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Sample records for compromised patients part

  1. The medically compromised patient.

    PubMed

    Parnell, A G

    1986-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is found in up to 5 per cent of the population. There is an excess of blood sugar due to a deficiency or diminished effectiveness of insulin. It is a complex disease which, if not controlled, has many major complications including an increased incidence of heart attacks, strokes and vascular changes in many other organs. The management of young onset diabetic patients is directed towards: controlling the carbohydrate intake, testing the blood sugar by the patient and regular insulin injections. Great care must be taken in treating diabetics in the dental surgery. Except for children, any diabetic can be treated for simple dental procedures by ensuring freedom from pain, by eliminating stress and by ensuring that the patient does not miss a meal. Children, unstable diabetic patients and those with infections or requiring multiple extractions should be treated in hospital under the care of an endocrinologist. In hypertension it is only after a number of years that complications begin to appear. The main ones are those of stroke, retinal haemorrhages, renal failure and heart disease. Dentists should be encouraged to take the blood pressure of all adults who present for treatment. Patients with increased blood pressure yet controlled by drugs may be treated as normal patients. Those that are not well controlled should be referred to their physician. Dental appointments must be free of pain and stress should be avoided. A screening method is presented which assists in the evaluation of medically compromised patients. PMID:2941377

  2. Patient-clinician conflict: causes and compromises.

    PubMed

    Lask, Bryan

    2003-03-01

    Conflict is an everyday phenomenon, a part of everyday life. It is hardly surprising that it also occurs in a clinical setting, not only between clinicians and within teams, but also between patients, their families and clinicians. This is all the more the likely in a setting that deals with a chronic disease such as CF. The physical, emotional, social and practical burdens of the illness are such that coping mechanisms are stretched to their limits. Disagreements, misunderstandings, impaired trust and different expectations may all challenge the patient-clinician relationship. In a context in which children and adolescents form at least half the clientele, the potential for conflict is intensified because of the involvement of parents. This paper emphasises the normality of such conflicts, and using case illustrations, explains the reasons for conflicts and explores how best to resolve them. The basic principles of conflict-resolution are outlined, and useful techniques, readily applicable in everyday practice, are described. PMID:15463846

  3. Compromised quality of life in adult patients who have received a radiation dose towards the basal part of the brain. A case-control study in long-term survivors from cancer in the head and neck region

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Adult patients with hypothalamic-pituitary disorders have compromised quality of life (QoL). Whether this is due to their endocrine consequences (hypopituitarism), their underlying hypothalamic-pituitary disorder or both is still under debate. The aim of this trial was to measure quality of life (QoL) in long-term cancer survivors who have received a radiation dose to the basal part of the brain and the pituitary. Methods Consecutive patients (n=101) treated for oropharyngeal or epipharyngeal cancer with radiotherapy followed free of cancer for a period of 4 to10 years were identified. Fifteen patients (median age 56 years) with no concomitant illness and no hypopituitarism after careful endocrine evaluation were included in a case-control study with matched healthy controls. Doses to the hypothalamic-pituitary region were calculated. QoL was assessed using the Symptom check list (SCL)-90, Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), and Psychological Well Being (PGWB) questionnaires. Level of physical activity was assessed using the Baecke questionnaire. Results The median accumulated dose was 1.9 Gy (1.5–2.2 Gy) to the hypothalamus and 2.4 Gy (1.8–3.3 Gy) to the pituitary gland in patients with oropharyngeal cancer and 6.0–9.3 Gy and 33.5–46.1 Gy, respectively in patients with epipharyngeal cancer (n=2). The patients showed significantly more anxiety and depressiveness, and lower vitality, than their matched controls. Conclusion In a group of long time survivors of head and neck cancer who hade received a low radiation dose to the hypothalamic-pituitary region and who had no endocrine consequences of disease or its treatment QoL was compromised as compared with well matched healthy controls. PMID:23101561

  4. Implant surgery in healthy compromised patients-review of literature.

    PubMed

    Gheorghiu, I M; Stoian, I M

    2014-01-01

    Systemic diseases are of major importance in terms of prosthetic restorations supported by dental implants in healthy compromised patients. Each treatment stage from conception of the treatment plan to the long-term monitoring is under the necessity of the interdisciplinary approach to the underlying disease. PMID:25870664

  5. Video-assisted thoracoscopy in compromised pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Gamba, Piergiorgio; Midrio, Paola; Betalli, Pietro; Snijders, Deborah; Leon, Francesco Fascetti

    2010-02-01

    The use of video-assisted techniques (VATs) in the paediatric field has become increasingly more frequent, based on reports of prompter recovery following VATs in respect to standard techniques. Specific advantages have been documented, in particular for pediatric patients undergoing chemioradiotherapic treatment. We retrospectively reviewed data of severely compromised patients who underwent VAT for lung wedge resections and biopsies carried out in our center over a 7-year period. As far as the area of therapeutic tumor resection is concerned, the present data are consistent with the view that thoracoscopy is both an effective and safe tool in diagnostic procedures. PMID:19811063

  6. Progress in Pain Assessment: The Cognitively Compromised Patient

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, C. Richard

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Pain assessment is essential for patient care in many settings, but it proves difficult when the patient is cognitively compromised or otherwise unable to produce a conventional pain report. This review describes progress in pain assessment technology that involves the coding of human facial expression. Recent findings It is possible to quantify facial expression by coding patterns of facial muscle contraction and relaxation. These patterns are action units, and they can gauge the intensity of pain as well as signal its occurrence. The experience of pain seems to generate a unique facial expression comprising several action units. Concerns have existed about whether demented patients produce diagnostically meaningful facial expressions of pain because they tend to generate more non-specific facial expressions and perhaps code pain intensity less well than normals. Recent work shows that facial expression reflects pain as well or better in demented patients compared to normals. Summary Although still nascent, coded facial expression appears to work reliably as a pain assessment tool with cognitively compromised patients. Clinical application awaits the development of technology that can automate facial coding and scoring. PMID:18784487

  7. Secretion of salivary statherin is compromised in uncontrolled diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Masahiro; Zhang, Bin-Xian; Dean, David D.; Lin, Alan L.; Saunders, Michèle J.; Hazuda, Helen P.; Yeh, Chih-Ko

    2015-01-01

    Background Statherin is an important salivary protein for maintaining oral health. The purpose of the current study was to determine if differences in statherin levels exist between diabetic and healthy subjects. Methods A total of 48 diabetic and healthy controls were randomly selected from a community-based database. Diabetic subjects (n = 24) had fasting glucose levels > 180 mg/dL, while controls (n = 24) had levels < 110 mg/dL. Parotid saliva (PS) and sublingual/submandibular saliva (SS) were collected and salivary flow rates determined. Salivary statherin levels were determined by densitometry of Western blots. Blood hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and total protein in saliva were also obtained. Results SS, but not PS, salivary flow rate and total protein in diabetics were significantly less than those in healthy controls (p = 0.021 & p < 0.001 respectively). Correlation analysis revealed the existence of a negative correlation between PS statherin levels and HbA1c (p = 0.012) and fasting glucose (p = 0.021) levels, while no such correlation was found for SS statherin levels. When statherin levels were normalized to total salivary protein, the proportion of PS statherin, but not SS statherin, in diabetics was significantly less than that in controls (p = 0.032). In contrast, the amount of statherin secretion in SS, but not PS, was significantly decreased in diabetics compared to controls (p = 0.016). Conclusions and general significance The results show that synthesis and secretion of statherin is reduced in diabetics and this reduction is salivary gland specific. As compromised salivary statherin secretion leads to increased oral health risk, this study indicates that routine oral health assessment of these patients is warranted. PMID:25793156

  8. An interactive case study assessment. Nursing care of the cancer patient with compromised immunity: practicum cases.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, P N; Adsit, K I; Volker, D

    1991-01-01

    This demonstration will present an interactive videodisc (IVD) case study assessment of nursing care of the immunocompromised cancer patient. This module is the third part of a series of instructional IVD programs entitled Nursing Care of the Cancer Patient with Compromised Immunity. The series has been developed to provide education for fourth year nursing students, experienced nurses new to the field of oncology nursing, and for continuing education. The series has been developed to run on an InfoWindow platform and can also run on an M-Motion system. The demonstration will cover the rationale, treatment, content, and instructional strategies used in the module. The technology including the development platform and authoring environment will also be presented. PMID:1807768

  9. Implant failure associated with actinomycosis in a medically compromised patient.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chun-Xiao; Henkin, Jeffrey M; Ririe, Craig; Javadi, Elham

    2013-04-01

    Oral actinomycosis is not a common disease, but it can cause massive destruction. This article reports a case of implant failure associated with actinomycosis. A 55-year-old Caucasian male patient had tooth #20 extracted years ago and an implant placed 3 years ago. The #20 implant area developed an abscess about 1½ years after implant placement. Radiographic findings revealed a large radiolucency on the mesial aspect of the #20 implant. The implant was surgically removed and the lesion thoroughly debrided. The patient experienced severe pain when the apical soft tissue was curreted following implant removal. A periapical radiograph revealed that the lesion approached the mental foramen. A short course of antibiotics was prescribed. Histological observation found sulfur granules, which were found to be actinomycotic colonies. Peri-implant actinomycosis was diagnosed. No recurrence had occurred at the 1-year follow-up. PMID:21767210

  10. Full mouth rehabilitation in a medically compromised patient with fluorosis.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Ramta; Jain, Aditya; Mittal, Sunandan; Kumar, Tarun

    2014-07-01

    Severely worn out dentition needs to be given definite attention as it not only affects aesthetics but can also cause psychological distress to the affected individual. It can cause chewing difficulty, temporomandibular joint problems, headaches, pain and facial collapse. Before any attempt to restore severely worn dentition, aetiology of excessive tooth wear should be established. Severe wear can result from chemical cause, mechanical cause or a combination of various causes. Dental fluorosis can also result in severe wear of teeth. Teeth sometimes become extremely porous and friable with a mottled appearance ranging from yellow to brown-black. There occurs loss of tooth substance and anatomic dental deformities resulting in un-aesthetic dentition requiring full mouth rehabilitation. Here a similar case of full mouth rehabilitation of severely worn dentition due to dental fluorosis in a 27-year-old patient is presented. This case report conjointly presents the uncommon association of diabetes insipidus with dental fluorosis. Diabetes insipidus through its characteristic symptom of polydipsia can result in intake of more than permitted dose of fluoride thus causing dental fluorosis. In literature only few cases have been reported of dental fluorosis in association of diabetes insipidus. Full mouth rehabilitation of the patient was successfully accomplished through well-planned systematic approach to simultaneously fulfill aesthetic, occlusal and functional parameters. PMID:25177654

  11. Orthodontic treatment in the severely compromised periodontal patient.

    PubMed

    Feu, Daniela; Menezes, Fernanda Catharino; Augusto Mendes Miguel, José; Cardoso Abdo Quintão, Catia

    2012-12-01

    We describe the diagnosis and treatment of a class II division 1 malocclusion complicated by severe periodontal disease, tooth loss, dentoalveolar protrusion associated with tipping and extrusion of the maxillary incisors, and a traumatic occlusion. Treatment involved the use of a modified palatal arch to intrude and retract the maxillary incisors and high-pull headgear to enhance anchorage and correct the Class II relationship. After active treatment for 19 months, a good anterior occlusion was achieved, with 17° of lingual retroclination and 3 mm of intrusion at the apex of the maxillary incisors. An acceptable occlusion and periodontal status was maintained over a retention period of 2 years. With the patient's cooperation, a successful outcome was achieved with this approach. PMID:23269694

  12. Is patient confidentiality compromised with the electronic health record?: a position paper.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Ilse M

    2015-02-01

    In order for electronic health records to fulfill their expected benefits, protection of privacy of patient information is key. Lack of trust in confidentiality can lead to reluctance in disclosing all relevant information, which could have grave consequences. This position paper contemplates whether patient confidentiality is compromised by electronic health records. The position that confidentiality is compromised was supported by the four bioethical principles and argued that despite laws and various safeguards to protect patients' confidentiality, numerous data breaches have occurred. The position that confidentiality is not compromised was supported by virtue ethics and a utilitarian viewpoint and argued that safeguards keep information confidential and the public feels relatively safe with the electronic health record. The article concludes with an ethically superior position that confidentiality is compromised with the electronic health record. Although organizational and governmental ways of enhancing the confidentiality of patient information within the electronic health record facilitate confidentiality, the ultimate responsibility of maintaining confidentiality rests with the individual end-users and their ethical code of conduct. The American Nurses Association Code of Ethics for nurses calls for nurses to be watchful with data security in electronic communications. PMID:25532832

  13. Clinical Outcomes of Osseointegrated Prosthetic Auricular Reconstruction in Patients With a Compromised Ipsilateral Temporoparietal Fascial Flap.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Kevin J; Wilkes, Gordon H

    2016-01-01

    Patients with major ear deformities and associated compromise of the superficial temporal artery are poor candidates for autogenous ear reconstruction because of a tenuous ipsilateral temporoparietal fascial flap (TPFF). Osseointegrated prosthetic auricular reconstruction (OPAR) is an alternative to contralateral free TPFF microsurgical and autogenous reconstruction, but data on clinical outcomes are limited. The records of patients with ear loss or major deformity and a compromised ipsilateral TPFF who underwent OPAR from 1989 to 2013 were reviewed. Satisfaction was assessed using a questionnaire based on a 5 point Likert scale. Thirty-two patients (8 women, 24 men) with mean age 43.0 years (range, 10-70 years) underwent OPAR. The ipsilateral TPFF was compromised due to major trauma (13 patients), cancer extirpation (9), burn injury (4), previous harvest (4), arteriovenous malformation (1), or infection (1). All but 2 patients had an associated craniofacial defect, such as soft tissue deformity (87.5%), hearing loss (46.9%), or bony deformity (31.3%). The overall implant success rate was 88.6% at mean follow-up time of 7.6 years post-OPAR. Prosthesis wear averaged 12.2 hours/day and 6.6 days/week (80.5 hours/week). All 5 patients who experienced implant failures had received prior head and neck irradiation. With their prosthesis, 76.2% (16 patients) stated that their self-consciousness and self-esteem were "better" or "much better," whereas 85.7% (18 patients) stated that their self-image was "better" or "much better." All patients declared that they would undergo the treatment again. Osseointegrated prosthetic auricular reconstruction is a reliable option in this challenging population with high patient satisfaction. Patients with prior radiotherapy may have a higher chance of implant failure and would benefit from extended annual follow-up. PMID:26703031

  14. Indications and contraindications of dental implants in medically compromised patients: Update

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-de Diego, Rafael; Mang-de la Rosa, María del Rocío; Romero-Pérez, María J.; Cutando-Soriano, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the current scientific literature in order to analyse the indications and contraindications of dental implants in medically compromised patients. A reference research was carried out on PubMed using the key words “implant” AND (oral OR dental) AND (systemic disease OR medically compromised), in articles published between 1993 and 2013. The inclusion criteria were the following: clinical studies in which, at least, 10 patients were treated, consensus articles, reviewed articles and meta-analysis performed in humans treated with dental implants, and which included the disease diagnosis. A total of 64 articles were found, from which 16 met the inclusion criteria. Cardiac systemic diseases, diabetic endocrine pathologies or controlled metabolic disorders do not seem to be a total or partial contraindication to the placement of dental implants. Tobacco addiction, and head and neck radiotherapy are correlated to a higher loss of dental implants. Patients suffering from osteoporosis undergoing biphosphonates therapy show an increased risk of developing bone necrosis after an oral surgery, especially if the drugs are administered intravenously or they are associated to certain concomitant medication. Key words:Dental implants, medically compromised patient, systemic diseases. PMID:24608222

  15. Axillary lymph node tuberculosis masquerading as inflammatory breast carcinoma in an immune-compromised patient.

    PubMed

    Chikkannaiah, Panduranga; Vani, B R; Benachinmardi, Kirtilaxmi; Murthy, V Srinivasa

    2016-02-01

    While tuberculosis is still the leading opportunistic infection among human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive patients, extra-pulmonary tuberculosis is more common than pulmonary tuberculosis, with lymph nodes being a common site. Axillary lymph node pathology such as tuberculosis and lymphoma rarely mimics inflammatory breast carcinoma by producing lymphatic obstruction. We report a case of axillary lymph node tuberculosis in a 40-year-old immune-compromised woman, clinically presenting as inflammatory breast carcinoma. PMID:25681261

  16. Mycobacterium mucogenicum bacteremia in immune-compromised patients, 2008-2013.

    PubMed

    Abidi, M Z; Ledeboer, N; Banerjee, A; Hari, P

    2016-06-01

    Mycobacterium mucogenicum (MM) is a rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacterium that may rarely cause bacteremia in immune-compromised hosts. All MM cases from 2008 to 2013 were analyzed across 4 risk groups: stem cell transplantation (SCT), hematologic malignancy, solid tumors, and others. Descriptive analysis was performed, as well as comparative analysis of neutropenic patients (absolute neutrophil count ≤1000/μL) with nonneutropenic patients. Of 39 MM cases, 27 patients had undergone SCT. Neutropenia was present in 12 patients. There was a significant difference in the presence of fever at the time of MM bacteremia between neutropenic and nonneutropenic groups (92% versus 42%; P=0.005). Central venous catheter (CVC) was present in 33 cases. All patients were treated with >1 antibiotic. Most frequently used combination antibiotic regimen involved clarithromycin and amikacin. Median duration of antibiotic treatment was 42days. Bacteremia resolved in all cases with CVC removal and combination antibiotic treatment. PMID:27117516

  17. Medial and Lateral Plantar Artery Angiosome Rotational Flaps for Transmetatarsal and Lisfranc Amputation in Patients With Compromised Plantar Tissue.

    PubMed

    Boffeli, Troy J; Waverly, Brett J

    2016-01-01

    Traditional incision techniques for midfoot amputation might not provide immediate soft tissue coverage of the underlying metatarsal and tarsal bones in the presence of a large plantar soft tissue defect. Patients undergoing transmetatarsal and Lisfranc amputation frequently have compromised plantar tissue in association with neuropathic ulcers, forefoot gangrene, and infection, necessitating wide resection as a part of the amputation procedure. Open amputation will routinely be performed under these circumstances, although secondary healing could be compromised owing to residual bone exposure. Alternatively, the surgeon might elect to perform a more proximal lower extremity amputation, which will allow better soft tissue coverage but compromises function of the lower extremity. A third option for this challenging situation is to modify the plantar flap incision design to incorporate a medial or lateral plantar artery angiosome-based rotational flap, which will provide immediate coverage of the forefoot and midfoot soft tissue defects without excessive shortening of the bone structure. A plantar medial soft tissue defect is treated with the lateral plantar artery angiosome flap, and a plantar lateral defect is treated with the medial plantar artery angiosome flap. Medial and lateral flaps can be combined to cover a central plantar wound defect. Incorporating large rotational flaps requires knowledge of the applicable angiosome anatomy and specific modifications to incision planning and dissection techniques to ensure adequate soft tissue coverage and preservation of the blood supply to the flap. A series of 4 cases with an average follow-up duration of 5.75 years is presented to demonstrate our patient selection criteria, flap design principles, dissection pearls, and surgical staging protocol. PMID:25681945

  18. Evaluation of instant cup noodle, irradiated for immuno-compromised patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji-Hye; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Park, Jae-Nam; Yoon, Young-Min; Sung, Nak-Yun; Kim, Jae-Hun; Song, Beom-Seok; Yook, Hong-Sun; Kim, Byeong-Keun; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2012-08-01

    In the present study, initial microbial load of instant cup noodle (ICN) was investigated and gamma irradiation applied to develop immuno-compromised patients food for their safe consumption. The initial microbial population of dried vegetable and meat, and noodle was below the detection limit (1 log CFU/g); however, that of seasoning powder was just above 4 log CFU/g. Moreover, rehydrated-ICN with water at 100 °C still show above 3 log CFU/g of microbial load, which indicates the need for an additional process to control microbial safety of the seasoning powder. The total aerobic bacteria in seasoning powder and rehydrated-ICN could be controlled with 17 kGy gamma irradiation. This result referred 17 kGy gamma irradiation could reach 'practical sterility' of ICN. The overall difference in sensory properties between the non-irradiated and irradiated ICN was insignificant. Thus, gamma irradiation could improve the microbial quality of ICN, and reduce the risk of infection posed by the seasoning powder, without any adverse effects on their sensory quality. These results suggest that gamma-irradiated ICN can be used as a snack food for immuno-compromised patients.

  19. Immediate implants and immediate loading in periodontally compromised patients-a 3-year prospective clinical study.

    PubMed

    Alves, Celia Coutinho; Correia, Andre Ricardo; Neves, Manuel

    2010-10-01

    To avoid the necessity of a removable provisional prosthesis, and therefore preserve the patient's functional outcome, esthetics, and quality of life, a clinical protocol was developed to approach periodontally compromised patients presenting a full-arch irreversibly lost dentition: full-arch extraction and immediate replacement with a provisional acrylic resin implant-supported fixed partial denture (FPD). A total of 23 periodontally compromised patients (11 women, 12 men; 4 smokers, 4 controlled diabetics) were included in this study. Pretreatment casts were taken and vertical dimension of occlusion was determined. In most patients, 6 Straumann implants were distributed along the arch according to the surgical guide or bone availability, with the most distal ones in the maxilla slightly tilted so they could emerge more distally. A total of 168 implants (146 Straumann, 10 Nobel Biocare, 8 Biomet 3i, and 4 Lifecore) were placed (83 in the maxilla, 85 in the mandible). Of those in the maxilla, 74 were loaded immediately (implant stability quotient mentor [ISQm] > 70) and 9 placed with delayed loading (ISQm =/< 70). Of the 85 implants placed in the mandible, all were loaded immediately (ISQm > 70). If an FPD had not been fabricated already, impressions were taken during surgery to do so. The prosthesis was then adapted (cemented or screwed) to the 6 implants within the first 48 hours postsurgery. After 2 months, definitive impressions were taken, and a definitive porcelain-fused-to-metal implant-supported 12-element FPD was fabricated and cemented or screwed to all 6 implants. Of the 168 implants, 108 were immediate implants and 159 immediately loaded. Only 2 implants (1 in the mandible, 1 in the maxilla) did not osseointegrate. This yields a 3-year cumulative survival rate of 98.74% (98.65% in the maxilla, 98.82% in the mandible). From a total of 26 immediately loaded prostheses (12 in the maxilla, 14 in the mandible), 6 were cemented and 20 screw-retained. The 3

  20. Respect in forensic psychiatric nurse-patient relationships: a practical compromise.

    PubMed

    Rose, Donald N; Peter, Elizabeth; Gallop, Ruth; Angus, Jan E; Liaschenko, Joan

    2011-03-01

    The context of forensic psychiatric nursing is distinct from other psychiatric settings as, it involves placement of patients in secure environments with restrictions determined by the courts. Previous literature has identified that nurses morally struggle with respecting patients who have committed heinous offences, which can lead to the patient being depersonalized and dehumanized. Although respect is fundamental to ethical nursing practice, it has not been adequately explored conceptually or empirically. As a result, little knowledge exists that identifies how nurses develop, maintain, and express respect for patients. The purpose of this study is to analyze the concept of respect systematically, from a forensic psychiatric nurse's perspective using the qualitative methodology of focused ethnography. Forensic psychiatric nurses were recruited from two medium secure forensic rehabilitation units. In the first interview, 13 registered nurses (RNs) and two registered practical nurses (RPNs) participated, and although all informants were invited to the second interview, six RNs were lost to follow-up. Despite this loss, saturation was achieved and the data were interpreted through a feminist philosophical lens. Respect was influenced by factors categorized into four themes: (1) emotive-cognitive reactions, (2) nonjudgmental approach, (3) social identity and power, and (4) context. The data from the themes indicate that forensic psychiatric nurses strike a practical compromise, in their understanding and enactment of respect in therapeutic relationships with forensic psychiatric patients. PMID:21348929

  1. Cost of Herpes Zoster in Patients With Selected Immune-Compromised Conditions in the United States.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Chen, Shih-Yin; Burstin, Stuart J; Levin, Myron J; Suaya, Jose A

    2016-04-01

    Background.  This retrospective study investigates the healthcare costs of herpes zoster (HZ) in patients with selected immune-compromised (IC) conditions in the United States (US). Methods.  Patients with incident HZ diagnosis (index date) were selected from nationwide administrative claims databases from 2005 to 2009. Baseline IC groups, analyzed separately, included adults aged 18-64 years with the following: human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV), solid organ transplant (SOT), bone marrow or stem cell transplant (BMSCT), or cancer; and older adults (aged ≥65 years) with cancer. Herpes zoster patients (n = 2020, n = 1053, n = 286, n = 13 178, and n = 9089, respectively) were 1-to-1 matched to controls without HZ (with randomly selected index date) in the same baseline group. The healthcare resource utilization and costs (2014 US dollars) during the first 2 postindex quarters were compared between matched cohorts with continuous enrollment during the quarter. Results.  Herpes zoster patients generally had greater use of inpatient, emergency room and outpatient services, and pain medications than matched controls (P < .05). The incremental costs of HZ during the first postindex quarter were $3056, $2649, $13 332, $2549, and $3108 for HIV, SOT, BMSCT, cancer in adults aged 18-64 years, and cancer in older adults, respectively (each P < .05). The incremental costs of HZ during the second quarter were only significant for adults aged 18-64 years with cancer ($1748, P < .05). The national incremental costs of HZ were projected to be $298 million annually across the 5 IC groups. Conclusions.  The healthcare cost associated with HZ among patients with studied IC conditions was sizable and occurred mainly during the first 90 days after diagnosis. PMID:27419151

  2. Cost of Herpes Zoster in Patients With Selected Immune-Compromised Conditions in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Chen, Shih-Yin; Burstin, Stuart J.; Levin, Myron J.; Suaya, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. This retrospective study investigates the healthcare costs of herpes zoster (HZ) in patients with selected immune-compromised (IC) conditions in the United States (US). Methods. Patients with incident HZ diagnosis (index date) were selected from nationwide administrative claims databases from 2005 to 2009. Baseline IC groups, analyzed separately, included adults aged 18–64 years with the following: human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV), solid organ transplant (SOT), bone marrow or stem cell transplant (BMSCT), or cancer; and older adults (aged ≥65 years) with cancer. Herpes zoster patients (n = 2020, n = 1053, n = 286, n = 13 178, and n = 9089, respectively) were 1-to-1 matched to controls without HZ (with randomly selected index date) in the same baseline group. The healthcare resource utilization and costs (2014 US dollars) during the first 2 postindex quarters were compared between matched cohorts with continuous enrollment during the quarter. Results. Herpes zoster patients generally had greater use of inpatient, emergency room and outpatient services, and pain medications than matched controls (P < .05). The incremental costs of HZ during the first postindex quarter were $3056, $2649, $13 332, $2549, and $3108 for HIV, SOT, BMSCT, cancer in adults aged 18–64 years, and cancer in older adults, respectively (each P < .05). The incremental costs of HZ during the second quarter were only significant for adults aged 18–64 years with cancer ($1748, P < .05). The national incremental costs of HZ were projected to be $298 million annually across the 5 IC groups. Conclusions. The healthcare cost associated with HZ among patients with studied IC conditions was sizable and occurred mainly during the first 90 days after diagnosis. PMID:27419151

  3. Radiation-treated ready-to-eat (RTE) chicken breast Adobo for immuno-compromised patients.

    PubMed

    Feliciano, Chitho P; De Guzman, Zenaida M; Tolentino, Levelyn Mitos M; Cobar, Maria Lucia C; Abrera, Gina B

    2014-11-15

    Usually in hospitals low-bacterial diets are served to immuno-compromised patients (ICPs). However, low-bacterial diets still pose a high risk of microbial infections and limit the food selection of the patients. Thus, pathogen-free dishes must be made available. This study presents the development of pathogen-free ready-to-eat (RTE) Filipino ethnic food chicken breast Adobo, sterilized by exposure to high-dose gamma rays (25 kGy) in combination with conventional treatments. Frozen vacuum-packed samples artificially inoculated with Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium, were exposed to 25 kGy gamma radiation for complete sterilization. Microbial quality and sterility of the samples were analysed following 15, 30, and 60 days of storage at -4°C. The effects of high-dose gamma irradiation on the nutritional quality and sensory characteristics of RTE chicken breast Adobo were also evaluated. PMID:24912709

  4. Gamma processing of Arabic bread for immune system-compromised cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Grecz, N.; Brannon, R.; Jaw, R.; Al-Harithy, R.; Hahn, E.W.

    1985-12-01

    Arabic bread prepared from local Saudi flour contained a total of up to 105/sup 4/ organisms per g. Most of these were bacterial spores that survived the baking process (1.3 x 10/sup 2/ to 3.5 x 10/sup 3/) and a small number of yeasts and molds (10 to 40 cells per g). The organisms in Arabic bread appear to be harmless to healthy individuals. However, for immune system-compromised cancer patients and bone marrow transplant recipients, it is prudent to irradiate the bread to reduce microbial contamination. The decimal reduction doses (10% survival) for the most radiation-resistant organisms (spore formers) in bread were 0.11 to 0.15 Mrad. Accordingly, 0.6 Mrad was sufficient to reduce the number of spores in Arabic bread by a factor of 10,000, i.e., to <1/g. This treatment constitutes radiation pasteurization (radicidation), and to this extent, provides a margin of microbiological safety. Sensory evaluation by the nine-point hedonic scale showed no detectable loss of organoleptic quality of bread up to 0.6 Mrad, while irradiation to 2.5 Mrad induced unacceptable organoleptic changes.

  5. From Space to the Septic Patient: Assessment of Cellular Immunity in Severely Immune Compromised Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sudhoff, Lars; Kaufmann, Ines; Feuerecker, Matthias; Crucian, Brian; Sams, Clarence; Mehta, Satish; Pierson, Duane; Schelling, Gustav; Chouker, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    PWM, LPS and CD3/28. Moreover, inter-patient comparisons revealed that patients receiving stress doses of hydrocortisone and patients in hypoxemia (pO2 less than 80mmHg) showed a significantly impaired TNF-alpha release in PWM-stimulated whole blood compared to the respective control group. Conclusion: Shortly after the onset of severe sepsis and septic shock, patients attain a general immunosuppressive state affecting both the innate as well as the acquired part of the immune system. This is partly mediated by T-cell apoptosis and a shift of the equilibrium to anti-inflammatory mediators. Its degree of severity correlates with conditions that are commonly present in aeronautics and spaceflight, such as increased hydrocortisone levels and hypoxemia (a condition resulting also from future space habitats). It entails an increase in secondary infection and subsequent late-phase morbidity and mortality. New therapeutic approaches such as reverse isolation and immune-stimulatory interventions should be discussed to improve patient outcome. Those can be of another translational benefit for immune-dysfunctional states in Space.

  6. Robust detection of gearbox deterioration using compromised autoregressive modeling and Kolmogorov Smirnov test statistic. Part II: Experiment and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Yimin; Mechefske, Chris K.

    2007-07-01

    Optimal maintenance decision analysis is heavily dependent on the accuracy of condition indicators. A condition indicator that is subject to such varying operating conditions as load is unable to provide precise condition information of the monitored object for making optimal operational maintenance decisions even if the maintenance program is established within a rigorous theoretical framework. For this reason, the performance of condition monitoring techniques applied to rotating machinery under varying load conditions has been a long-term concern and has attracted intensive research interest. Part I of this study proposed a novel technique based on adaptive autoregressive modeling and hypothesis tests. The method is able to automatically search for the optimal time-series model order and establish a compromised autoregressive model fitting based on the healthy gear motion residual signals under varying load conditions. The condition of the monitored gearbox is numerically represented by a modified Kolmogorov-Smirnov test statistic. Part II of this study is devoted to applications of the proposed technique to entire lifetime condition detection of three gearboxes with distinct physical specifications, distinct load conditions, and distinct failure modes. A comprehensive and thorough comparative study is conducted between the proposed technique and several counterparts. The detection technique is further enhanced by a proposed method to automatically identify and generate fault alerts with the aid of the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and thus requires no supervision from maintenance personnel. Experimental analysis demonstrated that the proposed technique applied to automatic identification and generation of fault alerts also features two highly desirable properties, i.e. few false alerts and early alert for incipient faults. Furthermore, it is found that the proposed technique is able to identify two types of abnormalities, i.e. strong ghost components abruptly

  7. Respiratory failure associated with the lipodystrophy syndrome in an HIV-positive patient with compromised lung function.

    PubMed

    Press, N; Montessori, V; Bai, T R; Montaner, J

    2001-01-01

    Protease inhibitors, used as treatment in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, are associated with a syndrome of peripheral lipodystrophy, central adiposity, hyperlipidemia and insulin resistance. An HIV-positive patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is presented who developed the lipodystrophy syndrome that is associated with the use of protease inhibitors. It is postulated that the lipodystrophy syndrome further compromised his lung function, leading to respiratory failure. Patients who have pulmonary disease and are taking protease inhibitors require monitoring of clinical status and pulmonary function tests. PMID:11521144

  8. Oral surgery in Norwegian general dental practice--a survey. Extent, scope, referrals, emergencies, and medically compromised patients.

    PubMed

    Berge, T I

    1992-02-01

    A questionnaire containing 37 questions concerning oral surgery and oral medicine was mailed to a systematic random sample of 500 Norwegian general dental practitioners in October 1989. A 60% return rate was obtained. From the 20 questions included in this paper the following conclusions were drawn: Norwegian general practitioners perform a substantial number and diversity of procedures in the field of oral surgery and oral medicine. The predictor variables sex, age, geographic location, and type of practice (private/public) showed by multiple classification analysis only limited correlation with the amount and diversity of procedures. On average, 12.3 patients were referred per practitioner per year to specialists in oral surgery. The indicated need for orthognathic consultations was 0.75 patient per year per practitioner. Serious emergencies demanding referral seldom occurred. Each month 6.6 medically compromised patients were seen in general practice, among which cardiovascular disorders dominated. PMID:1533083

  9. Complete Healing of a Giant Wart in a Severely Immune-Compromised Patient with HIV Infection Treated with Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Ursini, T.; Polilli, E.; Congedo, G.; Tontodonati, M.; Di Masi, F.; Mazzotta, E.; Parruti, G.; Pippa, L.

    2011-01-01

    Giant warts are infrequent dermatological viral infections caused by Papillomavirus (HPV) in immune-compromised patients. Treatment may often be difficult and unsatisfactory, either by surgery or cytotoxic agents, because of poor immune control of viral activity in such hosts. Here we report on the case of a patient with advanced and persistent immune suppression caused by HIV disease, who developed a monstrous wart covering the entirety of the radial district of his right hand. He was completely healed after a long treatment with traditional Chinese acupuncture, in spite of minimal immune recovery induced by efficacious antiretroviral therapy. To the best of our knowledge, therefore, the present report may be the first direct clinical evidence that acupuncture may be effective in the treatment of cutaneous warts also in HIV-infected patients. PMID:22059074

  10. Complex all-ceramic rehabilitation of a young patient with a severely compromised dentition: a case report.

    PubMed

    Groten, Martin

    2009-01-01

    A young patient with dentinogenesisimperfecta and a dentition severely compromised by discolorations,abrasion, and breakage of enamel on several teeth was prosthodontically treated with CAD/CAM-manufactured all-ceramic restorations. To reduce treatment risk, preparations were limited paragingivally. Maxillary anterior teeth and premolars were restored with adhesively luted ceramic crowns. All other teeth were treated with zirconia-based restorations luted with a self-etching resin-based material. Considering the deficient pretreatment situation, the use of tooth-colored restoration and luting materials yielded a satisfying functional and good esthetic result. The patient is highly satisfied, even though 3 minor chippings occurred shortly after the completion of treatment PMID:19159020

  11. A Ferromagnetic Foreign Body at the Lateral Aspect of the Mandibular Ramus in a Medically Compromised Patient.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Nakayama, Y; Yamamoto, I; Matsusue, Y; Shimotsuji, H; Kirita, T

    2016-01-01

    A case of a ferromagnetic foreign body in a medically compromised patient was reported. The patient was a 45-year-old male who consulted our department complaining of a foreign body accidentally impacted in the right cheek. X-ray examination revealed a foreign body at the lateral aspect of the right mandibular ramus. The removal of the foreign body was scheduled, but the patient did not return for the procedure. After 8 years he revisited our department for the removal of the foreign body, because it had been found to be ferromagnetic and a barrier to MRI examination. X-ray examination confirmed the foreign body was located at the same site as 8 years prior. Although the patient was suffering from liver cirrhosis with thrombocytopenia and leukopenia, the foreign body was successfully removed under general anesthesia. The foreign body was 12 × 5 × 1 mm, weighed 0.48 g, and was ferromagnetic. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. X-ray examination confirmed the removal of the foreign body. Since the surgery, the patient has been in generally stable condition with no complications. This case was a rare example of a foreign body that needed to be removed for medical examination. PMID:27583049

  12. A comparison of cardiac rate-pressure product and pressure-rate quotient in healthy and medically compromised patients.

    PubMed

    Campbell, R L; Langston, W G

    1995-08-01

    Healthy and medically compromised patients were studied to compare blood pressure and heart rate changes in response to stress of routine dental extractions performed while they were under local anesthesia. Thirty-nine patients divided into American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) I and II groups were noninvasively monitored every 5 minutes. Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures and heart rate were recorded. Rate pressure products (RPP) and pressure rate (PRQ) quotients were calculated and compared in each group. Significant results were measures of RPP greater than 12,000 and PRQ less than one. Of the 24 patients in the ASA I category, 50% demonstrated elevated RPP values, but only two of 24 had coincidental PRQ abnormalities. Of the 15 patients in the ASA II category, 80% demonstrated elevated RPP values, but two of 15 had coincidental PRQ abnormalities. Patients in the ASA II category had a higher incidence of RPP and PRQ abnormalities, as was expected. However, it is not known which of these two measures is a more sensitive indicator of increased risk associated with stimulation of the sympathetic-adrenergic axis during oral surgery performed with patients under local anesthesia. Correlation studies with continuous Holter monitoring for ST-T wave changes on electrocardiography are forthcoming. PMID:7552876

  13. Nutrition and Aging: Assessment and Treatment of Compromised Nutritional Status in Frail Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Jennie L; Dumbrell, Andrea C

    2006-01-01

    Nutrition is an important determinant of health in persons over the age of 65. Malnutrition in the elderly is often underdiagnosed. Careful nutritional assessment is necessary for both the successful diagnosis and development of comprehensive treatment plans for malnutrition in this population. The purpose of this article is to provide clinicians with an educational overview of this essential but often underecognized aspect of geriatric assessment. This article will review some common issues in nutrition for the elderly in both hospital and community settings. The complexity and impact of multiple comorbidities on the successful nutritional assessment of elderly patients is highlighted by using case scenarios to discuss nutritional issues common to elderly patients and nutritional assessment tools. Three case studies provide some context for an overview of these issues, which include the physiology of aging, weight loss, protein undernutrition, impaired cognition, malnutrition during hospitalization, screening procedures, and general dietary recommendations for patients 65 years of age and older. PMID:18047259

  14. Double segmentectomy for T4 lung cancer in a pulmonary-compromised patient

    PubMed Central

    Tezel, Cagatay; Bayram, Serkan; Yalçınkaya, Irfan; Tezel, Yelda

    2015-01-01

    Complete resection is the optimal treatment for primary lung cancer. The choice of surgical methods varies depending on tumor size, tumor location, and each patient’s respiratory reserve. Currently, lobectomy with lymph node dissection is the gold standard for the surgical management of lung cancer. However, many thoracic surgical candidates also have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or emphysema and thus present with minimal lung reserve. In the past few years, more reports have been published on the outcomes of patients who underwent anatomic segmentectomy for lung cancer. Herein we report the surgical outcomes of a patient with limited respiratory reserve, who underwent double segmentectomy. PMID:26807416

  15. A Ferromagnetic Foreign Body at the Lateral Aspect of the Mandibular Ramus in a Medically Compromised Patient

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, K; Nakayama, Y; Yamamoto, I; Matsusue, Y; Shimotsuji, H; Kirita, T

    2016-01-01

    A case of a ferromagnetic foreign body in a medically compromised patient was reported. The patient was a 45-year-old male who consulted our department complaining of a foreign body accidentally impacted in the right cheek. X-ray examination revealed a foreign body at the lateral aspect of the right mandibular ramus. The removal of the foreign body was scheduled, but the patient did not return for the procedure. After 8 years he revisited our department for the removal of the foreign body, because it had been found to be ferromagnetic and a barrier to MRI examination. X-ray examination confirmed the foreign body was located at the same site as 8 years prior. Although the patient was suffering from liver cirrhosis with thrombocytopenia and leukopenia, the foreign body was successfully removed under general anesthesia. The foreign body was 12 × 5 × 1 mm, weighed 0.48 g, and was ferromagnetic. The patient’s postoperative course was uneventful. X-ray examination confirmed the removal of the foreign body. Since the surgery, the patient has been in generally stable condition with no complications. This case was a rare example of a foreign body that needed to be removed for medical examination. PMID:27583049

  16. Vascular Compromise from Soft Tissue Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, Shannon; Carruthers, Jean D.A.; Carruthers, Alastair

    2014-01-01

    The popularity of soft tissue fillers is, in part, due to their favorable side-effect profile. However, serious complications can occur. The authors describe their extensive clinical experience with soft-tissue augmentation and the rare complication of vascular compromise, which can lead to necrosis and scarring. Over a 10-year period between January 2003 and January 2013, the authors observed a total of 12 cases of vascular compromise. Eight patients in their clinical practice showed evidence of vascular compromise out of a total of 14,355 filler injections (0.05%). In addition, four patients treated with an experimental particulate filler had vascular complications. All cases were examined for filler type, location of complication, risk factors, treatment, and outcomes. Although treatment plans differed for each patient in their series, all cases of vascular compromise resolved fully. The authors believe that an office-based protocol for both immediate and ongoing care—including a thorough individualized assessment and treatment plan for each patient—is critical to timely and effective resolution of side effects. They propose key recommendations for the prevention and management of vascular compromise to improve patient outcomes and reduce the risk of permanent complications. PMID:25276276

  17. Cardiac oxygen supply is compromised during the night in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Westerhof, Berend E; van Lieshout, Johannes J; Parati, Gianfranco; van Montfrans, Gert A; Guelen, Ilja; Spaan, Jos A E; Westerhof, Nico; Karemaker, John M; Bos, Willem Jan W

    2011-09-01

    The enhanced heart rate and blood pressure soon after awaking increases cardiac oxygen demand, and has been associated with the high incidence of acute myocardial infarction in the morning. The behavior of cardiac oxygen supply is unknown. We hypothesized that oxygen supply decreases in the morning and to that purpose investigated cardiac oxygen demand and oxygen supply at night and after awaking. We compared hypertensive to normotensive subjects and furthermore assessed whether pressures measured non-invasively and intra-arterially give similar results. Aortic pressure was reconstructed from 24-h intra-brachial and simultaneously obtained non-invasive finger pressure in 14 hypertensives and 8 normotensives. Supply was assessed by Diastolic Time Fraction (DTF, ratio of diastolic and heart period), demand by Rate-Pressure Product (RPP, systolic pressure times heart rate, HR) and supply/demand ratio by A(dia)/A(sys), with A(dia) and A(sys) diastolic and systolic areas under the aortic pressure curve. Hypertensives had lower supply by DTF and higher demand by RPP than normotensives during the night. DTF decreased and RPP increased in both groups after awaking. The DTF of hypertensives decreased less becoming similar to the DTF of normotensives in the morning; the RPP remained higher. A(dia)/A(sys) followed the pattern of DTF. Findings from invasively and non-invasively determined pressure were similar. The cardiac oxygen supply/demand ratio in hypertensive patients is lower than in normotensives at night. With a smaller night-day differences, the hypertensives' risk for cardiovascular events may be more evenly spread over the 24 h. This information can be obtained noninvasively. PMID:21786015

  18. The use of the pectoralis major flap for advanced and recurrent head and neck malignancy in the medically compromised patient.

    PubMed

    Avery, C M E; Crank, S T; Neal, C P; Hayter, J P; Elton, C

    2010-11-01

    A retrospective review of seventy-one PPM flaps used between 1996 and 2010 primarily for oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma presenting as either advanced stage IV primary disease (41/43), extensive recurrent (10) or metastatic (9) neck disease. The PPM flap was most commonly used following resection of the mandible (23) or the tongue/oropharynx (19). When the PPM flap was the preferred reconstruction option (54) the main indication, in addition to advanced disease, was significant medical co-morbidity (23). The majority of PPM flaps (75%) were used in the latter half of the series for an increasing number of patients in poor health with advanced disease. There was no evidence of an increase in age, ASA grade or extent of disease during this period. Approximately one quarter (17) of the flaps were used after failure of a free flap, most commonly a DCIA (7) or radial (6) flap. The 30day mortality in this group of compromised patients undergoing major surgery for advanced disease was 7% (5/71). The overwhelming majority had significant co-morbidity (94% grade 2 or higher with 63% ASA grade 3) and 90% had already undergone previous major surgery and/or radiotherapy. The 1-year, 3-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 65.5%, 39.1% and 11.0% respectively with cancer-specific survival rates of 82.0%, 65.5% and 65.5%. The majority died of disease related to the underlying co-morbidity. We recommend an aggressive approach to the surgical resection of advanced and recurrent disease but a pragmatic approach to reconstruction. The PPM major flap is reliable for reconstruction of defects of the mandible, tongue and oropharynx with a complete flap failure rate of 2.8%. Lateral defects of the mandible were managed without a plate and with an acceptable outcome in the context of limited life expectancy. This is the largest study of the use of the PPM flap for this type of patient group. The flap retains a major role in the management of advanced primary or

  19. Oral inflammatory process and general health. Part 2: How does the periapical inflammatory process compromise general health?

    PubMed

    Somma, F; Castagnola, R; Bollino, D; Marigo, L

    2011-01-01

    At present, the focal infection theory still has very controversial aspects. In spite of the great number of studies, there is no evidence that focal infections or even antigenic mimicry are responsible for anything other than sporadic abscesses/infections and possibly rare autoimmune disorders. linflammation of endodontic origin (i.e., apical periodontitis--AP) has not received the same attention as inflammation originating from the periodontium. Endodontics is a microbiological problem, since the bacterial infection is the "prime mover" of pulp (before) and periapical (later) disease. The aims of endodontic treatment have to be considered from a microbiological viewpoint. Considering these problems in this second part of their study, the Authors, after close examination of the virulence of microorganisms and of the host defense, analyze the endodontic infection and microbiological species. They emphasize the possibility of a relationship between periapical inflammatory lesions and bacterial endocarditis in preventing metafocal disease. Bacterial endocarditis deserves special mention because despite involving specialists of two scientific fields, its prophylaxis is almost always assigned to medical practice, and especially, to dentistry. Given the dangers of the disease, antibiotic prophylaxis is both absolutely necessary and can be very effective, and it should be used especially in clinical situations with high risk individuals. However, the ability of antibiotic therapy to prevent or reduce the frequency, magnitude or duration of bacteremia associated with a dental procedure is controversial. Studies should also be undertaken to determine to compare the efficacy of endodontic treatment with alternative therapy such as implants, prosthetic replacements or no treatment other than extraction. To date, these studies have not been carried out, and there is no evidence to support the theory that modern endodontic therapy is not safe and effective. PMID:21381498

  20. Effect of a dedicated oral care program on periodontal status of medically compromised patients at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute Dental Clinic.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Robert; Hebbes, Trudy

    2016-01-01

    Medically compromised patients attending the dental clinic at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute have considerable gingival inflammation and breath odor. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of toothbrushing on the periodontal status of these patients and to determine if there were any additional benefit in combining brushing with an application of an antibiotic rinse. During the first 7 days of the study, the teeth of 11 participants were brushed twice a day by a dental hygienist using a soft-bristle suction toothbrush without toothpaste. Soft interproximal brushes were used to clean interproximal surfaces from the facial aspect. During the second week, facial and interproximal cleaning were repeated in the same patients, but the toothbrush and interproximal brush were dipped in 10-mL of a solution consisting of water and 40 mg/mL of metronidazole with nystatin. Each patient underwent an oral examination and biofilm sampling at baseline, after brushing without toothpaste (week 1), and after brushing with antibiotic solution (week 2). After week 1, tissues improved substantially, and there was a notable change in the biofilm on the teeth. The addition of an antibiotic solution increased healing and resulted in a further decrease in oral biofilm. Medically compromised patients would benefit considerably from a treatment regimen of antibiotic solution to decrease oral infection followed by a daily oral care program of brushing and interdental cleaning to maintain healthy oral tissues. PMID:27367641

  1. Extended virulence genotypes of Escherichia coli strains from patients with urosepsis in relation to phylogeny and host compromise.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J R; Stell, A L

    2000-01-01

    Among 75 urosepsis isolates of Escherichia coli, 29 virulence factor (VF) genes were detected by use of a novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Compared with probe hybridization, the PCR assay's specificity was 100% and sensitivity 97.1%. fyuA (yersiniabactin: overall prevalence, 93%), traT (serum resistance, 68%), and a pathogenicity-associated island marker (71%) occurred in most strains from both compromised and noncompromised hosts. Present in <20% of strains each were sfaS, focG (F1C fimbriae), afa/dra, bmaE (M fimbriae), gafD (G fimbriae), cnf1, cdtB (cytolethal distending toxin), cvaC (colicin V), and ibeA (invasion of brain endothelium). Different VFs were variously confined to virulence-associated phylogenetic group B2 (as defined by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis); concentrated in group B2, but with spread beyond; or concentrated outside of group B2. These findings provide novel insights into the VFs of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli and demonstrate the new PCR assay's utility for molecular epidemiological studies. PMID:10608775

  2. [Tuberculosis in compromised hosts].

    PubMed

    2003-11-01

    Recent development of tuberculosis in Japan tends to converge on a specific high risk group. The proportion of tuberculosis developing particularly from the compromised hosts in the high risk group is especially high. At this symposium, therefore, we took up diabetes mellitus, gastrectomy, dialysis, AIDS and the elderly for discussion. Many new findings and useful reports for practical medical treatment are submitted; why these compromised hosts are predisposed to tuberculosis, tuberculosis diagnostic and remedial notes of those compromised hosts etc. It is an important question for the future to study how to prevent tuberculosis from these compromised hosts. 1. Tuberculosis in diabetes mellitus: aggravation and its immunological mechanism: Kazuyoshi KAWAKAMI (Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Graduate School and Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus). It has been well documented that diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major aggravating factor in tuberculosis. The onset of this disease is more frequent in DM patients than in individuals with any underlying diseases. However, the precise mechanism of this finding remains to be fully understood. Earlier studies reported that the migration, phagocytosis and bactericidal activity of neutrophils are all impaired in DM patients, which is related to their reduced host defense to infection with extracellular bacteria, such as S. aureus and E. colli. Host defense to mycobacterial infection is largely mediated by cellular immunity, and Th1-related cytokines, such as IFN-gamma and IL-12, play a central role in this response. It is reported that serum level of these cytokines and their production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are reduced in tuberculosis patients with DM, and this is supposed to be involved in the high incidence of tuberculosis in DM. Our study observed similar findings and furthermore indicated that IFN-gamma and IL-12 production by BCG-stimulated PBMC was lower

  3. 49 CFR 1018.51 - Reasons for compromising a claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... compromise in accordance with the guidelines in 4 CFR 103.4. (b) The Board shall determine the debtor's... compromise in accordance with the Federal Claims Collection Standards, 4 CFR part 103. (c) Compromises... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reasons for compromising a claim. 1018.51...

  4. Integrity and compromise in nursing ethics.

    PubMed

    Winslow, B J; Winslow, G R

    1991-06-01

    Nurses are often caught in the middle of what appear to be intractable moral conflicts. For such times, the function and limits of moral compromise need to be explored. Compromise is compatible with moral integrity if a number of conditions are met. Among these are the sharing of a moral language, mutual respect on the part of those who differ, acknowledgement of factual and moral complexities, and recognition of limits to compromise. Nurses are in a position uniquely suited to leadership in fostering an environment that makes compromise with integrity possible. PMID:1880466

  5. Pilot Study on the Influence of Nutritional Counselling and Implant Therapy on the Nutritional Status in Dentally Compromised Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wöstmann, Bernd; Simon, Teresa; Neuhäuser-Berthold, Monika; Rehmann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the impact of implant-prosthetic rehabilitation combined with nutritional counseling on the nutritional status of patients with severely reduced dentitions. Design An explorative intervention study including an intra-individual comparison of 20 patients with severely reduced dentitions in terms of nutrition- and quality of life-related parameters recorded at baseline and at six and twelve months after implant-prosthetic rehabilitation. Participants Twenty patients from the Department of Prosthetic Dentistry of Justus-Liebig University of Giessen, with an mean age of 63 years, who had fewer than ten pairs of antagonists. Measurements The baseline data collection included dental status, a chewing ability test, laboratory parameters, anthropometric data (body mass index), energy supply, a 3-day dietary record, an analysis of the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) with the OHIP-G14, the Mini-Mental Status (MMS) and Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA). Six months after implantation and prosthetic rehabilitation, individual nutritional counseling was performed by a dietician. Data were again collected and analyzed. A final follow-up was conducted 12 months after prosthetic rehabilitation. Results Despite the highly significant improvement in masticatory ability and OHRQoL after implant-prosthetic rehabilitation, no significant changes were observed regarding MNA, anthropometric data or energy supply. Except for cholinesterase (p = 0.012), ferritin (p = 0.003), folic acid (p = 0.019) and vitamin A (p = 0.004), no laboratory parameter changed significantly during the investigation period. In addition, no general significant differences were observed for nutrient intake or food choice. Conclusion The present study does not confirm the assumption that the implant-prosthetic rehabilitation of patients with severely reduced residual dentitions with or without an individual nutritional counseling influences nutritional status. PMID:26821352

  6. 48 CFR 32.610 - Compromising debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Contract Debts 32.610 Compromising debts. For debts under $100,000, excluding interest, the designated agency official may compromise the debt pursuant to the Federal Claims Collection Standards (31 CFR part 902) and agency regulations. Unless specifically authorized by agency...

  7. Mentalizing in male schizophrenia patients is compromised by virtue of dysfunctional connectivity between task-positive and task-negative networks.

    PubMed

    Das, Pritha; Calhoun, Vince; Malhi, Gin S

    2012-09-01

    Schizophrenia can be conceptualized as a disorder of functional connectivity within the fronto-temporal (FT) and/or default-mode (DM) networks. Recent evidence suggests that dysfunctional integration between these large neural networks may also contribute to the illness, and that the ability to mentalize or have a Theory of Mind (ToM) is discernibly impaired in patients with schizophrenia. Hence in this study, we examined whether impaired functional network connectivity (FNC) contributes to a compromise in the ability to mentalize in patients with schizophrenia. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired from 20 male schizophrenia patients and 19 matched healthy controls while performing a well-known ToM task. The study revealed that relative to non-ToM the engagement of ToM produced reduced neural activity in the lateral FT and insula networks in patients, as compared to healthy subjects. The findings also indicated that in comparison to healthy subjects the DM and medial FT networks are less suppressed in patients irrespective of the task (ToM/non-ToM). Further, FNC analyses showed that the degree of functional connectivity between task-positive (lateral FT and insula) and task-negative (medial FT, posterior DM) networks was significantly reduced in patients as compared to controls. Of note, a significant correlation between the functional connectivity strength of the lateral FT network with the medial FT and the degree to which this is modulated by the ToM task, suggests that mentalizing deficits in male schizophrenia patients may stem from impaired communication between neural networks that comprehend the mental states of self (medial FT) and others (lateral FT). PMID:22795367

  8. Neuron-Specific Enolase Is Correlated to Compromised Cerebral Metabolism in Patients Suffering from Acute Bacterial Meningitis; An Observational Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Bartek, Jiri; Thelin, Eric Peter; Ghatan, Per Hamid; Glimaker, Martin; Bellander, Bo-Michael

    2016-01-01

    . Conclusion In this observational cohort study, we were able to show that cerebral metabolism is frequently affected in patients with ABM. Furthermore, patients with high LPR (LPR>40) had significantly higher levels of NSE, suggesting ongoing deterioration in compromised cerebral tissue. However, the potential clinical impact of MD and biomarker monitoring in ABM patients will need to be further elaborated in larger clinical trials. PMID:27019200

  9. The Production of Interleukin-11 and Decidualization Are Compromised in Endometrial Stromal Cells Derived from Patients with Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Karpovich, Natalia; Klemmt, Petra; McVeigh, J. Enda; Barlow, David H.; Mardon, Helen J.; Hwang, Jung Hye; Heath, John K.

    2006-01-01

    IL-11 signaling is critical for decidualization of the endometrial stroma in early pregnancy in the mouse. In this study, we investigate the function of IL-11 signaling in cAMP-induced decidualization of human endometrial stromal cells. We show that treatment of endometrial stromal cells with 8-bromo-cAMP (8-Br-cAMP) results in an increase in the levels of secreted IL-11, whereas levels of cell surface IL-11 receptor α are similar with or without 8-Br-cAMP treatment. The production of IL-11 correlates with the production of molecular markers of decidualization, prolactin and IGF-binding protein-1. The expression of these markers is inhibited when IL-11 signaling is specifically blocked in decidualizing endometrial stromal cells by the IL-11 antagonist W147A. We demonstrate that 8-Br-cAMP-induced endometrial stromal cells derived from patients with primary infertility produce lower levels of prolactin, IGF-binding protein-1, and IL-11 than cells derived from fertile women. Our results suggest that IL-11 expression is critically important during decidualization in the human endometrium, and that aberrant regulation of endometrial IL-11 production may be associated with some types of infertility. PMID:15613426

  10. The effects of microvesicles on endothelial progenitor cells are compromised in type 2 diabetic patients via downregulation of the miR-126/VEGFR2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Keng; Yang, Yi; Zhong, Yun; Ammar, Hala Mustafa; Zhang, Peihua; Guo, Runmin; Liu, Hua; Cheng, Chuanfang; Koroscil, Thomas M; Chen, Yanfang; Liu, Shiming; Bihl, Ji C

    2016-05-15

    Our previous study showed that circulating microvesicles (cMVs) of diabetic mice have negative effects on the function of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Whether this is true in diabetic patients deserves further study. In this study, the effects of cMVs and EPC-derived MVs (EPC-MVs) on EPC migration, apoptosis, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in healthy controls, well-controlled, and uncontrolled diabetic patients were investigated. The levels of miR-126 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) in cMVs, EPC-MVs, and/or EPCs were analyzed. Moreover, miR-126 inhibitor or mimic was applied to EPCs to modulate the miR-126 level in EPC-MVs. We found the following: 1) the circulating EPC level was reduced but the circulating EPC-MV level increased in uncontrolled diabetic patients; 2) the cMVs and EPC-MVs of healthy controls had beneficial effects on EPCs (migration, apoptosis, ROS), whereas the effects were reversely changed in the cMVs and EPC-MVs of uncontrolled diabetic patients; and 3) the cMVs and EPC-MVs of uncontrolled diabetic patients carried less miR-126 and had downregulated VEGFR2 expression in EPCs. Manipulating the miR-126 level in EPC-MVs with inhibitor or mimic changed their function. The effects of cMVs and EPC-MVs are compromised in diabetes due to the reduction of their carried miR-126, which might provide a therapy target for diabetic vascular complications. PMID:26956185

  11. A compromise on abortion?

    PubMed

    Rhoden, N K

    1989-01-01

    Rhoden's article is one of three on "Abortion: searching for common ground" in this issue of the Hastings Center Report. Her article, together with those by M. Mahowald and M. Glendon, was prompted by the expectation that the impending U.S. Supreme Court decision in Webster v. Reproductive Health Services (3 July 1989) would overturn or restrict Roe v. Wade (1973). Rhoden, an advocate for the pro-choice position, asks whether a compromise leading to an acceptable regulatory policy is possible or desirable among those on opposite sides of the abortion issue. She identifies several reasons why the Roe decision is vulnerable to review, but argues that effective education about sexuality and comprehensive social support of women are better approaches to abortion than restrictive legislation. PMID:2663778

  12. A study protocol of a randomised controlled trial incorporating a health economic analysis to investigate if additional allied health services for rehabilitation reduce length of stay without compromising patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Reducing patient length of stay is a high priority for health service providers. Preliminary information suggests additional Saturday rehabilitation services could reduce the time a patient stays in hospital by three days. This large trial will examine if providing additional physiotherapy and occupational therapy services on a Saturday reduces health care costs, and improves the health of hospital inpatients receiving rehabilitation compared to the usual Monday to Friday service. We will also investigate the cost effectiveness and patient outcomes of such a service. Methods/Design A randomised controlled trial will evaluate the effect of providing additional physiotherapy and occupational therapy for rehabilitation. Seven hundred and twelve patients receiving inpatient rehabilitation at two metropolitan sites will be randomly allocated to the intervention group or control group. The control group will receive usual care physiotherapy and occupational therapy from Monday to Friday while the intervention group will receive the same amount of rehabilitation as the control group Monday to Friday plus a full physiotherapy and occupational therapy service on Saturday. The primary outcomes will be patient length of stay, quality of life (EuroQol questionnaire), the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), and health utilization and cost data. Secondary outcomes will assess clinical outcomes relevant to the goals of therapy: the 10 metre walk test, the timed up and go test, the Personal Care Participation Assessment and Resource Tool (PC PART), and the modified motor assessment scale. Blinded assessors will assess outcomes at admission and discharge, and follow up data on quality of life, function and health care costs will be collected at 6 and 12 months after discharge. Between group differences will be analysed with analysis of covariance using baseline measures as the covariate. A health economic analysis will be carried out alongside the randomised

  13. Initial Management and Evaluation of the Multisystem Injured Patient, Part 1

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Lenworth M.

    1987-01-01

    Trauma is the fourth leading cause of death for all Americans, with a mortality rate of 61 deaths per 100,000 people. Although the definitive place for the management of major abdominal or thoracic hemorrhage, as well as neurological or orthopedic problems, is the operating room in a tertiary care hospital, trauma is a time-related disease, and the more quickly hemorrhage is controlled and appropriate management initiated, the better the outcome. The author outlines a systematic approach to prehospital management of the trauma patient that includes a primary survey and a secondary survey. The primary survey (Part 1) focuses on life-threatening conditions that affect the airway and methods to clear the airway immediately. Once the airway is cleared, any anatomical or physiologic compromise that limits ventilation is identified and corrected, hemorrhage is controlled, and the cervical spine, if injury is suspected, is protected. The secondary survey (Part 2) is a comprehensive examination. PMID:3586032

  14. [Pulmonary compromise in leptospirosis].

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, J E; Marchiori, E dos S; Guedes e Silva, J B; Netto, B A; Tavares, W; de Paula, A V

    1992-01-01

    To study the pulmonary complications in leptospirosis case records of 23 such patients admitted at the Hospital Universitário Antônio Pedro, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, Brasil, were reviewed. Hemoptysis were seen in 21.7% and sputal blood in 30.4% of patients. Arterial gasometry detected hypoxemia and hypocapnia in most cases. Thoracic radiology showed an alveolar pattern in 60% of the patients, alveolo-interstitial in 20%, interstitial in 6%, and in 14% the lungs were considered to be normal. Necropsy of 13 cases showed edema, congestion and hemorrhage in the lungs in all cases. Hyaline membrane was found in 30% and fibrin thrombi in 46% of these cases, resulting in a diagnosis of adult respiratory distress syndrome and acute disseminated intravascular coagulation (consumption coagulopathy) in leptospirosis. PMID:1308063

  15. [Alveolar soft part sarcoma in pediatric patients].

    PubMed

    Paillard, Catherine; Coulomb, Aurore; Helfre, Sylvie; Orbach, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Alveolar soft part sarcoma, ASPS, is a rare malignant tumor, with preferential primary localization in limbs, usually occurring in adolescents and young adults. This sarcoma, well defined histologically and at molecular level, has an indolent course, but a high potential metastatic pulmonary and cerebral evolution, sometimes late. ASPS is characterized by an almost specific translocation t(X, 17)(p11;25) which creates a fusion protein, APSL-TFE3, acting as an aberrant transcription factor. An in-bloc resection of the primary tumor is the treatment of choice in cases of localized disease. Conventional chemotherapy is generally ineffective. The role of radiotherapy is discussed in case of micro- or macroscopical incomplete residue. It seems to reduce local recurrence, but did not influence overall survival. The 5 years survival rate in children, adolescents and young adults is close to 80% in case of localized disease but poorer in presence of metastases. Recently, systemic anti-tumoral treatments have been focused on the use of targeted therapies. Anti-angiogenic drugs and tyrosine kinase inhibitors are the most promising approaches, but require further study. Prognostic risk factors in the literature are age (>10Y), tumor size (>5cm) and presence of metastases. This article reviews the clinical manifestations, diagnosis modalities, radiographic characteristics and therapeutic strategy of this disease in the pediatric population. PMID:26235420

  16. Reduced Expression of Enac in Placenta Tissues of Patients with Severe Preeclampsia Is Related to Compromised Trophoblastic Cell Migration and Invasion during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yue; Liu, Ying; Diao, Ruiying; Sheng, Kai; Liu, Xinghui; Xu, Wenming

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the expression of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in normal pregnancy and severe preeclampsia placenta and to explore the underlying mechanism of the relationship between the altered ENaC expression and onset of preeclampsia. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot were used to check epithelial sodium channel subunits expression in mRNA and protein level in first term and full term placental tissue. ENaCα specific RNAi were used to knockdown ENaC expression and cell invasion and migration assay were used to check whether reduced expression of ENaC can compromise trophoblast cell function. The result showed that ENaCα was highly expressed in first term placental trophoblast cells; while EnaCβ was highly expressed in full term placenta. Knockdown ENaCα expression by using small interfering RNA reduced the invasive and migration abilities of HTR-8/SVneo cell. Real time-PCR and Western blot analysis showed that the expression levels of ENaCβ were also significantly lower in severe preeclampsia compared with normal pregnancy. It is concluded that the ENaC played an important role in trophoblast cell invasion and migration. Reduced expression and activity of epithelial sodium channel in trophoblast cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. PMID:23977235

  17. Care of the patient with chronic pain: part II.

    PubMed

    Wells-Federman, C L

    2000-01-01

    Chronic nonmalignant pain frequently results in significant physical, behavioral, psychological, social, and spiritual issues for patients and their families. It is often misunderstood and unsuccessfully managed. Advanced practice nurses who are knowledgeable about chronic pain and the complex biopsychosocial-spiritual needs of this patient population serve an important role in recognizing these patients and intervening appropriately in their care. The purpose of this two-part article is to provide that information. Part I [Clinical Excellence for Nurse Practitioners, 3 (4), 192-204] outlined the pathophysiology, assessment, biopsychosocial-spiritual aspects, and pharmacologic treatment of chronic pain. In Part II, a variety of nonpharmacologic and self-management interventions one can use in the primary care setting to treat these difficult health problems are introduced. PMID:11858295

  18. Care of the patient with chronic pain: Part I.

    PubMed

    Wells-Federman, C L

    1999-07-01

    Chronic nonmalignant pain is estimated to affect over 50 million Americans. It frequently results in significant physical, behavioral, psychological, social, and spiritual problems for patients and their families. In spite of its prevalence and consequences, chronic pain is often misunderstood and inadequately managed by healthcare professionals. Advanced practice nurses who are knowledgeable about chronic pain and the complex biopsychosocial-spiritual needs of this patient population serve an important role in recognizing these patients and intervening appropriately in their care. The purpose of this two-part article is to provide that information. Part I outlines the pathophysiology, assessment, biopsychosocial-spiritual aspects, and pharmacological treatment of chronic pain. Part II addresses a variety of nonpharmacologic and self-management interventions one can use in the primary care setting to treat these difficult health problems. PMID:10711057

  19. Effect of Part-time Practice on Patient Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Parkerton, Patricia H; Wagner, Edward H; Smith, Dean G; Straley, Hugh L

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND Primary care physicians are spending fewer hours in direct patient care, yet it is not known whether reduced hours are associated with differences in patient outcomes. OBJECTIVE To determine whether patient outcomes vary with physicians' clinic hours. DESIGN Cross-sectional retrospective design assessing primary care practices in 1998. SETTING All 25 outpatient-clinics of a single medical group in western Washington. PARTICIPANTS One hundred ninety-four family practitioners and general internists, 80% of whom were part-time, who provided ambulatory primary care services to specified HMO patient panels. Physician appointment hours ranged from 10 to 35 per week (30% to 100% of full time). MEASUREMENTS Twenty-three measures of individual primary care physician performance collected in an administrative database were aggregated into 4 outcome measures: cancer screening, diabetic management, patient satisfaction, and ambulatory costs. Multivariate regression on each of the 4 outcomes controlled for characteristics of physicians (administrative role, gender, seniority) and patient panels (size, case mix, age, gender). MAIN RESULTS While the effects were small, part-time physicians had significantly higher rates for cancer screening (4% higher, P = .001), diabetic management (3% higher, P = .033), and for patient satisfaction (3% higher, P = .035). After controlling for potential confounders, there was no significant association with patient satisfaction (P = .212) or ambulatory costs (P = .323). CONCLUSIONS Primary care physicians working fewer clinical hours were associated with higher quality performance than were physicians working longer hours, but with patient satisfaction and ambulatory costs similar to those of physicians working longer hours. The trend toward part-time clinical practice by primary care physicians may occur without harm to patient outcomes. PMID:12950480

  20. Long QT Syndrome Leading to Multiple Cardiac Arrests After Posaconazole Administration in an Immune-Compromised Patient with Sepsis: An Unusual Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Panos, George; Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vasilios; Matzaroglou, Charalampos; Tyllianakis, Minos

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 26 Final Diagnosis: Sepsis • drug induced long QT syndrome Symptoms: Cardiac arrest • cardiac arrhythmia • fever • Qt prolongation Medication: Posaconazole Clinical Procedure: Pacemaker insertion Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: We present the case of a septic patient with severe immunodeficiency, who developed QT interval prolongation followed by episodes of lethal cardiac arrhythmia. Cardiac events occurred after posaconazole administration, incriminating posaconazole use, alone or in combination with voriconazole, as the culpable agent. Case Report: A 26-year-old female patient underwent orthopedic surgery to remove ectopic calcifications in her left hip joint. On the first post-operative day she became septic due to a surgical wound infection. Despite being treated according to the therapeutic protocols for sepsis, no clinical improvement was noticed and further assessment revealed an underlying immunodeficiency. Considering the underlying immunodeficiency and to that point poor clinical response, an antifungal agent was added to the antibiotic regiment. Following discontinuation of multiple antifungal agents due to adverse effects, posaconazole was administered. Posaconazole oral intake was followed by episodes of bradycardia and QT interval prolongation. The patient suffered continuous incidents of cardiac arrest due to polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (torsades des pointes) that degenerated to lethal ventricular fibrillation. Posaconazole was immediately discontinued and a temporary pacemaker was installed. The patient finally recovered without any neurological deficit, and was discharged in a good clinical status. Conclusions: Close cardiac monitoring is recommended in cases where posaconazole administration is combined with coexisting risk factors, as they may lead to severe ECG abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias such as long QT interval syndrome and torsades de pointes. Posaconazole

  1. Long QT Syndrome Leading to Multiple Cardiac Arrests After Posaconazole Administration in an Immune-Compromised Patient with Sepsis: An Unusual Case Report.

    PubMed

    Panos, George; Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vasilios; Matzaroglou, Charalampos; Tylianakis, Minos

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We present the case of a septic patient with severe immunodeficiency, who developed QT interval prolongation followed by episodes of lethal cardiac arrhythmia. Cardiac events occurred after posaconazole administration, incriminating posaconazole use, alone or in combination with voriconazole, as the culpable agent. CASE REPORT A 26-year-old female patient underwent orthopedic surgery to remove ectopic calcifications in her left hip joint. On the first post-operative day she became septic due to a surgical wound infection. Despite being treated according to the therapeutic protocols for sepsis, no clinical improvement was noticed and further assessment revealed an underlying immunodeficiency. Considering the underlying immunodeficiency and to that point poor clinical response, an antifungal agent was added to the antibiotic regiment. Following discontinuation of multiple antifungal agents due to adverse effects, posaconazole was administered. Posaconazole oral intake was followed by episodes of bradycardia and QT interval prolongation. The patient suffered continuous incidents of cardiac arrest due to polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (torsades des pointes) that degenerated to lethal ventricular fibrillation. Posaconazole was immediately discontinued and a temporary pacemaker was installed. The patient finally recovered without any neurological deficit, and was discharged in a good clinical status. CONCLUSIONS Close cardiac monitoring is recommended in cases where posaconazole administration is combined with coexisting risk factors, as they may lead to severe ECG abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias such as long QT interval syndrome and torsades de pointes. Posaconazole interactions with medications metabolized via the CYP3A4 pathway should be considered an additional risk factor for lethal cardiac incidents. PMID:27125217

  2. Surviving cancer without compromising aspirations.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Sandra

    2011-07-01

    This short paper is a reflection of how one person coped, survived and grew following numerous metastatic incidences over a 20 year period. Surviving cancer is a complex process but coping with the threat of regular recurrence has required a coping strategy that embraced the disease, set it aside and refused to compromise hopes, dreams and future life. Central to this personal journey has been the need to redefine normality, live with and set aside the fear of future metastases and death and find an answer and meaning in a changing biology, increased morbidity and possible mortality. This paper contends that not compromising the direction of travel and being able to focus on a career has ensured that survival was valuable and valued. A working environment in which students' problems have been immediate has produced different stressors. These have ultimately forced personal worries to be set aside, while living with cancer has become normal and accepted. PMID:21514884

  3. Trichobezoar Causing Airway Compromise during Esophagogastroduodenoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Erica Y.; Scalzitti, Nicholas J.; Dion, Gregory R.; Bowe, Sarah N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. (1) Report the case of a 5-year-old female with trichotillomania and trichophagia that suffered airway compromise during esophagogastroduodenoscopy for removal of a trichobezoar. (2) Provide management recommendations for an unusual foreign body causing extubation and partial airway obstruction. Methods. Case report of a rare situation of airway compromise caused by a trichobezoar. Results. A 5-year-old patient underwent endoscopic retrieval of a gastric trichobezoar (hairball) by the gastroenterology service under general endotracheal anesthesia in a sedation unit. During removal, the hairball, due to its large size, dislodged the endotracheal tube, effectively extubating the patient. The bezoar became lodged at the cricopharyngeus muscle. Attempts to remove the bezoar or reintubation were unsuccessful. The child was able to be mask ventilated while the otolaryngology service was called. Direct laryngoscopy revealed a hairball partially obstructing the view of the glottis from its position in the postcricoid area. The hairball, still entrapped in the snare from the esophagoscope, was grasped with Magill forceps and slowly extracted. The patient was then reintubated and the airway and esophagus were reevaluated. Conclusions. Trichobezoar is an uncommon cause of airway foreign body. Careful attention to airway management during these and similar foreign body extractions can prevent inadvertent extubations. PMID:26457086

  4. Trichobezoar Causing Airway Compromise during Esophagogastroduodenoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kao, Erica Y; Scalzitti, Nicholas J; Dion, Gregory R; Bowe, Sarah N

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. (1) Report the case of a 5-year-old female with trichotillomania and trichophagia that suffered airway compromise during esophagogastroduodenoscopy for removal of a trichobezoar. (2) Provide management recommendations for an unusual foreign body causing extubation and partial airway obstruction. Methods. Case report of a rare situation of airway compromise caused by a trichobezoar. Results. A 5-year-old patient underwent endoscopic retrieval of a gastric trichobezoar (hairball) by the gastroenterology service under general endotracheal anesthesia in a sedation unit. During removal, the hairball, due to its large size, dislodged the endotracheal tube, effectively extubating the patient. The bezoar became lodged at the cricopharyngeus muscle. Attempts to remove the bezoar or reintubation were unsuccessful. The child was able to be mask ventilated while the otolaryngology service was called. Direct laryngoscopy revealed a hairball partially obstructing the view of the glottis from its position in the postcricoid area. The hairball, still entrapped in the snare from the esophagoscope, was grasped with Magill forceps and slowly extracted. The patient was then reintubated and the airway and esophagus were reevaluated. Conclusions. Trichobezoar is an uncommon cause of airway foreign body. Careful attention to airway management during these and similar foreign body extractions can prevent inadvertent extubations. PMID:26457086

  5. Intestinal Cell Barrier Function In Vitro Is Severely Compromised by Keratin 8 and 18 Mutations Identified in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zupancic, Tina; Stojan, Jure; Lane, Ellen Birgitte; Komel, Radovan; Bedina-Zavec, Apolonija; Liovic, Mirjana

    2014-01-01

    Keratin 8 and 18 (K8/K18) mutations have been implicated in the aetiology of certain pathogenic processes of the liver and pancreas. While some K8 mutations (K8 G62C, K8 K464N) are also presumed susceptibility factors for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the only K18 mutation (K18 S230T) discovered so far in an IBD patient is thought to be a polymorphism. The aim of our study was to demonstrate that these mutations might also directly affect intestinal cell barrier function. Cell monolayers of genetically engineered human colonocytes expressing these mutations were tested for permeability, growth rate and resistance to heat-stress. We also calculated the change in dissociation constant (Kd, measure of affinity) each of these mutations introduces into the keratin protein, and present the first model of a keratin dimer L12 region with in silico clues to how the K18 S230T mutation may affect keratin function. Physiologically, these mutations cause up to 30% increase in paracellular permeability in vitro. Heat-stress induces little keratin clumping but instead cell monolayers peel off the surface suggesting a problem with cell junctions. K18 S230T has pronounced pathological effects in vitro marked by high Kd, low growth rate and increased permeability. The latter may be due to the altered distribution of tight junction components claudin-4 and ZO-1. This is the first time intestinal cells have been suggested also functionally impaired by K8/K18 mutations. Although an in vitro colonocyte model system does not completely mimic the epithelial lining of the intestine, nevertheless the data suggest that K8/K18 mutations may be also able to produce a phenotype in vivo. PMID:24915158

  6. Morgellons: contested illness, diagnostic compromise and medicalisation.

    PubMed

    Fair, Brian

    2010-05-01

    The case of Morgellons illustrates how the emergence of a new medically contested illness intersected with and impacted on the diagnostic processes of an existing uncontested psychiatric condition, Delusional Parasitosis (DP). More specifically, the sociopolitical processes at play in the contested illness, Morgellons, dubiously reflect patient empowerment, as well the resilience and power of medical jurisdiction. This research offers insights into the contested illness and medicalisation literatures, and aims to bridge these two approaches towards the relationship between patient empowerment and medical authority, which I do through the notion of doctor-patient compromise. The data for this research come from a comprehensive qualitative analysis of Morgellons discourse through four key sources: the pro-Morgellons website Morgellons.org; the anti-Morgellons website Morgellonswatch.com; the popular media's portrayal of Morgellons; and the DP and Morgellons articles published in peer-reviewed medical journals, as made available on PubMed. PMID:20149149

  7. Caregiver Fatigue: Implications for Patient and Staff Safety, Part 2.

    PubMed

    Smith-Miller, Cheryl A; Harden, Jacqueline; Seaman, Christa W; Li, Yin; Blouin, Ann Scott

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue negatively affects healthcare workers' health and well-being, decreases patient safety, and negatively impacts the work environment. Although individual lifestyle choices influence fatigue levels, much responsibility lies with nursing administrators to prevent situations that may result in sleep deprivation or overwork. This article, the 2nd in a 2-part series, describes the results that were achieved from a fatigue reduction intervention. PMID:27442904

  8. Noninvasive Facial Rejuvenation. Part 1: Patient-Directed.

    PubMed

    Commander, Sarah Jane; Chang, Daniel; Fakhro, Abdulla; Nigro, Marjory G; Lee, Edward I

    2016-08-01

    A proper knowledge of noninvasive facial rejuvenation is integral to the practice of a cosmetic surgeon. Noninvasive facial rejuvenation can be divided into patient- versus physician-directed modalities. Patient-directed facial rejuvenation combines the use of facial products such as sunscreen, moisturizers, retinoids, α-hydroxy acids, and various antioxidants to both maintain youthful skin and rejuvenate damaged skin. Physicians may recommend and often prescribe certain products, but the patients are in control of this type of facial rejuvenation. On the other hand, physician-directed facial rejuvenation entails modalities that require direct physician involvement, such as neuromodulators, filler injections, laser resurfacing, microdermabrasion, and chemical peels. With the successful integration of each of these modalities, a complete facial regimen can be established and patient satisfaction can be maximized. This article is the first in a three-part series describing noninvasive facial rejuvenation. The authors focus on patient-directed facial rejuvenation. It is important, however, to emphasize that even in a patient-directed modality, a physician's involvement through education and guidance is integral to its success. PMID:27478421

  9. Patient experience should be part of meaningful-use criteria.

    PubMed

    Ralston, James D; Coleman, Katie; Reid, Robert J; Handley, Matthew R; Larson, Eric B

    2010-04-01

    The proposed federal "meaningful use" criteria for electronic health records include the direct engagement of patients in their care. In this study, we sought to describe the adoption and use of online services linked to the electronic health record at Group Health Cooperative. By August 2009, six years after the introduction of these services, 30 percent of outpatient "encounters" were actually conducted through secure electronic messaging. Meanwhile, 10 percent of enrollees reviewed medical test results online, while 10 percent went online to request medication refills. These results highlight the need to measure the patient experience as part of meaningful use and to enact policies supporting online and phone communication by patients and providers. PMID:20368589

  10. A variant in 3′-untranslated region of KRAS compromises its interaction with hsa-let-7g and contributes to the development of lung cancer in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hua; Zhang, Linlin; Teng, Geling; Wu, Yanhua; Chen, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of the present study was to explore the molecular mechanism by which a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs712) interferes with interaction between 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) of KRAS and let-7g, and its association with development of lung cancer in the patients with COPD. Materials and methods In this study, we confirmed that KRAS is a target of let-7g in lung cancer cells, and that introduction of rs712 minor allele into 3′-UTR significantly compromised the miRNA/mRNA interaction by using a luciferase reporter system. Additionally, a total of 35 lung tissue samples were obtained (TT:17, TG:12, GG:6), and let-7g and KRAS expression levels were determined. Results We showed that let-7g level was similar between groups, and the concentration of KRAS in GG genotype group was significantly higher than in TT or GT genotype group. Meanwhile, we found COPD patients with GG genotype had significantly higher risk for lung cancer (odds ratio OR =6.83, P=0.0081), compared with TT and GT genotypes. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that KRAS 3′-UTR rs712 polymorphism interfered with miRNA/mRNA interaction, and showed that the minor allele was associated with an elevated risk for development of lung cancer in COPD. PMID:26316738

  11. Novel psoriasis therapies and patient outcomes, part 1: topical medications.

    PubMed

    Feely, Meghan A; Smith, Barry L; Weinberg, Jeffrey M

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, advances in our understanding of inflammatory mediators and the underlying pathogenesis of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis have shed light on potential therapeutic targets, which has led to the development of several new promising treatments. In this article, key clinical trials, mechanisms of action, patient outcomes, and relevant safety information for these novel topical medications will be evaluated. This article is the first in a 3-part series on treatments presently in the pipeline for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis including topical agents, biologic treatments, and systemic therapies in phase 2 and phase 3 clinical trials. With novel approaches to the disease process, these therapies may afford more targeted individualized treatment regimens and offer hope to patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis who have reported a suboptimal therapeutic response to conventional therapies. PMID:25844785

  12. 48 CFR 432.616 - Compromise actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compromise actions. 432.616 Section 432.616 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Contract Debts 432.616 Compromise actions. Compromise of a...

  13. Forensic Analysis of Compromised Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Directory Tree Analysis File Generator is a Practical Extraction and Reporting Language (PERL) script that simplifies and automates the collection of information for forensic analysis of compromised computer systems. During such an analysis, it is sometimes necessary to collect and analyze information about files on a specific directory tree. Directory Tree Analysis File Generator collects information of this type (except information about directories) and writes it to a text file. In particular, the script asks the user for the root of the directory tree to be processed, the name of the output file, and the number of subtree levels to process. The script then processes the directory tree and puts out the aforementioned text file. The format of the text file is designed to enable the submission of the file as input to a spreadsheet program, wherein the forensic analysis is performed. The analysis usually consists of sorting files and examination of such characteristics of files as ownership, time of creation, and time of most recent access, all of which characteristics are among the data included in the text file.

  14. 47 CFR 1.1915 - Exploration of compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Federal Claims Collection Standards (31 CFR part 902). The Commission will also consider a request... justification of the offer and addressing the bases for compromise at 31 CFR 902.2. Debtors will provide full... evaluate an offer, using the factors set forth in 31 CFR 902.2 and, as appropriate, refer the offer...

  15. Making Treatment of Special Needs Patients an Important Part of Your Growing Dental Practice.

    PubMed

    Spangler, Craig C

    2016-07-01

    Today many young dentists want to find a way to make their practices satisfying in ways other than the financial rewards of dentistry. Some of these practitioners have gained additional training in diagnosis and treatment of medically and physically compromised patients in hospital-based, general practice residency programs. A hospital affiliation can create a unique niche that will allow dentists to differentiate themselves from other dentists. By welcoming those ongoing relationships for patients with special needs, and having the resources and desire to treat them, dentists will achieve greater visibility and a reputation as caring, capable practitioners in their community. PMID:27264856

  16. 49 CFR 1503.425 - Compromise orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Compromise orders. 1503.425 Section 1503.425... Assessment of Civil Penalties by TSA § 1503.425 Compromise orders. (a) Issuance. At any time before the issuance of an Order Assessing Civil Penalty under this subpart, an agency attorney and a person subject...

  17. 49 CFR 1503.425 - Compromise orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compromise orders. 1503.425 Section 1503.425... Assessment of Civil Penalties by TSA § 1503.425 Compromise orders. (a) Issuance. At any time before the issuance of an Order Assessing Civil Penalty under this subpart, an agency attorney and a person subject...

  18. 48 CFR 1432.610 - Compromising debts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compromising debts. 1432.610 Section 1432.610 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Contract Debts 1432.610 Compromising debts. The CO may...

  19. 26 CFR 301.7122-1 - Compromises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Secretary may, at the Secretary's discretion, compromise any civil or criminal liability arising under the internal revenue laws prior to reference of a case involving such a liability to the Department of Justice for prosecution or defense. (2) An agreement to compromise may relate to a civil or criminal...

  20. Practice improvement, part II: update on patient communication technologies.

    PubMed

    Roett, Michelle A; Coleman, Mary Thoesen

    2013-11-01

    Patient portals (ie, secure web-based services for patient health record access) and secure messaging to health care professionals are gaining popularity slowly. Advantages of web portals include timely communication and instruction, access to appointments and other services, and high patient satisfaction. Limitations include inappropriate use, security considerations, organizational costs, and exclusion of patients who are uncomfortable with or unable to use computers. Attention to the organization's strategic plan and office policies, patient and staff expectations, workflow and communication integration, training, marketing, and enrollment can facilitate optimal use of this technology. Other communication technologies that can enhance patient care include automated voice or text reminders and brief electronic communications. Social media provide another method of patient outreach, but privacy and access are concerns. Incorporating telehealthcare (health care provided via telephone or Internet), providing health coaching, and using interactive health communication applications can improve patient knowledge and clinical outcomes and provide social support. PMID:24261435

  1. 27 CFR 70.482 - Offers in compromise of liabilities (other than forfeiture) under 26 U.S.C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 U.S.C. (a) In general. The appropriate TTB officer may compromise any civil or criminal liability... involving such liability to the Department of Justice for prosecution or defense. (For compromise of forfeiture liability, see § 70.484 of this part.) Any such liability may be compromised only upon one or...

  2. Corticosteroids compromise survival in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Pitter, Kenneth L; Tamagno, Ilaria; Alikhanyan, Kristina; Hosni-Ahmed, Amira; Pattwell, Siobhan S; Donnola, Shannon; Dai, Charles; Ozawa, Tatsuya; Chang, Maria; Chan, Timothy A; Beal, Kathryn; Bishop, Andrew J; Barker, Christopher A; Jones, Terreia S; Hentschel, Bettina; Gorlia, Thierry; Schlegel, Uwe; Stupp, Roger; Weller, Michael; Holland, Eric C; Hambardzumyan, Dolores

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and most aggressive primary brain tumour. Standard of care consists of surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and concomitant and maintenance temozolomide (temozolomide/radiotherapy→temozolomide). Corticosteroids are commonly used perioperatively to control cerebral oedema and are frequently continued throughout subsequent treatment, notably radiotherapy, for amelioration of side effects. The effects of corticosteroids such as dexamethasone on cell growth in glioma models and on patient survival have remained controversial. We performed a retrospective analysis of glioblastoma patient cohorts to determine the prognostic role of steroid administration. A disease-relevant mouse model of glioblastoma was used to characterize the effects of dexamethasone on tumour cell proliferation and death, and to identify gene signatures associated with these effects. A murine anti-VEGFA antibody was used in parallel as an alternative for oedema control. We applied the dexamethasone-induced gene signature to The Cancer Genome Atlas glioblastoma dataset to explore the association of dexamethasone exposure with outcome. Mouse experiments were used to validate the effects of dexamethasone on survival in vivo Retrospective clinical analyses identified corticosteroid use during radiotherapy as an independent indicator of shorter survival in three independent patient cohorts. A dexamethasone-associated gene expression signature correlated with shorter survival in The Cancer Genome Atlas patient dataset. In glioma-bearing mice, dexamethasone pretreatment decreased tumour cell proliferation without affecting tumour cell viability, but reduced survival when combined with radiotherapy. Conversely, anti-VEGFA antibody decreased proliferation and increased tumour cell death, but did not affect survival when combined with radiotherapy. Clinical and mouse experimental data suggest that corticosteroids may decrease the effectiveness of treatment and shorten

  3. Female genital alteration: a compromise solution.

    PubMed

    Arora, Kavita Shah; Jacobs, Allan J

    2016-03-01

    Despite 30 years of advocacy, the prevalence of non-therapeutic female genital alteration (FGA) in minors is stable in many countries. Educational efforts have minimally changed the prevalence of this procedure in regions where it has been widely practiced. In order to better protect female children from the serious and long-term harms of some types of non-therapeutic FGA, we must adopt a more nuanced position that acknowledges a wide spectrum of procedures that alter female genitalia. We offer a revised categorisation for non-therapeutic FGA that groups procedures by effect and not by process. Acceptance of de minimis procedures that generally do not carry long-term medical risks is culturally sensitive, does not discriminate on the basis of gender, and does not violate human rights. More morbid procedures should not be performed. However, accepting de minimis non-therapeutic f FGA procedures enhances the effort of compassionate practitioners searching for a compromise position that respects cultural differences but protects the health of their patients. PMID:26902479

  4. Mutant Cullin causes cardiovascular compromise

    PubMed Central

    Luft, Friedrich C

    2015-01-01

    Mendelian hypertension is rare; however, Mendelian syndromes have taught us an amazing amount about mechanisms of distal sodium and chloride reabsorption, as well as how systemic hypertension might come about. In this issue of EMBO Molecular Medicine, Schumacher et al (2015) present a mouse model of the Cullin-3 (CUL3Δ403–459) mutation, which causes a form of pseudohypoaldosteronism type-2 (PHA-2). CUL3 is involved in ubiquitination. Surprising is the severity of the hypertension, which may be explained in part on the basis of CUL3 actions in vascular cells. The findings underscore the role of “cleanup” in the maintenance of normal physiology. PMID:26294796

  5. Patient-Centred Interviewing Part II: Finding Common Ground

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Judith Belle; Weston, W. Wayne; Stewart, Moira A.

    1989-01-01

    Developing an effective management plan requires physicians and patients to reach agreement in three key areas: the nature of the problems, the goals and priorities of treatment, and the roles of the doctor and patient. Often doctors and patients have widely divergent views in each of these areas. The process of finding a satisfactory resolution is not so much one of bargaining or negotiating but rather of moving towards a meeting of minds or finding common ground. This framework reminds physicians to incorporate patients' ideas, feelings, and expectations into treatment planning. PMID:21253279

  6. 7 CFR 3.19 - Standards for the compromise of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... follow the standards set forth in 31 CFR part 902 for the compromise of debts pursuant to 31 U.S.C. 3711... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Standards for the compromise of claims. 3.19 Section 3.19 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DEBT MANAGEMENT Standards for...

  7. 28 CFR Appendix to Subpart Y of... - Redelegations of Authority To Compromise and Close Civil Claims

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Redelegations of Authority To Compromise and Close Civil Claims Appendix to Subpart Y of Part 0 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Authority To Compromise and Close Civil Claims and Responsibility for Judgments, Fines, Penalties,...

  8. 7 CFR 3.19 - Standards for the compromise of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Standards for the compromise of claims. 3.19 Section 3.19 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DEBT MANAGEMENT Standards for the... follow the standards set forth in 31 CFR part 902 for the compromise of debts pursuant to 31 U.S.C....

  9. 28 CFR Appendix to Subpart Y of... - Redelegations of Authority To Compromise and Close Civil Claims

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Redelegations of Authority To Compromise and Close Civil Claims Appendix to Subpart Y of Part 0 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Authority To Compromise and Close Civil Claims and Responsibility for Judgments, Fines, Penalties,...

  10. 31 CFR 29.514 - Requests for waiver and/or compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standards set forth in the FCCS in 31 CFR part 902. (2) A waiver or compromise decision by the Department... Justice for consideration pursuant to 31 CFR 902.1(b). ... waiver and/or compromise. Individuals who receive a demand letter regarding an overpayment may ask...

  11. 39 CFR 931.1 - Compromise of obligations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compromise of obligations. 931.1 Section 931.1 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PROCEDURE GOVERNING THE COMPROMISE OF OBLIGATIONS § 931.1 Compromise of obligations. Any proposition of compromise shall be submitted in writing, and the amount offered in compromise...

  12. Part I: The Difficult Patient: Medical and Legal Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ovens, Howard

    1989-01-01

    Difficult patients are defined as those who elicit strong negative emotions from their physicians. If not acknowledged and managed correctly, these feelings can lead to diagnostic errors, unpleasant confrontations, and troublesome complaints or legal claims. The author reviews common personalities and situations that are associated with difficult encounters in emergency departments and describes an approach stressing flexibility in communication and the early establishment of rapport. He discusses diagnostic possibilities in the agitated or confused, unco-operative patient, reviews relevant laws governing restraint and competence to consent, and outlines techniques to reduce medicolegal risks. PMID:21249058

  13. Radionuclide scrotal imaging: further experience with 210 patients. Part I. Anatomy, pathophysiology, and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.C.P.; Holder, L.E.; Melloul, M.

    1983-08-01

    Ten years' experience with radionuclide scrotal imaging (RSI) to evaluate perfusion of the scrotal contents has confirmed the value of this examination. In 1973, Nadel et al. first proposed using sodium pertechnetate (Tc-99m) to diagnose testicular torsion. By the end of 1982, more than thirty articles have been published on this topic, with most emphasizing the usefulness of RSI in managing patients with acute scrotal pain. The present communication describes our findings in 210 patients, not previously reported. There were four groups with relatively distinct clinical presentations: (a) acute scrotal pain, (b) chronic scrotal pain, (c) scrotal injury, and (d) scrotal mass. The anatomic and pathophysiologic bases for the scan findings will be emphasized. We discuss the staging of testicular torsion; viability of the compromised testicle; variability in the presentation of acute infection; anatomy of trauma, varicocele, and inguinal hernia; and the correlation with scrotal sonography.

  14. Perpetually perplexing pediatric patients: it's complicated: part 2.

    PubMed

    Block, Stan L

    2015-01-01

    Many pediatric patients that you encounter will challenge your diagnostic and therapeutic skills. As the following cases will illustrate, some will perplex you with their esoteric or convoluted illnesses despite your best attempts. Although their initial presentation may often be mundane, thorough history taking and physical examination, and a keen "clinical intuition" will be invaluable. PMID:25594207

  15. Rheumatological management of patients with hemophilia. Part 1: joint manifestations.

    PubMed

    Alcalay, Michel; Deplas, Adeline

    2002-10-01

    The advent of factor VIII and IX replacement therapy has radically changed the physiognomy of hemophilia. In patients with no inhibitors, early replacement therapy shortens the immobilization and decreases the structural and functional alterations related to recurrent hemarthrosis. Routine prophylactic replacement therapy before or after the first episode of hemarthrosis is still rarely used in France. Recurrent hemarthrosis in the same joint can cause synovitis and chronic arthropathy. Injection synovectomy is now the preferred treatment, as opposed to secondary prophylactic replacement therapy and to arthroscopic or open synovectomy. The palliative treatment of chronic arthropathy is difficult and rests on analgesics and rehabilitation therapy, with orthotic devices and/or surgery where appropriate. The treatment of hemophilia is far more difficult in patients with inhibitors and, consequently, considerable hope is being placed in gene therapy, whose first results are encouraging. PMID:12477227

  16. Failing to forget: inhibitory-control deficits compromise memory suppression in posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Catarino, Ana; Küpper, Charlotte S; Werner-Seidler, Aliza; Dalgleish, Tim; Anderson, Michael C

    2015-05-01

    Most people have experienced distressing events that they would rather forget. Although memories of such events become less intrusive with time for the majority of people, those with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are afflicted by vivid, recurrent memories of their trauma. Often triggered by reminders in the daily environment, these memories can cause severe distress and impairment. We propose that difficulties with intrusive memories in PTSD arise in part from a deficit in engaging inhibitory control to suppress episodic retrieval. We tested this hypothesis by adapting the think/no-think paradigm to investigate voluntary memory suppression of aversive scenes cued by naturalistic reminders. Retrieval suppression was compromised significantly in PTSD patients, compared with trauma-exposed control participants. Furthermore, patients with the largest deficits in suppression-induced forgetting were also those with the most severe PTSD symptoms. These results raise the possibility that prefrontal mechanisms supporting inhibitory control over memory are impaired in PTSD. PMID:25847536

  17. Modeling the Dynamics of Compromised Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Soper, B; Merl, D M

    2011-09-12

    Accurate predictive models of compromised networks would contribute greatly to improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the detection and control of network attacks. Compartmental epidemiological models have been applied to modeling attack vectors such as viruses and worms. We extend the application of these models to capture a wider class of dynamics applicable to cyber security. By making basic assumptions regarding network topology we use multi-group epidemiological models and reaction rate kinetics to model the stochastic evolution of a compromised network. The Gillespie Algorithm is used to run simulations under a worst case scenario in which the intruder follows the basic connection rates of network traffic as a method of obfuscation.

  18. From function to esthetics: anterior or occlusal compromises to esthetics.

    PubMed

    Guichet, D L; Guichet, N F

    1993-01-01

    Increased patient expectations together with improved diagnostic, material, and surgical advances have expanded the boundaries of esthetic dentistry. To optimize functional and esthetic success, existing techniques are being enhanced through careful patient selection and management of the occlusion. During the period from 1991 to 1992, several areas relating anterior or occlusal compromises to esthetics have been identified. These include: dental and skeletal malocclusion, periodontal esthetic defects, restorative materials and laboratory techniques, tooth arrangement and maxillomandibular relations, and implant dentistry. This paper reviews some of the literature on these areas during this period. PMID:8401825

  19. Patient Cost Sharing and Receipt of Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agents Through Medicare Part D

    PubMed Central

    Davidoff, Amy J.; Hendrick, Franklin B.; Zeidan, Amer M.; Baer, Maria R.; Stuart, Bruce C.; Shenolikar, Rahul A.; Gore, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Medicare Part D prescription benefits cover injected medications, normally covered under Part B, when administered outside of physician offices. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) used for chronic anemia management in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are commonly injected in a physician office but can be administered safely at home. In this study, we explored out-of-pocket (OOP) costs and receipt of Part D–covered ESAs in Medicare beneficiaries with MDS. Materials and Methods: Patients with MDS enrolled in Medicare Parts A, B, and D were identified using diagnosis codes from 100% claims from 2006 to 2008. OOP costs for the mean erythropoietin alfa claim were compared for Parts B and D. Multivariable models examined the effect of low-income subsidy (LIS) and other Part D cost sharing on receipt of any ESA and any Part D–covered ESA. Results: A total of 13,117 (62.9%) of 20,848 patients received ESAs, but only 1,436 (6.9%) had any Part D claim. OOP payment was $348 under Part D versus $161 under Part B. Among patients with ESA use, those with LIS were 4× more likely to receive Part D ESAs (P < .01). Conclusion: Few patients with MDS received ESAs through Part D. OOP payments required under Part D were substantially higher than under Part B. Cost sharing, as reflected by LIS receipt, likely affected decisions to prescribe ESAs outside of the physician office. Improved coordination between Part B and D benefits regarding issues of home injection of medications may create incentives that improve patient access and convenience and reduce costs associated with administration. PMID:25563701

  20. Patients with oral tumors. Part 1: Prosthetic rehabilitation following tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Fierz, Janine; Hallermann, Wok; Mericske-Stern, Regina

    2013-01-01

    The present study reports on the surgical and prosthodontic rehabilitation of 46 patients, 31 male and 15 female, after resection of oral tumors. The treatment was carried out from 2004 to 2007 at the Department of Prosthodontics, University of Bern, with a follow-up time of 3 to 6 years. The average age at diagnosis was 54 years. 76% of all tumors were squamous cell carcinoma, followed by adenocarcinoma. Resection of the tumors including soft and/or hard tissues was performed in all patients. 80% of them additionally underwent radiotherapy and 40% chemotherapy. A full block resection of the mandible was perfomed in 23 patients, and in 10 patients, the tumor resection resulted in an oronasal communication. 29 patients underwent grafting procedures, mostly consisting of a free fibula flap transplant. To enhance the prosthetic treatment outcome and improve the prosthesis stability, a total of 114 implants were placed. However, 14 implants were not loaded because they failed during the healing period or the patient could not complete the final treatment with the prostheses. The survival rate of the implants reached 84.2% after 4 to 5 years. Many patients were only partially dentate before the tumors were detected, and further teeth had to be extracted in the course of the tumor therapy. Altogether, 31 jaws became or remained edentulous. Implants provide stability and may facilitate the adaptation to the denture, but their survival rate was compromised. Mostly, patients were fitted with removable prostheses with obturators in the maxilla and implant-supported complete dentures with bars in the mandible. Although sequelae of tumor resection are similar in many patients, the individual intermaxillary relations, facial morphology and functional capacity vary significantly. Thus, individual management is required for prosthetic rehabilitation. PMID:23512240

  1. Preparing patients to travel abroad safely. Part 2: Updating vaccinations.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, R. E.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide, for family physicians without access to a travel clinic, evidence-based recommendations on vaccinating infants and children, adults, pregnant women, and immunocompromised patients traveling to non-Western countries. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Searches were undertaken of MEDLINE from 1990 to November 1998 (372 articles); the Cochrane Collaboration Library; publications of the National Action Committee on Immunization and the Committee to Advise on Tropical Medicine and Travel in Canada Communicable Disease Reports; the Canadian Immunization Guide; and Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, United States Centres for Disease Control, and World Health Organization websites. Evidence-based statements, randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses were selected. Vaccination recommendations are based on this evidence. MAIN MESSAGE: Physicians should complete vaccination schedules for children whose primary series is incomplete and vaccinate unvaccinated adults. Hepatitis A is widespread, and travelers to areas where it is endemic should be vaccinated. The elderly should be vaccinated against influenza and pneumococcal disease. Pregnant women should receive vaccines appropriate to their trimester. Immunocompromised patients should be vaccinated, but BCG and live vaccines are contraindicated. Travelers to areas where meningitis, typhoid, cholera, Japanese encephalitis, and rabies are endemic should be vaccinated if they are likely to be exposed. Those traveling to areas where tuberculosis is endemic should take precautions and should have skin tests before traveling and 2 to 4 months after return. CONCLUSIONS: Family physicians can administer all necessary vaccinations. They can advise pregnant women and immunocompromised people about the balance of risk of disease and benefits of vaccination. PMID:10752003

  2. 48 CFR 232.616 - Compromise actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compromise actions. 232.616 Section 232.616 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM... actions. Only the department/agency contract financing offices (see 232.070(c)) are authorized...

  3. An Unstructured Workshop as a Training Compromise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    Because of its poor labor relations and consequent public image, New Zealand's meat industry asked the University of Otago to provide management training. Describes difficulties in developing effective training acceptable to the industry, the compromise workshop approach involving questionnaires and diaries, and the workshop's qualified success.…

  4. 49 CFR 1503.425 - Compromise orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compromise orders. 1503.425 Section 1503.425 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ADMINISTRATIVE AND PROCEDURAL RULES INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Assessment of Civil Penalties...

  5. 49 CFR 1503.425 - Compromise orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compromise orders. 1503.425 Section 1503.425 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ADMINISTRATIVE AND PROCEDURAL RULES INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Assessment of Civil Penalties...

  6. Political Compromise Makes the World Go 'Round

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everett, Diana

    2007-01-01

    Compromise in any context is often hard to accept. It feels like a person is giving up on his or her ideals. This is especially true in dealing with politics. Legislative and congressional bills can be written with the highest of ideals in mind. By the time the bill progresses through committees and the floor debate process, it can look like a…

  7. 38 CFR 1.931 - Bases for compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bases for compromise. 1.931 Section 1.931 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Standards for Compromise of Claims § 1.931 Bases for compromise. (a) VA may compromise a debt if it cannot collect the full amount because:...

  8. 40 CFR 13.25 - Standards for compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for compromise. 13.25 Section 13.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION STANDARDS Compromise of Debts § 13.25 Standards for compromise. (a) EPA may compromise a claim pursuant to this...

  9. 31 CFR 902.5 - Further review of compromise offers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Further review of compromise offers... COMPROMISE OF CLAIMS § 902.5 Further review of compromise offers. If an agency is uncertain whether to accept a firm, written, substantive compromise offer on a debt that is within the agency's...

  10. Gender Differences in the Readiness To Accept Career Compromise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gati, Itamar

    Most career decisions involve compromises. The need to compromise can be attributed to the fact that the characteristics of the options in the occupational world do not necessarily match the ideal career image of the career decision maker. This study examined the readiness to compromise and the content of compromise in 1,252 deliberating women and…

  11. Patient participation as an integral part of patient-reported outcomes development ensures the representation of the patient voice: a case study from the field of rheumatology

    PubMed Central

    de Wit, M P T; Kvien, T K; Gossec, L

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are important instruments to evaluate healthcare interventions, both in clinical practice and clinical research. Objective To describe how representation of the perspective of people with psoriatic arthritis was obtained through active participation on different levels in the development of PROs. Methods This case study focuses on the methods of involving patients in the elaboration and validation of the Psoriatic Arthritis Impact of Disease (PsAID) score. We used the concept of the participation ladder and the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the involvement of patient representatives in scientific projects to analyse the variety of ways patients participated in this process. Results Two patient experts were part of the steering group. 12 patient research partners, coming from 12 different European countries, participated in identifying domains, formulating items for the questionnaire and determining the number of items, the recall period and the questionnaire format. They also helped with the translation of the items into different European languages. Then, 139 patients took part in ranking and prioritising the domains for importance; 65 patients were involved in cognitive debriefing interviews; 499 new patients were recruited for the validation study. Challenges of patient participation in PRO development, such as the representation of patients, are discussed. Conclusions Making patient participation an integral part of the PRO development and validation process is an important requisite for outcome research. The variety of patient contributions at different phases in this case study resulted in an instrument with high face validity. PMID:26509075

  12. 46 CFR Appendix A to Subpart W of... - Example of Compromise Agreement To Be Used Under 46 CFR 502.604

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Example of Compromise Agreement To Be Used Under 46 CFR 502.604 A Appendix A to Subpart W of Part 502 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND... Compromise Agreement To Be Used Under 46 CFR 502.604 Compromise Agreement FMC File No. ____ This Agreement...

  13. 46 CFR Appendix A to Subpart W of... - Example of Compromise Agreement To Be Used Under 46 CFR 502.604

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Example of Compromise Agreement To Be Used Under 46 CFR 502.604 A Appendix A to Subpart W of Part 502 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND... Compromise Agreement To Be Used Under 46 CFR 502.604 Compromise Agreement FMC File No. ____ This Agreement...

  14. 46 CFR Appendix A to Subpart W of... - Example of Compromise Agreement To Be Used Under 46 CFR 502.604

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Example of Compromise Agreement To Be Used Under 46 CFR 502.604 A Appendix A to Subpart W of Part 502 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND... Compromise Agreement To Be Used Under 46 CFR 502.604 Compromise Agreement FMC File No. ____ This Agreement...

  15. 46 CFR Appendix A to Subpart W of... - Example of Compromise Agreement To Be Used Under 46 CFR 502.604

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Example of Compromise Agreement To Be Used Under 46 CFR 502.604 A Appendix A to Subpart W of Part 502 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND... Compromise Agreement To Be Used Under 46 CFR 502.604 Compromise Agreement FMC File No. ____ This Agreement...

  16. 46 CFR Appendix A to Subpart W of... - Example of Compromise Agreement To Be Used Under 46 CFR 502.604

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Example of Compromise Agreement To Be Used Under 46 CFR 502.604 A Appendix A to Subpart W of Part 502 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND... Compromise Agreement To Be Used Under 46 CFR 502.604 Compromise Agreement FMC File No. ____ This Agreement...

  17. Patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk estimation in CT: Part II. Application to patients

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Toncheva, Greta; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Frush, Donald P.

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Current methods for estimating and reporting radiation dose from CT examinations are largely patient-generic; the body size and hence dose variation from patient to patient is not reflected. Furthermore, the current protocol designs rely on dose as a surrogate for the risk of cancer incidence, neglecting the strong dependence of risk on age and gender. The purpose of this study was to develop a method for estimating patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk from CT examinations. Methods: The study included two patients (a 5-week-old female patient and a 12-year-old male patient), who underwent 64-slice CT examinations (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare) of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis at our institution in 2006. For each patient, a nonuniform rational B-spine (NURBS) based full-body computer model was created based on the patient's clinical CT data. Large organs and structures inside the image volume were individually segmented and modeled. Other organs were created by transforming an existing adult male or female full-body computer model (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. A Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated for dose simulation on the LightSpeed VCT scanner was used to estimate patient-specific organ dose, from which effective dose and risks of cancer incidence were derived. Patient-specific organ dose and effective dose were compared with patient-generic CT dose quantities in current clinical use: the volume-weighted CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) and the effective dose derived from the dose-length product (DLP). Results: The effective dose for the CT examination of the newborn patient (5.7 mSv) was higher but comparable to that for the CT examination of the teenager patient (4.9 mSv) due to the size-based clinical CT protocols at our institution, which employ lower scan techniques for smaller

  18. Interactive dose shaping part 2: proof of concept study for six prostate patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamerling, Cornelis Ph; Ziegenhein, Peter; Sterzing, Florian; Oelfke, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Recently we introduced interactive dose shaping (IDS) as a new IMRT planning strategy. This planning concept is based on a hierarchical sequence of local dose modification and recovery operations. The purpose of this work is to provide a feasibility study for the IDS planning strategy based on a small set of six prostate patients. The IDS planning paradigm aims to perform interactive local dose adaptations of an IMRT plan without compromising already established valuable dose features in real-time. Various IDS tools were developed in our in-house treatment planning software Dynaplan and were utilized to create IMRT treatment plans for six patients with an adeno-carcinoma of the prostate. The sequenced IDS treatment plans were compared to conventionally optimized clinically approved plans (9 beams, co-planar). For each patient, several IDS plans were created, with different trade-offs between organ sparing and target coverage. The reference dose distributions were imported into Dynaplan. For each patient, the IDS treatment plan with a similar or better trade-off between target coverage and OAR sparing was selected for plan evaluation, guided by a physician. For this initial study we were able to generate treatment plans for prostate geometries in 15-45 min. Individual local dose adaptations could be performed in less than one second. The average differences compared to the reference plans were for the mean dose: 0.0 Gy (boost) and 1.2 Gy (PTV), for {{D}98%}:-1.1 Gy and for {{D}2%}:1.1 Gy (both target volumes). The dose-volume quality indicators were well below the Quantec constraints. However, we also observed limitations of our currently implemented approach. Most prominent was an increase of the non-tumor integral dose by 16.4% on average, demonstrating that further developments of our planning strategy are required.

  19. Interactive dose shaping part 2: proof of concept study for six prostate patients.

    PubMed

    Ph Kamerling, Cornelis; Ziegenhein, Peter; Sterzing, Florian; Oelfke, Uwe

    2016-03-21

    Recently we introduced interactive dose shaping (IDS) as a new IMRT planning strategy. This planning concept is based on a hierarchical sequence of local dose modification and recovery operations. The purpose of this work is to provide a feasibility study for the IDS planning strategy based on a small set of six prostate patients. The IDS planning paradigm aims to perform interactive local dose adaptations of an IMRT plan without compromising already established valuable dose features in real-time. Various IDS tools were developed in our in-house treatment planning software Dynaplan and were utilized to create IMRT treatment plans for six patients with an adeno-carcinoma of the prostate. The sequenced IDS treatment plans were compared to conventionally optimized clinically approved plans (9 beams, co-planar). For each patient, several IDS plans were created, with different trade-offs between organ sparing and target coverage. The reference dose distributions were imported into Dynaplan. For each patient, the IDS treatment plan with a similar or better trade-off between target coverage and OAR sparing was selected for plan evaluation, guided by a physician. For this initial study we were able to generate treatment plans for prostate geometries in 15-45 min. Individual local dose adaptations could be performed in less than one second. The average differences compared to the reference plans were for the mean dose: 0.0 Gy (boost) and 1.2 Gy (PTV), for D98% : -1.1 Gy and for D2% : 1.1 Gy (both target volumes). The dose-volume quality indicators were well below the Quantec constraints. However, we also observed limitations of our currently implemented approach. Most prominent was an increase of the non-tumor integral dose by 16.4% on average, demonstrating that further developments of our planning strategy are required. PMID:26948274

  20. Identifying genetic relatives without compromising privacy

    PubMed Central

    He, Dan; Furlotte, Nicholas A.; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Joo, Jong Wha J.; Wadia, Akshay; Ostrovsky, Rafail; Sahai, Amit; Eskin, Eleazar

    2014-01-01

    The development of high-throughput genomic technologies has impacted many areas of genetic research. While many applications of these technologies focus on the discovery of genes involved in disease from population samples, applications of genomic technologies to an individual’s genome or personal genomics have recently gained much interest. One such application is the identification of relatives from genetic data. In this application, genetic information from a set of individuals is collected in a database, and each pair of individuals is compared in order to identify genetic relatives. An inherent issue that arises in the identification of relatives is privacy. In this article, we propose a method for identifying genetic relatives without compromising privacy by taking advantage of novel cryptographic techniques customized for secure and private comparison of genetic information. We demonstrate the utility of these techniques by allowing a pair of individuals to discover whether or not they are related without compromising their genetic information or revealing it to a third party. The idea is that individuals only share enough special-purpose cryptographically protected information with each other to identify whether or not they are relatives, but not enough to expose any information about their genomes. We show in HapMap and 1000 Genomes data that our method can recover first- and second-order genetic relationships and, through simulations, show that our method can identify relationships as distant as third cousins while preserving privacy. PMID:24614977

  1. National Lipid Association Recommendations for Patient-Centered Management of Dyslipidemia: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Terry A; Maki, Kevin C; Orringer, Carl E; Jones, Peter H; Kris-Etherton, Penny; Sikand, Geeta; La Forge, Ralph; Daniels, Stephen R; Wilson, Don P; Morris, Pamela B; Wild, Robert A; Grundy, Scott M; Daviglus, Martha; Ferdinand, Keith C; Vijayaraghavan, Krishnaswami; Deedwania, Prakash C; Aberg, Judith A; Liao, Katherine P; McKenney, James M; Ross, Joyce L; Braun, Lynne T; Ito, Matthew K; Bays, Harold E; Brown, W Virgil

    2015-01-01

    An Expert Panel convened by the National Lipid Association previously developed a consensus set of recommendations for the patient-centered management of dyslipidemia in clinical medicine (part 1). These were guided by the principle that reducing elevated levels of atherogenic cholesterol (non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol) reduces the risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. This document represents a continuation of the National Lipid Association recommendations developed by a diverse panel of experts who examined the evidence base and provided recommendations regarding the following topics: (1) lifestyle therapies; (2) groups with special considerations, including children and adolescents, women, older patients, certain ethnic and racial groups, patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus, patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and patients with residual risk despite statin and lifestyle therapies; and (3) strategies to improve patient outcomes by increasing adherence and using team-based collaborative care. PMID:26699442

  2. Graphical electrocardiogram waveforms as part of an integrated hospital system's patient record.

    PubMed Central

    Enison, E. J.; Dayhoff, R.; Fletcher, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has an ongoing project to integrate diagnostic images into its existing text-based hospital information system. High-quality images from cardiology, pulmonary medicine, gastroenterology, endoscopy, pathology, radiology, hematology and nuclear medicine can be displayed for clinicians quickly and conveniently on workstations throughout the hospital. As a part of this endeavor, diagnostic-quality computer generated 12-lead electrocardiograms, including both median and rhythm data, can be viewed as a part of the on-line patient record of an integrated hospital information system. Now computer generated graphics can be included in the longitudinal patient record. Incorporating generated graphics and images into a text based patient record is another step towards the next generation of integrated hospital information system with multimedia patient records. PMID:8130498

  3. “The Heart Game”: Using Gamification as Part of a Telerehabilitation Program for Heart Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dithmer, Marcus; Grönvall, Erik; Spindler, Helle; Hansen, John; Nielsen, Gitte; Sørensen, Stine Bæk; Dinesen, Birthe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this article is to describe the development and testing of a prototype application (“The Heart Game”) using gamification principles to assist heart patients in their telerehabilitation process in the Teledialog project. Materials and Methods: A prototype game was developed via user-driven innovation and tested on 10 patients 48–89 years of age and their relatives for a period of 2 weeks. The application consisted of a series of daily challenges given to the patients and relatives and was based on several gamification principles. A triangulation of data collection techniques (interviews, participant observations, focus group interviews, and workshop) was used. Interviews with three healthcare professionals and 10 patients were carried out over a period of 2 weeks in order to evaluate the use of the prototype. Results: The heart patients reported the application to be a useful tool as a part of their telerehabilitation process in everyday life. Gamification and gameful design principles such as leaderboards, relationships, and achievements engaged the patients and relatives. The inclusion of a close relative in the game motivated the patients to perform rehabilitation activities. Conclusions: “The Heart Game” concept presents a new way to motivate heart patients by using technology as a social and active approach to telerehabilitation. The findings show the potential of using gamification for heart patients as part of a telerehabilitation program. The evaluation indicated that the inclusion of the patient's spouse in the rehabilitation activities could be an effective strategy. A major challenge in using gamification for heart patients is avoiding a sense of defeat while still adjusting the level of difficulty to the individual patient. PMID:26579590

  4. Evaluation and diagnosis of the hair loss patient: part I. History and clinical examination.

    PubMed

    Mubki, Thamer; Rudnicka, Lidia; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Shapiro, Jerry

    2014-09-01

    Hair loss (alopecia) is a common problem and is often a major source of distress for patients. The differential diagnosis of alopecia includes both scarring and nonscarring alopecias. In addition, many hair shaft disorders can produce hair shaft fragility, resulting in different patterns of alopecia. Therefore, an organized and systematic approach is needed to accurately address patients' complaints to achieve the correct diagnosis. Part 1 of this 2-part continuing medical education article on alopecia describes history taking and the clinical examination of different hair loss disorders. It also provides an algorithmic diagnostic approach based on the most recent knowledge about different types of alopecia. PMID:25128118

  5. 31 CFR 902.2 - Bases for compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bases for compromise. 902.2 Section 902.2 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FEDERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION STANDARDS (DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY-DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE) STANDARDS FOR THE COMPROMISE OF CLAIMS § 902.2 Bases for compromise....

  6. 49 CFR 89.13 - Documentary evidence of compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Documentary evidence of compromise. 89.13 Section 89.13 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FEDERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION ACT General § 89.13 Documentary evidence of compromise. A compromise of any claim is not final...

  7. 49 CFR 89.13 - Documentary evidence of compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Documentary evidence of compromise. 89.13 Section 89.13 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FEDERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION ACT General § 89.13 Documentary evidence of compromise. A compromise of any claim is not final...

  8. 26 CFR 300.3 - Offer to compromise fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Offer to compromise fee. 300.3 Section 300.3... ADMINISTRATION USER FEES § 300.3 Offer to compromise fee. (a) Applicability. This section applies to the... provided in this section, this fee applies to all offers to compromise accepted for processing. (b) Fee....

  9. 20 CFR 340.13 - Compromise of amounts recoverable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... INSURANCE ACT RECOVERY OF BENEFITS § 340.13 Compromise of amounts recoverable. The Board or its designee may compromise an amount recoverable, provided such amount does not exceed $100,000, excluding interest, or such... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compromise of amounts recoverable....

  10. 5 CFR 185.146 - Compromise or settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compromise or settlement. 185.146 Section 185.146 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 185.146 Compromise or settlement. (a) Parties may make offers of compromise...

  11. 49 CFR 1018.71 - Referral of a compromise offer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Referral of a compromise offer. 1018.71 Section... § 1018.71 Referral of a compromise offer. The Board may refer a debtor's firm written offer of compromise which is substantial in amount to GAO or to DOJ if the Board is uncertain whether the offer should...

  12. 27 CFR 70.436 - Offers in compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Offers in compromise. 70.436 Section 70.436 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... Cigarette Papers and Tubes § 70.436 Offers in compromise. Procedure in the case of offers in compromise...

  13. 27 CFR 70.415 - Offers in compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Offers in compromise. 70.415 Section 70.415 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... Beer § 70.415 Offers in compromise. Procedure in the case of offers in compromise of liabilities...

  14. 49 CFR 89.13 - Documentary evidence of compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Documentary evidence of compromise. 89.13 Section 89.13 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FEDERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION ACT General § 89.13 Documentary evidence of compromise. A compromise of any claim is not final...

  15. 49 CFR 89.13 - Documentary evidence of compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Documentary evidence of compromise. 89.13 Section 89.13 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FEDERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION ACT General § 89.13 Documentary evidence of compromise. A compromise of any claim is not final...

  16. 49 CFR 89.13 - Documentary evidence of compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Documentary evidence of compromise. 89.13 Section 89.13 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FEDERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION ACT General § 89.13 Documentary evidence of compromise. A compromise of any claim is not final...

  17. Integrative Analyses of Uterine Transcriptome and MicroRNAome Reveal Compromised LIF-STAT3 Signaling and Progesterone Response in the Endometrium of Patients with Recurrent/Repeated Implantation Failure (RIF)

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Eun Jin; Park, Miseon; Yoon, Jung Ah; Kim, Yeon Sun; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Shin, Ji-Eun; Kim, Ji Hyang; Kwon, Hwang; Song, Haengseok; Choi, Dong-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Intimate two-way interactions between the implantation-competent blastocyst and receptive uterus are prerequisite for successful embryo implantation. In humans, recurrent/repeated implantation failure (RIF) may occur due to altered uterine receptivity with aberrant gene expression in the endometrium as well as genetic defects in embryos. Several studies have been performed to understand dynamic changes of uterine transcriptome during menstrual cycles in humans. However, uterine transcriptome of the patients with RIF has not been clearly investigated yet. Here we show that several signaling pathways as well as many genes and microRNAs are dysregulated in the endometrium of patients with RIF (RIFE). Whereas unsupervised hierarchical clustering showed that overall mRNA and microRNA profiles of RIFE were similar to those of endometria of healthy women, many genes were significantly dysregulated in RIFE (cut off at 1.5 fold change). The majority (~75%) of differentially expressed genes in RIFE including S100 calcium binding protein P (S100P), Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 13 (CXCL13) and SIX homeobox 1 (SIX1) were down-regulated, suggesting that reduced uterine expression of these genes is associated with RIF. Gene Set Enrichment analyses (GSEA) for mRNA microarrays revealed that various signaling pathways including Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) signaling and a P4 response were dysregulated in RIFE although expression levels of Estrogen receptor α (ERα) and Progesterone receptor (PR) were not significantly altered in RIFE. Furthermore, expression and phosphorylation of Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) are reduced and a gene set associated with Janus kinase (JAK)-STAT signaling pathway is systemically down-regulated in these patients. Pairwise analyses of microRNA arrays with prediction of dysregulated microRNAs based on mRNA expression datasets demonstrated that 6 microRNAs are aberrantly regulated in RIFE. Collectively, we here suggest

  18. Institutional Commitments, Individual Compromises: Identity-Related Responses to Compromise in an Australian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchman, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    This study explores compromises by individual academic staff, which reflect their multiple understandings of academic work. I offer a brief overview of the changing Australian tertiary sector environment and the ways in which this has had an impact on the academic role. The discussion centres around the need for investigations of academia to be…

  19. The spatial encoding of body parts in patients with neglect and neurologically unimpaired participants.

    PubMed

    Sposito, Ambra V; Bolognini, Nadia; Vallar, Giuseppe; Posteraro, Lucio; Maravita, Angelo

    2010-01-01

    Body parts are represented in the brain in a very specific fashion, as compared to other three-dimensional objects, with reference to their prototypic shape and multisensory coding. However, evidence is lacking about the spatial representation of body parts. To address this issue, in Experiment 1 we first compared the metric representation of body parts and of non-bodily objects in 14 right-brain-damaged patients with left unilateral spatial neglect (USN), and in 14 neurologically unimpaired control participants. Participants bisected, by manual pointing, a three-dimensional object, or their own left forearm. Patients showed the well-known ipsilesional rightward displacement of the subjective midpoint, in both forearm and solid bisection. Both USN patients and control participants were overall more accurate in the bisection of their own forearm, relative to the extracorporeal object. In four patients this advantage of the forearm was significant in a single-case analysis, while two patients showed the opposite dissociation, being more accurate with the solid object. In Experiment 2 neurologically unimpaired participants were more accurate in the bisection of a fake forearm, as well as of their own forearm, as compared to the extrapersonal object. Overall, the results indicate that the representation of the metric of the body is more reliable than that of extrapersonal objects, and also more resistant to the disruption of spatial representations brought about by USN, possibly due to the prototypical shape of body parts. Furthermore, the double dissociation found in USN patients suggests that the metrics of body parts and of extrapersonal objects are supported by independent spatial processes. PMID:19800899

  20. Putting patients first: patient-centered care: more than the sum of its parts.

    PubMed

    Frampton, Susan B; Guastello, Sara

    2010-09-01

    This is the seventh and last in a series of articles from Planetree, an international non profit organization founded in 1978 that's "committed to improving medical care from the patient's perspective." For more information, go to www.planetree.org. To register for a free Webinar based on this series that starts on September 21, go to http://bit.ly/aezmEu. PMID:20736711

  1. How End-Stage Renal Disease Patients Manage the Medicare Part D Coverage Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovacs, Pamela J.; Perkins, Nathan; Nuschke, Elizabeth; Carroll, Norman

    2012-01-01

    Medicare Part D was enacted to help elderly and disabled individuals pay for prescription drugs, but it was structured with a gap providing no coverage in 2010 between $2,830 and $6,440. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are especially likely to be affected due to high costs of dialysis-related drugs and the importance of adherence for…

  2. Internal Fixation Versus Nonoperative Treatment for Displaced 3-Part or 4-Part Proximal Humeral Fractures in Elderly Patients: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Chen, Aimin

    2013-01-01

    Background A few studies focused on open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) or nonoperative treatment of displaced 3-part or 4-part proximal humeral fractures in elderly patients have been published, all of whom had a low number of patients. In this meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), we aimed to assess the effect of ORIF or nonoperative treatment of displaced 3-part or 4-part proximal humeral fractures in elderly patients on the clinical outcomes and re-evaluate of the potential benefits of conservative treatment. Methods We searched PubMed and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases for randomized controlled trials comparing ORIF and nonoperative treatment of displaced 3-part or 4-part proximal humeral fractures in elderly patients. Our outcome measures were the Constant scores. Results: Three randomized controlled trials with a total of 130 patients were identified and analyzed. The overall results based on fixed-effect model did not support the treatment of open reduction and internal fixation to improve the functional outcome when compared with nonoperative treatment for treating elderly patients with displaced 3-part or 4-part proximal humeral fractures (WMD −0.51, 95% CI: −7.25 to 6.22, P = 0.88, I2 = 0%). Conclusions Although our meta-analysis did not support the treatment of open reduction and internal fixation to improve the functional outcome when compared with nonoperative treatment for treating elderly patients with displaced 3-part or 4-part proximal humeral fractures, this result must be considered in the context of variable patient demographics. Only a limited recommendation can be made based on current data. Considering the limitations of included studies, a large, well designed trial that incorporates the evaluation of clinically relevant outcomes in participants with different underlying risks of shoulder function is required to more adequately assess the role for ORIF or nonoperative

  3. Conflict and Compromise: Catholic and Public Hospital Partnerships

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Barbra Mann

    2010-01-01

    This article analyzes the tensions and uneasy negotiations, based on a case study, that occurred among Catholic sisters, administrators, bishops, physicians, and the Vatican for more than seven years at a hospital in Austin, Texas. Here, the largest health care system in the city, which was Catholic, joined with the local public, tax-supported hospital that provided the majority of reproductive health care services in the region. A clash resulted over whether the hospital could continue providing sterilization and contraceptive services to its primarily poor patients. This article examines the fierce debates that occurred, especially over emergency contraception and attempts to develop creative solutions after a hierarchical crackdown from the Vatican. The end result was a compromise that included the creation of a “hospital within a hospital.” PMID:20067093

  4. A new paradigm in patient education: a four-part model using videotape production.

    PubMed

    Meymandi, A; Deaver, E L

    1999-06-01

    In this article, the effectiveness of an instructional videotape for newly admitted hospitalized psychiatric patients is discussed and evaluated. It is suggested that by using 'actors' with whom the patient is familiar (hospital staff), the educational and therapeutic benefit of the video is enhanced. This paper provides a method for pre-production planning of an effective videotape based on a four-part model. In this model, the educational subject matter is divided into four categories; facts, procedures, support, and mastery. An attempt is made to match various styles of presentation by each member of the treatment team to the nature of the part being presented. The short attention span common to newly admitted depressed patients, for example, is remedied by the use of concise messages delivered by each treatment team member. Although videotapes are not a substitute for one-to-one professional interaction, they can provide some basic understanding of the therapeutic environment and allay some of the fears that often plague the newly admitted patient. This paper also demonstrates how the use of videotaped instruction allows the treatment team to administer organized information using unlicensed personnel or the patient himself, thus conserving the professional staff's time. PMID:10633670

  5. Patients' Perceptions of Endodontic Treatment as Part of Public Health Services: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Melgaço-Costa, José Leonardo Barbosa; Martins, Renata Castro; Ferreira, Efigênia Ferreira; Sobrinho, Antônio Paulino Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    Evaluations by patients constitute an important part of the process of improving health services. This study examined patients' perceptions of secondary dental care in three cities in Minas Gerais, Brazil based on the endodontic treatment received. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews (addressing access, treatment and results) and a field diary (direct observations and report of professionals). The interviews were audiotaped, fully transcribed, and analyzed using content analysis. Two principal themes were identified: access to service and quality of service. The difficulties in accessing service were associated with the insufficient number of professionals to meet the high demand for endodontic treatment, problems in referring from primary to secondary care and geographic barriers. Service quality was related to the presence/absence of pain and anxiety that patients experienced, the time and number of sessions required to complete treatment, how patients were treated by dentists, and whether those patients would recommend the service to other patients. Access to endodontic treatment was a problem emphasized by users, and satisfaction with the quality of the service was more related to how patients were treated than to the technical competence of the dentist. PMID:27128932

  6. 20 CFR 725.544 - Collection and compromise of claims for overpayment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Collection and compromise of claims for... OF LABOR FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, AS AMENDED CLAIMS FOR BENEFITS UNDER PART C OF TITLE IV OF THE FEDERAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ACT, AS AMENDED Payment of Benefits...

  7. 20 CFR 725.544 - Collection and compromise of claims for overpayment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Collection and compromise of claims for... LABOR FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, AS AMENDED CLAIMS FOR BENEFITS UNDER PART C OF TITLE IV OF THE FEDERAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ACT, AS AMENDED Payment of Benefits...

  8. Athletics' Little Sisters. Women's Colleges Face Pressure To Score Higher, but Fear Compromising Their Ideals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    Women's colleges, which have generally considered sports an integral part of academic life, now face pressures to compete with coed institutions at which sports have taken on a more competitive attitude. Many fear compromising their ideals if they endeavor to match the athletic programs of other institutions. (SLD)

  9. Fabricating an immediate denture for a medically compromised elderly patient.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Hyoung

    2015-04-01

    Fabricating an immediate denture (ID) in the conventional manner may be complicated and difficult. An alternative technique is described for the fabrication of an ID that eliminates the need for an interim prosthesis and reduces treatment time. PMID:25681356

  10. Patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: current concepts and concerns: part II.

    PubMed

    Dzeshka, Mikhail S; Brown, Richard A; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) and coronary artery disease (CAD) often present concomitantly. Given the increased risk of thrombotic complications with either of them but different pathogenesis of clot formation, combined antithrombotic therapy is necessary in patients developing acute coronary syndrome and/or undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Different antithrombotic regimens in this group of patients have been summarized and discussed earlier. Triple therapy remains the treatment of choice in these patients despite the increased risk of hemorrhagic complications. Given the absence of evidence from randomized controlled trials, balancing the risk of stroke and stent thrombosis against the risk of major bleeding is a challenge. Precise stroke and bleeding risk assessment is an essential part of the decision making process regarding antithrombotic management. Continuing the discussion of current concepts and concerns of antithrombotic management in AF patients undergoing PCI, we emphasize the importance of various strategies to reduce bleeding in the modern era, namely, radial access combined with careful selection of a P2Y₁₂ receptor inhibitor, use of newer drug-eluting stents, and uninterrupted anticoagulation for patients undergoing procedures. We also focus on the role of the non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (novel oral anticoagulants, eg, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban) which are increasingly used for stroke prevention in AF. Finally, recent recommendations on the management of antithrombotic therapy in AF patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome and/or undergoing PCI as well as ongoing clinical trials and future directions are highlighted. PMID:25534093

  11. Neuroimaging for patient selection for medial temporal lobe epilepsy surgery: Part 1 Structural neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Stylianou, Petros; Hoffmann, Chen; Blat, Ilan; Harnof, Sagi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of part one of this review is to present the structural neuroimaging techniques that are currently used to evaluate patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), and to discuss their potential to define patient eligibility for medial temporal lobe surgery. A PubMed query, using Medline and Embase, and subsequent review, was performed for all English language studies published after 1990, reporting neuroimaging methods for the evaluation of patients with TLE. The extracted data included demographic variables, population and study design, imaging methods, gold standard methods, imaging findings, surgical outcomes and conclusions. Overall, 56 papers were reviewed, including a total of 1517 patients. This review highlights the following structural neuroimaging techniques: MRI, diffusion-weighted imaging, tractography, electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography. The developments in neuroimaging during the last decades have led to remarkable improvements in surgical precision, postsurgical outcome, prognosis, and the rate of seizure control in patients with TLE. The use of multiple imaging methods provides improved outcomes, and further improvements will be possible with future studies of larger patient cohorts. PMID:26362835

  12. 49 CFR 209.109 - Payment of penalty; compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment of penalty; compromise. 209.109 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Hazardous Materials Penalties Civil Penalties § 209.109 Payment of penalty; compromise. (a) Payment of a civil penalty may be made...

  13. 49 CFR 209.109 - Payment of penalty; compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment of penalty; compromise. 209.109 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Hazardous Materials Penalties Civil Penalties § 209.109 Payment of penalty; compromise. (a) Payment of a civil penalty may be made...

  14. 49 CFR 107.327 - Compromise and settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compromise and settlement. 107.327 Section 107.327 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PROGRAM PROCEDURES Enforcement Compliance Orders and Civil Penalties § 107.327 Compromise and...

  15. 49 CFR 107.327 - Compromise and settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compromise and settlement. 107.327 Section 107.327 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PROGRAM PROCEDURES Enforcement Compliance Orders and Civil Penalties § 107.327 Compromise and...

  16. 5 CFR 1215.32 - Compromise, suspension and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compromise, suspension and termination. 1215.32 Section 1215.32 Administrative Personnel MERIT SYSTEMS PROTECTION BOARD ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES DEBT MANAGEMENT Claims Collection § 1215.32 Compromise, suspension and termination. (a)...

  17. 10 CFR 429.132 - Compromise and settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Compromise and settlement. 429.132 Section 429.132 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION CERTIFICATION, COMPLIANCE, AND ENFORCEMENT FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Enforcement § 429.132 Compromise and settlement. (a) DOE may...

  18. 10 CFR 429.132 - Compromise and settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Compromise and settlement. 429.132 Section 429.132 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION CERTIFICATION, COMPLIANCE, AND ENFORCEMENT FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Enforcement § 429.132 Compromise and settlement. (a) DOE may...

  19. 10 CFR 429.132 - Compromise and settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Compromise and settlement. 429.132 Section 429.132 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION CERTIFICATION, COMPLIANCE, AND ENFORCEMENT FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Enforcement § 429.132 Compromise and settlement. (a) DOE may...

  20. 38 CFR 1.970 - Standards for compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for compromise. 1.970 Section 1.970 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Referrals to Gao, Department of Justice, Or Irs § 1.970 Standards for compromise. Decisions of...

  1. 38 CFR 1.970 - Standards for compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for compromise. 1.970 Section 1.970 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Referrals to Gao, Department of Justice, Or Irs § 1.970 Standards for compromise. Decisions of...

  2. 48 CFR 252.239-7000 - Protection against compromising emanations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Protection against... CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.239-7000 Protection against compromising emanations. As prescribed in 239.7103(a), use the following clause: Protection Against Compromising Emanations (JUN 2004)...

  3. 20 CFR 355.46 - Compromise or settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compromise or settlement. 355.46 Section 355.46 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD ADMINISTRATIVE REMEDIES FOR FRAUDULENT CLAIMS OR STATEMENTS REGULATIONS UNDER THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT OF 1986 § 355.46 Compromise or settlement. (a) Parties may make offers of...

  4. 5 CFR 1312.30 - Loss or possible compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DOWNGRADING, DECLASSIFICATION AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Control and Accountability of Classified Information § 1312.30 Loss or possible compromise. Any person who has knowledge of the loss or possible compromise of classified information shall immediately secure the material and then report...

  5. 27 CFR 70.449 - Offers in compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Offers in compromise. 70.449 Section 70.449 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... Cartridges, and Explosives § 70.449 Offers in compromise. The procedures in the case of offers in...

  6. 19 CFR 161.5 - Compromise of Government claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Compromise of Government claims. 161.5 Section 161... Government claims. (a) Offer. An offer made pursuant to section 617, Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1617), in compromise of a Government claim arising under the Customs laws and the terms upon which...

  7. Skeletal Health Part 2: Development of a Nurse Practitioner Bone Support Clinic for Urologic Patients.

    PubMed

    Turner, Bruce; Ali, Sacha; Drudge-Coates, Lawrence; Pati, Jhumur; Nargund, Vinod; Wells, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Part 1 of this article highlighted the potential negative effects of cancer on the skeleton and provided an overview of available treatment options. Part 2 presents a nurse practitioner-led Bone Support Clinic, which was developed for patients with cancer-induced bone disease and cancer therapy-induced bone loss. This clinic, started in 2011 in a university medical center urology/oncology outpatient center in London, England, United Kingdom, has been a collaborative effort among a multidisciplinary team of doctors, nurse practitioners and nurses. Patients have responded positively to the improved continuity of care, and we have been able to assess and treat impending skeletal-related events in a more timely manner The needs of our patient population and problems with the existing service are reviewed, and the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to these problems is discussed. Initiation of a nurse practitioner-led Bone Support Clinic and the impact of timely response to the effects of cancer and cancer therapies on the skeletal system are outlined and offered as a model. PMID:27093760

  8. Choosing to Compromise: Women Studying Childcare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Hazel R.

    2013-01-01

    Reporting on a study of mature women training to work in childcare, this article demonstrates how some women choose to be part-time mothers, workers and students, wanting "the best of both worlds". It presents a theory of integrated lives that contrasts with customary deficit models and shows how a series of reciprocal links bind the…

  9. Engaging and empowering patients to manage their type 2 diabetes, Part II: Initiatives for success.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Stephan; Serrano-Gil, Manuel

    2010-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has reached pandemic proportions. The impact of it and its long-term sequelae represent a significant burden for many healthcare systems around the world, and a significant number of patients struggle to achieve the internationally recommended targets for the modifiable risk factors that optimize healthy outcomes. In the first part of this two-part review, the scene was set showing that there seems to be a knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) gap hindering successful management of T2D. Although theoretical knowledge about how T2D should be managed exists, the attitude of patients and healthcare professionals seems to influence the practicalities of implementing life-enhancing changes for patients living with diabetes. Following the chronic care model, macro-level initiatives such as Finland's national diabetes program, "The Development Programme for the Prevention and Care of Diabetes" (DEHKO), encourage a coordinated, supportive policy and financial environment for healthcare system change, and are advocated by the International Diabetes Federation. Over a 10-year period, the DEHKO program aims to demonstrate that a top-down population approach to prevention, focusing on reducing obesity, increasing physical activity, and encouraging healthier eating habits, may improve the overall health of the nation. However, the patient is the focus of day-to-day management of T2D, and innovative strategies that use a community (meso-level) approach to encourage self-management, or that embrace new technologies to access diabetes self-management education or support networks, are likely to be the way forward. Such measures may close the apparent KAP gap and bring about real and measurable benefits in quality of life and life expectancy. The second part of this review describes some of the many and varied initiatives designed to engage and empower patients to self-manage their T2D, with the aim of increasing the proportion of patients reaching health

  10. Direct Pay/Concierge/Blended Care: Where Is The Sweet Spot? Part II--Seen from Your Patients' Perspective.

    PubMed

    Childs, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Physicians are actively considering the direct pay and concierge models as plausible options in providing more patient-oriented care. What are the major considerations and how do we obtain accurate data that may help in sophisticated decision-making? Part I of this article introduced the models, typical patient contract configurations, physician/provider considerations, and commercial payers. In Part II, we discuss the access, cost, and value from a patient's point of view. We also consider patient loyalty and self-care, approaches for introducing and inviting patients, and how to work with other providers and in community relations. Lastly, we share some creative concierge models that are evolving. PMID:26399038

  11. Sterile diets for the immuno-compromised: Is there a need?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterweck, Joseph S.

    1995-02-01

    There is a general misunderstanding in the radiation processing industry about the use of sterile diets in the medical profession. Sterile diets are used on a limited basis in hospitals that specialize in cancer treatment and organ transplants. These patients are severely immuno-compromised. There are many other patients that are immuno-compromised that do not require sterile diets. These patients may require a diet that is pathogen-free and are aslo "low-microbial diets". Nosocomial infections have become a major issue in US hospitals. The "infection control committee" is the focus group responsible to assure nosocomial infections incidence are below the hospital goals. Application of ionizing radiation to sterilize diets has not been chosen because the product is not available at a reasonable total cost. This paper will discuss the hospitals views.

  12. Compromised central tolerance of ICA69 induces multiple organ autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yong; Gualtierotti, Giulio; Tajima, Asako; Grupillo, Maria; Coppola, Antonina; He, Jing; Bertera, Suzanne; Owens, Gregory; Pietropaolo, Massimo; Rudert, William A.; Trucco, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    For reasons not fully understood, patients with an organ-specific autoimmune disease have increased risks of developing autoimmune responses against other organs/tissues. We identified ICA69, a known β-cell autoantigen in Type 1 diabetes, as a potential common target in multi-organ autoimmunity. NOD mice immunized with ICA69 polypeptides exhibited exacerbated inflammation not only in the islets, but also in the salivary glands. To further investigate ICA69 autoimmunity, two genetically modified mouse lines were generated to modulate thymic ICA69 expression: the heterozygous ICA69del/wt line and the thymic medullary epithelial cell-specific deletion Aire-ΔICA69 line. Suboptimal central negative selection of ICA69-reactive T-cells was observed in both lines. Aire-ΔICA69 mice spontaneously developed coincident autoimmune responses to the pancreas, the salivary glands, the thyroid, and the stomach. Our findings establish a direct link between compromised thymic ICA69 expression and autoimmunity against multiple ICA69-expressing organs, and identify a potential novel mechanism for the development of multi-organ autoimmune diseases. PMID:25088457

  13. Contribution of consultants to care of compromised pregnancies.

    PubMed Central

    Bird, J. S.; Taslimi, M. M.; Gonzales, A. R.; Duggan, M.

    1996-01-01

    Obstetricians often seek consultative services of other specialists in the management of compromised pregnancies. However, the extent of such consultations and the contribution of these consultants have not been addressed in the literature. This study is addresses the contribution of consultants to the care of complicated pregnancies at a tertiary care center. During the 2 1/2 years of this retrospective study, 2263 antepartum admissions were made for pregnancy complications. One hundred sixty-six of those patients were hospitalized 176 times and were treated by one or more consulting physicians for a consultation rate of 7.8%. Eighteen specialties were consulted, including 54 (32%) consultations from maternal fetal medicine, 44 (24%) from internal medicine, 28 (16%) from general surgery, and 22 (12%) from endocrinology. Of the initial admission diagnoses, 87.9% were confirmed and 46 new diagnoses were made by the consultants. A significant positive correlation was noted between the number of consultants, maternal length of hospital stay, and maternal hospitalization cost. PMID:8776065

  14. Osteonecrosis of the Jaw in Patients Receiving Bone-Targeted Therapies: An Overview--Part I.

    PubMed

    Turner, Bruce; Drudge-Coates, Lawrence; Ali, Sacha; Pati, Jhumur; Nargund, Vinod; Ali, Enamul; Cheng, Leo; Wells, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Urologic patients receiving bone-targeted therapies are at risk of developing osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). ONJ has historically been associated with bisphosphonate therapy. More recently, RANK-Ligand inhibitors (denosumab) have also been used to reduce the risk of skeletal-related events in patients who have advanced cancers with bone metastases. More than 65% of men with metastatic prostate cancer and nearly 75% of women with metastatic breast cancer are affected by bone metastases. The literature has described ONJ associated with bisphosphonate therapy as bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ). However, with evidence also linking the use of RANK-Ligand inhibitors with osteonecrosis of the jaw, we advocate use of the term "anti-bone resorption therapy-related osteonecrosis of the jaw" (ABRT-ONJ). The term "medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw" (MRONJ) is now becoming more widespread. There is not a universally accepted definition of ABRT-ONJ, which may have hindered recognition and reporting of the condition. In Part I of this article, a review of current knowledge around the etiology of ABRT-ONJ and incidence data are provided. In Part II, we provide an audit of ONJ in a nurse consultant-led bone support clinic. In the article, we refer to zoledronic acid because this is the bisphosphonate of choice for use in men with prostate cancer in the United Kingdom. PMID:27501591

  15. Periodic Fever: A Review on Clinical, Management and Guideline for Iranian Patients - Part II

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadinejad, Zahra; Mansouri, Sedigeh; Ziaee, Vahid; Aghighi, Yahya; Moradinejad, Mohammad-Hassan; Fereshteh-Mehregan, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Periodic fever syndromes are a group of diseases characterized by episodes of fever with healthy intervals between febrile episodes. In the first part of this paper, we presented a guideline for approaching patients with periodic fever and reviewed two common disorders with periodic fever in Iranian patients including familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and periodic fever syndromes except for periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA). In this part, we review other autoinflammatory disorders including hyper IgD, tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes, autoinflammatory bone disorders and some other rare autoinflammatory disorders such as Sweet’s and Blau syndromes. In cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes group, we discussed chronic infantile neurologic cutaneous and articular (CINCA) syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome and familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome. Autoinflammatory bone disorders are categorized to monogenic disorders such as pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma ;gangraenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome, the deficiency of interleukine-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA) and Majeed syndrome and polygenic background or sporadic group such as chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) or synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome are classified in sporadic group. Other autoinflammatory syndromes are rare causes of periodic fever in Iranian system registry. PMID:25562014

  16. Medicare Part D Benzodiazepine Exclusion and Use of Psychotropic Medication by Patients With New Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Michael K.; Zhang, Lily; Xu, Haiyong; Azocar, Francisca; Ettner, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The Medicare Modernization Act (MMA) specifically excluded benzodiazepines from Medicare Part D coverage starting in 2006; however, benzodiazepines are an effective, low-cost treatment for anxiety. This study evaluated the effect of the Medicare Part D benzodiazepine coverage exclusion among patients with new anxiety disorders. Methods The authors used a quasi-experimental cohort design to study patients with new anxiety diagnoses from a large national health plan during the first six months of 2005, 2006, and 2007. Logistic and zero-truncated negative-binomial regression models using covered claims for behavioral, medical, and pharmaceutical care linked with eligibility files were used to estimate utilization and costs of psychotropic medication and health care utilization among elderly Medicare Advantage enrollees (N=8,397) subject to the MMA benzodiazepine exclusion and a comparison group of near-elderly (ages 60–64) enrollees (N=1,657) of a managed care plan. Results Medicare Advantage enrollees diagnosed in 2005 had significantly (p<.05) higher rates of covered claims for benzodiazepines and all psychotropic drugs, lower rates of covered claims for nonbenzodiazepines, and lower expenditures for psychotropic drugs than enrollees diagnosed in 2006 and 2007. There were no significant differences over time in utilization or expenditures related to psychotropic medication among the comparison group. There also were no significant changes over time in outpatient visits for behavioral care by either cohort. Conclusions Among elderly patients with new anxiety diagnoses, the MMA benzodiazepine exclusion increased use of nonbenzodiazepine psychotropic drugs without substitution of increased behavioral care. Overall, the exclusion was associated with a modest increase in covered claims for psychotropic medication. PMID:22549332

  17. Robot assisted radical prostatectomy: how I do it. Part I: Patient preparation and positioning.

    PubMed

    Valdivieso, Roger F; Hueber, Pierre-Alain; Zorn, Kevin C

    2013-10-01

    Radical prostatectomy remains the standard treatment for long term cure of clinically localized prostate cancer, offering excellent oncologic outcomes, with cancer-specific survival approaching 95% at 15 years after surgery. The introduction of the "da Vinci Robotic Surgical System" (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) has been another important step toward a minimally invasive approach to radical prostatectomy. Technologic peculiarities, such as three-dimensional vision, wristed instrumentation with seven degrees of freedom of motion, lack of tremor, a 10x-magnification and a comfortable seated position for the surgeon has added value to the surgeon and patient. In this first part of a two article series, we describe preoperative patient preparation and positioning protocols for robot assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) that are currently used in our institution (University of Montreal Hospital Center (CHUM)-Hopital St-Luc). We use the four-arm da Vinci Si Surgical System. Our experience with RARP is now over 250 cases with the senior surgeon having performed over 1200 RARPs and we have continually refined our technique to improve patient outcomes. PMID:24128839

  18. Listening to the Narratives of Our Patients as Part of Holistic Nursing Care.

    PubMed

    Alicea-Planas, Jessica

    2016-06-01

    Nurses in all settings interact with individuals often identified as vulnerable or marginalized, and at times are frustrated by their own inability to "make a difference." By allowing oneself to listen, a fuller appreciation of the individual circumstance, or that which is unwritten, can be appreciated. Storytelling is a way to set the stage for experiences to be shared and can provide insight into lives. The narratives told by patients are often complex, affected by various influences of the environment, and personal, which in combination with nursing informs their individual healing journeys. Using a philosophy of nursing that encompasses all of the distinct influences on these narratives can allow nurses to more holistically care and advocate for their patients. As this case study shows, nursing plays a significant role in the narratives of others. Although many vulnerable populations live in a perpetual cycle of poverty and poor health, some nurses are able to assess the intricacies of a situation and facilitate understanding, as part of their support, caring, and advocacy for their patients. PMID:26088595

  19. 15 CFR 904.106 - Compromise of civil penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... be sent to Agency counsel at the address specified in the NOVA. (c) Neither the existence of the... which a NOVA becomes final. (d) NOAA will not compromise, modify, or remit a civil penalty assessed,...

  20. 15 CFR 904.106 - Compromise of civil penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... be sent to Agency counsel at the address specified in the NOVA. (c) Neither the existence of the... which a NOVA becomes final. (d) NOAA will not compromise, modify, or remit a civil penalty assessed,...

  1. 15 CFR 904.106 - Compromise of civil penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... be sent to Agency counsel at the address specified in the NOVA. (c) Neither the existence of the... which a NOVA becomes final. (d) NOAA will not compromise, modify, or remit a civil penalty assessed,...

  2. 15 CFR 904.106 - Compromise of civil penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... be sent to Agency counsel at the address specified in the NOVA. (c) Neither the existence of the... which a NOVA becomes final. (d) NOAA will not compromise, modify, or remit a civil penalty assessed,...

  3. 15 CFR 904.106 - Compromise of civil penalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... be sent to Agency counsel at the address specified in the NOVA. (c) Neither the existence of the... which a NOVA becomes final. (d) NOAA will not compromise, modify, or remit a civil penalty assessed,...

  4. 34 CFR 30.70 - How does the Secretary exercise discretion to compromise a debt or to suspend or terminate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standards in the FCCS, 4 CFR part 103, to determine whether compromise of a debt is appropriate if— (1) The... standards in the FCCS, 4 CFR part 104, to determine whether suspension or termination of collection action... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How does the Secretary exercise discretion...

  5. 34 CFR 30.70 - How does the Secretary exercise discretion to compromise a debt or to suspend or terminate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standards in the FCCS, 4 CFR part 103, to determine whether compromise of a debt is appropriate if— (1) The... standards in the FCCS, 4 CFR part 104, to determine whether suspension or termination of collection action... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How does the Secretary exercise discretion...

  6. 34 CFR 30.70 - How does the Secretary exercise discretion to compromise a debt or to suspend or terminate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standards in the FCCS, 4 CFR part 103, to determine whether compromise of a debt is appropriate if— (1) The... standards in the FCCS, 4 CFR part 104, to determine whether suspension or termination of collection action... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How does the Secretary exercise discretion...

  7. 34 CFR 30.70 - How does the Secretary exercise discretion to compromise a debt or to suspend or terminate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standards in the FCCS, 4 CFR part 103, to determine whether compromise of a debt is appropriate if— (1) The... standards in the FCCS, 4 CFR part 104, to determine whether suspension or termination of collection action... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does the Secretary exercise discretion...

  8. Periodic Fever: a review on clinical, management and guideline for Iranian patients - part I.

    PubMed

    Ahmadinejad, Zahra; Mansori, Sedigeh; Ziaee, Vahid; Alijani, Neda; Aghighi, Yahya; Parvaneh, Nima; Mordinejad, Mohammad-Hassan

    2014-02-01

    Periodic fever syndromes are a group of diseases characterized by episodes of fever with healthy intervals between febrile episodes. The first manifestation of these disorders are present in childhood and adolescence, but infrequently it may be presented in young and middle ages. Genetic base has been known for all types of periodic fever syndromes except periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA). Common periodic fever disorders are Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and PFAPA. In each patient with periodic fever, acquired infection with chronic and periodic nature should be ruled out. It depends on epidemiology of infectious diseases. Some of them such as Familial Mediterranean fever and PFAPA are common in Iran. In Iran and other Middle East countries, brucellosis, malaria and infectious mononucleosis should be considered in differential diagnosis of periodic fever disorders especially with fever and arthritis manifestation. In children, urinary tract infection may be presented as periodic disorder, urine analysis and culture is necessary in each child with periodic symptoms. Some malignancies such as leukemia and tumoral lesions should be excluded in patients with periodic syndrome and weight loss in any age. After excluding infection, malignancy and cyclic neutropenia, FMF and PFAPA are the most common periodic fever disorders. Similar to other countries, Hyper IgD, Chronic Infantile Neurologic Cutaneous and Articular, TRAPS and other auto-inflammatory syndromes are rare causes of periodic fever in Iranian system registry. In part 1 of this paper we reviewed the prevalence of FMF and PFAPA in Iran. In part 2, some uncommon auto-inflammatory disorders such as TRAPS, Hyper IgD sydrome and cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes will be reviewed. PMID:25793039

  9. Periodic Fever: A Review on Clinical, Management and Guideline for Iranian Patients - Part I

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadinejad, Zahra; Mansori, Sedigeh; Ziaee, Vahid; Alijani, Neda; Aghighi, Yahya; Parvaneh, Nima; Mordinejad, Mohammad-Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Periodic fever syndromes are a group of diseases characterized by episodes of fever with healthy intervals between febrile episodes. The first manifestation of these disorders are present in childhood and adolescence, but infrequently it may be presented in young and middle ages. Genetic base has been known for all types of periodic fever syndromes except periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA). Common periodic fever disorders are Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and PFAPA. In each patient with periodic fever, acquired infection with chronic and periodic nature should be ruled out. It depends on epidemiology of infectious diseases. Some of them such as Familial Mediterranean fever and PFAPA are common in Iran. In Iran and other Middle East countries, brucellosis, malaria and infectious mononucleosis should be considered in differential diagnosis of periodic fever disorders especially with fever and arthritis manifestation. In children, urinary tract infection may be presented as periodic disorder, urine analysis and culture is necessary in each child with periodic symptoms. Some malignancies such as leukemia and tumoral lesions should be excluded in patients with periodic syndrome and weight loss in any age. After excluding infection, malignancy and cyclic neutropenia, FMF and PFAPA are the most common periodic fever disorders. Similar to other countries, Hyper IgD, Chronic Infantile Neurologic Cutaneous and Articular, TRAPS and other auto-inflammatory syndromes are rare causes of periodic fever in Iranian system registry. In part 1 of this paper we reviewed the prevalence of FMF and PFAPA in Iran. In part 2, some uncommon auto-inflammatory disorders such as TRAPS, Hyper IgD sydrome and cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes will be reviewed. PMID:25793039

  10. Dental implants in bilateral bifid canal and compromised interocclusal space using cone beam computerized tomography.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nizar; Arunachalam, Lalitha Tanjore; Jacob, Caroline Annette; Kumar, Suresh Anand

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of various anatomic landmarks is pivotal for important success. Bifid canals pose a challenge and can lead to difficulties while performing implant surgery in the mandible. Bifid canals can be diagnosed with panoramic radiography and more accurately with cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). This case report details the placement of the implant in a patient with bilateral bifid canal and compromised interocclusal space, which was successfully treated using CBCT. PMID:27433073

  11. Immediate Esthetic Rehabilitation of Periodontally Compromised Anterior Tooth Using Natural Tooth as Pontic

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, K. Pavan; Nujella, Surya Kumari; Gopal, S. Sujatha

    2016-01-01

    For patients who require removal of anterior teeth and their replacement various treatment modalities are available. With advancement in technology and availability of glass/polyethylene fibres, use of natural tooth as pontic with fibre reinforced composite restorations offers the promising results. The present case report describes management of periodontally compromised mandibular anterior tooth using natural tooth pontic with fibre reinforcement. A 1-year follow-up showed that the bridge was intact with good esthetics and no problem was reported. PMID:27195156

  12. Dental implants in bilateral bifid canal and compromised interocclusal space using cone beam computerized tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nizar; Arunachalam, Lalitha Tanjore; Jacob, Caroline Annette; Kumar, Suresh Anand

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of various anatomic landmarks is pivotal for important success. Bifid canals pose a challenge and can lead to difficulties while performing implant surgery in the mandible. Bifid canals can be diagnosed with panoramic radiography and more accurately with cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). This case report details the placement of the implant in a patient with bilateral bifid canal and compromised interocclusal space, which was successfully treated using CBCT. PMID:27433073

  13. Immediate Esthetic Rehabilitation of Periodontally Compromised Anterior Tooth Using Natural Tooth as Pontic.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K Pavan; Nujella, Surya Kumari; Gopal, S Sujatha; Roy, K Karthik

    2016-01-01

    For patients who require removal of anterior teeth and their replacement various treatment modalities are available. With advancement in technology and availability of glass/polyethylene fibres, use of natural tooth as pontic with fibre reinforced composite restorations offers the promising results. The present case report describes management of periodontally compromised mandibular anterior tooth using natural tooth pontic with fibre reinforcement. A 1-year follow-up showed that the bridge was intact with good esthetics and no problem was reported. PMID:27195156

  14. Why patients take part in the Royal College of Physicians Practical Assessment of Clinical Examination Skills (MRCP PACES).

    PubMed

    McFarland, Lorraine; Barlow, Julie; Nwokolo, Chuka

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine patients' motivation to participate in the Royal College of Physicians Practical Assessment of Clinical Examination Skills (PACES). An exploratory cross-sectional study was performed with data collected via telephone interviews. All patients aged 18+ who participated in PACES at University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire in the last two years were invited to take part; 28 patients were interviewed. Data were analysed using thematic content analysis. Motivational factors identified included the opportunity to give something back for the care received, contributing to doctors' learning processes, altruism and being able to learn more about one's own condition. Patients believed that they offered real-life experiences that cannot be provided by actors. The social environment during PACES played a large part in volunteer retention. Recruitment of patient volunteers needs to emphasise the altruistic nature of the role in assisting the learning process for doctors and the subsequent benefit for future patients. PMID:22372221

  15. National lipid association recommendations for patient-centered management of dyslipidemia: part 1--full report.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Terry A; Ito, Matthew K; Maki, Kevin C; Orringer, Carl E; Bays, Harold E; Jones, Peter H; McKenney, James M; Grundy, Scott M; Gill, Edward A; Wild, Robert A; Wilson, Don P; Brown, W Virgil

    2015-01-01

    The leadership of the National Lipid Association convened an Expert Panel to develop a consensus set of recommendations for patient-centered management of dyslipidemia in clinical medicine. An Executive Summary of those recommendations was previously published. This document provides support for the recommendations outlined in the Executive Summary. The major conclusions include (1) an elevated level of cholesterol carried by circulating apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins (non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C], termed atherogenic cholesterol) is a root cause of atherosclerosis, the key underlying process contributing to most clinical atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) events; (2) reducing elevated levels of atherogenic cholesterol will lower ASCVD risk in proportion to the extent that atherogenic cholesterol is reduced. This benefit is presumed to result from atherogenic cholesterol lowering through multiple modalities, including lifestyle and drug therapies; (3) the intensity of risk-reduction therapy should generally be adjusted to the patient's absolute risk for an ASCVD event; (4) atherosclerosis is a process that often begins early in life and progresses for decades before resulting a clinical ASCVD event. Therefore, both intermediate-term and long-term or lifetime risk should be considered when assessing the potential benefits and hazards of risk-reduction therapies; (5) for patients in whom lipid-lowering drug therapy is indicated, statin treatment is the primary modality for reducing ASCVD risk; (6) nonlipid ASCVD risk factors should also be managed appropriately, particularly high blood pressure, cigarette smoking, and diabetes mellitus; and (7) the measurement and monitoring of atherogenic cholesterol levels remain an important part of a comprehensive ASCVD prevention strategy. PMID:25911072

  16. Compromised GABAergic inhibition contributes to tumor-associated epilepsy.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Georgina; O'Toole, Kate K; Moss, Stephen J; Maguire, Jamie

    2016-10-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is the most common form of primary brain tumor with 30-50% of patients presenting with epilepsy. These tumor-associated seizures are often resistant to traditional antiepileptic drug treatment and persist after tumor resection. This suggests that changes in the peritumoral tissue underpin epileptogenesis. It is known that glioma cells extrude pathological concentrations of glutamate which is thought to play a role in tumor progression and the development of epilepsy. Given that pathological concentrations of glutamate have been shown to dephosphorylate and downregulate the potassium chloride cotransporter KCC2, we hypothesized that glioma-induced alterations in KCC2 in the peritumoral region may play a role in tumor-associated epilepsy. Consistent with this hypothesis, we observe a decrease in total KCC2 expression and a dephosphorylation of KCC2 at residue Ser940 in a glioma model which exhibits hyperexcitability and the development of spontaneous seizures. To determine whether the reduction of KCC2 could potentially contribute to tumor-associated epilepsy, we generated mice with a focal knockdown of KCC2 by injecting AAV2-Cre-GFP into the cortex of floxed KCC2 mice. The AAV2-Cre-mediated knockdown of KCC2 was sufficient to induce the development of spontaneous seizures. Further, blocking NKCC1 with bumetanide to offset the loss of KCC2 reduced the seizure susceptibility in glioma-implanted mice. These findings support a mechanism of tumor-associated epilepsy involving downregulation of KCC2 in the peritumoral region leading to compromised GABAergic inhibition and suggest that modulating chloride homeostasis may be useful for seizure control. PMID:27513374

  17. [The Patient Rights Act (PatRG)--part 2: informed consent, duty to inform, documentation of treatment, access to the patient file].

    PubMed

    Parzeller, Markus; Zedler, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The article deals with the new regulations in the German Civil Code (BGB) which came into effect in Germany on 26 Feb 2013 as the Patient Rights Act (PatRG). In the second part, the consent of the patient (Section 630d Civil Code), the physician's duties to inform the patient (Section 630e Civil Code), the documentation of treatment (Section 630f Civil Code), and the right of access to the patient file (Section 630g Civil Code) are discussed and critically analysed. PMID:24547617

  18. Alchemy or Science? Compromising Archaeology in the Deep Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Jonathan

    2007-06-01

    In the torrid debate between archaeology and treasure hunting, compromise is often suggested as the pragmatic solution, especially for archaeology carried out either in deep water or beyond the constraints that commonly regulate such activities in territorial seas. Both the wisdom and the need for such compromise have even been advocated by some archaeologists, particularly in forums such as the internet and conferences. This paper argues that such a compromise is impossible, not in order to fuel confrontation but simply because of the nature of any academic discipline. We can define what archaeology is in terms of its aims, theories, methods and ethics, so combining it with an activity founded on opposing principles must transform it into something else. The way forward for archaeology in the deep sea does not lie in a contradictory realignment of archaeology’s goals but in collaborative research designed to mesh with emerging national and regional research and management plans.

  19. Pilot Analysis of Asbestos-induced Diffuse Pleural Thickening with Respiratory Compromise.

    PubMed

    Nojima, Daisuke; Fujimoto, Nobukazu; Kato, Katsuya; Fuchimoto, Yasuko; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Kishimoto, Takumi; Tanimoto, Mitsune

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the clinical features of asbestos-induced diffuse pleural thickening (DPT) with severe respiratory compromise. We conducted a retrospective study of consecutive subjects with asbestos-induced DPT. Medical data such as initial symptoms, radiological findings, respiratory function test results, and clinical course were collected and analyzed. There were 24 patients between 2003 and 2012. All were men, and the median age at the development of DPT was 74 years. The top occupational category associated with asbestos exposure was dockyard workers. The median duration of asbestos exposure was 35.0 years, and the median latency from first exposure to the onset of DPT was 49.0 years. There were no significant differences in respiratory function test results between the higher and lower Brinkman index groups or between unilateral and bilateral DPT. Thirteen patients had a history of benign asbestos pleural effusion (BAPE), and the median duration from pleural fluid accumulation to DPT with severe respiratory compromise was 28.4 months. DPT with severe respiratory compromise can develop after a long latency following occupational asbestos exposure and a history of BAPE. PMID:26490022

  20. Patients with oral tumors. Part 2: Quality of life after treatment with resection prostheses. Resection prosthetics: evaluation of quality of life.

    PubMed

    Fierz, Janine; Bürgin, Walter; Mericske-Stern, Regina

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the oral health-related quality of life of 18 patients (13 men and 5 women) was evaluated using validated questionnaires as proposed by the European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC). The patients belonged to a cohort of 48 patients, whose prosthetic treatment was performed during the years 2004-2007. In the course of tumor resection, 12 patients underwent graft surgery and 14 patients radiotherapy. One patient required a nasal epithesis since resection of the nose became necessary. Five patients underwent a full block resection of the mandible, and tumor resection in 3 patients resulted in a large oronasal communication. Prosthetic rehabilitation was performed in all patients, and the follow-up period with regular care covered a minimum of 3 years. Eleven patients received dental implants for better support and retention of the prostheses. In spite of compromised oral conditions, functional restrictions, and some difficulties with the prostheses, the answers to the questionnaire were quite positive. The majority judged their general health as good or even excellent. The subjective perception of the patients may contradict the objective view by the dentist. In fact, the individual patient's history and experience provide a better understanding of the impact of oral tumors on daily life. The overall assessment identified 4 items that were perceived as major problems by all patients: swallowing solid food, dry mouth, limited mouth opening, and appearance. Prosthetic rehabilitation has only a limited influence on such problems. PMID:23526454

  1. Indirect porcelain veneers in periodontally compromised teeth. The hybrid technique: a case report.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Baeza, David; Saavedra, Carlos; Garcia-Adámez, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    The loss of periodontal structure causes an esthetic problem for many patients, especially when the esthetic zone is compromised. Among the various types of solutions is the use of composite resins. While this procedure is not aggressive towards tooth structure, it does require the clinician to have a precise technique, and demands strict longterm maintenance. 1 Another way of treating the compromised teeth is with porcelain veneers. This procedure is especially difficult, however, if carried out on periodontal teeth, as it requires preparation along the roots. 2 The intention of the hybrid technique described in this article is to combine both of these procedures in order to obtain a less aggressive treatment with precise management of the soft tissue and an adequate esthetic outcome. The hybrid technique consists of enlarging the root portion of the teeth with composite resin to obtain a less aggressive tooth preparation, and thereafter placing porcelain veneers. PMID:26171444

  2. Advanced medical life support procedures in vitally compromised children by a helicopter emergency medical service

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To determine the advanced life support procedures provided by an Emergency Medical Service (EMS) and a Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) for vitally compromised children. Incidence and success rate of several procedures were studied, with a distinction made between procedures restricted to the HEMS-physician and procedures for which the HEMS is more experienced than the EMS. Methods Prospective study of a consecutive group of children examined and treated by the HEMS of the eastern region of the Netherlands. Data regarding type of emergency, physiological parameters, NACA scores, treatment, and 24-hour survival were collected and subsequently analysed. Results Of the 558 children examined and treated by the HEMS on scene, 79% had a NACA score of IV-VII. 65% of the children had one or more advanced life support procedures restricted to the HEMS and 78% of the children had one or more procedures for which the HEMS is more experienced than the EMS. The HEMS intubated 38% of all children, and 23% of the children intubated and ventilated by the EMS needed emergency correction because of potentially lethal complications. The HEMS provided the greater part of intraosseous access, as the EMS paramedics almost exclusively reserved this procedure for children in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The EMS provided pain management only to children older than four years of age, but a larger group was in need of analgesia upon arrival of the HEMS, and was subsequently treated by the HEMS. Conclusions The Helicopter Emergency Medical Service of the eastern region of the Netherlands brings essential medical expertise in the field not provided by the emergency medical service. The Emergency Medical Service does not provide a significant quantity of procedures obviously needed by the paediatric patient. PMID:20211021

  3. Providing medications for low-income and indigent patients: success for Medicare Part D walks in the back door.

    PubMed

    Flaer, Paul J; Younis, Mustafa Z; Malow, Robert M

    2008-01-01

    Hailed by politicians as long-awaited assistance for seniors and the disabled with the rising costs of prescription drugs, Medicare Part D primarily helps indigent and low-income patients. Moreover, poverty-level patients will find stable prices and versatility in obtaining prescription medications under Medicare D. For low-income patients using pharmacies of their choice--including hospital pharmacies, if they so choose, there are reduced transportation hassles and reduced associated expenses. Poverty-level patients with the additional Social Security subsidy have no deductible and no gaps in their coverage. However, two unintended, unforeseen circumstances occurred with the implementation of Medicare Part D: 1. The exodus of patients from hospital pharmacies and from central pharmacies (e.g., pharmacies serving a particular HMO plan) to neighborhood pharmacies lowered the volume of medications provided and stabilized a teetering and overwhelmed system of prescription drug provision; and 2. Many hospital pharmacies charge on a sliding scale, and the users of specialty medications (e.g., Zyprexa) with large copays under Medicare Part D found minimal costs and big savings at the low end of the sliding scale (for example, $5). The biggest successes for Medicare Part D truly came through an unintended back door and serve as an economic advantage for the poor. PMID:18468374

  4. 26 CFR 601.203 - Offers in compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... STATEMENT OF PROCEDURAL RULES Rulings and Other Specific Matters § 601.203 Offers in compromise. (a) General... Department of Justice for prosecution or defense. Certain functions of the Commissioner with respect to... prosecution are pending in the Office of the Chief Counsel, the Department of Justice, or in an office of...

  5. 49 CFR 209.109 - Payment of penalty; compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment of penalty; compromise. 209.109 Section 209.109 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Hazardous Materials Penalties Civil Penalties § 209.109 Payment...

  6. Evil Searching: Compromise and Recompromise of Internet Hosts for Phishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Tyler; Clayton, Richard

    Attackers compromise web servers in order to host fraudulent content, such as malware and phishing websites. While the techniques used to compromise websites are widely discussed and categorized, analysis of the methods used by attackers to identify targets has remained anecdotal. In this paper, we study the use of search engines to locate potentially vulnerable hosts. We present empirical evidence from the logs of websites used for phishing to demonstrate attackers’ widespread use of search terms which seek out susceptible web servers. We establish that at least 18% of website compromises are triggered by these searches. Many websites are repeatedly compromised whenever the root cause of the vulnerability is not addressed. We find that 19% of phishing websites are recompromised within six months, and the rate of recompromise is much higher if they have been identified through web search. By contrast, other public sources of information about phishing websites are not currently raising recompromise rates; we find that phishing websites placed onto a public blacklist are recompromised no more frequently than websites only known within closed communities.

  7. Time-to-Compromise Model for Cyber Risk Reduction Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Miles A. McQueen; Wayne F. Boyer; Mark A. Flynn; George A. Beitel

    2005-09-01

    We propose a new model for estimating the time to compromise a system component that is visible to an attacker. The model provides an estimate of the expected value of the time-to-compromise as a function of known and visible vulnerabilities, and attacker skill level. The time-to-compromise random process model is a composite of three subprocesses associated with attacker actions aimed at the exploitation of vulnerabilities. In a case study, the model was used to aid in a risk reduction estimate between a baseline Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system and the baseline system enhanced through a specific set of control system security remedial actions. For our case study, the total number of system vulnerabilities was reduced by 86% but the dominant attack path was through a component where the number of vulnerabilities was reduced by only 42% and the time-to-compromise of that component was increased by only 13% to 30% depending on attacker skill level.

  8. CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICULATE STUDIES IN HEALTHY AND COMPROMISED RODENTS

    EPA Science Inventory


    CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICULATE STUDIES IN HEALTHY AND COMPROMISED RODENTS. WP Watkinson1, LB Wichers2, JP Nolan1, DW Winsett1, UP Kodavanti1, MCJ Schladweiler1, LC Walsh1, ER Lappi1, D Terrell1, R Slade1, AD Ledbetter1, and DL Costa1. 1USEPA, ORD/NHEERL/ETD/PTB, RTP, NC, US...

  9. 40 CFR 27.46 - Compromise or settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compromise or settlement. 27.46 Section 27.46 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES... at any time after the date on which the reviewing official is permitted to issue a complaint...

  10. 14 CFR 1261.414 - Compromise of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the Claims Collection Litigation Report. See § 1261.417(e) or 4 CFR 105.2(b). Claims for which the... Department of Justice for litigation. The Comptroller General may exercise such compromise authority with... other debtors that resistance to payment is not likely to succeed. (f) Enforcement policy....

  11. 14 CFR 1261.414 - Compromise of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the Claims Collection Litigation Report. See § 1261.417(e) or 4 CFR 105.2(b). Claims for which the... Department of Justice for litigation. The Comptroller General may exercise such compromise authority with... other debtors that resistance to payment is not likely to succeed. (f) Enforcement policy....

  12. 14 CFR 1261.414 - Compromise of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the Claims Collection Litigation Report. See § 1261.417(e) or 4 CFR 105.2(b). Claims for which the... Department of Justice for litigation. The Comptroller General may exercise such compromise authority with... other debtors that resistance to payment is not likely to succeed. (f) Enforcement policy....

  13. 14 CFR § 1261.414 - Compromise of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the Claims Collection Litigation Report. See § 1261.417(e) or 4 CFR 105.2(b). Claims for which the... Department of Justice for litigation. The Comptroller General may exercise such compromise authority with... other debtors that resistance to payment is not likely to succeed. (f) Enforcement policy....

  14. 14 CFR 1261.414 - Compromise of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the Claims Collection Litigation Report. See § 1261.417(e) or 4 CFR 105.2(b). Claims for which the... Department of Justice for litigation. The Comptroller General may exercise such compromise authority with... other debtors that resistance to payment is not likely to succeed. (f) Enforcement policy....

  15. Whatever It Takes: Health Compromising Behaviors in Female Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Jennifer J.; Krane, Vikki

    2005-01-01

    The power and performance model of sport stresses a sport ethic of doing "whatever it takes" to win (Coakley, 2004). Uncritical acceptance of this model may lead to various health-compromising behaviors. Employing achievement goal theory, we examine why female athletes may adopt the power and performance approach. An ego motivational climate and a…

  16. An Item Response Model for Characterizing Test Compromise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segall, Daniel O.

    2002-01-01

    Developed an item response model for characterizing test-compromise that enables the estimation of item preview and score-gain distributions. In the approach, models parameters and posterior distributions are estimated by Markov Chain Monte Carlo procedures. Simulation study results suggest that when at least some test items are known to be…

  17. 32 CFR 2400.33 - Loss or possible compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Loss or possible compromise. 2400.33 Section 2400.33 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12356; OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY...

  18. 7 CFR 1956.124 - Compromise and adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Compromise and adjustment. 1956.124 Section 1956.124 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS...

  19. 45 CFR 1177.12 - Compromise, suspension and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES CLAIMS COLLECTION § 1177.12 Compromise, suspension and termination. (a) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities or... available to the public. (b) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities may...

  20. 45 CFR 1177.12 - Compromise, suspension and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES CLAIMS COLLECTION § 1177.12 Compromise, suspension and termination. (a) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities or... available to the public. (b) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities may...

  1. 45 CFR 1177.12 - Compromise, suspension and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES CLAIMS COLLECTION § 1177.12 Compromise, suspension and termination. (a) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities or... available to the public. (b) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities may...

  2. 45 CFR 1177.12 - Compromise, suspension and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES CLAIMS COLLECTION § 1177.12 Compromise, suspension and termination. (a) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities or... available to the public. (b) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities may...

  3. 45 CFR 1177.12 - Compromise, suspension and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES CLAIMS COLLECTION § 1177.12 Compromise, suspension and termination. (a) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities or... available to the public. (b) The Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities may...

  4. Vehicle influence on permeation through intact and compromised skin.

    PubMed

    Gujjar, Meera; Banga, Ajay K

    2014-09-10

    The purpose of this study was to compare the transdermal permeation of a model compound, diclofenac diethylamine, from a hydrophilic and lipophilic vehicle across in vitro models simulating compromised skin. Mineral oil served as a lipophilic vehicle while 10mM phosphate buffered saline served as a hydrophilic vehicle. Compromised skin was simulated by tape stripping, delipidization, or microneedle application and compared with intact skin as a control. Transepidermal water loss was measured to assess barrier function. Skin compromised with tape stripping and delipidization significantly (p<0.05) increased permeation of diclofenac diethylamine compared to intact and microneedle treated skin with phosphate buffered saline vehicle. A similar trend in permeation was observed with mineral oil as the vehicle. For both vehicles, permeation across skin increased in the same order and correlated with degree of barrier impairment as indicated by transepidermal water loss values: intactcompromised skin. PMID:24979534

  5. 32 CFR 2400.33 - Loss or possible compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2400.33 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12356; OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY INFORMATION... measures taken to negate or minimize any adverse effect of the compromise. (b) The Security Officer...

  6. 32 CFR 2400.33 - Loss or possible compromise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2400.33 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12356; OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY INFORMATION... measures taken to negate or minimize any adverse effect of the compromise. (b) The Security Officer...

  7. 22 CFR 511.6 - Board authority to adjust, determine, compromise, and settle claims and limitations upon that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... settle claims asserted under the provisions of section 2672 of the Act and under this part. (b) Limitation on Board authority: An award, compromise, or settlement of a claim by the Board under the provisions of section 2672 of the Act, in excess of $25,000, shall be effected only with the prior...

  8. A review of dental treatment of head and neck cancer patients, before, during and after radiotherapy: part 2.

    PubMed

    Jawad, H; Hodson, N A; Nixon, P J

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of head and neck cancer is on the rise. Radiation therapy is one of the major treatment modalities for the management of oral malignancies. As with any treatment modality, radiation therapy is associated with various complications. The second part of this series is a review of the oral changes that occur during and after radiotherapy and the oral management of head and neck oncology patients before, during and after radiotherapy. Dental practitioners will encounter patients who have been affected by cancer or who are current cancer patents. General dental practitioners (GDPs) have a vital and proactive role in supporting such patients. The aim of this article is to review the oral management of these patients during and after radiotherapy, and gives practical advice for GDPs and their teams in the long-term care of these patients. PMID:25613261

  9. A brief historical and theoretical perspective on patient autonomy and medical decision making: Part II: The autonomy model.

    PubMed

    Will, Jonathan F

    2011-06-01

    As part of a larger series addressing the intersection of law and medicine, this essay is the second of two introductory pieces. Beginning with the Hippocratic tradition and lasting for the next 2,400 years, the physician-patient relationship remained relatively unchanged under the beneficence model, a paternalistic framework characterized by the authoritative physician being afforded maximum discretion by the trusting, obedient patient. Over the last 100 years or so, in response to certain changes taking place in both research and clinical practice, the bioethics movement ushered in the autonomy model, and with it, a profoundly different way of approaching decision making in medicine. The shift from the beneficence model to the autonomy model is governed legally by the informed consent doctrine, which emphasizes disclosure to patients of information sufficient to permit them to make intelligent choices regarding treatment alternatives. As this legal doctrine became established, philosophers identified an inherent value in respecting patients as autonomous agents, even where patient choice seems to conflict with the physician's duty to act in the patient's best interests. Whereas the beneficence model presumed that the physician knew what was in the patient's best interests, the autonomy model starts from the premise that the patient knows what treatment decision is in line with his or her true sense of well-being, even where that decision is the refusal of treatment and the result is the patient's death. PMID:21652559

  10. Biochemical characterization of the component parts of intestinal mucin from patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Mantle, M; Forstner, G G; Forstner, J F

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that human small-intestinal mucin consists of high-Mr glycoproteins and a smaller S-S-bonded protein of 118 kDa. The major antigenic determinants of the mucin were associated with the large glycoproteins, but depended for stability on intact disulphide bonds, and were destroyed by digestion with Pronase. In the present study we isolated and analysed the component parts of mucin from patients with cystic fibrosis with special attention being paid to the peptide constituents. After reduction with 0.2 M-beta-mercaptoethanol [5 min, 100 degrees C in 1% SDS (sodium dodecyl sulphate)], the large glycoproteins and smaller peptide with an apparent molecular size of 118 kDa were separated by equilibrium density-gradient centrifugation in CsCl, Sepharose 4B chromatography or preparative SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. The large glycoproteins contained about 70% of the protein of the native mucin. Digestion with Pronase resulted in a further loss of 'naked' protein (10% of the native mucin protein) from the C-terminal end of the glycoprotein peptide core, and left behind highly glycosylated proteins comprised mainly (70 mol%) of threonine, serine and proline. The 118 kDa component, which contained about 30% of the native mucin protein, consisted mainly of aspartic acid, serine, glutamic acid and glycine (40 mol%), plus threonine, proline, alanine, valine and leucine (35 mol%). Together with the 'naked' protein segment, the 118 kDa component contained most of the cysteine residues of the native mucin. Surprisingly, the peptide also contained carbohydrate (less than or equal to 5% of the native mucin carbohydrate but 50% by weight of the 118 kDa component), which included 9 mol% mannose, suggesting the presence of N-linked oligosaccharides. The peptide exhibited strong non-covalent interactions with the high-Mr glycoproteins and a tendency to self-aggregate in the absence of dissociating agents. Our findings therefore suggest that native

  11. Formative evaluation of a telemedicine model for delivering clinical neurophysiology services part II: The referring clinician and patient perspective

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Feedback from service users will provide insight into opportunities for improvement so that performance can be optimised. In the context of a formative evaluation referring clinician and patient satisfaction with a teleneurophysiology service was examined during a 20 week pilot period. Methods Questionnaire surveys of referring clinicians and patients were conducted. Results Fifteen (58%) clinicians responded to the first part of a postal survey which examined their satisfaction with traditional clinical neurophysiology services. Nine (35%) responded to a second part which assessed their experience with the teleneurophysiology service. Teleneurophysiology improved satisfaction with waiting times, availability of results and impact on patient management. There was unanimous support from the clinicians for the permanent development of a teleneurophysiology service, although 2 cautioned this could delay establishing a neurology service in their region. Eighty-two percent (116/142) of patients responded to a survey of their satisfaction with teleneurophysiology. This was compared to a previous report of 322 patients' experience with traditional CN services in Ireland. Waiting times for appointment were shorter for the former group who supported the telemedicine model recognising that it reduced the travel burden and need for overnight journeys. The two groups were equally anxious about the investigation although the teleneurophysiology patients received more prior information. Conclusion This study illustrates that teleneurophysiology is an acceptable model of service delivery for its primary customers. Their feedback is important in informing appropriate design and governance of such innovative models of health service provision. PMID:20843310

  12. Creating clones, kids & chimera: liberal democratic compromise at the crossroads.

    PubMed

    Adams, Nathan A

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this article is to find middle ground between the supporters and opponents of biotechnology by perpetuating the existing legal compromise pertaining to the complete range of health and welfare doctrines relevant to the biotechnological industry. The author aspires neither to add to nor detract from this liberal democratic consensus, but to preserve its constitutive balance between positivism and natural law and over-regulation and under-regulation in the hopes of stabilizing new political fault lines developing around the few biotechnological innovations already grabbing headlines. The most feasible solution is to extend the existing liberal democratic compromise with respect to equal protection, reproductive rights, the First Amendment, human subject experimentation, patent law, and parental rights. This includes banning or monopolizing certain biotechnologies and extending substantive special respect to the ex vivo living human embryo. Biotechnology must not be left to regulate itself. PMID:15382747

  13. A technique to salvage endodontically compromised maxillary anterior tooth.

    PubMed

    Comut, Alper; Foran, Denise; Cunningham, Ralph P

    2014-01-01

    A complication of endodontic treatment is over-preparation of the tooth structure in an attempt to access calcified pulp chambers and root canals. This could result in thin root walls that might compromise the long-term prognosis of the tooth. There are various treatment options when such a complication occurs, among them, extraction of the compromised tooth and its replacement with a dental implant. This clinical report describes a nonsurgical, multidisciplinary treatment alternative where a maxillary anterior tooth with a thinned root wall was successfully saved by repairing the damaged root to its original thickness using a composite resin material and subsequently restoring with a cast post and core and a crown. PMID:24654367

  14. Securing Single Points of Compromise (SPoC)

    SciTech Connect

    Belangia, David Warren

    2015-06-25

    Securing the Single Points of Compromise that provide central services to the institution’s environment is paramount to success when trying to protect the business. (Fisk, 2014) Time Based Security mandates protection (erecting and ensuring effective controls) that last longer than the time to detect and react to a compromise. When enterprise protections fail, providing additional layered controls for these central services provides more time to detect and react. While guidance is readily available for securing the individual critical asset, protecting these assets as a group is not often discussed. Using best business practices to protect these resources as individual assets while leveraging holistic defenses for the group increases the opportunity to maximize protection time, allowing detection and reaction time for the SPoCs that is commensurate with the inherent risk of these centralized services.

  15. Telephone calls to patients after discharge from the hospital: an important part of transitions of care

    PubMed Central

    Record, Janet D.; Niranjan-Azadi, Ashwini; Christmas, Colleen; Hanyok, Laura A.; Rand, Cynthia S.; Hellmann, David B.; Ziegelstein, Roy C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Teaching interns patient-centered communication skills, including making structured telephone calls to patients following discharge, may improve transitions of care. Objective To explore associations between a patient-centered care (PCC) curriculum and patients’ perspectives of the quality of transitional care. Methods We implemented a novel PCC curriculum on one of four inpatient general medicine resident teaching teams in which interns make post-discharge telephone calls to patients, contact outpatient providers, perform medication adherence reviews, and engage in patient-centered discharge planning. Between July and November of 2011, we conducted telephone surveys of patients from all four teaching teams within 30 days of discharge. In addition to asking if patients received a call from their hospital physician (intern), we administered the 3-Item Care Transitions Measure (CTM-3), which assesses patients’ perceptions of preparedness for the transition from hospital to home (possible score range 0–100). Results The CTM-3 scores (mean±SD) of PCC team patients and standard team patients were not significantly different (82.4±17.3 vs. 79.6±17.6, p=0.53). However, regardless of team assignment, patients who reported receiving a post-discharge telephone call had significantly higher CTM-3 scores than those who did not (84.7±16.0 vs. 78.2±17.4, p=0.03). Interns exposed to the PCC curriculum called their patients after discharge more often than interns never exposed (OR=2.78, 95% CI [1.25, 6.18], p=0.013). Conclusions The post-discharge telephone call, one element of PCC, was associated with higher CTM-3 scores – which, in turn, have been shown to lessen patients’ risk of emergency department visits within 30 days of discharge. PMID:25933623

  16. Potential Soviet compromise on ballistic missile defense. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H.P.

    1989-11-01

    The body of this research memorandum was written before the Baker-Shevardnadze meeting in Wyoming. It presented evidence suggesting that the Soviet Union might agree to a compromise at the Wyoming meeting that defers the issue of ballistic missile defense (BMD) negotiations to a later stage in arms reductions, thus facilitating a first-stage cut in offensive arms without an explicit Soviet endorsement of the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). Through this compromise, offensive arms reductions should first be delinked from an agreement on BMD, and then be relinked during the second stage of deeper cuts. Therefore, negotiations on limiting BMD systems, though deterred, are deemed inevitable if the U.S. persists in deploying a strategic defense system (SDS). Moreover, some Soviet arms controllers already look beyond the first stage to the prospect of negotiated transition into a strategic defense environment (i.e., a reliance on defensive deterrence). In this approach, Wyoming, then, was expected to be only a first move in the Soviet negotiating strategy for a grand compromise on strategic defense. As explained in the afterword added to the paper, the actual events at Wyoming seem consistent with that interpretation.

  17. Rules for improving pharmacotherapy in older adult patients: part 1 (rules 1-5).

    PubMed

    Wooten, James M

    2015-02-01

    The population of older adult patients in the United States is growing each year. Appropriate pharmacotherapy has allowed many older patients to live longer and maintain healthy lives. Unfortunately, the inappropriate utilization of medications can be harmful to older adult patients. Inappropriate pharmacotherapy may lead to overusing medications and polypharmacy. Polypharmacy can contribute to a higher incidence of adverse effects, increase the risk of dangerous drug interactions, cause noncompliance with appropriate medication use, and significantly increase the cost of health care. The polypharmacy issue with geriatric patients has been described as an epidemic and this issue must be addressed. This review provides objective rules that may help prevent polypharmacy. Consideration of these rules when prescribing, dispensing, and caring for older adult patients will improve the overall pharmacotherapy regimens instituted by healthcare providers. PMID:25688894

  18. Management of malignant airway compromise with laser and low dose rate brachytherapy. The Mayo Clinic experience

    SciTech Connect

    Schray, M.F.; McDougall, J.C.; Martinez, A.; Cortese, D.A.; Brutinel, W.M.

    1988-02-01

    Between January 1983 and October 1985, 65 patients with malignant airway compromise have had 93 flexible bronchoscopic placements of a nylon afterloading catheter for low dose rate iridium-192 temporary intraluminal brachytherapy. All patients received prior (59 patients) and/or concurrent (13 patients) external beam irradiation to tolerance and were not candidates for surgery. Forty of these patients also received neodymium-YAG laser treatment prior to brachytherapy in a planned combined approach to provide immediate symptomatic relief and facilitate catheter placement. A dose of 3000 cGy is prescribed to 5 mm and 10 mm radii over 20-40 hours in the bronchus and trachea, respectively. Of 59 patients treated with palliative intent, 40 patients (68%) have had follow-up bronchoscopy, 18 patients have had clinical follow-up only, and one patient was lost to follow-up. Of 40 patients examined by bronchoscope in follow-up, 24 (60%) responded, eight were stable, and eight progressed. Lack of progression after prior external beam radiation for periods of greater than 12 months, six-12 months and less than six months yielded response rates to brachytherapy in 83, 50 and 31%, respectively. Most patients with clinical follow-up only expired at early intervals with airway palliation from extra-airway disease progression. Four of five patients treated with curative intent are disease-free at a median of 16 months. Eleven patients have experienced fistula and/or hemorrhage, of which seven instances (11% of all patients) appear to be treatment-induced. This brachytherapy technique is simple, well tolerated, and convenient for the patient providing airway palliation in the significant majority of patients with acceptable risk.

  19. Patient-reported outcomes in post-traumatic stress disorder Part I: Focus on psychological treatment

    PubMed Central

    d'Ardenne, Patricia; Heke, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Since 2000, patient reports have contributed significantly to the widening diagnostic criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder, notably with the inclusion of complex, repeated, and indirect threat to people who develop symptoms. This paper describes and explains why patient reports matter, through worldwide mental health users' movements and the human rights movement. It looks at 46 recent patient-reported outcomes of preferred psychological treatments in clinical research and practice, and compares them with clinician-reported outcomes, using rating scales that diagnose and measure therapeutic gains. Attention is given to one qualitative study of survivors of the London bombings as an example of patients' personal traumatic experiences. Understanding patients' views and their limitations can help increase success in trauma-focused therapy outcomes, particularly where patients fail to engage with or complete treatment, where they doubt the validity of the treatment, or do not see it as culturally appropriate, or fear of revisiting the past. Specific recommendations are made for a more collaborative approach with patients in psychiatric and community care and clinical research. PMID:25152659

  20. Patient-reported outcomes in post-traumatic stress disorder. Part I: focus on psychological treatment.

    PubMed

    d'Ardenne, Patricia; Heke, Sarah

    2014-06-01

    Since 2000, patient reports have contributed significantly to the widening diagnostic criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder, notably with the inclusion of complex, repeated, and indirect threat to people who develop symptoms. This paper describes and explains why patient reports matter, through worldwide mental health users' movements and the human rights movement. It looks at 46 recent patient-reported outcomes of preferred psychological treatments in clinical research and practice, and compares them with clinician-reported outcomes, using rating scales that diagnose and measure therapeutic gains. Attention is given to one qualitative study of survivors of the London bombings as an example of patients' personal traumatic experiences. Understanding patients' views and their limitations can help increase success in trauma-focused therapy outcomes, particularly where patients fail to engage with or complete treatment, where they doubt the validity of the treatment, or do not see it as culturally appropriate, or fear of revisiting the past. Specific recommendations are made for a more collaborative approach with patients in psychiatric and community care and clinical research. PMID:25152659

  1. Lymphocyte transformation by grass pollen allergens: a study of atopic patients receiving immunotherapy. Part II. Patients during maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Broman, P; Möller, E

    1988-07-01

    We have previously reported on peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) transformation by allergen, PPD as a control antigen and PHA as a mitogen during and after a preseasonal immunotherapy period. The present report describes similar parameters during and after the ensuing maintenance treatment period. Ten patients with grass pollen rhinitis were treated with Allpyral extract and 10 with Conjuvac two-grass mixture. Lymphocyte transformation responses to grass antigen continued to be low for PBL from patients during the maintenance treatment. Postseasonal values were higher during treatment. In late autumn 1980, when treatment had been stopped, there was a spontaneous fall in lymphocyte stimulation values. Occasional high values were noticed in some patients, two of whom had treatment side effects (urticaria). Clinical data during the whole treatment period (skin prick test, provocation tests, serological parameters, total IgE, grass-specific IgE, grass-specific IgG, pollen counts, symptom scores, clinical effect and adverse reactions) have been published separately. PMID:3414911

  2. Evaluation and diagnosis of the hair loss patient: part II. Trichoscopic and laboratory evaluations.

    PubMed

    Mubki, Thamer; Rudnicka, Lidia; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Shapiro, Jerry

    2014-09-01

    The use of trichoscopy for evaluating a number of hair and scalp disorders is gaining popularity. It is a simple and noninvasive in vivo tool for visualizing hair shafts and the scalp. Recently, alopecias have been classified according to their trichoscopic findings. The second part of this 2-part continuing medical education article reviews recent advances in this field and describes a systematic approach for using the differential diagnostic findings of trichoscopy in alopecia. PMID:25128119

  3. Thienopyridine Use After Coronary Stenting in Low Income Patients Enrolled in Medicare Part D Receiving Maintenance Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tara I.; Montez‐Rath, Maria E.; Shen, Jenny I.; Solomon, Matthew D.; Chertow, Glenn M.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Coronary stenting in patients on dialysis has increased by nearly 50% over the past decade, despite heightened risks of associated stent thrombosis and bleeding relative to the general population. We examined clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticlopidine use after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stenting in patients on dialysis. We conducted 3‐, 6‐, and 12‐month landmark analyses to test the hypothesis that thienopyridine discontinuation prior to those time points would be associated with higher risks of death, myocardial infarction, or repeat revascularization, and a lower risk of major bleeding episodes compared with continued thienopyridine use. Methods and Results Using the US Renal Data System, we identified 8458 patients on dialysis with Medicare Parts A+B+D undergoing PCI with stenting between July 2007 and December 2010. Ninety‐nine percent of all thienopyridine prescriptions were for clopidogrel. At 3 months, 82% of patients who received drug‐eluting stents (DES) had evidence of thienopyridine use. These proportions fell to 62% and 40% at 6 and 12 months, respectively. In patients who received a bare‐metal stent (BMS), 70%, 34%, and 26% of patients had evidence of thienopyridine use at 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively. In patients who received a DES, there was a suggestion of higher risks of death or myocardial infarction associated with thienopyridine discontinuation in the 3‐, 6‐, and 12‐months landmark analyses, but no higher risk of major bleeding episodes. In patients who received a BMS, there were no differences in death or cardiovascular events, and possibly lower risk of major bleeding with thienopyridine discontinuation in the 3‐ and 6‐month landmark analyses. Conclusions The majority of patients on dialysis who undergo PCI discontinue thienopyridines before 1 year regardless of stent type. While not definitive, these data suggest that longer‐term thienopyridine use may be of benefit to patients on

  4. Hypnosis in nursing practice--emphasis on the "problem patient' who has pain--Part II.

    PubMed

    Zahourek, R P

    1982-04-01

    The program of treating burned patients with hypnosis was expanded to treating multi-problem and chronic pain patients on the same surgical unit at Denver General Hospital. The majority of patients received some benefit. Many gained control over intense pain and many increased their sense of self-esteem and mastery. The behavioral problems diminished and the staff became reinterested and reinvolved with these very needy people. Whether or not nurses elect to practice hypnosis, the principles are familiar and can be added to the repertory of nursing practice. Physical and psychological relaxation relieves distress and potentiates patients' comfort with or without pain medication. Communicate to the patient that what you are doing builds confidence and increases the probability that treatment wil be effective. Furthermore, recognizing imaginary capacities as powerful in promoting comfort adds an option for intervention not always considered or used by nurses. Whether or not nurses describe what they do as "hypnosis," the use of these techniques can be useful to their practice and to the patients in whom they attempt to alleviate suffering and promote comfort and growth. PMID:7047732

  5. Needs for CME in geriatrics. Part 1: Perceptions of patients and community informants.

    PubMed Central

    Pereles, L.; Russell, M. L.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the needs of physicians for continuing education in geriatrics as perceived by patients and community informants. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey by mail and in-person interviews. SETTING: Organizations working with the elderly in the community and patients in a primary care population in Calgary. PARTICIPANTS: Key informants working with the elderly in the community, including managers and providers of physical, psychosocial, educational, or mental health services to the elderly, and the first two geriatric patients visiting physicians after telephone contact from study investigators were surveyed. Twenty-five of 27 key community informants and 32 of 61 geriatric patients responded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Potential topics for continuing medical education. RESULTS: The 10 most frequently identified topics were communication, time management, attitudes to the elderly, medication, continuity of care, mental health, medical management of complicated cases, knowledge of community resources, health promotion, and compassion. Patients were more concerned than key informants about the process of care. Key informants were concerned about the technical aspects of care. CONCLUSIONS: The process of care as well as technical aspects of care must be addressed in continuing education in geriatrics for physicians. PMID:8616284

  6. Preparing patients to travel abroad safely. Part 1: Taking a travel history and identifying special risks.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, R. E.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present for family physicians without access to a travel clinic and the Internet the questions to ask about the medical history and itinerary of their patients traveling abroad. To suggest ways to identify and advise high-risk patients. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: MEDLINE searches from 1990 to November 1998 located 51 articles on travel and diabetes, 37 on travel and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), 63 on travel and heart disease, 192 on travel and pregnancy, and 298 on travel with infants or children. Additional searches were undertaken in September 1999. The quality of evidence in most articles is level III (expert opinion). There are no randomized controlled trials of the best advice for family physicians to give travelers. MAIN MESSAGE: A history should include countries to be visited, planned activities, previous tropical travel, medical history, vaccination status, whether children are traveling, pregnancy status, and patients' opinions of the risks and precautions needed. Detailed advice should be given to reduce risks. The main causes of mortality abroad are existing cardiovascular conditions and accidents. High-risk conditions to be identified in travelers are cardiovascular illness, COPD, diabetes, immunodeficiency, pregnancy, and traveling with children. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with cardiovascular illness or COPD should be advised to avoid too much exertion while traveling. Detailed instruction should be given to diabetic patients on how to maintain stable glucose levels, to pregnant women on avoiding malarial infection, and to parents on protecting their children from infections and accidents. PMID:10660795

  7. [The Patient Rights Act (PatRG)--Part 3: Burden of proof in liability questions and critical resumé].

    PubMed

    Parzeller, Markus; Zedler, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with the new regulations in the German Civil Code (Bürgerliches Gesetzbuch - BGB), which came into effect in Germany as the Patient Rights Act (PatRG) on the 2/26/2013. In the third part, the burden of proof in liability questions (and 630h BGB) are discussed and critically analysed. In the discussion and a final resume points of criticism of the new law are pointed out. PMID:24683869

  8. Pre-Prosthetic surgical alterations in maxillectomy to enhance the prosthetic prognoses as part of rehabilitation of oral cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    El Fattah, Hisham; Zaghloul, Ashraf; Escuin, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: After maxillectomy, prosthetic restoration of the resulting defect is an essential step because it signals the beginning of patient’s rehabilitation. The obturator used to restore the defect should be comfortable, restore adequate speech, deglutition, mastication, and be cosmetically acceptable, success will depend on the size and location of the defect and the quantity and integrity of the remaining structures, in addition to pre-prosthetic surgical preparation of defect site. Preoperative cooperation between the oncologist surgeon and the maxillofacial surgeon may allow obturation of a resultant defect by preservation of the premaxilla or the tuberosity on the defect side and maintaining the alveolar bone or teeth adjacent to the defect. This study evaluates the importance of pre-prosthetic surgical alterations at the time maxillectomy on the enhancement of the prosthetic prognoses as part of the rehabilitation of oral cancer patient. Study Design: The study was carried out between 2003- 2008, on 66 cancer patients(41 male-25 female) age ranged from 33 to 72 years, at National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, whom underwent maxillectomy surgery to remove malignant tumor as a part of cancer treatment. Patients were divided in two groups. Group A: Resection of maxilla followed by preprosthetic surgical preparation. Twenty-four cancer patients (13 male – 11 female). Group B: Resection of maxilla without any preprosthetic surgical preparation. Forty-two cancer patients (28 male-14 female). Results: Outcome variables measured included facial contour and aesthetic results, speech understandability, ability to eat solid foods, oronasal separation, socializing outside the home, and return-to-work status. Flap success and donor site morbidity were also studied. Conclusions: To improve the prosthetic restoration of maxillary defect resulting maxillary resection as part treatment of maxillofacial tumor depends on the close cooperation between

  9. Realizing your marketing influence, Part 1. Meeting patient needs through collaboration.

    PubMed

    Woods, Dana K

    2002-04-01

    To what degree do or should marketing and nursing overlap? If marketing is about meeting patient needs, who better than the nursing staff to inform marketing decisions? Meeting patient needs profitably ensures that patient care can continue to move toward excellence. As competition continues to intensify and reimbursement remains insufficient, using all of the healthcare system's available intellectual capital is imperative to achieving maximum competitive advantage. The author applies current marketing theory to the healthcare environment and provides practical suggestions on how nursing administrators and staff can work collaboratively with marketing colleagues to develop and implement strategic marketing programs. This is the first in a series of 3 articles, which will move readers from broad marketing strategy to specific applications. The second (June, 2002) and third articles (July/August, 2002) will focus on internal marketing and using professional certification as a marketing tool. PMID:11984254

  10. Selected problems associated with the treatment and care for patients with colostomy – part 2

    PubMed Central

    Kachaniuk, Hanna; Szadowska-Szlachetka, Zdzisława; Charzyńska-Gula, Marianna; Kocka, Katarzyna; Bartoszek, Agnieszka; Celej-Szuster, Jolanta

    2013-01-01

    Generally, ostomy is a purposeful connection of the lumen of the intestine with abdominal integuments by surgery. The study presents practical solutions related to care for the colostomy patient, i.e. an ostomy on the large intestine. The following issues will be discussed: regulating the defecation cycle, risk connected with improper selection of ostomy equipment, instruction on colostomy irrigation with practical advice and irrigation equipment supply. The knowledge of these rules and mastering them in practice is to provide ostomy patients not only with highest-standard care and help but also to prepare them for dealing with problems independently, i.e. for self-care. PMID:24596509