2005-07-15

    The interaction of a lithotripter shock wave (LSW) with laser-generated single vapor bubbles in water is investigated using high-speed photography and pressure measurement via a fiber-optic probe hydrophone. The interaction leads to nonspherical collapse of the bubble with secondary shock wave emission and microjet formation along the LSW propagation direction. The maximum pressure amplification is produced during the collapse phase of the bubble oscillation when the compressive pulse duration of the LSW matches with the forced collapse time of the bubble. PMID:16090745

  17. Shock Wave Interaction with Laser-Generated Single Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankin, G. N.; Simmons, W. N.; Zhu, S. L.; Zhong, P.

    2005-07-01

    The interaction of a lithotripter shock wave (LSW) with laser-generated single vapor bubbles in water is investigated using high-speed photography and pressure measurement via a fiber-optic probe hydrophone. The interaction leads to nonspherical collapse of the bubble with secondary shock wave emission and microjet formation along the LSW propagation direction. The maximum pressure amplification is produced during the collapse phase of the bubble oscillation when the compressive pulse duration of the LSW matches with the forced collapse time of the bubble.

  18. Experimental and computational studies of two-dimensional compressible vortex-shock interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Chun-Teh

    The problem of two-dimensional compressible vortex-shock interaction is studied both experimentally and numerically. On the experimental side, a strong compressible vortex and a shock wave are produced in the open test section of a shock tube. The shock wave of strength M ≈ 1.2 then collides with the vortex that possesses a density drop at the vortex center exceeding 60% of the free stream value. Shadowgraphs and schlieren pictures of the event are taken in a sequence of experiments with progressive time delays. The pictures show that the shock profile is significantly modified by the interaction, with substantial distortion, disconnection, and a local nonlinear focusing structure. In the computational work, both the Euler equations and the Navier-Stokes equations are solved to simulate the problem. Two flux-splitting techniques are employed: (1) first-order-accurate Modified Steger-Warming method and (2) second-order-accurate variable-extrapolation method satisfying the total-variation-diminishing (TVD) condition. Based on the numerical data, the respective behaviors of the vortex, the shock wave, and the secondary wave generated during the interaction are analyzed. The simulation also reveals that the focal region of the distorted shock structure is bounded by a Mach stem and two slipstreams, in which local intensified pressure, density, and temperature peaks occur. It is found that the local intensification of fluid properties and the secondary wave possess essentially nonlinear characteristics at their early stages. The computational results agree well, qualitatively, with the experimental observations.

  19. Gigabar shock wave in a laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of research on generating a powerful shock wave with a pressure of up to several gigabars in a laboratory experiment is reviewed. The focus is on results which give a possibility of shock-wave experiments to study an equation of state of matter (EOS) at the level of gigabar pressure. The proposals are discussed to achieve a plane record-pressure shock wave driven by laser-accelerated fast electrons with respect to EOS-experiment as well as to prospective method of inertial fusion target (ICF) ignition as shock ignition.

  20. Noise transmission along shock-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amur Varadarajan, Prasanna

    Shocks at the inlet of scramjet engines are subject to perturbations from their interaction with turbulent boundary layer. DNS results for this interaction indicate the presence of discrete vortices that interact with the shock at its foot. These studies reveal that the vortices cause oscillations of the shock. In this work we examine the propagation of disturbances along a stationary oblique shock following interaction with a two-dimensional vortex. We study the decay of disturbances along a normal shock as measured from Euler computations and compare these with the predictions of Geometrical Shock Dynamics (GSD) for long range propagation. We have incorporated two improvements into the GSD model to tackle the shock-vortex interaction problem. The wave structure of the disturbance resembles N waves, the decay of which follows a power law profile. An extension of the GSD model to predict shock surface propagation in 3-D flows is presented along with the numerical implementation.

  1. Biological Effects of Shock Waves on Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanadhas, Divya Prakash; Janardhanraj, S.; Chakravortty, Dipshikha; Gopalan, Jagadeesh

    Shock waves have been successfully used for disintegrating kidney stones[1], noninvasive angiogenic approach[2] and for the treatment of osteoporosis[3]. Recently shock waves have been used to treat different medical conditions including intestinal anastomosis[4], wound healing[5], Kienböck's disease[6] and articular cartilage defects[7].

  2. Clinical application of extracorporeal shock wave therapy in orthopedics: focused versus unfocused shock waves.

    PubMed

    Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Kearney, Cathal; Spector, Myron

    2012-10-01

    For the past decade extracorporeal shock wave therapy has been applied to a wide range of musculoskeletal disorders. The many promising results and the introduction of shock wave generators that are less expensive and easier to handle has added to the growing interest. Based on their nature of propagation, shock waves can be divided into two types: focused and unfocused. Although several physical differences between these different types of shock waves have been described, very little is known about the clinical outcome using these different modalities. The aim of the present review is to investigate differences in outcome in select orthopaedic applications using focused and unfocused shock waves. PMID:22920552

  3. Spherical shock waves in general relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Nutku, Y. )

    1991-11-15

    We present the metric appropriate to a spherical shock wave in the framework of general relativity. This is a Petrov type-{ital N} vacuum solution of the Einstein field equations where the metric is continuous across the shock and the Riemann tensor suffers a step-function discontinuity. Spherical gravitational waves are described by type-{ital N} Robinson-Trautman metrics. However, for shock waves the Robinson-Trautman solutions are unacceptable because the metric becomes discontinuous in the Robinson-Trautman coordinate system. Other coordinate systems that have so far been introduced for describing Robinson-Trautman solutions also suffer from the same defect. We shall present the {ital C}{sup 0}-form of the metric appropriate to spherical shock waves using Penrose's approach of identification with warp. Further extensions of Penrose's method yield accelerating, as well as coupled electromagnetic-gravitational shock-wave solutions.

  4. A midsummer-night's shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargather, Michael; Liebner, Thomas; Settles, Gary

    2007-11-01

    The aerial pyrotechnic shells used in professional display fireworks explode a bursting charge at altitude in order to disperse the ``stars'' of the display. The shock wave from the bursting charge is heard on the ground as a loud report, though it has by then typically decayed to a mere sound wave. However, viewers seated near the standard safety borders can still be subjected to weak shock waves. These have been visualized using a large, portable, retro-reflective ``Edgerton'' shadowgraph technique and a high-speed digital video camera. Images recorded at 10,000 frames per second show essentially-planar shock waves from 10- and 15-cm firework shells impinging on viewers during the 2007 Central Pennsylvania July 4th Festival. The shock speed is not measurably above Mach 1, but we nonetheless conclude that, if one can sense a shock-like overpressure, then the wave motion is strong enough to be observed by density-sensitive optics.

  5. Thermophysical properties of multi-shock compressed dense argon

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Q. F. Zheng, J.; Gu, Y. J.; Chen, Y. L.; Cai, L. C.; Shen, Z. J.

    2014-02-21

    In contrast to the single shock compression state that can be obtained directly via experimental measurements, the multi-shock compression states, however, have to be calculated with the aid of theoretical models. In order to determine experimentally the multiple shock states, a diagnostic approach with the Doppler pins system (DPS) and the pyrometer was used to probe multiple shocks in dense argon plasmas. Plasma was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The shock was produced using the flyer plate impact accelerated up to ∼6.1 km/s by a two-stage light gas gun and introduced into the plenum argon gas sample, which was pre-compressed from the environmental pressure to about 20 MPa. The time-resolved optical radiation histories were determined using a multi-wavelength channel optical transience radiance pyrometer. Simultaneously, the particle velocity profiles of the LiF window was measured with multi-DPS. The states of multi-shock compression argon plasma were determined from the measured shock velocities combining the particle velocity profiles. We performed the experiments on dense argon plasmas to determine the principal Hugonoit up to 21 GPa, the re-shock pressure up to 73 GPa, and the maximum measure pressure of the fourth shock up to 158 GPa. The results are used to validate the existing self-consistent variational theory model in the partial ionization region and create new theoretical models.

  6. Thermophysical properties of multi-shock compressed dense argon.

    PubMed

    Chen, Q F; Zheng, J; Gu, Y J; Chen, Y L; Cai, L C; Shen, Z J

    2014-02-21

    In contrast to the single shock compression state that can be obtained directly via experimental measurements, the multi-shock compression states, however, have to be calculated with the aid of theoretical models. In order to determine experimentally the multiple shock states, a diagnostic approach with the Doppler pins system (DPS) and the pyrometer was used to probe multiple shocks in dense argon plasmas. Plasma was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The shock was produced using the flyer plate impact accelerated up to ∼6.1 km/s by a two-stage light gas gun and introduced into the plenum argon gas sample, which was pre-compressed from the environmental pressure to about 20 MPa. The time-resolved optical radiation histories were determined using a multi-wavelength channel optical transience radiance pyrometer. Simultaneously, the particle velocity profiles of the LiF window was measured with multi-DPS. The states of multi-shock compression argon plasma were determined from the measured shock velocities combining the particle velocity profiles. We performed the experiments on dense argon plasmas to determine the principal Hugonoit up to 21 GPa, the re-shock pressure up to 73 GPa, and the maximum measure pressure of the fourth shock up to 158 GPa. The results are used to validate the existing self-consistent variational theory model in the partial ionization region and create new theoretical models. PMID:24559345

  7. Computing unsteady shock waves for aeroacoustic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, Kristine R.; Caughey, David A.; Casper, Jay

    1994-01-01

    The computation of unsteady shock waves, which contribute significantly to noise generation in supersonic jet flows, is investigated. The paper focuses on the difficulties of computing slowly moving shock waves. Numerical error is found to manifest itself principally as a spurious entropy wave. Calculations presented are performed using a third-order essentially nonoscillatory scheme. The effect of stencil biasing parameters and of two versions of numerical flux formulas on the magnitude of spurious entropy are investigated. The level of numerical error introduced in the calculation is quantified as a function of shock pressure ratio, shock speed, Courant number, and mesh density. The spurious entropy relative to the entropy jump across a static shock decreases with increasing shock strength and shock velocity relative to the grid, but is insensitive to Courant number. The structure of the spurious entropy wave is affected by the choice of flux formulas and algorithm biasing parameters. The effect of the spurious numerical waves on the calculation of sound amplification by a shock wave is investigated. For this class of problem, the acoustic pressure waves are relatively unaffected by the spurious numerical phenomena.

  8. Computing unsteady shock waves for aeroacoustic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows,, Kristine r.; Caughey, David A.; Casper, Jay

    1994-01-01

    The computation of unsteady shock waves, which contribute significantly to noise generation in supersonic jet flows, is investigated. This paper focuses on the difficulties of computing slowly moving shock waves. Numerical error is found to manifest itself principally as a spurious entropy wave. Calculations presented are performed using a third order essentially nonoscillatory scheme. The effect of stencil biasing parameters and of two versions of numerical flux formulas on the magnitude of spurious entropy are investigated. The level of numerical error introduced in the calculation in quantified as a function of shock pressure ratio, shock speed, Courant number, and mesh density. The spurious entropy relative to the entropy jump across a static shock decreases with increasing shock strength and shock velocity relative to the grid, but is insensitive to Courant number. The structure of the spurious entropy wave is affected by the choice of flux formulas and algorithm biasing parameters. The effect of the spurious numerical waves on the calculation of sound amplification by a shock wave is investigated. For this class of problem, the acoustic pressure waves are relatively unaffected by the spurious numerical phenomena.

  9. Shock Compression of Beryllium Single Crystals: Time-Dependent, Anisotropic Elastic-Plastic Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winey, J.; Gupta, Y.

    2013-06-01

    To gain insight into inelastic deformation mechanisms in shocked Be single crystals, wave propagation simulations were performed for crystals shocked along the c-axis, a-axis, and other crystal directions to peak stresses reaching 7 GPa. The simulations utilized a time-dependent, anisotropic material model that incorporated dislocation dynamics and deformation twinning based descriptions of inelastic deformation. The simulation results showed good qualitative agreement with the measured wave profiles, including features arising from wave mode coupling due to the highly anisotropic inelastic response of Be. The measured wave profiles can be understood in terms of dislocation slip along basal, prismatic, and pyramidal planes, together with deformation twinning. Our results provide insight into the complex nature of inelastic deformation in shocked Be, and are also expected to be valuable for understanding the anisotropic inelastic response of analogous hcp metals subjected to shock compression. Work supported by ARL and DOE/NNSA.

  10. Unsteady Phenomena in Shock Wave/Boundary Layer Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolling, D. S.

    1993-01-01

    A brief review is given of the unsteadiness of shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction. The focus is on interactions generated by swept and unswept compression ramps, by flares, steps and incident shock waves, by cylinders and blunt fins, and by glancing shock waves. The effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, and separated flow scale are discussed as are the physical causes of the unsteadiness. The implications that the unsteadiness has for interpreting time-average surface and flowfield data, and for comparisons of such experimental data with computation, is also briefly discussed. Finally, some suggestions for future work are given. It is clear that there are large gaps in the data base and that many aspects of such phenomena are poorly understood. Much work remains to be done.

  11. Shock Wave Dynamics in Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Joseph A., III

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of the dynamics of shock waves in weakly ionized argon plasmas has been performed using a pressure ruptured shock tube. The velocity of the shock is observed to increase when the shock traverses the plasma. The observed increases cannot be accounted for by thermal effects alone. Possible mechanisms that could explain the anomalous behavior include a vibrational/translational relaxation in the nonequilibrium plasma, electron diffusion across the shock front resulting from high electron mobility, and the propagation of ion-acoustic waves generated at the shock front. Using a turbulence model based on reduced kinetic theory, analysis of the observed results suggest a role for turbulence in anomalous shock dynamics in weakly ionized media and plasma-induced hypersonic drag reduction.

  12. Instability of spherically imploding shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Hilko, B.; Zhang, L.; Panarella, E.

    1995-12-31

    The importance of spherically imploding shock waves has increased recently due to their particular applications in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and the Spherical Pinch (SP). In particular, the stability of spherically imploding shock waves plays a critical role in the ultimate success of ICF and SP. The instability of spherically imploding shock waves is now systematically investigated. The basic state is Guderley and Landau`s unsteady self-similar solution of the implosion of a spherical shock wave. The stability analysis is conducted by combining Chandresakhar`s approach to the stability of spherical flames together. The governing equations for disturbances are derived and they use the condition that perturbed gas flow is potential. The three dimensional perturbation velocity profile and a shock front perturbation are solved by using the kinematic and dynamic boundary conditions in the shock front. The time-dependent amplitudes of the perturbations are obtained by solving the system of ordinary differential equations. This enables them to study the time history of the spherically imploding shock wave subject to perturbations. The relative amplification and decay of the amplitudes of perturbations decides the stability/instability of the spherical imploding shock waves. Preliminary results are presented.

  13. International Shock-Wave Database: Systematization of Experimental Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levashov, Pavel R.; Khishchenko, Konstantin V.; Lomonosov, Igor V.; Minakov, Dmitry V.; Zakharenkov, Alexey S.

    2011-06-01

    In this work, we announce the creation of the International Shock-Wave Database (ISWDB). Shock-wave and related dynamic material response data serve for calibrating, validating, and improving material models over very broad regions of the pressure-temperature-density phase space. Our objectives are (i) to develop a database on thermodynamic and mechanical properties of materials under conditions of shock wave and other dynamic loadings, selected related quantities of interest, and the meta-data that describes the provenance of the measurements and material models, and (ii) to make this database available internationally thru the Internet, in an interactive form. The development and operation of the ISWDB will be guided by input from a steering committee. The database will be installed on two mirrored web-servers, one in Russia and the other in USA. The database will provide access to original experimental data on shock compression, non-shock dynamic loadings, isentropic expansion, measurements of sound speed in the Hugoniot state, and time-dependent free-surface or window-interface velocity profiles. We believe that the ISWDB will be a useful tool for the shock-wave community.

  14. Stability of imploding spherical shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. B.; Zhang, L.; Panarella, E.

    1995-12-01

    The stability of spherically imploding shock waves is systematically investigated in this letter. The basic state is Guderley and Landau's unsteady self-similar solution of the implosion of a spherical shock wave. The stability analysis is conducted by combining Chandrasekhar's approach to the stability of a viscous liquid drop with Zel'dovich's approach to the stability of spherical flames. The time-dependent amplitudes of the perturbations are obtained analytically by using perturbation method. The relative amplification and decay of the amplitudes of perturbations decides the stability/instability of the spherical imploding shock waves. It is found that the growth rate of perturbations is not in exponential form and near the collapse phase of the shocks, the spherically imploding shock waves are relatively stable.

  15. Stability of imploding spherical shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.B.; Zhang, L.; Panarella, E.

    1995-12-01

    The stability of spherically imploding shock waves is systematically investigated in this letter. The basic state is Guderley and Landau`s unsteady self-similar solution of the implosion of a spherical shock wave. The stability analysis is conducted by combining Chandrasekhar`s approach to the stability of a viscous liquid drop with Zel`dovich`s approach to the stability of spherical flames. The time-dependent amplitudes of the perturbations are obtained analytically by using perturbation method. The relative amplification and decay of the amplitudes of perturbations are obtained analytically by using perturbation method. The relative amplification and decay of the amplitudes of perturbations decides the stability/instability of the spherical imploding shock waves. It is found that the growth rate of perturbations is not in exponential form and near the collapse phase of the shocks, the spherically imploding shock waves are relatively stable. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Possible Implications of Anomalous Shock Wave Behavior for Laser Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Jason W.; Montgomery, David C.

    1997-11-01

    In ``normal'' materials, shocks are compressive because of the inequality (partial^2p / partial V^2)_s> 0, which is, however, not dictated by thermodynamics.(e.g.), Ya. B. Zel'dovich and Yu. P. Raizer, ``Physics of Shock Waves and High-Temperature Hydrodynamic Phenomena,'' (N.Y., Academic Press, 1967), Vol I, pp. 67-69; Vol II, pp. 750-762. In ``anomalous'' materials, the inequality may go the other way, and exotic phenomena result: rarefactive shocks, spreading compressive pulses, and shock wave ``splitting'' or instability.^2,(N. M. Kuznetsov, Sov. Phys. JETP 61), 275 (1985). Materials tend to behave ``anomalously'' in the vicinities of phase transitions. Shock-imploded DT fusion fuels will experience a variety of phase transitions, including melting, vaporization, molecular dissociation, and ionization. Imperfectly explored gas-dynamic problems may require attention to each case. For example, in the shock Hugoniot measurements of Da Silva et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 483 (1997)], the high-pressure part of Fig. 4b suggests the possibility of ``anomalous'' behavior.

  17. Overview of shock waves in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Robin O.

    2003-10-01

    A brief overview of three applications of shock waves is presented. Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) has been in clinical use for more than 20 years. In the United States it is used to treat more than 80% of kidney stone cases and has wide acceptance with patients because it is a noninvasive procedure. Despite SWLs enormous success there is no agreement on how shock waves comminute stones. There is also a general acceptance that shock waves lead to trauma to the soft tissue of the kidney. Yet there has been little forward progress in developing lithotripters which provide comminution with less side-effects, indeed the original machine is still considered the gold standard. The last decade has seen the advent of new shock wave devices for treating principally musculoskeletal indications, such as plantar fasciitis, tennis elbow, and bone fractures that do not heal. This is referred to as shock wave therapy (SWT). The mechanisms by which SWT works are even less well understood than SWL and the consequences of bioeffects have also not been studied in detail. Shock waves have also been shown to be effective at enhancing drug delivery into cells and assisting with gene transfection. [Work partially supported by NIH.

  18. Synthesis of submicron metastable phase of silicon using femtosecond laser-driven shock wave

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujino, Masashi; Sano, Tomokazu; Sakata, Osami; Ozaki, Norimasa; Kodama, Ryosuke; Kimura, Shigeru; Takeda, Shingo; Kobayashi, Kojiro F.; Hirose, Akio

    2011-12-15

    We measured the grain size of metastable phase of Si synthesized by shock compression. We analyzed the crystalline structures of the femtosecond laser-driven shock compressed silicon with x-ray diffraction measurements. We found that submicron grains of metastable Si-VIII exist in the silicon. We suggest that the pressure loading time is too short for the nucleated high-pressure phases to grow in case of the femtosecond laser-driven shock compression, therefore Si-VIII grains of submicron size are obtained. We are expecting to discover other unique crystalline structures induced by the femtosecond laser-driven shock wave.

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic shock waves in molecular clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Draine, B.T.; Roberge, W.G.; Dalgarno, A.

    1983-01-15

    The structure of shock waves in molecular clouds is calculated, including the effects of ion-neutral streaming driven by the magnetic field. It is found that shock waves in molecular clouds will usually be C-type shock waves, mediated entirely by the dissipation accompanying ion-neutral streaming, and in which all of the hydrodynamic variables are continuous. Detailed results are presented for magnetohydrodynamic shock waves propagating at speeds in the range of 5--50 km s/sup -1/ in molecular clouds with preshock densities n/sub H/ = 10/sup 2/, 10/sup 4/, and 10/sup 6/ cm/sup -3/. Graphs are constructed of the effective ''excitation temperatures'' of the rotational and vibrational levels of H/sub 2/ in the shocked gas. The effects of chemical changes in the composition of oxygen-bearing molecules are investigated, and the contributions to the cooling of the shocked gas by emission from H/sub 2/, CO, OH, and H/sub 2/O are evaluated. Predictions are made of the intensities of the rotation-vibration lines of H/sub 2/ and of the fine-structure lines of O I and C I. Magnetic fields may lead to a substantial increase in the limiting shock velocity above which dissociation of H/sub 2/ takes place: for a cloud of density eta/sub H/ = 10/sup 6/ cm/sup -3/, the limiting shock speed is approx.45 km s/sup -1/. The fractional ionization is a critical parameter affecting the shock structure, and the processes acting to change the ionization in the shock are examined. Magnetic field effects enhance the sputtering of grain mantles in dense gas: H/sub 2/O ice mantles can be substantially eroded in v/sub s/> or =25 km s/sup -1/ shock waves. Grain erosion may contribute to the enhancement of some molecular species in the shocked gas.

  20. Ion acoustic shock waves in degenerate plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Akhtar, N.; Hussain, S.

    2011-07-15

    Korteweg de Vries Burgers equation for negative ion degenerate dissipative plasma has been derived using reductive perturbation technique. The quantum hydrodynamic model is used to study the quantum ion acoustic shock waves. The effects of different parameters on quantum ion acoustic shock waves are studied. It is found that quantum parameter, electrons Fermi temperature, temperature of positive and negative ions, mass ratio of positive to negative ions, viscosity, and density ratio have significant impact on the shock wave structure in negative ion degenerate plasma.

  1. Refraction index of shock compressed water in the megabar pressure range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batani, D.; Jakubowska, K.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Cavazzoni, C.; Danson, C.; Hall, T.; Kimpel, M.; Neely, D.; Pasley, J.; Rabec Le Gloahec, M.; Telaro, B.

    2015-11-01

    We compressed water to megabar pressures by laser-driven shock waves and evidenced transparent, opaque and reflecting phases as pressure increases. The refraction index of water in the first two states was measured using a VISAR system. At high compression a sharp increase of the real and imaginary part of the refraction index is observed. Experiments were performed at the LULI and RAL laboratories.

  2. Evolution Of Nonlinear Waves in Compressing Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    P.F. Schmit, I.Y. Dodin, and N.J. Fisch

    2011-05-27

    Through particle-in-cell simulations, the evolution of nonlinear plasma waves is examined in one-dimensional collisionless plasma undergoing mechanical compression. Unlike linear waves, whose wavelength decreases proportionally to the system length L(t), nonlinear waves, such as solitary electron holes, conserve their characteristic size {Delta} during slow compression. This leads to a substantially stronger adiabatic amplification as well as rapid collisionless damping when L approaches {Delta}. On the other hand, cessation of compression halts the wave evolution, yielding a stable mode.

  3. Shock wave dispersion in weakly ionized gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessaratikoon, Prasong

    2003-10-01

    Electrodeless microwave (MW) discharge in two straight, circular cylindrical resonant cavities in TE1,1,1 and TM0,1,2 modes were introduced to perform additional experimental studies on shock wave modification in non-equilibrium weakly ionized gases and to clarify the physical mechanisms of the shock wave modification process. The discharge was generated in 99.99% Ar at a gas pressure between 20 and 100 Torr and at a discharge power density less than 10.0 Watts/cm3. Power density used for operating the discharge was rather low in the present work, which was determined by evaluating the power loss inside the resonant cavity. It was found that the shock wave deflection signal amplitude was decreased while the shock wave local velocity was increased in the presence of the discharge. However, there was no apparent evidence of the multiple shock structure or the widening of the shock wave deflection signal, as observed in the d.c. glow discharge [3,5]. The shock wave always retained a more compact structure even in the case of strong dispersion in both the TE and the TM mode. The shock wave propagated faster through the discharge in the TE mode than in the TM mode. Discharge characteristics and local parameters such as gas temperature T g, electron density Ne, local electric field E, and average power density, were determined by using the MW discharge generated from an Argon gas mixture that contains 95% Ar, 5% H2, and traces of N2. The gas temperature was evaluated by using the amplitude reduction technique and the emission spectroscopy of Nitrogen. The gas temperature distribution was flat in the central region of the cavity. By comparing the gas temperature calculated from the shock wave local velocity and from the amplitude reduction technique, the present work was sufficiently accurate to indicate that the thermal effect is dominant. The electron density was obtained from measured line shapes of hydrogen Balmer lines by using the gas temperature and the well

  4. Shock compression of liquid helium to 56 GPa (560 kbar)

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W.J.; Holmes, N.C.; Mitchell, A.C.; Trainor, R.J.; Governo, G.K.; Ross, M.; Young, D.A.

    1984-09-24

    The first shock-compression experiments on liquid helium are reported. With a two-stage light-gas gun, liquid He at 4.3 K and 1 atm was shocked to 16 GPa and 12 000 K and double shocked to 56 GPa and 21 000 K. Liquid perturbation theory has been used to determine an effective interatomic potential from which the equation of state of He can be obtained over a wide range of densities and temperatures.

  5. Shock wave control using liquid curtains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvert, Brendan; Tao, Xingtian; Eliasson, Veronica

    2014-11-01

    The effectiveness of a planar wall of liquid as a blast mitigation device is examined using a shock tube and a custom-designed and -built shock test chamber. Experimental data collection methods being used include high-speed schlieren photography and high-frequency pressure sensors. During the relevant shock interaction time periods, the liquid-gas interface is examined to determine its effect on shock waves. The characteristic quantities that reflect these effects include reflected-to-incident shock strength ratio, transmitted-to-incident shock strength ratio, transmitted and reflected impulse, and peak pressure reduction. These parameters are examined for correlations to incident wave speed, liquid mass, liquid density, and liquid viscosity. Initial results have been obtained that show a correlation between fluid mass and peak pressure reduction. More experiments are being performed to further explore this relationship as well as examine the effects of altering the other parameters such as liquid-gas interface geometry and using dilatant fluids.

  6. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves.

    PubMed

    Marcowith, A; Bret, A; Bykov, A; Dieckman, M E; Drury, L O'C; Lembège, B; Lemoine, M; Morlino, G; Murphy, G; Pelletier, G; Plotnikov, I; Reville, B; Riquelme, M; Sironi, L; Novo, A Stockem

    2016-04-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebulæ, active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space. It is complexified by the impact due to high-energy cosmic rays in astrophysical environments. This review adresses the physics of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle acceleration based on a close examination of available multi-wavelength or in situ observations, analytical and numerical developments. A particular emphasis is made on the different instabilities triggered during the shock formation and in association with particle acceleration processes with regards to the properties of the background upstream medium. It appears that among the most important parameters the background magnetic field through the magnetization and its obliquity is the dominant one. The shock velocity that can reach relativistic speeds has also a strong impact over the development of the micro-instabilities and the fate of particle acceleration. Recent developments of laboratory shock experiments has started to bring some new insights in the physics of space plasma and astrophysical shock waves. A special section is dedicated to new laser plasma experiments probing shock physics. PMID:27007555

  7. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcowith, A.; Bret, A.; Bykov, A.; Dieckman, M. E.; O'C Drury, L.; Lembège, B.; Lemoine, M.; Morlino, G.; Murphy, G.; Pelletier, G.; Plotnikov, I.; Reville, B.; Riquelme, M.; Sironi, L.; Stockem Novo, A.

    2016-04-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebulæ, active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space. It is complexified by the impact due to high-energy cosmic rays in astrophysical environments. This review adresses the physics of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle acceleration based on a close examination of available multi-wavelength or in situ observations, analytical and numerical developments. A particular emphasis is made on the different instabilities triggered during the shock formation and in association with particle acceleration processes with regards to the properties of the background upstream medium. It appears that among the most important parameters the background magnetic field through the magnetization and its obliquity is the dominant one. The shock velocity that can reach relativistic speeds has also a strong impact over the development of the micro-instabilities and the fate of particle acceleration. Recent developments of laboratory shock experiments has started to bring some new insights in the physics of space plasma and astrophysical shock waves. A special section is dedicated to new laser plasma experiments probing shock physics.

  8. Shock waves on complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Mones, Enys; Araújo, Nuno A. M.; Vicsek, Tamás; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2014-01-01

    Power grids, road maps, and river streams are examples of infrastructural networks which are highly vulnerable to external perturbations. An abrupt local change of load (voltage, traffic density, or water level) might propagate in a cascading way and affect a significant fraction of the network. Almost discontinuous perturbations can be modeled by shock waves which can eventually interfere constructively and endanger the normal functionality of the infrastructure. We study their dynamics by solving the Burgers equation under random perturbations on several real and artificial directed graphs. Even for graphs with a narrow distribution of node properties (e.g., degree or betweenness), a steady state is reached exhibiting a heterogeneous load distribution, having a difference of one order of magnitude between the highest and average loads. Unexpectedly we find for the European power grid and for finite Watts-Strogatz networks a broad pronounced bimodal distribution for the loads. To identify the most vulnerable nodes, we introduce the concept of node-basin size, a purely topological property which we show to be strongly correlated to the average load of a node. PMID:24821422

  9. Shock waves on complex networks.

    PubMed

    Mones, Enys; Araújo, Nuno A M; Vicsek, Tamás; Herrmann, Hans J

    2014-01-01

    Power grids, road maps, and river streams are examples of infrastructural networks which are highly vulnerable to external perturbations. An abrupt local change of load (voltage, traffic density, or water level) might propagate in a cascading way and affect a significant fraction of the network. Almost discontinuous perturbations can be modeled by shock waves which can eventually interfere constructively and endanger the normal functionality of the infrastructure. We study their dynamics by solving the Burgers equation under random perturbations on several real and artificial directed graphs. Even for graphs with a narrow distribution of node properties (e.g., degree or betweenness), a steady state is reached exhibiting a heterogeneous load distribution, having a difference of one order of magnitude between the highest and average loads. Unexpectedly we find for the European power grid and for finite Watts-Strogatz networks a broad pronounced bimodal distribution for the loads. To identify the most vulnerable nodes, we introduce the concept of node-basin size, a purely topological property which we show to be strongly correlated to the average load of a node. PMID:24821422

  10. The physics of interstellar shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, J. Michael; Draine, Bruce T.

    1987-01-01

    This review discusses the observations and theoretical models of interstellar shock waves, in both diffuse cloud and molecular cloud environments. It summarizes the relevant gas dynamics, atomic, molecular and grain processes, radiative transfer, and physics of radiative and magnetic precursors in shock models. It then describes the importance of shocks for observations, diagnostics, and global interstellar dynamics. It concludes with current research problems and data needs for atomic, molecular and grain physics.

  11. Shock compaction of magnet powder using underwater shock wave

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Shiro; Fujita, Masahiro; Itoh, Shigeru

    1996-12-31

    In order to get a high plug density (over 90%), the authors tried a direct consolidation of the magnet powder using the converging underwater shock wave created by the underwater explosion of explosives. The processes of the consolidation of the magnet powder were investigated by numerical calculation. They obtained the parameters of the EOS (Petrie-Page model) for Magnet powder using quasi-static loading experiments. Moreover, the characteristics of the shock compaction assembly were also verified.

  12. Solitary and shock waves in discrete double power law materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbold, Eric; Nesterenko, Vitali

    2007-06-01

    A novel strongly nonlinear metamaterial is composed using a periodic arrangement of toroidal rings between plates. The toroids are considered massless strongly nonlinear springs where the force versus displacement relationship is described by two additive power-law relationships. In these systems the nonlinearity is due to the dramatic change of the contact plane, which starts as an arbitrarily thin circle then increases in thickness with increasing compression. Solitary and shock waves are examined numerically and experimentally using three different types of polymer or rubber o-rings allowing mitigation of higher amplitude shock impulses in comparison with granular systems. In these systems a train of pulses can consist of two separate groups related to two strongly nonlinear regimes with different values of exponents, depending on the amplitude. In experiments two types of shock waves (monotonic or oscillatory) were observed depending on the type of o-rings.

  13. Beamwidth measurement of individual lithotripter shock waves

    PubMed Central

    Kreider, Wayne; Bailey, Michael R.; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    New lithotripters with narrower foci and higher peak pressures than the original Dornier HM3 electrohydraulic lithotripter have proven to be less effective and less safe. Hence, accurate measurements of the focal characteristics of lithotripter shock waves are important. The current technique for measuring beamwidth requires a collection of single-point measurements over multiple shock waves, thereby introducing error as a result of any shock-to-shock variability. This work reports on the construction of a hydrophone array sensor and on array measurements of individual lithotripter shock waves. Beamwidths for an electrohydraulic lithotripter with a broad-focus HM3-style reflector and a narrow-focus modified reflector were measured using both new and worn electrodes as well as two different electrical charging potentials. The array measured the waveform, beamwidth, and focal location of individual shock waves. The HM3-style reflector produced repeatable focal waveforms and beam profiles at an 18 kV charging potential with new and worn electrodes. Corresponding measurements suggest a narrower beamwidth than reported previously from averaged point measurements acquired under the same conditions. In addition, a lack of consistency in the measured beam profiles at 23 kV underscores the value of measuring individual shock waves. PMID:19206897

  14. Shock wave diagnostics using fluorescent dye probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banishev, Alexandr; Christensen, James; Dlott, Dana

    2015-06-01

    Fluorescent probes are highly developed, and have found increasing use in a wide variety of applications. We have studied shock compression of various materials with embedded dye probes used as high speed probes of pressure and temperature. Under the right conditions, dye emission can be used to make a map of the pressure distribution in shocked microstructured materials with high time (1 ns) and space (1 micrometer) resolution. In order to accomplish this goal, we started by studying shock compression of PMMA polymer with rhodamine 6G dye (R6G), as a function of shock pressure and shock duration. We observed the shock-induced spectral redshift and the shock-induced intensity loss. We investigated the fundamental mechanisms of R6G response to pressure. We showed that the time response of a dye probe is limited by its photophysical behavior under shock. We developed superemissive ultrafast dye probes by embedding R6G in a silica nanoparticle. More recently, we have searched for dye probes that have better responses. For instance, we have found that the dye Nile Red embedded in the right polymer matrix has 1.7 times larger pressure-induced redshift than R6G.

  15. Dynamic Shock Compression of Copper to Multi-Megabar Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haill, T. A.; Furnish, M. D.; Twyeffort, L. L.; Arrington, C. L.; Lemke, R. W.; Knudson, M. D.; Davis, J.-P.

    2015-11-01

    Copper is an important material for a variety of shock and high energy density applications and experiments. Copper is used as a standard reference material to determine the EOS properties of other materials. The high conductivity of copper makes it useful as an MHD driver layer in high current dynamic materials experiments on Sandia National Laboratories Z machine. Composite aluminum/copper flyer plates increase the dwell time in plate impact experiments by taking advantage of the slower wave speeds in copper. This presentation reports on recent efforts to reinstate a composite Al/Cu flyer capability on Z and to extend the range of equation-of-state shock compression data through the use of hyper-velocity composite flyers and symmetric planar impact with copper targets. We will present results from multi-dimensional ALEGRA MHD simulations, as well as experimental designs and methods of composite flyer fabrication. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Emission lines and shock waves in RR Lyrae stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillet, D.; Fokin, A. B.

    2014-05-01

    Context. Emission lines observed in radially pulsating stars are thought to be produced by atoms de-exciting after being excited by a shock wave that is traveling into and then compressing, heating, and accelerating the atmospheric gas. Aims: With the help of recent observations, we examine the origin of all the different types of emission lines of hydrogen and helium that appear during a pulsation cycle. Methods: To analyze the physical origin of emission lines, we used the different models of atmospheric dynamics of RR Lyrae stars that have been calculated so far. Results: In contrast to a recent explanation, we propose that the redshifted emission component of Hα, which occurs near the pulsation phase 0.3, is produced by the main shock. In this case, the emission is the natural consequence of the large extension of the expanding atmosphere. Therefore, this (weak) emission should only be observed in RR Lyrae stars for which the main shock will propagate far enough from the photosphere. It appears as a P-Cygni type profile. We estimate the shock front velocity during the shock propagation in the atmosphere and show that it decreases by 40% when the Hα emitting-shock passes from the photospheric level to the upper atmosphere. The Hα P-Cygni profile observed in long-period Cepheids also seems to be caused by the main shock wave. Although to date He II has only been detected in some Blazhko stars, a comprehensive survey of RR Lyrae stars is necessary to confirm this trend, so we can say that the most intense shocks will only be observed in Blazhko stars. Conclusions: The development of a model of atmospheric pulsation that takes the effects of 2D and 3D convection into account, seems to be a necessary step to fully quantify the effects of shock waves on the atmospheric dynamics of radially pulsating stars.

  17. Shock wave sensors: I. Requirements and design.

    PubMed

    Lewin, P A; Schafer, M E

    1991-01-01

    In the last 9 years, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy has become one of the preferred procedures for the treatment of urinary and gallbladder calculi. While there is still uncertainty as to the mechanisms of stone fragmentation, current hypotheses suggest that acoustical shock wave parameters such as rise time, peak compressional and rarefactional pressure, and frequency content may all influence the treatment's efficiency. Thus, optimization of lithotripsy treatment needs pressure sensors that can adequately characterize the shock wave field. This article presents and discusses the design of reliable, wideband, quantitative shock wave sensors made of piezoelectric material. The development, design, and performance characteristics of the sensors are presented. Sensor construction details are described, as are the methods used to characterize the sensor's acoustical performance. The key acoustical parameters of the sensor, its frequency response, and directivity pattern are presented; theory indicates that the probes feature uniform sensitivity over the frequency range up to 100 MHz. Preliminary experimental results indicate that piezoelectric polymer sensors made of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) with a low acoustical impedance backing are suitable for lithotripter field measurements. The applicability of sensors based on fiber optics to shock wave measurements is also briefly discussed. In a companion article, shock wave measurement techniques are outlined and selected lithotripter test data are presented. PMID:10149140

  18. Thermal transport in shock wave–compressed solids using pulsed laser heating

    SciTech Connect

    La Lone, B. M. Capelle, G.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Veeser, L. R.

    2014-07-15

    A pulsed laser heating method was developed for determining thermal transport properties of solids under shock-wave compression. While the solid is compressed, a laser deposits a known amount of heat onto the sample surface, which is held in the shocked state by a transparent window. The heat from the laser briefly elevates the surface temperature and then diffuses into the interior via one-dimensional heat conduction. The thermal effusivity is determined from the time history of the resulting surface temperature pulse, which is recorded with optical pyrometry. Thermal effusivity is the square root of the product of thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity and is the key thermal transport parameter for relating the surface temperature to the interior temperature of the sample in a dynamic compression experiment. Therefore, this method provides information that is needed to determine the thermodynamic state of the interior of a compressed metal sample from a temperature measurement at the surface. The laser heat method was successfully demonstrated on tin that was shock compressed with explosives to a stress and temperature of ∼25 GPa and ∼1300 K. In this state, tin was observed to have a thermal effusivity of close to twice its ambient value. The implications on determining the interior shock wave temperature of tin are discussed.

  19. Finite Mach number spherical shock wave, application to shock ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Vallet, A.; Ribeyre, X.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2013-08-15

    A converging and diverging spherical shock wave with a finite initial Mach number M{sub s0} is described by using a perturbative approach over a small parameter M{sub s}{sup −2}. The zeroth order solution is the Guderley's self-similar solution. The first order correction to this solution accounts for the effects of the shock strength. Whereas it was constant in the Guderley's asymptotic solution, the amplification factor of the finite amplitude shock Λ(t)∝dU{sub s}/dR{sub s} now varies in time. The coefficients present in its series form are iteratively calculated so that the solution does not undergo any singular behavior apart from the position of the shock. The analytical form of the corrected solution in the vicinity of singular points provides a better physical understanding of the finite shock Mach number effects. The correction affects mainly the flow density and the pressure after the shock rebound. In application to the shock ignition scheme, it is shown that the ignition criterion is modified by more than 20% if the fuel pressure prior to the final shock is taken into account. A good agreement is obtained with hydrodynamic simulations using a Lagrangian code.

  20. Finite Mach number spherical shock wave, application to shock ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallet, A.; Ribeyre, X.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2013-08-01

    A converging and diverging spherical shock wave with a finite initial Mach number Ms0 is described by using a perturbative approach over a small parameter Ms-2. The zeroth order solution is the Guderley's self-similar solution. The first order correction to this solution accounts for the effects of the shock strength. Whereas it was constant in the Guderley's asymptotic solution, the amplification factor of the finite amplitude shock Λ(t)∝dUs/dRs now varies in time. The coefficients present in its series form are iteratively calculated so that the solution does not undergo any singular behavior apart from the position of the shock. The analytical form of the corrected solution in the vicinity of singular points provides a better physical understanding of the finite shock Mach number effects. The correction affects mainly the flow density and the pressure after the shock rebound. In application to the shock ignition scheme, it is shown that the ignition criterion is modified by more than 20% if the fuel pressure prior to the final shock is taken into account. A good agreement is obtained with hydrodynamic simulations using a Lagrangian code.

  1. Jump in the electrical conductivity of shock-compressed glassy carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molodets, A. M.; Golyshev, A. A.; Emel'yanov, A. N.; Shul'ga, Yu. M.; Fortov, V. E.

    2014-04-01

    The effect of high dynamic pressures on the electrical conductivity of the amorphous conducting carbon phase (glassy carbon) has been studied. The electrical conductivity of glassy carbon samples has been measured under the condition of shock compression and subsequent release wave. The history of the shock loading of glassy carbon has been calculated with the developed semiempirical equations of state. It has been shown the electrical conductivity of glassy carbon samples in the compression phase at a pressure of 45(5) GPa decreases abruptly by two orders of magnitude. In the relief phase, partially reversible change in the electrical conductivity of an amorphous carbon sample occurs. The recorded effect has been treated as a result of a partially reversible physicochemical transformation of shock-compressed amorphous carbon.

  2. Origin of compression-induced failure in brittle solids under shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J. Y.; Li, Y.; Liu, Q. C.; Zhou, X. M.; Liu, L. W.; Liu, C. L.; Zhu, M. H.; Luo, S. N.

    2015-10-01

    The origin of compression-induced failure in brittle solids has been a subject of debate. Using in situ, high-speed, strain field mapping of a representative material, polymethylmethacrylate, we reveal that shock loading leads to heterogeneity in a compressive strain field, which in turn gives rise to localized lateral tension and shear through Poisson's effects, and, subsequently, localized microdamage. A failure wave nucleates from the impact surface and its propagation into the microdamage zone is self-sustained, triggering interior failure. Its velocity increases with increasing shock strength and eventually approaches the shock velocity. The seemingly puzzling phenomena observed in previous experiments, including incubation time, failure wave velocity variations, and surface roughness effects, can all be explained consistently with the nucleation and growth of the microdamage, and the effects of loading strength and preexisting defects.

  3. Shock compression of condensed matter using Eulerian multimaterial method: Applications to multidimensional shocks, deflagration, detonation, and laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoh, Jack J.; Kim, Ki-hong

    2008-06-01

    The reactive flow analysis of high energy material is performed using hydro shock compression of condensed matter (SCCM) tool that is being developed for handling complex multimaterial dynamics involving energetic and inert matters. Typically, the reacting flows of high energy materials such as fires and explosions give rise to strong nonlinear shock waves and high strain rate deformation of metallic confinements at unusually high pressure and temperature. In order to address difficulties associated with analyzing such complex systems, we have developed a suite of modeling capabilities for elegantly handling large gradients and high strain rates in solids as well as reactive shock waves present in gaseous phase. Mathematical formulation of explosive dynamics involving condensed matter is explained with an emphasis on validating and application of hydro-SCCM to a series of problems of high-speed multimaterial dynamics in nature. A detailed numerical description of a level-set based reactive ghost fluid approach is reported in a separate paper.

  4. Attenuation and distortion of compression waves propagating in very long tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Shinya; Sasa, Daisuke; Aoki, Toshiyuki

    2011-03-01

    A lot of phenomena related to propagating various waves are seen when the high-speed train goes through the tunnel, the gas pipeline is broken due to an accident or the air brake of the wagon operates. For instance, a compression wave generated ahead of a high-speed train entering a tunnel propagates to the tunnel exit and spouts as a micro pressure wave, which causes an exploding sound. In order to estimate the magnitude correctly, the mechanism of the attenuation and distortion of a compression wave propagating along a very long tunnel must be understood and the experimental information on these phenomena is required. An experimental investigation is carried out to clarify the attenuation and distortion of the propagating compression wave in a very long tube. Experimental results show that the strength of a compression wave decreases with distance. The attenuation and distortion of compression waves are affected by the initial waveform of the compression wave and by the unsteady boundary layer induced by the propagating wave. The shape of a compression wave becomes different with the propagating distance; that is, a shock wave appears just head of a wavefront and an overshoot on pressure distribution is observed behind a shock wave due to the transition of the unsteady boundary layer.

  5. Turbulence in argon shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. A., III; Santiago, J. P.; I, L.

    1981-01-01

    Irregular density fluctuations with turbulent-like behaviors are found in ionizing shock fronts produced by an arc-driven shock tube. Electric probes are used as the primary diagnostic. Spectral analyses show statistical patterns which seem frozen-in and characterizable by a dominant mode and its harmonics.

  6. Whistler waves observed upstream from collisionless shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Waves in the frequency range 0.5 - 4 Hz were studied in the region upstream of the earth's bow shock using data from the fluxgate magnetic field experiment on IMP-6. Analysis of 150 examples of these waves during a three month interval indicates that amplitudes are generally less than 1 or 2 gammas and propagation directions generally make angles of between 20 and 40 degrees with the field direction. The waves as measured in the spacecraft frame of reference are either left or right hand polarized with respect to the average field direction. It is concluded that the observed waves are right handed waves in the plasma frame of reference with wavelengths of approximately 100 km propagating upstream in the whistler mode. Doppler shifting reduces the observed frequencies in the spacecraft frame and reverses the observed polarization for those waves propagating more directly upstream. Similar waves are seen ahead of most interplanetary shocks.

  7. A New Acoustic Lens Design for Electromagnetic Shock Wave Lithotripters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Pei; Smith, Nathan; Simmons, Neal W.; Sankin, Georgy

    2011-09-01

    The 3rd-generation electromagnetic (EM) shock wave lithotripters often have narrow focal width and high peak pressure compared to the original Dornier HM-3. In addition, the pressure waveform produced by a typical EM lithotripter has a secondary compressive wave following the tensile component that suppresses lithotripter pulse induced cavitation, which may impact negatively on stone comminution. These characteristic changes in the modern EM lithotripters may contribute in part to their reduced effectiveness observed clinically. To overcome these two drawbacks, we have designed a new acoustic lens for the Siemens Modularis EM lithotripter that produces an idealized pressure waveform similar to that of the HM-3 with broad focal width and low peak pressure. At acoustic pulse energy of 53 mJ, the new lens design enlarges the -6 dB focal width of the Modularis by 47% while significantly reducing the second compressive wave in the lithotripter pulse throughout its focal plane. After 2000 shocks, in vitro comminution produced by the original and new lens designs are 100% and 99% at the lithotripter focus, and 52±16% and 77±8% (p<0.001) at 10 mm off axis, respectively. Corresponding values for stones that are translated to mimic respiratory motion during shock wave lithotripsy are 83±4% and 91±1% (p<0.01), demonstrating the significant performance improvement provided by the new lens design.

  8. Elastic properties of metals and minerals under shock compression

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, T.S.

    1992-01-01

    Comparison of laboratory elasticity data with seismic measurements of the Earth provides a means to understand the deep interior. In this work, elastic wave velocities have been measured under shock compression to 80 GPa in an Fe-Cr-Ni alloy, to 27 GPa in polycrystalline MgO, and to 81 GPa in molybdenum preheated to 1400[degrees]C. These measurements were made by recording particle velocity histories at a sample surface using the method of velocity interferometry. Compressional and bulk wave velocities in Fe-Cr-Ni alloy are consistent with third-order finite strain theory and ultrasonic data. The measured wave profiles can be successfully reproduced by numerical simulations utilizing elastic-plastic theory modified by a Bauschinger effect and stress relaxation. Material strength was found to increase by a factor of at least 5 up to 80 GPa and to be 2-3% of the total stress. Compressional and bulk velocities in Fe-Cr-Ni define linear velocity-density trends and can be modeled by averaging properties of Fe, Cr, and Ni. The effect of alloying [approximately]4 wt.% Ni with Fe would change both V[sub P] and V[sub B] by less than 1% under Earth's core conditions. Compressional and shear velocities in Fe-Ni are compatible with inner core values when corrected for thermal effects. Wave profile and EOS measurements in polycrystalline MgO define its EOS: U[sub S] = 6.77(0.08) + 1.27(0.04)[mu][sub p]. Compressional sound velocities to 27 GPa yield a longitudinal modulus and its pressure derivative which are in good agreement with ultrasonic determinations. The unloading wave profiles can be modeled using a modified elastic-plastic constitutive response originally developed for metals. Thermal expansivities in MgO have been determined to be 12 [+-] 14 [times] 10[sup [minus]6] K[sup [minus]1] at P = 174-200 GPa and T = 3100-3600 K from shock temperature and EOS data. These results imply that the Earth's lower mantle is enriched in Si and/or Fe relative to the upper mantle.

  9. Thermodynamics, compressibility, and phase diagram: shock compression of supercritical fluid xenon.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J; Chen, Q F; Gu, Y J; Chen, Z Y; Li, C J

    2014-09-28

    Supercritical fluids have intriguing behaviors at extreme pressure and temperature conditions, prompting the need for thermodynamic properties of supercritical fluid xenon (SCF) under shock compression. Double-shock experimental data on SCF xenon in the 140 GPa pressure range were directly measured by means of a multi-channel pyrometer and a Doppler-pins-system. It entered the so-called warm dense region. We found that the shock compressed SCF Xe had higher dynamic compression and higher number density than that of liquid Xe at same shock pressure. The larger compressibility of SCF Xe in our experiments could be explained that the increase of electronic excitations and ionizations leaded to a large drop of thermal pressure and a softening of Hugoniot. The high pressure phase diagram of xenon was depicted with the aid of the degeneracy, coupling parameter, and current available experiments on the pressure-temperature plane. PMID:25273430

  10. Stishovite: Synthesis by shock wave

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    De Carli, P. S.; Milton, D.J.

    1965-01-01

    Small amounts of stishovite were separated from specimens of explosively shocked sandstones, novaculite, and single-crystal quartz. Estimated peak pressures for the syntheses ranged from 150 to 280 kilobars, and shock temperatures were from 150?? to 900??C. No coesite was detected in any sample. It is suggested that quartz can invert during shock to a short-range-order phase, with sixfold coordination. A small portion of this phase may develop the long-range order of stishovite, and, during the more protracted decrease of the pressure pulse through the stability field of coesite accompanying meteorite crater formation, a portion may invert to coesite.

  11. Turbulent Water Coupling in Shock Wave Lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Lautz, Jaclyn; Sankin, Georgy; Zhong, Pei

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that stone comminution decreases with increased pulse repetition frequency as a result of bubble proliferation in the cavitation field of a shock wave lithotripter (Pishchalnikov et al., 2011). If cavitation nuclei remain in the propagation path of successive lithotripter pulses, especially in the acoustic coupling cushion of the shock wave source, they will consume part of the incident wave energy, leading to reduced tensile pressure in the focal region and thus lower stone comminution efficiency. We introduce a method to remove cavitation nuclei from the coupling cushion between successive shock exposures using a jet of degassed water. As a result, pre-focal bubble nuclei lifetime quantified by B-mode ultrasound imaging was reduced from 7 s to 0.3 s by a jet with an exit velocity of 62 cm/s. Stone fragmentation (percent mass < 2 mm) after 250 shocks delivered at 1 Hz was enhanced from 22 ± 6% to 33 ± 5% (p = 0.007) in water without interposing tissue mimicking materials. Stone fragmentation after 500 shocks delivered at 2 Hz was increased from 18 ± 6% to 28 ± 8% (p = 0.04) with an interposing tissue phantom of 8 cm thick. These results demonstrate the critical influence of cavitation bubbles in the coupling cushion on stone comminution and suggest a potential strategy to improve the efficacy of contemporary shock wave lithotripters. PMID:23322027

  12. Isentropic compressive wave generator impact pillow and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Barker, Lynn M.

    1985-01-01

    An isentropic compressive wave generator and method of making same. The w generator comprises a disk or flat "pillow" member having component materials of different shock impedances formed in a configuration resulting in a smooth shock impedance gradient over the thickness thereof for interpositioning between an impactor member and a target specimen for producing a shock wave of a smooth predictable rise time. The method of making the pillow member comprises the reduction of the component materials to a powder form and forming the pillow member by sedimentation and compressive techniques.

  13. Damage mechanisms in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokhandwalla, Murtuza

    Shock wave lithotripsy is a 'non-invasive' therapy for treating kidney stones. Focused shock waves fragment stones to a size that can be passed naturally. There is, however, considerable tissue injury, and the mechanisms of stone fragmentation and tissue injury are not well understood. This work investigates potential tissue damage mechanisms, with an aim towards enhancing stone fragmentation and minimizing tissue damage. Lysis of red blood cells (RBC's) due to in vitro exposure to shock waves was investigated. Fluid flow-fields induced by a non-uniform shock wave, as well as radial expansion/implosion of a bubble was hypothesized to cause cell lysis. Both the above flow-fields constitute an unsteady extensional flow, exerting inertial as well as viscous forces on the RBC membrane. The resultant membrane tension and the membrane areal strain due to the above flow-fields were estimated. Both were found to exert a significantly higher inertial force (50--100 mN/m) than the critical membrane tension (10 mN/m). Bubble-induced flow-field was estimated to last for a longer duration (˜1 microsec) compared to the shock-induced flow (˜1 ns) and hence, was predicted to be lytically more effective, in typical in vitro experimental conditions. However, in vivo conditions severely constrain bubble growth, and cell lysis due to shock-induced shear could be dominant. Hemolysis due to shock-induced shear, in absence of cavitation, was experimentally investigated. The lithotripter-generated shock wave was refocused by a parabolic reflector. This refocused wave-field had a tighter focus (smaller beam-width and a higher amplitude) than the lithotripter wave-field. Cavitation was eliminated by applying overpressure to the fluid. Acoustic emissions due to bubble activity were monitored by a novel passive cavitation detector (HP-PCD). Aluminum foils were also used to differentiate cavitational from non-cavitational mode of damage. RBC's were exposed to the reflected wave-field from

  14. Equation of state for shock compression of distended solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, Dennis; Fenton, Gregg; Vogler, Tracy

    2014-05-01

    Shock Hugoniot data for full-density and porous compounds of boron carbide, silicon dioxide, tantalum pentoxide, uranium dioxide and playa alluvium are investigated for the purpose of equation-of-state representation of intense shock compression. Complications of multivalued Hugoniot behavior characteristic of highly distended solids are addressed through the application of enthalpy-based equations of state of the form originally proposed by Rice and Walsh in the late 1950's. Additive measures of cold and thermal pressure intrinsic to the Mie-Gruneisen EOS framework is replaced by isobaric additive functions of the cold and thermal specific volume components in the enthalpy-based formulation. Additionally, experimental evidence reveals enhancement of shock-induced phase transformation on the Hugoniot with increasing levels of initial distension for silicon dioxide, uranium dioxide and possibly boron carbide. Methods for addressing this experimentally observed feature of the shock compression are incorporated into the EOS model.

  15. Shock wave loading of a magnetic guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindt, L.

    2011-10-01

    velocities and a shock wave is created between the two velocity regions. In order to conserve number of particle, momentum and enthalpy the density of the atomic beam passing through the shock wave must increase. We have build such a shock wave in an atomic beam and observed the density increase due to this. As an extra feature having a subsonic beam on a downward slope adds an extra density increase due to gravitational compression. Loading ultra cold atoms into a 3D trap from the dense subsonic beam overcomes the problem with 2D cooling and thermal conductivity. This was done and evaporative cooling was applied creating an unprecedented large number rubidium BEC.

  16. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements under shock compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jue; Bassett, Will; Banishev, Alexandr; Dlott, Dana

    2015-06-01

    Fluorescence anisotropy measurements, where the parallel and perpendicular polarized emissions from probe molecules are acquired simultaneously, provide direct measurement of molecular rotational dynamics. In our experiments, the fluorescence from rhodamine 6G dye in various materials under GPa shocks produced by laser-driven flyer plates is collected, separated into two orthogonally-polarized beams using a Wollaston prism and detected with a streak camera. In liquids, the molecular rotations result from rotational diffusion and in solids from shear flow. The rotation rates can be used to determine the viscosity of the shocked medium.

  17. Nonplanar Shock Waves in Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mamun, A. A.; Shukla, P. K.

    2011-11-29

    Nonplanar (viz. cylindrical and spherical) electro-acoustic [dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) and dust-acoustic (DA)] shock waves have been investigated by employing the reductive perturbation method. The dust charge fluctuation (strong correlation among highly charged dust) is the source of dissipation, and is responsible for the formation of the DIA (DA) shock structures. The effects of cylindrical and spherical geometries on the time evolution of DIA and DA shock structures are examined and identified. The combined effects of vortex-like electron distribution and dust charge fluctuation (dust-correlation and effective dust-temperature) on the basic features of nonplanar DIA (DA) shock waves are pinpointed. The implications of our results in laboratory dusty plasma experiments are briefly discussed.

  18. Nonplanar Shock Waves in Dusty Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamun, A. A.; Shukla, P. K.

    2011-11-01

    Nonplanar (viz. cylindrical and spherical) electro-acoustic [dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) and dust-acoustic (DA)] shock waves have been investigated by employing the reductive perturbation method. The dust charge fluctuation (strong correlation among highly charged dust) is the source of dissipation, and is responsible for the formation of the DIA (DA) shock structures. The effects of cylindrical and spherical geometries on the time evolution of DIA and DA shock structures are examined and identified. The combined effects of vortex-like electron distribution and dust charge fluctuation (dust-correlation and effective dust-temperature) on the basic features of nonplanar DIA (DA) shock waves are pinpointed. The implications of our results in laboratory dusty plasma experiments are briefly discussed.

  19. Laser driven single shock compression of fluid deuterium from 45 to 220 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, D; Boehly, T; Celliers, P; Eggert, J; Moon, S; Meyerhofer, D; Collins, G

    2008-03-23

    The compression {eta} of liquid deuterium between 45 and 220 GPa under laser-driven shock loading has been measured using impedance matching to an aluminum (Al) standard. An Al impedance match model derived from a best fit to absolute Hugoniot data has been used to quantify and minimize the systematic errors caused by uncertainties in the high-pressure Al equation of state. In deuterium below 100 GPa results show that {eta} {approx_equal} 4.2, in agreement with previous impedance match data from magnetically-driven flyer and convergent-explosive shock wave experiments; between 100 and 220 GPa {eta} reaches a maximum of {approx}5.0, less than the 6-fold compression observed on the earliest laser-shock experiments but greater than expected from simple extrapolations of lower pressure data. Previous laser-driven double-shock results are found to be in good agreement with these single-shock measurements over the entire range under study. Both sets of laser-shock data indicate that deuterium undergoes an abrupt increase in compression at around 110 GPa.

  20. Hypersonic flow separation in shock wave boundary layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamed, A.; Kumar, Ajay

    1992-01-01

    An assessment is presented for the experimental data on separated flow in shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions at hypersonic and supersonic speeds. The data base consists mainly of two dimensional and axisymmetric interactions in compression corners or cylinder-flares, and externally generated oblique shock interactions with boundary layers over flat plates or cylindrical surfaces. The conditions leading to flow separation and the subsequent changes in the flow empirical correlations for incipient separation are reviewed. The effects of the Mach number, Reynolds number, surface cooling and the methods of detecting separation are discussed. The pertinent experimental data for the separated flow characteristics in separated turbulent boundary layer shock interaction are also presented and discussed.

  1. Magnetoacoustic shock waves in dissipative degenerate plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, S.; Mahmood, S.

    2011-11-15

    Quantum magnetoacoustic shock waves are studied in homogenous, magnetized, dissipative dense electron-ion plasma by using two fluid quantum magneto-hydrodynamic (QMHD) model. The weak dissipation effects in the system are taken into account through kinematic viscosity of the ions. The reductive perturbation method is employed to derive Korteweg-de Vries Burgers (KdVB) equation for magnetoacoustic wave propagating in the perpendicular direction to the external magnetic field in dense plasmas. The strength of magnetoacoustic shock is investigated with the variations in plasma density, magnetic field intensity, and ion kinematic viscosity of dense plasma system. The necessary condition for the existence of monotonic and oscillatory shock waves is also discussed. The numerical results are presented for illustration by using the data of astrophysical dense plasma situations such as neutron stars exist in the literature.

  2. Laser Light Scattering by Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Adamovsky, G.

    1995-01-01

    Scattering of coherent light as it propagates parallel to a shock wave, formed in front of a bluff cylindrical body placed in a supersonic stream, is studied experimentally and numerically. Two incident optical fields are considered. First, a large diameter collimated beam is allowed to pass through the shock containing flow. The light intensity distribution in the resultant shadowgraph image, measured by a low light CCD camera, shows well-defined fringes upstream and downstream of the shadow cast by the shock. In the second situation, a narrow laser beam is brought to a grazing incidence on the shock and the scattered light, which appears as a diverging sheet from the point of interaction, is visualized and measured on a screen placed normal to the laser path. Experiments are conducted on shocks formed at various free-stream Mach numbers, M, and total pressures, P(sub 0). It is found that the widths of the shock shadows in a shadowgraph image become independent of M and P(sub 0) when plotted against the jump in the refractive index, (Delta)n, created across the shock. The total scattered light measured from the narrow laser beam and shock interaction also follows the same trend. In the numerical part of the study, the shock is assumed to be a 'phase object', which introduces phase difference between the upstream and downstream propagating parts of the light disturbances. For a given shape and (Delta)n of the bow shock the phase and amplitude modulations are first calculated by ray tracing. The wave front is then propagated to the screen using the Fresnet diffraction equation. The calculated intensity distribution, for both of the incident optical fields, shows good agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Calculation of the flow field in supersonic mixed-compression inlets at angle of attack using the three-dimensional method of characteristics with discrete shock wave fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vadyak, J.; Hoffman, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of molecular transport is included in the computation by treating viscous and thermal diffusion terms in the governing partial differential equations as correction terms in the method of characteristics scheme. The development of a production type computer program is reported which is capable of calculating the flow field in a variety of axisymmetric mixed-compression aircraft inlets. The results agreed well with those produced by the two-dimensional method characteristics when axisymmetric flow fields are computed. For three-dimensional flow fields, the results agree well with experimental data except in regions of high viscous interaction and boundary layer removal.

  4. Ultrafast pressure-sensitive paint for shock compression spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banishev, Alexandr A.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2014-05-01

    A pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) consisting of rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye in poly-methylacryate (PMMA) polymer is studied during nanosecond GPa shock compression created by km s-1 laser-launched layer plates. In contrast with conventional PSP, whose response time is limited to microseconds by diffusion of O2 in porous materials, the response time of this PSP is limited to ˜10 ns by fundamental photophysical processes. The mechanism of shock-induced PSP intensity loss is shown to be shock-enhanced intersystem crossing, which transfers some R6G population from the emissive S1 state to the dark T1 state. Simulations of dye photophysics and comparisons to experiment show that the PSP is sensitive to the complicated time-dependent density profiles produced in PMMA by different duration shocks. The risetime of the PSP response is limited by the S1 lifetime under shock compression. The fall time is limited by the T1 lifetime, which can be decreased by adding triplet quenchers. The PSP can function in two modes. When dissolved O2 (a triplet quencher) was eliminated, the fall time became relatively slow (microseconds), and the PSP sampled the peak shock pressure and held that value for a long time. When dissolved O2 was present, the intensity loss recovery became faster, so the PSP could function as a transient recorder of the shock-induced time-dependent density profile.

  5. Characterizing the Thermal History of Shock-Compressed Phyllosilicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaulding, D.; Stewart, S. T.; Hankin, M.; Wizda, L.

    2013-12-01

    Phyllosilicates are known to be abundant on the surface of Mars and as matrix material in carbonaceous chondrites. It is important to understand the influence of shock processing on such materials because they are expected to play an important role in the preservation and transport of volatile chemical species. Shock effects may thus influence how volatiles are preferentially incorporated or lost during planetary accretion as well as spectral observations and interpretations of the aqueous history of planetary surfaces. Previous experiments have studied devolatilization of phyllosilicates under shock compression, though the role of temperature and the details of thermal alteration are poorly constrained. Here we measure the shock response (Hugoniot) and post-shock temperatures of Montmorillonite up to 23 GPa (shock velocities of 5.5 km/sec). We examine the relative importance of temperature and pressure for shock devolatilization and revisit the implications for the interpretation of previously published experiments. In addition, progress towards increasingly controlled shock recovery experiments is presented using the above equation of state, post-shock temperature data, and computational modeling of recovery capsule geometries.

  6. Emission Lifetimes of a Fluorescent Dye under Shock Compression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-long; Bassett, Will P; Christensen, James M; Dlott, Dana D

    2015-11-01

    The emission lifetimes of rhodamine 6G (R6G) were measured under shock compression to 9.1 GPa, with the dual intents of better understanding molecular photophysics in extreme environments and assessing the usefulness of fluorescence lifetime microscopy to measure spatially dependent pressure distributions in shocked microstructured media. R6G was studied as free dye dissolved in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), or dye encapsulated in silica microparticles suspended in PMMA. Thin layers of these materials in impedance-matched geometries were subjected to planar single-stage shocks created by laser-driven flyer plates. A synchronized femtosecond laser excited the dye at selected times relative to flyer plate arrival and the emission lifetimes were measured with a streak camera. Lifetimes decreased when shocks arrived. The lifetime decrease was attributed to a shock-induced enhancement of R6G nonradiative relaxation. At least part of the relaxation involved shock-enhanced intersystem crossing. For free dye in PMMA, the lifetime decrease during the shock was shown to be a linear function of shock pressure from 0 to 9 GPa, with a slope of -0.22 ns·GPa(-1). The linear relationship makes it simple to convert lifetimes into pressures. Lifetime measurements in shocked microenvironments may be better than emission intensity measurements, because lifetimes are sensitive to the surrounding environment, but insensitive to intensity variations associated with the motion and optical properties of a dynamically changing structure. PMID:26469397

  7. (BARS) -- Bibliographic Retrieval System Sandia Shock Compression (SSC) database Shock Physics Index (SPHINX) database. Volume 1: UNIX version query guide customized application for INGRES

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, W.; von Laven, G.M.; Parker, T.

    1993-09-01

    The Bibliographic Retrieval System (BARS) is a data base management system specially designed to retrieve bibliographic references. Two databases are available, (i) the Sandia Shock Compression (SSC) database which contains over 5700 references to the literature related to stress waves in solids and their applications, and (ii) the Shock Physics Index (SPHINX) which includes over 8000 further references to stress waves in solids, material properties at intermediate and low rates, ballistic and hypervelocity impact, and explosive or shock fabrication methods. There is some overlap in the information in the two data bases.

  8. Vorticity Transfer in Shock Wave Interactions with Turbulence and Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agui, J. H.; Andreopoulos, J.

    1998-11-01

    Time-dependent, three-dimensional vorticity measurements of shock waves interacting with grid generated turbulence and concentrated tip vortices were conducted in a large diameter shock tube facility. Two different mesh size grids and a NACA-0012 semi-span wing acting as a tip vortex generator were used to carry out different relative Mach number interactions. The turbulence interactions produced a clear amplification of the lateral and spanwise vorticity rms, while the longitudinal component remained mostly unaffected. By comparison, the tip vortex/shock wave interactions produced a two fold increase in the rms of longitudinal vorticity. Considerable attention was given to the vorticity source terms. The mean and rms of the vorticity stretching terms dominated by 5 to 7 orders of magnitude over the dilitational compression terms in all the interactions. All three signals of the stretching terms manifested very intermittent, large amplitude peak events which indicated the bursting character of the stretching process. Distributions of these signals were characterized by extremely large levels of flatness with varying degrees of skewness. These distribution patterns were found to change only slightly through the turbulence interactions. However, the tip vortex/shock wave interactions brought about significant changes in these distributions which were associated with the abrupt structural changes of the vortex after the interaction.

  9. Amorphization and nanocrystallization of silcon under shock compression

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B. A.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Zhao, S.; Hahn, E. N.; Kad, B.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2015-11-06

    High-power, short-duration, laser-driven, shock compression and recovery experiments on [001] silicon unveiled remarkable structural changes above a pressure threshold. Two distinct amorphous regions were identified: (a) a bulk amorphous layer close to the surface and (b) amorphous bands initially aligned with {111} slip planes. Further increase of the laser energy leads to the re-crystallization of amorphous silicon into nanocrystals with high concentration of nano-twins. This amorphization is produced by the combined effect of high magnitude hydrostatic and shear stresses under dynamic shock compression. Shock-induced defects play a very important role in the onset of amorphization. Calculations of the free energy changes with pressure and shear, using the Patel-Cohen methodology, are in agreement with the experimental results. Molecular dynamics simulation corroborates the amorphization, showing that it is initiated by the nucleation and propagation of partial dislocations. As a result, the nucleation of amorphization is analyzed qualitatively by classical nucleation theory.

  10. Frequency shift measurement in shock-compressed materials

    DOEpatents

    Moore, David S.; Schmidt, Stephen C.

    1985-01-01

    A method for determining molecular vibrational frequencies in shock-compressed transparent materials. A single laser beam pulse is directed into a sample material while the material is shock-compressed from a direction opposite that of the incident laser beam. A Stokes beam produced by stimulated Raman scattering is emitted back along the path of the incident laser beam, that is, in the opposite direction to that of the incident laser beam. The Stokes beam is separated from the incident beam and its frequency measured. The difference in frequency between the Stokes beam and the incident beam is representative of the characteristic frequency of the Raman active mode of the sample. Both the incident beam and the Stokes beam pass perpendicularly through the shock front advancing through the sample, thereby minimizing adverse effects of refraction.

  11. Plasma waves downstream of weak collisionless shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, F. V.; Greenstadt, E. W.; Moses, S. L.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1993-01-01

    In September 1983 the International Sun Earth Explorer 3 (ISEE 3) International Cometary Explorer (ICE) spacecraft made a long traversal of the distant dawnside flank region of the Earth's magnetosphere and had many encounters with the low Mach number bow shock. These weak shocks excite plasma wave electric field turbulence with amplitudes comparable to those detected in the much stronger bow shock near the nose region. Downstream of quasi-perpendicular (quasi-parallel) shocks, the E field spectra exhibit a strong peak (plateau) at midfrequencies (1 - 3 kHz); the plateau shape is produced by a low-frequency (100 - 300 Hz) emission which is more intense behind downstream of two quasi-perpendicular shocks show that the low frequency signals are polarized parallel to the magnetic field, whereas the midfrequency emissions are unpolarized or only weakly polarized. A new high frequency (10 - 30 kHz) emission which is above the maximum Doppler shift exhibit a distinct peak at high frequencies; this peak is often blurred by the large amplitude fluctuations of the midfrequency waves. The high-frequency component is strongly polarized along the magnetic field and varies independently of the lower-frequency waves.

  12. Optical shock waves in silica aerogel.

    PubMed

    Gentilini, S; Ghajeri, F; Ghofraniha, N; Di Falco, A; Conti, C

    2014-01-27

    Silica aerogels are materials well suited for high power nonlinear optical applications. In such regime, the non-trivial thermal properties may give rise to the generation of optical shock waves, which are also affected by the structural disorder due to the porous solid-state gel. Here we report on an experimental investigation in terms of beam waist and input power, and identify various regimes of the generation of wave-breaking phenomena in silica aerogels. PMID:24515173

  13. Weakly nonlinear dust ion-acoustic shock waves in a dusty plasma with nonthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Berbri, Abderrezak; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2009-05-15

    Weakly nonlinear dust ion-acoustic (DIA) shock waves are investigated in a dusty plasma with nonthermal electrons. A modified Korteweg-de Vries equation with a cubic nonlinearity is derived. Due to the net negative dust charge {mu}Z{sub d} and electron nonthermality, the present plasma model can admit compressive and rarefactive weak DIA shock waves. The effect of increasing {mu}Z{sub d} is to lower the critical nonthermal parameter {beta}{sub c} above which only rarefactive DIA shock waves are admitted. Our investigation may help to understand the nonlinear structures observed in the auroral acceleration regions.

  14. Shock Compressing Diamond to a Conducting Fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D K; Eggert, J H; Hicks, D G; Celliers, P M; Moon, S J; Cauble, R C; Collins, G W

    2004-07-29

    Laser generated shock reflectance data show that diamond undergoes a continuous transition from optically absorbing to reflecting between Hugoniot pressures 600

  15. Determination of dynamic shear strength of 2024 aluminum alloy under shock compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. S.; Yan, M.; Wang, H. Y.; Shen, L. T.; Dai, L. H.

    2016-04-01

    A series of plate impact shock-reshock and shock-release experiments were conducted by using an one-stage light gas gun to determine the critical shear strength of the 2024 aluminum alloy under shock compression levels ranging from 0.66 to 3.05 GPa in the present study. In the experiments, a dual flyer plate assembly, i.e., the 2024 aluminum alloy flyer backed either by a brass plate or a PMMA plate, was utilized to produce reshock or release wave. The stress profiles of uniaxial plane strain wave propagation in the 2024 aluminum alloy sample under different pre-compressed states were measured by the embedded stress gauges. The stress-strain data at corresponding states were then calculated by a Lagrangian analysis method named as path line method. The critical shear strengths at different stress levels were finally obtained by self-consistent method. The results show that, at the low shock compression level (0.66 to 3.05 GPa), the critical shear strength of the 2024 aluminum alloy cannot be ignored and increases with the increasing longitudinal stress, which may be attributed to rate-dependence and/or pressure dependent yield behavior of the 2024 aluminum alloy.

  16. Compression Shocks in Two-Dimensional Gas Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busemann, A.

    1949-01-01

    The following are arguments on the compression shocks in gas flow start with a simplified representation of the results of the study made by Th. Meyer as published in the Forschungsheft 62 of the VDI, supplemented by several amplifications for the application.In the treatment of compression shocks, the equation of energy, the equation of continuity, the momentum equation, the equation of state of the particular gas, as well as the condition Of the second law of thermodynamics that no decrease of entropy is possible in an isolated system, must be taken into consideration. The result is that, in those cases where the sudden change of state according to the second law of thermodynamics is possible, there always occurs a compression of the gas which is uniquely determined by the other conditions.

  17. Chromospheric heating by acoustic shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Stuart D.

    1993-01-01

    Work by Anderson & Athay (1989) suggests that the mechanical energy required to heat the quiet solar chromosphere might be due to the dissipation of weak acoustic shocks. The calculations reported here demonstrate that a simple picture of chromospheric shock heating by acoustic waves propagating upward through a model solar atmosphere, free of both magnetic fields and local inhomogeneities, cannot reproduce their chromospheric model. The primary reason is the tendency for vertically propagating acoustic waves in the range of allowed periods to dissipate too low in the atmosphere, providing insufficient residual energy for the middle chromosphere. The effect of diverging magnetic fields and the corresponding expanding acoustic wavefronts on the mechanical dissipation length is then discussed as a means of preserving a quasi-acoustic heating hypothesis. It is argued that this effect, in a canopy that overlies the low chromosphere, might preserve the acoustic shock hypothesis consistent with the chromospheric radiation losses computed by Anderson & Athay.

  18. Shock Wave Dynamics in Weakly Ionized Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Joseph A., III

    1998-01-01

    We have begun a comprehensive series of analyses and experiments to study the basic problem of shock wave dynamics in ionized media. Our objective is to isolate the mechanisms that are responsible for the decrease in the shock amplitude and also to determine the relevant plasma parameters that will be required for a drag reduction scheme in an actual high altitude hypersonic flight. Specifically, we have initiated a program of analyses and measurements with the objective of (i) fully characterizing the propagation dynamics in plasmas formed in gases of aerodynamic interest, (ii) isolating the mechanisms responsible for the decreased shock strength and increased shock velocity, (iii) extrapolating the laboratory observations to the technology of supersonic flight.

  19. Reactive, anomalous compression in shocked polyurethane foams

    SciTech Connect

    Dattelbaum, Dana M. Gustavsen, Richard L.; Coe, Joshua D. Kiyanda, Charles B.; Patterson, Brian M.

    2014-05-07

    We present the results of plate impact experiments performed on 30%–75% porous, polymeric methylene diphenyl diisocyanate polyurethane foams. The combination of new data with those previously obtained on full-density material was used to calibrate complete equations-of-state under both inert and chemically reactive frameworks. Description of unreacted polyurethane was based on a combination of Hayes and P-α models, whereas its decomposition products were predicted via free energy minimization under the assumption of chemical and thermodynamic equilibrium. Correspondence of experiment and theory suggests that polyurethane at all densities decomposes when shocked above some threshold pressure, and that this threshold falls dramatically as a function of initial porosity. The shock locus of foams at 50% or less of theoretical maximum density was found “anomalous” in the sense that final volumes increased with pressure. We attribute this anomaly to chemical decomposition of the initial matrix to a mixture of small-molecule fluids and bulk carbon (graphite or diamond, depending on the initial density)

  20. Reactive, anomalous compression in shocked polyurethane foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Coe, Joshua D.; Kiyanda, Charles B.; Gustavsen, Richard L.; Patterson, Brian M.

    2014-05-01

    We present the results of plate impact experiments performed on 30%-75% porous, polymeric methylene diphenyl diisocyanate polyurethane foams. The combination of new data with those previously obtained on full-density material was used to calibrate complete equations-of-state under both inert and chemically reactive frameworks. Description of unreacted polyurethane was based on a combination of Hayes and P-α models, whereas its decomposition products were predicted via free energy minimization under the assumption of chemical and thermodynamic equilibrium. Correspondence of experiment and theory suggests that polyurethane at all densities decomposes when shocked above some threshold pressure, and that this threshold falls dramatically as a function of initial porosity. The shock locus of foams at 50% or less of theoretical maximum density was found "anomalous" in the sense that final volumes increased with pressure. We attribute this anomaly to chemical decomposition of the initial matrix to a mixture of small-molecule fluids and bulk carbon (graphite or diamond, depending on the initial density).

  1. Shock wave absorber having a deformable liner

    DOEpatents

    Youngdahl, C.K.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Shin, Y.W.; Kot, C.A.; Ockert, C.E.

    1983-08-26

    This invention discloses a shock wave absorber for a piping system carrying liquid. The absorber has a plastically deformable liner defining the normal flow boundary for an axial segment of the piping system, and a nondeformable housing is spaced outwardly from the liner so as to define a gas-tight space therebetween. The flow capacity of the liner generally corresponds to the flow capacity of the piping system line, but the liner has a noncircular cross section and extends axially of the piping system line a distance between one and twenty times the diameter thereof. Gas pressurizes the gas-tight space equal to the normal liquid pressure in the piping system. The liner has sufficient structural capacity to withstand between one and one-half and two times this normal liquid pressures; but at greater pressures it begins to plastically deform initially with respect to shape to a more circular cross section, and then with respect to material extension by circumferentially stretching the wall of the liner. A high energy shock wave passing through the liner thus plastically deforms the liner radially into the gas space and progressively also as needed in the axial direction of the shock wave to minimize transmission of the shock wave beyond the absorber.

  2. Colliding electromagnetic shock waves in general relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Halilsoy, M.

    1988-04-15

    We derive a new, exact solution for the Einstein-Maxwell equations that describes the collision (interaction) of two arbitrarily polarized electromagnetic shock waves. In the limit that the polarization angle vanishes, our solution reduces to the Bell-Szekeres solution.

  3. Uncovering the Secret of Shock Wave Lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, P.

    Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) is an engineering innovation that has revolutionized the treatment of kidney stone disease since the early 1980s [1] - [3]. Today, SWL is the first-line therapy for millions of patients worldwide with renal and upper urinary stones [3, 4].

  4. 21 CFR 876.5990 - Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... focuses ultrasonic shock waves into the body to noninvasively fragment urinary calculi within the kidney... Notifications (510(k)'s) for Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripters Indicated for the Fragmentation of...

  5. 21 CFR 876.5990 - Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... focuses ultrasonic shock waves into the body to noninvasively fragment urinary calculi within the kidney... Notifications (510(k)'s) for Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripters Indicated for the Fragmentation of...

  6. 21 CFR 876.5990 - Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... focuses ultrasonic shock waves into the body to noninvasively fragment urinary calculi within the kidney... Notifications (510(k)'s) for Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripters Indicated for the Fragmentation of...

  7. 21 CFR 876.5990 - Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... focuses ultrasonic shock waves into the body to noninvasively fragment urinary calculi within the kidney... Notifications (510(k)'s) for Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripters Indicated for the Fragmentation of...

  8. 21 CFR 876.5990 - Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... focuses ultrasonic shock waves into the body to noninvasively fragment urinary calculi within the kidney... Notifications (510(k)'s) for Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripters Indicated for the Fragmentation of...

  9. Shock wave propagation in glow discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, B. N.

    1998-10-01

    The modification of acoustic shock wave propagation characteristics in a 25 cm long positive column low pressure (10 to 50 Torr), low current density (2 to 10 mA/cm^2) argon and N2 dc discharges have been measured by laser beam deflection technique. The simultaneous multi point shock velocity, dispersion and damping have been measured both inside and outside the glow discharge region. The local shock velocity is found to increase with the increased propagation path length through the discharge; for Mach number greater than 1.7 the upstream velocity exceeded the downstream velocity in contrast to the opposite behavior in neutral gas. The damping and dispersion are also dependent on the propagation distance. The recovery of the shock dispersion and damping in the post discharge region, for a given discharge condition, are functions of the initial Mach number. The optical measurement of the wall and the gas (rotational) temperatures suggest the observed shock features can not be solely explained by the gas heating in a self sustained discharge. The results are similar for both Ar and N2 discharges showing that vibrational excitation and relaxation are not essential^1. The explanation of the observed weak shock propagation properties in a glow discharge appears to require long range cooperative interactions that enhance heavy particle collisional energy transfer rates for the measured discharge conditions. Unlike collisional shock wave propagation in highly ionized plasmas^2,3, the exact energy coupling mechanism between the nonequilibrium weakly ionized plasma and shock is not understood. 1. A.I. Osipov and A.V. Uvarov, Sov. Phys. Usp. 35, 903 (1992) and other references there in. 2. M. Casanova, O. Larroche and J-P Matte, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 2143 (1991). 3. M.C.M. van de Sanden, R. van den Bercken and D.C. Schram, Plasma Sources Sci.Technol. 3, 511 (1994).

  10. Experimental Plans for Subsystems of a Shock Wave Driven Gas Core Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazeminezhad, F.; Anghai, S.

    2008-01-01

    This Contractor Report proposes a number of plans for experiments on subsystems of a shock wave driven pulsed magnetic induction gas core reactor (PMI-GCR, or PMD-GCR pulsed magnet driven gas core reactor). Computer models of shock generation and collision in a large-scale PMI-GCR shock tube have been performed. Based upon the simulation results a number of issues arose that can only be addressed adequately by capturing experimental data on high pressure (approx.1 atmosphere or greater) partial plasma shock wave effects in large bore shock tubes ( 10 cm radius). There are three main subsystems that are of immediate interest (for appraisal of the concept viability). These are (1) the shock generation in a high pressure gas using either a plasma thruster or pulsed high magnetic field, (2) collision of MHD or gas dynamic shocks, their interaction time, and collision pile-up region thickness, and (3) magnetic flux compression power generation (not included here).